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Questions about JC programs and services described in this publication should be directed to Student Services itself. Comments or questions about the publication itself can be directed to the Marketing Department at 517.796.8416. Publisher: Editor: Writer: Graphic Design: Photography:

Fall 2013 • Volume 10 Issue 1

A publication of Jackson College

Cynthia S. Allen Dotty Karkheck Marilynn Fryer Ashley Banks Lisa Drake JC Marketing Staff

JC Board of Trustees:

Samuel R. Barnes Chairman

Matthew R. Heins Trustee

John M. Crist Vice Chairman

Philip E. Hoffman Trustee

Doing business at Jackson College

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• College launches new degree in sales

Help the world around you with a career in Environmental Science 6 Start here, go far: Partnerships help students seeking bachelor’s degrees 7 State approves limited number of bachelor’s degrees 8 Dual enrollment adds up to free college credit 10 Why go to college? The top five reasons to go to college 11 Status update: Social media changing landscape for job seekers 12 A healthy start to the nursing program Keep these points in mind 13 General and Cardiac Sonographers can keep their vascular skills flowing smoothly 14 Graphic design program turns new page with print production certificate 15 Computer support program getting an upgrade 16 Career programs at Jackson College

Sheila A. Patterson Secretary

Dr. Edward A. Mathein Trustee

Donna L. Lake Treasurer

Dr. Daniel J. Phelan President

Career Choices is published twice a year. All rights reserved. No part of the material may be reproduced or used in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or any information storage retrieval system without the permission of the publisher. It is the policy of Jackson College that no person shall be discriminated against on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin or ancestry, gender, marital status, sexual orientation, or handicap, excluded from participation in, denied the benefits of, or otherwise be subjected to, discrimination in any program or activity for which it is responsible for or for which it receives financial assistance from the U.S. Department of Education.

Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400 Chicago, IL 60602-2504 (312) 236-0456 www.ncacihe.org

Jackson College 2111 Emmons Road • Jackson, MI 49201 www.jccmi.edu

• Executive assistants help keep business running smoothly • Passion and persistence can pay off for entrepreneurs

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doing BUSINESS

at Jackson College

By Marilynn Fryer

Sold! College launches new degree in sales A good salesperson is always in demand! Sales are an important part of any business or enterprise. Representing a product or service to a customer and persuading them to buy is the primary job of someone in sales. This fall, Jackson College will launch new associate degree and certificate programs in sales, designed to help students interested in sales and sales

manager positions. Sales jobs occur in every industry, including pharmaceutical sales, transportation sales, manufacturing sales, insurance sales, food sales, real estate sales, leisure and vacation sales and more. Positions may require business-to-business sales, or business-to-customer sales. Sales careers offer many options, and the job outlook is bright, with about 12 percent growth expected through the year 2020. The goal of sales is the same no matter what the industry – help customers find the goods or services they want, thereby making money for the company you represent. Often those in sales start out as customer representatives or sales staff, communicating and meeting directly with customers to represent the company’s goods or services. After some years of experience, they may become sales managers, responsible for setting budgets and price points, overseeing sales staffs, planning sales efforts, determining discount rates or pricing plans and more.

The job: Making the sale

To be a good sales person or sales manager, one will need knowledge of basic sales and marketing principles, be comfortable with pertinent technology such as computers and software like Microsoft® Excel®, and good basic mathematics skills. Perhaps most importantly, they will need strong communication, customer service and interpersonal skills. They should be socially perceptive to understand another’s reactions, and be persuasive to move others to change their minds or behavior. Persistence, energy and a positive attitude are key. “A successful sales person has the stamina and perspective to eagerly seek out the rejections, because they know on average, for every 10 refusals, they will get one yes,” said Professor Barbara Van Syckle, business administration. Van Syckle said sales can be a difficult way to make a living, so she suggests students test the waters by getting a retail job for six months while they are in school. A salesperson needs to fully understand their product and be able to represent the product and company to the customer. “Whereby working in retail/sales may sound like an easy profession, quite the opposite is true,” said Carol Thompson, owner and operator of I’ve Been Framed! of Jackson. “People who enter this field should be outgoing, with a neat appearance and good grammar, reliable, able to multi-task with several customers at the same time, cheerful, and have a basic belief that pleasing the customer, means a return customer.” Thompson said the best part of the sales/ customer service job is the satisfaction of knowing each customer leaves having had the attention he or she needed, but the down

Aimee Bozinoff, at I’ve Been Framed, talks with a customer about a possible sculpture purchase for his home.

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E h r

side is also that in doing so, sometimes the sales rep may be a little drained, because truly investing in customers’ decisions all day can be both exhilarating and exhausting. “Without sales you have no business. Without reliable, trained sales staff, a business could be left not taking care of each customer to the fullest extent. By not taking care of each and every customer, it could mean an early demise to any customer service-related business,” Thompson said. Sales can be a lucrative career with high wages and other benefits, such as incentives for meeting certain sales goals. Sales workers may start at the low end, retail sales, making $20,990 per year, while others make much more. Advertising sales agents make on average $45,350, while wholesale and manufacturing sales representatives make $56,620. Sales manager positions start at around $49,000 and may earn over $100,000.

Executive assistants help keep business running smoothly Today’s executive assistants are highly skilled professionals who help hold an office together! To keep up with changing demands in today’s business offices, Jackson College will launch a new executive assistant associate degree program in the fall 2013 semester. The College has long had an administrative assistant degree, which emphasizes technical and computer skills, but this new degree will add even more classes in business administration to help executive assistants provide the high-level support necessary for their employers. Executive assistants are professional-level positions who provide support for senior management and executives in almost every business type – industrial, retail, medical,

Lori Mason, executive assistant to the president at Stanton and Associates, (above at left) discusses an upcoming event with Sarah Appel, another Stanton and Associates employee.

legal, finance, education, hospitality, nonprofits and more. Most still perform basic clerical tasks, but have added responsibilities as well. Some will train and supervise lowerlevel clerical staff. “Executive assistants in today’s offices are being asked to do more and more. It’s not just answering the phone or keeping a calendar; they may be asked to sit in on a meeting or even run a meeting if their employer isn’t there,” said Assistant Professor Angel Fonseca, who previously worked as an executive assistant herself to JC’s president before joining the teaching faculty. They will often deal with confidential information, and may have authority in the executive’s absence. For those thinking about a career as an executive assistant, good communication skills, both speaking and written, are important. Knowledge of business principles will help assist the executive – customer service, human relations, marketing, and so on. “If you are a self-starter, dedicated to exceeding standards, love being the first point of contact, and take pride in your work, then being an executive assistant would be a good fit for you,” said Lori Mason, executive assistant to the president at Stanton & Associates, Inc. and a JC alumnus. “Remember, you will literally be the glue that holds everything together. An executive assistant has to have self-confidence, a strong presence and a professional demeanor and appearance.”

Working at Stanton & Associates, Inc. – local franchisee of Wendy’s Restaurants – Mason is known around the office as the “master juggler, the gate keeper or the nucleus.” She is the “face and voice of the Wendy’s Corporate world … a less official title but one I am proud of.” Executive assistants need to lead others with enthusiasm, possess solid leadership skills, sound judgment, integrity, resourcefulness and resilience. It helps to be able to anticipate others’ needs before they arise. “I enjoy being the right hand person, anticipating needs and acting as a liaison between the executives and our clients. Supporting the president and the other executives in day-to-day operations keeps me energized because I am personally driven by helping people – I love being a day maker,” Mason said. “There are small and large differences we can make each day, and I believe when you are in the role of executive assistant, you will have many opportunities to make days. If you want to be a day maker, then this program may be for you.” Demand for executive assistants is expected to grow rapidly in the next several years, with large numbers of job openings. Job growth is projected to be about 8 to 13 percent, with averages wages of about $21 per hour, or $43,800 a year.

Looking for more information? E-mail us at careerchoices@jccmi.edu

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Passion & persistence can pay off for entrepreneurs

to help them put together a thorough plan for transforming their ideas into reality.

Get started with new degree program!

JC had previously offered a skill set in entrepreneurship, but has expanded to offer a deeper and more well-rounded curriculum. Students will draw from a broad range of disciplines and courses, providing them with the analytical tools and diversity of knowledge conducive to thinking like an entrepreneur. This breadth of knowledge will be coupled with specific knowledge and expertise in business and entrepreneurial ventures.

Does the thought of becoming your own boss sound like a dream come true? Is there something you have always wanted to try and think, maybe now is the time? Perhaps becoming an entrepreneur is right for you!

“You have to have a passion for something to become a successful entrepreneur,” said Ron Betzig, director of JC’s entrepreneurship program. “Whatever your passion, it will take time and commitment.”

A successful entrepreneur is someone who identifies specific needs in the world around them and then creatively implements strategies for meeting those needs. Entrepreneurs can be found in all sorts of places. Not only do they start and operate successful for-profit and not-forprofit ventures, they work as change agents in organizations that were started by others (these entrepreneurs are sometimes known as “intrapraneurs”).

Those interested in entrepreneurship should start with some self-directed questions. Are they comfortable taking risks? Any new venture is a risk in itself. Those who choose to start for-profit companies must be willing to put in long hours of hard work and go for possibly two or three years with little income while the business gets off the ground and builds a name for itself. They will also need to have money to sustain themselves through those lean years, through either savings, supportive friends and family, or professional financing organizations. Passion is most important.

This fall, Jackson College will launch new programs leading to an associate degree or a certificate in entrepreneurship. At the heart of the new program will be the desire to guide students into identifying their own driving passion, their distinctive talents, and

“Entrepreneurship is very difficult. Most new businesses fail. There may come a day when you think, ‘I’m not making money, or my

customers are unhappy or my associates are unhappy, why don’t I just hang it up and go get a 9-to-5 job?’ But if it’s your passion, you say, ‘Deep down inside, this is what I really want to do,’ so you keep pushing and become successful.” In addition to passion, entrepreneurs need competence and skill in their chosen venture. To be successful, they will need to develop an economic model, understand the needs of a customer base, and engage in the iterative business planning process. Entrepreneurship classes will help focus on how to “create your own job” (whether that is an independent venture or within an existing organization), entrepreneurial marketing, brand identity design, and developing an adaptive business model. In addition, core courses in leadership, accounting, and business law will help equip students to overcome many of the obstacles associated with managing an enterprise. A strong liberal arts background can benefit entrepreneurs in several ways. One of the keys to success for any entrepreneur is the ability to innovate, including taking concepts and methods from one discipline and applying them in a new area. Without a broad and diverse knowledge of many areas, this type of innovation is difficult, Betzig said. Networking is vital for entrepreneurs, both in making themselves known and in continuously improving their business. New ideas, new contacts and developments may all be found through networking with others. One of the very best places in the world to build a strong network is an academic institution like JC, where creative thinking and collaboration across many disciplines is highly valued. Chris Warren was a culinary arts major at JC who studied entrepreneurship to help him in his culinary career. In 2012 Chris opened a restaurant in Allen in Hillsdale County, something he had dreamed about for a while. His restaurant, Madigan’s, has been very successful during its first year of operation. “It will require a lot of work. It will take a lot of hours to get started, so make it something you really want to do,” Warren said. “It can really be what you make it.”

Chris Warren, owner of Madigan’s restaurant in Allen, Michigan, and a recent culinary arts graduate from Jackson College, also studied entrepreneurship at JC to help make his dream of owning a restaurant a reality.

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Fall 2013 • Career Choices • 517.796.8416

Environmental science offers opportunities as diverse as the planet itself, and a new program is taking root at Jackson College. Plans are for a new environmental science associate degree program to begin in the fall 2013 semester, following the launch of a certificate program in 2012. Environmental scientists explore nature’s systems and how humans influence those systems. They may be involved in a variety of areas, such as soil conservation, water quality and treatment, agriculture, plant pathology, ecology, environmental engineering, biology and more, or in related fields like environmental management and administration, or public relations and communications. They may work in industry, government, consulting or education. “Environmental science is one of the fastest growing science disciplines in the country,” said Professor Steven Albee-Scott, JC’s Dr. Wilbur Dungy Endowed Faculty Chair for the Sciences. The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts a 24 percent increase in jobs relating to environmental science over the next decade. Environmental science majors test hypotheses by drawing on their understanding of mathematics, biology, chemistry, physics and geology. These hypotheses are drawn from contemporary environmental challenges that have an immediate impact, for example air pollution and asthma, or a long-term challenge like the ecological assessment to maintain deer habitat and deer numbers. Environmental science also focuses on alternative energy, sustainability and engineering challenges of the future. Environmental science allows a student scientist to develop a deep understanding of scientific knowledge to address the underlying

environmental challenges of the future. These challenges are the most complex problems that the human race will face, and it is the duty of the faculty in the environmental science program to ensure that students are prepared to meet that challenge either in JC’s new alternative energy baccalaureate, currently under development, or in transfer. To prepare for those jobs, students may choose to focus on a biotechnology emphasis, an ecology emphasis or a quantitative analysis or chemistry emphasis. Biotechnology applications may include agricultural or medical applications, ecological emphasis may include invasive plant species or pests, and a chemistry emphasis may be involved in water or soil testing. Students will have opportunities to pursue research in their areas of interest, and write about their research for possible publication. Albee-Scott encourages students in his classes come up with a project, develop a hypothesis, experiment and gather data, and write up their work. “One of my primary interests in teaching environmental science is teaching students how to use information to solve problems,” Albee-Scott said. “There are environmental problems they will need to evaluate and say, ‘What is the best way to solve this problem?’”

The environmental science certificate prepares students for transfer to or enrollment in four-year institutions as environmental science majors. An associate degree will prepare students for positions as technicians in a variety of areas, for example forestry technician, agricultural technician, conservation technician, environmental engineering technician, which can offer employment and experience to students who then want to further their education. “Further study is really recommended,” Albee-Scott said. “You work yourself into a job through an education.” Students considering a career in environmental science should possess good observational skills, be able to compare and contrast and think critically. Both are teachable skills students will practice throughout their education, Albee-Scott said. “It is the most rewarding science I think most people can get into because it is always something new,” he said. “It’s very much involved with the outdoors, which works well in Michigan.”

Using the knowledge and abilities they develop, students will create a portfolio detailing the skills that they have acquired to show to potential employers. Their skills will be measured on three levels – basic, understanding the basic concepts; intermediate, understanding content and processes; and mastery, synthesizing the first two levels.

Looking for more information? E-mail us at careerchoices@jccmi.edu

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By Marilynn Fryer

Is a bachelor’s degree in your future? Jackson College offers many transfer and articulation agreements with four-year universities around the state to help students hoping to complete a bachelor’s degree. At Jackson College you can get an excellent education without being buried in debt. Tuition at JC is a fraction of the cost of a 4-year institution. Transfer your credits to the 4-year school of your choice such as Grand Valley, Michigan, Western or Michigan State to name a few, or choose a local or online program. Whether you plan to continue your education with one of the partner institutions on our Central Campus in Jackson, the online institutions we have articulation agreements with or any university or college in the state of Michigan, Jackson College can help you reach your goal.

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Fall 2013 • Career Choices • 517.796.8416

Check out these options for earning a bachelor’s degree locally:

Concordia University

Concordia University is a Christian liberal arts university in Ann Arbor, also with locations in Dearborn and Frankenmuth. Concordia has an office at JC’s Central Campus in McDivitt Hall, and will offer Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree program on JCC’s campus, as well as bachelor’s degree programs in health care management, human resources and liberal arts. Master’s degree options will be available online. Call 517.990.1361, or visit www.cuaa.edu.

Siena Heights University

Siena Heights University is a Catholic university with its main campus in Adrian, with a bachelor’s degree completion center located in McDivitt Hall on the Jackson Central Campus. SHU offers several 3+1 (three years at JC, one year at SHU) articulation agreements, with classes offered at the Jackson Central Campus, online classes and

an accelerated Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration at JC @ LISD TECH. Call 517.796.8672, or visit www.sienaheights.edu.

Spring Arbor University

Spring Arbor University is a Christian liberal arts university located in Spring Arbor, with locations in downtown Jackson. SAU also has an office in McDivitt Hall on the Jackson Central Campus. JC and SAU have 2 + 2 transfer agreements for over 70 majors, as well as articulation agreements in several areas. Visit www.arbor.edu/ transfer, or call 517.474.6674. Check out these online options for earning a bachelor’s degree:

Davenport University

www.davenport.edu/office-admissions

Eastern Michigan University

www.emich.edu/admissions/requirements/ transfer.php

State approves Jackson College to offer limited number of bachelor degrees Bachelor’s degrees at a community college? That’s right, Gov. Rick Snyder signed a bill into law in December allowing community colleges in Michigan to offer bachelor’s degrees in certain applied and technical programs. With this legislation, state residents have increased access to baccalaureate level education and training in these distinct programs. This is designed to help those who are limited by geographic or financial boundaries to further their education.

For students considering the energy systems management degree, they may start with the traditional freshman-year science and general education classes, writing, mathematics up through pre-calculus and trigonometry, Introduction to Sustainability, chemistry or physics. They may also want to take Circuit Analysis I or AutoCAD 1 (computer assisted drafting). For more information, please schedule an appointment with an academic advisor at any JC location. To learn more about advising, visit http://www.jccmi.edu/studentservices/ admissions/advising.htm.

Jackson College is developing curriculum to offer bachelor’s degrees in culinary arts and energy systems management beginning Fall 2014. Students interested in either of these areas can get started now with general studies and prerequisite courses.

Franklin University

www.franklin.edu/getting-started/ community-college-students

Kaplan University

www.kaplanuniversity.edu

The College has offered an associate degree in culinary arts and hospitality for a few years now, at both the Central Campus and JC @ LISD TECH. Students interested in the future bachelor’s degree may start the associate degree program, taking some general education studies courses and program-related requirements. Students may want to check out the requirements for the Associate in Applied Science for Culinary Arts and Hospitality.

Kettering University

www.kettering.edu/admissions/ transfer-student-admissions

Northwood University

www.northwood.edu/adults/locations/ michigan-lansing

Walsh College

www.walshcollege.edu/transfercollegecredit

Western Governors University www.wgu.edu/admissions/cc_transfer

JC also has transfer guides for various programs at most of Michigan’s public universities online, such as Western Michigan University, Central Michigan University, Michigan State University, University of Michigan, and more! Visit www.jccmi.edu/studentservices/transfer.

Looking for more information? E-mail us at careerchoices@jccmi.edu

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By Marilynn Fryer

High school students thinking about college don’t have to wait to get started. With dual enrollment, motivated, collegebound students can earn college credits while still in high school, for free!

Dual enrollment means students may be enrolled in both high school and college. According to Michigan law they may take courses freshman, sophomore, junior or senior years, accumulating credits for their college program and perhaps taking classes unavailable to them at their high school. “If you have time in your schedule, dual enroll. You may get developmental classes out of the way, or get a head start on your degree,” said JC graduate Stephanie Layton. “Dual

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Fall 2013 • Career Choices • 517.796.8416

enrollment is a wonderful program and should be taken full advantage of.” To get started students should speak to their parents and the JC dual enrollment coordinator, who can help determine whether the student qualifies. Students need to pass the Michigan Merit Exam (MME) or an alternative (PSAT, ACT, PLAN) to qualify. Public, home school and private/parochial school students may participate in dual enrollment. Students and their parents/ guardians should meet with JC’s dual enrollment coordinator to discuss enrollment plans. For public or private/parochial school students, usually the high school/home district pays. The college will send a bill for

tuition and fees to the local district, or to the state Department of Treasury for qualifying non-public or home school students. Again, meet with the JC dual enrollment coordinator to decide on courses and know how much the school district will pay. All school districts, even if they do not pay, must sign off on a high school student enrolling in college courses. Find out more at the JC web site, or speak with your local high school principal or counselor. “It (dual enrollment) helped me a lot,” said Annie Warbritton, graduating senior at Grass Lake High School. She enrolled in a psychology course, Introduction to Counseling. She plans to go into speech pathology and thought the course would help her in working with people. “It gives you an experience of college. Definitely do it.”

h

Q&A What is dual enrollment?

The Michigan Postsecondary Enrollment Options Act, commonly referred to as dual enrollment, allows high school students (grades 9, 10, 11, 12) to take college courses while also enrolled in high school. The credit earned is not only for college credit, but may also be used for high school credit to meet graduation requirements.

Who is eligible?

Students in grades 9 through 12 are eligible. Academic readiness may be determined by student performance on any of the following assessments: Explore, PLAN, ACT, COMPASS, MME, PSAT, SAT, or Accuplacer. Jackson College offers a free COMPASS assessment and has materials to help your son or daughter prepare. In addition, representatives at JC often provide assessment services on-site at the local high schools. Assessments shall not be the sole indicator of a student’s readiness and often, conversation with JC’s dual enrollment coordinator and/or high school counselors will help determine if your son or daughter is ready for such experience.

Why should I consider dual enrollment for my son/daughter?

Students who participate in dual enrollment opportunities are better equipped to succeed in higher education by having a realistic idea of what college requires. National research shows that dual enrollment participation leads to a higher GPA in the first year of college, a higher overall cumulative GPA after three years of college, and more credits earned. Additionally, those who take two college courses as a dual enrolled student have a higher GPA than those who take just one dual enrolled course. During the 11/12 academic year, dual enrolled students were 15 percent more successful than their JC counterparts. Nearly 85 percent of dual enrolled students earned a 2.0 or higher on their college-level course work.

Who pays for dual enrollment courses?

The law directs local school districts to assist students in paying tuition and fees for courses at Michigan colleges and universities. If your son or daughter is enrolled in a state approved nonpublic school, the state of Michigan pays for the coursework and JC bills the department of treasury directly. Just think, your son/ daughter can get a jump-start on their college career at no cost to you or your family!

What courses do most dual enrolled students take?

The following are the top courses that dual enrolled students traditionally complete:

What courses can my son or daughter take? Eligible courses include:

• Any Jackson College course that is not offered by the school district or nonpublic school; • Any course that is offered by the school district or nonpublic school, but is not accessible due to scheduling conflicts beyond the student’s control; • A course that is offered by postsecondary Career and Technical Education program that is not offered through the school district, intermediate school district, area vocational-technical education program or state approved nonpublic school in which an eligible student is enrolled.

Does my son or daughter have to exhaust the high school’s curriculum before they are eligible for dual enrollment?

No. The law does not require students to take all available high school courses before participating in dual enrollment. The law only requires that the college courses not be offered by the school district or state approved non-public school. If a high school course is not accessible to your son/daughter based on scheduling conflicts, they may take that course at the college under the law.

ENG 131 Writing Experience I MAT 141 Pre-Calculus PSY 140 Introduction to Psychology ENG 132 Writing Experience II MAT 151 Calculus I SOC 231 Principles of Sociology ACC 231 Principles of Accounting MAT 154 Calculus II CIS 101 Computer Info Systems BIO 161 General Biology I CEM 131 Fundamentals of Chemistry MOA 120 Medical Terminology THR 116 Introduction to Theatre Various history courses and foreign language options.

When can my son or daughter take classes?

Depending on your son/daughter’s schedule, they may take dual enrolled courses during the high school day or outside of the high school day. JC offers a variety of evening, weekend, and online classes to meet our learner’s needs.

If I have questions, who should I contact?

Please do not hesitate to contact us with your questions. In Jackson County call 517.796.8405, Hillsdale County 517.437.3343 and Lenawee County 517.265.5515, or online www.jccmi.edu/dual. .

Looking for more information? E-mail us at careerchoices@jccmi.edu

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? e g e l l o c o t Why goThe top five reasons to go to college College sounds like a great idea, but sometimes it is hard to stay in school if you think you need to be working to earn money. However, if you finish high school and go on to college, you will have a wider variety of jobs to choose from, and you will earn more — especially in the long run.

1

More learning equals more earning.

A college education decreases your chances of becoming unemployed while it increases your earning potential. Think of it as an investment in yourself that yields significant future earnings. Over a lifetime, someone with an associate degree can earn $1,813,000, while someone with just a high school diploma may earn just $1,371,000. (Earnings represent expected earnings over a 40-year time period for the population aged 25-64, from U.S. Census Bureau 2011 American Community Survey).

2

More education equals better opportunities to get a good job.

More and more jobs today require an education beyond high school. College graduates have more jobs to choose from than those who do not pursue education beyond high school. It is more important now than ever to have the right skills for the workplace. In 2012, those with an associate degree had an unemployment rate of 6.9 percent, while those with just a high school diploma had an unemployment rate of 9.4 percent, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

10 Fall 2013 • Career Choices • 517.796.8416

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Increase your potential. A

college education can boost your communication skills, expand your knowledge base, make you methodical and organized, boost your confidence, and expose you to a whole new world of learning. In addition to preparing for a career, a college education can help you learn how to work well with others and develop problem-solving skills, something many employers look for in all employees. College is also a great place to build a network, get to know others who may be able to help you in the future with job prospects, letters of reference and more.

4

Prepare for lifelong learning.

Many of today’s college majors didn’t exist 10 or 15 years ago – such as new media technology, online business, and homeland security. Education can help prepare you to be a lifelong learner, important

in a changing world where tomorrow’s careers are still unknown. According to a study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, individuals born from 1957 to 1964 held an average of 11.3 jobs from ages 18 to 46.

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Make lasting memories. Whether it’s academic achievements, a memorable professor or hanging out with friends and ordering pizza at 1 a.m., many remember their college years as some of the best of their life!

Think you can’t go to college? College is accessible to all who have the desire to learn. Financial aid is available for those with a demonstrated need. If you want to learn more, or are unsure of how the whole “college thing” works, speak with an enrollment services specialist today.

The growth of social media and social networking sites has been unprecedented. It is no surprise, then, for job seekers that social media is changing the job hunting landscape. Job searching has long been about not only finding jobs but also about networking with others who can help you in your search. “I think social networking is one of the keys to the successful job search,” said Teri Ogg, manager of Manpower, Jackson. “There’s a lot of information out there both about what positions are available, and also about best practices when applying for those positions.” Social networking sites can aid in the job search by helping candidates promote their skill sets, expertise and certifications, which can be easily researched by hiring managers as they seek to attract new talent and secure quality candidates, according to Michelle Shields, career coach/employer liaison at JC. According to a 2013 survey by the Society of Human Resource Management (SHRM), more than three-quarters, 77 percent, of organizations reported using social networking sites to recruit potential job candidates, an increase from 56 percent in 2011 and 34 percent in 2008. Of those organizations that use social networking for recruitment, LinkedIn is by far the most common, with 94 percent using it, compared to Facebook, 54 percent and Twitter, 39 percent. “There are many different ways an individual can utilize social networking to obtain employment,” said Justin Gifford, community relations officer for South Central Michigan Works! Gifford feels LinkedIn is one of the most beneficial. “LinkedIn allows you the ability to perform company research, employer-staff research, and then also allows the job-seeker the ability to see if they are already connected to someone who might be networked to that potential employer through their contacts.”

Social media tools offer a great way to build relationships by connecting and networking with others in companies job seekers may be interested in. LinkedIn is designed for professional networking like this, and Twitter is designed to help you follow people with similar interests, so following employers and job sites that post openings is helpful. For example, Manpower is a global organization, Ogg said, with its own Twitter and other social media accounts used for recruiting efforts. “Those seem to be the wave of the future as far as being able to really connect with people on a more personal level,” she said. Companies who are really in tune with social media are those who are trying to reach different skill levels of candidates. Because of this, many experts advise users to be sure their online presence speaks well of them, highlighting their strengths and skills, and why an employer should be interested. “If you are looking for employment, you want to make the best ‘sales’ pitch about you that you can,” Gifford said. “Employers have been utilizing social media sites to research top candidates and find out who they are outside of work, find out if they truly fit the culture of the business, and even in some cases find out if individuals will have a negative ethical impact on business.”

Job seekers should be wary of sharing too much or inappropriate content online. Applicants should set privacy controls to protect their identity and data, limit what others share about them, and eliminate information that might compromise their job candidacy. A good rule of thumb – do not post anything you would not want your mother or grandmother to see. “Get rid of spring break pictures, party posts, and especially images that depict risky, irresponsible or unprofessional behavior,” Shields said. “Companies do not seek to hire candidates that post to be controversial or reckless. Think of it this way; if you can’t manage your own information, how will you manage your employer’s information?”

There are many great job search web sites also, be sure to check out: www.monster.com www.indeed.com Pure Michigan Talent Connect www.mitalent.org JC’s Jobs for Jets www.jccmi.edu/cce/JobBlast.asp

Looking for more information? E-mail us at careerchoices@jccmi.edu

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A career in nursing offers great rewards to students interested in health care and helping others. Jackson College’s nursing faculty members want to help students prepare for the rigor needed to become a nurse today. Nurses work to promote health, prevent disease and help people cope with illness. Registered nurses (RN’s) provide care, treatment, counseling and health education to individuals, families and their communities. Licensed practical nurses (LPN’s) care for ill, injured, convalescent and handicapped persons in hospitals, clinics, private homes, doctors’ offices and other settings, and work under the supervision of an RN, doctor or dentist.

By Marilynn Fryer

To become a registered nurse, students must be admitted to the nursing program specifically, what is called a “second admit.” After completing general studies requirements and prerequisites, students may apply for admission to the nursing program. JC has about 200 students in the registered nurse program. To get started, Director of nursing Peggy Comstock urges all students to see an academic advisor regularly. Admission to the nursing program is based on a point system, and speaking with an advisor from the first semester on can help students take the classes they need to be successful. “We really don’t want students to self-advise, to think that they can do this on their own. It’s very important to work with an advisor,” Comstock said. A strong background in science and mathematics is critical for any future nurse. Students need to be ready for college-level science courses, in particular Human Anatomy and Physiology, a subject that is very complex. Students will need to have mastered anatomy and physiology, including not only what all the parts and systems of the human body are, but what they do and how they interact, because they will be expected to build on that knowledge once they are admitted to the nursing program; a grade of 3.0 is required. Exams in the nursing program involve application of the material, not just memorizing and repeating facts, so again, students need a good mastery of the subject and critical thinking skills.

12 Fall 2013 • Career Choices • 517.796.8416

Comstock suggests students work closely with an advisor to create a plan of study with a sequence of science courses that will help them to be most successful. To develop the plan, students can review with the advisor their ACT Test scores in science. If a student has not taken the ACT nor has taken any recent high school science courses, it may be helpful to take preparatory science courses to get ready for anatomy and physiology. In mathematics, students may need to take a developmental math course or two in order to prepare for college-level mathematics. The nursing department recommends prenursing students take statistics and probability to meet the mathematics requirements. Statistics prepares the future nurse with skills needed to interpret nursing research and utilize an evidence-based practice model. The advisor will work with each student to create an individual education plan. “The stronger one’s math and science skills are, the more likely they are to succeed in their nursing courses,” Comstock said. Many pre-nursing students have attended college part-time and, once admitted to the nursing program, have difficulty making the transition to all the nursing requirements. Recognizing this, faculty urge students to have multiple backup plans in case something comes up, a child gets sick, a car will not start, and so on. “Students must have a Plan A, Plan B and Plan C in place. We are getting them prepared for the nursing workforce.

By Marilynn Fryer To help meet the needs of local hospitals and health care providers, Jackson College’s vascular sonography program will offer a new course to cross train general and cardiac sonographers.

We will expect them to be on time and in place for their classes, labs and clinicals,” Comstock said. JC’s Center for Student Success offers workshops and other resources on time management and other life skills that may be useful for students to take before they enter the program. Another surprise for many students selected for admission are the immunization requirements for health care providers. Students must show evidence of immunity to measles, mumps, rubella, varicella (chicken pox) and Hepatitis B. They must have negative two step TB skin tests, a current CPR card for health care providers, no exclusionary criminal convictions and a negative drug screen. Students with questions about any of these requirements should contact the nursing department.

JC offers associate degree programs in vascular sonography, general sonography and cardiac sonography. The health care industry today is looking for sonographers who are skilled in a variety of areas, and sometimes technologists who are general or cardiac sonographers are asked to perform these vascular procedures. JC will offer a 10-credit class (DMS 255) in two common vascular exams, carotid duplex imaging (carotid artery in neck) and venous duplex imaging to evaluate for patency (veins of the lower body). “We want to provide quality training by registered vascular sonographers for the individuals who are required to perform these exams,” said Heather Ruttkofsky, program director for vascular sonography. “This training will help sonographers of other specialties provide quality, accurate patient care.” This new course will be a competencybased one that will include five credits

of theory online and five credits of handson experience. Students will be asked to log at least 80 hands-on exams in the JC health lab as part of the program. It will be offered all three semesters, and because it is competency-based, students may progress at their own pace. To enroll in the course, prospective students must either: • Actively hold sonography credentials, or; • Be a graduate of a CAAHEP accredited programs with at last 12 months hands-on experience in general or cardiac sonography. For those who are registered sonographers, this course will count for 7.5 continuing medical education credits (CMEs) from the Society of Diagnostic Medical Sonographers (SDMS). This course is not, however, for new students or those in other health care fields; completion of the course alone will not lead to registration, but is meant to augment existing sonographers’ skills and abilities. Students wishing to register for this course should register for DMS 255 - Enhanced Skills in Carotid Duplex and Venous Duplex Imaging. To learn more, contact Ruttkofsky at 517.796.8531, or e-mail RuttkofHeatherM@ jccmi.edu.

Nursing employers are becoming more selective in who they hire. Students who create a solid portfolio recording their accomplishments throughout the program may have the best job opportunities. Nursing graduates who are good communicators, have clinical reasoning skills, maintain a healthy lifestyle – including not smoking, and have a good work ethic will have the best chances on the job market. To learn more about a career in nursing or JC’s program, contact Comstock for an appointment at 517.796.8515, or ComstocMargareA@jccmi.edu.

Looking for more information? E-mail us at careerchoices@jccmi.edu

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turns new page with print production certificate By Marilynn Fryer Taking the creative talents of graphic designers and transforming them into the printed publications that one comes across every day is the task of prepress workers or desktop publishers. Every time you pick up a printed flyer, brochure, newsletter or magazine, a variety of workers have contributed to its creation. The Jackson and mid-Michigan area has a large number of printing businesses, and to help meet the demand for printing professionals, Jackson College will launch a new print production certificate this fall. It will combine some basic design skills common to graphic design students, along with more

14 Fall 2013 • Career Choices • 517.796.8416

practical, technical coursework in printing and press operation. The College will work with the Jackson Area Career Center to offer students a background in many printing areas – screen-printing, linotype, four-color process, web offset press and more. “There is a need for students with a printing background in the area. Students who complete this certificate should be able to find a decent job with a local printing company,” said Christie Hughes, instructor in graphic design and 3D design. “It will include more focused knowledge on the technical side of production, taking files from people, preparing and printing them.”

Print production careers involve a variety of tasks associated with turning text, artwork and photos into finished pages. They may produce camera-ready copy, lay out pages with text and art elements from writers and graphic designers, and transmit a publication master to production to be converted into film and plates for the printing process. Some may create plates and operate presses used in printing. For those interested in a career in desktop publishing, prepress or print production careers, it’s important to have some design and artistic background, but not necessarily as much as a graphic designer who creates artwork from a concept. Attention to detail and knowledge of the printing and production processes are necessary.

By Marilynn Fryer Rhonda Throne has worked in the printing business for 25 years and is currently taking classes in graphic design at JC. She hopes to use her graphic design skills in her job in the print shop. “I enjoy working with people and taking their ideas and jobs they do and making them come alive,” Throne said. “The printing processes have changed a lot through the years.” In addition to the new print production certificate, JC will also launch a new skill set in graphic design. This quick 12-credit credential will introduce students to the industry standard Adobe® Creative Suite graphic design programs, including Adobe Illustrator®, Adobe Photoshop® and Adobe InDesign®. This skill set can help students who aren’t interested in being full-time graphic designers, but may want to enhance some of their graphic skills for another or their current career. JC student Meghan Bashir is currently completing an internship in graphic design at Ella Sharp Museum. Her goal is to become a graphic designer, and she completed a printing practicum as part of her program, where students learn the printing press, screen-printing and more. “It was interesting. From a design standpoint, it gave me an idea of what the printer goes through when they get a project ready for printing. It helped me be more conscientious of how I design things.” Average earnings for prepress workers in Michigan are about $16.86 per hour, or $35,100 per year. Printing press operators in Michigan make about $15.84 per hour, or $32,900 per year. A moderate decline is forecast overall in the number of jobs available, but a strong local mid-Michigan printing industry should help graduates.

One of Jackson College’s versatile computer support programs is getting an upgrade!

classes or experience under your belt, it’s just that much better for you,” Olds said.

Starting this fall, students may complete their associate degree or certificate in computer support specialist, a program formerly known as the microcomputer applications specialist. Faculty members believe the name change will be more current and draw the attention of more prospective students. A few of the program requirements have been revised to help serve today’s computer specialists.

The revised program will add an Advanced Information Technologies course, which will cover more about social media, a Programming Logic course to help prepare students to know how to read and write programming code, and add the option of a Finite Mathematics course, with more of a business focus.

“There is a huge demand for information technology graduates in our state,” said Professor Chris Olds. “This is a degree that can give students experience in computer support to prepare for a variety of job opportunities.”

The job outlook for computer support specialists expects about 15 percent growth in the number of jobs available through the year 2020, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Wages range from $28,300 to $76,000, with a median wage of $46,260.

Computer support specialists provide technical assistance, support and advice to individuals and organizations that depend on information technology. They work within organizations that use computer systems, for computer hardware or software vendors, or for third-party organizations that provide support services on a contract basis, such as help-desk service firms. The skills learned in this program may also help those already working in businesses and organizations looking to expand their skill levels to be more tech-savvy to help with more technology issues. Those interested in a career in computer support should be interested in computers and technology, but need not worry if they don’t have a lot of experience because JC has classes for every level. “You can have basically no experience or classes to get started in this program. If you do have some

Looking for more information? E-mail us at careerchoices@jccmi.edu

15

JC Program

Career Possibilities

Salary Range

Entry-level positions in digital illustration, computer-generated film and video game design industry. Career titles include animator, concept artist, character designer, modeling supervisor, 3D artist, 3D animator and animation director.

$32,100

Associate in Applied Science

Careers with duties assigned to a beginning or junior accountant, such as verifying additions; checking audits, postings and vouchers; analyzing accounts; and preparing financial statements.

$21,270-$34,030

Certificate

Entry-level accounting positions with bookkeeping and related services, CPA firms, and small businesses, such as office assistant, accounting staff assistant, or payroll staff assistant.

$20,000-$33,700

Financial Services - Concentration

Job opportunities could include beginning positions with banks, trust offices, pension and retirement firms, personal financial planning groups and investment broker houses (account clerk or customer service representative).

$18,730-33,970

3D Design & Animation Associate in Applied Science

Accounting

Alternative Energy Learn theory and skills required to design, install, operate and maintain alternative energy systems both for residential and small commercial applications. Specific topics include energy efficiency, photovoltaic (solar) systems, wind turbines, geothermal systems, solar thermal systems, bio-fuels and hydrogen fuel cells.

Emerging field, earnings vary

Studio Art - Certificate

Start in the field of studio art with this certificate program.

Hourly, $9.10 to $21.56

Digital Photography - Certificate

Gain the foundational skills to expand your photography portfolio and help develop skills needed to apply to a fine arts degree program or a career in the field.

Hourly, $8.34 to $23.57

Associate in Applied Science

Art

Associate Degrees Associate in Arts/Transfer (minimum of 60 credits)

A four-year college or university program where students may elect to major in such fields as art, business, education, English, music, psychology, social work and theatre.

Associate in Science/Transfer (minimum of 60 credits)

A four-year college or university program where students may elect to major in such fields as engineering, medicine, or computer science, just to name a few.

Earnings vary

Earnings vary

automotive Automotive Collision Repair Associate in Applied Science

A career as an automotive body repairer, often called collision repair technician. College utilizes the InterIndustry Conference on Automotive Collision Repair (I-CAR) Enhanced Delivery Curriculum, an industry standard in the field.

$22,990-$38,130

Automotive Collision Repair Certificate

A beginning position in collision repair performing basic tasks.

$20,000

Concentrations

JC offers concentrations in Collision, Mechanical & Electrical Components, Collision Repair Body Technician. Take these courses to quickly achieve a specific occupational goal.

Earnings vary

Skill sets

JC offers skill sets in Collision Repair Non-Structural Technician, Collision Repair Structural Body Technician, Collision Repair Refinishing Technician. Take these courses to quickly achieve a specific occupational goal.

Earnings vary

Automotive Service Technology Associate in Applied Science

Careers involving diagnosis, adjustment, repair and overhauling automotive vehicles. Students prepare to pass state and national exams to become a certified Master Automotive Technician. College meets ASE/NATEF standards in all eight areas of automotive repair, important to employers.

$20,700 to $59,400

Automotive Service Technology Certificate

Entry-level jobs in the field of automotive technology where you’ll work under the supervision of an experienced mechanic, or for career enhancement if you are already in the field.

$20,000

JC Program

Career Possibilities

Salary Range

Concentrations

JC offers concentrations in Wheel Service, Driveability, Ford Service, Powertrain, Undercar Service, High Speed Diesel, Hybrid Vehicles, Maintenance and Light Repair. Take these courses to quickly achieve a specific occupational goal.

Earnings vary

Skill sets

JC offers skill sets in Air Conditioning & Heating, Driveability, High Speed Diesel Service, Hybrid Vehicles, Maintenance and Light Repair, Powertrain, Wheel Service, Undercar Service. Take these courses to quickly achieve a specific occupational goal.

Earnings vary

Individual Certification (non-degree)

Certification in private pilot, commercial pilot, instrument rating, flight instructor, instrument flight instructor, multi-engine and multi-engine instructor.

Earnings vary

Associate in Applied Science

This program for pilots includes all simulator training, flight training and appropriate ground schooling to qualify you for private, commercial, multi-engine or flight instructor certification.

Wide range depends on airlines and experience, $30,000 to $119,100

aviation

Students complete their first two years toward a bachelor’s degree. Many commercial pilots today have a bachelor’s degree.

Transfer

Earnings vary

biology Transfer

College offers individual courses for transfer in biology, botany, microbiology, human anatomy & physiology and zoology. These can be the foundation for four-year studies in biology, pre-professional health programs (pre-medicine, pre-veterinary, pre-pharmacy, physical therapy, etc.), or biotechnology.

Earnings vary

business Business Administration Associate in Applied Science

Broad-based occupational opportunities in business. Students may find work in a variety of fields as small business owners, managers, or any career that benefits from an understanding of how to work with others in an organizational setting.

Vary greatly; wages of food service managers vary from $30,480 to $51,210.

Business Administration Certificate

Develop your knowledge of all functional aspects of the business world and prepare for employment in fields that require skills in sales presentation, negotiation, customer service, display preparation, inventory analysis and basic market research.

What you earn will depend on the industry, work setting and level of responsibility.

Executive Assistant Associate in Applied Science

Positions that provide support for senior management and executives (VPs, CEOs, CFOs, etc) of almost every business type, including industrial, retail, medical, legal, finance, education, hospitality, non-profits and more.

$28,800 to $62,400

Management - Certificate

People with management skills are employed in every industry. This will build on your natural ability to get along with people and develop your leadership potential for management roles.

There are dozens of job titles with the word “manager”; earnings vary.

Marketing - Certificate

Positions involved in marketing, advertising and promotion involved in retail, sales and customer service.

$25,000-$54,800

Sales Associate in Applied Science

Sales positions occur in every industry. Prepare for a career in sales and sales manager positions.

Earnings vary; some positions have opportunity for excellent earnings.

Sales - Certificate

Sales positions occur in every industry. Prepare for a career in sales and sales manager positions.

Earnings vary; some positions have opportunity for excellent earnings.

Business - Transfer

Transfer to a four-year university, where you’ll further develop your communication and interpersonal skills while developing a specialty in accounting, economics, finance, management, computer information systems or some other aspect of business.

“Jackson College was a good start to a four-year degree. I don’t think I would trade it for anything in the world, I’m glad I started out there.” Terri Papiersky, chief executive officer, South Central Credit Union, JC alumna

Earnings vary

JC Program

Career Possibilities

Salary Range

College offers individual courses in introductory, general, organic and inorganic chemistry. These courses can be the foundation for four-year college studies in pre-professional health (pre-medicine, pre-veterinary, pre-pharmacy, physical therapy) and professional chemistry.

Earnings vary

Employers seek people with the ability to express themselves clearly, to speak persuasively, to think on their feet and to work well with others. These are the skills developed in courses such as the fundamentals of speaking, interpersonal communications, argumentation and debate.

Earnings vary

Networking Specialist Associate in Applied Science

Computer networking positions; networking involves the hardware, software and communications channels that allow computers to talk to each other. Most organizations use computer networks and need networking specialists to maintain their networks.

$42,400-$69,100

Networking Specialist Certificate

Networking involves the hardware, software and communication channels necessary to allow computers to talk to each other. Learn the various components of computer networking.

$28,300-$46,260

Concentrations in Microsoft© Networking, Network+/Security+

Work as an information technology professional with knowledge of networking and information security within computer networks.

Earnings vary

Associate in Applied Science

Programmers write the detailed sets of instructions computers understand and act on. Job opportunities may include applications programmer, computer operators, information systems manager, systems analyst, and programmer.

$40,820-$71,380

Certificate

Entry-level computer programmer positions working with a systems analyst in an applications environment to support information processing functions.

$30,000-$40,000

Computer Support Specialist Associate in Applied Science

Careers that provide technical assistance, support and advice to individuals and organizations that depend on information technology. Opportunities include applications specialist, data processing manager, end-user support technician, information systems associate or software specialist.

$28,300-$46,260

Computer Support Specialist Certificate

Entry- level careers that provide technical assistance, support and advice to individuals and organizations that depend on information technology.

$20,000-$28,300

Microsoft® Office® Specialist Certificate

A variety of positions in an automated office setting, such as administrative assistant and administrative support personnel.

$20,000-$34,660

Microcomputer Applications Concentration

A variety of positions in an automated office setting.

Earnings vary

Skill sets

JC offers skill sets in Microcomputer Applications and Computer Service Technician (A+/Network+). Opportunities incluce a variety of positions in an automated office setting.

Earnings vary

Administrative Assistant Associate in Applied Science

Expanded job opportunities in office settings where technical skills in computer usage, spreadsheet and database software packages are important, and where increased responsibilities require time management, human relations and general office skills.

Earnings vary

Microsoft® Office® Specialist Certificate or Concentration

Build a foundation in the programs and systems used in an automated office setting to prepare for a variety of positions.

Earnings vary

Associate in Applied Science

Corrections officers are charged with safekeeping any person who has been arrested, is awaiting trial or is in a correctional institution. Certification to work in correctional jobs in the State of Michigan.

$32,900 to $50,800

Certificate

Prepare for required exams for jobs in county- and state-level correctional facilities and for advancement within state correctional facilities.

Earnings vary

Skill Set

Students have opportunity to pursue initial study in their area of interest. Skill set allows students to apply to the Michigan Department of Corrections (MDOC).

Earnings vary

chemistry Chemistry - Studies

Communications Communications - Studies

computer networking

computer programming

computer systems support

corrections

JC Program

Career Possibilities

Salary Range

criminal justice/law enforcement Law Enforcement Associate in Applied Science

A career as a police officer in a city or county government agency. Police officers function to keep the peace, protect life and property, detect and prevent crime, and maintain public order through the law.

$32,440-$55,010

Law Enforcement - Certificate

Opportunity to pursue initial study in an area of interest.

Earnings vary

Criminal Justice - Transfer

A four-year university program where students may earn a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice and work at occupations such as local, state and federal law enforcement officers, parole and probation officers, juvenile counselors and prison administrators.

Earnings vary

Associate in Applied Science

A career in a restaurant, hospitality or institutional setting. Culinary arts professionals’ responsibilities may include food preparation, supervising and coordinating the activities of other employees, planning menus, estimating daily or weekly needs, maintaining inventories of supplies and equipment.

$19,400-$55,010

Certificate

Wide variety of positions involving food service preparation, supervision and coordination. Prepare for entry-level employment in areas of cooking, baking and food service management.

$19,400-$30,480

Concentration

The culinary arts concentration is primarily designed to prepare students for entry-level positions as chefs.

$19,400-$30,480

Skill Set

Entry-level positions in the food service industry.

$19,400-$30,480

culinary arts

early childhood education Early Childhood Education - Studies

Caring for and teaching young children is a growing field which is changing greatly as more and more continues to be expected of early childhood professionals.

ecommerce Web Technology eCommerce Professional Associate in Applied Science

Businesses looking to expand in the online global marketplace or individuals looking to make a few extra dollars will learn to combine web design, programming, search engine optimization and mobile eBusiness practices to create a secure and smooth experience for the Internet shopper.

Earnings vary

Web Technology - eCommerce Consultant - Certificate

Students will be skilled to consult with clients regarding their desires for an eCommerce site, as well as manage inventory through integrated database technology.

Earnings vary

Concentrations

JC offers several concentrations in Web Technology – eCommerce Specialist, Web Technology – eCommerce Entrepreneur. These courses allow students to quickly achieve a specific business goal.

Earnings vary

Skill sets

JC offers several skill sets in Web Technology – eCommerce Manager, Web Technology – eCommerce Designer. These courses allow students to quickly achieve a specific business goal.

Earnings vary

College offers individual courses in microeconomics and macroeconomics.

Earnings vary

A career in either an elementary or secondary teaching. Students need to major and/or minor in subject disciplines they plan to teach. All education students should take the Michigan Test for Teacher Certification: Basic Skills during the second semester of their freshman year.

Earnings vary

economics Economics - Studies

education Teacher Education - Transfer

“I had a great start with the education program at Jackson College. You are learning about teaching and theory throughout, and then when you are in the classroom, you apply everything that you have learned in your undergraduate program, putting it all together.” Andrew Faber, teacher, Vandercook Lake Public Schools; JC alumnus, transferred to Spring Arbor University

JC Program

Career Possibilities

Salary Range

Associate in Applied Science

Electricians install and maintain electrical systems in residential construction and commercial buildings. They also work in manufacturing settings often servicing highly automated industrial processes.

$29,400-$48,250

Certificate

Entry-level jobs as an electrician where you may lay out, assemble, install, maintain and test electrical fixtures, apparatus, control equipment and wiring.

Earnings vary

Concentration

Completion of this program provides a solid electrical foundation for the person seeking electrical or industrial mechanic training.

Earnings vary

Electronic Technology/ELT Associate in Applied Science

Electronic technologists are employed in digital computer maintenance, voice and data communications, radio and television broadcasting, medical electronic instrumentation, high-tech manufacturing, research and development in laboratory settings.

$26,480-$49,170

Electronic Technology/ELT Certificate

Employment opportunities include OEM product service and repair, repair and calibration technician, manufacturing maintenance, instrument technician, and retail sales.

Earnings vary

Electronic Technology/ Microcomputer Associate in Applied Science

Careers in electronics occupations, such as digital computer maintenance, voice and data communications, radio and TV broadcasting, and high-tech manufacturing. opportunities would include PC repair, staffing for help desk for a software manufacturer, PC service desk and retail sales.

Earnings vary

Electronic Technology/ Microcomputer - Certificate

Entry-level jobs in almost any of the electronics cluster of occupations, such as digital computer maintenance, voice and data communications, radio and TV broadcasting, and high-tech manufacturing.

$26,480-$49,170

electrician

Electronics

emergency medical services/paramedic Associate in Applied Science

A position as a paramedic in a pre-hospital emergency medical team; a paramedic may administer treatment for emergency care to sick and injured persons and transport them to medical facilities.

$19,710-$40,000

Certificate

A paramedic position in a pre-hospital emergency medical team.

Earnings vary

Concentration

A career as an emergency medical caregiver, EMT-Basic.

Earnings vary

Skill Set

A career as an emergency medical caregiver, EMT-Basic.

Earnings vary

Transfer to a four-year university to complete a bachelor’s degree in engineering, as well as entry-level work in industry as an engineering technician.

Earnings vary

engineering Certificate

“It was a good experience attending Jackson College. I felt like I got an excellent education. JC is an excellent place to start, and it’s an excellent stepping stone to help you get where you want to go in life.” Corwin Holmes, project engineer, Consumers Energy, JC alumnus english College offers courses in technical and business writing, basic writing, creative writing, writing fundamentals, communication skills, journalism, composition, Shakespeare and literature, including poetry, drama, short story, novel and children’s literature, African-American and world literature.

Earnings vary

Associate in Applied Science

Entrepreneurship is a discipline that can be applied to virtually any endeavor. Entrepreneurs start their own businesses and non-profit organizations, but they also identify opportunities and develop innovative solutions within the organizations for which they work.

Earnings vary

Certificate

Students may begin applying the analytical skills which will assist students in creatively solving problems and meeting the needs of constituents either in their own company or in another organization. Students can adapt these skills to whatever field(s) of endeavor they decide to pursue.

Earnings vary

English - Studies

entrepreneurship

JC Program

Career Possibilities

Salary Range

Associate in Applied Science

Environmental scientists explore nature’s systems and how humans influence those systems. They may be involved as technicians in a variety of areas, such as soil conservation, water quality and treatment, agriculture, plant pathology, ecology, environmental engineering, biology and more.

Lab technician $26,200-$43,500

Certificate

Entry-level positions as technicians in a variety of areas, such as soil conservation, water quality and treatment, agriculture, plant pathology, ecology, environmental engineering, biology and more.

Earnings vary

Flexible degree that can be adapted to a student’s needs and interests. To earn this associate degree, you will need to earn a minimum of 60 credits.

Earnings vary

College offers individual courses in world, regional, physical, and U.S. and Canadian geography.

Earnings vary

Associate in Applied Science

Careers where you design product packages, publications, book covers, annual reports, magazines, advertisements, trade publications, and more. You will have to blend creativity and computer savvy with resourcefulness and people skills.

$26,200-$43,500

Certificate

Entry-level positions where you might design product packages, publications, book covers, annual reports, magazines, advertisements, trade publications and more.

$26,200-$43,500

Skill Set

Gain an introduction to graphic design skills or enhance your current career with an understanding of today’s Earnings vary basic graphics software programs.

Print Production - Certificate

Print production careers involve a variety of tasks associated with turning text, artwork and photos into finished pages. They may produce camera-ready copy, lay out pages with elements from writers and graphic designers, and transmit a publication master to production to be converted into film and plates for printing.

environmental science

General studies Associate in General Studies

geography Geography - Studies

graphic design

$25,000-$35,000

health and physical fitness Health and Physical Fitness - Studies

Round out your studies with individual courses in cardiovascular training, such as golf, weight training and aerobics, which can be transferred to fulfill the physical education requirements in some four-year degree programs. JC also offers stress management and wellness.

Earnings vary

Health managers may handle day-to-day operations of various departments in large facilities, or handle daily operations in smaller facilities such as nursing homes or clinics.

$21,240-$53,430

College offers courses in African-American and 20th-century history, as well as courses in western civilization, ancient history, and the history of the U.S.

Earnings vary

College offers individual courses that can transfer to four-year institutions, fulfill core requirements in a JC associate degree program and enrich your understanding of the human experience.

Earnings vary

health management Associate in Applied Science

history History - Studies

humanities Humanities -Studies

manufacturing technology Manufacturing Tech/Machining Associate in Applied Science

Careers in the increasingly technical area of manufacturing and/or production machining, where they set up and operate a variety of computer-controlled or mechanically controlled machine tools to produce precision metal parts, instruments, and tools.

$25,000-$58,000

Manufacturing Tech/Maintenance Associate in Applied Science

A career in the areas of manufacturing and/or industrial maintenance, where you may workers maintain and repair factory equipment and other industrial machinery.

$20,800-$44,160

Manufacturing Tech/Tool Room Associate in Applied Science

Careers in the increasingly technical area of manufacturing tool room operations.

$20,000-$40,000

JC Program

Career Possibilities

Salary Range

Courses include preparatory learning, including basic mathematics, algebra and intermediate algebra; business mathematics; and general transfer, including probability and statistics, pre-calculus, discrete mathematics, calculus I, II and III, and differential equations.

Earnings vary

Associate in Applied Science

Work as a multi-skilled health care practitioner performing medical, administrative and clinical assisting. Your responsibilities may include working as a secretary/receptionist, preparing medical charts and reports, handling patient billing and taking vital signs.

$20,800 to $36,840

Certificate

Work as a beginning multi-skilled health care practitioner performing medical, administrative and clinical assisting.

$20,800 to $36,840

EKG Technician - Skill Set

EKG technicians specialize in electrocardiography, or EKG testing. EKGs measure and record heart action and rhythm by graphically tracing electrical activity occurring during heartbeats.

$24,800 to $31,600

Medical Office Support Concentration

Positions where you provide administrative support in various health care settings such as hospitals, medical offices or outpatient clinics, insurance companies and other private and public healthcare settings.

Earnings vary

mathematics Mathematics - Studies

medical assistant

medical insurance coding/billing

Associate in Applied Science

Medical billers and coders communicate between medical offices, patients and insurance companies. By assigning letters and numbers to diseases, injuries and medical procedures, they speed up the process of payment and ensure that records are correct.

$21,240-$32,350

Certificate

Entry-level careers in the increasingly complex world of insurance coding and billing. Each time a patient sees a health care professional, coder billers assign a code to each diagnosis and procedure.

$21,240-$32,350

College offers individual courses in voice, stage presence, small instrumental groups, music theory and music appreciation. Students who qualify can study and perform with the Concert Chorale or Jackson Community Concert Band.

Earnings vary

Associate in Applied Science

The registered nurse (RN) of today and the future is not only caring and compassionate but must have sound mathematical, scientific and technological skills in order to make responsible and ethical clinical judgments, carry out evidence-based interventions and evaluate the effectiveness of care.

$42,720 to $69,280

Nursing LPN to ADN Associate in Applied Science

This program is specifically designed for the licensed practical nurse who is interested in advancing their career and becoming a registered nurse (RN). By continuing their education, upon program completion, graduates will have a wider range of job opportunities.

$42,720 to $69,280

Practical Nursing - Certificate

Practice as a licensed practical nurse. The LPN assesses, plans for, implements and manages patient care at the direction of the registered nurse. Job tasks examples are patient assessment including taking vital signs, administering medications, providing bedside care and performing procedures.

$29,680 to $56,010

music Music - Studies

nursing

“Jackson College and the people there changed my life, on every level. The nursing faculty is phenomenal.� Philicia Richmond, registered nurse, Allegiance Health; JC alumna

JC Program

Career Possibilities

Salary Range

A skilled trades position with increasing opportunities. This degree program is designed for those with apprenticeship or journeyman credentials in a skilled trade who are looking for a college degree.

Earnings vary

A position as a pharmacy technician, someone who helps licensed pharmacists prepare prescription medications, provide customer service and perform administrative duties, in a retail or hospital pharmacy.

$22,776 to $33,030

occupational studies Associate in Applied Science

pharmacy technician Associate in Applied Science

“I would highly recommend anyone go to a two-year program before they go on to a four-year degree. It saved me money, and I have to tell you that I probably had the best professors at Jackson College that I ever had anywhere.” Michelle Buell, pharmacist in Hillsdale; JC alumna philosophy Philosophy - Studies

College offers individual courses in introductory philosophy and logic.

Earnings vary

College offers courses in astronomy and three levels of physics. Astronomy and conceptual physics serve as introductory courses and are useful for those individuals needing a general laboratory science elective or are pursuing a career in elementary education. College physics is one of the foundation courses necessary for students who will be pursuing a four-year degree in a pre-professional career, such as architecture or health care. University physics is designed for students who will transfer to a physics or engineering program at a four-year institution.

Earnings vary

College offers individual courses in introductory political science. It is often a field chosen by transfer students who plan to go on to study government or law.

Earnings vary

Jobs involving planning, analyzing and controlling production in a variety of process industries. Duties involve maintaining a safe work environment, controlling, monitoring and troubleshooting equipment, analyzing, evaluating and communicating about data concerning the process.

Earnings vary

College offers individual courses in introductory psychology, social psychology, educational psychology, introduction to counseling, child psychology, abnormal psychology and human sexuality.

Earnings vary

A radiologic technologist, or radiographer, is someone who administers x-rays to patients in order to help provide diagnosis of possible pathology. A radiographer also works together with the radiology physician in order to perform certain radiological examinations.

$42,710 to $63,010

physics

Physics - Studies

political science Political Science - Studies

process technology Concentration

psychology Psychology - Studies

radiography Associate in Applied Science

“My experience was phenomenal. (Assistant Professor) Joe Shackelford has been an inspiration. He’s been a mentor and a good friend throughout the program, and very supportive.” Debbie Lake, radiographer, Allegiance Health; JC alumna

JC Program

Career Possibilities

Salary Range

A respiratory care practitioner is instrumental in assisting a physician in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of a wide spectrum of disorders affecting the heart and lungs, and specializes in the application of scientific knowledge and theory to practical, clinical problems of respiratory care.

$39,990-$54,280

Transfer to a four-year university as science majors or pre-professional students (pre-veterinary, pre-medical, pre-dental, physical and occupational therapy, optometry, pharmacy, physician’s assistant, etc.). Certificate graduates could also find work as laboratory technicians.

$20,000-$40,000

General Sonography Associate in Applied Science

A sonographer uses high frequency sound waves to create cross-sectional images of a patient’s anatomy for diagnostic purposes. Sonographers explain the procedure to patients, position them for scanning, scan and collect image data, and work with the physician to interpret the image.

$44,900-$64,380

Cardiac Sonography Associate in Applied Science

Cardiac sonographers are specially trained to operate ultrasound equipment to obtain diagnostic images and hemodynamic information of the heart (echocardiogram). Cardiac sonographers and physicians work as a team during the echo procedure to accurately integrate data for optimal diagnosis.

$40,000-$60,000

Vascular Sonography Associate in Applied Science

A career as a vascular technologist, a sonographer who specializes in ultrasound images of veins and arteries. A vascular sonographer works closely with the vascular surgeon to formulate a diagnosis and assist with the treatment plans.

$40,000-$60,000

College offers individual courses in principles of sociology, family relationships, criminology, minority groups in America, social problems, women in a changing society and juvenile delinquency. To become a social worker, you must transfer and continue on for a bachelor’s or master’s degree.

Earnings vary

respiratory care Associate in Applied Science

sciences Pre-Professional Science - Certificate

sonography

social work Social Work - Studies

“I loved Jackson College. It gave me a small setting that I needed to get me on the right path and give me the structure I needed. I definitely recommend for students to go to a small community college before transferring on to a four-year university.” Kendra Henry, LMSW, school social worker, Jackson County ISD; JC alumna theatre A firm base of performance classes (practice and theory) which can prepare students for any college or university theatre program. The study of acting also provides important speaking skills beneficial to a number of career fields.

Earnings vary.

Associate in Applied Science

Careers that require a well-rounded experience in all aspects of multimedia web page design to build user-friendly and engaging websites.

$40,000 to $70,000

Certificate

Entry-level careers that require a well-rounded experience in all aspects of multimedia web page design to build user-friendly and engaging websites.

$40,000 to $70,000

Concentration

Program is designed for students wanting to expand their welding knowledge and experience to include reading blueprints, proper fitting, welding and inspection.

$23,940 to $53,690

Skill Set

This foundational skill set is designed to expose students to the process of welding which is joining pieces of metal by fusing them together.

$23,940 to $53,690

College offers individual courses in elementary French; elementary German; conversational Spanish, elementary and intermediate Spanish, and Spanish composition and conversation. Also English as a Second Language. Proficiency in a foreign language can enhance job opportunities, and some transfer programs recommend it.

Earnings vary

Theatre Performance - Certificate

web design

welding

world languanges French, German, or Spanish - Studies


Career choices Fall 2013