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Modern Food Processing

May 2010

An invite that rewards as well...

Dear Reader, ‘Modern Food Processing’ solicits original, well-written, application-oriented, unpublished articles that reflect your valuable experience and expertise in the food processing industry. You can send us Technical Articles, Case Studies and Product Write-ups. The length of the article should not exceed 3000 words, while that of a product write-up should not exceed 200 words. The articles should preferably reach us in soft copy (either E-mail or a CD). The text should be in MS Word format and images in 300 DPI resolution & JPG format. The final decision regarding the selection and publication of the articles shall rest solely with ‘Modern Food Processing’. Authors whose articles are published will receive a complimentary copy of that particular issue and an honorarium cheque. Published by Infomedia 18 Limited , ‘Modern Food Processing’ is the leading monthly magazine exclusively meant for producers and user fraternities of the food processing industry. Well supported by a national readership of over 80,000 and our strong network of 26 branch offices across India, this magazine reaches out to key decision makers among the Indian manufacturers of food processing products, machinery and allied sectors. Brought out in association with Hong Kong-based Ringier Trade Media Ltd (one of the world’s largest trade publishing houses with more than 200 special interest titles and offices in every major country), it ensures that advertisers are able to promote their products and services across the globe at no extra cost. So get going and rush your articles, write-ups, etc… Thanking you, Yours sincerely,

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Printed by Mohan Gajria and published by Lakshmi Narasimhan on behalf of Infomedia 18 Ltd and printed at Infomedia 18 Limited, Plot no.3, Sector 7, off Sion-Panvel Road, Nerul, Navi Mumbai 400 706, and published at Infomedia 18 Limited, ‘A’ Wing, Ruby House, J.K.Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai - 400 028. Modern Food Processing is registered with the Registrar of Newspapers of India under No. 14798/2005. Views and opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of Infomedia 18 Limited. Infomedia 18 Limited reserves the right to use the information published herein in any manner whatsoever. While every effort has been made to ensure accuracy of the information published in this edition, neither Infomedia 18 Limited nor any of its employees accept any responsibility for any errors or omission. Further, Infomedia 18 Limited does not take any responsibility for loss or damage incurred or suffered by any subscriber of this magazine as a result of his/her accepting any invitation/offer published in this edition. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the written permission of the publisher. All rights reserved.

Editor: Manas R Bastia

Healthy prospects

a

look at the demand drivers and the global averages, India undoubtedly has enormous potential to grow in the food processing sector. Though it sounds so simple, there are ample challenges to overcome before the country can get both the forward and backward integration right. Some of the key hurdles include new technologies to increase the life of perishable vegetables & fruits, cold storage systems and better food processing & packaging machinery. As the first step, there should be increased cooperation between the industry (especially the small and medium enterprises) and the government to develop machinery/technology as per the country’s needs. This will not only make us self-sufficient towards meeting the burgeoning domestic demand for processed foods, but also save valuable foreign currency from imports. Among the major product categories, demand for snacks machinery is likely to show robust growth. It is interesting to note here that technological developments in the global markets are primarily being driven by international legislation governing food safety, product quality and energy efficiency. In addition, foreign players are joining hands with Indian companies to take advantage of cost-competitiveness. Besides, India can meet the rising demand for affordable & reliable food processing solutions from other developing countries, to begin with. However, prior to that the Indian exporter has to successfully address the challenges arising out of increasing input and labour costs. Also, the Indian manufacturer needs to offer energy-efficient technologies and eco-friendly processes to keep margins intact apart from ensuing lower rejection rates, low-cost automation, high-speed packaging, etc. The ‘Cover Story’ section has further details on the food processing machinery sector. With consumers becoming health savvy, there is a growing preference for healthy and nutritional products these days. This trend is amply reflected by the rise in popularity of non-carbonated beverages, particularly fruit juice products in India. Other similar categories on the consumers’ mind include nectars, flavoured drinks, functional drinks, health-based beverages, etc. In this regard, the market is witnessing plentiful innovations related to product designs, pack sizes and price points. However, some of the key challenges on the way are high customs duties on imported juice concentrates, inadequate infrastructure (especially the cold chain logistics), and highly unorganised market, among others. Turn to the ‘Special Feature’ for the latest insights into this fast evolving space. The European Union (EU) is said to be considering to inspect 20 per cent of India’s aquaculture imports for antibiotics and microorganisms. The new inspection process is widely anticipated to add to the financial burden of the industry. However, as per a divergent set of views, it can be a positive step against increasing competition from other countries. See the ‘Roundtable’ for both sides of this story.

Manas R Bastia Editor manas@infomedia18.in May 2010

Modern Food Processing

11

May

CONTENTS

40

2010 26

F EAT U R ES LEADERS SPEAK “The food processing industry must invest in modern equipment and manufacturing practices” ...says Sanjay Nandrajog, CEO, FieldFresh Foods Pvt Ltd

48

36

ROUNDTABLE New EU testing norms for seafoods: Will it impact the Indian industry?

PROFILE Nichrome India Ltd: The end-to-end packaging solutions provider

26 32 36

COVER STORY Food processing machinery sector: On a roll towards a healthy future

R EGU LA R SECT IONS Editorial ................................................................11

Dairy equipment market: Integrating quality and efficiency Dr J V Parekh, founder, Parekh Technical Consultancy Services

SPECIAL FEATURE Non-carbonated beverages: Paving way for nutrition & health

40 46

48

National News ......................................................14 World News ..........................................................18 Techno Trends ......................................................24

QUALITY MANTRA Fresh food safety: More than just risk management Courtesy: The Coca-Cola Retailing Research Council Asia

52

Events Calendar....................................................61 Product Update ................................................... 68 Product Inquiry ....................................................81 Advertisement Inquiry ..........................................83 Product Index .......................................................86

RETAIL ZONE Organised retailing: The modern food trade for perishables Limji Nanabhoy, director, Agri Sciences (India) Pvt Ltd

CASE STUDY Tea packaging: A blend of attraction and efficiency Courtesy: Bosch Packaging Services AG

56 58

Advertisers’ List ....................................................88

32

52

REPORT India Packaging Show 2010: Showcasing the latest trends and innovations

65

Highlights of Next Issue Cover Story Special Feature Cover photo courtesy: Georgia Technology Research Institute

12 Modern Food Processing

May 2010

: IT & Automation in food industry : Supply Chain Management / Logistics

Note: $ stands for US dollar and £ stands for UK pound, unless mentioned otherwise

NATIONAL NEWS MARKET TRENDS

Health foods market in India to reach Rs 55,000 crore by 2015

Tata Strategic Management Group (TSMG), the management consulting INVESTMENT

FDI inflow into food processing sector increased twofold Even as the foreign direct investment (FDI) into the country declined, FDI flow in the food processing sector increased twofold in April-December 2009-10. The FDI inflow in the foodprocessing sector in the said period was Rs 937 crore, compared with Rs 455 crore in the entire 2008-09 BUSINESS STRATEGY

MTR Foods to outsource manufacturing

MTR Foods, the Bengaluru-based food processing company, is planning to utilise the services of a third-party manufacturer for the first time. The contracted plant in Mathura, which produces vermicelli, is expected to NEW LAUNCH

ITC launches Sunfeast Marie Light OATS After the success of the Sunfeast Marie Light Original and Orange, ITC Foods has launched Sunfeast Marie Light OATS - a biscuit containing oats, for the first time in India. “The new Sunfeast Marie Light Oats is enriched with the natural goodness of two

14 Modern Food Processing

firm, has reported that the potential market of health & wellness (H&W) foods in India will reach Rs 55,000 crore by 2015 - up from the current Rs 10,150 crore. TSMG underlines new product development, technological advances in ingredient introductions and regulatory support as key growth drivers of H&W food & beverages industry in India. Raju Bhinge, CEO, TSMG, said, “The global H&W foods market

estimated at $ 460 billion in 2008 has grown at twice the rate of the packaged foods market during 2002-08. With the growing awareness of lifestyle diseases in the country, Indian consumers are increasingly open to the benefits provided by H&W foods. Therein lies the mega-opportunity that Indian food & beverage companies could leverage to create large packaged food brands in India.”

fiscal. The major investors included PepsiCo Panimex investing in PepsiCo India Holdings in two installments of Rs 243 crore and Rs 244 crore each. While explaining the reason for the increase in investments, Amrit Lal Meena, joint secretary, Ministry of Food Processing Industries, said, “The fiscal benefits that have been accorded to this sector in the last five years have made this sector highly investmentfriendly. Besides, the rich agro-climatic

diversity and availability of raw materials for a longer period allows tremendous scope of processing, resulting in a huge potential in this sector.”

give it a push in the northern and eastern markets where it is trying to expand its presence. The company is also planning a capacity expansion for spices. MTR has nine plants in Bommasandra industrial area in Bengaluru, which caters to its product categories like spices & masala, beverages, vermicelli and frozen food. The company has so far produced its brands in-house. “The plant in Mathura would help us supply to

the north and eastern parts of the country. It would help us source wheat faster and also trim freight costs by six to seven per cent,” said Sanjay Sharma, CEO, MTR Foods. While MTR caters mostly to the South, products like vermicelli under its portfolio see demand from across the country. The company currently produces about 1,100 tonne of vermicelli per month. The plant would add a further 150 tonne per month to the total.

power-packed fibres – natural wheat fibre and soluble oats fibre, which keeps one light & healthy. It helps to savour the real taste of tea/coffee, on account of its non-interfering taste with the beverages,” said the company in a press release. Oats are a good source of soluble fibre, which aid in digestion, help reduce cholesterol, and are a good source of

vitamin E, zinc and iron. The introductory price of the product is Rs 10 for 147 gm, and is available across the country in all types of outlets.

May 2010

NATIONAL NEWS NEW FACILITY

Grundfos India on expansion mode

New facility of Grundfos

Grundfos Pumps India Pvt Ltd, a 100 per cent subsidiary of Grundfos Group, has inaugurated the new 7,000 sq m facility at Thoraipakkam, Chennai. The MARKET RESEARCH

Indian consumers choose healthier products, encouraging FMCG makers According to Datamonitor, healthy eating stays the right mantra for Indian consumers and the market trends stand testimony to that. Research shows that consumers are embracing healthier variants of food and beverages more than ever before, cradling wider scope for the fast moving consumer goods MEMORANDUM

AFTPAI meets union minister for food processing

A delegation of Agro & Food Processing Technology & Equipment Providers Association of India (AFTPAI) led by FOOD PARKS

Orissa to get a mega food park and marine food park Government of India is likely to set up a mega food park and a marine food park over a 282 acre area at Malipara near Khurda, Orissa. Subodh Kant Sahai, union minister for food processing, announced this while responding to a demand raised by Naveen Patnaik, chief minister, Orissa, at the Orissa Investors Meet 2010.

facility was constructed in a record time of 11 months with an investment of Rs 17.6 crore. This new facility boasts of sophisticated material handling equipment needed to handle pumps and components in manufacturing, assembly & storage operations, and houses an office area of 1,000 sq m. The new facility has a test bed capacity that is built to 300 KW, and the entire load is well supported by back-up power, which will help in the testing

of large pumps used for massive infrastructure projects. On the occasion, Carlo Prola, senior vice president, Grundfos Group, said, “India is one of the most important overseas markets for the company in the Asia – Pacific region. The expansion of the Chennai based facility further strengthens our capabilities to adapt to the local market and signifies our commitment to long-term business operations in India.”

(FMCG) markets in India. “Consumers are increasingly becoming sensitised as the initial skepticism over veracity of these claims is slowly, yet steadily getting subdued,” commented Pinaki Mukherjee, lead consultant, Datamonitor India Consumer Markets. With the lifestyle of typical urban Indians becoming more hectic, they are proactively seeking information and resources to help them stay healthy in course of their increasing mental and

physical stress. Owing to their emphasis on a healthy diet, food and beverages with health and wellness positioning are showing significant adoption among consumers.

Sanjeev Gupta, president of AFTPAI & managing director of Kanchan Metals, and Manoj Paul, vice president of AFTPAI & country head of Heat & Control, recently met the Union minister for food processing industries, Subodh Kant Sahai, to present a memorandum for accelerating growth of the food processing industry in the country. All major members of the association were present in the delegation, informed Firoz H Naqvi, honorary secretary, AFTPAI.

The union minister showed a keen interest and informed the delegates to conduct a conference with the ministry official on all tax- and incentive-related projects. Sahai also accepted that, finance by the bankers to the food processing companies remains a major hurdle in the growth. He asked the association to provide regular feedbacks on financerelated issues, development-related issues and problems faced by the food processing companies.

Addressing the conference jointly organised by the Indian Chamber of Commerce (ICC), Ministry of Food Processing Industries (MoFPI) and the state government, Sahai said that Orissa is one of the major agriculture producing states, but is still way behind other states like Kerala, Gujarat and Maharashtra in food processing, making Orissa a natural contender for the mega food park.

Subodh Kant Sahai

Sahai added, “With suitable policy intervention, investment and use of latest technology, the country can achieve its agricultural growth target.”

May 2010

Modern Food Processing

15

NATIONAL NEWS SPORTS DRINK

PepsiCo launches Gatorade Sports Mix powder

PepsiCo India has entered the powder category with the launch of Gatorade EVENT

International Food & Drink Expo India to be held in December The second edition of International Food & Drink Expo India 2010 will take place during December 2-4, 2010, at the Pragati Maidan Exhibition Grounds, Delhi. The launch show in December 2009 saw participation not only from India but also from other countries like the US, Australia, China, France, Italy, Spain, Thailand, etc. Some of key attendees in 2009 included representatives from Air AGRICULTURAL FAIR

Manipur agri fair shows new techniques & products

To showcase new agricultural techniques, organic products and equipment, an agricultural fair was held at the premises NEW MOVE

India first Asian nation to join OIV India will be the first Asian country to be accepted as a member of the Parisbased Organisation Internationale de la Vigne et du Vin (OIV), according to Dott Federico Castellucci, director general of the premier international organisation having only government bodies as members.

16 Modern Food Processing

Sports Mix in March 2010. “Gatorade, one of the world’s leading sports drinks, is quickly becoming popular with the sport and fitness loving Indian youth. Gatorade’s scientifically researched isotonic formula helps restore fluids, electrolytes and energy, which one loses while being active and sweating,” claimed the company. The product is a ready-to-mix powder, available in lemon and

orange flavours. Gatorade can be prepared by simply adding water, is convenient and available for Rs 15 per sachet. Each sachet makes 500 ml of Gatorade. The drink is also available in liquid format in three flavours orange, lemon and blue bolt. PepsiCo plans to support the launch through heavy consumer sampling and in-store activities.

India, Reliance, Dominos, Café Coffee Day, Ikea, M&S, and Carrefour. Key features of the event will involve Chef Essentials – a new feature for 2010, an area dedicated to kitchen equipment for India’s chef community among the rest, such as cooking demonstrations. Moreover, exhibitors can show live on their stands the culinary creations with their products. Besides, in Food Industry Forum food industry professionals will discuss the latest topics facing the food industry today, etc.

On this platform, the best sommeliers in India will be tested on their theoretical and practical knowledge by a panel of wine experts as well as networking with the buyer/exhibitors where one can conduct one-to-one meetings with key buyers to inform and educate about their products.

of the Central Agricultural University (CAU) in Manipur recently. With the North-Eastern region of India long being recognised as the hub of aromatic and medicinal plants, the fair showcased organic products, equipment and agricultural techniques tailored for the climate and terrain of the northeastern states of the country. Gurbachan Jagat, governor of Manipur, explained, “Agriculture is

the main source of livelihood for the people of Manipur and the other states of the North-East region. Development of agriculture and the allied sectors, being the backbone of the economy, plays a crucial role towards the overall development of the region. The fair aims to boost scientific technology in agriculture and its allied sectors like food processing and train farmers in the same.”

Acknowledging the role played by Subhash Arora as a catalyst, Castellucci informed 105 international journalists and enologists from Italy and abroad to judge wines for the 18th Vinitaly Concorso Internazionale at Verona that OIV is looking forward to welcoming India as a full member in a few months. The by-laws of the organisation provide for a period during which the

members can raise objection to the entry of any new applicant. Government of India has taken steps to join the organisation, which would be attractive to table grape growing industry and wine making companies.

May 2010

NATIONAL NEWS NEW PRODUCT

Agro Tech unveils Sundrop Freshlite

Agro Tech Foods Ltd, an affiliate of the US-based ConAgra Foods, has launched FROZEN FOODS

Nikasu plans to open two new food processing units Nikasu Frozen foods, the Kochi-based manufacturer and exporter of ready-toeat food products, has apportioned Rs 30 crore to set up two food processing units in Uttaranchal and Jharkhand in the next two years.

FOOD POLICY

Five new mega food parks to come up in North India

Pranab Mukherjee

The union minister for food processing industries, Subodh Kant Sahai, has recently said that five new mega food parks proposed in the Union Budget are expected to come up in the Northern NEW INITIATIVES

McDonald’s unveils its web ordering site Aimed at providing convenience to its customers, McDonald’s has launched a web ordering service across India. Customers can simply log on to the website www.mcdelivery.co.in and order their favourite burgers & fries online. Abhijit Upadhye, director - National Supply Chain and New Formats, McDonald’s India, said, “At McDonald’s

Sundrop Freshlite, a new edible oil. “Sundrop-Freshlite is low in saturated fat and its good inherent stability (GIS) delays the rate of oxidation, which helps keep food fresher and longer. It will be a healthier option compared with other edible oils in this category,” claimed the company. The oil is a scientific blend of canola and sunflower oil, with the recommended ratio of Omega 6 and

Omega 3 to provide nutrition and help maintain a healthy and active lifestyle. It shares many benefits of olive oil, as it is rich in monosaturated fatty acid (MUFA). At the launch, Sachin Gopal, president and CEO, Agro Tech Foods, said, “The launch of Freshlite reflects our continued commitment to bring to the Indian market products, which are of superior quality and address the changing needs of the Indian consumer.”

The group’s turnover is approximately Rs 100 million. The company exports to the US, UK, Australia and Middle East, while its distribution channels are in Kerala, Karnataka, Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh and West Bengal within the country. The company also plans to expand its existing capacity by 100 tonne per

month and also to double its turnover in the next two years from the present Rs 10 crore to Rs 25 crore.

states of India. “Our intention is to have at least one mega food park in each state. We have covered the Southern states and now we will try to cover the northern states,” informed Sahai. Mega food parks are aimed at facilitating the processing of perishable food items backed by efficient supply chains, collection centres, primary processing centres and cold chain infrastructure. Finance minister, Pranab Mukherjee, in his Budget speech had proposed to set up five new mega food parks, aimed at boosting the food processing sector.

Ten such parks are already in the process of being set up mostly in the Southern states. With the setting up of mega food parks, the government aims to minimise wastage of fruits and vegetables, which is now pegged at a whopping Rs 50,000 crore a year. The government extends financial assistance of Rs 50 crore for setting up a mega food park. Processing of food and vegetables in India currently stands at mere 2.2 per cent and the government aims to increase it up to about 20 per cent by 2015.

we have tried and made every possible attempt to offer convenience of location to our customers and make their favourite meal available to them when and where they need. This new initiative launched across India now will undoubtedly be well received by the young net savvy consumer base, and hope to achieve additional sales of five per cent through web ordering alone.” Customers can order all menu options from the website and delivery

will be done in defined areas of radius of seven minutes at peak traffic from the nearest restaurant, so as to maintain the quality of food. A delivery charge will also be applied to every order.

May 2010

Modern Food Processing

17

WORLD NEWS EXPO

Food Safety Summit Resource Center to make debut at PACK Expo

EXPORTS

Scotch whisky survives the downturn Global exports of scotch whisky reached record levels in 2009, despite the economic downturn in some major markets, according to annual figures published by The Scotch Whisky Association (SWA). After a slow start to the year caused by trade de-stocking and weaker consumer confidence, the SWA reported an impressive export performance in ACQUISITION

Emmi to buy specialty cheese maker Fromalp

Emmi has signed an agreement to buy specialty cheese maker Fromalp CORPORATE MAKEOVER

Kosme to carry the logo of Kornes Kosme, comprising Kosme GmbH in Austria and Kosme s.r.l. in Italy after being acquired by Krones AG of Neutraubling, Germany, will now carry the logo of Kornes while still retaining its corporate colour orange. The move conveniently differentiates

18 Modern Food Processing

Food Safety Summit Resource Center will debut at the PACK Expo International 2010, to be held at McCormick Place, Chicago, from October 31 - November 3, 2010. Commenting on the debutant, Charles D Yuska, president & CEO, Packaging Machinery Manufacturers Institute (PMMI), said, “With the 2010 show, PACK Expo has expanded to provide processing and packaging solutions - and food safety is certainly a leading issue across both industries.”

BNP Media, the organiser of the Food Safety Summit, and PMMI will jointly promote the Food Safety Summit Resource Center, where leading experts will share information on food safety about breakthroughs, challenges and solutions to ensure safety of packaged foods before, during and after processing and packaging. Emily Patten, event director, BNP Media, said, “We are is thrilled to expand our portfolio and bring the success of the Food Safety Summit to the attendees of PACK Expo.”

the second half of 2009. Compared with 2008, additional £ 71 million of blended scotch whisky was exported in 2009 (over 3 per cent), with malt scotch whisky shipments rising by £ 4 million (over 1 per cent). Scotch whisky exports have increased by £ 977 million in shipment value in the last 10 years - a 45 per cent increase. Shipment volume has also increased by 13 per cent since 2000. Commenting on the increase, Paul Walsh, chairman, SWA, said, “Scotch whisky distillers have delivered record

exports in the face of a global economic downturn. It is an impressive performance, underscoring the importance of scotch whisky to the UK economy. The industry is continuing to invest and sustain its efforts to secure fair access to export markets.”

from the German firm Hochland in an effort to boost its marketshare and secure long-term growth. With this deal, Emmi plans to increase its international sales from less than a third of overall turnover to a half by 2014. The acquisition of Fromalp will help Emmi increase exports of fondue & raclette and also support Swiss milk sales. Emmi said in a report that the value chains of Emmi and Fromalp are

largely identical; thus, integrating the two businesses will increase efficiency and reduce costs. The Swiss cheese firm further added that combining the two businesses could mean that some Fromalp production could be relocated to other Emmi sites. If production is relocated, Emmi said it would be able to continue employing the Fromalp employees affected at its facilities.

the Austro-Italian subsidiary, and simultaneously denotes the group affiliation. Kosme Italy focusses on labelling, filling, packaging and conveyor technologies. In terms of complete lines, Kosme concentrates on an output range of up to approximately 18,000 container per hour. Kosme Austria will be developing and manufacturing stretch blow-moulding technology. Hans-Jürgen Thaus, deputy

executive board chairman, Kosme, said, “In the past, we had to give due consideration to the wishes of the minority shareholder but now that the company is a wholly owned subsidiary, the aim is to optimise the processes involved and to improve product portfolio.”

May 2010

WORLD NEWS LESS SODIUM

General Mills to reduce sodium in its products

General Mills promises a 20 per cent reduction in sodium content in about 40 per cent of its product portfolio POLICY ISSUE

FDA’s new import alert to affect food companies Recently, the US Food & Drug Administration (FDA) issued Import Alert #99-20, ‘Detention without physical examination of imported food products due to Nutritional Labeling Education Act (NLEA) wiolations’ or IA 99-20. FDA enforces all laws and regulations related to ‘front of package’ labeling and nutritional facts panels. This applies to both imported and domestic products. COCOA PLANTATION

Cargill’s third cocoa buying station in Vietnam

HEALTH DRINKS

Arla Foods creates juice formulation containing calcium The juice developed by Arla Foods has 0.12 per cent calcium content as milk and, at 3 per cent, almost the same level of protein. It is being considered an alternative to milk. The product has been under study for

20 Modern Food Processing

by 2015. The company said that even though it had been trying to reduce sodium since 2005, it has not confirmed it. The company has now joined food giants like Kraft, ConAgra and Unilever to publicise its plans for sodium reduction. General Mills announced that it had already cut sodium content by 16 per cent from Cheerios and Honey Nut Cheerios, a 25 per cent reduction for some Progresso soups, and a 36 per cent reduction for its Chex snack mix products. In its 2010 corporate social

responsibility (CSR) report, General Mills stated that the newly announced 20 per cent reduction in sodium would affect about 600 products. World Health Organization recommends 5 g sodium and the packaging industry has been under increasing pressure to reduce sodium. The biggest hurdle in the path of the companies is the acceptability by consumers, and many were unwilling to discuss their reduction plans in the fear that it could affect taste perception.

According to Benjamin L England, founder, FDAImports.com LLC, “Despite NLEA being issued in 1994, the new import alert makes it clear that FDA is substantially increasing its enforcement of food manufacturers and importers, under this statute. FDA will stop importers from selling products with illegal claims on their labels.” Many manufacturers have already been placed on IA 99-20. According to the alert, when FDA first discovers a product or manufacturer has violated

NLEA, FDA may issue a release ‘with comment’ which instructs the importer that the violation must be remedied on future shipments. “In our experience, FDA often just refuses the product resulting in expensive delays and shipping charges for the importer,” he added.

According to a report, Cargill’s new buying station in Binh Phuoc, its third in Vietnam, demonstrates the growth of cocoa crop in this country and Cargill’s commitment to it. Cargill has high expectations for cocoa development in Vietnam, even though the output currently is small. Vietnam is not a traditional cocoa producing country, but five years ago, Cargill had reportedly started a project together with Mars,

the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and the Dutch Ministry of Agriculture, to revitalise the cocoa industry in Vietnam. The reason behind promotion of cocoa plantation is the favourable climate and soil conditions in Vietnam. Since the inception of the project, Cargill has been training farmers and is confident of Vietnamese government’s target of 100,000 tonne of cocoa output by 2020 as being realistic.

almost a year and is now ready for commercial production. Arla Foods believes that there is a huge market waiting to be tapped. As the juice has milk protein, which helps in muscle growth, sports drink sector is a natural market for the company. Besides, other potential markets include seniors seeking extra milk protein and calcium, and young people

who prefer fruit drinks to milk. The company will promote the juice as per the market requirement, which varies from country to country.

May 2010

WORLD NEWS MANUFACTURING

Nestle’s new plant in Dubai starts production

INNOVATIONS

Poly-clip launches improvised semi-automatic double clipper Poly-clip System has improved the all rounder PDC 600/700 to further meet the high requirements of clip professionals. The new enhanced machine has features that were earlier available only in automatic machines. The machine has been made even more user friendly and hygienic. Some notable changes have PACKAGING INNOVATIONS

Sudpack to display advanced ‘warm’ meat packaging system at IFFA

Sudpack has announced its plans to showcase a new packaging innovation INVESTMENT

Coca-Cola increases stake in Innocent Coca-Cola has increased its stake in healthy smoothie maker, Innocent, to 58 per cent. The move comes after the gradual erosion of Innocent’s once pulsating and booming business plan. The 12-year-old business plan went awry as many more new products came into the market laden with antioxidants, which was initially the USP of this health drink. According to reports, access to more

22 Modern Food Processing

Nestle’s Middle East Associate has started producing powdered milk, confectionery and wafer products at its new plant in Dubai, which has a capacity of 100,000 tonne a year. The 1.78 million sq ft facility in TechnoPark was built as part of a $ 400 million investment programme in the region. Nestle already has a total of

17 factories and 37 offices in the Middle East region. The production of milk powder has already started, so has the packaging of imported Mackintosh’s Quality Street chocolates. Chocolate and wafer manufacturing will start later this year, and there are also plans for bottling & distributing water from the site.

been made in the following areas: a modular system that allows the machine to be individually upgraded any time, improved automatic looper (GSE) for clean loops placed near the operator, the drive of the GSE placed in a control box, discharge tray that can be adjusted as per requirement, cleaning is easier as the machine is open towards the bottom, the automatic labelling system ES 4000 can be retrofitted that ensures exact labelling and batch tracking any time, etc.

The new and modified PDC 600/700 is now even easier to operate, maintain and use, as per the press release.

at the upcoming IFFA international meat fair in May. The German-based flexibles company will be launching Ecovlies range of printed paper and non-woven material composite designed to make products distinct at the retail point of sale. According to a report, the Ecovlies range is a co-extruded & laminated rigid film with a special surface and can be adjusted to the application & equipped with high or medium barrier, with or without peel.

The report further stated that the outer layer, which gives the film its special surface and feels similar to paper or carton does not have any technical function. However, Sudpack said it believes this feature gives the film a more natural, warm surface, which it hopes will appeal to consumers. The company claimed that its new packaging system gives consumers an opportunity to display their products in a unique way that will make them noticeable.

cost-effective raw material purchase, distribution and marketing by Coca-Cola may help in turning around Innocent’s fortunes. In March last year, Coca-Cola had purchased 18 per cent of Innocent’s shares. The move was criticised and the company defended by saying that it required investment to develop international markets & new lines. According to reports, the latest investment does not change the company’s management structure or independence. Coca-Cola would continue

to be a ‘hands off’ investor. Innocent stated that it remains committed to natural healthy food, to sustainability and to give 10 per cent of the profits to charity. Coca-Cola’s fresh 40 per cent investment is believed to be worth Euro 85 million.

May 2010

WORLD NEWS

CHOCOLATE BUSINESS

Kraft to sell Cadbury plants

US food group, Kraft, has reportedly recruited HSBC and BNP Paribas to help TRADE FAIR

IFFA 2010 to enlarge packaging segment IFFA 2010 is scheduled to be held in Frankfurt from May 8-13, 2010. Spread over an area of more than 100,000 sq m, the event expects participation by over 900 exhibitors to showcase their latest products and services. Suppliers from more than 40 countries will present machines & equipment for meat processing and

sell Cadbury’s Polish and Romanian businesses. According to analysts, the sale of the assets will not bring in more than Euro 500 million for Kraft. The European Commission had given Kraft the goahead in January for the acquisition of Cadbury. But, it had stated that the US food group would have to sell the Romanian and Polish businesses of the Dairy Milk maker to a third party, as the takeover would cause competition

concerns in some confectionery markets. Kraft’s major brands in Europe are Milka, Cote d’Or and Toblerone, which are more in line with continental than British tastes; hence, they were not deemed by the Commission to be in direct competition with Cadbury’s brands. Kraft would sell Cadbury’s Polish business, marketed under the brand Wedel, and Cadbury’s domestic chocolate business in Romania.

packaging, spices & additives, butchers’ requisites and products for butchers’ shops. Messe Frankfurt expects approximately 60,000 trade visitors from over 100 countries to attend IFFA 2010. Major manufacturers of machines and plants for slaughtering, dismembering and processing will present their products and innovations in halls 8 & 9. At IFFA, visitors can see a cross-section of relevant packaging technology, from packaging lines to

important peripheral equipment for labelling, as well as scales & marking technology at halls 4.0 and 6.0. Halls 6.0 & 6.1 will be showcasing the latest products, aimed primarily at the butchers’ trade and food retailers.

May 2010

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TECHNO TRENDS

Baker Perkins launches efficient cooking system for sugar confectionery

Brabender offers hygienically designed metering feeders

Baker Perkins has introduced a new series of cooking systems to handle all kinds of sugar confectionery. Unique cooking process technologies are at the heart of the AutoCook concept, backed by modular units configured to provide an efficient, automatic solution for a wide range of outputs, claimed the company. Cooking method depends on process and product requirements. It includes the Microfilm swept surface cooker, regarded as the industry standard for sugar and sugar-free high boiled & hard candies, including those with milk & cream; the Turbofilm plate pack cooking system for jelly products; the Carablend for toffee & caramel; and a dedicated fondant cooker. Cookers are integrated with skid-mounted systems for weighing & mixing, dissolving, pre-cooking and colour & flavour addition. The systems are designed for easy installation, maximum efficiency and minimal cleaning & maintenance. Controls are stand alone or integrated with upstream and downstream systems. These systems can feed most types of confectionery forming technique, eg, starchless depositing, die forming, etc.

Great demand on hygiene in the food industry requires easy cleanability of machines applied and involves a wide range of additional measures to prevent contamination with microbiological, chemical & physiological contaminants. Equipment suppliers must comply with hygienic design principles. For bulk ingredient metering, Brabender Technologie has developed the Brabender Food Line in cooperation with leading food companies, producing an array of metering feeders strictly complying with all relevant standards, guidelines and recommendations for the food industry (DIN EN 1672-2, EHEDG, FDA, etc). Although special attention is given to technical solutions allowing quick and easy cleaning, the development has focussed on preventive measures to avoid contaminations. The Brabender Food Line offers suitable metering feeders for virtually all bulk ingredients metered in the food industry, eg, loss-in-weight feeders like the Brabender FlexWall®Plus Feeder with its paddle-massaged flexible hopper, scrrew feeders with stirring agitators, etc, despite compact dimensions.

Gelatine can be replaced by fibres in candy

Trans free bakery shortening used to retain quality

Soluble fibres may replace gelatine, at least partially, in confectionery products, tapping into consumer demands for gelatine-free products, reported a study at the National University of Singapore and the Nestlé R&D Center in Singapore. Scientists reported that a combination of sugar and agarose could replace gelatine in confectionery applications. Scientists stated, “While gelatine is the most frequently used structuring agent in confectionery products, it is increasingly falling ‘out of fashion’ with consumers and producers alike”. Researchers are thinking if soluble fibre could help replace gelatine for several food products, including confectionery products. While a mixture of kappa-carrageenan & sugar or agarose & sugar showed brittle performance at low sugar levels, at higher levels agarose showed better elasticity than gelatine. “This rather under-researched area has other applications, eg, flavour encapsulation and preservation of bioactive molecules in glassy polysaccharide matrices,” said the researchers. Gelatine is a translucent colourless substance, created by boiling animal skin, connective tissue or bones, and is used as a stabiliser, thickener, or texturiser in a variety of foods. But, the industry is being threatened by vegetarian alternatives.

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Recent findings of a research at University of Delhi reported that interesterified (IE) trans free bakery shortenings could be used effectively to replace hydrogenated shortening (HS) and still give better spread ratio, lesser hardness and higher sensory acceptability for baked products such as biscuits. As per the research, using IE shortenings in place of hydrogenated fats led to a significant decrease in trans fatty acids (TFA). Often, alternatives to hydrogenated fat, in order to provide products that deliver the desired performance in terms of functionality and stability, can substantially increase the saturated fatty acid (SFA) content in baked goods and other products. However, scientists noted that their project showed that using IE shortening only marginally increased the SFA content of the short dough biscuits produced. The researchers explained that IE process involves rearrangement of fatty acids on the glycerol backbone of the fat in the presence of a chemical catalyst or an enzyme. Their new technique modifies the melting and crystallisation behaviour of the fat, producing fats with desirable physical properties but without TFA.

TECHNO TRENDS

Natural way to extend shelflife of RTC poultry products Scientists from the University of Ioannina, Greece, have found that a combination of chitosan and thyme treatment with modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) could extend the shelf life of ready-to-cook (RTC) poultry products. Scientists noted that the twofold use of the substances under MAP conditions restricted the growth of bacteria, inhibited lipid oxidation and maintained the visual and sensory quality of meat. Using fresh chicken-pepper kebabs, the team evaluated the performance of natural antimicrobials - chitosan and thyme. A drawback of the poultry product is its relatively short shelf life of six days. Another issue is the high initial microbial load often found in meat, which may occur due to initial contamination of raw material, tainting associated with preparation as well as possible hygiene issues in processing facilities. “Processors are not only faced with the challenge of extending shelf-life but also with the need to develop new preservation methods using ‘natural additives’ in response to consumer demand. The presence of chitosan and thyme, both individually and in combination, had a positive effect on meat flavour,” scientists observed.

New way to produce extra sweet tomatoes As per a report in Nature Genetics, Israeli and American scientists have developed a sweet and plentiful variety of tomato, which may cater to consumer demand for natural products. The key to the high-yield, extra tasty tomatoes is a gene that produces a protein called florigen, which reportedly controls when the plant stops producing leaves and begin producing flowers and subsequently fruits. Fruit yield in plants such as tomatoes is controlled by a delicate balance between the florigen protein and another protein that delays flowering. The key to improved yield is a mutation in only one copy of the florigen gene that causes the hybrid to produce more flowers in less time. By cross-breeding 33 mutant plants, most of which had low yield, the US-Israeli team produced hybrids with improved yield – in some cases, the yield increased by 60 per cent. The researchers tapped into a phenomenon called hybrid vigour, or heterosis, by which inter-crossing two varieties of plants produces more vigorous hybrid offspring with higher yields. This phenomenon was first observed by Charles Darwin in 1876. The researchers noted that the florigen gene is also responsible for boosting sugar content and sweetness of the individual fruits.

Robotic fish processing brings in efficiency Cabinplant A/S has developed a new robot-assisted processing system for fish and shrimps, combining processing and packaging functions to reduce time, space and product giveaway. According to the Danish company, its breakthrough equipment means that products are no longer processed in individual linked steps, instead, process steps are carried out while the fish or seafood is in transit from the conveyor belt to the package. “All processing steps - separation of head and tail, removal of innards - are performed during the pick-andplace operation in which a robot transfers individual products from a feed conveyor into the package,” said a Cabinplant press release. This eliminates several handling steps needed to link individual processing stations in traditional methods, which take up extra time and space. The new system is an integrated process, with an uninterrupted automation sequence. The company said, “It sets new standards in space minimisation and throughput rates.” “The system can also result in a reduction in product giveaway of 10-12 per cent compared to semiautomatic equipment,” said Henning Ingemann Hansen, director - R&D, Cabinplant.

Nexen’s clutch brakes to bring down energy cost The US-based Nexen has upgraded its pneumatic clutch brakes, which can withstand washdown, eliminate bacteria build-up and reduce downtime for bakery & other food processing operations that require repetitive stop-start torque control. Nexen claimed its latest range of Baking Industry Sanitation Standards Committee-certified fully enclosed clutch brakes have a 30 per cent faster response time than electrically actuated models and can offer bakers a range of cost-savings, particularly in energy output and low maintenance requirements. Hank Schilling, sales and marketing representative, Nexen, said, “Its air-engaged clutches and brakes give 40 per cent more dynamic torque, 60 per cent less energy consumption, 30 per cent more thermal horsepower, longer life and 80 per cent savings on repair costs than the electric version.” Clutch brakes are found in numerous applications, eg, forming & frying systems, mixers, ovens, sheeters, meat processing, etc, and can also control output of dough from a hopper for uniform sizing. These can be used in a wide range of post-processing operations like material handling, packaging and labelling.

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LEADERS SPEAK

“The food processing industry must invest in modern equipment and manufacturing practices” …says Sanjay Nandrajog, CEO, FieldFresh Foods Pvt Ltd - a joint venture between Bharti Enterprises and Del Monte Pacific Ltd. His aptitude for innovative business strategies has led the company through milestones of success in the industry. In an e-interview with Rachita Jha, Nandrajog reflects on the prospects of the processed food sector and his company’s growth plans.

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May 2010

LE ADERS SPEAK

A brief history of FieldFresh Foods…

Opportunities in food processing industry in India…

Business model of Del Monte Foods and Beverages vertical…

FieldFresh Foods is a joint venture (JV) between Bharti Enterprises and Del Monte Pacific Ltd. The company offers two brands – FieldFresh for branded fresh fruits & vegetables being sold across Indian & international markets and Del Monte for processed foods & beverages aimed at the Indian consumer. FieldFresh Foods was initially set up in September 2004 as an exportoriented venture for fresh produce. The company went on to become the largest Indian exporter of fresh baby corn in 2008-09 and currently enjoys over 10 per cent marketshare in the UK retail for fresh baby corn with nearly 800 million tonne of export from over 4,000 acre of contract farming across Punjab and Maharashtra in 2009-10. We began supplying fresh fruits & vegetables to the Indian modern retail in 2008. To widen our portfolio, we added the Del Monte range of processed foods & beverages so as to capitalise on the huge domestic potential of India’s fast expanding economy. This led to the successful launch of the brand Del Monte in May 2009 in 15 cities, which we plan to expand to over 35 cities in the future.

The food processing industry has a huge potential in India and is in its initial stage of development in the country. India has an abundance of fruits and vegetables due to its diverse climatic conditions, which offer a source of competitive advantage in the food processing industry. It is believed that in the future, the impact of the food processing industry on the rural economy will be similar to the effect that information technology industry had on urban India. Statistically, the food processing industry is presently growing at a rate of 14 per cent against 6-7 per cent growth in 2003-04. We have seen the government formulating ‘Vision-2015

Del Monte operates in the retail customer segment as well as the business-tobusiness (B2B) segment, with good taste and innovation as its key differentiating planks. It has a wide product range, incorporating popular food and beverage products like ketchups & sauces and fruit drinks as well as category-defining products like packaged fruits & new emerging categories such as the Italian range of food products. The product packaging and pricing is decided according to the purpose they serve. For instance, large tin packs are for institutions that require lower per unit costs and higher shelf lives, while smaller & slim cans are for fruit drinks and on-thego consumption. In terms of geographical scope, the brand is targeting to extend its reach to the top 35 cities. In categories where the company finds a relative competitive advantage, the products will continue to be sourced from the country of origin, providing a clearly differentiated and superior offering. In other categories such as ketchups & sauces and fruit drinks, we will manufacture the products in India and deliver the taste profile desired by the Indian palate along with a strong value proposition to the consumer.

Building brands that ride on the ‘Freshness, wellness & convenience’ platforms… Our vision of providing high-quality branded fresh food is reflected in our brand name ‘FieldFresh’. Even though, fruits and vegetables contribute to a major share in the householders’ fruit basket, there are not many active players with national ambitions in this segment. We aim to bridge this gap in the marketplace with our offerings. Del Monte sources its products from the best possible producing regions to ensure the high quality for its customers. The Del Monte range of fruit drinks, sauces & ketchup, Italian food and packaged fruits spell innovation in taste & high quality.

India has an abundance of fruits and vegetables due to its diverse climatic conditions, which offer a source of competitive advantage in the food processing industry Action Plan’ as a catalyst for growth with specific targets and timelines. This includes tripling the size of the food processing industry from approximately $ 70 to $ 210 billion, increasing the level of processing of perishables from 6 to 20 per cent, increasing value addition from 20 to 35 per cent and enhancing India’s share in the global food trade from 1.5 to 3 per cent, which would imply a total investment of $ 20.6 billion. All these encouraging developments, along with the evolving consumer trends, a growing middle-to-affluent class and an emerging modern trade, especially in Tier 1 and 2 cities, have led to opening up new windows of opportunity for Bharti as we enter into the processed foods business.

Branded fruits & vegetables… We believe that branded fresh fruits and vegetables will redefine the way the average middle class Indian buys food, because the category fits well with the requirement of convenience, hygiene and affordability along with catering to the consumer’s penchant for fresh food. Major fresh fruit & vegetable offerings by FieldFresh are apples, bananas, baby corn and sweet corn. These are grown in farms and orchards where the company works closely with the farmers, bringing in international practices of growing to produce high-quality products. On the customer end, while our fresh baby corn and sweet corn find their way to the shelves of the leading retailers in the UK, the FieldFresh branded fruits are

May 2010

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LEADERS SPEAK

Moreover, the industry has huge potential – with a growing middle class, change in demographics favouring youth-focussed industries and increased disposable incomes. Today’s consumers are ready to pay a premium for food safety & hygiene while seeking convenience. supplied to some of the leading modern trade outlets in India.

About the greenfield facility near Hosur, Tamil Nadu… We will soon be setting up our first manufacturing unit at Hosur, Tamil Nadu. This world class facility, with an investment of over Rs 100 crore, will be the first of its kind to have the production of both fruit drinks and ketchup & sauces under the same roof. To be operational by the second half of 2010, the facility will manufacture about 300 can per minute and 200 polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottle per minute of fruit drinks besides tomato ketchup & various sauces and emulsion products.

On new investments… Our future investments in the processed foods business will focus on bringing in technology for manufacturing, processing and building consumer & customer access through marketing & brand building. The growth in processed foods business will be further bolstered via channel build up, product development, innovation and marketing. We are also planning to introduce some new flavours of fruit drinks and some new packaged fruits. For fresh produce, the company aims to consolidate its operations by focussing on key fruits & vegetables and reach out deeper at the farm/orchard level.

Your growth strategy and role of diversification… As one of the latest entrants in the food and beverage market in India, Del Monte studied the market and its trends. In many categories like fruit drinks and ketchups & sauces, we have found sufficient gaps in the market where our value-added

28 Modern Food Processing

offerings can carve out a space for themselves. In other categories, where we have been traditionally strong worldwide, eg, packaged fruits and Italian culinary range, we aim to bring in new products that will complete our offerings in that category for both our food service & retail customers and consumers. In the packaged fruits category, we began with pineapple slices, pineapple tidbits and fruit cocktail. In both the B2B and retail space, these products have been popular and are considered ‘value for money’. Among our main clients are the leading bakery and ice cream chains. As these customers also buy peaches, cherries, etc, we have extended our range to include these products as well. Similarly, in the Italian range, we already had pasta, olive oil, olives & jalapenos, and are now offering tomato paste to the institutional buyer.

Major challenges in processed food business in India… In India, the food processing industry is in its nascent stage. Compared with the developed world, or the Asian superpowers, the marketshare of our food production being harnessed by the food processing industry is miniscule. As a drawback, the large amounts of food wastage reflects our inability to transport fresh produce to all consuming markets within a stipulated time. It also indicates the unavailability of food processing infrastructure to salvage at least some of the produce and find a market for the same. The existing food processing infrastructure, especially the cold chain, is in need of a massive overhaul. The industry must invest in modern equipment and manufacturing practices. Currently, in our country, such investments are one of the lowest in

May 2010

the world. Thus, the domestic offerings are not satisfactory. Due to consumer apathy towards processed foods, the existing manufacturers have been slow in expanding their operations. But, the scenario is fast changing and we are now witnessing more players like FieldFresh Foods enter the food processing industry. They bring with them state-of-theart machinery and some of the best manufacturing practices in this part of the world. Due to low penetration of processed foods into the Indian households, there is ample opportunity for this insustry to register double-digit growth in the coming years. Moreover, the industry has huge potential – with a growing middle class, change in demographics favouring youth-focussed industries and increased disposable incomes. Today’s consumers are ready to pay a premium for food safety & hygiene as well as convenience.

Growth prospects of national and global processed food markets… The processed food industry received foreign direct investment (FDI) totaling $ 143.80 million in 2007-08 as against $ 5.70 million in the previous fiscal. India’s share in exports of processed food in the global trade is only 1.5 per cent, while the size of the global processed food market is estimated at $ 3.2 trillion. Also, in developed countries, about 80 per cent of agricultural products are processed and packaged. These statistics indicate the huge growth potential of this sector in India. In the future, we are poised to create and define the market in many product categories and change the mindset of the consumers towards processed food products. For us, to bring world-class products into India has been extremely exciting and challanging, especially after having researched the market and having understood that the Indian consumer is extremely value conscious. We are confident that our vision to be counted among the top food and beverage companies in the country will soon come true.

ROUNDTABL E

New EU testing norms for seafoods

Will it impact the Indian industry? The European Union (EU) is currently considering to thoroughly scrutinise Indian mostly

aquaculture shrimps,

for

products, antibiotics

and microorganisms. The industry, which is already facing several policy controls, feels that the new testing procedures will add to the financial burden of the industry. In contrast, some opine that this will be a positive step to combat increasing competition from other countries.

In

conversation

with

some industry experts, Shivani Mody finds out more‌

Courtesy: www.chateaugranville.com

Anwar Hashim president, Seafood Exporters Association of India The new EU testing norms are under scrutiny and have not been implemented. The Food & Veterinary Organization has recommended to the EU to test 20 per cent of the farmed products exported from India to ensure that no banned antibiotics are used. This testing will be implemented only after the notification is published. Currently, inspection is carried out for pathogens and banned antibiotics in products at the factory before shipment and as regular pre-harvest examination, where the products are selected from the farms for testing. There are two types of testing – the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLCMS/MS) test. ELISA for antibiotic testing is done using a special media, for a quick test for shrimps. If this test is not satisfactory, the HPLC MS/MS test is done, which gives

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May 2010

the final verdict for the products. When the cargo is ready for shipment, the second test using HPLC MS/MS is done before finally allowing the product for export. The rejections at EU entry points increased, as more farmed shrimp, especially fresh water prawns were diverted from the US to EU because of anti-dumping duties in the US. We have several issues with the EU on our shipments. As a shipment is rejected for any reason, the exporter appears on the alert list not only in the state it was rejected but in all 26 states of EU. To remove its name from the alert list, the exporter has to ship 10 consignments to the particular state, along with 10 consignments each to all 25 states. In future, we need to have products without containing any of the banned antibiotics. Moreover, government agencies like Aqua Culture Authority and Marine Products Export Development Authority (MPEDA) are working along with farmers to produce healthy shrimps without using such antibiotics. All farms are registered and satellite mapped, and inputs & outputs are monitored. Our farming industry has a bright future and we look forward to the government & the concerned agencies to help us hasten our march towards a million tonne production and export goal.

ROUNDTABLE

K V V Mohanan managing director, K V Marine Exports Pvt Ltd Currently, India exports to the EU and some other countries. Our products are also recognised in other markets like the US, Canada, Asian countries like Japan and all Middle East countries. There is a major issue in EU testing, which needs attention. When an importing country detects traces of antibiotics from the cargo of the container from an exporter, the exporter’s name is entered into the red alert list and the same is communicated to all EU ports. As a remedial measure, the said exporter has to export 10 consignments under strict vigilance of EU authorities

Kishan Fofandi chief executive, Shiv Ganga Marine Products Some internal policy changes in the EU have resulted in stricter norms for Indian products. For aquaculture industry, the products follow the national or EU standards. Most units use technologies based on the EU policies. Further, the government only sanctions technologies and processes accepted by the EU norms, which makes implementation more important. The industry is already under pressure due to lack of raw material and reduced profit margins. With the stricter testing procedures, the industry will face increased financial burden, as these involve new testing requirements. The EU is expected to inspect 20 per cent of India’s aquaculture imports for antibiotics and microorganisms.

M M Ibrahim partner & MD, Quality Foods The new EU testing policy is to thoroughly inspect Indian products to ensure that they are disease free. This might have drawbacks but, in general, this is not a problem. With the policy imposed on Indian products, we will have to use modern and latest technology, which will actually be good for the industry. The testing is mainly for the aquaculture product, eg, black tiger prawns. According to this policy, farmers and fishermen will have to obtain a particular approval, and register in MPEDA for which they will be issued a catch certificate and a membership number. The new testing norm includes a precautionary testing measure for the aquaculture cargo, which if not followed, might lead to cargo rejection. The new testing norm will be an additional burden on exports. The industry is currently facing a financial

and thorough inspection by the Export Inspection Agency’s officials from the concerned country. After verification is complete, the exporter’s name is removed from the red alert list by the importing EU country, but this message is not sent immediately to all EU ports, which causes confusion to both exporters and concerned importers. Sharing this information by the EU authority with all EU ports will bring relief to most exporters.

Currently, the EU randomly inspects aquaculture imports from India. The new inspection process will be extended, delaying the products to reach the destination. However, the new EU norms will also facilitate the industry to seek new export locations. This will be an advantage, as we are facing stiff competition from other countries regarding exports. The industry needs to take proactive steps to prevent such issues in future. By accepting responsibility and strictly adhering to standard norms, the industry can fare better in exports.

crunch due to the decreasing dollar rate, affecting profits. Besides, the catch last year was not sufficient. Apart from the regular testing to incorporate the new tests, companies will have to invest in equipment and have an inhouse testing facility. Setting up this facility may need Rs 3-4 crore expenditure, which is huge. Another option is to send the products for testing to authorised EU and Export Inspection Agency (EIA) laboratories in select locations across the country. Further, the testing facilities are limited and available in select big cities. In both cases, companies will see a 5-10 per cent increase in costs. But, the industry has to follow the new procedures, & the government can help simplify this process by providing proper testing facilities at more locations.

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ROUNDTABL E

M R Francis GM, Naik Frozen Foods Pvt Ltd Currently, EU is the largest importer of Indian marine products. It has decided to thoroughly examine the aquaculture products imported from India from April onwards. Based on a report by Technical Committee of Marine Products, EU health authority has recommended inspecting about 20 per cent of aquaculture products imported from India for antibiotic residue, microorganisms, etc. Currently, random sampling of products is done for quality checks. Surprisingly, they will be inspecting products that undergo double scrutiny in India by the Indian Government. These tests are conducted by drawing samples from ponds by MPEDA officials before harvest and sending them for test to approved laboratories. The farm should be certified legally by Coastal Aquaculture Authority (CAA), which is the basic parameter for culturing shrimps in ponds of India. If the results meet the standard, the farmer can look for a prospective buyer to harvest the culture within a stipulated period of 10 days after the date

Taj Mohammed joint MD, Z A Food Products The European Union (EU) has not changed any testing policies. It has brought in measures by introducing catch certificate to stop illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing. This new system will bring more credibility to the catch. In India, the catch certificate was implemented on January 1, 2010, and is meant only for sea catch materials. Other exporting nations to EU have also implemented the catch certificate in their countries where every fishing activity is accounted and registered, giving complete information of the catch. The Indian exporter has no option but to abide by the regulations, as EU is one of the major importers of Indian marine products. Such a policy will ensure that the catch is accounted for. There will

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of antibiotic result. After harvest, the same product undergoes another similar test for antibiotic and microorganisms in the processing establishment of the exporter after completion of its processing. Another officer from a competent authority then visits the establishment to personally draw the samples after checking the previous relevant documents and send the sample for inspecting to an approved or competent authority’s laboratory. After double scrutiny of the product, authorities in India will allow the product to leave Indian shores. These testing processes in EU will delay the delivery of products to the importer by one to four weeks, resulting in possible avoidance by European importers of Indian aquaculture products, especially shrimps because of cost increase. This inspection process is justified to some extent, but it may increase costs and the time lag between the exporter and importer. To avoid such trade blocks in future, the company’s strategy should be to educate farmers about the harmful effects of using antibiotics in aquaculture shrimps. Farmers should be educated about the exporting rules and regulations that are put in place for the safety of the consumer. Exporters should specially ensure that they buy prawns from genuine farmers, certified by CAA. This can solve the biggest problem and also eliminate some of the unwanted farmers that are not using proper methods to culture prawns.

initially be some practical difficulties, which need to be clarified. A post-shipment document is required only for the EU exports for sea catch materials. The government should conduct awareness programmes for fishermen, as most of them are illiterate and unaware of such issues. The policy changes will bring in discipline, which will be beneficial in the future. All unreported, unauthorised and illegal fishing activities will be restricted, showing the industry in a better light. The government should ensure that Indian exporters are aware of and follow all norms. Antibiotic testing is also important and there will be greater tracing mechanism. Such testing and certification will be beneficial for customers, as they can obtain trustworthy products, and there will be more discipline in the industry. The landing centres should also be improved by providing better infrastructure facilities, to bring better hygiene and sanitation for the same.

ROUNDTABLE

Vishnu Bhat director, Marine Products Export Development Authority Many importing countries including those in EU have stringent quality standards and food safety measures. Therefore, food safety is given utmost importance in these countries when they import/source material from overseas for their consumers. Similarly, traceability is another area of concern, as it is important for tracing back to the origin by the consumers. The quality of the products originating from aquaculture therefore requires better production methods, including better farming practices. Traceability of the products from hatchery to consumer is also strictly under the EU protocols. As EU is a major importing country for Indian products, especially for aquaculture products to sustain the market, India has to follow the regulations as prescribed by the importing country. Although Indian farmers have the required skills and production ability, a good number lacks the documentation procedure. Also, the escalated cost of testing of produce before the harvest is prohibitive. Most developing countries including India have limited facilities for testing the produce. The compulsory inspection of the produce in EU without proper harmonisation of testing protocols among the member states of EU will definitely

hamper the production cost, ultimately resulting in higher cost of production and less profit for the primary producers. The compulsory inspection of aquaculture product by EU may lead to low profits for the producer due to the cost of compulsory inspection of the produce, which could be levied by the exporter. As the testing protocols vary from country to country in EU with wide variations in cost, this could affect the production cost. Compulsory pre-harvest testing and compulsory registration of farms will also increase the cost of production. Positive cases of samples may lead to refusal for purchase of the products by the exporters/packers from the farmers. The strategies for companies purchasing the produce are to inspect the products from aquaculture for pre-harvest testing and make traceability programme a mandatory protocol in their system of operation along with registration of farms. The companies should take initiative to meet the challenges and make use of the opportunities available in order to reach higher scales.

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PROFILE

Nichrome India Ltd

The end-to-end packaging solutions provider With an experience of over 30 years in packaging systems, Nichrome India Ltd is known for its extensive product domain knowledge in packaging, processing and packaging material, and thus aims to be one of the leading integrated packaging solution providers. Ayesha Augustine focusses on Nichrome India’s business strategy that helps it stay ahead of the competition in providing end-to-end packaging services.

everal market surveys provide evidence that the global packaging market will reach $ 5.4 billion with a growth rate of 4.3 per cent by the end of 2010. The US, Europe and Asia lead in food packaging production. One such company into food packaging and processing solutions is Nichrome India Ltd, which spotted and seized the opportunity to develop packaging machines by responding to the government policy to encourage cooperative dairy movement and research in the same field. In 1977, Nichrome became the first Indian company to develop pouch

s

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May 2010

packing for milk in India. Since then, it has produced more than 4,500 machines serving over 1,000 customers. The last 33 years have been a relentless journey for the company. Harish Joshi, managing director, Nichrome India Ltd, elucidates, “The idea of developing a product like packaging machine was quite stimulating for the company, and it immediately took root in its culture. The overwhelming faith of its customers like cooperative dairies or multinational companies such as Nestle, Tata Tea, Unilever, etc, led Nichrome to develop newer applications in packaging.�

PROFILE

In-house facilities

Harish Joshi

Nichrome takes pride in its modern manufacturing infrastructure. It offers the widest range of packaging solutions, for both liquid and solids. The factory is located at Shrimal, 45 km south of Pune on the Pune-Bengaluru highway. The unit is spread across eight acre of factory premises, with modern amenities in a built-up area of over 60,000 sq ft for various manufacturing, assembly, trials & testing activities. Nichrome has a separate development centre for machine and application development with a capacity to build 600-700 machines. It claims to be the first company in India to obtain ISO 22000 certification in food safety system.

managing director

Products range Nichrome offers expertise in a complete range of packaging machines for solids, liquid and viscous food or non-food products like milk and edible oil, grains, powders, seeds and snacks & confectionaries. For liquids, Nichrome’s Filpack series is used for milk and edible oil in viscous packages ranging from 100 ml to five litre. Nichrome India is recognised for developing its first aseptic packing system for milk and juices. It also offers hot fill packaging solutions. For solids, Nichrome’s Stickpack, Sprint and Excel series machines with volumetric, weigh metric fillers pack a wide range of products, including powders, grains and snack food. It covers a wide weight range from

The idea of developing a product like packaging machine was quite stimulating for the company, and it immediately took root in its culture. The overwhelming faith of its customers like cooperative dairies or multinational companies led Nichrome to develop newer applications in packaging. one gm to 50 kg. The modes of packaging are flexible pouches or jar/ bottle/can-filling machines. Nichrome offers all feeding equipment and postpackaging secondary packaging systems like baling, boxing and cartoning systems. Besides the vertical-form-fillseal (VFFS) packaging machines, the company also offers allied equipment and pick-fill-seal solutions for solid, liquid and viscous products.

Secondary packaging Nichrome offers baling machines to pack flexible pouches of grains, powders and liquids in compact flexible baling bags that form the secondary packaging. These machines automate the entire secondary packaging process and save labour, time and space for the customer providing a hygienic, modern secondary packaging process. Moreover, cartoning solutions wherein a complete cartoning line can be engineered to suit a particular product or combination of different production lines are also some of the

Work in progress on the shop floor

secondary packaging processes that the company undertakes.

Research and development Joshi believes that a true packaging solution is an optimum combination of products packed, packaging machine and packing material. Every factor such as the product behaviour and characteristics, the packing material, package style and pre- & post-packaging systems are checked by the company’s R&D department before preparing the final prototype. The company has focussed on new packaging formats to enhance product value. The company is acknowledged as being pioneers in many packaging developments like introduction of weighing technology for tea, servo auger solutions for coffee, milk powder, four-line seal Stabilo Pack for products like Milo and Bru coffee. “The 10-kg atta pouch for Pillsbury, 1-2 gm micro-dosing of pharma powder, antiseptic pouch for milk for Thorat Dairy, etc, were among

Unit manufacturing Filpack machines

May 2010

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PROFILE

ingredient feeding systems for Act II Popcorn has made the solution customer-friendly and inexpensive.

Customer service

the first innovations in the industry developed and created by the company,” claims Joshi. Nichrome has a full-fledged R&D development centre for creating new applications in a modified atmosphere and work on the latest three-dimensional modelling software for machine design. It employs a team of software programmers for logic and automation development. Overall, it offers end-to-end packaging project solutions like customised feeding systems for GSK’s Boost and Horlicks sachet-filling operations and solutions for coffee & tea pre-mixes in Stickpack for Nestle.

Latest innovations Nichrome India has recently introduced its high-speed, accurate, reliable machines for seed packaging, which can help the industry to double its output per year. Joshi believes that another feather in the company’s hat is Nichrome’s mini weigher that produces an accuracy of 10 mg for hybrid seeds, thereby reducing wastage. Recently, the company has introduced pouch-in-pouch system for cottonseed packing, which helps avoid manual packing. Its aseptic packaging for milk avoids the cold chain for milk, increasing the shelf life of milk to approximately 60 day, making possible the sale of milk from Maharashtra to Chhattisgarh. The company recently started producing small-sized pouches for the milk industry, thus reducing the distribution costs by 20 per cent. Further, a special pickle filling system for 50/100 gm packs has enabled automation in traditional pickle industry and multiple

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Joshi affirms that the company believes in its commitment to support its customers. Nichrome has created an in-house team of trained and experienced service engineers to cater to a wide database of installations and routine back-up service. It also provides a special team of service personnel to cater to complex assignments of installations and commissioning, retro-fitment jobs and service supports. The expertise in the service team is utilised for trial management at the factory unit for critical application machines and tested thoroughly as per the client’s requirements before dispatch. The company has its own sales and service offices across India that employ expert engineers for different regions, namely, Delhi, Kolkata, Mumbai, Hyderabad, Chennai, Bengaluru, Indore and few more big cities in India. “Nichrome has trained service engineers present in all export markets. For immediate overseas calls, the company has service engineers at Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) & Russia, Eastern & Western Africa, Middle East, South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC) and South East Asian countries and has spare parts distributor in each region across the country and overseas,” confirms Joshi. Moreover, the company is going to launch some new facilities in the future. “The company’s famous 24-hr ‘service on wheels’ facility in Hyderabad region is a round-the-clock service launched recently and, in the near future, it is planning to go digital and take customer satisfaction to the next level by launching its own Customer Relationship Management (CRM) system,” informs Joshi. The CRM system will be based on self-diagnostic

May 2010

techniques to help customers receive immediate help through the Internet, which would help the company avoid time lags and service hassles.

Export strategy Nichrome has well-established and extended sales and service offices across India (eight offices) and a worldwide network of agents. It has been exporting its products for last 20 years and, being a recognised brand, enjoys major marketshare in the export markets of CIS, Africa, Middle East, Association for Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) and SAARC. Joshi states, “Nichrome India has exported more than 700 machines, to 40 countries all over the world. It has an exclusive network of selling partners with service back-up in these markets. The company is planning to fortify its export base through strategic marketing JVs in these markets while strengthening its service network in these markets.”

Expanding horizon India and the emerging food industry have yet to witness massive growth in processing technologies. “Hence, we need to develop latest innovative technology, which is appropriate, affordable and customised for every region. Nichrome plans to build a new R&D centre to increase its product development activity to cater to the increasing food packaging demands. The centre will also have a modern pouch testing laboratory. Nichrome is also bringing in new technology for high-speed, specialty sachet packs for food and non-food products along with the launch of its stand up packs for solids and liquids,” adds Joshi. Nichrome is actively in discussion with various partners around the globe for merger and acquisition (M&A) opportunities. The company believes that through these M&A plans with international companies it would be able to enter newer market verticals or market geographies.

COVER STOR Y

The processed food sector is in for rapid growth mainly buoyed by increased purchasing power of the urban population. This signifies greater demand for food processing machinery and equipment. While domestic manufacturers are capable of meeting this burgeoning demand, they are facing challenges like escalating input costs, imported machinery and improper duty structures. Rakesh Rao takes a closer look at how food processing machinery sector is shaping up and its future prospects.

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COVER STORY

a

s the shadow of slowdown is fading away, the Indian food sector is expected to show a strong growth at 30-40 per cent from the current rate of 15 per cent in the next 10 years. Revenue from processed foods is likely to increase from Rs 8,200 billion in 2009-10 to Rs 13,500 billion by 2014-15. Given that merely 3 per cent of the total agricultural production is processed in the country, there is vast potential in the Indian food processing sector. For the rapid growth of food processing industry, investments are needed in a wide range of machines so as to process a variety of raw materials.

Safe sail through slowdown While economic slowdown adversely affected the global manufacturing industry, it had little impact on the Indian food processing machinery sector. Sanjeev Gupta, president, The Agro & Food Processing Technology & Equipment Providers Association of India (AFTPAI), and managing director, Kanchan Metals Pvt Ltd, avers, “In the initial days of so-called economic slowdown, there were some talks about the impact. But later they proved to be wrong. At present, there is no slowdown and we are in the best phase of the growth.” Now, with the economy showing signs of strong growth, the demand for machinery is expected to increase. Sreedhar Yarlagadda, CEO, Sunbeam Machines India Pvt Ltd, opines, “Economic slowdown brought a good debate to this industry, but, on the whole, failed to make much negative impact. There was a continuous demand as usual even in 2008 and 2009. Since last three months, we are witnessing a huge surge in our order books from different existing medium-scale producers as well as new customers, a trend we had not seen earlier. The philosophy for success in the Indian market should be revenue growth rather than profit growth. This industry has been following this constantly for several decades.”

What’s in store for Indian machinery manufacturers? Opportunities Y Y Y Y

Rapidly growing domestic processed food industry Increase in modernisation & expansion of existing facilities Exports market, especially Gulf and African countries Tie-ups with MNCs for local manufacturing and in some cases for global requirements

Challenges Y Y Y Y

Highly volatile steel & input prices Availability of qualified skilled technicians & manpower on the shop floor Tax structure for these equipment Meeting global standards

Although the domestic market remained relatively unaffected, there was a visible impact on exports. “Indian biscuit machinery has a good global demand, but it was affected by the economic slowdown, as many overseas projects were either delayed or suspended. However, there are some clear signs of revival of these projects and the situation is expected to be normal in the coming months,” explains Yarlagadda.

Budget impact The government has identified food processing as one of the sunrise industries and, in the last few years, it has taken steps to give a boost to this industry. This year’s Budget was no different. The Budget announced several initiatives to propel the growth further. Gupta says, “Overall, this year’s Budget was good, even for the food processing industry, as finance minister presented some interesting schemes. AFTPAI had submitted a memorandum of 10 suggestions on the eve of Budget 2010, and the finance minister selected two of the suggestion in the Budget proposal.” The government has agreed to provide agriculture and related sectors ‘project import status’ with a concessional import duty of 5 per cent for setting up of mechanised handling systems and pallet-racking systems in mandi or warehouses for food grains & sugar and also full exemption from service tax for installation and commissioning of such equipment. It has also agreed to provide ‘project import status’ at a concessional

customs duty of 5 per cent, with a complete exemption from service tax to the initial setting up and expansion of cold storage, cold room including farm pre-coolers for preservation or storage of produce from agriculture & related sector and processing units for such produce. Gupta informs, “The association is already in touch with Ministry of Food Processing Industries for further relaxation in duty structures and newer initiatives. The minister has assured us to look after the interests of allied sectors of the food industry.”

Rationalised taxation According to a recent study by RNCOS, a leading market research firm, while India has huge potential to become a leader in the global food processing sector, there are numerous challenges both in the forward and backward linkages in the country.

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Courtesy: www.britannica.com

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COVER STOR Y

Sanjeev Gupta president, The Agro & Food Processing Technology & Equipment Providers Association of India, and MD, Kanchan Metals Pvt Ltd

There is huge demand coming up in the near future. India is becoming a global hub for technology in all forms of business. We will see better per capita consumption of processed food in the country. The entire global food processing industry and allied industry is closely watching the Indian consumer.

New technologies to increase the life of perishable vegetables & fruits, cold storage systems and better packaging machinery are some of the key areas where the industry and government should chart out plans for improvement. Ravi Mirchandani, manager Marketing and Development, Dynamech Engineers, says, “The Indian snack food processing industry is still in its nascent stage. In case of small and medium enterprises (SMEs), increased cooperation is needed from the government in terms of subsidies on plant & equipment and more focus on developing machines in India to save the already scarce foreign currency.” There are abundant opportunities, but several issues act as roadblocks in the growth of the food processing machinery industry. Yarlagadda says, “With regard to domestic manufacturers of food processing machinery, the

industry is facing several challenges like highly volatile steel & input prices, availability of qualified skilled technicians & manpower on the shop floor and, most importantly, the tax structure for these equipment.” Experts believe that there is an urgent need to rationalise tax structure. “On one hand, the government is charging 10.3 per cent excise and 14.5 per cent value added tax (VAT), which totals to 24.8 per cent on these equipment. On the other hand, it has been giving a subsidy of 25 per cent (a ceiling of Rs 50 lakh per existing project). Instead of this, to increase agro & food processing percentage and to attract larger number of entrepreneurs into food processing sector, it is reasonable to exempt taxes and duties for capital goods purchased for the food processing sector. This will drastically reduce the total cost to set up a project,” opines Yarlagadda. He adds, “Transaction cost of taking with one hand and giving with another will also decrease. Even entrepreneurs will save important time during project implementation, which will have multiple impacts like shortening gestation periods, decreasing capital & borrowings and also lowering the interest burden on the project.”

The MNCs factor

Courtesy: Heron Food Machinery Service Co

42 Modern Food Processing

Realising vast untapped opportunities in the Indian processed food market, a large number of multinational companies (MNCs) have already established their feet in the market and many others are evaluating options to

May 2010

do the same. “Venturing of MNCs at a massive scale will also open floodgates of opportunities for food processing equipment suppliers who have been facing shortage of customers,” says Pramod Taparia, chairman, Wintech Taparia Ltd. Even the global machinery manufacturers are now eyeing the Indian food processing sector. In fact, over the years the market for imported machinery has increased. “With the growth of the industry, imported machinery market has also grown. It has not affected the domestic manufacturers, but has contributed to them positively. Indian machinery manufacturers are one of the best in the global market and they have proved that their machinery is better than the Chinese machinery; some times even the European ones. There are several Indian manufacturers such as Nichrome India who are exporting their machinery and giving tough competition to the European and American manufacturers,” claims Gupta. So, how competitive are the Indian manufacturers compared with MNCs? Taparia responds, “As far as the technology is concerned, Indian manufacturers do have high-end solutions for any machinery for any given segment of food processing equipment. CE-marked food processing machinery are highly accepted at international market, which gives a plus point to Indian manufacturers. The labour cost in India is very low compared to the European countries, making the price of machines highly acceptable in the international market. Companies like Wintech Taparia, can provide high-end solutions in food processing machinery segment at affordable price, whereas it becomes difficult for MNCs to slash their prices.” The food processing industry in India is a heterogeneous mix of SMEs & large corporations (both Indian & international) and the needs of each of these companies are different, thus offering ample scope of growth for Indian companies as well as MNCs.

COVER STORY

Mirchandani explains, “For each machine manufacturer, there is a target segment. For example, MNCs are interested in big projects of large companies, while Indian manufacturers target SMEs, which cannot afford to invest crores of money in plant and equipment. Compared to MNCs, Indian companies are competitive, as manufacturing in the country is still inexpensive and they have better understanding of the local market.”

Sreedhar Yarlagadda

Overseas market

increasingly unaffordable to them. However, there are constraints such as differences in local standards for equipment and service between Indian and international equipment. Thus, many European companies setup or tie-up with Indian companies for their equipment manufacturing and sell products in their respective countries. This clearly shows the urgent need to create awareness among equipment manufacturers about the standards in different countries by export promotion councils and related bodies, which will help in increasing exports and equipment standards.” He further adds on regulations for such tie-ups in other countries , “Many countries have restrictions on import of processed foods and are encouraging setting up food processing units locally. They are encouraged by reducing import duties to lowest levels and are being offered certain capital incentives. This is helping Indian food processing equipment manufacturers to sell more in those countries.”

As the Indian companies are adopting global standards, exports of food processing machinery is also on the rise. “Indian machines are rated as reliable and affordable by many countries. In developing and underdeveloped countries, there is a tremendous demand for low-cost reliable solutions and India is fortunately in a comfortable position to cater to these markets. However, continuously increasing input and labour costs is proving difficult, as margins are becoming thinner and are discouraging Indian manufactures to export,” says Yarlagadda. While Indian manufacturers export their products mainly to African and Middle East countries, they are also expanding their presence in developed markets like the US and Europe. “Currently, 90 per cent of our projects are export oriented, which are taken on a turnkey basis. Internationally, every one wants to have a good and high-end technology at an affordable cost and is unable to afford the European price structures. Therefore, we undertake maximum projects, which are export driven and meeting international standards. Some of our current projects are in countries such as Saudi Arabia, Syria, South Africa, Malawi, Sweden, the UK and UAE, besides some big projects in India,” claims Taparia. Even foreign players are joining hands with Indian companies to take advantage of cost-competitiveness. Yarlagadda informs, “Developed markets are looking towards Indian machinery as locally made equipment is becoming

CEO, Sunbeam Machines India Pvt Ltd

Indian machines are rated as reliable and affordable by many countries. In developing and underdeveloped countries, there is a tremendous demand for low-cost reliable solutions and India is fortunately in a comfortable position to cater to these markets. economic expansion in developing nations, leading to increase in investment in food and beverage manufacturing facilities. Meat & poultry, industrial bakery and industrial cooking/ heating equipment will grow at the fastest rate.” Among the major product categories, demand for snacks machinery is likely to show robust growth. Mirchandani informs, “The dairy, meat and beverages industries have already been fully automated, while the snack food sector still needs more automation and modernisation. This is the reason why Indian snack food sector will be one of the drivers for growth of food machinery industry.” The growth in the bakery product segment will be supported by increasing demand for bread, pastries and other baked goods in developing countries as employment and income levels rise. With the increase in

Growth drivers The food processing industry in India is on an up-swing. Gupta avers, “The food processing industry is showing an overall growth However, bakery, beverages and snack food segments look promising with double-digit growth.” Increase in demand for processed food will lead to larger capacity, and modernisation of existing facilities. Taparia says, “Global demand for food processing machinery will grow 4.6 per cent annually, driven by ongoing

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Courtesy: Britannica.com

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COVER STOR Y

Ravi Mirchandani manager - Marketing and Development, Dynamech Engineers

The dairy, meat and beverages industries have already been fully automated, while the snack food sector still needs more automation and modernisation. This is the reason why Indian snack food sector will be one of the drivers for growth of food machinery industry. demand for these products, bakery equipment market will also register above average growth. Yarlagadda says, “Indian biscuit industry is going to witness a transformation in the coming decade. International players will play a key role and food production facilities coming up will be ultra-modern and large-scale green factories. The machinery industry needs to be ready for these new giant assignments. Sunbeam is geared up for complete project executions of international standards with dedicated project teams.”

Retail boom The advent of modern retail has changed the face of food processing industry. Gupta says, “There is huge demand coming up in the near future. India is becoming a global hub for technology in all forms of business. We will see better per capita consumption of processed food in the country. The entire global food processing industry and allied industry is closely watching the Indian consumer. The success of retail industry has contributed to the growth of food industry.”

Supporting this statement Mirchandani says, “The emerging trends in Indian snack food processing industry have shifted substantially. Many different types of snacks concepts are being brought in by big companies like ITC (Mad Angles), Parle (Hippo & Smart Chips). New packing styles like jumbo pack, addition of new ingredients to existing products and roasted (oil less) healthy snacks will be in demand in the coming years.” At the same time, heightened competition among food processing machinery manufacturers has led to constant product innovation. Yarlagadda opines, “As consumption trends are observed, apart from lowcost food segment, demand towards premium and quality food products is increasing at faster rate. This trend is pushing the industry to innovate new products and production processes. This situation will provide a great opportunity to machine manufacturing industry to become more dynamic and show real talent in innovation with more freedom & less limitations. These innovations will lower the number of

Pramod Taparia chairman, Wintech Taparia Ltd

As far as the technology is concerned, Indian manufacturers do have high-end solutions for any machinery for any given segment of food processing equipment. CE-marked food processing machinery are highly accepted at international market, which gives a plus point to Indian manufacturers.

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players and increase margins as well as improve standards of the industry simultaneously.”

Energy-efficient technology Technological developments in the market are driven by international legislation governing food safety, product quality and energy efficiency. Yarlagadda elaborates, “There is a constant search for fuel- & energy-efficient technologies and processes to keep margins intact & remain competitive. Green factories, eco-friendly processes, fuel- & energyefficient production processes, lower rejections, low-cost automation, high-speed packaging are the areas of concern within the industry.” Mirchandani adds, “Another new trend has been the development of edible oil heater for Indian snacks. This has resulted in fuel savings up to 50 per cent compared with conventional heating systems. If such a system can be installed in most Indian companies that use old systems, it could result in substantial savings in fuel cost, again saving foreign exchange.”

Gearing up for future RNCOS has asserted that the food processing industry will open new horizons of developments for new players showing willingness for investment. The government has set a target of achieving investment of $ 25.07 billion by 2015, which will enable India to extend its contribution to the global processed food trade from an estimated 1.7 per cent in 2008 to 3 per cent by 2015. Increase in investments in food and beverage manufacturing units will stimulate demand for food processing equipment. As a result, opportunities for manufacturers of food processing and packaging equipment are likely to expand fairly rapidly. Machinery manufacturers, on their part, are gearing up to meet this increase in the demand through innovation, expansion, tie-ups, etc.

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Dairy equipment market

Integrating quality and efficiency India is currently the global leader in milk production, with remarkable improvements in the quality of milk & milk products manufactured. Post Budget, the Government has made various proposals & exemptions on customs duty, which will enable Indian dairy industry to work towards boosting the development of new & efficient processing equipment, expanding the market and increasing opportunities

exports. Overall, tremendous exist

for

dairy

machinery

manufacturers in the years to come. Courtesy: Pladot Mini Dairy

Dr J V Parekh

t

oday, India is the leading producer of milk worldwide. The overall quality of milk and milk products manufactured in India has improved. Many dairy plants have received ISO 22000 certification as well. This great upsurge has opened up new avenues for the country in the dairy & food and allied sectors.

Budget blues Cleanliness and hygiene is extremely important in milk production and handling, which can be done by using machines for milking and adopting aluminium or stainless steel (SS) milk cans & bulk milk coolers. However, excise, sales tax, octroi, etc, have increased exorbitantly the prices of such equipment. Taxes and duties include almost 25 per cent of the basic prices of machinery. Heavy taxes & duties have decreased the use of such equipment; thus, the quality of milk remains poor. In its pre-Budget memorandum for the last three years, the Indian Dairy Association (IDA) has been requesting Government of India to exempt

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milking machines, bulk milk coolers & aluminium & SS milk cans and other dairy equipment required for clean milk production and also processing of milk & milk products from the purview of excise duty. Although the Budget has removed the excise duty on milking machines and dairy machinery with respect to tariff heading 84.34, very few dairy equipment will enjoy the benefit. This is because majority of dairy equipment are classified under different categories other than 84.34. Hence, there is a need to create a separate category for ‘dairy equipment and machinery’ under Central Excise Custom Tariffs and exempted from central excise duty. Customs duty on food processing machinery & their parts has been reduced to 5 per cent, and that on packaging machine to 5 per cent. Customs duty on refrigerated vans has been reduced to 10 per cent. Income tax rebate is allowed on 100 per cent profit for 5 years and on 25 per cent profit for the next 5 years, for new processing, preserving and packaging food/dairy industries. Customs duty on food processing machinery has been reduced to 5 per cent. However, after

COVER STORY

adding countervailing duty (CVD), education cess and other surcharges, the total import duty comes to 30 per cent, which is quite high.

Packaging material and machinery Almost 46 per cent of the milk produced in India is consumed as liquid milk. Only 20 per cent of the milk is processed and packaged. Thus, a major portion of liquid milk is open to adulteration, unhygienic handling and distribution. It is, therefore, essential to distribute only pasteurised and packed or machine-vended milk. But, the huge costs of pouch filling machines, milk vending machines and polyethylene films prevent people from taking these steps. As the adulterated milk poses major health hazards to the public, the cost of the packing & vending machines and packing materials should be reduced by exempting them from central excise duty and central sales tax (CST)/value added tax (VAT).

Moving towards progress The 11th Five Year Plan has envisaged a growth of 5-6 per cent annually for dairy industry, which is most ambitious. A National Dairy Plan proposed by National Dairy Development Board (NDDB) aims at meeting the demand for milk by 2021-22, which has been projected at 180 million metric tonne (MMT). This implies a 4 per cent annual growth in the period, but in absolute terms, the incremental production of 2.5 MMT annually will have to increase to 5 MMT. Thus, the focus is on substantially expanding the infrastructure for procurement, processing, marketing and quality assurance. With increased production, the industry would require additional processing capacities with emphasis on making value-added products in place of liquid milk. A direct result of this gigantic growth in milk production is the demand for equipment for processing of milk and milk products. A few companies like L&T,

GEA, APV, SSP, IDMC, Alfa Laval, Goma, HMT, Samarpan, Panchal, Nichrome, etc, manufacture dairy equipment to fulfil the demands of dairy industry. Despite an excellent growth, Indian dairy equipment manufacturers have been unable to occupy a place in export market, even in the presence of a great opportunity. India can export dairy equipment to several countries like Nepal, Indonesia, Malaysia, Middle East, Africa, China, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, North Yemen, Vietnam, Iran, etc. Currently, the total export of dairy machinery is about Rs 2,000 million.

In better control In recent times, better manufacturing process controls & materials, wider acceptance of new technologies, availability of new-generation sensors and programmable logic controls (PLC) as well as factors such as increasing globalisation of the dairy industry have given a major boost to development of new, more efficient processing equipment for the dairy and food industry. Large handling capacities help reduce unit cost of the products, while creating an opportunity for automation & introduction of third-generation equipment like continuous cheese making machines, ultrafiltration, vacuum packaging and portioning machines. Products such as cheese, yoghurt, lassi, flavoured milk and ice cream will need new processing lines in the dairy industry, so as to help achieve international product standards. The indigenous milk products industry is likely to benefit the most. But, due to non-unavailability of a suitable technology with reliable equipment, we are unable to fully commercialise production of Indian dairy products even though they are popular throughout the country. This offers tremendous scope for their commercialisation. The quality of milk and milk products manufactured in India need to be improved in line with international quality. New technologies based on improved design of equipment are

Courtesy: Guernsey Farms Dairy

needed to achieve this goal. With recent advancements in dairy equipment, the industry is likely to witness continuous or mechanised production lines for products like rasgolla, gulab jamun, khoa, peda, ghee, shrikhand and sandesh. Similarly, demand will increase for packaging machinery to hygienically pack these products to increase shelf life. Improved product quality will also give Indian manufacturers a definite edge in the global market.

On a positive note Today, India has almost attained selfsufficiency in dairy equipment. Notable gains in the recent years include sophisticated equipment like electronic milkoscan, evaporating & drying plant, cream separator, plate heat exchanger, homogeniser, small-capacity packaging machine, instruments & controls, bulk vending units, rail/road milk tankers and the expertise to take responsibility for integrated milk projects. Some of the equipment yet to be manufactured in the country are UHT plant; reverse osmosis; ultra-filtration; packaging machines for cheese, butter, etc. With growing awareness, the need for ecofriendly methods and technologies is felt in the processing sector. Thus, all efforts should be made towards more efficient designing of equipment and developing better technologies for the dairy & food sector. Dr J V Parekh, founder, Parekh Technical Consultancy Services, is a senior consultant for the food and dairy industry. Email: jvparekh@bom2.vsnl.net.in

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SPECIAL FEATURE

Non-carbonated beverages

Paving way for nutrition & health Non-carbonated drinks are increasingly filling the crates that were otherwise occupied by fizzy carbonates in the Indian market. With people turning more health conscious, the non-carbonated beverage segment has become one of the fastest growing and most exciting businesses at the moment. Geetha Jayaraman finds out more about this booming segment.

Courtesy: Agrana Beteiligungs AG

he Indian non-carbonated beverages market has witnessed stupendous growth in the past few years. The fruit drinks market earlier was mostly an unorganised sector, with local fruit juice vendors at stalls. Gradually, with the growing economy, increasing income levels, changing lifestyles and growing health awareness, consumers have moved on to packaged non-carbonated beverages. The surge in supermarkets and malls in metros & tier-two cities has also added to the growth of this segment. With the expanding market, the big players have also entered this segment. Many companies are targeting the juicebased beverages market due to the tremendous opportunities it offers as consumers gradually shift towards

t

Total non-alcoholic beverages market in India

19% 9% 72%

Carbonated drinks Fruit-based beverages Other non-alcoholic drinks Source: Orana India

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healthy drinks. In the past, Pepsi had launched Tropicana and Nimbooz. Dabur is bullish on its Real range. Parle Agro also launched LMN (lemon drink). Safal India (a unit of Mother Dairy Fruit & Vegetable Ltd) and Orana have their own range of fruit juices, to name a few. Parveen Dang, director, Sales and R&D (South Asia), Orana India, points out, “Customers today are becoming more health conscious, so they are opting for products that are good for them healthwise. Because customers want healthy and nutritional products, fruit juice products are becoming more popular in India.�

Juicy growth The Indian non-alcoholic beverage market is estimated at Rs 23,000 crore. Out of this, the total non-carbonated

SPECIAL FEATURE

beverage market is estimated at Rs 6,400 crore. The share of juices and juice-based beverages is about 30 per cent (approximately Rs 2,000 crore), which is growing at the rate of 25 per cent. Earlier, only fruit drinks dominated this segment, but now new sub-categories are also emerging. Consumers have readily accepted 100 per cent juices, nectars, flavoured drinks, functional drinks, health-based beverages, etc. Nadia Chauhan, joint managing director & CMO, Parle Agro Pvt Ltd, says, “In terms of value, the non-carbonated fruit-based beverages market comprising fruit drinks, nectars, fruit juices, flavoured drinks, etc, is pegged at approximately Rs 2,000 crore. Fruit drinks occupy the largest share within this segment, making up for about Rs 1,500 crore. Juices comprise approximately Rs 200 crore and nectars and flavoured drinks cover the remaining share.” With increasing consumer affluence and companies tailoring the product designs and marketing specifically to target the young adult population group, the trend of robust double-digit annual volume growth is expected to continue in the next few years. Competition from the unorganised sector is expected to decline in the near future, as the national players make a concerted effort to educate consumers about the health benefits of packaged drinks. Moreover, there is now a greater acceptance for new flavours and new beverage products, as consumers are

Parveen Dang director, Sales and R&D (South Asia), Orana India

Customers today are becoming more health conscious, so they are opting for products that are good for them healthwise. Because customers want healthy and nutritional products, fruit juice products are becoming more popular in India. no more hesitant in trying something new. Chauhan says, “We have better technologies to develop innovative products. We have better R&D expertise to ensure that our products have a longer shelf life. Also, we have developed better infrastructure to ensure that our products have wide distribution and reach across the country.”

Growth drivers The market for carbonated softdrinks in India has seen difficult times in the recent past, as Indian consumers have now begun to embrace non-carbonated alternatives. This shift has resulted in introduction of many new products, leading to intense competition in the market. After the pesticide controversy and growing health concerns, the sales of non-carbonated drinks has increased manifold. Dr Anand Ramanathan, manager, KPMG Advisory Services, opines, “The rapidly increasing size of the fruit juice segment can certainly overturn the carbonated drinks market. The carbonated drinks market has

suffered innumerable health and safety controversies in the recent past, thus creating a doubt in the minds of consumers, while non-carbonated drinks are usually fruit based, offering the goodness of fruits.” This has created new opportunities for drinks manufacturers in the country and high growth has been witnessed in still drinks, juice and nectars - fruitbased drinks not consisting 100 per cent juice like Dabur’s Real, PepsiCo’s Tropicana and Parle’s apple-flavoured drink Appy. “These fruit drinks do not use any synthetic flavours and are low on sugar compared with colas that are sugar based. Non-carbonated drinks are a good option for all age groups, particularly for the health conscious and kids,” points out Chauhan. Consumers buy non-carbonated drinks to quench their thirst or simply when they are looking at indulging themselves with a refreshing drink. “The key driving factor for India is the low per capita consumption of non-alcoholic beverages (about

Some facts about 100 per cent fruit juice v Fruit juices offer good taste and health benefits that are found naturally

in 100 per cent juice v 100 per cent juices are nutritious, either naturally or when fortified, with

nutrients such as vitamin C, calcium and vitamin D v These are fat-free & rich in vitamins, minerals and naturally occurring

phytonutrients - which are compounds in fruits, vegetables and other plants that have been found to possess disease-preventative & diseasefighting properties v While the calorie content can vary slightly from one juice to another, most 100 per cent fruit juices have only 60-80 calorie per half cup of nutritionally rich juice Source: www.fruitjuicefacts.org

May 2010

Courtesy: Parle Agro

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SPECIAL FEATURE

Nadia Chauhan

Pulpy facts

joint managing director & CMO, Parle Agro Pvt Ltd

v Fruit juice: These are

Fruit drinks occupy the largest share within the non-carbonated beverages segment, making up for about Rs 1,500 crore. Juices comprise approximately Rs 200 crore and nectars and flavoured drinks cover the remaining share.

fruit beverages containing 85 per cent and more fruit pulp. Tropicana and Real belong to this category v Fruit nectar: These contain

approximately 20-85 per cent fruit pulp. Brands like Godrej Xs and Real Nectar belong to this category v Fruit drinks: These drinks

5 ltr compared with the regional average of 27 ltr and global average of 84 ltr). This is an advantage for the juice manufacturer, as there is a vast unexplored market,” avers Dang. To add to the buzz, players are now looking at different pack sizes and price points. Also, tetrapaks have come as a handy solution for juice manufacturers to provide fruit juice practically fresh and free of preservatives. Most brands are available in a variety of pack sizes and price points to cater to different consumption occasions and consumer requirements. Parle Agro claims to be one of the first companies in India to introduce the concept of fruit drinks in a hygienic tetrapak offering at an affordable price point. Dang informs, “Indian consumers are slowly shifting from traditional home-made beverages options to packaged drinks due to the convenience factor, availability, lifestyle and increasing disposable income. Additionally, some of the product categories such as juices and functional drinks are being favoured among the health conscious consumers.” Supporting the statement, Ramanathan says, “Consumers are now

looking at options that provide high nutritive value along with a good taste. Brands such as Coca-cola India’s Minute Maid pulpy and Dabur’s Real have capitalised on the growing demand for natural alternatives to carbonated drinks by advertising heavily on the high fruit content of their products.”

Carbonates are fun & on-the-go type products, while non-carbonates are for health conscious customers. Hence, both operate on different platforms Is the fizz out? Due to health and obesity concerns the consumption of carbonated drinks has been declining in the global market. Indian markets are also witnessing a similar trend. With growing health consciousness and changing lifestyles focussed on wellness, consumers are moving towards fruit-based, non-carbonated

Table 1: Comparison of sugar in 12 ounces of juices (no sugar added) with carbonated drink

Carbonated drink Total carbohydrates (in gm) 40 Carbohydrates from sugar (gm) 40 Sugar* (teaspoons) 10 Calories (in kcal) 145 12 Ounces of

Orange juice 39 33 8 165

Apple juice 42 39 10 165

Cherry juice 49.5 37.5 9 210

Grape juice 60 58.5 15 240

* Nutrition label on a can of beverages, the carbohydrate is mostly sugar, and 4 gm of sugar carbohydrates equal approximately 1 teaspoon of sugar. Source: www.hookedonjuice.com

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contain less than 20 per cent fruit pulp, eg, Frooti, Maaza, etc. Fruit drinks is the dominant category in the fruitbased beverages market beverages. The non-carbonated beverage segment is growing at almost double the rate of the carbonated segment. Several new beverage sub-categories such as 100 per cent juices are accelerating this growth. Sunil Bansal, CEO - horticulture, Mother Dairy Fruits & Vegetables Pvt Ltd, states, “Even with the existence of carbonated drink sector, the demand for healthier drinks has been increasing, which has contributed to its growth and development. If the carbonated drinks could meet the requirement of the informed consumer, the non-carbonated drink sector would have not emerged. It is a testimony for the establishment of the non-carbonated drink industry. The segment has been flourishing, while the carbonated drink segment has co-existed. Different types of consumers and their demands contribute to the development of both the categories.” Though the market for carbonated drinks is worth Rs 8,000 crore (four times larger than fruit-based drinks market) and is growing at a steady rate, it is not a threat to fruit-based beverages market, as both cater to different categories. Carbonates are fun & on-the-go type products, while non-carbonates are for health

SPECIAL FEATURE

conscious customers. Hence, both operate on different platforms. Bansal adds, “With health becoming a priority, on one hand, there is a consumer demand for healthier drinks, demanding non-carbonated drinks and, on the other hand, there is set of consumers who continue to consume carbonated drinks, and hence the demand for the same. So, the industry works on the demands of all consumers. It is for the abovestated reasons that Safal India had introduced non-carbonated packaged drinks in 200-ml glass bottles and tetrapak to furnish the need of health conscious consumers.”

Road blocks The main challenges faced by this industry are heavy customs duties on imported juice concentrates, making sales of these products extremely difficult in India. Other issues are poor infrastructure, lack of cold chain & proper logistics, rigid food laws due to which some good ingredients cannot be used in India, and the highly unorganised market, mainly constituted by road-side vendors. Consumers still prefer to buy juices from road-side vendors even if the juices are unhygienic in most cases. All these factors add to

Sunil Bansal CEO - horticulture, Mother Dairy Fruits & vegetables Pvt Ltd

With health becoming a priority, on one hand, there is a consumer demand for healthier drinks, demanding non-carbonated drinks and, on the other hand, there is set of consumers who continue to consume carbonated drinks, and hence the demand for the same. costs and some of the really good products do not see light of the day, as it is difficult for companies to sell products in India due to high input costs. “We have created some formulation by using a combination of juice concentrates/purees from India and blending it with some imported juice concentrates to obtain a cost-effective, pleasant-tasting healthy product and this has worked for us. We will explore processing of some more fruits other than mango in India in order to create cost-effective products,” points out Dang.

Healthy outlook Though fruit drink and juices market is growing at a fast pace, health and wellness products are still not firmly established within Indian consumers’ habits & needs and they still rely

heavily on various standard products like carbonated drinks. However, the non-carbonated drinks currently present a greater opportunity than the carbonated drinks. This has encouraged carbonated drink companies like Pepsi and Coca Cola, towards diversifying their presence in the non-carbonated drinks segment also. The non-carbonated drinks market is all set to expand further and grow strong in the future. Valued at Rs 2,000 crore, the segment is already growing at an annual rate of 30-40 per cent. Incidentally, the growth rate of carbonated drinks market has been declining. Dang says, “Indian noncarbonated market has huge potential and the future looks optimistic due to factors like huge middle class, young population, changing lifestyle, availability, increased spending power, need for health and wellness-based products. These factors will drive growth in this segment. If some of the previously explained issues are taken care of, this segment can grow at an even higher rate.” The fruit juice market is a fastgrowing niche that appeals to health conscious adults who always want juices to ‘deliver more’. Bansal concludes, “Interestingly, this concept is not entirely alien to the Indian consumer who is accustomed to drinking mixed fruit and easily available juices from the neighbourhood juice vendor, but does not have a choice of hygienically packaged juice. Hence, there is a huge potential in the Indian market that can be tapped by manufacturers.”

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QUALITY MANTRA

Fresh food safety

More than just risk management Food safety issues are now of paramount concern for the food industry. Recent incidences of food safety violation emphasise the relevance of quality food products to the reputation and financial success of retailers worldwide. Food freshness & safety is critical and a constant challenge for retailers in Asia. Retailers can benefit from strong customer loyalty and brand equity in the long term, by being more active in setting up and improving standards for food in Asia. Courtesy: The University of Southern Mississippi

f

reshness has always been top priority for grocery retailers, as consumers in markets worldwide think fresh offerings are important in selecting their store. Retailers are aware of this category, which drives and enhances consumer loyalty. They strive to differentiate retail formats through their fresh offers, delivering higher quality or better pricing for fresh products, emphasising healthier & fresher choices, and adding more instore appeal to their fresh foods. Retailers across Asia understand the link between fresh food categories & customer loyalty, and that expanding their customer base & building brand equity start with the delivery of fresh products. Yet a single failure along the food supply chain can create safety problems that can lead to catastrophic food safety breaches with unpredictable expanse. Even a single major incident can generate recalls and tragic results - causing immeasurable damage to a retailer’s brand and reputation, with no guarantee of recovery. Food safety

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improvement in the long term demands systemic changes across a wide range of industry participants, which only retail leaders can deliver. For instance, in 2008, an incidence of melamine-tainted powdered milk formula for infants occurred in China. This tainted formula caused kidney failure in infants, affecting thousands of families. The incident illustrates not merely the health hazards but also the risk to retailers from poor food safety practices. Such a controversy can cause extensive losses in sales for an Asian retailer, including compensatory damages and product recalls. Consumer expectations and behaviours compound the impact of fresh food safety incidents. Findings from a survey ‘How The World Shops’, conducted by McKinsey indicate that food safety has already become a crucial factor for consumers in selecting retailers (Figure 1). Research conducted after the tainted infant formula incident showed a major shift in attitudes of consumers (Figure 2). Such incidents

QUALITY MANTRA

Food safety risks greater in Asia

tend to reveal similar patterns of consumer trust being affected adversely, and the global network of today’s media & communications only serves to intensify this dynamism. Incidents like the tainted infant formula controversy, and the resulting swift consumer response, underscore the importance of ensuring food safety. Moreover, accomplishing appropriate safety measures in fresh categories is particularly important. Retailers understand that fresh categories are critical because they strongly influence customers’ choice of store and are also important for other reasons. Retailer brands dominate the fresh category, exposing them to the highest risk of damage from food safety incidents. Also, supply chains are complex, fast & dynamic, creating more opportunities for things to go wrong.

Importance

Fresh food safety is a major issue even in developed markets. Recently, both Europe and the US have incurred food incidents, such as Escherichia coli contamination, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and foot & mouth disease. From contaminated spinach in the US to beef in the UK, food-borne diseases have resulted in losses of billions of dollars and shaken consumer confidence. The situation in Asia is at even greater risk. The severity of the issue is difficult to fathom, because most incidents in less developed economies are never recorded or monitored. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that over 7,00,000 people die in the region and many more Hypermarket Vs fresh market - fruit/vegetables* are debilitated annually High from single outbreaks of Trust to offer good quality 0.5 food- and water-borne Can touch/ Lowest prices Specialises feel products on all items in good diseases - many of which quality fresh 0.4 No food safety Prepackaging concerns are never documented. The Can buy most items Easy access Best promotions Well organised 0.3 Like to visit frequency and severity of Excellent service Part of food safety incidents in well-known Pleasant 0.2 Take family/ national chain friends for fun shopping environment Asia is a constant danger, Product origins are known Makes people feel important 0.1 especially in developing countries. Although the Low -1.5 -1.0 -0.5 0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 tainted infant formula Fresh market better Hypermarket better controversy is the most * Derived importance Source: ‘How The World Shops’, McKinsey & Company, 2006 infamous of those Figure 1: Food safety drives store choice recorded recently, there are extreme food safety Do you agree with the following statements?* Agree incidents as well. Percent Disagree I am now looking more cautiously at food labels before making my decision I am more likely to cook at home now so I know what ingredients are in what I eat I find out more information about brands before selecting one I eat out less than before

14

86 81

16 73

27 61

39

I prefer international brands of food as they are considered safer

43

I have changed the place I buy my daily groceries as a result of current food concerns I have changed the types of food I regularly eat I have recently changed the restaurants that I used to go to regularly

57

56 60

67

44 40 33

* An online survey conducted with 515 urban Chinese, aged 18+, in tier 1 and 2 cities about their perceptions of food and beverages Source: ‘Food Quality Concerns: Impact on behaviour and attitude’, Synovate, Oct. 2008

Figure 2: Consumers have become more cautious about food and food safety

Threats to fresh food There are three primary threats to fresh food safety, the dangers posed by which cannot be eliminated completely, but can be restricted to some extent. Residual chemical compounds are hazardous to consumers’ health and also retailers’ reputations,

Courtesy: Outperform Consulting

eg growth stimulants & antibiotics for fish/seafood, and pesticides & fertilisers for fruit/vegetables. Microbial contamination in meat/poultry and fish/ seafood often contain microorganisms at levels that can cause illnesses with alarming frequency. Veterinary diseases are relatively infrequent, but even single cases of virulent diseases such as BSE, bird flu and foot & mouth disease can increase the risk manifold. Poor consumer knowledge poses serious dangers to fresh food safety. For example, in India, meat, poultry & fish are often sold uncovered, and consumers prefer fresh products over cold ones. Thus, retailers could lose money by using cold chain practices.

Safety goes beyond risk management The potential downside risk justifies focussing on fresh food safety. Measures to improve food safety provide dramatic benefits to an economy because they actuate improvement along the entire supply chain. Food and related industries represent a significant portion of gross domestic product (GDP), especially in developing economies. Moreover, many fresh food safety practices also promote overall industry productivity. For instance, In India, Suguna Poultry pioneered the contract-farming model, capturing the benefits of distributed farming and economies of scale. Distributed farming prevented the risk of massive outbreaks of animal disease, while consistent and high-quality chicks and centralised veterinary support

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QUALITY MANTRA

enabled small poultry farmers to breed quality birds at lower cost. The approach has translated into higher incomes for farmers and higher productivity in the animal husbandry industry. Farmers participating in the Suguna programme have witnessed their income grow by an estimated Rs 20 per bird. In countries like Korea, Japan & Australia, the global best practices are regularly sought, adopted and, in some cases, innovated. Retailers use common standards and certification regimes such as Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) or ISO 22000, and learn from incidents as they occur. Developing countries, including Thailand, Taiwan, Hong Kong and Singapore (including few of China’s large cities & markets), are midway through the journey. They have achieved development on some of the requirements. Retailers in these countries can benefit from global standards, but they still face enormous constraints in regulatory enforcement, product tracing and smooth development in cold chain system. Retailers in emerging countries – India, Philippines, Indonesia and most regions in China – face more fundamental constraints. These nations are lacking in most of the requirements for food safety. Global standards, although a useful aspiration, are impossible to achieve in the near term. Significant constraints hinder advances in providing universal access to running water & sewage,

developing a seamless cold chain system, offering primary education, passing & enforcing regulations and building consumer awareness on the importance of food safety.

Leadership by top management Recent incidents have alerted retailers regarding fresh food safety. A 2008 CIES survey of retail executives revealed that 40 per cent of retailers selected food safety as one of their top three issues for the next year, compared with 28 per cent in 2007, although retailers represent only a part of the food safety segment. Fresh food safety covers the entire supply chain. Hence, to ensure food safety

Food safety experts can provide guidance, but it is the top management that should take the lead broad participation from government, consumers and the food processing & distribution industries is important. Food safety experts can provide guidance, but it is the top management that should take the lead. Retailers constitute the last line of defence before products reach consumers, and are responsible for driving the entire supply chain to the next level of fresh

food safety practices. The commitment of retail leaders is justified by the size of the challenge, and underscores the importance of achieving proper food safety. By improving practices in the next 5-10 years, those leading the charge will build their brands and be able to take pride in their determination, foresight and commitment to ensuring fresh food safety for future generations.

Summing up Clear communication and focus towards a broad group of fresh food industry participants will facilitate significant improvements in-store and throughout the fresh food supply chain, leading to reduced food safety risks. The approach should include adopting changes in practices and mindset. For retailers, the long-term benefits from increased focus & leadership on fresh food safety will be more apparent in strengthened customer loyalty & brand equity, improved supplier development and a sustainable fresh food supply in the longer term. Whether working jointly to highlight food safety priorities in a market, or working regionally to share proven practices, increased collaboration and shared leadership can lead to improvements. Retail leaders should undertake an active role, sharing ideas and practices to accelerate the retail industry in Asia. A proactive, right-minded leadership drives the extensive change required than do expensive investments. Courtesy: Coca-Cola Retailing Research Council Asia (CCRRCA)

Courtesy: www.meanwhilehereinfrance.com

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This article is based on a study commissioned by retail industry think tank CCRRCA and conducted by McKinsey & Company to encourage retailers to focus more on improving food safety standards. CCRRCA is a research body dedicated to in-depth investigation of food retailing issues in a cooperative, non-competitive environment. For details, email: gwalsha@apac.ko.com

RETAIL ZONE

Organised retailing

The modern food trade for perishables Food sales in India constitutes 60 per cent of total retail sales. Of the total production in the country, fresh produce constitutes 25-40 per cent, which goes waste every year due to lack of adequate infrastructure, quality standards, supply chain and logistics. In India, despite having an agrarian economy, this sector is extremely unorganised and fragmented. This article highlights the advantages of organised retailing in improving the production of fresh produce and enhancing food safety & hygiene standards.

Courtesy: www.uwiregoinggreen.com

Limji Nanabhoy

i

low investment

poor yields Poor returns

low processing & value addition high wastage

ndia is the second largest producer of fresh fruits and vegetables in the world, with its global contribution of 11 per cent in vegetable production and 15 per cent in fruit production. Yet this contribution is not reflected in the country’s food supply chain security and stability. India’s agrarian economy comprises 20 per cent of total gross domestic product (GDP) and like most ‘big emerging markets’, this is still a high proportion. About 60 per cent of the Indian population is employed in the agrarian economy.

Major drawbacks There exists a vicious cycle at the farm level, which the economists have been highlighting for more than four decades

Figure 1: Major systemic inefficiencies

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There is rampant wastage of fresh produce in the country, which is estimated at 25-40 per cent of the total

May 2010

production. It is estimated that the annual loss of agro produce could be about Rs 58,000 crore ($ 14.5 billion). A wide disparity exists between the price realised by the producer and that paid by the end consumer. On an average, the grower receives 20-25 per cent of the end price of vegetables and 30-40 per cent of that of fruits. Abysmally low levels of processing or value addition are seen for horticultural crops. Current levels of food processing are estimated at 2-5 per cent of the end price of the product. Although agriculture forms the backbone of the Indian economy, the fresh produce sector remains extremely unorganised and fragmented. It lacks adequate infrastructure and faces hurdles like inefficient supply chain & logistics. The quality of produce is also inconsistent as there is lack of standards and quality processes. Moreover, the sector is highly regulated and politically sensitive.

Breaking the vicious cycle Figure 1 shows a vicious cycle, which exists at the farm level, and that results in major systemic inefficiencies. In India, food sales constitutes 60 per cent of all retail sales. Organised retail is a miniscule portion (less than 5 per cent) of the retail sector. Retail trade has now opened up to expand business, and its cumulative growth is expected to double every year in the next five years. This would have a positive impact on the agri-business sector and more for the trade in perishables. Modern food trade (ie, organised retail) creates a strong demand-pull. This

RETAIL ZONE

forces strong backward linkages to the agriculture & food processing sectors and has the potential to transform the trade in perishables.

Advantages of organised retail The produce will be of better quality, as customers consistently demand for quality products. Support will be given to improve grading and quality standards as set out to meet modern retail needs. Supply chain infrastructure will be developed at farm level with pre- & post-harvest facilities, collection & consolidation centres, cold storage and warehousing facilities to cater to the standards set by organised retailers. Disintermediation will be done – ie, all intermediaries between farmers & retail outlets will be removed – to channelise the value captured into improving productivity (shortening channel length & achieving cost-efficiencies). Demand-led cropping systems will lead to improved income realisation at the farm level. Consumers will receive better value for money, wider variety and assured quality. This will help to set standards and high levels of organisation, which will help raise the bar and permeate through to the unorganised retail trade.

Benefits to all stakeholders Substantial benefits will accrue from the development of organised retail for all participants and stakeholders in the agri-business chain. At the farm level: Farmers will receive better support for seeds and inputs, including exposure to best practices. They will receive timely information on weather patterns, demand trends, market prices, etc. Computerisation and information technology will percolate down the supply chain, giving more leverage to the farmer. Modern, appropriate farm inputs, pre- & post-harvest facilities and aggregation of produce at climatecontrolled collection centres will be available. Agri-extension services will be available to produce high-quality fresh

produce to meet retailer specifications. Direct feedback can be obtained on variety, quality specification and harvesting parameters. Quality standards will be enhanced, leading to better price realisation. Insulation will be provided from unreasonable price fluctuations and prompt payments will be made without unnecessary deductions. Moreover, better quality and price trade-offs will be available through improved production systems and inputs. Through the supply chain: As a result of organised retail, efficient, appropriate & dedicated transport and distribution infrastructure will be available for reducing wastage & cost. Cold storage or climate-controlled produce-handling facilities will help in

Modern food trade will be the driver for better farming practices, leading to improved yields, food safety and enhanced hygiene standards increasing the shelf life of the produce and preserving its quality. Appropriate packaging and grading facilities will aid in meeting consumer demand at various price points. Organised retail will help in managing logistics at each stage, including optimal distribution centre clusters. It can capture value across the supply chain, enhancing shelf life of the produce. At retail, point of sale or consumer interface level: There will be segmentation in retail facilities, eg, wholesale, cash & carry, retail, etc. The product will be convenient to use and/or inexpensive. Appropriate store formats will be provided, with equipment for proper display and climate control. Sales and profitability will be enhanced due to reduction in wastage. Quality produce will be provided at ‘value for money’ prices.

Courtesy: Nature’s Basket

Consumers will be able to obtain more variety, better availability and hygienic produce with enhanced shelf life.

Conclusion The perception that organised retail is only about large supermarkets is untrue. There are numerous examples of smalland mid-sized stores that form a major part of this sector, eg, Foodland, Spinach, Nature’s Basket, etc. All organised retail players cooperate to organise and strengthen the back-end of the supply chain, which enormously benefits the perishable food trade. Modern food trade will be the driver for better farming practices, leading to improved yields, food safety and enhanced hygiene standards. It will incorporate proper transport, storage and packaging facilities. This will provide enhanced value to producers and consumers as well as increase India’s exports of fresh produce and make the Indian farmer globally competitive. Thus, modern food retail, particularly with regard to fresh produce, will be advantageous for the producer, intermediary, retailer as well as the consumer. Limji Nanabhoy is the director, Agri Sciences (India) Pvt Ltd. He is also the chairman of the Agribusiness Committee at Bombay Chamber of Commerce and Industry (BCCI). He can be contacted on email: nanabhoy@gmail.com

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CASE STUDY

Tea packaging

A blend of attraction and efficiency Efficient packaging increases the shelf life of products, while attractive packaging boosts the sales of products. Several tea-packaging machines are available today in the market based on the type and form of tea being packed, ensuring highest standards of packaging with utmost hygiene and exquisite presentation. Right packaging is critical for the success of any tea product sold, making it the unsung hero of the global tea business.

life, as we are increasingly becoming accustomed to using packed items. Packaging communicates, preserves, protects and, ultimately, sells the product. The increased sophistication of the tea drinker’s palate indicates that tea as a whole is moving towards a richer, more complex drinking experience.

Scandinavian tea expertise

t

ea is one of the most consumed drinks in the world, second only to water. With the changes in demographics and culture, the market demand is also changing for new satisfying beverage offerings that complement lifestyles of comfort, pleasure and luxury. Major health and wellness trends are encouraging sales of tea brands, as consumers are now seeking healthy alternatives to traditional products, and switching to natural, organic & nutritious beverages such as specialty fruit, herbal, black & green teas. In the tea business, the medium of packaging ensures that the message is reaching to the consumer. Packaging has taken an important place in our

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Even in the farthest corners of Europe, such as Finland, tea is much appreciated and thoroughly enjoyed. Suomen Elintarviketuonti Oy Nordqvist, for instance, is a small company selling a surprisingly large volume of tea – approximately 200 tonne a year. With only 15 employees, Nordqvist’s successful business makes it the largest importer of tea in Finland. For the last 20 years, the company has been developing its tea-selecting expertise and has specialised in both flavoured and unflavoured ranges. Nordqvist was founded in 1979 as a retail enterprise, and is now recognised as one of the most active Finnish players in the tea sector in terms of new launches.

Reducing costs and improving package quality In order to support the goals of its business growth, Nordqvist was on

CASE STUDY

the look out for a new package that could revamp its brand image, while reinforcing its commitment to product quality and premium taste. Combined with economic and environmental concerns, such as reducing packaging & transportation costs and subsequently reducing wastage, Nordqvist decided to acquire a packaging machine that works with plastic film roll instead of pre-made bags. The machine makes bags from this plastic film, fills them and seals them. Cost-efficiency is the major advantage of using the film roll, instead of pre-made bags. The use of plastic film roll would mean less cost per bag, less transportation costs, as it eliminates the need for shipping pre-made bags from the producer to the packaging company, and less storage costs, because the volume of pre-made bags is larger than plastic film rolls. Nordqvist decided to choose Bosch Packaging Technology as its partner. To provide answers to all needs of the Finnish tea company, Bosch offered a tailor-made machine to Nordqvist. Finally, Nordqvist chose

Challenge Y Reducing packaging & transportation costs and subsequently reducing wastage

Solution Y Packaging machine that works with plastic film roll instead of pre-made bags

Benefits Y Advantages of packaging machine using plastic film roll instead of pre-made bags are cost-efficiency, less cost per bag, lower transportation and storage costs Bosch’s flexible package maker, PME 4161 BN, due to its ability to vacuum pack tea, which is vital for locking in the freshness and aroma of tea for maximum customer satisfaction. The technology minimises the amount of oxygen in the package, lengthening the shelf life of the product. The tea is economically packaged, maintaining its form, and is thus easy to handle. The vacuum packing also creates a tamper-evident package. PME 4161 BN enabled Nordqvist reduce costs by increasing the speed of packaging production and filling, while improving the overall package quality. The machine can support a variety of packaging formats and sealing options to meet the demands of customers worldwide. Designed for easy cleaning, this ergonomic machine ensures gentle package transportation and features a scaleable settling section and height adjustment for well-shaped packages. Easy to operate because of the graphical colour touch screen provided, the machine has good accessibility to all types of workstations. PME 4161 BN can produce four package styles - stand up vacuum bags for 60 and 400 gm batches, stand up bags for 1,000 gm batches and stand up bags with four-corner sealing for the 100 gm batches. Kristiina Nordqvist, sales manager, Nordqvist, says, “We are pleased with investing in this flexible machine, which

packs top-quality teas and supports our expansion in the global marketplace. Bosch has been of immense help in assisting with machine installation and training. The future, therefore, looks bright for our tea company.”

Expansion plans As a distinguished brand, Nordqvist tea can be found throughout Finland, from the biggest supermarket to the smallest gas station. After having such great success in Finland, Nordqvist is currently expanding into the US, Japan, Estonia, Sweden and Norway. The company’s products, elegantly packaged in Nordic styles, and the exclusive flavours appeal to a wide market. Nordqvist adds, “It may come as a surprise to some, but Nordic design is fashionable in Japan, and they have a preference there for the same types of flavoured teas as we do in Finland.”

Conclusion Packaging cannot enhance the taste of tea, but it can make it reach the consumer, faster, presenting in a more attractive way and with a better idea for using it. The success of any tea product sold lies in right packaging. This is true even today, with the ever-increasing number of tea products and the decreasing attention span of the consumer due to strong competition on retail shelves. The role of a package is, thus, as critical as the product inside. Courtesy: Bosch Packaging Services AG For details contact, Margit Nuck (manager - Corporate Communications, Bosch Packaging Services AG). Email: margit.nuck@bosch.com

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EVENTS CALENDAR

National

Pune

Ahmedabad

Ludhiana

Indore

Maharashtra

Gujarat

Punjab

Madhya Pradesh

Chennai Tamil Nadu

Nov 19-22, 2010

Dec 17-20, 2010

January 2011

February 18-21, 2011

March 4-6, 2011

India’s premier industrial trade fair on products and technologies from machine tools, fluid power, instrumentation & control, electrical & electronics, material handling, plastics, rubber, packaging, chemical, CAD/CAM, auto components, and general engineering.

For details contact:

Engineering Expo Infomedia 18 Limited, Ruby House, 1st Floor, J K Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai 400 028. Tel: 022-3003 4649, Fax: 022-3003 4499 Email: shamal@infomedia18.in, Website: www.engg-expo.com

All Food Tech 2010 An exhibition and seminar on food processing, rice & grain processing, bakery, dairy, packaged food and beverages; June 11-14, 2010; at KTPO Trade Centre, Bengaluru For details contact: Arjun N, head - Events AdsStation No. 1365, 2nd Floor, Sarakki Gate, Kanakapura Main Road, Bengaluru 560 078 Tel: 080-6570 7899 Fax: 080-2654 3205 Email: arjun@adsstation.com

Process Industry Forum A conference on automation and enterprise solutions in process and batch industries aimed at key decision makers; July 14-17, 2010; at Hyderabad For details contact: ARC Advisory Group 20, Annaswamy Mudaliar Road Sivan Chetty Garden Post, Bengaluru 560 042 Tel: 080-2554 7116; Fax: 080-2554 7116 Email: prakasha@ARCweb.com Web: www.arcweb.com

International Foodtec India 2010 An international exhibition and conference for food processing, packaging, ingredients, beverages, cooling & refrigeration; September

30-October 03, 2010; at Bombay Exhibition Centre, Mumbai For details contact: Cidex Trade Fairs Pvt Ltd 1, Commercial Complex Pocket H & J, Sarita Vihar New Delhi 110 076 Tel: 011-2697 1056; Fax: 011-2697 1746 Email: info@cidex-tradefairs.com Website: www.foodtecindia.com

Sagar Tech Plaza, SakiNaka Junction Andheri-Kurla Road Andheri (E) Mumbai 400 072 Tel: 022-6612 2600, Fax: 022-6612 2626 Email: bipins@ubmindia.com Website: www.fi-events.com

Poultry India 2010 An international exhibition for the poultry industry; November 24-26, 2010; at Hyderabad International Trade Exposition Centre (HITEX), Hyderabad

PROMACH 2010 An exclusive exhibition for the process plant & machinery industry showcasing new-age technologies & solutions; October 01-04, 2010; at Bangalore International Exhibition Centre, Bengaluru For details contact: Bangalore International Exhibition Service 10th Mile, Tumkur Road, Madavara Post Bengaluru 562 123 Tel: 080-6583 3234 Email: dayanand@bies.co.in Website: www.promach.co.in

Fi India 2010 An event that would feature companies showcasing ingredients for food & beverages, dietary supplements, functional/health foods, nutraceuticals, natural foods; October 22-23, 2010; at Bombay Exhibition Centre, Mumbai For details contact: UBM India Pvt Ltd

For details contact: Indian Poultry Equipment Manufacturers’ Association (IPEMA) E-36, ‘D’ Road, MIDC, Satpur Nashik, Maharashtra 422 007 Mob: 98220 94653 Email: info@ipema.co.in

Food Technology Show 2010 An exhibition focussed on technologies, equipment, materials & services for food production & processing, brewing & distilling, baking, freezing, refrigeration & climatic engineering, etc; December 03-06, 2010; at Pragati Maidan, New Delhi For details contact: Print-Packaging.com Pvt Ltd F-101 Tower No. 7 International Infotech Park Vashi, Navi Mumbai 400 705 Tel: 022-2781 2093 Fax: 022-2781 2578 Email: info@indiapackagingshow.com May 2010

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EVENTS CALENDAR

International IFFA 2010 One of the leading exhibitions for the meat processing industry showcasing latest machinery and equipment for all stages of the process chain – from slaughtering to processing and packaging; May 08-13, 2010, at Frankfurt am Main, Germany For details contact: Messe Frankfurt Trade Fairs India Pvt Ltd 2, Bajaj Bhavan, 1st floor Nariman Point Mumbai 400 021 Tel: 022-6144 5900 Fax: 022-6144 5999 Email: info@india.messefrankfurt.com Website: www.iffa.com

FOODMASH 2010 International exhibition of equipment and technologies for manufacturing, processing and packaging of foodstuffs; June 15-18, 2010; at Crocus-Expo IEC, Moscow For details contact: MVK Holding Company Mikluho-Maklaya Str., 22 117437, Moscow Russia Tel: +7 (495) 995-05-95 Email: info@mvk.ru

Tel: +66 (02) 617 1475 Fax: +66 (02) 617 1406 Email: info@besmontnet.com

Saudi Agro-Food Industries 2010 A trade fair showcasing the latest in food products, processing and packaging technologies; October 04-07, 2010; at Riyadh International Exhibition Centre in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

MIFB 2010 A trade fair for international food and beverage industry; July 22-24, 2010; at Putra World Trade Centre (PWTC) in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

For details contact: Riyadh Exhibitions Co. Ltd Olaya Road Postfach P O Box 56010 SA - 11554 Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Tel: +966 1 454 1448 Fax: +966 1 454 4846 Email: esales@recexpo.com

For details contact: Expomal International Sdn Bhd 7-2, Subang Business Centre Jalan USJ9/5Q 47620 Subang Jaya Selangor Darul Ehsan, Malaysia Tel: +603 8024 6500 Fax: +603 8024 8740 Email: info@expomal.com

IPA 2010 International food processing and equipment week; October 17-21, 2010; at Paris Nord Villepinte in Paris, France

INTERMEAT 2010 An international trade fair for meat, cold meats and sausage; September 12-15, 2010; at Düsseldorf Exhibition Centre in Dusseldorf, Germany For details contact: Messe Düsseldorf GmbH Stockumer Kirchstrasse 61 D-40474 Düsseldorf Germany Tel: +49 - 211 - 4560 900 Fax: +49 - 211 - 4560 668 Email: info@messe-duesseldorf.de

For details contact: Comexposium Immeuble le Wilson 70, avenue du Général-de-Gaulle 92058 Paris-La Défense, France Tel: +33 (0) 1 7677 1111 Fax: +33 (0) 1 7677 1212 Email: infos@exposium.fr

Food Processing & Packaging Indonesia 2010

Propak Asia 2010

FI South America 2010

International food processing and packaging technology exhibition; June 16-19, 2010; at Bangkok International Trade & Exhibition Centre (BITEC), Bangkok

International food ingredients exhibition; September 21-23, 2010; at Transamérica Expo Center in Sao Paulo, Brazil

International exhibition on food processing & packaging machinery, equipment, materials & services; October 27-30, 2010; at Jakarta International Expo in Jakarta, Indonesia

For details contact: United Business Media Industrieweg 54 PO Box 200 3600 AE Maarssen, The Netherlands Tel: +31 34 65 59 444 Fax: +44 (0) 20 7921 8059 Email: jblack@cmpinformation.com

For details contact: KristaMedia Pratama PT. Krista Exhibitions Jln.Blandongan 28 DG Jakarta 11220, Indonesia Tel: +62-21 6345861 Fax: +62-21 6340140 Email: info@krista-exhibitions.com

For details contact: Bangkok Exhibition Services Ltd. 62 Rama VI Soi 30 Rama VI Road Samsennai, Phiyathai Bangkok 10400, Thailand

The information published in this section is as per the details furnished by the respective organiser. In any case, it does not represent the views of Modern Food Processing

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REPORT

Showcasing the latest trends and innovations The Indian packaging industry is expected to show strong growth over the next few years. With the growing market & changing customer requirements, packaging industry is likely to witness many transformations. To highlight some of these changes and showcase the latest innovations in packaging & bulk packaging industries, India Packaging Show 2010 and the concurrent Bulk Pack 2010 were held at Hyderabad recently. A report…

Inaugural session

Dignitaries during the inauguration of the show

t

he Indian packaging industry is currently growing at a fast pace and is all set to make inroads into global markets. With the growing domestic and international markets, packaging has undergone a remarkable transformation. Mostly used as a marketing tool, packaging is witnessing advancements and innovations in design, graphics and materials. Developments have been noted in the technology used by the industry. To showcase the recent developments & trends and for the industry to network, PrintPackaging.Com Pvt Ltd had organised the India Packaging Show (IPS) 2010 at Hitex, Hyderabad, recently. A concurrent show for bulk packaging, Bulk Pack 2010, was also held.

The exhibition was inaugurated by the minister for major industries, Government of Andhra Pradesh, Kanna Lakshmi Narayana, in the presence of K Harishchandra Prasad, president, Federation of Andhra Pradesh Chambers of Commerce and Industry (FAPCCI); Rajeshwar Rao, secretary general, FAPCCI; Sanjay Kapoor, COO, HITEX and other dignitaries. The minister also unveiled the show catalogue. Congratulating the organisers for bringing the packaging exhibition to South, Narayana said, ”Exhibitions and trade fairs have now been established as a powerful, costeffective marketing tool. These not only help exhibitors and visitors in getting acquainted with the new technology but also boost the state’s economy.” IPS 2010 and Bulk Pack 2010, spread over 7,000 sq m gross area, brought together about 230 exhibitors on the same platform. The four-day event witnessed national and international participation. Especially, with international participation, the event saw more than 50 product launches, 100 live demonstrations of running machines and 120 product highlights.

Launch pad Many exhibitors chose IPS 2010 to introduce their products. Robatech India chose the show to launch its new Greenline environment friendly hotmelt systems. On a similar note, Spearepet launched green PET. Cyklop Packaging Systems showcased its new

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REPORT

An overview of the exhibition

Exhibitors showcasing their products to visitors

Exhibitors speak Bulk packaging industry has lot of prospects and an exhibition dedicated to this segment can only provide an excellent platform for dissemination of information. The exhibition was quite focussed as the quality of the visitors matched the quality of the international exhibitors.

Guglielmo Zizzi export sales manager, Goglio SpA, Italy

With the Greenline technology, up to 17 percent energy can be saved in combination with a heated hose NW 6 mm and the fully insulated SX Diamond applicator heads. With the rising awareness of environment, the industry is looking for green products and IPS 2010 gave us a platform to present our products for this purpose.

Kishor Butani CEO & MD, Robatech India

Through Bulk Pack 2010, we got to know more about the Indian bulk packaging industry and the kind of products people are looking for. We are planning to extend our base in India and the show helped us gain more knowledge on the Indian market.

Gerald Wu marketing manager, My Flexitank

We displayed our new T 60 tube-filling machine at the show. The live demo of the machine gave us a chance to show its efficiency and also help the customer understand the mechanism of the product.

Mahadevan Iyer MD, IMA-PG India Ltd

KGK inkjet printers for the first time in India. ID Technologies is one of the first companies in India to design and develop thermal transfer label/bar-coding printer indigenously. The company introduced its latest Strom iX201 thermal transfer printers. Similarly, Saurabh Flexipack Systems introduced high speed pick FFS machines with 6 stations & 8 stations at IPS 2010. The machine caters to almost all packaging requirements of food, pharma and chemical industries. Proface launched new compact human machine interface (HMI) GP4100 series - at IPS 2010. GP4100 series models are equipped with 3.4inch, 16-level grayscale and 200 x 80 pixels high-resolution display offering touch operation as well as high quality display capability of full graphic and text data with expanded support of Windows image and Bitmap fonts. Bulk Pack 2010 also saw new launches from Indian and international companies. Goglio SpA, Italy, launched the aseptic filling systems and industrial bags at the show. My Flexitank Industries, Malaysia, introduced its Flexitank - a new concept in the field of bulk packaging. Time Technoplast participated in Bulk Pack 2010 to launch its new range of material handling solutions.

Conference The concurrently held two-day conference focussed on the bulk packaging segment and highlighted the usages, importance, innovations, developments and challenges faced by the bulk packaging industry. The conference saw more than 100 attendees,

with a healthy mix of national and international speakers. Some of the presentations at the conference reflected the latest developments in bulk barrier packaging; aseptic and non-aseptic packaging in fruit juices, dairy products & beverages; challenges in bulk barrier packaging for pharma; new-generation woven sack design – manufacturing & high-speed filling systems; and end-user experiences, among others.

The way forward With the packaging industry in India all set to double the growth, the stakeholders will have to understand the latest trends. Manufacturers and consumers of the packaging industry also need to understand the varying demands and importance for marketing of the products. One of the growing, important trends for the packaging industry is the use of eco-friendly, green solutions. The event also showcased the advancements in technology and newer products. The knowledge gained at the show and international partnerships will be beneficial to both the exhibitors and visitors. After this southern venture, PrintPackaging.Com is all set to stage PackPlus 2010 scheduled during December 3-10, at New Delhi. This show promises to give insights into tapping various verticals such as food, beverage, pharmaceutical, cosmetics and textile of packaging industry. It is also likely to help in accessing international markets and understanding the latest technological advancements, which will pave the way for growth of the Indian packaging industry.

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PRODUCT UPDATE

Burner Eclipse Combustion offers ‘AH-MA’ burner, which produces a uniform odourless and smokeless flame ideal for heating fresh air in makeup and process air heating applications. Its design provides stable operation over a wide range of velocities, input and fuels. This burner is ETL listed, complies with ANSI Z21.2 design standards, and is used in systems, which meet emission standards for NOx and CO. This burner can be assembled from straight sections, tees and crosses to produce required configuration. The features of the burner include inputs up to 1,200,000 Btu/hr/LF, up to 30:1 turndown, up to 450 ºF/232 ºC upstream air temperature, up to 850 ºF/450 ºC downstream air temperature, multifuel capability (natural gas, propane and butane), etc. Eclipse Combustion Pvt Ltd Pune - Maharashtra Tel: 020-3250 3630, 3234 7612, 3260 5979 Email: sdeo@eclipsenet.com

Cleaning nozzle Industrial Equipwash offers fully automatic turbo tank cleaning nozzle powered by cleaning fluid. It is designed for large volumetric tanks/agitators in pharma, food, distilleries, beverage, chemicals and other process industries. The heart of the turbojet cleaner is an internal hydraulic motor, which makes the nozzles automatically perform a geared rotation around the horizontal and vertical axes. The number of cycles required for proper cleaning usually depends on the cleaning distance, cleaning procedure and cleaning agent. To control the RPM of the machine the flow rate is controlled through nozzles of various orifice sizes. A choice of nozzles is available to suit tank geometry and cleaning requirements. Industrial Equipwash Inc Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-2679 7941, Fax: 022-2679 2936 Mob: 098692 31815 Email: iewi@vsnl.net

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Chilli cutting machines Varada Engineers offers chilli cutting machines, which are used specially for green chilli cutting. All food contact parts and structure are made of 304 grade stainless steel. The cut chilli pieces are as per specifications or 20 mm in length. The machines are compact and easy to work with. These have durable SS cutting blades and a feeding arm that propels chillies towards the cutting blades. These machines are user-friendly and have inbuilt conveyor to carry the chillies. One of its main features is less product wastage. These machines are available in capacities ranging from 2,000 kg to 10 tonne/day. The power requirement of these chilli cutting machines range from 2 to 5 hp at 415 V. Varada Engineers Pune - Maharashtra Tel: 020-2698 9087 Mob: 09823076601 Email: omvarada@gmail.com

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PRODUCT UPDATE

Infrared lamps/heaters Alok International offers a complete range of infrared heaters and lamps manufactured by Victory Lighting (UK) Ltd. Infrared is an electromagnetic radiation whose wavelength is longer than visible light but shorter than microwave radiation. It is divided into short-wave, medium-wave and long-wave infrared. These infrared lamps/heaters are used in PET preform heating, drying water-based inks on printing presses, paint baking, powder-coating curing, curing inks on textiles, drying glue on paper, drying moisture in paper mills, paper coating drying, shrink wrapping, food warming, evaporation of water in humidifiers, soldering and in the semiconductor industry. The company also offers complete range of short-wave infrared lamps, ceramic infrared heaters and medium-wave quartz infrared heaters. Alok International New Delhi Tel: 011-2592 0408/0439 Fax: 011-4144 3563 Email: alok@alokinternational.in

Metal detector Technofour Electronics offers conveyorised metal detector for detection of metal contamination in food and pharmaceutical products. It is an Eddy current-based digital metal detection system, which also finds application in chemicals, cosmetics, garments, leather, rubber, and in many other industries. The metal detector consists of electronic unit, test coil, conveyor and rejection mechanism. The functions performed by the electronic unit are diagnostics on LCD display, auto product compensation, set parameter retention on loss of power, buzzer and LED indication on detection of metal contamination, LCD bargraph/ numeric display to monitor noise and signal, etc. Rejection mechanisms offered by the company are conveyor stoppage, air nozzle, diverter arm, flap and pusher/puller. Technofour Electronics Pvt Ltd Pune - Maharashtra Tel: 020-2605 8063/4/5 Fax: 020-2605 8073 Email: sales@teplindia.com

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Reverse osmosis desalination system Parker Hannifin India offers reverse osmosis desalination system. It consists of ‘Aqua Pro® 3 or 5’ plunger high-pressure pump with titanium head for maximum corrosion resistance, balanced drive for lowest noise & pulsation and ceramic plungers as well as nylon valves for long service life. The SS-316 prefiltration housings deliver 200 sq ft of filtering area, and a boost pump provides up to 50 psi of boost pressure to the filtration system. It is provided with stainless steel, glycerin-filled pressure gauges, which accurately read pressure at filters, pump and product. The easy-to-operate SS-316 high-pressure bypass valve controls the operating mode from cleaning/rinsing to water production. Automatic diversion valve diverts water to discharge if water quality decreases below acceptable standards. Digital water quality monitor displays ppm TDS of product water output and also displays temperature and total hours for accurate service logs. Parker Hannifin India Pvt Ltd Navi Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-6513 7081-85, Fax: 022-2768 6841 Email: parkerind@parker.com

Food extruder Malik Engineers offers single-screw food extruders suitable for extruding pellets from wheat, potato or corn. The line consists of a ribbon blender for dry mixing. After mixing, screw conveyors propel the product to pre-conditioner chamber, which consists of a single rotating agitator shaft fitted with mixing paddles. The material is cooked by mechanical shear and heat supplied by heaters wrapped around the temperature controlled barrel. The cooked dough is extruded out of the cooker extruder in the form of a continuous ribbon and is chopped into small lengths by stationary blades fitted at the end of the barrel. These are pneumatically transferred to the driers, which further removes extra moisture present in the pellet. The pellets are then weighed and packed for future consumption by expansion in hot oil (frying). It is available in screw sizes of 50, 65, 75 and 100 mm to give throughput rates of 25, 50, 80 & 120 kg/hr, respectively. The company also offers a special model with screw diameter of 160 mm, which provides up to 800 kg/hr output of pellet product. Malik Engineers Thane - Maharashtra Tel: 0250-239 0839, Fax: 022-2883 0751 Email: info@malikengg.com

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PRODUCT UPDATE

EPS cup making machine Neejtech India offers both vertical and horizontal expanded polystyrene (EPS) cup making machine manufactured by Thermoware EPS Machinery BV. This machine is used for for the production of cups, containers, tubs and meat trays. The features of the machine include guaranteed cycle time, high volume production, approximately 4,50,000 cups/day with 3 machines of 16 cavity, etc. It is available with upto 16 cavity moulds & machines, and is provided with pneumatic control & user-friendly electronics. The machine is used for manufacturing drinking cups for hot & cold drinks and ice cream cups. It is designed to run at an optimised cycle time and gives 60 per cent higher productivity. The key advantage of the machine is that disposable trays, plates, containers, etc, can be made easily by changing the mould. Neejtech India Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-2656 1312, Mob: 098250 40231 Email: sales@neejtech.com

Form fill seal machine Associated Pack-Tech Engineers offers form fill seal (FFS) machine, designed to pack sticky hydroscopic and non-free-flowing products like spices, turmeric powder, chilly powder, henna, glucose powder, ORS powder, detergent powder, pharmaceuticals powder, etc. The batch-to-batch variation in weight due to change in specific density is fully controlled in this machine by using specially designed adjustable disc system. The weight of the product being packed can be adjusted within minutes without stopping the machine by adjusting the handle. The hopper has been designed such that it does not allow powder to stick to its wall and the material is continuously fed on the disc without any lump formation. The dropping and sealing time is synchronised such that the materials are fully settled in pouch before sealing is done, which ensures that materials do not come in the sealing portion of the pouch. The material being packed drops directly into pouches from the disc without touching any metal part of the machine, thus ensuring that heat is not transmitted to the material being packed. Associated Pack-Tech Engineers Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-2277 3447 Email: packtech2003@yahoo.co.in

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Water and modular process system Neela India offers water and modular process system for the food & beverage, bio-pharma, biotech and cosmetic industries. The water and modular process system includes process vessels, accessories, CIP/SIP, transfer piping & equipment, storage tanks along with complete instrumentation and documentation. The process vessels (containers) are made of stainless steel. The ingredient(s) of an end product, ie, a drug or a food item is subject to a process in these vessels and are transferred for further action. It is provided with a level measurement meter, safety valves, filters, etc, for executing and controlling the process parameters of an end product. The transfer piping moves the intermediate product a raw/finished form of drug or food item from one place to another for further process. The storage tanks store process intermediates and subsequently transfer them for further processes. The cleaning/sterilisation-in-place is done by passing a chemical, acid, water and/or pure steam through the whole system so that it is ready for next production cycle. Neela India Pvt Ltd Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-4088 8444, Mob: 098229 76110 Fax: 022-2874 7129 Email: abhay@neelaindia.com

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Photoelectric sensor Omron Automation offers ‘E3ZM series’ compact photoelectric sensor with built-in amplifier and stainless steel housing (SUS-316L). It is suited for applications in the food industry where hygiene and resistance to aggressive environments are key requirements. This sensor is also suitable for high-temperature, high-pressure jet water spray cleaning applications. It has a sensing range of 15 m in through beam, 4 m in retro reflective, 1 m in diffused and 200 mm in BGS reflective mode. The sensor has both prewire & connector type and NPN & PNP output models. It can be used in various applications in the food industry like components detection, transparent bottle detection, counting of number of bottles/packs moving on the conveyor, presence/absence of cap in the bottle, position detection of objects, etc. This detergent-resistant sensor is tested on alkaline and acid-based detergents used in the food industry. The high-grade stainless steel SUS 316L and the housing design of the ‘E3ZM series’ sensor with protruding optics or adjusters provides enhanced protection against mechanical damage. Omron Automation Pvt Ltd Bengaluru - Karnataka Tel: 080-4072 6400 Email: in_enquiry@ap.omron.com

Conveyor components Spectra Plast India offers modular conveyor components as per international standards in various grades of engineering plastics like reinforced polyamide, polyacetal, UHMWPE, etc. The range of products include wear strips, slat chains, modular chains, sprockets, idlers, frame supports, leg supports, corner bends, etc. The products are manufactured as per the standard practised in the conveying industry. Various machine builders and end-users use these products in breweries, distilleries, pharmaceuticals, soft drinks, personal care, etc. Tailor-made components are also manufactured from various grades of engineering plastics and as per requirement of machine builders and end-users. Spectra Plast India Pvt Ltd Coimbatore - Tamil Nadu Tel: 0422-653 9529, Fax: 0422-266 5872 Email: systemplast@vsnl.net

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Cold room Colpan Poly Panel Industries offers cold room. Its surface is made of GI prepainted sheet, SS sheet, GI plain sheet and aluminium sheet. It is available in thicknesses of 60, 80, 100, 125 and 150 mm. Its wall, floor, door frame, door leaf, tee walls, corners, ceilings and PVC gaskets are available in a variety of heights and widths. It is fitted with flush-type big door that could have a long-term heavy duty usage. Its window/hatch door comes with a frame and can be fitted anywhere in the installed cold room. Door accessories consist of an importedmake handle, closer and chromium-plated hinges. The door leaf is made of fibreglass reinforced plastic lining. This does not dent, rust, wrap or scratch and can easily bear the impact of roll-in trolleys/carts. The cold room comes with double toughened glass vacuum due to which it becomes transparent and there is no need to frequently open the door. Its advanced high-density 40 kg/m3 of Puf insulation ensures insulating efficiency and uniform cell structure or density that can be provided as per the user’s demand. Colpan Poly Panel Industries Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-6542 6394, Fax: 079-2297 1352 Email: panel@colpangroup.com

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Bottle filling machine Laxmi Pharma Equipment offers compact automatic volumetric high-speed bottle liquid filling machine. The machine consist of turntable, SS slat conveyor belt, filling & post gassing SS-316 nozzles, precision built SS-316 syringes, non-toxic synthetic rubber tubing, easy-to-reach compact panel and no-container-no-filling system, etc. This compact, matt finished unit is totally enclosed in stainless steel. The

un-scrambler has been designed in the machine to eliminate dead ends and difficult to clean spot. All its exposed parts are made of SS-304, matt finish to avoid any reflection. It is provided with co-eccentric nozzles, which allow quick and precise setting. Its height can be adjusted to match other machines for efficient synchronisation. This machine is used in pharmaceuticals, food & beverages, chemicals and in allied industries. Laxmi Pharma Equipment Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-2583 1600 Email: laxmipharma1@dataone.in

Pulveriser Jas Enterprises offers pulveriser for cashew nut cutting. This machine is provided with a single-piece crushing chamber. There are no separate joints of fabrication for outlet. This machine is suitable for continuous crushing (breaking) of cashew nuts, pistachio nuts, almonds, etc. Features of the pulveriser include dustfree and environment-friendly operation because there is no wastage of products. All contact parts are made of stainless steel 304/316. The machine is available with a set of three pieces of perforated round hole screens. If not operated by hands, this machine requires 0.25 hp motor for automatic operation. Jas Enterprises Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-2274 3454 Fax: 079-2274 5062 Email: info@jasenterprise.com

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Industrial vacuum cleaners Acmevac Sales offers a range of sophisticated Swiss Vac industrial vacuum cleaners. These cleaners are available in light, medium and heavy duty. The powerful suction makes these vacuum cleaners suitable for wet and dry applications. The collection tanks are made of stainless steel and castor mounted for mobility. Trolleys are provided for the heavier models. The trolleys have a unique tipping arrangement for emptying the container without lifting it. These cleaners are also equipped with bypass motors/turbines. The air intake is in the lid, which allows for larger space. The larger models feature an exclusive triple filter system for proper filtration and for protecting the suction unit. The accessories include a set of nozzles for effective dust, dirt and wet pick up. Acmevac Sales Pvt Ltd Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-2837 5837, 2838 1053, Fax: 022-2836 4977 Email: acmevac@vsnl.com

Rapid mixer granulator Vyanktesh Fabricraft offers rapid mixer granulator, which is used for grinding and mixing of granules in food, pharma and other related industries. These granulators are used for achieving uniform size of granules and for homogeneous mixing. These are available with batch capacities in the range of 25-1,000 ltr. The features of these granulators include reduced material handling,thereby ensuring a more hygienic process,uniform granule size, low headroom for user-friendly operation, etc. The company offers platform and railing in certain models for the floor plan at the user’s end. Vyanktesh Fabricraft Pvt Ltd Nashik - Maharashtra Tel: 0253-660 2691/238 3603 Fax: 0253-660 2691 Email: vyankteshen@yahoo.co.in The information published in this section is as per the details furnished by the respective manufacturer/distributor. In any case, it does not represent the views of

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 Aerosol can.......................................................  Effluent treatment plant ....................................  Laminar flow work stations ..............................  Aerosol spray paint...........................................  Electromagnetic feeder .....................................  Latches .............................................................



 Air cooler ..........................................................  Encoders...........................................................  Level controllers ...............................................  Air handling units..............................................  EPS cup making machine .................................  Levelling elements ............................................  Air showers.......................................................  Evaporating units for cold rooms .....................  Levers ...............................................................  Air tents for operation theatre...........................  Evaporators.......................................................  Lipid food processing .......................................  Almond cutting machine...................................  Exhausters ........................................................  LV motors.........................................................  AODD pumps ....................................................  Exhibition - India Foodex 2010 .........................  Magnetic equipment .........................................  Aseptic filter......................................................  Extruded products ............................................  Magnetic plate ..................................................  Automatic scrubber driers ................................  Extruder ............................................................  Magnetic traps ..................................................  Beverage can ....................................................  Feeder ...............................................................  Mathiya making machine ..................................  Blower motor ....................................................  Filtration systems..............................................  Mechanical vacuum boosters ...........................  Blowers.............................................................  Flexible screw ...................................................  Metal detector...................................................

First Fold Here

 Bottle filling machine ........................................  Flexible transparent PVC strip door ..................  Metering pumps................................................  Brewers.............................................................  Flour mills.........................................................  Milk powder plant .............................................  Bucket elevator .................................................  Fluid mixing dispersion unit..............................  Mini dal mill ......................................................  Burners ............................................................  Food analysing & testing machine....................  Mini pulveriser with circulating system ............  Cap sealing machine.........................................  Food extruder....................................................  Mini vacuum machine.......................................  Carpet cleaning machines.................................  Food process equipment ..................................  Mixer cooler......................................................  Centrifugal pumps ............................................  Food testing programmes.................................  Mixer grinder ....................................................  Chapati making machine...................................  Foot sealer ........................................................  Mixture for papad machine...............................  Chilli cutting machine .......................................  Forced convection unit air cooler......................  Motion controls ................................................



Fax.: +91-22-3003 4499 Email: b2b@infomedia18.in

 Blister forming machines..................................  Filtration equipment ..........................................  Measuring & monitoring relay .........................



 Chocolate/cocoa making machine ....................  Form fill seal machine.......................................  Multi-chamber pulveriser..................................  Chorafali making machine ................................  Gas conditioning and fire protection.................  Multi-level car parks .........................................  Chow making machine......................................  Grain handling unit ...........................................  Nip .................................................................  Clamps..............................................................  Gravy making machine .....................................  Noodle making machine ...................................  Clean room equipment......................................  Grill magnet ......................................................  Oil milling unit ..................................................  Clean room projects..........................................  Grinding & dispersion unit................................  Online vacuum machine....................................  Clean room validations & services....................  Gyratory screen ................................................  Packaging machine...........................................  Cleaning nozzle .................................................  Hammer machine..............................................  Panipuri machine ..............................................



 Cleaning section equipment..............................  Hand sealer.......................................................  Papad making machine.....................................

Tel.: +91-22-3003 4685

 Cold form C & Z purlins....................................  Handwheels ......................................................  Pasta making machine......................................  Cold room.........................................................  Haul off .............................................................  Photoelectric sensors .......................................

Second Fold Here

 Colour sorters...................................................  Heat-resistant door ...........................................  Piston pumps....................................................  Contamination controller ..................................  Heat transfer systems.......................................  Plastic pellets....................................................  Conveyor...........................................................  Heavy industrial steel buildings ........................  PLC’s ................................................................  Conveyor belts ..................................................  High-pressure cleaners.....................................  Plungers............................................................  Conveyor components ......................................  Hinges...............................................................  Poly carbonate sheets.......................................  Conveyor unit....................................................  Hopper magnet .................................................  Pounding machine ............................................  Cooling & boiler water treatment plants ...........  Horizontal wrapping machines..........................  Pre-engineered steel buildings..........................  Counters & power supplies ..............................  HVAC clean room..............................................  Pre-fab shelters ................................................  Cutters ..............................................................  Impact pulveriser ..............................................  Programmable logic controllers........................  Daliya making machine.....................................  Indicators..........................................................  Programmable terminals ..................................



Please tick against the box of product(s) you are interested in:  Mention specific product/service you need,  Complete all the details on this form.  Tear the form & mail it to us. (It is a prepaid mail)

 B2B magazines .................................................  Extruder for papad machine..............................  Masala mill........................................................



 Debacterisation plants ......................................  Industrial control & sensing devices ................  Proximity sensors.............................................  Doors ................................................................  Industrial door ..................................................  Pulveriser..........................................................  Double chamber vacuum ..................................  Industrial-type unit air cooler............................  PVC strip door ..................................................  Drawer magnet .................................................  Industrial vacuum cleaners...............................  Rapid mixer granulator .....................................  Drum roller .......................................................  Infrared lamps/heaters......................................  Rare earth tubes ...............................................  Dry cum wet grinder.........................................  Instant coffee plant ...........................................  Residential steel houses ...................................

Send your inquiries at: Tel: +91-22-3003 4685 Fax: +91-22-3003 4499 Email: b2b@infomedia18.in

GLUE

We will send your inquiries to the manufacturers and ask them to send you the details or contact you directly. Use this form for FREE additional Information on products published in this issue.How to use this form:

 Aero mechanical devices ..................................  Dust control door..............................................  Juicer ................................................................

Third Fold Here

PRODUCT INQUIRY FORM

 AC drives ..........................................................  Dryers ...............................................................  Invertor/variable frequency drives ....................

Please complete the following & get a quick effective response from suppliers: 1. Your company’s business function is (one only)  Wholesalers  Manufacturer  Distributor  Agent  Other, please specify______________ 2. Your role in your company’s buying process can best be described as:  I buy  I identify potential suppliers  I approve purchases  I negotiate contracts  I select suppliers. 3. Your line of business Name: Designation: Company Name:

City:

Pin:

Tel:

Fax:

05 / 2010

Address:

Email:

 Reverse osmosis desalination system ..............  Sludge drainage presses...................................  Tri lobe roots blowers.......................................  RFID .................................................................  Spice mill ..........................................................  Turnkey systems for dust suppression.............  Rice milling equipment .....................................  Spout can..........................................................  Twin lobe roots blowers ...................................  Roof vent ..........................................................  Spray nozzles and accessories .........................  Universal type unit air coller .............................  Roofing & cladding sheets................................  Stirrer................................................................  Vaccum cleaners...............................................  Rotary lobe pumps ...........................................  Stretch wrapping machine ................................  Vacuum belt dryers...........................................  Safety door .......................................................  Structural floor decking sheets.........................  Vacuum drying cabinets ...................................  Safety light curtains ..........................................  Sweepers ..........................................................  Vacuum machine ..............................................  Sealing machine................................................  Switching relays................................................  Vacuum packing machines ...............................  Self-adhesive tapes...........................................  Takeup drum.....................................................  Vegetable cutting machine................................  Services - aimal feed technology ......................  Temperature controllers....................................  Ventilators.........................................................  Services - emulsification solutions ...................  Thermal processes............................................  Vermicelling machine........................................  Services - market research ...............................  Thermoforming/vacuum forming machines......  Vibration motor.................................................  Services - total water management ..................  Timers...............................................................  Vision sensors ..................................................  Shaped can .......................................................  Timing belts ......................................................  Waste water treatment & recycle plant .............  Shrink wrapping machine .................................  Timing pulleys ..................................................  Water and modular process system .................  Single disc machines ........................................  Tin can ..............................................................  Water treatment plant .......................................  Skin packaging machines .................................  Tomato strainer ................................................  Winder ..............................................................  Slip lid can ........................................................  Total integrated automation ..............................  Zeodration plants ..............................................

Ruby House, ‘A’ Wing, J.K. Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai 400 028, INDIA.

INFOMEDIA 18 LIMITED Special Projects POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY ADDRESSEE

BR Permit No. 555 Bhavani Shankar Post Office, Mumbai 400 028.

Business Reply Inland

NO POSTAGE STAMP NECESSARY IF POSTED IN INDIA

ADVERTISER INQUIRY FORM

U 

se this form for FREE additional Information on advertisements published in this issue. We will send your inquiries to the advertisers and ask them to send you the details or contact you directly.



How to use this form:

Please tick against the box of advertiser(s) you are interested in:  Mention specific product/ service you need, against the advertiser’s name  Complete all the details on this form.  Tear the form & mail it to us. (It is a prepaid mail)

Tel.: +91-22-3003 4640



Fax.: +91-22-3003 4499 Email: b2b@infomedia18.in 

 A G Engineers ........................................................................................ 

Jaykrishna Magnetics Pvt Ltd................................................................

 ABB Limited ........................................................................................... 

Media Today Pvt Ltd..............................................................................

 Acme Air Equipment Co Pvt Ltd ............................................................ 

Monarch Appliances ..............................................................................

 Bosch Limited........................................................................................ 

New India Electricals..............................................................................

 Bucher Processtech AG .........................................................................

 First Fold Here

 Buhler (India) Pvt Ltd ............................................................................

Noida Fabcon .........................................................................................



Omron Automation Pvt Ltd....................................................................



Plast World ............................................................................................



Shah Brothers........................................................................................



Siemens Ltd...........................................................................................



Smart Logistics......................................................................................



Spraying Systems (India) Pvt Ltd..........................................................



Sreelakshmi Traders ..............................................................................



SSP India ...............................................................................................



Steri Clean Air Technologies (I) Pvt Ltd.................................................

 IDEX India.............................................................................................. 

Tricon.....................................................................................................

 Ion Exchange (India) Ltd ....................................................................... 

United Steel & Structurals Pvt Ltd.........................................................

 Jas Enterprises ...................................................................................... 

Vikaash Packaging .................................................................................

 Business Development Bureau India P Ltd ............................................  Danfoss Indus Pvt Ltd ...........................................................................  Diversey India Pvt Ltd............................................................................  Eclipse Combustion Pvt Ltd...................................................................  Elesa-Ganter India Pvt Ltd .....................................................................



 FX Multitech Pvt Ltd ..............................................................................  Guan Yu Machinery Factory Co., Ltd. ....................................................  Hindustan Tin Work Ltd.........................................................................  HRS Process Systems Pvt Ltd...............................................................

Second Fold Here Please complete the following & get a quick effective response from suppliers: 1. Your company’s business function is (one only)  Wholesalers  Manufacturer  Distributor  Agent  Other, please specify______________ 2. Your role in your company’s buying process can best be described as:  I buy  I identify potential suppliers  I approve purchases  I negotiate contracts  I select suppliers. 3. Your line of business Name: Designation: Company Name:

City:

Pin:

Tel:

Fax:

Email:

05 / 2010

Address:

Third Fold Here

GLUE



4. Specific product requirement

POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY ADDRESSEE

Business Reply Inland BR Permit No. 555 Bhavani Shankar Post Office, Mumbai 400 028.

NO POSTAGE STAMP NECESSARY IF POSTED IN INDIA

Special Projects

INFOMEDIA 18 LIMITED Ruby House, ‘A’ Wing, J.K. Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai 400 028, INDIA.

PRODUCT INDEX

Product

Pg No

AC drives .................................................. 29 Aero mechanical devices .................................. 31 Aerosol can............................................................. 85 Aerosol spray paint ............................................. 74 Air cooler....................................................................7 Air handling units ................................................ 23 Air showers............................................................. 23 Air tents for operation theatre ....................... 23 Almond cutting machine.................................. 73 AODD pumps ........................................................ 55 Aseptic filter ........................................................... 10 Automatic scrubber driers................................ 77 B2B magazines .........................60,62,64,66 Beverage can ......................................................... 85 Blister forming machines .................................. 69 Blower motor............................................................4 Blowers..................................................................... 72 Bottle filling machine ......................................... 76 Brewers .................................................................... 13 Bucket elevator ..................................................... 31 Burners .............................................................35, 68 Cap sealing machine ............................... 71 Carpet cleaning machines................................ 77 Centrifugal pumps............................................... 55 Chapati making machine.................................. 73 Chilli cutting machine........................................ 69 Chocolate/cocoa making machine ............... 13 Chorafali making machine ............................... 73 Chow making machine ...................................... 73 Clamps.....................................................................FIC Clean room equipment ..................................... 23 Clean room projects ........................................... 23 Clean room validations & services ................ 23 Cleaning nozzle .................................................... 68 Cleaning section equipment ........................... 13 Cold form C & Z purlins..................................... 21 Cold room ............................................................... 75 Colour sorters ........................................................ 13 Contamination controller ................................. 23 Conveyor ................................................................. 74 Conveyor belts .........................................................9 Conveyor components .........................................9 Conveyor unit........................................................ 31 Cooling & boiler water treatment plants.... 30 Counters & power supplies.................................3 Cutters.........................................................................4 Daliya making machine .......................... 73 Debacterisation plants....................................... 75 Doors ........................................................................ 68 Double chamber vacuum ................................. 71 Drawer magnet..................................................... 78 Drum roller ................................................................4 Dry cum wet grinder .......................................... 73 Dryers........................................................................ 87 Dust control door ................................................ 68 Effluent treatment plant ........................ 87 Electromagnetic feeder ..................................... 78 Encoders .....................................................................3 EPS cup making machine ................................. 72 Evaporating units for cold rooms.....................7 Evaporators ............................................................ 87 Exhausters............................................................... 72 Exhibition - India Foodex 2010..........................6 Extruded products............................................... 13 Extruder ......................................................................4 Extruder for papad machine............................ 73 Feeder......................................................... 4 Filtration equipment...........................................BC Filtration systems.................................................BC Flexible screw ........................................................ 31 Flexible transparent PVC strip door.............. 68 Flour mills................................................................ 13

Product

Pg No

Fluid mixing dispersion unit............................ 55 Food analysing & testing machine ...............BC Food extruder........................................................ 71 Food process equipment.................................. 70 Food testing programmes................................ 39 Foot sealer .............................................................. 71 Forced convection unit air cooler ....................7 Form fill seal machine ........................................ 72 Gas conditioning and fire protection.... 45 Grain handling unit............................................. 13 Gravy making machine...................................... 73 Grill magnet ........................................................... 78 Grinding & dispersion unit ............................... 13 Gyratory screen..................................................... 78 Hammer machine .................................... 73 Hand sealer............................................................. 71 Handwheels ..........................................................FIC Haul off .......................................................................4 Heat-resistant door ............................................. 68 Heat transfer systems......................................... 10 Heavy industrial steel buildings..................... 21 High-pressure cleaners ...................................... 77 Hinges......................................................................FIC Hopper magnet .................................................... 78 Horizontal wrapping machines ...................... 69 HVAC clean room................................................. 23 Impact pulveriser .................................... 73 Indicators................................................................FIC Industrial control & sensing devices................3 Industrial door....................................................... 68 Industrial-type unit air cooler.............................7 Industrial vacuum cleaners .............................. 78 Infrared lamps/heaters....................................... 70 Instant coffee plant ............................................. 87 Invertor/variable frequency drives...................3 Juicer ........................................................ 73 Laminar flow work stations.................... 23 Latches ....................................................................FIC Level controllers ......................................................3 Levelling elements .............................................FIC Levers.......................................................................FIC Lipid food processing.........................................BC LV motors................................................................ 29 Magnetic equipment............................... 78 Magnetic plate ...................................................... 78 Magnetic traps ...................................................... 78 Masala mill.............................................................. 73 Mathiya making machine ................................. 73 Measuring & monitoring relay ..........................3 Mechanical vacuum boosters ......................... 72 Metal detector....................................................... 70 Metering pumps................................................... 55 Milk powder plant ............................................... 87 Mini dal mill............................................................ 73 Mini pulveriser with circulating system ...... 73 Mini vacuum machine........................................ 71 Mixer cooler ..............................................................4 Mixer grinder ......................................................... 73 Mixture for papad machine.............................. 73 Motion controls .......................................................3 Multi-chamber pulveriser ................................. 73 Multi-level car parks............................................ 21 Nip .............................................................. 4 Noodle making machine................................... 73 Oil milling unit......................................... 13 Online vacuum machine................................... 71 Packaging machine ................................. 71 Panipuri machine ................................................. 73 Papad making machine..................................... 73 Pasta making machine....................................... 13 Photoelectric sensors .................................... 3, 74 Piston pumps..................................................10, 55

Product

Pg No

Plastic pellets ......................................................... 13 PLC’s.......................................................................... 29 Plungers....................................Front inside cover Poly carbonate sheets........................................ 21 Pounding machine .............................................. 73 Pre-engineered steel buildings ...................... 21 Pre-fab shelters ..................................................... 21 Programmable logic controllers........................3 Programmable terminals .....................................3 Proximity sensors....................................................3 Pulveriser................................................................. 76 PVC strip door ....................................................... 68 Rapid mixer granulator .......................... 78 Rare earth tubes ................................................... 78 Residential steel houses .................................... 21 Reverse osmosis desalination system.......... 71 RFID ..............................................................................3 Rice milling equipment ..................................... 13 Roof vent................................................................. 21 Roofing & cladding sheets ............................... 21 Rotary lobe pumps.............................................. 55 Safety door .............................................. 68 Safety light curtains ...............................................3 Sealing machine ................................................... 71 Self-adhesive tapes ............................................. 74 Services - aimal feed technology................... 13 Services - emulsification solutions ................ 55 Services - market research...................................5 Services - total water management.............. 30 Shaped can............................................................. 85 Shrink wrapping machine ................................ 71 Single disc machines .......................................... 77 Skin packaging machines ................................. 69 Slip lid can .............................................................. 85 Sludge drainage presses ................................... 75 Spice mill................................................................. 73 Spout can ................................................................ 85 Spray nozzles and accessories ........................ 45 Stirrer ........................................................................ 73 Stretch wrapping machine............................... 71 Structural floor decking sheets....................... 21 Sweepers ................................................................. 77 Switching relays.......................................................3 Takeup drum ............................................. 4 Temperature controllers.......................................3 Thermal processes............................................... 13 Thermoforming/vacuum forming machines....... 69 Timers ..........................................................................3 Timing belts ..............................................................9 Timing pulleys..........................................................9 Tin can...................................................................... 85 Tomato strainer .................................................... 76 Total integrated automation....... Back inside cover Tri lobe roots blowers ........................................ 72 Turnkey systems for dust suppression ........ 45 Twin lobe roots blowers.................................... 72 Universal type unit air coller.................... 7 Vaccum cleaners...................................... 77 Vacuum belt dryers ............................................. 75 Vacuum drying cabinets ................................... 75 Vacuum machine ................................................. 71 Vacuum packing machines .............................. 69 Vegetable cutting machine.............................. 73 Ventilators............................................................... 74 Vermicelling machine......................................... 73 Vibration motor .................................................... 78 Vision sensors...........................................................3 Waste water treatment & recycle plant .... 30 Water and modular process system............. 73 Water treatment plant ....................................... 30 Winder.........................................................................4 Zeodration plants.................................... 75

BC - Back Cover, BIC - Back Inside Cover, FIC - Front Inside Cover

PRODUCT SOURCING MADE SIMPLE 86 Modern Food Processing

May 2010

ADVERTISERS’ LIST

Advertisers’ Name & Contact Details

Pg No

A G Engineers T: +91-129-2866114 E: admin@agengineers.net W: www.agengineers.net

9

ABB Limited T: +91-80-22949560 E: amit.a.sharma@in.abb.com W: www.abb.co.in

29

Acme Air Equipment Co Pvt Ltd T: +91-79-25831985 E: info@airequipments.com W: www.airequipments.com

72

Bosch Limited T: +91-832-669-2004 E: Amol.Matkar@in.bosch.com W: www.boschindia.com

19

Bucher Processtech AG T: +41-44-857-2300 E: info.ch@bucherdrytech.com W: www.bucherdrytech.com

75

Buhler (India) Pvt Ltd T: +91-80-22890000 E: sujit.pande@buhlergroup.com W: www.buhlergroup.com

13

Business Development Bureau India P Ltd 5 T: +91-20-27010321 E: info@bdbmr.co.in W: www.bdbmr.co.in Danfoss Indus Pvt Ltd T: +91-44-66501555 E: danfoss.india@danfoss.com W: www.danfoss.com

4

Advertisers’ Name & Contact Details

FX Multitech Pvt Ltd T: +91-79-27910993 E: fxmultitech@gmail.com W: www.frascold.it

77

Eclipse Combustion Pvt Ltd T: +91-20-32347612 E: vkulkarni@eclipsenet.com W: www.eclipseindia.com

35

Elesa-Ganter India Pvt Ltd T: +91-120-4726666 E: grover@elesaganter-india.com W: www.elesa-ganter.com

FIC

Advertisers’ Name & Contact Details

Pg No

7

Omron Automation Pvt Ltd T: +91-80-40726400 E: srirams@ap.omron.com W: www.omron-ap.com

3

Guan Yu Machinery Factory Co., Ltd. BC T: +886-4-896-5198 E: guanyeu@ms39.hinet.net W: www.gy-1000.com.tw

Plast World T: +91-9376128372 E: plastworld1@rediffmail.com W: www.stripdoor.co.in

68

Hindustan Tin Work Ltd T: +91-11-23357276 E: sales@hindustantin.co.in W: www.hindustantin.biz

85

Shah Brothers T: +91-22-43560400 E: foodkit@shahbros.com W: www.shahbros.com

39

HRS Process Systems Pvt Ltd T: +91-20-25663581 E: cthe@hrsasia.co.in W: www.hrsasia.co.in

10

Siemens Ltd BIC T: +91-22-24987529 E: nurjaha.arora@siemens.com W: www.siemens.com/food-beverage

IDEX India T: +91-22-66780053 E: info.fmt@idex.corp.com W: www.idexfmt-asia.com

55

Smart Logistics 60,62,64,66 T: +91-22-30034651 E: b2b@infomedia18.in W: www.eshop.infomedia18.in

Ion Exchange (India) Ltd T: +91-22-39890909 E: hocro@ionexchange.co.in W: www.ionindia.com

30

Jas Enterprises T: +91-79-22743454 E: info@jasenterprise.com W: www.jasenterprise.com

73

Jaykrishna Magnetics Pvt Ltd T: +91-79-22970452 E: info@jkmagnetics.com W: www.jkmagnetics.com

78

Media Today Pvt Ltd T: +91-11-26682045 E: indiafoodex@gmail.com W: www.indiafoodex.com

Diversey India Pvt Ltd T: +91-22-66444222 W: www.diversey.com

Pg No

6

Monarch Appliances T: +91-281-2461826 E: monarchappliances@gmail.com W: www.polysealindia.com

71

New India Electricals T: +91-22-22651177 E: nietco@hotmail.com W: www.nietco.in Noida Fabcon T: +91-120-4225550 E: nishant@fabcon-india.com W: www.fabcon-india.com

Spraying Systems (India) Pvt Ltd T: +91-80-23378166 E: ssipl@sprayindia.com W: www.spray.com

45

Sreelakshmi Traders T: +91-44-22313606 E: sreelakshmitraders@gmail.com W: www.sreelakshmitraders.com

74

SSP India T: +91-129-4183700 E: info@sspindia.com W: www.sspindia.com

87

Steri Clean Air Technologies (I) Pvt Ltd 23 T: +91-40-23173205 E: shantyella@gmail.com W: www.stericleanairsystems.com Tricon T: +91-20-25652205 E: trivedi@pn2.vsnl.net.in

70

76

United Steel & Structurals Pvt Ltd T: +91-44-42321801 E: admin@unitedstructurals.com W: www.unitedstructurals.com

21

31

Vikaash Packaging T: +91-44-42171271 E: vikaashpack@eth.net W: www.vikaashpack.com

69

Our consistent advertisers

88 Modern Food Processing

May 2010

Registration No: MH / MR / WEST / 232 / 2009-2011; RNI No: MAHENG / 2008 / 25262 Allowed To Post At Patrika Channel Sorting OfďŹ ce, G.P.O., Mumbai 400 001. Date of Mailing 3rd & 4th of Every Month Issue.

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Modern Food Processing - May 2010