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WINTER 2013

e v ent s January Saturday, January 5 at 2pm L.A. Rebellion Daughters of the Dust / Diary of an African Nun Saturday, January 5 at 5pm L.A. Rebellion Emma Mae

Saturday, January 19 at 2pm La Rebellion As Above, So Below / I & I: An African Allegory / Ujamii Uhuru Schule Community Freedom School / Medea Saturday, January 19 at 5pm L.A. Rebellion Fragrance / Your Children Come Back to You / Shipley Street / Rich

Saturday, January 5 at 8pm L.A. Rebellion My Brother’s Wedding / A Little Off Mark

Saturday, January 19 at 8pm L.A. Rebellion Bellydancing – A History & an Art / Festival of Mask / Black Art, Black Artists / Four Women / Define

Friday, January 11 at 7pm The Secret Cinema The Three Stooges: Hollywood Filming Locations

Thursday, January 24 at 7pm Motion Pictures: Spaghetti Western Django

Saturday, January 12 at 2pm L.A. Rebellion Bless Their Little Hearts / The Pocketbook Saturday, January 12 at 5pm L.A. Rebellion Compensation / Dark Exodus Saturday, January 12 at 8pm L.A. Rebellion Passing Through / When it Rains Sunday, January 13 at 8pm Cage: Beyond Silence Meetings Wednesday, January 16 at 7pm L.A. Rebellion A Different Image / Grey Area / Cycles / Water Ritual #1: An Urban Rite of Purification Thursday, January 17 at 7pm Spring Arts Preview / A Sunny Day in Glasgow / Films by Kenneth Anger / Roman Vishniac Science Films Friday, January 18 at 7pm Janus Collection Daisies

Friday, January 25 at 8pm Scribe Video Center Teza Saturday, January 26 at 5pm L.A. Rebellion Brick by Brick / L.A. In My Mind / Child of Resistance / Rain / The Dawn at My Back: Memoir of a Black Texas Upbringing Saturday, January 26 at 8pm L.A. Rebellion Bush Mama / Daydream Therapy January 27 – 31 Brundibar and The Children of Theresienstadt Tuesday, January 29 at 7pm IHP Language Programs + CETRA The Linguists Wednesday, January 30 at 7pm We Won’t Grow Old Together (Nous ne vieillirons pas ensemble) Thursday, January 31 at 7pm Flaherty on the Road: OPEN WOUNDS Program 1: CL.A.SH Qu’ils Reposent en Révolte (May They Rest in Revolt)

February Friday, February 1 at 7pm Flaherty on the Road: OPEN WOUNDS PROGRAM 2: THE ENVIRONMENT WHICH SURROUNDS US Coal Spell / River Rites / Three Men and a Fish Pond Saturday, February 2 at 5pm Flaherty on the Road: OPEN WOUNDS PROGRAM 3: FAMILY AFFAIRS Family Nightmare / Free Land Saturday, February 2 at 7pm Flaherty on the Road: OPEN WOUNDS PROGRAM 4: EXPERIMENTAL VISIONS Fokus / Perambulations Saturday, February 2 Brundibar and The Children of Theresienstadt Tuesday, February 5 at 7:30pm Three Favorite Films of J.G. Ballard chosen by Claire Walsh and presented by Tacita Dean Come and See

Saturday, February 16 at 7pm The Cinema is Jonas Mekas Lost Lost Lost Wednesday, February 20 at 7pm Cleopatra Thursday, February 21 at 7pm One Book, One Philadelphia Picture Bride Friday, February 22 at 8pm Exhumed Diabolical Double Feature Saturday, February 23 2pm Chris Marker: Réalisateur A Grin without a Cat (Le Fond de l’air est rouge) Saturday, February 23 at 7pm Level Five Wednesday, February 27 at 7pm Tube Time! Thursday, February 28 at 6pm Historical Exhibit Opening Party

Wednesday, February 6 at 7pm Archive Fever! 4.0: Straub/Huillet Too Early/Too Late / Marchorka-Muff

March

Friday, February 8 at 7pm An Evening with Sarah Christman As Above, So Below / Broad Channel / Dear Bill Gates

Friday, March 1 at 7pm Three Favorite Films of J.G. Ballard chosen by Claire Walsh and presented by Tacita Dean Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior

Saturday, February 9 at 7pm Janus Collection Ali: Fear Eats the Soul

Tuesday, March 5 at 7pm IHP Language Programs + CETRA Beyond Silence

Tuesday, February 12 at 7pm Scribe Producers’ Forum Janeane from Des Moines

Friday, March 8 at 7pm International Women’s Day: Fantastic Films by Women Meshes of the Afternoon / Agatha / Cry When it Happens / Somnium / The Seashell and the Clergyman

Thursday, February 14 at 7pm Motion Pictures: Love Stories Sid & Nancy Friday, February 15 at 7pm Lunar New Year Party RAAC Pearls of the East: 11th Annual Lunar New Year Celebration

Saturday, March 9 at 7pm Janus Collection: Cherry Blossom Festival Naked Island

Monday, March 11 at 7pm Visiting Filmmaker: Agnès Varda Daguerreotypes / Cinevardaphoto Tuesday, March 12 at 7pm Scribe Producers’ Forum The Contradictions of Fair Hope Wednesday, March 13 at 7pm Motion Pictures: Historical Epics The Last Days of Pompeii Thursday, March 14 at 7pm Visiting Filmmaker: Agnes Varda The Beaches of Agnes Friday, March 15 at 8pm Exhumed Diabolical Double Feature Saturday, March 16 at 5pm Chris Marker: Early Marker – Collaborations Les Astronautes / Toute la mémoire du monde / Les Statues meurent aussi / Night and Fog (Nuit et brouillard)

Tuesday, March 26 at 7pm Ars Nova Workshop Merzbow / Mats Gustafsson / Balázs Pándi Wednesday, March 27 at 7pm Three Favorite Films of J.G. Ballard chosen by Claire Walsh and presented by Tacita Dean Point Blank Thursday, March 28 at 7pm Spotlight on Shintoho Black Line Thursday, March 28 at 9pm Spotlight on Shintoho Ghost Story of Yotsuya Friday, March 29 at 7pm Spotlight on Shintoho Yellow Line

Saturday, March 30 at 5pm Spotlight on Shintoho Death Row Woman

Wednesday, March 20 at 7pm Nothing But a Man

Saturday, March 30 at 7pm Spotlight on Shintoho Flesh Pier

Friday, March 22 at 7pm The Invisible War

3 IHP: The First 100 years 5 ihp program history 7 program SpotLight: L.A. Rebellion 9 Programs 11 january 22 february 31 march

Friday, March 29 at 9pm Spotlight on Shintoho Vampire Bride

Selections from the HRWIFF: A Film Festival and Symposium on Human Rights Awareness

Thursday, March 21 at 7pm Reportero

table of contents

Saturday, March 30 at 9pm Spotlight on Shintoho Ghost Cat of Otama Pond

Saturday, March 23 at 5pm Putin’s Kiss Saturday, March 23 at 8pm Brother Number One Sunday, March 24 at 5pm Commemorating Dexter Gordon’s 90th Birthday Round Midnight

tickets/box office: Tickets are available at www.ihousephilly.org + 215.387.5125 IHP’s Box Office is now open from 1pm – 8pm, Tuesday – Saturday. Purchase your tickets in person or with IHP over the phone during these hours and save the processing fee. Cover: Daisies

Meshes of the Afternoon (pg 16)

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H I S T O R I CA L E X H I B I T

IHP: THE FIRST 1 0 0 Y e a rs This January, we are thrilled to open International House Philadelphia’s first permanent historical exhibition, which highlights the indispensable residential services and social programming provided by IHP throughout the last century to both the people that have called it home, and the general public. From internationally themed-multicultural events and programming, to informal social gatherings and student support, IHP has made possible for tens of thousands of students in Philadelphia to feel welcome, to make lasting friendships, and to effect positive change within the global community. Over the past many months, we have endeavored to document the story of International House through the institution’s archival material, and bring this important history and narrative to life. The story of IHP’s beginning is well known to us all and can be traced back to 1908 when Dr. Waldo Stevenson, a missionary with a huge heart, befriended a group of foreign students on Penn’s campus and invited them to his ihousephilly.org

West Philadelphia home for dinner, which quickly became a regularly occurring Friday night social. This act of kindness allowed these students to feel at home through kinship, camaraderie, and understanding. They shared stories of their countries back home, played friendly games of chess and backgammon, and were entertained with good music and good food. The Stevenson’s generosity and warmth allowed these visiting students to relax and begin their assimilation into American culture, giving them confidence in the classroom, a network of friends, and social stability, ultimately paving the way in the founding of the first International House. IHP has helped to transition students into American culture, and to find their footing while living away from home for the first time, by offering housing, language programs, and cultural programming to all. Additionally, IHP has served as a pillar of its community by being an institution that welcomes the involvement of volunteers and provides

structure for those who want to give back, all in the name of communication and cultural exchange, enduring friendship, and the promise of peace. Although the physical location has changed, this exhibition demonstrates that the mission of IHP has remained fundamentally the same and traces its path from a Reverend’s home, to a mansion on Penn’s campus that housed 12 students and entertained hundreds, to a hotel across town on 15th and Cherry that was home to nearly 100 with the capacity to entertain thousands, to its present location nestled within University City – an independent, non-profit able to hold large-scale events, provide residence for 450 students, scholars, and interns at any given time, and a regional destination for world-class arts and culture. IHP is proud of its origins and its journey in becoming an international organization whose positive impact on students and the public is invaluable for international policy making and communication. A series of photographs, newsletters, press clippings, and other memorabilia along with corresponding text moves us through the past and into the present to explain the evolution of International House Philadelphia and to reveal the common thread that has woven its way through the changing physical, economic, religious, and political climates that have ultimately given International House its place among non-profit organizations that advocate for communication, progressive thinking, international culture, and peace. In addition to a complete survey of the institutions’ archives and history, we will also exhibit for three months (January – March 2013) a history of programming at IHP. Please join us on February 28, 2013 at 6pm to officially open these exhibits, and to leave your mark on the next 100 years of International House Philadelphia.

IHP has served as a pillar of its community by being an institution that welcomes the involvement of volunteers and provides structure for those who want to give back, all in the name of communication and cultural exchange, enduring friendship, and the promise of peace. 4

IHP PROGRAM HISTORY

The IHP programming of today and recent history is best known for its world-class international, avant-garde, and repertory cinema, as well as documentaries and lectures that seek to increase awareness on important global issues in the arts and humanities. The roots of this programming can be traced back to an opportunistic partnership born in 1976, which ultimately proved successful for both organizations involved. This partnership eventually led to city-wide events and initiatives that are still active today.

In looking back, the early 1970s proved a tumultuous time in IHP’s past. Due to the inability to reach full occupancy of the 450 available rooms, the high cost of heating and cooling the enormous facilities of the new building, and a revolving door of administrative staff, it seemed as if IHP had overestimated its ability to fulfill the financial obligations of the new building. However, due to an active, caring, and involved Board that refused to give up the nearly 75-year-old institution and the good fortune of having Program Director (and later President) Ellen Davis on staff, IHP began to gain financial and public footing once again. In 1976, Ms. Davis

made the bold move to donate space to the established Neighborhood Film Project (previously of the Christian Association) and the Folklife Center of Philadelphia, under the condition that they split ticket sales of events held in IHP facilities. This tactful decision allowed IHP to develop unique public programming that engaged not only an international audience, but a community audience as well. This ultimately helped to cultivate respect and reverence locally, leading to increased funding for further development and programming. This new-found identity within Greater Philadelphia, and expansion on a legacy of goodwill, is what continues to set IHP apart from other International Houses throughout the world. In 1979, the Neighborhood Film and Video Project and International House Philadelphia merged. Following this merger, the NFP’s Director Linda Blackaby added to the roster the Festival of Independents (a showcase for works by local and regional filmmakers), the first Philadelphia Festival of World Cinema (now known as the Philadelphia Film Festival in 2003), and the Philadelphia Independent Film and Video Association (PIF VA). As a result of the success of these programs, greatly needed renovations to improve the living quarters for students were undertaken during the latter part of the 1980s. New kitchens were installed in group apartments, and Hopkinson Hall underwent massive renovations to include comfortable seating and a state of the art projection booth. While IHP is no longer home to many of these early programs, this history has informed our current identity and is a valuable part of the institutions past. We invite you to discover more about the history of art, culture, and programming at IHP by visiting our expanded historical exhibit between January and March 2013. This exhibit builds upon our newly completed, permanent historical exhibit that will be open to the public beginning January 2013. Please join us on February 28, 2013 at 6pm to officially open these exhibits, and to leave your mark on the next 100 years of International House Philadelphia.

October – November 1976: The first International Cinema film series takes place at IHP. March 31, 1978: A leader of the New German Cinema movement, filmmaker Wim Wenders visits IHP during screenings of his films The Wrong Move, Kings of the Road and Alice in the Cities. Wenders answers questions in a special presentation moderated by film programmer/historian/professor Amos Vogel.

July 1, 1979: The Neighborhood Film Project and International House Philadelphia officially merge. IHP provides office, storage and exhibition space for the NFP, who bring the entirety of their increasingly-renown programs to Hopkinson Hall.

1979: The Philadelphia Independent Film Video Association (PIFVA) was founded as part of the NFP. PIFVA was a local resource group that encouraged film and video-makers and offered shared resources, experience and networking. It was a program at IHP until 1998. In 2002, the program was started again and is now a non-profit organization hosted in an office at the Scribe Video Center.

1981: The Neighborhood Film Project is renamed, becoming the Neighborhood Film/Video Project. March 19, 1986: The first Festival of Independents (originally known as the Philadelphia Independents Showcase) is held at IHP. The Festival of Independents was created to showcase film and video works by local and regional filmmakers, and later was included as a sidebar in the Philadelphia Festival of World Cinema.

1989: The NFVP launches the impressive exhibition Latin American Visions. Bringing together essential, classic, and rarely-seen films from Central and South America, the 80-program exhibition includes a 59-page catalog that was widely read and distributed. The NFVP also created new prints of five films previously unavailable in the US. These prints are now part of the MOMA Circulating Film Library.

1992: The NFVP organizes the first Philadelphia Festival of World Cinema (PFWC). Forty films were screened, some at other venues including the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Free Library. At this time, the NFVP has 13 staff members and 11 University of Pennsylvania work-study students working on the programs.

1997: Following the departure of Linda Blackaby, the NFVP moniker is retired. The film program is now organized under the name International House Arts Center. 2001: TLA Entertainment assumes management of the Philadelphia Festival of World Cinema, which IHP previously founded and administered. International House would remain a venue for the festival (renamed the Philadelphia Film Festival in 2003) for many years. Ultimately the film program undergoes a reset back to its original programming aesthetic and structure.

September 19, 2008: Following a new renovation with a major gift donated by S.A. and Nina Ibrahim, Hopkinson Hall is renamed The Ibrahim Theater. A new, retractable seating system is the main upgrade of the renovation. The grand opening screening is John Cassavetes’ Faces (1968), shown in a new 35mm restored print.

February 2012: A new, state of the art Barco 2K digital cinema projector is installed in The Ibrahim Theater, providing high quality HD digital projection, and if the first step toward the new industry-standard digital projection compatibility. 6

L.A. Rebellion: Creating a New Black Cinema

January 5 – 26, 2013

L.A. Rebellion: Creating a New Black

FEATURED PROGRAM In the late 1960s, in the aftermath of the Watts Uprising and against the backdrop of the continuing Civil Rights Movement and the escalating Vietnam War, a group of African and African-American students entered the UCL A School of Theater, Film and Television, many as part of an “Ethno-Communications” initiative designed to be responsive to communities of color (also including AsianAmerican, Chicano and Native American communities). Now referred to as the L.A. Rebellion, these mostly unheralded artists created a unique cinematic landscape, as—over the course of two decades—students arrived, mentored one another and passed the torch to the next group. Some aspects of the story have been told before, in articles and in panel discussions, and at retrospective screenings of key films.  Now, UCL A Film & Television Archive has undertaken its L.A. Rebellion initiative to help illuminate previously unknown aspects of the story, the artists and the work, and facilitate a greater understanding of the whole. The Archive’s initiative began with the Archive’s participation in the Getty Foundation funded “Pacific Standard Time” exhibition of post World War II art in Los Angeles.  Three years later, dozens of filmmakers have been identified as part of the L.A. Rebellion movement and the initiative has grown into a massive effort by all departments of the Archive to bring to light the contributions of these first generations of Black UCL A film students. Presented in association with UCL A Film & Television Archive and supported in part by grants from the Getty Foundation and The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. The series is curated by Allyson Nadia Field, JanChristopher Horak, Shannon Kelley, and Jacqueline Stewart. Co-sponsored by Philly Weekly, Scribe Video Center, and Temple University, Department of Film and Media Arts.

A Different Image Saturday, January 5 at 2pm Daughters of the Dust / Diary of an African Nun Saturday, January 5 at 5pm Emma Mae Saturday, January 5 at 8pm My Brother’s Wedding / A Little Off Mark Saturday, January 12 at 2pm Bless Their Little Hearts / The Pocketbook Saturday, January 12 at 5pm Compensation / Dark Exodus Saturday, January 12 at 8pm Passing Through / When it Rains

Saturday, January 19 at 2pm As Above, So Below / I & I: An African Allegory / Ujamii Uhuru Schule Community Freedom School / Medea Saturday, January 19 at 5pm Fragrance / Your Children Come Back to You / Shipley Street / Rich Saturday, January 19 at 8pm Bellydancing – A History & An Art / Festival of Mask / Black Art, Black Artists / Four Women / Define Saturday, January 26 at 5pm Brick by Brick / L.A. In My Mind / Child of Resistance / Rain / The Dawn at My Back: Memoir of a Black Texas Upbringing Saturday, January 26 at 8pm Bush Mama / Daydream Therapy

Wednesday, January 16 at 7pm A Different Image / Grey Area / Cycles / Water Ritual #1: An Urban Rite of Purification

Images on left from top to bottom: Shipley Street, Passing Through, Bush Mama, & Bless Their Little Hearts

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PROGRAMS An Evening with Sarah Christman

Sarah J. Christman’s non-fiction films examine the intersection between people, technology and the natural world. A Philadelphia native, Sarah received an MFA in Film & Media Arts from Temple University and a BA from Oberlin. She currently lives in New York City, where she is an Assistant Professor in the film department at Brooklyn College. Friday, February 8 at 7pm As Above, So Below / Broad Channel / Dear Bill Gates

Archive Fever! 4.0

Central to our visual culture, the archive is a repository for any personal memories, shared histories, objects and documents through which we revisit the history of our time. In this series, we explore the myriad ways in which the archive, archival and found materials are central to the works of film and video artists who are discovering the dynamic possibilities within archives.

Languages

Our Language Program offers the opportunity to study a foreign language or improve English conversation skills. At our friendly and affordable sessions, the small class setting will allow you to quickly learn how to communicate clearly outside of the classroom and enhance skills that assist with future goals. Spring 2013 registration dates: January 8 - 11, 12:30pm - 4pm Spring 2013 classes: January 22 - April 10

For more information call 215.895.6592 or visit www.ihousephilly.org.

Motion Pictures: Traversing Genres of the Cinematic Imaginary

Motion Pictures is a monthly series that focuses on different movements in film culture such as science fiction, city symphonies and New German Cinema. It has previously featured the films of Georges Méliès, John Ford, Preston Sturges, and Andrei Tarkovsky.

Wednesday, February 6 at 7pm Too Early/Too Late / Marchorka-Muff

Thursday, January 24 at 7pm Django

Chris Marker

Wednesday, March 13 at 7pm The Last Days of Pompeii

Chris Marker was the master of the cinematic essay, fusing fiction, documentary and experimental techniques in creating associations that put in debate cotemporary philosophical and political notions. Marker made films that engaged in the culture, but were often mysterious, even poetic and playful, seemingly, conspiring to give the films a sense of provocation, as though he was using his camera to explore something about the human condition that film and film alone could access. Saturday, February 23 at 2pm A Grin without a Cat

Saturday, February 23 at 7pm Level Five

Monday, March 11 at 7pm Daguerreotypes / Cinevardaphoto

Thursday, March 14 at 7pm The Beaches of Agnes

Saturday, March 16 at 5pm Les Astronautes / Toute la mémoire du monde / Les Statues meurent aussi /Night and Fog - Nuit et brouillard

Flaherty on the Road: Open Wounds

The Flaherty on the Road program offers innovative, provocative, and hardto-see films from Open Wounds, the 2012 Robert Flaherty Film Seminar programmed by Josetxo Cerdan. With this initiative, The Flaherty Seminar extends its reach to a far greater number of academics, students, filmmakers, and film enthusiasts than the 160 participants who attend the week-long event. The Flaherty on the Road program keeps the spirit of the Seminar alive throughout the year. Thursday, January 31 at 7pm Qu’ils Reposent en Révolte (May They Rest in Revolt)

Friday, February 1 at 7pm Coal Spell / River Rites / Three Men and a Fish Pond

Saturday, February 2 at 5pm Family Nightmare / Free Land

Saturday, February 2 at 7pm Fokus / Perambulations

Thursday, February 14 at 7pm Sid & Nancy

Selections from the HRWIFF: A Film Festival and Symposium on Human Rights Awareness

In recognition of the power of film to educate and galvanize a broad constituency of concerned citizens, Human Rights Watch decided to create the Human Rights Watch International Film Festival, a leading venue for distinguished fiction, documentary and animated films and videos with a distinctive human rights theme. Through the eyes of committed and courageous filmmakers, we showcase the heroic stories of activists and survivors from all over the world. The works we feature help to put a human face on threats to individual freedom and dignity, and celebrate the power of the human spirit and intellect to prevail. We seek to empower everyone with the knowledge that personal commitment can make a very real difference. Wednesday, March 20 at 7pm Nothing But a Man

Thursday, March 21 at 7pm Reportero

Friday, March 22 at 7pm The Invisible War

Saturday, March 23 at 5pm Putin’s Kiss

Saturday, March 23 at 8pm Brother Number One

Spotlight on Shintoho: An Introduction to Shintoho

One of the six studios active during Japanese cinema’s 1950s Golden Age, Shintoho began life in 1947 in the chaos of a ferocious labor struggle and was on a shaky financial footing for most of its brief history. In its early days Shintoho was home to such internationally acclaimed auteurs as Akira Kurosawa, Kenji Mizoguchi, Yasujiro Ozu, Mikio Naruse and Kon Ichikawa. Once showman Mitsugu Okura became its head in 1955, Shintoho shifted

The following programs are support in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts: Janus Collection, Archive Fever, Motion Pictures .Directors in Focus, Human Rights Watch, Jonas Mekas

production to resemble American International Pictures, the Hollywood schlock factory that targeted the drive-in market in the 1950s and 1960s with B-grade pics featuring fast cars, rebellious teens, vampires, werewolves and curvy girls in bikinis genre pictures that proved successful with fans. The occasional hit, however, couldn’t drain the swamp of red ink. When the end came in 1961, the only surprise was that the studio had managed to hold on so long. Condemned as cheap, disposible trash at the time, these films have had a surprisingly long after life, as well as over-sized influence. Just as there was a direct line from the AIG biker movies of the 1960s to the phenomenum of Easy Rider, Shintoho’s genre product had a big, lasting impact on everything from Japan’s porno industry to the J Horror shockers that became favorites of Hollywood remakers.

saline landscapes of Utah, Nevada, and Southern California using her invented aperture masking process. It is her first landscape film made in the US and seeks to respond, in some way, to the proposition posed to her by the author shortly before he died, to treat the Spiral Jetty as a mystery her film will solve. Please join us on February 5 as Dean introduces the series and speaks briefly about Ballard and cinema.  Tuesday, February 5 at 7:30pm Come and See Friday, March 1 at 7pm Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior

Thursday, March 28 at 7pm Black Line

Thursday, March 28 at 9pm Ghost Story of Yotsuya

Wednesday, March 27 at 7pm Point Blank

Friday, March 29 at 7pm Yellow Line

Friday, March 29 at 9pm Vampire Bride

PARTNER PROGRAMS

Saturday, March 30 at 5pm Death Row Woman

Saturday, March 30 at 7pm Flesh Pier

Saturday, March 30 at 9pm Ghost Cat of Otama Pond

The Janus Collection

CETRA

IHP’s Language Programs and CETRA Language Solutions presents a series of international language films. They range from drama to documentaries, a variety of foreign languages to sign language, and are both thought provoking and entertaining. Learn more about the world around you through these fabulous films being screened throughout the year. We are delighted to offer these films free of charge to the public.

Truly one of our national treasures, Janus Films is a vital part of American film culture. International House continues the Janus Collection with titles from their library, all in brand new or restored 35mm prints.

Tuesday, January 29 at 7pm The Linguists

Friday, January 18 at 7pm Daisies

Formed in 1997, Exhumed Films was created to provide a theatrical venue for a much beloved art form that had all but disappeared in the 1990s and is in further decline in the early 21st Century: the cult horror movie.

Saturday, February 9 at 7pm Ali: Fear Eats the Soul

Saturday, March 9 at 7pm Naked Island

Three Favorite Films of J.G. Ballard  chosen by Claire Walsh and presented by Tacita Dean

In conjunction with Dean’s new film JG, on view at Arcadia University Art Gallery (February 7 - April 21), a new film project funded by The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage. In response to an invitation by International House’s program curator Jesse Pires to put JG into a cinematic context, Dean asked if J.G. Ballard’s long-time partner, Claire Walsh could make a list of the author’s favorite films. The first three films on the list perfectly combine to present three very distinctive aspects of Ballard’s personal vision – war, sci-fi, and film noir. J. G. Ballard (1930-2009) earned a cult following during his lifetime for fiction distinguished by its “dystopian modernity, bleak man-made landscapes, and the psychological effects of technological, social, or environmental developments.” Dean’s new 35mm film, JG, is a sequel in technique to her 2011 Turbine Hall project FILM, and is inspired by her correspondence with J.G. Ballard about the artist, Robert Smithson’s earthwork, Spiral Jetty and his own short story, The Voices of Time. The new work is a looping 35mm Cinemascope film shot in the

Tuesday, March 5 at 7pm Beyond Silence

EXHUMED FILMS

Friday, February 22 at 8pm Diabolical Double Feature

Friday, March 15 at 8pm Diabolical Double Feature

Scribe Video Center Producers’ Forum

The Producers’ Forum in-person screening series is a lecture discussion program, that allows Scribe to invite important nationally and internationally recognized media makers to Philadelphia to share their work and talk about their process of creating. Friday, January 25 at 8pm Teza

Tuesday, February 12 at 7pm Janeane from Des Moines

Tuesday, March 12 at 7pm The Contradictions of Fair Hope

Secret Cinema

For 20 years Secret Cinema has been the area’s premiere floating repertory cinema series, bringing hundreds of unique programs to nightclubs, bars, coffee houses, museums, open fields, colleges, art galleries, bookstores, and sometimes even theaters and film festivals. Friday, January 11 at 7pm The Three Stooges: Hollywood Filming Locations

Unless noted, all IHP screenings are free admission for IHP members; $7 students + seniors; $9 general admission.

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January

Daughters of the Dust

Saturday, January 5 at 2pm

Saturday, January 5 at 5pm

Daughters of the Dust (New print!)

Emma Mae (New print!) dir. Jamaa Fanaka, 1976, 35mm, 100 min.

L.A. Rebellion

dir. Julie Dash, 1991, 35mm, color, 112 min.

Julie Dash’s masterpiece, the first American feature by an African American woman to receive a general theatrical release, announced a formidable talent with its story of an island family, descendants of escaped slaves, living off the Southern coast of the US in 1902 and contemplating a move to the U.S. mainland.  Superb performances, cinematography, music and touches of magical realism, grace this unforgettable film, named to the National Film Registry in 2004. Diary of an African Nun (New print!) dir. Julie Dash, 1977, 16mm, b/w, 15 min. A nun in Uganda weighs the emptiness she finds in her supposed union with Christ.  Adapted from a short story by Alice Walker, the film was a deliberate first move by its director toward narrative filmmaking, though its graphic simplicity and pantomimed performance by Barbara O. Jones give it an intensity that anticipates Julie Dash’s work on Daughters of the Dust.  Preservation funded in part with a grant from the National Film Preservation Foundation

L.A. Rebellion

In Jamaa Fanaka’s second feature, Emma Mae arrives in Los Angeles from Mississippi replete with rough edges and an exceptional ability to kick ass. Emma Mae’s plain looks and shy demeanor set her apart from supermama heroines of this “Blaxploitation” era (e.g., Foxy Brown, Cleopatra Jones). But when folks underestimate her, Emma Mae surprises everyone, including her no-good boyfriend Jesse, with her extraordinary physical and emotional strength. A Day in the Life of Willie Faust, or Death on the Installment Plan dir. Jamaa Fanaka, 1972, digital video from 16mm, color, 16 min.

Jamaa Fanaka’s first project is an adaption of Goethe’s Faust, superimposed over a remake of Super Fly. A morality tale in two reels.

Friday, January 11 at 7pm

The Secret Cinema

The Three Stooges: Hollywood Filming Locations

My Brother’s wedding Saturday, January 5 at 8pm

L.A. Rebellion

My Brother’s Wedding (Director’s cut!) dir. Charles Burnett, 1983/2007, digital video, color, 82 min.

Laid off from his factory job, Pierce (Silas) marks time working at his family’s dry cleaning store, swapping loaded jabs with his brother’s upper middle-class fiancé and hanging out with his best friend, recently released from prison. Director Charles Burnett fleshes out Pierce’s sense of suspension with richly observed detail, the revelation of character bound to the revelation of an African American community, itself at a crossroads. 

Secret Cinema presents a combined film screening and live presentation, providing new insight into the making of some of the best loved comedy films ever made. With The Three Stooges: Hollywood Filming Locations, special guest Jim Pauley will explore, with forensic precision, the various real life sites where Stooges once walked the Earth! His long and lovingly researched presentation of original and archival photographs contrasts intriguing then-and-now views. These are the same Hollywood streets and landscapes where producer Jules White could take a small film crew -- along with his top box office attractions, Moe, Larry and Curly (and Shemp!), -- and in just a few days create comedy magic that has entertained the world for decades. Copies of the book The Three Stooges: Hollywood Filming Locations by Jim Pauley will be available for purchase at this event, and will be autographed by the author. About the Author Jim Pauley is a recognized expert on the Three Stooges filming locations, having written articles on the subject since 2001 for the Three Stooges Journal, a publication of the Three Stooges Fan Club. Pauley has also presented on this topic at the Hollywood Heritage Museum and the Stoogeum, a Three Stooges museum in Pennsylvania. Pauley lives in Philadelphia. $9 General Admission, $7 Students + Seniors, $5.00 IHP Members

A Little Off Mark dir. Robert Wheaton, 1986, 16mm, b/w, 9 min.

Writer-director Robert Wheaton’s story of a shy guy, Mark (Parros), trying all the wrong the moves to meet the right girl rides high on a romantic sensibility. Introduced by Dr. Frankelin Cason, Temple Univ.

The Three Stooges: Hollywood Filming Locations 12

Saturday, January 12 at 2pm

L.A. Rebellion

Bless Their Little Hearts (New restoration!) dir. Billy Woodberry, 1984, 35mm, b/w, 84 min.

Saturday, January 12 at 5pm

L.A. Rebellion

Compensation dir. Zeinabu irene Davis, 1999, digital video from 16mm, b/w, 90 min.

Billy Woodberry’s Bless Their Little Hearts chronicles the devastating effects of underemployment on a family in the same Los Angeles community depicted in Killer of Sheep (1977), and pays witness to the ravages of time in the short years since its predecessor. Nate Hardman and Kaycee Moore deliver gut-wrenching performances as the couple whose family is torn apart by events beyond their control.

In two Chicago love stories, set a century apart, a deaf woman and a hearing man face the specter of death in director Zeinabu irene Davis’ feature debut. They also confront intraracial differences across lines of gender, class, education and ability. Through innovative use of sign language and title cards evoking the silent film era, Compensation is accessible to deaf and hearing audiences.

Preservation funded by the National Film Preservation Foundation and the Packard Humanities Institute.

Dark Exodus (New print!)

The Pocketbook (New restoration!)

Visualizing the migration of African Americans from the rural South to the industrial North in sepia tones, Iverson White’s period film captures the atmosphere of early 20th century America.

dir. Billy Woodberry, 1980, 35mm, b/w, 13 min.

In the course of a botched purse-snatching, a boy comes to question the path of his life. Billy Woodberry’s second film, and first completed in 16mm, adapts Langston Hughes’ short story, Thank You, Ma’am, and features music by Leadbelly, Thelonious Monk and Miles Davis. Preservation funded in part by a grant from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

dir. Iverson White, 1985, 16mm, b/w, 28 min.

Saturday, January 12 at 8pm

L.A. Rebellion

Passing Through (New print!) dir. Larry Clark, 1977, 35mm, color, 111 min.

Eddie Womack, an African-American jazz musician, is released from prison for the killing of a white gangster. Not willing to play for the mobsters who control the music industry, Womack searches for his musical mentor, Poppy Harris. Larry Clark’s film repeatedly turns to various musicians improvising jazz, leading a French critic to call it “the only jazz film in the history of cinema.” Preservation funded in part by a grant from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and the Packard Humanities Institute. When it Rains dir. Charles Burnett, 1995, 16mm, color, 13 min.

The Pocketbook ihousephilly.org

On New Year’s Day, a man tries to help a woman pay her rent and learns a lesson in connecting with others in a community. Ayuko Babu, founding director of the Pan African Film Festival of Los Angeles, assumes the lead role in a pleasingly empathic reading.

Wednesday, January 16 at 7pm

L.A. Rebellion

A Different Image (New print!) dir. Alile Sharon Larkin, 1982, 16mm, color, 51 min.

An African-American woman contemplates self-identity, heritage and perception on the streets of the sprawling Los Angeles metropolis in a film by Alile Sharon Larkin. Grey Area (New print!) dir. Monona Wali, USA, 1981, 16mm, b/w, 38 min.

From Black Panthers to Young Urban Professionals, several members of a blighted neighborhood debate the causes and experience the stresses of cyclical poverty in Monona Wali’s bracing drama, as a monolithic bank commissions a film about its own supposedly good work in the community. Cycles dir. Zeinabu irene Davis, 1989, digital video from 16mm, b/w, 17 min.

MEETINGS

Sunday, January 13 at 8pm

Cage: Beyond Silence

Meetings Pauline Oliveros, Christian Wolff, Keith Rowe, Michael Pisaro Cage: Beyond Silence is a major festival celebrating the music of John Cage taking place at the Philadelphia Museum of Art and venues across the city.

As a woman anxiously awaits her overdue period, she performs Africanbased rituals of purification in this short by Zeinabu irene Davis. Water Ritual #1: An Urban Rite of Purification, (New restoration!) dir. Barabara McCullough, 1979, 35mm, b/w, 6 min.

In collaboration with performer Yolanda Vidato, Barbara McCullough presents a Black woman’s attempt to expel the putrefaction she has absorbed from her blighted urban environment, while symbolically cleansing the environment itself.

Preservation funded with a grant from the National Film Preservation Scored for a quartet with “any way of producing sounds,” Four6 Foundation’s Avant-Garde Masters Grant Program funded by The Film is perhaps the most open of Cage’s Number Pieces.  Offering no Foundation. other directives than a series of time brackets, Four6 invites its players to individually choose and number 12 sounds that they are willing to make, and to begin and end them sometime during a set of fixed durations.  As each performer has no knowledge of the others’ sounds beforehand, the result is unexpected and magical Composed in 1992, and dedicated to Pauline Oliveros on the occasion of her 60th birthday, this performance brings together four preeminent post-Cagean composer-performers.

Cycles

$15 General Admission

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Thursday, January 17 at 7pm

Spring Arts Preview

Live performance by A Sunny Day in Glasgow with science films by Roman Vishniac / Films by Kenneth Anger / Special expanded cinema presentation by IHP curators A Sunny Day in Glasgow A Sunny Day in Glasgow is a six-piece band based in Philadelphia and Sydney, Australia. Formed in 2006 by Ben Daniels, the lineup has changed over the years but became permanent around the 2009 release of the band’s second album Ashes Grammar. ASDIG spent most of 2010 recording and touring around the world with dates in the US, Canada, UK and Europe including festival appearances at SXSW and the Primavera Sound Festival in Barcelona. The band is currently recording their fourth album in Philadelphia with Jeff Zeigler at Uniform Recording (Kurt Vile, War on Drugs, Blues Control). This will be their first performance since 2010. “[A Sunny Day in Glasgow] draw you in by offering outstanding moments in strange contexts; you’ll re-listen to hear specific pieces even though you’re unable to remember exactly when and how they occur. Ashes Grammar often feels like the result of a band who took Martha Reeves & the Vandellas’ Come and Get These Memories in the most abstract, art-damaged way possible: nostalgic, jigsaw pop music from a group of writers strong enough to keep you humming and courageous enough to make you guess.” – Andrew Gaerig, Pitchfork Films by Kenneth Anger Born in 1927, Kenneth Anger is perhaps the most infamous American underground filmmaker of all time. Starting out as a child actor, Anger has had a diverse career, though he is most famous for the group of experimental films he created from 1947-1980 known as the Magick Lantern Cycle. IHP is proud to feature 16mm prints from Canyon Cinema of three of the Magick Lantern titles in a special presentation. Rabbit’s Moon dir. Kenneth Anger, US, 1950, 16mm, color, 15 min.

Lucifer Rising dir. Kenneth Anger, US, 1980, 16mm, color, 29 min.

Puce Moment dir. Kenneth Anger, US, 1949, 16mm, color, 6 min. with live soundtrack by A Sunny Day in Glasgow

Roman Vishniac Science Films While well-known as a photographer who captured the preHolocaust life of Jews in Central and Eastern Europe, Roman Vishniac (1897-1990) also created many science films in the 1960s and 70s. Recording film observations of microscopic organisms, Vishniac became a pioneer in microcinematography and photomicroscopy. The University of South Carolina Moving Image Research Collection (MIRC) now holds the Roman Vishniac Film Collection, which includes 156,000 feet of motion picture film. Among the holdings are home movies and naturalist film experiments in addition to outtakes and working materials from the Living Biology film series. Whether showing close-ups of bacteria, single-celled organisms or even light reflections on the waves of a pond, Roman Vishniac’s films show the eye-opening views of the natural world that normally goes unobserved. This program of film clips and fragments will be projected during the performance by A Sunny Day in Glasgow. Sponsored by Great Lakes Brewing Company.

A Sunny D ay in G l asg o w

Friday, January 18 at 7pm

Janus Collection Daisies

dir. Věra Chytilová, Czech Republic, 1966, 35mm, color, 76 min., Czech w/ English subtitles

Maybe the New Wave’s most anarchic entry, Věra Chytilová’s absurdist farce follows the misadventures of two brash young women. Believing the world to be “spoiled,” they embark on a series of pranks in which nothing—food, clothes, men, war—is taken seriously. Daisies is an aesthetically and politically adventurous film that’s widely considered one of the great works of feminist cinema.

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Saturday, January 19 at 2pm

Ujamii Uhuru Schule Community Freedom School

As Above, So Below (New print!)

dir. Don Amis, 1974, digital video from 16mm, color, 9 min.

La Rebellion

dir. Larry Clark, 1973, 16mm, color, 52 min.

A rediscovered L.A. Rebellion masterpiece, Larry Clark’s As Above, So Below comprises a powerful political and social critique in its portrayal of Black insurgency.  I & I: An African Allegory (New print!) dir. Ben Caldwell, 1979, 16mm, color, 32 min.

Weaving experimental, dramatic and documentary styles, Ben Caldwell’s I & I is a moving meditation on reciprocity. Preservation funded in part by a grant from the National Film Preservation Foundation.

As Above, So Below ihousephilly.org

Don Amis’ documentary chronicles the day-in-the-life of an Afrocentric primary school located in South Los Angeles. Learn, baby, learn. Medea dir. Ben Caldwell, 1973, digital video from 16mm, color, 7 min.

Made as Ben Caldwell’s first project at UCL.A., Medea is a collage film that explores the information that permeates a child before it is born.

Saturday, January 19 at 8pm

L.A. Rebellion

Bellydancing – A History & an Art dir. Alicia Dhanifu, 1979, digital video from 1” videotape, color, 22 min.

Alicia Dhanifu, who appears in Jamaa Fanaka’s Emma Mae, constructs a rigorous history of belly dancing — its roots and history, forms and meanings. Festival of Mask dir. Don Amis, 1982, digital video from 16mm, color, 25 min.

Fragrance Saturday, January 19 at 5pm

L.A. Rebellion Fragrance

dir. Gay Abel-Bey, 1991, digital video from ¾” videotape, b/w, 38 min.

Conflicted by duty and fear, George heads off to war, still unresolved over the larger question of whether African Americans should be fighting for justice at home or abroad in Gay Abel-Bey’s drama. Your Children Come Back to You (New print!) dir. Alile Sharon Larkin, 1979, 16mm, b/w, 30 min.

Alile Sharon Larkin’s film looks at a mother, a child, a better life on the horizon, and a bond that cannot be broken. Shipley Street dir. Jacqueline Frazier, 1981, digital video from 16mm, color, 25 min.

An African American family sends their child to an all-white parochial school, where she is confronted with harsh discipline and racist attitudes in this drama by Jacqueline Frazier.

In this documentary by Don Amis about the Craft & Folk Art Museum’s annual festival, L.A.’s diverse racial and ethnic communities (African, Asian, Latin American), express themselves through a shared traditional form. Black Art, Black Artists dir. Elyseo J. Taylor, 1971, digital video from 16mm, color, 16 min.

Director Elyseo Taylor visually surveys black art since the 19th century, punctuated with jazz and blues selections, and a running commentary by woodcut printer Van Slater. Four Women (New print!) dir. Julie Dash, 1975, 16mm, color, 7 min.

Dancer Linda Martina Young portrays the four Black women described in Julie Dash’s dance film set to Nina Simone’s stirring ballad. Define dir. O.Funmilayo Makarah, USA, 1988, digital video, color, 5 min.

O.Funmilayo Makarah’s oblique, episodic meditation on the semiotics and ethics of ethnic female identity is accompanied by a blandly cynical narrator explaining how to “win an invitation to the dominant culture.”

Rich (New print!) dir. S. Torriano Berry, 1982, 16mm, b/w, 22 min.

On the day of his high school graduation, an African-American youth battles for self-determination as a convergence of forces attempt to shuttle him toward a future of lowered expectations in S. Torriano Berry’s gritty, yet tender, character study.

Festival of Mask 18

Thursday, January 24 at 7pm

Motion Pictures: Spaghetti Western Django

dir. Sergio Corbucci, Italy, 1966, Blu-Ray, color, 87 min., Italian w/ English subtitles

The inspiration for many of Quentin Tarantino’s signature film bits (Reservoir Dogs’ infamous ear-cutting scene was a direct reference), and now homaged in his upcoming Django Unchained, it’s time to revisit the original 1966 Spaghetti Western blockbuster that spawned over 30 sequels and cemented the genre as an international phenomenon. Franco Nero stars as the title character, a horseless, dark-clad, blazingly blue-eyed stranger dragging a coffin through the mud of a desolate frontier town. Django is a red ragù of confederates, bandidos, Klansmen, dance hall gals, and a bloody trail of too-slowon-the draw bad men. Friday, January 25 at 8pm

Scribe Video Center Teza

dir. Haile Gerima, Ethiopia/Germany, 2008, color, 140 min.

With director Haile Gerima in person! Teza, set in Germany and Ethiopia, examines the displacement of African intellectuals, both at home and abroad, through the story of a young, idealistic Ethiopian doctor – Anberber.  After studying medicine abroad in Germany for several years, Anberber returns home to Ethiopia only to find his beloved Ethiopia, and soon the quiet of his dreams, stifled and disarrayed by the country’s political turmoil.  The solace that the memories of his youth provide is quickly replaced by the competing forces of the military and rebel factions.  Anberber must determine if he can bear the strain or piece together a life from the fragments that lie around him. Presented in partnership with International House, Cinema Studies at University of Pennsylvania, History of Art Department at University of Pennsylvania, The Center for Africana Studies at University of Pennsylvania, and Film and Media Arts at Temple University $10 general admission, $8 students/seniors, $5 Scribe & IHP members Free for students, faculty and staff of the University of Pennsylvania and Temple University

Django

Child of Resistance

Saturday, January 26 at 5pm

L.A. Rebellion

Brick by Brick dir. Shirikiana Aina, 1982, digital video from 16mm, color, 33 min.

Shirikiana Aina exposes the gentrification of poor Black neighborhoods in late-Seventies Washington D.C. through compelling personal testimony, including participants in the Seaton Street project, in which tenants successfully united to purchase buildings. L.A. In My Mind dir. O.Funmilayo Makarah, USA, 2006, digital video, color, 4 min.

A captivating montage of notable Los Angeles sites, laced with free-floating names of places and people and accompanied by street noises, make up O.Funmilayo Makarah’s delightful and personal canon of spiritually sustaining quantities.

Child of Resistance dir. Haile Gerima, 1972, 16mm, b/w and color, 36 min.

Inspired by a dream Haile Gerima had after seeing Angela Davis handcuffed on television, Child of Resistance is an abstract and symbolic film that follows a woman imprisoned as a result of her fight for social justice. Rain dir. Melvonna Ballenger, 1978, digital video from ¾” videotape, color, 16 min.

The political awakening of a female typist is vividly portrayed through Melvonna Ballenger’s use of John Coltrane’s song, After the Rain. The Dawn at My Back: Memoir of a Black Texas Upbringing (excerpt) dirs. Carroll Parrott Blue, Kristy H.A. Kang; The Labyrinth Project, 2003, digital video adapted from DVD-ROM, color, 10 min.

This evocative work derived from the Labyrinth Project’s DVD-ROM, and based on a memoir by Carroll Parrott Blue, leads viewers on a rich visual and textual exploration of Blue’s family history, and of the history of Houston’s black community. 20

Saturday, January 26 at 8pm

L.A. Rebellion

Bush Mama (New print!) dir. Haile Gerima, 1975/1979, 16mm, b/w, 97 min.

With introduction by director Haile Gerima in person! Bush Mama is Haile Gerima’s powerfully moving look at the realities of inner city poverty and systemic disenfranchisement as experienced by Dorothy, a pregnant welfare recipient in Watts, played by the magnetic Barbara O. Jones. Motivated by the incarceration of her partner T.C. (Weathers) and the protection of her daughter and unborn child, Dorothy undergoes an ideological transformation from apathy to action. Daydream Therapy dir. Bernard Nicolas, 1977, digital video, b/w and color, 8 min.

Bernard Nicolas’ Daydream Therapy, set to Nina Simone’s haunting rendition of Pirate Jenny poetically envisions a hotel worker’s escape from workplace indignities through vivid fantasy. Sunday, January 27 – Wednesday, January 30 Brundibar and The Children of Theresienstadt Presented by the International Opera Theater and International House Philadelphia. Brundibar and The Children of Theresienstadt tells the story of the children who gave 55 performances of the little opera Brundibar in the Theresienstadt concentration camp during WWII. The sense of hope that was transferred to them by their art, music and drama teachers enabled them, and countless other prisoners, to live their final days uplifted and joyously humming the famous lullaby from their childhood. Brundibar and The Children of Theresienstadt boasts an original script, based on writings of prisoners. In addition to the presentation of the short opera, there is additional music that was permitted in the camp; songs in German, French and Italian, by Ravel, Strauss, Dvorák and Mascagni. Brundibar was immortalized by Maurice Sendak in his book of the same name. Visit www.ihousephilly.org for more information on dates and show times.

ihousephilly.org

Bush Mama Tuesday, January 29 at 7pm

IHP Language Programs + CETRA The Linguists

dir. Seth Kramer, Daniel A. Miller, Jeremy Newberger, US, 2008, video, color, 64 min.

The Linguists is an independent 2008 American documentary film produced by Ironbound Films about language extinction and language documentation. It follows two linguists, Greg Anderson of the Living Tongues Institute for Endangered Languages and David Harrison of Swarthmore College, as they travel around the world to collect recordings of some of the last speakers of three moribund (dying) languages: Chulym in Siberia; Sora in Orissa, India; and Kallawaya in Bolivia. The documentary received rave reviews at the Sundance Film Festival and was nominated for an Emmy Award in 2010. Free admission.

Wednesday, January 30 at 7pm We Won’t Grow Old Together (Nous ne vieillirons pas ensemble) dir. Maurice Pialat, France, 1972, 35mm, 110 min., French w/ English subtitles

Maurice Pialat’s emotionally raw chronicle of a relationship in decline is a semi-autobiographical drama from one of world cinema’s oftoverlooked directors. “This austerely devastating 1972 drama about a long-running but ultimately unhappy love affair has been hard to see for some time, so don’t pass up this chance to catch it on the big screen. Be warned, though: It’s deeply upsetting, featuring the kind of emotional brutality we just don’t see in movies anymore.” —New York Magazine

February Thursday January 31 at 7pm

Flaherty on the Road: OPEN WOUNDS Program 1: CL.A.SH Qu’ils Reposent en Révolte (May They Rest in Revolt)

dir. Sylvain George, France, 2010, digital video, color, 154 min., French with English subtitles

The film Qu’ils Reposent en Révolte is a poetic attempt to elevate emigrants to the status of political entities. Hence his insistence on filming expressions of the memories and the culture of these nomads: graffiti on the wall indicating the person’s name, the date and the route taken, a joyful song in the park between two police raids, creating slogans to chant before the media … Qu’ils Reposent en Révolte is a reminder that there can be no civilization or personal histories without this notion of movement, travel, and emigration, and that perhaps the emigrants, in their dispossession, are the carriers of a truth that is likely to wake the West up very suddenly one day. Friday, February 1 at 7pm

Flaherty on the Road: OPEN WOUNDS PROGRAM 2: THE ENVIRONMENT WHICH SURROUNDS US Coal Spell

dir. Sun Xun China, 2008, digital video, color, 8 min.

For Sun Xun, to erase is just as important as to draw. His work as an animator is not so different as that of a historian. And Sun’s work is very concerned with history and myths, especially with regards to how they interact. Adding to the process of drawing/ erasing, Coal Spell also employs the use of found footage as traces of the past, for markers of events within history or mythology. River Rites dir. Ben Russell, USA, 2011, digital video, color, 12 min.

Russell takes his transcendent cinema to new heights with this amazing short documentary which transforms an idyllic riverside scene of a group of Saramaccan Maroon children playing and washing in the river into a sort of sacred animist rite. Features a superb noise-metal soundtrack from Mindflayer.

Coal Spell Three Men and a Fish Pond dirs. Laila Pakalnina, Maris Maskalans, Latvia, 2008, digital video, color, 52 min., Latvian with English Subtitles

A film on the celebration of life beyond violence, predation, and death. In her director’s note for Doc Alliance Films, Laila Pakalnina herself has said that “perhaps this film is rather very simple instead of very complicated—about our physical and spiritual understanding of the world simultaneously. It is about the fact that there are people. And also birds, and fog, the sun, night and so on. That everything exists.” But beneath that apparently simple and calm surface runs an undercurrent of film history and vital knowledge. On the first issue, we can find here references from Charlie Chaplin to Sergei Eisenstein, or from Soviet rural drama to a “Flahertynian” exploration of the relationship of characters and landscapes; on the second, a profound depth of understanding the circle of life and death as dramatic but also joyful. The film’s simplicity is an achievement very few have: unpretentious, humoristic, respectful of her characters, but also of the animals, plants, and even objects, all part of the same universe.

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Free Land

Saturday, February 2 at 5pm

Saturday February 2 at 7pm

Flaherty on the Road: OPEN WOUNDS PROGRAM 3: FAMILY AFFAIRS

Flaherty on the Road: OPEN WOUNDS PROGRAM 4: EXPERIMENTAL VISIONS

dir. Dustin Guy Defa, USA, 2011, digital video, color, 10 min.

dir. Sami van Ingen, Finland, 2004, digital video, color, 40 min.

Using VHS frames as family memories, thousands of middle-aged Americans can identify with this video by seeing imagery of their own similar domestic videos, including clothes, hairstyles, furniture, and even attitudes toward being in front of the camera. But no two families are alike.

A structuralist film on family footage, Fokus is based on a 16mm home movie shot during the early 1960s in India by the director’s grandmother (and Robert & Frances Flaherty’s daughter), Barbara van Ingen. The original 11-minute stretch of film portrays the spectacular Dussera procession arranged annually in the town of Mysore. In his film, Sami van Ingen questions: what can we deconstruct and reconstruct better than our own past? Van Ingen notes that “the fact that I have chosen material filmed by my own grandmother as the starting point for my new film is not a coincidence. It is important to understand as much as possible the footage you manipulate.”

Family Nightmare

Free Land dir. Minda Martin, USA, 2009, digital video, color, 63 min.

From the personal to the community portrait, Free Land draws an arc of almost two hundred years in the history of the United States that allows Minda Martin to point to a series of structural connections between class (especially in regards to poverty), race, culture, and identity, which are not always taken into account when dealing with these issues and implications. An essay film involving landscape as history, found footage as hints of trauma, and family as social memory, Martin describes the film in her own words as “a personal historical documentary that examines what it means to be constantly looking for opportunity in America.” Using her family history of homelessness and displacement, she examines the unfulfilled promise of “The Land of the Free” in the United States of America. Furthermore, Free Land describes “how this myth is translated into a belief in ‘free land,’ which has geographically and psychically uprooted people, created social inequalities and left legacies of emptiness.”

Fokus

Perambulations dir. Sami van Ingen, Finland, 2004, digital video, color, 40 min.

A woman comes back to one of her childhood landscapes and her grandson goes with her. She moves through the place, looking for traces of the past, finding old friends. He understands nothing. But still, there is a link, a feeling of mutual understanding: I take a picture of you, you take one of me.

Sunday, February 3 Brundibar and The Children of Theresienstadt Presented by the International Opera Theater and International House Philadelphia. Brundibar and The Children of Theresienstadt tells the story of the children who gave 55 performances of the little opera Brundibar in the Theresienstadt concentration camp during WWII. The sense of hope that was transferred to them by their art, music and drama teachers enabled them, and countless other prisoners, to live their final days uplifted and joyously humming the famous lullaby from their childhood. Brundibar and The Children of Theresienstadt boasts an original script, based on writings of prisoners. In addition to the presentation of the short opera, there is additional music that was permitted in the camp; songs in German, French and Italian, by Ravel, Strauss, Dvorák and Mascagni. Brundibar was immortalized by Maurice Sendak in his book of the same name. Visit www.ihousephilly.org for more information on dates and show times.

Tuesday, February 5 at 7pm

Three Favorite Films of J.G. Ballard chosen by Claire Walsh and presented by Tacita Dean

February 6 at 7pm

Archive Fever! 4.0: Straub/Huillet Too Early/Too Late

dirs. Jean-Marie Straub, Danielle Huillet, France, 1982, 16mm, color, 105 min., German with English subtitles

This is a film about landscapes — landscapes recorded with a Lumiere-like precision and clarity. Divided into two parts, the first juxtaposes present-day views of French villages with Friedrich Engels’ descriptions of the same locales at the time of the 1792 Commune; the second shifts to Egyptian scenes, accompanied by a recent Marxist history of the country’s resistance to colonialism. preceded by

Marchorka-Muff dirs. Jean-Marie Straub, Danielle Huillet, France, 1963, 16mm, b/w, 18 min., German with English subtitles

The simplest and most accessible of Straub’s films, MarchorkaMuff is an admirably concise satirical attack on West Germany’s rearmament and revival of militaristic tradition in the Adenauer era: it takes the form of a character portrait of a former Nazi officer working his way back to society, and official good standing. Based freely on a story by Heinrich Böll.

Come and See

dir. Elem Klimov, Soviet Union, 1985, 35mm, color, 136 min., Russian/German w/ English subtitles

in conjunction with Dean’s new film JG, on view at Arcadia University Art Gallery (February 7 – April 21), a project funded by The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage. Regarded by author J.G. Ballard as the greatest war film ever made, Klimov’s journey through the terror and brutality of World War II is an epic tale of survival against physical and emotional destruction.  Tacita Dean in person to introduce the series and speaks briefly about JG. Free admission.

Come and See 24

Friday, February 8 at 7pm

An Evening with Sarah Christman As Above, So Below

dir. Sarah Christman, USA, 2012, 16mm, color, 50 min.

For thousands of years, alchemists toiled to synthesize rare substances and universal cures, to manipulate the speed of natural processes. Today, a woman has her husband’s ashes transformed into a memorial diamond. Precious metals are extracted from obsolete electronics. What was once the world’s largest landfill-- now also the final resting place of the World Trade Center’s remains-- is being converted into a public park. The film intimately examines various transmutations, both microscopic and massive, that reshape matter and its meanings. What separates the permanent from the impermanent, the things we discard from those we preserve?

Dear bill G at e s

ihousephilly.org

Broad Channel dir. Sarah Christman, USA, 2010, 16mm, color, 14 min.

Over the course of four seasons, the nuances of everyday activity are examined along one narrow stretch of public shoreline in New York City’s Jamaica Bay. Moments of recurrence and change cycle through an ecosystem rooted in migration. Dear Bill Gates dir. Sarah Christman, USA, 2006, 16mm, color, 17 min.

A simple correspondence evolves into a poetic visual essay exploring the ownership of our visual history and culture. Combining original and archival film, video and images from the internet, Dear Bill Gates draws unexpected connections among mining, memory and Microsoft. Original music by Adam Granduciel.

Saturday, February 9 at 7pm

Janus Collection

Ali: Fear Eats the Soul dir. Rainer Werner Fassbinder Germany, 1974, 35mm, color, 93 min., German w/ English subtitles

Rainer Werner Fassbinder, already the director of almost twenty films by the age of twenty-nine, paid homage to his cinematic hero, Douglas Sirk, with this updated version of Sirk’s All That Heaven Allows. Lonely widow Emmi Kurowski (Brigitte Mira) meets Arab worker Ali (El Hedi ben Salem) in a bar during a rainstorm. They fall in love––to their own surprise––and to the shock of family, colleagues, and drinking buddies. In Ali: Fear Eats the Soul (Angst essen seele auf), Fassbinder expertly uses the emotional power of the melodrama to underscore the racial tensions threatening German culture.

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Tuesday, February 12 at 7pm

Scribe Producers’ Forum

Janeane from Des Moines dir. Grace Lee, USA, 2012, 78 min.

Presented in partnership with International House Philadelphia,  Asian American Studies Program at University of Pennsylvania, Pan-Asian American Community House at University of Pennsylvania, Film and Media Arts at Temple University, and Philadelphia Independent Film & Video Association Director Grace Lee in person Mixing documentary and scripted material, Janeane from Des Moines tells the story of a conservative Iowa housewife determined to find a Republican candidate who will take America back from the Democrats, repeal  Obamacare, defund Planned Parenthood and get rid of gay marriage. She dives into Iowa Tea Party politics and the lead-up to the Iowa caucus, but a crumbling economy causes her to lose everything she holds dear -- her job, her marriage, her health, and her home. As Mitt Romney, Michele Bachmann, Rick Santorum, Rick Perry and Newt Gingrich criss-cross Iowa during her hour of need, Janeane presses them for answers that she and many of her fellow Americans would like to hear.

Friday, February 15 at 7pm 11th Annual Lunar New Year Celebration Come out and celebrate the Year of the Snake. Program events include the Lion dance, traditional cultural performances, and a sampling of foods Saturday, February 16 at 7pm

The Cinema is Jonas Mekas Lost Lost Lost

dir. Jonas Mekas, US, 1976, 16mm, color and b/w, 178 min.

Our series The Cinema is Jonas Mekas continues with a splintered chronology. Whereas last season we screened Walden (Diaries, Notes and Sketches), our next selection (Lost Lost Lost) was made later but with footage from before the period that Walden covered. Working with his archive, Mekas chooses specific times to revisit footage, sometimes many years after the fact. In an interview in

Free for Temple and Upenn students, faculty and staff; $5 Scribe, IHP and PIFVA members; $8 students/seniors; $10 general admission.

Thursday, February 14 at 7pm

Motion Pictures: Love Stories Sid & Nancy

dir. Alex Cox, UK, 1986, 35mm, color, 111 min.

A lacerating love story, Sid & Nancy chronicles the brief, intense attachment of two of punk’s most notorious poster children, Sex Pistols bassist Sid Vicious and his girlfriend, Nancy Spungen. Director Alex Cox balances a bleak evocation of star-crossed love with surreal humor and genuine tenderness, creating a compelling portrait of the late ’70s punk scene. With brilliant performances by Gary Oldman and Chloe Webb, the film’s haunting imagery and black comedy resonate long after the final frames.

Sid & Nancy

A Critical Cinema Volume 2, he told Scott MacDonald that it had previously been too painful to edit this particular footage, but enough time had then passed that he chose to work through it.   “These six reels of my film diaries come from the years 1949-1963. They begin with my arrival in New York in November 1949. The first and second reels deal with my life as a Young Poet and a Displaced Person in Brooklyn. It shows my own frustrations and anxieties and the decision to leave Brooklyn and move to Manhattan. Reel three and reel four deal with my life in Manhattan. First contacts with New York poetry and filmmaking communities. Robert Frank shooting The Sin of Jesus. LeRoy Jones, Ginsberg, Frank O’Hara reading at The Living Theatre. Documentation of the political protests of the late fifties and early sixties. Reel five includes Rabbit Shit Haikus, a series of Haikus filmed in Vermont; scenes at the Film-Maker’s Cooperative; filming Hallelujah the Hills; scenes of New York City. Reel six contains a trip to Flaherty Seminar, a visit to the seashore in Stony Brook; a portrait of Tiny Tim; excursions to the countryside seen from two different views; that of my own and that of Ken Jacobs whose footage is incorporated into this reel. The period I am dealing with in these six reels was a period of desperation, of attempts to desparately grow roots into the new ground, to create new memories. In these six painful reels I tried to indicate how it feels to be in exile, how I felt in those years. These reels carry the title Lost Lost Lost, the title of a film myself and my brother wanted to make in 1949, and it indicates the mood we were in, in those years. It describes the mood of a Displaced Person who hasn’t yet forgotten the native country but hasn’t gained a new one. The sixth reel is a transitional reel where we begin to see some relaxation, where I begin to find moments of happiness. New life begins. What happens later, you’ll have to see the next installment of reels…” – Jonas Mekas

Wednesday, February 20 at 7pm Cleopatra dir. Michel Auder, US/France/Italy, 1970, 16mm transfer to digital, color, 155 min.

Cleopatra situates itself in the same relationship to Hollywood as the Warhol/Morrisey films of the period. It corresponds to Joseph Mankiewicz’s 1963 Cleopatra, starring Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton which Auder’s cast watched and used as the starting point for scene by scene improvisation. Auder drew his cast from Warhol’s ensemble – including not only Viva and Louis Waldon, but also Taylor Mead, Ondine, Andrea Feldman, Gerard Melanga and others. The film revels in epic excess like Mankiewicz’s cinematic debacle which succumbed to vast length, a bloated budget, multiple revisions and a scandal occasioned by the extramarital escapades of its costars. In Auder’s Cleopatra, Viva is the queen, shrieking with an authority different from the languorous speech patterns she had perfected in Warhol’s films. The (newly invented) snowmobile substitutes for horses; the industrial setting of a factory becomes a showplace of armaments, and the whole Egypt section takes place in upstate New York. The streets and parks of Rome, where Waldon lived at the time, are the staging ground for his role as Caesar. In a wonderful display of Waldon’s charm and skills as an improviser, he begins a dialogue with local police who are then conscripted into the film as Roman soldiers. Auder shot the culminating orgy and gladiator scenes in the famous Cinécita film studio in Rome where Mankiewicz filmed. Due to a fight with his producers, Auder never edited the film which was lost for many years. It survives as an uncut degraded copy of the original. Organized in conjunction with White Petals Surround Your Yellow Heart at the Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania. ICA thanks The Spiegel Fund to Support Contemporary Culture and Visual Arts.

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Friday, February 22 at 8pm

Exhumed

Diabolical Double Feature Formed in 1997, Exhumed Films was created to provide a theatrical venue for a much beloved art form that had all but disappeared in the 1990s and is in further decline in the early 21st Century: the cult horror movie. Saturday, February 23 at 2pm

Chris Marker: Réalisateur

The film will be followed by a panel discussion.

Born Christian François Bouche-Villeneuve on July 29, 1921 in Neuilly-sur-Seine, France. Chris Marker was the master of the cinematic essay, fusing fiction, documentary, as well as, experimental techniques in creating associations that put in debate cotemporary philosophical and political notions. Employing a range of montage techniques, Marker made films that engaged in the culture, but were often mysterious, even poetic and playful, seemingly, conspiring to give the films a sense of provocation, as though he was using his camera to explore something about the human condition that film and film alone could access.

In celebration of One Book, One Philadelphia—A Project of the Office of the Mayor and the Free Library of Philadelphia.

A Grin without a Cat (Le Fond de l’air est rouge)

At the beginning of the 20th century, Hawaii’s economy was dominated by the export of sugar cane, and, to boost production, plantation owners imported workers from China, Japan, Korea, the Philippines, and other countries. Men arrived in droves, with illusions of getting rich. Reality, of course, was far from the dream, so, instead of wealth, they sought the comfort and stability of a family. As Hawaii lacked an abundance of available women, the eventual solution was the concept of the “photo marriage.”

dir. Chris Marker, France, 1977, digital video, color and b/w, 180 min., French w/ English subtitles

Picture Bride Thursday, February 21 at 7pm

One Book, One Philadelphia Picture Bride

dir. Kayo Hatta, US, 1995, Digital video, color, 95 min., English/ Japanese w/ English subtitles

More than 20,000 picture brides came to Hawaii between 1907 and 1924, primarily from Japan and Korea. Most were young and, armed only with a photograph of their intended groom, they arrived to find hardship and disillusionment. In person, the men often bore little resemblance to their black-and-white representations, and the day-today work that awaited the new wives was grueling. City girls especially had a hard time coping. ihousephilly.org

“Some think the third World War will be set off by a nuclear missile. For me, that’s the way it will end. In the meantime, the figures of an intricate game are developing, a game who’s de-coding will give historians of the future - if they are still around - a very hard time. A weird game. Its rules change as the match evolves. To start with, the super powers’ rivalry transforms itself not only into a Holy Alliance of the Rich against the Poor, but also into a selective co-elimination of Revolutionary Vanguards, wherever bombs would endanger sources of raw materials. As well as into the manipulation of these vanguards to pursue goals that are not their own. During the last ten years, some groups of forces (often more instinctive than organized) have been trying to play the game themselves - even if they knocked over the pieces. Wherever they

A Grin without a c at

Wednesday, February 27 at 7pm Tube Time! IHP presents a night of videos straight from YouTube through our 2K Barco digital cinema projector and onto the big screen. Since 2005, YouTube has been a rapidly-growing user-generated resource that many use for diverse functions, research, personal expression and piracy among them. Tube Time! has been a feature in past editions of the Migrating Forms Festival (formerly the New York Underground Film Festival) and it just feels right to bring it to The Ibrahim Theater for the first time. We’ve simply asked participants to introduce a 20-minute playlist comprised of videos of their choosing. We expect the results to delight, shock, excite and horrify! Please see our website for the full lineup of participants. Thursday, February 28 at 6pm IHP: The First 100 Years

tried, they failed. Nevertheless, it’s been their being that has the most profoundly transformed politics in our time. This film intends to show some of the steps of this transformation”. Chris Marker Saturday February 23 at 7pm Level Five

Over the past 100 years, IHP has amassed an incredible archive of documents, addressing the history of this important institution and its role in the Philadelphia community. Join us to celebrate the opening of our permanent exhibit that explores IHP’s past through photos, press clippings, newsletters, and other archival documents. The evening will feature brief speeches from members of the IHP community, complimentary hors d’oevres and refreshments, themed decorations, as well as a live band playing music from the ‘40s and ‘50s. Thank you to our framing sponsor, Vision Graphics.

dir. Chris Marker, France, 1997, digital video, color and b/w, 106 min., French w/ English subtitles

Level Five, the story of Laura, a computer game designer. Whilst working on a new World War II game following the epic battle of Okinawa, Japan she searches the internet for background information and finds harrowing eye witness accounts, disturbing pictures and upsetting interviews. This discovery leads her to look deeper into the reasoning behind the war and in turn allows her to look at her own life in a new way. 30

March Friday, March 1 at 7pm

Three Favorite Films of J.G. Ballard chosen by Claire Walsh and presented by Tacita Dean Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior

dir. George Miller, Australia, 1981, 35mm, color, 95 min.

in conjunction with Dean’s new film JG, on view at Arcadia University Art Gallery (February 7 – April 21), a project funded by The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage. In the post-apocalyptic Australian wasteland, a cynical drifter agrees to help a small, gasoline rich, community escape a band of bandits. Free admission.

Tuesday, March 5 at 7pm

IHP Language Programs + CETRA Beyond Silence

dir. Caroline Link, Germany, 1996, 35mm, color, 109 min.

Since the earliest days in her childhood Lara has had a difficult but important task. Both her parents are deaf-mute and Lara has to translate from sign-language to the spoken word and vice versa when her parents want to communicate with other people. Getting older and more mature she becomes interested in music and starts to play clarinet very successfully. However her parents are deaf, they cannot share Lara’s musical career. The day comes when Lara has to decide between her parents and her own ambitions.  Free admission.

Friday, March 8 at 7pm

International Women’s Day: Fantastic Films by Women

Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior

We celebrate International Women’s Day with a screening showcasing both new and classic films by women filmmakers. Each of the films shown present their own vision of the fantastic: otherworldly, sci-fi imagery; surrealist, dream-like atmosphere; or the incomprehensible beauty of the natural world. Legendary filmmakers Maya Deren and Germaine Dulac are showcased in their most-loved and discussed films. Beatrice Gibson, Rosa Barba and Laida Lertxundi are each blazing their own trails, taking film and video to new and exciting

places. The exciting films shown tonight by these three contemporary filmmakers have been screened at the International Film Festival Rotterdam, The Images Festival and the Whitney Biennial. Meshes of the Afternoon dir. Maya Deren, Alexander Hammid, US, 1943, 16mm, b/w, 14 min.

Meshes of the Afternoon is one of the most influential works in American experimental cinema. The central figure in Meshes of the Afternoon, played by Deren, is attuned to her unconscious mind and caught in a web of dream events that spill over into reality. Symbolic objects, such as a key and a knife, recur throughout the film; events are open-ended and interrupted. Deren explained that she wanted “to put on film the feeling which a human being experiences about an incident, rather than to record the incident accurately.” Made by Deren with her husband, cinematographer Alexander Hammid, Meshes of the Afternoon established the independent avant-garde movement in film in the United States, which is known as the New American Cinema. It directly inspired early works by Kenneth Anger, Stan Brakhage, and other major experimental filmmakers. – MoMA Agatha dir. Beatrice Gibson, UK, 2012, HD, color, 14 min.

Beatrice Gibson’s latest film Agatha is a psychosexual sci-fi about a planet without speech. Its narrator, ambiguous in gender and function, weaves us slowly through a mental and physical landscape, observing and chronicling a space beyond words. Based on a dream had by the radical British composer Cornelius Cardew.

Somnium dir. Rosa Barba, Germany/Netherlands, 2011, HD, color, 19 min.

Rosa Barba produced a science fiction film based on interviews with local residents and individuals involved in the land suppletion project for Maasvlakte 2. Barba asked the interviewees to imagine what this new land could look like in the future. While we see images of the new land, the slufter: a storage reservoir for heavily contaminated sludge from the new Meuse river, the construction of the huge docksides, basalt blocks, empty containers and the mechanical movements of the transhipment process, we listen to a story apparently taking place in the future. The main character is a beekeeper who started with his first hive on the Maasvlakte, 30 years ago, and is now surrounded by silos for oil storage. Combined with archive pictures of the port, the images form a mechanical ballet of man and machine, set against a futuristic landscape. – SKOR | Foundation for Art and Public Domain The Seashell and the Clergyman dir. Germaine Dulac, France, 1928, 16mm, b/w, 29 min.

A clergyman experiences a bizarre sequence of fantasies that torment him and test his faith to the limit. He has fallen for a beautiful woman, the wife of a proud general, and this obsession provokes image after image in his increasingly heated brain. He sees himself kill the general; he sees himself chase after the beautiful woman. The dream becomes ever more fantastic and terrifying, until, at its climax, the clergyman seizes a giant shell and thirstily drains its contents… — filmsdefrance.com

Cry When it Happens dir. Laida Lertxundi, US, 2010, 16mm, color, 14 min.

Los Angeles City Hall is reflected onto the window of the Paradise Motel. It serves as an anchor for this traversal through the natural expanse of California. Here, we discover a restrained psychodrama of play, loss, and the transformation of everyday habitats. Music appears across the interiors and exteriors and speaks of limitlessness and longing.

The Seashell and The Clergyman 32

Saturday, March 9 at 7pm

Janus Collection: Cherry Blossom Festival Naked Island

dir. Kaneto Shindo, Japan , 35mm, b/w, 93 min., Japanese w/ English subtitles

The Naked Island tells the story of a small family unit and their subsistence as the only inhabitants of an arid, sun-baked island. Daily chores, captured as a series of cyclical events, result in a hypnotizing, moving, and beautiful film harkening back to the silent era. With hardly any dialogue, Shindo combines the stark ‘Scope cinematography of Kiyoshi Kuroda with the memorable score of his constant collaborator Hikaru Hayashi, to make a unique cinematic document.

ihousephilly.org

Tuesday, March 12 at 7pm

Scribe Producers’ Forum

The Contradictions of Fair Hope dirs. S. Epatha Merkerson, Rockell Metcalf, USA, 2012, 67 min.

Presented in partnership with International House Philadelphia Daguerreotypes Monday, March 11 at 7pm

Visiting Filmmaker: Agnès Varda Daguerreotypes

dir. Agnes Varda, France, 1975, color, digital video, 80min., French w/ English subtitles

A classic documentary from Agnes Varda. Daguerreotypes is a wonderfully intimate portrait of the small shops and shopkeepers on a short stretch of the Rue Daguerre, a picturesque street that has been the filmmaker’s home for more than 50 years. Varda has described the film as an archeological study for future sociologists. Varda has lived and worked on the rue Daguerre in Paris’s 14th Arondissement since the 1950s. But it wasn’t until 1974, while at home with her two-year old son, that she turned her camera on her neighbors and began this rich documentary about the street and its inhabitants. follow by Cinevardaphoto dir. Agnes Varda, France, 1965-2004, digital video, b/w & color, 92min., French w/ English subtitles

Cinevardaphoto is an exceptional triptych of film essays exploring the photographic medium. Varda, who began her career as a photographer before turning to film in the late 50s, approaches her subject from three distinct angles. In the first, Ydessa, The Bears and Etc., Varda muses on a curious, yet haunting art exhibit, “The Teddy Bear Project” curated by Ydessa Hendeles, a daughter of Holocaust survivors that features hundreds of found photos spanning the 20th century; in each one, a teddy bear. In the second essay, Ulysses, she deconstructs a photograph she took in 1954 – a striking image of a man, a child and a goat on the seashore. The final short, Salut les Cubains, constructed entirely from 1,800 photographs taken by Varda on a trip to Cuba in 1962, captures the exuberant spirit in the early days of the Revolution.

Directors S. Epatha Merkerson and Rockell Metcalf in person This documentary sets the stage in rural Alabama, prior to Emancipation, and traces the development, struggles, contributions and gradual loss of tradition of one of the last remaining African American benevolent societies, known as “The Fair Hope Benevolent Society” in Uniontown, Alabama. Through gripping human stories of some of the last surviving society members and interviews with historians and local residents, the film provides an unprecedented look at the complex and morally ambiguous world of Fair Hope juxtaposed against the worldly pleasures of what has become known as the annual “Foot Wash” celebration. $5 Scribe & IHP memebers; $8 students & seniors; $10 general admission

Wednesday, March 13 at 7pm

Motion Pictures: Historical Epics The Last Days of Pompeii

dir. Mario Caserini, Italy, 1913, 35mm, tinted b/w, silent, Italian inter-titles w/ English translation ( w/ musical accompaniment)

An influential Italian epic that paved the way for the elaborate costume drama, The Last Days of Pompeii romanticizes the final hours of those ill-fated souls living in the shadow of Mount Vesuvius. In this rendition of Edward Bulwer’s classic novel, set in 79 A.D., the lives of a prominent statesman, a beautiful woman, a pagan priest, a spiteful witch and a blind beggar are carefully interwoven. The intrigues that connect them are brought to a climax in the gladiatorial arena, at the moment the sleeping volcano unleashes its molten fury. The Last Days of Pompeii is among the last of the great tableaux films, in which most scenes are explained by a title, then dramatized within a single wide shot, a presentational style whose origins were more theatrical and literary than cinematic. Just a few short months after the film’s release, this technique would be forever outmoded, due to such films as D. W. Griffith’s The Birth of a Nation and Giovanni Pastrone’s Cabiria, which helped rewrite the laws of cinematic expression. 34

Thursday, March 14 at 7pm

Visiting Filmmaker: Agnes Varda The Beaches of Agnes

dir. Agnes Varda, France, 2008, digital video, b/w & color, 100 min., French w/ English subtitles

Agnes Varda in Person A reflection on art, life and the movies, The Beaches of Agnes is a magnificent new film from the great Agnes Varda, director of Cleo from 5 to 7 and The Gleaners and I, a richly cinematic self portrait that touches on everything from the feminist movement and the Black Panthers to the films of husband Jacques Demy and the birth of the French New Wave. When one thinks of the major figures of postwar cinema, the name Agnès Varda immediately springs to mind. Her body of work in both fiction and documentary is defined by a wealth of innovation and imagination. Irrepressible and inquiring, she is a force of nature, and even at eighty shows no signs of slowing down. Her new film is a reminder that there are few artists capable of such eloquence in cinema. Varda takes beaches as her point of departure. Though she was not born near the ocean, she would travel to the seaside every Easter and summer during her childhood, and her memories of these trips act as a springboard for the film’s meditation on her early life. She recalls her wartime exile to the coastal village of Sète as a period of endless fun and life jackets. While a young adult, Varda began her career as a photographer before raising a family with her husband, Jacques Demy (best known for The Umbrellas of Cherbourg) and eventually turning to filmmaking. Returning to Sète over a decade after the end of the war, she used the locale and its fishermen as the backdrop for her remarkable first feature film, La Pointe Courte. Varda weaves photographs, vintage footage, film clips, and present-day sequences into a memorable voyage through her life, during which she confronts the joy of creation and the pain of personal loss, death and aging. It is a singular trip played out against the exciting context of the postwar explosion of cultural expression in France. She knew everyone: her colleagues in the French New Wave, the Black Panthers in California and even Jim Morrison, who would visit when in Paris. Idiosyncratic, engaging and deeply moving, The Beaches of Agnes is a journey through an extraordinary artistic life.

The Beaches of Agnes

Friday, March 15 at 8pm

Exhumed

Diabolical Double Feature Formed in 1997, Exhumed Films was created to provide a theatrical venue for a much beloved art form that had all but disappeared in the 1990s and is in further decline in the early 21st Century: the cult horror movie.

Saturday, March 16 at 5pm

Wednesday, March 20 at 7pm Nothing But a Man

Les Astronautes [Chris Marker: Coopération technique]

dir. Michael Roemer, US, 1964, 35mm, b/w, 92 min.

Chris Marker: Early Marker – Collaborations dir. Walerian Borowczyk, France/Poland, 1959, digital video, color, 12 min.

The earliest entry is the rarely seen Les astronautes, a collaboration with stop-motion master Walerian Borowczyk that anticipates the farcical collage of Monty Python. “Although Marker’s name appears in the credits, the extent of his participation in this animated short about an amateur space traveler (and his pet owl Anabase) is unknown”. Sam Diiorio

Michael Roemer’s landmark independent film follows the ups and downs of Duff Anderson, a young black man struggling to survive in the recently desegregated American south of the 1960’s.  Costarring jazz singer Abbey Lincoln in her acting debut, Nothing But a Man is a poignant drama that far exceeds its pocket-sized budget. 

Toute la mémoire du monde [Chris Marker: Interprète] dir. Alain Resnais, France, 1956, digital video, b/w, 21 min., French w/ English subtitles

A documentary about the Bibliothèque Nationale, France’s national library. In the credits, “Chris and Magic” Marker are listed as collaborators. Les Statues meurent aussi [Chris Marker: Auteur du commentaire] dirs. Alain Resnais, Chris Marker, France, 1953, digital video, b/w, 30 min., French w/ English subtitles

This 1953 essay film directed by Chris Marker and Alain Resnais is about historical African art and the effects colonialism has had on how it has been perceived. The film won the 1954 Prix Jean Vigo. Night and Fog - Nuit et brouillard [Chris Marker: Coopération technique] dir. Alain Resnais, France, 1955, digital video, b/w, 31 min., French w/ English subtitles

Ten years after the liberation of the Nazi concentration camps, filmmaker Alain Resnais documented the abandoned grounds of Auschwitz. One of the first cinematic reflections on the horrors of the Holocaust, Night and Fog (Nuit et brouillard) contrasts the stillness of the abandoned camps’ quiet, empty buildings with haunting wartime footage. With Night and Fog, Resnais investigates the cyclical nature of man’s violence toward man and presents the unsettling suggestion that such horrors could come again.

NIGHT AND FOG

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Thursday, March 21 - Saturday, March 23

Selections from the HRWIFF: A Film Festival and Symposium on Human Rights Awareness

Presented by International House Philadelphia in conjunction with Human Rights Watch International Film Festival and the Greenfield Intercultural Centers at the University of Pennsylvania In recognition of the power of film to educate and galvanize a broad constituency of concerned citizens, Human Rights Watch decided to create the Human Rights Watch International Film Festival. Human Rights Watch’s International Film Festival has become a leading venue for distinguished fiction, documentary and animated films and videos with a distinctive human rights theme. Through the eyes of committed and courageous filmmakers, we showcase the heroic stories of activists and survivors from all over the world. The works we feature help to put a human face on threats to individual freedom and dignity, and celebrate the power of the human spirit and intellect to prevail. We seek to empower everyone with the knowledge that personal commitment can make a very real difference. In selecting films for the festival, Human Rights Watch concentrates equally on artistic merit and human rights content. The festival encourages filmmakers around the world to address human rights subject matter in their work and presents films and videos from both new and established international filmmakers. Each year, the festival’s programming committee screens more than 500 films and videos to create a program that represents a range of countries and issues. Once a film is nominated for a place in the program, staff of the relevant division of Human Rights Watch also views the work to confirm its accuracy in the portrayal of human rights concerns. Though the festival rules out films that contain unacceptable inaccuracies of fact, we do not bar any films on the basis of a particular point of view. For the 10th consecutive year, International House Philadelphia will be hosting the Philadelphia premieres of works from this powerful Human Rights Watch program.

ihousephilly.org

Thursday, March 21 at 7pm Reportero dir. Bernardo Ruiz, Mexico/US, 2011, digital video, color, 72 min.

Reportero follows veteran reporter Sergio Haro and his colleagues at Zeta, a Tijuana, Mexico-based weekly, as they dauntingly ply their trade in what has become one of the most deadly places in the world to be a journalist. Since the paper’s founding in 1980, two of the paper’s editors have been murdered and the founder viciously attacked. “Impunity reigns in Mexico, especially here along the northern border,” explains Adela Navarro, Sergio’s boss and Zeta’s co-director. Despite the attacks, the paper has continued its singular brand of aggressive investigative reporting, frequently tackling dangerous subjects that other publications avoid, such as cartels’ infiltration of political circles and security forces. As a veteran member of Zeta’s editorial team, Sergio contributes to the investigative crime pieces that are the paper’s bread and butter, but at this stage of his career, he is also after what he calls the “deeper story” of the region—the human stories that tend to fall between the cracks. Friday, March 22 at 7pm The Invisible War dir. Kirby Dick, USA, 2011, digital video, color, 95 min.

The Invisible War is a groundbreaking investigative documentary about the shameful and underreported epidemic of rape within the US military. With stark clarity and escalating revelations, The Invisible War exposes the rape epidemic in the armed forces, investigating the institutions that perpetuate it as well as its profound personal and social consequences. We meet characters who embraced their military service with pride and professionalism, only to have their idealism crushed. Focusing on the emotionally charged stories of survivors, the film reveals the systemic cover-up of the crimes against them and follows their struggles to rebuild their lives and fight for justice. The Invisible War features hardhitting interviews with high-ranking military officers and members of Congress that reveal the perfect storm conditions that exist for rape in the military, its history of cover-up, and what can be done to bring about much needed change

Saturday, March 23 at 5pm Putin’s Kiss dir. Lise Birk Pedersen, Denmark, 2011, digital video, color, 85 min.

Meet Masha, a 19-year-old who grew up in the Putin era, on her journey through the Kremlin-created Nashi youth movement. This coming-ofage tale focuses on Masha’s personal political struggle and paints a grim picture of the Russian political climate. Many see Putin as the one leading Russia back to being a global superpower. Masha grows up with this belief, wholeheartedly supporting Putin’s policies and seeking to rid Russia of what Nashi believes are Russia’s “enemies”—the political opposition, investigative journalists, and human rights defenders. But when Masha, a journalist, starts socialising with colleagues in the circle of her friend, investigative journalist OIeg Kashin, she also begins to question Nashi and its leaders. Soon Masha finds herself closer with this circle of friends than her Nashi comrades. And ultimately, she faces a choice between the two groups. A shocking event pushes Masha to take a decision in the end, highlighting the costs of her internal struggle as well as the ever-increasing political stakes in Russia today.

Commemorating Dexter Gordon’s 90th Birthday

Saturday, March 23 at 8pm Brother Number One

dir. Bertrand Tavernier, France/US, 1986, Video, 133 min., English & French w/ English subtitles

dir. Annie Goldson, New Zealand, 2011, digital video, color, 99 min.

Through New Zealander Rob Hamill’s story of his brother’s death at the hands of the Khmer Rouge, Brother Number One explores how the regime and its followers killed nearly 2 million Cambodians between 1975 and 1979. In 1978, Kerry Hamill and two friends disappeared without a trace while sailing from Australia to Southeast Asia. Rob discovers that a Khmer Rouge cell attacked the boat. One sailor, Canadian Stuart Glass, was shot immediately, but Kerry and Englishman John Dewhirst were taken to the notorious S-21 Prison in Phnom Penh, held for several months, tortured, and killed. Thirty years later, Kerry’s youngest brother Rob has a rare chance to take the stand as a witness at the Cambodia War Crimes Tribunal and face Comrade Duch, the man who gave the final orders for Kerry and thousands of others to be tortured and killed. As Rob retraces his brother’s final days, he meets survivors who tell the story of the S-21 prison and of what countless families across Cambodia experienced at the hands of the Khmer Rouge. In this spirit, Brother Number One grapples with the trauma that grips all Cambodia: the struggle to forgive in the face of immeasurable anger.

Putin’s Kiss

Sunday, March 24 at 5pm

Round Midnight

Round Midnight stars legendary jazz saxophonist Dexter Gordon as an expatriate jazz musician living in Paris in the 1950s. . Director Bernard Tavernier creates a moving tale of an unlikely friendship and life in post-WWII Paris and New York backed with a musical soundtrack featuring Herbie Hancock who received an Oscar for the Score. Dexter Gordon was nominated for an Academy Award as best leading actor for his portrayal of Dale Turner, whose life story was based on legendary jazz artists Lester Young and Bud Powell. Dexter Gordon was born on February 27, 1923 and died in Philadelphia in 1990. Celebrations commemorating Dexter’s 90th birthday are scheduled for Paris, Copenhagen, New York, and many other cities. Join us for an uncut screening of the film and an in-person appearance by Dexter Gordon’s widow, Maxine, an active jazz scholar and director of the Dexter Gordon Foundation. Maxine will introduce the film and lead a discussion after the screening. A reception will follow. 38

Tuesday, March 26 at 7pm

Ars Nova Workshop

MERZBOW

Merzbow / Mats Gustafsson / Balázs Pándi Please join Ars Nova Workshop for the first Philadelphia collaboration between the Japanese noise artist Merzbow, the Swedish saxophonist Mats Gustafsson and the Hungarian drummer Balázs Pándi. Merzbow has collaborated with many artists and groups, such as Sunn O))), Boris, Keiji Haino, Mike Patton and John Wiese. In 2005, at the Roskilde Festival, Merzbow performed with Sonic Youth, as well as 1/3 of tonight’s trio, the saxophonist Mats Gustafsson. Known for his aggressive playing, Gustafsson has worked with Evan Parker, The Ex, Derek Bailey, Ken Vandermark and Peter Brötzmann. He is also a member of The Thing, Swedish Azz, Fire! and Sonore. Sharing the stage tonight with Merzbow and Gustafsson is the Hungarian drummer Balázs Pándi (who played in duo with Merzbow in Philadelphia, when Ars Nova Workshop presented them in 2010). He has worked with Blood of Heroes (with Bill Laswell and Justin Broadrick of Jesu and Godflesh), To Live and Shave in L.A (a loose collective of musicians including Andrew WK and Sonic Youth’s Thurston Moore), Venetian Snares, Lasse Marhaug, Flying Lotus and Attila Csihar.

Spotlight on Shintoho Black Line

dir. Ishii Teruo, 1960, 35mm transfer to digital, b/w, 80 min., Japanese w/ English subtitles

Three Favorite Films of J.G. Ballard chosen by Claire Walsh and presented by Tacita Dean

A reporter (Amachi Shigeru) investigating a prostitution ring is framed for the murder of a dancer. He has to find the real killer before he is nabbed by the cops. Based on a true incident, this noir classic foreshadows director Ishii Teruo’s later scandalous adventures in the erotic and the grotesque.

dir. John Boorman, USA, 1967, 35mm, color, 92 min.

Thursday, March 28 at 9pm

Wednesday, March 27 at 7pm Point Blank

in conjunction with Dean’s new film JG, on view at Arcadia University Art Gallery (February 7 – April 21), a project funded by The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage. Double-crossed and out for revenge, Lee Marvin plays Walker, an unstoppable gangster on a mission.  Free admission.

Thursday, March 28 at 7pm

Spotlight on Shintoho

Ghost Story of Yotsuya dir. Nagakawa Nobuo, 1959, 35mm, color, 76 min., Japanese w/ English subtitles

This masterpiece of shock stars Amachi Shigeru as a low-ranking samurai who poisons his trusting wife so he can make a more advantageous match. But his plans go awry when her ghost returns for revenge. Wakasugi Katsuko is unforgettable as the horrifically dying wife – and implacable ghost.

Friday, March 29 at 7pm

Saturday, March 30 at 5pm

Spotlight on Shintoho

Spotlight on Shintoho

dir. Ishii Teruo, 1960, 35mm transfer to digital, b/w, 79 min., Japanese w/ English subtitles

dir. Nakagawa Nobuo, 1960, 35mm transfer to digital, b/w, 76 min., Japanese w/ English subtitles

An exotic dancer (Mhara Yoko) is kidnapped by a killer on the run (Amachi Shigeru). When her newspaper reporter boyfriend (Teruo Yoshida) finds her missing, he starts a search that leads him to Kobe and its teemins, foreign “kasbah.” More than in any other of his Shintoho films, director Ishii Teruo creates his own special atmosphere redolent of sex, decadence and danger.

A woman is falsely accused of murder when her rich father is fatally poisoned. Sentenced to death, she manages to escape -- and go in search of the real killer. While serving as a template for later Japanese “women in prison” pictures, from its woman-on-woman brawls to its then-daring suggestions of same-sex passion, the film is also a tense, taut thriller.

Friday, March 29 at 9pm

Saturday, March 30 at 7pm

Vampire Bride

Flesh Pier

Yellow Line

Spotlight on Shintoho

Death Row Woman

Spotlight on Shintoho

dir. Namiki Kotaro, 1960, 35mm transfer to digital, b/w, 80 min., Japanese w/ English subtitles

dir. Ishii Teruo, 1958, 35mm transfer to digital, b/w, 73 min., Japanese w/ English subtitles

An aspiring actress becomes an object of envy to her rivals when she lands a studio contract. They push her off a cliff -- and she survives, but with a horrible facial scar. An old shaman restores her beauty, but when she is enraged she transforms into a hairy vampire! Highly unusual treatment of the vampire theme, with an all-out performance by Ikeuchi Junko as the actress/vampire.

An undercover cop (Utsui Ken) infiltrates a nightclub that is the center of a call girl ring with the help of his former girlfriend (Mihara Yoko), who is mixed up in the ring herself. Shot in a semi-documentary style, this thriller reflects director Ishii Teruo’s intimate acquaintance with Tokyo postwar underworld. Saturday, March 30 at 9pm

Spotlight on Shintoho

Ghost Cat of Otama Pond dir. Ishikawa Yoshiro, 1960, 35mm transfer to digital, color, 75 min., Japanese w/ English subtitles

A lost couple end up in a haunted house by a mysterious pond. There they learn from a priest of the events in the long-ago past that led to the haunting -- events that threaten their very lives. Director Ishikawa Yoshiro apprenticed under Shintoho horror meister Nakagawa Nobuo and delivers his shocks with a similar skill and conviction.

Vampire Bride 40

I H P Al u mni R el a tion s Dear IHP Alumni and Friends, It is with great excitement that I write to let you know of my recent appointment as Alumni Relations Director at International House Philadelphia. This is a homecoming for me, having lived at IHP from 19982002. The development of a position solely dedicated to engaging former residents (alumni) with each other and with the house exemplifies IHP’s strong commitment to serving its international community even after they leave the building. I look forward to developing a growing number of engaging and meaningful programs in the U.S. and abroad, so our residents and alumni can continue to foster their bonds of international friendship for years to come. ihousephilly.org

A little about me: I first came to learn of International House when I was an undergraduate at the University of Pennsylvania. I was a very unusual undergraduate student having lived on my own and in other countries for 5 years before starting my studies in the USA. I grew up in Mexico City, Mexico, but when I was 17 I earned a scholarship to study at the United World College of South East Asia in Singapore. After my two years of International Baccalaureate were over, I traveled to visit friends I had made in high school, which took me to: Nepal, Belgium, Germany, Norway and Austria. My last stop of the tour proved to be longer than I had anticipated and I ended up staying in Vienna for three years! As an undergraduate at the University of Pennsylvania, I felt rather out of place with undergraduates who were leaving home for the very first time. I was not only 4-5 years their senior, but I had also experienced the world in a way that many of them could not relate to. When I found IHP on a friend’s recommendation, I found home. For the following three years I served as a House and Programming RA, a Senior RA, and for the last year as a staff person at the then called RPO office (now the RA AC). My international experiences and the amazing intercultural exchanges and leadership opportunities that I had at International House led me to pursue a Master’s Degree in Intercultural Service, Leadership and Management at the School for International Training Graduate Institute in Brattleboro, VT. Ten years after leaving IHP I am back to the organization that was so pivotal in determining my career path. I know first hand how meaningful and impactful the experience of building a diverse, inclusive, multicultural community can be. Personally, I continue to benefit from the deep friendships I developed while living at International House. These friends

have become my extended family in the US. A particularly moving and meaningful aspect of this experience is watching our multi-cultural, multi-racial children growing up together in an ever richer environment of diverse traditions and languages.

About the Alumni Program: As we begin a new chapter in the iWorld community (your alumni network) I hope you’ll consider how IHP can contribute to your own success. We’d like to hear how IHP can be of service to you. Consider iWorld your gateway to a professional network of fellow alumni who can serve as collaborators, mentors, clients, and even potential employers and employees. The iWorld community can connect you with a host of exciting opportunities and resources as well, including being involved in the IHP community both here in the US and abroad. I look forward to meeting more of you, learning about your latest achievements, and promoting them within this community. The iWorld magazine will be published three times a year starting January 2013, so continue to send us your updates, births, marriages, moves, and accomplishments. Each issue features alumni benefits, resources or continued learning and networking opportunities. Join us on Facebook, on LinkedIn and on Twitter (@IHPhillyAlumni) to get up to date information from IHP and to interact with your fellow alumni. To find out more about upcoming events and to learn more about the iWorld community, feel free to contact the Alumni Relations office at 215-895-6598, or email iworldihp@ihphilly.org. We look forward to hearing from you soon.

Warmest regards, Sarvelia Peralta-Durán (IHP 1998-2002) Alumni Relations Director

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Become a Member at IHP! As a member supported organization, IHP depends upon member contributions to present our signature contemporary arts and cultural programs, and to continue providing a warm and welcoming environment for the thousands of people who come from around the world and call IHP home year after year. Please help IHP continue to serve our century-long mission by becoming a member today!

Flip back through the pages of this magazine, look at all the events taking place at IHP, and consider the variety of subjects covered, the ensuing conversations and dialogue inspired by them, and the way in which this unique programming engages the local and international community. It only happens at International House Philadelphia.

We’ve simplified our Membership Levels and Benefits! Individual Member: $60 annually • Young Friend: $50 annually • Student: $35 annually With your membership, you will receive free admission to most IHP films in International House’s Ibrahim Theater, as well as free and discounted admission to concerts, language classes and other events and programs presented at IHP. To discover the full benefits of IHP Membership, please call 215.387.5142, or visit our website: www.ihousephilly.org/membership.

Join today!

Beyond Membership - Support our Annual Fund! You can make an even bigger impact on the cultural landscape of the Philadelphia region through the support of one of our Annual Funds. You choose how to direct your gift to one of three specific program areas: Residential Life, Arts & Humanities, and the Area of Greatest Need. By making a tax-deductible contribution to the IHP Annual Fund you take an active role in supporting the vital resources and services that are integral to the success of International House, and you help us to serve our Residents, Members, and the Philadelphia Community for Generations to come. Make a difference in the lives of others that will be felt around the world. Support our Annual Fund! The Arts + Humanities Fund The arts and humanities are an avenue for cultural, political, and social understanding. Through live performance, film, visual arts, and languages, your support allows IHP to present programs and events that successfully unite contemporary and emerging forms with classical traditions. Residential Life Fund Support our philosophy of educating outside of the classroom and help IHP’s residents discover the Greater Philadelphia and global communities by contributing to the Residential Life Fund. Area of Greatest Need Your support of International House Philadelphia maintains a diverse and welcoming community for scholars from around the world and broadens the horizons of IHP Residents and the Philadelphia community through a wide range of Arts, Humanities, and Leadership Programs. When you give an unrestricted gift, IHP is able to direct your commitment to a budgeted area where there is the most need. IHP’s Members and Donors are integral to maintaining the important cultural exchange at International House through the Arts, Humanities, and Residential Programs. Please use the enclosed envelope found in the back to give today.

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International House Philadelphia:

A Unique Location for Your Next Event or Meeting! Whether you are planning a business conference, an intimate soiree, an executive meeting, or a large social event, International House Philadelphia has the space and services to meet your needs and make your event a success. Located in the heart of Philadelphia’s University City, IHP has over 8,500 square feet of available space with the capacity to meet the needs of groups as small as 10, or as large as 600. IHP’s Ibrahim Theater The Ibrahim Theater is a fully-equipped, multipurpose theater facility. Featuring a state-of-the-art concert sound-system, we can accommodate a variety of music presentations from small acoustic ensembles to fully amplified 10+ piece bands. The Ibrahim Theater is ideal for film and video screenings, with the capability to project 16mm and 35mm film as well as most video formats including DigiBeta, BetaSP, DVD, Blu-ray and miniDV. Additional devices can be incorporated into our system. There is also access from the stage, which is perfect for PowerPoint lectures and other visual presentations. Our lighting system is equipped with a digital lighting board. With a knowledgeable staff able to assist you, we can provide a complete package for most events. South America Room At almost 2,000 square feet, with a capacity of up to 150, South America is our most versatile space with a great view and an outdoor balcony. It is ideal for large seminars and classes, as well as receptions. Australia Lounge A uniquely designed atrium space, the Australia Lounge is an attractive setting for receptions, breakfasts, and as a breakout space for conferences, accommodating up to 100 for stand-up events and 50 for a seated gathering or meeting. Europe, Asia, Africa, and North America Rooms These rooms, which accommodate 10 to 60 people, are ideal for small board meetings, seminars, retreats, classes and conference breakout space. The Asia and Africa Rooms can be combined to form a larger meeting space. To inquire about hosting your event in IHP’s Ibrahim Theater or any of our other wonderful event spaces, please email events@ihphilly.org or call 215.895.6539.

ihousephilly.org

Great reasons to live at ihp • Free admission to IHP events • Convenient location • 24-hour security staff • Computer lab with web access • Resident cafÉ on premises • Leadership development programs • tv lounge + recreation center • discounted gYM membership • long And short term housing • laundry facilities & utilities included If you are a student, scholar, or professional trainee looking for an apartment or room in Philadelphia, consider International House. IHP is a multicultural residential center, and a source of distinctive arts and cultural programming. We are a warm and friendly living environment; a home for nearly 1,000 people from as many as 95 different countries around the world annually, including the US, who attend area colleges and universities. As a resident of International House, you’ll not only enjoy the privacy and quiet of our apartments and single rooms, you’ll also develop relationships while making friends with others from around the world, and become part of a unique community where all cultures are celebrated and shared. Our residents also enjoy the benefits of IHP membership, and get free admission and access to films, concerts, cultural events, art exhibits, leadership seminars, executive networking events and more throughout the year. Inquire today and start enjoying life at the intersection of Philadelphia and the World! housing@ihphilly.org, 215.895.6540, www.ihousephilly.org/student-housing

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IHP Corporate Partnerships Residents and the greater community around International House Philadelphia benefit from many of the programs and events hosted at IHP year round. Some of those benefits are in part due to our many corporate and university partners. Citibank recently participated in our Welcome Back Week this past September. By tabling at the event, they had the opportunity to share with our residents, many of whom are from another country, their service to establish US credit by opening an international credit card. This can be challenging for many of our residents because a US social security card is generally required when establishing credit here. However, not with Citibank. By partnering with IHP, University City District can show case the magnificent changes in the area over the past 15 years and highlight some of their upcoming events to residents and IHP members watching one of our films in the Ibrahim Theatre. University of the Sciences was the first to sign up for our newly created University Partnering Program. With this agreement, they receive a host of benefits, but the greatest benefit is the one their students receive: free admission to IHP films and events! Contact our Corporate Relations Department at 215.895.6543 or thomasinat@ihphilly.org to learn more.

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Language Programs

Our Language Programs offer the opportunity to study a foreign language or improve English conversation skills. At our friendly and affordable sessions, the small class settings will allow you to quickly learn how to communicate clearly outside of the classroom and enhance skills that assist with future goals.

UPCOMING CLASS OFFERINGS: MANDARIN SPANISH KOREAN

To learn more, contact us at 215.895.6592 or languages@ihphilly.org and visit www.ihousephilly.org

ihousephilly.org

FARSI

getting here

International House Philadelphia is located at 3701 Chestnut Street, in the University City neighborhood, one block south of Market Street and one block north of Walnut Street. Public Transportation: It’s a short walk from either of the Green Line’s 36th Street stops or the Market-Frankford El’s 34th Street stop. From Center City, take the 21 bus west on Walnut Street to 37th Street. From West Philly, take the 21 bus east on Chestnut to 37th. Parking: It’s easy to park in University City! Discounted parking for International House patrons is available at the Science Center Parking Garage, 3665 Market Street. A special rate of $5 per vehicle, effective after 4pm until 7am, Monday through Friday plus all day Saturday & Sunday. Please bring your parking stub to IHP’s Front Desk to be stamped when attending events. Plenty of street parking, free after 8pm, is available on Chestnut and Market Streets and throughout the neighborhood. Contact Us: General Information 215.387.5125 or info@ihphilly.org

Become a fan on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ihousephilly.

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Staff

Executive Office Tanya Steinberg, Executive Director Clara Fomich, Office Manager Admissions + Resident Services Glenn D. Martin, Admissions + Resident Life Director Michael T. Beachem IV, Associate Director of Resident Life Edwin Garcia, Admissions Coordinator Emily Martin, Admissions Coordinator Yun Joon Park, Front Desk Coordinator Marlon Patton, Cashier + Front Desk Manager Institutional Advancement Arts, Communications, + Events William Parker, Arts, Communications, + Events Director Austen Brown, Production Supervisor Sasha Dages, Marketing + Communications Manager Patrick DiGiacomo, Box Office Supervisor Wendy Hyatt, Conference Center Manager Justin Miller, Graphic Designer Robert Cargni Mitchell, Programs Curator + Projectionist Jesse Pires, Programs Curator Herb Shellenberger, Programs Office Manager Barbara Warnock, Language Program Manager Development Jessamyn Falcone, Development Services Manager Lauren Fenimore, Foundations Research Manager Florence Lipsman, Development Assistant Sarvelia N. Peralta-Duran, Alumni Relations Director Thomasina R. Tafur, Corporate Relations Manager Building Services + Operations Lina Yankelevich, Finance + HR Director Angela Bachman, Finance Manager Moshe Caspi, Security Services + Systems Manager Lisa Coogan, Operations Coordinator Deborah Sara Houda, Customer Service + Housekeeping Manager Larry Moore, Lead Security Guard Raj Persad, Building Operations + Maintenance Services Manager Alexander Rivkin, Information Systems + Technology Manager Althelson Towns, Lead Housekeeper Housekeeping, MAINTENANCE, + SECURITY Reginald Brown Yefim Klurfeld Ronald Persaud Melvin Caranda Henry C. Koffi Christina Rivera Phillip Carter Vipin Maxwell Ronald Smith Moifee Dorley Lulzim Myrtaj Linda Stanton David Kodzo Gasonu Anthony Noah Robert Wooten Sylvie Hoeto Alberto Osoria Marie Berthe Johnson Amar Persad

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Nonprofit. Org. US Postage PAID Philadelphia, PA Permit No. 5335

3701 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104

IHP is an independent, member supported non-profit.

JOIN TODAY!

International House Philadelphia is a multicultural residential center, a source of distinctive programming, and the embodiment of an ideal. It has a critical threefold mission: to maintain a diverse and welcoming community for scholars from around the world, while introducing them to the American experience; to broaden the horizons of its Residents and the larger community through high quality international arts and humanities programs; and to encourage cooperation and respect among the peoples of all nations. www.ihousephilly.org

International House Philadelphia:

THE NEXUS BETWEEN INTERNATIONAL CULTURE AND INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

The generous support of our Members, Friends and Benefactors allows International House Philadelphia to continue the tradition of offering lifelong learning through the Arts, Culture and Humanities to an increasing number of people each year.

Adroitent, Inc., Ahmad & Zaffarese Llc, All State Abstract Inc., Alpin W Cameron Foundation, Bartlett Foundation, Berkadia, Chestnut Hill Health Care, Citizens Charitable Foundation, Comcast Corporation, Dole Fresh Fruit Co, Electriplast Corp, Epam Systems, Inc., Exude Benefits Group, Inc., Fox Chase Cancer Centre, Friends Of The Japanese House And Garden, Gawthrop Greenwood, Pc, Greater Philadelphia Chinese Restaurant Association, Gupta Foundation, Hp Health Partners, I-Lead Inc., Ing Financial Partners, Interfaith Center Of Greater Philadelphia, International House Harrisburg, International House, New York, Jacoby Donner Pc, John Wiley & Sons Inc., Lincoln University, Nmci Group, Inc., Philadelphia Exhibitions Initiative, Philadelphia Foundation, Philadelphia Music Project, Premier Urology Associates, Progressive Business Publications, Prometrics, Inc., Qlicktech Inc, Reed Smith Llp, Russian Speaking Professionals Network, Saks Incorporated, Sam And Charles Foundation, San Diego Foundation, Scandinavian American Business Forum, University Of Pennsylvania, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., World Affairs Council Of Philadelphia We are also thankful for the support of our in-kind donors and the many generous members and annual donors.


IHP Magazine, Winter 2013