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14 A local magazine delivered to more than 46,000 households in the Treasure Valley

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Plan for a festive Fourth of July

8 Idaho Shakespeare Festival’s leaders

18 Tranquil garden is a perfect escape

42 Photos from the Culinary World Tour

23 Experience Garden Tour 2012

43 Photos from Curtis Stigers’ concert

26 Boise home gets a new kitchen, more

44 Support our nonprofit community by attending a fundraising event

31 Take the Remodeled Homes Tour

11 The farmers markets are open

47 Spring is all about hope ...

32 Head north for some Idaho R&R

ON THE COVER: Mike and Chris Pierson

14 Writer Alan Heathcock is on a roll

36 Taste the flavor of great barbecue

17 News from Idaho’s art ambassadors

40 Ste. Chapelle has new leadership

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Dear Reader, You can almost feel it in the air. Summer is around the bend, and so are all those glorious summer activities that make living in Idaho so much fun. Whether you are planning an Idaho vacation (check out Carroll Ann Kimsey’s story about her adventures in North-Central Idaho on page 32), are going to take in the concerts at Ste. Chapelle this summer (see page 40 for an update on the winery) or plan to spend weekends exploring our Treasure Valley farmers markets (story, page 11), you’ll find lots to keep you busy in the Gem State. Some of my family’s favorite Idaho traditions revolve around the Fourth of July. We attend the “We the People Liberty Day Parade” in Downtown Boise, have a family barbecue and end the day with a visit to Ann Morrison Park for Boise’s fabulous fireworks display. I’m proud to say that the Idaho Statesman is again presenting — along with the City of Boise and Journal Broadcast Group — the fireworks and other Fourth of July festivities in Ann Morrison Park this year.

In between all my family time on the Fourth, I also volunteer for the Idaho Statesman’s Chalk Art Festival. You’ll find me handing out chalk to kids who want to try their hands at drawing works of art in the children’s Chalk Land area (free for those under 12). Those 12 and older can compete in the youth and adult competitions. There also are guest artists turning out amazing masterpieces. (That’s Boise artist Liz Wolf at left participating as a guest artist last year.) So if you want to find out how you can be a part of the Chalk Art Festival at Ann Morrison Park — either as a spectator or an artist — visit www.idahostatesman.com/chalkart to get all the details. I guarantee you it’s a great way to spend a summer day in the city.

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Treasure Magazine is delivered to more than 46,000 Treasure Valley homes quarterly. To reserve space in the Aug. 18 issue, call Eleanor Hurst at 377-6235 or contact your sales and marketing executive for more information today. The advertising space deadline is July 20. VISIT US ONLINE AT:

IdahoStatesman.com/Treasure Treasure Magazine is published quarterly by the Idaho Statesman, 1200 N. Curtis Road, 83706. Single copy sales are $3.95 per issue. Copyright 2012 Treasure Magazine. No part of this magazine may be reproduced without the consent of the publisher. Treasure Magazine is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photos and artwork, even if accompanied by a selfaddressed stamped envelope. The opinions expressed by writers and contributors do not necessarily reflect those of the publisher.

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Mark

Hofflund IDAHO SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL DIRECTORS STORY BY DANA OLAND

Charlie

Fee

DARIN OSWALD / DOSWALD@IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

L

uck and pluck brought Charlie Fee to the Idaho Shakespeare Festival as artistic director in 1992. The board chose the tall charmer from California from a field of about 100 candidates — despite the fact that at the time he had never directed a play by William Shakespeare. After a solid first season, Fee hired his longtime friend and colleague Mark Hofflund — who had never been a managing director — as his stalwart second in command, and the die was cast. These two first-timers set out to create theater in Boise. “At the time, I told Mark, ‘Who knows what this will be? It could be one year or five.’ But I knew we wanted to build a theater, and I thought we could do it,” Fee says. This season marks their 20th anniversary together at the helm. In that time, they have achieved what they set out to do and more. With Fee’s charisma and creativity and Hofflund’s intellect and attention to detail, they make a formidable team. They met in the theater graduate program at the University of

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California, San Diego. They share a vision and creative ethic that strike a balance between savvy business acumen and creative flair. In 1998, they opened ISF’s multimillion-dollar amphitheater for summer production. They’ve created a strong artistic company that brings artists back year after year to create theater against the backdrop of the Boise Foothills. They acquired Idaho Theater for Youth and developed the theater’s Shakespearience education programs and have a direct impact on kids from elementary to high school age across the state. But perhaps most importantly, they have changed the model for how a regional theater can operate by forging unique partnerships with Great Lakes Theater in Cleveland 10 years ago and Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival three years ago. Fee also is the producing artistic director at those theaters, and he moves productions and casts from city to city. That makes ISF the only regional summer repertory company in the country producing work in three states.

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Idaho Shakespeare Festival 2012 plays How did you choose Mark as your managing director? CHARLIE: Mark and Lynn (Allison

Hofflund) came through on a vacation that first summer. We had dinner and when they left, Lidia (Fee’s wife) said, ‘You’re looking for a managing director. Why not Mark?’ I was like, ‘You’re absolutely right. Done.’ We made the call the next day. It took a little bit of pushing Mark to take this kind of risk. The truth is, we were both at a point in our careers that if we weren’t going to do it at that age, we weren’t ever going to. MARK: Lynn and I were driving through the desert on our way back to San Diego, when Lynn asked me the same question. ‘Did Charlie ask you about a job?’ But I wasn’t really looking for a job. (Mark was literary manager at The Old Globe theater.) When I got the call, I wasn’t sure. I asked one of my mentors at The Old Globe, (managing director) Tom Hall, for advice. He said, ‘If you like and want to work with Charlie, you should do this because the two of you will come up with a model that we don’t know yet,’ not knowing what he meant.

What makes you two good partners? CHARLIE: I trust Mark. He’s from the same theatrical tradition. I knew he’d be strong in community relations, just from knowing him. He would be a good fundraising team for me and for our board of directors. And after being at the Globe for 10 years, he has that deep institutional programming, which we needed here because we wanted to create a more institutional theater company. MARK: I’ve always had a high regard for Charlie and Lidia. On a fundamental level, Charlie’s someone who has been among my peers and also among my mentors. I had some good mentors at the Globe.

How did you start creating your company? CHARLIE: I wrote a five-year plan that first summer that included building the amphitheater. First, I deeply believe in a company structure. I grew up around ACT (American Conservatory Theater) in San Francisco, a large repertory theater, sustaining artists over many years. I knew we would bring together people we wanted to work with to develop a body of work. We would define and create our aesthetic as a team. We were looking for people who would make multiyear commitments. I looked for emerging artists who had just left grad school or were in their first professional blush. It’s this period where you lose a huge number of talented people because they can’t get work and they think they have to be in the big city. I’d go to them and say, ‘OK, fine, but in the meantime

The plays run in repertory June 1 through Sept. 29. Find more details and ticket information at IdahoShakespeare.org. Charlie Fee restages his 2006 production of Shakespeare’s “ROMEO AND JULIET” with an almost entirely new cast. It’s set in a bombed-out Verona circa 1921 in between the two world wars. Fee directed “R&J” his first season as artistic director in 1992. June 1 through June 30. Director Drew Barr, in his 10th season with ISF, puts his thoughtful stamp on Agatha Christie’s classic whodunit “THE MOUSETRAP.” It’s filled with twists and thrilling turns as a group of strangers stranded during a snowstorm discovers a murderer in their midst. June 8 through July 27. After her ISF debut with her wonderfully wacky

come and do this and work on developing a company with us.’ MARK: Charlie had an incredible vision that I didn’t fully appreciate at the time. It was a little against the way theater was going. Then it was moving away from the repertory idea, but in Boise that’s what made sense. And then, it was just the two of us in the office most days. We got to invent how we were going do this.

So who came on board then? CHARLIE: Bart was the first director I hired, who we knew from San Diego. (Bartlett Sher directed at ISF from 1992 to 1999. He has gone on to direct at the Lincoln Center Theatre and the Metropolitan Opera. Sher won the 2008 Tony for Best Direction of a Musical for “South Pacific.”) We also brought in costume designer Kim Krumm Sorensen and Peter John Still (resident sound designer). By the second summer, we had Mark, Gage Williams (resident set designer), Rick Martin (resident lighting designer). The same thing with actors — a lot of people who come back year after year.

Is that still how you’re building? CHARLIE: We’re older now, so we’re hiring people who are older and who come from deeper backgrounds. The acting company is still being found in the same way. We’re bringing a lot of new young talent in this season, people I’ve not worked with before. There are new designers, a new composer, a new director (Jesse Berger of Red Bull Theatre in New York City will direct “The Winter’s Tale.”) The company is growing faster than ever now because of this new model. With three theaters, there are literally more roles to fill.

What’s next? CHARLIE: There are lots of nexts. You know us, we don’t just set out in one direc-

1980s “Shrew” last season, director Tracy Young returns with Moliere’s “THE IMAGINARY INVALID,” a comedy about a wealthy hypochondriac and those who would take advantage of him. July 6 through Aug. 24. First-time ISF director Jesse Berger takes on Shakespeare’s romantic fairy tale “THE WINTER’S TALE.” Kings, queens, thieves, clowns, shepherds — and one hungry bear — celebrate the comedy of life. Aug. 3 through 26. The season wraps up with Michael Frayn’s theatrical farce “NOISES OFF,” directed by Boise’s Gordon Reinhart, who has a penchant for wrangling these fast-paced, doorslamming comedy extravaganzas. This one is about a group of itinerant actors rehearsing a play in which the backstage intrigue is more interesting than what’s on stage. Aug. 31 through Sept. 29.

tion. We have a bunch of ideas that are percolating all the time, waiting for the opportunity. The next could be a fourth theater — but it’s not the thing I’m focused on. When Tahoe happened, we had been focused on finding a third theater. Right now we have to solidify and expand Tahoe’s season (two plays for next season). It’s really becoming clear that there are other ways to move our work to other cities that don’t have to do with having another fullon company.

Touring? CHARLIE: Yes. We could do “Mousetrap” and “Winter’s Tale”(the two shows originated in Boise) in Cleveland, then take them to Columbus (Ohio), for instance. Then bring the focus back to Boise. The whole point is to keep the company working.

In all of history, with whom would you most like to dine? CHARLIE: Benjamin Franklin. It would be fun. He just knew everything. MARK: Lynne Rossetto Kasper. (Host of American Public Media’s “The Splendid Table.”)

What are you reading? CHARLIE: I read magazines. The Atlantic, which I just love, and it’s my favorite reading on planes. I am a podcast addict. My top podcasts: The BBC “In Our Own Time with Melvyn Bragg” — it’s history and philosophy and it’s the best podcast on Earth; “Start the Week with Andrew Marr,” also BBC; Slate Magazine “Culture Gabfest” and “Political Gabfest” and “This American Life” MARK: “The Years with Ross” by James Thurber. (Originally published in 1958, it’s available from Perennial Classics, paperback edition, $14.99). It’s a biography of

continued MAY 2012

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The New Yorker founder Harold Ross. He’s a guy who came out of the American heartland and started a thing that failed. Then he started it again until it was successful. I was at an arts meeting and a friend was telling me I needed to read this book. He literally found a copy on a decorative bookshelf in the hotel lobby, and they gave it to me.

What’s on your playlist? CHARLIE: I get addicted to a single thing, and I listen to it for several weeks. Right now I’m addicted to Mumford and Sons and the soundtrack to “Pina.� That’s our party music now. I loved the movie, but the music is just great. MARK: I don’t really listen to music although I’m surrounded by it; I grew up with it and love it. I don’t have an iPod. If I can unplug, I go out for a run, and I listen to the music in my head.

What keeps you in Boise? CHARLIE: The most obvious things — friends, the lifestyle. I love to mountain bike in the Foothills. When I’m in Cleveland, I pine for them. Boise is a really great place to live because it’s not filled with the daily indignities you have to suffer in most cities, where it takes so much energy to do anything, like go grocery shopping. And, of course, our work. MARK: I agree. It’s that combination of quality of life, quality of the people and the opportunities, for both me and Lynn. She’s been able to carve out a very creative life for herself here as an actor and director. The opportunities here are stunning, and they’re ones we wouldn’t get as readily someplace else. Boise is a place where you have the ability to accomplish things that benefit other people in schools, in politics, in so many walks of life.

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What’s your guilty pleasure? CHARLIE: I have too many is the problem, and I don’t want to talk about the ones I really have. I know — crime novels. I love Henning Mankell. He’s one of the Swedish guys. He’s got this character Kurt Wallander who’s really human and wonderful. I can’t wait for the next book. MARK: Running in the dark.

Whom do you most admire? CHARLIE: Nick Hytner, artistic director of the National Theatre in London, for transforming a huge company and creating thrilling work. MARK: Everyone who has ever tried to teach me something.

What is your motto? CHARLIE: Feature what you can’t fix. MARK: Love what you do.

0519-Treasure-11-13-SigStyle-markets_Treasure 5/10/12 7:01 PM Page 11

STORY BY MARIA SMITH PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOE JASZEWSKI

Valley farmers markets TOP: Lazy Dog

Gardens’ sign welcomes shoppers back to the Capital City Public Market in Downtown Boise on opening day. RIGHT: Offer-

ings from Urban Gardens at the Eagle Saturday Market in Heritage Park. BELOW:

Zeppole’s breadsticks and a breakfast burrito with chorizo, cheese, potato and egg from Garcia’s Tex-Mex Grill at the Capital City Public Market.

welcome another year of home-grown produce, tasty eats and hand-crafted creations “See you at the market!” My husband (the market’s volunteer bell-ringer coordinator) and I had been saying that for days in anticipation of the Capital City Public Market’s opening April 21. And what an opening it was! After J.V. Evans of market sponsor D.L. Evans Bank rang the opening bell, thousands of locavores descended on Downtown Boise to sate their post-winter hankering for locally grown produce and enjoy the warmest opening day ever. Not just the crowd and the weather set records. On opening day, shoppers were greeted by 136 vendors, including several new produce and food vendors, artisans and street food purveyors. The newbies offered everything from sheep’s milk ice cream, chevre, chocolate truffles and locally raised pork to fresh-churned butter. New artisans brought a slew of new products, including handmade leather goods, hand-painted textiles, and vintage and custom-made aprons. There’s even a compost and vermiculture vendor! Janie Burns of Meadowlark Farms was there in 1994 when it all began. “Hard to believe now, but the Capital City Public Market opened with a whimper, not a bang. Farmers markets were new then, and few Boise shoppers came — probably no more than a couple of hundred folks the entire day. There was so little traffic during the last hour of the market that it was dubbed the ‘Whine and Wine Hour,’ and the

continued MAY 2012

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20 or so vendors implored Karen Ellis, the market manager, to close early every week. But the farmers kept coming, their loyal customers told their friends and the rest ... is history.” Under the guidance of founding director Ellis, the market has burgeoned into a feast for all the senses. After 18 years at the market’s helm, she still has trouble sleeping the night before opening day. “I’m excited for the beauty that is the market ... the colors, the smells, the sounds. Watching the street go from empty to bustling and fill up with people and products. It’s a joy to have all the producers back for the season and see how happy customers are as they greet their favorite vendors and meet new ones. “In the spring, we have the lovely flowers and bedding plants and fresh spring veggies — spinach, lettuce, radishes, carrots, asparagus, tender young herbs. Then comes summer and the abundance of all the summer produce: mouth-watering veggies, fruits and berries — and the beautiful summer flowers. It becomes a real live piece of art,” Ellis says. When fall comes, you’ll find pumpkins, root vegetables, squash, gourds, Indian corn, mums and autumn plants. Thanksgiving and Christmastime bring cranberries and gifts galore for the holidays. “And all season long, local producers bring us excellent Idaho meats and wines,” she says. A cook’s paradise it may be, but the market is also a delight for multitaskers who like to eat as they shop. Shoppers can pick from an assortment of munchies ranging from locally grown peanuts, mini-donuts, sticky buns, brownies and croissants to ethnic specialties like biscotti, crepes, burritos and African sambusas. A personal favorite is the root beer float. In addition to all the produce for cooks to turn into delicious meals, there is plenty of food that’s ready to take home and serve — hummus, marinated olives, salsa, blue-

The Next Generation Organics booth at the Capital City Public Market.

berry ketchup (trust me, it’s luscious), pasta (we have a weekly order), fruit pies, cupcakes and breads ranging from whole-wheat to flatbreads, baguettes and gluten-free. Be sure to check out Chef at the Market, where chef Abby Carlson demonstrates recipes concocted from market-available ingredients. There are myriad other programs, for kids as well as adults, so check the website. And don’t forget the Harvest Moon Dinner on Sept. 8 — the Market’s annual fundraising feast that showcases the best of Idaho foods and wines. Don’t worry about hauling around your bounty. Just drop your packages off at Veggie Valet (on Idaho Street in front of the Vandals store), and drive up to the pick-up spot on Ninth Street when you’re ready to go. Not only shoppers love the market. Most restaurants and coffee shops are full to capacity on market days, as are other area

The Meridian Farmers Market and Bazaar is at the Meridian Crossroads shopping center, Eagle Road and Fairview Avenue, on Saturdays. 12

businesses. “The market brings so many customers Downtown who otherwise don’t shop here. Every week, the new people who come in express awe at the diversity of merchants and restaurants Downtown — best of all, they all come back,” says Lil Kurek, owner of American Clothing Gallery. You can join in the fun in Downtown Boise from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Saturdays. And while the Downtown Boise market is the Treasure Valley’s biggest market, there are many other markets for fresh produce and other local products in our area. In addition to produce and artisan crafts, the Meridian Farmers Market and Bazaar features treats like Momo Nepalese dumplings to eat as you shop or to take home. I enjoyed the live music as well as the vendors selling everything from plants and produce to jewelry and jams at the Eagle Saturday Market in charming Heritage Park. There is also a good variety of fashion items. Other finds included goat milk skin lotion in varied scents and custom guitars from 3GWoodworks. The East End Market at Bown Crossing, Boise’s Sunday Market, is in its third season of offering local produce, plant starts, premium meats and a varied slate of artisans. If you’re in the market for smoker chips made from local grape vines and furniture made from wine barrels as well as jewelry and other fashion items, check it out. For information on all these markets, see the box at right and check their websites for information on specific vendors. Freelance writer Maria Smith and her husband, Mike, previously wrote the “Becoming Boiseans” column for Treasure.

0519-Treasure-11-13-SigStyle-markets_Treasure 5/8/12 10:08 PM Page 13

Treasure Valley farmers markets CALDWELL FARMERS MARKET: Blaine and 8th St., Wednesdays 4-7:30 p.m. through Sept. 26; 571-3474, klmbh@msn.com. CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET: 8th Street from Bannock to Main & Grove Plaza, Saturdays 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., through Dec. 22; 345-9287, www.capitalcitypublicmarket.com. EAGLE SATURDAY MARKET: Heritage Park (State Street), Saturdays 9 a.m.-1 p.m., through Oct. 13; 440-2412, www.eaglearts.org. EAST END MARKET AT BOWN CROSSING: Bown Way in Southeast Boise, Sundays 10 a.m.-2 p.m. through Oct. 13; 331-3400, info@adrianandsabine.com. EMMETT FARMERS MARKET: Blaser Park, Washington Ave. and Idaho 52, Saturdays 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Wednesdays 3-7 p.m., through Oct. 31; Emmett FarmersMarket@yahoo.com. KUNA FARMERS MARKET: Veterans Memorial Park, Saturdays 9 a.m.-noon through Oct. 6; 922-3031, www.kunafarmersmarket.com. MARSING FARMERS MARKET: Island Park off Idaho 55, Sundays 11 a.m.4 p.m. through Sept. 30; 859-9834, www.marsingfarmersmarket.com. MERIDIAN FARMERS MARKET AND BAZAAR: Eagle at Fairview, Saturdays 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Thursday 5-9 p.m.; Nampa Gateway Shopping Center, Wednesdays 5-9 p.m. through Sept. 29; 376-2610, www.meridianfarmersmarket.com. MOUNTAIN HOME FARMERS MARKET: Railroad Park Downtown, Saturdays 8 a.m.-1 p.m. through Oct. 29; 587-3134. NAMPA FARMERS MARKET: 14th Ave. and Front St., Saturdays 9 a.m.1 p.m. through Oct. 27; 461-4807, www.nampafarmersmarket.com. See a list of new Capital City vendors and find more market information at IdahoStatesman.com/treasure.

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Boise writer Alan Heathcock arrived on the national literary scene in 2011 with his first book “Volt: Stories.” It’s a series of tales that explore the natural forces of good and evil. 14

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‘Volt’ writer Alan Heathcock’s internal duality fuels his gripping prose and creates his epic stories

MODERN

MYTHOLOGY STORY BY DANA OLAND PHOTOGRAPHY BY DARIN OSWALD

There are two sides to Alan Heathcock. There’s the quiet, serious writer with the furrowed brow sequestered in the former law-enforcement surveillance trailer turned office where he puts pencil to paper to imagine the unforgiving moral landscapes where his characters fight for survival on a biblical scale. Then there’s the quick-witted, gregarious Heathcock who wears fedoras, growls like a grizzly bear for National Public Radio and delivers one-liners as the co-host of a wacky game-show fundraiser. Will the real Alan Heathcock please stand up? The truth is, they both are Heathcock. “I’m kind of an introvert,” he says. “I’m most at peace at my desk doing my work, but I’m able to fire myself up to do that part of the job. Whatever I need to do.” The space between these two internal poles — that also span the distance from his native Chicago to his current hometown of Boise — is where Heathcock’s fertile imagination can cut loose and create the stark landscape of his first published book — “Volt: Stories” (Graywolf Press, $15). Since it came out in March 2011, it has taken off nationally, earning glowing accolades for Heathcock’s “spare and muscular yet poetic” prose (The New York Times) and several awards. Heathcock won third place in the Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers awards. He won the The Great Lakes Colleges Association’s 2012 New Writers Award. The University of Iowa, where he earned his undergraduate degree, recruited him as an ambassador for its Overseas Reading Tour to Brazil, where he is this week. And “Volt” made “best of” lists at Publisher’s Weekly, the (Cleveland) Plain Dealer and Chicago Tribune. One of his stories, “Fort Apache,” about a group of restless teens who terrorize a town, is being made into a short film, and there is a quiet bidding war for the film rights to “Volt.” continued MAY 2012

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IT HAPPENED IN IDAHO Heathcock, 41, grew up on Chicago’s rough south side in a hard-working and creative family. The city’s cultural landscape is locked in his DNA. “It was an extraordinary place to grow up,” he says. “The way I talk, the way I think, my worldview is shaped by the experiences I had there.” He moved to Boise 12 years ago after visiting close friend and award-winning writer Tony Doerr and his wife Shauna, who grew up here. Doerr — who is one of today’s most acclaimed writers — and Heathcock met in graduate school at Bowling Green State University in Ohio. Heathcock gave Doerr his orientation tour, and the two became fast friends. “Tony and I, we saw a kinship in each other right away,” he says. “We both like books and movies, but we’re also a rarity in that we like sports, too.” They would spend Friday nights together, watching a game and having a few beers — something they still do occasionally — but the rest of the time, they were both hard at work writing, Doerr says. “Alan was an example for me by being so serious about his craft,” Doerr says. “I’m really happy for him with this book. He’s worked so long, toiling in relative obscurity. It’s a good lesson that quality will rise to the top if you stick with it.” Heathcock left the Ph.D. program at the University of Chicago to move to Idaho and earn a second master’s degree at Boise State — a move his family and friends still think is a little crazy — but it turned out to be the turning point for him as a person and a writer, he says. Soon after arriving in Idaho, Heathcock met and fell in love with Rochelle Lanfear on a sunny afternoon at Zoo Boise. They married a few months later and became an instant family with Lanfear’s two children, Carly Coba, 12, and Andrew Coba, 16. The

PROVIDED BY BARNES & NOBLE

Alan Heathcock accepts his third-place Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers Award at a banquet in New York City in March. 16

couple has a daughter, Harper, 5. “Finding my voice as a writer coincided with having a family and feeling different things for the first time,” Heathcock says. “My preoccupations as a human being changed through loving my wife and kids and being worried about them.”

‘VOLT’ The title comes from a line in the book’s last story: “When we’re born we’re ... innocent. Then a volt comes into your life and changes you for good or bad.” The book compiles Heathcock’s preoccupations over the past 12 years and the vestiges of his Southern Baptist upbringing. “The church had this strict sense of morality that the moment I walked out of the church didn’t count anymore. Everybody recognized that,” he says. “So, I’m interested in what it means to be a good person. Good people do stupid things, and stupid people do good things. It’s so difficult to negotiate what that means.” “Volt” is set in the fictional town of Krafton, where his lovingly drawn, deeply human characters battle the fate set upon them by their own actions. There are floods and fires, homicide, fratricide and other catastrophes that befall the town’s populace. This penchant for mythic story harkens back to his family’s tradition of gathering around a campfire and telling stories. His grandfather told a story that haunted Heathcock for many years. His grandfather worked as a foreman in the Oklahoma oil fields and drove from pump to pump to check on them. One day, his truck came nose to nose with another on a narrow stretch of road with ditches on either side so deep there was no passage. “So my grandfather told the other guy he had to put his car in reverse and back out. The guy refused, so my grandfather got a tire iron and hit that man until he went back from where he came,” Heathcock says. “I thought about that story for a long, long time. If you hit someone with a tire iron you’re that close to altering your life, the lives of your children and grandchildren, how you understand yourself and what the name Heathcock means. I didn’t know why he told me that story.” But that family moral became the nugget for “Smoke,” one of eight stories in “Volt.” In Heathcock’s version, the father, a war veteran, ends up killing the other driver

Heathcock bought this former Idaho State Police trailer and turned it into his office. It brims with books and a few hats from his collection of more than 40.

then recruits his son to help him dispose of the body by burning it. “The book looks at the invasive nature of violence and the tenuous nature of peace. I’ve seen it time and time again to some of the best people I’ve known who have lives I’ve admired. Something will happen and it’s all gone. That’s a great fear of how tenuous life is. Everything is one decision away.” Heathcock plans to put more of his preoccupations in his next book, which will be a novel. “40” is about a plucky young girl on the high school dance team — a la “Buffy” — caught in a coming biblical-level flood. “Her family is falling apart and she has to gather everyone before the storm hits and confront her own personal demons,” he says. For now, all the attention still takes Heathcock off guard, but being in Idaho helps him stay grounded, he says. “I’m starting to understand that people are reading (“Volt”), and we’re beating expectations,” he says. “But I still mostly sit by myself all day, so I’m not always aware of how I’m doing. I travel and do all these readings with some pretty great writers, then I come home and I’m just Al, which is great.”

“I’m interested in what it means to be a good person. ... It’s so difficult to negotiate.” Alan Heathcock

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News from Idaho’s arts ambassadors

more recent books by Idaho authors University of Idaho creative writing professor KIM BARNES has a new book out. “Kingdom of Men” (Knopf, $24.95) is a deft exploration of corporate corruption and intrigue told from the perspective of a young Oklahoma woman caught up in the glamorous world and fast lives led by elite oil workers in Saudi Arabia in the 1960s. Boise native CHRISTOPHER FARNSWORTH’S latest novel, “Red, White and Blood” (G.P. Putnam’s Sons, $25.95), the third installment in his “President’s Vampire” series, is out. The books follow the exploits of Nathaniel Cade, a 19th-century vampire who is bound by a blood oath into the super-secret service of the president of the United States. Farnsworth now lives in Southern California. Boise’s KELLY JONES released her book “The Woman Who Heard Color” (Berkley Trade Original, $15) in October. It’s about a young woman driven to return artworks stolen by Nazis to their rightful owners. But her quest leads her headon into a buried family secret and the truth about her mother’s past.

CURTIS STIGERS’ new album “Let’s Go Out Tonight” marks a few firsts for the Boise jazz singer. It’s the first time in a long time — since his “Brighter Days” album from Sony — that Stigers worked with a producer; multiple Grammy winner Larry Klein produced “Let’s Go Out Tonight.” It’s also the first album in a while without at least one original Stigers song. And it’s his first album in a decade that begs the question: Is this a jazz album? “We didn’t set out to make a certain kind of record; we just wanted to make a good record,“ Stigers says. “Larry and I are both jazz musicians so there’s a lot of that in there. I mean, there’s not a drumstick used on the whole thing — it’s all brushes and acoustic bass. But no, it’s not really a jazz record.” Stigers worked with Klein to choose the songs for the record from a variety of songbooks. You’ll find tunes by Bob Dylan, Neil Finn, Steve Earle, Eddie Floyd and David Poe, the latter a song Poe wrote with Stigers in mind. Once the songs were laid down at the Village Recorder studio in Los Angeles, Klein and Stigers created a sequence that offers an intimate narrative. “When we got all the songs together, we realized we had a story to tell,” he says. “When I listen to it, I can hear it’s very autobiographical. It’s about where I’ve been for the last few years and reflects the tumult in my personal life.” “Let’s Go Out Tonight” (Concord Jazz, $18.99 list price) has been getting great reviews in Europe, where Stigers is an established star, and this month he’s on tour in Germany. Stigers played an album pre-release concert at The Record Exchange in Downtown Boise on Record Store Day, April 21 (photos, page 43), will perform as a guest artist with the Boise Philharmonic for its pop series on Sept. 1 and will headline his own concert sometime this fall. Writer TONY DOERR continues to polish his novel set in World War II. His story “The Deep,” which won him the London Times Story Prize, won him his fourth O’Henry Prize. It’s in the “2012 O’Henry” collection. Doerr will again teach at Boise State in the fall and he will headline at the Cabin’s Reading and Conversations on Feb. 12. Doerr has introduced other writers in the past, but his first time as the featured author. Tickets go on sale to new subscribers June 1.

Film director MICHAEL HOFFMAN will return to Boise this month after completing post production on his remake of “Gambit,” a snappy caper film starring Colin Firth and Cameron Diaz and an A-list group of British and American actors. The film is slated to be released Oct. 12 by CBS Films. There are big doings with Boise’s TREY MCINTYRE PROJECT this issue. The contemporary ballet company left on its monthlong tour of Asia as U.S. cultural ambassadors May 5. TMP was selected by the Brooklyn Academy of Music in New York and the U.S State Department to represent the United States. While in Asia, TMP will give concerts, teach and work with dance companies in Manila, Philippines, Hanoi and Saigon, in Vietnam, Guangzhou and Chengdu in China and Seoul, South Korea. After the tour, McIntyre will select one company to come to the United States for six weeks in the fall on a cultural exchange. Three of those weeks will be in Boise to collaborate with McIntyre on a new ballet. The piece will get its official world premiere at BAM — one of the top dance and theater venues in the world — but not before its preview at its Nov. 10 concert at the Morrison Center. The company — which also is Boise’s official cultural ambassador — will move into new headquarters this summer. Their current building, 775 Fulton St., will become part of the neighboring Foothills School. TMP will take up residence at the former Five Rivers Interiors, 2285 Warm Springs Ave. And Brian Aune, a Harvard-trained lawyer, came from Hawley Troxell to become TMP’s managing director and general counsel. His wife is TMP engagement and education director Kristin Aune. The couple moved here when she took the job. Former TMP managing director Shawn Testin is now the general manager for Spotlight Events, an Eagle-based company that produces national dance competitions. Look for more changes in how the company operates in the coming months, says executive director and dancer John Michael Schert. With the beginning of year five as a company, there is some retooling of its business model to allow McIntyre the freedom to pursue several offers — which, of course, can’t be discussed yet. IDAHO SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL Read about ISF’s season on page 9.

Dana Oland is a former professional dancer and member of Actors Equity who writes about performing and visual arts for the Idaho Statesman. She also writes about food, wine, pets, jazz and other aspects of the good life in Boise. Read more arts coverage in her blog at www.idahostatesman.com/blogs/oland. MAY 2012

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Paradise

Mike and Chris Pierson treasure their outdoor oasis in the North End, and you’re invited on a garden tour June 24.

FOUND STORY BY CHEREEN LANGRILL

PHOTOGRAPHY BY DARIN OSWALD

Mike and Chris Pierson have transformed their yard with conifers, unique plants and water features. Their garden and eight others in the North and East Boise areas will be on display June 24 as part of Garden Tour 2012. DETAILS, PAGE 23.

Patience was a virtue

for Mike Pierson. He lives in a home and property he admired from afar for years. As the proud owner and caretaker, he walks visitors through his garden reciting facts the way a museum docent might introduce a painting to an art patron. And to Pierson, his garden is like a work of art. It is a combination of new and old, past and present, and he plans to help it thrive for years to come. Wandering through the garden, Pierson pauses to admire the beauty of the paperbark maple tree, pointing out the delicate brown bark curling back from the trunk. “It makes a great patio tree,” Pierson says. “This is such a beautiful plant.” In the mid-’90s, Pierson lived in a quiet neighborhood in North Boise just a few doors away from Sunset Nursery. He is a Realtor and property manager by trade, but his passion is gardening. Pierson became one of those customers retailers learn to know by name. He would drop by Sunset Nursery on such a routine basis that the owners let him “baby-sit” the place when they were away. Mike Pierson’s passion is outdoors, but for his wife, Chris Pierson, the magic is inside. Chris (who works at the Idaho Humane Society) loves to cook and also admired the charm of the cottage-style home they eventually had a chance to purchase in 2006. The Piersons lived down the road from the nursery and knew the property was being sold for a new residential development. The nursery would become the site of the new development, and the

continued

A sun dial, Japanese bell and Buddha on a half shell add to the peace and serenity of the Pierson garden. The couple have blended many Zen ideas into the property's landscaping using rock, water and asymmetrical patterns. 18

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A small stream flows over rocks and empties into a koi pond. The water feature separates the front yard from the back with the garden running the length of the property on the west side of the house.

MAY 2012

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The largest area in the Pierson garden is sheltered by a large Norway Maple tree planted when the house was built in 1935. The tree looms over an outdoor patio set on a bed of cedar bark. Mike Pierson said reducing the lawn in this way reduced water consumption and maintenance.

A traditional Japanese tsukubai wash basin is located near the entrance of the Pierson home. Tsukubai are provided at Japanese Buddhist temples for visitors to wash before entering.

A bench shaded by a variety of white pines on the west side of the property is one of many sitting locations in the Pierson garden. 20

The back porch deck offers an elevated outdoor dining area.

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home where the nursery’s owners lived was placed on the market when the owners decided to relocate. Mike was an ideal buyer, because the yard was loaded with trees and plants that needed special care. “They wanted somebody who would know how to take care of the yard,” Mike says. And there was so much to love inside. They remodeled the kitchen to make it an ideal place for Chris to cook and made some other updates throughout the house, which was built in 1935. “The house just had so much charm,” Chris says. The property is 12,000 square feet, but the Piersons gave the yard a makeover to maximize its best features and make it more efficient. In the end, it became a low-maintenance showplace that often attracts admirers seeking advice. “People stop by to look at our yard and to get advice,” Mike says. “We all do that. That’s what is great about the North End.” The main attraction? More than 107 conifers that fill the property, making it lush and colorful, adding depth and variety without much upkeep. Conifers are the bridesmaids of the garden world: never the main attraction and often overlooked. But Mike believes they belong in the spotlight. They don’t need much water or fertilizer, and because they are acidic, they help keep weeds at bay. In the winter, when most trees have bare branches, conifers are a green breath of fresh air in an otherwise colorless yard. Mike doesn’t spend all his summer evenings doing yardwork, because his conifers don’t require much when it comes to regular maintenance. “They’re frugal little deals,” Mike says with admiration. Mike created a conifer garden for Chris in their former garden. “He loves his conifers,” she says. In August 2006, shortly after purchasing their home, Mike purchased a Snow Sprite Deodar for Chris as a birthday gift because it is her favorite type of tree. It can be admired from the patio where they often enjoy summer evenings. “Most women wouldn’t get excited about a tree for their birthday,” Chris laughs. The birthday tree was just one of the additions made to their garden. When the Piersons purchased the home, there was no grass in the front yard. They added a small patch of grass (just 1,000 square feet) for lush texture. A porch, walkway and curbing made the front entry more inviting.

continued MAY 2012

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The Pierson home in Boise's North End was built in 1935. The yard is filled with around 230 plants.

Mike Pierson admits his Victoria Southern Magnolia tree is an oddity in an Idaho climate. This typically Southern tree has found a home in his yard and, because it stays green even in the winter season, the solo magnolia harmonizes well with a chorus of evergreen conifers.

some of Mike Pierson’s favorite gardening tips Mike Pierson makes the most of his garden by following a few basic ideas: KEEP INFORMATION HANDY: Pierson saves all his garden’s plant tags, instructions and receipts in a plastic bag. This keeps information at his fingertips if he needs to remember care instructions or plant information, discover where he purchased a plant or needs to return a product. TRACK YOUR PROGRESS: Take photos of your garden in various stages, different seasons and different holidays. It tracks progress, allows you to enjoy your handiwork (and share it with friends) and helps you remember what worked (and didn’t work) when doing seasonal displays. BE A SCHOLAR: Research the plants you want to use in your garden by reading books, searching the Internet and talking to experts at area nurseries.

A multigreen shaded Snow Sprite Deodora Cedar proudly anchors the rear porch of the home. The yard features 107 varieties of conifers.

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The yard is a tribute to efficiency, thanks to the adjacent canal that provides water at a minimal cost. The Piersons pay $90 annually to use the canal water, and Mike installed a bubbler irrigation system to water nine different zones in the yard. There are four water features in their garden, and they count the canal as one of those features. “And that’s the best one,” Mike says. “It makes the greatest sound at night. In the summer we open our windows at night, and it’s like you’re camping.” Goldfish thrive in another water feature that runs like a stream across the yard. Sitting areas create secluded, peaceful conversation areas throughout the property, including the back patio, beneath a massive Norway Maple tree in the front yard, and in the back of the property, where there is a firepit. Sunset Nursery is gone, but the dedication to gardening remains alive and well, thanks to Mike Pierson’s commitment to his neighborhood. In the front yard, there is a special hardscaping feature that serves as evidence that the Piersons are good caretakers of their beloved property: A plaque embedded in the earth near the front entry was awarded to Mike from the Idaho Horticulture Society, earning first place in the 2010 community landscape and garden contest.

See more photos at Idaho Statesman.com/treasure Freelance writer Chereen Langrill, a graduate of Boise State University, has been a journalist in Idaho for more than 15 years. Chereen enjoys walking in the Foothills with her dogs, Lulu and Murphy, and her husband, Idaho Statesman sports reporter Chris Langrill. She is trying to improve her gardening skills, and one day she hopes to have a garden worthy of admiration.

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2012 garden tour WHEN: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, June 24 (rain or shine) TICKETS/MAP: $20, available at the Idaho Botanical Garden’s administrative office (2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise), online at www.idahobotanicalgarden.org or on the day of the tour at any of the homes on the tour. The brochures with maps and driving directions also are available at local nurseries.

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MORE INFORMATION: 343-8649 or www.idahobotanicalgarden.org. KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: The tour spans neighborhoods off of Hill Road, the Warm Springs Mesa and East Boise, so organizers suggest tour visitors car pool. Strollers are not allowed in the gardens. If you don’t purchase a ticket in advance, you must pay for the tour on the day of the event at any of the featured homes (volunteers will be stationed at each home to handle ticket purchases). Garden stores will have tour maps but won’t sell tickets this year. ABOUT THE TOUR: There are nine homes on the 2012 Garden Tour, and each one promises inspiration and education. The tour includes a mix of professionally designed gardens and gardens created and maintained by the homeowners, says Marj Dougherty, tour organizer and member of the Idaho Botanical Garden board of directors.“So many people have to have (professional help) because they have such busy lives, so why not do both?” Dougherty says.

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The tour, in its 26th year, benefits the Idaho Botanical Garden’s Lunaria Grant Program and the Idaho Botanical Garden itself. Here is a glance at the featured gardens, in addition to other tour details (for addresses, see the tour map):

c95411-01

NEW TO THE TREASURE VALLEY!

MIKE AND CHRIS PIERSON, GARDEN #1 THERESA MADRID, #2: A paradise with a pond and waterfall in addition to plants that serve as food sources and beauty. BILL & PENNY HON, #3: A hillside garden with a spectacular view and colorful poolside flowerbeds. Refreshments will be served at this garden, and there will also be live music and watercolor artists. CRAIG & VANESSA LANG, #4: Get swept away by the diversity in this woodland garden, where there are 20 Japanese maple trees and a 60-foot cedar.

“Mom can’t manage by herself any longer”

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DAVE & KECIA CARLSON, #5: Discover what happens when a landscape contractor and garden designer create their own dream garden.

With House Calls 30 Day Program

JOANNE & MIKE LECHNER, #6: Imagination and creativity rule this garden.

Professional & Convenient In-Home Healthcare

DAVE & JUDY TAYLOR, #8: A garden meant to be enjoyed year-round, with a reflecting pool, fire pit and more. RITA & CARL AYRES, #9: Objects find new purpose here as they are recycled and repurposed to become clever plant containers.

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MARK DUNDON & MARLAYNA ELLEDGE, #7: Mediterranean-themed garden on a hillside with a view of the Boise River and amazing outdoor living space.

Turn Chaos into Stability

MAY 2012

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2012 PLAYS ROMEO AND JULIET

By William Shakespeare June 1 – June 30 Sponsored by Hawley Troxell and Idaho Statesman’s Scene and Treasure Magazines

THE MOUSETRAP

By Agatha Christie June 8 – July 27 Sponsored by D.A. Davidson & Co., and KTVB 7 Idaho’s Newschannel

THE IMAGINARY INVALID Freely adapted from Molière by Oded Gross and Tracy Young. Originally produced by the Oregon Shakespeare Festival July 6 – August 24 Sponsored by Holland & Hart, LLP and Boise Weekly

THE WINTER’S TALE

By William Shakespeare August 3 – August 26 Sponsored by 200 Teachers, UBS Financial Services, Inc., and Boise State Public Radio

NOISES OFF

Immensely popular when we introduced it in 2011, The Student special season-ticket pricing is now here to stay! We also are proud to continue offering all the sweet savings of season tickets without straining your budget. Shakespeare Layaway is our best kept secret—with no service fees or additional charges. Don’t delay! Schedule that “in-town summer escape” at fabulous savings. See enclosed order form for full details.

LAYAWAY AVAILABLE!

SH

AKESPEA

RE

For 36 years, Idaho Shakespeare Festival has been creating memorable evenings under gorgeous Idaho skies. It is a complete and unique adventure, a perfect summer evening, and a true escape without traveling far!

By Michael Frayn August 31 – September 29 Sponsored by Stoel Rives, LLP, and 107.1 KHITS

PAY PLAY LA

YA W AY

PHOTOS (Clockwise) Laura Perrotta*, Lynn Allison*, Richard Klautsch*, An Ideal Husband (2010). Kathryn Cherasaro*, David Anthony Smith* The 39 Steps (2011). Jim Lichtscheidl*, The Taming of the Shrew (2011). Jodi Dominick*, Cabaret. Sara M. Bruner, The Taming of the Shrew (2011). 2011 Apprentice Company. Tom Willmorth, Joe Conley Golden*, The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged) 2011. Stitch Marker, Dudley Swetland*, The Two Gentlemen of Verona (2011). Camp Shakespeare 2011. *Member Actors’ Equity. Photography by DKM Photography unless otherwise noted.

SEASON TICKETS, GIFT CERTIFICATES AND MORE AVAILABLE ONLINE

WWW.IDAHOSHAKESPEARE.ORG OR CALL 336-9221 M–F, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

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2012

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Camp Shakespeare Ages 3 to 11 Shakespeare Intensive Ages 12 to 18 Camp Musical Ages 10 to 18 Camp Improv Ages 10 to 18 Apprentice Company High School Juniors and Seniors

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JUNE—AUGUST

TUESDAY—SATURDAY 6:30 p.m. House Opens 7:30 p.m. Performance *

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JULY

TUESDAY—SATURDAY 6:30 p.m. House Opens 7:30 p.m. Greenshow 8:00 p.m. Performance

SEPTEMBER

WED

5

7:00 FAM 11

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SHOWTIMES

SUNDAY 6:00 p.m. House Opens 7:00 p.m. Performance —Family Nights included*

FAM 4

10

LEGEND

WITH ISF SUMMER CAMPS AND THE APPRENTICE COMPANY!

TUES

1

ALENDAR

THERE’S A PLACE FOR EVERYONE

MON

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RJ Romeo and Juliet M The Mousetrap I The Imaginary Invalid W The Winter’s Tale N Noises Off PRE Preview Performance OPEN Opening Night CLOSE Closing Night FAM Family Night GALA Annual Benefit SHOW Apprentice Sho wcase Wine Tasting Beer Tasting Interpreted Performance

msyy!! i h W

A SUMMER OF

22 7:30

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N 7:30 N 7:30 Please note: Calendar and age only admitted on Fami plays subject to change without notice. Children under 6 years of ly Nights. Wine tastings generousl y sponsored by 3 Horse Ranch Vineyards. Beer tastings generousl y sponsored by Bier: Thirt y Bottle & Bistro.

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A cook’s

kitchen

Thanks to some remodeling, Jeanne Miranda’s new home better suits her and her family BY CHEREEN LANGRILL

Within two weeks of the first viewing, Chad Vincent of Renaissance Remodeling had a kitchen remodeling plan in place for Jeanne Miranda’s new home. BEFORE PHOTOS PROVIDED BY RENAISSSANCE REMODELING

before after

KITCHEN PHOTO BY JOE JASZEWSKI / JJASZEWSKI@IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

J

eanne Miranda’s passion for cooking needed a home, so in 2009 she set a plan in motion to make it happen. Miranda is a professor of psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, but she grew up in Wendell and planned to return home to Idaho when she neared retirement. (Miranda will retire in July 2013, and until her retirement she divides her time between Boise and Los Angeles.) It was a natural landing point for Miranda because Idaho is home to her mother, a sister and other relatives. Miranda and her husband, Ed Klein, began searching for homes in 2009 and found a place with potential on Warm Springs. The location was right — just down the road from cousin Jennifer Russell — and the home had plenty of room to host visiting family members and to entertain. “We saw this house and loved it, but the kitchen wasn’t what I wanted,” Miranda says. Miranda needs space to work in the kitchen. Food doesn’t come from a box or a can in this house. She grows and cans her own tomatoes and makes sauces from scratch. Homemade pizza (more on this later) starts with a dough Miranda makes herself. Her inventory includes rows and rows of spices and cabinets loaded with small kitchen appliances. Her charming new kitchen lacked the storage necessary for a busy cook. Before Miranda pulled the trigger on a home purchase, she turned to a remodeling professional for expert advice. She contacted Chad Vincent at Renaissance Remodeling after receiving a recommendation from her sister, Jo Ann Andrew, who volunteers with the Assistance League of Boise and was impressed with a bathroom remodeling project that Renaissance did for the nonprofit group at no charge. Vincent joined Miranda to take another look at the Warm Springs house to advise her on remodeling possibilities. Consulting a remodeler about a home purchase is a smart move because it gives the buyer a better idea of what can (and can’t) be done, and what it will cost, Vincent says. “It’s something we are happy to do. You can give them an idea of the structure, or the bones, of the home,” Vincent says. “It is a huge advantage for people to see what they’re getting into.”

continued MAY 2012

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Another advantage: fresh eyes. People shopping for a new home don’t have preconceived ideas of how it should look the way they would if they had lived in it for a decade. “Sometimes when you live in a home for a while it is hard to see it in a different way,” Vincent explains. Ultimately, within about two years Vincent and his team completed three large projects for Miranda, in Chad addition to a few other odds Vincent and ends along the way.

DREAMING IN RED The kitchen was the first priority because of Miranda’s interests in cooking. Her biggest challenge? Lack of storage and space that wasn’t used to its full potential. The Renaissance team created an appliance garage for all of Miranda’s clunky appliances in order to keep them out of sight but still within easy reach. A spice cabinet was built into a wall for more storage and convenience: The cabinet is at eye level, so the cook simply needs to open the door and reach in to grab what she wants. “There was nothing there before, so it was just wasted space,” Miranda says. The main attraction in the kitchen is a red Viking range. The professional-grade stove includes a small and large oven, making it efficient for smaller meals or when she cooks for large groups. The distinctive red color became a focal point for the kitchen, so she set off to find a granite that would match and discovered a stone called Iron Red. It was placed on the counters, and a smaller piece was added to top a bistro table in the kitchen and a buffet nearby. “This is now the most functional kitchen,” Miranda says. “They really made it a cook’s kitchen.” The home was built in the mid-1930s and has about 3,400 square feet. Through the years, previous owners had made changes throughout the house and Vincent could see areas where it needed improvements and updates. The floor in the master bedroom slanted about four inches. They replaced the tile with wood and leveled it out to make it safer. Electrical and plumbing updates also were completed, and an underused downstairs area got a makeover. It had been used as a play area/family room by previous owners, but it was dark and had little purpose. The room was remodeled to become a guest bedroom, and windows were added to bring in more light.

OUTDOOR BLISS After the interior updates were made, Renaissance returned to transform the backyard. Once again, the team focused on creating usable space. “There was nothing to draw you out here before,” Miranda says. 28

INDOOR & OUTDOOR KITCHEN PHOTOS BY JOE JASZEWSKI / JJASZEWSKI@IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

A new patio includes an outdoor kitchen with a barbecue and pizza oven, and the area is frequently used for neighborhood parties and family gatherings. “If we can create an outdoor space for you that you can use six or seven months out of the year instead of two or three months, then we have invested well in your home,” Chad Vincent says.

A patio created off the kitchen includes a built-in barbecue and a brick pizza oven. If the Viking range is the star of the indoor kitchen, the pizza oven takes the spotlight outdoors. Miranda had admired similar ovens, common in Europe, and requested one for her patio. It is a highlight for neighborhood parties and family meals, because Miranda makes fresh pizza dough and then invites her guests to select toppings and make their own pies. It cooks a pizza in about 90 seconds, thanks to a dome inside the oven

that radiates heat similar to a convection oven. (The fire is started using a small amount of wood.) Guests on the Remodeled Homes Tour will have a chance to experience the oven firsthand because Miranda and the Renaissance team will invite visitors to make pizzas in her outdoor kitchen. “It’s the kind they use in Italy and throughout Europe, and I’ve just always wanted one,” Miranda says.

continued

0519-Treasure-26-31-Remodel_Treasure 5/7/12 9:56 PM Page 29

Jeanne Miranda knew she had found the right chandelier for her living room when she discovered this piece online. It was from an antique store in Italy, and before that it was in a mansion in Genoa. The chandelier, made from Murano glass and wood, was shipped dismantled to Boise. Brad Girard, from Valley West Electric, helped Miranda assemble the chandelier in addition to doing the wiring work. “It’s just perfect for this room,” Miranda says. CHRIS BUTLER / CBUTLER@IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

after before CHRIS BUTLER / CBUTLER@IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

Jeanne Miranda kept her kitchen’s existing cabinets and sink. Additional cabinets were added to give her more space, but were made to match those already in place. More photos: IdahoStatesman.com/Treasure.

Jeanne Miranda, her mother Naomi Miranda and her cousin Jennifer Russell in front of the new cottage.

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You can also use the ovens to bake bread. It is something Miranda hasn’t tried yet, but she plans to spend time developing that skill once she retires and has more time to herself. An older wood deck located off the master was replaced with a new deck and courtyard. It is now a favorite area for Miranda to enjoy with a cup of coffee in the morning or during conference calls. “Taking her ideas and how we could make them work for her in her yard was really fun,” Vincent says. “She knows what she wants, but she also gave us the freedom to do what we wanted.”

A COTTAGE RETREAT The most recent project was inspired by Miranda’s mother, Naomi Miranda, who was still living in Wendell when Miranda first purchased the home. “She told me she didn’t think she should live alone anymore,” Miranda says. “She is fiercely independent and we wanted to give her her own space.” The Renaissance team launched the new project in July 2011 and finished in October 2011, building a 600 square- foot home behind the main house. It utilizes geothermal heat (so does the main house) and was built without steps or levels that would create safety issues. It allows Miranda’s mother to maintain her independence while being closer to her daughter. And it is a smart investment when it comes to resale value. It could be used for a college student or as a guest suite because it is a self-contained home. “You hardly know it is back there,” Vincent says. Miranda has found the home of her dreams, thanks to some creative support from the team at Renaissance. While Vincent described the original home as something not made “for how we live today,” the final product is a model of style and efficiency. “You know how sometimes people only use a corner of their house? In this house, we live in all of it,” Miranda says.

The new cottage includes a small kitchen, above, and a separate bedroom and bathroom (with a walk-in shower). Below, are the entry and living area of the cottage.

PHOTOS BY JOE JASZEWSKI / JJASZEWSKI@IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

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the remodel team

tours, home shows and more

Three different projects at Jeanne Miranda’s home required a dedicated team: Chad Vincent — Renaissance Remodeling, owner (CR, CKBR), project manager. Contact Renaissance at remodelboise.com or 384-0591. Jim Vincent — Renaissance Remodeling, project manager CoCo Cooley — Renaissance Remodeling, design consultant Dan Barker — Renaissance Remodeling, project manager Eric Williams — Mountain View Concrete Larry Brooks — Brooks Excavating Pat Nolan — Nolan Construction (framing, siding) Brad Allison — Allison Climate Control (HVAC) Brad Girard — Valley West Electric Josh Johnson — Johnson & Sons Plumbing Ken Farmer — G & G Insulation Eric Storkson — Floors to Ceilings Unlimited (Sheetrock) Gary Bell — Bell’s Painting Miles Astle — Rimrock Roofing Steve Smith — ACA Flooring Zikret Susak — ZS Tile Ray Westmoreland — Wood Windows Dave Koby — Boise Gutters Bryan Collett — Wechwerth Cabinets Randy Bauer — Da Vinci Stone (countertops)

Get your walking shoes on, because the valley is home to many events designed to inspire you:

NARI of Idaho Remodeled Homes Tour WHEN: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. June 2 and 3 TICKETS: $5 and available online at http:// nariofidaho.org, or at the door of each home. Tickets also can be purchased at the NARI office: 5420 West Franklin, Ste. C, in Boise. ABOUT: The eighth annual tour includes a mix of bathroom and kitchen remodels and larger projects, according to NARI spokeswoman Jaclyn Brandt. There are eight homes on the tour, and the homes will be located throughout Boise. All the remodel projects were done by businesses that are NARI (National Association of the Remodeling Industry) members and were completed in the past year. “While the homes are not for sale, unlike the Parade of Homes, the point of the tour is to get good ideas on how you can remodel your own home,” Brandt says. “Especially in this economy remodeling is a great way to have that feeling of updating without selling your home.” One of the homes featured on the tour belongs to Jeanne Miranda, who is featured in the accompanying story. Miranda will host a pizza-making party during the home tour. Renaissance built a pizza oven on her patio, and visitors can see the oven in action.

Boise Parade of Homes WHEN: noon to 8 p.m. May 19 and 20 ABOUT: The Parade of Homes is presented by the Building Contractors Association of Southwestern Idaho. There are 40 new homes on the tour. Free. See a list of featured homes and more information at boiseparadeofhomes.com.

Home Makeover Show WHEN: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. May 19, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 20 at Boise Centre ABOUT: Displays from Treasure Valley professionals to help you fix up your home inside and out. $1 adults. www.idahobusinessleague.com.

Nampa Parade of Homes WHEN: June 9 through 23 ABOUT: Presented by the Snake River Valley Building Contractors Association. Learn more at www.srvbca.com/parade-of-homes.

Idaho Green Expo WHEN: 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. June 23, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. June 24 ABOUT: It’s at Expo Idaho this year, and the cost is $5 with kids younger than 12 admitted for free. Discover green businesses, take a workshop on sustainable living, more. Kids can learn more about their world at the Eco-Kids Room. Learn more at www.idahogreenexpo.org.

See many more photos of this home remodel at IdahoStatesman.com/treasure

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Take a trip with me to

Kooskia BY CARROLL ANN KIMSEY

PROVIDED BY CARROLL ANN KIMSEY

Carroll Ann Kimsey, right, with her best friend from Kooskia, Tilly Elliott.

I

live in Boise but my heart belongs to Idaho County, specifically the Kooskia (pronounced koos’key) area. I raised my kids in the hills above town — first in a white clapboard with incredible sunset views, then in a log cabin on Crane Hill. Our 65 acres there were bordered on three sides by Forest Service land. I hope to someday retire to a quiet cabin in those Clearwater Forest hills. There, the birds are always singing and responsibilities fall from my shoulders like autumn leaves from the elm tree in my yard. So if you’re yearning for a low-key adventure where cellphones won’t always work, the air is soft and the folks are friendly, come with me to Kooskia, Idaho. Population 600 to 700 people depending on the day, season, economy…

START THE TRIP BY GOING NORTH As you drive Idaho 55 by Banks and Smiths Ferry, toss a penny off Rainbow Bridge and make a wish. Much of the joy of this journey is the journey itself. Glorious. Donnelly fascinates me, especially since the fall of Tamarack Resort. I’ve always said I’d just stop and visit the small towns and campgrounds and “Sportsman Access” spots along this drive. I never do. I want to get to the Clearwater. Once through McCall, the valley north of New Meadows smells and feels incredibly fresh near U.S. 95. A good spot to stop and swim is Zims Hot Springs. The springs are fed from a hot artesian well, and the water is then cooled by water from the Little Salmon River. There is a snack bar and restrooms, a picnic area and campground/RV park. The outside pool is extremely hot and the inside one is cooler. Stop and play if you have the time. Call (208) 347-2686 for more information. On to the Little Salmon River. At the Rapid River turnoff, in season, there are lots of sportsmen, pickups, and Nez Perce and possibly other Native Americans selling salmon out of ice chests. Riggins bills itself as the whitewater capital of the world. During the year there are 32

U.S. 12, Lewis & Clark Trail Salmon River and U.S. 95

Zims Hot Springs TOP AND LEFT PHOTOS PROVIDED BY IDAHO TOURISM, RIGHT PHOTO BY CARROLL ANN KIMSEY

many fun events happening in Riggins, including jet boat races, a sacred salmon ceremony and “Hot Summer Nights.” You can find details on events, motels and restaurants at www.rigginsidaho.com. Next, if you’re not in a hurry to get to Kooskia, as I always am, take the righthand turn to White Bird. The town’s website (www.visitwhitebird.com) says, “White Bird Idaho is big on Western hospitality and is a premier family destination, providing jaw-dropping scenery, excellent fishing

and hunting, camping, wildlife galore, pristine nature, white-water rafting trips and jet-boat action, swimming, 4-wheeling, hiking, bird-watching, along with a splash of history and culture. ... The best of two rivers — the Salmon and the Snake — are in our backyard, so come play with us.” This really describes much of Idaho County. Grangeville and Cottonwood are on the prairie, so are not on a river, and “my” end of the county is in the Clearwater River canyon, but it’s all a glorious place to

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Kooskia Tolo Lake Mammoth Exhibit

PHOTOS PROVIDED BY IDAHO TOURISM

good restaurants if you want to explore a bit (www.grangevilleidaho.com). Once you do turn onto Main Street, it becomes U.S. 13 at the edge of town — the Idaho Northwest Passage Scenic Byway, Nez Perce Trail. At the bottom of the Grangeville grade, a challenge of twisting turns and incredible vistas, U.S. 14 comes from Elk City and joins with U.S. 13. Turn left at the bottom of the hill on U.S. 13 toward Harpster and you will be driving along the Clearwater River at last. This is the South Fork, small and friendly.

ONWARD TO KOOSKIA

live — or visit for a nice change of pace. And if, like me, you decide to save White Bird for another day, head up the White Bird Grade — a modern marvel if you look over to your right and see the twists and turns of the old road. Over the top of the grade, you’ll see the “other” Camas Prairie below. Tolo Lake is out there. In 1994, Idaho Fish and Game was excavating the lake to create better wildlife habitat and discovered mammoth remains. According to the Mammoth Replica Committee, remains of more than 200 Colombian mammoths, which became extinct 10,000 to 15,000 years ago, were discovered. There is a large exhibit on U.S. 95 heading north if you don’t turn onto Grangeville’s Main Street.There are a couple of nice motels in Grangeville and lots of

Through the small town of Harpster and past the Sally Ann Road is the Southfork River Ranch Guest Ranch (www.southforkriverranch.com, (208) 926-4514 or cell (208) 507-1514). This used to be a private ranch. It is an absolutely to-die-for setting and could be a nice spot to stay if it fits your trip — and your pocketbook. Past the Southfork Ranch and more twists and turns and you’re in and out of Stites. Drive along the highway past the high school that all three of my children attended and in to Kooskia (www.kooskia. com). There are a few restaurants — such as the China Cafe, which has Chinesespeaking cooks and real Oriental cuisine, the Kooskia Cafe and Rivers Cafe. There is a little coffee place on the west side of Main Street toward the end of town — Coffee and Cream is the name of it. It’s a good spot for coffee and a snack. There is a motel in Kooskia, the Kooskia Western Inn right on Main Street across from the bank. Once through Kooskia, turn right on U.S. 12. Lowell, home of Three Rivers Resort, is about 21 miles east. Stop to see if the osprey nest is still atop the utility pole on the east bridge out of Kooskia, by Scott’s Grove. Osprey have been nesting

there for years. Up the highway and you are traveling another Idaho Northwest Passage Scenic Byway — this one is the Lewis & Clark trail. There’s a new place in Syringa — a little community about 14 miles east of Kooskia. The River Dance Lodge-Ranch Resort (www.riverdancelodge.com) is in partnership with ROW Adventures, which offers trips all over the world. But they also offer fun trips out of Syringa. And the cafe has the best huckleberry pie I’ve ever tasted. This is a good spot to put a raft in the river and spend the afternoon floating to Kooskia. It’s an easy float, one for beginners, for sure, and only takes a couple of hours. Seven miles up U.S. 12 from Syringa is Three Rivers Resort (www.threerivers resort.com). I love this spot of the world. When you walk into the “office” of Three Rivers, it’s like going into an old country store. Mike and Marie Smith have owned the resort since 1976, and a wonderful calm pervades their place. Three Rivers is busy in the summer, but Marie always makes time to talk. Marie has many tales about the people who come to stay at Three Rivers. Forest Service personnel have commandeered many of the cabins and motel rooms when forest fires threatened the region. Bill Clinton, then governor of Arkansas, Hillary and Chelsea stayed in cabin No. 4 for two days. One night Marie will rent a motel room to a bear hunter who has just come out of the woods, filthy and smelling of bear bait. The next morning the crew will clean that room, and that night a prim and proper blue-haired lady in a beige pantsuit will rest her head on that same pillow, never knowing how close she’s been to a bear! The Lochsa and Selway rivers are world-

continued MAY 2012

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Rafting the Lochsa River

Three Rivers Resort LEFT PHOTO BY CARROLL ANN KIMSEY, ABOVE RIGHT PHOTO BY SHAWN RAECKE, RAFTING PHOTO PROVIDED BY IDAHO TOURISM

famous Class IV rivers, to which whitewater enthusiasts from all over come to raft and kayak. Families also come by the dozens. Three Rivers is a great place to have a family reunion. Sitting across the river from the highway, on the banks of the Lochsa, there are accommodations for everyone. The cabins are closest to the river. They have little kitchens, bathrooms, barbecues and fire rings. They are truly rustic but clean and comfortable. There are Aframe cabins without kitchens but with indoor plumbing and a strip of motel rooms. My favorite is the “Old #1” cabin, which sits on a hill high above the resort. It includes a hot tub on the front deck with a river view. Then there are campsites for large and small RVs and tents. Three Rivers guests can enjoy hot showers, a swimming pool and three hot tubs. The restaurant is open from about May until sometime in the fall, usually after the majority of the hunters are gone. The restaurant serves dinner only — well, not only. The dinner menu includes rainbow trout, pork ribs with famous Three Rivers sauce, counSelway & Lochsa Rivers

34

try-style pork chops, steaks, appetizers, burgers, sandwiches, a salad bar and more. There are homemade pies and huckleberry sundaes. Lochsa Louie’s bar serves cocktails, wine and really cold beer.

DO NOTHING OR DO LOTS ... There is a lot to do in the area: Drive up the Selway road and go on a pack trip, drive to the parking lot at the falls and walk into the wilderness area or stop at one of the beaches along the Selway. If you’re a hunter, there are elk, deer, moose, bear and cougar. Fishermen can try their luck for cutthroat and rainbow trout. I just go to restore peace in my soul. If you’re a photographer or a nature lover, you can see otters, bald eagles, osprey, geese, mountain goats and beautiful wildflowers, including the famous spring dogwood. And there’s the famous whitewater rafting. Three Rivers Rafting (www.threerivers rafting.com), for instance, offers trips on the Selway, Salmon and Lochsa rivers. Early in the season — May and June — the Lochsa is an exciting, nonstop adrena-

line rush with experienced guides. Later in the summer it becomes a placid vagabond, perfect for the more timid. For those folks, the “watermelon” float trips on the lower Lochsa, lower Selway or Middle Fork of the Clearwater flow at a relaxed pace. You can fish for trout, paddle an inflatable or sit-ontop kayak, or relax on a raft while professional guides do the work. Mike and Marie have a gift shop and sell groceries, Fish and Game licenses and sporting goods. Across the river and up the highway a hop, skip and a jump is the Cougar Canyon Station — the last chance for gas for a long time. It also has a gift shop, sporting goods and more. The station sits right next to Ryan’s Wilderness Inn and Cafe. The Wilderness Inn is open yearround and serves all meals every day. There’s a motel and restaurant there, with

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plan your trip The direct drive to the Kooskia area takes about five hours (that doesn’t include some of the stops that I’ve suggested here). There are many other places to dine, stay and recreate in the north-central Idaho area. Here are some other websites to help you start researching your own trip: • www.visitnorthcentralidaho.org • www.visitidaho.org • www.fs.fed.us/r1/clearwater/VisitorInfo

/visinfo.htm

good food and homemade pies (www.wildinn2.com). Another lodging option, which is much more low-key, is Reflections Inn — a small country inn about 11 miles east of Kooskia on U.S. 12. With a ranch-like setting on 10 wooded acres, above the highway overlooking the river, it is perfect for a getaway or small group retreat. Reflections Inn does not cater to children younger than 12 or pets. This is a great place for someone who doesn’t quite want the rustic feeling of Three Rivers and does want a bit more pampering. All the rooms have a view of the river and surrounding mountains (http://reflectionsinn.com). A neat little day trip upriver is to the Powell Historical Ranger Station, which had been completely refurbished. It’s about 20 miles up U.S. 12 from Lowell, near Lolo Pass. Directly across U.S. 12 from the ranger station is the Lochsa Lodge, which is open year-round and offers accommodations from very rustic to very nice. Take a lunch to the ranger station and explore the area or make plans to stay at the lodge. The lodge has a great website which will entice you to stay on the Montana/Idaho border (www.lochsalodge.com; 208-942-3405). The sun sets early here in the canyon where the Lochsa and Selway rivers join to become the Middle Fork of the Clearwater (hence the name Three Rivers), on the edge of the Selway Bitterroot Wilderness. For years I took this part of the world for granted. Now, leaving Three Rivers is always sad. I drive slowly down the pot-holed dirt drive onto the bridge and over to U.S. 12. If it’s a Sunday, there is no time to linger. Traffic going into Boise will be bad, and you’ll lose the hour you gained crossing Time Zone Bridge out of Riggins. Time to get on the road. Carroll Kimsey has worked in the Statesman’s newsroom for more than 15 years. Before moving to Boise, she lived in Idaho County for 18 years, and she and family have worked at, frequented and/ or enjoyed many of the establishments in her story.

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Goodwood Barbecue Company: 7849 West Spectrum Street, Boise, 658-7173 and 1140 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 884-1021. Information: goodwoodbbq.com. The three-meat platter offers brisket, pulled pork and baby-back ribs with steak-cut fries, beans and sweet potatoes.

MickeyRay's 395 W. State Street, Eagle, 939-7427; 2325 Apple Street, Boise, 344-7427. Information at www.mickeyraysbbq.com. Above, a succulent set of pork ribs glazed with MickeyRay’s secret sauce. 36

0519-Treasure-36-39-Savor_Treasure 5/8/12 11:03 PM Page 37

’s t a h t e u c e b r a b l Loca

fingerlicking

good Steve Cooper and Mike Mantooth opened Goodwood Barbecue Company in Boise 13 years ago with the Spectrum location. There’s a second location on Eagle Road as well as three more restaurants around Salt Lake City using managers who trained here under Cooper and Mantooth.

Down-home cookin’ is the name of the game at MickeyRay’s and Goodwood Barbecue Company

A

Mickey Shields started cooking barbecue at competitions and found himself on the podium more often than not, so he decided to pursue his dream of opening a restaurant. MickeyRay’s has two locations in the Valley and, since the interview for this story, Shields has revealed he’s working to open a third location in the former Macaroni Grill building on Milwaukee Street in Boise.

STORY BY RICK OVERTON PHOTOGRAPHY BY DARIN OSWALD

fter 10 seconds on the phone, it’s not hard to get a grasp of Mickey Shields’ personality and priorities. With a complete stranger at the other end — a reporter, no less — the first words out of Mickey’s mouth are a lamentation for the firing of the football coach at the University of Arkansas. His words drip out like molasses, leaving no doubt that he’s talking about home. The razorback is a wild boar native to the part of the South where Shields grew up. Renowned as a fierce fighter, it’s the mascot of his alma mater. It’s also the mascot of his restaurants, MickeyRay’s BBQ, though you won’t find the rugged, muscled animal on the menu. What you will find is a wide selection of barbecue dishes and sides based on the foods that have inspired Shields since childhood, including a lot of uses for animals that used to be pigs. Now in two locations, Shields’ success and menu are reminiscent of another local barbecue success story — Goodwood Barbecue Company, also in two locations in the Treasure Valley. Looking in from the outside, you can be forgiven for thinking that either of them is part of a national franchise. Goodwood is also located in the parking lot for the Spectrum Theater complex, an island in a sea of food franchises. “We’ve struggled with that,” says Goodwood’s manager and minority owner Kevin Hughes. “We’ve threatened to throw mud on the side of the building sometimes.” Make no mistake — the Valley’s two best barbecue joints are local. Beyond that, the similarities run out faster than a platter of baby back ribs.

Y’ALL COME BACK NOW The owners of both restaurants have a solid understanding of the importance of hospitality and service, though they acquired it in slightly different ways.

continued MAY 2012

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Black-Eyed Peas FROM THE KITCHEN OF MICKEYRAY’S Serves 8-10 people 1 pound black-eyed peas (dried) 1 small ham hock 1 medium yellow onion, roughly chopped Salt and pepper to taste

Rehydrate peas overnight. Put peas in a large pot, bring to a boil and add the ham hock and onion. Reduce heat to a slow, rolling boil and add salt and pepper. Add water if level becomes too low. Peas are finished when tender.

Kay’s Texas Sheet Cake FROM THE KITCHEN OF GOODWOOD BARBECUE CO. Serves 12 people

For the cake: 2 cups white sugar 2 cups all-purpose flour ¼ cup unsweetened cocoa 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon baking powder ¼ teaspoon cinnamon

1 cup water 8 ounces butter 1/3 cup eggs (approx. 1 extra large egg) 1 teaspoon vanilla ½ cup buttermilk

Preheat oven to 375 degrees, cover a high-sided baking sheet with a non-stick liner, such as parchment. Mix first six ingredients thoroughly in a bowl using a wire whisk. Heat the water and butter in a saucepan until boiling, then add to dry mixture. Beat the egg, vanilla and buttermilk with a hand mixer on medium for 3-4 minutes, then add to the other ingredients. Pour the batter into the baking sheet and bake for 15-19 minutes. The cake is done when an inserted toothpick comes out clean. Let cool before frosting. For the frosting: 1 cup chocolate chips 8 ounces butter 2 teaspoons vanilla 2 cups white sugar ¼ teaspoon cinnamon 2/3 cup evaporated milk Place butter, sugar and evaporated milk in a saucepan and bring to boil, stirring constantly for 2-3 minutes, careful not to scorch the milk. Combine remaining ingredients with a wire whisk until creamy. Pour over the cake immediately, tipping the pan to spread and touching up with a spatula where necessary. Serve right away. 38

Goodwood Barbecue co-owners Mike Mantooth and Steve Cooper have made a career out of making restaurants operate profitably. Both were raised in Texas. Mantooth went to the now-defunct Steak and Ale chain right out of college, meeting Cooper while both were managing for Chili’s — they even briefly went into business for themselves. They learned the fundamentals of the food-service business — training, budgeting, marketing and advertising — skills that are in most cases more important to surviving than knowing how to cook. Cooper and Mantooth might as well have been attending restaurant grad school. “We were both pretty fortunate to work for some pretty smart people along the way,” Mantooth says. “By the time we decided to do this we felt like we knew enough about it top to bottom to give it a go.” Shields started out by entering barbecue competitions out of an enthusiasm for the food, then noticed that he was pretty good at it. “I cooked in a lot of competitions and got to where, on a consistent basis, I was standing on the podium,” he says. “I always thought, you know, one of these days when I can I’m going to do something with this.” Whatever the differences in pedigree, both have arrived at the realization that the quality of service and hospitality can make or break a barbecue restaurant. Goodwood has prospective employees pass quizzes about the food and trains managers to think of the dining room as theirs — like they were throwing a big dinner party. Hughes calls their attitude about service “old-fashioned.” Shields’ words drip out a little more slowly but get to the same place. “I have what I call the 10-foot rule,” he says. “When someone gets within 10 feet of that front door, somebody better be moving around that counter to get to them.” For him, it’s an unavoidable part of barbecue itself. “For the most part you are going to get barbecue from people who have had some influences from the South,”

Shields says. “Even people who are born and raised out this way are proud of the fact they can cook good barbecue. From that comes a sense of sharing, a sense of hospitality, a sense of openness that you don’t get from something a little more hoity-toity.” On Saturdays MickeyRay’s offers an additional form of hospitality. The large group dining room doubles as a TV lounge for college football games. Shields is happy to host fans of his native Arkansas but also makes room for fans of Boise State, Texas A&M and Army. Not long after grousing about the exit of disgraced Arkansas football coach Bobby Petrino, the university hired legendary former University of Idaho coach John L. Smith, so Shields may also be making space soon for Vandals.

WHERE THERE’S SMOKE, THERE’S FOOD Good barbecue is not easy to do at home, and a glance inside the fragrant kitchens of these restaurants quickly reveals why. Each features not one but two large wood-fired smokers that pretty much never get turned off. Some cuts of meat will rotate around in those ovens for upwards of 18 hours, and everyone has to sleep sometime. In Texas — where Mantooth and Cooper have roots —barbecue is beef with a tomato-cumin barbecue sauce, and there’s a widespread availability of fragrant mesquite. Shipping in mesquite would be unwieldy, so the restaurant has standardized around Idaho applewood. And Goodwood aspires to a more inclusive set of barbecue traditions beyond Texas. “I think we have the Kansas City-style barbecue sauce, but we also have baby-back ribs that are familiar in the Midwest,” Mantooth explains. “From Texas we’ve got the beef ribs and the brisket. When I lived in Texas, if you went to any of those places in the ’70s and ’80s and ordered ribs, you got beef ribs. They didn’t serve much pork down there.” Shields hails from western Arkansas and claims to have cut his palate on equal helpMike Mantooth, co-owner of Goodwood Barbecue Company, inspects racks of ribs being smoked for hours at the Boise location.

0519-Treasure-36-39-Savor_Treasure 5/7/12 10:02 PM Page 39

ings from Memphis and Texas. He’d like to be using a mixture of hickory and oak but has settled on a reliable supply of maple. One of the housemade sauces at MickeyRay’s tips the toque to the east with a strong mustard-vinegar flavor, but he’s looking toward the Lone Star State for inspiration as well. “What you have here is mostly a Memphis-style barbecue,” Shields explains, “with dry rub and sauce on the side. I’ve worked hard to be able to beat those Texans at cooking brisket, and I’m just telling you that I can. I’m from Arkansas, which is right between Memphis and Texas, so for the most part what you are getting is a Memphis-style barbecue with a little Texas flair.” For those who are uninitiated, Kansas City-style barbecue sauce resembles what the majority of Americans expect to find on supermarket shelves — thick and tomato-based with a kick from chilis and slight tanginess from touches of spice and vinegar. The Rib Shack, a former destination for great barbecue in downtown Eagle, modeled itself mostly around the Kansas City traditions, introducing many Treasure Valley residents to burnt ends, the charred portions at the end of a well-smoked brisket that are otherwise cut off and discarded before slicing into the buttery beef. Arguments over barbecue are inherently unsolvable (and that’s part of the fun), but

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Mickey Shields of MickeyRay’s shows the firebox where chunks of applewood are burned to slowly smoke the meat.

don’t expect a heated rivalry to break out anytime soon between MickeyRay’s and Goodwood. The Boise market is underserved generally, so there are plenty of customers to go around, and none of the four restaurant locations are near each other. Shields is in the process of converting the adjacent space in Eagle into a bar and opening a third location in the Valley. When pressed by the reporter just a little on where

it might be located, Shields does a feint that is most appropriate to his barbecue roots. Stopping at a new tap, he asks, “Do you want to taste this beer?” Moments later, reporter and owner are perfectly satisfied looking over a plate of ribs with a small glass of the Firestone Double Barrel Ale. What third location? Pass the mustard sauce.

Boisean Rick Overton studied the social sciences at Boise State University and obtained a master’s in journalism from Northwestern University. As a freelance writer, he has contributed to magazines such as Wired and Outside, but he is known among his friends mostly as being an able hand in the kitchen.

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Pintler’s return bodes well for Ste. Chapelle Dear readers: This story is now out of date. Just after Treasure Magazine went to press, Idaho winery Ste. Chapelle was sold to Precept Wine, a company based in Seattle. While Maurine Johnson still is head winemaker at Ste. Chapelle, former general manager Brad Pintler and his position were not included in the sale to Precept.

T

hree years ago, Brad Pintler’s biggest competitor in the Idaho wine industry was Ste. Chapelle. Now he’s in charge of the Caldwell winery, serving as general manager of Idaho’s largest winemaker. “I just turned 50, but I started in this business in 1982 when I was 21,” Pintler said. “I was going to Boise State and had this dream of growing grapes.” Those plantings on his family farm in Nampa evolved into more than 30 grape varieties and 450 acres of vines — the largest vineyards in the state. Pintler built the brand for what is now Sawtooth Winery and served as its award-winning winemaker, producing as many as 24,000 cases in some vintages. “I think I have contributed some to the Idaho wine industry along the way,” he said. “I’ve been president of Idaho Wine Commission over a lot of that time, and I’ve been on the board about three quarters of the time. I’ve put my heart and soul into the Idaho wine industry, and we did plant

Maurine Johnson is now the head winemaker at Ste. Chapelle. 40

NEWS FROM

By Andy Perdue and Eric Degerman

that big vineyard — and it’s a really nice vineyard. So now the next step is the largest winery in the state and the most successful winery in the state.” He now answers to Ascentia Wine Estates in Healdsburg, Calif., which also owns Washington state brands Columbia Winery, Covey Run and 1805. “I think it’s going to be great for the industry,” said Moya Shatz Dolsby, executive director of the Idaho Grape Growers and Wine Commission. “Brad’s wonderful, and this not only will help unite everyone, but he was one of the key faces in the Idaho wine industry.” Pintler’s arrival at Ste. Chapelle is viewed as historic, ironic and a natural fit. “A lot of the grapes that come to Ste. Chapelle are from Sawtooth, and Ste. Chapelle makes 120,000 to 140,000 cases, depending upon the year,” Pintler said. And while there have been significant changes at Ste. Chapelle in the past year, the consumer should not consider any of the moves as a step back. “Ste. Chapelle ... does a terrific job making wines that are more of an easy-drinking style,” Pintler said. “We have to be mindful of what the market expectations are and conscious of the price. The Riesling and the Soft Red and the Soft White are good-quality wines. They just have a little sweetness left in them. Those are big sellers for Ste. Chapelle, and a lot of people like those sweeter style of wines.” Longtime assistant winemaker Maurine Johnson was promoted to the head winemaking role, and the transition appears seamless. This spring, Wine Press Northwest staged a historic Riesling competition — the largest-ever sampling of the German white grape grown in the Pacific Northwest — and Ste. Chapelle earned four gold medals in the blind judging of 130 wines. Two of those gold medals were produced from the 2011 vintage, Johnson’s first as the lead winemaker.

PHOTOS BY KATHERINE JONES / KJONES@IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

Brad Pintler is the new general manager at Ste. Chapelle.

“Maurine’s a really good winemaker and stepped right into that position,” Pintler said. “She’s got tons of experience.” Crushing grapes and crunching numbers are two areas Pintler is comfortable with. He graduated from Boise State with a degree in business with an emphasis on accounting, which he put into play when he sold the family vineyards and the Pintler Cellar label to Corus Brands and the Baty family in 1999. Corus rebranded the winery as Sawtooth, and Pintler oversaw the expansion of Sawtooth Vineyard and the development of Skyline Vineyard. In January 2009, the Baty family, which controls Seattle-based Precept Wine, and Pintler parted ways. “I was ready to take a break, and they wanted to do some label changes,” Pintler said. “I was the one who started that winery, and I was the face of the winery.” So he returned to farming, but in the

0519-Treasure-40-41-Savor-Wine_Treasure 5/7/12 10:04 PM Page 41

Visit Ste. Chapelle The winery is at 19348 Lowell Road, in the Sunnyslope area near Caldwell and is known for its beautiful grounds with a striking view of the Snake River. The wine shop is open daily (except for certain holidays). Wine tasting is $5. Tours are also available by appointment for a small fee. The winery also hosts a popular outdoor concert series and many other events. For more information, visit SteChapelle.com. To learn more about Idaho wines visit, www.idahowines.org.

Savor Idaho

meantime, he and three partners launched American Revolution Vodka, a product of Idaho. “And I’ve done a bit of real estate with some other friends of mine, but I was excited to get back into the Idaho wine industry so I sent a resume,” Pintler said. It feels right and bodes well for the Snake River Valley to have Pintler involved as he’s watched Idaho grow from three wineries to nearly 50 in three decades. “Back then, there was only Weston, Rose Creek and Lou Facelli. I remember our first production was in 1987, and we did that at Indian Creek, so I got to know Bill Stowe. In 1988, we built the winery where (Sawtooth) still is now.” And the Johnny Appleseed of the Idaho wine industry seems to be enjoying his return to the game. “It was fun to be back at the Wine Commission meeting ...,” Pintler said. “I had been gone for three years, but I’ve put a lot of my heart and soul into the Idaho industry, so I’m excited about moving into this position.”

Andy Perdue and Eric Degerman are the editors of Wine Press Northwest, a quarterly consumer wine magazine that focuses on the wines of Idaho, Washington, Oregon and British Columbia. Learn more at www.winepressnw.com. Subscriptions to the quarterly magazine are $20 a year.

596221-01

Tickets are on sale for Savor Idaho, the annual Idaho Grape Growers and Wine Producers Commission shindig at the Idaho Botanical Garden. The day features the full spectrum of Idaho-made wines and a bevy of restaurant fare, tasting classes and presentations by local wineries. More than 25 wineries will be on hand. The event runs from 2 to 6 p.m. June 10 at the Idaho Botanical Garden in East Boise. But hurry: The event sold out last year. Tickets are $45 for those 21 and older at Idahotickets. com or find more ticket information and other details online at www.SavorIdaho.org.

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0519-Treasure-42-43-S&Hphotos_Treasure 5/7/12 10:13 PM Page 42

BY ALEX COUEY Special to the Idaho Statesman

1 3 4

2 2012 Culinary World Tour About 350 supporters helped raise more than $80,000 in March for the Children’s Home Society of Idaho’s Community Sponsorship Program for early intervention and treatment. 1. The evening’s festivities included silent and live auctions and Polynesianthemed cuisine, entertainment and more. (Plan ahead: 2013 will feature a Mexican theme!)

5

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2. Jack Lemley, left, Billy Ray Strite & Robert Allis 3. Dee & Brian Mooney 4. Patsy Fedrizzi, Joanne Taylor & Teresa Alexander

7

5. Art Berry & Allen Dykman 6. Christa Patton, Ann Cordum & Robin Hanford 7. Keanta & Bethany Lathrop

IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM/SPOTTED

More photos at IdahoStatesman.com/ spotted

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See photos from more local events online — including the Treefort Decompression Party, Ballet Idaho’s Cinco de Mayo and local proms.

ALEX COUEY/SPECIAL TO THE IDAHO STATESMAN

0519-Treasure-42-43-S&Hphotos_Treasure 5/7/12 10:14 PM Page 43

BY ERICA SPARLIN DRYDEN Bandwagon Photography/Special to the Idaho Statesman

Curtis Stigers in concert More than 250 people celebrated the pre-release of Curtis Stigers’ new album, “Let’s Go Out Tonight,” as part of Record Store Day on April 21 at The Record Exchange in Downtown Boise.

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MAY 2012

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Upcoming events in support of nonprofit groups COMPILED BY DUSTY PARNELL WEEKENDS THROUGH JUNE 17 Visit the St. Jude’s Dream Home 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturdays, noon to 5 p.m. Sundays, 466 E. Eaglewood Lane, Lakemoor (Eagle Road between Chinden Boulevard and State Street, Eagle); 2,389-square-foot home worth $350,000 with three bedrooms and more; built by Flynner Building Company. $100 for a “Dream Home” ticket available at Lowe’s, Zamzow’s or online at www.stjude.org; 1-800-537-8939. SATURDAY, MAY 19 Preservation Idaho 35th Annual Orchids and Onions Awards 11 a.m.-2 p.m., Masonic Temple, Boise, $20/members, $25/non-members, lunch and tour of the historic building. Walkups welcome if event is not sold out. 4245111; www.preservationidaho.org. Russian Food Festival 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., St. Seraphim of Sarov Orthodox Church, 872 N. 29th St., Boise. http://stseraphimboise.org/ festival.html There are several other fundraising events scheduled for today (May 19), including several golf tournaments, FUNDSY and the American Heart Association Treasure Valley Heart Walk, but they are either sold out or the registration deadline has passed. SUNDAY, MAY 20 The 17th annual Diabetes Ride 10 a.m., Eagle Foothills, $35/adults, $15/kids, registration includes raffle ticket, BBQ dinner and T-shirt; it's also a pledge drive — those who collect $175 or more ride free; benefits youth programs, 371-2020; www.hodia.org/diabetesride MONDAY-TUESDAY, MAY 21-22 Saint Alphonsus Auxiliary Book Sale 7 a.m.-4 p.m., McCleary Auditorium, Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center THURSDAY, MAY 24 Idaho Community Foundation 23rd Annual Luncheon 11:45 a.m., Boise Centre. Call about ticket availability. $50, $60/patron, $480/table of 10, $580/patron table of 10; RSVP required; keynote speaker is Sharon Allen, first woman chairman of Deloitte & Touche USA LLP, attendees will vote to award grant to one of four nonprofit presenters; grant made possible by US Bank and Kissler Family Fund/Norco. 342-3535; www.idcomfdn.org SATURDAY, MAY 26 Redfish Lake Lodge 2nd Annual Memorial Run “Running To Remember” 10 a.m., Redfish Lake Lodge; half marathon ($60), 10K ($45) and 5K ($35) races; raffle tickets; benefits Sawtooth Interpretive Historical Association. 208-644-9096; www.imathlete.com MONDAY, MAY 28 Wish Granters Wishes & Wine 1:30-6 p.m. Indian Creek Winery, Kuna, $10/person, $25/carload, wine-tasting from five wineries, food trucks, live music by the Chicken Dinner Road Band and Robin Scott. 377-9029; www.wishgranters.org THROUGH THE END OF MAY Boise Rescue 44

Mission May Match Month Business partners will match donations dollar for dollar throughout month (up to $35,000). Go to website to donate or text MISSION to 20222 for a $10 donation. 343-2389; www.boiserm.org FRIDAY-SATURDAY, JUNE 1-2 Western States CAT/Idaho Ronald McDonald House 9th Annual Sporting Clays Tournament Black Dog Clays, 7680 Vallejo Road; 100-Bird Main Event, side games, silent auction, prizes and meals. $125, $100/Saturday re-entry; also Friday reception for entrants at 5:30 p.m. at World Center for Birds of Prey Interpretive Center (additional tickets are $15). 336-5478; www.rmhidaho.org FRIDAY-SATURDAY, JUNE 1-2 31st annual Greek Food Festival 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Sts. Constantine & Helen Greek Orthodox Church, 2618 W. Bannock St., $1 entrance, under 12 free, chance to eat authentic Greek foods and take home exceptional desserts; live Greek band, Greek dance troupe and church tours. 345-6147; www.boisegreekfestival.com FRIDAY, JUNE 1 St. Luke’s Children's Hospital 20th annual Kid For A Night 6:30 p.m., Boise Centre, $200, dinner, dancing, games, silent auction; this year's theme is “Superheroes.” Come enjoy the fun dressed as your favorite superhero. Will Superman win all the games? Will Wonder Woman dance with the Joker? Will Batman hit on Lois Lane? How many SpiderMans live in Boise? Who knows? Come find out! 381-2123; www.stlukesonline.org LOVE INC 3rd annual Desserts & Delights Silent Auction 6:30 p.m., Boise First Community Center, $25/advance, $30/door; auction, finger food, desserts — chocolatedipping fountains, cupcakes, bar cookies and more; catered by Brown Shuga Soul Food, tickets available online. 377-3502; www.boiseloveinc.org SATURDAY, JUNE 2 Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Great Strides Walk 9 a.m., Ann Morrison Park, 5K walk, Kids'Corner activities, food and festivities; pledge walk. www.cff.org/Chapters/utah Nampa Rotary Club 3rd Annual Paws For A Cause 9 a.m., Nampa Civic Center, $25/by May 26, $30/after, $10/additional T-shirts, vendors, contests and more, pick a charity; also sponsored by D&B Supply; register online www.paws4acause.us Saint Alphonsus Capitol Classic Race 10:15 a.m. (11 a.m. race), Boise Depot to Capitol Park, $15 ($20/after May 28) for kids of all abilities, ages 6-14; shortened course for those with assistive devices; ends with finish fair, T-shirt, medal and refreshments; fee waivers available; benefits children's health programs. 367-3997; www.saintalphonsus.org/classic FRIDAY-SUNDAY, JUNE 8-10 Northwest Children's Home Tennis Challenge Boise Racquet & Swim Club, $55/person, $250/sponsorship. Come support the

players. 467-5223 ext. 203; www.northwest childrenshome.org SATURDAY, JUNE 9 Terry Reilly Health Services 10th annual Bob LeBow Bike Tour 7-11:30 a.m., Nampa High School, $20-$50/depending on race course chosen; start times, race lengths vary; teams of 8 or more; registration ends May 25. Call 467-4431. Benefits the Terry Reilly Zero Pay Fund. www.trhs.org Special Olympics Idaho Round Up 6 p.m., Special Olympics Idaho Headquarters, 199 E. 52nd St., Garden City, $50, BBQ dinner, live entertainment from JoyRide, complimentary beer and wine, live and silent auction.323-0482, ext. 12; www.idso.org Paint the Town Team registration has passed, but you can still be placed on a team. Call 343-4065 ext. 113; you can also support the program by donating online to the Buy-ABucket campaign ($10-$500). www.nhsid/ org/news-and-events/paint-the-town-boise WEDNESDAY-THURSDAY, JUNE 13-14 St. Luke’s Medical Center Dansko Shoe Sale 7 a.m.-5 p.m., June 13: St. Luke's Anderson Center in Boise; June 14: St. Luke's Lobby in Meridian. Benefits St. Luke's Children's Hospital. 608-1753 THURSDAY, JUNE 14 Idaho Human Rights Education Center's 9th annual Change Your World Celebration 5:30 p.m., Barber Park Events Center, $60, live and silent auction, dinner by Life's Kitchen, entertainment by Dr. Linda Ricketts and The New Trio, keynote speaker Clifton Taulbert, founder of the Building Community Institute in Tulsa and author of "Eight Habits of the Heart." 345-0304; www.idaho-humanrights.org JUNE 16-24 Wish Granters 2nd annual Playhouse Raffle and Auction Lowe's on Overland Road near Cole Road, mix of raffles and auctions, $1/raffle tickets. Volunteers and donations welcome. 377-9029; www.wishgranters.org SATURDAY, JUNE 16 Brown Bus Company Bike & Car Show 8 a.m.-2 p.m., First Church of the Nazarene, 7th Street South & 16th Avenue South, Nampa, $20/entry fee for cars, $15/for motorcycles. Benefits Idaho Ronald McDonald House. 336-5478; www.rmhidaho.org Saint Alphonsus Meridian 7th annual Art in the Yard Bazaar & Cancer Fundraiser 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Sunday, Saint Alphonsus Urgent Care grounds, 3025 W. Cherry Lane, Meridian. Art, yard ornaments, soaps, lotions, bird feeders, wind chimes, children’s items, purses, crocheted items, jewelry and more, plus a free raffle ticket. Benefits The Nalen Fund. 861-0850 Valley of the Pines/Thorn Creek Volunteer Fire Department Annual Fundraiser 10 a.m.6 p.m., Wildcat Ranch, 3379 Highway 21 (4 miles south of Idaho City), flea market, auction, raffle, food and drink. 392-4237.

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The next issue of Treasure comes out Aug. 18, so please send us your fundraising events happening through November 2012 by July 18. Email information (text only; no attachments) to treasure@idahostatesman.com. If you also want your event in the Statesman calendars, enter it online at Events.IdahoStatesman.com.

MCPAWS Regional Animal Shelter’s 14th annual Bark in the Park 11 a.m., Ponderosa State Park, McCall, $19, 3K fun walk with your dog, picnic lunch, contests, and prizes. 208-634-3647; www.mcpaws.org SUNDAY, JUNE 17 Women's and Children's Alliance 3rd annual Father's Day “Man Brunch” 11 a.m.-2 p.m., Chandler's Steakhouse, $35/adults, $15/kids under 12; beef, beer and benedicts. Tickets available online. 343-3688; www.wcaboise.org THURSDAY-FRIDAY, JUNE 21-22 Congregation Ahavath Beth Israel Deli Days Noon-7 p.m., Synagogue & Education Center, 11 North Latah St., food, music, folk dancing, synagogue tours. 343-6147; www.ahavathbethisrael.org FRIDAY, JUNE 22 American Cancer Society Relay For Life Of Canyon County 6 p.m.8 a.m., June 22-23, Columbia High School, $150/team, $100/donation pledge per participant, canyoncountyrelay@gmail.com; www.relayforlife.org SATURDAY, JUNE 23 Blue Cross of Idaho Foundation 9th annual Blue Cruise of Idaho 7-10:30 a.m. start times, Blue Cross of Idaho, corner of Eagle Road and Pine Avenue; $35, $25/under 16 (online preregistration; $5 extra/late entry), includes lunch and T-shirt; $7/lunch for non-riders, $8/day of ride; four bicycle courses of 15, 30, 50 and 100 miles. This year’s proceeds go to Miles of Smiles Dental Van and Bikes for Kids. www.bluecruiseidaho.org Make-A-Wish 2nd annual Ultimate Urban Challenge 8:30 a.m. Start at Caven-Williams Sports Complex just north of Bronco Stadium, ends at Julia Davis Park. $65, meal and one drink included. Race is part run, part biking. $200/pledges minimum. Team theme encouraged for Costume Challenge prize. Race includes puzzle-solving fun. www.idaho.wish.org Meridian Parks & Recreation 9th Annual Meridian Barn Sour 8:30 a.m., Meridian Settlers Park, $20/6K and 10K races, $10/1-mile run, $25/$15/day of race;races, food, raffles and prizes; benefits Care Enough To Share; 888-3579; www.meridiancity.org/barnsour Idaho Office for Refugees World Refugee Day Celebration 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., Grove Plaza, free, ethnic food and crafts, naturalization ceremony, music, dancing, puppet shows, storytelling and poetry. 336-4222; www.idahorefugees.org 2nd annual Young Faces of ALS National Corntoss Challenge Day 11:30 a.m., Mallard Building, 1161 W. River St., $20/per team of 2, lunch, T-shirt, drinks (for $100 in fundraising), corn toss tournament, food available for purchase, prizes include a pair of BSU football season tickets; funds benefit the fight against Lou Gehrig's Disease. Register online. 639-7792; http://yfals.als.net/ Wright and Wround-Up 6 p.m., Wright Congregational Church, 4821 Franklin Rd., $10,

University of Idaho annual Vandal Scholarship Fund Gala THURSDAY, JULY 26 6 p.m. Boise Centre, $149/age 40 and over, $99/under 40 (only 50 available), $69/under 30 (only 50 available), $1,750 table; dinner, live and silent auctions (includes football package for two to the LSU football game, Sept. 15; other auction items include tickets to the Final Four and the Daytona 500); special guests include U of I President M. Duane Nellis, Athletic Director Rob Spear and the Vandal coaching staff, including football Coach Robb Akey. 208-631-8816; http://vandalscholarshipfund.com.

$12/door, $5/kids ages 5-9, $7/door, barbecue dinner by Goodwood Barbecue Company, dessert auction, silent auction, entertainment by the Scandia Group, Western attire encouraged. 343-0292; www.wrightucc.com SUNDAY, JUNE 24 26th annual Garden Tour to benefit the Idaho Botanical Garden, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., $20. 343-8649; idahobotanicalgarden.org. (See related story, page 18). SATURDAY, JUNE 30 Centerville Fire Department Pancake Breakfast 8 a.m.-noon, Centerville Fire Station, $7, $5/ kids ages 3-12. 392-4447 SUNDAY, JULY 1 Boise Basin Boosters Pancake Breakfast 8 a.m.-noon, Placerville, $7/adults, $5/kids ages 3-12, all you can eat. 392-9934; www.boisebasinboosters.org WEDNESDAYS, JULY 11-SEPT. 19 Idaho Botanical Garden Movies in the Garden Series $5/non-members, $3/members and children ages 4-12; “Mamma Mia!”, “Indiana Jones & The Raiders of the Lost Ark,” “The Goonies,” “Hairspray,” “Some Like It Hot” and “Napoleon Dynamite.” Benefits IBG educational programs. www.idahobotanical garden.org THURSDAY, JULY 12 Idaho Humane Society 22nd annual Lawn Party 6 p.m., $150, cocktail hour, buffet dinner, silent auction, music by Frim Fram Fellas. 387-2760; www.idahohumanesociety.org FRIDAY, JULY 13 American Cancer Society Relay For Life Of Boise 6 p.m.-8 a.m., Bishop Kelly School, $150/team, $100/donation pledge per participant; Luminaria Ceremony, 11 p.m. boiserfl@hotmail.com; www.relayforlife.org MONDAY, JULY 16 19th annual Idaho Shakespeare Festival Gala 5:30 p.m., $150/person, tables of 8 available, dinner, drinks, auctions and entertainment. 4299908, ext. 207; www.idahoshakespeare.org Special Olympics Idaho Dine For A Cause 5-9 p.m. Bardenay Restaurant & Distillery in

IDAHO STATESMAN FILE

Eagle, 20 percent of food and liquor sales benefits Special Olympics Idaho. www.idso.org THURSDAY, JULY 19 MCPAWS Regional Animal Shelter's Auction for the Animals 5:30 p.m., Northfork Lodge, McCall, $75, buffet dinner, live and silent auction, live music, 208-634-3647 www.mcpaws.org SATURDAY, JULY 21 Emmett Valley 24th annual Swap Meet and Show-N-Shine 7 a.m., Swap meet includes Lions Club Pancake Breakfast, $5. www.emmettshowandshine.com Special Olympics Idaho Super Summer Sale 8 a.m., Special Olympics Idaho Headquarters, Garden City, yard sale. www.idso.org The First Tee Charity 5th annual Boise State Football Team Softball Challenge 5 p.m., gates open, Boise Hawks Stadium; $5-$20, 20-on-20 softball game featuring the BSU football team — offense vs. defense; prizes, raffle tickets for BSU memorabilia, Home Run Derby starts at 6 p.m., autographs on free souvenir team posters after the game. Contact Boise Hawks for ticket information. 322-5000; www.thefirstteeidaho.org MONDAY, JULY 23 Kegs4Kause 5-10 p.m., Payette Brewing Company, 111 W. 33rd St., Boise, 50 percent of beer sales benefits the Women's & Children’s Alliance; food truck and live music, too. 343-3688. FRIDAY-SUNDAY, JULY 27-29 4th annual Sun Valley Road Rally Supports Blaine County Community Drug Coalition. 208-727-8768; www.sunvalleyroadrally.com SATURDAY, JULY 28 Boise Basin Boosters Idaho Sesquicentennial Gold Celebration Pancake Breakfast 8 a.m.-noon, Centerville train station, junction of Centerville and Grimes Creek roads, $5, $3/kids ages 3-12, all you can eat, flyover, guest speakers and gold panning. 392-4447; www.boisebasin boosters.org

continued MAY 2012

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Upcoming events in support of nonprofit groups SUNDAY, JULY 29 Camp Rainbow Gold 11th annual Motorcycle Escort to Camp Rainbow Gold Free, motorcycle ride escorts children diagnosed with cancer to Camp Rainbow Gold for Youth Oncology Camp at Cathedral Pines, barbecue. 208-539-6885; www.camprainbowgold.org SATURDAY, AUG. 4 20th annual Soul Food Extravaganza 11 a.m.-8 p.m., Julia Davis Park, Gene Harris Bandshell, free; authentic soul food, live entertainment, car show, kids activities, beer garden and more; benefits Idaho Foodbank, the Idaho Black History Museum and Life's Kitchen. 368-0520; www.boisesoulfoodfestival.com Boise Basin Boosters Idaho Sesquicentennial Gold Celebration Hot August Nights Pig Roast Noon to night, 5 p.m./dinner, Placerville, free, donations welcome, old-fashioned games throughout the day, speakers, dunk tank and roast pork dinner. 392-9934; www.boisebasinboosters.org TUESDAY, AUG. 7 Northwest Children's Home Annual Lawn Party to Benefit the Syringa House 5:30 p.m., invitational event at private residence, dinner, silent and live auction. 467-5223 ext. 203; www.northwest childrenshome.org THURSDAY, AUG. 9 Idaho State Historical Society Wine, Eats and Artifacts 6 p.m., private home on Warm Springs Avenue, $35, cocktail party atmosphere hosted by the Foundation for Idaho History with chance to get close to artifacts, archives and listen to stories from the Idaho State Historical Society about the newly donated Lincoln Legacy collection. 514-2310; www.history.idaho.gov FRIDAY, AUG. 10 12th annual Wild & Wacky Women's White Water Adventure 9 a.m. Cascade Raft & Kayak, Horseshoe Bend, $95, half-day trip on the Payette River. Benefits Dress For Success. RSVP by July 30. 343-1551; www.twigafoundation. org SUNDAY, AUG. 12 Boys & Girls Club Great Dolphin Dunk Noon, Roaring Springs, $5, 3 for $10. www.adaclubs.org for details. FRIDAY, AUG. 17 The Basque Museum 15th annual Winefest 5:30 p.m., Basque Block, $27/advance, 4 for $100, $30/day of event, commemorative glass to sample more than 100 wines, silent auction, tapas. 343-2671; www.basquemuseum.com THURSDAY, AUG. 23 United Way Campaign 5th annual Kick-Off Flapjack Feed 7:30 a.m.-10:30 a.m., Boise Centre Plaza, $5, all-you-can-eat, live music, prize drawings and local celebrities flipping the pancakes. www.unitedwaytv.org SATURDAY, AUG.25 Nampa’s 5th annual Pooch Party Stroll & Splash 9 a.m., Lakeview Park, $20, 1-mile walk and splash for families and their dogs; contests, raffles and more, benefits development of Nampa Dog Park. www.nampaparksandrecreation.org 46

Some golf fundraisers across the Valley FRIDAY, JUNE 1 St. Luke’s 12th annual Brian Olson Memorial Classic 7:45 a.m. BanBury Golf Club, $110, $400/foursome; golf, lunch, prizes; benefits colon cancer detection at St. Luke's Mountain States Tumor Institute and Olson's alma mater, the Pacific Lutheran University scholarship endowment fund; www.stlukesonline.org/boise/ways_to_give/ special_events/brian_olson.php; 381-2123 MONDAY, JUNE 11 Family Advocates Golf Classic 12:30 p.m., Plantation Country Club Golf Course, $125, $500/team, dinner, awards. 345-3344; www.familyadvocate.org THURSDAY, JUNE 14 NARI Golf Tourney! 1 p.m., Shadow Valley Golf Club, $75/members, $85/non-members, $10 more after June 1; dinner and raffle. 322-8191; www.nariofidaho.org FRIDAY, JUNE 15 Boise-area Burnout Fund Light-My-Fire Golf Tournament 8 a.m. Warm Springs Golf Course, $75, $300/team, putting contests, longest drive, hole-in-one chance, raffle for prizes. 322-5525; www.lightmyfiretv.org/ golf_tournament.html 3rd annual Golf For Joy 12:30 p.m. check-in, Shadow Valley Golf Course, $85, includes dinner, silent and live auction; $15/extra dinner tickets; limited to 30 teams; benefits Ride For Joy Therapeutic Riding Program. 8613377; www.rideforjoy.org/golfforjoy.html WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20 Epilepsy Foundation Idaho 11th annual D.L. Evans Bank Golf Tournament 1 p.m., Ridgecrest Golf Course, $125, $500/team of 4, BBQ dinner, contests. 344-4340; www.epilepsyidaho.org FRIDAY, JUNE 22 Garden City Community Clinic 2nd annual Golf Scramble 8 a.m.. Shadow Valley Golf Course, $100, $400/team of 4; continental breakfast, BBQ lunch, hole-in-one contest; benefits the Garden City Community Clinic. www.gcidahochamber.com Eagle Chamber of Commerce Golf Classic noon, BanBury Golf Course. 939-4222; www.eaglechamber.com MONDAY, JUNE 25 The First Tee 5th annual Swing Fore the Kids Charity Golf Event 1 p.m., BanBury Golf Club; $250, sponsorships/$150-$2,500; box lunch, gift bag, golf shirt, BBQ dinner and live auction; Special Olympics Idaho Movies For A Cause 6:30 p.m. pre-show entertainment, Ann Morrison Park, movie (TBA) starts at dusk, food vendors on site. www.idso.org THROUGH THE MONTH OF AUGUST Boise Rescue Mission/Anytime Fitness Food for Fitness Drive Donate 5 cans of food at any Anytime Fitness gym and get the $99

several local pro golfers and celebrities will be up for auction to add to your golf team. 938-3411; www.thefirstteeidaho.org FRIDAY, AUG. 3 St. Luke's Scramble for the Kids, www.stlukesonline.org SOLD OUT FRIDAY-SATURDAY, AUG. 10-11 Boise Bench Lions Club Hit the Jackpot XVI Golf Tournament & Dinner Jackpot, Nev., $150/golf & dinner, $35/dinner only; 8 a.m. Saturday scramble and putting contest, $30,000 hole-in-one contest, evening banquet, silent auction, raffle. Benefits Lions Sight & Hearing Foundation. www.idaho lions.org WEDNESDAY-SATURDAY, AUG. 15-18 The Annual Killebrew-Thompson Memorial Golf Tournament Sun Valley Resort & Elkhorn Golf Club, $2,500, $3,000/with social guest; golf, benefit concert, barbecue, auction dinner, luncheon, fashion show, awards reception, Ladies 9-hole Scramble. 208-6222006; www.dannythompsonmemorial.com FRIDAY, AUG. 17 Linking Up FORE Kids Annual Golf Tournament BanBury Golf Course. 350-5039; www.meridianschoolsfoundation.org The First Tee 5th annual Ultimate Ball Drop 10 a.m.-noon, Foxtail Golf Course, free, raffle tickets: $10, $50/for six; golf demonstration at 10 a.m., ball drop from helicopter just before noon; closest balls to the pin with the prizes; don't have to be present to win. 938-3411; www.thefirstteeidaho.org MONDAY, AUG. 20 Suicide Prevention Action Network Save the One Golf Tournament 1 p.m., Plantation Country Club, $75, golf and dinner, proceeds benefit Idaho Suicide Prevention Hotline. 939-0439; www.spanidaho.org MONDAY-SATURDAY, AUG. 23-25 The Idaho Governor's Cup Coeur d’ Alene Resort, hosted by Gov. Otter and the first lady. 208-860-9296; www.idahogovernorscup.com FRIDAY, AUG. 24 Alzheimer's Idaho 3rd annual Golf Tournament BBQ lunch, silent auction, cake auction, golf contests. 914-4719; www.alzid.org SATURDAY, AUG. 25 Italian American Club of Boise 9th annual Golf Tournament Eagle Hills Golf Course. www.iacboise.org registration fee waived. Existing gym members can donate 3 cans of food for a free one-hour trainer session.

Dusty Parnell is a freelance print, radio and video journalist who has worked in the Treasure Valley for more than 20 years.

0519-Treasure-47-reflections_Treasure 5/7/12 10:10 PM Page 47

“The day the Lord created hope was probably the same day he created

spring.” Bern Williams

Apricot trees are the first to bloom in late March in the Snake River Valley above Marsing, followed by plums — and then the pink blossoms of peaches and nectarines. Pears will flower white, and apple trees are the last. They bloom in late April or early May, the last to flower. PHOTO BY KATHERINE JONES / KJONES@IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

0519-Treasure-48-FPA_Treasure 5/7/12 10:08 PM Page 48

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