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All items can be purchased from the IDF online shop or requested from wdd@idf.org. 

http://shop.idf.org/catalog/



http://www.worlddiabetesday.org/merchandise

You will find the answer in this user-friendly reference guide that has been compiled to inspire and engage, and facilitate a unified global campaign across all regions and countries. This guide will help you with the planning, promotion and execution of your World Diabetes Day activity. www.worlddiabetesday.org

World Diabetes Day Campaign Book

How can YOU mark World Diabetes Day?

Campaign book

Get Inspired!

The World Diabetes Day Campaign Book

“I look forward to your continued support to take World Diabetes Day to the next level. No matter where you are, it’s your efforts and your hard work that make World Diabetes Day a truly global, grassroots campaign. Because of you and the events you organize, diabetes is put in the international spotlight. Therefore I count on you to have a positive impact - not only on the lives of people with diabetes, but those who are at risk of developing the disease. We are united for diabetes, we’re in this together.” Jean Claude Mbanya President 2009-2012, International Diabetes Federation

Introduction

Introduction Every year on November 14, World Diabetes Day unites the global diabetes community to produce a powerful voice for diabetes awareness and advocacy, engaging individuals and communities to bring the diabetes epidemic into the public spotlight. The campaign is a truly global celebration that brings together millions of people in over 160 countries to raise awareness of diabetes and advocate for improved diabetes care and prevention. The World Diabetes Day 2012 campaign marks the fourth year of the International Diabetes Federation's five-year focus on "Diabetes education and prevention," the theme chosen for the period 2009-2013.Following the United Nations Summit on NCDs in 2011, there is an urgent need to continue and strengthen the momentum generated by the event and widen the awareness of the factors responsible for the global diabetes and NCD epidemic and the solution that are required to counter it. It is important to appeal to the hearts of concerned individuals and the general public to achieve these goals. The success of the campaign is built on the dedicated grassroots efforts of diabetes representative organizations, healthcare professionals, healthcare authorities, industry partners, and individuals who want to make a difference. No matter how small, every contribution makes a difference in the fight against the diabetes epidemic that currently affects 366 million people around the world. What can you do to mark World Diabetes Day? You’ll find the answer in this user-friendly reference guide that we’ve compiled to inspire and engage, and facilitate a unified global campaign across all regions and countries. The guide will help you with the planning, promotion and execution of your WDD activity. The document consists of three sections: Introduction, WDD activities, and WDD resources. The activity section includes different WDD activities that can be organized to suit different target groups. Each activity includes a description, a check-list, suggestions on how to promote your event locally, how IDF can help promote your activity, which WDD materials are available to help you organize your event, and how you can share your success with others. The resources section includes a selection of documents with information that has been developed to help you organize a WDD event: from key facts about the campaign, media guidelines, and campaign tools, to how to order WDD materials and merchandize, and how to use the Virtual Museum. If you require any additional information or have any questions or comments about the information included in this document, please contact the WDD team at wdd@idf.org. We wish you a very successful World Diabetes Day campaign! Together we can make a difference. The WDD team

Introduction

About World Diabetes Day When does World Diabetes Day take place? World Diabetes Day takes place on 14 November every year. The date was chosen because it marks the birthday of Frederick Banting, who, along with Charles Best, is credited with the discovery of insulin in 1921. While many events take place on or around the day itself, a themed campaign runs throughout the year.

How did it all begin? World Diabetes Day was introduced by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and the World Health Organization (WHO) in 1991, in response to concern over the escalating incidence of diabetes around the world. Since then, the event has grown in popularity every year.

United Nations World Day World Diabetes Day is now an official United Nations World Health Day. On 20 December 2006, the UN General Assembly passed resolution 61/225, which designated the existing World Diabetes Day as an official world day beginning in 2007. This landmark resolution also recognized diabetes as “a chronic, debilitating and costly disease associated with major complications that pose severe risks for families, countries and the entire world.”

Where does it take place? World Diabetes Day is celebrated worldwide. It brings together millions of people in over 160 countries to raise awareness of diabetes, including children and adults affected by diabetes, healthcare professionals, healthcare decision-makers and the media. Numerous local and national events are organized by the member associations of the International Diabetes Federation and by other diabetes representative organizations, healthcare professionals, healthcare authorities, and individuals who want to make a difference. World Diabetes Day unites the global diabetes community to produce a powerful voice for diabetes awareness.

How is it marked? IDF member associations and partners develop an extensive range of activities, tailored to a variety of groups. Activities that are organized every year include: 

Lighting in blue – the colour of the diabetes circle - of monuments and

buildings. Walks and cycle rides

Radio and television programmes

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Sports events Public screenings for diabetes and its complications

Introduction

Public information meetings

    

Poster and leaflet campaigns Diabetes workshops and exhibitions Press conferences Newspaper and magazine articles Events for children and adolescents

Introduction

WDD 2012 – Diabetes: Protect our Future The World Diabetes Day 2012 campaign marks the fourth year of the five-year focus on “Diabetes education and prevention.” Following the United Nations Summit on NCDs in 2011, there is an urgent need to continue and strengthen the momentum generated by the event and widen the awareness of the factors responsible for the global diabetes and NCD epidemic and the solutions that are required to counter it. It is important to appeal to the hearts of concerned individuals and the general public to achieve these goals. The World Diabetes Day 2012 campaign will link the urgent need for action to the protection of the health of our future generations. Particular focus will be placed on highlighting the importance of education - for health professionals, people with diabetes and people at risk – in reducing the impact of diabetes throughout the world. The campaign aims to EDUCATE, ENGAGE and EMPOWER youth and the general public on diabetes. The slogan chosen for the campaign is: DIABETES: PROTECT OUR FUTURE The 2012 campaign will have a special focus on children and young people as the driving force for the promotion and dissemination of education and prevention messages that we hope will inspire and engage local communities to recognise the importance of early awareness of the risks and dangers of diabetes. The aim is to build awareness among children and young people of the warning signs and risk factors for diabetes and that in many cases type 2 diabetes can be prevented through healthy eating and physical activity. The three key messages of the campaign are:   

Access to essential education for everyone The way we live is putting our health at risk People with diabetes face stigma and discrimination

Calls to Action and Activities

Calls to Action and Activities

Blue Monument Challenge Description A great way of raising awareness of diabetes and World Diabetes Day in your village, town or city is by lighting iconic buildings and sites in the colour of the blue circle, the global symbol for diabetes, the central component of the World Diabetes Day campaign logo. The logo can also be projected onto the building. A key aspect of the Monument Challenge is strengthening the link of the blue lightings with diabetes and World Diabetes Day, and using this platform to communicate the campaign key messages to the general public and media. We are encouraging the organization of physical activity events in conjunction with the blue lighting of iconic monuments and buildings. The lightings offer the perfect scenario to organize activities which promote physical activity – for example a walk, an aerobics workout, or dancing – to encourage people with diabetes, those at risk, and the general public to take control of diabetes and their health, and convey a positive and empowering message. To highlight the benefits of physical activity in managing diabetes, people with diabetes could measure their blood glucose before and after the exercise. The blue monument challenge is the perfect opportunity to involve local authorities, celebrities, and the media. A ceremony could be organized around the activity, and local authorities or celebrities could be invited to speak and share their personal experiences with the public. We recommend programming the lightings on the weekend of November 12-13; this way the media will be able to have images of the lightings for use in WDD-related stories printed or broadcast on November 14.

Checklist 

Identify the building or monument to be lit in blue and contact the people responsible for the building to request the lighting. See our WDD lighting guide for more details.

Identify an area near the building where the exercise event could take place.

Identify an area where signatures for the Charter of Rights and Responsibilities for People with Diabetes can be collected.

See the section on physical activity events and blood glucose testing for more information on how to organize the exercise activity.

Calls to Action and Activities

Identify technical requirements for your event – lighting equipment, audiovisual requirements, etc. You may also require a stage.

Identify who is going to participate in the lighting ceremony and send invitations.

Identify with the local authorities (e.g. police) what permits are required, and consider safety issues.

Identify a professional photographer or someone within your organization that could take pictures of the lighting. Be aware that night shots require special equipment and skills.

Consider a registration area for those who wish to participate in the exercise/blood glucose test event.

Order WDD promotional items and copies of the Charter of Rights from the IDF Online Shop.

How can I promote my event locally? Prior to the lighting, contact local media and let them know about the event, what is happening and why, and who will be attending (local authorities and/or celebrities). Prepare a press release for local and national media. Send media and photo call alerts. Promote the event on local websites, and in local community centres, health centres, pharmacies, etc. An example of a press release and tips on how to contact local media can be found in the Resources Section. If you have a website or webpage, create a WDD section where you can include news updates and information about the event.

How can IDF support my event? If you secure a lighting, please communicate it to the IDF Executive Office – communications@idf.org. Lightings will be promoted in the IDF newsletter and on the WDD Twitter and Facebook pages. All lightings are listed on the WDD website.

What WDD materials can I use in my event? 

WDD posters

WDD merchandising items: pins, flags, bracelets, waist measuring tape.

Campaign videos and audio podcasts.

Online platforms: WDD website, social networks

Calls to Action and Activities

Share the success of your event with others 1. Include a report of your event in the WDD section of your website and send a copy to the IDF Executive Office. 2. If you have high quality photos of the building and monuments lit up in blue the same day of your event please send them as soon as practical to the IDF Executive Office as global media contacts might request images. Photos can also be uploaded in the WDD group on Flickr. 3. Share video footage of your event with the diabetes community through the World Diabetes Day YouTube channel and participative video website. 4. Share photos and key achievements with members of your organization, authorities and celebrities that were involved in the day. Thank them and invite them to take part next year.

Calls to Action and Activities

Flash Mob Description Raise diabetes awareness in your town or city by organising a flash mob for World Diabetes Day! A flash mob is a group who organize themselves, using electronic media such as cell phones or the internet, to gather together in a public place, behave in a predetermined manner for a predetermined amount of time, and then quickly disperse. Help us make this a coordinated global celebration by getting your friends, families and colleagues together on 13 or 14 November and organising a special World Diabetes Day performance in a local square, commercial centre or other public place in your area. You could dance, do a physical activity (eg. jumping, exercising), form a blue circle, or just shout out awareness messages to alert the public on the urgent need to act on diabetes for a healthier future. We invite you to:   

Use the blue circle as the theme of your performance Wear blue Use the key messages of the World Diabetes Day 2012 campaign

View some examples of World Diabetes Day flash mobs that have been organised around the world: [insert link]

Checklist 

     

Identify a suitable location in your town, city or neighbourhood to perform the flash mob. You should choose a place where you are most likely to attract public attention (e.g. a public square, shopping mall, train station, airport). Enquire if any authorisation is required to make a public performance in the desired location. Develop a routine to perform using the blue circle or the colour blue. You could do a dance to the tune of a well-known pop song or an aerobic activity. See what IDF staff performed last year: [insert link]. Get as many people as possible to participate by promoting your flash mob online and through social media. Practice your routine in the days or weeks preceding the performance. Have someone video your flash mob so that you can share it with the world Submit your flash mob details at www.worlddiabetesday.org

Calls to Action and Activities

What WDD materials can I use?    

Blue circle pin Blue circle bracelet World Diabetes Day flag Blue circle t-shirts

See our merchandise section for more information about these items.

Calls to Action and Activities

Human Blue Circles Description The formation of human blue circles is a simple activity with a great visual impact that can be organized as an individual activity or as part of a bigger event. It can be organized within a company, school, college, university, with members of a local organization, or just a group of friends. Human blue circles are a simple and fun activity to organize in a school. To do so contact the school principle or nurse and explain the meaning of World Diabetes Day and the blue circle, the importance of diabetes prevention, and how organizing an activity like a human blue circle can encourage children to be more active, while raising awareness of one of the most common chronic conditions affecting children. To organize a human blue circle in your workplace with your colleagues, contact your HR department and explain how such an activity can raise awareness of diabetes, and promote diabetes prevention and a healthy lifestyle among staff. Colleagues could also receive blue measuring tapes to raise awareness of the link between waist circumference and the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

Checklist 

Identify the location where the human blue circle will be formed.

Check with local authorities (e.g. police) if a permit is required.

Plan in advance the size of the circle and estimate the number of people needed.

Print or obtain blue t-shirts, raincoats, balloons, or prepare pieces of blue cardboard that people can hold in the air. Blue umbrellas are an appropriate choice if the weather conditions are a concern.

Order blue measuring tapes, blue circle stickers, and other WDD promotional items from the IDF Online Shop.

Identify a professional photographer or someone within your organization that could take pictures. In order to capture the full visual impact of this activity, it is recommended to take the pictures from a height (e.g. top of a building). You may need to hire a crane to get the best effect. If so, always keep safety in mind.

Share information about the WDD theme with participants. Prepare some flyers with information.

Calls to Action and Activities 

Prepare a small speech with key points on WDD, and thank the participants.

How can I promote my event? You can promote this activity on local community websites. If you are organizing a human blue circle within your company, school or university, prepare posters and leaflets with information about the activity (what, where and why) and the meaning of the blue circle. Use social media to promote the activity.

How can IDF support my event? Please include information about your event in the WDD events calendar. Local media may check the calendar for information about what is happening on World Diabetes Day in their area. Some events are also mentioned in the WDD newsletter, and in WDD social media (Twitter, Facebook).

What WDD materials can I use? 

Blue measuring tapes

WDD posters (see WDD posters section).

WDD merchandising items: pins, bracelets, measuring tapes, flags.

Online platforms: WDD website, social networks

Share the success of your event with others 1. Include information on your website blog or social network group. 2. Send images of your human blue circle with information on why it was organized to local community websites, media and social networks. 3. If you have high quality photos of the human blue circle, please upload them to the WDD group in Flickr. 4. If you have video footage of the day, you can share it with the diabetes community through the World Diabetes Day YouTube channel. 5. Share photos and key achievements with the participants and ask them to take part next year.

Calls to Action and Activities

Wear blue Description Wearing blue is a very popular activitywhich allows individuals to individuals to participate in the WDD campaign by themselves or as part of a group. Ask your friends and family, and colleagues at work to also join in. One key aspect of this activity is to highlight the meaning of the blue colour and promote the blue circle, the global symbol of diabetes and logo of the World Diabetes Day campaign. You could do this by wearing the blue circle pin or bracelet.

Checklist 

Send a message to your target group asking them to dress in blue on November 14. You could include information about WDD, the campaign theme and key messages, and information about the blue circle, the symbol of diabetes.

Identify a place to get together on November 14. This will provide the opportunity to meet, share stories and take photographs.

Order blue circle pins and/or bracelets from the IDF online shop.

Take photographs on the day with the people participating in your event. You may also want to do a small speech about WDD.

How can I promote my event? In the workplace: request support from your communications or PR department to promote the event and encourage other staff to take part. You can also include information on the office notice board, in the cafeteria, on the office intranet, or bring it up at your staff meeting. Schools, universities, social clubs and associations: create a promotional poster to put on display online and offline; promote the activity among friends, fellow students, and members through social networks. You can also send fun messages to your friends and family. Use the WDD logo and WDD pictures from the WDD Flickr group to prepare your messages. Ask your Facebook friends and Twitter followers to wear blue in November.

Calls to Action and Activities

How can IDF support my event? Download the WDD logo in over 60 different languages from the World Diabetes Day website. Use the pictures available in the WDD Flickr group and create your messages with information available on the website. Don’t forget to include the information in the WDD online events calendar, your images in the WDD Flickr group, and your videos on the World Diabetes Day YouTube Channel.

What WDD materials can I use? 

WDD posters (see WDD posters section).

WDD merchandising items: pins, bracelets, flags.

Online platforms: WDD website, Facebook, Twitter

Share the success of your event with others 1. Include information in your website blog or social network group. 2. Share images of you or your colleagues and friends dressed in blue within your organization, on local community websites, media, social networks, and friends and family. 3. Upload your photos to the WDD group on Flickr. 4. Upload videos to the WDD YouTube Channel. 5. Share photos and key achievements with participants and ask them to take part next year in this or other WDD activities.

Calls to Action and Activities

Promote the diabetes symbol Description Promote the blue circle, the global symbol for diabetes, and/or integrate the colour blue (pantone colour 279 or as near as possible) into your local diabetes and WDD promotional materials, activities, and communications. Make the blue circle and/or blue colour a key component of your WDD activities. The circle symbolizes the unity of the diabetes community in response to the diabetes pandemic. You can: 

Download the World Diabetes Day logo - available in over 60 languages – from www.worlddiabetesday.org.

Purchase the blue circle pin from the IDF online shop.

Request blue circle stickers from wdd@idf.org.

See the Logo Guidelines for information on how the blue circle can be used in promotional materials and activities.

Checklist 

Identify elements where you could include the blue circle.

Download the logo in your local language from the WDD website, or translate it if your language is not available.

Order pins, stickers, and other promotional items from the IDF online shop.

Prepare a short pitch about WDD and the blue circle for people that will be raising awareness of the campaign in your area.

How can I promote the blue circle? There are many ways you can promote the WDD logo for World Diabetes Day. It can be incorporated into a variety of promotional elements - banners, t-shirts, balloons - and included in online and print materials such as emails, letterheads, and press releases. The blue circle can also be promoted by local personalities such as professional athletes, who can wear the symbol on their clothing or equipment. Ask a local celebrity to wear the pin or contact your local TV channel and ask them if their newsreaders could wear it.

Calls to Action and Activities

How can IDF support me? The WDD logo is available in over 60 languages. Visit the WDD website to see if your language is available. If not, don‟t worry, just send the translation of the text below to the WDD team and we will provide you will the logo in your language. Text to be translated in your local language: 

World Diabetes Day

November 14

Send your request to wdd@idf.org.

What IDF Materials can I use? 

WDD Logo - visit www.worlddiabetesday.org to download the logo in your language.

WDD promotional items: pins, flags, candles, stickers, measuring tape.

WDD posters and other material.

Share your success with others The WDD team is eager to receive examples of how the blue circle is used around the world. All copies received will be included in our WDD archives. Please send examples of any materials featuring the blue circle to: International Diabetes Federation Communications Unit 166 Chaussée de la Hulpe B-1170 Brussels Belgium Email: communications@idf.org

Calls to Action and Activities

Pin a Personality Description To many people around the world the blue circle means nothing. Help us change that by making the blue circle the universally recognized symbol of diabetes awareness. Join our PIN A PERSONALITY campaign by taking a picture of a personality with the blue circle pin. How to choose a pinable personality? Your personality can be anyone who you think would profile our blue circle to a wider audience or contribute to IDF’s mission of promoting diabetes care, prevention and a cure worldwide. Your personality could be a:     

Local celebrity Politician or decision-maker Teacher Health professional Fitness instructor

Checklist     

Identify a local personality in your town, city or neighbourhood that is active in promoting healthy lifestyles or diabetes in particular. Make sure you have some blue circle pins. If not, request them from wdd@idf.org. Explain the meaning of the blue circle - www.idf.org/bluecircle - to the personality that you want to pin. Take a picture of the personality wearing the pin with a camera, mobile phone or other device. Upload the photo to the World Diabetes Day Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/pages/World-Diabetes-Day/67935817021 - or on Twitter using #WDDPin by November 14. Include a short sentence explaining who your chosen personality is.

Calls to Action and Activities

World Diabetes Day Heroes Description World Diabetes Day heroes are individuals that are active in promoting the diabetes cause or engaging, motivating and leading others to take steps toward adopting a healthy lifestyle. Help inspire the 366 million people with diabetes around the world by nominating a person or group of people that you feel deserve to be called World Diabetes Day hero. All WDD heroes are profiled on a dedicated section on the World Diabetes Day website – www.worlddiabetesday.org – and receive a “Show your Outrage” tshirt, blue circle bracelet and blue circle pin.

Checklist    

Identify an individual or group that fit the criteria to be considered a World Diabetes Day hero. Write a short text (max. 1 page) describing your nominee and why the person should be a WDD hero. Submit your text online at www.idf.org/worlddiabetesday/heroes/nominate-your-hero Send a picture of your hero to wdd@idf.org

Resources

Resources

WDD Logo The World Diabetes Day logo is the blue circle - the global symbol for diabetes - which was developed as part of the Unite for Diabetes awareness campaign. The logo was adopted in 2007 to mark the passage of the United Nations World Diabetes Day Resolution. It is a simple icon that can be easily adapted and widely adopted. The circle symbolizes life and health. The colour blue reflects the sky that unites all nations. Circles occur frequently in nature, and thus have been widely employed since the dawn of humankind. Most significantly for World Diabetes Day, the circle symbolizes unity. The combined strength of the global diabetes community in response to the diabetes pandemic is the key element that makes World Diabetes Day so special. The simplicity of the symbol facilitates its widespread use by anyone who wishes to support the campaign. It is so easy-to-use that a child could draw it with a crayon. By using the World Diabetes Day logo you can help establish the diabetes circle as a global icon for diabetes. The World Diabetes Day logo is available in over 60 languages. Join the campaign The International Diabetes Federation welcomes the widespread use of the World Diabetes Day logo in order to raise awareness of diabetes and establish the blue circle as the global symbol for diabetes. On request, IDF member associations, corporate partners and other individuals and organizations are permitted to use the logo in promotional documents and official publications. Written permission must be obtained from the IDF Executive Office prior to publication. This is applicable for any communications, including press releases, publications, oral presentations, websites, etc. To request permission to use the WDD logo, contact wdd@idf.org.

Resources

Blue Circle Test

Description The Blue Circle Test allows individuals to learn about their risk of type 2 diabetes and how to start taking control of their lifestyle. The Blue Circle Test consists of an online and offline component. The online version is an interactive test that showcases the risk factors of type 2 diabetes and displays the positive actions that can be taken to reduce a person’s risk. Users are confronted with one or more fictitious characters at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The aim is to reduce a character's risk by eliminating risk factors and adding positive actions. With each action, the user will be informed in an informal way on the hows and whys. The online Blue Circle Test is available at www.worlddiabetesday.org/bluecircletest. Organizations and individuals are encouraged to include the Blue Circle Test on their websites or webpages, or to promote the test by linking to it. The online version can also be part of a WDD event encouraging people to take the test and learn about the risks of developing type 2 diabetes.

Checklist 

Arrange for the online Blue Circle Test to be included on your website. Promote the test among your users/members

Include promotional banners of the test on your homepage

If the test is going to be promoted at a WDD event, arrange to have a computer and electricity supply. Before making the online test available for

Resources people at an event and, in case there are any questions, become familiar with the test and the different options.

How can I promote my event locally? 

If you include the online blue circle test on your website, contact health professionals, health and lifestyle websites and local media explaining what the aim of the test is. Ask for support to promote the test in order to raise awareness of diabetes and encourage people at risk to take control of their health.

How IDF can support my event? The application can be downloaded at www.worlddiabetesday.org/bluecircletest.

What WDD materials can I use? 

Online Blue Circle Test

WDD promotional banners

Diabetes Facts

WDD logo

Share the success of my event with others IDF registers the number of times that the test is taken wherever the application is hosted, and displaying the total on a web counter. We therefore encourage widespread promotion of the online test. Your success is our success.

Resources

Measure your risk of type 2 diabetes

Description The offline version of the Blue Circle Test consists of a special blue World Diabetes Day measuring tape for use in World Diabetes Day grassroots activities all over the world. The tape will include information on the links between waist circumference and the risk of type 2 diabetes. We encourage all those organizing WDD events to distribute the blue measuring tapes among participants. They can also be used in popular activities like mass screenings. Organizations are also encouraged to distribute the tapes among the general public in busy areas of the city or town, raising awareness of diabetes and World Diabetes Day among all those with little or no knowledge about the condition and the campaign. More information on how to use the offline version of the Blue Circle Test and order the tape can be found in the resource section of this guide. The blue waist measuring tapes can be ordered from the IDF online shop – http://shop.idf.org.

Checklist 

Identify activities at which the blue circle test could be distributed.

Print and distribute instructions on how to use the blue circle test for those distributing the measuring tapes.

If you are distributing the test in your town or city and this is not linked to any other WDD activity, check with your local authorities (eg. police) if any permits are required. Choose an area where there is a constant flow of people, eg. a shopping mall.

Order the blue circle test from IDF. See how to order WDD materials in the resource section

How can I promote my event locally? 

Promote the event in local websites, local community centres, local health centres, pharmacies, etc.

Resources 

Send a media alert to your local newspapers, TV channels and radio stations explaining what the test is about, and inviting the public to come and measure their risk of diabetes.

How IDF can support my event? The measuring tapes can be ordered from IDF at wdd@idf.org. Depending on the quantity requested, a fee may be charged to cover postage.

What WDD materials can I use? 

Blue Circle Test (Measuring Tape)

WDD posters

Other WDD merchandise eg. flags, pins and stickers with the WDD logo.

Share the success of my event with others Why not track the number of people that received the measuring tape, measured their waist, and were referred to their healthcare provider. This could provide a good opportunity for engaging the media in communicating this information. Don’t forget to share the details of your event with IDF, as we are eager to receive information about what is organized around the world for WDD. Send your information and pictures to wdd@idf.org.

Resources

Glycaemic Index Wheel

Description A well-balanced diet containing a variety of foods in appropriate portions, high in carbohydrate and low in saturated fat and sodium, combined with regular physical activity, is key to healthy outcomes and a very important part of preventing, treating and managing diabetes. Foods contain several important nutrients, one of which is carbohydrate. There are several ways of measuring the type of carbohydrate in foods. One way is the Glycaemic Index (GI). The GI system classifies carbohydrates according to how fast they raise glucose levels in the blood. In simple terms, a food with a high GI raises blood glucose faster than a food with a low GI. The Glycaemic Index could be used as well as other meal-planning systems such as carbohydrate counting. Monitoring blood glucose levels can help people with diabetes understand how various carbohydrate foods with different GIs affect their blood glucose levels. The International Diabetes Federation has developed a special application to raise awareness of the Glycaemic Index and the various nutritional components that make up a healthy and well-balanced diet. The Glycaemic Index Wheel and Healthy Food Plate displays a variety of foods, divided by food group, with an indication of their respective GI values and whether the food causes a slow, medium or rapid rise in blood glucose levels. The online Glycaemic Index Wheel and Healthy Food Plate is available at www.idf.org/wdd-glycemicwheel/app. Individuals are organisations are encouraged to include the application on their website or webpages, or to promote the Wheel by linking to it. The application can also be part of a World Diabetes Day event that focuses on healthy nutrition.

Resources The Glycaemic Index Wheel and Healthy Food Plate is also available in print format and can requested from wdd@idf.org.

CHECKLIST  

Arrange for the online application to be included or linked to on your website. If you intend to promote the application at a public event or activity, arrange to have a computer and electricity supply. Make sure to become familiar with the application before promoting it.

Resources

IDF Resources for Health Professionals Diabetes Education International Curriculum for Diabetes Health Professional Education Published in 2008, the Curriculum is an important step towards implementing a model of diabetes care delivered by an appropriately educated interdisciplinary team, the Curriculum is designed to meet the needs of local health professionals, institutions and organizations. It was originally developed in response to the need for health professionals to have specialised, evidenced-based training in diabetes education. A comprehensive curriculum is fundamental to the education of well prepared and clinically effective diabetes educators. The Curriculum can be adapted to suit local contexts. The Curriculum is available for download at www.idf.org/education. Diabetes Education Modules Published in 2011, the Diabetes Education Modules can be used as a foundation to develop health professional education programmes. They consist of more than 800 slides and detailed speaker notes to reflect the objectives contained in the International Curriculum f or Health Professionals Education. Health professionals anywhere in the world can adopt this resource to develop diabetes education programmes for other health professionals. The consistent, evidence-based research and information provided are designed to help educators gain recognition for their training and assure governments and education organisations that the education programmes they offer are of a high standard. The Modules are available in six languages and can be downloaded at www.idf.org/education.

Diabetes Prevention IDF Consensus on Type 2 Diabetes Prevention Early intervention and the avoidance or delay of progression to type 2 diabetes is of enormous benefit to individuals in terms of increasing life expectancy and quality of life, and potentially in economic terms for society and health-care payers. The IDF

Resources

strategy for the prevention of type 2 diabetes is based on controlling modifiable risk factors and can be divided into two target groups:  

People at a high risk of developing type 2 diabetes The entire population

The Consensus is available for download at www.idf.org/diabetes-prevention.

Resources

Social Media

Facebook Follow the campaign daily by becoming a fan of one of our World Diabetes Day pages:   

World Diabetes Day Día Mundial de la Diabetes Journée Mondiale de Diabète

Twitter Follow @WDD on http://twitter.com/wdd - #WDD, #WDDgoblue, #14Nov, #WDD2012, #WDDPin, #BlueCircle, #protectourfuture,#diabetes, #WDDHeroes, #WDDChampion

YouTube Our World Diabetes Day Channel showcases campaign-related videos from around the world. Upload your own video or visit the channel to get inspired:

Flickr Thousands of photos at your disposal in our World Diabetes Day group to see how WDD is celebrated around the world.

Resources

Merchandise

The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) has produced a selection of promotional items for use in World Diabetes Day awareness events:

Awareness bracelet Blue silicon awareness bracelets with the slogan 'Act on Diabetes. Now.' printed on the outside. Available to order in packs of 10. Flag Show your support for World Diabetes Day by displaying the World Diabetes Day flag. The flag displays the World Diabetes Day logo, the date and the website URL. Size: 1.5x1m (5x3 ft). Available in Arabic, English, French and Spanish. Pin Show your support for World Diabetes Day by wearing the blue circle, the global symbol for diabetes. Help spread awareness of diabetes by wearing the pin. Available to order in packs of 10. T-shirts T-shirts promoting the blue circle are available to order in various colours from our World Diabetes Day online store. Waist measuring tape Special blue waist measuring tape produced to raise awareness of the link between waist circumference and the risk of type 2 diabetes. The tape displays information in seven languages: Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Hindi, Russian and Spanish. Order. Length: 140cm/55in Material: reinforced paper These items can be purchased from the IDF online shop and the WDD online store.

Facts & Figures

Facts & Figures

ABOUT DIABETES Diabetes is a chronic disease that arises when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin, or when the body cannot effectively use the insulin it produces. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas that enables cells to take in glucose from the blood and use it for energy. Failure of insulin production, insulin action or both leads to raised glucose levels in the blood (hyperglycaemia). This is associated with long-term damage to the body and the failure of various organs and tissues. There are two main types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease characterized by the destruction of the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. Consequently, people with type 1 diabetes produce very little or no insulin and must take insulin to survive. Type 1 diabetes, which used to be called juvenile-onset diabetes, is most commonly diagnosed in children and young adults. Type 2 diabetes is marked by insulin resistance. People with type 2 diabetes cannot use the insulin that they produce effectively. They can often manage their condition through exercise and diet. However, in many cases oral drugs are needed and often insulin is required. Type 2 diabetes accounts for over 90% of the more than 300 million people living with diabetes worldwide. Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are serious. A third type of diabetes is Gestational diabetes (GDM), a condition in which women without previously diagnosed diabetes have high blood glucose levels during their pregnancy. GDM affects about 4% of all pregnant women. It has few symptoms and usually disappears when the pregnancy ends. Women who had GDM have a significantly increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. According to the latest data released by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), diabetes now affects over 360 million people worldwide. If nothing is done to reverse the epidemic, IDF predicts that by 2030, more than 500 million people will live with the disease. For more information about diabetes, visit www.idf.org . For more information about diabetes prevalence, visit www.diabetesatlas.org.

Facts & Figures

Understand Diabetes: Know the Warning Signs The warning signs* of diabetes include:           

Frequent urination Excessive thirst Increased hunger Weight loss Tiredness Lack of interest and concentration Vomiting and stomach pain (often mistaken as the flu) A tingling sensation or numbness in the hands or feet Blurred vision Frequent infections Slow-healing wounds

*These can be mild or absent in people with type 2 diabetes.

Understand Type 2 Diabetes: Know the Risk Factors There are many risk factors for type 2 diabetes. They include:         

Obesity and overweight Lack of exercise Previously identified glucose intolerance Unhealthy diet Increased age High blood pressure and high cholesterol A family history of diabetes A history of gestational diabetes Ethnicity - higher rates of diabetes have been reported in Asians, Hispanics, Indigenous people s (USA, Canada, Australia) and African Americans.

Facts & Figures

A Global Burden Source: IDF Diabetes Atlas Fifth Edition, International Diabetes Federation 2011        

366 million people have diabetes; by 2030 this total will have risen to 552 million The number of people with type 2 diabetes is increasing in every country 80% of people with diabetes live in low-and middle-income countries The greatest number of people with diabetes are between 40 to 59 years of age 183 million people (50%) with diabetes are undiagnosed Diabetes caused 4.6 million deaths in 2011 Diabetes caused at least USD 465 billion dollars in healthcare expenditures in 2011; 11% of total healthcare expenditures in adults (20-79 years) 78,000 children develop type 1 diabetes every year

Top 10 countries (number of people with diabetes)

Facts & Figures

Top 10 countries (prevalence %)

Visit www.diabetesatlas.org for more facts and figures on diabetes.

Resources

DIABETES EDUCATION AND PREVENTION Diabetes Education Diabetes is difficult. It imposes life-long demands on people with diabetes, requiring them to make multiple decisions related to managing their condition. People with diabetes need to monitor their blood glucose, take medication, exercise regularly and adjust their eating habits. Furthermore, they may have to face issues related to living with the complications of diabetes and may be required to make considerable psychological adjustments. As outcomes are largely based on the decisions they take, it is of paramount importance that people with diabetes receive ongoing, high-quality diabetes education that is tailored to their needs and delivered by skilled health professionals. Without diabetes education, people with diabetes are less prepared to take informed decisions, make behavioural changes, address the psycho-social issues presented by diabetes and, ultimately, may be ill-equipped to manage their diabetes effectively. Poor management will result in reduced health outcomes and an increased likelihood of developing complications. The role of the diabetes educator is of critical importance within the diabetes care team. The educator enables people with diabetes to manage their diabetes-related health to the best of their ability so that choices and actions are based upon informed judgement. Diabetes education is best provided by a multidisciplinary team. While multidisciplinary education is available in some countries, in many others it is not available and its value is not fully recognized by the medical profession.

Primary Prevention of Diabetes At present, type 1 diabetes cannot be prevented. The environmental triggers that are thought to generate the process that results in the destruction of the bodyâ€&#x;s insulin-producing cells are still under investigation. Type 2 diabetes, however, can be prevented in many cases by maintaining a healthy weight and being physically active. The International Diabetes Federation proposes a simple three step plan for the prevention of type 2 diabetes in those at increased risk. IDF recommends that all people at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes be identified through opportunistic and self-screening. People at high risk can be easily identified through a simple questionnaire to assess risk factors such as age, waist circumference, family history, cardiovascular history and gestational history.

Resources

Once identified, people at high risk of diabetes should have their plasma glucose levels measured by a health professional to detect Impaired Fasting Glucose or Impaired Glucose Tolerance, both of which indicate an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Prevention efforts should target those at risk in order to delay or avoid the onset of type 2 diabetes. There is substantial evidence that achieving a healthy body weight and moderate physical activity can help prevent the development of type 2 diabetes. In primary prevention there is an important role for the diabetes educator to help people understand the risks and set realistic goals to improve health. IDF recommends a goal of at least 30 minutes of daily exercise, such as brisk walking, swimming, cycling or dancing. Regular walking for at least 30 minutes per day, for example, has been shown to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes by 35-40%.

www.worlddiabetesday.org


World Diabetes Day Campaign Book