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Pig

But on January 17 and 18, UMC will use live pigs to teach future doctors how to treat human patients. After the training, the animals are killed and discarded.

January 16 - 27, 2013

Tell UMC to join the 98% of programs that use hightech, human-based methods for medical training— including Emory, Vanderbilt, and Duke.

www.JacksonTakeAction.org FROM PHYSICiANS COMMITTEE FOR RESPONSIBLE MEDICINE

2 12258-COM Jackson Free Press Pig Ads Final.indd 3

1/3/2013 2:08:51 PM

DARNELL JACKSON

JACKSONIAN DARRELL WINSTON

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s program director for the Jackson chapter of the Sigma Beta Club, Darnell Winston in the most positive role model in many young males’ lives. Born in Inglewood, Calif., Winston arrived in Jackson in 1995 on a scholarship to play trombone at Jackson State University, and has called the capital city home ever since. Winston pledged to Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity Incorporated in 1997. He earned his bachelor’s degree in mathematics in 1999 and his masters of science in mathematics in 2002. In 2005, Winston began mentoring public-school students from Jim Hill and Terry high schools. From these small mentoring groups, along with another group from Provine High School, Winston created the Jackson chapter of the national boys mentoring program, the Beta Sigma Club, in 2009. “This mentoring program is designed to enhance young males’ educational skills and one of our main goals is for them to complete high school and pursue some form of higher learning,” Winston, 35, says. The program, for boys ages 8 to 18, provides ACT preparation classes as well as workshops on how to dress and interview skills, and monthly assessment meetings. Beta Sigma Club also engages in an array of monthly community service projects, including feeding the needy, visiting nursing homes, annual events such as Toys for Tots and High School Day at JSU, and sending care packages to children in Africa.

CONTENTS

“We hope to provide guidance and just some type of male figure in their life, because of lot of them don’t have that. We have a lot of young guys out there whose fathers are in jail or just not a part of their life,” Winston says. The boys often have speakers come in to talk with them from various professions, including lawyers, doctors, police officers and mayors. Controlled by the Mu Sigma Graduate Chapter of Jackson and Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity Inc. members, the mentoring program also teaches and young men to perform step-show routines, but academics come first. “A major concern are their grades,” Winston says. “If you don’t have the right grades you can’t make it to the show.” Winston also serves as the after-school director at BJ’s Learning Center, where he helps young people with their homework. He has worked at the Mississippi Museum of Art since 2002, where he currently serves as the assistant chief of security. Each year, Winston looks forward to seeing members graduate from the program. “I wouldn’t say I tear up, but once they head across that stage, and I know that they’re headed off to college … it’s just a great feeling to see them, and I know they’re going on to do things,” he says. “That’s the big rush—knowing they’re headed to another chapter in their life.” For more information on the club, visit sigmabetaclubofjackson.com. —Darnell Jackson

Cover photograph by Trip Burns, cover design by Kristin Brenemen

10 Off to the Races

Meet the four women vying for District 28’s seat in this year’s Mississippi Senate race. Nine candidates total are after the spot left vacant after the death of Sen. Alice Harden.

27 Midtown Mural

Scott Allen unveils a new public art mural focused on the Midtown community, part of a grant to bring more art to the neighborhood.

33 Wandering Chef

“I buy all local, from the little mom-and-pop grocery stores to the farmers markets to individual farmers. That is my 100-percent passion. Every farmer I deal with, I spend a day at their farm, doing some odds and ends, cooking them dinner. I want to see how they’re treating things, seeing their whole practice or else it could be off a truck, and then I just defeated what I went for.” —James Roache, “The Next Culinary Adventure”

jacksonfreepress.com

4 ............................. EDITOR’S NOTE 6 ................................................ YOU 8 ............................................ TALKS 12 .................................. BUSINESS 14 .................................. EDITORIAL 14 ................. EDITORIAL CARTOON 15 .................................... OPINION 17 .............................. COVER STORY 26 .............................. DIVERSIONS 27 .......................................... ARTS 27 .......................................... FILM 28 ....................................... 8 DAYS 29 ............................... JFP EVENTS 31 ....................................... MUSIC 31 ....................... MUSIC LISTINGS 32 ..................................... SPORTS 33 ......................................... FOOD 34 ................................. ORGANICS 35 ...................................... FAMILY 36 ................... GIRL ABOUT TOWN 37 .............................. ASTROLOGY 38 .................................. FLY HOME

ANDREW DUNAWAY; COURTESY SCOTT ALLEN; TRIP BURNS; TRIP BURNS; CORUTESY KATHY SYKES; TRIP BURNS

JANUARY 16 - 22, 2012 | VOL. 11 NO. 19

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EDITOR’S note

by Donna Ladd, Editor-in-Chief

Weapons of Mass Destruction

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h, guns. We have a bittersweet joke at the Jackson Free Press: If we feel like piling up a few more page views, we can just do a gun story or a blog post. All we have to do is mention guns, or God forbid criticize any form of the precious instrument, and the gun aficionados come out of the woodwork. They troll, yell, sputter, moan and even freak out if you call a “semi-automatic” weapon an “automatic” one (although gun makers do, too). They get personal, and ugly, and really, really angry, and they call us names. They wail at any attempt just to discuss potential gun regulation on behalf of public safety, immediately jumping to the conclusion that we want to take all their guns. And most remarkably to me, they come up with some of the most illogical analogies one can imagine—the kind that I would have flunked out of logic class at Mississippi State for floating. So, so … if people didn’t have guns, they’d use cars or buses or airplanes as deadly weapons, they spout. You know, like on Sept. 11, 2011! Yes, we-the-logical respond, and we vastly regulated everything to do with air travel after 9/11. Cars and buses are already saddled with massive safety regulations. But, but … the framers didn’t mean the Second Amendment to allow any sort of regulation of any “arm” whatsoever, they tell us, not even for safety reasons! Don’t tough my guns! No, we point out. Even the First Amendment is limited in cases of libel and yelling “fire!” in a crowded theater. And if you look closely, the word “regulated” is firmly ensconced in the Second Amendment. And the right to “bear arms” already doesn’t mean any damn arm you want to stockpile and play war with on the weekends. Or , or… on the same day as Newtown, a man in China attacked a group of kids with a knife in a mass attack, too! Yes, we respond, and none of those children died. It was bad, but not deadly. Children dying is why we want to have

this conversation that this brand of gun geek really doesn’t want us to have. In other words, these folks want to deny our First Amendment rights to talk about their Second Amendment ones. Not logical. But we’re going to talk about guns in America anyway, and we have to stop bowing down in front of the powerful gun lobby that exists to help gun corporations sell more guns. If we don’t, it means we are bought and owned by a large, dangerous industry. Does having that conversation, or en-

The gun lobby has become too strong, too strident and a bit insane. acting smarter gun regulations, mean we want to stop all hunting or take weapons of self-defense away from everyone? Of course not. That’s absurd, and I personally don’t know anyone who is supporting that. Here’s where the rubber—like on all those cars that are more regulated than guns, by the way—meets the road. Too many adults and children, and suicidal Americans, are dying because they have too easy access to too many weapons. The country that supported a war in Iraq over a lie about weapons of mass destruction are actually confronted with real WMD right here and now. Whatever you want to call them—mostly automatic, too automatic, somewhat automatic, deliciously automatic, mine’s-bigger-thanyours automatic—the U.S. is inundated with guns that make it easy, and rather romantic, for a mentally disturbed person to

act out his videogame fantasies in a theater or synogogue or school full of innocent victims. They make it easy to kill many very quickly. The fact that a gun can and is sometimes actually used for self-defense—as the Twitter trolls love to point out—is beside the point. You can still have a gun for selfdefense, but you don’t need to shoot up your damn neighborhood with an AR-15 to run the robber off your property. What we’re talking about here are delusions of grandeur and bloodlust. And too many people end up using those crazy guns to act it out. Here’s the thing: You can love guns and still be part of a serious conversation about them. If you also love children, it is incumbent on you to decide to be part of the solution. The gun lobby has become too strong, too strident and a bit insane. They seem to want us to turn against each other and assume that our government is coming to get us. (And I assure you that, should they, these AR-15 hobbyists aren’t going to protect us.) Countries and states with more gun control are less violent. We all know it is easiest, and quickest, to commit a mass killing with one of these weapons. (Ask that guy in China.) The question now is what kind of nation do we want to be? Do we want to follow the lead of people who profit off our distrusting “the other” and arming ourselves against them? Do we want to continue being the state that provides huge numbers of guns used in violence in Chicago? Do we want to assume that we solve violence with violence? The same people who argue those things look and act like they’re afraid of their shadows. You can watch them on talk shows and see it all over their faces. They have no problem with the gun industry flooding our poorest communities with huge numbers of guns, which they damn well know will be used in crimes. They seem to want to play war games with “the other.” But even many NRA members know that it doesn’t make sense to have no regu-

lations or restrictions on what guns we can have—or, more importantly, that gun makers can make and market to civilians. The point of gun regulation, ultimately, is not to keep any gun crime from happening whatsoever (even though we can wish); it is to reduce the supply of weapons and the incentive for the gun industry to profit off elementary kids being blown to bits with guns designed to blow people to bits. Meantime, not only is the NRA owned by the gun industry; so are the politicians it funds. Right now, we have state leaders who are drooling all over themselves (looking at you, Tate Reeves and Phil Bryant) to be the elected pawns of the corporate gun industry. These men are showing no interest in making your children safer. And the absurd idea to arm schools more? That would work out about as well as Haley Barbour’s pardons: It might seem like a good idea until a pardonee goes and kills someone, as one allegedly did last week. Imagine being the lawmaker who pushed for that lunacy when an armed teacher shoots and kills an innocent child. Armed school officials do not stop school shootings—including right here in Pearl. Yes, an assistant principal went after the shooter when he was leaving with a gun, but well after he had sowed the destruction that his guns empowered him to mete out. If the shooters don’t kill themselves, someone often gets to them after the rampage: No, trolls, that is not preventing a shooting. Not to mention, since Republicans expired the assault weapons ban, we’re seeing gun inflation even among the mass shooters. They are covering themselves with badasslooking guns and magazines because they can easily buy them at places like Walmart. Thank you, gun industry. It is time we talk back—in honor of every child and teacher who died at Newtown and every other victim of gun violence and suicide. We can change this, leaving the Second Amendment fully intact. We must.

January 16 - 22, 2013

CONTRIBUTORS

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Ronni Mott

R.L. Nave

Darnell Jackson

Genevieve Legacy

Ronni Mott came to Jackson by way of D.C. in 1997. She’s an award-winning writer and the JFP’s news editor, where she practices her hobbies of herding cats. She teaches yoga in her spare time. She contributed to the cover package.

Reporter R.L. Nave grew up in St. Louis, graduated from Mizzou (the University of Missouri), and lived a bunch of other places before coming to Jackson. Contact him at 601362-6121 ext. 12. He contributed to the cover package.

Editorial intern Darnell “Chris” Jackson is writer, photographer, graphic designer and entrepreneur. He is a Jackson native and Jackson State graduate. He owns J.Carter Studios. He wrote the Jacksonian.

Genevieve Legacy is an artist and writer who relocated from New York last August. She lives in Brandon with her husband, and son and one of Mississippi’s laziest dogs, a piebald hound named Dawa. She wrote a music story.

Andrew Dunaway Jim PathFinder Ewing Kelly Bryan Smith Andrew Dunaway knew his friends and family were tired of hearing him talk constantly about food, so he took to writing about it. He’s doing his best to keep it to a dull roar. He wrote a food piece.

Jim PathFinder Ewing’s book “Conscious Food: Sustainable Growing, Spiritual Eating” is in bookstores now. Find Jim on Facebook, follow him @ edibleprayers or visit blueskywaters.com. He wrote the organics feature.

Kelly Bryan Smith is a busy mom, writer, brain tumor survivor, and nursing student living with her son in Fondren. She enjoys cooking, swimming and collecting pastel blue eggs from her backyard chickens. Kelly wrote the family feature.

Monique Davis Advertising coordinator Monique Davis is a passionate promoter of all things Jackson. She is a cartoonist, is married to the smartest man on the planet, and a mother of six wonderful children. She can be bribed with red wine.

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jacksonfreepress.com

COURTESY ALFENETTE ROBINSON

[YOU & JFP]

Send us a photo of you and your JFP somewhere interesting. You get a $20 gift certificate if we print it.

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Write us: letters@jacksonfreepress.com Tweet us: @JxnFreePress Facebook: Jackson Free Press

WHAT IS THE TOP THING YOU PLAN TO DO IN 2013 TO HELP JACKSON BECOME THE BEST POSSIBLE CITY IT CAN BE? Angela Grayson I will educate as many families as I can on how to become properly protected, debt free and financially independent! Share how God’s Grace and Mercy can change the city and let as many people possible experience a CakePopCutie. Dane Carney Going to try to get a job somewhere as IWW union salt. Donna Ladd I will do more investigative reporting. Lynn Robinson I will continue to have community discussions with real people that have no vested interest in making money off Jackson, but want to see a better city. Dawn Beasley Macke Give more: words, time, compliments, positivity, props, appreciation.

Tom Head I plan to do more pro bono grantwriting, copywriting and social media work for small local nonprofits. There’s a huge demand for that. Jenni Watson I do not think Jackson can become a “best city� as long as we are supporting businesses and politicians that want to take away the rights of various groups. I think we have some serious soul searching to do. This place is nothing to be proud of right now. What do I want to invite friends here for, so they can see the way we treat gay people and see the fetus truck making traffic issues on Lakeland? We look like we are stuck in 1870 here.

Carrie McMahan Support small business, vote, tell as many people as I can on how to save money the right way for their future. Tony Davenport Utilizing my skills & talents to work with other positive, inclusive and visionary people who really want to move forward in creating the change they want to see here in Jackson. Monique Davis My top tactic is to only emphasize the positive, i.e the Peaceful Parenting Expo happening at St. Dominic’s Jan. 27. I will not repeat any crime stats, house burning, etc. I will be affirming the good.

Janice Hogan Become a better informed citizen, communicate with those who make decisions for our community, and exercise my constitutional right to vote. Mississippi Youth Hip Hop Summit ACLU of MS Youth and Parents are fully engaged to make MS Schools the BEST THEY CAN BE! Join us! Beth Poff Zoo It Better!

Percy King Volunteer more.

Kathleen Morrison Mitchell Random acts of kindness.

Andrea Thomas I will promote only the good. People always speak on the negative aspects of Jackson. If everyone would replace the negatives with a positive, I think the morale of the city would change. Positive visualization or positive reinforcement always equals a positive outcome.

Torri Nichelle Mow my lawn, support more small businesses, attend a Koinonia Friday morning session. Vote in the mayoral election.

Amanda Joullian Ragland Give more support to local musicians, restaurants and retail!

Virginia Ezelle Shop and patronize small local businesses. We are fortunate to have many wonderful ones.

-OST6IRAL3TORIESATJFPMS

True Mississippi Hospitality

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January 16 - 22, 2013

ast Saturday I ran the Mississippi Blues Marathon. It was a memorable event and visit. The highlight occurred in a post office near the airport. I was waiting in line to buy stamps for my postcards. The line was a little lengthy, and my husband finally came

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in, anxious to leave for the airport. The ladies behind me first offered and then insisted on not only mailing my postcards but buying the stamps as well. They said they wished to show me true Mississippi hospitality. Their warm kindness topped our list of Mis-

sissippi memories and will never fail to fill me with sense of gratitude for being treated to heartwarming Mississippi friendliness and generosity. Laura Schultz East Lansing, Mich.

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Thursday, Jan. 10 Insurance Commissioner Mike Chaney announces that federal regulators will make a decision on Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s health-insurance exchange within 10 to 15 days. â&#x20AC;Ś Wayne Harris, one of more than 200 felons to whom former Gov. Haley Barbour granted clemency in early 2012, is involved in a shootout leaving one man dead. Friday, Jan. 11 Reps. Andy Gipson, R-Braxton, and Mark Formby, R-Picayune, file a bill to prohibit abortions if doctors can detect a heartbeat except when a medical emergency necessitates. Gipson also files another personhood bill. Saturday, Jan. 12 Conservatives mount a â&#x20AC;&#x153;not-sofastâ&#x20AC;? campaign against a $50.7 billion Superstorm Sandy aid package, believing much of the money will go toward other recovery efforts and projects. â&#x20AC;Ś About 3,500 Pakistani Shiites block a main road with dozens of coffins of relatives killed in explosions to demand better security from the government. Sunday, Jan. 13 State Rep. David Gibbs, recalled as a common-sense lawmaker who preferred to keep a low profile, dies at age 76. â&#x20AC;Ś Thousands march through Moscow to protest Russiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new law banning Americans from adopting Russian children.

January 16 - 22, 2013

Monday, Jan. 14 Several parents of Sandy Hook victims speak at the launch of Sandy Hook Promise, a group calling for a national dialogue to help prevent similar tragedies.

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Tuesday, Jan. 15 Mississippi Senate Education Committee members send a charter-school bill to the full Senate for consideration. â&#x20AC;Ś The Rhode Island House hears testimony on whether to make Rhode Island the 10th state to legalize gay marriage. Get news updates at jfpdaily.com

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One City, United and Divided by Jacob D. Fuller

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ithin two months, the city of Jackson and community leaders have unveiled several programs that claim the same goals: to unite Jacksonians, promote the capital cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s positive features and move Jackson into a better future. That presents a question that no one seems to answer: Why arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t they working together on one big project? On Nov. 14, the city unveiled Celebrate Jackson, a marketing campaign for Jackson, at a surprise event with little advance notice. City officials announced a celebration, called Eleven 14 until the day of the event, but gave little more information prior to the event. On Nov. 14, a Wednesday, local restaurants set up booths, school choirs performed, and bands played on the green around City Hall for a couple hundred people as the city announced its new marketing campaign: Celebrate Jackson. Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr., with the support of the Jackson City Council, hired the local Fahrenheit Creative Group for $98,000 in July to help shine a better light on the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;coincidentally or not, just in time for the 2013 city elections. Johnson is up for reelection. City Director of Marketing Anthony Dean said the goal of Celebrate Jackson is to give local residents a chance to use their voices to highlight the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s positive aspects. Dean said the campaign will feature Jacksonians highlighting the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best attributes in television commercials, on billboards, in print

advertising and in other outlets. Darren Schwindaman, a graphic designer and branding specialist at Jacksonbased Creative Distillery, says the entire

man said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do any focus grouping to figure out what the perceptions are from people in the suburbs and in the city,â&#x20AC;? Schwindaman told the JFP. The opening event drew criticism, too. Signs that marketers designed to hang from light poles were too long and dragged on the ground. The city meant for the signs to showcase the city. Instead, workers took them down soon after the Eleven 14 event. Dean said the signs, which read â&#x20AC;&#x153;Celebrate Jackson,â&#x20AC;? still advertised the campaign as intended despite their wrong size. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not saying it was a mistake,â&#x20AC;? Dean told the JackDuane Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill, President and CEO of the Greater son Free Press. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was just the Jackson Chamber Partnership, addresses members at way it turned out. The banners the first Team Jackson luncheon. were just long.â&#x20AC;? Starting the campaign Celebrate Jackson campaign process stunk with an event was a very poor way to start from the beginning. The first problem a marketing campaign, Schwindaman said. came when the city didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t bid the campaign Branding the TV commercials and posters out, he said. Most organizations request for the event with the Eleven 14 logo was bids and proposals before hiring agencies, even more confusing to Schwindaman. he said, but the city hired Fahrenheit Creâ&#x20AC;&#x153;All the promotion that was done and, ative without a bidding process. The city presumably, all the money spent wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to bid out projects that can be about the Jackson rebranding. It was about considered professional services. the unveiling event for the Jackson rebrandOnce Fahrenheit Creative got the con- ing,â&#x20AC;? Schwindaman said. tract, they didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do any of the needed prepaDespite early promises of TV commerration to discover what the views of the city cials, billboards and more, little has come of were that they wanted to change, Schwinda- the campaign since the Nov. 14 event.

JACOB D. FULLER

Wednesday, Jan. 9 Rep. David Baria, D-Bay St. Louis, files a resolution urging Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s congressional delegation to support federal aid for Superstorm Sandy recovery. â&#x20AC;Ś Officials at the Washington National Cathedral announce that the church will implement a rite of marriage for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender members.

¹)T SEEMS TO ME THERE´S NOT A PROBLEMWITHOUREDUCATIONSYS TEM4HERE´SAPROBLEMWITHTHE ,EGISLATURE²

TOP-GROSSING MOVIES OF 2012 1. Marvelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s The Avengers 2. The Dark Knight Rises 3. The Hunger Games 4. Skyfall 5. The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn, Part 2 6. The Amazing Spider-Man 7. Brave 8. The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey 9. Ted 10. Madagascar 3: Europeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Most Wanted 11. Dr. Seussâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; The Lorax 12. Men in Black 3 13. Wreck-It Ralph

WALT DISNEY STUDIOS MOTION PICTURES

14. Ice Age: Continental Drift 15. Snow White and the Huntsman 16. Hotel Transylvania 17. Taken 2 18. 21 Jump Street 19. Lincoln 20. Prometheus 21. Safe House

22. The Vow 23. Magic Mike 24. The Bourne Legacy 25. Argo 26. Journey 2: The Mysterious Island 27. Flight 28. Think Like a Man 29. Rise of the Guardians 30. The Campaign 31. The Expendables 2 32. Life of Pi 33. Wrath of the Titans 34. Beauty and the Beast 3D 35. Dark Shadows 36. John Carter

37. Act of Valor 38. Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol 39. Les Miserables 40. Contraband 41. Looper 42. Tyler Perryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Madeaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Witness Protection 43. Battleship 44. Mirror Mirror 45. Chronicle 46. Pitch Perfect 47. Django Unchained 48. Hope Springs 49. Underworld: Awakening 50. The Lucky One

*movies with instances of gun violence are in bold

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Ben Allen, president of Downtown Jackson Partners, makes the opening remarks at the first Team Jackson luncheon at The South Warehouse off State Street.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Vision 2022 is an initiative that takes a lot of projects, money and things to do. Team Jackson is more to share the information and keep everybody plugged in,â&#x20AC;? Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill told the Jackson Free Press. â&#x20AC;&#x153;(Vision 2022) is more down in the nitty gritty, making it happen.â&#x20AC;? Like Vision 2022, Team Jackson also consists of 10 committees. Marika Cackett, co-chairwoman of the Team Jackson news committee, said Team Jackson, unlike Celebrate Jackson, is not focused solely on the capital city, but also on surrounding suburbs.

From Team Jackson and Vision 2022 to Celebrate Jackson, the capitol city suddenly has a host of organizations trying to change the perception of the city. How is a bit more unclear.

To help those suburbs, Good said the focus needs to be on Jackson, though. For the suburbs to thrive, he warned, the core city must thrive. Not a Political Platform Despite the 100-plus member group including businesses and individuals with direct links to political candidates in this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s city election, and the timing of its announcement, Cackett says Team Jackson is not a political group. Mayoral candidate Jonathan Lee is a member of Team Jackson, as are former City Councilman Ben Allen, who has remained actively involved in city politics, and the law firm of Sam Begley, who has close ties to Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr. and worked on his campaign in 2005. The city is also listed as a member, although city sources say it has not been actively involved in the effort. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think if you look at the different committees and the different people, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all very different people,â&#x20AC;? Cackett said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not trying to elect someone to office. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not what this is about. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re just trying to let people know whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going on in our city.â&#x20AC;? Money for Team Jackson membership and bi-monthly meetings goes to the Central Mississippi Growth Foundation, a non-profit created in 1970 by the Greater Jackson Chamber Partnership. Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill said the foundation is a way for the GJCP to raise and distribute funds for various projects without having to create separate non-profit organizations. CMGFâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tax records show the nonprofit brought in $656,604 in 2010 and $706,671 in 2009. Most of those revenues, between $484,000 and $540,000, come from membership dues. Most of the remainder, about $160,000, came from government grants. Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill said he couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t say exactly without looking at the records, but that he

believes the membership dues come from fund raising. The grants are mostly workforce development grants, Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill said, that the GJCP uses for job training projects. The largest expenditure for the foundation over the past five years has been the Horizon United campaign. Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill said Horizon United was GJCPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s five-year plan that led up to Vision 2022. It is now complete. Among other investments, the Greater Jackson Chamber Partnership donated $250,000 through the foundation to the Pearl River Vision Foundation for its lake project. That foundation is led by McGowan Working Partners, which is also a Team Jackson member and active in local politics. Central Mississippi Growth Foundation filed tax returns as a IRC 501(c)(6), which includes business leagues and chambers of commerce. Under that filing, CMGF is legally capable of making campaign contributions to candidates and lobbying office holders, as long as neither of those actions is the organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s primary activity. Paul Moak, former president of the GJCP, said he did not know much about the foundation, even though he is listed as the groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s president on its 2010 IRS Form 990. He said his presidency at GJCP made him president of CMGF. He said CMGF is not a political organization. CMGF makes it easier for the GJCP to fund various projects, such as Team Jackson, Moak said. Instead of having to set up nonprofits for each program, GJCP can use the Central Mississippi Growth Foundation name to report the revenues and expenditures of Team Jackson. Why exactly the chamber set up CMGF in the first place is a mystery to Moak. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s primarily a vehicle that was just created to help facilitate a lot of different things that have occurred over the years without having to recreate (a nonprofit) every time some project comes down the pike,â&#x20AC;? Moak said.

jacksonfreepress.com

A Team â&#x20AC;Ś Vision? In January, two business groups, Downtown Jackson Partners and the Jackson Chamber of Commerce announced Team Jackson, an effort to counter bad perceptions about Jackson and promote business in the city and its suburbs. Membership in this group is available to anyone for a fee of $100. It is made up of schools, businesses, individuals and organizations from around the city. Team Jackson states the same basic and vague goals of Celebrate Jackson: to provide citizens a chance to be heard, to focus on the positives in the city and to move the city forward with one united vision. To accomplish its goals of spreading positive perceptions, Team Jackson plans to hold luncheons every other month for members and their guestsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;who presumably are already on board with the groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mission. The lunches cost $20. Non-members are invited to join luncheons, but Team Jackson requires a RSVP. At the groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first luncheon Jan. 15, organizers pledged to move Jackson forward. Jeff Good, member of the board of directors of the Greater Jackson Chamber Partnership, also spoke to the crowd of more than

100 Team Jackson members about Vision 2022, yet another chamber-led project that popped up in recent months. Vision 2022, which the GJCP announced in October, is a comprehensive 10-year plan for the entire Jackson metro that includes building a lake near downtown Jackson, a medical corridor along Lakeland Drive and Woodrow Wilson Avenue, pedestrian trails throughout the metro, and a focus on aerospace engineering development, as well as other aspects. A group of 10 volunteer committeesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;separate from 10 Team Jackson committeesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;are steering the Vision 2022 initiative. Good said the committees donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t set any agendas, because the plan is already complete. The committeesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; job is to put the plan into action. Duane Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill, president and CEO of GJCP, said after the Jan. 15 meeting that Team Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s purpose is to act as a public relations tool for the chamber and the Vision 2022 plan. He hopes that Team Jackson will help bring the 10-year plan, which focuses on the growth of Jackson as well as its suburbs, to fruition. JACOB D. FULLER

Jason Thompson of Fahrenheit Creative Group said he is working with the city to plan the next steps of the campaign and search for new avenues of funding. Thompson said Fahrenheit hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t spent the full $98,000, but the company approached the Jackson Convention and Visitors Bureau board Nov. 30 and asked for additional public funding for the campaign. JCVB Executive Director Wanda Wilson told the JFP that Fahrenheit Creative didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ask for an exact amount, and didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t present any specifics about how it would use the money. Other sources present at the meeting, though, said Mayor Johnson warmed the room up before Fahrenheit Creative requested more than $100,000 in additional funding, based on a vague PowerPoint presentation that gave little specific detail. Despite the lack of details, Wilson still called it a â&#x20AC;&#x153;great presentation.â&#x20AC;? She said Fahrenheit Creative will submit a grant application with more specifics, at which time the JCVB board will make a decision. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is being taken under consideration at this point,â&#x20AC;? Wilson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know for sure until after the grant application has been received.â&#x20AC;? The Jackson Free Press has requested the Fahrenheit proposal, budget and expenses of the Celebrate Jackson campaign to date. The city had not responded to the request at press time.

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9

TALK | politics

Senate 28: Meet the Candidates by R.L. Nave

TAMARRA GRACE BUTLER, health educator Having worked for four years as an assistant to Lt. Gov. Amy Tuck, Tamarra Butler is confident that she knows her way around the Senate. Butler, said she wants to take her practical experience working on political campaigns and in government to build on Harden’s legacy of championing public education and supporting workers’ rights. A resident of the Washington Addition community, Butler believes improving the relationship between Jackson Public Schools and the Legislature, as well as working to attract and retain Mississippi teachers by increasing their salaries, is critical. “We lose teachers to surrounding states because of the pay,” she said. Butler also said she would have to look at the particulars of any charter school bill before deciding whether she would vote yes, but said she also believes in keeping public money in public schools. A community health adviser for the American Cancer Society, Butler focuses on promoting cancer prevention in minority communities. She said her work has demonstrated the need for the state to expand

CASSANDRA WELCHLIN, policy consultant Cassandra Welchlin is running—and walking—for state Senate. Welchlin, a Jackson native and 10year resident of the district, kicked off her campaign on Jan. 7 with a 100-mile walk through the district and a promise to walk the territory and knock on the doors of would-be constituents every day until the special election. Welchlin opposes charter schools and supports Medicaid expansion. She works with the Mississippi Low-Income Childcare Initiative, and believes that Medicaid would help more low-income families get health-care services they need. The candidate also believes that citizens of her district could also benefit from the 9,000 Medicaid expected might create. She can’t say charter schools would have the same benefits, however. “Charter schools would hurt the district,” she said, adding that she’s concerned about tax money following the child to charter schools, which don’t have to meet the same teacher certification requirements as public schools.

“Why are we taking about charter schools when we are not funding our publicschool system?” she asked. KATHY SYKES, organizer Kathy Sykes has what her boss, Bill Chandler of the Mississippi Immigrant Rights Alliance, calls “movement experience.” Sykes, MIRA’s lead organizer, has worked with the Mississippi Poultry Workers’ Center in Morton as a liaison between black and Latino factory workers as well as the Jackson branch of the NAACP. Sykes, who hopes to continue Sen. Harden’s activism—she led a teacher’s strike in 1985—opposes anti-immigration efforts, anti-reproductive-rights legislation and charter schools. “It will drain funds from public schools,” said Sykes about charter schools. She favors specialized public schools such as science and math academies over charters. “The schools are already doing a lot with a little, and they would have to do more with less if we allow the passage of charter schools.” Sykes also wants to expand Medicaid, which she believes would benefit hospitals and community health centers in District 28. “That’s an investment in the people of Mississippi, just like we invested in the Nissan and Toyota plants because they were going to bring jobs here,” Sykes said. “We are investing in the health of Mississippians so that we will improve our health care, longevity and our productivity, and Mississippians are worth it.” Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email R.L. Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com.

COURTESY KATHY SYKES

Medicaid under the federal health-care law known as the Affordable Care Act. Butler also wants to work on economic development along U.S. Highway 80, and is encouraged by the city’s decision to relocate offices and services in Metrocenter Mall. “The district needs more businesses that will come in and be able to hire the people that live in this district,” Butler said. “If people have jobs in the area, then they’ll tend to spend that money in the area.”

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CINDY AYERS-ELLIOT, farmer Two years ago, Cindy Ayers-Elliot became a farmer. At her 68-acre farm, she raises goats for meat and, depending on the season, vegetables under the auspices of her company Foot Print Farms LLC. For AyersElliot, everything goes back to the land, and she wants fellow Jacksonians to farm their backyards for economic empowerment and improve their family’s health. “Prevention is the key. A lot of it ties back to your diet,” Ayers-Elliot said. That’s why she supports expanding Medicaid, which is one of the key issues with which lawmakers will grapple. Covering more people under Medicaid would save the state money in the long run because fewer people will rely on expensive emergency room visits as the primary form of health care, which is costly for hospitals

and taxpayers, she said. Ayers-Elliot, a former assistant to state Treasurer Marshall Bennett, ran unsuccessfully to replace Bennett in the 2000 Democratic primary. She is noncommittal on which way she would vote on a charter-school bill, saying she would have to look at any legislation that comes before the chamber. She said: “I believe in improving what you have. I don’t think you put another layer on top of it.”

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ine people want to fill the Mississippi Senate seat vacated by the recent death of Alice Harden. Broadly, two issues will dominate the session—education and health care. Specifically, the issues are a renewed push to establish charter schools in Mississippi and whether to expand the state’s Medicaid program to qualify for billions of dollars in federal health-care funds. In District 28, which consists of westcentral Jackson including Jackson State University and part of the U.S. 80 corridor, jobs and economic development are other key areas that have the candidates’ attention. Here are snapshots of the four women who are in the race. Next week, we’ll profile the male candidates.

jacksonfreepress.com Harvey Johnson, Jr. - Mayor

11

LEGISLATURE: Week 1

Good to Be Back by R.L. Nave

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orking on a shorter 90-day Charters Set to Fly schedule compared to last A highly anticipated charter-school bill year, Mississippi lawmak- made its way out of the Jan. 15 Senate Eduers got right to work filing cation Committee. The bill allows for the bills in the opening week of the 2013 legislative session. House members filed more than 350 bills and senators filed close to 200 in the first week, including many of the old standbys that have become staples of Mississippi’s legislative proceedings. For example, Rep. Andy Gipson, R-Braxton, and chairman of the House Judiciary B Committee, submitted two anti-abortion bills. The first, Sen. Hob Bryan, D-Amory, and fellow Democrats HB 6, prohibits doctors from denounced anticipated changes to the Public performing an abortion when Employee Retirement System. a fetal heartbeat is present—except in medical emergencies—and re- establishment charter schools, privately run vokes the medical licenses of physicians schools that receive public funding for the who don’t try to detect a heartbeat before children who attend, across the state. Howperforming an abortion. Then, HC 14, ever, school boards in school districts rated A would amend the state Constitution de- or B must approve a charter school’s applicafine a person as all humans “from concep- tion. Proposed charter schools in C, D and tion to natural death.” F district can be approved without the say so Even though the state is embroiled in a of local public school boards. lawsuit over abortion restrictions the LegislaSenators agreed by voice vote to send ture passed last year, Gipson, a Baptist min- the measure to the floor with one key ister, said he filed the bills again because “it’s modification. the right thing to do.” Sen. David Blount, D-Jackson, ofAlso from the here-we-go-again file is fered an amendment to strip virtual Brookhaven Republican Rep. Becky Currie’s schools in the bill. As proposed, the legisbill that puts more regulations on employers lation did allow up to three online charter to prove they’re not hiring people who aren’t schools to operate in Mississippi. authorized to work in the U.S. and imposes Blount told the Jackson Free Press he stiffer penalties on employers who do. wanted to amend the bill because he does Last year’s attempt to implement im- not believe that virtual charter schools, which migration crackdowns similar to those in allow kids to log on to a computer and comArizona and Alabama failed, and over the plete coursework without the supervision of summer at a hearing Gipson convened, Re- a teacher is effective. publicans tipped their hand, signaling that Legislative Republicans have said they immigration efforts this year would focus on want charter school legislation to pass quickbusiness regulation, over which the state has ly. The Senate could vote on the charter bill more leeway to enforce immigration law. as early as today, Wednesday.

Workers’ Rights Redux A push is under way to beef up workers’ protections. Several groups, including the Mississippi Workers’ Center for Human Rights, are lobbying lawmakers to extend workers’ compensation protections “We want to increase workers’ compensation coverage to 520 weeks (10 years),” said Jaribu Hill, executive director of the Mississippi Workers’ Center for Human Rights. Currently, workers can receive up to 8.5 years of workers’ comp. The Mississippi Workers Compensation Commission, reports there were 11,761 workers injured and 84 workers killed on the job in 2011. It’ll be an uphill climb to get lawmakers in Mississippi to give workers any more rights. Last year, Republicans succeeded in rolling back rights by ending the so-called “found dead” presumption that held if workers are found dead at work, the law presume the employee while working and mandating drug and alcohol testing for people hurt at work. Democrats this week also decried proposed chances to the Public Employee Retirement System, PERS. According to the analysis Moak provided reporters, the bill changes the number of PERS board members from 10 to 17 and adds more appointees from the governor and lieutenant governor’s offices. In addition, the so-called 13th check— a cost of living adjustment—would be frozen for three years and tied to the Consumer Price Index. Sen. Derrick Simmons, D-Greenville, said he is worried about the effects of making what he considers unnecessary changes to PERS because in his Delta district, government agencies are among the largest employers. “You can’t change the rules in the middle of the game,” Simmons said. Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email R.L. Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com.

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13

Well Informed and Educated

â&#x20AC;&#x153;W

elcome to a new winter/spring semester at Hair Did University Schools of Cosmetology and Vocational Studies. The universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s objective for 2013 is to enhance the lives of the disenfranchised masses through critical thinking and quality vocational education. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The faculty and staff at Hair Did University are committed to teaching students how to navigate around a system of spiritual and economic oppression. This is the year for teachers to implement and execute a non-traditional method of instructing students. At Hair Did University, over-crowded classes will transform into large think tanks. Students will be required to take arts, humanities, history and political science classes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As dean of students of Hair Did University, I will dedicate my time and effort to develop well-informed and educated graduates capable of critical thinking. I plan to achieve my goal with help from concerned members of the Ghetto Science Community Education Board. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So students, get ready for a different approach toward your education. I hired Chief Crazy Brotha of Jojoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Discount Dollar Store to teach part-time classes in creative store-operations management and theatrical arts. Kunta â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Rahseed Xâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Toby, filmmaker and multi-media artisan, will be your journalism, radio and television production instructor, as well as head of Hair Did Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mass Communications and Marketing Department. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m also honored to have Congressman Smokey â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Robinsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; McBride teach political science, history and economics. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Remember: Classes begin in February. And I hope to see you at H.D.U.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Hair Did University.â&#x20AC;?

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Why it stinks: While the parent company of Al Jazeera English also owns Al Jazeera Arabic, the two stations are not the same. Al Jazeera English is a well-respected news outlet in the West. Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Reillyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quote was part of a daylong FOX rant regarding the sale of Current, focusing on everything from the amount of money Gore stands to make to the fact that the anti-fossil-fuel environmentalist Gore is selling to people in a country that sells a lot of oilâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;fossil fuels. It saved its big guns, though, to skewer Gore over Al Jazeera Arabicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s antiAmerican sentiment. Conveniently, what FOX failed to tell its viewers is that one of its own big stock owners isâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;wait for itâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Saudi Prince Al-Waleed bin Talal, a nephew of the Saudi king, who also owns a share in the anti-American, anti-Israeli network Rotana. One of the other shareholders of Rotana is none other than Rupert Murdoch himself, majority owner of News Corp., the group that includes FOX News and The Wall Street Journal. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a connection you wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hear on FOX News.

Put Funds into Education, Not Guards

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ast week, Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves went on the record to push the National Rifle Associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pro-gun agenda in Mississippi. In case you missed it, NRA chief Wayne LaPierre announced Dec. 21 that he had the answer to gun violence in public schools: Put armed guards in every one. As the largest representative of gun and ammunition manufacturers and dealers in the United States, as well as the largest provider of gun training, LaPierre kindly offered the services of the NRA to help make his multi-billion dollar program a reality. On Jan. 14, Reeves proposed allocating $7.5 million in taxpayer funds to begin carrying out the plan. The initial amount, which Reeves wants the Legislature to pass this session, would cover approximately 750 of Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s roughly 1,050 schools. Schools could apply for the funds, and the state would match up to $10,000 that the schools would need to provide. Simply put, the NRA/Reeves plan would put taxpayersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; money into the wrong side of the equation. Putting armed guards in Mississippi schools, which already have a nationwide reputation for overly harsh disciplineâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and for running school-to-prison pipelinesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;will do more harm than good. The stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s zero-tolerance policies create a hostile environment for the very children that our schools are attempting to educate. And, as any parent of a 13-year-old will tell

you, making enemies of our children is no way to create environments where kids are actually open to learning. The stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard-core discipline policies have done far more to alienate students than educate them. Adding armed guards, metal detectors and all the rest of the paraphernalia that comes along with weapons is a drain on the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economy. Teachers end up being authoritarians instead of educators. Students with multiple suspensions simply get farther behind until all hope of catching up is gone. At that point, dropping out probably looks like a pretty good decision. It isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t, of course, and these kids donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just disappear. Where they are most likely to show up is on the dole, in the courts or behind bars in a Mississippi prison. Even if they find gainful employment, a dropoutâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s earning power and his or her ability to make a meaningful economic contribution to society is radically curtailed. Mississippi loses every time the state makes a decision to put money into the situations caused by decades of systemic racism, poverty and the bigotry of low expectations. More black kids are suspended for minor infractions than whites in just about school districtâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;even the ones that are majority white. More African Americans drop out of school, and more fill the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s prison cells. Mr. Reeves, you could just ignore that NRA campaign contribution. How about trying different tactics now that we know what doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t work?

Email letters to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019 or mail to P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, MS 39296. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Or write a 300-600-word â&#x20AC;&#x153;Your Turnâ&#x20AC;? and send it by email, fax or mail above with a daytime phone number. All submissions are subject to fact checks.

JOE ATKINS

Editor-in-Chief Donna Ladd Publisher Todd Stauffer EDITORIAL News Editor Ronni Mott Features Editor Kathleen Morrison Mitchell Reporters Jacob Fuller, R.L. Nave Events Editor Latasha Willis Deputy Editor Briana Robinson Copy Editors Dustin Cardon, Molly Lehmuller Music Listings Editor Natalie Long Fashion Stylist Meredith Sullivan Writers Torsheta Bowen, Ross Cabell Marika Cackett, Richard Coupe, Jim Pathfinder Ewing, Bryan Flynn, Genevieve Legacy, Anita Modak-Truran, Larry Morrisey, Eddie Outlaw, Julie Skipper, Kelly Bryan Smith Editorial Interns Susan Hogan, Damian Kelly, Octavia Thurman, Mo Wilson Consulting Editor JoAnne Prichard Morris ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY Art Director Kristin Brenemen Advertising Designer Andrea Thomas Production Designer Latasha Willis Staff Photographer/Videographer Trip Burns Editorial Cartoonist Mike Day Photographers William Patrick Butler, Tate K. Nations, Amile Wilson Graphic Design Interns Ariss King, Melvin Thigpen ADVERTISING SALES Sales Director Kimberly Griffin Advertising Coordinator Monique Davis Account Executive Stephanie Bowering Marketing Assistant Samantha Towers BUSINESS AND OPERATIONS Executive Assistant Erica Crunkilton Bookkeeper Montroe Headd Distribution Manager Matt Heindl Distribution Raymond Carmeans, Jeff Cooper, Clint Dear, Robert Majors, Jody Windham ONLINE Web Developer Matt Heindl Web Editor Dustin Cardon Multimedia Editor Trip Burns Web Producer Korey Harrion CONTACT US: Letters Editorial Queries Listings Advertising Publisher News tips Fashion

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EMPHIS, Tenn.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Before 1878, this city was a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Casablanca on the Mississippi,â&#x20AC;? a rough river town of 50,000, two-and-a-half miles long and one mile wide, densely populated with immigrants from Ireland, Germany, and Italy, Jews from Central and Eastern Europe, white cotton traders, scalawags and carpetbaggers, and former slaves up from the plantations farther south. It was a city of sharp contrastsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;bars and brothels from its waterfront to its eastern edge, â&#x20AC;&#x153;a dangerous, dirty placeâ&#x20AC;? with pigs roaming the streets, but also churches, opera, French cuisine at the finer restaurants and the ever-present Peabody Hotel. Then came the 1878 yellow-fever epidemic. More than half the population fled. Of the 20,000 who remained, 17,000 got sick, and 5,000 died. It was a plague of biblical dimensions, and it exposed an even deeper dissonance in the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the bravery and selflessness of those who stayed to fight, and the corrupt and cowardly leaders who fled after long refusing to fund the basic city services that might have lessened suffering. Memphis in 1878 became a city of the deadâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;people hiding behind shuttered windows and locked doors, the clickety-clack of wagons carrying the corpses to waiting gravediggers. This is the story that unfolds in Jeanette Keithâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fever Season: The Story of a Terrifying Epidemic and the People Who Saved the Cityâ&#x20AC;? (Bloomsbury Press, 2012, $30). A historian who teaches at Bloomsburg University in Bloomsburg, Pa., Keith offers an amazing tale that hits close to home, not only to Mississippians and Louisianians who remember all too well a different disaster, Hurricane Katrina, but also to the East Coast, still reeling from Superstorm Sandy. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a human tale of untold suffering and courage that makes you question whether weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve really progressed much in our understanding of public and private life, the role of government, and the limits of charity. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yellow Jack,â&#x20AC;? as the fever was known, is a horrific disease. The victimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s temperature tops 105, delirium sets in, and the destruction of the bodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s organs produces the telltale â&#x20AC;&#x153;black vomitâ&#x20AC;? and the stink of impending death. Infected mosquitoes cause the sicknessâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;mosquitoes that originally came from Africa on slave shipsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but people wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know this until Major Walter Reed and others made that determination decades later in Havana, Cuba. The 1878 epidemic wreaked havoc in Mississippi, too. Some 3,000 died. Towns were decimated, some losing half their population. A skinflint Mississippi government

created a Board of Health that helped fight the fever, according to historians James W. Loewen and Charles Sallis. In Memphis, people looking for causes pointed to the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s filth and squalor. Cotton traders in Memphis grew rich but, as a municipality, the city â&#x20AC;&#x153;was a failure,â&#x20AC;? Keith writes. Only the well-to-do had any kind of water or sewage system. Garbage went uncollected, streets turned to mud after heavy rains, and crime ran rampant while political leaders enjoyed mint juleps with cotton traders at the Peabody. Of course, people blamed the poor, particularly Irish workers who populated the teeming warren of shanties along the levees. Race complicated things. Memphis largely escaped the ravages of the Civil War. White bitterness after the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lost Cause,â&#x20AC;? however, led to one of the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worst race riots there in 1866. Newly enfranchised black voters aligned with the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Irish and Italian immigrants in the mid-1870s and put a halfdozen blacks on the City Council and an Irishman in the mayorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office. Reconstruction ended in 1877, however, and white rule soon reasserted itselfâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;with a vengeance. As horrible as it was, the 1878 epidemic provided an opportunity for a major southern city to point the way to a truly â&#x20AC;&#x153;New Southâ&#x20AC;? where all people could work together. Among the heroes who stayed to fight the scourge were Catholic priests and nuns, Episcopalian nuns, the brothel madam Annie Cook, doctors, nurses, journalists, and a host of former slaves who, as soldiers, police officers, relief workers and nurses, used their newfound freedom to help others. They were celebrated for a while, but then attitudes on race and class hardened. Banquets held after the plague excluded not only blacks but also working-class Irish and women. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The very fact that white Memphians (and white Memphis) would not have survived without the aid of blacks was something that whites had to deny and hide,â&#x20AC;? Keith says. Memphis was a changed city after 1878, even losing its charter for a while. From a city of European immigrants, it became a city of poor southern black and white immigrants. Modern Memphis is a city of 650,000, famed for the music that those poor southerners made its legacy, and poverty and crime are still a plague. It isâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;like the South as a wholeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;working even today on those old issues of race and class that seem never to go away completely. A veteran journalist who teaches at the University of Mississippi, Joe Atkins is author of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Covering for the Bosses: Labor and the Southern Press.â&#x20AC;? His blog is laborsouth.blogspot.com.

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jacksonfreepress.com

City of the Dead

15

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Guns:

A Public Health Crisis?

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espite the pervasive notion that guns make people safer, science suggests otherwise. “They actually pose a substantial threat to members of the household. People who keep guns in their homes appear to be at greater risk of homicide in the home than people who do not. Most of this risk is due to a substantially greater risk of homicide at the hands of a family member or intimate acquaintance. We did not find evidence of a protective effect of keeping a gun in the home, even in the small subgroup of cases that involved forced entry,” a group of researches wrote in a 1993 article that ran in the New England Journal of Medicine. The article challenged the conventional thinking at the time—which remains the conventional thinking today—and bolstered the long-held view in the medical community of treating guns as a public-health problem, and treating guninduced trauma the same way doctors treat patients suffering from other traumatic events. Consider, for example, that 30,000 people die every year in car accidents. The numbers were once higher but, over the

years, stricter laws requiring passengers to wear seat belts and prohibiting the use of alcohol while operating motor vehicles have caused the number of car crashes to plummet. Recognizing the public-health benefits of ensuring that people drive as safely as possible drove down the rate of vehicle deaths from around 26 per 100,000 people in the late 1960s to 10 per 100,000 today. After the December shooting in Newtown, Conn., in which 20 children and six adults were murdered, publichealth officials urged President Obama to intervene. “The tragedy of gun violence is compounded by the fact that the usual methods for addressing a public health and safety threat of this magnitude—collection of basic data, scientific inquiry, policy formation, policy analysis and rigorous evaluation—are, because of politically-motivated constraints, extremely difficult in the area of firearm research,” the group wrote in the Jan. 10 letter. Pro-gun groups such as the NRA have resisted government-funded research about the effects of gun violence, however. An investigation by NBC News revealed that U.S. Rep. Jay Dickey, R-Ark., led a push in the mid1990s to slash $2.6 million from the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, THE EFFECTS OF GUN VIOLENCE a division of the Centers for Disease Control COULD A PUBLIC HEALTH APPROACH END THE CYCLE? and Prevention. Ultimately, center’s budget remained intact but gun-friendly lawmakers 9OUTH3HOT succeeded in adding language to the CDC’s 4REATEDIN 3TABBED OR appropriation bill in Congress that “none of $EATH *AIL %MERGENCY !SSAULTED the funds made available for injury preven$EPARTMENT tion and control at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention may be used to advocate or promote gun control.” !DMITTEDTO Meanwhile, the number of gun-related )NPATIENT 2ETALIATION deaths tends to mirror deaths that result from 3URGICAL other forms of trauma. In 2009, the United 3ERVICE States saw 31,347 firearms deaths. Of those, about 60 percent were suicides, and 37 percent were homicides. Homicide is the leading cause of death for young people $ISCHARGEDTO 'ET7EAPON !CUTE ages 10 to 24, according to the Centers for 3ELF -EDICATE 3TRESS THE3TREET Disease Control and Prevention. Dr. John Porter is a trauma surgeon in SOURCE: JOURNAL OF TRAUMA & DISSOCIATION the emergency department of the University

of Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson, and is on the frontlines of the public-health crisis rising from the cycle of gun violence. “When a person gets traumatized, whether it’s a gunshot wound or a car crash, what the doctor does at that point is not the end,” Porter said. “There’s a big path to recovery that includes nursing, rehabilitation, physical therapy, occupational therapy and also of the families that are involved because it’s such a huge event.” Annually, medical costs and lost productivity from gun violence totals more than $70 billion, according to a 2007 American Journal of Preventive Medicine article, “Medical Costs and Productivity Losses Due to Interpersonal and SelfDirected Violence in the United States.” At UMMC, the path to healing begins in the ER, where a team of surgeons, residents and nurses stabilize the victim before there, the patient receives case managers, social workers, physical therapists and speech therapists who work not only to get the victim and his or her family on the road to recovery. A unique feature of UMMC’s trauma program involves working closely with churches in the victim’s community and talking to children, Porter said. “Sometimes on TV, it makes it looks like you’re a hero to be shot, but we want to point out all the pain and all the recovery involved,” Porter said. About 18 percent of patients seen in the UMC trauma center are penetrating trauma victims—shootings and stabbings—and Porter sees many of the same patients over and over. In fact, the trauma recidivism rate is around 30 percent, and the severity of the wounds worsens with each shooting, Porter said. To Porter, treating gun-related trauma from a publichealth perspective is similar to fighting an infectious disease pandemic. “You have the host—that’s the person who was shot. You also have the environment, which is where the person lives. And then the pathogen is actually the guns itself,” Porter explained. Porter eschews debates about gun control, preferring instead to offer his trauma patients with information on how to store guns and ammunition more safely. “I’m not in the business of saying who can have a gun, I’d just like the guns to be safer so fewer people get shot,” Porter said.

jacksonfreepress.com

by R.L. Nave

17

Castle Doctrine: Not So Cut and Dried by Jacob D. Fuller

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n 2008, Justin Vanquez Thomas, 24, shot and killed Dexter Harris outside the Southaven Performing Arts Center. According to witnesses, a gang known as â&#x20AC;&#x153;TNTâ&#x20AC;? was assaulting Justin Buckner, Thomasâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; friend, outside the center. Thomas fired two shots into the air to distract the gang. It worked. The gang left Buckner and turned their attention to Thomas, who got into his car. The gang surrounded the vehicle and began banging on it, at which time Thomas fired two shots out of the car. Both bullets struck Harris, killing him.

Mississippi legislators passed one of the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s broadest Castle Doctrine laws in 2006, giving Mississippians a wide range of legal reasoning to use deadly force. The statute exists as a lengthy amendment to the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;justifiable homicideâ&#x20AC;? law. The amendment set several key provisions under which Mississippians can use deadly force. One criterion is location: A person can invoke the doctrine from inside or in the immediate vicinity of a vehicle, a dwelling or a place of business. A dwelling does not only apply to a personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home. It

can apply to any place with a roof, mobile or immobile, that he or she plans to occupy for at least one night, even a tent. Secondly, the law states that the person who uses the deadly force must do so â&#x20AC;&#x153;in resisting any attempt unlawfully to kill such person or to commit any felony upon him.â&#x20AC;? The law requires that the person who uses the deadly force must have a reasonable fear for his own or anotherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life or health. If a person has unlawfully entered a dwelling or vehicle, for example, or has unlawfully attempted to remove someone from a dwell-

ing, vehicle or place of business, a defender could use those actions to demonstrate his or her fear. Under these provisions, Thomas claims to have a defense under the statute; however, two juries failed to agree. In April 2009, a jury convicted Thomas of manslaughter after the judge denied Thomasâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; attempt to claim innocence based on the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Castle Doctrine. The court sentenced Thomas to 15 years in prison. The Mississippi Appeals Court overturned the ruling Aug. 30, 2011, saying

More Gun Control in Mississippi? by Jacob D. Fuller

January 16 - 22, 2013

Can Felons Own Guns?

18

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The stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s other major prohibitive law is a requirement for retailers to make a public record of firearm or ammunition purchases, including buyerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name, type of gun or amTRIP BURNS

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ith statewide household gun ownership at 54 percent in Mississippi, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no secret that heightened gun-control laws arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t likely to get much support from the state Legislature. Vice President Joe Biden and President Barack Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gun control task force are addressing possible gun-control measures on the federal level this month. That has some state and local officials thinking and talking about gun laws. There seems to be a consensus about the goal: greatly reducing, if not eliminating, mass murders like that of teachers and students at Sandy Hook Elementary School. Getting people to agree on how to reach that goal is far from simple. In Mississippi, it is as easy as just about anywhere to purchase a firearm. Any resident 18 or older who has not been convicted of a felony can purchase rifles, shotguns and any non-felon 21 or older can buy handguns. The state does not require a waiting period, a permit to purchase guns, licensing of gun owners or registration of firearms. One prohibitive law on the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s books is one that requires a permit to carry a handgun or concealed weapon, including stun guns, several types of knives, rifles with barrels under 16 inches long and shotguns with barrels less than 18 inches long. The license costs $100 from the Department of Public Safety. The DPS can deny a license to anyone under 21, anyone convicted of a felony, violent misdemeanor in the previous three years, committed to a mental health, drug or alcohol rehabilitation program in the previous three years, or anyone with a physical disability that prevents them from properly handling a firearm.

A vendor shows off part of his collection at a Jan. 12 gun show in Jackson at the Trade Mart Building.

munition purchased, and the date. Rep. John Moore, R-Brandon, is chairman of the House Education Committee. He believes the answer to preventing gun violence is less about getting guns out of the wrong hands and more about getting them in the right hands. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m thinking very strongly about introducing a piece of legislation that requires each school district to arm some of their staff so this kind of situation wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t happen,â&#x20AC;? Moore told the Jackson Free Press. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When you put a big sign out in front of a school full of children that says, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;This is a gun-free

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zone,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; that means to the person whose intent is to do them hard that heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got a free rein. He can go in there and kill as many people as he can carry the bullets in there for.â&#x20AC;? Potential gunmen may change their minds if they know there are an unknown number of licensed gun owners with concealed weapons in the school, Moore said. He will think long and hard before introducing such legislation, however, because he knows it will create a lot of backlash. In 2011, the state passed a law that allows licensed carriers to have concealed guns on college campuses. Previously, guns were not allowed on any campuses in the state. On elementary and secondary campuses, only non-students can possess weapons, and only if the weapon remains in a motor vehicle and no one brandishes the weapon. Gov. Phil Bryant told the Jackson Free Press Jan. 7 that he would like to see legislation that would require armed guards on school campuses. All other state buildings already have armed guards, he said. A 2011 study by the non-profit Violence Policy Center shows the numbers donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t support Mooreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s claim that more guns equal less gun violence. The study showed that Mississippi, which has some of the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s loosest gun laws and one of the highest percentages of household gun ownership, ranked second in the nation in gun deaths at 19.32 per 100,000 deaths. All of the top five statesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Alaska, Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama and Wyomingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;had a household ownership greater than 45 percent. In contrast, the bottom five states in gun deaths all had household ownership of less than 19 percent. Rep. Edward Blackmon Jr., D-Canton, believes the state needs to push for bans on assault-style rifles and high-capacity magazines. Such weapons are clearly not made for sport hunting but maximizing human casualties, Blackmon said. Such weapons were illegal for civilian ownership in the United States under the Public Safety and recreational Firearms Use Protection Act from September 1994 through September 2004, when the act expired. Federal legislators have made several attempts to reinstate the law, often called the assault-weapon ban, but no legislation regarding the weapons has reached the House floor for a vote in the eight years since.

SAN FRANCISCO WORLD SPIRITS COMPETITION

FLICKR/JO NAYLOR

the lower court should have allowed Hawthorne drove away. the jury to consider the Castle Doctrine The jury didn’t see it that way; it acquitdefense. “Thomas was entitled to a jury in- ted Pannu of both charges. struction that properly covered his theory Smith said after the trial that he believed of defense under the Castle Doctrine,” Chief Judge L. Joseph Lee wrote in the decision. Thomas went to trial a second time on the charge last April. The court declared a mistrial and scheduled another trial for August. That third trial ended much the same as the second, with a hung jury and no decision. Despite state lawmakers’ attempt in 2006 People can invoke Mississippi’s Castle Doctrine from inside to make the Castle Docor in the immediate vicinity of a vehicle, a dwelling or a place of business. trine less ambiguous and more black and white, gray areas still exist, often leaving the determination of justifiable or the jury’s perceptions of crime in Jackson afunjustifiable homicide up to police, juries fected the decision. People fear being robbed and judges. and killed, he said, and he believed the jury For example, in August 2008, the same was trying to send a message that such bemonth Thomas shot and killed Harris, Sa- havior would not be tolerated. brinder Pannu shot and killed James HawDays after Pannu shot Hawthorne, thorne, 15, outside the J & S Food Mart on on Aug. 25, 2008, Terrance Prior entered a Medgar Evers Boulevard in Jackson. Haw- convenience store on Robinson Road wearthorne had stolen a case of beer and was in ing a mask and carrying a gun and robbed a car pulling away when Pannu shot and the store. killed him. After he left the building, the clerk Hinds County District Attorney Robert chased Prior, and shot and killed him. In Shuler Smith prosecuted Pannu for murder that case, law enforcement refused to press and for firing his weapon into an occupied charges against the shooter, citing the Castle vehicle. Smith argued that neither Pannu’s Doctrine. Authorities did not release the life nor anyone else’s life was in danger as shooter’s name.

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ALEC Pushes Stand-YourGround Bills by Jacob D. Fuller

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lorida’s “Stand Your Ground” law, which received widespread media coverage after the shooting death of Trayvon Martin Feb. 26, 2012, is similar to Mississippi’s Castle Doctrine, with one major difference: location doesn’t matter. The law, Title XLVI, Ch. 776.012 of Florida law, a person can use deadly force and does not have the duty to retreat if “[h]e or she reasonably believes that such force is necessary to prevent imminent death or great bodily harm to himself or herself or another or to prevent the imminent commission of a forcible felony.” This provision allows a person to use defensive deadly force just about anywhere he or she feels threatened. The second provision of the law sets up the defense of one’s home, work or vehicle, much like Mississippi’s Castle Doctrine. The Florida law became a model for legislation that the American Legislative Exchange Council has promoted across the country. ALEC is a group made up of legislators, corporate organizations and lobbyists, including the National Rifle Association and Walmart, the nation’s leading gun retailer. In August 2005, NRA lobbyist Marion Hammer asked legislators and lobbyists at a meeting of ALEC’s Criminal Justice Task Force to adopt Florida’s stand-your-ground law as model legislation for other states. At the time, Walmart co-chaired the Criminal Justice Task Force, which accepted the NRA’s pitch. To date, more than two dozen states have adopted similar legislation that originated with ALEC and the NRA.

19

The ‘Gun-Show Loophole’ by Ronni Mott

Pub Quiz with Andrew

THURSDAY 01/17

Vulcan Eejits (Traditional Irish)

FRIDAY 01/18

Baby Jan and all that Chaz (Soul/Jazz)

SATURDAY 01/19

More than Caffeine (Acoustic Pop)

SUNDAY 01/20

Ceili 2 - 5pm

with Jackson Irish Dancers

MONDAY 01/21

Karaoke w/ Matt Open Mic with Zach Lovett

Includes Drink & Choices of Fresh Vegetables

TRIP BURNS

All for only

$7.98

Monday: Hamburger Steak Tuesday: Grilled Tilapia or Fried Chicken Wednesday: Roast Beef

January 16 - 22, 2013

Thursday : Chicken Diane

20

or Grilled Pork Chop Friday: Meatloaf or

Chicken & Dumplings

Handguns for sale at the Jackson Gun Show. Private sellers don’t need to run background checks on buyers.

A gun vendor displays his wares to Mississippians at the Jackson Gun Show that took place Jan. 12 and 13 at the Trade Mart Building. Organizers estimated that the turnout hit record numbers; some attendees waited in line for hours just to get in.

monitors, at most, 2 percent of gun shows fickers,” published in June 2000. In 2005, nationally. The bureau hasn’t had a perma- Canada’s Criminal Intelligence Service called nent director in six years; the U.S. Senate, unregulated American gun shows a “serious which hasn’t brought a nomination up for threat.” And a study from the University of a vote in that time, must confirm nominees Oxford in 2002 estimated that 80 percent of for the position. The department’s budget Mexico’s illegal firearms are imported from has been nearly stagnant for a decade, as has the United States. its staffing levels. The Virginia Center for Public Safety A spider’s web of laws further hampers has determined that background checks the bureau’s effecwork to keep firetiveness. For examarms out of the ple, the agency canhands of criminals. not maintain a daIn 2005, licensed tabase of firearms, dealers doing backmaking tracing ground checks preand determination vented 2,668 illeof gun ownership gal gun sales. The a tedious, manual Virginia Tech Reprocess when a fireview Panel recomarm has been used mended closing in a crime. the so-called “gunBetween the show loophole” to Gun shows are a common occurrence in legal loopholes and its state legislature. Mississippi nearly every weekend, as they are nationwide. Some 5,000 shows take lack of regulation “Gun shows place annually in the United States. and enforcement, provide a large margun shows have ket where crimibecome sales bonanzas for those who are nals can shop for firearms anonymously. either unable or unwilling to sell or buy Unlicensed sellers have no way of knowing firearms legally. Few states have laws that whether they are selling to a violent felon govern gun shows, and Mississippi isn’t one or someone who intends to illegally trafof them. The exhibitor registration form for fic guns on the streets to juveniles or gangs. the Jackson Gun Show, which holds three Further, unscrupulous gun dealers can shows in the Mississippi Trade Mart annu- use these free-flowing markets to hide their ally, asks for minimal information, which off-the-book sales,” wrote the authors in doesn’t include whether the exhibitor is a “Gun Shows: Brady Checks and Crime Gun federally licensed dealer. Traces” in 1999. The report was a joint effort Gun shows are the second-leading of the U.S. departments of the Treasury and source of crime guns recovered in firearms Justice in cooperation with the ATF. trafficking investigations nationwide, behind “While most gun-show sellers are hononly corrupt federally licensed dealers, re- est and law-abiding, it only takes a few to ported the ATF in “Following the Gun: En- transfer large numbers of firearms into danforcing Federal Laws Against Firearms Traf- gerous hands,” the report concluded. TRIP BURNS

TUESDAY 01/22

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WEDNESDAY 01/16

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ississippians with a yen to add to their personal arsenals can head out to a gun show in the state just about any weekend of the year. A quick review of the MississippiGunShows.com website Jan. 4 listed 52 shows in 2013, with 11 in Jackson alone—one every month except June. Gun shows have proliferated in the United States since 1986, when Congress passed the Firearm Owners Protection Act. That law reversed a section in the Gun Control Act of 1968 that prohibited firearms dealers who hold a Federal Firearms License to sell guns anywhere but their registered address. After passage of the FOPA, dealers could take their “stores” on the road. The so-called “gun-show loophole” takes these shows—which numbered more than 5,000 in 2005—to a whole new level. Under federal law, retailers, manufacturers and others who sell guns as a business must be licensed. Licensed sellers must perform background checks on the people who buy guns from them and keep records of their sales, though records of background checks must be destroyed after 24 hours. Hobbyists, collectors and others who only make occasional sales are exempt from either performing background checks or keeping records of who buys their guns. These “private” sellers make up an estimated 25 percent to 50 percent of sellers at gun shows. No background check on purchasers makes it easy for anyone to buy guns, even those who can’t pass a check and are legally prohibited from owning firearms, such as convicted felons. The federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives’ lack of adequate resources to enforce gun laws makes buying guns at gun shows even easier. The ATF

by R.L. Nave

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JOSE M. OSORIO/CHICAGO TRIBUNE

ate on the evening of May 20, 2010, Arkansas, southern states provided 17 perThomas Wortham IV was sitting on cent of Chicago’s guns. his motorcycle when a car pulled up. The gun used in Wortham’s murder, for A Chicago police officer who had example, came from Holly Springs. There, a just returned from a second tour of duty in West Chicago resident and Rust College stuIraq as second lieutenant with the Wisconsin dent named Quawi Gates, hatched a MisArmy National Guard, Wortham bought sissippi-to-Chicago gunrunning scheme. the Yamaha R1 as present to himself and While at Rust, Gates recruited Mississippi had gone to his parents’ house to show them residents, including friends from college, to pictures from a recent trip. buy guns at local gun shops and gun shows. As he sat in front of his parents’ home on South King Drive, four armed young men exited their Nissan Maxima attempting to take the motorcycle away from him. Wortham identified himself as a police officer and brandished his service weapon, but took a fatal bullet from a .45-caliber Smith & Wesson to his abdomen. His father, a retired police sergeant, heard the shots and rushed out onto the porch with to his son’s Thomas Wortham IV, a Chicago police officer aid and fired his weapon at the asand Iraq war veteran, was killed during a 2010 sailants, wounding two of the robshootout with a gun traced to Mississippi. bers, one of them fatally. Chicago has increasingly developed a reputation for unceasing gang warfare Gates then illegally transported the weapons that has resulted in one of the nation’s high- back to Chicago where he would sell them to est murder rates. But the roots of the city’s gang members, federal prosecutors said. problem with guns, including the one that The investigation by the Chicago and killed Wortham, go much deeper than Chi- Oxford branches of the Bureau of Alcohol, cagoland gangs, often extending southward Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) redown Interstate 55 to Mississippi. vealed that five firearms purchased on Gates’ Chicago officials have long decried this behalf were used in violent Chicago-area so-called “Dixie Pipeline” of guns purchased crimes, including Officer Wortham’s murlegally in southern states, where gun laws are der. Gates received a sentence of 10 years in more lax, and transported to northern cities prison for orchestrating the plot; four Miswhere familial ties to the South are strong. sissippians were also charged for buying the “It’s a multiple-pronged problem,” said guns for Gates. Nick Roti, chief of CPD’s Bureau of OrgaCourt documents in the government’s nized Crime. case against Quawi Gates illuminate the In 2010, the year Wortham was killed, problem of using straw purchasers, people Chicago had 435 murder, good enough give with clean criminal histories who buy guns the city its lowest homicide rate in 45 years. for someone else. According to the transcript Last year, the number of murders ballooned of Gates’ plea bargain, a woman named Jacto 500 by the close of 2012. quisha Sims bought one gun for Gates from A University of Chicago analysis con- a gun shop in Southaven and three more at ducted for the Chicago Police Department gun show in Tupelo. shed light on exactly how out-of-state guns “Sims stated that she knew that Quawi complicate matters for law enforcement was from Chicago and assumed that he was agencies by analyzing more than 17,230 not allowed to buy firearms in Mississippi guns that cops recovered from January 2008 because he was an out-of-state resident,” to March 2012. Only 42 percent of them stated Susan Bradley of the U.S. Attorney’s originated in the state; the rest poured in office during Gates’ 2010 plea hearing. from out-of-state. Behind Illinois’ next-door Roti, of the CPD, said that loophole neighbor, Indiana, Mississippi sent the most that permits people like Sims to buy weapguns to Chicago. ons at gun shows without a federal backIn all, the analysis showed that roughly ground check could help Chicago reduce its 1,200 guns, or 7 percent of the total num- gun violence and should be closed. ber of guns recovered by CPD, came from “It’s ridiculous,” he said. “It’s just a Mississippi. Adding weapons originating in built-in way to circumvent the law, and Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, Georgia and it’s silly.”

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From Dixie With Slugs

21

The NRA Bankroll by Ronni Mott

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n Dec. 21, National Rifle Association chief Wayne LaPierre went in front of the TV cameras to read an announcement regarding the shootings in Newtown, Conn. The organization, which boasts 4 million members, had hesitated out of respect for the grieving families, he said. LaPierre went on to blame politicians, the media, the â&#x20AC;&#x153;criminal class,â&#x20AC;? prosecutors and the â&#x20AC;&#x153;shadow industriesâ&#x20AC;? of video games and filmmakers for the deaths in Newtown and sites of other mass shootings. His solution to gun violence in schools? Put armed guards in every school and put the NRA in charge: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every school in America needs to immediately identify, dedicate and deploy the resources necessary to put these security forces in place right now. And the National Rifle Association, as Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s preeminent trainer of law enforcement and security personnel for the past 50 years, is ready, willing and uniquely qualified to help.â&#x20AC;?

Contributions by Political Affiliation

$EMOCRAT 2EPUBLICAN

   

SOURCE: FOLLOWTHEMONEY.COM

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an interesting tack for an organization that bills itself as the oldest civilrights organization in America. Founded in 1871 as a marksmanship-training club, today the NRAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest field of operations is lobbying Congress and state legislatures not to pass any laws to regulate guns in America. Beyond the individuals who pay, at most, $35 annually (lifetime memberships are $1,000, available through easypay terms of $25 a month), the association collects millions from its corporate partners, 74 percent of which are in firearms industriesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;manufacturers and sellers of guns and ammunition. These days, the NRA operates primarily as a front group for the $12 billion gun industry. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Since 2005, corporationsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;gun related and otherâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;have contributed between $19.8 million and $52.6 million to the NRA as detailed in its Ring of Freedom corporate-giving program,â&#x20AC;? wrote the Washington, D.C.based Violence Policy Center, a nonprofit think tank, in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bloodmoney: How the Gun Industry Bankrolls the NRA,â&#x20AC;? published in April 2011. Of course, industry lobbyists are neither illegal nor inherently bad. Nonetheless, it is important to understand on which side of the bread an outfit finds its butter. For the NRA, it seems, that grease is on the side of industry, not individual members. A recent poll found that 82 percent of gun owners (including 74 percent of NRA members) support background checks for concealed carry permits, a position the NRA does not support. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most Americans would protect the Second Amendment rights and yet agree with the idea that not every human being should own a gun, not every gun should be available at anytime, anywhere, for

NRA CONTRIBUTIONS TO MISSISSIPPI CANDIDATES #ANDIDATE /F½CE %LECTION3TATUS 0ARTY 2ECORDS %U\DQW3KLO *RYHUQRU :RQ 5HSXEOLFDQ  5HHYHV7DWH /W*RYHUQRU :RQ 5HSXEOLFDQ  %XUWRQ7HUU\& 6HQDWH :RQ 5HSXEOLFDQ  $OGULGJH%ULDQ 6HQDWH :RQ 5HSXEOLFDQ  &KDVVDQLRO 6HQDWH :RQ 5HSXEOLFDQ  /\GLD*UDYHV &ODUNH(XJHQH 6HQDWH :RQ 5HSXEOLFDQ  6 %XFN

(DWRQ%ODLQH %R  +RXVH :RQ 'HPRFUDW  )LOOLQJDQH+DUYH\$ +RXVH :LWKGUHZ 5HSXEOLFDQ  0DUWLQVRQ5LWD +RXVH :RQ 5HSXEOLFDQ  0RRUH-RKQ/ +RXVH :RQ 5HSXEOLFDQ  6PLWK-HIIUH\& +RXVH :RQ 5HSXEOLFDQ  6QRZGHQ*UHJ +RXVH :RQ 5HSXEOLFDQ  6WRQH%LOO 6HQDWH :RQ 'HPRFUDW  :DUG*LOHV. 6HQDWH :RQ 5HSXEOLFDQ  $OGD\:( *HQH  +RXVH :RQ 5HSXEOLFDQ  'HQQ\%LOO +RXVH :RQ 5HSXEOLFDQ  6NHOOLH$VKOH\ 6HQDWH /RVW 5HSXEOLFDQ 

4OTAL                 

SOURCE: FOLLOWTHEMONEY.COM, 2011

anyone,â&#x20AC;? said Frank Luntz, a Republican strategist and author of the poll on CBSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;This Morningâ&#x20AC;? in December 2012. â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;Ś What theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking for is a common-sense approach that says that those who are law-abiding should continue to have the right to own a weapon, but that you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t believe the right should be extended to everyone at every time for every type of weapon.â&#x20AC;? The NRAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s corporate giving levels run from a low of $25,000 to $499,999 at the â&#x20AC;&#x153;James Madisonâ&#x20AC;? level to the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Harlon Carterâ&#x20AC;? level of $5 million to a buck short

of $10 million. The partnerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s program â&#x20AC;&#x153;is geared toward your companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s corporate interests,â&#x20AC;? LaPierre stated in a brochure about the program, according to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bloodmoney.â&#x20AC;? Among the partners are gun manufacturers, distributors and retailers; highcapacity ammunition manufacturers and vendors; and gun accessory manufacturers and vendors. Xe, the new name for Blackwater Worldwide, a company tied

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to abuses during the Iraq War, sits at the George Washington level ($500,000 to $999,999), according to the report. Sturm, Ruger & Co., a firearms manufacturer, donated $1 for each gun they sold in 2011, providing $1.2 million for the NRAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Institute for Legislative Action, the organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lobbying arm, reported The Economist magazine in April 2012. Other NRA corporate-giving opportunities outlined in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bloodmoneyâ&#x20AC;? include a â&#x20AC;&#x153;round-upâ&#x20AC;? program, where buyers can round up their purchases to the nearest dollar and specify the difference for the NRA. The Violence Policy Center attributes more than $5 million in round-up contributions from one company aloneâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; MidwayUSAâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;that went to the NRAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lobbying group. Midway attributes much of its success to the NRA-backed Firearms Ownersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Protection Act, which opened the door for gun and ammunition sellers to market their goods outside of their primary places of business in 1986. In addition to its lobbying group, the NRA manages a political action commit-

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tee that contributes directly to candidates. The NRA Civil Rights Defense Fund does second-amendment-related work on a pro-bono basis, and the NRA Foundation raises and contributes funds to causes as diverse as state fish and game departments to 4-H groups, mostly for recreationalfirearm equipment and training, reported the Business Insider website last month. Together, the NRAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s power and cash make it one of the most powerful lobbying and influence-peddling groups in Washington today. OpenSecrets.org, a website of the Center for Responsive Politics, reports that the organization spent between $1.5 million and $2.7 million on federal-level lobbying between 2001 and 2010. Its PAC spent nearly $19 million in the 2012 elections, of which $10.5 million went to opposing Democrats. In Mississippi, the NRA contributed $12,500 to 17 Republican and two Democratic candidates in the 2011 elections. The largest recipients were Gov. Phil Bryant, $4,500, and Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves, $1,000. On Jan. 11, Reeves called for spending $7.5 million to pay what he called school safety enhancements, including for hiring armed guards

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Vendors showed off an assortment of long-range rifle bullets, which were on dsiplay at a well-attended gun show in Jackson Jan. 12

at Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s public schools. With all of its gun-industry backing, it comes as no surprise that the NRA has become the loudest voice in speaking against any legislation to regulate guns. As Wayne LaPierre wrote in a disparaging release following a meeting with Vice President Joe Biden Dec. 10:

â&#x20AC;&#x153;[W]e will now take our commitment and meaningful contributions to members of Congress of both parties who are interested in having an honest conversation about what works â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and what does not.â&#x20AC;? The question is: Whom will the NRAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s conversation benefit?

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ARTS p 27 | FILM p 27 | 8 DAYS p 28 | MUSIC p 31 | SPORTS p 32

Zappa Is As Zappa Does by Genevieve Legacy

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guitar-meister who fronts Zappa Plays Zappa, was sitting down and finally learning his dad’s music. “I actually had to abandon everything I knew up to that point and start over,” Zappa says. “Learning all new techniques—it was like getting a lobotomy then training for the Olympics.” It took three years of intense study and practice to learn Frank’s music and technique. During that time, Dweezil retooled his entire approach to guitar, learning hybrid-picking—using the extra fingers on his right hand— to play parts written for other instruments, like keyboards or marimba, on the guitar. “There’s a misconception that Frank’s music is a kind of novelty or comedic music with silly lyrics.” Dweezil says. “He recorded over 80 albums in his lifetime, and a lot of it was serious instrumental music.” Case in point: Zappa Plays Zappa recently added a new piece to its repertoire, a whimsical but rhythmically complex and textured instrumental called “Strictly Genteel.” Just listening to the song, looking at the score and figuring out who would play which parts took the band about 15 hours. “With a six-piece band, there’s a lot of multi-tasking. On ‘Strictly Genteel,’ Sheila (Gonzalez) plays sax and keyboards at the same time,“ Dweezil says. “We call the band’s current line-up, ‘the rocking teenage combo.’ … To me, they’re the best.” Dweezil Zappa plays at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave., Suite 601-292-7121) Jan. 31 at 7:30 p.m. with cocktails at 6 p.m. Tickets are $40 at ticketmaster.com at $45 at the door. The show is restricted to those 18 and older. For more information, visit ardenland.net. COURTESY ARDENLAND

January 16 - 22, 2013

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rank Vincent Zappa was a musical prodigy and icon“I would listen and try to find the notes on the guitar oclast whose prolific career ended too soon. Over the and pick them out by ear,” Dweezil says. “Steve showed course of his 30-year career, the self-taught musician me a few rudimentary things like how to hold a guitar and composer wrote and performed rock, jazz, blues pick and a few chords.” and orchestral music. He recorded and produced, made Nine months later, Dweezil was in a recording films, and was an outspoken advocate for voting and voters’ rights. Since Zappa’s death in 1993, his family has kept the torch of his genius burning. In a long-running concert series called “Zappa Plays Zappa,” his eldest son and virtuoso guitarist, Dweezil, tours the U.S. and Europe, performing the music his father is best known for, along with a few surprises from the Zappa Vault to keep devoted fans engaged and new inductees on their toes. The band’s current lineup includes bassist Kurt Morgan, keyboardist Chris Norton, vocalist Ben Thomas, drummer Joe Travers and Sheila Gonzalez, who Dweezil Zappa performs his father’s legendary hits at Duling Hall Jan. 31. plays saxophone, flute and keyboard. At 43, Dweezil has already had an inspiring career. He grew up hearing his father’s music and studio, making his first record—a single called “My whatever Frank was listening to—anything from Delta Mother is a Space Cadet.” His sister, Moon Unit, joined blues to modern composers such as Igor Stravinsky and him on vocals. At his father’s request, Eddie Van Halen Dmitri Shostakovich. produced the song. “I always liked my dad’s music and guitar-playing, but “I put a lot of time into diligent practice, playing 13 to I knew there was something really sophisticated about it,” 14 hours a day,” Dweezil says. “In nine months, I learned Dweezil says. “I knew you’d have to know what you are do- a fair amount of technical ability. I wasn’t a well-rounded ing to play like him.” player at that point,” he continues, “but it was a crazy trip When he started to listen to other music, guitarists, and to go from knowing very little to having a song produced rock legends such as Jimmy Page, Randy Rhoads and Brian by one of your guitar heroes.” May, the young, undaunted son of Frank Zappa decided to Becoming the well-rounded musician he is today has pick up the guitar himself. With a little coaching from his been the outcome of 30 years of diligence, a deep interest dad and guitarist Steve Vai, the ambitious 12-year-old put in music and guitar, not to mention a good dose of musical himself to the task of learning some chops of his own. DNA. The biggest challenge on the road to becoming the

DIVERSIONS | arts

Community Collaboration and Creation by Kathleen M. Mitchell

art in the past, he finds himself drawn more to larger-scale public works. “I guess when you make a painting and you just sell it to an individual, you don’t know what they do with it. Maybe they put it in a basement,” he says. “I think there is something better about doing public art that you share with the community, especially hopefully in a positive way.” He feels the art he does gives him another outlet to share his skills with Jackson besides his day job. “I feel personally that I need to contribute to my community by doing public art,” Allen says. “I own a sign company as well, and Scott Allen’s mural is the first of new public art hitting Midtown soon. that’s a way for me to provide a basic service, things people need. Doing public art, maybe people don’t need it, but it’s a way and focus on growing the Midtown Arts District. to share something with people that is free. It beautifies the “I could go on and on about how important art is. It’s neighborhood and creates a sense of pride. I think by involv- the only thing that makes your town unique, you know, culing the community, too, it gives them a sense of ownership ture,” Allen says. since they all had their hand in there.” “Without that, it’s just Applebee’s and strip malls.” Allen’s mural is just the first of several creative, artistic The free mural unveiling is Jan. 17 at 3:30 p.m. at and entrepreneurship initiatives funded by the National En- 126 Keener Ave. For more information on the Our Town grant dowment for the Arts’ “Our Town” grant. All the projects projects, call Mary Elizabeth Evans at 601-354-5373 or email receiving money from the grant will take place in Midtown maryelizabethevans@midtownpartners.org. COURTESY SCOTT ALLEN

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hen Scott Allen was a kid, his parents let him draw and paint on a stretch of wall in his home. These days, Allen, 33, is still painting on walls, but he has a bit more space to work with. This week, he unveils an outdoor mural nearly 40 feet long, the first of a new crop of public art funded by a grant aimed at bringing art to Midtown. The grant, called an “Our Town” grant, requires the artists it funds to collaborate with the community that will enjoy the finished piece, which Allen found different than the way he normally works. “I’ve done a few (murals), but never one in this way, having to deal with so many people,” he says. “That was tricky to navigate. We started out with some open discussion meetings with community leaders and Midtown people and school people and then started doing revisions through email.” The completed mural features scenes of everyday life in Midtown, all surrounding a large tree of life motif. “The whole concept was kind of a balance between the creative economy that’s there and then the people that live and work there outside of that. I wanted a balance between people working and then people living,” Allen says. One corner features hills and factories as homage to the neighborhood’s old nickname of Factory Hills. Another scene shows a community garden, another the bridge that allows Midtown kids to get to Brown Elementary School without crossing railroad tracks. The mural features artists, welders, children, parents and others. Although Allen has worked on more traditionally sized

Celebration and Remembrance

“Hava Nagila”

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 23 “My First Wedding,” a 2011 comedy from Argentina. Directed by Ariel Winograd, this film follows Jewish-born Adrián’s disastrous attempts to delay his wedding to Catholic-born Leonora after misplacing his and his bride-to-be’s wedding rings. The opening film is shown in memory of Suzanne Goodwin, who passed away unexpectedly in 2012. Godwin was a member of the festival planning committee last year.

THURSDAY, JAN. 24

“My First Wedding”

“A Bottle in the Gaza Sea,” which delves into the Israeli/Palestinian conflict through the lens of precarious friendship between a teenage girl in Israel and a boy in Palestine.

“Hava Nagila.” Including interviews with Harry Belafonte, Leonard Nimoy, Connie Francis, Glen Campbell, Regina Spektor and others, the documentary explores the meaning of the Jewish standard and the history of the ubiquitous song “Hava Nagila.” Following the film is a Klezmer concert featuring Glenn Hartman and Jonathan Freilich, two founding members of the New Orleans Klezmer All-Stars, and Beth Israel’s own Buddy “Dr. Rhythm” Fish.

SUNDAY, JAN. 27 “Remembrance,” showing on the day designated by the United Nations as International Holocaust Remembrance Day. The film explores a love that spans decades, distance and loss. “Beth Israel is proud to show the film “Remembrance” on this special day of observance, the day that we honor the memory of millions of Jews and gentiles who were massacred during the Holocaust. We use this day to reassert our commitment to human rights and religious and ethnic tolerance and appeal to our leaders to develop Holocaust

history education programs to help prevent future acts of genocide,” stated Rabbi Valerie Cohen, Beth Israel Congregation’s religious leader, in a press release.

“Remembrance”

The Jewish Cinema Mississippi film festival is Jan. 23-24 and 26-27 at the Malco Grandview (221 Grandview Blvd., Madison, 601-607-7676). For more information or to purchase festival tickets, visit JewishCinemaMS.com. Tickets purchased on the web site through Jan. 18 are discounted to $35, $15 students, and increase $5 after the 18th. Full price tickets and festival passes can be purchased at the door each night of the festival. All films except “Hava Nagila” are $10, $5 students. Tickets for “Hava Nagila” and the Klezmer concert are $15, $10 students. 27

jacksonfreepress.com

COURTESY JEWISH CINEMA MISSISSIPPI

SATURDAY, JAN. 26

COURTESY JEWISH CINEMA MISSISSIPPI

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or the 11th year, Jewish Cinema Mississippi presents the best films of the year to explore Jewish culture. Out of 60 films screened, the selection committee chose four to bring to Madison’s Malco Grandview. “The film selection process was the most competitive year in the history of the festival,” stated Dr. James Bowley, co-chairman of this year’s festival, in a press release. “These are extraordinarily well-crafted films that have yet to be released commercially in the US or any other market.” Beth Israel Congregation and the Jewish Culture Organization at Millsaps College cosponsor.

COURTESY JEWISH CINEMA MISSISSIPPI

by Kathleen M. Mitchell

THURSDAY 1/17

SATURDAY 1/19

Artist Scott Allen reveals his mural at 3:30 p.m. in Midtown.

The Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parade is at 10 a.m. at Freedom Corner.

WEDNESDAY 1/23 Jewish Cinema Mississippi kicks off at 7:15 p.m. at Malco Grandview Theater.

BEST BETS JAN. 16-23, 2013

Architectural historian Bill Gatlin presents “Art Deco Architecture in Mississippi” during History Is Lunch at noon at the William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Free; call 601-576-6998. … Martin’s hosts Ladies Night. … Jesse “Guitar” Smith is at Burgers & Blues.

THURSDAY 1/17

FLICKR/M J SQUIRE PHOTOGRAPHY

Jackson artist and business owner Scott Allen unveils his new mural at 3:30 p.m. at 126 Keener Ave. in Midtown. The National Endowment for the Arts funded the project. Also watch a time-lapsed video of Allen painting the mural and learn some of his painting techniques. Free; call 601-3545373. … The Third Thursday Art Reception is from 5-8 p.m. at View Gallery (Township at Colony Park, 1107 Highland Colony Parkway, Suite 105, Ridgeland). Wine and cheese

January 16 - 22, 2013

10 a.m. at Rose McCoy Auditorium with Reena Evers-Everette, daughter of Medgar Evers, as the speaker (free), and the For My People Awards Luncheon is at 11:45 a.m. in the Student Center Ballroom; seating limited ($10). Call 601979-3935. … The exhibit “Pieces of the Past: Civil Rights in Jackson” at the Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.) opens today and is up through April 7. Free; call 601576-6920. … The Monster X Tour is at 7:30 p.m. at Mississippi Coliseum (1207 Mississippi St.) and runs through Jan. 20. The event includes motorcycle races and monster truck shows. $17, $25-$40 box seats; call 800-745-3000. … Bluesman and Rock and Roll Hall of Famer B.B. King performs at 7:30 p.m. at Thalia Mara Hall. $35-$85; call 800-745-3000.

SATURDAY 1/ 19

The Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Birthday Celebration Parade kicks off at 10 a.m. at Freedom Corner (Martin Luther King Jr. Drive and Medgar Evers Boulevard). Free; call 601-960-1090. … The Friends of Music New Year’s Sampler is BY LATASHA WILLIS at 6:30 p.m. at Mississippi College (200 Capitol St., Clinton) JACKSONFREEPRESS.COM in Anderson Hall. Enjoy dinner, a silent auction and a conFAX: 601-510-9019 cert with blues artist Dorothy DAILY UPDATES AT Moore as the headliner. RSVP. JFPEVENTS.COM $50, $30 MC employees and students; call 601-925-3440. … Nameless Open Mic is at 9 p.m. at Suite 106. Poets, singers, actors and comedians are welcome. $5 admission, $3 to perform; call 601-720-4640.

EVENTS@

Blues legend B.B. King performs at Thalia Mara Hall Jan. 18 at 7:30 p.m.

served. Free; call 601-856-2001; viewgalleryart.com. … See the Sundance documentary “AMANDLA! A Revolution in Four-Part Harmony” at 6 p.m. at Gallery 1 (One University Place, 1100 John R. Lynch St., Suite 4). Curator Dr. Rico Chapman also talks about the Nelson Mandela exhibit that hangs through Jan. 19. Free; call 601-960-9250. … The simulcast of “A Night with Nicholas Sparks’ ‘Safe Haven’” is at 7 p.m. at Malco Grandview Theatre (221 Grandview Blvd., Madison). $12.50; call 601-898-7819.

FRIDAY 1/18

At Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.),

28 the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Birthday Convocation is at

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WEDNESDAY 1/16

SUNDAY 1/ 20

The Stop the Violence Concert and Rally is at 2 p.m. at Golf World (5124 N. State St.). Enjoy entertainment, motivational speakers and family activities. Free; email pamgreer@rocketmail.com.

MONDAY 1/ 21

The World of Walter Anderson Art Exhibit at Brandon Public Library (1475 W. Government St., Brandon) hangs through Jan. 31. Free; call 601-825-2672. … The Mississippi Artists’ Guild Exhibit at the Mississippi Library Commission (Education and Research Center, 3881 Eastwood Drive) is up through Feb. 28. Free; call 601-432-4111.

Artist Sandra Murchison speaks during History Is Lunch at the Archives and History Building Jan. 23 at noon.

TUESDAY 1/ 22

The Detectives Mystery Dinner Theatre presents the four-act interactive comedy “A Decent Proposal” from 6-9 p.m. at Rossini Cucina Italiana (207 W. Jackson St., Suite A, Ridgeland). Includes cocktails and three-course meal. Must RSVP. $49.50; call 601-937-1752; thedetectives.biz.

WEDNESDAY 1/ 23

Millsaps College art department chairwoman Sandra Murchison discusses her mixed-media interpretations of the Mississippi Blues Trail during History Is Lunch at noon at the William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Free; call 601-576-6998. … Jewish Cinema Mississippi kicks off at 7:15 p.m. at Malco Grandview Theatre (221 Grandview Blvd., Madison) with a screening of “My First Wedding.” Continues Jan. 24 and Jan. 26-27. $10, $5 students; festival pass: $40, $20 students ($5 off before Jan. 18); call 601-572-6122; schedule at jewishcinemams. com. … The New Bourbon Street Jazz Band performs at Hal & Mal’s in the restaurant. … Martin’s hosts Ladies Night at 5 p.m. … Jesse “Guitar” Smith is at Burgers & Blues. More at jfpevents.com and jfp.ms/musicvenues.

Startup Weekend Jackson Jan. 18-20, at Millsaps College (1701 N. State St.), in Leggett Center. Entrepreneurs, marketers, general strategists, developers, designers, programmers and others get together to create a company in three days. Registration required. $75-$99; call 601-960-3640; jackson.startupweekend.org.

(/,)$!9 Martin Luther King Jr. Day Celebration Jan. 19, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., at Mississippi Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Museum (2145 Highland Drive). Children watch Dr. Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Have a Dreamâ&#x20AC;? speech and participate in activities related to civil rights. $8, children under 12 months and members free; call 601-981-5469.

#/--5.)49 Summer Internship Fair Jan. 16, 11 a.m.-5 p.m., at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.), at the New Engineering Building in room 100 and the atrium. Students meet with program coordinators from several universities and the Princeton Review to find out about summer research opportunities. Free; call 601-979-1604. Career Fair Jan. 17, 2-6 p.m., at University of Phoenix, Jackson Campus (120 Stone Creek Blvd., Suite 200, Flowood). Network with local employers and learn about job opportunities. Vendors must RSVP. Free; call 601-664-9510. Precinct 3 COPS Meeting Jan. 17, 6 p.m., at Jackson Police Department, Precinct 3 (3925 W. Northside Drive). These monthly forums are designed to help resolve community issues. Free; call 601-960-0003. Senate District 28 Political Candidates Forum Jan. 17, 6-7:15 p.m., at Johnnie Champion Center (1355 Hattiesburg St.). Candidates share their plans for the district and answer questions. The special election is Feb. 5. Free; call 601-983-9619. Events at Mississippi Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Museum (2145 Highland Drive). Call 601-981-5469. â&#x20AC;˘ S.T.E.A.M. Society Jan. 18, 5-8 p.m. The after-hours program is for children ages 6-12. Topics include science, math, art, technology and engineering. Registration at least 24 hours in advance required. $40 per child. â&#x20AC;˘ Tinker with Tuesdays Tuesdays, 3:30 p.m. Children ages 4-11 learn about science, technology, engineering and mathematics. $8, members and children 12 months and under free.

Soupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s On! Jan. 19, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., at Broadmeadow United Methodist Church (4419 Broadmeadow Drive), in the fellowship hall. Pre-order and pick up your choice of locally-made soup or bread; quantities limited. The event is a fundraiser for the Broadmeadow Neighborhood Association. $10 quart of soup, $5 loaf of bread, $5 per dozen of muffins or rolls; call 251-753-6917; email maureencatherinesmith@gmail.com or inmotion. danahar@yahoo.com; topoffondren.com. Rhino Behind the Scenes Tour Jan. 19, 8:309:30 p.m., at Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.). The zoo staff gives a tour behind the barriers and shows how they care for the rhinos. For ages 16 and up. $60, $50 members; call 601-352-2580, ext. 241; jacksonzoo.org. Youth Participation Initiative Squirrel Hunt Registration through Jan. 21, locations vary. Youth ages 10-15 learn about principles of hunting and firearms safety, squirrel hunting with dogs, the daily life of squirrels and their habitats, and participate in a squirrel hunt Feb. 9. The registration deadline is Jan. 21. Space limited. Free; call 601-432-2044; email chrism@mdwfp.state. ms.us; mdwfp.com. Human Resources: Insurance Coverage for Your Employees Jan. 22, 9 a.m.-noon, at Mississippi Center for Nonprofits (201 W. Capitol St.). Learn more about available insurance policies and how to obtain them. Registration required. $99, $59 members; call 601-968-0061; msnonprofits.org. Mississippi Main Street Associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Back Stage Pass Conference Jan. 23-24, at Pearl River Resort (13541 Highway 16, Choctaw), at Golden Moon. The event includes information sessions, an exhibitor reception, networking, an artist showcase and meals. $125, $55 students with ID; call 601-944-0113; msmainstreet.com.

7%,,.%33 Is This a Migraine? Jan. 16, 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m., at Baptist Health Systems, Madison Campus (401 Baptist Drive, Madison), in the Community Room. Nurse practitioner Gina Burge defines common characteristics, explains causes and gives treatment strategies. Registration required. Free, $5 optional lunch; call 601-948-6262 or 800948-6262; mbhs.org. Diabetes Super Conference Jan. 19, 9 a.m., at Jackson Marriott (200 E. Amite St.). The Diabetes Foundation of Mississippi is the host. The 025((9(1766((3$*(

WEEKLY EVENT CALENDAR WEDNESDAYS

01/16

LADIES NIGHT

1/2 OFF DRINKS FOR LADIES 5PM - UNTIL â&#x20AC;˘ MUSIC STARTS AT 8PM THURSDAYS

01/17

COURTESY FURROWS

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WEDNESDAY 01/16

Emma Wynters (Restaurant) Mark Whittington (Restaurant)

$4 APPETIZERS â&#x20AC;˘5 -9PM

THURSDAY 01/17

with live music by

The

Brian Jones (Restaurant)

Revivalists

FRIDAY 01/18

FRIDAY 01/18 Ribeye Steaks & Baked Potatoes

with live music by

Richard Mcain Pumpkin Pie 6pm-10pm

10pm - close

SATURDAY

01/19

SPACE WOLF

+ 5TH CHILD =

5TH WOLF MONDAY

01/21

2 for 1 DRAFT ALL DAY

Lazy Magnolia, Magic Hat, Lucky Town, Laughing Skull, Blue Moon, Andy Gator, and all of your favorites.

OPEN MIC 10pm TUESDAY

01/22

SHRIMP BOIL â&#x20AC;˘ 5 - 10 PM

MATTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LATE NITE

KARAOKE

$1 PBR & HIGHLIFE $2 MARGARITAS â&#x20AC;˘ 10 - 12pm Live Music By

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Small Talkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and Skeleton Rock

THIS WEEK

Broxton 6 - 10pm

UPCOMING SHOWS 01.24: Space Capone 01.25: Alvin Youngblood 01.26: Gravity A 02.09: Nappy Roots 02.16: Bloodkin 214 S. STATE ST. 601.354.9712 DOWNTOWN JACKSON

Crooked Creek (Restaurant) Bantam Foxes with Liver Mousse (Red Room) SATURDAY 01/19

Captain Green (Restaurant) Dandy & The Lions (Red Room) MONDAY 01/21

MS Blues Societyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Blue Mondays

TUESDAY 01/22

Pub Quiz w Erin and Friends

(Dining Room & Brew Pub)

Coming Soon

01/24: As Cities Burn, Skies Revolt, Waypoint $15 advanced at lostlegendent.com | doors at 7:00 pm / Music 8:00 pm sharp 01/24: Scott Albert Johnson (REST) 01/26: HannaLena (REST) DMI Showcase (RR) 01/30: Singer/Soungwriter Night with Natalie Long 01/31: Mutual Ditchings (REST) 03/16 - Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s St. Paddyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day Parade with headliner Alabama Shakes http://www.ticketmaster.com/event/ 1B004984C1667E2E

MONDAY - FRIDAY

Blue Plate Lunch

$8

with corn bread and tea or coffee

25

Fridays: Catfish Plates are $9.75

$4.00 Happy Hour Well Drinks! visit HalandMals.com for a full menu and concert schedule

601.948.0888

200 S. Commerce St. Downtown Jackson, Mississippi

jacksonfreepress.com

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9.99

interactive program includes presentations and resources. Registration required. $25, $40 two tickets, $10 ages 12 and under; call 601957-7878; msdiabetes.org.

Weekly Lunch Specials

$

Open for dinner Sat. 4-10pm 2-for-1 House Wine 2-for-1 Bottled Domestic Beer Thursday

January 17

LADIES NIGHT

w/ DJ Stache

Now offering a full dinner menu. Now accepting reservations.

Wednesday, January 16th

PATRICK HARKINS (Acoustic) 7-10, No Cover,

Thursday, January 17th

JESSE ROBINSON (Blues) 8-11, No Cover

Friday, January 18th

SOUTHERN KOMFORT BRASS BAND

LADIES DRINK FREE Friday January 18

(Brass Funk) 9-1, $10 Cover

CAPTAIN GREEN

(Americana) 9-1, $10 Cover

Saturday

January 19

KENT GOOLSBY

Saturday, January 19th

LISA MILLS

Tuesday, January 22nd

CHARLES SCOTT

(Piano) 6:30 -9:30, No Cover

HAPPY HOUR ALL NIGHT! -Tuesdays Only-

COMING SOON January 25, 2013

Zac

Harmon Tuesday

January 22

Highlife, Highlife Lite, PBR, Schlitz, Fatty Natty Open Mic w/ Jason Turner

Wednesday January 23 January 16 - 22, 2013

KARAOKE w/ DJ STACHE

30

HAPPY HOUR! TUESDAY ALL NIGHT LONG! Till 7 Wednesday -Friday

2-FOR-1

Open Mon-Sat, Restaurant open Mon-Fri

• DRAFT BEER • WELL DRINKS • APPETIZERS!

facebook.com/Ole Tavern

119 S. President Street 601.352.2322 www.Underground119.com

FREE WiFi 11 am-10 pm & Sat 4-10 pm

601-960-2700

Art in Mind Art Program Jan. 23, 10-11:45 a.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). The Alzheimer’s Association of Mississippi offers the program for people with early-stage dementia and their caregivers. Participants tour the galleries and make art in the studio classroom. Registration required. Free; call 601-987-0020; alz.org/ms. Mental Health First Aid Training Course Jan. 23-24, at Hinds Behavioral Health Services (3450 Highway 80 W.). Learn to become a first responder for someone having a mental health crisis. Registration required. 12 CEU credits may be applicable. $100 per person for one to two people, $75 for a third person; call 601-321-2436. Skin Care Professional Consultations through Jan. 31. SPA Innovations gives free consultations for people ages 14 and up with a focus on acne, blemishes and hyperpigmentation problems. Appointment required. Free; call 601-331-2673 for details.

34!'%!.$3#2%%. Little Opera for Children: “The Pied Piper of Hamelin” Jan. 18, 7:30 p.m. and Jan. 19, 10 a.m., 2:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., at Belhaven University Center for the Arts (835 Riverside Drive), in the concert hall. Vocal arts students present Seymour Barab’s opera of a piper’s magic flute. Free; call 601-974-6494; belhaven.edu.

War Tale of a Woman In-Between,” “Flora and Fauna of the Civil War” and “Bayou-Diversity – Nature and People in the Louisiana Bayou Country.” Free, books for sale; call 601-631-2997; email info@southernculture.org.

#2%!4)6%#,!33%3 Events at New Stage Theatre (1100 Carlisle St.). $150; call 601-948-3533, ext. 232. • Creative Dramatics and Acting Technique Class Registration. Children in grades 1-6 learn basic acting techniques. Classes are Saturdays at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. from Feb. 16-April 6. • Creating a Character Class Registration. Students in junior high and high school develop a character to portray. The eight-week class starts March 18, and classes are Mondays from 5:30-7 p.m. Fiber Folks Jan. 17, 3:30-5 p.m., at Madison Public Library (994 Madison Ave., Madison). Possible projects include spinning, weaving, and knitting. For ages 10 and up. Registration required. Free; call 601-856-2749. “Turn It Up” Hip Hop Dance-a-thon Jan. 19, 12:30-3 p.m., at Courthouse Racquet and Fitness Club, Lakeland (2625 Courthouse Circle, Flowood) Roger and Tena Long of Go Long Productions host the event. Learn the latest hip-hop dances, tips and tricks. For ages 15 and up. $15 through Jan. 16, $20 at the door, $10 members and per person in group of five or more; call 601-932-4800; go-long-productions.com.

“Black Love 3 - The Documentary” Casting Call Jan. 19, 10 a.m., at Dreamz JXN (426 W. Capitol St.). J. Lee Productions holds interviews of single, dating, married and divorced individuals for them to share experiences with love and relationships. People in LGBT and interracial relationships, and those who experienced infidelity are welcome. 18+. Free; call 979-3994; email jleeproductions@yahoo.com.

Bread Basics Jan. 20, 1-5 p.m., at Viking Cooking School (1107 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland). Topics include measuring ingredients, working with leavening agents, mixing, kneading, proofing and testing for doneness. Registration required. $79; call 601-898-8345; vikingcookingschool.com.

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Events at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Free; call 601-960-1515. • Look and Learn with Hoot Jan. 18, 10:30 a.m. This educational opportunity for 4-5 year olds features a hands-on art activity and story time. Please dress for mess. • “Visionaries: The Legacy of the Mississippi Art Association” through Jan. 27, in the McCarty Foundation Gallery.

Events at Lemuria Books (Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N., Suite 202). Call 601-366-7619. • “Tenth of December: Stories” Jan. 23, 5 p.m. George Saunders signs books. Reading at 5:30 p.m. $26 book. • Lemuria Story Time Saturdays at 11 a.m., children enjoy a story and make a related craft. Call for the book title. Free. The Unchained Tour Jan. 16, 7:30 p.m., at Powerhouse Arts Center (413 S. 14th St., Oxford). The event features storytellers and authors. Speakers include poker champion Annie Duke, fiction writer Tim Manley, storyteller Michaela Blei and “The Moth” host Peter Aguero. Songwriter Christopher Paul Stelling performs. Reception at 6:30 p.m. $15; call 662-236-2262; email alissa@ squarebooks.com; theunchainedtour.org. “The Secret World of Walter Anderson” Book Presentation Jan. 17, 6 p.m., and Jan. 18, 2 p.m., at Brandon Public Library (1475 W. Government St., Brandon). Author and performer Hester Bass shares highlights from her picture book, a biography of Walter Anderson. The Jan. 17 session is for parents and teachers, and the Jan. 18 session is for home-schooled students. Free; call 601-825-2672. Kelby Ouchley Lecture and Book Signing Jan. 22, 6 p.m., at Southern Cultural Heritage Center (1302 Adams St., Vicksburg), at the SCH Convent (corner of Adams and Crawford streets). Ouchley is the author of “Iron Branch: A Civil

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Family Fun Science Night Jan. 17, 6-8 p.m., at Mississippi Museum of Natural Science (2148 Riverside Drive). Enjoy hands-on activities such as a touch tank, fossils, live animals and divers. Primarily for families of elementary students. $2, members free; call 601-576-6000.

"%4(%#(!.'% Canned Good and Personal Care Items Drive through Jan. 17. The city of Jackson seeks donations on behalf of Stewpot Community Services. The project is a part of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Day of Service. Free; call 601-960-0000 or 601-960-1084. Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.

MUSIC | live

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was raised in a family filled with most like I was at a rock concert, except gospel music and musicians. Daddy the only thing passed around for people sang in the church choir, and Mama to share was a collection plate, and inplayed the piano at church (and stead of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Freebird,â&#x20AC;? I heard â&#x20AC;&#x153;Amen.â&#x20AC;? still does). And while we moaned and I attended Wells Church (2019 Baigroaned and came up with every excuse ley Ave.) at the early service last Sunday. in the book not to, my older sister Tatia While quite a few less were in attendance and I were forcefully encouraged to sing compared to the thousands that were at in our church choir as teenagers. There Joel Osteenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, our small church service were many road trips and Sunday morn- attendees felt the same passion, even ings headed to and from church that Daddy would have J.D. Sumner and The Stamps, The Statler Brothersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; gospel records or the Happy Goodman Family playing. My great-grandfather, S.L. Long, was a gospel songwriter, and my second cousin, Glen Calcote, has been writing and arranging gospel music for as long as I can remember. And even my 15-year-old cousin triplets, Embry, Logan and Christian Long, play for churches Mississippi boy Elvis Presleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ultimate Gospelâ&#x20AC;? album is and revivals in north a favorite in the gospel genre. Mississippi. For years, I loathed listening to gospel music because, you see, though we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have any roadies, pyroI was way too cool for such noise and, plus, technic crew or a whole band playing. It I wanted to be the rocker of the family (a makes me understand the power of music part of me still does.) But, as a now older more, now that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m actually paying attenand more musically appreciative Natalie, tion to it. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not the genre of music, the Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve come to enjoy gospel music not just band, or sometimes even the artists that from the old, faded Cokesbury hymns we make music matter to peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the sang from years ago, but from all religions. way it makes them feel, inspiring them to It also fascinates me how others use various do something or to endure whatever sadforms of music to worship. ness theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re dealing with in life. And thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s In recent years, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had the opportu- music to my ears. nity to visit many churches. My â&#x20AC;&#x153;adoptedâ&#x20AC;? If you get a chance, check out my fafamily, the Fradys and the Waldons, are vorite gospel albums (some are a mixture Church of Christ members, and in their of gospel and Americana songs): worship they use no musical instruments, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oh Brother, Where Art Thouâ&#x20AC;? yet everyone makes a cheerful noise as if soundtrack (Mercury Records) there were a 50-piece band behind them. The Isaacsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x153;Stand Stillâ&#x20AC;? (Horizon Many of the churches I visited had enorRecords) mous choirs and assorted instruments Johnny Cashâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Gospel Roadâ&#x20AC;? they used instead of the traditional piano (Columbia Records) and organ. But none of this seemed to af- Nitty Gritty Dirt Bandâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x153;Will The fect the joy they received from music beCircle Be Unbrokenâ&#x20AC;? (EMI America) ing made and played around them. Elvis Presleyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x153;Elvis: Ultimate Two weeks ago I attended the Joel Gospelâ&#x20AC;? (Solar Music Group) Osteen program held at the Mississippi Mississippi Mass Choirâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x153;Greatest Coliseum. His â&#x20AC;&#x153;Night of Hopeâ&#x20AC;? praise Hitsâ&#x20AC;? (Malaco Records) band was amazingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;once they had you Amazing Graceâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Country Salute to on your feet, you stayed there. They had Gospel Vol. 1-3â&#x20AC;? (Sparrow Records) many instruments and musicians onstage, The Statler Brothersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x153;Todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gospel and everyone was feeling it. It seemed alFavoritesâ&#x20AC;? (Heartland)

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by Natalie Long

COURTESY 5TH CHILD

natalieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s notes

31

DIVERSIONS | jfp sports the best in sports over the next seven days

Big Richard

Fri. Jan. 18 Norman Clark & Smokestack Lighteninâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Friday, January 18 & Saturday, January 19

SLATE by Bryan Flynn

THURSDAY, JAN. 17 College basketball (6-9 p.m., ESPN 2): Texas A&M faces their toughest test yet in the SEC when they host what could be the conferenceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best team, the Florida Gators.

Sat. Jan. 19

Stevie J & The Blues Eruption

FRIDAY, JAN. 18 NBA (6-8:30 p.m., ESPN): The Chicago Bulls hit the road to face the Boston Celtics in a game where both teams are looking to improve their current playoff position. SATURDAY, JAN. 19 NHL (2-5 p.m., NBC): Welcome back hockey after the labor dispute between the players and the owners with the Pittsburgh Penguins and the Philadelphia Flyers.

- Thursday Night: Ladies Night -Karaoke with Matt (Wed - Sat) 824 S. State St. Jackson, MS www.clubmagoos.com â&#x20AC;˘ 601.487.8710

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SUNDAY, JAN. 20 NFL (2-5 p.m., Fox): The Atlanta Falcons host the San Francisco 49ers, with the right to go to New Orleans on the line. â&#x20AC;Ś NFL (5:30-9 p.m., CBS): Tom Brady looks for his sixth Super Bowl appearance with the New England Patriots

This time next week we will know who will play in the Super Bowl in February. New England knows no Manning is left standing in their way, thanks to the Redskins and the Ravens. while hosting the Baltimore Ravens in what could be Ray Lewisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; final game. MONDAY, JAN. 21 NHL (6:30-10 p.m., NBC Sports Network): Hockey Town is back with the Detroit Redwings hitting the road to face the Columbus Blue Jackets. TUESDAY, JAN. 22 College basketball (8-10 p.m., ESPN): The baby Kentucky Wildcats must grow up quickly in conference play on the road against the Alabama Crimson Tide. WEDNESDAY, JAN. 23 College basketball (7-9 p.m., CSS): The Arkansas Razorbacks host the Mississippi State Bulldogs who are starting to come together as a team as conference play starts. Thank goodness Australia is halfway around the world. There is nothing better than tennis in the middle of the night to put a crying baby to sleep. Thank you, Australian Open. Follow Bryan Flynn at jfpsports.com, @jfpsports and at facebook.com/jfpsports

Final JFP College Football Top 25

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COURTESY SOUTHEASTERN CONFERENCE

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ORGANICS p 34 FAMILY p 35 GIRL ABOUT TOWN p 36 ASTRO p 37 FLY p 38

The Next Culinary Adventure by Andrew Dunaway

I

ANDREW DUNAWAY

f there is one daunting fact about James Roache and his restaurant Ro’Chez (204 W. Jackson St., Ridgeland, 601503-8244), it’s that in seven years of operation, Chef Roache has never repeated a menu. Armed with little more than his 120-item pantry and local produce, for three nights a week, two seatings a night and more than 300 menus, Chef Roache has never repeated himself. Just what sort of person would take on such a challenge? I met Chef Roache at his Ridgeland restaurant in December in hopes of getting a better grasp on his ideals and why he is planning to move Ro’Chez this March. How did Ro’Chez start?

What’s your cooking style?

If I had to label it, I would call it Creole eclectic. I’ll take you around the world and back home again. I might do Thai, I might do Russian, French, but my food does have that Creole or southern root to give you something familiar. What do you think sets you apart from other restaurants in Jackson?

The food is my life experience filtered through my mind’s eye. The other thing that sets me apart is that I cook on a 100year-old wooden stove with a mix of oak,

A AND Balance Warmth

by Victoria Sherwood

After more than 300 menus in Jackson without repetition, Chef James Roache of Ro’Chez is looking toward the next adventure.

pecan and cherry wood. There is no gas, no microwave, nothing.

Tell me about your plans to move this spring.

Do you have a big party planned for the final meals at this location?

Is there anything unique about your supplies?

In March, I am making a move to either Belize or New Orleans. I think NOLA will be more receptive to my ideas, and I’ll be doing the exact same concept down there.

We might, but I always go out for Valentine’s Day anyway. Either way, get in before March; the gypsy is calling. This has been really awesome and good to me, and I feel that if I keep staying my interest will die. I’m just not doing the volume I need. Hell, there’s still more for me to learn, and moving will help me broaden my horizons. Who knows: After Belize I might end up in France or Spain. I just need a place to work, something to drink and a place to sleep.

I buy all local, from the little momand-pop grocery stores to the farmers markets to individual farmers. That is my 100percent passion. Every farmer I deal with, I spend a day at their farm, doing some odds and ends, cooking them dinner. I want to see how they’re treating things, seeing their whole practice or else it could be off a truck, and then I just defeated what I went for.

s the chilly, damp weather continues, we crave warm and hearty recipes to warm our bones. Potato “risotto” fits the bill perfectly. Christopher Freeman, executive chef at Pan Asia, learned this recipe while attending the Culinary School of America. He says this dish is the first to help him realize balance and simplicity within cooking.

Where does Belize fit?

I wouldn’t mind being a beach bum down there, but the city has seemed very receptive to me. After New Year’s, I’ll be down there cooking at a dinner for the investors, movers, shakers and anyone who will be an important contact while I’m down there.

POTATO RISOTTO 1 large baked potato, finely diced Whites of 2 leeks, rinsed and finely diced 1/2 yellow onion, finely diced 3 tablespoons olive oil 1/2 lemon 2 slices cooked bacon, chopped (adjust more or less to taste)

chives/parsley, finely chopped, to taste salt and pepper to taste

In a saucepan add olive oil, onions and leeks. Let them sweat until they become translucent. Add potatoes and stir; keep pota-

toes in water until needed. Coat potatoes and onions with oil and cream. Keep stove on medium/ low heat until they become tinder. Add salt and pepper as well as your chopped herbs. Add half a lemon and precooked bacon. Plate with scallops or salmon.

jacksonfreepress.com

I just had a dream; I saw the building and fell in love with it. I’ve always wanted to do what I ended up creating here. I was a gypsy for 20-30 years. I’ve been from New York City to Corpus Christi cooking under the best chefs I could find. I just got real fortunate, and I found the passion for what I wanted to do.

33

LIFE&STYLE | organics

Boycotting Pro-GMO Organic Brands Not the Way by Jim Pathfinder Ewing

A

FLICKR/NATALIE MAYNOR

list going around the Internet calls products. Such labeling is already required for consumers to boycott the top by most of the industrialized world. organic brands owned by 10 parThe boycott is backed by the Organic ent companies that donated to de- Consumers Organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a group I supfeat Prop 37, the California Right to Know portâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but I disagree with the boycott. GMO labeling initiative. It may be galling that longtime conWhile I share sumers of, say, Horizon the frustration of organic soy milk or consumers being deKashi organic cereals are nied honest labeling supporting companies of the food they eat that donated a total of by corporations that $46 million in a cynical apparently value the disinformation camdollar over human paign to defeat a law to health, safety or even simply state if a product consumer rights, I contains GMO. donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think this is the But consider what Boycotting organic brands is a selfway to go. boycotting those brands Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s certainly a defeating initiative. might mean. slap in the face of Will it promote consumers who buy organic? Or other ororganic. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s insulting to know that the cor- ganic products? Or organic growers? Or the porations that manufacture and sell the or- companies that sell organics? Hardly. Rather, ganic brands they buy are, at the same time, it will simply retard market share for organundermining labeling of food containing ge- ics. This will, in turn, feed the idea that ornetically modified organisms (GMOs) that ganics isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t growing as a consumer market, is banned under the rules governing organic which it is. And it could undermine those

who are actually growing organically and the stores that carry these organic brands. Moreover, it accelerates the trend away from small growers to Big Ag corporations that can afford a smaller profit margin as part of a mix of organic and nonorganic products. In other words, a boycott plays into the hands of those who are being boycotted: the very corporations that sell both organic and nonorganic products. They win either way while it penalizes those who solely sell organic products, grow organics and buy organics. Consumers do hold the key, however. By demanding local and organic, they

are supporting organic where itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s produced and the small, local growers who need the consumer support. By demanding labeling of GMO from local, state and federal politicians, voters can exert their clout in local, state and national elections. The GMO labeling fight hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ended. The truth will out. GMO not only will be labeled in the United States eventually, but once buyers know the full environmental dangers and potential health and safety effects, it will probably be banned outright or so tightly regulated as to be treated as the potentially eco-catastrophic activity it is.

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LIFE&STYLE | parenting/family

Parenting Through Serious Illness by Kelly Bryan Smith

KELLY BRYAN SMITH

W

hen I was first diagnosed with a rare brain tumor more than a year ago, I was scared. But my biggest fears were for my son, then only a year old. How would he cope with having a mama recovering from brain surgery in the hospital for an unknown amount of time? How might he deal with my long recovery process? How would his life change if I woke up vision impairedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;or worse? Serious medical problems are scary for grownups, but they can be even scarier for kids, who may not be able to fully understand or conceptualize the implications of any given diagnosis or treatment or what it might mean for their lives. As a result, offering as much stability and reassurance as possible can go a long way in helping kids cope when a parent is sick.

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Children may need to be prepared to see a Franken-Mama change after surgery.

Top 10 Ways to Maintain Stability for Kids

4

2

5

Keep childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s routines as consistent as possible before, during and after the. Make sure the daily schedule offers consistency and stability. Gradually get kids used to new routines. If you will be staying in the hospital and not putting the kids to bed, start getting them used to the new bedtime routine and new caregivers in advance of the hospitalization, if possible. If your appearance is likely to change, ease into that change gracefully and gradually. I knew that my head would be shaved for brain surgery, so a few weeks in advance of my operation, I started donning head scarves. I also cut my long hair much shorter in hopes that a bald head would be slightly less of a shock for my son after seeing the intermediate stage.

3

Pack a few of your childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s favorite things to create a home away from home for when he or she visits you in the hospital. If you need to seek treatment out of town and your child is coming along, stay in an extended-stay hotel or a furnished apartment where you will have a more home-like environment and your own kitchen for cooking favorites. Demystify the medical process by including children in doctorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; appointments, if appropriate, reading childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s books about hospitals, or purchasing your child a doctorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kit to practice with at home. Make a meal plan in advance to keep your children well-fed with healthy food at regular intervals, or arrange for

6 7

How to Take Care of Yourself In a time of serious illness, everyone in the family is probably experiencing a lot of stress. If you are the patient, you are trying to cope with your own physical, mental and emotional stresses in addition to worrying about your kids. It is important to take care of the kids, but it is also vitally important to take care of yourself in order to best promote the healing process. 1. If you are physically able, get some exercise every day. 2. Eat healthy foods and drink lots of water.

3. Get enough sleep each night. 4. Spend quality time with your family members. 5. Get out with friends. 6. Indulge in bubble baths and great books. 7. Take time to relax and unwind over a cup of hot tea. 8. Get a massage, a pedicure or both. 9. Focus on where you are and what you feel, and tune out everyone elseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s opinion about how you should feel and act. 10. Do what you need to do to enjoy your life in the moment and not spend time worrying about the what-ifs.

family and friends to bring food for the family if cooking is going to be hard to keep up with at first. Give your child individual attention, playing with toys at home, running around at local parks, reading stories, drawing pictures about how he or she is feeling, and making trips to your favorite local story time. Even if it is an alternate caregiver who is giving that attention to your child, be sure to allow time and space for your child to spend time with you and share their feelings. Keep your children informed about what is going on in a developmentally appropriate manner that balances honesty with optimism. Give your kids lots of love and patience.

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LIFE&STYLE | girl about town

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BELHAVEN LOCATION OPEN DURING CONSTRUCTION Mon - Thur: 11am-10pm | Fri - Sat: 11am-11pm | Sun: 11am - 9pm 925 East Fortification Street Jackson, MS 39202 601-352-2001 | thepizzashackjackson.com NORTH JACKSON LOCATION Mon - Thur: 11am-9pm | Fri - Sat: 11am-10pm | Sun: 11am - 8pm 5046 Parkway Drive Colonial Mart Jackson, MS 39211 Off of Old Canton Road | 601-957-1975

My goal for this new year is to cook a full mealâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and maybe even handle raw meat.

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t a party over the holidays, I noticed a friendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s outfit. While itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not unusual for me to take note of what people wear, her ensemble caught my eye because, over the past year as my wardrobe expanded to include a fair number of leather pieces, she always commented on how much she, a more conservative dresser, likes to look but could never pull leather off. But that night, she sported a leather skirt and suede knee-high boots and looked great. Naturally, I complimented her, and she responded that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d encouraged her to just give it a shot. As we enter the new year, many of us contemplate goals (I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really like the word â&#x20AC;&#x153;resolutionsâ&#x20AC;?) to accomplish over the course of the next 365 days. As I considered what mine might be, I thought about that friend and how pushing ourselves outside our comfort zonesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;even just a littleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;helps us grow, or explore a new side of ourselves (and can be a lot of fun). Prior to the new year, I went a little outside my comfort zone with my hair to channel my inner rock star. With a little gentle prodding, my stylist convinced me to add a few fuchsia-colored extensions that peek out from underneath my mane. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not like I dyed my entire head pink or got a Christina Aguilera-esque dip dye, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a little edgy and not something Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d ordinarily do. So I worried a little: Was this even appropriate for someone over the age of 25 with a day job? Would my parents think Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d gone off the deep end? But the universal reaction has been positive. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just something fun and funky thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not permanent. (If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re interested, a salon can help you achieve this effect for around $40. Clip-in extensions you can apply yourself at home are also available at beauty supply stores.) Sometimes, though, pushing past

your comfort zone involves more than a new outfit or some fake hair. A number of friends and acquaintances seem to be starting the new year contemplating bigger life decisionsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;changing careers, going back to school and the like. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve read that members of my generation will have something like an average of seven careers over the course of our lives, so I suppose it shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be a big deal. But making that change feels pretty monumentalâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and scary. I say this as one whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been there, done that and lived to tell the tale. Especially for those considering a major change in direction or who arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sure what they want to do, leaving a job where theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve grown comfortable or thought was the one theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d always wanted but turned out not to be requires pushing past that comfort zone in a major way. It takes a leap of faith, but thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what makes it exciting (and scary). Overcoming that fear is part of what makes it worthwhile in the end. To everyone making goals or considering changes this year, whether big or small, I say, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Go for it.â&#x20AC;? So how will I push past my comfort zone in 2013? Having made friends with leather and colorful hair, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m turning my sights to accomplishing something that, to date, I have managed to always avoid: preparing an entire meal. This past year, I became a bit of a baker, but I still donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t cook actual food. I shared this goal with a friend at happy hour who replied, â&#x20AC;&#x153;You know what your downfall in this is going to be? Handling raw meat.â&#x20AC;? Could be; I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t say that doing things with raw chicken is up there on my list of Things That Sound Awesome. But Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m willing to push through that and give it the old college try. After all, after changing careers and having pink hair, can a sautĂŠ pan really be that scary?

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Home Exhibit by Kathleen M. Mitchell

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January 16 - 22, 2013

local â&#x20AC;¢ handmade â&#x20AC;¢ art â&#x20AC;¢ jewelry necklaces - bracelets - earrings

38

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650 Hwy 51 | Ridgeland, MS 39157 | 601.856.3078 facebook.com/martinsonsms | www.martinsonsms.com mon - sat 8:30am - 5:30pm | sunday CLOSED

KATHLEEN M. MITCHELL

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meowners out there have created much more professional or interesting gallery walls, but I was able to incorporate a few money-saving tricks and do-it-yourself elements to keep mine within my budget while still looking interesting and fun. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what I did:

Future. FX]VBc^_ on State Street

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Both Locations Open 7 Days A Week

All-You-Can-Eat $20 wings & draft beer dine-in only, no sharing, no carry out

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jacksonfreepress.com

398 Hwy. 51 â&#x20AC;˘ Ridgeland, MS (601) 853-3299 â&#x20AC;˘ www.villagebeads.com

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Hey! Music Loversâ&#x20AC;Ś

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Valentines…

Just because it’s named for a Saint doesn’t mean be one! (Toys, lingerie and DVD’s will certainly help with that!)

Romantic Adventures Jackson’s very nice, naughty store. 175 Hwy 80 East in Pearl * 601.932.2811 M-Th: 10-10p F/Sa 10-Mid Su: 1-10p www.shopromanticadventures.com


Biting The Bullet: A Close Look at Mississippi's Culture