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Sponsored Research at FSU Office of Sponsored Research and Programs Annual Report for 2012—2013

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What’s Inside the Issue….

TABLE OF CONTENTS OSRP & Research Staff

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Greetings from the Chancellor

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Greetings from the Provost

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OSRP Mission Statement

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Center for Defense & Homeland Security

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SENCR-MIC (Microprobe Facility)

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Biopsychology Laboratory

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FSU Aquatic Laboratory

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FSU Researchers

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FSU Grant Writers

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OSRP Grant Award Ceremony

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Grant Awards and Submission Data

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PROUD TO BE

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THE

OFFICE

OF SPONSO RED RESEARCH AND PROGRAMS FUNDED WITH TITLE III FUNDING

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Meet the OSRP & Research Office Staff

Dr. Daryush ILA Associate Vice Chancellor for Research

Dr. A. Leslie Evelyn Director of Sponsored Research

Shenetta Dudley Pre-awards Administrator

Dwane Hodges Budget Officer

Carolyn Harris Post-awards Administrator

Amy Mendez Admin. Support Assoc.

Carla Raineri Padilla Compliance Officer

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Greetings from the Chancellor FSU Family and Friends, It is my pleasure to present the 2013 Annual Report on Sponsored Research at Fayetteville State University. By adding the Research Office to the Office of Sponsored Research and Programs (OSRP), Fayetteville State University has entered a new era of funded research and an expansion of our grant-driven services. The opening of the Science and Technology building in winter 2013 brought national attention to FSU, and increased the level of respect for FSU as a research institution. This state-of-the-art structure exemplifies our move into the realm of advanced research by combining the practicality of an energy efficient LEED Silver Certified building, with the innovation of a 64,000 square foot high tech, lab-intensive building that brings all elements of STEM-related instruction and research under one roof to promote intellectual collaboration. The expansion of our research endeavors in partnership with business and the military is being spearheaded by the Center for Defense and Homeland Security, which is also located in the Science and Technology building.

The Research Office and OSRP, under the leadership of Dr. Daryush Ila, th undergirding FSU’s growth and efficiency to secure funding for research and p of re sources to promote the University’s mission through the creativity, pa journey filled with great expectations and anticipation, and with our outstandin our place as one of the premier academic institutions of this nation. James A. Anderson, Chancellor

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he Associate Vice-Chancellor for Research, is doing an excellent job of programming. This report displays how FSU is advancing its acquisition assion and dedication of our faculty and staff. We are on an incredible ng students, faculty, staff and supporters leading the way, we are securing

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Greetings from Greetings,

It is my pleasure to share with you in the area of research activity and institution. Although the Universit faculty have remained committed a provide academic services and purs

The diversity, complexity and utilit cause for great excitement. We hav collaboration with partner institutio excellence. Each year the Office o FSU toward increasing the number efforts, in conjunction with those o by 59%, and the number of funded

I thank and commend all faculty an Fayetteville State University, as I a and oversight of grant and contract research and programmatic accomp

Jon Young, Provost and Vice Chanc

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the Provost

the achievements of the faculty and staff of Fayetteville State University grant acquisition to further the intellectual and academic goals of the ty has experienced extensive funding cuts for the past few years, our and inspired to increase their efforts in securing additional funding to sue their own scholarly endeavors.

ty of funded projects being undertaken by the faculty and staff of FSU is ve increased our level of community engagement, expanded our ons, and motivated our students to pursue a greater level of academic of Sponsored Research and Programs develops a strategic plan to guide r and quality of funded projects. During the 2012-2013 fiscal year, their of our faculty and staff, helped to increase the number of grant submissions projects by $1.3 million.

nd staff who write proposals and administer funded projects on behalf of also thank and commend the staff of OSRP for assisting in the generation t funded projects. I invite you to read this annual report to see the myriad of plishments that are born of Bronco Pride.

cellor for Academic Affairs

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OSRP MISSION STATEMENT The 2013-2014 revised mission of the Office of Sponsored Research and Programs (OSRP) at Fayetteville State University (FSU), within the division of Academic Affairs, is to provide a variety of services to FSU in order to increase the number of submitted and awarded proposals, and to meet the needs of our customers. These services include, but are not limited to, the following: • Identifying funding and fund-generating strengths at FSU; • Identifying potential partners and business development for potential funding opportunity; • Helping in team formation for targeted opportunities; • Helping in grants and contracts proposal development; • Helping in compliance with agency requirements; • Helping establish proposal development milestones; • Helping in proposal budget reviews; • Supporting Internal Review Board (IRB) administration; • Advising on compliance with awards and deliverables; • Providing export control advice ; • Supporting tech-transfer and tech-insertion; • Aiding in the educational program development; and • Aiding in policy and procedure development and improvement. All of these services serve to promote research, innovation, scholarship, and creativity through external funding..

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C U T T I N G

Advances in Biotechnology and Toxicology

E D G E R E S E A R C H

Advances in Autonomy

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Center for Defense & Homeland Security (CDHS)

Dr. Charles Senior Associate Vice Chancellor for Institutional Transformation & CDHS Executive Director

In order to keep pace with the workforce demands of emerging technologies to forecast and respond to the mitigation and recovery of natural and man-made catastrophic disasters, the CDHS scholars have joined forces with academic and industry partners to enhance and develop programs and capabilities in scientific and engineering disciplines critical to the national security functions of the military. These collaborations are not only promoting research and technological innovations; they are also integral in establishing robust mentoring research opportunities at FSU for students in the fields of Science, Technology, Engineering and/or Mathematics (STEM) in preparation for jobs in the DoD and Homeland Security, as well as in the Emergency Management and Intelligence fields. As CDHS Scholars share joint responsibilities in research, program design, and classroom instruction, they are uniquely qualified to address our national security needs of the present, and form a career pipeline to the students who will address those needs in the future.

Southeastern North Carolina Regional Microanalytical and Imaging Consortium (SENCR-MIC) PAGE

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SENCR-MIC is a State–of–the-Art Microimaging and Analysis Center headed by Dr, Zhiping Luo. During the 2012-2013 Academic Year

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14 undergraduate students were trained on the SEM/EPMA, 5 conducted research. 3 courses supported Forensic Microscopy, Seminar in Chemical Literature, and Nanoscience and Nanotechnology. 24 research papers, all affiliated with FSU, were published in peer-reviewed journals, including high-rank journals of Nano Letters and Advanced Materials. 16 grants or contracts were submitted, and 8 of them have been awarded, in total $152,046 funded (including the ARO grant remaining fund upon no-cost extension). The 2012 Jacquet-Lucas Award from the International Metallographic Society and ASM International was presented to the Dr. Luo on October 9, 2012. SENCR-MIC served the community for research and professional service. Research collaborations were established (University of Texas at Austin, Texas A&M University, Lamar University, Texas A&M University at Kingsville, Texas Biochemicals, Inc., and Texas State University - San Marcos). Outreach at SENCR-MIC included Inner Mongolia Normal University, China.

Dr. Luo

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Biopsychology Laboratory Can a human learn from a robot in the same way we learn from other humans? FSU’s Biopsychology Laboratory is devoted to the study of human cognitive functions. Its most recent projects examine the interaction between humans and robots, and their effects on human cognitive capacities. With the support of the NSF and through collaborations with the Department of Mathematics and Computer Sciences, our graduate students are being trained in cutting-edge Cognitive Sciences. Dr. Daniel Montoya, Associate Professor of Psychology, Dr. Daniel Montoya serves as Director of the FSU Biopsychology Laboratory. Human-Robotic Interactions: Reports on the mirror neuron system indicate that humans are able to discern the goal of motor actions enacted by humans even when action flow is incomplete. Theoretically, this effect is only observable when humans see other humans performing tasks. If true, participants should have a more difficult time accurately replicating motor tasks demonstrated by a robot rather than a human. A. Baker-Oglesbee (Master‘s Thesis) showed human subjects a video of a person or a robotic hand solving a tangram puzzle. Subjects were then asked to replicate the shapes. Results showed no significant differences in the type of instruction. So, humans are able to learn complex motor tasks from viewing either a human or a robot performing it. Further questions were asked, about the mirror neuron system and its involvement. We focused on the electroencephalographic analysis (EEG) of the Mu Rhythm (8-13 Hz). J. Pokora (Master’s Thesis), measured Mu Rhythm in healthy adults as they watched a video of human and non-human agents grasping an object, attempting to determine what levels of human-likeness was necessary to desynchronize the Mu Rhythm. Participants were exposed to a baseline condition followed by four conditions: the grasping of an object with a human hand, a plastic hand, a robotic hand, and a metallic grasping rod. Results suggest that anthropomorphic robots activate the mirror neuron system provided and that their movements resemble that of human anatomy. Other Projects Currently research is being carried out in the Biopsychology Lab in the following areas: Reproductive messages in Argentinean and Swedish Folk music from the beginning of 20th Century, carried out by I. Christensson (undergraduate); A comparison of the levels of relaxation when instruction is given by a human or a robot, by J. Hafner (undergraduate); and Emotional impairments in Cerebrospinal Fluid leakage patients, by S. Reid-Harriman (graduate) .

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FSU Aquatics Laboratory Research Area: Human Food Additives Effecting Behavior

The Aquatic Research Laboratory at Fayetteville State University, under the direction of Dr. Stephen Salek, specializes in both marine and freshwater research. It maintains over 300 gallons of salt and freshwater aquariums used for research, teaching and community outreach. The yellowhead jawfish (opistognatus aurifrons) is a small burrowing marine fish. It is an excellent model for testing the effect of chemicals on social behavior because of its unique burrowing and intraspecific behaviors. Today’s foods are loaded with artificial dyes that are thought to be psychoactive compounds and may aggravate ADHD in children. Small groups of jawfish were allowed to establish burrows in captive aquariums and their baseline social behaviors were quantified for 3 days post burrowing. During this time they were fed a diet of Mysis shrimp. Subsequently, Mysis shrimp were soaked in red dye derived from red Skittles and fed to the fish. Social behaviors were observed an 1 to 1-1/2 hours before feeding and about 1/2 hour after feeding. Fighting increased in fish that had been fed red dye. Results demonstrate the effects of red dye on social behavior. Our findings support the idea that dyes consumed by children may alter their social interactions.

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Dr. Daryush Ila In the spring of 2012, a team of students from FSU’s School of Business and Economics won 1st place in a national competition for a business plan presentation. The business plan was for a thermoelectric device that attaches to cell phones. The device generates electricity from body heat. It attaches to the back of the phone and, when the person holds the phone, it immediately charges the phone.

The invention is the creation of Dr. Daryush Ila. Technically, it is a high efficiency thermo electric device comprising a multi nanolayer structure of alternating insulator and insulator/metal material that is irradiated across the plane of the layer structure with ionizing radiation. The ionizing radiation produces nanocrystals in the layered structure that increase the electrical conductivity and decrease the thermal conductivity thereby increasing the thermoelectric figure of merit. Future applications for use of the device are to broaden its capabilities, such as creating electricity not only to operate small appliances, but also to potentially run small vehicles.

Dr. Stephen Salek In winter 2013, FSU assistant professor of biology Dr. Stephen SALEK used a handmade snow gun to make 3-to-5 inches of snow. His snow gun, which is made out of a pressure washer and an air compressor, has a small nozzle that shoots a fine mist and two larger nozzles that shoot a coarser mist. Dr. SALEK explained that when it comes out under pressure, the water expands and that makes it freeze. The bigger droplets fall on the smaller ones and that is what makes it snow." The snow gun, covered a patch of ground about 30 feet by 30 feet. SALEK first started making snow for his daughter and neighborhood children in his backyard where the children could sled. He wanted to share a similar experience with FSU students and faculty. Students on their way to class were amazed that it looked and felt like snow coming from the clouds. SALEK invited physics professors to bring their classes to the snow patch to learn about snowmaking.

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Dr. Subir Nagdas

The Role of Bovine Sperm Acrosomal Membrane-Matrix Complex in Fertilization Dr. Subir Nagdas is a biochemist/molecular biologist with expertise in reproductive biology and mammalian fertilization. The mammalian sperm acrosome is an organelle which contains a variety of hydrolases utilized to penetrate egg investments, key controls in fertilization. Our understanding of both the assembly and functions of protein constituents of the outer acrosomal membrane-matrix complex (OMC) is limited. The goals of the current research are to identify the proteins of the outer acrosomal membrane and to define the role of OMC polypeptides in the membrane fusion and the release of hydrolases during the acrosome reaction. Understanding these issues could contribute to improved strategies for maintaining acrosomal integrity in stored spermatozoa, promoting the acrosome reaction, and improving the fertilizing capacity of functionally impaired spermatozoa. In the dairy industry, artificial inseminations are done with frozen-thawed semen. It is assumed that the thawing rate is influenced by several factors of the cryopreservation procedure such as type extender, glycerol concentration, freezing rate and packaging methods.

Dr. Abdelmajid Kassem Soybean seeds are rich in isoflavones, protein, oil, and other beneficial compounds for humans’ consumption and animal feed. Dr. Abdelmajid Kassem sought to identify and map quantitative trait loci (QTL) for seed isoflavones, protein, and oil content, yield, and yield components in soybean using three recombinant inbred line (RIL) populations derived from elite soybean cultivars. The project was funded to Dr. Kassem, $514,695, by the Department of Defense (DoD). Dr. Kassem, along with his Postdoctoral Fellow and his undergraduate and graduate students, published two high quality scientific articles from these projects. They also presented their research findings at the prestigious International Plant and Animal Genome Conferences in 2012 and 2013. The grant promoted research training of underrepresented students at FSU and provided two scholarships for 2 graduate students. It also fully equipped Dr. Kassem’s Lab (Plant Genomics and Biotechnology Lab) with state-of-the art equipment to conduct these research projects.

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Dr. Shubo Han Dr. Shubo Han is a Professor of Analytical Chemistry in the Department of Chemistry and Physics. He serves as the Coordinator of the FSU "3+2" Engineering and Science Dual Degree Programs and is a Co-PI of the Southeastern North Carolina Regional Microanalytical and Imaging Consortium. Dr. Han's research interests include: molecular basis of flavonoids inhibiting protein aggregation related to neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease and fabrication and characterization of nanomaterials for the development of electrochemical and optical biosensors. He has published more than 30 peer-reviewed articles, is co-owner of one patent, and has mentored more than 25 undergraduate and graduate research students.

More than half of the research students were military-affiliated.

Dr. Cevdet Akbay Research Interests for Dr. Cevdet Akbay include: 1) synthesizing, characterization, utilization of novel monomeric and polymeric chiral, and achiral surfactants and their application as pseudostationary phases for enantioseparation of chiral and achiral molecules (e.g., drugs, environmentally important molecules, proteins, etc.); 2) developing methods for real life experiments, e.g., quantification of chemicals in body fluids and in the environment (PAHs, PCBs, explosive residuals); 3) investigating partitioning mechanisms between pseudo-stationary phases and analytes using the linear salvation energy relationships (LSER) model; 4) separating carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using both CE and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC); and 5) using CNTs as pseudostationary phases in CE. One of his major goals is to involve students (undergraduate & graduate) in hands-on research, using state-of-the-art analytical instruments (e.g., CE, HPLC, gas chromatography, fluorescence, ultraviolet, infrared spectrometry, densitometry, and surface tensiometry, etc.). Because of his guidance and exposure to advanced research, his students have co-authored numerous publications in peer-authored journals and presented at both national and international conferences.

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Dr. Maurice Mongkuo

Dr. Maurice Mongkuo is a Professor of Public Administration at Fayetteville State University. He teaches courses in research design and quantitative methods. These courses are aimed at providing students with the requisite skills in developing and implementing sound research proposals. Each student is expected to select a single major public policy problem area published in a recent (i.e., within the last two months) newspaper article, magazine or newspaper editorial, and develop a research proposal to systematically study the problem. An integral part of the course requirements is for each student to participate in a formal training on the ethics of the use of human subjects in research conducted. All the proposals developed by the students must be submitted to the OSRP for review and approval before the student can proceed with conducting the research. Students who complete the proposal-writing course are encouraged to enroll in the Advanced Research Seminar course. In this course, the students are given an opportunity to implement their research proposal. The students, under the close supervision of Dr. Mongkuo, assume the role of Principal Investigator (PI) and take the lead in actually conducting the proposed study by collecting, compiling, analyzing, and interpreting their data, as well as writing their research report and formally presenting their research findings as a panel to a live audience. Upon successful completion of these activities, the students are also encouraged to submit their research paper to a professional journal for peer-review and publication.

Dr. Eid Haddad

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Prior to FSU, Dr. Haddad joined ImmunoBio Inc. (IBI) as its Senior Research Scientist in February 2006. In 2008, Dr. Haddad became the vice president of research and development at IBI. Dr. Haddad was also a visiting scientist at North Carolina State University. During his tenure at IBI and NCSU, Dr. Haddad conducted research on the application of a novel vaccine technology toward the development of viral and bacterial vaccines. His research focused on the applicability of a novel vaccine technology towards the development of a vaccine against human influenza. He also collaborated with scientists at UTMB and UTA/Texas on similar projects involving human respiratory syncytial virus and adenovirus. Dr. Haddad held several positions with the most recent being Senior Manager, Global Product Development, at Embrex Inc. a NC biotechnology company (currently Zoetis, Inc.). He worked on the development of novel vaccines against the Avian Infectious bursal disease (IBD) and Avian Newcastle disease (ND) viruses using the company patented antigen-antibody complex vaccine technology. As lead investigator he developed two viral vaccines that were licensed in the USA of which one was also licensed in several other countries. Dr. Haddad also conducted research on a technology application for several other avian viruses including the development of a multi-virus vaccine.

Dr. Shirley Chao The research of Dr. Shirley Chao primarily focuses on understanding how chemicals adversely impact our health and the environment. She has worked on a variety of chemicals, specifically pesticides, metals, and industrial chemicals. In addition, through collaboration with the School of Education, our research focuses on science and early literacy. Dr. Chao’s recent research covers three main areas: 1. Bioremediation strategies to clean up pesticides and industrial chemicals in the environment 2. Pest management strategies using natural products such as hemp 3. Learning strategies using science activities and early exposure to books to improve literacy success and interest in the sciences in young children.

Dr. Theodore Kaniuka

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The research interests of Dr. Theodore Kaniuka focuses on school reform, in particular Early College High Schools in the State of North Carolina. He has made several national and international presentations and coauthored papers and presentations with colleagues &students. In 2010, Dr. Kaniuka & M. Vickers, (doctoral candidate) published a paper on Cross Creek Early College which presented findings on student performance, leadership systems, & student perspectives on faculty & student interactions. Currently Ms. Vickers is completing students, an extension of work Dr. Kaniuka completed as part of a grant funded project form the North Carolina New Schools project. Recently, Dr. Mizzelle, a former student of Dr. Kaniuka, coauthored a paper based on Dr. Mizzelle’s dissertation, which was presented at a state conference. Current students of Dr. Kaniuka are completing research on the effectiveness of district developed professional development, if Professional Learning Communities (PLC) offer a way to increase the retention of beginning teachers, & an examination of the culture in successful alternative high schools here in North Carolina. Dr. Kaniuka worked with a team of MSA students has they conducted a study of Pauline Jones Elementary School in Cumberland County to understand the perspectives of staff and administration of the critical success factors

Dr. Sambit Bhattacharya Dr. Sambit Bhattacharya is currently working on two projects which have synergies. In one project he is creating autonomous methods for robots to explore and map indoor and outdoor spaces. His work addresses specific types of sensor and locomotion capabilities found in a humanoid robot and a quadrotor robot He is interested in using visual data captured on board through cameras to create detailed maps of environments. These maps may be further used for location recognition from visual data and search for specific areas and/or objects. In his other project he is applying machine learning algorithms to analyze data from moving objects, for example vehicles, which create traces of GPS data over time. This application is useful in domains like geospatial intelligence where analysts need to understand patterns of events taking place at different locations around the world. The analyst gathers intelligence from large data sets which rapidly grow over time so computational analysis is most often the preferred solution. He is also investigating methods of automatically identifying anomalous patterns i.e. movements that deviate from normal movement patterns around certain types of landmarks, e.g. public buildings like airports.

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Business

The EDA University Develo

Dr. Pamela Jackson

The University Center Economic Development Grant, funded by t represents a unique opportunity to make a significant difference in yetteville State University is servicing this region through its EDA extensive small business development expertise at FSU. This Cent tive entrepreneurs—and will play a leading role in transforming di sustaining growth. A regional entrepreneurial resource information one stop virtual access to the resources available throughout the reg ucts. The clearinghouse features seven resource categories (Regio Business Guidance, Manufacturing & Office Space, Professional S can be instrumental in assisting small businesses grow revenue and

Blauser GreenMr. JayEnerg FSU Recycle

Mr. Jay Blauser

Jay Blauser manages the University’s sustainability programs, rela making, campus behavioral change management, state compliance Blauser oversees FSU’s $10,000 food waste diversion grant. Fun versity’s Dining Hall. This equipment is designed to process and (87.5%) reduction. The 150 pounds per day of food waste is gene washing area. The liquids are recirculated through the closed- lo o for composting. Based on current averages, FSU will lower its car equivalent annually.

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Funding

Center for Economic opment

the Economic Development Administration at a total of $543,000, n the long distressed economy of southeast North Carolina. FaA University Center for Economic Development that leverages the ter will drive job growth through coordinated support of innovaisconnected pockets of success to collaborative clusters of selfn clearinghouse has been created to provide entrepreneurs with gion to help launch and grow new companies and new prodnal Innovation Accelerators, Sources of Capital, Mentoring & Services, Job Opportunities, and Science & Tech Researchers) that d improve efficiency.

gy Funding es—Pitch In

ated implementation and construction projects, as well as policye reporting and associated grant applications and proposals. Mr. ding includes the purchase of a new pulper/extractor for the Unireduce the volume of food waste/organics by as much as an 8 to 1 erated in two areas: 1) during food preparation and 2) in the dishop system allowing for the solids to then be separated and deposited rbon footprint by 250 metric tons of carbon dioxide

Ms. JurLonna Walker

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Interprofessional Beha

Focusing on the Biopsychosocial Needs of M

FSU has received $1.1 million dollars from the Health Resources and Services Administration ioral Center (IPBC) that will focus on the biopsychosocial health of military personnel, vetera

The Department of Nursing at Fayetteville State University (FSU) will lead this collaboration ogy, as well as with the FSU/ Fort Bragg Veteran’s Center and Fayetteville VA Medical Cente the behavioral health of military personnel, veterans and families, which will include complem pain and other co-morbidities.

A collaborative center that focuses on the behavioral health of military personnel, veterans an cine as a treatment option for chronic pain and other comorbidities is a unique, one-of-a- kin total military personnel and active duty military personnel per capita.

The center services can be grouped as; 1) clinical services for the personnel, families and veterans residing in the surrounding com educational setting for a newly developed Masters-Family Psych Practitioner (FPMHNP) students of FSU; as well as undergraduat psychology students. The FPMHNP curriculum will flow from t educational framework of the Department of Nursing of FSU. The core and focused content for graduate education for the Advanced (APRN) and specialty courses that will prepare students and grad in the IPBC and other similar settings throughout the community. Dr. Afua Arhin serves as Primary Investigator on the project.

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avioral Health Center

Military Personnel, Veterans and their Families

n (HRSA) to establish a comprehensive Inter-Professional Behavans and their families.

n in partnership with the departments of Social Work and Psycholer. This collaborative center will focus on holistic approaches to mentary and alternative medicine as treatment options for chronic

n d families incorporating complementary and alternative medid, timely, idea for North Carolina, a state that ranks third in both

returning military services munities; and 2) an iatric Mental Health Nurse te nursing, social work and he mission, philosophy and e curriculum will include d Practice Registered Nurse duates to provide direct patient care .

Dr. Afua Arhin

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Community S The Military Behavioral H

The Military Behavioral Health Certificate Program that enhance their abilities to provide quality care f families as well as enhance their marketability in fi Designed by Dr. Terri Moore-Brown, Dean of FSU military culture, programs and services, post-traum assessment and treatment.

Dr. Terri Moore-Brown

Education

The 21st Century Communit

Dr. Teresa Thompson-Pinckney has a passion for fund her passion, Dr. Thompson Pinkney has receiv ing Centers Program (21st CCLC). The purpose of signed to improve academic achievement and enga ties designed to complement student’s regular acad from four target middle schools and three target hig Recreation (CFPR) and Cumberland County Schoo reation facilities within two miles of the target scho

Dr. Teresa Thompson- Pinckney

Service Grants Health Certificate Program

m provides mental and behavioral health professionals knowledge and skills for active duty military service members, veterans, citizens soldiers and their inding employment with organizations that target military populations. U’s School of Social Work, this program brings together courses in areas of matic stress disorder, substance abuse, traumatic brain injuries, and suicide

nal Grants

ty Learning Centers Program

helping youth regardless of the communities in which they live. Seeking to ved funding in the amount $1,360,000 for the 21st Century Community Learnf the 21st Century Community Learning Center is to provide programming deage students in quality academic enrichment opportunities along with actividemic progress. Participants in grades eight through twelve will be recruited gh schools. Working in partnership with Cumberland /Fayetteville Parks and ols (CCS), 21st Century Community Learning Centers will be located at recools.

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The Geospatial In

Fayetteville State University is creating a new interdisciplinary Geospatial jointly by faculty from Computer Science, Geography and Intelligence Studi in these disciplines. During the implementation of this $440,000 grant, whic telligence Agency and includes support for a geospacial teaching laborato litical Science. Accreditation for this certificate will be sought from the Unite United State to accredit certificate and educational programs in Geospati include the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York, and t

In its 2009 High growth Job Training Initiative, the US Department of Labor businesses being transformed by technology and innovation requiring new Computer Programming, Geography, and Intelligence will prepare students fo other parts of the US Intelligence Community. The GEOINT certificate at FSU be used to develop similar STEM programs at other HBCUs. The program was designed by Dr. Rakesh Malhotra, with the assistance of Dr. Bogdan Czejdo and Dr. Sambit Bhattacharya.

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ntelligence Certificate

l Intelligence (GEOINT) Certificate. The certificate is being implemented ies, and w i l l initially be offered to undergraduate students seeking degrees ch is funded by the US Department of Defense’s National Geospatial Inory, the certificate will be expanded to include allied disciplines such as Poed States Geospatial Intelligence Foundation, the only organization in the ial Intelligence. Institutions that are currently accredited under this program the US Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, Colorado.

reported that Geospatial Technologies is one of the “existing or emerging skill sets for workers”. A GEOINT certificate founded in applied courses in or successful careers with the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency and U, will offer a template that can

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The OSRP Annual Award Ceremony HONORING: Excellence in Grant Award Total: Awarded to recipients of grant awards with the largest dollar value. Excellence in Student Support: Awarded to recipients of grants that will be instrumental in supporting students toward achieving their educational goals. Excellence in Community Support: Awarded to recipients of grants that support community improvement initiatives. Excellence in University Support: Awarded to recipients of grant funding that help promote the education, social, cultural and economic transformation goals of the University. Excellence in Grant Proposal Submissions: Awarded to recipients for their consistency and persistence in grant proposal submissions which attribute to increasing the annual number of proposal submissions through Sponsored Programs. Excellence in Collaborative Partnership: Awarded to recipients who take advantage of sponsored funding opportunities by building collaborative partnerships for conducting research and pursuing new funding. Top Co-Investigator: Awarded to faculty or staff for their expertise, partnership and support in development and execution of grant proposals.

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Chancellor Anderson presenting the Excellence in Grant Proposal Submissions to Dr. HoEun Chung

Chancellor Anderson presenting the Excellence in Grant Award Recipient to Dr. Shelton Ford

Chancellor Anderson presenting the Excellence in Collaborative Partnership to Dr. Kimberly Smith Burton

Chancellor Anderson presenting the Excellence in Top Co-Investigator to Dr. Bogdan Czejdo

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Chancellor Anderson presenting the Excellence in Grant Award Recipient to Dr. Terri Moore-Brown

Chancellor Anderson presenting the Excellence in Grant Proposal Submissions to Mr. Bobby Wynn

Chancellor Anderson presenting the Excellence in University Support to Mr. Jay Blauser

Chancellor Anderson presenting the Excellence in Student Support to Dr. Mei-Chuan Wang

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Chancellor Anderson presenting the Excellence in Grant Proposal Submissions to Dr. Abdelmajid Kassem

Chancellor Anderson presenting the Excellence in Student Support to Dr. Afua Arhin

Chancellor Anderson presenting the Excellence in Collaborative Partnership to Dr. Peter Eley

Chancellor Anderson presenting the Excellence in Community Service to Dr. Teresa Thompson–Pinckney

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F U N D I N G B Y N U M B E R S

FSU Faculty Use Their Skills to Generate Funding, and Create a Community of Experiential Learners

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Awarded Projects FY 2013 Percentage of Funding Dollars Received from External Funding Sources by Schools and Departments

FY 2013 Percentage of Awards Received from External Funding Sources by Schools and Departments

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Grant Award Activity FY13, 1 July 2012 - 30 June 2013, was an exceptionally productive year 93 proposals were submitted to external sponsors, A 59% increase over submissions in FY 12. $11,382,415 was awarded to the university in FY 2013.

No. Proposals Submitted Dollars Requested No. Awards Received Funding Dollars Received

FY 2012 55

FY 2013 93

$18,347,612

43,561,176

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52

$10,047,929

11, 382,415

Proposal Submissions by School % Dollars Requested

% Proposals Submitted

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Proposal Submissions by Department

Awards by Department

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PROUD TO BE

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Sponsored Research at FSU