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FINE ARTS

AMBITION &

EXPANSION

DCOB EARNS AACSB ACCREDITATION REPEAT TITLES IN TRACK & MEN’S HOOPS

SPRING 2010

VOLUME 13 • NUMBER 2 www.ju.edu

Publisher Kerry D. Romesburg Editor Traci Mysliwiec-Johnson CREATIVE DIRECTOR Derek Hall ART DIRECTOR Taryn Hannah ASSISTANT EDITOR Kristi Mace

Publications Manager Robin Bangert-Lenard

Greetings JU Alumni & Friends, Excitement is the best word to describe the feeling on campus today. So many wonderful things are in progress that it was hard to fit them all into one magazine. The most visible change has been the construction of the Marine Science Research Institute, which is set to open at the end of summer (page 18). The resources that will be available to students in this facility will be another reason why this University is like none other. Also adding to JU’s uniqueness is the recent accreditation of our Davis College of Business (page 8). I am proud to say that we now offer the only private, AACSB-accredited business program in North Florida. Another college taking on ambitious projects is the College of Fine Arts, who for the first time took its students downtown to the Florida Theatre to showcase the musical “Chess” (page 4). The show is set to rival the Broadway touring version. There was also a new series developed: The Dolphin Alumni Speaker Series (page 24). So far, we have featured three outstanding alumni who have shared stories of their lives after JU. Let me again congratulate the Track and Field team, who won their fifth consecutive Atlantic Sun title (page 23). This is a result of our dedicated athletes, coaches and instructors who are determined to be the best. Many more great things are in store for our University. I want to again encourage each of you to get in contact with us and plan your next visit to see what all the buzz is about! Sincerely,

Contributing Writer Joel Lamp Class Notes Patricia Reeves

Main Number 904.256.8000

Admissions 904.256.7000 admissions@ju.edu Alumni 904.256.7201 alumni@ju.edu University Marketing 904.256.7042 & Communications media@ju.edu Registrar 904.256.7091 cbarret@ju.edu Institutional 904.256.7021 Advancement dyazbec@ju.edu

published University Marketing & semi-annually by Communications Office Change of Address to

Institutional Advancement Jacksonville University 2800 University Blvd. N. Jacksonville, FL 32211-3394

JACKSONVILLE UNIVERSITY BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Ron A. Autrey ’01 Margaret Black-Scott ‘85 Walter P. Bussells Michael Cascone Jr. ‘65 Adrienne Conrad Timothy P. Cost ‘81 Kevin F. Delaney Brian Dudley ‘96, ‘05 Wayne A. Galloway J. Phillip Garcia ’90 John G. Harrison ’67 Michael Howland ’76 Cyrus M. Jollivette Matthew Kane ’01 Jack Keigwin Bruce Kern Lawrence E. Kurzius Raymond K. Mason, Jr. ’78

Michael J. McKenny F. Andrew Moran ’78 Victoria M. Mussallem ’98 Elizabeth Anne P. Nimnicht Frank Pace ’73 Timothy D. Payne Carole J. Poindexter ’77 Gilbert J. Pomar, Jr. Fred G. Pruitt ’69, ’85 Kerry D. Romesburg H.W. Shad (Mike) ’85 Linda Berry Stein ’69 Chris A. Verlander Gordon Keith Watson ’71 Terry L. Wilcox Carolyn Munro Wilson ’69, ’77, ’89 Charles J.O. Wodehouse

Kerry D. Romesburg President

All contents © COPYRIGHT 2010 Jacksonville University. All rights reserved.

Cover

4 AMBITION & EXPANSION Fine Arts Students Are Reaching New Levels BY KRISTI MACE With an elaborate new production and upgraded facilities and equipment, Fine Arts students are achieving higher levels of performance experience. The latest production of “Chess” at the Florida Theatre downtown is the most challenging by JU yet. The improvements in the recording studio are already being used to produce new music and students are enjoying many of the newly donated pianos, too.

FEATURES

8 D  avis College of

20 SPORTS

E arns AACSB Accreditation

24 ALUMNI NEWS

12 Q&A: KEN OELRICH A Soldier & A Student

  20 MEN’S BASKETBALL

14 NEWS

Business Joins Elite Company

BY TRACI MYSLIWIEC-JOHNSON

DEPARTMENTS

Repeats A-Sun Championship

28 ALUMNI EVENTS 32 CLASS NOTES

N O I T I B AM

&

EXPANSION FINE ARTS STUDENTS ARE REACHING

4 The Wave

NEW LEVELS BY KRISTI MACE

WITH an elaborate new production and upgraded facilities and equipment, Fine Arts students are achieving higher levels of performance experience to further broaden their marketability after graduation. The latest production, “Chess” at the Florida Theatre downtown, is the College’s most challenging yet for its scope, style and use of multiple performance venues. The improvements that have been made in the recording studio are already being used to produce new music and students are busy practicing on many of the newly donated pianos, including a one-of a-kind grand master piano only a few colleges have the privilege to own.

CHESS A MUSICAL EXTRAVAGANZA FOR THE SENSES

By the time they graduate, most

musical theatre students will have performed in a variety of shows featuring a range of music such as opera, pop, orchestral, disco and rock, among others. However, try and fit all of those styles into one and you’ve got the musical “Chess.” Taking on the task this spring of producing a show of such grandeur are 18 JU students, many of whom are being pushed beyond their comfort zone. “Out of all my performances, this one has challenged me the most,” said Senior Greg Bosworth, who has been preparing for his lead role in what has been coined as JU’s most ambitious musical theatre venture. “It was written in the 80s and has some touches of pop belting, which is hard to do for two hours in a show, let alone three months of rehearsal. I’ve got to belt some really high notes and hold them for a really long time.” Piece by piece, “Chess” the musical with lyrics by Tim Rice (“The Lion King”) and music by Björn Ulvaeus and Benny Andersson (ABBA, “Mamma Mia!”) is taking shape. Not only is the show a vocal challenge, students have also been adjusting to some unfamiliar territory, as the musical premieres in downtown Jacksonville at the Florida Theatre on April 9.  “We’re approaching taking this show to the Florida Theatre like a touring production,” said the director, Dr. Rob Tudor, assistant professor of music. “This means, our students will experience moving in the set, costumes, and props; setting the lights and band; walking through the show on a cue-to-cue shortened rehearsal; and opening all in the same day. It’s new for all of us, but we are excited about the challenge, and have been preparing for it since its inception.”

“It was important for us to take our musical theatre team to

Freddie’s manager who falls in love with Anatoly. Senior Lukas

a bigger venue as a way to help them grow,” said Bill Hill,

Cyr plays Ivan Molokov, Anatoly’s manager; and Senior Vincent

dean of The College of Fine Arts. “They have to be able to

Teschel appears as Walter Anderson, a secret CIA agent.

adapt to a different stage and become aware of the angles of the audience and how to properly fit in the set design. The

“The show is a melodic, daring, witty and ambitious musical.

experience will be as real-world as it gets for them.”

I have loved seeing what was once believed as too challenging of a show for JU to produce now come to fruition,”

The show was such a challenge that many of the lead roles

said Tudor, who has directed musically some of JU’s largest

had to be double-casted.

productions like “Ragtime,” “Oklahoma!” and “Company.”

“The lead roles are very challenging for young voices to

“Dr. Tudor is a phenomenal director,” said Winter. “He has

sing,” said Tudor. “Rock-style musical theatre is very taxing on

definitely challenged me to connect with my character in an area

the voice, and all of our students are learning and practicing

of my life that I have been skeptical to tap. His constant push

healthy singing habits. They were a bit suspicious of being

in finding the best objective for every scene has been a key

double cast at first, but are understanding why I did it now

component to the passion that is coming through in this show.”

that we’re running acts back to back.” The show is set to not only dazzle the ears but the eyes as Bosworth along with Sophomore Stephen Johns play

it will include chess pieces that double as usable furniture

Anatoly Sergievsky, a Russian who is the current World Chess

pieces. There will also be two-dimensional artwork shown in

Champion about to challenge American Freddie Trumper

the background.

(played by Sophomores Erick Crow and Dean Winter); all in the context of a Cold War struggle between the United States and

“This is truly going to be a spectacular collaborative and

the Soviet Union, during which both countries wanted to win

comprehensive production,” said Hill.

international chess tournaments for propaganda purposes. The show will also be held at JU’s Swisher The show also includes Senior Nina

Theatre on April 16 and 17.    To order tickets

Waters and Sophomore Taylor

for the Swisher Theatre showing, call

Anderson who play Florence Vassy,

904.256.7370.

TESCHEL WATERS

BOSWORTH

CYR

NEW ADDITIONS STIR UP ENTHUSIASM It began last spring, a project to replace more than two dozen

their “thank you” gift to the University. In addition, two new

pianos that sparked excitement and renewed a sense of pride

grand pianos and two vertical (upright) pianos have been

in the JU music department.

installed in practice rooms. The Sam Marks Chapel, where the choir rehearses, also has a new medium-sized grand

It was during a concert as Assistant Professor of Piano Scott

piano. Professors Marguerite Richardson and John Ricci also

Watkins led his music students through their first class recital

have new studio verticals.

that he got the surprise of a lifetime. “This has been one of the most targeted quality improvements “Carolyn Munro Wilson ’69, ’77, ’89, was so impressed with

for our facilities,” said Ricci. “I’m already enjoying having

the students that she came up to me immediately following

an excellent piano for illustrating harmonies/concepts and

the concert and offered to purchase a new concert piano,”

accompanying my students, who are already playing better

said Watkins. “That was followed with a matching donation

because of it.”

by former Board of Trustee member Mary Virginia Terry, as well as a few other donations.”

As more donations are made, more pianos (about 28 in all) will be replaced.

As a result, the Steinway Concert Grand Piano was replaced with a Shigeru-Kawai EX Concert Grand Piano that now sits proudly

The new pianos feature carbon-fiber technology in much

in Terry Concert Hall. According to Watkins, this is the only piano

of the operating mechanism (action) of the instruments.

of its kind in Florida, and one of only a very few in the country.

According to Watkins, that will help to reduce the amount of maintenance and repair on the pianos which will be heavily

For purchasing the piano, the Kawai Company is installing a

used and fight the negative effects humidity and temperature

completely new suite of electronic keyboard instruments as

fluctuation have on wooden parts.

RECORDING STUDIO RENOVATED A lot of hard work goes into producing a record, and the

students the ability to create more accurate mixes

renovations made to the P-19 studio theatre in the Fine Arts

and translate them to a lot of different environments such

Hall have been making it easier for students this spring.

as Ipods.

Equipped with a new booth, the studio now serves as a professional recording studio.

With the goal of introducing a new CD and a new artist each year, Dolphinium Records, the student-run, campus based

According to Assistant Professor of Music Business and

record label for JU, is already using the upgraded studio to

Dolphinium Records Adviser Dr. Thomas Harrison, the quality

produce three CDs from the bands “Inside the Target Car,”

of the sound in the room has increased significantly, giving

“Dancell” and “Newborn Thriller.”

Davis College of B usiness Joins E lite Company Accreditation is Good for Students, Good for JU and Good for Jacksonville

BY TRACI MYSLIWIEC-JOHNSON

In January, 

Jacksonville

adds to their degrees. Accreditation assures

University’s Davis College of Business (DCOB)

students, parents and the public that a school

joined the elite company of the five percent

adheres to the highest-quality standards

of institutions worldwide that have earned

based on the latest research and professional

accreditation from the Association to Advance

practices. An accredited school must continue

Collegiate Schools of Business International

to demonstrate that it is growing, not just

(AACSB). After a long arduous process, the

maintaining existing standards during regular

DCOB now offers the only private, AACSB-

review cycles.

accredited business program in North Florida. Exemplifying that growth, accreditation isn’t This impressive accomplishment resonated

the only new development in DCOB. They’ve

even more when the November evaluation

also reconfigured the Accelerated and Flex

yielded a clean report. Most schools expect

Master of Business Administration (MBA)

there to be stipulations about areas that need

programs, added the Mayo Clinic Executive

to be improved to earn the official accreditation

Health Program to the Executive MBA (EMBA),

and the DCOB had none.

brought in three new Executives-in-Residence

WE WERE ALL A BIT SHOCKED WHEN WE REALIZED THAT WE HAD A CLEAN REVIEW WITH FOUR OF OUR CURRENT PRACTICES ALSO RECOGNIZED AS ‘BEST PRACTICES’ BY AACSB,” SAID DR. JOSEPH MCCANN, DEAN OF THE DCOB. “WE’VE LEARNED THAT ABOUT ONE IN 10 SCHOOLS HAVE THAT OCCUR WHILE EARNING INITIAL ACCREDITATION. THAT SAYS A LOT ABOUT THE LEVEL OF FACULTY, STAFF, STUDENT AND ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT PROVIDED IN THE EFFORT.

Officially announced by AACSB Jan. 7, the

(see sidebar on page 11), started a blog (http://

University celebrated the achievement with

judaviscollegeofbusinessblog.ju.edu/),

a reception on Feb. 4 in the DCOB. Alumni,

hosted the Political Leadership Institute (PLI)

faculty and trustees gathered to mark the

and joined the Partnership for Responsible

occasion and reminisce in a crowd that

Management Education (PRME), which is

included Dan Davis and Chairman of the Board

sponsored by the UN Global Compact.

of Trustees, Ron Autrey, along with former presidents Dr. James Brady and Dr. Frances

“All business schools today have to continu-

Bartlett Kinne.

ously change as much and as fast — preferably faster — than world conditions change. This

“With much thanks to donors, trustees, faculty

means staying in touch with those conditions

and our students, we met all 20 standards

and their implications for businesses and our

of evaluation,” said McCann. “This is good

graduates so that they are best prepared,” said

for our students, good for us and good for

McCann. “We systematically benchmark our

Jacksonville. It’s not just a transitional event,

programs against those of the top business

but a transformative event.”

schools in the world, not just locally, to be sure that we are responsive. To our pleasant surprise,

Current students and alumni alike will reap

we’ve also innovated in terms of content and

the benefits of the value the accreditation

program design beyond many of those.”

Spring 2010 9

DAN DAVIS WITH DEAN MCCANN IN FRONT OF THE NEW AACSB PLAQUE IN THE DCOB LOBBY

The MBA programs have adapted to

presentations, articles and teasers into

in the world, all of whom are dedicated to

today’s student needs, offering the Davis

recent developments in the field.

creating sustainable economies and ethical professional practices. PRME makes us

Accelerated and Flex MBA options along with the EMBA. The full-time, Accelerated

“‘Relevance’ and ‘academic-business

smarter and engages students in the larger

day program includes 12 months of

linkages’ are the key themes. We blog

world in which they must function.”

continuous study designed to help launch

about topics that are relevant to our

a professional career as many undergrads

business community and to our students,”

Everyone involved is feeling a renewed

move right into this program. Tailored for

said McCann, the initial force behind the

enthusiasm with the new developments

experienced, working professionals, the

project. “Similarly, part of our mission is to

and are all energized by the new begin-

Flex program is paced in conveniently-

link business academic developments to

ning and the chance to build on it. Now,

scheduled evening courses.

our scholarship.”

with accreditation already earned, the DCOB looks forward to future innovation

As part of the Mayo initiative, EMBA

The relationships that the DCOB has been

students will receive a preventative medi-

cultivating have already grown and started

cal examination by specialists in the Mayo

to reap the benefits for students.

and growth.

The Aviation Program, for example, is nationally recognized and has tremendous

Clinic Executive Health Program designed for top-level executives, including a

“Our hosting of the PLI through the Davis

opportunities ahead of it. The Davis

complete checkup and comprehensive

Leadership Center is also helping identify

Leadership Center will also respond

lifestyle assessment. Mayo Clinic and the

and prepare North Florida’s next genera-

to very significant opportunities in

DCOB will jointly design a series of short

tion of public leaders, some of whom are

developing talent management programs

seminars, briefings and workshops to be

our alumni. And, of course, there is our

for companies, as well as capitalizing

delivered by Mayo Clinic staff focusing on

early joining of the PRME,” explained

on growing competence in developing

the connections between mind, body and

McCann. “PRME has connected us with the

leaders who understand the power of

human performance and will be woven

leading business schools and companies

public-private partnerships.

into the Davis EMBA curriculum.

Started at the beginning of the last

THE DCOB IS FAR FROM FINISHED IN ITS EVOLUTION, AND WHILE CHANGE IS SOME-

academic term with contributions by

TIMES UNCOMFORTABLE THERE IS NO ALTERNATIVE. WE HAVE TO MAKE OUR CURRENT

faculty and administrators providing content for readers interested in business

PROGRAMS WORK EVEN BETTER AND GROW THEM SUBSTANTIALLY MORE,”  SAID

and leadership issues, the blog highlights

MCCANN. “WE PROMISE TO DO OUR BEST TO MAKE CURRENT AND FUTURE CHANGE

discussions of newly-released studies,

AS SMOOTH AS POSSIBLE, BUT THE WORLD IS MOVING FAST AND SO MUST ALL OF US.

D COB We l co m e s T hre e Ne w E x e c u t iv e s - in - Re s iden c e Alvin Brown, an expert in

business experience to a new focus

public policy and public-private partner-

on teaching. His recent role at BCBSF

ships, R. John Kaegi, former chief strategy

included facilitation of the processes

officer for Blue Cross and Blue Shield of

and meetings of the corporate strategy

Florida (BCBSF), and Glenn Hansen, a

committee and he was deeply involved in

former senior vice president of the Federal

shaping health care reform. He also pro-

Reserve Bank of Chicago, have joined JU’s

vided corporate leadership over solutions

Davis College of Business as Executives-

innovation to identify new opportunities in

in-Residence.

the marketplace.

Brown, president and CEO of the Willie Gary

Kaegi holds a Bachelor of Science from

Classic Foundation, served as the executive

the University of Oregon and a Master

director of the Bush/Clinton Katrina Fund’s

of Business Administration from the

Interfaith Fund. As former Vice President Al

University of Memphis.

Gore’s Senior Advisor for Urban Policy and Vice Chair of the White House Community

Hansen was responsible for the Detroit

Empowerment Board, Brown advised

branch of the Federal Reserve Bank

both Gore and President Clinton. He held a

and served on the Bank’s Management

number of other key positions, including as a

Committee as well as System committees.

senior advisor in the Commerce and Housing

He has more than 35 years of managerial

and Urban Development departments.

experience. Currently, Hansen is the president and founder of STRATEGIC

Brown graduated from JU with a Bachelor

INTEGRATION, INC., which specializes in

of Science and a Master of Business

executive consulting, business acumen

Administration. He has also completed

training and financial literacy efforts.

post graduate work at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. He

He earned a Bachelor of Science degree

has served on the JU Board of Trustees

and a Master of Business Administration

and Board of Directors of the Jacksonville

degree from Loyola University of Chicago.

Regional Chamber of Commerce.

Hansen also attended the Advanced Management Program at the Harvard

Kaegi applies 40 years of corporate

LEFT TO RIGHT: KAEGI, BROWN & HANSEN AT THE ACCREDITATION RECEPTION

Business School.

Spring 2010 11

he nor my mother ever told me to reconsider. I appreciate that and love and respect them very much for the support they have given me.

YOU SERVED TWO TOURS. WHAT WERE THE EXPERIENCES LIKE? I did two deployments during my second enlistment while I was serving with the 2nd Batallion, 5th Marine Regiment, or 2/5 as we call it. The first was a deployment to South East Asia where we trained in Okinawa, South Korea and Thailand. We conducted landslide relief for a village in the Philippines that

KEN OELRICH A SOLDIER & A STUDENT

had been hit hard by the natural disaster. We also visited Iwo Jima, which is the site of the famous flag raising photo and the Marine Corps’ most famous battle. The second deployment was to the Al Anbar Providence in Iraq. Our first three months, we

AFTER BEING INSPIRED BY THE

were in Ramadi conducting counter-insurgency

Marine Corps, Ken Oelrich decided to join the

operations. Iraq is an eye-opening experience. The

many brave soldiers who are traveling across

extreme poverty and living conditions make you

the globe to fight in the “war on terror.” The

understand just how blessed we all are to live in

Wave had the opportunity to learn more about

America. Getting to know and talk to the people

his unique journeys abroad, as well as having a

and hearing their stories firsthand was remarkable.

father who serves in the state senate, and how he

The majority of Americans get their information

now helps lead the JU football team to victory.

from a very politically-biased media and to be able to see the changes and improvements unfiltered, for myself, made it all worth it. Did bad things happen in Iraq? Absolutely. But much worse things

WHAT DID YOUR DAD (FLORIDA STATE SENATOR STEVE OELRICH) THINK ABOUT YOU GOING INTO THE MILITARY DURING A TIME OF WAR?

were happening before America ever showed up

My dad has always been supportive of my

DO YOU THINK YOUR EXPERIENCES HAVE INFLUENCED YOUR DAD’S POLITICAL DECISIONS?

decisions and this one was no different. I had impeccable timing and shipped off for boot camp

and now, Iraq and its people are more free than they have ever been before and I’m proud of that.

in July of 2001. The terrorist attacks occurred about

12 The Wave

a month before I graduated boot camp and I didn’t

Well, my dad doesn’t have much say on U.S.

learn of the extent of the damage until I left Parris

foreign policy but I doubt the fact that his son

Island. When I decided to re-enlist, for the sole

was serving overseas would sway him to make

purpose of doing a combat deployment, neither

a decision other than what is best for the people

he represents. He’s a strong leader with strong

right now, as a new member of this team, my job is

principles so I have faith in the decisions he makes.

to follow our senior leaders and to help the team in any way I can to achieve another championship.

WHAT WAS THE MOST CHALLENGING EXPERIENCE YOU HAD IN IRAQ?

WHAT ARE YOUR FUTURE GOALS?

Probably the boredom. Even in the infantry, it’s

I’d like to work in the NFL one day. I love business

not like you walk outside everyday and step into

and I love football, so I can think of no better

a “Rambo” movie. A vast majority of the time on

combination. It is a hard business to get into but I

patrol or on post, you are just bored out of your

have no doubt that I can succeed.

mind. So you just had to do your best to stay focused on your mission and on your down time, keep yourself entertained.

WOULD YOU EVER GO BACK TO IRAQ? WHY DID YOU CHOOSE TO ATTEND JU?

WITHOUT A DOUBT.

After being away for eight years, I wanted to move back somewhere close to my family in Gainesville and I wanted to play football. JU offered that combination of a small-school environment with a quality football program. The fact that Coach Bell was here also let me know this was the right place for me.

TEAMMATES CALL YOU SARGE (SHORT FOR SERGEANT) ON THE JU FOOTBALL TEAM. DO YOU THINK OTHER STUDENTS LOOK UP TO YOU KNOWING HOW MUCH YOU HAVE EXPERIENCED? I just try to carry myself with confidence and conduct my business like a professional and if that rubs off on my teammates then that’s great. Good leadership is not to tell people you’re a leader, it’s to show them. While in the Marine Corps, I tried to give my Marines a good example to follow and if they ever made a mistake or needed a correction then I was there to make sure that mistake didn’t happen again, and that’s no different than on a football team. I have been the “new guy” enough to know that you don’t just barge your way onto a new team and start demanding respect. In order to be a great leader you have to be a good follower and

Spring 2010 13

WAVE  |

NEWS

HASKELL ENCOURAGES GRADUATES TO IMPROVE JACKSONVILLE COMMUNITY

DEJESUS

GIBBONS

THE RAIN DIDN’T DAMPEN THE

of you into Jacksonville than sending

engineering in 1960. He earned a Master

enthusiasm and cheer of the friends and

from it.”

of Business Administration with distinction from Harvard Business School in 1962. He

family of the more than 300 students who received their degrees at the annual fall com-

He closed with a directive for students

also attended Massachusetts Institute of

mencement ceremony in December. Keynote

to push themselves to create change to

Technology for graduate study in building

speaker Preston H. Haskell, III, founder and

enhance their world.

engineering and construction. In Jacksonville and nationally, Haskell has been involved in

chairman of The Haskell Company, spoke about how the world has changed since they

“I HOPE I’VE GIVEN YOU A SMALL

entered the University.

GLIMPSE OF THE COMPLICATED

community, civic and industry leadership.

WORLD YOU ARE ENTERING THAT

The graduates included 272 undergraduates

“You’re entering a world which is quite dif-

HAS CHANGED SO MUCH,” HASKELL

receiving bachelor’s degrees. Of those, 139

ferent from when you matriculated,” Haskell

SAID. “I CHALLENGE YOU TO USE YOUR

were nursing students. Master’s degrees

said. “All of you will have opportunities and

TALENTS, INSIGHT AND INTELLECT TO

were bestowed on 35 graduate students,

challenges on the global, national and local

MAKE A BETTER WORLD, A BETTER

including 25 in business administration, six in

levels to respond to the complexities these

NATION AND A BETTER CITY.”

nursing and two in education.

changes represent.” An honorary doctor of humane letters was

Fanya Sabrina DeJesus received a standing

He talked to graduates and their families

conferred on Haskell. “When I arrived in

ovation when Romesburg brought her back

about the changes that need to be made

Jacksonville, I was told there were four or

up to the stage to acknowledge that she had

to fix the current state of the economy

five people I had to meet,” said President

not only earned her Master’s of Nursing degree,

and the environment on both the global

Kerry D. Romesburg. “Preston Haskell was

but also her Master of Business Administration.

and local stages.

one of them. He is such a leader —  for art, for education, for business  —  it is an honor to

The University’s Navy ROTC Program

“I hope many of you will stay in this com-

have him with us today.”

commissioned one officer, Patrick Gibbons. JU’s NROTC program also serves students

munity and think of ways to improve the city and commit your resources,” Haskell

Haskell graduated with honors from Princeton

at the University of North Florida and Florida

said. “JU has a history of bringing more

University with a Bachelor of Science in civil

Community College at Jacksonville.

14 The Wave

POINDEXTER, VERLANDER AND KURZIUS JOIN BOARD OF TRUSTEES JACKSONVILLE UNIVERSITY

in 2008 and JU’s Distinguished Alumna

Industries of Florida (AIF). Verlander joined

welcomes Carole J. Poindexter ’77, Chris A.

award in 2009.

AIF from American Heritage Life Insurance Company and American Heritage Life

Verlander and Lawrence E. Kurzius to the University’s Board of Trustees.

After JU, Poindexter went on to become a

Investment Corporation in Jacksonville.

Florida CPA in 1980 and earn a Master of

Verlander retired after 29 years with

“NEW BOARD MEMBERS BRING

Business Administration from the University

American Heritage to join the AIF staff.

FRESH PERSPECTIVES AND

of North Florida in 1981. He is a past president of both the Florida

ENTHUSIASM,” SAID PRESIDENT KERRY D. ROMESBURG. “WE’RE

Kurzius is president —  International Business

Insurance Council and the Gator Bowl

THRILLED THAT CAROL, LAWRENCE

for McCormick & Company, Inc. He is

Association. Verlander serves on the board

AND CHRIS ARE JOINING THE BOARD

responsible for McCormick’s consumer and

of directors of SunTrust Bank of North Florida

BECAUSE EACH INDIVIDUAL BRINGS

industrial businesses in Europe, the Middle

and Baptist South Hospital. He is a member

WITH THEM A UNIQUE BACKGROUND

East and Africa, Canada, Asia, Australia and

of the Rotary Club of Jacksonville and a

AND INNOVATIVE IDEAS THAT WILL

emerging markets. Previously, he served as

board member of Baptist Towers Retirement

HELP US GROW THE UNIVERSITY.”

the company’s president for Europe, Middle

Home. He also participates on the Florida

East and Africa starting in 2007 and president

Insurance Council Board, the Management

Poindexter is the president and CEO of Baker

of U.S. Consumer Foods in 2005 and 2006.

School Advisory Board at Georgia Tech and

Distributing Company. She started as a staff

Kurzius joined McCormick’s in 2005 as vice

the Executive Committee of Boy Scouts of

accountant at Baker Distribution and rose to

president and general manager of sales

America, North Florida Chapter.

treasurer, CFO and CEO. She is a Chamber

and marketing following the acquisition of

of Commerce Trustee, a governing body

Zatarain’s in 2003. He joined Zatarain’s in

Verlander graduated from the Georgia

member of the Athena Power Link, as well as

1991 and became president and CEO in 1997.

Institute of Technology in 1970 with a

a member of the Davis College of Business’

Kurzius graduated from Princeton Univer-sity,

Bachelor of Science in industrial manage-

advisory board.

Magna Cum Laude in economics.

ment. In 1971, he received a Master of

Poindexter was honored with the Jacksonville

Verlander is senior vice president of

of Florida. He spent a year as Second

Business Journal Woman of Influence award

Corporate Development for Associated

Lieutenant in the U. S. Army.

Business Administration from the University

POINDEXTER

VERLANDER

KURZIUS

WAVE  |

NEWS

HUCKABEE TALKS ABOUT PROBLEMS IN U.S. POLITICAL SYSTEM FORMER GOVERNOR & PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE VISITED JU DURING MEDIA FIRESTORM AS HE WAS FACING A MEDIA

it was up to the parole board to authorize

JU students asked him about the tax system,

frenzy due to a decision he made in 2000

Clemmons’ release.

student loans and whether young people should go into politics. They laughed at

while he was the governor of Arkansas, Mike Huckabee spoke to JU students and

“I’D GIVE ANYTHING IF I COULD

his jokes like the one about how “being a

the community on Dec. 2 in a packed

ROLL THE CLOCK BACK AND MAKE A

Republican in Arkansas is like being a fire

Swisher Theatre.

DECISION ON WHAT WAS GOING TO

hydrant in a neighborhood full of big dogs.”

HAPPEN,” HUCKABEE SAID. “I DON’T A prospective 2012 GOP presidential candi-

KNOW HOW I WAS SUPPOSED TO

He mentioned faculty should give any

date, Huckabee came under fire because of

KNOW THE FUTURE. THERE WAS NO

student attended a full letter grade bonus for

the clemency order he signed for Maurice

FUTURE. NOBODY AT THAT POINT WAS

showing up, bringing cheers from the crowd.

Clemmons. At the time, he thought 108 years

SAYING HE’S A COP KILLER.”

Then he joked, “That’ll make the faculty mad, but on most campuses, the faculty doesn’t

was excessive for a burglary and robbery

like me anyway.”

committed when Clemmons was a 16-year-

Huckabee finished second to John McCain in

old. The week before his visit, nine years

his 2008 run for the Republican nomination.

later, Clemmons is thought to have shot and

When asked about the possibility of running

He spoke of the problems with the current

killed four Seattle-area police officers.

for president in 2012, Huckabee said he

political system, not particularly praising his

thought it was too early to decide.

own party or criticizing the other. Talking about the problems facing the economy, he

After a reception with student leadership in the Terry Concert Hall, local media questioned

“That political race is three years from now.

said, “I’m not blaming Barack Obama, I’m

him along with CNN before his speech.

Barack Obama hasn’t even been president for

blaming it on the system.”

He said his order cut Clemmons’ sentence

a year yet. We haven’t had the 2010 elections,

down to 47 years. Nobody involved with the

let’s get those behind us,” he said. “Right

Referring to what is being called the health

case  —  the law enforcement, prosecutors or

now, it’s a bit offensive to the families of those

care crisis, he said, “We don’t have a health

judges  —  protested the action, he said. And

police officers to talk about it at this point.”

care crisis as much as we have a health crisis.”

HUCKABEE SPEAKS TO THE PRESS

16 The Wave

DUNN ENTERTAINS STUDENTS WITH AWARD-WINNING POETRY PULITZER PRIZE AND ACADEMY

people abuse the English language but were

that made any underlying turmoil seem

Award-winning poet Stephen Dunn was both

never given over to pessimism or excess.”

nonexistent. His poems “Criminal,” “Scapegoat” and “Language of Love” had a much

personable and mysterious as he sat quietly signing books and glancing from face to face

Dunn began by stating that he usually tries

more serious tone but still maintained a

on Jan. 29 in Usen Auditorium. His winter

to read a poem that is “pertinent to where

demure reflection.

visit brought both laughter and intrigue to the

he finds himself.” Therefore, being in Florida

students, staff and faculty in attendance.

he started with “The Girl in the Neon Tank

He ended with “On the Airplane” which

Top.” The poem followed a young girl and her

seemed to express his previous statement

“STEPHEN’S POETRY READING

encounter with a young man. This meeting

that “because language is indiscriminate, it is

SKILLS ARE STILL SUPERIOR AND

marked a new day in the girl’s life. She saw

very hard to be brave enough to make sense.”

MASTERFUL,” SAID DR. PETE

that she no longer required the bright colors

MOBERG, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF

and flamboyant styles to find her place in

COMMUNICATIONS.

the world, but could instead embrace simply growing and being.

“His poems are concerned with anxieties, fears, joys and problems common to the

Dunn followed with poems that addressed

average person attempting to make sense of

social, emotional and intellectual issues.

21st-century American life. What he called his

He referred to these poems as “complaint

grumpy complaint poems were about how

poems.” He delivered them with a calmness

NURSING STUDENTS LEARN WITH ELECTRONIC MEDICAL FILES AT THE BEGINNING OF THE

Cerner system used at Baptist South. When

Showing support for the initiative was

spring semester, School of Nursing students

the Jacksonville hospital opened in 2005, it

House of Representatives member Ander

began using a new program known as the

was the hospital operator’s first to become

Crenshaw who represents Florida’s Fourth

Cerner Academic Education Solution.

all-electronic. Today, three of Baptist’s five

Congressional District.

hospitals use electronic records. “WE ARE EXTREMELY

The program, developed by Cerner Corp., simulates the kinds of electronic medical

The JU student program does virtually

APPRECIATIVE OF THE EFFORT

records that are being adopted by hospitals

everything that the professional version

THAT ANDER HAS PUT FORTH

and physicians’ offices across the country.

does, Fry said. Among other things, it keeps

IN SECURING THIS IDEA,”

Each nursing student received a log-in

patients’ medical histories, allows nurses

SAID PRESIDENT KERRY D.

identification and a password to use the

to create a care plan and warns caretakers

ROMESBURG. “THIS WILL BE

system, which runs on the Internet and can

whenever a patient is prescribed a drug that

ENORMOUSLY BENEFICIAL TO NOT

be accessed from any computer.

interacts with another.

ONLY OUR UNIVERSITY BUT THE

“It will speed up their training and hopefully

The educational software is part of an

make our JU grads more attractive for hiring,”

overhaul of the nursing school’s practice facil-

Supporters say that electronic records

said Carla Fry, an assistant nursing professor.

ity. Congress included $250,000 under the

improve efficiency and reduce the risk of

JU-Baptist Health of Northeast Florida Health

medical errors, leading to hopes that they will

As the education manager for Baptist Health,

Information Technology Initiative, which was a

help reduce America’s $2.2 trillion in annual

Fry trained nurses, doctors and others on the

part of a 2010 appropriations bill.

health care spending.

ENTIRE COMMUNITY.”

Spring 2010 17

WAVE  |

NEWS

MARINE SCIENCE RESEARCH INSTITUTE SET TO OPEN THIS SUMMER opportunities for JU students, visiting high school and college students, scholars, scientists and engineers engaged in research involving local, state and national ecosystems. The building will be LEED certified with rain water harvesting capabilities, a solar hot water heater and have natural lighting in regular occupied space. The marine science department is developing a master’s degree program as well. “THIS IS GOING TO BE AN AWEINSPIRING NEW VENUE FOR MARINE SCIENCE CLASSES, OFFERING A UNIQUE COMBINATION OF A PRIVATE UNIVERSITY SETTING, STATE RESEARCH AND CHEMISTRY LABS WHITE AT THE MSRI CONSTRUCTION SITE

WITH PUBLIC SCHOOL SYSTEMS,” SAID WHITE. “THE MSRI AND ITS EXPANDED RESEARCH AND EDUCATION CAPACITY

THE MARINE SCIENCE RESEARCH

facility will open its doors in July and classes

IS AN EXCITING STEP FOR JU, THE CITY

Institute (MSRI) is scheduled to open “on

will begin in the fall.

AND THE ST. JOHNS RIVER.”

time and on budget,” according to Dr. Quinton White, executive director of the

The Institute will serve as an on-campus

To see the current progress of the construc-

MSRI. Faculty and staff will move in as the

learning community providing research

tion of the MSRI, visit www.ju.edu/msri.

CARLSON TO RETIRE AFTER MORE THAN THREE DECADES THE JACKSONVILLE UNIVERSITY

During his tenure as chair, he increased

community would like to thank Dr. Jon O.

enrollment for music majors from 64

Carlson for his many years of dedicated service

to 97 from 1991 to 1995; initiated JU’s

to the University’s Division of Music and wish

annual Music Day; created the first recital

him success in his future endeavors. Carlson will

handbook for music students; initiated the

officially retire after the spring 2010 semester.

music division’s web site and converted the acoustic piano lab in the Philips Fine Arts

As the director of choral activities and profes-

Hall to a digital lab/music technology lab,

sor of music, Carlson has led more than 300

among other achievements.

performances by the Concert Choir, Chamber

18 The Wave

Singers and Men’s and Women’s Choruses

Also retiring this year are Julia Ann Andrae,

of JU. Carlson joined the music faculty in

assistant professor of nursing, Carole Cayer,

1978 and from 1991 to 2001 served as chair

associate professor of nursing and CAPT.

of the Division.

Jerry Terrell, professor of Aeronautics.

PORDELI PRESENTS NATIONAL STUDY OF WOMEN-OWNED BUSINESSES PROFESSOR OF ECONOMICS and

Pordeli. “The rate of women entrepreneurs

Finance Dr. Hassan Pordeli, co-authored a study

starting a new business has grown rapidly in

country, they would have the fifth largest

last fall entitled “The Economic Impact of Women-

recent years, and most of these firms do not

Gross Domestic Product in the world, ahead

Owned Businesses in the United States.”

yet have employees —  just 20% of women-

of France, the United Kingdom and Italy.

• If women-owned businesses were their own

owned businesses have employees. Our Pordeli presented the results at the 2009

research indicated that once a firm has grown

• Industries where women-owned

National Economic Summit for Women

enough to hire employees, what has followed

businesses have the highest revenues

Business Owners in October, which revealed

has been substantial growth. This indicates

include Professional and technical

that women-owned firms are responsible for

a vast, untapped potential for greater growth

services, Retail and wholesale, Business

more than $2 trillion in total economic output

and makes a compelling case for increased

services and Communications and

and create some 11 million jobs.

funding, training and procurement dollars for

Administrative support.

women-owned businesses.” The study was commissioned by Walmart,

“We believe the findings from this research will provide critical knowledge that will help

OTHER MAJOR FINDINGS INCLUDE:

the National Women’s Business Council and

to propel women-owned businesses toward

• Approximately 8% of the total labor force

the Center for Women’s Business Research in

further growth and greater profitability,” said

work directly for a woman-owned firm.

Washington D.C.

EMPLOYEE GIVING CONTINUES TO IMPROVE IN TOUGH TIMES DURING THE 75TH ANNIVERSARY

EDUCATION THAT IS PROVIDED BY JU,”

Nine departments were recognized for 100

celebrations, our employees, like our alumni

SAID GRADY JONES, VICE PRESIDENT

percent participation. To make a donation, visit

and friends, were proud to celebrate and

OF INSTITUTIONAL ADVANCEMENT.

www.ju.edu/giving

honor Jacksonville University’s past and rich history. Numbers continued to rise, bringing in 65 percent participation, beating last year’s high of 62 percent. Many used the anniversary as an opportunity to make their gift in honor of a coworker or beloved faculty member. This year, there were incentives provided for all levels of contribu-

INCREASED EMPLOYEE GIVING THROUGH PAYROLL DEDUCTION

tions to The JU Fund. In a difficult economy, the University was pleased to see how important supporting the school was to employees. “OUR EMPLOYEES REALIZE THAT DURING THESE TOUGH ECONOMIC TIMES, IT IS AS IMPORTANT AS EVER TO GIVE BACK TO JU TO ENSURE THAT STUDENTS CONTINUE TO BE ABLE TO ACHIEVE THE QUALITY, PRIVATE

Spring 2010 19

WAVE  |

SPORTS

BACK-TO-BACK: JU REPEATS AS A-SUN CHAMPIONS WINNING YOUR FIRST

championship is easy. Repeating as

champions is harder.

Over the next five weeks, JU focused on getting better —  a mantra that fifth-year head coach Cliff Warren preached every day. Once

Nothing came easy for the 2009-10 JU men’s basketball team, but in the end, they battled through the ups and down to come away with their second straight Atlantic Sun Conference title and a

they set their sights on improving, the team took off, winning 10 straight games to retake its spot atop the league standings.

berth in the NIT. Entering its final two home games of the Picked in the preseason to repeat as conference champi-

season, JU controlled its own destiny —  and

ons, hopes were high at the start of the year. But what

won its share of the league title by dispatch-

happened at the start was nothing short of a nightmare.

ing Campbell, 65-52, becoming the first back-to-back league champion in almost a

Jacksonville opened its season by winning one of its first

decade. While JU came up short of its goal

eight games, with a close loss at South Carolina, 97-93, and

of a spot in the NCAA Tournament, the

dropping a home game to #13 Florida, 85-67. Topping it off

Dolphins made the most of their postseason

were two blowout losses on the road to start conference play. Going into the Christmas break, JU sported a 1-7 record and was 0-2 in the conference.

trip. The NIT sent the Dolphins out to Arizona State for a first-round matchup on ESPN2 that saw Ben Smith bank home a 3-pointer with 1.6 seconds left to give JU its first

Then, something happened over the break —  and when the Dolphins

postseason win in 36 years with a 67-66 victory over the Sun Devils.

returned, it was a whole new team with a different attitude. That attitude was on full display at the UCF Holiday Classic as JU

For Smith and Lehmon Colbert, it was a senior moment —  becoming the first four-year seniors in program history to never

won the event by beating

endure a losing season and will walk away

in-state rival UCF on its home

with two championship rings and most

floor in the championship

important, a degree.

game —  the Dolphins’ first win over UCF since 2001.

When they came to JU, the Dolphins were coming off the worst season in

And just when it looked like

program history —  having won just one

the Dolphins were going to

game. They knew playing time was available

roll, the rug got pulled out from

and that this new coach had a vision of

under them. A controversial loss

winning titles.

to Mercer on a 3-pointer that came

COLBERT

after the buzzer was the last wake up call the Dolphins needed. They were sitting in 11th place three games into conference play —  the preseason pick looking up at the entire league.

SMITH

Little did they know then what they would be able to do together for four years. The duo became the all-time leading scoring 1,000-point duo in JU history, scoring more than 3,400 points during their careers. Smith

JU BASKETBALL CELEBRATED WITH REUNION OF 1970 TEAM

is third on the all-time scoring list at JU with more than 1,900 points while Colbert is 14th

ON FEBRUARY 12,

with more than 1,400 points.

the JU basketball family was

reunited with a celebration of JU Basketball at the While he put up a ton of points, Smith’s

Jacksonville Veterans Memorial Arena. More than 500

name is already littered throughout the JU

people were in attendance as JU recognized all of

record books.

the former players, coaches and staff that made JU

He leaves

basketball a staple in the city of Jacksonville.

JU as the

The highlight of the evening was the reunion of the

all-time

1970 team on the 40th anniversary of its epic run to the

leader

national title game. Each member of the team was given

in steals,

a championship ring in honor of this achievement, with

assists,

former director of athletics Dr. Judson Harris handing

games played

them out to the players and coaches.

and minutes played along with

Former head coach Joe Williams talked about the run

being second on the

the Dolphins made in 1970, with highlights from their

all-time 3-pointers made list.

wins over Kentucky and St. Bonaventure in the NCAA Tournament being shown.

Colbert meanwhile has grabbed more than 700 rebounds in his career and ranks

A host of JU basketball legends attended the event, includ-

11th on the JU all-time list.

ing Roger Strickland, Rex Morgan and Artis Gilmore.

“YOU LOOK AT THE BODY OF WORK

“To have so many former Dolphins back together

THAT THESE TWO YOUNG MEN HAVE

brought back a lot of good memories for everyone who

ACCOMPLISHED DURING THEIR

came,” said JU Director of Athletics Alan Verlander. “To

CAREERS AND YOU HAVE TO BE

honor a group as accomplished as the 1970 team was

AMAZED,” SAID WARREN. “I’M

long overdue and that was a special moment for me.”

FOREVER INDEBTED TO THESE YOUNG MEN FOR TAKING A CHANCE ON OUR PROGRAM FOUR YEARS AGO.” While the ultimate goal was a trip to the NCAA Tournament, this year’s team broke through in the postseason and accomplished a great deal to rebuild the foundation of JU basketball, creating excitement and anticipation of bigger and better things in the future.

WARREN

WILLIAMS

WAVE  |

SPORTS

MEN’S AND WOMEN’S LACROSSE EACH EARN FIRST VICTORY SIX DAYS AFTER MEN POST FIRST WIN, WOMEN FOLLOW WITH THEIR OWN WHEN THE JU DIRECTOR OF

completed a six-goal comeback to win in a

was saved. Freshman midfielder Cameron

lacrosse, Mindy McCord, began putting

triple overtime thriller, 13-12.

Mann was in the right place at the right time, however, to scoop up the ground ball

the wheels in motion to bring lacrosse to Jacksonville, she never imagined that it

The Dolphins dominated faceoffs all game,

and complete a quick pass to freshman

would be successful so quickly.

while the home side assisted eight of its

attackman Nick Scalzo who pushed the ball

13 goals in front of more than 700 fans.

past goalie Butex Zander for the program’s first win.

A program two years in the making grabbed the attention of the first coast on

JU was led by freshman attackman Ryan

a sunny saturday when the dolphins took

Serville, who entered the game leading the

The Dolphin bench cleared and dog piled

the field for the first time for a men’s and

country in goals and points. Serville netted

near midfield as the celebrations began.

women’s double-header.

three goals and three assists, while four

The new team has a challenging schedule

Dolphins also tallied two goals each.

with games still to be played at Duke, Bucknell and Hofstra but the sky is the limit.

More than 4,500 fans came to D.B. Milne Field to witness the action of the first

“I’M SO PROUD OF THEIR EFFORT

university in Florida to offer both men’s and

AFTER GOING DOWN SIX GOALS

Six days later, the women’s team clinched

women’s Division I lacrosse.

TO A STRONG, WELL-COACHED

their first victory as well. Campasano led

TEAM,” SAID JU HEAD COACH

the Dolphins in points for the second time,

MATT KERWICK.

scoring the program’s first hat trick and

For the men’s team, a scrappy loss to No.

adding an assist for four points while eight

4 North Carolina showed signs of good things to come and two weeks later, all

In the third overtime, the Dolphins gained

Dolphins scored goals with six scoring more

the hard work paid off.

possession and pushed for a winner when

than one. Freshman goalie Karli Tobin also

sophomore Jeremy Tissenbaum fired a

turned in an inspired performance, making

Facing No. 18 Denver and legendary

shot from five yards out with 34 seconds

12 saves, turning away several point-blank

coach Bill Tierney, the Dolphins

shots in the dying minutes of the game.

22 The Wave

remaining but the ball

PHOTO COURTESY OF BLUEPRINT LACROSSE

TRACK & FIELD LOCKS UP FIFTH CONSECUTIVE A-SUN CHAMPIONSHIP DOLPHINS WIN FIRST SIX EVENTS OF THE DAY TO SECURE LATEST TITLE THE JU TRACK AND FIELD

“Most Outstanding Field Performer”

Other championship performances

team again saved its best performances

and “Most Outstanding Freshman

included junior Danielle Davenport

for the final day as the Dolphins won

Performer.” Pierre was the “Most

winning the 400-meter title with a time

the first six events on Feb. 27 to secure

Outstanding Track Performer,” while

of 55.73 and sophomore Stacey Y   oung’s

their fifth consecutive Atlantic Sun

Grigg was named “Coach of the Year”

conference record

Indoor Championship. JU posted 23 all-

for the fifth consecutive time.

3,431 points to win the pentathlon.

conference performances, 10 individual titles, two conference records and one

Pierre earned her honors after winning

new school record.

the 800-meter with a conference record time of 2:14.66 and took first in the mile

“THE A-SUN CONFERENCE

with a time of 5:03.63. She also ran a

CONTINUES TO IMPROVE EACH

leg of the distance medley relay that

YEAR SO WINNING AGAINST

finished first with a time of 12:14.57.

STRONG COMPETITION IS REWARDING,” SAID HEAD COACH

Charles finished second in the

RON GRIGG. “TO WIN AS MANY

60-meter (7.66) and fourth in

EVENTS AS WE DID AND TO HAVE

the 200-meter (25.00) on

AS MANY ALL CONFERENCE

the final day of the meet.

PERFORMERS AS WE DID WAS

She also took third in

PRETTY STAGGERING.”

the pentathlon (3,431 points) and first

After taking second on the first day, the

in the long jump

Dolphins took the top four spots in the

(19’8”) on the first

mile and 200-meter and the top three

day of the meet

spots in the 60-meter hurdles, while

to help secure

getting the top two spots in 60-meter

her accolades.

and 400-meter on the final day to finish with a personal-best 211 points for

Junior sprinter Louise

the title. Kennesaw State, the day one

Kiernan won the

leader, finished second with 154 points,

200-meter with a school

while cross-town rival UNF took third

record time of 24.16

with 98 points.

and ran a time of 7.55 to win the 60-meter, while

Freshmen Charlene Charles and Joane

junior Hillary Crook

Pierre each had a solid meet to sweep

tossed a life-time best

individual honors for JU. Charles was

46’10.25” to win the

named the “Most Valuable Performer,”

shot put title.

PIERRE

KIERNAN

WAVE  |

ALUMNI NEWS

SIMENDINGER TELLS STUDENTS ‘BEING POSITIVE IS A CHOICE’ NEW ALUMNI SPEAKER SERIES GIVES STUDENTS A GLIMPSE INTO LIFE AFTER GRADUATION HE CAUTIONED THE AUDIENCE THAT WE SHOULD ALL CHOOSE TO BE GOOD TO OTHER PEOPLE, BECAUSE “WE ALL TAKE TURNS IN THE BARREL AND THE NUMBER OF HANDS PULLING YOU OUT WILL EQUAL THE ONES YOU’VE HELPED ALONG THE WAY.” After graduating with a major in business and triple minors in marketing, economics and psychology, he went to work for a daily newspaper. He decided to pursue a

SIMENDINGER IN ROSS THEATHER

corporate career instead and returned to Florida to join Xerox Corporation. Since he

THEODORE SIMENDINGER III

Circle.” Three of his 10 books have been

left Xerox in 2000, Simendinger has coached,

optioned for movie development.

taught and lectured on four continents.

as part of the Dolphin Alumni Speaker Series

Among other life lessons, he told the crowd to

Dr. Pam Mullarkey’69 ’72, founder and

on Feb. 10 in the Ross Theater. Much of his

realize that time is short and we can all choose

director of Project SOS, Inc. (Strengthening

presentation focused on what he learned

to live the life we want. “Manage your time

Our Students) kicked off the new series

during and after his time at JU.

with urgency,” he said. “A full life is not lived

in January (see below). Channel 4’s

on the sofa. The couch will make you older.”

Meteorologist Rebecca Barry ’05, appeared

’76,

author and international sales leadership coach, entertained students, alumni and staff

on Tuesday, March 2 (see top right).

Also published under the name Ocean Palmer, Simendinger has written novels,

Advising the students to travel alone

such as “The Rise and Fall of Piggy Church”

somewhere they do not speak the language

For more information on the Dolphin Alumni

and “Jurassic Trout,” as well as business

to learn more about themselves, he said a

Speaker Series, contact Alumni Relations at

books, including “Managing the Worry

“battered suitcase can be your best friend.”

904.256.7201.

MULLARKEY SPOKE ABOUT

OF THEIR POTENTIAL, INNER

the 2009 Kiwanian of the Year given by the

creating SOS and said that young people

STRENGTH AND IMMEASURABLE

Kiwanis Club of Jacksonville.

today live in an incredibly challenging environ-

WORTH,” SAID MULLARKEY.

ment. “We can get so unfocused with the stresses of technology these days,” she said.

Since she left JU, Mullarkey became a health and physical education teacher and created The

She also spoke about the voices of hope

Foundation of Infant Awareness, Inc., Tumbling

and character that are being drowned out

for Tots, Inc. and SOS. She also served on the

today by the alluring cries of negative cultural

St. Johns County School Board from 1984

forces like drugs, alcohol, peer pressure and

to 1994 and was an International Abstinence

sexual activity among our youth.

Speaker and Trainer from 1999 until 2008.

“WE AT PROJECT SOS HAVE MADE

Mullarkey has also authored the book “All

IT OUR MISSION TO REMIND TEENS

Teens Destined for Greatness” and was

24 The Wave MULLARKEY

BARRY, ONE OF ONLY TWO

While at Mississippi State, Barry got a

current Jacksonville female meteorologists,

call from WJXT’s Chief Meteorologist John

spoke about the challenges and rewards of

Gaughan, who asked her to come in for an

her career on TV.  “You’re going to face some

interview the next day. Barry drove 10 hours

challenges that could be derailing,” said

to interview and got to be on air for the first

Barry. One of the challenges Barry faced was

time that weekend.

is that she has had to learn to deal with criticism gracefully.

hearing that she had to take Calculus I and II before being accepted into the master’s

“They never actually offered me an official

program for meteorology at Mississippi

position,” said Barry. “That weekend, I was

State University.

just filling in for someone else. However, that weekend turned into two then three and the

She decided to move to Tampa for the

rest is history.”

summer to take accelerated classes before the fall term began. After hours each day with

Barry was able to finish her master’s

a tutor, she completed the classes in time.

degree online and is now working 35-hour

“The things that you think you can’t do, a lot

weekends at Ch. 4. Barry says that the only

of the time you can,” said Barry.

reason she has survived in the business BARRY

EXPLORE YOUR NEW ALUMNI HOUSE IN PERSON OR ONLINE MOVING INTO THE OLD PRESIDENTS’ HOUSE ON THE NORTH END OF CAMPUS, ALUMNI RELATIONS HAS CREATED A WELCOMING AND IMPRESSIVE NEW SPACE FOR ALUMNI EVENTS WITH GOOD TIMING AND GENEROUS HELP FROM A GOOD FRIEND. “We do plan to have events here going forward including Alumni Board and other group meetings, barbecues, low-country boils, welcome receptions and Presidential dinners among other types,” said Kimberly Mariani-Hernandez, assistant vice president of Institutional Advancement. “Carolyn Munro Wilson once again stepped in as a friend to the University and furnished the entire space! We’re lucky to work in such a warm, welcoming environment.” To see more of the new space and learn more about upcoming events, visit www. ju.edu/alumnihouse or call 904.256.7201.

Spring 2010 25

WAVE  |

ALUMNI NEWS

GREEN GLASS ‘RIVER OF DOLPHINS’ GIFTED BY CLASS OF 2009 “THE UNIFYING THEME FROM the discussion at the Green Key meeting was that the campus needed more dolphins,” said Dr. Karen Jackson ’89, the faculty adviser. ACCORDING TO JACKSON, THE 2009 CLASS RAISED MORE MONEY THAN ANY PREVIOUS CLASS AT $2,500 AND HAD THE MOST GRADUATE PARTICIPATION AT 102 STUDENTS. Each year the Green Key organization sponsors the Graduating Class Gift, a way for graduates to say thank you and to help make the University a better place for current and

2009 CLASS GIFT - A RIVER OF DOLPHINS

future students by supporting a gift of their class’ choice. “We looked at buying statues and foun-

was more than willing to develop our ‘River

This year, that choice was a ‘River of Dolphins’

tains —  way too costly,” said Jackson. “So we

of Dolphins.’ He created an artistic rendering

featuring six green dolphins made out of glass

went back to the art department who created

we could use to advertise and promote the

placed behind the Gooding Building.

the fountain the year before and Mark Hursty

idea and now they are finally real.”

NELLIE’S DECK REDEDICATED TO CLASS OF ’59 IN HONOR OF THE CLASS OF ’59’s

and tradition to campus like never

50-year reunion, Jacksonville University

before,” said Matthew Kampfe, director of

rededicated Nellie’s deck at the Davis Student

Alumni Relations.

Commons on Oct. 17 as the Senior Plaza. The Senior Plaza was first created by the

NEW SENIOR PLAZA IN FRONT OF NELLIE’S

26 The Wave

“The rededication of the Senior Plaza

class who started the tradition of the senior

during our historic 75th anniversary has

glass gift. The plaza stood in front of the

helped to bring a renewed sense of history

Wolfson Student Center back then.

MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF ’59 AT THE GREEN AND GOLD GUARD INDUCTION CEREMONY

INAUGURAL GROUP OF 75 “DISTINGUISHED DOLPHINS” HONORED TO CELEBRATE OUR 75TH

To be recognized at future commence-

Anniversary, Jacksonville University announced

ment ceremonies, nominees must have

the inaugural group of 75 “Distinguished

added significant value to the brand

Dolphins” at a press conference in February

statewide, nationally or internationally

at the new Alumni House. The honorees

and demonstrated a high level of

must have at one time either matriculated at

professional success and personal

JU or be a former or current faculty or staff

integrity. To nominate a Distinguished

member. Jacksonville Mayor John Peyton

Dolphin, send an e-mail to media@

issued a proclamation to honor them and the

ju.edu. For more information, please

University’s contribution to Jacksonville.

visit www.ju.edu.

PRESIDENT ROMESBURG AND MAYOR PEYTON

GARCIA TAPS AND TEACHES IN THE BIG APPLE Not only is Garcia busy teaching, she also found the time to complete a master’s in dance education at New York University and is dancing professionally as a company member of Les Femmes, Sasberg’s tap dance company, and Folktap, Carlos Donan’s tap dance company. “I BELIEVE THAT ARTISTIC DANCE ENGAGES EXPRESSIVE CAPABILITIES OF THE SELF THROUGH THE INSTRUMENT OF THE BODY,” SAYS GARCIA. “Dancing expressively plays creatively dynamic

THEY SAY NEW YORK CITY IS

the

chords with one’s individualistic tune of expression.

PEP BAND INVITES ALUMNI TO PLAY JU boasts having a Pep Band for a fourth consecutive year. If you have an instrument and feel like playing, just sit down and join the fun. Pep Band includes 20 paid university students and is student-run. To request a song for the band to play or contribute via old or new instrument donations, e-mail the current student director, Thomas Urbanek at turbane@ jacksonville.edu.

DISCOVER THE GALAPAGOS ISLANDS

place to be for any aspiring artist looking for

As an advocate for academic achievement and

an abundance of opportunity to grow in their

creative inquiry, I would like to one day assist college

field. And, taking full advantage of those

students in reaching their full potential as professional

Members of the JU community are

opportunities is Julie Garcia ’06.

dancers, profound thinkers and imaginative artists.”

taking a trip to the Galapagos Islands at

Garcia received her Bachelor of Arts in

Garcia says her biggest challenge for now is the

Aug. 8) and there is room for more! The

communications with minors in dance and

time commitment, explaining that in dance you are

estimated cost is $4200 - 4500, inclusive

Spanish. After graduation, she decided

always pushing yourself to be better and you always

depending on airfare. JU faculty have lead

to pursue her love of teaching dance and

want to put your best foot forward no matter where

numerous study trips to these enchanted

became the assistant director of dance at

you find yourself.

isles and each one has been an interest-

the end of July (approximately July 28 -

ing and exciting opportunity to see this

Episcopal High School in Jacksonville. She is now a teaching assistant for one of the

“You never want to burn any bridges,” said Garcia.

unique set of islands. If you’re interested,

most influential tap dance teachers in New

“Every day in New York is like an audition because

please contact Dr. Quinton White at the

York City, Germaine Salsberg at the famous

it is such a small community here even though it

Marine Science Research Institute at

Broadway Dance Center.

seems so large.”

904.256.7766.

Spring 2010 27

WAVE  |

ALUMNI EVENTS

L to R

NYC ORDER OF THE DOLPHIN 1 Bill Ash ‘69 & Judy Romesburg 2 Alan Verlander, Cindy Barquist Chomiak ‘83 & President Kerry Romesburg

SAN DIEGO HAPPY HOUR 3 Betsey Patton Johnson ‘73 & Mark Johnson ‘73, Tom Whitehouse ‘64 & Carol & John Garger ‘74

1 2

4 Omar Sanchez ‘01, Charles Armstrong ‘00, Matthew Ward ‘03, Lauren Asp ‘04 & Janet Wolf Eisler ‘69

JU VS. SAN DIEGO PRE-GAME GATHERING 5 Tanya & Steven Modregon ’98 & Family

RECENT DOLPHIN NETWORK HAPPY HOUR AT THE BRICK 6 Josh Gordon ‘09, Ben Bowerman ‘05 & Andrew Murphy ‘06 7 Kevin Vucinich ‘05, Matthew Kampfe ’06 ‘08 & Adeyemi Mason ’09

COLLEGE NIGHT AT THE JACKSONVILLE FAIR

5 6

8 Alumni Team on Scholarship Night

2009 ALUMNI HOLIDAY PARTY  9 Constance Doss Hutton ‘73, Joseph Foy ‘71 & Colleen Foy 10 Robert Price ‘67, Matt Tuohy ‘75 ‘03 11 Stephanie Potts Wholey ‘02, David Wholey ‘08 12 Pamela Shelley ‘05 (far left), Matt Eckler ‘96 (far right) and guests

ATLANTA OUTING TO THE BRAVES GAME

9 10

13 Nancy Whitman Duncan ‘77 & Royce Duncan ‘75, Vernon ‘00 & Mary Catron

NEW YORK CITY ALUMNI HAPPY HOUR 14 Paulina Battaglia ‘08, Shana Grossman ‘08, Julie Garcia ‘06 & Emily Townes ‘05

JU AT THE JACKSONVILLE SUNS 15 Robert ‘86 & Julie Leverock & Family 16 Kimberly Grigsby Matthews ’83 & Family

RECENT DOLPHIN NETWORK & BEACHES ALUMNI EVENT AT RAGTIME 17 Richard Billings ‘73 & Rich Gerrity ‘73

14 ORLANDO ALUMNI LUNCHEON AT THE RAVENOUS PIG 18 Lisa Boger Sheppard ’84, Susan Gordon Lindsay ‘83 & Judith Bashian Chiusano ’83 19 Frank Casey ‘71 & Artis Gilmore ‘71 20 Marshall Reeves ‘51

STUDENT GOVERNMENT PRESIDENTS’ REUNION 21 Former SGA Presidents at their Reunion

IMPORTANT NOTICE

18 19

3 4

7

8

11 12

13

15 16

17

20 21 ALUMNI RELATIONS IS GOING GREEN! NO MORE PRINTED INVITATIONS In an effort to promote sustainability, the Alumni Relations department is no longer going to use printed invitations for most events. There are many ways you can keep up-to-date about upcoming events: Friend Dunk’n Dolphin on Facebook and follow JU on Twitter at www.twitter.com/dolphinnetwork to stay connected and learn about events and speakers.

ALUMNI EVENTS

PRESIDENT’S RECEPTION

WAVE  |

GREEN KEY BREAKFAST

HOMECOMING

30 The Wave

DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI AWARDS

GREEN & GOLD GUARD INDUCTION FOOTBALL PREGAME TAILGATE

2009

PRESIDENT’S RECEPTION GREEN & GOLD GUARD INDUCTION CEREMONY – CLASS OF 1959 DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI AWARDS – FOOTBALL HALFTIME GREEN KEY BREAKFAST FOOTBALL PREGAME TAILGATE

Spring 2010 31

WAVE  |

CLASS NOTES

1970s

1980s Artis

Annette Fudge Jacobs ’80, was

Cindy Waltrip Hagat

Gilmore

recognized as an honored recipient of

’97, earned a nursing

’71, paid a

the Puget Sound Business Journal’s

degree in 2009 from

visit to Dr.

prestigious Women of Influence Award

Akron Institute of Herzing

Tom Long,

this past October.  Jacobs is president

University. A former

retired

and CEO of Door to Door Storage, Inc.

professor

in Kent, Wash.

JU employee as well, she is an oncology nurse with Robinson

of psychology, at his diner “Toots” in

Memorial Hospital in Ravenna, Ohio.

Baldwin this past fall.

Debbie Jo Roberts

Alan Deichler ’73,

Grell ’82

is the new president of

and Andy

CPAmerica International,

Hart ’91

one of the world’s largest

coordinated the first alumni event, “JU

associations of indepen-

Night at the Tides,” for Dolphins in the

The sisters of Alpha Delta Pi celebrated

dent CPA firms. Deichler

Hampton Roads, Va. area.

the 40th anniversary of their sorority

took over leadership of the association Jan. 1. John R. “Jay” Slosar, PH.D. ‘74,

at JU during Homecoming this past The Honorable Gary Flower ’82, was

October. Sisters with 10, 25 and 50 years

elected to serve as president of the Con-

of membership to the organization were

ference of County Court Judges of Florida.

recognized.

is the author of “The Culture of Excess:

2000s

How Americans Lost Self-Control and

Ronald V. Walters

Why We Need to Redefine Success.”

’86, was recently

Published in Nov., 2009, the book dis-

accepted into the Master

cusses that the country’s fast-and-loose

of Divinity Program at the

Rachel

approach to money was symptomatic of

Samuel DeWitt Proctor

Thompson

a more widespread pattern of excessive

School of Theology at

’04, Eliz-

behavior. To learn more, visit www.

Virginia Union University in Richmond,

thecultureofexcess.com.

Va. He also recently celebrated his fifth

Raymond “Smoke” Laval ’77, will take over as the new head baseball coach for the UNF Ospreys at the end of the 2010 season.

abeth Healy

year as senior pastor of Olivet Missionary

Sweeney ‘05, Nicole Keiser ’05,

Baptist Church in Lake City, Fla.

Kassandra Gove ’05 and Amanda McGranahan ’06 met in Boston this

1990s

past fall to discuss creating a Boston Alumni Chapter.

| WEDDINGS

Capt. John M. Landon II, ’78 ’86, was

Steve

awarded the Defense Superior Service

Wisniewski

Medal for his role as the Director of

’91, Kevin

Readiness, Office of the Assistant

Haga ’92,

Kelly Fuller

Secretary of Defense for Reserve

Brooks

’89, married David

Affairs, upon his retirement in Sept.

Tomlin ’91 and Dennis Turcotte

Brannon ’86, on

2009 after 30 years of active duty with

’93, reunited at The Greenbrier Resort, in

June 13, 2009. They

the Navy.

White Sulphur Springs, W.Va. this past fall.

reside in Virginia.

32 The Wave

Class Notes is compiled by your friends in the Alumni Relations Office. If you’ve got news to share, let us know! We want to stay connected with you so e-mail your information and photos to alumni@ju.edu. Please do not send hard copy photos.

JOHN SESSIONS ’59, BASEBALL’S TOP FAN AND SUPPORTER Patti Jenkins ’05, married Jeremy Reams on March 28, 2009 in Orlando, Fla. where they reside. Kate Burke ’06 ’07, and Bryan Brown ’05 ’06, were married on Aug. 7, 2009 in Atlantic City, N.J. They now live in Cincinnati, Ohio. Jeff Coggins ’09, married Jessica McKinsey ’09, on Dec. 27, 2009 in Mississippi. Neil Armingeon of the St. Johns Riverkeeper was the officiant. The couple lives in Dallas.

| NEW ARRIVALS

John Sessions ’59, passed away on Nov. 14, 2009, after a long courageous fight against a brain tumor. Sessions was a constant presence at JU sporting events through the years. On May 4, 2007, JU honored Sessions by naming the baseball stadium after him —  forever linking him together with one of his great passions, JU baseball. “Mr. Sessions was a true gentleman and friend,” said JU Director of Athletics Alan Verlander. “He had a great passion for JU and everyone here knew Mr. Sessions and had a great love and respect for him. We have lost a true champion for JU and an ambassador for life.” A member of JU’s first graduating class with a degree in business administration, he served his country honorably in the U.S. Army for two years. Sessions taught math at both Terry Parker and Ribault High Schools before joining Arlington Fuel Oil Co., later becoming its vice-president. He then bought a small pest control division of Arlington Fuel (Bug Out Service) which he successfully operated until 1998 when he retired. His accomplishments and accolades include: Small Businessman of the Year, Colonel Harry L. Kinne Free Enterprise Award and the Pest Control Technology Leadership Award. He was also a member of the Chamber of Commerce and Optimist Club, as well as a past president of the JU Alumni Association, among others. He is survived by his wife of more than 52 years, Elizabeth Carson, two children and three grandchildren.

Ellen Rowe Brown ’93, and Brian Brown ’92, welcomed their second child, Bolton Robert Brown, this past March. Christy Hendry Alexander ’95, and her husband Jon, are the proud parents of Pierce Eliott, born Sept. 26, 2007 and Aubrey Hale, born May 1, 2009. Jessica Windell Ryals ’01, and Jason Ryals ’02, are pleased to announce the addition of Kailyn Paige Ryals to their family. Kailyn was born on June 17, 2009.

LONG-TIME ADMINISTRATOR AND PROFESSOR DAN THOMAS Dan Anderson Thomas, a physicist who became JU’s vice president and dean of faculties, died Sept. 19, 2009. He was 86 and had been in declining health for several years. His tenure at JU spanned a quarter-century. Thomas was named dean of faculties at JU in 1963 and became a vice president in 1967. After 17 years as an administrator, he returned to the classroom as a trustee professor of physics at JU. Thomas was active in the community, serving as president of the Jacksonville Museum of Arts and Science in 1979. He was president of the Meninak Club in 1973. After retiring from JU in 1987, he traveled to 29 countries, hiked the Swiss Alps and explored the Florida and Georgia wilderness by boat. He is survived by his wife of 65 years, Elizabeth Glaze; a daughter, a son, two grandchildren and his sister. His son, Roger, also taught at JU.

Spring 2010 33

Take care of your family create a legacy at JU.

&

A Planned Gift can do BOTH!

To start the conversation, please contact: Donna Morrow, Director of Planned Giving Ph: 904.256.7928 • E-mail: dmorrow1@ju.edu

Every gift matters. Make yours today & support JU tomorrow.

www.ju.edu/plannedgiving

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‚"55*OUFMMFDUVBM1SPQFSUZ"MMSJHIUTSFTFSWFE"55 UIF"55MPHPBOEBMMPUIFS"55NBSLT DPOUBJOFEIFSFJOBSFUSBEFNBSLTPG"55*OUFMMFDUVBM1SPQFSUZBOEPS"55BGGJMJBUFEDPNQBOJFT ‚:&--081"(&4$0. --$"MMSJHIUTSFTFSWFE

Discover Marine Science at JU! Explore the

natural laboratory provided by the St. Johns River and conduct extensive fieldwork as

a JU marine biology student in the new 30,000 square-foot Marine Science Research Institute. You’ll be

diverse marine environments with your professors and classmates. Our faculty have active, grant-funded research projects that provide ample opportunities for students to get involved.

wading through

To learn more about earning your degree in marine science, call 904.256.7000 or visit www.ju.edu

Nonprofit Org.

U.S. POSTAGE PAID

2800 University Boulevard North Jacksonville, FL 32211-3394

Permit No. 3160 Jacksonville, FL

www.ju.edu

HONORING OUR

history... LOOKING TO OUR future...

CELEBRATE JU’S 75TH ANNIVERSARY by making

Gifts of $75+ to The JU Fund receive a commemorative gift

your gift to The JU Fund. Commemorate your years at

$1,000+ qualifies for Order of the Dolphin membership

$ 7,500+ (or pledges of $2,500 over 3 years) qualifies for an exclusive private reception

JU and honor your favorite member of the JU family.

VISIT www.ju.edu/giving OR CALL 904.256.7612 TO MAKE YOUR GIFT TODAY!


Wave Magazine - Spring 2010