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JEFFREY MANIACI COMPREHENSIVE PORTFOLIO UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES FALL 2009-WINTER 2013 UNIVERSITY OF DETROIT MERCY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE This portfolio is a collection of work from my undergraduate studies at the University of Detroit Mercy School of Architecture. Each and every project is the result of an overwhelming interest in exploring the world of design and personal discovery. Throughout this period, I have developed an understanding of the bigger picture while expanding my interest in the finer details such as textures through photography. The connection I have with my work is personal and genuine, with each project provoking a range of emotions and memories.

CONTENTS PROJECT

3

PAGE

INSTRUCTOR

ROYAL OAK TRANSIT CENTER 4

Wladek Fuchs

CENTER FOR THE ARTS PRAGA 10

Jan Mazur Tony Martinico

CASS PARK REDEVELOPMENT 14

Pawel Trecbacz

MAKER'S VILLAGE BOOKENDS 18

Gilbert Sunghera, S.J.

CORKTOWN COFFER CREDIT UNION 22

Tadd Heidgerken

DETROIT CLASSICAL MUSIC PLAZA 26

Chandra Moore

LIGHT IN THE LANDSCAPE 28

Chandra Moore

ADDITIONAL STUDIES

31

Various

BEYOND STUDIO

35

TEXTURES THROUGH PHOTOGRAPHY

38

ROYAL OAK TRANSIT CENTER ROYAL OAK, MICHIGAN YEAR 4, FALL 2012 SITE Royal Oak, Michigan is an inner-ring suburb of Detroit. The site is located on the southern border with Ferndale where Woodward Avenue and Main Street converge. The site also anchors the southern end of the Main Street commercial corridor. Medium density condos line the north, while single family homes border the east. The I-696 service drive borders the south and the Detroit Zoo sits to the west.

SCHEME 1

PROJECT The need for public transportation is growing in metro-Detroit and Royal Oak is the most logical place for a transit center. The transit center will focus on bussing and carpooling services due to the convenient location just off I-696, two miles West of I-75 and 12 miles from the Detroit Central Business District.

SCHEME 2

N

APPROACH The idea was to offer another solution to the traditional transit center. This process would provide a mixed use structure that incorporated a transit center, office and retail opportunities along with residential units to create a more cohesive intervention. Included was a residential and commercial corridor along the north, maintaining the urban street facade on the east and west, and providing uninterrupted access for busses coming from Woodward and Main street.

4

FINAL SCHEME

Site | Royal Oak, Michigan

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT ROYAL OAK TRANSIT CENTER | FALL 2012

LEVEL 4 | residential

SOUTH ELEVATION PERSPECTIVE

LEVEL 3 | residential

Retail Promenade

Transit Center LEVEL 2 | retail + transit EAST ELEVATION PERSPECTIVE

N

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT Organizing and Integrating each program came as a challenge but dividing the different uses by floor and location provides privacy but accessibility for all users. Because of the layout, there will only be 4 of each unit, and half of these units are on the end, providing for additional natural light from three sides, and individuality. The facade treatment also breaks up the traditional replicated facade in multi-unit housing projects.

Transit Center

Transit Center

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LEVEL 1 | retail + transit

NORTHEAST PERSPECTIVE

INTERIOR DEVELOPMENT ROYAL OAK TRANSIT CENTER | FALL 2012

STUDY NOOK + LIVING SPACE

KITCHEN

TYPICAL FIRST FLOOR PLAN

8

KITCHEN ACCENTS

VIEW INTO LIVING SPACE

CENTER FOR THE ARTS, PRAGA Warsaw, Poland YEAR 3, WINTER 2012 SITE The Praga neighborhood on the eastern bank of the Visula River which divides Warsaw in half, was the chosen site for this project. Praga is also divided in two, North Praga and South Praga, by a busy commuter and regional rail line. In recent years, Praga has been the site of transformation and is beginning to gentrify. The exact site sits at the convergence of two major roads, two tram lines, and soon to be completed EastWest subway line. The site borders Targowa, a major road running north - south and most importantly, straddles the border of north and south Praga.

GIVEN SITE

CURRENT SITE

PHASE 3

PHASE 1

PHASE 4

PHASE 2

PHASE 5

PROJECT An art school was chosen for the site because it is an incubator of creativity, much like Praga. Once home to the largest Bazaar in Europe, the residents are handy, working class citizens, who could make a decent living selling in the Bazaar. APPROACH The exposure the site allows the function to be expressive and creative. Beginning with phase one, a school of performing art, the structure exposes the students to the street, and the pedestrians to the interior creating a performance for each. The project's next 4 phases add additional schools of art and will span both sides of the railroad tracks.

10

VIEWPORTS | TARGOWA

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

N

CENTER FOR THE ARTS, PRAGA | WINTER 2012

LEVEL 5

LEVEL 4

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT LEVEL 3

The performing arts school is all about performance and expression. On the top three levels, studios wrap the perimeter for the display of movement from the inside and the ability to see in all directions. Classrooms are along the inner courtyard which is raised one level above the street. The public spaces line the courtyard and provide a space for students and the neighborhood to gather for free time or an impromptu performance.

LEVEL 2

12

LEVEL 1

13

DETAILED SKETCHES WORKING SECTION

CASS PARK REDEVELOPMENT

CULTURAL RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL + OFFICE

DETROIT, MICHIGAN YEAR 3, FALL 2011 SITE The Cass Park neighborhood is located directly north of Downtown Detroit and is bordered by Woodward Avenue to the east, I-75 to the south, M-10 the Lodge to the west and Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. to the north. The historic Cass Park is surrounded by the Masonic Temple, Cass Technical High School, and additional historic structures and is situated in the southwest quadrant.

NEW FUNCTION SKETCH

PROJECT

N

More than 50% of the structures have been demolished or are in need of demolition, and many others need extensive rehabilitation. We were to create a new urban plan for this Detroit neighborhood with respect to new density, future transportation options, and new demand to be close to downtown. APPROACH The team's approach was to not only focus on Woodward Avenue, but also Grand River Avenue that slices through the southwestern corner of the site. This thoroughfare in addition to Woodward is another "spoke" of the hub and spoke urban plan of downtown Detroit. We decided to plan a new commercial, office, and residential corridor along Grand River Avenue with a light-rail line running down the center, and connect back to Woodward's commercial corridor

GREEN CONNECTION | MAJOR ROADS

14

Southeast Perspective

INDIVIDUAL DEVELOPMENT

RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL + OFFICE RESIDENTIAL COMMONS

CASS PARK REDEVELOPMENT | FALL 2011 DESIGN DEVELOPMENT The new Grand River commercial corridor needed a consistent scale and to be anchored to create a defined place. By preserving the three historical urban plans that are present in Cass Park, non-traditional urban blocks were formed. Two curved office buildings would create the entrance from the northwest and medium density residential would line the corridor. Underground parking would relieve congested surface parking lots while providing large courtyards for residents and employees of their respective structures.

N

MAIN FLOOR PLAN DETAIL

EARLY MASSING MODEL

16

N

DETAILED SECTION

MAKER’S VILLAGE BOOKENDS DETROIT, MICHIGAN YEAR 2, WINTER 2011 SITE Harmony Park, historically known as the "Black Bottom" and Germantown is located in the downtown core, directly south of Comerica Park and Ford Field, and north of the Greektown Entertainment District. The historic Harmony Club is directly opposite of the site. PROJECT Within a group 5 students, we were to create a maker's village consisting of live/work spaces where the artisan could practice their skill. Each structure would be lined up like books and placed between two existing structures. One space would be left open to pass through the block. The structures would have to work together, sharing systems and space, while being aesthetically cohesive. APPROACH The Chocolatier was chosen and was placed next to the pass through on the northern side, thus allowing three sides exposed. To the north was the candle maker, allowing the heat from roasting the cocoa beans to be funneled next door to keep the wax in liquid form. The chocolatier is a performer, the chocolate is his partner and together, they create an incredible and delicate display of patience and skill. To expose every process of making was necessary for the customer to have a complete experience.

GIVEN SITE

18

19

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT MAKER’S VILLAGE | BOOKENDS | WINTER 2011

FINAL DESIGN The maker's village is in a prime location, able to pick up pedestrian traffic from all sides. The Chocolatier's showplace was to attract that attention, show the motion of melted chocolate through the fenestration, as well as expose this activity to the street and the pass through.

TOP FLOOR CHOCOLATE AND WINE BAR

20

WORKING MODELS | DETAIL

CORKTOWN COFFER CREDIT UNION DETROIT, MICHIGAN YEAR 2, FALL 2010 SITE The Corktown neighborhood of Detroit is located just west of the downtown core and has recently become a hotbed for artists and entrepreneurs. The neighborhood is also home to the abandoned Michigan Central Depot which looms over the given site. The site fronts Michigan Avenue which runs through the norther half of Corktown and is a major thoroughfare in and out of downtown Detroit.

MICHIGAN AVENUE PERSPECTIVE

PROJECT The need for a credit union in Corktown is clear. With new interests moving into the neighborhood, a financial institution that invests in the surround neighborhood is necessary. The credit union would also need to house an art fellow and provide living space for 4 additional tenants and also allow easy access to the alley marketplace explored in an earlier project.

ALLEY PERSPECTIVE

APPROACH The move to a more transparent money handling system is clear in modern bank design. The idea for the CCCU was to engage the community in as many ways as possible. The pass through to the alley, large open frame structure, and ample community gathering space allows for that engagement. The design was also seen through the lens of contemplation, a study done earlier in the semester looking into removal and tension.

22

BRICK OVERHANG DETAIL

MICHIGAN AVENUE ELEVATION

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT CORKTOWN COFFER CREDIT UNION | FALL 2010

FINAL DESIGN The design of the CCCU was a direct result of research of contemplative spaces exploring the feelings of tension and removal. The basic structure consists of individual cubes that in their own right offer a framed space for contemplation. The brick panels that sit in tension hanging over the sidewalk, create different degrees of reveals for the residents. To increase the engagement between residents, the units fit together like block puzzle pieces.

FINAL MODEL

24

FLOOR PLAN DIAGRAM

NORTH - SOUTH SECTION

DETROIT CLASSICAL MUSIC PLAZA DETROIT, MICHIGAN YEAR 1, WINTER 2010 SITE The site fronts on Woodward Avenue and is one block north of the downtown core. It is a collection of surface parking lots used for large sporting events and festivals. Two abandoned hotels are on two plots just west of the site and premium condominiums are on the east side of Woodward. PROJECT Using the sounds of Vivaldi's Four Seasons, we were to work in a group of 5 and create a plaza where classical music could be performed. Each person was assigned a one of five functions; retail, main stage, transportation center, art gallery and a restaurant which was my assigned function. APPROACH After analyzing the trajectories of musical sound waves and the experience of working in restaurants for many years, I aimed to create a place where the average person could feel, see, and touch the sound. The dining is spread out across two floors and many suspended platforms which surround the main stage. The stage's location was emphasized by undulating panels that wrapped along the side and roof of the building. Horizontal undulating glass planes were used to open the restaurant to the plaza.

26

FINAL MODEL

GROUP MODEL

WEAVE + WEFT LIGHT IN THE LANDSCAPE DETROIT, MICHIGAN YEAR 1, FALL 2009 SITE The given site for this project was Brush Park, just north of the downtown core on the east side of Woodward Avenue. The exact site is located almost in the center of the neighborhood and is approximately 10 feet wide, sandwiched between an abandoned church and fuel service station.

INTEGRATED SEATING

PROJECT The function of the project was up to the student. The site is between an assisted living facility to the southeast and then Children's Hospital to the north, this inspired me to create a space for each demographic to escape their treatment facilities and be able to relax and connect with each other in this new space. WEAVE DETAIL WRAPPING ROOF

APPROACH To create this "light in the landscape" I used strips of paper that would be illuminated to reach beyond the limits of this confined site, leading someone to think that there may be something interesting to investigate. Later in the project, we were challenged to weave and weft each and every piece of material we used. This new requirement integrated well with my concept to weave in the environment and connect the buildings and people with each other.

28

GATHERING SPACe

WEAVE DETAIL

30

ADDITIONAL STUDIES DETROIT, MICHIGAN YEAR 1-3, FALL 2010-WINTER 2013

31

SOUND INSTALLATIONS DETROIT, MICHIGAN YEAR 1, WINTER 2010 PROJECT These two projects were done during the winter 2010 term the first year of study. This semester was an exploration of architecture through sound that culminated in the design of the DCMP. They are both installations on campus to engage with students and create interest in sound study.

HANGING TUBES

INSTALLATION 1 [RIGHT] The first installation was done in the stairwell of the architecture building where a cage supports the new steps. The intention of this study was for sound to be created by students pulling on stings, which would move large cardboard cylinders hanging in the cage. The Strings were at different levels than the cylinders so when pulled, the participant would not hear the sound, but students walking on a different floor would.

BASEMENT

INSTALLATION 2 [OPPOSITE] The second installation was done in a large open space on campus. It was a simple illustrated trajectory which came from Vivaldi's Four Seasons. The panels are corrugated plastic hung between three trees off of white masons line. The wind played a major role in this installation by never allowing the panels to stay completely still.

MECHANISM

32

33

INSTALLATION 2

LONG ISLAND RESIDENCE CASE STUDY DETROIT, MICHIGAN YEAR 2, FALL 2010 PROJECT One of the projects leading up to the CCCU. We were too choose a project which represented our "word" the best. I chose contemplative and I decided to study the delicate balance between public and private spaces and how they relate to active and static spaces. The project I chose was the Long Island Residence by Tod Williams and Billie Tsien.

ACTIVE SECTION

STATIC SECTION

ACTIVE SPACES

LONG ISLAND RESIDENCE | TOD WILLIAMS and BILLIE TSIEN ARCHITECTS

34

STATIC SPACES

BEYOND STUDIO DETROIT, ISTANBUL, MLMO, COPENHAGEN, WARSAW, BARCELONA YEAR 1-3, FALL 2010-WINTER 2013

35

UDM | SOA MATERIALS LIBRARY DETROIT, MICHIGAN YEAR 1-2, SUMMER-FALL 2010 PROJECT This project was a Materials Library for the University of Detroit Mercy School of Architecture. The project was initiated by students and entirely funded through donations. Labor was also donated by students and staff. My involvement was the construction and installation of the custom shelving units designed by students. Along with the shelving unit installation, A lightweight cable system was installed to hang material samples . APPROACH The design was simple and repetitive enough to work in an assembly line fashion. On some days we had 4 or 5 people helping and on others it was just myself. The system I devised would work with any number of volunteers which allowed the working schedules to be extremely flexible. The shelves were finished with an acrylic sealer and then moved into the library in 6 pieces, each piece consisted of 3 shelves and between 2 and 4 individual vertical supports.

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ASSEMBLED SHELVES

ISTANBUL GRAND BAZAAR

ISTANBUL WIRES

ISTANBUL ROOFTOPS

MLMO SCAFFOLDING

NYHAVN WATERFRONT

WARSAW TRAMS

JEFFREY MANIACI DETROIT, MICHIGAN WINTER 2013 GRADUATE COMPREHENSIVE PORTFOLIO SEPTEMBER 2009 - WINTER 2013 UNIVERSITY OF DETROIT MERCY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

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SELF REFLECTION


Comprehensive Undergradute Portfolio 1