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IB AFRICA, EUROPE & MIDDLE EAST REGIONAL CONFERENCE Programme

CONTENTS Mission Statement 1

Schedule

Learner Profile 2

Thursday 24

Introduction from Adrian Kearney 4

Friday 25

Schedule 6 Venue Map 8 Supporters 10

Saturday 31 Sunday 35 Workshops

Exhibitors 11 Speaker Profiles

Opening Plenary Veronica Boix-Mansilla 12

Plenary Speaker Ben Walden 14

Plenary Speaker Lance King 15

Plenary Speaker Grant Wiggins 16

Plenary Speaker Crist贸bal Cobo 18

Plenary Speaker Sarah Kay 20

Featured Speaker Stephen Heppell

Session One

36

Session Two

41

Expo Sessions

46

Session Three

48

Session Four

52

Focus Groups & Meetings

56

Session Five

58

Expo Sessions

63

Session Six

66

Focus Groups & Meetings

71

Session Seven

72

Associations 76 22

The International Baccalaureate Mission statement Education for a better world The International Baccalaureate aims to develop inquiring, knowledgeable and caring young people who help to create a better and more peaceful world through intercultural understanding and respect. To this end the organization works with schools, governments and international organizations to develop challenging programmes of international education and rigorous assessment. These programmes encourage students across the world to become active, compassionate and lifelong learners who understand that other people, with their differences, can also be right.

Déclaration de mission du Baccalauréat International L’éducation pour bâtir un monde meilleur Le Baccalauréat International a pour but de développer chez les jeunes la curiosité intellectuelle, les connaissances et la sensibilité nécessaires pour contribuer à bâtir un monde meilleur et plus paisible, dans un esprit d’entente mutuelle et de respect interculturel. À cette fin, l’organisation collabore avec des établissements scolaires, des gouvernements et des organisations internationales pour mettre au point des programmes d’éducation internationale stimulants et des méthodes d’évaluation rigoureuses. Ces programmes encouragent les élèves de tout pays à apprendre activement tout au long de leur vie, à être empreints de compassion, et à comprendre que les autres, en étant différents, puissent aussi être dans le vrai.

Declaración de principios del Bachillerato International Una educación para un mundo mejor El Bachillerato Internacional tiene como meta formar jóvenes solidarios, informados y ávidos de conocimiento, capaces de contribuir a crear un mundo mejor y más pacífico, en el marco del entendimiento mutuo y el respeto intercultural. En pos de este objetivo, la organización colabora con establecimientos escolares, gobiernos y organizaciones internacionales para crear y desarrollar programas de educación internacional exigentes y métodos de evaluación rigurosos. Estos programas alientan a estudiantes del mundo entero a adoptar una actitud activa de aprendizaje durante toda su vida, a ser compasivos y a entender que otras personas, con sus diferencias, también pueden estar en lo cierto. 1

THE IB LEARNER PROFILE The aim of all IB programmes is to develop internationally minded people who, recognizing their common humanity and shared guardianship of the planet, help to create a better and more peaceful world. IB learners strive to be: Inquirers

Communicators

They develop their natural curiosity. They acquire the skills necessary to conduct inquiry and research and show independence in learning. They actively enjoy learning and this love of learning will be sustained throughout their lives.

They understand and express ideas and information confidently and creatively in more than one language and in a variety of modes of communication. They work effectively and willingly in collaboration with others.

Knowledgeable

Principled

They explore concepts, ideas and issues that have local and global significance. In so doing, they acquire in-depth knowledge and develop understanding across a broad and balanced range of disciplines.

They act with integrity and honesty, with a strong sense of fairness, justice and respect for the dignity of the individual, groups and communities. They take responsibility for their own actions and the consequences that accompany them.

Thinkers They exercise initiative in applying thinking skills critically and creatively to recognize and approach complex problems, and make reasoned, ethical decisions.

Open-minded They understand and appreciate their own cultures and personal histories, and are open to the perspectives, values and traditions of other individuals and communities. They are accustomed to seeking and evaluating a range of points of view, and are willing to grow from the experience.

Caring

Balanced

They show empathy, compassion and respect towards the needs and feelings of others. They have a personal commitment to service, and act to make a positive difference to the lives of others and to the environment.

They understand the importance of intellectual, physical and emotional balance to achieve personal well-being for themselves and others.

Risk-takers They approach unfamiliar situations and uncertainty with courage and forethought, and have the independence of spirit to explore new roles, ideas and strategies. They are brave and articulate in defending their beliefs.

Reflective They give thoughtful consideration to their own learning and experience. They are able to assess and understand their strengths and limitations in order to support their learning and personal development.

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Welcome to Madrid This year’s theme, “The culture of learning” is truly meaningful in this vibrant international city and especially in Spain where there are already 61 IB World Schools. In fact, this means Spain has the 2nd largest number of IB schools in our region of Africa, Europe, Middle East. To quote the Madrid born philosopher José Ortega y Gasset, “Siempre que enseñes, enseña a la vez a dudar de lo que enseñas” (“Whenever you teach, teach [your students] at the same time to question what you teach.”) which I think is an interesting perspective to begin the conference debate. However, more than just welcoming you to an international venue, I am delighted to welcome you all as members of the IB community. The regional conference is our unique event where we come

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together as a community to share and learn from each other’s experiences. It is the ideal forum to meet and discuss with fellow educators, heads of schools, coordinators and university and government representatives, allowing us to generate ideas and share experiences around a subject we all have a passion for - international education. You have come here from over 70 countries and it is your active participation in this conference that will give meaning and life to the conference theme; it will make this an event where we leave replenished with enthusiasm and creativity that will continue to benefit our IB students. I encourage you to take the opportunity to network with your colleagues and develop ways that you can continue to collaborate after the conference.

While the IB continues to grow, with over 4,300 programmes around the world, we are excited about the new schools that are continuing to join our community. We also continue to focus on improving the advocacy and support that we provide to all schools across this region and around the globe. We would like to share with you the work we are doing in the AEM regional office at one of the drop in sessions scheduled in the conference programme.

I would like to thank our sponsors, supporters and exhibitors for their generous support and without whom this event would not have been possible. I truly believe that in these changing times it is imperative that we, as educators, continue to challenge ourselves to understand what we need to do to instil a culture of learning, not just in our schools but indeed among all the people that we encounter, in the whole of our communities. It is only by seeking to improve the society in which we live that we can hope to influence the world and deal with the challenges that lie ahead.

Adrian Kearney Regional Director, IB Africa, Europe, Middle East

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SCHEDULE

Thursday October 4th 10:30 - 16:30 Full-day Pre-conference Leadership workshop 13:00 - 16:30 Half-day Pre-Conference workshop with Lance King 15:00 - 17:00 Registration desk open 17:00 - 17:30 Welcome 17:30 - 19:00 Plenary Veronica Boix-Mansilla 19:00 - 20:30 Networking event and cocktail

Friday October 5th 08:15 09:00 10:15 11:15 11:45 12:45 13:15 14:15 15:15 15:45 17:00 19:00 20:00

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- - - - - - - - - - - - -

09:00 late arrival registration 10:00 Plenary Ben Walden 11:15 Session ONE 11:45 Exhibition & Coffee break 12:45 Session TWO 14:15 Exhibition (LUNCH SERVED BETWEEN 12:45 - 13:45) 14:15 Expo session 15:15 Session THREE 15:45 Exhibition & Refreshments 16:45 Session FOUR 18:00 Focus Groups & Meetings 20:00 Conference Dinner - Welcome Cocktail 01:00 Dinner & Entertainment

Saturday October 6th 09:30 10:45 11:15 12:15 13:00 14:00 15:00 15:45 17:00

- - - - - - - - -

10:45 Plenary Lance King 11:15 Exhibition & Coffee break 12:15 Session FIVE 14:00 EXHIBITION (Lunch served between 12:15 -13:15) 14:00 Expo session 15:00 Session SIX 15:30 Exhibition & Refreshments 17:00 Plenary Grant Wiggins 18:00 Focus Groups & Meetings

Sunday October 7th 09:00 - 10:00 Session SEVEN 10:00 - 10:30 Exhibition & Coffee break 10:30 - 11:30 Plenary Cristobal Cobo 11:30 - 12:30 Closing with Sarah Kay 12:30 - 14:00 Lunch

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VENUE MAP LEFT WING

4th Floor

RIGHT WING

Bratislava

3rd Floor Exhibitions & Refreshments

2ND Floor Roma, Londres, Amsterdam, Reijkiavik, Dublin (IB Conference Office)

Caracas, Bogotá, La Paz, Montevideo

1ST Floor Madrid, Paris, Bonn-Berlin, Monaco, Luxemburgo

La Habana, Buenos Aires / México

GROUND FLOOR

Entrance

-4th floor Auditorium B Venue for all plenary sessions

Network: IBConference_2012 Code: 0123456789

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Registration

Reijkiavik

Roma

Montevideo

Elevator

Dublin

Toilet

La Paz

Stairs

Amsterdam Bogatรก Londres

Escalator

Caracas

2nd Floor

Bratislava Monaco

Madrid

Luxemburgo

Buenos Aires/ Mexico La Habana

Bonn-Berlin

4th Floor Paris

1ST Floor

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Supporters

Manage Bac

Educational Trust Foundation

SEK

http://managebac.com

www.dof-edu.ru

www.sek.es www.ucjc.edu

We thank the SEK Foundation and the Global Education Forum for their sponsorship of Stephen Heppell and their many contributions to the organisation of the conference

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Exhibitors 3P Learning Ltd

IB Source

ManageBac

www.mathletics.com

www.myibsource.com

www.managebac.com

Cambridge University Press

IB Answers Oxford Study Courses Ltd www.osc-ib.com IB Examiner recruitment and training Oxford University Press IB Global Research   www.oxfordsecondary.co.uk/ib IB Professional Development   Pamoja Education IB Publishing www.pamojaeducation.com IB Regional Office IB World Student Conferences Paris Sorbonne www.ibo.org    University Abu Dhabi www.sorbonne.ae IBID Press www.ibid.com.au Pearson Education www.pearsonglobalschools.com IE University www.ie.edu Pronin IB www.proninib.com InThinking www.inthinking.co.uk Scholastic International www.scholastic.com itslearning www.itslearning.eu SEG, Swiss Education Group www.swisseducation.com John Catt Educational Ltd www.johncatt.com Texas Instruments www.education.ti.com Kurzweil / IntelliTools www.kurzweiledu.com World Challenge www.worldchallengeLanterna Education

http://education.cambridge.org

Capita SIMS International www.capita-independent.co.uk

Casio Europe GmbH www.casio-europe.com

CEM, Durham University www.cem.org

CES Holdings Ltd. www.cesholdings.com

Concord www.concord.com.au

Educational Trust Foundation www.dof-edu.ru

Encyclopædia Britannica (UK) Ltd. www.britannica.co.uk

ESADE Business School www.esade.edu

Finalsite www.finalsite.com

Haese Mathematics

www.lanternaeducation.com

www.haesemathematics.com.au

LD-Didactic GmbH

Hodder Education

www.ld-didactic.de

internationalschools.com

Young Digital Planet www.ydp.eu

www.hoddereducation.co.uk

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OPENING PLENARY Thursday 4th OCTOBER

Veronica Boix-Mansilla

What matters most to teach in an increasingly interdependent world? The world for which we are preparing students today is fundamentally different from the one we experienced growing up. Today’s societies are marked by new global economic, cultural, technological and environmental trends that are part of a rapid and uneven wave of globalization. In this context, thoughtful educators ask: What matters most to teach in an increasingly interdependent world? What skills and disposition should students develop to address the global issues defining their times? In this session, we will examine the nature of global consciousness (and related notions of international mindedness, global competence, and global engagement) as a promising

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aim of education in the 21st century. We shall define global consciousness as the sensitivity to and understanding of issues of global and local significance and an inclination to view oneself as an engaged actor in the global sphere. Through analysis of a student’s work, we will discern what global consciousness and engagement look like, and how it might be assessed and nurtured by multiple stakeholders in our educational communities. We will do so by drawing on an example from the newly developed World Studies Extended Essay, in which students are invited to examine a topic on personal, local and global significance through rigorous self-directed interdisciplinary research. Boix Mansilla, V. & Gardner H. (2006). From Teaching Globalization to Teaching for global consciousness. In Globalization and Learning, Marcelo Suarez-Orozco Ed. Jossey Bass.

Veronica Boix-Mansilla is Chair of the Future of Learning at Harvard Graduate School of Education and is a Principal Investigator at Project Zero. Her research examines how human beings enhance their understanding of complex problems by using the lenses of disciplines like history, science, or the arts, or by combining disciplinary approaches in novel ways. She studies the developmental progressions that lead youngsters from early intuitive conceptions of the world to understandings that are informed by one or more disciplines. Her research bridges the minds and worlds of experts,

educators, and learners and stands at the crossroads of fields like cognitive and developmental psychology, epistemology, sociology of knowledge and education. She links theory and practice learning from, and informing, initiatives in curriculum design, teaching, learning, assessment, and professional development in primary, secondary and higher education.

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PLENARY SPEAKER Friday 5th October

Ben Walden

Introducing inspirational leadership lessons from Shakespeare’s Henry V It is increasingly common to hear people say that we are facing a crisis of leadership. The ways in which organisations are moving forward can no longer be comprehended through the same models, language and logical analysis that have served leaders in the past. The rational leader has got business where it is – he/ she will not be able to take it where it needs to go. The leaders of tomorrow will need to be ordinary human beings with extraordinary talents. By Using Shakespeare we aim to develop authentic leaders - by teaching individuals to act with integrity, tell a compelling story and release the full potential of those around them.

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Ben’s work has received major acclaim. He is an actor and presenter who has played a number of leading roles on television and for the Donmar and Almeida theatre companies as well as at Shakespeare`s Globe. Having run many masterclasses for the Shakespeare`s Globe Education Centre he has worked in close collaboration with Mark Rylance and Richard Olivier in the development of an experiential theatre learning technique called Mythodrama. As a Senior Associate at Olivier Mythodrama, Ben is now running sessions bringing this work at Leadership level into a broad range of organisations across the world. He has also run projects at a number of leading business schools including Columbia, OSBS, the London Business School and Insead. “Contender Charlie” is the company he has formed to take this, and other theatre techniques, into education. Ben`s chief passion is using theatre as a medium to bring meaning, purpose and greater personal expression to the lives of young people.

PLENARY SPEAKER Saturday 6th OCTOBER

Lance King

Changing the world one child at a time: the IB and the teaching revolution If the purpose of schooling is developing lifelong (self-directed, self-managed, self-regulated, autonomous, independent) learners, how well are we doing? Does modern schooling support the development of such individuals? My contention is that we are at a confluence of history where the proliferation of school subject based websites, the ubiquity of the internet and connectable devices, the comfort all students have with the digital world and the rise of learning skills based curricula are combining to bring about a revolution in teaching. My hope is that the IB can lead the way.

Lance King is an internationally recognized author, teacher and workshop facilitator who, in the last 17 years, has worked with over 150,000 students worldwide. He is the creator of the Art of Learning programme taught in over 200 schools in eight countries and is a specialist in the direct teaching of ‘learning skills’. Within the IB he has been instrumental in the development of the IBCC and the new MYP programme with particular focus on reformulating ATL. He is married with four children, lives in Raglan, New Zealand and divides his time between teaching and presenting workshops for teachers, parents and students around the world and writing.

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PLENARY SPEAKER Saturday 6th October

Grant Wiggins

Understanding by design, not by good fortune We all claim as teachers to be aiming for understanding, but we often unwittingly choose planning, teaching and assessment approaches that undercut our aim. What is understanding and what does it require of instructional design and teaching? What must occur in local assessment for understanding to be elicited and probed? Why is content ‘coverage’ a tempting but fundamentally flawed approach to managing IB courses?

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Drawing upon his work in education around the world over the past 40 years, Grant Wiggins will offer a thought-provoking yet highly practical approach to achieving understanding by design.

Grant Wiggins is the President of Authentic Education in Hopewell, New Jersey. He earned his Ed.D. from Harvard University and his B.A. from St. John’s College in Annapolis. Grant is perhaps best known for being the co-author, with Jay McTighe, of Understanding By Design, the award-winning and highly successful program and set of materials on curriculum design used all over the world; and of Schooling by Design.

Over the past twenty five years, Grant has worked on some of the most influential reform initiatives in the world, including Ted Sizer’s Coalition of Essential Schools, the IB, the Advanced Placement Program; state reform initiatives in New Jersey, New York, and Delaware; and national reforms in China, the Philippines, and Thailand. Grant is widely known for his work in assessment reform.

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PLENARY SPEAKER SUNDAY 7th OCTOBER

Crist贸bal Cobo

Radical openness in education We live in an exciting time. Digital technologies are becoming increasingly ubiquitous changing centres and peripheries of knowledge production and consumption. Today it is essential to identify new learning perspectives enriched by distributed, open and collaborative communities.

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This talk will explore how to overcome the resistance to change in educational organisations. The idea is to discover remarkable open knowledge initiatives (i.e. open educational resources), new certification systems (i.e. open badges, peer assessment), new profiles (data broker, design thinkers or digital curators); as well as distributed research networks. The audience will be invited to reinvent the future of education.

Crist贸bal Cobo (PhD) is a research fellow at the Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford, where he coordinates research on innovation, open knowledge initiatives and future of learning research projects. Currently he works on Internet Science, OportUnidad, K-Networks and SESERV (European Commission). He is also coordinator of a collective project on informal, non-formal and invisible learning - a collaborative book and an online repository of bold ideas for designing cultures of sustainable innovation.

Crist贸bal has been a Visiting Fellow at the Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance, University of Oxford and Professor and Director of Communication and New Technologies and editor of the educational platform of the Latin American Faculty of Social Sciences , Mexico. He has worked on academic projects with organizations such as the Open University (UK), the University of Oxford, the University of Minnesota, the University of Toronto, the Open University of Catalonia, the Mexican Ministry of Public Education, and the Ministries of Education of Chile and Argentina, the Telefonica Foundation (Argentina and Mexico) and the European Union.

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PLENARY SPEAKER SUNDAY 7th October

Sarah Kay

Considering breakthrough What does it mean to have a breakthrough? How can we embrace breakthroughs in and out of the classroom? How can breakthroughs guide us in the right direction? Spoken Word Poet Sarah Kay is an educator who teaches and performs in schools all over the world. She shares stories of her personal breakthroughs and asks us to consider our own.

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Sarah Kay is a Spoken Word Poet who grew up in New York City and began performing her poetry when she was only fourteen years old. Even though she was often the youngest poet by a decade, Sarah made herself at home at the Bowery Poetry Club, one of New York’s most famous Spoken Word venues. She is the Founder and Co-Director of Project V.O.I.C.E. In 2004, Sarah founded Project V.O.I.C.E. and has since taught Spoken Word Poetry in classrooms and workshops all over the world, to students of all ages. Most recently, Sarah was a featured speaker at the 2011 TED conference. Sarah is an IB Diploma graduate from the United Nations International School (UNIS) in New York City.

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FEATURED SPEAKER FRIDAY 5th October

Stephen Heppell

Building better learning This is a pivotal moment in education's evolving history. Worldwide an enormous number of children will be passing through school. Apparently, more leave school in the next 30 years than have left in history. At the same time major corporations are seeing education as the next major global market and public service investment is being squeezed in the aftermath of the financial collapse. This makes for interesting times that need better learning. But in parallel, a gentle new "pedagogic spring" of reflective students and brave teachers, with a clear aim to redefine their learning environments, is delivering substantial progress. They are swapping effective new ingredients and

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making some remarkable new recipes for learning. For the astute observer, it is becoming apparent that although we can't build better learning FOR our young learners, we can certainly build better learning WITH them.

Stephen Heppell is an English educator who specialises in the use of ICT in education. He is a Professor at Bournemouth University, Chair in New Media Environments, Emeritus Professor Anglia Ruskin University and Visiting Professor at Universidad Camilo JosĂŠ Cela, Madrid. Stephen's "eyes on the horizon, feet on the ground" approach, coupled with a vast portfolio of effective large scale projects over three decades, have established him internationally as a widely and fondly recognized leader in the fields of learning, new media and technology.

Stephen has worked, and is working, with governments around the world, with international agencies, Fortune 500 companies, schools and communities, with his PhD students and with many influential trusts and organizations.

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WORKSHOPS OVERVIEW 10:30 - 16:30 FUll-day pre-conference leadership workshop

THURSDAY

The workshop will encourage reflection and discussion on the four domains of the leadership framework • Pedagogical leadership - Students and their learning • Leading and Managing teams - Professional relationships and behaviours that support learning

• The school as a community -  Schools as learning focussed organisations • The wider community - Working within the wider IB community to support learning

Sue Richards, IB, Manager Teacher Education Services, Introduction to the IB Leadership Framework Prof. Veronica Boix-Mansilla, Chair of The Future of Learning Institute at Harvard Graduate School of Education and Principal Investigator at Project Zero Ben Walden, Senior Associate at Olivier Mythodrama

13:00 - 16:30 Half-day Pre-Conference workshop with Lance King

THURSDAY

“Changing the world, one child at a time - developing the self-regulated learner” When all the information in the world is available at the fingertips of every student, the key skills needed for success both academically and in the world of business and enterprise will be the skills of the self-regulated learner. At that point the development of self-regulated learners will become the primary focus of schooling which will require all forms of transmission teaching to be replaced by process oriented, skills based teaching. This workshop will attempt to answer questions such as: • If technology is the answer what was the question? • How do you develop a student’s metacognitve awareness? • What are the key cognitive and affective skills and how do you teach them?

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• How can different styles of regulation between students and teachers be catered for? • What is the future of teaching?

15:00 - 17:00 Registration desk open

THURSDAY

17:00 - 17:30 Welcome

THURSDAY

17:30 - 18:30 Plenary Veronica Boix-Mansilla

THURSDAY

19:30 - 20:30 Networking event and cocktail

THURSDAY

PYP MYP DP IBCC

WORKSHOPS OVERVIEW 08:15 - 09:00 LATE ARRIVAL REGISTRATION

FRIDAY

09:00 - 10:00 OPENING PLENARY WITH BEN WALDEN

FRIDAY

10:15 - 11:15 SESSION ONE

FRIDAY 1 | L | Madrid

MY CONFERENCE PLANNER

Blended learning: The right mix I plan to attend. . .

Room:

|

|

Denise Perrault

1 | L | Paris

1 | L | Bonn-Berlin

The thinker in action

Introducing the regional strategy: Africa, Europe and Middle East

Keri Anne Johnson, Janie Morris, Anne Françoise Verbert

Adrian Kearney, Theresa Forbes

1 | R | Buenos Aires & Mexico

1 | R | La Habana

New Learning/ New Cultures: The mediacenter’s changing role Presented in Spanish

Quality assurance framework for professional development

Ignacio Blanco, Manuel Berrio, Alejandra Camacho

Yi Chun Chen, Sue Richards

2 | L | Roma

2 | L | Londres

Leadership and the culture of learning How do you get the best out of yourself?

MYP: The Next Chapter

LEADERSHIP

Malcolm Nicolson

Huw Davies, Luis Rey, Joan Fye 2 | L | Amsterdam

2 | R | Caracas

Passport to Peace: Changing the school climate through the IB attitudes

Third Culture Kids

Ana Maria Leon

Yonca Oktay 2 | R | Bogatá

2 | R | La Paz

Evaluating a school’s international education programme

Learning about changes and losses in our lives

Dan Keller

Anthony Walsh 2 | R | Montevideo

4 | R | Bratislava

DP languages focus group

Different cultures of learning: A panel discussion...

James Monk

Edward Lawless

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WORKSHOPS OVERVIEW 11:15 - 11:45 EXHIBITION & COFFEE BREAK

FRIDAY

11:45 - 12:45 SESSION TWO

FRIDAY 1 | L | Madrid

MY CONFERENCE PLANNER

Developing internationally minded educators I plan to attend. . .

Room:

|

|

Dr. Mary Hayden, Dr. Alison Hudson

1 | L | Paris

1 | L | Bonn-Berlin

Debate and oratory: Transdisciplinary skills in a unit of inquiry

The Future of PYP

Presented in Spanish

Helen Barrett

Rosa Vazquez, Alicia Gamboa Herráiz 1 | R | Buenos Aires & Mexico

1 | R | La Habana

21st century education; global engagement

The four keys to plurilinguism

Andrew Derry

Luis Rey, Myriam Canto 2 | L | Roma

2 | L | Londres

Approaches to teaching and learning across the Diploma Programme

Learning in a language other than in the mother tongue in IB Programmes

Andrew Atkinson, Chris Mannix

Natascha Thomson 2 | L | Amsterdam

A tool not a toy... 1-to-1 iPad program for IB Diploma Programme students Caroline Hazel, Alan Perkins

2 | R | Caracas

Did we ever think the IB Diploma Programme could be taught and studied online? Presented in SPANISH Luz Maria Gutierrez

2 | R | Bogatá

Lifelong learning realised through e-portfolios and student-led conferences Chad Schwaberow, Steven Sheperd

2 | R | La Paz

The IB Career-related Certificate (IBCC): the IB’s fourth programme PRESENTED IN SPANISH Concepcion Allende

2 | R | Montevideo

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4 | R | Bratislava

Internationalism within the culture of learning: Challenges and reality Presented in French

Is your school language policy left on the shelf? A look at how a language policy can be a dynamic work in progress

Esmat Lamei, Gabriel Gavoille

Carol Inugai Dixon

PYP MYP DP IBCC

WORKSHOPS OVERVIEW 12:45 - 14:15 Exhibition (LUNCH SERVED BETWEEN 12:45 - 13:45)

FRIDAY

13:15 - 14:15 EXPO SESSION

FRIDAY 2 | R | Caracas

MY CONFERENCE PLANNER

Philanthropy focus group I plan to attend. . .

Room:

|

|

Sobana Nallaiah

2 | R | La Paz

Meeting of the Middle East IB Schools Association (MEIBA)

2 | R | Montevideo

Essential skills for IB students - insights from IB graduates Dennis Lam, Anna Kvarmgren, Lanterna Education

4 | R | Bratislava

How SALT talks put an END to friday afternoon classes. Also deadlines!

2 | R | Bogatá

Review of the IB Learner Profile: research focus group 1 – by invitation

Tim Williams, Oxford Study Courses 1 | R | Buenos Aires & Mexico

2 | L | Amsterdam

Primary Years Programme focus group

Analysing assessment results at a sub-criteria level in the IB curricula

Helen Barrett, Kirsten Loza

Colin Bell

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WORKSHOPS OVERVIEW 14:15 - 15:15 SESSION THREE

FRIDAY 1 | L | Madrid

MY CONFERENCE PLANNER

MYP: Next Chapter Repeated Session 5 I plan to attend. . .

|

Room:

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Heather Lapper

1 | L | Paris

1 | L | Bonn-Berlin

The Learner Profile in a changing world Repeated Session 6 & 7

IB Programme impact research: Findings and implications of recent research on IB students’ academic performance, engagement, and postsecondary enrollment

Christine Amiss, Robert Harrison

Mike Dean 1 | R | Buenos Aires & Mexico

1 | R | La Habana

New learning paradigms: How can these be supported through the school guidance office?

Mission Laique française (MLF) and the International Baccalaureate

Mercedes Blasco Peña, Paloma Arizcun Cela

Jacques Verclytte

Presented in Spanish

Presented in FRENCH

2 | L | Roma

2 | L | Londres

Building better learning

Global School Services - open discussion

Stephen Heppell

Andrew Atkinson 2 | L | Amsterdam

2 | R | Caracas

Creativity that works

Embracing ‘theatre of the oppressed’ in education

Jánis Zeimanis

Simon John 2 | R | Bogatá

2 | R | La Paz

Creating a unified culture of learning in multi-cultural settings

Could you be IB PD?

Darlene Fisher

Anthony Tait, Liza Tercero 2 | R | Montevideo

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4 | R | Bratislava

Modelling in school: From strategy to culture

Passport to peace: Changing the school climate through the IB attitudes

Mitchell Maddox

Ana Maria Leon

PYP MYP DP IBCC

Presented in Spanish

WORKSHOPS OVERVIEW 15:15 - 15:45 EXHIBITION & REFRESHMENTS

FRIDAY

15:45 - 16:45 SESSION FOUR

FRIDAY 1 | L | Madrid

MY CONFERENCE PLANNER

Oxford and the IB I plan to attend. . .

|

Room:

|

Elizabeth Burrows

1 | L | Paris

1 | L | Bonn-Berlin

Leadership in an IB context

Coaching tools to develop your staff

Sue Richards, Carol Van Vooren

John Nicholls 1 | R | Buenos Aires & Mexico

1 | R | La Habana

The role of the disciplines in an interdisciplinary education PRESENTED IN SPANISH

Learning diversity and the IB continuum of international education

Veronica Boix-Mansilla

Jayne Pletser 2 | L | Roma

2 | L | Londres

Update from the Director General: the global story

Diploma Programme: Hexagon core update

Jeff Beard

Chris Mannix 2 | L | Amsterdam

2 | R | Caracas

Venturing into online education IB Open World Schools pilot project

Recognition of IB programmes in the world and AEM

Tobin Bechtel, Eric Mace-Tessler, Kevin Page

Ake Sorman, Paul Sanders, Julian Metcalf 2 | R | Bogatá

2 | R | La Paz

My friend the I-pad: the new children’s tool

Critical thinking in the classroom

Presented in Spanish

Brian Hull

Begoña Ortiz, Judith Canning 2 | R | Montevideo

4 | R | Bratislava

Mathematical integration: Moving beyond a traditional stand-alone approach towards mathematical inquiry

Overview of the Middle Years Programme in the UK

Patricia Anne Fortune

Rachel Cunningham

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WORKSHOPS OVERVIEW 17:00 - 18:00 FOCUS GROUPS AND MEETINGS

FRIDAY 1 | L | Bonn-Berlin

MY CONFERENCE PLANNER

Meet the Regional Office Team I plan to attend. . .

Room:

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Adrian Kearney

2 | R | La Paz

IB Answers - successes and challenges Lynda Clark

19:30 - 20:30 Conference evening - Welcome drink

FRIDAY

20.30 - 22.30 Conference Dinner 22:30 - 01:00

Music and dance Carretera Mejorada-san Fernando,3 28522 Rivas-Vacia, Madrid www.negralejo.com There is no public transport to this venue, therefore IB will provide buses. If you would take a taxi this would cost you around â‚Ź25 one way.

Conference Evening Bus Service A bus service has been arranged for all conference participants attending the conference evening. There will be two pick up/drop off locations. Buses will depart from the main entrance of the Palacio Municipal de Congresos (in front of the registration area) and from Plaza de Oriente in the city centre (underground parking area), 5 minutes walk from the Opera Metro station.

Bus schedule

18:15 | 18:30 | 18:45 | 19:00 | 19:15 | 19:30

18:30 | 18:45 | 19:00 | 19:15 | 19:30 | 19:45

Buses depart from Palacio Municipal de Congresos Buses depart from underground parking at Plaza de Oriente (near the Opera Metro Station)

22:30 | 23:00 | 23:30 | 00:00 | 00:30 | 01:00 | 01:15 Return buses will depart from the front of Palacio del Negralejo back to Palacio Municipal de Congresos (main entrance) and to Plaza de Oriente (underground parking area).

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Guests are advised that the metro is open until 01:30 from the Opera Metro stop (5 minutes walk from Plaza de Oriente)

WORKSHOPS OVERVIEW 09:30 - 10:45 PLENARY LANCE KING

SATURDAY

10:45 - 11:15 EXHIBITION & COFFEE BREAK

SATURDAY

11:15 - 12:15 SESSION FIVE

SATURDAY 1 | L | Madrid

MY CONFERENCE PLANNER

School culture and achievement LEADERSHIP

I plan to attend. . .

Room:

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Samia Al Farra

1 | L | Paris

1 | L | Bonn-Berlin

MYP: The Next Chapter Repeated

Assessment: Pumpkin or glass slipper?

Heather Lapper

Richard Penrose 1 | R | Buenos Aires & Mexico

Learning will endure if it goes beyond the classroom PRESENTED IN SPANISH Matilde Castro

1 | R | La Habana

Critical and creative thinking Rola Hallak, Dina Jradi, Rash Hammoud

2 | L | Roma

2 | L | Londres

Services to IB Schools - Supporting your IB Programme

IB applications at UK competitive universities

Jeff Beard, Siva Kumari

Prof. Denise Lievesley, Katja Lamping 2 | L | Amsterdam

2 | R | Caracas

Antarctica - Global Engage

The Changing world of Online Professional Development

Scott Herrington

Matt James 2 | R | Bogatรก

2 | R | La Paz

Enhancing leadership & learning

IB Educator Network - A world of opportunity

Nigel Ashton, Samantha Abram

John Nicholls 2 | R | Montevideo

4 | R | Bratislava

Professional development for experienced mathematics teachers

The IB Learner Profile

Dr.David Reid

Peter Fidczuk

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WORKSHOPS OVERVIEW 12:15 - 14:00 Exhibition (LUNCH SERVED BETWEEN 12:15 - 13:15)

SATURDAY

13:00 - 14:00 EXPO SESSION

SATURDAY 2 | R | Caracas

MY CONFERENCE PLANNER

Focus group regarding the Global IBEN project – by invitation I plan to attend. . .

Room:

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John Nicholls

2 | R | Montevideo

West Africa IB World Schools Association

4 | R | Bratislava

Experiential learning and the extended essay Rosanna Montalbano, Oxford Study Courses 2 | R | Bogatá

Research Network - Invitation-only networking event to discuss research trends and areas of interest.

IB World Students Conferences planned for 2013

Michael Dean

Ross Duran 1 | R | Mexico & Buenos Aires

Manage your five year evaluation cycle Colin Bell

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2 | L | Amsterdam

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WORKSHOPS OVERVIEW 14:00 - 15:00 SESSION SIX

SATURDAY 1 | L | Madrid

MY CONFERENCE PLANNER

Heads to Heads LEADERSHIP

I plan to attend. . .

Room:

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Ian Andain, Members of Heads & Regional Councils

1 | L | Paris

1 | L | Bonn-Berlin

An overview of the new authorization and evaluation processes for all four IB programmes

The Learner Profile in a changing world

Richard Henry, Fidelis Nthenge, Heather Lapper, John Sauer

Christine Amiss, Robert Harrison

1 | R | Buenos Aires & Mexico

1 | R | La Habana

Developing the IB’s programmes through research

Documentation and a culture of thought

Kate Lin

Mary Marjerrison, Melanie Schryburt, Deborah Ferrari 2 | L | Roma

2 | L | Londres

Approaches to teaching and learning across the Diploma Programme

Tracking progress in the IB Diploma Programme

Andrew Atkinson

Peter Fidczuk, Lisa Harkness

PRESENTED IN SPANISH

2 | L | Amsterdam

2 | R | Caracas

The IB MYP languages continuum - definition, development and discussion

The IB Career-related Certificate (IBCC ): the IB’s fourth programme

Margareth Harris

Dominic Robeau, Julian Metcalf 2 | R | Bogatá

2 | R | La Paz

Learning through the Lens of Language

A strategy for IB in Africa

Stephanie Camahort, Patricia Anne Fortune

Theresa Forbes, Adzo Ashie, Jonathan Renaudon-Smith 2 | R | Montevideo

Simplifying the management of the IB Kevin Skeoch, Maria José Fonseca, Kyle Longhurst

15:00 - 15:30 EXHIBITION & REFRESHMENTS

4 | R | Bratislava

Learning 3.0: tools for a new methodology Presented in Spanish

Monika Horch, Juan Antonio Fernández-Arévalo

SATURDAY

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WORKSHOPS OVERVIEW 15:45 - 17:00 PLENARY GRANT WIGGINS

SATURDAY

17:00 - 18:00 EXPO SESSION AND MEETINGS

SATURDAY 1 | L | Bonn-Berlin

MY CONFERENCE PLANNER

Meet the Regional Office Team I plan to attend. . .

Room:

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2 | R | Montevideo

Helen Barrett, Kirsten Loza 2 | L | Amsterdam

Meeting of the Spanish IB World Schools Association (ACBIE)

PYP MYP DP IBCC

2 | R | Bogatá

Review of the IB Learner Profile: research focus group 2 – by invitation

Primary Years Programme focus group

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Adrian Kearney

WORKSHOPS OVERVIEW 09:00 - 10:00 SESSION SEVEN

SUNDAY 1 | R | Buenos Aires & Mexico

MY CONFERENCE PLANNER

‘Living’ the Learner Profile through concepts: Salient strings of human interaction I plan to attend. . .

Room:

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Tonia Whyte Potter-Mal

2 | R | Montevideo

1 | R | La Habana

“Maths is fun” - Implementing this method in the first years of primary school PRESENTED IN SPANISH

The future of PYP Repeated

Gloria Tobio

Helen Barrett 2 | L | Londres

2 | L | Roma

Data to support school leadership

The Learner Profile in a changing world

LEADERSHIP

Peter Murphy

Christine Amiss, Robert Harrison

2 | R | Caracas

2 | L | Amsterdam

Education, technology and global understanding

The work of IB World School Associations

Eric Lauzon

Ake Sorman, Eleni Kanava 2 | R | La Paz

2 | R | Bogatá

Student-led development of study skills: Lessons from higher education

Cross-pollination of learning cultures: The IB Diploma Programme in a national school context

Oscar Van Nooijen

Jutta Rüdiger 4 | R | Bratislava

Success with sanity: Planning for effective curriculum implementation Mary Condon

10:00 - 10:30 EXHIBITION & COFFEE BREAK

SUNDAY

10:30 - 11:30 PLENARY CRISTÓBAL COBO

SUNDAY

11:30 - 12:30 Closing with Sarah Kay

SUNDAY

12:30 - 14:00 Lunch

SUNDAY 35

SESSION ONE WORKSHOPS FRIDAY 10:15 - 11:15 Blended learning: The right mix Denise Perrault

Head of Online Learning Development IB, The Hague, NL

1 | L | Madrid

The thinker in action Keri Anne Johnson

Grade 5 Teacher St John’s International School Waterloo, Belgium

Janie Morris

Grade 5 Teacher St John’s International School Waterloo, Belgium

Anne Françoise Verbert

Grade 5 Teacher St. John’s International School Waterloo, Belgium

1 | L | Paris

Introducing the regional strategy: Africa, Europe and Middle East Adrian Kearney

Regional Director, IB, The Hague, NL

Theresa Forbes

Head of Regional Development, IB, The Hague, NL

1 | L | Bonn-Berlin

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Blended learning is an educational model in which technology supports the teaching and learning process, but what are the ingredients that make for a successful mix? This presentation seeks to define blended learning and inform participants about how this approach is being successfully utilized throughout the world and more importantly, how it could impact your school and classroom. There will be an exploration of how different models function, program implementations, successful practices and tools, and what we’re learning about blended learning models.

Wouldn’t it be useful to go back to school on Monday with a few systematic and engaging activities, applicable to all subjects and grade levels, which develop the ‘Thinker’ in each individual. Students actively develop their thinking skills and learn how to discuss ideas, find creative solutions to a variety of challenges and ultimately access a deeper understanding of concepts. In this interactive presentation, examples and ideas will be shown, tried out, shared and ready to use upon returning to school with the whole class, small groups and individuals. These strategies, which support and enhance the conceptual thinking encouraged by the IB, will provide students with frameworks to develop their ability to observe, analyse and act effectively in ever-challenging and changing learning environments, a priority for today’s educators.

This session will provide an overview of the regional strategy, how it is developed, how priorities are decided upon and how AEM is working with partnerships to strengthen the sustainable growth of programmes and IB educators in our diverse and culturally rich region. There will be an opportunity to learn about our strategic partnerships

New learning/ new cultures: The mediacenter’s changing role Ignacio Blanco

Librarian Colegio Internacional SEK-Catalunya La Garriga, Spain

Manuel Berrio

Librarian Colegio Internacional SEK-Alborán Almerimar-El Ejido, Spain

Alejandra Camacho Librarian Colegio Internacional SEK-Ciudalcampo Madrid, Spain

When the developing of new technologies converted traditional libraries into media centers, the role of librarians came to be key in the implementation of the consequent new ways of managing resources, accessing information and interacting with all members of the educational community. Both technology and the IB philosophy brought a new culture of learning which has influenced our school libraries’ role, practices, organisation, resources, learning tools, teaching activities and librarians skills. Library users are not passive agents any more: they demand an active approach to resources and a more dynamic way of researching and learning. The aim of this session is to share the experience of three Spanish librarians in supporting the three IB Programmes in an evolving digital world. What challenges are they facing and what solutions are they finding? PRESENTED IN SPANISH

1 | R | Buenos Aires & Mexico

Quality assurance framework for professional development Yi Chun Chen

Research Manager IB, Bethesda, USA

Sue Richards

Manager of Teacher Education Services, IB, Bethesda, USA

1 | R | La Habana

MYP: The Next Chapter Malcolm Nicolson

Head of Middle Years Programme Development IB, The Hague, NL

This session provides an update of the quality assurance framework for professional development, developed in 2009. The framework incorporates multiple online instruments surveying workshop participants at the time of the workshop and 3 months later, workshop leaders, field representatives and session observers. The session will discuss data gathered from the 30,000 workshop participants we receive responses from annually. Analysis of the results allow us to report across region, programme, workshop category and demographics of the participants. In addition, we can dig deeper into the data to investigate concepts such as whether cultural differences affect questionnaire response styles. Participants will also have the opportunity to ask questions and provide feedback on the quality assurance process.

This session will outline the project, MYP: The Next Chapter. It will explain the main features and the rationale behind any changes. Participants will have opportunity to give feedback, make comments and to develop their own understanding of these important changes. The main areas of focus will be changes in curriculum and assessment, with discussion about plans for transitioning in terms of school services and professional development.

2 | L | Roma

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Leadership and the culture of learning How do you get the best out of yourself? Huw Davies

Head, International School of London, London, UK

Luis Rey

Director, Colegio de San Francisco de Paula, Sevilla, Spain

Joan Fye

Director, Leadership Development Centre, UK LEADERSHIP

2 | L | Londres

Passport to peace: Changing the school climate through the IB attitudes Ana Maria Leon

School Counselor/Professor Wilton Manors Elementary, Florida Atlantic University Coral Springs, Florida, USA

2 | L | Amsterdam

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In this session, two IB Heads, Huw Davies of the International School of London and Luis Rey of Colegio de San Francisco de Paula, Seville, will talk about their experiences with one model of leadership and how this has supported their development and enabled them to support others more effectively. The School Leadership Model has been developed based on feedback from existing Heads and it sets out the key qualities of an effective school leader. The model provides a mechanism for supporting school leaders at all stages of their career. Whether a new teacher, a head of department or a deputy, it is important that teachers understand their leadership roles and are supported in that development. The School Leadership Model underpins the Development Centre where candidates go through 12 exercises designed to assess their leadership qualities. After visiting the Centre, school leaders receive a bespoke profile setting out their strengths and weaknesses and areas for development. This is followed up by one to one feedback with a consultant and the opportunity for additional coaching sessions.

The Passport To Peace fosters a school-wide focus on the IB Attitudes and embeds them in everyday integrated lessons for children which opens teachers minds to new strategies and ways of thinking about the IB attitudes and how they interact with the curriculum. As students progress through the curriculum they learn to practice and demonstrate the IB attitudes that form lifelong values. As students travel through the attitudes with their passports, they develop as caring, tolerant, creative. empathetic, committed, and peaceful share-holders in the school. Concurrently, they become responsible and respectful global citizens who embody the learner profile. Find out, through a three pronged approach aimed at: (1) school climate change, (2) knowledge and awareness and (3) early intervention, how this proactive, effective and interactive program can help your school and students reach their IB goals.

Third culture kids Yonca Oktay

PYP Coordinator St. Dominic’s International School Lisbon, Portugal

2 | R | Caracas

Evaluating a school’s international education programme Dan Keller

Associate Director General Bilkent Laboratory & International School Ankara, Turkey

2 | R | Bogotá

Learning about changes and losses in our lives Anthony Walsh

Grade 3 Teacher St. Dominics International School Lisbon, Portugal

2 | R | La Paz

“A third-culture kid is an individual who, having spent a significant part of their development years in a culture other than their parents’ home culture, develops a sense of relationship to all of the cultures, while not having full ownership in any. Elements from each culture are incorporated into the life experience, but the sense of belonging is in relationship to others of similar experience,” David Pollock. Culture is the way we come to know the world, individually and collectively. It is the active engagement of what and who we are as individuals, as communities and as a nation. The quality of that culture is a measure of the way we live. We will discuss how our personal cultural identities influence who we are as teachers; how international-mindedness is about recognising and reflecting multiple perspectives; why it’s important to foster internationalism in education; and identify the stages of intercultural learning.

We often talk about providing an international education at our schools, but there is lack of agreement about what this term actually means. What do the teachers, parents, and students in your school value about international education? How do these stakeholders perceive the international education is being implemented in your school? Answers to these questions can help schools understand their stakeholders, evaluate the effectiveness of the programme, and strengthen implementation. Using specific indicators from the IB and other international education organisations, an instrument has been developed and piloted within international schools. Initial results and future research stages will be shared and discussed.

In international education, often identity is left behind as we learn in different locations. Some children cope well others struggle and sense isolation. Practical techniques that we as educators can offer as possible strategies will be explored to aid students with transitions. Finally we will touch upon what happens when loss is more permanent as in death or divorce. Many students suffer in life, be it a breakdown of family marriage, or death of a close relative, friend or pet. Communicating these thoughts is distressing and difficult. Without education of how to express reactions in a healthy way as a child, we will often carry these negative sentiments into our adult life. This session is not to counsel, but as an essential educating one. It is to help students “coping with loss” so that our community continues with less distress and in a positive way learning lifelong skills together.

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DP languages focus group James Monk

Curriculum Area Head, Diploma Programme Languages IB, The Hague, NL

An opportunity to meet with the curriculum area head of DP languages to discuss how schools are implementing the new courses in groups 1 and 2. The main objectives of the session are to share feedback on the strengths and challenges of the new courses, and to clarify any doubts that have arisen in the first year of teaching. Participants will learn about the curriculum review process and will be asked to provide specific feedback on a range of topics, including: aims and requirements of the courses, needs for future teacher support and professional development materials, and challenges faced by schools in placing students into the right DP language course. The results of this discussion will help the DP to refine and improve its languages programme in the new review cycle currently underway.

2 | R | Montevideo

Different cultures of learning: A panel discussion with school representatives involved with IB Diploma Online courses Edward Lawless

Principal and Academic Head Pamoja Education Oxford, United Kingdom

4 | R | Bratislava

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What are the challenges and benefits of online learning in • Helping schools establish new cultures of learning that will equip students today with the skills they will need tomorrow • Establishing classrooms without walls where students from all over the world learn together In this session, participants will benefit from the first-hand experiences of schools and students who are participating in IB Diploma Online courses. Specifically, this interactive session shares the lessons learned by schools and students. It also invites participants to question panel members and to offer their own views regarding the potential challenges and benefits of online learning in today’s world.

SESSION TWO WORKSHOPS FRIDAY 11:45 - 12:45 Developing internationally minded educators Dr. Mary Hayden

University of Bath, Bath, UK

Dr. Alison Hudson

University of Dundee, Dundee, UK

1 | L | Madrid

The future of PYP Helen Barrett

Head of Primary Years Programme Development IB, The Hague, NL

1 | L | Paris

Debate and oratory: Transdisciplinary skills in a unit of inquiry Rosa Vazquez

Coordinadora PEP Colegio Internacional SEK-El Castillo Madrid, Spain

Alicia Gamboa Herráiz

IB partners with reputable universities around the globe to offer educators IB-recognized courses of study. Upon completing a course of study, educators receive an IB educator certificate (formerly the IB teacher award), which acknowledges teachers’ understanding of the principles and practices associated with IB programmes and their commitment to ongoing professional learning. The IB offers two certificates: the IB certificate in teaching and learning for teachers who want to develop their skills as reflective IB practitioners and the IB advanced certificate in teaching and learning research for teachers who want to conduct academic research with the support of university faculty. Participants will learn about the transformational effect of reflective practice and why it is such an important element in learning organizations and leads to stronger teaching. Representatives from universities linked to the IB educator certificates will share insights about the programs they offer.

This session provides an update on ongoing and future developments in the PYP. The emphasis will be on new publications, new services and initiatives aimed at enhancing teaching and learning in an International Baccalaureate Primary Years Programme school. Responses to these developments will be sought.

Working with debating and oratory aims to develop students’ communication, social and analytical skills. This includes activities such as public speaking, teamwork, information gathering, defending and arguing positions, reflecting and drawing conclusions, etc. The debate league as a learning experience within a unit of inquiry encourage curiosity for inquiry ,addressing issues of both a global and multicultural nature. PRESENTED IN SPANISH

Coordinadora área de aprendizaje en inglés infantil y primaria Colegio Internacional SEK-El Castillo Madrid, Spain

1 | L | Bonn-Berlin

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21st century education; global engagement Andrew Derry

Director Harare International School Harare, Zimbabwe

1 | R | Buenos Aires & Mexico

The four keys to plurilinguism Luis Rey

Director Colegio de San Francisco de Paula Sevilla, Spain

Myriam Canto

Head of Languages and Scenic Arts Colegio de San Francisco de Paula Sevilla, Spain

1 | R | La Habana

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The presentation will discuss how some international schools around the world have been working together to create collaborative programmes for students. Curriculum units have been created at various levels between the schools so that children develop ageappropriate, collaborative, linguistic and intercultural skills. For example, Pre-K PYP units of inquiry have been built around videoconference communication. MYP students work with partners in Spanish speaking IB schools using a variety of web 2.0 technologies to collaborate on joint MYP presentations. At older grades, collaborative units often culminate with exchanges between the schools. The presentation will give step-by-step ideas for setting up such programmes and will hope to share other good practice in the room.

Colegio de San Francisco de Paula, in Seville, was an essentially typical Spanish school. In 1998 it started a bilingual programme in English and Spanish, which also incorporated French and German for the whole student body, to create a plurilingual, intercultural environment – in spite of the fact that the enrolment is over 90 % local. Fifteen years later, over 40% of the teaching body is non-Spanish, the number of Cambridge diplomas has a steady increase, national days of different countries provide additional flavour and there are exchanges and co-operation activities with a variety of nations in Europe and America. Chinese has also been taught for several years as an enrichment option and Arabic has just started in September, 2012. The presentation will analyse the principles and key factors for success, the main issues overcome during the implementation, and the benefits that students have drawn.

Approaches to teaching and learning across the Diploma Programme Andrew Atkinson

Director of Global School Services, IB, Bethesda, USA

Chris Mannix

Acting Head of Diploma Programme Development, IB, The Hague, NL

2 | L | Roma

Learning in a language other than in the mother tongue in IB programmes Natascha Thomson

Language Coordinator/EAL Teacher Kongsberg International School Kongsberg, Norway

2 | L | Londres

“A tool not a toy”The do’s and don’ts of beginning the journey to successfully integrating a 1-to-1 iPad program for IB Diploma Programme students. Caroline Hazel

MYP Coordinator, ACS Egham International School Egham, Surrey, England

Alan Perkins

IB Diploma Coordinator/ Assistant Principal ACS Egham International School Egham, Surrey, England

In a new initiative from the DP development department in The Hague, a project has started for 2015 launch to produce resources for DP schools, teachers, students and other stakeholders that focus on IB ‘pedagogical approaches’ for teachers and ‘approaches to learning’ for students broadly across the programme. For greater alignment with PYP & MYP but also to underpin our own programme standards and practices on teaching and learning in the DP, there has been a recognized need to give greater guidance to schools on the written, taught and assessed curriculum. This session will outline IB pedagogical tenets with practical application for DP classes as well as discuss the general skills and attitudes DP students need to develop for success across all the core requirements and subjects. What resources do your schools need? Do you agree with the project directions? How do DP schools plan as a whole faculty? How do schools prepare students to learn and study effectively in the intense high stakes Diploma? Come along and share ideas with the Head of DP development.

In today’s global society many learners are facing the challenge of accessing an IB programme in a language other than their mother tongue. To enable learners to fully participate in both the academic and social aspects of school life, educators need to recognise how this phenomenon impacts on teaching and learning and identify ways to support language development. This session aims to raise awareness of this issue and discuss the general implications for practice based on a research investigation into the language teaching strategies and techniques that IB educators have been using to foster student learning.

The first step will include strategies to implement a 1-to-1 iPAD ‘beta’ trial programme in the IBDP years: how to introduce the programme to students and staff, how to provide training so that students understand how to integrate their iPAD into their workflow so that it becomes an essential and efficient tool for use to support their learning and organisation throughout their IB Diploma programme. The second section will look at how to implement the programme in classrooms from a faculty members point of view. This will not just be a long list of ‘good apps to use’ (although we will certainly mention some that we’ve found useful) - it will examine how to introduce new technology into your classroom from specific experience of an IB Diploma English teacher so that it enhances the learning experience in new and engaging ways. In addition to an examination of the questions we ask in the classroom, teachers will also be introduced to several cross curricular, hands-on activities that can be used to promote critical thinking in their classrooms.

2 | L | Amsterdam

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Did we ever think the IB Diploma Programme could be taught and studied online? Luz Maria Gutierrez Senior Consultant Pamoja Education Oxford, United Kingdom

2 | R | Caracas

Lifelong learning realised through e-portfolios and student-led conferences Chad Schwaberow

Middle Years Programme Coordinator Qatar Academy Senior School Doha, Qatar

Steven Shepherd

Primary Years Programme Technology Qatar Academy Junior School Doha, Qatar

2 | R | Bogatá

The IB Careerrelated Certificate (IBCC): the IB’s fourth programme Concepcion Allende

DP School Services Associate Manager IB, The Hague, NL

2 | R | La Paz

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The IB and Pamoja Education signed an agreement to help broaden access to the IB Diploma Programme by developing and delivering IB Diploma Programme Online courses. Both the IB and Pamoja Education are committed to supporting schools in expanding the IB DP courses allowing students a wider choice of subjects by offering online IB DP courses. During this presentation we will share the reasons why schools and students engage in IB DP Online courses, consider the opportunities for schools in Spain for a bilingual Diploma and demonstrate how the pedagogy and experience of online courses can support the development of relevant skills necessary for the New Millenium Learners (NML). PRESENTED IN SPANISH

A cohesive system of PYP and MYP e-portfolios, student-led conferences, and an MYP Exit Interview are shared, demonstrating ten years of cross-programme personal growth and reflection. First, e-portfolios offer a chance to focus students on a broader concept of learning and personal growth, moving beyond grades to a highly visible environment for tracking of goals, visual evidence of ATL and Learner Profile growth, Multiple Intelligence profiles, and learning modalities. Many examples, options, and materials will be shared, with student involvement. These are then utilized in student-led conferences and a culminating MYP Exit Interview, which will also be shared. The system includes apparatus for tracking Learner Profile and ATL metacognition while supporting the new requirements of the Personal Project and IB mission. The culmination will be interactive, giving audience members a chance to contribute electronically to this vision.

The IB Career-related Certificate is bringing the IB’s access agenda to life. Students with a career-related focus can now benefit from an IB education. This session will highlight the strategic plan for the IBCC. Topics including programme development, services to schools, communication and recognition. As we move into a new era for the IB with the mainstream launch of the IBCC, find out how schools in the AEM region have implemented the programme and how we can support the introduction of this new programme in your school. PRESENTED IN SPANISH

Internationalism within the culture of learning: Challenges and reality Esmat Lamei

Owner and General Director Oasis International School Group Cairo, Egypt

Gabriel Gavoille

Pedagogical Counsellor Oasis International School Group Cairo, Egypt

Building on the cultural origins of the individual for the benefit of all. Systematically developing native and foreign languages skills. Prioritizing multiculturalism in all forms of learning. Organizing extra-curricular activities at local, national and international level. Maintaining a continued interest in exploring, understanding and accepting cultural diversity and getting results. With a learning culture based on an essential openness to the world, Internationalism is not just an empty phrase. It is a mindset which is present in all three IB programmes , duly converted into actions, namely projects, conferences, festivals and international forums. PRESENTED IN FRENCH

2 | R | Montevideo

Is your school language policy left on the shelf? A look at how a language policy can be a dynamic work in progress. Carol Inugai Dixon

Language and Learning Manager IB, The Hague, NL

In this interactive session participants will have an opportunity: • To watch a video about how one school’s language policy, informed by the IB’s beliefs about language and learning, energizes the curriculum • To review and discuss how a viewing guide for the video could inspire a school to develop dynamic language policy practices • To discuss how the recent document Guidelines for school self-reflection on its language policy could support a school in developing dynamic language policy practices

2 | R | Bratislava

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EXPO SESSIONS FRIDAY 13:15 - 14:15 Philanthropy focus group Sobana Nallaiah

Philanthropy Manager, IB, The Hague, NL

Did you know that the IB has a team of fundraisers dedicated to advancing the IB mission and supporting the work of schools like yours? Want to find out more about what we do? Have experience of fundraising yourself? Join the fundraising team for an informal focus group session to help us to develop our fundraising plans.

2 | R | Caracas

Meeting of the Middle East IB Schools Association (MEIBA)

Meeting of the Middle East IB Schools Association (MEIBA)

2 | R | La Paz

Essential skills for IB students - insights from IB graduates Dennis Lam

Head of School Relations

Anna Kvarmgren School Relations UK

Lanterna Education Stockholm, Sweden

2 | R | Montevideo

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IB students live hectic lives trying to balance their school work, CAS and social life often neglecting the opportunity to contemplate over things they can do to make their time in the IB more manageable and enjoyable. Some students manage to find their way early on, whilst others discover the tips and tricks too late. As past IB students we will highlight the most important things IB students need to do in order to get a head start and improve their chances of better grades.

How SALT talks put an END to Friday afternoon classes. Also deadlines! Tim Williams

IB Schools Liaison, Oxford Study Courses

Teaching is often an immensely rewarding profession – but there are flies in the ointment. Teachers can sometimes feel that much of their energy is channelled in the wrong directions: the need to meet deadlines, to defuse confrontations, to get through the day… in short, all the management issues that need addressing and can somehow get between teaching and learning. If you teach 40 IBDP students, these issues will be very familiar. But we can adopt strategies to re-channel our energies positively. The session looks at negotiation techniques from SALT talks, Sun Tzu and The Godfather, and picks out a few that might really work for teachers, students and administrators with the EE, IA, TOK, IAOP, GCW, PPP, CAS, and possibly more.

4 | R | Bratislava

Review of the IB Learner Profile:

Research focus group 1 - by invitation.

2 | R | Bogatá

PYP focus group Helen Barrett

Head of PYP Development

Attendees will discuss their experiences of the programme and share ideas and suggestions for future and ongoing programme development.

Kirsten Loza

PYP Curriculum Manager

2 | L | Amsterdam

Analysing assessment Results at a sub-criteria level in the IB curricula Colin Bell

CEO, Concord, Australia

1 | R | Buenos Aires & Mexico

Results of a number of pilot projects conducted over the past two years will be shared and a new set of teacher assessment tools that automate the “manual” tasks and processes that are integral to criteria based assessment across the IB continuum (and other international curricula) will be introduced. This automation allows teachers to focus on judging the quality of submitted student work rather than being distracted by the mechanics of grading. You will also see how Concord’s digital marking process allows the micro or sub-criteria within IB rubrics to be extracted, collated and analysed in order to provide teachers, students, parents and administrators with a detailed and accurate picture of exactly where each student excels and where they require attention.

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SESSION THREE WORKSHOPS FRIDAY 14:15 - 15:15 MYP: The Next Chapter Heather Lapper

Middle Years Programme School Services Manager IB, The Hague, NL

1 | L | Madrid

The Learner Profile in a changing world Christine Amiss

Head of Continuum Development IB, The Hague, NL

Robert Harrison

Continuum Development Curriculum Manager IB, The Hague, NL

Carol Inugai-Dixon

Language and Learning Manager IB, The Hague, NL

1 | L | Paris

IB programme impact research: Findings and implications of recent research on IB students’ academic performance, engagement, and postsecondary enrollment Mike Dean

Head of Research IB, Bethesda, USA

1 | L | Bonn - Ber;lin

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A school’s guide to transitioning the changes through to 2014. This session will provide a practical, hands-on approach for schools in all phases of the MYP (interested, candidate and authorized) to effectively and efficiently implement the exciting new changes in the programme in the school’s own context. Find out how these changes will impact your school’s current teaching and learning, and how to best prepare for the transitions which will occur through 2013 and 2014. A question and answer session will be included. REPEATED IN SESSION 5

In this seminar style session participants will engage in conversation, inquiry and critical reflection on the IB Learner Profile. Feedback from participants will be used during the review process along with results from a survey that will be conducted. Provocations during the session will include: Can ten attributes and descriptors really ‘define the type of learner’ we all want to develop? Are they the best ‘learning outcomes for the 21st century?’ How well does the Learner Profile’s long term vision for education inspire and motivate the work of the IB community? What issues of power and privilege should we include in our ongoing conversation about the Learner Profile? Please join us for this conversation and bring your voice to the review of the Learner Profile.

This interactive session will provide an overview of the main findings and educational implications derived from recently completed Programme Impact studies of IB students’ academic performance, engagement, and postsecondary enrollment. Moreover, the session will focus on discussing in-depth findings and implications of recent studies. This session will also discuss several research projects currently underway in India (PYP), the UK (MYP), Canada (DP EE), and the US (DP EE).

New learning paradigms: How can these be supported through the school guidance office?

The session will explain how it is possible to work with new learning paradigms and models, through the guidance office at a school, as well as how to colloborate with the guidance office in order to strengthen and reinforce the “culture of learning" PRESENTED IN SPANISH

Mercedes Blasco Peña

Kindegarten Coordinator and Educational Counsellor Colegio Internacional SEK-Santa Isabel Madrid, Spain

Paloma Arizcun Cela

Primary Years Educational Counsellor Colegio Internacional SEK-Santa Isabel Madrid, Spain

1 | R | Buenos Aires & Mexico

The Mission laïque française (MLF) and the International Baccalaureate Jacques Verclytte,

Honorary Inspector General, French Ministry of Education, Consultant for the MLF.

The Mission laïque française wishes to promote the introduction of the bilingual French/English Diploma Programme in selected schools in its network. By doing so it seeks to attract a different and broader public than that interested in the French baccalaureate, which of course it will continue to promote as part of its mission of service to the public. The two courses can run alongside each other in the schools where they are introduced.

1 | R | La Habana

Building better learning Stephen Heppell

2 | L | Roma

This is a pivotal moment in education's evolving history. Worldwide an enormous number of children will be passing though school. Apparently, more leave school in the next 30 years than have left in history. At the same time major corporations are seeing education as the next major global market and public service investment is being squeezed in the aftermath of the financial collapse. This makes for interesting times that need better learning. But in parallel, a gentle new "pedagogic spring" of reflective students and brave teachers, with a clear aim to redefine their learning environments, is delivering substantial progress. They are swapping effective new ingredients and making some remarkable new recipes for learning. For the astute observer, it is becoming apparent that although we can't build better learning FOR our young learners, we can certainly build better learning WITH them.

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IB School Services - consistent, high quality and differentiated to meet the needs of all our IB schools Andy Atkinson

Director of Global School Services, IB, Bethesda, USA

2 | L | Londres

Creativity that works Jánis Zeimanis

English Teacher Riga State Gymnasium No 1 Riga, Latvia

2 | L | Amsterdam

Embracing ‘theatre of the oppressed’ in education Simon John

Deputy Head International School Hilversum Hilversum, Netherlands

The new Director of Global School Services, Andy Atkinson, will outline a new vision for IB services to schools supporting programme implementation. This talk will answer three questions; how is the IB ensuring high quality consistent core services of authorization and evaluation? In what ways will new IB services seek to meet the needs of different types of IB World Schools and better meet your particular needs? What lessons have we learned in the vital involvement of experienced IB educators in designing and delivering these services? Come and join the session to help shape a new direction for IB school services. Expect some provocative questions and interesting debate.

The session will focus on diverse classroom strategies that enhance learning and foster creativity with respect to the Learner Profile. By having taken into account diverse abilities of my students, I have tried to create such learning environment that actively engages them in research and invites to challenge their creativity with the help of both modern and more traditional teaching methods.

This session will focus upon the techniques of ‘Theatre of the Oppressed’ as a means of working with students and groups of young people. It’s message is universal: move from passivity to activity, from a spectator to spect-actor. Participants will explore, through practical means, preparation (warm-up) exercises, basic Image Theatre and Forum Theatre experiences. The session will be physical and fun!

2 | R | Carcas

Creating a unified culture of learning in multi-cultural settings Darlene Fisher Director Enka Schools Istanbul, Turkey

2 | R | Bogotá

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The session will explore the following ideas through a short presentation, some activities and group discussion: school cultures are central to the experience of every student and impact their goals and achievement. Cultures of learning are developed in schools as a product of the actions and values of leaders and members of the community. Within each community there may be many social/ national cultures (or values) of learning. These cultures may be similar, different or even contradictory. When comparing what good teaching and learning looks like and what the aim of education is, some fundamental differences can exist between national cultures. These differences may therefore exist within one educational community. How can a leader in an IB school manage these differences and create a unified and supported culture of learning that enhances their students’ achievement?

Could you be IB PD? Anthony Tait

Global Professional Development Director, IB, Bethesda, USA

Liza Tercero

Head of global professional development (diploma), IB, Cardiff, UK

Are you looking for workshops that are new, different, inspiring, and internationally minded? Are you ready to develop a workshop of your own? This session gives an overview of the IB’s exciting offerings for face-to-face and online workshops and other multimedia professional development opportunities. It also offers a look at how IB educators can propose and create new IB workshops. Come meet the IB’s global Professional Development team and discuss ideas for cutting-edge ways to promote lifelong learning.

2 | R | La Paz

Modelling in school: From strategy to culture Mitchell Maddox

Teacher Istanbul International Community School Istanbul, Turkey

Modelling has always been fundamental to student learning. This session will cover how to expand the concept of modelling from classroom strategy to schoolwide culture. The three parts will be: cognitive implications of modelling, classroom and schoolwide strategies, and schoolwide culture implementation.

2 | R | Montevideo

Passport to peace: Changing the school climate through the IB attitudes Ana Maria Leon

School Counselor/Professor Wilton Manors Elementary, Florida Atlantic University Coral Springs, Florida, USA

4 | R | Bratislava

The Passport To Peace fosters a school-wide focus on the IB Attitudes and embeds them in everyday integrated lessons for children which opens teachers minds to new strategies and ways of thinking about the IB attitudes and how they interact with the curriculum. As students progress through the curriculum they learn to practice and demonstrate the IB attitudes that form lifelong values. As students travel through the attitudes with their passports, they develop as caring, tolerant, creative. empathetic, committed, and peaceful share-holders in the school. Concurrently, they become responsible and respectful global citizens who embody the learner profile. Find out, through a three pronged approach aimed at: (1) school climate change, (2) knowledge and awareness and (3) early intervention, how this proactive, effective and interactive program can help your school and students reach their IB goals. PRESENTED IN SPANISH

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SESSION FOUR WORKSHOPS FRIDAY 15:45 - 16:45 Oxford and the IB Elizabeth Burrows

University of Oxford, Student Recruitment Officer Undergraduate Admissions Oxford, UK

1 | L | Madrid

Leadership in an IB context Sue Richards

Manager of Teacher Education Services, IB, Bethesda, USA

Carol Van Vooren

Assistant Professor School of Education, California State University, San Marcos, USA

This is designed to give you an introduction to Oxford, including the academic structures, the collegiate system and other aspects of the University’s composition. It will look at the application process in detail with a particular focus on the IB; including entrance requirements and considering recent statistics to demonstrate IB success rates at Oxford. There will also be detail on writing successful personal statements and references, aptitude testing, interviews, entrance requirements and how to identify potential Oxford candidates who are studying the IB diploma, or in earlier years.

This session will inform educators, administrators, heads of school and higher education professionals about the IB’s new certificates in leadership practice and leadership research. It will outline the leadership development framework; share the experiences of a university that is piloting the leadership framework currently; and engage participants in a discussion about what is needed in a leadership course from a variety of perspectives.

1 | L | Paris

Coaching tools to develop your staff John Nicholls

IB Educator Network Manager IB, The Hague, NL

One of the most powerful ways to improve the culture of learning within your school is to use coaching to develop key members of your staff. In addition to giving you an overview of what coaching is, you will be given a range of templates and frameworks to use with staff. This taster session will give you the chance to practice some coaching techniques with a partner, so come along with a small issue you would like to be coached on.

1 | L | Bonn-Berlin

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The role of the disciplines in an interdisciplinary education: how can we rethink the expertise in the educational world today? Veronica Boix-Mansilla

1 | R | Buenos Aires & Mexico

Learning diversity and the IB continuum of international education Jayne Pletser

Curriculum Manager for Inclusive Education IB, The Hague, NL

As educators at the beginning of the 21st Century, we are challenged to rethink our expertise. We understand that it is not sufficient to simply invite our students to store knowledge. The new interdependence of economies and societies require that we prepare children and teenagers to be capable to think in an informed and flexible way to solve problems, create products, to interpret situations, explain phenomena with the expertise appropriate to their age. In this session, we will explore productive ways of integrating disciplines such as history, sciences, arts through interactive analysis and examples. PRESENTED IN SPANISH

In considering the IB’s position with regard to learning diversity the session will explore the IB’s position on inclusive education. IB documents, approaches, resources and the role of the standards and practices will be considered with relation to school development and meeting the needs of a diverse range of learners. The working document for the session will be ‘Special educational needs within the International Baccalaureate programmes’. This session is aimed at those educators who are in involved in the areas of whole school development and learning diversity.

1 | R | La Habana

Update from the Director General: The global story Jeff Beard

Director General IB, The Hague, NL

1 | L | Roma

Diploma Programme: Hexagon core update Chris Mannix

Curriculum Area Head - DP core, IB, The Hague, NL

2 | L | Londres

The IB has been focusing on how to sustain the capability to meet the growing global demand for IB programmes, while adhering to our mission and without relinquishing our high standards of quality and rigor. Join Director General Jeffrey Beard for an update regarding how the IB has been progressing in its delivery of its strategic plan. The session will include updates of progress across all areas of the organization, including Leadership in International Education, the delivery of high-quality IB programmes and services to a growing number of schools, and how the IB is enabling more students to benefit from an IB education regardless of personal circumstances.

With all elements of the DP core in review, it is timely to update everyone on what is happening with TOK, CAS and the EE. First teaching of the new TOK course will begin next year, with changes to CAS and the EE occurring two years later. Come and hear about what is happening to each of the core elements and also find out about how the IB is working toward a more coherent core underpinned by core IB values.

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Venturing into online education IB Open World Schools pilot project Tobin Bechtel

Deputy Director/Secondary School Principal International School of Berne Guemligen, Switzerland

Eric Mace-Tessler

This pilot project was initiated this year by the IB with four IB World schools to explore the possibilities of giving access to IB Diploma Programme courses to students beyond their own campuses (not enrolled in an IB world school). This is a new paradigm for the IB and this session will debate the project’s potential and the hurdles that have emerged from the first stages of this project including the use of online and blended learning as well as balancing access with quality control.

IB Diploma Programme Coordinator International School of Berne Guemligen, Switzerland

Kevin Page

Director International School of Berne Guemligen, Switzerland

2 | L | Amsterdam

Recognition of IB programmes in the world and AEM Ake Sorman

Development and Recognition Manager AEM, IB, The Hague, NL

Paul Sanders

Head of Recognition, IB, Bethesda, USA

Julian Metcalf

University Liaison Officer, IB, UK

This session will provide an overview of IB recognition around the world and in the AEM region in particular. The focus will be on how the IB works with universities and ministries to improve the status of IB programmes. We will also discuss the role of different stakeholders such as Associations of IB World Schools and best practices and strategies for gaining or improving recognition and to strengthen students’ applications to universities. The session will also include relevant research updates and an overview of the recognition materials available for schools.

2 | R | Caracas

Critical thinking in the classroom Brian Hull

IB Diploma Programme Coordinator American International School, Kuwait Salmiya, Kuwait

2 | R | Bogotá

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Who is the president of the United States? Why does a feather fall at the same rate as a rock in a vacuum? Many teachers tend to ask basic fact and comprehension questions just like these. The goal of this session is to encourage students and teachers alike to broaden the type of questions they ask and consequently promote a greater degree of critical thinking in our classrooms.

My friend the I-pad: the new children’s tool Colegio Internacional SEK-El Castillo Madrid, Spain

Brief introduction to the aims of the project, as well the process of implementation and results, in both Spanish and English. Demonstration of the most commonly used Apps within the project, in both Spanish and English. Workshop with participants using Video to illustrate the work carried out in the classroom using some of the Apps.

Judith Canning

PRESENTED IN SPANISH.

Begoña Ortiz

Colegio Internacional SEK-El Castillo Madrid, Spain

2 | R | La Paz

Mathematical integration: Moving beyond a traditional stand-alone approach towards mathematical inquiry Patricia Anne Fortune

Teacher Trondheim International School Trondheim, Norway

2 | R | Montevideo

Overview of the Middle Years Programme in the UK Rachel Cunningham

Researcher National Foundation for Educational Research for England and Wales (NFER) Slough, England

For students to develop robust mathematical thinking and reasoning processes, they need opportunities not only to construct a broad base of conceptual knowledge but also require ways to build their understanding of mathematical practices through curiosity, investigation, discovery and reflection. These need to be linked directly to practical, real life situations which impact them as learners. This change in teaching and learning necessitates radically different roles and responsibilities both for teachers and students. This action research project describes how one teacher’s beliefs about teaching and learning mathematics were challenged as she had to rethink her role and responsibility and the role of her students within the classroom. The teacher and her students all began as novices in the process of inquiry and, during a two year quest, moved beyond a stand-alone approach to a community of learners engaged in mathematical inquiry embedded in all subjects.

The National Foundation for Educational Research for England and Wales (NFER) was commissioned by the International Baccalaureate (IB) to conduct an independent evaluation of the implementation of their Middle Years Programme (MYP) in the UK, and to investigate any teaching and learning benefits perceived by participants. In this session, we will present the results of three parallel surveys which explore the perceptions and attitudes of students, teachers and parents in relation to the ‘culture of learning’ engendered in the IB Middle Years Programme as it is implemented in the UK. The surveys address areas such as teaching, learning and assessment practices, and the beliefs and values of the different groups of respondents. The survey data will be complemented by some ‘vignettes’ of practice and interview data from case studies carried out in four UK schools and set in the context of the UK examination system.

4 | R | Bratislava

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FOCUS GROUPS & MEETINGS FRIDAY 17:00 - 18:00 Meet the Regional Office Team

An opportunity to meet members of the Regional Office and put a face to a name.

Adrian Kearney

Regional Director, Africa, Europe, Middle East, IB, The Hague, NL

1 | L | Bonn-Berlin

IB Answers: successes and challenges Lynda Clark,

IB Answers Associate Manager, IB, Cardiff, United Kingdom

2 | R | La Paz

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March 2011 saw the launch of the IB’s new global information desk, IB Answers. IB Answers offers a first point of contact for inquiries to the IB, responding to in excess of 120,000 queries in its first year of operation. The service also includes an online self-help tool granting access to frequently asked questions. Lynda Clark (IB Answers Associate Manager) shares the successes and challenges that IB Answers has faced. This session will be an opportunity to discuss the lessons learned and the vision for the future to ensure that the needs of the organization’s stakeholders across the globe are met.

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SESSION FIVE WORKSHOPS SATURDAY 11:15 - 12:15 School culture and achievement Samia Al Farra

Chief Education Officer, Taleem, Dubai, UAE LEADERSHIP

How does the school culture impact on achievement? How different are school cultures in different regions in the world? What contributes to school culture in an IB school setting? How different is it the international school from a national school in our part of the world and how do both affect student achievement? School culture is defined as the shared beliefs and priorities driving the thinking and actions of people within a school community. They sometimes refer to it as school climate. One studies the norms, risk taking and locus of control in the school to understand its culture. School culture can be the momentum to real improvement in students’ achievement and is best driven by the people within a school community mainly teachers, administration, board members and parents. The key is to create the interest and the momentum which eventually improve the beliefs and attitudes within a school community. There are cultures that put students’ achievements at the center of what they do and believe in effort as the way to get high academic achievement (eastern), others believe in a student’s ability (western).

1 | L | Madrid

MYP: The Next Chapter Heather Lapper

Middle Years Programme School Services Manager IB, The Hague, NL

1 | L | Paris

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According to research, dramatically improving a school’s culture typically takes 3 to 5 years.

A school’s guide to transitioning the changes through to 2014. This session will provide a practical, hands-on approach for schools in all phases of the MYP (interested, candidate and authorized) to effectively and efficiently implement the exciting new changes in the programme in the school’s own context. Find out how these changes will impact your school’s current teaching and learning, and how to best prepare for the transitions which will occur through 2013 and 2014. A question and answer session will be included. REPEAT OF SESSION 3

Assessment: pumpkin or glass slipper? Richard Penrose Head of Marking IB, Cardiff, UK

1 | L | Bonn-Berlin

Learning will endure if it goes beyond the classroom Matilde Castro

ICT Coordinator and MYP Science Teacher Colegio Internacional SEK-El Castillo, Madrid, Spain

In the May 2012 session all ToK essays and many audio files were electronically uploaded, a pilot upload of Visual Arts work was carried out in over 100 schools, 67% of all student examination scripts and all ToK essays were e-marked. Richard Penrose, head of marking, will discuss how the tensions between aspiration and reality, idealism and pragmatism are currently resolved within IB assessments and the directions of change. He will ask for feedback on proposals for new services and procedures and will welcome all comments and thoughts from colleagues on assessment matters. The objectives of the presentation are to inform IB Educators about assessment developments and to listen and gain feedback about colleagues’ perceptions of IB assessment in schools. The session will therefore offer plenty of opportunity for members of the audience to raise issues and questions.

We will show how our whole teaching staff was able, thanks to technology and mobile devices, to work on the MYP and to extend it beyond the classroom; how we have used cooperative learning within the classroom and the potential of social networks outside the school environment so that students can interiorize the syllabus by “playing & doing”. Furthermore, deep and long term learning is achieved by “learning by doing”. The fact of building bridges between teachers and students while at home has been the major achievement of this teaching methodology. This has prevented student demotivation and they arrive at school eager to continue learning. PRESENTED IN SPANISH

1 | R | Buenos Aires & Mexico

Critical and creative thinking Rola Hallak

PYP Teacher, IB Workshop Leader Makassed Houssam Eddine Hariri High School, Lebanon

Dina Jradi

PYP Coordinator, IB Workshop Leader Makassed Houssam Eddine Hariri High School, Lebanon

Rash Hammoud

PYP Teacher, IB Workshop Leader Makassed Houssam Eddine Hariri High School, Lebanon

The twenty first century demands education to embody new practices. One of these practices is the necessity to develop learners as thinkers and inquirers. How to create a culture of learning which cultivates thinking? That is the question. The primary purpose of the session is to increase the participants’ awareness of the most recent pedagogical theories and practices that enhance thinking for the life and in the life of the twenty first century. What after the “thinking hats”? How to develop critical and creative thinkers of the future? The participants will have the opportunity to think deeply about the IB Standard C3 – Practice 2 “Teaching and learning engages students as inquirers and thinkers”. Participants will be engaged to share their knowledge and practices in constructive discussions and interactive presentation techniques.

1 | R | La Habana

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Services to IB schools – Supporting your IB programme Jeff Beard

Director General, IB, The Hague, NL

Siva Kumari

Chief Operating Officer, Schools Division, IB, Bethesda, USA

2 | L | Roma

IB applications at UK competitive universities Professor Denise Lievesley Professor of Social Statistics and Head of School of Social Science and Public Policy

Katja Lamping

UK/Europe Marketing Manager, King’s College, London, UK

2 | L | Londres

Antarctica Global Engage Scott Herrington

Middle Years Programme Coordinator The KAUST School Thuwal, Saudi Arabia

2 | L | Amsterdam

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One of the four goals of IB’s current strategic plan is to “evolve and improve our services to schools.” The IB Director General will explain what this goal means within the overall context of IB strategy, while the COO of the Schools Division will speak to the many initiatives being undertaken by the IB not only to improve the level of support but also to expand the range of services that schools can call upon, whether they be existing schools or new to the IB. The session will give participants an important opportunity to provide input as these services are being developed.

With the current trend for interdisciplinary studies, students need to apply to universities equipped with a broader skillset than ever. In terms of international qualifications, the IB diploma is by far the most often encountered by UK admissions teams. Admissions tutors know the qualification well, and know that it prepares students extremely well for degree-level studies across a range of competencies. This presentation will discuss how the CAS, Extended Essay and other key elements of the IB diploma can be used to their fullest potential when making an application to competitive universities, from the perspective of a highly selective institution. The session aims to be interactive with plenty of opportunity for Q&A.

Antarctica – A place frozen in time, a place that has never known war, belongs to no nation, is home to no tribe or clan or indigenous race. In the year 2041 the Antarctic Treaty comes up for review. The outcome of this decision will decide the fate of the last great wilderness on earth. Presenter Scott Herrington joined Sir Robert Swan, the founder of 2041 and the first man in history to walk to both the north and south poles, and participated in the 2041 Inspire Antarctica Expedition last March. As an MYP Coordinator at The KAUST School in Saudi Arabia Scott developed a K-12 Learning Plan to incorporate Antarctica into all IB programmes including PYP units of Inquiry, MYP units focusing on AOIs of Environment, HSE, and C&S and TOK in the DP. This inspirational session will include practical ways of incorporating Antarctica into your school curriculum.

The changing world of Online Professional Development Matt James

Head of Online Professional Development IB, The Hague, NL

What’s new in Online PD? This session will report on the rapid growth in popularity in IB online professional development and why some educators prefer to do their PD online. There’ll be a chance to find out what really happens in an online workshop, hear about what we’re doing in other languages as well as learn about some new and exciting developments for the coming year.

2 | R | Caracas

Enhancing leadership and learning Nigel Ashton

Head Teacher Leverhulme Community Primary School Bolton, United Kingdom

Samantha Abram

Primary Years Programme Leader Leverhulme Community Primary School Bolton, United Kingdom

2 | R | Bogotá

IB Educator Network - A world of opportunity John Nicholls

IB Educator Network Manager, IB The Hague, NL

All schools whether international or UK mainstream put children at the centre of the learning process. We will demonstrate how we have used the PYP as a main contributor along with the UK national curriculum to motivate children and raise standards. We will share how the PYP has been embedded into the accountability, tracking and testing culture of a UK state primary school, ensuring pupil attainment, achievement and high expectations for all stakeholders, despite the many constraints from Government, Ofsted and Local Authorities. The session will include reference to the following strategies: using the PYP as a framework to underpin all learning, the exhibition as an example of summative assessment, where individual and groups of children have taken action in response to a unit of inquiry, assertive behaviour policy, teacher accountability , subject leadership, school improvement plans linked to performance management linked to continuing professional development.

If you are a current IB educator (work-shop leader, site visitor, examiner, moderator, field representative, examination site inspector, consultant, application reader, curriculum developer or reviewer), or if you are interested in becoming involved in these roles, come to an informative and interactive session that focuses on opportunities both within the IB Africa, Europe, Middle East region and beyond.

2 | R | La Paz

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Professional development for experienced mathematics teachers Dr. David Reid

Universität Bremen, Bremen, Germany

2 | R | Montevideo

The IB Learner Profile Peter Fidczuk

Assistant Head Teacher Dartford Grammar School, Dartford, UK

4 | R | Bratislava

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There are relatively few opportunities for international school teachers to pursue Masters level professional development that is directly related to the international school context and to their subject specialities. In light of this need Universität Bremen is developing an advanced Masters degree for experienced mathematics teachers. It includes a mix of on-campus courses and on-line courses. Throughout there is a strong emphasis on connecting current research and school practice. This session will describe the program as it is presently envisaged, and invite input from the audience.

The Learner Profile is sometimes looked upon as an ‘add on’ to the school curriculum and schools may consider that giving students opportunities to develop the LP attributes is difficult within programmes of study. However, this presentation will use the example of a UK MYP-DP school to show that students develop the LP attributes within the normal requirements of the two programmes and that embedding the LP is a natural consequence of the MYP and DP. Examples of the programmes of study used at the school will be shared along with activities that give students the opportunities to develop their LP attributes as well as some ways in which students assess their development.

EXPO SESSION SATURDAY 13:00 - 14:00 IB Educator Network (IBEN)

Focus group regarding the Global IBEN project - by invitation.

John Nicholls

IB Educator Network Manager, IB, The Hague, NL

2 | R | Caracas

Research Network Michael Dean

Head of IB Research

This invitation-only networking event is for higher education professionals and those who either hold or are pursuing IB educator certificates or advanced certificates. Michael Dean, head of IB Research, will attend to discuss research trends and areas of interest.

2 | R | Bogotá

West Africa IB World Schools Association 2 | R | Montevideo

Experiential learning and the extended essay Rosanna Montalbano IB Schools Liaison, Oxford Study Courses

4 | R | Bratislava

IB World Students Conferences planned for 2013 Ross Duran 2 | L | Amsterdam

Dealing with a 4000 word research paper can be very daunting for a 16 year-old. By highlighting the importance of networking, research skills and attention to detail that is needed for the project (the best essays are largely the fruit of independent research and initiative undertaken outside the classroom), students can be made to realize the intrinsic value of the Extended Essay. It is, after all, one of the key elements that sets the DP student apart from any other university applicant. The tips on how to approach the Extended Essay in this presentation will feature input from real students who achieved maximum scores on their Extended Essay.

The IB is pleased to announce a series of IB World Student Conferences in 2013 which will bring together IB Diploma Programme and IB Careerrelated Certificate students from around the world to experience what it really means to ‘think globally’. Learn more about the sites for the 2013 World Student Conferences, their programmes, registration, costs, feedback from the 2012 conferences and much more. 63

IB World Students Conferences planned for 2013 Ross Duran 2 | L | Amsterdam

Manage your five year evaluation cycle Colin Bell

CEO, Concord Australia

1 | R | Buenos Aires & Mexico

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The IB is pleased to announce a series of IB World Student Conferences in 2013 which will bring together IB Diploma Programme and IB Careerrelated Certificate students from around the world to experience what it really means to ‘think globally’. Learn more about the sites for the 2013 World Student Conferences, their programmes, registration, costs, feedback from the 2012 conferences and much more.

The five year IB review is time consuming and demanding - team based review and capture of school practice, gathering and managing supporting evidence, tracking changes, school self assessment, and finalising submissions to the IB. This session will explore Concord Xitracs, a continuous improvement Internet based tool that streamlines the processes associated with cyclical standards and practices reviews for the IB, CIS, NEASC, WASC and many other international school accreditation agencies. On completion, Xitracs will print forms and documents for uploading to IB Docs.

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SESSION SIX WORKSHOPS SATURDAY 14:00 - 15:00 Heads to Heads Ian Andain

Chair, AEM Regional Council

Members of Heads Council & Regional Council LEADERSHIP

An opportunity to question IB officers, Heads, members of the Regional and Heads’ Councils on a range of issues from the latest developments in School Services, the Regional Strategy, challenges for the IB, leadership issues, quality assurance, changes to the MYP and a host of other issues. This session will give participants the chance to air views, give feedback on IB activities, hear the latest news and pose questions to a panel of experts chaired by the Chair of the AEM Regional Council, Ian Andain.

1 | L | Madrid

An overview of the new authorization and evaluation processes for all four IB programmes Richard Henry

Head of School Services AEM, IB, The Hague, NL

Fidelis Nthenge

DP School Services Manager AEM, IB, The Hague, NL

Heather Lapper

MYP School Services Manager AEM, IB, The Hague, NL

John Sauer

PYP School Services Manager , IB, The Hague, NL

1 | L | Paris

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PYP MYP DP IBCC

This presentation is an overview of the new processes and systems for IB schools who are undergoing authorization and/or evaluation. Practical advice will be offered with respect to authorization and evaluation for PYP, MYP, DP and IBCC along with the opportunity for questions from participants. There will also be information about the new procedures for candidacy and a brief summary of the requirements for evaluation during the transition to the MYP Next Chapter.

The Learner Profile in a changing world Christine Amiss

Head of Continuum Development, IB, The Hague, NL

Robert Harrison

Continuum Development Curriculum Manager, IB, The Hague, NL

1 | L | Bonn-Berlin

Developing the IB’s programmes through research Kate Lin

Research Manager for programme development IB, The Hague, NL

1 | R | Buenos Aires & Mexico

Documentation and a culture of thought Mary Marjerrison

PYP and Curriculum, Bilingual European School, Milan, Italy

Melanie Schryburt

Teacher, Bilingual European School, Milan, Italy

In this seminar style session participants will engage in conversation, inquiry and critical reflection on the IB Learner Profile. Feedback from participants will be used during the review process along with results from a survey that will be conducted. Provocations during the session will include: Can ten attributes and descriptors really ‘define the type of learner’ we all want to develop? Are they the best ‘learning outcomes for the 21st century?’ How well does the Learner Profile’s long term vision for education inspire and motivate the work of the IB community? What issues of power and privilege should we include in our ongoing conversation about the Learner Profile? Please join us for this conversation and bring your voice to the review of the Learner Profile. REPEATED SESSION 7

Programme development research in the IB is to inform curriculum development initiatives and to support internal research capacity for curriculum review. Following a brief outline of the four interconnected areas of the programme development research, this interactive session will illustrate how they are approached through a series of literature reviews, discussion documents, position papers and inhouse training in educational research methodology. To demonstrate the relevance of those IB programme development research efforts to the wider IB community, the session also attempts to communicate the outcomes of a literature review on curriculum alignment and articulation in diverse contexts to encourage critical reflection on current understandings and practices as well as active engagement with professional dialogues among the participants.

As a school creates its identity, a story develops, a story of what is essential and rooted in its fabric. Traces of the story can be told through classroom documentation of learning, which is then examined by children and adults for the purpose of deepening their understanding. Through careful looking and dialogue, new stories unfold, new directions emerge, new ideas evolve. This endless weaving and reweaving creates the thinking classroom.

Deborah Ferrari

Teacher, Bilingual European School, Milan, Italy

1 | R | La Habana

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Approaches to teaching and learning across the Diploma Programme Andrew Atkinson

Director of Global School Services, IB, Bethesda, USA

Chris Mannix

Acting Head of Diploma Programme Development, IB, The Hague, NL,

2 | L | Roma

Tracking progress in the IB Diploma Peter Fidczuk

Dartford Grammar School, Dartford, United Kingdom

Lisa Harkness

Primary and Intl Administrator, CEM, Durham University, Durham, UK

In a new initiative from the DP development department in The Hague, a project has started for 2015 launch to produce resources for DP schools, teachers, students and other stakeholders that focus on IB ‘pedagogical approaches’ for teachers and ‘approaches to learning’ for students broadly across the programme. For greater alignment with PYP & MYP but also to underpin our own programme standards and practices on teaching and learning in the DP, there has been a recognized need to give greater guidance to schools on the written, taught and assessed curriculum. This session will outline IB pedagogical tenets with practical application for DP classes as well as discuss the general skills and attitudes DP students need to develop for success across all the core requirements and subjects. What resources do your schools need? Do you agree with the project directions? How do DP schools plan as a whole faculty? How do schools prepare students to learn and study effectively in the intense high stakes Diploma? Come along and share ideas with the Head of DP development. PRESENTED IN SPANISH

This session will discuss methods of tracking pupil, class, subject and school performance in the Diploma Programme by using a British State school as a case study and will describe the practical use of data generated from the University of Durham’s ALIS database. The session will begin with the principles behind target setting and the use of data from ALIS, the monitoring of student progress and the development of appropriate responses a school can make to support students who are underachieving. The use of tracking and monitoring data will then be extended to analyse the ways that a school can evaluate progress in subjects and whole school achievement. The procedures described in this session have been used successfully during the last 3 years to improve the achievement of Diploma students so that it is above average.

2 | L | Londres

The IB MYP languages continuum - definition, development and discussion Margareth Harris

Curriculum and Assessment Manager, MYP Development, Languages A and B, IB, The Hague, NL

2 | L | Amsterdam

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PYP MYP DP IBCC

How does the IB define language A, language B, additional language, second language, mother tongue, and the teaching and learning of these within the MYP framework? How do the current projects reflect this approach? This session is an opportunity to discuss these questions and learn more about curriculum and assessment developments in the MYP languages A and B subject groups.

The IB Careerrelated Certificate (IBCC): The IB’s fourth programme Dominic Robeau

Curriculum and Assessment Manager - DP Core and IBCC, IB, The Hague, NL

Julian Metcalf

The IB Career-related Certificate is bringing the IB’s access agenda to life. Students with a career-related focus can now benefit from an IB education. This session will highlight the strategic plan for the IBCC. Topics including programme development, services to schools, communication and recognition. As we move into a new era for the IB with the mainstream launch of the IBCC, find out how schools in the AEM region have implemented the programme and how we can support the introduction of this new programme in your school.

University Liaison Officer, IB, UK

2 | R | Caracas

Learning through the lens of language Stephanie Camahort

Teacher Trondheim International School Trondheim, Norway

Patricia Anne Fortune

Teacher Trondheim International School Trondheim, Norway

The role of language is central in acquiring knowledge, concepts and skills. At Trondheim International School we have a diverse population of learners. The school is a meeting point where students representing different nationalities, cultures, and languages meet to learn content in one common language, English. Since very few of our students are actually mother-tongue English speakers, our challenge then is to provide a supportive learning environment where students can communicate and gain content area knowledge, concepts and skills while developing English language fluency. This action research project describes the journey of two teachers investigating how the cultural and linguistic diversity at a school can be approached as an advantage in developing open-minded communicators and creative thinkers. We found that learners that take risks when using language, any available language, to support meaningful inquiry, helps improve the students’ English language skills and content

2 | R | Bogotá

A strategy for IB in Africa Theresa Forbes

Head of Regional Development AEM, IB, The Hague, NL

Adzo Ashie

Regional Manager Africa, Accra, Ghana

Traude Rogers

Portfolio Manager, Access Projects, IB, The Hague, NL

Jonathan Renaudon-Smith

Head of Professional Development AEM, IB, The Hague, NL

The AEM Regional Development Team is responsible for coordinating the strategic IB partnerships and initiatives in the region. We are currently working with 82 countries out of a potential 128 across the sub regions of Europe, Africa and the Middle East. In April 2012 IBAEM held its first Symposium for African IB schools: ‘Connecting, strengthening and developing the IB community in Africa’. The symposium brought together schools from across the continent to discuss, debate, celebrate success and to look to the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead. This session will share the discussion and the recommendations for how IB will work to support a strategy for schools in this region.

2 | R | La Paz

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Simplifying the management of the IB Kevin Skeoch

Head of School Dwight International School Seoul, South Korea

Maria José Fonseca

System Analyst St Dominic’s International School, Portugal Lisbon, Portugal

Kyle Longhurst

International Account Capita SIMS International Gloucestershire, UK

The International Baccalaureate embraces diversity and helps to feed enquiring young minds. However, its breadth and flexibility can make tracking students’ learning progress and reporting to parents challenging tasks for schools. This presentation will talk about why technology is being used in the presenter’s schools to monitor students’ progress against set standards and identify issues that might be affecting a child’s performance so that appropriate steps can be taken sooner to raise achievement. Visitors will hear how when stored electronically in one place, data such as students’ attendance, assessment and pastoral information can be combined quickly and easily, providing a holistic view of a child. This is critical to delivering more personalised teaching and learning and can reduce the administrative burden of reporting to parents.

2 | R | Montevideo

Learning 3.0: tools for a new methodology Monika Horch

Deputy Principal, High School Teacher Colegio Montserrat Barcelona, Spain

Juan Antonio FernándezArévalo IB Coordinator, Maths / Physics teacher Colegio Montserrat Barcelona, Spain

4 | R | Bratislava

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PYP MYP DP IBCC

Project-based learning is a methodological approach where students proactively deal with contextualised challenges. Solving these problems or projects helps them in learning both content and skills. Using examples of projects that have been completed, the use of new technologies in adding value to this learning is demonstrated, in relation to five key elements. These elements are quality of the final product, cooperation in real time, access to a variety of sources, personalization through PLE, and monitoring and evaluation. PRESENTED IN SPANISH

FOCUS GROUPS & MEETINGS SATURDAY 17:00 - 18:00 Meet the Regional Office Team

An opportunity to meet members of the Regional Office and put a face to a name.

Adrian Kearney

Regional Director, Africa, Europe, Middle East, IB, The Hague, NLCastillo, Madrid, Spain

1 | L | Bonn-Berlin

PYP Focus Group Helen Barrett

Head of PYP Development

Kirsten Loza

Focus group led by Helen Barrett, Head of PYP Development and Kirsten Loza, PYP Curriculum Manager where attendees will discuss their experiences of the programme and share ideas and suggestions for future and ongoing programme development.

PYP Curriculum Manager

2 | R | Montevideo

Review of the IB Learner Profile

Research focus group 2 - by invitation

2 | R | Bogotรก

Meeting of the Spanish IB World Schools Association (ACBIE)

Meeting of the Spanish IB World Schools Association (ACBIE)

2 | L | Amsterdam

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SESSION SEVEN WORKSHOPS SUNDAY 09:00 - 10:00 ‘Living’ the Learner Profile through concepts: Salient strings of human interaction Tonia Whyte Potter-Mal

PYP Coordinator and Professional Development Coordinator Metropolitan School Frankfurt Frankfurt am Main, Germany

1 | R | Buenos Aires & Mexico

“Maths is fun” Implementing this method in the first years of primary school Gloria Tobio

Teacher Colegio Internacional SEK-El Castillo Madrid, Spain

2 | R | Montevideo

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PYP MYP DP IBCC

This presentation format has been purposely tailored to reflect aspects of the IB PYP unit planner and the PYP Essential Elements framework. Transdisciplinary theme: Where we are in place and time. Central idea: The Learner Profile is a multi-dimensional body of values internalized through conceptual thinking and active inquiry to facilitate lifelong learning. Inquiry into: The impact of personal stories, picture book themes and human experiences on the culture of learning; Shared educational experiences that inspire further professional learning and collegial action, Links between visible thinking routines and purposeful transdisciplinary learning. Knowledge (Transdisciplinary areas of learning), Key Concepts (Connection, Perspective, Responsibility), Transdisciplinary Skills (Metacognition, Dialectical thought, Synthesis), Attitudes (Commitment, Empathy), Action: Reference to personal and professional action resulting from participation in this breakout session.

How the new introductory mathematics course, based on the system developed by José Antonio Fernández Bravo, was implemented in the schools at the Institución SEK and adapted to PYP methodology. Presented in Spanish

The future of PYP Helen Barrett

Head of Primary Years Programme Development IB, The Hague, NL

1 | L | Paris

The Learner Profile in a changing world Christine Amiss

Head of Continuum Development, IB, The Hague, NL

Robert Harrison

Continuum Development Curriculum Manager, IB, The Hague, NL

Carol Inugai-Dixon

Language and Learning Manager, IB, The Hague, NL

2 | L | Roma

Data to support school leadership Peter Murphy

Director, Vienna International School, Vienna, Austria LEADERSHIP

This session provides an update on ongoing and future developments in the PYP. The emphasis will be on new publications, new services and initiatives aimed at enhancing teaching and learning in an International Baccalaureate Primary Years Programme school. Responses to these developments will be sought. REPEAT

In this seminar style session participants will engage in conversation, inquiry and critical reflection on the IB Learner Profile. Feedback from participants will be used during the review process along with results from a survey that will be conducted. Provocations during the session will include: Can ten attributes and descriptors really ‘define the type of learner’ we all want to develop? Are they the best ‘learning outcomes for the 21st century?’ How well does the Learner Profile’s long term vision for education inspire and motivate the work of the IB community? What issues of power and privilege should we include in our ongoing conversation about the Learner Profile? Please join us for this conversation and bring your voice to the review of the learner profile. REPEAT

In a significantly digital world, schools are increasingly under pressure to generate easily accessible data that will reassure all stakeholders. There is a risk that we focus on the ‘easily measured’ at the cost of the ‘most valuable’. Are the needs of students, teachers, parents and board members common or will a differentiated approach provide more useful starting points for learning-focussed conversations? The workshop will provide an opportunity to reflect upon the types of data that are available and some methods of making constructive use of them. Workshop participants are encouraged to bring examples from their schools to share.

2 | L | Londres

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Education, technology and global understanding Eric Lauzon

Chief Information Officer, IB, Singapore

Join Eric Lauzon, IB Chief Information Officer, as he explores the interplay between education and technology in a global economy. The presentation will highlight the importance of integrating technology in education for an increased global understanding for schools. In addition, he also will address how new collaborative tools can offer unique opportunities for education technology stakeholders.

2 | L | Amsterdam

The work of IB World Schools associations Ake Sorman

Development and Recognition Manager AEM, IB, The Hague, NL

Eleni Kanava

Development Associate AEM, IB, The Hague, NL

This session will give an overview of the purpose of Associations of IB World Schools and the strategic role they play for IB developments in the AEM region. It is primarily targeted for schools in countries where there are currently no associations. We will look at the criteria and the steps towards forming an association as well as the advantages that we see in a close collaboration with the IB and in the networks themselves. We will share best practices and examples of successful cooperation.

2 | R | Caracas

Student-led development of study skills: Lessons from higher education Oscar Van Nooijen

Diploma Programme Coordinator The Abbey School Reading, United Kingdom

2 | R | Bogotá

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PYP MYP DP IBCC

The UK sixth form school model offers rich opportunities for using ‘student voice’ and various levels of peer support across the age and ability range when inculcating good study habits. This reflects increasing efforts being made by HE providers across the sector to support the development of their students’ study skills. Using the presenter’s experience in both the school and HE sectors, this session will reflect on the ways in which learners can participate and lead the creation of a ‘culture of learning’, both for their own personal educational journey, and to the benefit of the wider academic community in which they find themselves.

Cross-pollination of learning cultures: the IB Diploma Programme in a national school context Jutta Rüdiger

IB Coordinator Nørre Gymnasium Brønshøj, Denmark

2 | R | La Paz

Success with sanity: Planning for effective curriculum implementation Mary Condon

Diploma Programme Spanish B Teacher Park Center IB World School Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

A considerable percentage of IB schools offer both the national curriculum and the IB Diploma Programme with the staff teaching both systems to their respective student clientele. In daily reality, this is a challenge especially for the teachers feeling caught between their native heritage/culture/regulations and IB demands. This situation will be presented by example of Scandinavian IB schools : The Nordic humanistic traditions, their pedagogical concepts and behaviour patterns often deviate from the approaches a rigorous global educational system stipulates; many teachers find it difficult to adjust their background and attitude in the classroom to the “IB code”. In this workshop, the participants will exchange views of major challenges in their countries/schools and suggest best practise on how to successfully combine national and IB “learning culture(s)”.

A rapid-fire presentation by the author of Success with Sanity: Planning for Effective Curriculum Implementation. Contents include: Ya gotta play the hand you’re dealt!, Go Toward the Light!, Pencil it In!, Skim the Cream from the Top!, Put the skeleton in the closet!, and ...the last shall be first! Packed with real-life examples shared with metaphorical humour, Success with Sanity provides seven proven steps for implementing new curriculum -- something many of us have to or will need to do soon!

4 | R | Bratislava

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Many IB World Schools have chosen to form local associations with other IB World Schools at a national or sub-regional level. These non-profit associations provide a forum for school collaboration, informal gatherings and the exchange of good practice. Associations are often active in negotiating university and government recognition for IB programmes and can be an indispensable resource for schools discovering the IB for the first time. The IB is increasingly working on a formal basis with these associations, recognizing the key role that they play in supporting the school network and developing the IB mission around the world. Each association is an independent entity that is not run or managed by the IB itself.

Associations of IB World Schools with a cooperation and licence agreement in the Africa, Europe, Middle East region • Commonwealth of Independent States The IB Schools Association of Commonwealth of Independent States (IBSA) • Germany Association of German International Schools (AGIS) • Middle East Middle East IB Schools Association (MEIBA)

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• Netherlands The Association of Dutch IB World Schools • Spain Asociacion de Colegios BI en Espana (ACBIE) • Sweden The Association of Swedish IB Schools (ASIB) • United Kingdom The IB Schools and Colleges Association (IBSCA )

Associations of IB World Schools • Denmark The Danish Association of IB Schools

• Portugal IB Schools in Portugal

• Finland Association of Finnish IB Schools (AFIB)

• Southern Africa IB Schools in Southern Africa (IBASA)

• Greece IB Schools in Greece Association (IBSIGA)

• Switzerland Swiss Group of International Schools (SGIS)

• Norway Norwegian IB Schools (NIBS)

• Turkey IB Schools in Turkey

• Poland IB Schools Association in Poland

Contact details are available on the IBAEM regional website for your school to become a member of the relevant association.

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Programme Regional Conference 2012 Madrid