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Erasmus Facts, Figures & Trends The European Union support for student and staff exchanges and university cooperation in 2011-12

Education and Training

Acronyms for country names Iso Code

Country Name

AT BE BG CH CY CZ DE DK EE EL ES FI FR HR HU IE IS

Austria Belgium Bulgaria Switzerland Cyprus Czech Republic Germany Denmark Estonia Greece Spain Finland France Croatia Hungary Ireland Iceland

IT LI LT LU LV MT NL NO PL PT RO SE SI SK UK TR

Italy Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Latvia Malta Netherlands Norway Poland Portugal Romania Sweden Slovenia Slovakia United Kingdom Turkey

Table of contents

The 2011-12 academic year in a nutshell . . . . . . 4 Erasmus Student Mobility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Erasmus Staff Mobility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Erasmus Intensive Programmes . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Erasmus Intensive Language Courses . . . . . . . . 16 Erasmus University Cooperation Projects . . . . . 18 Annexes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

4 | Erasmus – Facts, Figures & Trends

The 2011-12 academic year in a nutshell

By the time you read this brochure, the Erasmus Programme will have achieved its target of supporting three million student exchanges since its launch in 1987. This is a major milestone, which is testament to the enduring popularity of the European Union’s best known programme. This brochure provides an in depth look at the ongoing Erasmus story during the academic year 2011-12. Focusing not only on student mobility, but also on exchanges of academic and administrative staff. These are instrumental in improving the quality of the education of today’s students and opening up our universities and colleges to cooperation with the world. And it looks at joint projects, summer schools and participation in networks, which are changing the ways in which education is delivered and ensuring a better match with the needs of the labour market and of society in general.

Erasmus mobility, with its core focus on skills development, is a central element of the European Commission’s strategy to combat youth unemployment, featuring prominently in the Europe 2020 strategy for growth and jobs. Student mobility contributes to individuals’ personal development and equips them with a wide range of competences and skills that are increasingly valued by employers – from foreign languages and greater intercultural awareness, to quick adaptability to changes and an entrepreneurial mindset. In this way, mobility boosts job prospects and encourages labour market mobility later in life. Since its launch in 1987, the Erasmus Programme has seen a constant increase not only in the number of students taking part, but also in the quality and diversity of the activities proposed.

Erasmus is part of the EU’s Lifelong Learning Programme, with a budget of EUR 3.1 billion for the period 2007-13. During the academic year 201112, 33 countries took part in the Erasmus Programme: the 27 EU Member States, Croatia, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway, Switzerland and Turkey.

Work placements in companies abroad have been supported through Erasmus since 2007 and have accounted for the largest increases in the number of students in recent years; grants have already been awarded to nearly 200 000 students to undertake placements. This growth is helping to strengthen links between higher education and business.

In 1987, 3 244 students from 11 countries spent a study period abroad under the Erasmus Programme. In 2011-12 the number of Erasmus students exceeded 250 000 and, thanks to the Programme, more than 46 000 staff from 33 European countries spent time abroad.

Teachers and other staff, such as university international relations officers, can also benefit from EU support to teach or be trained abroad, and Higher Education Institutions have the opportunity to invite staff from companies to come and teach in their institutions.

The 2 0 1 1 - 1 2 a c a d e m i c y e a r i n a n u t s hell | 5

Erasmus not only caters for students and Higher Education staff, but, by funding transnational projects and networks, also enables Higher Education Institutions to work together. In 2012, Erasmus counted over 4 400 Higher Education Institutions as members. For the vast majority of these institutions, taking part in Erasmus has led them to innovate in key areas such as teaching and learning, recognition of study periods abroad, student support services, cooperation with business, and institutional management. Mobility supported by Erasmus has thus promoted the internationalisation of the European Higher Education system, contributed to its modernisation, and paved the way for the Bologna Process. It now supports the Bologna goal that by 2020 at least 20 % of all graduates from the European Higher Education Area should have spent a period of time studying or training abroad. Erasmus cooperation projects have led to long-term structural changes and strategic initiatives. These include the European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System that promotes transparency and transferability in European Higher Education, and the Tuning of academic degree programmes based on learning outcomes and the many joint curricula developed over the years.

The new EU programme for education, training, youth and sport – Erasmus+ – to be launched in 2014, will build on the legacy of Erasmus by offering opportunities for a further four million people to go abroad to study, train, or do voluntary work by 2020. Every year, the European Commission compiles statistics from the National Agencies that run the Erasmus Programme in the participating countries and publishes an annual statistical overview online, providing an overall picture of the different types of actions funded under the Programme, with a comparison of this year’s results with those of previous years. We hope you will find this information both interesting and useful.

6 | Erasmus – Facts, Figures & Trends

Erasmus Student Mobility

Erasmus is the world’s most successful student mobility programme. Since it began in 1987-88, the Erasmus Programme has provided over three million European students with the opportunity to go abroad and study at a Higher Education Institution or train in a company. In 2011-12 student mobility accounted for around 80 % of the annual Erasmus budget and 1 in 20 students in participating countries in Europe received Erasmus grants during their studies to go abroad: • In the 2011-12 academic year, 252 827 students went to another European country to study or train, which represented a year-on-year increase of 9 %. It is certain that during 2012-13 the Erasmus target of supporting three million students will have been reached. • As in the previous academic year, Spain sent the most students abroad with 39 545 students leaving for another country. Germany supported the second highest number of students going abroad, followed by France, Italy and Poland. • The highest numbers of outgoing Erasmus students as a proportion of the national student population in 2011-12 were reported in Luxembourg, Liechtenstein, Spain, Latvia and Lithuania. • The most popular destination among European students was Spain, which received 39 300 students, followed by France, Germany, the United Kingdom and Italy.

• The average monthly EU grant received by students (including both studies and work placements) was EUR 252 – roughly corresponding to the previous year (EUR 250). • The number of zero-EU grant students (7 955) represents around 3 % of the total number of student mobility periods. This shows that the Erasmus ‘branding’ has a leverage effect, since in situations where the national Erasmus budget for  an academic year has already been allocated, for example, additional students can benefit from all the advantages of being an Erasmus student (such as non-payment of tuition fees to the host institution) without receiving EU funding. • The average duration of student exchanges was six months. This has remained constant over the past decade. •E  rasmus also actively supports the participation of students with special needs by offering a supplementary grant. The number of students with special needs taking part has increased in the past few years. In 2011-12, 336 students with special needs received additional funding to participate in Erasmus, a slight increase in numbers on the previous year. Although this remains a relatively low figure, it reflects the limited low participation rates of students with special needs in Higher Education in general.

Erasmus Student Mobility | 7

Student mobility in figures

• Some 3 328 European Higher Education Institutions sent students abroad through Erasmus in 2011-12, out of a total of 4 452 institutions holding an Erasmus University Charter (EUC) that year.

Type of student mobility Studies

Work placements (traineeships)

Student mobility

204 744

48 083

252 827

Average EU monthly grant (EUR)

234

361

252

Average duration (months)

6.3

4.3

5.9

Number of special needs students

295

41

336

Top sending countries (absolute numbers)

ES, DE, FR, IT, PL

FR, DE, ES, UK, PL

ES, DE, FR, IT, PL

Top sending countries (% share of the student population)

LU, LI, ES, CZ, PT

LV, LI, MT, EE, LT

LU, LI, ES, LV, LT

Top receiving countries

ES, FR, DE, UK, IT

ES, UK, DE, FR, IT

ES, FR, DE, UK, IT

Level of studies ( % share)

Bachelor 70 % Master 28 % Doctorate 1 % Short-cycle 1 %

Mobility for Studies Erasmus offers students the possibility of studying at another Higher Education Institution. Erasmus Student Mobility for Studies, which is the most common action, enables students to spend a study period of 3 to 12 months abroad. It aims to provide students with the opportunity of studying in another country, to promote cooperation between institutions and help enrich their educational environment, and to contribute to building a pool of well-qualified, open minded and internationally experienced young people. • In 1987-88, 3 244 students went abroad to study with an Erasmus grant. Out of the 252 827 Erasmus students in 2011-12, 204 744 student exchanges for studying were supported, representing an increase of 7.5 % on the previous year. • Spain sent the most students abroad followed by Germany, France, Italy and Poland. These countries also have the largest student populations in Europe. The same countries together with the United King­dom, which receives almost twice as many students as it sends, make up the most popular destination countries, namely Spain, France, Germany, the United Kingdom and Italy.

Total

Total number of Erasmus students

Bachelor 57 % Master 29 % Doctorate 3 % Short-cycle 11 %

Bachelor 68 % Master 28 % Doctorate 1 % Short-cycle 3 %

Average age of students (years)

22.5

22.8

22.5

Number of Higher Education Institutions sending students in 2011-12

2 283

2 574

3 189

Gender balance ( % of women)

60.6 %

61.1 %

60.7 %

8 | Erasmus – Facts, Figures & Trends

• The average length of stay was 6.3 months, while the average monthly grant increased slightly (by 0.9 %) compared to the previous year, to EUR 234. • Students of social sciences, business and law made up the biggest share (41.4 %) of those on exchanges. The second biggest share was made up of students of humanities and arts (21.9 %). Students of engineering, manufacturing and construction (15.1 %); science, mathematics and computing (8 %); and health and welfare (6 %) continue to participate actively, though in proportionately lower numbers compared to the overall number of students taking these subjects.

Mobility for Work Placements (Traineeships) Erasmus also benefits students who do traineeships in companies. By temporarily working in a company – or an organisation – abroad students gain a better understanding of other economies as well as the chance to develop specific skills. Work placements in companies abroad have been supported through Erasmus since 2007 (they had been previously managed within the Leonardo da Vinci Programme for vocational education and training) and are increasingly popular. By 2011-12, grants have already been awarded to more than 177 000  students for this purpose.

Grants enable students to spend a period of 3 to 12 months, or 2 to 12 months in case of short-cycle higher education, doing a work placement abroad. Spending time in a company abroad helps students to adapt to the requirements of the labour market and develop specific skills. It also boosts cooperation between Higher Education Institutions and companies. • Out of the 252 827 Erasmus students, 48 083 went on work placements abroad in 2011-12. This represents an annual increase of over 18 %. Since its inclusion in the Erasmus Programme, work placements abroad have grown rapidly, and today the annual number of placements is more than three times higher than the number of placements in 2006-07. •P  lacements represented a 19 % share of all Erasmus student mobility periods in 2011-12. • France sent the most students abroad for work placements, followed by Germany, Spain, the United Kingdom and Poland. The top destinations for students on work placements were Spain, the United Kingdom, Germany, France and Italy. • The average duration of work placements, which is generally lower than for study periods, was 4.3 months, compared to 6.3 months for studies. The average monthly grant for work placements decreased by 1,4 % compared to the previous year, to EUR 361.

•A  total of 35 785 enterprises across Europe received Erasmus placement students in 2011-12, a 16.4 % rise (up from 30 732 in the previous year). Around 45.5 % of the enterprises were small, 32.4 % medium-sized and 22.1 % were large. • Students of social sciences, business and law made up the biggest share (31.9 %) of trainees. The second biggest share was that of students of engineering, manufacturing and construction (17.1 %), closely followed by students of humanities and arts, who represented 16.9 % of all trainees. • To support work placements abroad, Higher Education Institutions can create consortia for placements. These consortia comprise Higher Education Institutions and other organisations, such as companies or associations. A total of 93 Erasmus Placement Consortia organised 7 348 work placements in 12 countries during 2011-12. Work placements organised through consortia made up over 15.3 % of all work placements abroad under Erasmus.

Erasmus Student Mobility | 9

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g rin ctu 06 % a uf . an | 15 , M ion g t n ri c ee stru gin on En d C an

Share of subject areas in mobility for work placements in 2011-12

ring actu anuf17.10 % M , g in n| neer ctio Engi Constru d n a  % .80 |2 y ar rin ete V d an re ltu u ric Ag al

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l an scie d nc La es w ,B | 3 us 1. ine 85 ss  %

Science, Ma and Computing thematics | 11.18 %

He

Share of subject areas in mobility for studies in 2011-12

Humanities and Arts | 16.91 %

cia

l Pro gram mes | Educ ation 0.29 % | 2.4 1 %

eral

era

Gen Prog ram mes | Educ ation 0.14 % | 3.4 7 %

Humanities and Arts | 21.87 %

So

10 | Erasmus – Facts, Figures & Trends

Erasmus Staff Mobility

Staff mobility for teaching has become a very popular action since its introduction in 1997. With the creation of the Lifelong Learning Programme in 2007, staff mobility was extended to include staff training as well as the possibility for Higher Education Institutions to invite staff from companies to come and teach at their institutions. Since its launch, over 300 000 staff exchanges for teaching and training have been supported. Staff mobility aims to enrich the experience of participating staff, to contribute to the internationalisation and modernisation of Higher Education through cooperation among Higher Education Institutions and staff, and to encourage student mobility. The staff mobility budget accounts for approximately 7 % of the overall Erasmus budget. • Some 46 527 staff exchanges were supported in 2011-12, a year-on-year increase on 8.6 %. • The share of teaching assignments was 71.6 %, while staff training accounted for 28.4 % of all staff exchanges. This share has nearly doubled since 2007-08, when it was only 15 %. • The average duration of a staff mobility period (including teaching assignments and staff training) was 5.7 days and the average grant was EUR 713 per staff exchange. • Poland sent the most staff abroad, followed by Spain, Germany, France and Turkey.

The five most popular destinations were Spain, Germany, Italy, France and the United Kingdom.

Teaching Assignments Staff mobility for teaching assignments enables staff from Higher Education Institutions and enterprises to spend a teaching period of a minimum of one day (or at least five teaching hours) up to six weeks at a Higher Education Institution in another participating country in Europe. • Since its introduction in 1997, the number of teaching assignments has grown constantly. Out of the 46 527 staff exchanges, 33 323 were teaching assignments in 2011-12. This represents an increase of 5.4 % on the previous year. • On average, teachers taught 8.4 hours abroad per teaching assignment, which had an average duration of 5.5 days. A small but constant decrease has been observed since 2000-01 when the average was 6.9 days. The average grant per staff teaching assignment was EUR 686, representing an increase of 6.3 % on the previous year. • Teachers from humanities and arts spent the highest number of periods abroad on teaching assignments. This was followed by teachers of social sciences, business and law and then teachers of engineering, manufacturing and construction. This share has been more or less constant in recent years.

E r a s m u s S t a ff M o b i l i t y | 1 1

Staff mobility in figures Type of staff mobility

Total

Teaching assignments

Training

Staff mobility

33 323

13 204

46 527

Average duration (in days)

5.5

6.1

5.7

Average EU grant (in EUR)

686

783

713

Number of staff with special needs

12

4

16

Top sending countries

PL, ES, DE, FR, CZ

PL, ES, DE, TR, FI

PL, ES, DE, FR, TR

Top receiving countries

ES, DE, IT, FR, PL

DE, ES, UK, IT, FR

ES, DE, IT, FR, UK

Total number of Higher Education Institutions sending out staff in 2011-12

2 147

1 772

2 336

Gender balance ( % of women)

42.9 %

69.5 %

49.5 %

Total number of staff mobility periods

• The five most popular destinations for staff on teaching assignments were Spain, Germany, Italy, France and Poland. Teachers taught most often in English, followed by French, German, Spanish and Italian. The five most active countries in sending teachers abroad on teaching assignments were Poland, Spain, Germany, France and the Czech Republic.

• Some 422 teaching assignments were undertaken by staff from companies who were invited to teach at Higher Education Institutions in other European countries. The increase in participation grew by 19 % compared to last year.

12 | Erasmus – Facts, Figures & Trends

Staff Training In addition to teaching assignments, the Programme has been opened up to allow both administrative and academic staff to participate in different forms of training abroad, such as job-shadowing or attending job-related workshops and training sessions. Erasmus staff mobility for staff training offers an opportunity to go on training for a period of between one week (five working days) and six weeks in a company or an organisation, such as a Higher Education Institution, in another participating country. • Staff mobility for training continues to increase in popularity. Out of the 46 527 staff exchanges 13 204 were staff training periods in 2011-12. This represented an 18 % increase on the previous academic year. • In 2011-12, 3 336 Higher Education staff went on training to companies abroad. This represented an increase of 13.2 % compared to the previous academic year. Training in companies thus constituted 25.3 % of all Erasmus mobility for staff training.

• Staff went abroad for training for 6.1 days on average and received an average grant of EUR 783, which is considerably higher than the previous year. • Most training periods abroad were undertaken by academic staff (40.1 %), followed by finance staff (23 %), general administrative and technical staff (18.5 %) and staff from international offices (9.5 %). • Most staff received specific training (46 %) abroad, while 26 % of staff went for job-shadowing. Around 16 % of beneficiaries used the action to participate in workshops, while 12 % went abroad for other purposes. • Staff from Polish Higher Education Institutions spent the most periods abroad for training with 2 318 staff training periods supported. They were followed by staff from Spain, Germany, Turkey and Finland. The five most popular destinations for staff training were Germany, Spain, the United Kingdom, Italy and France.

E r a s m u s S t a ff M o b i l i t y | 1 3

Growth in staff mobility numbers from 2007-08 to 2011-12 50 000

46 527 42 817

45 000 40 000 35 000 30 000

36 389

37 776

32 040 27 157

28 615

29 031

31 620

33 323

25 000 20 000

13 204

15 000 10 000

5 000

7 774

8 745

11 197

4 883

0 2007-08

2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

• Staff mobility periods total • Teaching assignments • Staff training

14 | Erasmus – Facts, Figures & Trends

Erasmus Intensive Programmes

Erasmus also funds Intensive Programmes, which are short subject-related programmes of study (of between 10 days and 6 weeks in length), bringing together students and teaching staff from Higher Education Institutions from at least three European countries. These short study programmes encourage the multinational learning of specialist topics; provide students with access to academic knowledge that is not available in one Higher Education Institution alone; allow teachers to exchange views on course content and new curricula approaches; and to test teaching methods in an international classroom environment. • Since 2007-08 Erasmus Intensive Programmes have been managed individually by the participating countries. They have also experienced strong growth during this time. A total of 462 Intensive Programmes were organised in 31 countries during the academic year 2011-12, which represents a 14 % increase on the previous year. • Altogether 15 855 students and 5 663 teachers participated in Intensive Programmes in 2011-12.

• The highest number of courses (60) was organised by Italy, which represents 13 % of the total number of courses organised in 2011-12. Germany organised 43 courses followed by France (35), the Nether­ lands (34) and Poland (25). • The most popular subjects for Intensive Programmes were social sciences, business and law (23 %), engineering, manufacturing and construction (19 %), humanities and arts (19 %), and science, mathematics and computing (15 %).

Erasmus Intensive Programmes Number of Intensive Programmes courses

462

Total number of participating students

15 855

Total number of participating teachers

5 663

Top five organising countries Average duration of Intensive Programmes

IT, DE, FR, NL, PL 12 days

E r a s m u s I n t e n s i ve P r o g r a m m e s | 1 5

Number of Erasmus Intensive Programmes from 2000-01 to 2011-12 500

462 450

384

400

404

350 300 250

319 222

232

202 178

150

257

203

200

174

174

100 50 0 2000-01

2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05

2005-06

2006-07 2007-08

2008-09 2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

16 | Erasmus – Facts, Figures & Trends

Erasmus Intensive Language Courses

Since 1996, Erasmus has financed specialised courses in the less widely used and taught languages for students going abroad as part of the Programme. The aim is to prepare incoming students for their study exchange or work placement through a linguistic and cultural introduction to the host country. Language courses are not organised for the most widely taught languages, namely English, German, French and Spanish (Castilian). • The number of Intensive Language Courses supported has grown tremendously since their launch. Some 435 courses were organised in 26 participating countries in 2011-12, an increase of 11 % compared to the previous year, and they have more than doubled as compared with 2005-06. • A total of nearly 48 000 Erasmus students have benefited from a language course prior to their study exchange or work placement since 1999. Some 6 631 students participated in an Intensive Language Course in 2011-12 (up from 5 872 the previous year, representing a 13 % increase). This represents 2.6 % of the total number of students participating in the Programme. If we take the share of the incoming Erasmus students only to those countries eligible to organise an Intensive Language Course, the percentage is around 5.8 %.

• The most popular destination was Italy with 1 008 participants, followed by Portugal, Belgium (Dutch-speaking community), Turkey and Sweden. • The highest proportion of incoming students participating in a language course remained in Slovenia, where 19.1 % of incoming students took part, followed by Croatia (12.7 %). Iceland, Romania, Greece and Estonia had participation rates of between 10 and 11 %.

Erasmus Intensive Language Courses Number of courses Total number of students Top hosting countries

435 6 631 IT, PT, BE (NL), TR, SE

E r a s m u s I n t e n s i ve L a n g u a g e C o u r s e s | 1 7

Number of Erasmus Intensive Language Courses from 2005-06 to 2011-12 500

435

450

392

400

337 350

326 303

300

275

250 200

199

150 100 50 0 2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

18 | Erasmus – Facts, Figures & Trends

Erasmus University Cooperation Projects

Together with mobility, the Erasmus Programme also fosters the modernisation of European Higher Education through funding joint projects. These projects, which run from between one and three years, aim to stimulate policy reforms through transnational cooperation among Higher Education Institutions and other relevant stakeholders across Europe.

Applications are submitted once every calendar year and around EUR 20 million is allocated annually to these projects. Most of the 2012 funded projects are closely linked to the following EU Higher Education policy areas: developing mobility strategies and the removal of

Erasmus University Cooperation Projects in 2012 Number of applications received

Number of applications approved

Applications success rate

Cooperation between Higher Education Institutions and enterprises

67

12

17.9 %

Mobility strategies and removal of barriers to mobility in Higher Education

19

7

36.8 %

Social dimension of Higher Education

20

5

25.0 %

Fostering excellence and innovation in Higher Education

32

5

15.6 %

Support to the modernisation of Higher Education

63

15

23.8 %

Total

201

44

21.9 %

Academic Networks

26

8

30.8 %

Accompanying Measures

23

5

21.7 %

Total

250

57

22.8 %

Type of action

Multilateral Projects

E r a s m u s U n i ve r s i t y C o o pe r a t i o n P r o j e c t s | 1 9

barriers to mobility in higher education, promoting employability and addressing the social dimension of higher education. It is important to note that some of these projects tackle more than one policy area. • The number of applications has grown year-on-year. Some 250 applications were submitted in 2012 (up from 197 in 2011). Among these 57 were selected for funding, which represents, on average, a 22.8 % success rate. This is significantly lower than the previous year (35 %), since in 2012 the available budget had decreased by 7 % and was distributed among 27 % more applications. • Most applications (44 out of 57) have been approved under the so-called ‘Multilateral Projects’, in the fields of support to the modernisation of Higher Education; cooperation between Higher Education Institutions and enterprises; promoting Virtual Campuses and the removal of barriers to mobility; fostering excellence and innovation in Higher Education; and social inclusion in Higher Education. • Applications received as part of cooperation between Higher Education Institutions and enterprises have experienced strong growth: 67 applications as compared to 45 last year, which represents a yearon-year increase of 48.9 %. These projects mainly focused on promoting creativity, competitiveness, entrepreneurial spirit and employability; the development of innovative practices; and improving quality and increasing student and staff mobility throughout Europe.

• Eight applications have been selected from the ‘Academic Networks’ proposals, designed to promote innovation in a specific discipline, set of disciplines, or in a multidisciplinary area, and requiring the participation of Higher Education Institutions from all participating countries. • Finally, five applications have been approved from the ‘Accompanying Measures’ proposals. These are innovative projects wich aim to have clear relevance to the European Higher Education Modernisation Agenda and to raise awareness of relevant target groups or the general public on the importance of European cooperation in the field of Higher Education. • The United Kingdom submitted the highest number of proposals (35), followed by Belgium (25), Finland (24), Spain (23) and Italy (19). Belgium was the most successful country in terms of applications approved, with 11 accepted. Many of the projects funded under this part of the Erasmus Programme have led to important policy developments. For example, the European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System (ECTS) was originally an Erasmus project, before becoming a major tool to foster mobility that is used throughout Europe.

20 | Erasmus – Facts, Figures & Trends

Higher Education policy priorities addressed by Erasmus University Cooperation Projects from 2007 to 2012 80

70

60

50

40

30

20

10

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R

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The columns represent the number of times that a policy priority is covered by projects selected in a specific year. The same project can cover more than one priority.

A nne x es | 2 1

Annexes

Sweden 41 %

Outbound student mobility growth rates between 2007-08 (start of the Lifelong Learning Programme) and 2011-12

Norway 46 %

Liechtenstein

Estonia 52 %

14 countries grew by more than 40 % (BG, CY, DK, EE, EL, ES, IE, LV, NL, NO, SE, SI, SK and TR). 14 countries experienced growth of between 20 % and 40 % (AT, BE, CZ, DE, FI, FR, IS, LT, LU, MT, PT, RO, IT, UK). 2 countries experienced growth of between 0 and 20 % (HU and PL).

Ireland 52 %

Luxembourg

Latvia 85 %

Denmark 66 %

Malta

• > 40 % growth • 20-40 % growth • 0-20 % growth • < 0 % (decrease) • n/a • Not Erasmus countries

Netherlands 55 %

1 country experienced a decrease (LI).

Slovakia 58 %

1 country (HR) has only participated in the Programme from 2009-10.

Slovenia 46 %

1 country (CH) began participating in the Programme in 2011-2012.

Bulgaria 62 %

Turkey 66 %

Spain 58 % Greece 46 % Cyprus 69 %

Reaching the three million mobility goal

252 827

231 408

213 266

2 Million

2012-13

2011-12

2010-11

2009-10

250 000

198 523

182 697

159 324

1 Million

2008-09

2007-08

2006-07

154 421

144 037

135 586

200 000

2005-06

2004-05

2003-04

123 957

115 432 2001-02

300 000

2002-03

111 092 2000-01

0

107 666

97 601

85 999

79 874

84 642

73 407

150 000

1999-00

1998-99

1997-98

1996-97

1995-96

1994-95

62 362

51 694

36 314

27 906

100 000

1993-94

1992-93

1991-92

1990-91

19 456

9 914

3 244

50 000

1989-90

1988-89

1987-88

2 2 | E rasmus â&#x20AC;&#x201C; F acts , F igures & T rends

Progress to achieving the three million student mobility target 3 Million

A nne x es | 2 3

Distribution of outgoing students studying or doing work placements abroad in 2011-12 40 000

35 000

30 000

25 000

20 000

15 000  

10 000

5 000

0

• •

BE

BG

CZ

1 284

319

945

DK

DE

1 015 5 770

EE

IE

EL

322

791

603

5 807 1 533 6 059 2 300 27 593 770

• Mobility for placements • Mobility for studies

ES

FR

IT

5 442 7 345 2 973

CY

LV

LT

LU

HU

MT

43

748

911

3

889

55

2 861 1 041 3 209 1 215 1 198

447

3 472

94

1 963 2 988 34 103 25 924 20 404 214

1 446 2 637

NL

AT

PL

PT

RO

SI

SK

FI

SE

UK

HR

IS

TR

LI

NO

CH

324

516

1 184

369

4 568

200

29

1 558

5

148

200

6 449 4 549 12 106 5 269 3 380 1 411 2 169 4 088 3204 9 094

682

232 10 268

33

1 542 2 514

2 4 | E rasmus – F acts , F igures & T rends

Average monthly EU grant for student mobility (in EUR) from 2000-01 to 2011-12 300

272

250

254

255

250

252

200

192

150 100

140

138

135

125

140

verage monthly EU grant • Afor student mobility (in EUR)

157

50 0

2000-01

2001-02 2002-03 2003-04

2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09

2009-10 2010-11 2011-12

Growth of Higher Educations Institutions active in Erasmus from 2003 to 2012 5 000

4 000

3 579

3 873

4 131

4 452

3 161 3 000

2 000

1 982

2 191

2 374

1 950

2 071

2004-05

2005-06

2 523 2 187

2 517

2 757

2 982

3 174

3 328

1 000

0 2003-04

2006-07

2007-08

2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

 umber of Erasmus University • NCharter (EUC) holders  umber of Higher Education Institutions • Nsending out students and staff

A nne x es | 2 5

Number of students with special needs participating in student mobility in 2011-12 120

109 100

80

60

51 37

40

20

20

13

11 0

1

1

BE

BG

CZ

â&#x20AC;˘ N umber of special needs students

DE

2

1

2

EE

IE

EL

ES

11

FR

15

9 1

1

IT

LV

Note: only countries with at least one student with special needs are displayed in the chart.

LT

4 HU

NL

AT

PL

6

7

PT

SI

11 3 SK

FI

8 UK

5 TR

8 CH

2 6 | E rasmus – F acts , F igures & T rends

Consortia for work placements per country in 2011-12 2 500

2 000

1 500

1 000

500

0

• • •

BG

CZ

DE

EL

ES

FR

IT

AT

PL

PT

FI

TR

1

1

16

4

23

19

10

2

2

13

1

1

10

3

119

10

290

89

39

10

2

13

2

4

45

29

2 373

75

1 375

1 745

644

174

49

745

46

48

• Number of consortia • Number of Higher Education Institutions in consortia • Number of placements organised

A nne x es | 2 7

Erasmus students as proportion of graduates in 2011 (in %) 35 %

30 %

25 %

20 %

15 %

10 %

5%

0%

BE

BG

CZ

DK

DE

EE

IE

EL

6.7

2.9

6.5

5.8

6.3

9.2

4.6

5.5 10.4

• 2011-12 (in %) • Average: 4.7 %

ES

FR

IT

CY

LV

LT

LU

5.1

6.0

4.3

8.8

8.2 34.9

HU

MT

NL

AT

PL

PT

RO

SI

SK

FI

SE

UK

HR

IS

TR

NO

CH

6.4

4.4

6.7

8.8

2.4

7.4

1.8

8.5

3.6

10.7

5.2

1.8

2.3

6.4

2.2 14.7 4.2

3.7

Data from Eurostat 2011 (Graduate Population: EDUC_GRAD4)

LI

2 8 | E rasmus – F acts , F igures & T rends

Outbound staff mobility growth rates between 2007-08 (start of the Lifelong Learning Programme) and 2011-12 14 countries grew by more than 40 % (BE, BG, EL, ES, HU, LI, LU, LV, NL, PL, RO, SI, SK, UK). 10 countries experienced growth of between 20 % and 40 % (AT, CZ, DE, FI, IE, IS, IT, LT, NO, TR).

Liechtenstein 113 %

Luxembourg 67 % United Kingdom 41 % Latvia 52 %

7 countries experienced growth of between 0 and 20 % (CY, DK, EE, FR, MT, PT, SE). 1 country (HR) has only participated in the Programme from 2009-10.

Poland 103 %

Netherlands 42 % Belgium 40 %

Slovakia 64 % Hungary 63 % Romania 74 % Bulgaria 69 %

Spain 55 %

Slovenia 78 %

Greece 67 %

Malta

• > 40 % growth • 20-40 % growth • 0-20 % growth • n/a • Not Erasmus countries

A nne x es | 2 9

Number of Erasmus University Cooperation project applications submitted and selected per country (coordinators) from 2007 to 2012 150

125

100

75

50

25

0

• •

BE

BG

CZ

DK

131

19

19

67

3

2

• Proposals submitted • Proposals selected

DE

EE

IE

EL

13

77

11

10

43

2

24

1

4

14

ES

FR

IT

89

49

102

32

16

36

CY

LV

LT

LU

HU

6

6

1

1

MT

17

2

24

2

1

2

3

0

NL

AT

PL

PT

RO

SI

SK

FI

SE

UK

91

49

46

14

HR

IS

TR

LI

NO

CH

20

43

15

29

19

108

13

117

4

1

6

0

7

2

5

12

7

7

4

24

3

44

0

0

0

0

3

1

3 0 | E rasmus – F acts , F igures & T rends

Participation of countries in Erasmus University Cooperation projects (as coordinators and partners) from 2007 to 2012 1000 900 800 700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0

• •

BE

BG

CZ

DK

DE

EE

IE

EL

ES

FR

IT

CY

LV

LT

LU

HU

MT

NL

AT

PL

PT

RO

SI

SK

FI

SE

UK

HR

IS

TR

LI

NO

CH

860 341 316 295 897 252 251 398 921 650 905 149 202 311

60

344 112 612 425 478 517 429 286 211 569 320 965

64

93

343

29

201

83

425 151 140 133 417 124 136 187 414 312 418

29

153

25

58

166

15

111

35

• Proposals submitted • Proposals selected

62

101 138

59

283 170 235 249 196 118 106 237 149 459

European Commission Erasmus – Facts, Figures & Trends. The European Union support for student and staff exchanges and university cooperation in 2011-12 Luxembourg: Publications Office of the European Union 2013 — 32 pp. — 25.0 x 17.6 cm ISBN 978-92-79-30652-5 doi:10.2766/43672

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Erasmus facts figures 2011 12 en