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Travel & Recreation Supplement to the Tremonton Leader/Garland Times • June 18, 2014

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Travel & Recreation 2014

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Travel & Recreation 2014

Make it Rec, not a wreck Be safe on ATVs Ellen Cook Leader Editor

Like other activities involving high speeds and heavy machinery, riding an ATV can be risky. That is why safety should be foremost in the mind of any rider. To help riders stay safe, Chief Deputy Kevin Potter of the Box Elder County Sheriff’s Department offers some useful tips for recreationalists. Training is key, Potter said, and hands-on training on a course with knowledgable instructors offers a step to safety in any situation. “Drivers with formal, hands-on

ATV training have a lower injury risk than drivers with no formal training,” he said. Many ATV crashes result in head injuries. “Wearing a helmet may reduce the severity of these injuries,” Potter said. That helmet should be specific to motorized sports and certified by the U.S. Department of Transportation. Additionally, over-the-ankle boots, goggles and gloves, longsleeved shirt and long pants will help protect the rider against cuts and injuries from rocks and branches. The majority of ATVs are designed to carry a single person. Tandem

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travel can be dangerous. Carrying a passenger can make it difficult for the driver to control the machine and shift weight when needed. To be safe, Potter said, do not drive an ATV with a passenger or be a passenger on an ATV. Many fatalities related to ATVs occur when the driver takes his machine on a paved road. Because of how they are made, ATVs are not easily control on pavement and encounters with other road travelers – cars and trucks – can prove deadly. Be aware of who is on the ATV. “Children are involved in about one third of all ATV-related deaths and hospital emergency room injuries,” Potter continued, and most of those

happened when a child was allowed to drive or ride on an adult ATV. Children under the age of 16 are more likely to be seriously injured on an adult machine than one geared closer to their size. Just as with any piece of powerful equipment, drinking and drugs don’t mix with driving. “Alcohol and drugs impair reaction time and judgement, two essential skills for safe ATV use,” said Potter. Training, proper equipment and following the rules can lead to an enjoyable time in the great outdoors. But use common sense and put safety first to ensure the fun continues. “Take knowledge to the extreme,” Potter concluded.

Inside This Issue

Make it Rec, not a wreck . . . . . . . . The Racing Bug . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Eyes on the Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fuel Efficiency Misconceptions . . . Extending the life of your vehicle . Camp with success . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Vol. 4 • June 18, 2014 Publisher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Greg Madson Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ellen Cook Assistant Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jessica Tanner Advertising . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Denise Lasley, Becky Howard Layout/Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jodie ValDez, Joan Chadwick Travel & Rec is a product of the Leader/Garland Times. To contribute or offer suggestions, contact Ellen Cook at: ellenc@tremontonleader.com, or call 435-257-5182. All information included in this publication is copyright Leader/Garland Times.

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Travel & Recreation 2014

The Racing Bug Gardner restores 1972 Hodaka

Leader/Jessica Tanner

Jessica Tanner Leader Assistant Editor

Motorcycles have always been a passion for Deweyville resident Doug Gardner. He raced for 42 years, but gave up the sport after a heart attack. For the last 25 years he has been restoring Maicos motorcycles. This past year he took on the challenge of restoring a 1972 Hodaka Wombat 125, which he plans to ride to the 50th celebration of Hodaka Days in Athena, Ore., at the end of June. Gardner was 13 years old, in 1973, when he first started racing on a Yamaha 175. He said, “I bought it brand new. I had that thing about five minutes before the lights were stripped off it and number plates were put on. I don’t know why I had the racing bug but ever since I was a little kid I wanted to race.” After about eight months, he moved onto a 1973 Maico 400 and raced other modern bikes through the 80s before moving onto vintage bikes in the 90s. Over the years he has raced at the expert level in every state from Washington to Florida. In the 80s, he began collecting Maico bikes and made parts to restore them. Along the way, this self-taught mechanic has learned a lot of useful trades, including welding and hand forming aluminum to make many of his parts. The motorcycle bug has even spread to his son, Ryan, 22, of Logan, who has helped him restore motorcycles for almost 10 years, and to his three grandsons, Trayton, 7, Ryder, 5, and Maverik, 2. Gardner saw his first Hodaka motorcycle when he was eight years old. “I was just in awe, I thought it was the most beautiful bike,” he said. So it was no surprise that the Hodaka Days celebration caught his eye. He and his grandson, Trayton, made a quick trip to the event last year. “We spent one day there and I said, 'I’m building one and riding it from Deweyville to Hodaka Days and back'… It’s all I have been able to talk about since.” He sold all his Maico stuff and focused on restoring his 125 Hodaka, which he purchased in September. He took his

Doug Gardner recently restored a 1972 Hodaka Wombat 125. He is now preparing ■ See RESTORING BUG pg. 5 to ride the bike to the 50th celebration of Hodaka Days in Athena, Ore.

Travel & Recreation 2014

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■ RESTORING BUG continued from pg. 4

first ride in March. “It’s taught me a lot of stuff that I didn’t do with the other motorcycles,” he said. “I never had to deal with wiring and lights before.” During the restoration process he knew he was going to be down on horsepower, so he made several improvements to make it as efficient as possible. He bought all new parts for the motor and made sure they, along with the gears, fenders and rims, were all polished. He added new wheel spokes and cut a new cylinder head combustion chamber. The real challenge will start on June 23, when Gardner sets out on his journey. Round trip he will cover about 1,600 miles on a motorcycle that reaches a maximum speed of 50 mph. “It’s really working it to do that,” he said. “My lawnmower has three times the horsepower.” With that said, he’ll travel on back roads, hauling enough stuff to face any situation that may arise. “If I do have trouble I want to be prepared to fix anything,” he said.

This two-stroke has a small tank and since gas stations could be few and far between along his route, he will carry an extra tank and the required oil to mix with the gas. He’ll also have every tool he could possibly need to “rebuild the whole top end” if needed. During Hodaka Days, the small town of Athena (1,100 residents) opens up to bikes from all over for four days. Main Street is closed for the Hodaka parade, while a swap meet, barbecues, camping, swimming and showers are all made available. Every year the Bad Rock ride through the mountains, a 40-mile trail that was a racing trail in the 70s, is opened up to 120 riders. This year Gardner will be one of them. He’s excited for “four days of nothing but sitting around and talking about Hodakas.” But the adventure isn’t over. He said, “I bought one more of these (Hodakas) and I have hinted around to my wife (DeDe) that next year I want both of us to ride our own up to Hodaka Days. Will she do it? I've got a year to work on it.”

Leader/Jessica Tanner

Doug Gardner has restored 40 motorcycles over the past 25 years. Although he has sold most of them he has a few on hand. Pictured are some in his collection.

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Travel & Recreation 2014

Eyes on the Drive Don’t be distracted on the road Ellen Cook Leader Editor

Distracted driving can be very dangerous. Diverting one’s attention from the road for mere seconds can have serious, and potentially fatal consequences. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have found distracted driving kills more than 15 people each day, while injuring more than 1,200. Lt. Lee Perry, Utah Highway Patrol, said that in 2012, 3,328 people were killed and an estimated 421,000 were injured in distracted driver crashes in the United States. A recent study indicated that 80 percent of crashes and 65 percent of near-crashes in the United States involve some form of driver distraction. Most drivers think driving while distracted is unacceptable, yet many drivers don’t understand just how distracting some of their behaviors are. Any activity that takes attention away from driving is considered a distraction. These include taking your hands off the wheel, daydreaming or engaging in any behavior that takes your eyes off of the road. Certain activities are known distractions, and understanding which habits can be dangerous and making strides to correct behaviors can help save lives, prevent injuries and reduce accidentrelated expenses. Using mobile phones Leading the list of the top distractions behind the wheel are mobile phones. Studies have shown that driving performance is lowered and the level of distraction is higher for drivers who are heavily engaged in cell phone conversations. The use of a hands-free device just places calls, and drivers often cannot pull away from their phones. The percentage of vehicle crashes and near-crashes attributed to dialing is nearly identical

to the number associated with talking or listening. A study by Car and Driver magazine compared the dangers of texting while driving to the effects of driving

answering a phone would still be legal, as would actually talking on the phone and you are allowed to use GPS devices so long as it does not require manual input.”

said. “It is left up to each of us to restrict our use of technology more than is absolutely necessary so that our minds stay focused on the critical task of driving.” Moving Objects Whether there’s a pet bouncing in the front seat or children being boisterous in the back, passengers and items moving around the car are significant distractions. Turning around to look at the kids or to reach for a ball that may be rolling around on the floor of the car can take a person’s eyes off the road. If something really is important and needs to be addressed, it is much safer to pull over and take care of it before getting back on the road. Daydreaming Many people will admit to daydreaming behind the wheel or looking at a person or object outside of the car for too long. Perhaps they’re checking out a house in a new neighborhood or thought they saw someone they knew on the street corner. It can be easy to veer into the direction your eyes are focused, causing an accident.

drunk. Measuring the time it takes to brake after being alerted by a red light to stop, the reaction time was recorded when the driver was legally drunk, reading an e-mail and sending a text. Texting easily elicited the slowest response time. “This is why the 2014 State Legislature passed an amendment to the State Texting law that now prohibits any manipulation of any technology device,” said Perry, who is also a part of the Legislative body.  “We have interpreted that as more than one manipulation or button push. So

Perry said there are three problems with the use of technology. “They are visual, manual and cognitive. When we look at the device, we are visually impaired. When we text or look down at our phone or other device to enter or read something, we generally take our eyes off the road for an average of four or five seconds. If we are traveling at 55 MPH, we will have traveled over the length of a football field in the time our eyes are off the road.”  Holding the device and typing on it impairs a person manually, Perry

Eating Those who haven’t quite mastered walking and chewing gum at the same time may want to avoid eating while driving. The majority of foods require a person’s hands to be taken off of the wheel and their eyes to be diverted from the road. Reaching in the back seat to share some French fries with the kids is also distracting. Try to eat meals before getting in the car. For those who must snack while en route, take a moment to pull over at a rest area and spend 10 minutes snacking there before resuming the trip. ■ See DISTRACTED DRIVING pg. 7

Travel & Recreation 2014 ■ DISTRACTED DRIVING continued from pg. 6

Reading Glancing at an advertisement, updating a Facebook status or reading a book are all activities that should be avoided when driving. Even pouring over a traffic map or consulting the digital display of a GPS system can be distracting. When driving, attention should be placed on the task of safely getting from point A to point B. All other activities taking place in the vehicle are distractions that can end up risking

a person’s life. “The UHP encourages people to never text and drive and limit phone calls to emergencies,” Perry concluded.  “Wear your seatbelt and make sure others in your vehicle are also secured, as it is critical to your safety as well as that of others on the roadway.  Do not drive while impaired or fatigued.  We hope everyone has a great summer and arrives alive because ZERO Fatalities is a goal we can all live with.”

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Travel & Recreation 2014

Fuel Efficiency Misconceptions Fuel efficiency is good for a driver’s budget and the planet. While it’s important to consider ways to conserve fuel, it’s a good idea to know some of the misconceptions as well. Here are a few of the most common misconceptions about fuel efficiency: * Full tanks conserve fuel. Many people have long believed that a nearly full tank of gas means that the fuel is less likely to evaporate, and that half-full tanks are losing gas to evaporation. Though this might have been the case years ago, today’s vehicles are smarter than ever before. Fuel systems are designed with vapor recovery systems so this is no longer the case. * Manual transmissions are more fuel-efficient. Technology can once again be credited with turning conventional wisdom on its head. In the past, manual transmission vehicles might have been more fuel-efficient because drivers could better control engine revving with a five-speed manual transmission than they could with the standard three-speed automatic transmission. However, automatic transmissions have evolved, and they are now more adept at controlling revs and conserving fuel than many drivers of manual transmission vehicles. * When you fill up matters. Some drivers have long believed that filling up during the cooler hours of the day earns them more gas than filling up when the temperatures are at their peak. This theory traces its origins to the fact that liquids are at their most dense when they are cool. But today’s

filling stations store their gas in tanks beneath the ground. These underground tanks are insulated from temperature swings, so you aren’t likely to receive any more gas by filling up in the morning than you will when filling up at night. * An old vehicle is destined to be less fuel-efficient. Any product that is allowed to fall into disrepair will prove less efficient than products that are well maintained, and cars are no exception. A car that is not taken care of will not operate at peak fuel efficiency because it’s likely being forced to work harder to get down the street. But a well-maintained vehicle should not grow less fuel-efficient over time. * Shifting into neutral while stopping saves gas. This is another misconception that was once true but no longer applies thanks to advances in technology. When engines still had carburetors, shifting into neutral might have helped conserve fuel by stopping the flow of gas into the engine while the car was idling. However, fuel injection systems are now computerized and capable of sensing when an engine is revving above idle. This shuts off the fuel injectors, preventing gas from being injected into the engine and preventing gas from being wasted while the vehicle is stopped as a result. Taking steps to conserve fuel is a good way for drivers to save money and benefit the environment. However, some of the conventional means to conserving fuel are no longer viable.

Metro File Art

Looking for ways to save on fuel? There are a few misconceptions about what will and what won't lower the bill.

Travel & Recreation 2014

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Extending the life of your vehicle The average new car costs $30,500. That’s a considerable expense, especially at a time when fuel costs remain high and cost of living continues to rise. Because new cars have become so expensive, more and more vehicle owners are looking for ways to extend the life of their vehicles. The longer a car can stay on the road, the better an investment that vehicle becomes. Fortunately, there are several steps vehicle owners can take that should ensure their vehicles stay on the road for years to come. Scale back on short trips. The toll that cold starts take on a vehicle can add up over time. When a car is started, condensation builds up in the vehicle’s exhaust system. On longer trips, that condensation will gradually evaporate. However, on short trips, that condensation often does not have enough time to evaporate, and too many short trips will lead to an accumulation of water in the muffler that can lead to rust and rust holes on the muffler overtime. Short trips also can negatively affect gas mileage. When possible, leave your car at home on trips into town when you can just as easily walk or ride a bicycle. Reducing the amount of short trips you take in your car will greatly reduce wear and tear on your vehicle and improve your fuel efficiency, as well. Stick to the manufacturer’s recommended maintenance schedule. Adhering to your vehicle’s mainte-

nance schedule improves its durability and protecting various components, including its cooling system and drivetrain. While many manufacturers used to recommend changing a vehicle’s oil every 3,000 miles, many of today’s newer automobiles need their oil changed less frequently. Check your owner’s manual for manufacturer recommendations regarding oil changes, and don’t forget to replace the oil filter when changing your vehicle’s oil. Pay attention to brake pads. Brake pads that are allowed to wear down can cause damage to the brakes’ rotors and calipers. That damage can prove costly and make things harder on your vehicle. Keep your tires properly inflated. Tires that are under-inflated will negatively impact your vehicle’s fuel efficiency. The tires’ life expectancy is reduced considerably when tires are not properly inflated. Routinely check your tire pressure, especially if you drive a lot, and keep tires inflated at the pressure recommended in your vehicle’s owner’s manual. Be mindful when filling up your tank. Many people do not pay much attention to their surroundings when pulling into the filling station. But when you fill up can impact your car’s life expectancy. Perhaps the worst time to fill your tank is when the fuel tanker is in the gas station refilling the underground tanks. That’s because the process of filling the underground tanks can stir

up sediment that had settled at the bottom of those tanks. If that sediment finds its way into your vehicle’s gas tank, it can clog filters and fuel injectors and negatively affect the vehicle’s performance. Take care of your vehicle’s interior, too. Caring for a car is not just about being good to what’s under the hood. Caring for the car’s interior will not necessarily impact its performance, but a well-kept interior will improve how you look at your vehicle and how much you enjoy driving it. The longer you enjoy driving your vehicle, the longer you are likely to keep it. Preserve the vehicle’s door and window seals; clean the dashboard, including the gauges, vacuum the floor mats and wipe down the vehicle’s interior, whether it’s cloth or leather. Keeping up the appearance of the car’s interior will make the vehicle more enjoyable to drive and increase its value at resale.

Metro File Art

The interior of your vehicle is just as important as the exterior in maintaining its life.

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Travel & Recreation 2014

Camp with success Ellen Cook Leader Editor

Camping is a popular outdoor activity that attracts many enthusiasts year after year. Some people camp every month while others only have time for one great excursion into the wilderness each year.

This year, millions of camping trips will take place across the country. Preparation is key to a successful camping trip. Whether campers plan to spend one night or several in the great outdoors, there are certain tips to follow to ensure your trip is as fun and safe as possible.

Metro File Art

Spending time outdoors is a great way to be with family and friends. Preparation is key to any successful camping trip.

Gear In order to be comfortable, stock up on camping gear. Tents, sleeping bags and other gear need not be the most expensive. Quality, moderately priced gear works well, too. With care and maintenance, camping gear can last for several years. A tent will be your first line of defense against the outdoors. Although plenty of people prefer to sleep out under the stars, a tent is a place to avoid inclement weather and insects and have a little privacy. Your tent need not be too big, unless you plan to share it with many of your fellow campers. Since you will be spending the majority of your time outdoors, don’t feel pressured to buy the tent equivalent of a three-room suite. A good tent should be sturdy, weatherresistant and large enough to fit the people who will be sleeping in it during your trip. Invest in a pad to place on the

floor of the tent to shield you from the hard ground. The pad will make sleeping more comfortable. If you will be sleeping during warm-weather months, you don’t have to worry about an expensive sleeping bag. An average-weight one will be just fine. Don’t forget to pack a pillow. A cooler filled with food and drinks will tide you over for the trip. If you plan to cook, you will need to bring the ingredients for meals. Otherwise sandwiches should suffice. Some campgrounds have grills and picnic tables available. Otherwise, you can cook hot dogs right over your open campfire. Where to camp Campsites may be public or private. Public campgrounds are generally funded by tax dollars and ■ See CAMP pg. 11

Travel & Recreation 2014

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■ CAMP continued from pg. 10

maintained by parks departments or government offices. They may be free to enter or charge a nominal fee for use. Because of the low cost involved, they may be quite popular and crowded during peak camping season. Private campsites are run by private companies or individuals and may also feature RV hookups. In many instances, private campsites sell memberships to interested parties, which gives access to certain private areas. They may have more amenities than public campsites. Private sites also may employ security personnel and maintenance crews to ensure the areas are clean and safe and to enforce campground rules. This may not be the case at public campsites, where conditions may be inconsistent from site to site. An online search of both public and private campsites nearby can help you determine which option best suits you. Consider national parks, national forests and even the Army Corps of Engineers, which manages many recreational areas.

Avoid critters Animals and insects are part of the camping experience. While they are unavoidable, there are some measures you can take to reduce the propensity for bothersome bug bites or clever critters raiding the cooler. Keeping a clean campsite is perhaps the most effective animal and insect deterrent. Ants and animals are attracted to food bits scattered around the site, so be sure to gather trash and dispose of it properly each day. Try not to store food on the ground. Whenever possible, keep food locked away in an airtight cooler or other container. Dry foods can be stored under lock and key in the car. Racoons, squirrels, birds and skunks all have been known to patrol campgrounds for an easy meal. Also, you don’t want to lure in larger predators, such as bears or wild cats. To avoid insects, steer clear of perfumed products. Keep lights dim at night, as bright lights attract mosquitoes and other biting bugs. Use appropriate insect repellents to help further

repel bugs. Closer isn’t always better Many new campers make the mistake of choosing campsites that are in close proximity to bathrooms and clubhouses and other reminders of civilization. But these areas tend to feature heavy foot and car traffic and can make for a noisy experience. To avoid the lights, sounds and bustle of too many people, stick with campsites farther off the beaten path. You may need to walk a little farther, but you will likely enjoy a more peaceful camping experience. Plan for the wetness Even if it doesn’t rain, dew is an inevitable part of camping outdoors. Warm weather with high humidity can make dew even more plentiful. Use a shower curtain or another plastic impenetrable liner beneath your tent to reduce wetness and chilliness while you sleep. Be sure to bring in clothes and remove items from your clothes-

lines before you retire for the night if you don’t want them damp the next morning. Use tarps to cover anything that should not get wet. Be sure to pack plenty of dry socks and changes of clothes and store them in zipper-top bags in the event clothing does get wet. Wet clothes can be uncomfortable and increase your risk for hypothermia. Carry in and carry out Part of the magic of camping is being able to enjoy nature and experience the great outdoors. It is crucial to protect natural landscapes as much as possible and to exercise caution around plant life. In addition, be mindful of animal habitats. What you bring to the campsite, including trash, should be removed when you are done. Do not leave a mess behind. Camping can be an enjoyable and inexpensive vacation option. Learning the ropes and heeding some advice can make camping an enjoyable getaway year after year.


Tremonton Car Care Summer 2014