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A custom advertising publication of The Indianapolis Star • Sunday, Sept. 29, 2013

College Guide

Indianapolis NACAC Fair Tuesday, Oct. 1, 2013 Indiana Convention Center 9 a.m. – noon; 6 – 8 p.m.

Register now at www.gotomyncf.com

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• SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2013

AN ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT OF THE INDIANAPOLIS STAR

college fair

Tips for attending a national college fair Before the fair

Answer the following questions to help determine what kind of school would best suit you.

Mobile Student Registration

Students can register for NACAC National College Fairs with their smartphones by going to http://mobile.gotomyncf.com or by scanning the QR code here:

❯ Do you want to attend a two- or four-year institution? Coed or single sex? ❯ What size school do you want to attend? ❯ What programs of study are you considering? ❯ How far from home do you want to go? ❯ Do you want to attend a school in an urban, suburban or rural environment? ❯ Will you want to participate in specific extracurricular activities or athletics? ❯ Do you require special services such as tutoring, note takers, readers, TDD or interpreters? ❯ Have you discussed your college plans with your guidance counselor, family, teachers and friends? ❯ Have you researched the colleges you’re interested in on the Internet and in your guidance office or library?

Benefits of online student registration: ❯ Students register for the fair one time.

Indianapolis National College Fair Tuesday, Oct. 1, 2013 Indiana Convention Center Exhibit Hall C 9 a.m. – noon and 6 – 8 p.m.

❯ Eliminates the need for college contact cards. ❯ Allows students to elaborate on special interests, extracurricular activities and accomplishments. If a smartphone is not available, visit www.gotomyncf.com and preregister for the electronic lead retrieval system.

❯ Did you check dates and registration deadlines for college entrance examinations?

At the fair

This publication is an advertising product of Custom Publications, a division of Star Media.

❯ Pick up a bag and a fair directory.

Credits

❯ Visit with colleges and universities that meet your criteria.

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❯ Talk with a college counselor at the counseling center if you have questions or need help with your college search.

Christine Sipos Account manager (317) 444-7183 christine.sipos@indystar.com

Elaine Benken Beth Winchell Associate manager Creative coordinator

❯ Attend an information session.

File photos and illustrations unless otherwise noted.

IS BLUE FOR YOU? Let’s find out. Join us for a Sycamore Preview Day. Visit campus and meet with admissions and financial aid staff. Sign up at www.indstate.edu/admissions/visiting.htm. The 2013 Washington Monthly College Guide ranks Indiana State at No. 1 on its list of 281 national universities in the category of community service participation and hours worked by students, faculty, and staff.

THERE’S MORE TO BLUE. indstate.edu

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• SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2013

AN ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT OF THE INDIANAPOLIS STAR

college fair

Good question!

Plan ahead for trip to national college fair National Association for College Admission Counseling

At national college fairs, admission representatives from a variety of colleges gather in one place, ready to answer your questions.

whether scanners will be available at the fair you’re going to, or visit www.nacacnet.org/fairs and search for the fair in which you’re interested. When you arrive at the fair, look for a map and note where each college is located, then plan the most efficient way to visit Savvy students preview the list of schools, choose the ones the ones on your list. (For example, visit all the colleges of they want to learn about then research them. interest to you in one room before moving to the next.) “Know what you want to find out at the fair,” said a director of Also check out the schedule of information sessions. Many admission at a college in Ohio. fairs have sessions on the search process, applications, financial Make a short list of questions unique to your aid and other issues. These sessions are a interests and not easily found in standard college great place to ask general questions about the materials. Then ask the same questions at each college admission process. school. Your notebook and pen are great tools “The college fair is a good time to talk personfor keeping all those conversations straight. to-person with the representative of that school,” After you leave a table — and before visiting “The college fair said one guidance counselor. “Your job is to think another — jot down your impressions of of good questions.” is a good time to the college and the answers the admission Don’t ask how many people are in the freshman talk person-torepresentatives gave you. class. Instead, ask about the most popular majors. person with the That can give you a good idea of the main representative of interests of the majority of the students. Team up If you have a particular major in mind, don’t that school. Your If a family member attends the fair with ask if the school’s program is good. No college you, talk about your plan ahead of time. It job is to think of representative will tell you that a program is bad. might be best to split up. A parent can attend good questions.” Instead, ask how many students are in that major; the financial aid seminar so you can visit what research the faculty is involved in and the more colleges. On the other hand, if you stick opportunities for undergraduate participation; or together, your parents or siblings might ask which courses you would take your first year in a questions you didn’t think of, and it can be particular major. helpful to get a second opinion. If you’re undecided, ask about services and support to help you explore various majors. Browse Ask about extracurricular activities, what kinds of students Planning ahead ensures that you’ll get to visit the colleges the college is looking for, what percentage of students receive that most interest you, but also leave time for browsing. financial aid, and other concerns unique to your interests and “Be adventurous,” said an admission director. “Don’t just situation. focus on ‘name’ schools. You may find that a school you’ve never heard of offers the exact major, extracurricular program, etc., Map out a strategy that you’re seeking.” When going to the fair, be sure to take a small notebook with your list of colleges and questions, a pen or pencil and a Follow up backpack or tote bag to hold the information you’ll collect. After the fair, you’ll have a bag filled with information and If possible, print a few sheets of self-stick address labels with a possible case of information overload. Don’t succumb to the your name, address, phone number, email address, high school, temptation to pile all those brochures in a corner. Take a day year of graduation, intended major(s), and any extracurricular or two away from the college search then get out all those activities you’re interested in. At the fair, slap the address labels brochures and the notes you took, and read through them. on college information cards to save time repeatedly filling out You might find that some colleges aren’t as interesting as you the same information. At some fairs, scanners are used to collect contact information first thought. Others will look better the more you research them. For those, follow up by filling out the information cards or electronically, but students must sign up beforehand to have by scheduling college visits. ◆ their information electronically scanned. Ask your counselor

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College categories National Association for College Admission Counseling

In your search for the right college or university, you need to know which general category each school falls under: private, public or proprietary. Nonprofit private Private colleges and universities can vary greatly in their course offerings and campus life. The thing they have in common is that they all receive funding primarily from student tuition and endowments. These institutions function as nonprofit organizations that usually follow the leadership of a board of trustees. Private colleges and universities may receive some governmental support in the form of tax breaks and student loans, but operating mainly on private support allows them to develop their own institutional plans. Many are associated with religious and other community groups. The list of private colleges includes the nation’s oldest institutions. Many have kept their

traditional campus models, though the courses and student cultures transformed drastically over a couple hundred years. Private institutions that date back to the 17th and 18th centuries include Harvard University, Yale University and Princeton University. These centuries-old institutions also tend to be highly selective, though selectivity rates among all private schools vary greatly. According to the Department of Education, selectivity rates at all private and public institutions were nearly identical in 2007. Reliance on private funds also has led to higher average cost. For the 2008 – 2009 academic year, the Department of Education estimated the cost of tuition, room and board at private colleges

the real world waits for graduation. So students at Anderson University begin reaching out into the world as soon as they step on campus. From a workday in the city during new-student orientation to an internship at the Flagship Enterprise Center, AU students work to build meaningful relationships, gain practical experience, and share the love of God through service. Come discover AU!

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and universities to average $31,233, compared to $12,283 at public colleges and universities. Don’t let this sharp contrast in cost prevent you from seeking admission. At these institutions, financial aid opportunities often reduce the total cost and loan burden.

Nonprofit public Public colleges and universities receive funding from tuition and endowments, but the larger part of their funding comes from state or local taxes. Most public postsecondary schools are state-run, which lowers the tuition for in-state students. Public colleges and universities can focus on a specific area of study such as research or liberal arts, but many,

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college fair referred to as “regional comprehensive institutions,” offer many different fields of study, with an emphasis on professional programs. Public colleges and universities follow performance standards set by the state, as opposed to a private school’s board of trustees. Public schools typically are categorized as two-year, four-year, research, comprehensive or community colleges. Like private institutions, the selectivity rates among public schools can vary greatly. Public schools include highly selective schools like William and Mary and the University of California-Berkley, as well as community colleges with openaccess policies.

were more nonprofit institutions than forprofits, but over the last two decades, the number of degree-granting for-profits has increased rapidly. Proprietary institutions attract adult learners and part-time students in search of narrowly focused professional training opportunities. These programs usually offer a nontraditional setup with flexible schedules and convenient locations. Many for-profits also have classes available solely online.

Careful consideration

When you have narrowed your list of schools and are ready to begin the application process, first be sure to calculate the amount you could owe after graduation. For-profit or proprietary You’ll need to have a good grasp of this While public and private colleges receive amount when you receive financial aid. their funding in different forms, both are During the 2007 – 2008 academic year, the still considered nonprofit. median debt load for a bachelor’s degree Proprietary institutions are considered recipient was: for-profit companies that operate under the • $7,960 at public schools demands of investors and stockholders. As • $17,040 at private schools of the 2008 – 2009 academic year, there • $31,190 at for-profit colleges

Because a postsecondary degree is such a significant investment, don’t overestimate the importance of patience during the college admission process. Take time to reflect on all your options. Some institutions might offer quick admission, but be sure you have examined enough options before accepting any immediate offer. The admission process at four-year nonprofits typically requires an application, which may ask for standardized test scores, high school transcripts, essays and other materials. You want to find the institution that will best match up with your qualifications and personality, so the application process is a great way to get to know a college and for a college to get to know you. Before you send those applications, make sure you have completed all the admission requirements. A close examination of the academic, social and financial factors will lead you to a best-fit college. To read more on the differences in college categories, please visit our web site at www.nacacnet.org/ ncfstudent. ◆

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Major spotlight: Biology

Life lessons

A biology degree can lead to careers in medicine and beyond By Lori Darvas For Custom Publications

On paper, the description for a biology degree program may read like it’s designed only for future medical school students.

who were fascinated by science as kids, courses. said Loren Bertocci, PhD, dean of Marian “I can University’s school of math and sciences. take a very While classmates watched “Rugrats” bright math cartoons, they tuned into “Bill Nye the student and Science Guy.” These kids connected with make him a But biology majors also include science early, and that fascination drove very good undergraduates who want to examine life on them to pursue the subject through high biologist. I cannot a cellular level, whether they intend to work school and into college. take someone who can’t do math in research laboratories or out in the field. Biology majors and make him a biologist,” Bertocci said. Biology grads can explore should be good at math, Most colleges offer various paths for diverse career options, Bertocci said, because biology majors. At Marian University, a including pharmaceutical it’s the foundation of student also can pursue a concentration in sales, radiation therapy understanding science. bioinformatics, cell and molecular biology and teaching high school Formulas, statistics and human biology, among others. science to the next and research studies Indiana University students can select generation. all involve calculations. “Usually students fall While the average Indiana into one of two groups,” student scores about 520 said Kate Emblom, in the math portion of associate director of the SAT, science majors advising for Indiana who earn a score anything University’s college of less than 550 tend to struggle with college arts and sciences. “The first group wants to pursue a career in some sort of health profession. The second wants to do science. They might be conducting research, they might want a laboratory job or they might want to go out into the field and work for Loren Bertocci would like to talk to high school students who want to study biology in college. the EPA or in wildlife rehabilitation.” The dean of Marian University’s school of math and sciences, he said prospective biology majors Most biology graduates don’t get where should think about numbers when they’re selecting high school courses. they are because they woke up one morning “Most are underprepared in math, underprepared in physics and underprepared in chemistry, in that order,” Bertocci said. and decide to study life forms. Nor are they In the study of living organisms, students must be able to handle formulas the type to enter medical school because and understand the nature and properties of all matter. Students who avoid their parents always dreamed of having a taking the advanced classes are at a disadvantage when they start college doctor in the family. and have to study those subjects in depth for the first time. Success is Biology majors typically are the adults

High school subject matters

possible, but only if they’re willing to work harder. Indiana University doesn’t require incoming freshmen to have certain classes on their high school transcript, said Libby Tilghman, academic advisor in the biology department. Still, wise class choices in high school can make a difference. “It can be beneficial to our majors if they’ve had some chemistry and biology in high school, as there is the possibility of testing out of some introductory courses,” Tilghman said. Freshmen should plan to take a variety of courses their first two semesters, regardless of what they learned in high school, said Kate Emblom, associate director of advising for IU’s college of arts and sciences. They also need to be open to all possible major and career paths. “College is an excellent time for students to understand where their own dreams are coming from and what their passions are,” she said. Bertocci

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biology or microbiology, or earn an animal behavior area certificate and minor degree, said Libby Tilghman, academic adviser. They may opt to focus on plants, animals, evolution, anatomy, physiology or environmental biology. That decision doesn’t have to be made right away. Colleges tend to encourage or even require students to pursue general courses freshman year, which provides them more time to choose a more specific field. It also gives them time to gauge program requirements and course workload. “The biology and microbiology majors require several laboratory courses, and labs in general are considered time-

consuming because you have to set up experiments, wait for them to run, observe and record the results, and then write up the findings in a lab report,” Tilghman said.

What’s a biology degree worth? For many, the degree’s primary value is being the first step on the path toward graduate or postgraduate work. Biology majors will take required classes in math and science, which can prepare them for medical school or doctoral work, Bertocci said. A bachelor’s degree in biology can lead more immediately to a job as a laboratory technician, but lab leaders and administrators are those who hold an

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advanced degree. Biologists with PhDs who pursue research can earn six figures with opportunities for growth. They also have the potential to make a difference, even if they’re not directly diagnosing diseases and performing lifesaving surgeries. Bertocci’s former students have gone on to great success in the field. One student was involved in redesigning kidney dialysis to make it less toxic for patients. Another looked at how oxygen reactions can impact stem-cell therapy in arthritic adults. A third studied the link between chemicals in water and how they can impact livestock and the humans who eat it. ◆

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Safety first on campus By Deb Buehler For Custom Publications

Exciting opportunities awaited students as they arrived on college campuses last month: new friendships, classes and routines. Living away from home, attending football games and exploring new terrain. And though most students quickly feel at home on campus, they should take steps every day to stay safe.

Start with responsibility “Now that students are away from mom and dad, they are responsible for their own safety,” said Bill Weber, assistant police chief of operations for Butler University’s public safety department. “Students should realize that there are people out there

who, given the opportunity, will attempt to defraud them or do them harm.” While campus police departments strive to make the community comfortable and safe, students have a responsibility to avoid setting themselves up for problems, Weber said. They should begin by having a strategy for evenings out, choosing one or more friends who will watch out for each other in all circumstances. Weber said students must remain aware of their surroundings. If they’re drinking with new friends at 2 a.m., they need to notice what’s happening around them — and not distract themselves by texting or listening to music with headphones. Students, particularly

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females, should use the buddy system and not venture out alone across campus.

Lock it up Kory Vitangeli, dean of students and vice president for student and campus affairs at University of Indianapolis, encourages dorm residents to keep their doors locked. Students tend to think of their dorm room as their own home, she said. But in the time it takes to run to the laundry room, an intruder could swiftly steal a smart phone, laptop and expensive textbooks. Students become so comfortable in their residence halls, Weber said, that come leave their room unlocked at night. Not surprisingly, the most common crime on college campuses is theft.

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Want me 2 walk u to class? “We are seeing more and more bikes stolen,” K Vitangeli said. Thx! “Students need to be sure to lock bikes and make sure that valuables aren’t visible when left in cars.” Students who leave money or a computer in the car are susceptible to break-ins. Likewise, a plugged-in GPS — with its glowing LED light — is an invitation for thieves.

Walk or ride with sidekick Butler and UIndy are among the many campuses that offer police escorts to students who are out alone. Butler’s “Dog Ride” is available from dusk to dawn to

Social media safety

help students get safely to their car, dorm or apartment after late classes. Schools nationwide are adopting large-scale communication systems to provide campus-wide alerts. Students, staff and faculty who register for the program can receive a phone call, text and email when the weather or any other issue threatens safety on campus. In all circumstances, Vitangeli encourages students to trust their gut instincts. Anyone who feels unsafe should promptly call a friend or alert campus security. ◆

University students can take action to stay safe on campus – and they also need to stay safe online. During orientation week, the University of Indianapolis provides social media strategies and reminders to incoming students. “Facebook and Twitter are places students represent themselves and their university,” said Kory Vitangeli, dean of students and vice president for student and campus affairs. “It is important for students not to post their every move and to be responsible about what they do post on social media outlets.”

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Workshop schedule

Indiana Convention Center • Exhibit Hall C

Morning Sessions 9 a.m.

Room ❯ Understanding the Admission Process................... 121

9:30 a.m.

❯ Financial Aid...........................................................120 ❯ The College Search: Finding the Right Fit ..............122

10 a.m.

❯ College Athletics..................................................... 121 ❯ Everything You Need to Know About the SAT..........122

10:30 a.m.

❯ Financial Aid...........................................................120 ❯ The College Search: Finding the Right Fit ..............122

Evening Sessions 6 p.m.

❯ Financial Aid...........................................................120 ❯ Everything You Need to Know About the SAT..........122

6:30 p.m.

❯ Admission to Selective Institutions........................ 121 ❯ College Athletics ....................................................122

7 p.m.

❯ Financial Aid...........................................................120 ❯ Understanding the Admission Process................... 121

Thanks to these contributors for their support of the 2013 Indianapolis College Fair:

$1.3 million in scholarships a year Apply at www.axa-achievement.com

Preregistration Log on to www.gotomyncf.com for student registration. The college representative can scan your contact information so you can spend more time with them and less time filling our information cards. Join the Indianapolis National College Fair group on Facebook for more information.

2013 Indianapolis National College Fair Committee Mike Jaskoski, Cathedral High School (co-chair) Aimée Rust-Scheuermann, Butler University (co-chair) Mona Bowe, St. Mary’s College, information sessions Linda Christy, Carmel High School, publicity and marketing Greg Davidson, Hamilton Southeastern High School, transportation Cindy Parshall, Earlham College, hospitality

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college fair

Indianapolis National College Fair • Tuesday, Oct. 1, 2013 • 9 a.m. – noon and 6 – 8 p.m. International Savannah College of Art and Design – Hong Kong and eLearning........................................................................507 Armed Forces United States Merchant Marine Academy .............................319 Alabama Samford University ................................................................516 The University of Alabama.....................................................211 The University of Alabama in Huntsville ................................412 Arizona Arizona State University* .......................................................317 Grand Canyon University .......................................................328 The University of Arizona.......................................................525 University of Advancing Technology ......................................425 California FIDM-The Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising........311 University of California-Irvine.................................................231 . Colorado Colorado Christian University.................................................537 Regis University .....................................................................420 University of Colorado Boulder ..............................................116 Florida Barry University .................................................................... 306 Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University ...................................407 Florida Gulf Coast University..................................................237 Florida Institute of Technology............................................... 410 Nova Southeastern University................................................216 The University of Tampa ....................................................... 303 Georgia Berry College ........................................................................ 330 Savannah College of Art and Design......................................507 Illinois American Academy of Art......................................................532 Augustana College ................................................................ 505 Blackburn College................................................................. 338 Bradley University*................................................................520 Columbia College Chicago .................................................... 203 Concordia University Chicago............................................... 304 DePaul University ..................................................................313 DeVry University ................................................................... 543 Dominican University*...........................................................415 Eastern Illinois University....................................................... 414 Elmhurst College.................................................................... 416 Illinois College ........................................................................119 Illinois Institute of Technology................................................429 Illinois State University* ........................................................ 438 Illinois Wesleyan University....................................................241 Lincoln College...................................................................... 404 Loyola University Chicago......................................................510 McKendree University ...........................................................521 Millikin University................................................................... 417 Monmouth College.................................................................542 North Park University ............................................................517 Northern Illinois University.....................................................219 Robert Morris University Illinois .............................................101 Roosevelt University...............................................................341 Southern Illinois University Carbondale .................................318 University of Illinois ................................................................212 University of Illinois at Chicago*............................................ 506 University of Illinois at Springfield ..........................................511 Indiana Anderson University ..............................................................242 The Art Institute of Indianapolis ............................................ 406 Ball State University* .............................................. 102,104,106 Bethel College........................................................................321 Brown Mackie College ...........................................................205 Butler University ............................................................ 337,339 DePauw University................................................................ 408 Earlham College.................................................................... 400 Franklin College .................................................................... 502 Hanover College.................................................................... 509 Holy Cross College .................................................................210 Indiana State University .........................................................238 Indiana Tech ..........................................................................214 Indiana University Bloomington..................................... 522,524 Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis ........ 501,503

Ivy Tech Community College..................................................140 Ivy Tech Community College Central Indiana ........................142 Marian University*.................................................................301 Purdue University ..................................................................225 Purdue University – College of Technology........................... 336 Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology................................... 504 Saint Joseph’s College ...........................................................424 Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College ..........................................315 Saint Mary’s College...............................................................437 Taylor University ................................................................... 538 Trine University..................................................................... 204 University of Evansville...........................................................422 University of Indianapolis.......................................................528 University of Southern Indiana.............................................. 439 Valparaiso University..............................................................239 Wabash College .....................................................................441 Iowa Drake University ....................................................................121 Kansas University of Kansas ............................................................. 440 Wichita State University ........................................................ 540 Kentucky Bellarmine University........................................................... 308 Brescia University................................................................. 534 Campbellsville University ...................................................... 442 Eastern Kentucky University* ................................................215 Kentucky Wesleyan College ...................................................515 Morehead State University.....................................................431 Murray State University*....................................................... 409 Northern Kentucky University................................................201 Spalding University ................................................................ 117 Transylvania University .......................................................... 114 University of Kentucky* .........................................................324 University of the Cumberlands...............................................316 Western Kentucky University.................................................314 Maine University of New England.....................................................310 Michigan...................................................................................... Adrian College........................................................................435 Alma College..........................................................................115 Aquinas College .................................................................... 209 Calvin College ........................................................................ 141 College for Creative Studies*................................................. 206 Grand Valley State University .................................................218 Hillsdale College.....................................................................312 Hope College .........................................................................513 Lawrence Technological University........................................107 Michigan State University* ....................................................514 Michigan Technological University ........................................512 Northern Michigan University* ..............................................213 Oakland University.................................................................423 University of Michigan ...........................................................518 Western Michigan University ..........................................118,120 Missouri Barnes-Jewish College/Goldfarb School of Nursing............... 111 Columbia College...................................................................143 Fontbonne University.............................................................413 Maryville University............................................................... 402 Missouri University of Science and Technology.....................523 Ranken Technical College......................................................401 St. Louis College of Pharmacy............................................... 433 Saint Louis University.............................................................529 University of Missouri-Saint Louis..........................................138 Webster University.................................................................109 Nebraska University of Nebraska-Lincoln* ............................................113 New Jersey Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey .........................221 Seton Hall University............................................................. 403 New York LIM College ...........................................................................519 Rochester Institute of Technology*........................................223 United States Merchant Marine Academy .............................319 North Carolina High Point University .............................................................325

North Carolina A & T State University* ..................................235 Warren Wilson College ...........................................................307 Ohio Baldwin Wallace University....................................................320 Capital University...................................................................419 Central State University..........................................................342 The Cleveland Institute of Art................................................ 508 College of Mount St. Joseph ..................................................332 Defiance College....................................................................217 Kent State University..............................................................112 Lourdes University .................................................................110 Miami University ....................................................................220 Ohio Christian University....................................................... 334 The Ohio State University ..................................................... 530 Ohio University...................................................................... 229 Ohio Wesleyan University.......................................................240 Otterbein University...............................................................527 University of Cincinnati – College of Engineered Applied Science................................................................. 500 University of Cincinnati ......................................................... 233 The University of Findlay .......................................................418 University of Dayton.............................................................. 300 University of Mount Union .................................................... 343 Wittenberg University ............................................................323 Xavier University ................................................................... 539 Pennsylvania Grove City College................................................................. 340 Penn State University.............................................................531 Rhode Island Johnson & Wales University.................................................. 305 South Carolina Clemson University* ............................................................. 309 College of Charleston ............................................................ 535 University of South Carolina...................................................207 Tennessee Aquinas College .................................................................... 443 Lee University ....................................................................... 533 University of Tennessee........................................................ 208 Texas Texas Christian University...................................................... 411 Vermont Norwich University ............................................................... 200 Virginia Hampton University ...............................................................322 Sweet Briar College............................................................... 536 Virginia Military Institute........................................................ 436 Washington DigiPen Institute of Technology............................................. 302 Wisconsin Carthage College....................................................................103 George Williams College of Aurora University ....................... 405 Marquette University .............................................................105 Marshall University ................................................................421 University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee .....................................202 University of Wisconsin-Madison...........................................139 West Virginia University Institute of Technology.....................108 Wyoming University of Wyoming ...........................................................541

Shopping Sheet NACAC member colleges marked with an asterisk (*) have voluntarily begun using the U.S. Department of Education’s Financial Aid Shopping Sheet as the method they will use to let you know about your financial aid package. You will be able to make direct, clear comparisons between financial aid award letters for colleges using the Shopping Sheet. For more information about the Shopping Sheet and the colleges using it, go to www.nacacnet.org.

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• SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2013

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college prep

College students are warming up to e-textbooks By Jen Bingham For Custom Publications

As students prepared to head off to college last month, most put new laptops, mobile devices and e-readers at the top of their packing list.

Today these types of technology are helpful for much more than status updates, instant photos, addictive games and cat videos. Increasingly, the cumbersome, heavy college textbooks of yesterday are being released in digital formats. The electronic versions cost less and are infinitely more portable.

Slow to grow While young adults tend to quickly grasp the latest technology, e-textbook usage has been slower to catch on. E-books accounted for only 7 percent of all textbook sales and rentals in the fall of 2012, according to Student Monitor, a behavior-

tracking organization. That’s up from just 4 percent in 2011. “Students come to us with a technical skill and a lack of fear in using any technology, but we have pockets in our student body who are not as adept at using tech,” said Thomas Enneking, provost and executive vice president at Marian Enneking University. Even students who are familiar and comfortable with technology believe using a physical book is an easier way to learn and study, he noted. Marian University for some time has offered online courses through its adult

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college prep education and accelerated nursing programs. In both, e-texts are included in the cost. “The newest place where we’re doing e-texts is in the College of Osteopathic Medicine,” Enneking said. “Each student receives a fully loaded iPad with all course materials they need for the semester — instruction, course syllabi, all the text they need.” Some of these students prefer to purchase the physical textbook, too, or print out pages to study.

Coming wave? At Indiana State University, about 40 percent of textbooks are available digitally. But the trend has been slow-growing, said Susan Powers, associate vice president for academic affairs. ISU’s official bookstore currently makes e-textbooks available with course instructors’ permission. The school works to help tech-shy students understand how to Powers use the electronic files. “The bookstore is at our resource fair during new-student orientation, and there’s a session that explains all the different options and how they work,” Powers said. “We offer demonstrations on how to use the laptops we provide to students with laptop scholarships. These come loaded with the Nook Reading App.” The Nook Reading App is software that

can be installed on a PC or laptop as well as a mobile device like an iPad or e-reader. The app’s features enable students to highlight sections and take notes. As more high schools shift toward e-textbooks, Powers said, incoming college freshman soon will expect to use them on campus, which will spur more rapid adoption of the technology. “I’m interested in seeing how well our students start doing once more and more high school students are already comfortable with the technology,” she said. One of Powers’ own daughters decided not to use e-textbooks and she doesn’t currently use an e-reader. For now, she prefers to turn the pages of a physical book for recreational and academic reading.

Time to buy an e-reader? The list of needs for college students already is lengthy, with parents having to buy computers, TVs, furniture and more. Are they now expected to invest in yet another device so their student can access e-books? “I would probably say a kid doesn’t need an e-reader across the board,” Enneking said. “The problem today is that specifications don’t always match. All students will probably have an e-reader, smart phone, etc., they will be able to access. The challenge in education is how we use that tech that’s hanging around in their pockets. How do we tell students to do something constructive on it? Where’s it going to be in five years? Who knows?” ◆

“Students come to us with a technical skill and lack of fear in using any technology, but we have pockets in our student body who are not as adept at using tech.”

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• SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2013

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college life

Time for a

food-choice

refresher By Holly Wheeler For Custom Publications

When you imagine a college student’s typical meal, you probably don’t conjure up images of leafy salads, steamed vegetables and lean protein. For decades, the meal of choice on campus is pizza, pizza and more pizza. Freshman 15? Years ago, the so-called Freshman 15 was the dreaded consequence of living it up on campus, eating fatty foods and sugary drinks around the clock without a watchful parent to set limits on junk food. Away from mom’s home-cooked meals and strict eye on snacking, students quickly packed on pounds. In 2013, families have a different lifestyle. Most only rarely sit down to dinner together, with kids and parents heading to activities, clubs, games and meetings. The fresh home-cooked meal of the last generation has been replaced by packaged meals, frozen dinners and trips through the drive-through. Now, college can be the time to reverse bad habits set at home. “As parents and students look at being away from home, they need to look at balancing their diets,” Kathie Guyler, general manager of dining services for Earlham College. “All of the things they’ve learned about eating properly, they need to be able to translate to personal choices.”

In college, young adults actually have a unique opportunity to redefine meal times. With dining halls open set hours, students can form a new habit by taking time for a more leisurely sit-down meal with friends. And without a car to transport them through the nearest drivethrough lane, they can forego high-calorie fast food. “We have a student population that participates with the meal plan,” Guyler said. “It’s all part of the culture here to be around the student restaurant.”

Go for the green Today’s college dining plan is just that — dining — and not the cafeteria of yesterday. Universities have begun to view students as restaurant patrons, offering them diverse options and erasing the stereotype of cafeterias ladling out chipped beef on toast from an industrialsize trough. “A percentage of our students are vegetarian or vegan, so we offer every day a vegetarian entrée, a vegan entrée,” Guyler said. “We do quinoa dishes, we do interesting things with couscous and

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college life

beans. And a lot of our students choose to eat that way anyway, even though they may pick up a chicken breast on occasion.” With so many options — both healthy and not — students can become overwhelmed. A solution? Choosing a green salad and varying the toppings. “One thing to do is to put fresh fruit on your salad, and chopped nuts are really good,” said Leslie Muse, RD, owner of A Cut Above Nutrition. “You can put on eggs, sunflower seeds, tomatoes, any vegetables, chicken or lean ham. Some of the vinaigrette dressings are okay, but ranch and bleu cheese dressings are super heavy — about 200 calories for a tablespoon. Get the dressing on the side, and then dip your fork and spear the salad.” ◆

Snack-time solutions

Snacking can make college students more vulnerable to poor food choices overall. By going long periods between meals and staying up for hours after dinner, they’re more likely to tear open and devour a bag of chips or cookies. When students are tempted by junk food, they should try to think outside the bag, said Leslie Muse, RD, owner of A Cut Above Nutrition. “Popcorn is good,” she said. “It takes three minutes (in the microwave), and you have a source of high fiber to fill you up.” Items packaged to look like healthy choices aren’t always so. Cereal bars actually are laden with high fructose corn syrup. Muse recommends exchanging them for fiber bars, high-fiber cereal or whole-wheat fig bars, which can satisfy a sweet tooth and provide appetite-curbing bulk. “They are a little higher in calories but should take the edge off,” she said. “If you have a refrigerator, you could have string cheese, which will have protein and a little bit of fat and will give you a feeling of satiety. Or try whole-wheat pita bread with hummus. You get fiber from the bread and chickpeas, as well as vitamins, magnesium and calcium.” Students should be careful not to take in too many liquid calories. “Pop is high in calories and has no nutritional value at all,” Muse said. “If you have to have caffeine, you can have coffee or tea, but stay away from the exotic coffees that have lots of cream and sugar.”

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• SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2013

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college life

On campus or off, students can enjoy the comforts of

home By Julie Young For Custom Publications

College living has come a long way since your grandma spent her days and nights in a cramped dormitory monitored by a cranky housemother, sharing a bathroom with 50 other girls.

Today’s updated residence halls and off-campus housing provide flexible, comfortable spaces where amenities abound.

Home away

On-campus living offers students many of the comforts of home while granting their first true taste of independence. In a traditional-style dorm, incoming freshmen can experience large-scale communal living, with public and private places for students to alternately study and relax. Most dorm rooms are equipped with Wi-Fi, cable and modular furnishings that can be moved and stacked to

maximize the square footage. Resident assistants, or RAs, are nearby to dole out advice, lend a hand or mediate difficult situations. They’re available when students help managing their course schedule, communicating with professors or resolving roommate problems. “After that first year (in a dorm), they are usually ready for something different,” said Kory Vitangeli, dean of students and vice president for student and campus affairs at

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college life University of Indianapolis. When they’ve outgrown a traditional dorm, students may want to move on to a suite-style dormitory with a private bath or a shared bath between units. Another option is a sorority or fraternity, where students can live, study and socialize with like-minded students. In a communal, apartment-style arrangement, students have their own room and share the kitchen and other common areas. Some students have the finances and maturity to live off campus in a rented house, apartment or condo. “There are a lot of things to think about when it comes to choosing your living situation,” said Amanda Knerr, executive director of residential life at Indiana State University. “On campus, you have a meal plan, can walk to class in your pajamas and rarely need a car. Those who live off campus often have to pay utilities, find parking options and get up early for their commute. It’s a lot to consider, but some find that with several roommates, it’s the right option for them.”

Under mom and dad’s roof For some students, the best option is to live at home and commute to college. This, of course, can present other problems — from helicopter parents who swoop in to solve every problem to students who have trouble adjusting to strict house rules. “This is a great opportunity for mom and dad to ease up on the apron strings a little and give their child independence,” Knerr said. “Set some ground rules for what to expect from them and let them shoulder some of the responsibility as well.” For parents whose children are used to living on campus, weekend and holiday visits can be stressful. The college-age kid may not want to fall back in line with past curfews and chores. “It’s hard to shift your mentality and treat your child like an adult when they’ve been living on campus,” Vitangeli said. “But if you set those ground rules ahead of time, it can go a long way to navigating this new phase of their lives.” ◆

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Special students, suitable living

Colleges and universities generally are willing to adapt the available living options to accommodate students’ special needs. During initial campus tours, parents can ask about special accommodations to suit students who have health issues, physical limitations or emotional disabilities. The terms should be understood and reiterated after the student’s acceptance letter is issued. The school likely will require the student’s physician to provide documentation before adaptations can be made. “No matter if it is a special mattress, specific cleaning supplies, their therapy animal or a place to lock up their medication, we’ll work with them to keep their needs confidential while keeping them safe,” said Amanda Knerr, executive director of residential life at Indiana State University.

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• SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2013

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college costs

The cost factor By Deb Buehler For Custom Publications

When budgeting for college, parents and students know to factor in the cost of tuition and housing. But many forget to plan ahead for all of the other expenses of higher education: books, computers, mobile devices, transportation and incidentals. These variables can and should influence the student’s educational choices.

Planning ahead “Tuition is less than half of the cost of attending school,” said Ted Malone, executive director for the division of financial aid at Purdue University. “While everyone is talking right now about tuition and college debt, they are forgetting that other things are really important.” In-state tuition at Indiana’s public universities varies only slightly from one school to the next. For state residents, tuition at Purdue University this school year is $9,992. At Indiana University, it’s slightly higher at $10,208. Ball State University’s current annual tuition is $8,498; Indiana State University comes in at $8,056 per year. Tuition for out-of-state students is significantly higher, as is the cost to study at a private school. But private institutions tend to have large endowments and are able to offer more significant financial-aid packages.

Paying the way “There are three periods in which someone can pay for school,” Malone said. “Paying from the past by saving over time is one way. Parents can pay in the present with current income that’s enough to cover the cost, or they can pay in the future by borrowing money and paying it back later.” Some families foot the bill using a combination of the three strategies, Malone said. But in his experience, parents and their college-ready children haven’t put a priority on saving money. As a result, some face a tremendous financial challenge when college enrollment begins.

Exploring other avenues Only about 15 percent of students are awarded scholarships, Malone said. A common misconception is that students receive scholarship money as a reward for their academic or athletic excellence. In reality, universities offer them to the students they most want to attract to their school. As a result, students should explore and apply to the schools where they’ll rate among the top performers in their field, discipline or sport. “The more a school wants you over someone else, the better chance you have of receiving a scholarship,” Malone said.

Starting now Student loan debts have increased significantly in the U.S. For a household with two adults who have four-year degrees, the average college loan balance is $53,000, according to Demos, a publicpolicy research organization. While families seek solutions to pay for higher education, they can begin by saving early on for their children’s future tuition. When kids are small, grandparents and extended family members can give contribute to a savings account in the child’s name. Parents who set aside even a modest amount each month when child are young

Work your way up

For students, saving up thousands of dollars to pay for college seems daunting at best, impossible at worst. Still, young entrepreneurs can find opportunities to earn money and invest in their own future. Whether they earn money by babysitting, walking dogs, mowing lawns or working part-time during high school, they can accumulate a tidy sum over time. Working during college is another strategy for motivated students. Ted Malone, executive director for the division of financial aid at Purdue University, said parents really shouldn’t worry that a part-time job will interfere with students’ academic progress. In fact, studies show that college students who work perform better academically than those who do not.

can build up a decent balance. The Indiana CollegeChoice 529 Direct Savings Plan is a savings option specifically for Hoosiers. Taxpayers who contribute to a dedicated account are eligible for a 20 percent tax credit. According to Malone, the plan sets up parents for a substantial tax advantage while helping them save for college. Another long-term strategy is to enroll seventh-grade students in the 21st Century Scholars program. Student who meet income requirements and fulfill a pledge of good citizenship are guaranteed four years of tuition at a participating public school in Indiana. To be considered for financial aid, students should apply to their preferred schools between August and October of their senior year in high school. Their next step is to apply for scholarship and financial aid opportunities through each institution. At Purdue University, the priority deadline for incoming freshmen and merit scholarship consideration is Nov. 1. The school’s FASFA application process runs Jan. 1 through March 1. Statewide, the FASFA filing deadline is March 10. Like all colleges and universities, Purdue has a number of online resources to help students complete financial aid and scholarship applications. ◆

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college costs

Indiana college costs 2013-14 academic year Institution

Ancilla College Anderson University Ball State University Bethel College Butler University Calumet College of St. Joseph DePauw University Earlham College Franklin College Goshen College Grace College Hanover College Holy Cross College Huntington University Indiana State University Indiana Tech Indiana University IU East IU Kokomo IU Northwest IU South Bend IU Southeast IUPUC (Columbus) IPFW (Fort Wayne) IUPUI (Indianapolis) Indiana Wesleyan University Ivy Tech Community College Manchester University Marian University Martin University Oakland City University Purdue University Purdue University Calumet Purdue University North Central Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology Saint Joseph’s College Saint Mary’s College Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College Taylor University Trine University University of Evansville University of Indianapolis University of Notre Dame University of Saint Francis University of Southern Indiana Valparaiso University Vincennes University Wabash College Western Governors University

Tuition

$13,230 $26,200 $8,980 $24,620 $34,368 $14,880 $40,720 $41,450 $27,695 $28,500 $23,970 $31,760 $24,500 $24,040 $8,056 $24,860 $10,208 $6,639 $6,674 $6,738 $6,815 $6,699 $8,756 $7,013 $8,756 $23,628 $3,784 $27,920 $28,400 $14,870 $19,200 $9,992 $6,399 $7,066 $40,284 $27,350 $34,600 $27,672 $28,753 $28,700 $30,596 $24,420 $44,605 $25,180 $6,568 $33,480 $5,010 + program fees $35,650 $6,070

Room and board

None $9,110 $8,990 $7,130 $11,240 None $10,700 $8,260 $8,190 $9,460 $7,670 $9,690 $8,894 $8,180 $9,010 $9,380 $9,162 None None None $8,478 $9,108 None $9,242 $8,534 $7,560 None $9,2500 $8,658 None $8,300 $10,378 $7,717 None $11,484 $8,440 $10,560 $10,050 $7,989 $9,500 $10,460 $9,320 $12,512 $8,420 $7,680 $9,560 $8,478 $8,510 None

Total

$13,230 $35,310 $17,970 $31,750 $45,608 $14,880 $51,420 $49,710 $35,885 $37,960 $31,640 $41,450 $33,394 $32,220 $17,066 $34,240 $19,370 $6,639 $6,674 $6,738 $15,293 $15,807 $8,756 $16,255 $17,290 $31,188 $3,784 $37,170 $37,058 $14,870 $27,500 $20,370 $14,116 $7,066 $51,768 $35,790 $45,160 $37,722 $36,742 $38,200 $41,056 $33,740 $57,117 $33,600 $14,248 $43,040 $13,488 + program fees $44,160 $6,070

NOTE: All totals are based on full-time residential student status (typically about 30 credit hours per year). Tuition costs include mandatory student fees/charges. Room and board is based on double occupancy and the largest meal plan available. Source: The National Center for College Costs

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• SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2013

AN ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT OF THE INDIANAPOLIS STAR

college news

PHOTO: TRINE/DEAN OREWILER

Trine invention changes a life

Terry Haffner shows the new hands-free shower system installed in his Fort Wayne home.

A hands-free automatic shower system, developed by Trine University’s Innovation One and a team of engineering students, is improving a Fort Wayne man’s quality of life. “I’m nearly 61 years old and for the first time I can shower myself alone,” said Terry Haffner, a Fort Wayne resident and artist who was born without arms and with partial legs. The shower features areas to rinse, shampoo hair, wash and be dried. Haffner moves through the system in the same way a car moves through an automatic carwash. For more information, visit innovation1.org. —Trine University

IU freshman set the mark for achievement

This year’s Indiana University – Bloomington freshmen class is the most academically accomplished on record, setting new marks for average SAT scores, grade-point average and class rank. It also is one of the biggest, most diverse classes ever to enroll at the Bloomington campus. Entering students are projected to have an average score of 1215 on the combined mathematics and critical reading sections of the SAT college-entrance exam, surpassing the previous Bloomington-campus record of 1203 set in 2009. About 90 percent of the class’s Indiana residents earned Academic Honors Diplomas. Of all first-year students, 34.5 percent were in the top 10 percent of their graduating class, and 70.2 percent were in the top 25 percent. And 1,050 first-year students are enrolled in the Hutton Honors College, a 29 percent increase from last year. The median high school GPA for freshmen was 3.72. Adding to campus diversity, first-year international students represent six continents and 33 countries. U.S. minority enrollment increased an estimated 4 percent. —Indiana University – Bloomington

Gen Con, one of the world’s largest gaming conventions, partnered with IUPUI’s Media Arts and Science program to create a massive multiplayer alternate-reality game. Students and faculty worked eight months on the project. Featured at this year’s convention in Indianapolis, “Return of Aetheria” used video mapping and projectors to create a large crystalline display, stereoscopic 3D and a smart phone app. The entire convention center was a play area, with costumed actors portraying game characters. Since establishing the partnership with Gen Con, the Media Arts and Science program has added classes on game preproduction and production. Mathew Powers, an IUPUI lecturer and the project leader, plans to have students add to the game each year, creating new versions for future conventions. —IUPUI

PHOTO: IUPUI

IUPUI students create a game like no other

Mathew Powers of Informatics and Computing and Jake Theis of Gen Con — the two driving forces behind the Gen Con/Informatics partnership.

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college news

Duke Energy is funding 120 new $2,600 Ivy Tech Corporate College scholarships that will jumpstart five regional training programs. The programs will equip workers with skills identified by area manufacturers as critical for the workforce. Ivy Tech and Duke Energy are collaborating with leaders in manufacturing, economic development and local government from Bloomington, Bedford, Connersville, Richmond, Kokomo and Shelbyville to develop eightweek advanced manufacturing programs modeled after an Ivy Tech initiative in Lafayette. The Lafayette program also will receive a share of scholarships. “Manufacturing still employs more people than any other industry in Indiana, but the modern manufacturing environment requires advanced training that goes beyond the high school diploma,” said Doug Esamann, Duke Energy Indiana president. To learn more about the scholarship program, join the program mailing list at www.ivytech.edu/duke-grant. —Duke Energy

PHOTO: ISU/TONY CAMPBELL

Ivy Tech and Duke Energy Workforce Development scholarships

Indiana State University students, faculty and staff worked March 24, 2012, to help construct a Habitat for Humanity house. The project was one of the university’s many service learning opportunities.

ISU tops national ranking for community service

The 2013 Washington Monthly College Guide placed Indiana State University at the top of its list of 281 national universities in the categories of community service participation and hours worked by students, faculty and staff. At the same time, the publication ranks ISU No. 2 in the country in terms of university support for service learning. “Indiana State has made community service a core component of what we do,” said Dan Bradley, university president. “There is an expectation that if you are a Sycamore, you will be involved in community service.” In the 2012 – 2013 school year, ISU students, faculty and staff provided an estimated 1.2 million hours of community service with a total value of $8 million. The university served 115 community partners, according to the Center for Community Engagement’s annual report. —Indiana State University

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SMART

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• SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2013

AN ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT OF THE INDIANAPOLIS STAR

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College guide 092913