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State grants to help restore Issaquah Creek Issaquah will benefit from state grants given out to save Puget Sound. The Washington departments of Ecology and Commerce, awarded nearly $4 million to Western Washington communities to help rehabilitation efforts to the sound and watersheds emptying into it, according to a May 13 press release. Specifically in Issaquah, $172,000 will go to a Mountains to Sound Greenway Trust project aimed at Issaquah Creek restoration and controlling invasive plants. The project will include a survey of 16 miles of Issaquah Creek and its tributaries, invasive weed control on more than 60 acres and planting of 10,000 native trees and shrubs. It will also include a significant public engagement and education component focused on private landowners along the creek. Learn more at mtsgreenway.org.

Water district gets clean audit The Sammamish Plateau Water and Sewer District received a pair of clean audits from the Washington State Auditor’s Office. One report was dated April 24 and covered financial issues during calendar year 2012. The auditor’s office held the district up to general auditing standards for government agencies and found no problems with the district. The other audit was issued April 14. It covered nonfinancial governance issues, such as whether the district has proper controls in place to maintain public assets and whether the district complies with state laws and its own policies. In that audit as well, the auditor’s office found no problems with the district. Information released by the auditor’s office also noted it has not had any problems with the district in more than 10 years.

EFR reminds to keep safety in mind with spring cleanups Eastside Fire & Rescue officials remind homeowners to keep these safety tips in mind when it comes to spring cleanup efforts: 4Visible home addressing — Don’t make it hard for emergency responders trying to locate your home. Properly posting your address sign on your driveway will help responders locate your home more quickly when minutes count during an emergency situation. 4Fire hydrant visibility — EFR requires a 3-foot clear space be maintained around the circumference of the fire hydrant for easy access during emergencies. 4Road access — Don’t let parked cars block driveways, and keep large trees, shrubs and other vegetation maintained to prevent hampering access. Road widths cannot be less than 20 feet and vertical clearance not less than 13 feet, 6 inches.

Governor signs bill to protect domestic violence victims House Bill 1840, signed into law by Gov. Jay Inslee on March 28, was the only gun safety bill to pass the Legislature this session. Sponsored by State Rep. Roger Goodman, HB 1840 aligns Washington state law with federal law by removing firearms from those subject to protection orders. Under federal law, when protection orders are issued against domestic violence offenders, they must surrender their firearms. Current state law allows domestic abusers to keep an arsenal of weapons. Victims, survivors and advocates have long called for the removal of firearms from domestic violence offenders. HB 1840 goes into effect Dec. 1.

The Issaquah Press

Wednesday, May 21, 2014 •

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The IssaquahPress

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Sports

Wednesday May 21, 2014

Issaquah girls win state lacrosse title in a thriller Katie Bucy got a second chance and made the most of it, scoring the game winner May 16 with under a minute remaining to give Issaquah an 11-10 victory over Lake Sammamish and its first Washington high school girls state lacrosse championship. Bucy, a Skyline High School senior who will play next year at Missouri’s Lindenwood University, delivered the winner on a free-position shot after a goal

just seconds earlier was disallowed on a shooting-space violation. “That’s the biggest goal ever,” Bucy said while celebrating with teammates from Skyline, Issaquah and Liberty high schools. “It was hit or miss, and this one was a hit.” The shot beat Lake Sammamish goaltender and Eastlake freshman Kristene Nickel low and to the left, opposite of where

she wanted to go with the shot. “I wanted to hit her top right, but coach said go opposite. Opposite of normal,” Bucy said. “You have to listen and have confidence.” For Lake Sammamish, which draws from the Northshore and Lake Washington School districts, the game was a disappointment after falling the previous two seasons in the state title game to Bainbridge and the

Lakeside School. “Our seniors fought so hard for this one,” said Lake Sammamish coach Tony D’Alessio, one of the winningest coaches in Washington state with 64 wins and 14 losses in his fourth season leading the Lake Sammamish program. “You knew it was going to come down to whoever had the ball last,” he said. Suzy Emerson led Issaquah

with five goals and three draw controls, while Nicole Victory and Meg Corscaden each had two. Lake Sammamish was led by Sarah Wryrick with three goals and two assists and Alexandra Johnson with three goals and one assist. Source: Mike McQuaid, sports information director, US Lacrosse, Washington state chapter.

Patriot powers through KingCo tourney Jenny Adams takes second at KingCo tennis tournament By Christina Corrales-Toy newcastle@isspress.com Liberty High School tennis player Jenny Adams is going solo this year. Almost a year after she took second place in the state’s doubles tournament alongside Kristy Braunston, Adams delved into the 2014 postseason as a singles player. The switch came with a few nerves, Liberty tennis coach Mike Salokas said, but you wouldn’t know it after Adams earned second place in the KingCo 3A tennis tournament May 15. “Jenny was a little uncomfortable going into the KingCo tournament,” Salokas said. “Last year, she and Kristy Braunston teamed in doubles and had great success in the postseason.” With Braunston now playing the sport at Bellevue College, Adams was on her own for her senior season. She certainly rose to the occasion, compiling an undefeated regular season, and earning the No. 1 seed at the KingCo tournament. She opened day one of the tournament, held at Mercer Island High School, with a dominant 6-0, 6-2 victory over Bellevue’s Meredith Berry. Adams dropped the first set in her next two matches, before coming back to win both of them. She defeated Mercer Island’s Melanie Lee, 1-6, 6-0, 6-2, in the quarterfinals, before besting the Islanders’ Sammy Sweet, 2-6, 6-4, 6-3, in the semifinals. The win over Sweet earned

Adams a spot in the KingCo championship where, under an unforgiving sun and 80-degree temperatures, she matched up against Interlake’s Lina Larson. Adams won the first set, 6-4, but Larson made a swift comeback, winning the next two, 6-4, 7-5, to capture the KingCo title. “The match was very close,” Salokas said. “As I reflect today on that match, nothing stands out as a determining factor. Heat, fatigue, hydration were certainly influences but those conditions were present for both players. Jenny performed admirably and lost, is the best way I can put it.” The Liberty senior now heads into the district tournament May 20-21 at Seattle’s Lower Woodland Park. As the No. 2 seed from KingCo, she gets a first-round bye. Results were not available at press time. “Having earned the No. 2 and runner-up distinction aligns her well going into next week’s districts tournament,” Salokas said. Before that, though, Salokas made sure he gave his star senior plenty of rest before the postseason continued, especially after enduring the heat and exhaustion of the May 14-15 tournament play. “It was sunny and hot during KingCo and playing three, threeset matches over a two-day period was taxing on all players,” he said. “Taking the next three days off and getting some rest is the best thing she can do going into district play.” The top five players from the district tournament will move on to state.

The 28 singles players and 28 doubles teams that converged on the Skyline High School tennis courts last week knew they’d have to be on top of their games. At the Class 4A KingCo Conference girls tennis championships, only the two finalists in singles and doubles were guaranteed berths into the state tournament, while the third-place finisher had to win a crossover match with a Wesco Conference foe to get there. As it turned out, the competition wasn’t the only thing that proved daunting over the course of the three-day event. Eighty-degree temperatures greeted the players in the afternoons, making fitness even more vital. “I think the heat really makes us tired, but I think we played really well today still,” said Skyline junior Jasmine Ye, who was paired with sophomore Julia Lioubarski. “I think we were confident in our game, and that’s important.” Ye and Lioubarski looked solid in their May 13 quarterfinal victory, getting out of the gates quickly and shutting down Roosevelt’s Julia Mirick and Izzy Mason. There weren’t a lot of extended points during the 6-1, 6-2 victory, as the Spartans’ duo served well and kept Mirick and Mason pinned to the baseline, forcing mistakes. “Normally, we both play singles, so that’s a lot of running,” Ye said, “and in doubles, we cover half the court, so I think it’s a little easier for us.” Ye and Lioubarski played doubles for two early-season matches,

and then returned to singles for the bulk of the season to best help the team. But the KingCo singles bracket was stacked with talent, Ye explained, so Spartans coach Bettina Gehle reunited the duo to give them a better chance of advancing to state. They were one of the top-four seeds into the tourney, giving them a first-round bye. After dispatching Newport’s Kari Nasu and Sara Park (6-0, 6-1) and the Roosevelt duo, they lost in the semifinals to Inglemoor’s Jenae Chinn and Michaela Jendralova, the eventual champions. They rebounded with a victory

Boys soccer coaches in the Class 4A KingCo Conference recently selected their all-conference teams for the 2014 season. First team: MF Nate Hardwick, junior, Skyline; GK Saif Kerawala, junior, Issaquah; D Nick Morgan, senior, Skyline; GK Jack O’Keefe, senior, Skyline; D Jeff Shipley, senior, Issaquah; and F Jason Twaddle, senior, Skyline. Second team: GK Alex Appel, sophomore, Skyline; D Nick Christoforou, senior, Skyline; F Ryan Higgins, senior, Issaquah; MF Alex Kane, senior, Issaquah; and F Josh Zhou, senior, Issaquah.

Liberty’s soccer playoff run comes to an end

By Greg Farrar

Jenny Adams, Liberty High School senior, volleys against Interlake’s Lina Larson during the first set of her 3A KingCo Championship tennis final May 15.

Girls tennis titles on the line at KingCo By Neil Pierson npierson@sammamishreview.com

All-KingCo boys soccer teams selected

over Issaquah’s Kelsey Wilson and Halle Gordon. Lioubarski, a right-hander, said she complements well with the left-handed Ye. “It’s fun playing with Jasmine because she knows how to pump you up and motivate you, and she doesn’t get mad if you miss, so it’s an easy partnership,” Lioubarski said. Lioubarski and Ye were the No. 3 seed from the tournament, and lost a winner-to-state crossover match May 16 against the Wesco Conference’s third seed. Skyline’s other KingCo qualifiers were singles players Theresa Huang, Sherry Huang and Hilary

By Neil Pierson

Jasmine Ye (left) and Julia Lioubarski, Skyline High School doubles partners, are on the court May 13 having a successful run during the Class 4A KingCo Conference girls tennis championships.

Taylor; and the doubles teams of Rianna Eduljee and Shreenu Sivakumar, and Avery Sampson and Kourtney Kirton. Issaquah’s top-six placing during the regular-season standings gave the Eagles three singles and three doubles entries into the event. Wilson and Gordon didn’t advance to state, but the seniors had a solid season, Issaquah coach Gary Kiyonaga said. Wilson was a state runner-up in 2013, pairing with former star Samantha Garrard, who now plays for Seattle University. “They’ve been playing together for the whole season,” Kiyonaga said. “They’ve been teammates for four years, but this is the first year that they’ve focused together as a doubles team.” Wilson and Gordon advanced to the KingCo semifinals with a hard-fought victory over Newport’s Ashley Sun and Erica Hsia. After dropping the first set in a tiebreaker, they won the last two sets impressively (6-2, 6-2). In singles, Issaquah’s Ellen MacNary, Lucy Huffman and Regina Darahovski were eliminated early. The doubles teams of Eve Shih and Sami Mittman, and Inyoung You and Emma Gavin also didn’t make it past the first day. Kiyonaga said his players were ready for the grueling test of possibly playing five matches in three days. “They’re conditioned for it,” the coach said. “There’s a little bit of a fatigue factor because it’s warmer than regular, but this tournament is structured nicely. There’s no problem with that.”

The Liberty High School boys soccer team’s season came to an abrupt end May 15. The KingCo regular season champions lost to Mercer Island and Mount Si in the league tournament. The Patriots fell to the Islanders, 4-2, in the conference championship, before losing to the Wildcats, 1-0, in a loserout game. Despite a tough league tournament, it was a relatively successful year for the Patriots. Liberty senior Colton Ronk was named the KingCo 2A/3A Most Valuable Player, while head coach Darren Tremblay earned Coach of the Year honors. Patriots Tyler Jensen, Tyler Wray and Colton Ronk were named All-League First Team; Quinn Magendanz and Antonio Lago were AllLeague Second Team; and Michael Duvall, Ryan Graham, Leoul Hancock and Jacob Muttart received Honorable Mentions.

Skyline grad earns allregion softball honors Anya Kamber, a Sammamish resident and 2011 graduate of Skyline High School, was part of the National Fastpitch Coaches Association’s All-New England teams announced May 10. Kamber, who plays for Brandeis University in Waltham, Mass., was a first-team All-New England selection. She will be eligible to be selected for NCAA Division III AllAmerica honors. Kamber, a junior, was the only Brandeis player to appear in every game during the 2014 season, and led the squad in hits, doubles and RBIs. She was second on the team with a .420 batting average. The Judges finish with a 21-18 record in the Eastern College Athletic Conference, winning their last six games to reach the postseason for the eighth straight year. Kamber’s parents are Peter and Tracey Kamber, of Sammamish.

The Issaquah Press

Wednesday, May 21, 2014 •

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Archie Adair

Buford R. (Bud) Ambrose

Albert Anderson

Rodney Albert Anderson

Vern G. Anderson

Allen Sherman Anderson

Daniel T. Anderson

Vigo E. Anderson

Gilbert R. Andress

Born: May 5, 1911 Died: Feb. 18, 1985 Branch of service: U.S. Army Where served: Germany in World War II Details of service: While with the 83rd Infantry Division in Germany, was awarded the combat infantryman’s badge for displaying exemplary conduct in action

Deceased Highest rank achieved: SK2 (store keeper second class) Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: South Pacific — USS Saginaw Bay Dates of service: Feb. 15, 1943 to Feb. 5, 1946

Born: Feb. 28, 1892 Died: Oct. 1969 Highest rank achieved: Fireman Second Class Branch of service: Navy Where served: U.S.S. New York Dates of service: May, 17, 1917 to May 7, 1918

Born: Apr. 16, 1925 Died: Nov. 16, 2000 Branch of service: Army Where served: Europe Details of service: served in World War II in the 97th Infantry Division and drove a jeep

Born: Nov. 23, 1927 Died: May 16, 2008 Highest rank achieved: Corporal Branch of service: Navy and Army Where served: Fort Lewis, Fort Lawton, Whittier (Alaska), Port of Embarkation in Seattle Dates of service: 1946 (Navy) then discharged after eight months, drafted again in 1951 Details of service: in Seattle, was a military police officer at the main gate, in Alaska unloaded ships

Highest rank achieved: E-3 Branch of service: U.S. Navy Dates of service: Dec. 2, 1972 to April 7, 1977 Details of service: Hull tech, was on the USS Samuel Gompers, USS John Paul Jones, USS Kitty Hawk; was off the coast of Vietnam from late 1973 until mid-1975; finished enlistment in dry dock at Bremerton shipyard overhauling the Kitty Hawk

Branch of service: U.S. Navy Highest rank achieved: ET2 Where served: Atlantic Theater two years aboard USS Pocono, flagship of the Atlantic Fleet Details of service: Served as electronic technician (UHF specialist); President Truman was often aboard the ship, using my radio shack and equipment. Years of service: 1946-1948

Born: Sept. 1, 1944 Highest rank achieved: 1st Lieutenant Branch of service: Marine Corps Where served: motor transportation, First Marine Division Dates of service: March 1967 to June 1970 Details of service: spent 25 months in Vietnam

Highest rank achieved: Carpenters mate third class Branch of service: U.S. Navy, SeaBees Naval Construction Wounded in action: Gun explosion caused tinnitus Where served: Pacific Ocean, Hawaii, Guam, Okinawa Dates of service: July 7, 1943 to March 6, 1946

John Arnold William Ernest Arndt Highest rank achieved: Baker second class Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: Pacific Dates of service: March 1943 to December 1945

Highest rank achieved: Lieutenant Commander Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: U.S., Cuba, three tours in Vietnam Dates of service: August 1955 to January 1982

Michael Bloch Florence Blankenship Born: 1922 Highest rank achieved: Storekeeper First Class Branch of service: Navy Where served: Washington, D.C., Bureau of Ships Dates of service: 1944-46

Born: Oct. 25, 1939 Highest rank achieved: Airman First Class Branch of service: Air Force Where served: Hahn Airbase, Germany Dates of service: 1960-64 Details of service: assisted in base chapel and forecasted weather for pilots

Edward E. Authier Highest rank achieved: Lieutenant colonel Branch of service: U.S. Army Where served: Germany, Korea, Vietnam and U.S. Dates of service: 1960 - 1980 Details of service: Was a senior Army aviator

John Michael Barry Highest rank achieved: Corporal Branch of service: U.S. Marine Corps Where served: Vietnam Details of service: 1st Marine Air Wing, 3rd Marine Division; served in combat at Khe Sahn Combat Base during Tet and the Siege of Khe Sahn in February 1968; I Corps below the DMZ; in combat in Vietnam from December 1967 to August 1969 Dates of service: February 1966 to February 1972

Jim Briody

Gaius Sunday Buxton Highest rank achieved: Signalman third class Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: Signalman on staff of Commander Transport Division 60 in the Pacific area on the USS Grimes; Okinawa Campaign, initial occupation of Tokyo Bay Area and Nagasaki, Japan Dates of service: 1944-1946

Jean-Michel Christopher Highest rank achieved: EM2 (electricians mate second class) Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: USS City of Corpus Christi Dates of service: August 1992 to August 1998

John Brooke Born: 1933 Highest rank achieved: Specialist SP3 Branch of service: Army infantry Where served: Hawaii Dates of service: 1955-56 Details of service: worked as a guard for prison duty and combat training

Highest rank achieved: Army PFC and Navy MR3 Branch of service: Army and Navy Where served: 41st Infantry Division 146 Field Artillery (Army); USS Ticonderoga; USS Coral Sea Details of service: Multiple cruises with Pacific Fleet to the Far East Dates of service: Army 1955-58; Navy 1958-62

Born: June 6, 1939 Highest rank achieved: Adjutant 3 Branch of service: Navy, Aviation Machinist Mate Where served: aircraft carriers, U.S.S. Kearsarge CVA 33 — U.S.S. Oriskany CVA 34 Dates of service: Sept. 10, 1957 to Sept. 10, 1961

William Bentz Highest rank achieved: Staff sergeant Branch of service: U.S. Army Where served: South Pacific, New Guinea Philippines; Fort Lawton, Wash. Dates of service: 1943-1946, 19481949

Dan Boni Born: Aug. 25, 1924 Branch of service: Navy Where served: Motor machinist’s mate second class unit Dates of service: Sept. 17, 1943 to March 31, 1946 Details of service: served in combat in the South Pacific for two years; Ship PGM8 received two letters of commendation for services in Northern Solomons and the Philippines

Born: Aug. 3, 1925 Highest rank achieved: Coxswain on the USS PGM19 Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: Okinawa and Ryukyus Dates of service: August 1942 to January 1946

Born: Jan. 1, 1927 Died: Oct. 27, 2011 Branch of service: U.S. Navy Dates of service: 1945-1947 Details of service: served aboard a landing-craft carrier in the Pacific Theater during World War II

David Wayne Bracken Paul Thomas Boone

Louis Boni Born: Nov. 24, 1918 Died: 2003 in Issaquah Branch of service: Navy, water tender Dates of service: April 3, 1942 to Nov. 29, 1945, and the Korean War Details of service: served in combat in the Pacific during World War II and the Korean War

Born: Sept. 26, 1924 Died: Oct. 7, 2009 Highest rank achieved: Flight officer Branch of service: U.S. Air Force Where served: P-51 pilot in combat in the Philippines, New Guinea and other places in the South Pacific Details of service: He was in Japan after the bomb was dropped, and ferried numerous planes from the islands to storage areas. Dates of service: 1943-1946

Born: 1917 Died: 1979 (in Issaquah) Highest rank achieved: PFC Branch of service: U.S. Army Where served: Aleutian Islands Details of service: Signal Corps Dates of service: 1942 to 1945

Highest rank achieved: First sergeant Branch of service: U.S. Army Where served: 508th MP BN, Military Police; Fort Lawton, Wash.; 61st MP Co., France; 62d MP (RAFP) Co.; USAREC, Bloomington, Ill.; Special Forces Thailand-Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam; 1st Infantry Division Fwd., Germany; and Fort Lewis Dates of service: October 1956 to December 1977

David Hardman Black Sr. Born: Nov. 5, 1945 Died: Feb. 24, 2008 Highest rank achieved: SP5 E-5 (T) Feb 1969 Branch of service: U.S. Army Where served: Thailand (1966-68) Korea (1970) Dates of service: 1965 to 1977 Details of service: Served in Vietnam in 1972 and was exposed to Agent Orange; received the National Defense Service Medal, Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal, Vietnam Service Medal, Vietnam Campaign Medal, Good Conduct Medal (second award), two overseas bars and the Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with palm; buried at Camp Nelson National Cemetery in Nicholasville, Ky.

Carl B. Bridges Deceased (at age 70) Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: Stationed on the USS Braine Dates of service: 1952-1956

Wayne E. Busby

Christopher Brown Sr. Highest rank achieved: ABH 3rd class Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: CVN 68 USS Nimitz Details of service: Served in Atlantic Fleet with multiple cruises to the Mediterranean area Dates of service: March 1979 to March 1983

Joseph Elmer Chevalier

James R. Darst Robert R. Coward

Highest rank achieved: Corporal; airman second class Branch of service: Air National Guard/Air Force Reserve/U.S. Naval Reserve Where served: United States Dates of service: Jan. 23, 1946 U.S.N.R to June 4, 1946; June 1948 A.N.G. to June 1952; May 1, 1951 U.S. Air Force to Dec. 20, 1951

Greg Beman Born: Aug. 17, 1948 Highest rank achieved: E4 Branch of service: Marine Corps Where served: Dong Ha, Vietnam; six miles south of the DMZ Dates of service: 1966-1970 Details of service: combat engineer, 3rd Marine Division, served in combat, gunshot wound, received Purple Heart

Walter Lee Brazelton

Thomas Strander Carlisle Born: March 28, 1923 Deceased: 2007 Branch of service: Marine Corps Dates of service: 1943-1946 Highest rank achieved: 1st Lieutenant Details of service: In 1942, enlisted as aviation cadet; in 1943, completed flight training, receiving his aviator wings and commission as 2nd Lieutenant

Paul Eugene Bartholomew

Highest rank achieved: LTJG Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: Served in Korea for one year Dates of service: 1953-1955 Details of service: Was landing craft control officer on the USS Logan

Angelo Boni Born: Dec. 26, 1926 Died: July 24, 2006 in Issaquah Highest rank achieved: Private Branch of service: Army Dates of service: June 22, 1945 to Nov. 11, 1946

Roger Lee Brown

Highest rank achieved: Specialist 5 (E-5) Branch of service: U.S. Army Where served: U.S. Military Liaison Mission, West Berlin and Potsdam, East Germany Dates of service: 1961-1964

Harry G. Behrens

Christopher Brown Jr. Highest rank achieved: Sergeant Branch of service: U.S. Army Where served: 2nd Infantry Division, 3rd Stryker Brigade Details of service: Fought in every major battle in Iraqi Freedom, including Fallujah, Mosul and Baghdad; received two Purple Hearts, Commendation for Stryker Vehicle Commander under hostile engagements; Personal Commendation Medal for Operation Iraqi Freedom Dates of service: November 2004 to present

Milton Bronsdon Highest rank achieved: Interior Communications Second Class Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: served on U.S.S. Grand Canyon AD28, traveled to Mediterranean countries, England, Norway, Cuba Dates of service: 1955-1958

William Michael Cooper Born: April 25,1940 Highest rank achieved: Master sergeant Branch of service: Air Force, Marine Corps Where served: served in combat, Vietnam Conflict, first Marine platoon to land, stayed until 1967 Dates of service: USMC September 1958 to June 1967 Details of service: also in the Air Force and then the Reserves from 1980 to April 2000, retired after 29 years; from the Air Force: Meritorious Service Award, Commendation Medal, Outstanding Unit Award, Nave Unit Commendation, Air Force Training Ribbon; from Marines: Marine Corps Good Conduct Medal, Air Reserve Forces Meritorious Service, Small Arms Expert Marksmanship, National Defense Service Medal, Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal

Born: 1920 Died: 1995 Highest rank achieved: Aviation Machinist’s Mate Second Class; ratings held — S1c, AMM3c, AMM2c Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: NRAB Seattle, NRAB Pasco, Hed Ron 14-2, FAW14, Hed Ron Fleet Airwing Six-FAW-4 Dates of service: April 1942 to October 1945

Bud Butterfield Born: Oct. 17, 1934 Highest rank achieved: Chief Petty Officer Branch of service: Navy Dates of service: 1951 to 1971 Details of service: first served aboard the USS Saint Paul Heavy Cruiser, stationed in many locations from San Diego to Alaska, retired upon returning from service in Vietnam

Fred Butler Highest rank achieved: Colonel Branch of service: U.S. Army Where served: Vietnam, Germany and U.S. Dates of service: Jan. 8, 1963 to Jan. 31, 1990

Donald (Bud) Wayne Cochran

James Gerard Day Born: July 24, 1953 Highest rank achieved: Corporal Branch of service: Marine Corps Where served: Marine Corps Aircraft Wing Dates of service: 1972-74 Details of service: ranked as a pistol and rifle sharpshooter, received the National Defense Service Medal

George W. Croft Jr. (Bud) Highest rank achieved: E9 (master chief petty officer) Branch of service: U.S. Army Where served: Pacific Theatre, WWII Wounded in action: In Pearl Harbor hospital recovering from appendectomy when the Japanese began bombing Pearl Harbor. Ran out to veranda to see the entire Harbor as it was being bombed. Read his story in the military section on AncientFaces.com. Dates of service: 1941-1971

Born: Dec. 1, 1921 Highest rank achieved: Staff Sergeant Branch of service: Army Where served: 634th Ordinance Ammunition; Oro Bay, New Guinea; Manila and Lati, Philippines; Hirasaki, Japan Dates of service: May 1942 to January 1946 Details of service: served in combat; Bud’s transport to the WWII Pacific war zone began in San Francisco, where he boarded the David C. Shanks with nearly 5,000 other G.I.s. While serving in New Guinea, he was burned with mustard gas. He landed in Japan with the first American invasion forces where he remained until the end of the war.

The Issaquah Sportsmen’s Club salutes our local veterans.

Theodore Vernon Colbert Sr.

Phillip James Conway

Born: Jan. 22, 1922 Died: Jan. 6, 2012 Highest rank achieved: PFC/ Special Weapons Group Branch of service: U.S. Marine Corps Where served: World War II, in the Pacific Region and fought in the Russell and Solomon islands, on Rendova Island, and in Guam and the Guadalcanal Islands, and stormed many beaches Dates of service: Nov. 12, 1942 to May 5, 1945 Details of service: awarded the Asiatic Pacific Ribbon 1 star for New Georgia Group Operations

Born: Feb. 22, 1926 Highest rank achieved: Coxswain on the USS Renshaw Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: World War II — Solomon Islands, Marianas, Marshall Islands, Saipan, Tinian, Guam Details of service: He was the coxen charged with ferrying the “big shots” to shore and transporting work crews around the ship or to shore in a “gig.” Dates of service: 1943 to 1946

B4 • Wednesday, May 21, 2014

Colin Corbett Born: Jan. 14, 1931 Highest rank achieved: Sergeant Branch of service: Army Where served: northeastern France and California Dates of service: six years in the 1950s Details of service: supply depot, toured Europe, Nike missile base in San Francisco, Switzerland, Germany, Holland, Chemical Corps, small corps gas masks and chemical training for chemical warfare

Lee Cook

Dallas Cross

Born: Mar. 14, 1941 Highest rank achieved: Master Chief Petty Officer Branch of service: Navy Where served: all over the world, Europe and the Far East Dates of service: 1961-88

Highest rank achieved: PFC, U.S. Army Infantry (twice achieved) Branch of service: U.S. Army Where served: Fort McNair, Washington, D.C., and Fort Meyer — Arlington Cemetery, Arlington, Va. Dates of service: Active service, Sept. 11, 1957 to Sept. 10, 1959; Army Reserve, 1959-1962 Details of service: Drill platoon in The Old Guard Regiment, 1957; worked with the Secret Service as bayonet-guarded cordon lines to limit access to the President and visiting heads of state

Thomas D. Donegan

Jack Dompier

Born: Dec. 1, 1946 Highest rank achieved: RM3 Branch of service: Navy Dates of service: 1966-1970 Details of service: served in combat; the first tour to Vietnam was aboard the Destroyer USS Chevalier off the Vietnam coast in 1967-68. The last 2 1/2 years was spent on PBRs (River Patrol Boat) at PBR Mobile Base 1, north of Danang. One river that was patrolled was the HUE river.

Highest rank achieved: Lieutenant colonel Branch of service: U.S. Army Where served: Panama, England, Europe, Korea Wounded in action: Suffered machine gun leg wounds while leading a rifle platoon into Germany in February 1945 Dates of service: January 1940 – July 1946, July 1952 to January 1965

William Falkenstein

David T. Evans Born: Oct. 2, 1943 Died: 2002 Highest rank achieved: 1st Lieutenant Branch of service: U.S. Army Where served: Tour of duty was from 19671969 in Heidelberg, Germany Dates of service: 1967-1969 Details of service: Military Police and Criminal Investigation Division

Mark W. Gilliam Born: Feb. 3, 1959 Highest rank achieved: Engineman Second Class Branch of service: Navy Where served: served on the USS Ketchikan and at the Naval Torpedo Station, Keyport, Wash. Dates of service: 1976-82 Details of service: four-year Good Conduct award

Born: Dec. 22, 1913 Died: Dec. 18, 2001 Highest rank achieved: Master sergeant Branch of service: U.S. Army Where served: WWII — New Guinea; Korean War — Seoul, Korea Dates of service: 1940-1960

Gerald Patrick Darst Born: March 17, 1932 Highest rank achieved: Corporal Branch of service: Army Dates of service: 1951-1952 Details of service: served in combat in Korea

Charles Dorian

Highest rank achieved: Petty officer first class Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: San Diego; Great Lakes, Ill.; Pearl Harbor; Camp Lejeune, N.C. Dates of service: Aug. 11, 1994 to present

Raymond C. Davis

William Dixon

Born: July 8, 1941 Highest rank achieved: Radarman third class Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: Far East, Pacific, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Details of service: Served on the USS Washburn and USS Cabildo Dates of service: 1959 to 1963

Highest rank achieved: Bos’n mate second class Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: Mediterranean and Pacific Theatres Dates of service: October 1942 to January 1946

W.J. (Joe) Dodge Died: June 3, 1982 Highest rank achieved: Private (infantry) Branch of service: U.S. Army (Samuel Company) Where served: Georgia, not deployed Dates of service: Discharged May 3, 1919

W.J. (Joe) Dodge Jr. Highest rank achieved: AO3 (aviation ordnance man third class) Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: USS Hancock CVA-19, Southeast Asia Dates of service: October 1961 to November 1963

Ralph Carl Eikenberry

Bob Doyle

Born: Sept. 27, 1921 Highest rank achieved: Captain Branch of service: Coast Guard Where served: North Atlantic, Washington, D.C.; San Francisco; Great Lakes; World War II Greenland, New York Dates of service: June 1942 to March 1972 Details of service: served on seven ships in the North Atlantic, Caribbean, Great Lakes, North Pacific and South Pacific Oceans; was Chief Coast Guard Communications from 1964-67 and Deputy Director, Office of Telecommunications, in the U.S. Department of Transportation from 1967-72; is one of the “fathers” of the current satellite communication system for ships

Alice L. Davis

Born: Jul. 29, 1931 Highest rank achieved: Captain Branch of service: Army Special Forces Where served: Kentucky Dates of service: August 1952 to March 1955 Details of service: never left the states

Tauno L. Erickson

Joel Estey

Highest rank achieved: Technical sergeant Branch of service: U.S. Army Signal Corps Where served: Southwest and Central Pacific theaters Medal awarded: Bronze Star Dates of service: May 1942 to October 1945

Highest rank achieved: E-5 Branch of service: U.S. Army Where served: Served in combat in I Corps South Vietnam, Da Nang Chulai; mostly in the field throughout tour of duty; American 196th Light Infantry Details of service: Wounded by booby trap; earned a Purple Heart and two Bronze Stars Dates of service: 1967-1969

Duane W. Englund Highest rank achieved: Sergeant Branch of service: Army Engineers Where served: Europe, Philippine Islands Dates of service: July 1943 to January 1947

Highest rank achieved: Staff sergeant Branch of service: U.S. Marine Corps infantry Where served: Served in a combat zone in Korea for six months in 1950 in the 7th Marines; was wounded at Chosin Reservoir and was air evacuated to Japan Dates of service: 1946-48; 1950-51

Tyler Lenwood Fraker

Pete Favini Born: 1894 Died: 1977 Branch of service: Navy Dates of service: World War I Details of service: served in WWI aboard the USS Theodore, where he made seven trips to France, and then crashed on the reefs of France

Barry A. Feder

Delbert E. Fleming

Highest rank achieved: Lieutenant colonel Branch of service: U.S. Army, retired Where served: Fort Polk, La., active duty; reserve units in Oregon and Washington; active duty for six months during Desert Storm (first Gulf War) Dates of service: Commissioned in 1969; active duty 1973-1975; reserves 1975-1995

Highest rank achieved: Chief petty officer Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: Vietnam on various ships and commands Dates of service: 1957-1977

John E. Flood Highest rank achieved: Lieutenant Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: Supply Corps Dates of service: Three years

Born: June 11, 1970 Highest rank achieved: E-4, fuels specialist Branch of service: U.S. Air Force Where served: Spain during Desert Shield and Dahran, Saudi Arabia, during Desert Storm Details of service: 406th TFTW Dates of service: October 1990 to October 1994

Norma Ernsting-Emmons Highest rank achieved: Storekeeper Second Class Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: Milledgeville, Ga.; and Bremerton, Wash. Dates of service: March 2, 1943 to July 12, 1945

Luther E. Franklin Highest rank achieved: Lieutenant Branch of service: Navy Where served: continental USA and GTMO Details of service: naval aviator Years of service: active duty, 1953-57; active reserve: 195758; inactive reserve 1958-73

David Germani

Wayne Geiger

Stanley Pete Favini Born: March 7, 1923 Died: Aug. 25, 1987 Branch of service: Navy Where served: USS Monterey aircraft carrier Dates of service: World War II Details of service: served on USS Monterey aircraft carrier, ship was on the Japanese coast ready to attack when the Japanese surrendered

Brandon Christopher Galvan Born: Jan. 8, 1990 Highest rank achieved: Private First Class Branch of service: Army Where served: 1-1 Attack Reconnaissance Battalion, First Infantry Division, Combat Aviation Brigade Dates of service: May 2013 to present Details of service: just returned home May 5, 2014, from combat service in Kandahar, Afghanistan; received Gold Coin of Honor

Louis Charles Giraldin Highest rank achieved: Radioman second class Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: North Pacific Ocean Dates of service: April 12, 1944 to Feb. 21, 1946

David Hayes Highest rank achieved: Journalist first class Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where Served: USS Simon Lake; Diego Garcia; USS Kittyhawk; Naval Station Sandpoint, Naval Station Everett Dates of service: 1987-1998

The Issaquah Press

Robert C. Harper Highest rank achieved: Corporal Branch of service: U.S. Army Signal Corps MOS 1187 Where served: U.S. and Germany Dates of service: December 1952 to November 1954

Ray Giaudrone

Durward M. Garrett Highest rank achieved: Lt. Col. Branch of service: Air Force (retired) Where served: service included WWII, occupation forces in Japan, troop carrier duties from Guam covering the entire South Pacific, the Berlin airlift, the Korean Conflict, and The Cold War era including Vietnam while serving in the Strategic Air Command (SAC) Dates of service: enlisted in the Army Air Corps as an aviation cadet in June 1943 and retired in June 1966 Details of service: served on B-17, B-29, F-2,C-54, KB-29, KC-97 and KC 135 aircraft and was instructor navigator/ master navigator

William Daniel Gilley Highest rank achieved: Sergeant Branch of service: U.S. Army Where served: Panama; Fort Columbia, Wash.; and Fort Stevens, Ore. (the forts guarding the mouth of the Columbia River) Details of service: Hurt very seriously in an accident as they fired one of the 10-inch disappearing guns at Fort Columbia early in 1942. Was unable to serve afterward and was discharged. Dates of service: 1936-1942

Doris Gross Highest rank achieved: Link instructor, involved in American Legion, first woman vice commander Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: Corpus Christi, Texas Dates of service: 1941-1945

Highest rank achieved: MM 1st Class Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: Navy Post Office Dates of service: 1941-1945

Highest rank achieved: E4 Branch of service: U.S. Marine Corps Where served: 1st Marine Division; served in combat in Danang, Vietnam, from May 1969 – May 1970 Dates of service: November 1968 to May 1970

Sabatino Germani

William Clinton Geil

Born: Dec. 19, 1922 Died: 1998 Branch of service: Navy Where served: Repair Facility Guam, Shore Patrol, USS Hector, USS Yellowstone and Fleet Reserve Dates of service: 1939-63 Details of service: electronic technician in World War II, Korea and Vietnam

Born: Jan. 16, 1925 Highest rank achieved: Colonel Branch of service: Army Dates of service: World War II, 1943 to 1974 Details of service: plane crashed in Germany and he was a POW for 44 days, received $44 in compensation and bought his wife a watch

Gordon Hanson

Judson Burns Harper

Born: 1926 Highest rank achieved: Private Branch of service: Canadian Army Where served: Chilliwak, British Columbia Dates of service: March 1945 to September 1945 Details of service: engineering division

Born: Dec. 8, 1936 Highest rank achieved: Gunnery sergeant Branch of service: U.S. Marine Corps Where served: Korea and Vietnam Details of service: Awarded Combat Action Medal, two air medals, six good conduct medals, Navy commendation, served as aerial gunman on CH-46 helicopters Dates of service: Dec. 10, 1953 to June 30, 1973

Born: July 26, 1947 Highest rank achieved: Staff Sergeant Branch of service: Marine Corps Where served: Marine Corps Recruiting Depot in San Diego; Okinawa; Vietnam; Camp Pendleton in California Dates of service: 1965-71 and 1975-77 Details of service: served in Vietnam in 1967, at An Hoa and Hill 55 in the 155mm Artillery Battery, Third Battalion 11th Marines, First Marine Division, I Corps; received the Combat Action Ribbon and meritoriously promoted to Sergeant in Vietnam

Kenneth Lee Hampton Joseph L. Grove Born: March 16, 1942 Highest rank achieved: Sgt. First Class Branch of service: four years active duty Air Force, six years Navy Reserve, 10 years Army National Guard Where served: served four years at the Elmendorf Air Force Base, Alaska; six years with the Navy Reserve in Alaska and Arkansas, and 10 years with the Arkansas Army National Guard Dates of service: 1960-1964; 19852002 Details of service: active duty Air Force 5040th Supply Squadron, US Navy Reserve and Army National Guard 875 Combat Engineers

Born: Nov. 12, 1931 Highest rank achieved: Staff sergeant Branch of service: U.S. Army Security Agency Where served: Korea Details of service: Served until the truce was signed Dates of service: 1952 to 1955

Roger L. Heric Died: 1994 Highest rank achieved: Sergeant Branch of service: U.S. Army Where served: Germany, 749th Tank Battalion Details of service: The 749th fought with the 76th Division, April 7-30, 1944; was wounded in action

James Thurston Hoganson Highest rank achieved: Sergeant Branch of service: U.S. Army, infantry Where served: 40th and 24th Infantry Divisions in Korea Details of service: Served in combat in Korea as a medical tech Dates of service: May 1953 to March 1955

Brown Bear Car Wash and Pearson Law Firm honor our veterans.

Ron Howatson Highest rank achieved: CD3 Branch of service: U.S. Navy — Seabees Where served: Korea 1952-1954

Randolph (Randy) Carter Harrison Born: June 21, 1944 Highest rank achieved: Captain Branch of service: Army Special Forces Where served: U.S. and South East Asia (Vietnam/Cambodia) Dates of service: Regular Army active duty: January 1966 to June 1971; Army Special Forces Reserve: March 1989 to March 1993 Details of service: enlisted infantry, attended Infantry Officer’s Candidate School, commissioned as second lieutenant, completed basic airborne training, Special Forces Qualification, Special Forces Officer’s Intelligence Course, Defence Language Institute Course/ Vietnamese, two tours of duty in Republic of South Vietnam totaling 27 months in country

The Issaquah Press

S. William Hollingsworth

Archie Howatson

Born: 1925 Died: 2010 Highest rank achieved: PFC (private first class) Branch of service: U.S. Army 100th Infantry Wounded in action: Wounded in combat in France, Nov. 1944 Dates of service: World War II January 1944 to August 1945

Branch of service: U.S. Army Where served: Hawaii for 26 months; Served during combat in Okinawa, Japan, with the 892nd Ordnance Heavy Automotive Maintenance Co. in the 10th Army; he was a mechanic who kept the vehicles moving Dates of service: Jan. 5, 1942 to 1945

Daryl E. Johnson Born: December 1927 Died: October 2009 Highest rank achieved: Seaman first class Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: Washington, D.C. Dates of service: 1945-1946

Erik Johnson Highest rank achieved: Second class petty officer Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: Iraq Dates of service: 1994-2006

Shirley Beining Hilgemann

Ewert Hilgemann

Highest rank achieved: E5/SP5 Branch of service: U.S. Army Where served: 9th Adjutant General Fort Lewis; HQ U.S. Army Element, Brunssum, The Netherlands Medals awarded: Army Commendation Medal, Good Conduct Medal, Joint Services Commendation Medal Details of service: We married one year before joining the U.S. Army. Would do it all over — the marriage and serving. Dates of service: 1975-1980

Highest rank achieved: E5/SP5 Branch of service: U.S. Army Where served: 9th Adjutant General Fort Lewis; HQ U.S. Army Element, Brunssum, The Netherlands Medals awarded: Army Commendation Medal, Good Conduct Medal, Joint Services Commendation Medal, Expert (M16) Details of service: Married my high school sweetheart one year before joining the Army. She convinced me that serving together would be fun. It was. Dates of service: 1975-1980

Roy Inui

Reed W. Jarvis

Bonnie Eugene Johnson Jr.

Donnas D. Johnson

Born: Oct. 6, 1945 Highest rank achieved: Specialist 4th Class Branch of service: Army Where served: 5th of 46th Light Infantry Brigade attached to 198th Light Infantry Brigade, located in Chulai below Danang Dates of service: January 1967 to January 1969 Details of service: served in combat in Vietnam, mortar man (killing radius is 50 meters; mortar would go up 5 miles)

Highest rank achieved: T5 Branch of service: U.S. Army Where served: Was an allied translator, interpreter section; served in combat in the Philippines for two months Details of service: Received Presidential Unit Citation, Congressional Gold Medal (2011), Philippine Liberation Medal, others Dates of service: 1944-1946

Died: April 1, 2012 Highest rank achieved: Colonel Branch of service: U.S. Army and U.S. Navy, U.S. Army, Washington National Guard, Washington State Guard Where served: Korea, Persian Gulf Details of service: Active and reserve Dates of service: March 1951 to June 2001

Born: July 5, 1925 Died: March 29, 2012 Highest rank achieved: ETM 3C Branch of service: U.S. Navy Dates of service: Jan. 1, 1944 to May 31, 1946 Details of service: Great Lakes Naval Air Station in Radio Training School, radio operator, World War II veteran

Highest rank achieved: YN1 Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: Mare Island Naval Shipyard; Alameda Naval Airbase Dates of service: 1950-1954

Arthur E. Landdeck

Ken Konigsmark

Gene Klineburger

Rolland R. Kiefel

Highest rank achieved: Corporal Branch of service: U.S. Army Where served: Utah, California, Arizona Dates of service: 1942-1945

Highest rank achieved:

Margaret (Slate) Larsen Howard E. Landdeck Highest rank achieved: AX3 (aviation antisubmarine warfare technician, third class) Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: Ream Field, Imperial Beach, Calif.; USS Bennington Dates of service: Nov. 17, 1961 to Aug. 31, 1965

Born: April 12, 1930 Highest rank achieved: Staff sergeant Branch of service: U.S. Air Force Where served: Korea Details of service: As one of very few female radio repair technicians, she worked to prepare Presidents Truman’s and Eisenhower’s planes for flights in the Pacific. Dates of service: 1951-1954

Jack Loppnow William Kenneth Loken Born: Oct. 1, 1930 Highest rank achieved: JO3 Branch of service: Navy Where served: Whidbey Island Naval Air Station & Commander Submarine Force Pacific Fleet Dates of service: Jan. 17, 1951 to Dec. 3, 1954 Details of service: Journalist

Born: 1921 Highest rank achieved: Staff Sergeant Branch of service: Air Corps Where served: Iwo Jima and the United States Dates of service: 1942-46 Details of service: all over the United States and Iwo Jima

Lucille E. Lundstrom Branch of service: U.S. Army Highest rank achieved: First lieutenant Where served: General nursing care on the hospital ship Marigold, Zone of Interior and in the European and Southwest Pacific Theaters of operation Details of service: Was the youngest nurse on the Marigold at age 22; Bronze Star (4) AsiaticPacific Campaign Medal; Bronze Star (2) European-African Middle Eastern Campaign Medal; Bronze Star (2) Philippine Liberation Medal Years of service: Dec. 31, 1943 to Feb. 1, 1946

Edith Rose MacDougall

Highest rank achieved: Lieutenant commander Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: Served in combat in Korea for 18 months Details of service: On senior ship in Inchon Harbor at the time of the truce in 1953; commanding officer of USS Lenawee APA 195; navigating officer of USS Lenawee APA 195 Dates of service: May 17, 1943 to July 1, 1966

Bruce Leavitt Born: Nov. 20, 1925 Highest rank achieved: Signalman Second Class Branch of service: Navy Where served: European Theatre, Asian Theatre Dates of service: December 1941 to December 1946 Details of service: visited North Africa, Italy, Scotland, Wales, England, Okinawa and the Pacific Islands

Deceased (at age 58) Highest rank achieved: Mechanics mate Branch of service: Navy — WAVES Where served: Cedar Falls, Iowa; Norman, Okla. Dates of service: 1943-1944 mother of former Mayor Ava Frisinger

Deceased (at age 76) Highest rank achieved: Lt. junior grade Branch of service: Navy Where served: South Pacific; Atlantic Dates of service: 1943-1945 active duty; reserve to 1954; father of former Mayor Ava Frisinger

Melvin Miller Born: Nov. 5, 1922 Died: April 25, 2010 Branch of service: Navy Where served: Philippine Theatre Dates of service: 1942-1945

Highest rank achieved: Specialist 4 Branch of service: U.S. Army/Reserve Where served: Various states including Indiana, South Carolina and Colorado Dates of service: March 1983 to December 1989

Richard C. Larson Born: Aug. 3, 1919 Died: Nov. 26, 2010 Highest rank achieved: Tech Sergeant 5th Grade Branch of service: U.S. Army Where served: 2nd Armored Division Headquarters Company 66th Armored Regiment Details of service: Fought in World War II — North Africa, Sicily, Holland, France, Belgium and Germany Dates of service: February 1941 to July 1945

D.C. ‘Duke’ Livingstone

Edward Prior Leahy Born: April 1, 1923 Highest rank achieved: Lieutenant JG Branch of service: U.S. Navy/ Marine Corps Where served: 4th Marine Division — Iwo Jima, Marshall Islands, Tinian, Saipan Details of service: Injured and taken to the hospital on the third day of attacks on Iwo Jima Dates of service: 1942 to 1945

Highest rank achieved: Lieutenant commander Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: Patrol Squadron 46 (VP-46); Vietnam 1972-1974 Dates of service: July 1969 to September 1974

Deceased Highest rank achieved: Yeoman Third Class Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: Japan, Hawaii, Philippines Dates of service: 1959-1963

Highest rank achieved: E-7 Branch of service: U.S. Coast Guard Where served: Marine Patrol; Marine Inspection; served in combat in Korean waters marking channels for troop ships for six months Details of service: Served from Korean Waters — Bering Sea Patrol — ice breaking for dew line; teaching firefighting school at T.I. Coast Guard Academy; and up and down the East Coast all in different groups. Wrote book for Marine Corps on the new Marine Corps in 1985. Dates of service: 1952 until retirement

Highest rank achieved: Captain Branch of service: Marines Where served: continental U.S. Dates of service: 1956-64

Highest rank achieved: Corporal Branch of service: U.S. Marine Corps Where served: Vietnam Dates of service: 1966-1972

Sean S. Lewis Highest rank achieved: Private first class Branch of service: U.S. Marine Corps Dates of service: 2011 – currently serving

Ledo J. Malmassari

Chad Magendanz Born: May 24, 1967 Highest rank achieved: Lieutenant Branch of service: Navy Dates of service: 1985-1997 Where served: SSBN 730 & 729 Details of service: Submariner specialty, Navy Achievement Medal

Died: Oct. 25, 1998 Highest rank achieved: Sergeant Branch of service: U.S. Army Where served: Korea – Third Infantry Division Dates of service: 1950-1952

John A. Marsh Deceased Highest rank achieved: Private Branch of service: U.S. Army Where served: 75th Infantry Division Details of service: Served in combat for one year in the European Theatre; received Purple Heart for being wounded during the Battle of the Bulge

Kenneth MacKenzie Born: Nov. 9, 1920 Died: Aug. 25, 2003 Branch of service: Navy Where served: USS Memphis and later Harrisburg, Penn. Dates of service: 1943-1946 Details of service: served on the USS Memphis, patrolling waters between Brazil and Africa; later stationed at a supply depot in Harrisburg, Penn.

Urban V. Masset

Highest rank achieved: Lieutenant Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: USS Forrestal CVA59, Sixth Fleet (Mediterranean) Dates of service: 1966-1973

Born: 1956 Highest rank achieved: Lieutenant colonel Branch of service: Army and Air Force Reserve Where served: West Point, Korea, Fort Lewis, Guam, Hawaii Dates of service: 1974-2000 Details of service: Military Intelligence officer; six years active Army and 17 years in Air Force Reserve

Larry R. Kulin

Born: April 25, 1921 Died: March 9, 2003 Highest rank achieved: Sergeant Branch of service: U.S. Army, 1393rd Engineer Construction Battalion; entry and training – Fort Leavenworth, Kan., and Camp Joseph T. Robinson, Ark. Where served: During WWII, in the Pacific Theater – In the Philippines was in the Battle at Luzon Dates of service: June 15, 1942 to Dec. 23, 1945

Steven W. Lewis

Born: May 17, 1918 Died: Jun. 14, 2012 Dates of service: 1944-1946 Details of service: stationed at Harrisburg, Penn., as the store-keep where she met and fell in love with Kenneth MacKenzie; discharged in 1946

Bob McCoy

Kathleen R. Merrill

Storekeeper second class (SK2) Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: Atlantic, Mediterranean, Gulf of Mexico aboard USS Exultant, USS Rigel, USS Des Moines, USS Conway Dates of service: June 6, 1958 to June 6, 1964

Ivan A. Lee

Gladys MacKenzie

Jeremiah Fraser Pitts MacDougall

Robert C. Lyon

Steve Johnson Highest rank achieved: Sergeant Branch of service: U.S. Army Where served: Vietnam Dates of service: August 1967 to August 1969

B5

Neal Harley Howard

Scott Wayne Johnson Highest rank achieved: E4 AMH/ AMS Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: VAQ – 129 Viking Dates of service: 1978-1988

Wednesday, May 21, 2014 •

Norman W. McLean

Ed McKee Highest rank achieved: Sergeant Branch of service: U.S. Air Force, turret gunner Where served: Served in combat in 12th Air Force in Corsica, fall and winter of 194445; 23 bombing missions over European Theater Dates of service: Sept. 16, 1940 to Sept. 14, 1945

Deceased Highest rank achieved: Seaman first class Branch of service: U.S. Coast Guard Where served: Alaska Dates of service: April 21, 1943 to March 18, 1946

Don A. McWhirter Born: March 1, 1931 Highest rank achieved: S/SGT Branch of service: U.S. Air Force Dates of service: May 23, 1949 to Nov. 7, 1952 Details of service: HRRC Where served: Lackland AFB, San Antonio, TX, through basic training, permanent party at HRRC until discharged

John Meek

Thomas M. Mechler Born: Feb. 26, 1932 Highest rank achieved: Staff Sergeant Branch of service: Air Force Dates of service: September 1950 to September 1954 Details of service: Airborne radar mechanic, 434th and 464th Troop Carrier Wings

David V. Merritt

Highest rank achieved: SFC (sergeant first class) Branch of service: U.S. Army Where served: Okinawa, Vietnam, India, Bolivia, Greece and Afghanistan Dates of service: July 1954 to July 1957; September 1959 to November 1976

Born: Sept. 30, 1961 Highest rank achieved: Sgt. Branch of service: Army Where served: served in combat, Persian Gulf War (Aug. 22, 1990 to April 1, 1991), one of first 10 Washington Army National Guard reservists deployed to Saudi Arabia in support of Operation Desert Shield Dates of service: Nov. 1, 1984 to May 16, 1992 Details of service: Combat Engineer, 317th Engr BN & 116th RAOC

Issaquah Valley Grange #581 and Bellewood Retirement Living thank our veterans.

Leonard Miles Born: Dec. 16, 1920 Died: 2005, (in Issaquah) Highest rank achieved: PFC, washman Branch of service: U.S. Army Where served: Sitka, Alaska Details of service: Received the Victory Medal Dates of service: 1945 to 1946

B6 • Wednesday, May 21, 2014

John A. ‘Tony’ McIntosh

Alan Ray Miles

Michael Dean Miles

Born: Jun. 8, 1942 Highest rank achieved: Sergeant Branch of service: Army Where served: Second Battalion, Second Infantry, Fifth Division; Headquarters Company, Third Brigade, 50th Armored Division Dates of service: 1964-66 Details of service: served in combat for 10 months in 1966

Born: July 18, 1947 Highest rank achieved: Corporal Branch of service: U.S. Marine Corps Where served: Vietnam Details of service: Received the Purple Heart for shrapnel in the leg, Presidential Unit Citation, 2nd Battalion and 9th Marine Division Dates of service: 1967 to 1968

Born: Oct. 10, 1951 Highest rank achieved: Lance corporal Branch of service: U.S. Marine Corps Where served: Okinawa Details of service: Meritorious Unit Citation and National Defense Service Medal, 5th Marine Division, Fleet Marine

Force Pacific Dates of service: 1970 to 1972

The Issaquah Press

David John Mitman

John Mizenko

Duncan Mulholland

Kevin J. Murphy

Richard Murphy

John Norman Naegle

Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: USS Coral Sea Years of service: 1951-1953 Details of service: Served as flight engineer for top secret Martin Mercator intelligence-gathering aircraft, flying spy missions into Soviet airspace from Port Lyautey, Morocco. During one mission, his plane was fired at by a Soviet surface to air missile. (It missed.)

Born: 1934 Highest rank achieved: radar specialist Branch of service: Army Where served: Rhode Island Dates of service: 1955-57 Details of service: worked with Nike missile surface-to-air battery control when fired

Highest rank achieved: Staff sergeant Branch of service: U.S. Air Force Where served: 3595th GIDIST Supply Squadrons; Nellis Air Force Base 1951-52; NCOIC Base Supply Nagoya, Japan, 1952-54 Details of service: Received good conduct medal, National Defense Medal, Korean Service Medal and United Nations Medal Dates of service: November 1950 to November 1954

Born: March 17, 1957 Highest rank achieved: Lt. Colonel Branch of service: Army and Air Force Where served: U.S. and overseas Dates of service: June 1979 to June 2000 Details of service: Army Infantry and Intelligence, Air Force Intelligence

Born: March 10, 1923 Highest rank achieved: Captain Branch of service: Army Air Corps Where served: Shemya Air Station, Alaska Dates of service: July 1943 to October 1949 Details of service: On his first mission, he flew one of six planes out of 18 that returned from bombing Japan; on his 23rd and last mission, he was shot down Dec. 7, 1944, over Sakhalin Island. Was a POW in Russia.

Born: May 1, 1942 Died: Jan. 4, 1999 Highest rank achieved: Commander Branch of service: U.S. Coast Guard Details of service: Coast Guard Academy graduate with honors in 1964; Master of Science in engineering, University of Michigan – Naval Architecture 1969; Engineering Mechanics 1970; Ph.D. Naval Architecture, Marine Engineering 1980; Détente Delegation to USSR 1974-75; served on several “wind” class ice breakers Dates of service: 1964-1985

Michael O’Connor

Donald Nelson Norman B. ‘Crash’ Nash Highest rank achieved: Captain Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: Service included two combat tours in A-6 Intruders in Vietnam Dates of service: 1957-1988 Details of service: naval aviator; served in attack squadrons and weapons test facilities, was an aircraft carrier operations officer, squadron commanding

Born: Jan. 11, 1928 Died: 1969 Highest rank achieved: Specialist Branch of service: Army Where served: served in combat in the Korean Conflict for a little more than a year Dates of service: 1950-1953 Details of service: Headquarters Company

Ruben Nieto

Gerald A. Nelson Born: July 26, 1944 Highest rank achieved: Specialist 5 Branch of service: Army National Guard and Military Policeman Where served: California Dates of service: January 1964 to January 1970 Details of service: Outstanding military policeman of our company in 1967

Gary C. Newbill Highest rank achieved: Major Branch of service: U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Where served: Virginia; California; Okinawa, Japan; The Philippines and Vietnam Dates of service: January 1965 to March 1968 (active duty)

Born: May 4, 1946 Highest rank achieved: Spl. 4 Branch of service: U.S. Army Dates of service: June 1966 to March 1968 Details of service: Radio Operator (RTO), 1st Cavalry Div/1/7th Cavalry Regiment, served in combat, Vietnam, December 1966 to December 1967

Ernest R. Nyberg Highest rank achieved: Sergeant Branch of service: U.S. Army Air Force Where served: South Pacific – Tinian Island Wounded in action: B-29 crashed off Iwo Jima, three men survived out of crew of 10, Ernie made 17 missions, some over capital of Japan Dates of service: 1943-1945

Vernon M. Parrett, M.D. Charles D. Parker Died: Nov. 7, 2010 Highest rank achieved: Captain Branch of service: U.S. Marine Corps Where served: U.S.; Okinawa, Japan; Vietnam Dates of service: Sept. 9, 1954 to Sept. 30, 1974

Highest rank achieved: Captain Branch of service: U.S. Army, medical Where served: Served two years in the Valley Forge Army Hospital in officers’ ward, tuberculosis unit Dates of service: 1944-46 and 195254

Highest rank achieved: Seaman first class Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: Aleutians Islands Alaska; Japan; USS Jarvis DD-799 Dates of service: Dec. 16 1943 to May 19 1946

Born: Sept. 15, 1925 Highest rank achieved: Air cadet Branch of service: U.S. Army/Air Force Where served: Various bases in the U.S. Dates of service: 1943 to 1945

Robert Ploss Highest rank achieved: Captain Branch of service: U.S. Air Force (B-17 pilot, physician U.A. Air Force medical) Where served: 11 combat missions over Germany; POW Mission Austria to France; two food drops to the Dutch; flew Atlantic twice Dates of service: 1943-1952

Highest rank achieved: Specialist 4th class Branch of service: U.S. Army/ Washington National Guard Where served: Camp Murray, Wash., 181st Support Battalion, Company D Dates of service: August 1977 to May 1983

Frank Valentine Schroeder

John Schroeder Born: Feb. 23, 1888 Died: Jan. 10, 1973 Highest rank achieved: private Branch of service: U.S. Army Dates of service: Muster out telegram Nov. 16, 1918, according to discharge papers. Start date unknown. Details of service: Last assigned school for cooks and bakers. Was a cook at Camp Lewis, now known as Fort Lewis.

The photos in this section are mostly in alphabetical order. However, photos that came in late are at the end of the section. We accept photos and information about veterans all year. Email them to editor@ isspress.com.

Born: Feb. 10, 1894 Died: Sept. 6, 1977 Branch of service: U.S. Army Details of service: Fought in France during World War I

Sarah Pommer Born: Dec. 12, 1943 Highest rank achieved: Lieutenant Branch of service: Navy Dates of service: 1966-1969 Details of service: USN Nurse Corps, hospital nurse, amputee specialist

Hugh Gordon Ross No photo available Highest rank achieved: Petty officer 2 Branch of service: U.S. Navy, cryptograph tech Where served: Strategic nuclear deterrence in South China Sea during Vietnam War; Combat Zone vet, 1972-1973; nuclear submarine force Dates of service: January 1971 to January 1977

Edward Schaefer Born: June 10, 1911 Died: 1986 in Spokane Gale Robert Schroeder Highest rank Born: March 1935 achieved: Technician Deceased: June 2005 fifth grade (Tec 5) Highest rank Branch of service: achieved: Master U.S. Army Sergeant Where served: Served Branch of service: in combat in the Army European Theater, Where served: last February 1944 to unit 409th Engineer November 1945; Company, Reserve 3429th Ord Mam Co. Dates of service: Details of service: “A 1954-1963 and man who loved his 1976-1994 country” Details of service: Dates of service: airplane mechanic 1943-1945

Leroy Olson Born: Oct. 28, 1921 Highest rank achieved: Lieutenant Junior Grade Branch of service: Navy Reserves Air Group IV Where served: Pacific Theatre during World War II Dates of service: August 1942 to December 1942 Details of service: fighter pilot in Air Group IV flying F6F-3 Air Grumman Hellcats; saw action under Admiral Halsey and flew off of the USS Essex, including the first carrier-based raid on Tokyo involving more than 1,200 targets; decorated with Air Medal Citation for meritorious achievement, skills and courage

Wayne Pommer Born: Jan. 1, 1943 Highest rank achieved: SGT Branch of service: Air Force Dates of service: 1966-1970 Details of service: administrative specialist; 941stMAG, 97stMAS, 62nd SPS

Charles Edwin Runacres Jr. Born: Sept. 17, 1917 Highest rank achieved: Lieutenant Branch of service: Navy Where served: USS Wedderburn DD684 Dates of service: 1942-1945 Details of service: served in combat in the Pacific for three years and three months, survived three tornadoes while at sea and one kamikaze attack

Elmer John Petett

Hugh Asher Preston Jr. Born: April 29, 1924 Died: May 1, 2014 Highest rank achieved: Seaman First Class Branch of service: Navy Dates of service: Feb. 11, 1942 to Feb. 19, 1946 Details of service: At 17, Hugh fudged his age and was accepted into the Navy. He served four years during World War II on the USS Aaron Ward III in the Pacific Theatre. He was on watch at the wheelhouse when the ship was attached off Okinawa on May 3, 1945. Twenty-five planes attacked and six kamikaze planes crashed into its decks, towers and engine rooms. The attack lasted just under an hour and left the ship in dire condition with many wounded. Hugh was one of many heroes on board the ship that day.

Highest rank achieved: Pharmacists mate second class Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: USS Alshain in the Asiatic Pacific and Philippines Dates of service: July 1943 to March 1946

Meindert Pillie

Reuben Allen Richard Highest rank achieved: SP4 Branch of service: U.S. Army Where served: Co. E 122nd Mnt. Bn. USAREUR Dates of service: January 1968 to December 1969

Died: March 10, 2010, at age 95 Highest rank achieved: Sergeant Branch of service: U.S. Army Air Corps Where served: Instructor at 349th Flexible Gunnery Training Squadron, Tyndall Field, Fla. Dates of service: Oct. 21, 1941 to Sept. 17, 1943

Highest rank achieved: Petty officer second class Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: In the Pacific, aboard the carrier USS Lexington, as radio gunman Wounded in action: Received Distinguished Flying Cross, Air Medal and Purple Heart Dates of service: 1942-1945

Born: Feb. 9, 1923 Highest rank achieved: WT3/C Branch of service: Navy Where served: USS Ludlow during World War II Dates of service: 1944-1946 Details of service: served in combat in World War II, American Area, Victory medal, Asiatic Pacific

Michael M. Riste

Gilbert Purschwitz

Dave Sao

Born: April 16, 1939 Highest rank achieved: Pfc Branch of service: Army Dates of service: July 16, 1957 to July 15, 1959 Details of service: communications, 1st Army Division (Big Red One)

Highest rank achieved: Staff sergeant Branch of service: U.S. Air Force Where served: Strategic Air Command Dates of service: March 1966 to March 1970 Details of service: Munitions specialist, sent to Anderson AFB in Guam and Utapao AFB in Thailand, team chief of a team that was responsible for loading hundreds of bombs each day on B52 bombers in support of the Vietnam War, and loading and caring for nuclear weapons stateside.

Don Riggs Born: Seattle, 1936 Highest rank: PFC Branch of service: Army Where served: Okinawa Dates of service: October 1959 to January 1962 Details of service: producer for The Voice of the United Nations Command, broadcasting propaganda radio programs to North Korea and China; returned in time to work at the 1962 World’s Fair

Elmo Jerome Sagedahl Highest rank achieved: Corporal Branch of service: U.S. Marine Corps Where served: Pacific area Dates of service: May 26, 1944 to Aug. 31, 1946

William Edward Seil

Daniel S. Segon Highest rank achieved: Private Branch of service: U.S. Army Where served: Germany Dates of service: 1966-1967

Deceased Highest rank achieved: SP5/E-5 Branch of service: U.S. Army, transportation Where served: 1st Cavalry Division Details of service: Served three tours of duty in Vietnam Years of service: Oct. 25, 1966 to Nov. 15, 1983

Robert Howard Rockwell (Rocky)

Helen Sabin Born: April 10, 1923 Highest rank achieved: Radioman Third Class Branch of service: Coast Guard Where served: New York, New Jersey, Seattle Dates of service: 1943-45 Details of service: attended boot camp in Florida, worked in communications, one sister was an Army nurse and the other a nurse cadet

Louis Ortiz

Jeston J. Phillips

Russell D. Peery

Jay Robert Rodne Highest rank achieved: Lieutenant colonel Branch of service: U.S. Marine Corps/ still serving in the U.S. Marine Reserve Where Served: Persian Gulf War (1991); Somalia (1992-93); Operation Iraqi Freedom, Kuwait & Iraq (2003) Dates of service: 1990-present

Philip Pitruzzello Highest rank achieved: Aviation Radioman Second Class Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: Atlantic Fleet, Pacific Fleet Dates of service: June 1942 to September 1945

Gerald Francis Petersen Norman Peery

Branch of service: Air Force Dates of service: 1962-1966 Details: Michael joined the Air Force right out of high school because his older brother did and found out it was the easiest. In those days you either joined a branch of your choice or else they drafted you into the army.

Deceased (at age 66) Highest rank achieved: Colonel Branch of service: U.S. Air Force Where served: World War II, Korea and Vietnam Dates of service: 1944-1975

Market Well, Imelda Dulcich PR & Social Media, Eastside Family Dentistry and NAPA Auto Parts of Issaquah honor our veterans.

Highest rank achieved: PFC (private first class) Branch of service: U.S. Army 173rd Airborne Recon, RTO (radio telephone operator) call sign Papa Kilo, nickname Crash Where served: Vietnam 1969-1970 (The Blackscarfed Gunslingers) Dates of service: 1968-1970

The Issaquah Press

Born: April 10, 1926 Highest rank achieved: PFC Branch of service: U.S. Army/Air Force Where served: Germany Details of service: 4th Infantry Division Rifleman, 22nd Infantry, chaplin of the Post 79th Snoqualmie Dates of service: 1944 to 1946

Pete Sims

Mary Ellen Holmes Sheridan

Lee F. Scheeler

Born: Sept. 7, 1927 Highest rank achieved: Lieutenant Branch of service: Navy Where served: Pentagon; White House; Kodiak, Alaska; Long Beach, Calif.; Kansas City, Mo. (recruiting); Newport, R.I. Dates of service: 1953-1960 Details of service: received a letter of commendation from the chairman, Joint Chief of Staff

Born: Oct. 28, 1919 Highest rank achieved: Captain Branch of service: Army, infantry Where served: Germany, France, Austria Dates of service: 1941-46 Details of service: served in World War II combat and occupation, received a Bronze Star and Bronze Star Clusters, Company Commander, kept in contact with 17 out of 178

Norm Smith Highest rank achieved: Classified Branch of service: Army – counter intelligence Where served: Fort Benjamin Harrison, Ind. Dates of service: 1956-59 Details of service: Worked in background investigation and wanted to go to Germany, but was never sent overseas

Wednesday, May 21, 2014 •

William A. Somsak

Cody D. Sorteberg

Jack Richard Steidl

William Britton Striker

Highest rank achieved: Boatswain’s mate third class Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: Marshall Islands, USS Midway Details of service: Received two medals; operated landing craft Dates of service: 1942-1944

Born: Feb. 25, 1992 Highest rank achieved: E4 (corporal) Branch of service: Marine Corps Where served: Afghanistan 2012, Japan/Korea 2013/2014 Dates of service: January 2011 to present Details of service: weapons company, 2nd Battalion, 5th Marines, served in combat

Highest rank achieved: PFC (private first class) Branch of service: U.S. Army Air Corps Where served: Jackson, Tenn. Dates of service: 1941-1944

Born: Dec. 12, 1907 Died: Oct. 1, 2003 Highest rank achieved: T-4, sergeant Branch of service: U.S. Army, Big Red 1 Where served: Omaha Beach Normandy, Sicily, Tunisia, European – African Campaign, Middle Eastern front – Ardennes Wounded in action: Leg wounds, shrapnel, received Silver Star and Bronze Star Dates of service: July. 6, 1942 to Sept. 2, 1945

Jay Anthony Vanni George H. Swanson Died: 1992 Branch of service: U.S. Army Air Corps Where served: United States Dates of service: 1943-1945

Alonzo Lee Sweet

John Swanson Died: 2001 Highest rank achieved: Staff sergeant Branch of service: U.S. Army Air Corps Where served: Missouri and Alberta, Ferry Command Post planes to Russia Dates of service: 1942-1945

Born: Nov. 18, 1938 Died: 2003 Highest rank achieved: Corporal Branch of service: U.S. Navy Dates of service: April 27, 1956 to Oct. 16, 1959

David S. Waggoner Highest rank achieved: Lieutenant colonel Branch of service: U.S. Army Where served: Vietnam, Central America, U.S. Wounded in action: Purple Heart awarded Dates of service: 1968-1993

Neil (Sol) Winikoff Born: March 31, 1920 Died: Oct. 11, 2013 Branch of service: Army Where served: North Africa and Europe Dates of service: February 1942 to November 1945 Details of service: served in North Africa and Europe as a cryptographic technician, served in ETO with signal outfit encoding and decoding classified messages by means of army codes and devices; familiar with Army means of maintaining signal security and proper storage of secret documents; languages: English, Yiddish, Italian, French, German and some Russian

Henry D. (Hank) Thomas

Frank R. Troutman

Born: April 21, 1944 Highest rank achieved: lieutenant commander, unrestricted line Branch of service: Navy Where served: nuclear power submarines and surface combatants Dates of service: February 1963 to March 1983 Details of service: nuclear qualified, qualified in submarines, surface warfare qualification, Navy Commendation Medal recipient

Deceased Highest rank achieved: Colonel Branch of service: U.S. Army/Air Force Where served: Pacific, Italy Dates of service: May 1940 to January 1984 Details of service: APTO-US-MTO

Dwight Eldon Waggoner Winston Matthew Yourglich Highest rank achieved: PhM3c (photographer’s mate third class) Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: South Pacific Wounded in action: After his ship, the USS Houston, was torpedoed, Winston swam in shark-infested waters in the China Seas for four hours before being picked up. Dates of service: Oct. 11, 1943 to April 13, 1946

Born: August 23, 1922 Died: Oct. 9, 2009 Highest rank achieved: Seaman third class Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: South Pacific Details of service: American Area Campaign Medal, Asiatic Pacific Area Campaign Medal, WWII Victory Medal Dates of service: April 1943 to November 1945

Geoff Warren

Joe Wallis Born: Oct. 2 1931 Highest rank achieved: Commander Branch of service: Navy Reserve Where served: Korean War Dates of service: January 1954-57 Details of service: spent 22 years in the reserve on the USS Thomas 833 destroyer in Iwo Jima, Japan and Hong Kong

George Van Leeuwen Born: May 18, 1921 Died: 2012 Highest rank achieved: Lieutenant Branch of service: Army/Air Force Where served: served in combat in the South Pacific Dates of service: 1943-1945 Details of service: pilot, flew C46

Highest rank achieved: Petty officer third class Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: two six-month tours to Persian Gulf on the aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson as catapult officer Details of service: Letter of Commendation; graduated from Central Washington University with degrees in science and business; (lived in Issaquah for 36 years) Dates of Service: 1993-1997

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Ernest Milton Swanson Highest rank achieved: Aviation machinist first class Branch of service: Coast Guard

Dates of service: Oct. 21, 1941 to Dec. 23, 1946

Dallas L. Waggoner

James H. Van Winkle Died: Feb. 9, 2008 Drafted into the U.S. Army in 1944, one month before high school graduation. Deployed to Japan and in transit, the Japanese surrendered before he arrived. James went from front line duty to a clerk typist in the office due to termination of the war. Stayed in Japan in civil service and returned stateside from Kanagawa, Japan, on Nov. 5, 1946

Deceased (at age 76) Highest rank achieved: Tech sergeant Branch of service: U.S. Army Where served: Europe, Italy, North Africa Wounded in action: Purple Heart awarded Dates of service: 1941-1945

David Les Yeisley William James Weatherford

Highest rank achieved: CDR Branch of service: U.S. Coast Guard Dates of service: 1992 to current Details of service: continues to serve in the Coast Guard Reserve; is the senior reserve officer for Sector Puget Sound in Seattle; has mobilized for national disasters such as the Deepwater Oil Spill, the Haiti Earthquake and Hurricane Katrina; flew C-130s while stationed at Kodiak, Alaska, and Elizabeth City, N.C.

Born: March 8, 1925 Highest rank achieved: MAM 2C Branch of service: Navy Where served: NTS Farragut, Idaho, Acorn 21 NAB Navy 825 NAS, Seattle, PSCU 5NB, Bremerton, served in combat in Roi-Namur in the Marshall Islands for 15 months Dates of service: July 1943 to March 1946 Details of service: Awarded Asiatic Pacific Area Campaign Medal — 1 star and World War II Victory Medal

George Westlake

Robert Edward Wolahan

Born: Feb. 21, 1919 Highest rank achieved: Colonel Branch of service: Army Where served: 1941-1945 France and D-Day Dates of service: Retired 1972 Details of service: Colorado, Fort Lawton

Born: Nov. 23, 1932 Deceased: Dec. 10, 2010 Highest rank achieved: PNC (chief) Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: Korea and Vietnam Dates of service: 1950-1970

Matt Winzen Born: Jan. 22, 1925 Highest rank achieved: MM1C Branch of service: Navy Where served: Panama Canal, South Pacific Fleet Dates of service: 1943-45 Details of service: enlisted at 18, assigned to nucleus crew for USS Dennis in Panama Canal; participated in many invasions, most notably the battle of Leyte Gulf; ship picked up 445 survivors from the aircraft carrier St. Louis; served on the destroyer escort the President flew in and protected carriers

Jack Yusen Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: Pacific Theater: Home Front, Atlantic sub scare, Leyte Gulf Details of service: Served aboard the USS Samuel B. Roberts amid World War II, until Japanese forces sunk the destroyer escort in the Battle of Leyte Gulf — the largest naval battle during World War II; some sailors survived the attack only to bob in the shark-infested Philippine Sea until rescuers arrived days later

Born: Dec. 23, 1932 Highest rank achieved: Sergeant Branch of service: U.S. Army, Infantry Where served: 3rd Infantry Division, Korea and 28th Infantry Division, Germany Details of service: Received Bronze Star with V-Device Combat Infantry Badge, Korean Service Medal with Bronze Service Stars and United Service Medal, National Defense and Army Occupation (Germany) Medals Dates of service: Jan. 22, 1951 to Jan. 8, 1954

Gordie Blume

Austin Vickery Wiggins Branch of service: U.S. Marine Corps Where served: Saipan in the Mariana Islands Dates of service: 1942-1946

Garrett from page B1

he was transferred to a special photo reconnaissance unit in Japan. Garrett was charged with providing aerial coverage of Japan and Korea for use in updating maps since the war’s ending. “We would fly every day and take pictures. At the time, Hiroshima and Nagasaki had been bombed just a year before,” he said. “Hiroshima was really destroyed. I don’t see how anything lived there. Seeing what a bomb could do was scary.” In 1947, he was sent to Guam, where he was on the crew of a C-54 aircraft assigned to transport troops and supplies to active military bases throughout the South Pacific. One such trip, a trek from Australia to Guam, had a very special passenger, but Garrett didn’t know it at the time. “My first wife, Nicky, was on one of those flights from Brisbane,” he said. “I flew her before I even knew

Born: Aug. 25, 1948 Highest rank achieved: Captain Branch of service: Air Force Where served: Southeast Asia, Alaska, Europe, Mediterranean, Pacific, U.S. Dates of service: January 1973 to June 1979

who she was.” Nicky was one of the Australian civil workers the United States hired to work various jobs to support military requirements, Garrett said. The two started as friends, socializing among others while she played the piano and he and his fellow servicemen sang at the local officer’s club. She was hospitalized for a minor illness September 1947, and Garrett, being the smitten airman he was, offered to drive her home when she was better, assuming that his assignment that day didn’t have any hiccups. “I told her, ‘Hey, I’ll pick you up, if our plane doesn’t go down,’ and I sort of laughed it off,” he said. It was no laughing matter that same day when his C-54, carrying supplies to Manus Island off the northeastern tip of Papua New Guinea, did crash into the ocean. Stranded at sea An engine fire forced the six-man crew to make a water landing. When they saw the flames, the men burst into action, making use of their extensive emergency train-

James Wood Born: May 8, 1950 Highest rank achieved: RM3 Branch of service: U.S. Navy Where served: Vietnam, three tours Details of service: Radio Teletype Task Group operator, Yankee Station Dates of service: 1968 to 1972

ing, Garrett said. While two men tried to extinguish the fire, another climbed into the co-pilot’s seat, where he initiated emergency procedures. The radio operator declared mayday, and Garrett transmitted the group’s position to someone that could help. It was such a flurry of activity, Garrett said he never had time to fear for his life. “To tell you the truth, when you’re 22, you think you’re infallible,” he said. “You’re so busy preparing for impact, you don’t even think about it.” In an impressive feat of skill, the pilot safely landed in the “Pacific Ocean, 500 miles from nowhere,” and only the crew’s engineer sustained anything more than minor bumps and bruises. The group boarded the deployed life rafts and watched from afar as the aircraft disappeared into the water. “It somehow gave me a terrible feeling of loneliness as the tail sank out of sight,” Garrett said. The rafts contained only an emergency transmitter and floppy hats to shield from the sun. Garrett still has his hat, guarding it

as a keepsake from his memorable mission. It was Garrett’s responsibility to identify the group’s position, while the radio operator continually transmitted it in hopes that someone would find them. Seasickness began to overcome four of the six crew members, as day turned to night with no sign of help. Garrett was fortunately spared from the illness, but as the group remained stranded, he feared he had transmitted the wrong location. “If nobody finds us, is there going to be room in the raft for me, because I didn’t send them the right position?” he thought. Garrett needn’t have worried. Later that night, a C-54 from the same squadron found them. The plane was joined by a B-17 aircraft that lowered a boat for the stranded crew’s use. But the group couldn’t find it as they attempted to navigate the waters in the pitchblack darkness. They waited for daylight, and the boat was still nowhere to be seen. So began an altogether new waiting game, while dehydration started to set in among the crew mem-

Contributed

Dag Garrett is the co-pilot on a photo reconnaissance unit over Japan and Korea in 1946. bers, Garrett said. Another boat was dropped later that afternoon, and this time, the group managed to find and board it, but the setbacks weren’t over. The hungry men found only spoiled food on board, and try as they might, they couldn’t figure out how to start the engine. “Spoiled water, maggots in the rations, that kills your appetite right there,” Garrett said. The crew pitched a sail and continued along through the night before a submarine came to the rescue. Once aboard, they feasted on a meal of steak and eggs. The six men received a hero’s welcome when they returned to Guam, including a celebration later that night. Garrett’s date was Nicky, now feeling better and out of the hospital. “That was our first date,” Garrett said. “Four months later, we were married.” Remembering sacrifices Annie, Garrett’s second wife, remembers reading about the ordeal in the Honolulu papers, where she was living with her pilot husband, George Head. Little did she know, less

Kiwanis Club of Sammamish, Bellevue Honda, Al and Jean Erickson, and Las Margaritas Restaurant thank our veterans for their service.

than 20 years later, she and Garrett would marry, after the deaths of both of their spouses. Head, a military hero in his own right, died in a 1962 plane crash while transporting California Congressman Clem Miller. Around that time, Nicky lost her battle with Lou Gehrig’s disease. Annie and Dag Garrett met at a California officer’s club in 1964. Friends prodded them to talk to each other, but the two were reluctant. Dag asked her to dance and immediately told her, “I’m not ever going to get married again.” “That’s a heck of a thing to say when you just meet someone,” Annie recalled, even though she didn’t want to get remarried either. The Garretts will celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary June 19. Before that, they’ll pause May 26 to remember the men and women who lost their lives on the battlefield. “It’s so easy to forget all that they’ve done,” Dag said. “I’m lucky, I’m still here. There are so many that aren’t. They go through hell and high water so that we can be here and experience freedom.”

The Issaquah Press

Harrison

ON THE WEB One of Randy Harrison’s more harrowing recon missions into Cambodia is recounted by the helicopter pilot, James Fleming, who won the Congressional Medal of Honor for his heroic efforts to Harrison’s squad, at http://yhoo.it/1gkzNb6.

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ond recruitment center he wore contacts. During a final physical for officer candidate school, however, an astute physician, a captain who happened to be an eye doctor, took one look at his record and asked the obvious, “Do you wear contacts?” Harrison knew he was busted. “I take them out, and I couldn’t see the wall, much less an eye chart,” he said. The only duty the doctor could approve for Harrison was quartermaster or judge advocate, any paper shuffling assignment. Just not combat. Undeterred, Harrison tossed his record into the trash bin at the rear of the medical facility. When his first sergeant asked a few days later if he knew where his file was, he answered truthfully, “I don’t know.” The sergeant pulled out a new file, filled in a few blanks, scribbled an illegible signature and put it away. “Bingo. Done,” said Harrison, happy he was headed for Airborne training. Don’t volunteer for SOG At a competitive time for officer candidates trying to get into Special Forces Intelligence, he signed up for a one-year course in Vietnamese language that guaranteed a slot in Special Forces in the Vietnam 5th Group. Preparing to leave, a sergeant friend with three tours in Vietnam under his belt told Harrison the only thing he had to remember was don’t volunteer for SOG. “‘You don’t have to know what it is. Just don’t volunteer for it,’ he told me.” A year and a half later, finally in Vietnam in Au-

gust 1968, standing in the adjutant general’s office, waiting for assignment, he was asked, “You speak five languages? Including Vietnamese? You ever think about SOG?” “I have trained all this time, I don’t know what it is, only that I was told if you join SOG you die,” Harrison said. “I’m not going start my time here by chickening out. So, I said, ‘OK.’” SOG’s cover name was “studies and observation group.” Harrison said it was actually a special operations group that performed deep, recon missions in Cambodia, observing the enemy’s activities across the recognized border. “Technically, they were illegal missions,” he said. When Harrison agreed to take command of the recon company, he said he had the audacity to tell his superiors he would only take the job if he could take missions, too. “The motto of infantry school, which is the best leadership motto for corporate, family or soldiers, is two words — follow me,” Harrison said. “I can’t send anyone into that inferno

ing along the beach from Pearl Harbor to Waikiki when a reporter stopped them to ask questions. In the article, the other Marines expressed some fear and hesitation about their upcoming deployment, but not Pearson: “We’re all very anxious to get there,” he’s quoted as saying. “…There’s a real purpose to going over there, and I’m all for it.” Nearly 50 years later, Pearson is a bit apologetic, but mainly steadfast toward his feelings at the time. “That’s what it was in the moment — gung ho,” he said. “Absolute clarity.” Forming connections with men from different states, races and religions is something Pearson continues to cherish about his Marine Corps days. One of the deepest connections was with Lester Bell, a young African-American from Miami. Racial strife was consuming the U.S. in the 1960s, but Pearson felt he avoided much of that growing up in Issaquah. Bell and other black Marines had a singing group modeled on The Temptations, and Pearson was invited to join. “He taught me how to dance, and I taught my grandkids how to dance the way Bell taught me to dance,” Pearson said, strutting around the room. One night, Bell and Pearson were on guard duty in a bunker outside of Da Nang. To pass the time, they pulled a tarp over the bunker so they could turn

volunteered for the draft in 1943, only a few months after the attack on Pearl Harbor. “I wanted to be a hotshot fighter pilot,” Geil said about signing up for the military. He went through about a year of college before he took a test to enlist, ultimately finding himself a plane navigator. The waning days of the war took him to England, where a fateful mission to Berlin and back would change his life. A compression problem caused one of the plane’s four engines to seize up and Geil said the pilot did not react accordingly. “A more experienced pilot would have turned back, but he was being

On the A-team Harrison rode the wave of his good fortune to prosperous careers, including as a foreign correspondent for the Orlando Sentinel and a 20-year stint in public relations for The Boeing Co. When Harrison came out

I’m too old for this In about 1994, when it was time to re-up, he changed his mind. During a routine night training mission, after jumping out of a plane over Fort Lewis, he looked down. “You’re not supposed to

By David Hayes

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from page B1

replacement “took a bullet meant for me.” He recently gave a eulogy in Spokane and reunited with three fellow soldiers, who’d received grievous wounds in Vietnam. “Sitting there looking at these guys with permanent wounds, I realized I put in 27 months Vietnam and never got a scratch,” Harrison said. To this day, he wears a bracelet bearing the name Harold W. Kroske. Another friend who was killed in the line of duty, Harrison uses it to remind himself of how things could have turned out differently. “Unfortunately, I tend to be impatient, a characteristic I guess I have,” he said. “So, I wear this to remind myself, every day, several times a day, how incredibly, indescribably fortunate I am.”

west to take that position, he didn’t know anybody. To find other like-minded souls, and since his kids from his first marriage were out of the house, he decided to give public service back to the country he so believes in. He visited the recruiter’s office on Gilman Boulevard and at age 44, he enlisted in the Army Reserve, signing on with the Special Forces Group. This time, he had to go in a sergeant, on an A-team. “I was a year older than the A-team leader’s father,” Harrison said. “Hey, but one weekend a month, I got to jump out of airplanes, blow stuff up, fire automatic weapons and drink beer.” During his tenure with the unit, the first Gulf War ignited. While individual members of his Reserve unit volunteered to participate in operations, the unit itself was never recalled to active duty. Harrison said a number of his guys subsequently went on to serve in Iraq and Afghanistan operations as part of civilian security contractors.

Randy Harrison looks at his old green beret he wore during the Vietnam War, that he now keeps in his ‘hooray for me’ room in his Squak Mountain home, wondering how it avoided moths.

Pearson

Geil

Wednesday, May 21, 2014 •

unless I go myself, to understand conditions, see how individual teams operate and know what additional training they needed or what was not working. They basically said, ‘OK.’” The six-man squad’s assignments were either fiveday insertions where they observed an area, or 10-day insertions where they observed a river or road. “There were times we were so close to the enemy, I could hear them and write down what there were saying,” he said. Extremely fortunate Despite his best preparations, Harrison said his unit had the highest sustained casualty rate (unavailability for combat due to injury or death) in American history — more than 100 percent. Harrison said in all his time in Vietnam, he was extremely fortunate to avoid the casualty list. Once, he was allowed to return to the states to take care of a “Dear John” letter situation. Another time, he missed a mission to give the senior officers a briefing. Both times, his

on a light and play cards. “Every once in a while,” Pearson said, “we’d throw a hand grenade out the window, and it would roll down the hill and blow up. And we’d get a call from (a superior) going, ‘What the hell is going on out there?’ ‘Well, sir, we thought we heard something out there.’ ‘Oh, OK, good men.’ “We’d pull the tarp back down and play cards.” Bad times often overshadowed good ones, of course. On the way to Vietnam, the troops stopped in the Philippines to get acclimatized to the tropical heat and humidity. Pearson saw men throwing coins into a river. It took him a few days to realize it was a river of sewage. “They would throw coins in there, and some of the young Filipino kids would dive in to get the coins,” he said. “… It’s almost like, if you were from a different culture or a different race, you weren’t one of them. Then, when we got into Vietnam, it got worse.” When Ron Dexter — Pearson’s friend from South Dakota — was killed in combat, it spurred an angry outburst from another Marine. “The next day, he went through a village and opened fire on people he should not have opened fire on,” Pearson said. “The discipline … between when to pull the trigger and when not to, it’s largely based on your training, but it’s also influenced by your emotional life.” The war devolved into a cat-and-mouse game, he explained. The Americans would capture a hill, for example, then re-

stupid,” he said. “I’m busy as hell as a navigator and then the next thing I know we are in a tailspin.” The pilot righted the plane, but more engines were lost and the oil pressure dropped dangerously. The crew quickly determined they could not get the plane back to friendly borders and decided to bail out while in the air. Bailing out into more trouble Geil told the story with acute recollection of squeezing himself out of the plane’s hatch with his parachute on his back. He said the opening was small and it took off one of his boots on the way out. He described falling through the air, looking behind him and seeing his boot flying off into the distance. He landed safely on the ground, gathered his parachute and ran to hide

in nearby trees. Unfortunately, locals noticed the evacuating crew. “The whole damn town was coming out,” Geil said. “When I saw their eyes, I knew I was in deep kimchi. I figured I’d had it.” That sinking feeling only grew when German soldiers escorted him to a holding cell, removed his sidearm and held rifles to either side of his head while he showed them how to remove the weapon’s magazine. Afterward, they searched him, finding all the things he had secreted about in his cell in case of escape, and gave him food. “They gave me a boiled potato sort of thing, which was not very tasty,” he said. “But I ate as much as I could. I was starting to learn how to be a prisoner of war.” Geil spent 44 days in prison camps around Ger-

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look down, but everybody does,” he said. It looked like he was heading straight for a big tree. “Not a good thing,” he added. He wiggled his parachute straps to maneuver around the tree, but only managed to inadvertently turn into the wind, a much worse situation that accelerated him uncontrollably to Earth. “I hit the ground so hard, I knocked myself out. I knocked the webbing out of my helmet,” he said. “I was out cold.” When he finally came to minutes later, the airplane had circled around and was making preparations to drop a second lift of parachutists. He got up, looking for the tree that caused his woes, only to discover he had landed in an empty field. In the low light, he had mistaken something flat and circular on the ground for a tree. “I pranged the hell out of myself and thought that this was a sign,” Harrison said. “I’m too old for this.” That was his last jump. He decided then and there that the United States Army no longer needed his services. He has since remarried, retired and written a novel, “West From Yesterday,” just to prove he could. These days, among voracious reading, he remains active as a master docent for the Issaquah Salmon Hatchery and is a chairman on the city’s Development Commission. Harrison said his journals have been used by other authors, both with permission and without, to good affect and bad. Although just one of his sons has asked to read them, he keeps them locked up in a safe, ready to be discovered in 500 years, ready to recount the tales of just one little guy who played his part in a big war.

treat and allow the enemy to retake it. That pattern repeated itself, with a few Marines killed every time. “After a while, and I don’t know how long it took, it became not about American foreign policy, not about the war, it became about survival,” Pearson said. It took Pearson nearly 20 years to begin dealing with the psychological effects of Vietnam. His sense of humor evaporated; he wasn’t comfortable being in a room with a lot of strangers. His intensity sparked a “volcanic reaction” in others, he said, which contributed to his first marriage ending in divorce after 17 years. Working with a Veterans Administration psychologist, Pearson recounted the gory details that led to post-traumatic stress disorder. It was difficult, he said, because veterans don’t want to cry, don’t want to betray the military’s ultra-masculine culture. But he began to understand the consequences of walking around with unchecked aggression. Today, Pearson specializes in personal injury claims, and works alongside second wife Michele at Pearson Law Firm in Issaquah. They have been married 25 years. His Marine Corps background likely pushed him into law, he said, because of the similarities. “There’s something about being able to do something that remedies a problem or prevents a harm,” he explained, “and then using the information to show people how to do things in a more safe way.”

many, mostly in Moosburg. He spoke of his time there, telling fellow American troops what songs were popular at the time and sleeping on cold floors. He said a clandestine radio existed in the camp somewhere, where the prisoners could hear about the continued Allied success in the war. He suspected it was only a matter of time before the camp was liberated. Still, he doubted he would survive. “It was a panicky time,” he said. “Being a POW is a life-changing event. I figured I wouldn’t make it.” But make it, he did. General George Patton’s army came through and liberated the town. Geil remembers seeing a tank use its gun to lift up the gate and break it down. “Man, we were all there cheering, about six or eight deep,” he said.

Pulling him back in He recuperated and returned home to marry his high school sweetheart and finish college. His life returned more or less to normal and it didn’t take long before he considered re-entering the military for further credentials. However, he said a month after he re-enlisted, the Korean War started. “I thought, ‘Jesus, I’m working this system wrong,’” Geil said, smiling. “When I went out, damned if they didn’t pull me right back in.” Though he didn’t have to go overseas for his service in the Korean War, he ended up traveling abroad for the Vietnam War. There, he flew planes with a variety of functions, from transportation to combat. “I finally got to be a fighter pilot when I was 42 years old,” he said. Geil retired in 1974,

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hardly believing he spent so long in service. “I left the military with 31 years, one month and 15 days, retiring as a full colonel,” he said. Retirement did not slow him down. He went on to earn a Masters in Business Administration and another business degree in construction, graduating the third time alongside his son. He and his wife raised three kids during his long career, and he said he thought his military service helped him and his wife raise a tightknit family. “I think our family was closer because we got to travel,” he said. He said his time in the military helped him build a life he valued greatly. “A lot of times, I think back, and I think a lot of these decisions probably saved my life,” Geil said. “The military was good to me when I look back on it.”


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