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Under Siege s e rv i n g t h e w e s t e r n t r e a s u r e va l l e y

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Inquiry focuses on bin Laden

WEDNESDAY September 12, 2001 Midnight body count ➤  266 people died in the four airliner crashes on Tuesday, including: ■  92 on American Airlines #11, the first plane to hit the twin towers ■  65 on United Airlines #175, the second plane to hit the towers ■  64 on American Airlines #77 in the Pentagon crash ■  45 on United Airlines #93 when it crashed southeast of Pittsburgh ➤ On Tuesday afternoon, about 2,100 people were reported injured in New York, and at least five had died in hospitals, but 50,000 work at the World Trade Center where the attack occurred. Thousands are still missing. At least six people were seen falling out of the 1,300-foot towers. ■ 78 New York police officers and up to 200 New York fire fighters missing. ■ 100-800 reported missing at the Pentagon. ➤ Today rescuers reported hearing cries for help and other signs of life from the World Trade Center debris.

By Karen Gullo and John Solomon The Associated Press WASHINGTON — U.S. officials began piecing together a case linking Osama bin Laden to the worst terrorist attack in U.S. history, aided by an intercept of communications between his supporters and harrowing cell phone calls from victims aboard the jetliners before they crashed on Tuesday. Authorities were focusing some of their efforts on possible bin Laden supporters in Florida based on the identification of a suspected hijacker on one of the manifests of the four jets that crashed, law enforcement officials said. The FBI was preparing to search locations in Broward County in south Florida and the Daytona Beach area in central Florida, Florida Department of Law Enforcement spokesman Rick Morera said.

Inside ■ Panic-stricken people line up at gas pumps; what happened on Tuesday; President Bush speaks to the country, Page 2 ■ City begins massive rescue effort, Page 3 ■ Victims, witnesses recount Trade Center attacks, Page 4 ■ Defense Chief predicts attacks; Passenger phones in hijack in Pennsylvania crash; Buildings on expert’s short list of targets, Page 5 ■ Bin Laden focus of investigators; killing innocent people for political reasons an old tactic; Schools attempt to ease kids’ minds, Page 6 ■ Bush heightens security, promises justice; Sorrow gives way to anger across the country; West Bank, Gaza celebrate Tuesday’s terror, Page 7 ■ U.S. Flag you can display, Page 8

Please see Inquiry, Page 3

Attacks may hurt economy

Inside this section, your regular daily newspaper includes these stories ■ Local law enforcement authorities tighten security across valley, 1A ■ Nampa police officer visiting D.C. recalls day of attack, 1A ■ Travelers stranded at Boise airport, 1A ■ Horrific television scenes stun viewers, 1A ■ Reactions, 3A ■ Canyon motorists line up to fill tanks in anticipation of sudden gas price hikes, 4A ■ Fiesta Idaho canceled, despite story on 1C. See brief on 4A ■ Canyon County authorities prepare should disaster hit, 4A ■ NNU students discuss terrorism, 4A ■ Special religious services planned in Treasure Valley, 4A ■ Idaho security tightens, 6A ■ Teachers talk to students about attacks, 6A ■ Editorial and columns, 10A Dear Reader: As the stories of this tragedy unfold, we want to know your thoughts. Please call the newsroom at 465-8172 to leave your voice messages. Call 465-8158 if you have stories related to the tragedies. Send comments to newsroom@idahopress.com. Watch our Web site at idahopress.com for new developments. Copyright © 2001 Printed on recycled newsprint

Vol. 22, No. 74, 36 pages

on the web: idahopress.com

By Marti Crutsinger AP Economics Writer AP

Firefighters raise a flag at the World Trade Center in New York on Tuesday after hijackers crashed two airliners into the center, killing thousands of Americans. At top of page, Karen Scienksi cries while praying during a vigil service at the International Church of Las Vegas in Las Vegas Tuesday. The church held an open house for people to pray for the victims of the terrorist attacks against the World Trade Center and the Pentagon.

Rescuers scour the rubble Officials say establishing death toll could take weeks By David Crary and Jerry Schwartz AP National Writers NEW YORK (AP) — Hundreds of rescue workers today are searching for victims in the most devastating terrorist onslaught ever waged against the United States. The entire world is reeling from the news that knife-wielding hijackers crashed two airliners into the World Trade Center on Tuesday, toppling its

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twin 110-story towers.The deadly calamity was witnessed on televisions across the world as another plane slammed into the Pentagon, and a fourth crashed outside Pittsburgh. ‘‘Today, our nation saw evil,’’ President Bush said in an address to the nation Tuesday night. He said thousands of lives were ‘‘suddenly ended by evil, despicable acts of terror.’’ Said Adm. Robert J. Natter, commander of the U.S. Atlantic Fleet: ‘‘We have been attacked like we haven’t since Pearl Harbor.’’ Establishing the death toll could take weeks. The four airliners alone had

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266 people aboard and there were no known survivors. Officials put the number of dead and wounded at the Pentagon at about 100 or more, with some news reports suggesting it could rise to 800. In addition, a union official said he feared 300 firefighters who first reached the scene had died in rescue efforts at the trade center — where 50,000 people worked — and dozens of police officers were missing. ‘‘The number of casualties will be more than most of us can bear,’’ a visibly distraught Mayor Rudolph Giuliani said. Please see Terror, Page 3

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WASHINGTON — Tuesday’s terror attacks may push the teetering economy into recession, analysts suggested. The Federal Reserve said it stood ready to pump extra money into the economy if needed. The Fed’s promise to supply additional money to the banking system was similar to a pledge it issued on the morning after the October 1987 stock market crash. That action was credited with keeping the economy out of recession. Private analysts, however, said the Fed’s magic of lower interest rates and ample supplies of cash may not be enough to overcome Tuesday’s series of attacks. ‘‘The economy has been on a highwire act straddling between a recession and anemic growth. Now the terrorists have cut the wire underneath our feet,’’ said Sung Won Sohn, chief economist at Wells Fargo in Minneapolis. ‘‘The United States and the rest of the world are likely to experience a full-blown recession now.’’

■ Stock market closed today, 1D.

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➤ Gas prices stabilize, 3A ➤ Airlines move planes, 3A ➤ President Bush calls attacks ‘acts of war’, 9A ➤A partial list of victims, 10A

Under Siege THURSday

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September 13, 2001

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Agents: up to 50 involved in plot

The latest casualty update Rescue crews frantically searched through the night for signs of life, but as the hours ticked away, so did hopes of finding survivors. A frantic search is under way for the names of confirmed survivors so officials can begin to guess the number of dead. ‘‘The best estimate we can make is that there will be a few thousand left in each building,’’ Mayor Rudolph Giuliani said Wednesday. The city asked for 6,000 body bags. Because of the difficulty of digging through the rubble, only 82 fatalities had been confirmed as of Wednesday. ➤ 202 firefighters and 57 police officers, as well as the World Trade Center’s head of security, were among the missing. ➤ Nearly 200 state government workers and an unknown number of private-sector employees couldn’t be located. ➤ About 300 state workers and more than 3,000 employees of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey worked in the towers. ➤ Also missing Wednesday were some of the 900 people employed by the state Attorney General’s Office in a building near the World Trade Center. ➤ At the Pentagon, the military services said about 150 people — mostly Army soldiers — were unaccounted for. ➤  266 people died in the four airliner crashes on Tuesday, including: ■  92 on American Airlines #11, the first plane to hit the twin towers ■  65 on United Airlines #175, the second plane to hit the towers ■  64 on American Airlines #77 in the Pentagon crash ■  45 on United Airlines #93 when it crashed southeast of Pittsburgh

Government investigation still focuses on Osama bin Laden By Karen Gullo The Associated Press

16 Americans die in Mexico plane crash MERIDA, Mexico (AP) — A plane carrying 16 American tourists and three crew members on a visit to Mayan ruins crashed in Yucatan state on Wednesday. All aboard died. Fernando Vargas, director general of Aero Ferinco, said in a telephone interview that the passengers had gotten off of the cruise ship Massdam at the Caribbean island of Cozumel and were flying to visit the Mayan ruins of Chichen Itza. A U.S. State Department official said all 16 of the tourists were U.S. citizens, most from the Pacific Northwest.

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▼ Deaths Bradley Bennett Jessica Gregory Lawrence Handford Robert Hill

William Maerz Loren Musser Clara Rodosevich

Obituaries and death notices, 5A ‑AP

▼ Today’s edition

Emergency personnel deploy at the site of the World Trade Center in New York Wednesday. Rescue workers dug for bodies in mountains of rubble as the city struggled to recover from an airborne attack on the World Trade Center Tuesday that shut down the nation’s financial capital and created a new skyline etched in terror.

Business, 1D Classifieds, 2D Comics, 3C Connections, 1C Legals, 13A Movies, 4C

More local news inside today

Opinion, 16A Puzzles, 3D TV listings, 2A Valley, 4A Weather, 2A

Today’s news section was produced by News Editor Drew Munro, Managing Editor Vickie Holbrook, Assistant Managing Editor David Woolsey, Opinion Editor Jay Vail, and page designers Glen Bruderer, Melissa Wilson and Rosemary Gray. Copyright © 2001 Printed on recycled newsprint

Vol. 22, No.75, 32 pages

on the web: idahopress.com

➤ Nampa firefighter Jeff Trusnovec joined his Treasure Valley colleagues in mourning the apparent loss of hundreds of New York firefighters’ lives in the collapse of the World Trade Center towers. But he has even closer ties: His brother is a New York firefighter who doesn’t know the whereabouts of scores of fellow emergency workers. 4A ➤ Trent Davis might not have lived to tell about the bad traffic in New York City if he hadn’t gotten stuck in it. The Caldwell native was scheduled for a meeting in one of the World Trade Center towers when it was hit by a terrorist jet, but he was late. 4A ➤ The Boise Airport remains quiet as only selected flights across the country are allowed to resume. 3A ➤ Idaho’s attorney general says his office will keep an eye out for price-gouging by the state’s service stations. Gas prices rose only modestly in the Treasure Valley even though there were fears of larger increases Tuesday. 3A

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WASHINGTON — Federal authorities have identified more than a dozen hijackers of Middle Eastern descent in Tuesday’s bombings and gathered evidence linking them to Osama bin Laden and other terrorist networks, law enforcement officials said. In all, perhaps 50 people were involved in the plot, government officials say. The massive investigation stretched from the Canadian border, where officials suspect some of the hijackers entered the country, to Florida, where some of the participants are believed to have learned how to fly commercial jetliners before the attacks. Locations in Massachusetts and Florida were searched for evidence. The names of two men being sought by authorities emerged in Florida. There, the FBI interviewed a family that gave them temporary shelter a year ago. The officials, speaking on condition of anonymity, told The Associated Press that multiple cells of terrorist groups participated and that hijackers had possible ties to countries that included Saudi Arabia and Egypt. The identities of more than a dozen of the men who hijacked four planes with knives and threats of bombs has been determined, the officials said. Several hijackers had pilot’s licenses. Attorney General John Ashcroft said 12 to 24 hijackers commandeered the four planes, and a government official said another two dozen are believed to have assisted them. About 40 of the men have been accounted for, including those killed in the suicide attacks, but 10 remain at large, The Los Angeles Times reported on its Web site, citing an unidentified source with knowledge of the investigation. Please see Investigation, 9A

Joanie Vasquez, left, and Vivian Dux of Nampa sing “Amazing Grace” on Wednesday at a special community church service held in the wake of Tuesday’s terrorist attacks on the East Coast.

➤ The son of Caldwell High School athletic director George Scott witnessed the horror of the World Trade Center attacks. 4A ➤ Across the Treasure Valley, worried friends and relatives have worked to make contact with their loved ones in New York and Washington, D.C. 4A ➤ Idaho groups band together to help the American Red Cross raise money for disaster relief efforts. 4A ➤ Caldwell students talk about the impact of the tragedy and how they’re dealing with the horrific news. 5A ➤ Local stockbrokers say the tragedy at the heart of the nation’s financial district is heartbreaking, but investors shouldn’t flee the markets when they reopen. 5A ➤ Idaho flag sales soar, Boise-based Washington Group locates more than 100 New York employees, Boise mayor drives West. 3A

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America

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➤ Middleton plant hearing postponed, 3A ➤ Local schools join relief effort, 4A ➤ Former resident describes atmosphere in Washington,4A ➤ Bush vows to win the ‘first war of the 21st century,’ 6A ➤ More than 4,700 missing in New York attack, 7A ➤ Airlines tentatively resume flights, increase security, 8A ➤ Ida Chatter meets patriotic Middleton teen, 1C

Under Siege friday

Partly cloudy, showers, 83

September 14, 2001

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Nampa family awaits news

Day of Prayer today President Bush and Gov. Dirk Kempthorne have declared today a day of prayer to remember victims of the terrorist attacks in the United States. A ceremony will be held at noon on the Statehouse steps in Boise. Kempthorne suggested all bells around the state ring for one minute at noon, and citizens observe a moment of silence wherever they are at that time. “While each individual is dealing with their feelings in their own way, as a state we can come together, reach out and share our feelings and express our condolences to those who have lost loved ones,” Kempthorne said. Military, police, firefighters, the governor and religious leaders will lead the remembrance ceremony in Boise.

Parents pray for a miracle that Vauk survived Pentagon attack By Sam Bass Idaho Press-Tribune

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▼ Today’s edition Business, 1D Classifieds, 2D Comics, 3C Connections, 1C Legals, 8A Movies, 4C

Opinion, 10A Puzzles, 3D TV listings, 2A Valley, 4A Weather, 2A

Please see Vauk, 5A

By John Solomon The Associated Press WASHINGTON — U.S. investigators pressed Thursday to identify terrorist collaborators who may still be in a position to strike more Americans, and agents located critical ‘‘black boxes’��� from two of Tuesday’s hijacked planes. Four U.S. officials told The Associated Press that authorities are investigating the possibility that some terrorists involved with Tuesday’s plots are still at large. Five men who tried to board a plane Thursday in New York were being questioned, officials said. One of the men had a false pilot’s identification.The five were identified as the same men who had tried to board a plane around the time of Tuesday’s hijackings, but were turned away. The FBI sent the airline industry a list of 52 people wanted for questioning.Airlines were asked to alert agents if any of the individuals were spotted. The FBI searched the country and abroad for possible suspects who had recent flight training, ties to the hijackers or their backers, or attempted to enter the United States recently, said these officials, who spoke only on condition of anonymity. Agents have been examining manifests of flights that were not hijacked on Tuesday, to find

AP

Flowers sit atop a car Thursday morning near the site of the World Trade Center in New York. A fine dust coated much of lower Manhattan when buildings collapsed Tuesday. Someone used the medium to leave a poignant message on the car’s window. More coverage, Pages 5 through 12.

matches with people who fit this profile, the officials said. The concerns are also being driven by fresh intelligence suggesting a continuing threat, the officials added. The information ‘‘suggests we haven’t seen the end of this current threat,’’ one U.S. official said. He cited concerns terrorists may strike in a different manner now that airport security has been beefed up. Signs of fear were every-

where. The U.S. Capitol was evacuated for a suspicious package and New York’s airports were temporarily closed to incoming flights. One man was arrested in New York with a fake pilot’s identification. A security ring around the White House was widened. A number of people questioned in connection with the plot have been arrested for immigration violations and were in the custody of the

Immigration and Naturalization Service, a Justice Department official said. The department had previously said people were detained, including at least a half dozen in Massachusetts and Florida, because of immigration problems. But it wasn’t until late Thursday that officials revealed that those people had been arrested. The INS has 48 hours after arrest to charge someone vio-

lating immigration rules. Some of those detained could be charged Friday, said the official, speaking on condition of anonymity. No one has yet been charged in Tuesday’s attacks. In Minnesota, the possibility emerged that the FBI knew before Tuesday’s attack of at least one Arab man seeking the type of flight training the hijackers received. Please see Investigation, 6A

Prep games on, but NFL, MLB canceled

Today’s news section was produced by News Editor Drew Munro, Managing Editor Vickie Holbrook, Assistant Managing Editor David Woolsey, Night Editor Andrea Scott, and page designers Melissa Wilson and Rosemary Gray. Copyright © 2001 Printed on recycled newsprint

Vol. 22, No. 76, 36 pages

on the web: idahopress.com

Tuesday that he was missing. Navy officials confirmed Wednesday that he was in the area where the attack occurred. The family refuses to give up hope. “We continue to pray,” sister Lynn Caba said. “Many people are praying with us.” Born and raised in Nampa, Ron graduated from Nampa High School in 1982 with highest honors.

Federal agents track leads across the globe

WASHINGTON — White House officials and congressional leaders agreed early today to final details of a $40 billion package to combat terrorism and recover from attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. The figure was double what President Bush requested. Determined to show a united front, lawmakers also seemed to be nearing agreement on a separate measure that would back the use of ‘‘necessary and appropriate force’’ by President Bush against the people responsible for Tuesday’s attacks. House Speaker Dennis Hastert, R-Ill., said the House could consider that bill as early as Friday. Hastert said the two sides agreed to drop earlier language opposed by some lawmakers that would also have approved use of force by Bush to ‘‘deter and pre-empt any related future acts of terrorism or aggression against the United States.’’ Opponents said that would have gone too far in eliminating Congress’ role in future incidents. Leaders hoped to finalize the spending measure in the House today, and in the Senate to follow. A Saturday session of Congress was looking increasingly likely. At a Capitol meeting that ran past midnight Thursday, top lawmakers and White House officials agreed that half the package would be available virtually immediately, and half after details are spelled out in subsequent legislation. Administration officials had hoped Congress would approve the measure in time for Bush to tout it when he visits New York on today.

Death es, 5A

U.S. Navy Reserve Lt. Commander, was assigned a week’s duty at the Pentagon. Had the attack come a week earlier, or later, he might not have been there. He is the youngest of five sons and four daughters of the Vauks, a longtime Nampa family. Siblings Chuck, David, and Lynn gathered at the family home Thursday to support their parents and other family members. They did not know Ron was at the Pentagon when the attacks went down, but learned later

Hijackers may be at large

The Associated Press

Terry Baird William Colson Helin Jones

NAMPA — Hubert and Dorothy Vauk and their children anxiously wait today, praying they will hear from son Ron Vauk, who was at the Pentagon when terrorists struck Tuesday morning. As fate would have it, Vauk, 37, a

Ron Vauk

Congress doubles Bush request for $20 billion in aid

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Local and state colleges will play some games Staff and wire reports

Most high school sports events in Idaho have not been altered due to Tuesday’s terrorist attacks, meaning a full slate of high school football will be played tonight in the area just as soccer, volleyball and cross country events have been previously this week. However, the national sports scene at the professional and

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college levels will continue a complete standstill throughout the weekend. The NFL announced Thursday it will not play its 15-game schedule because of the attacks in New York and Washington.Following the NFL’s lead, Major League Baseball, several auto racing circuits, college football conferences and the country’s largest soccer league postponed or canceled games through Sunday. The postponement was the first for non-strike reasons by the NFL, which played two

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days after President John F. Kennedy was assassinated on Nov. 22, 1963. Pete Rozelle, the NFL commissioner at the time, later said it was the worst decision he made in 29 years in the job. All NCAA Division I college football teams went on to cancel or postpone weekend games, including the University of Idaho’s game at Montana. A makeup date, if any, has not been announced. Also, Idaho State’s scheduled home football game Saturday against Eastern Washington

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was postponed without an announ­ced makeup date. All activities at the Pocatello university, including the ISU Sports Hall of Fame Weekend, were postponed or canceled. Though Idaho State and all Big Sky teams postponed their athletic events, a handful of other NCAA I-AA football games will take place across the country. Boise State already announced Wednesday that its scheduled home football game against Central Michigan was postponed until Dec. 1 and

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that its other athletic events were canceled. Idaho also announced Wednesday that most of its athletic events were canceled, adding the football postponement Thursday. Albertson College will not play its scheduled volleyball match today at Western Baptist in Oregon, though it is expected to play Saturday at Concordia in Portland. The men’s and women’s soccer teams at ACI will play as scheduled.

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➤ Accidental shooting kills Nampa teen, 3A ➤ Nampa, Caldwell airports still closed, 4A ➤ Group shows support for Treasure Valley Muslims, 4A ➤ Businesses, workers take time to show respect, 4A ➤ President Bush activates military reserves, 6A ➤ Nation observes Day of Remembrance, 7A ➤ Black boxes recovered from Pentagon attack, 7A

Under Siege saturday

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September 15, 2001

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First suspect arrested Caldwell · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 27 Nampa · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 21 Vallivue · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 20 Emmett · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 14 Eagle · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 14 Meridian · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 0 Homedale · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 28 Nampa Christian · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7 Melba · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 41 Middleton · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6 Parma · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 27 Nyssa, Ore. · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 13 Highland · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 21 Centennial · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 18 Kuna · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 28 Boise · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 21

Report: Fighters were scrambled, but not in time

CNN reported late Friday that at least four U.S. Air Force fighter jets scrambled to inter­ cept the hijacked jetliners that hit the World Trade Center and the Pentagon on Tuesday, but the planes arrived too late. Defense Department officials told the network two armed fighters from a Mass­ achusetts base raced toward New York after the first Boeing 767 hit the north tower, but didn’t arrive until after the second airliner crashed into the south tower. CNN reported that officials said there was no consideration of shooting down the civilian airliners — in part because the fighter jets were never in a position to fire. Similarly, jets arrived from Langley Air Force Base in Virginia too late to prevent the attack on the Pentagon, CNN said.

Afghanistan gets ready for ‘holy war’ Mullah Mohammed Omar, leader of the Taliban ruling party, said in a radio address Friday that the Afghan people should prepare to wage a holy war, according to a report by CNN. Omar said the country survived inva­ sions by Britain and Russia, and would prevail over the United States as well, the report said. Afghanistan is concerned that the United States is going to attack the country because it has harbored Osama bin Laden.

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Obituaries and death notices, 5A Opinion, 10A Puzzles, 4D TV listings, 2A Valley, 4A Weather, 2A

WASHINGTON — Lawenforcement authorities made their first arrest Friday in the worldwide investigation of

Copyright © 2001 Printed on recycled newsprint

same person arrested Thursday at Kennedy International Airport after showing a pilot’s license issued to his brother. In that case, he was detained by Port Authority police. The man later appeared in federal court in White Plains, N.Y., on Friday, but officials declined to identify him or say what information they were

seeking. It was the first big break in the investigation, code-named PENTTBOM, into the worst terrorist assault on U.S. soil. Some 5,000 people are believed to have perished in Tuesday’s attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. Please see Arrest, 6A

Patriotism prevails on local fields

Families think beyond game in wake of terrorism attacks By Vickie Holbrook Idaho Press-Tribune

Hundreds of Canyon County residents turned off their television sets Friday night and headed to local football fields to root for their favorite teams. It seemed to be therapy for many. The turnout was excellent.The spirit good. But their hearts still ached for the thousands of victims in Tuesday’s terrorist attacks on the United States. And they didn’t mind showing it. Flags of every form. Red. White. Blue. Candles. Silent Moments. Tributes. Prayers. Posters. Donations for the Red Cross.Tears. Hugs. Small talk about the tragic stories, the miracles and the barrage of e-mails that honor those who died. Questions about an obvious pending attack. The stadium was filled with talk of 18-year-old sons who wonder if they will be called to serve to sustain any military action that might — no, must — occur. And hushed conversations about the victims, including one of Rob Bartholomew / IPT Nampa High School’s own graduNampa High School football fans show their respect for the fallen victims of Tuesday’s terrorist attacks during the National Anthem at the Bulldog Bowl in ates of 1982. Nampa Friday night. The flags were printed by the Idaho Press-Tribune and distributed both in the paper and at local football games. Please see Patriotism, 5A

By Nathaniel Hoffman Idaho Press-Tribune

Vol. 22, No. 77, 88 pages

for the FBI in New York, said the Joint Terrorist Task Force took the man into custody at 3 p.m. EDT on the material witness warrant, which allows authorities to arrest someone considered crucial to an investigation without charging him with any crime. A law enforcement source said the man arrested was the

canyon county remembers

Thousands mourn, show patriotism at Statehouse

Today’s news section was produced by News Editor Drew Munro, Assistant Managing Editor David Woolsey, Night Editor Andrea Scott, and page design­ ers Sergio Brown and Rosemary Gray.

on the web: idahopress.com

By John Solomon and Karen Gullo The Associated Press

this week’s terrorist attacks, apprehending a suspect in New York thought to have relevant information. The man was arrested as a material witness in the World Trade Center attack, New York City Police Commissioner Bernard Kerik told a news conference there Friday night. Jim Margolin, spokesman

Idahoans unite at rally in support of Americans

Carol Howard Helin Jones Robert Wade

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Man said to be ‘witness’ in New York City attack

BOISE — Thousands of proud flag-waving Idahoans gathered at the Statehouse steps Friday to remember those killed in Tuesday’s terrorist attacks on the East Coast. The crowd — many wearing red, white and blue colors —  swelled beyond the Capitol grounds onto nearby streets. “I wonder how closely our numbers represent the numbers of those American citi-

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zens whose lives have been lost,” Gov. Dirk Kempthorne told the alternately somber and resounding audience of men, women and children. "You are the face of America and you represent the faces of those lost. Soldiers from Gowen Field and Mountain Home Air Force Base,joined police officers,firefighters, emergency personnel, civilians, politicians and clergy to demonstrate that Idaho suffers with the families who lost loved ones Tuesday. “Throughout the 50 states of the United States, we pray for their well being and their future,” Kempthorne said.

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The rally included rousing tributes to police and firefighters, scores of whom are feared dead in New York after the World Trade Center towers collapsed, as well as tearful moments. In one of those, the governor described what’s speculated to be a heroic effort by passengers aboard a fourth hijacked airliner to bring it down rather than allow the terrorists to crash it into a national landmark. All were killed when the plane crashed Mike Vogt/IPT in western Pennsylvania. John Langfield of Boise waves the American flag Friday at the noon ceremony on Please see Rally, 6A the Idaho Statehouse steps.

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Under Siege

➤ U.S. forces stand ready in Persian Gulf, 3A ➤ Cyclists pedal to help others, 4A ➤ First wave of victims laid to rest, 6A ➤ Feds detain 25, issue 2nd warrant, 7A ➤ Bush: Victory will take patience, 7A‑ ➤ Airline guards on the rise, 8A ➤ Legal industry suffers big loss, 9A

SUNDAY

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September 16, 2001

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Pilot saw hijacked jet on way to crash The Associated Press NASHUA, N.H. (AP) — Before his own plane was hijacked, a United Airlines pilot saw a hijacked American Airlines jet already on a collision course with the World Trade Center, a Federal Aviation Administration worker told The Associated Press. Controllers asked the pilot of United Airlines Flight 175 to scan the skies for the wayward American Airlines Flight 11 after they noticed signs of trouble, the worker said Saturday. ‘‘The controller is trying to determine what is going on, so they call (other planes). One of those traffic calls was to United 175, and he did see him,’’ said the source, an employee of the FAA’s Boston Center, about 45 miles northwest in Nashua. The two flights, carrying 157 people, took off from Boston on Tuesday and crashed into New York’s World Trade Center, causing the building to collapse in the deadliest terrorist attack in American history. The man spoke on condition of anonymity, saying workers at the Boston Center were warned they will be prosecuted for interfering with a criminal investigation if they speak with the media. Controllers at the center handled both flights after they took off for Los Angeles. The first sign of trouble came about 15 minutes after takeoff when controllers gave the American Airlines pilots permission to move to a higher altitude, the source said. ‘‘The controller, I believe, first knew something was wrong when they tried to clear him to climb to 31,000 or 35,000 feet. They did not respond,’’ he said. ‘‘In some time during that period, the controller notified the supervisor, ’Hey, there might be a problem here — we can’t talk to this guy.’’’ All signs indicated that the United flight had not been hijacked yet. Had the American plane been on course, the United pilot would not have been able to see it, the worker said. In fact, the American flight had veered south around Albany, N.Y., and was headed for Manhattan.

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Bush preps forces for war President also braces Americans for sacrifice By Ron Fournier AP White Correspondent

House

WASHINGTON — Presi­ dent Bush ordered U.S. troops to get ready for war and braced Americans for a long, difficult assault against terrorists to avenge the deadliest attack on the nation. ‘‘Those who make

war against the United States have chosen their own destruc­ tion,’’ he declared Saturday. ‘‘We will smoke them out of their holes,’’ Bush said.‘‘We’ll get them running and we’ll bring them to justice.’’ But first the nation had to mourn its dead. ‘‘This is indeed a sad occasion, one to be repeated thousands of times by our fellow citizens across the country,’’ Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas said at the memorial service

for Barbara Olson, wife of U.S. Solicitor General Theodore Olson. She was among the 64 pas­ sengers and crew members on American Airlines Flight 77 that crashed into the Pentagon. Rescue workers searched with diminishing hopes in the rubble of the World Trade Center in New York and the crash-scarred Pentagon for any survivors. Four days after hijackers seized commercial airliners

and slammed them into the symbols of American military and economic might, Bush said prime suspect Osama bin Laden’s days are numbered.‘‘If he thinks he can hide and run from the United States and our allies he will be sorely mistaken.’’ ‘‘This act will not stand,’’ he said. The vow recalled the words of his father, former President Bush who put Iraq on notice in 1990 that the United States

Local clergy tries to explain horror of terrorist attacks By Sam Bass Idaho Press-Tribune

In the Nampa Bulldogs football article on 1B of Saturday’s paper, Brett Schiller’s first name was misspelled.

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Powerball: 19 28 33 43 49 PB:23 PP:3x Rolldown: 8 25 27 37 39 Wild Card 2: 3 5 20 24 31 Ace of spades Pick 3: 3 2 9

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Hamlin

Jamie Chatham, 9, facing and Cheyene Parker, 8, of Nampa, show their patriotism before an Optimist football game at West Middle School Saturday morning. At weekend events across the Treasure Valley, Idahoans remembered victims of last week’s terrorist attacks by showing their patriotic spirit.

Carol J. Howard Albert Van Vliet Barron Royce Whitley John Sparks Young

Obituaries and death notices, 5A

Business, 1D Classifieds, 3D Connections, 1C Legals, 5C Movies, 8C

New York deaths

By Beckie Ferguson Idaho press-Tribune

Opinion, 16A Puzzles, 4D TV listings, 2A Valley, 4A Weather, 2A

Today’s news section was produced by News Editor Drew Munro, Assistant Managing Editor David Woolsey, Night Editor Andrea Scott and page designer Sergio Brown. Copyright © 2001 Printed on recycled newsprint

Vol. 22, No. 78, 46 pages

on the web: idahopress.com

Valley officers feel N.Y. losses Sadness from attacks spreads to Idaho

▼ Today’s edition

Please see War, 3A

Pastors: Loss hurt God, too

Unfurling the Red, White and Blue

Football correction

▼ Deaths

would not tolerate the invasion of Kuwait. Vice President Dick Cheney,Secretary of State Colin Powell and National Security Adviser Condoleezza Rice — who played key roles in the Persian Gulf War — huddled with Bush under extraordinary security Saturday at Camp David in western Maryland. ‘‘We’re at war,’’ the com­ mander in chief said.

TREASURE VALLEY — It’s still unknown today just how many New York City police officers lost their lives in the terrorist at tacks on the World Trade Center, but the loss of those officers is being felt in the Treasure Valley. Local police and depu­ ties are wearing black bands across their badges — cus­ tomary when fellow officers are killed in the line of duty anywhere. “I don’t think anyone in this business can help but be affected when something

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The city of New York has estimated that about 70 officers from the New York Police Department and Port Authority Police are missing after the World Trade Center was destroyed. As many as 300 New York firefighters are believed to have died when the towers collapsed on them. The search for survivors continues.

happens to another offi­ cer, no matter where it is,” Caldwell Police Capt. Gary Maybon said. “It illustrates how vulnerable people are, not just civilians, but fire per­ sonnel and police officers. We’re all brothers.”

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IPT staff

Canyon County deputies and other local law enforcement officers are wearing black arm bands in honor of their fallen police brethren in New York City.

The collapse of the 110- and firefighters dead or miss­ story twin towers after they ing. They were buried trying were struck by hijacked jet­ to rescue tower workers. liners left scores of officers Please see Police, 6A

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CALDWELL — In the aftermath of the terror and death that rained down on the World Trade Center in New York and the Pentagon, Americans of faith are seeking answers to the question: How can a God of love permit such a devastation of life and property? Canyon County pastors, who spent the horrific days after the tragedy preparing sermons for today, agree that there is no easy answer. Some struggled to prepare special messages of comfort and hope for their congregations, expected to gather in higher-than-normal num­ bers for Sunday services. Caldwell First Assembly of God Pastor Gerald Crownover admits he does not have an answer. “It seems like hatred has always been here,” he said. “It’s a challenge to preach love and forgiveness.” Many ministers, including The Rev. Billy Graham, have framed the tragedy around the spiritual tenets of the clash between good and evil. “Today, we say to those who mas­ terminded this cruel plot and to those who carried it out, the spirit of this nation will not be defeated by their twisted and diabolical schemes,” Graham told the nation’s leaders at a prayer service Friday. “It must break God’s heart, too,” said Stephen Jahn, pastor of spiri­ tual development at the Deer Flat Free Methodist Church.“Life is unfair (and) understanding God is difficult. “This tragic event is so far from the sense of (God’s) care for others that it’s difficult to explain,” he said, adding, “It’s not over. There will be more of a price to be paid.” God is both a god of justice and mercy, Pastor David Rowe of the Nampa First Baptist Church said as he struggled with a special Sunday sermon. “There is a time for mercy, but there is a time for accountability of injustice, a day of reckoning, if you will.” People of faith know that even the most devout aren’t spared adversity.

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6 y

Inside today

America

a D

Under Siege

➤ BSU enrollment up, 3A ➤ Beware of fund-raising scams, 4A ➤ Residents show patriotic pride, 4A ➤ Some local flights allowed, 4A ➤ Airline task forces appointed, 6A ➤ Will biological attacks be next, 8A ➤ New York, nation back to work, 8A ➤ Americans pack local churches, 8A ➤ Osama bin Laden denies charges, 9A ➤ Pentagon repair will cost millions, 9A ➤ Is bigger really better, 1C

Monday

Partly cloudy, 82

September 17, 2001

s e rv i n g t h e w e s t e r n t r e a s u r e va l l e y

w w w. i d a h o p r e s s . c o m

▼ Death toll rises Here is a tally of victims and people missing as a result of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks

New York

By Tom Raum The Associated Press

Washington Believed dead: 188, a combination of military and civilian employees at the Defense Department and the passengers and crew of American Airlines Flight 77. Missing: 74 The missing list includes Lt. Cmdr. Ronald James Vauk, a 1982 Nampa High School graduate. Vauk’s family continues to wait for news and refuses to give up hope. Injured: 94 treated at area hospitals, including at least 10 in critical condition

Pennsylvania Confirmed dead: 45 SOURCE: AP wire reports

▼ Lend a hand To send financial donations or letters of support, the following addresses or phone numbers are suggested. ■ To write letters of support: Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani City Hall New York, NY 10007

Donations ■ Blood Donations 1-800-933-BLOOD (between 8am and 9pm) ■ Red Cross Donations 1-800-514-5103 1-800-Help Now ■ NYS Emergency Management Office Bulk Donations 1-800-801-8092

Financial Contributions ■ American Red Cross Disaster Relief P.O. 3756 Church Street Station New York, NY 10008 ■ The Salvation Army 120 West 14th Street New York, NY 10011 ■ Phone contributions: (888) 234-8888 ■ United Way of New York City United Way September 11th Fund 2 Park Avenue New York, NY 10016 Phone contributions: (800) 710-8002

▼ Deaths Carol J. Howard Deanna M. Livingston Mary Katherine Black Margot Borden Connie Christensen

Alice Hartley Sean H. Miller Lloyd N. Parve Rowland C. Witters

Obituaries and death notices, 5A

▼ Today’s edition Classifieds, 1D Comics, 6C Connections, 1C Legals, 10A-13A, 3C-5C Movies, 7C

Bush pledges end to evil doers Bush: ‘no question’ bin Laden is prime suspect

Confirmed dead: 180 Dead who have been identified: 115 Missing: 5,097, including hundreds of firefighters and 23 New York police officers. Injured: 4,300

WASHINGTON — Vowing not to be cowed, President Bush pledged a crusade against terrorists Sunday as top administration officials zeroed in on Saudi exile Osama bin Laden and Afghanistan’s Taliban militia for possible retribution for last week’s terrorist attacks. ‘‘No question, he is the prime suspect. No question about that,’’ Bush said,

brushing off a reported denial of responsibility by bin Laden. As Bush sought to rally Americans to get on with their lives and jobs, administration officials asserted on the Sunday talk shows that nations that harbor terrorists would face the ‘‘full wrath’’ of the United States. They emphasized that the battle against terrorism would be long and include legal, diplomatic and economic offensives as well as military action. Vice President Dick Cheney disclosed that after suicide hijackers slammed planes into the World Trade Center in New York and the Pentagon on Tuesday morning, Bush ordered the military to

shoot down any commercial aircraft that disobeyed orders to turn away from Washington’s restricted air space. Bush, upon returning to the White House from Camp David, said: ‘‘I gave our military the orders necessary to protect Americans. Of course, that was difficult.’’ Bush, who was in Florida at the time of the attacks, added:‘‘Never did I dream we would be under attack this way.’’ The president also said that the nation and its limping economy were resilient and would bounce back. ‘‘Tomorrow when you get back to work, work hard like you always have.’’ he told Americans. ‘‘My administration

Investors New church breaks ground nervous, eager for market The building will serve more than 2,000 families By Beckie Ferguson Idaho Press-Tribune

CALDWELL — More than 600 people attended a ground breaking ceremony Sunday at the future site of a 16,000-square-foot Catholic church on the corner of Linden Street and Farmway Road. The new Our Lady of the Valley church will combine the Catholic communities of Homedale, Middleton, Marsing, Parma, Greenleaf, Wilder and other rural areas. “I’m very excited about it,” Oralia Quijano, of Caldwell said. “We can all be together — united, not separate.” Not everyone, particularly citizens of outlying towns, were as thrilled when they first heard of the decision to do away with masses at the smaller parishes, according to Father Enrique Terriquez. “At first it was hard for them to understand and they thought building the new church meant their parishes would no longer be there,”Terriquez said.“But after they got their questions answered and realized there will still be a presence in their communities, they accepted it.” Terriquez,who pastors St.Mary’s Catholic Church in Caldwell, said the smaller parish buildings will be transformed into social halls where small weddings, receptions and religious education classes Rob Bartholomew / IPT will continue to take place. Yadira Almeida, 4 of Homedale, rests on a shovel during the Rosary for the groundbreaking of Please see Church, 5A the new Our Lady of the Valley Parish near Caldwell Sunday afternoon.

Marsing student helps organize and raise funds

Today’s news section was produced by Managing Editor Vickie Holbrook, and copy editors Sergio Brown and Melissa Wilson and Reporter Beckie Ferguson Copyright © 2001 Printed on recycled newsprint

Vol. 22, No.79, 34 pages

has a job to do. ... We will rid the world of evil doers.’’ ‘‘This crusade, this war on terrorism, is going to take awhile. And American people must be patient,’’ Bush said. Cheney,appearing on NBC’s‘‘Meet the Press,’’ had harsh words for Afghanistan, where bin Laden has operated since 1996, and the Taliban, the Muslim fundamentalist militia that controls most of Afghanistan. ‘‘The government of Afghanistan has to understand that we believe they have, indeed, been harboring a man who committed and whose organization committed this most egregious act,’’ Cheney said.

O u r L a d y o f t h e V a ll e y

Analysts expect traders to buy Lisa Singhania AP Business Writer

NEW YORK — Even as the collapsed twin towers of the World Trade Center still smolder,Tony Sewell takes comfort that, just a few blocks away, the nation’s devastated financial district reopens today. ‘‘You’ve got to move onward and show that they didn’t succeed,’’ said Sewell, referring to the terrorists who hijacked and crashed two planes into the symbol of the nation’s financial heartland, within walking distance of his home. ‘‘I don’t think people are going to sell. People are going to come together and say ’We need to sit through this and make it through this together.’’’ His sentiment was shared by Americans across the country Sunday, a day ahead of the scheduled resumption of stock trading in U.S. financial markets after a four-session closure prompted by the devastation. Bonds and some commodities resumed trading Thursday. But it is the stock market’s longest closure since World War I, although the NYSE did close early for five straight sessions during 1929 in the aftermath of the market crash that year. There appeared to be strong consensus that Wall Street needed to get back to normal — though search and rescue efforts continue a short distance from the New York Stock Exchange and other financial businesses struggle to assess their physical and human losses. Please see Market, 6A

Skate park becomes a reality

Opinion, 14A Puzzles, 2D TV listings, 2A Valley, 4A Weather, 2A

on the web: idahopress.com

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By Michelle Cork Idaho Press-Tribune MARSING — For now it’s just a concrete slab, but Marsing’s new skateboard park represents years of organizing and fund raising for a small group of people led by high school senior Jeff Moyer. “It’s great,” Moyer, 17, said Tuesday as he watched the 25-by100-foot slab being poured by a crew from McAlvain Construction,

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which donated the materials and labor.“All this work finally paid off. It makes me happy.” The skate park is located across from City Park and behind V & F Produce Market at the corner of First Avenue and Second Street. During the past couple of years, Jeff and a core group of skateboarders, in-line skaters, extreme bikers, other students and their adult backers raised $6,400 through grants, donations from individuals, businesses and civic organizations and fund-raisers. About $4,000 was used for the

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first phase of the project. Tired of he and his skateboarding friends being run off of parking lots throughout town, Jeff suggested a skate park to Barbie Vander Boegh, president of the board of the Congressional Award Program in Idaho, who introduced him to city councilwoman Faye Pfrimmer. “We really have nothing here in Marsing for kids to do,” Pfrimmer said. “I went along with them because we’ve got some great Dick Selby/IPT kids.” Jeff Moyer, a Marsing High School senior, wants to help the comPlease see Skate, 5A munity get a skate board park. The concrete was poured Tuesday.

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Day 7

covers America Reecovers Tuesday

Sunny, 82

September, 18, 2001

s e rv i n g t h e w e s t e r n t r e a s u r e va l l e y

w w w. i d a h o p r e s s . c o m

Warhawk celebrates patriotism tonight NAMPA — In response to last week’s attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, Nampa’s Warhawk Air Museum will host an hour-long patriotic program tonight beginning at 7 p.m. There will be a color guard, pledge of allegiance, prayer and remembrance and performances by the Nampa High School Choir and the Nampa High Trumpet Players. The public is encouraged to bring a red, white or blue candle. Child care will be provided by the Eagle High School cheerleaders. The museum is located at 201 Municipal Drive at the Nampa Airport. It is off Airport Road, about a block east of Garrity Boulevard. For more information about tonight’s and other museum events, call 465-6446.

Canyon firefighters offer support NAMPA — A week after terrorists destroyed the World Trade Center, leaving hundreds of New York firefighters missing and their families praying for their recovery, Canyon County firefighters keep rallying to the cause. As of Monday, Nampa and Caldwell crews were tallying the fruits of fund-raising efforts that were launched immediately after the attacks. Nampa Battalion Chief Larry Richardson announced the department had received $13,000 for the families of fallen New York firefighters. Caldwell Battalion Chief Dan Hartwig estimated that $3,000 had been raised. “People are going nuts — it’s great,” Hartwig said late Monday. “Several people came in today and gave 50 to 100 bucks.” In Nampa, where the fund has nearly doubled since Friday, Richardson was thankful for the outpouring of support. “The people of this community continue to amaze us with their support and giving,” he said.

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Market down, not out

Dow closes down 684 points as trading resumes By Lisa Singhania AP Business Writer

NEW YORK — Nervous investors sent stocks reeling Monday on Wall Street’s first day of trading since the terrorist attacks. The Dow suffered its biggest one-day point drop and closed below 9,000 for the first time in more than 2 1/2 years. The resumption of trading — on a floor still smelling heavily of acrid smoke — ended the stock market’s longest shutdown since the Depression.

The Dow ended the day down 684.81 points at 8,920.70, according to preliminary calculations. Its previous record for a one-day drop was 617.78, set April 14, 2000. The Nasdaq fell 115.83 points to 1,579.55, and the broader Standard & Poor’s 500 index was down 53.77 at 1,038.77. Still, in percentage terms the drop in the Dow was only a third as big as the 1987 crash. Both the Dow and the Nasdaq were off about 7 percent. By comparison, the Dow dropped more than 22 percent when it lost 508 points in the crash of 1987. Even before last week, the market had been hurting because of the slug-

gish economy. But the terrorist attacks dealt a punishing blow, particularly to airlines, which have been forced to cut back service and lay off tens of thousands of employees because a fear of flying has reduced bookings. The Federal Reserve, hoping to boost the economy and the market’s confidence, cut interest rates by a halfpoint just an hour before trading began. It was the eighth rate cut so far this year. Despite the still-smoking ruins in lower Manhattan, it appeared the usual 3,000 traders and other employees made it to the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Please see Market, 5A

N a m p a n a t u r a li z a ti o n

Proud to be Americans

Here’s how you can help: ■ In Nampa, drop off checks or cash at any fire station or at City Hall. Donations also can be mailed to: Nampa Firefighters, 1103 2nd St. S., Nampa, Idaho, 83651. The department asks that “New York Firefighters” be written on checks. ■ Caldwell donations can be mailed to or dropped off at the station, 310 S. 7th Ave., Caldwell, Idaho, 83605. Dick Selby/IPT

Sports correction Caldwell football player Robert Mora was misidentified in a photo caption on page 4B of Saturday’s Press-Tribune.

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Evelyn Baker Everett Bates Ruby Bowman Connie Christensen Raymond Edde James Gilman David Gregg Jessica Gregory Joe Hellhake Victor McKenzie Sean Miller

Ilene Nelson Olyve Payne Winona Packer Terina Schwanz Merritt Seacord Theresa Stonier Velma Teixeira Robert White Rowland Witters

NAMPA — They’re Bosnians, Vietnamese and Peruvians no more. They’re American citizens now. And at no better time. On Monday, 92 applicants from 34 countries became naturalized American citizens at a ceremony in the Nampa Civic Center. While last week’s terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon tinged

Obituaries and death notices, 5A Opinion, 8A Puzzles, 6D TV listings, 2A Valley, 4A Weather, 2A

Members question expense, citing effects on other projects By Sam Bass Idaho Press-Tribune

Today’s news section was produced by Assistant Managing Editor David Woolsey, Valley Editor Sean Deter, and copy editors Sergio Brown and Julius Tigno. Copyright © 2001 Printed on recycled newsprint

Vol. 22, No. 80, 28 pages

on the web: idahopress.com

the event with sadness, the tragedies in no way dimmed the new citizens’ pride. As she was helped across the stage, an 82-year-old Iranian woman clutched her miniature U.S. flag high above her head. A Mexican woman expecting a baby was given two flags with her citizenship papers. In an especially moving moment, 92 new citizens, their friends and families rose to sing “The Star-Spangled Banner.” Many of the new citizens expressed sadness about last week’s tragedy. However, Dolly Janeth Quast, originally from Colombia, said that

while she was sad for those who lost their lives, she only felt the strength of her patriotism grow. “My heart is very strong,” Quast said. “I want to be a better citizen, especially because of the tragedy and for the people that suffer.” Marcella Hurtado-Gomez admitted to mixed feelings of joy and trepidation on the heels of last week’s deadly violence. She said the attacks were “a little scary,” but even though they haven’t had much time to sink in, they haven’t changed her gratitude and pride. Please see Americans, 5A

President has faith in economy despite Monday stock plunge By Tom Raum The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — President Bush said Monday the United States wants terrorism suspect Osama bin Laden ‘‘dead or alive.’’ The Federal Reserve cut key interest rates, but nervous investors sent Dow Jones industrial stocks plunging to their largest point loss ever. Faced with a faltering economy, Bush met with top domestic policy advisers late Osama bin Laden Monday to consider legislation to bail out hard-hit U.S. airlines. Inside And aides said he news weighing a new economic stimulus pack- ■ Fed cuts age that might include interest rate, 1D new tax cuts. ‘‘I’ve got great faith ■ Consumers in the economy. I return to malls, understand it’s tough 4D right now,’’ Bush said. ■ Taliban will ‘‘Transportation busi- meet to decide ness is hurting.’’ He if they will turn suggested that stock over bin Laden, markets, closed since 3A last Tuesday’s attacks, ■ Bush urges had been ‘‘correcting U.S. not to prior to this crisis.’’ Even though turn against the Federal Reserve Muslims, 6A slashed its benchmark ■ Plane crash federal funds and dis- victims rememcount interest rates bered, 6A by half a percentage ■ Pentagon point, stocks plummet- recovery effort ed as markets opened continues, 9A for the first time since ■ U.S. tightens the devastating attack energy security, in the heart of New 9A York’s financial district. ■ Pakistan Airline, insurance closes its and entertainment border with stocks were hit partic- Afghanistan, ularly hard. The Dow 10A Jones industrials suffered their biggest oneday point drop, 684.81, to 8,920.70, dropping below 9,000 for the first time since December 1998. Bush balanced attending to the weakening economy with preparing the military — and the nation — for possibly prolonged conflict in the battle against international terrorism. ‘ We will win the war and there will be costs,’ Bush said during a visit to the Pentagon,badly damaged when hit by one of the hijacked airliners.‘ The U.S. military is ready to defend freedom at any cost.’

Planners decide against Flying Wye landscaping

▼ Today’s edition Business, 1D Classifieds, 5D Comics, 3C Connections, 1C Legals, 4D Movies, 4C

Nampa ceremony welcomes 92 naturalized citizens By Lora Volkert Idaho Press-Tribune

Pick 3: 6 0 5

▼ Deaths

Iranian native Tabandeh Seiedbagheri, 83, waves her flag Monday after becoming a United States citizen at the Nampa Civic Center. Judge Larry M. Boyle welcomed 92 of the nation’s newest citizens, hailing from 34 countries, during a naturalization ceremony marked by reactions to last week’s terrorist attacks on America.

Bush wants Bin Laden found dead or alive

CALDWELL — Treasure Valley city and county leaders want to nix a $12 million project to landscape the Flying Wye Interchange, saying the money should be used to improve traffic instead. The Community PlanningAssociation of Southwest Idaho voted down the measure Monday because of concerns that spending the money in Boise might shortchange future transportation projects in Canyon County. It marked the second time the plan-

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ning association rejected the proposal, Executive Director Clair Bowman said. Boise Mayor Brent Coles asked the board to reconsider last month’s vote. The Flying Wye is the largest and most expensive highway project in Idaho history. It is designed to improve safety and traffic flow along Interstate 84 and the I-184 Connector in West Boise. The landscaping was sought to improve its appearance. Only Ada County members of the association could vote on the measure. However, Canyon County members consider it a two-county issue because of the possible loss of federal transportation funds to them if so much is spent in Ada County. The motion to reconsider failed by

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The Flying Wye

The Flying Wye interchange in Boise ties together I-184 (The Connector) and traffic from the Boise Town Square area to Interstate 84.

a 5-5 tie of the Ada County members, Bowman said. Canyon County officials felt they should have a say, as well. “I think that project affects Canyon County,”Caldwell Mayor Garret Nancolas said.“Those are funds we all have access to, therefore we should have a vote on them.” The issue will be considered by the Idaho Transportation Board at its meeting Thursday at 8:30 a.m. at transportation headquarters, 3311 W. State St., in Boise. Board members are likely to do

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away with plans for the mammoth landscaping project. “If COMPASS votes a project off their program, we have to take it off the statewide transportation program,” Idaho Transportation Board member Monte McClure said.“We don’t have a vote on COMPASS, and we pretty much follow their lead.” Ada County has a five-year transportation improvement program document covering how the county would like to spend federal transportation funds. It sets the desires of COMPASS.The Idaho Transportation Board has its own version. Only projects agreed to by both groups and included in the document will be considered by federal officials for future funding.

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CY M K

Inside today

Day 8

America Recovers

➤ Nampan fabricates heroism, 3A ➤ Nampan apologizes for story, 3A ➤ American flags missing, 4A ➤ Sen. Craig visits Pentagon, 5A ➤ Bush seeks global alliance, 7A‑ ➤ N.Y. crews reach ground zero, 9A ➤ Afghans historically tough, 10A

Wednesday

Sunny, 80

September 19, 2001

s e rv i n g t h e w e s t e r n t r e a s u r e va l l e y

w w w. i d a h o p r e s s . c o m

Boeing expected idle at least 20,000 The Associated Press SEATTLE — Boeing Co. is planning to lay off at least 20,000 people — more than 20 percent of its commercial airline work force — as a result of last week’s terrorist attacks, Gov. Gary Locke said Tuesday. The aircraft maker was expected to make an announcement today. The company was not expected to disclose specific locations for the layoffs, but was telling lawmakers the cuts are expected to be implemented by early 2002. The layoffs could swell to as many as 30,000 workers, according to a congressional source, who spoke Tuesday on the condition of anonymity. A Boeing spokesman would not comment Tuesday night, but Boeing officials confirmed that an announcement was expected early today. Roughly 93,000 people work for Boeings’ commercial airline sector, much of which is centered around the company’s former headquarters in Seattle. The White House and Congress are considering a federal aid package for the airline industry to help them recover from last week’s attacks. The industry has asked for $24 billion. The House floated a $15 billion relief plan last Friday that could include $2.5 billion in immediate grants and $12.5 billion in loans and credits.

U.N. to Taliban: Hand over Osama bin Laden The Associated Press UNITED NATIONS — The U.N. Security Council said Tuesday it had one message for Afghanistan’s Taliban rulers: Hand over suspected terrorist Osama bin Laden and close all terrorist training camps ‘‘immediately and unconditionally.’’ The 15-nation council, whose permanent members are the United States, Russia, China, Britain and France, issued a statement after a briefing on the political, military and humanitarian situation in Afghanistan, ‘‘including the dire consequences of Taliban rule for the Afghan people.’’

Afghans told to prepare for holy war against U.S. The Associated Press KABUL, Afghanistan — The hard-line Taliban said God would protect it if the world tried to ‘‘set fire’’ Afghanistan for sheltering terrorist suspect Osama bin Laden, and in comments broadcast Tuesday also called on all Muslims to wage holy war on America if it attacks. Hundreds of Islamic clerics were gathering in the Afghan capital to discuss conditions for extraditing bin Laden to a country other than the United States, a Pakistan government official said. The clerics are expected to meet today, said Hamdullah Nomani, the mayor of Kabul and host of the gathering.

▼ Idaho Lottery ▼ Deaths Evelyn Baker Ruby Bowman Arnold Branden Raymond Edde

Councilman says Nampa needs to be run differently By Sam Bass Idaho Press-Tribune

NAMPA — Nampa City Councilman Tom Dale wants to be mayor. The six-year council member said he is running because he doesn’t feel comfortable with the

held by Maxine Horn, who is seeking a second term as mayor. Caldwell incumbents Mayor Garret Dale was elected to the council Nancolas and City Council members in 1995. Shannon Ozuna and Rob Hopper He listed a number of issues say they will seek re-election, but he considers critical for Nampa’s Jerry Langan will not. No others had growth, saying: announced as of Tuesday. ■ The city is “30 years behind” in transportation planning; ■ There has been no progress Rob Bartholomew / IPT way Nampa is now being run. on the city’s comprehensive plan; Tom Dale, right, announces that he will run for mayor as Gerry Boone Dale, 50, announced Tuesday he’s vying for the office now Please see Dale, 6A and Vicki McMinn hold up a sign in support on the steps of City Hall.

plans to buy Nampa plant

FBI convinced more attacks were plotted By John Solomon The Associated Press WASHINGTON — The FBI has meticulously pieced together a broad terrorist plot, securing evidence the hijackers trained for months or years without raising suspicions in the United States, received financial and logistical support from others and identified additional targets for destruction. Law enforcement and other officials familiar with the evidence said the FBI is investigating whether the terrorist network behind Tuesday’s attacks targeted more flights for hijacking. Authorities have grown increasingly certain that a second wave of violence was planned by collaborators. They said Sept. 22 has emerged as an important date in the evidence, but declined to be more specific. Please see Attacks, 6A

Execs don’t expect big layoffs at MCMS

NAMPA — MCMS plans to seek bankruptcy and sell its Nampa plant and most other assets to a Massachusetts electronics manufacturing services company. The potential owner, Manufacturers’ Services Limited, said it intends to keep the Nampa site open and retain the vast majority of the approximately 750 MCMS workers. Although the Nampa electronics manufacturing services company will file Chapter 11 bankruptcy, chief executive Rick Rowe said that under the new owners, “life really doesn’t change very much” for the company’s employees, customers and suppliers.

Three arrested FBI agents raided a residence in Detroit looking for one of the nearly 200 witnesses being sought in the investigation. Instead, they found three men and a cache of documents. The three were charged with having false immigration papers, the first criminal charges related to last week’s terrorist incidents.

Rob Bartholomew / IPT

Jesse Ledbetter directs the Nampa High School choir during a patriotic rally at the Warhawk Air Museum in Nampa on Tuesday night. The event was designed as a show of American spirit.

Obituaries and death notices, 5A

By Vickie Holbrook Idaho Press-Tribune

Opinion, 8A Puzzles, 5D TV listings, 2A Valley, 4A Weather, 2A

Today’s news section was produced by News Editor Drew Munro, Assistant Managing Editor David Woolsey, and page designers Sergio Brown and Rosemary Gray. Copyright © 2001 Printed on recycled newsprint

Vol. 22, No. 81, 30 pages

NAMPA —  Family members of Lt. Cmdr. Ronald James Vauk remain in a holding pattern today as search and recovery crews sort through the burned rubble at the Pentagon. It’s been a week since Nampans Dorothy and Hubert Vauk and their grown children were notified that Ron, a 1982 Nampa High School graduate and a 1987 U.S. Naval Academy graduate, was missing. As a Navy Reservist, Ron Vauk was serving a week’s tour as watch commander when a plane loaded with passengers smashed into the Washington, D.C., complex. “My parents and brothers and sisters would like to thank everyone for their support, their prayers and their expressions of sympathy at this most difficult

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Potential shift

One change MCMS CEO Rick Rowe expects will occur at the Nampa plant is a shift in emphasis from assembling circuit boards to box-building work, creating racks and cabinets of circuit boards. Rowe said that involves different skills — more physical labor and less machine operation.

By Lora Volkert Idaho Press-Tribune

Nampa reservist missing in Pentagon terrorist attack

on the web: idahopress.com

Caldwell candidates

More strikes planned Mass. firm

Charles Fox Victor McKenzie Terina Schwanz Bob White

▼ Today’s edition Business, 1D Classifieds, 4D Comics, 5C Connections, 1C Legals, 6B Movies, 6C

Dale aims to be mayor

Family still waits for word

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time for our family,” Chuck, the eldest of nine Vauk children, said Tuesday night. Sister Lynn Caba of Nampa and brothers Gary and Dennis of Ron Vauk Texas are in the Washington, D.C., area with Ron Vauk’s wife and young son. Brothers Chuck of Boise and Dave of Nampa remain in the Treasure Valley. Chuck said the family members have attended Federal Emergency Management Agency meetings at the Pentagon where they’ve been told the recovery process is slow because the building is unstable and sections must be shored up before the search can proceed. “The Navy liaisons have been very helpful, and they continue to support the family as the search continues,” Chuck said. John Huff, the FEMA incident support team leader for the

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Vauk background Lt. Cmdr. Ronald James Vauk served about four years on submarines after he completed his submarine training in 1989. Since 1993, he’s been a Reservist in the Navy Command Center 106. All NCC 106 personnel require a Top Secret clearance and must apply for acceptance. Vauk was the watch officer for the Navy Command Center at the Pentagon. The Navy Command Center is the link between the chief of Naval Operations and the entire Navy fleet. For more information about the unit, see www.hq.navy.mil/ncc106/index.htm

search and rescue task forces, said the search and recovery process is especially difficult “because you have a structural collapse, a building fire and a plane crash all rolled up into one event.” Of 188 victims, Pentagon officials said the remains of 97 people had been removed by Monday. Eleven of those have been identified

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The asset sale amounts to an estimated $43.5 million. MCMS has about $260 million in debt, which would not be taken on by the new owners.The transaction is subject to approval by the bankruptcy court supervising the Chapter 11 case for MCMS. Stephen Schultz of Manufacturers’ Services Limited said MCMS’ experienced work force was one reason MSL decided to acquire the company. Please see MCMS, 6A

Arrest made in school vandalism Caldwell teen held on $50,000 bond By Brad Hem Idaho Press-Tribune CALDWELL — Canyon County prosecutors have levied two felony charges against a Caldwell teenager for the Aug. 19 vandalism at the De Colores Migrant Head Start School. Tony McCormick, 19, was arrested Tuesday and held in Canyon County Jail on $50,000 bond for the attack last month that left the tiny pre-school west of Caldwell devastated. Equipment was also reported stolen. McCormick is charged with burglary and malicious damage to property. Sheriff’s deputies said the crime is still under investigation and more arrests might come. Clues at the scene led investigators to McCormick, but investigators would not say what those clues were. The late-night attack left major damage in every room of the school. Two

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computers, toys and nearly every other piece of equipment were destroyed. The vandal or vandals emptied filing cabinets and turned them over, destroyed a copy machine, tipped over shelves, pulled food from freezers and smashed many items. They also sprayed fire extinguisher chemicals throughout the building. Deputies said the vandals began their spree by cutting the phone and power lines to the building so the alarm wouldn’t go off. Three computers, a television, paper shredder and other equipment valued at about $3,500 were stolen from the school in the attack, which came just two days after the school’s fall session for 72 students started. The damage followed $250,000 worth of renovations just finished in the three-room school. In the past month, workers have installed a new security system and made other improvements at the school. Much of the money came from community contributions after the vandalism.

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Inside today

Day 9

America Recovers

➤ Proper flag etiquette, 3A ➤ Franklin Pierce tosses hat into ring for Nampa Council race, 4A ➤ Airlines lay off 40,000, 7A ➤ Memorial planned in N.Y., 8A ➤ Greenspan urges caution, 8A‑ ➤ Feds lose 1,100 computers, 11A

Thursday

Sunny, 83

September 20, 2001

s e rv i n g t h e w e s t e r n t r e a s u r e va l l e y

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India helps U.S. track terrorists CNN reported late Wednesday that India has been working with the United States in the days following last week's hijacking attacks by sharing the locations of terrorist training camps. Indian intelligence officials said that for more than a decade, Islamic militants have been training in Afghanistan and Pakistan for a jihad, or holy war. Sources told CNN that more than 120 camps are operating in the two countries. The camps are small, they are easy to move, and they can be difficult to track by satellite because of the region's rough terrain.

FBI scours e-mails Sources told Fox News that the FBI is poring over hundreds of e-mail communications from both private and public computers. Fox reported the FBI is more interested in content than volume, and the agency said the content not only contains information related to events on Sept. 11 but also chitchat as well. In reference to the Internet, an official said: “They used it and they used it well.”

Network reports that pilots probably murdered

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Bush orders planes to Gulf President will address full Congress tonight By David Espo AP Special Correspondent WASHINGTON — The Pentagon ordered dozens of advanced aircraft to the Persian Gulf region on Wednesday as the hour of military retaliation for deadly terrorist attacks drew closer. President Bush

announced he would address Congress and the nation Thursday night. ‘‘I owe it to the country to give an explanation,’’ the president said in the Oval Office. Bush spoke after meeting with congressional leaders to discuss the economy, weak before the attacks and buffeted by thousands of layoffs in the airline industry and elsewhere in the eight days since.

‘‘No question it’s tough times,’’ he said. ‘‘This is a shock to the economy and we’re going to respond.’’ The president’s announcement that he would go before a joint session of Congress marked a quickening in the pace of events as the administration worked on military, diplomatic and economic responses to the attacks that killed thousands.

Mountain Home ready

NBC News reported Wednesday that Pentagon officials say Mountain Home Air Force Base planes will be among the first called into action. Boise affiliate KTVB said planes will leave today for undisclosed locations, including B-1 bombers and F-15 fighter jets. Details, 3A.

A Pentagon official outlined the first steps of ‘‘Operation Infinite Justice,’’ the decision to send F-15s, F-16s and possibly B-1 bombers to the Persian Gulf.The aircraft will follow the

‘A good patriot’

Hijackers frequented gyms across the country

Authorities investigate how the attacks were financed

ABC News reported more details about the hijackers’ activities in America. The FBI has determined that at least seven of the hijackers had trained or worked out at various gyms. Ziad Jarrahi, one of the hijackers on the flight that crashed in Pennsylvania, is believed to have trained for hand-to-hand combat for two months at a gym in Dania, Fla. "He came in to learn street tactics, street defense, street fighting," Bert Rodriguez, who runs the US1 Fitness Center, told ABC. "When I asked him the purpose, he said just basic self-defense — he told me he traveled a lot."

By Karen Gullo The Associated Press

MCMS correction Wednesday’s 1A story on MCMS’ planned sale incorrectly stated that MicronPC was a client of MCMS. MCMS actually makes memory modules for Micron Technology, the Boise computer chip manufacturer.

Flag pin correction

▼ Idaho Lottery

▼ Deaths Everett Bates Raymond Edde Victor McKenzie Ilene Nelson Charles Powell Stewart Simonson Eileen Stover

Genevieve Stracener Bob White Sidney Williams Leonard Wilson Stephanie Wright John Young

Obituaries and death notices, 5A

▼ Today’s edition Business, 1D Classifieds, 4D Comics, 5C Connections, 1C Legals, 3C Movies, 6C

Opinion, 10A Puzzles, 5D TV listings, 2A Valley, 4A Weather, 2A

Today’s news section was produced by News Editor Drew Munro, Assistant Managing Editor David Woolsey, and page designers Rosemary Gray and Melissa Wilson. Copyright © 2001 Printed on recycled news-

Hearts are heavy after Ron Vauk’s body recovered NAMPA — A community tribute to thousands of terrorist victims takes on new meaning today as family and friends grieve the news that Nampa High School’s 1982 graduate is a confirmed casualty at the Pentagon. Navy Reservist and 1987 Naval Academy graduate Lt. Cmdr. Ronald

Vauk’s body, recovered from the rubble, has been identified. His family was notified Wednesday. “It’s been difficult to wait for the news that we received today,” brother Chuck Vauk said on behalf of his parents, Hubert and Dorothy Vauk, and seven other siblings. “While our family mourns Ron’s death, we recognize that many families face the same situation we do today,”

the eldest Vauk son said. “We appreciate all the support we’ve received and continue to receive as we work through this senseless tragedy. Details haven’t been arranged at this time, but the family expects services will be held on the East Coast, followed by a memorial service in Nampa.

Please see Vauk. 6A

WASHINGTON — The terrorists who planned and carried out last week’s attacks probably were supported by foreign governments, Attorney General John Ashcroft said Wednesday. After visiting the damaged Pentagon building, Ashcroft said of that attack and the ones on the World Trade Center,‘‘It is pretty clear that the networks that conduct these kind of events are harbored, supported, sustained and protected by a variety of foreign governments.’’ ‘‘It is time for those governments to understand with crystal clarity that the United States of America will not tolerate that kind of support,’’ he said. Ashcroft’s comments followed news that the government had received information from a foreign intelligence service that Mohamed Atta, identified by the FBI as a hijacker aboard one of the planes that slammed into the Trade Center, met earlier this year in Europe with an Iraqi intelligence agent. Iraq has denied any involvement in the attacks. Authorities were looking into how the plot was financed, and federal banking regulators Wednesday distributed a list of 21 people, including most of the 19 hijackers. Banks were asked to search their customer files for accounts or financial transactions under those names.

Drawing for house set Fall Fest set to brighten Firefighters fund will also benefit

Free concert

By Beckie Ferguson Idaho Press-Tribune

Caldwell’s All 12 Step Club is sponsoring a prayer vigil and free concert from 1:30 to 6 p.m. Sunday in honor of the New York City firefighters who died in the World Trade Center tragedy last week. It will be held at Lakeview Park in Nampa. Firefighters will be on hand to collect donations for the families of fallen New York firefighters. The bands Nada Brahma, Reckless, The Divas, and Sparky Sparks & The Aardvarks will perform.

NAMPA — Saturday will be the big day when someone wins a home. A raffle drawing for a house donated by Heartland Homes and Corey Barton Construction will be held at 5 p.m. Saturday at the Nampa Boys and Girls Club on Stampede Drive. The fund-raiser will benefit the Boys and Girls Club. Tickets are $100 and only 2,000 will be sold. The house is located at 2821 Pennsylvania Ave. in Oakhurst Estates. Before Saturday’s drawing, a steak and chicken barbecue will be served from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. by Outback Steakhouse, which donated all the food for the event.

Raffle tickets Raffle tickets for the donated house to benefit the Nampa Boys and Girls Club can be purchased at Saturday’s barbecue, or from Nampa City Hall, the Idaho Press-Tribune and Mercy Medical Center. For more information, call City Hall at 465-2270.

Please see Drawing, 11A

Vol. 22, No. 82, 34 pages

on the web: idahopress.com

Dick Selby / IPT

A memorial in remembrance of the victims of last week’s terrorist attacks on the East Coast has been placed in the downtown plaza next to the Nampa Police Station. Nampa Mayor Maxine Horn said the memorial was set up as place where people can leave flowers or light a candle.

By Vickie Holbrook Idaho Press-Tribune

Powerball: 21 26 28 31 41 PB:29 PP: 5x Rolldown: 5 19 27 38 48 Wild Card 2: 5 10 11 16 19 Ace of hearts Pick 3: 2 0 3

■ See details on 8A.

Ashcroft: Terrorists helped by countries

CBS News reported Wednesday that federal investigators believe some of the pilots and co-pilots of the four hijacked aircraft last week were murdered before the planes crashed. But investigators would not disclose what leads them to that conclusion, the network reported. FBI technicians have also recovered fragments of conversations from within one of the plane’s cockpits, CBS said.

Scott Syme was incorrectly identified in a brief on Page 4A Wednesday about a family in Nampa selling flag pins. The pins, made from safety pins, and red, white and blue beads, are available by calling 455-9392.

deployment of air traffic control teams. In addition, an aircraft carrier left Virginia to join other carriers in the region.

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Caldwell this Saturday Event will feature a range of family-oriented fun

Get involved To share your talents or volunteer to help with Caldwell’s Fall Fest at Memorial Park, call Priscilla Chavez at 284-5037. The deadline is 5 p.m. Friday.

By Sam Bass Idaho Press-Tribune CALDWELL — Residents will find a time for families to get together and have fun Saturday during Caldwell’s Fall Fest at Memorial Park. Sponsored by the Western Canyon Youth and Family Coalition, the family community event runs from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. It is free to the public. This is the first of what is hoped to be an annual event, Coalition Executive Director Priscilla Chavez said. “We really wanted an event that would promote a safe and healthy

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environment for youth, families and community organizations to come together.” The fair will include a variety of family-oriented activities. “This is a good way to celebrate Caldwell,” coalition board director Allan Laird said. “After the events of last week, we are looking forward to a turnout of citizens to express their patriotism and cohesiveness.” Please see Festival, 11A

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Day 10

America Recovers

Inside today ➤ Boise Airport resumes curbside service, initiates new fines, 3A ➤ Idahoans react to speech, 6A ➤ N.Y. toll soars past 6,300, 7A ➤ Pope plans Kazakstan trip, 10A

Friday

Sunny, 82

September 21, 2001

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Nampan launches campaign

‘Whether we bring our enemies to justice, or bring justice to our enemies, justice will be done.’

Rob Bartholomew / IPT

Bobby Jones, caddie for Buy.Com Boise Open player Kevin Burton, replaces the pin that bears the American flag at Hillcrest Country Club in Boise Thursday afternoon. ■ For complete coverage of the Buy.Com Boise Open, see Sports, 1B.

History-making relief effort airs tonight By The Associated Press and Idaho Press-Tribune staff Uniting screen stars, musicians and television personalities in an unprecedented collaborative effort, 27 television networks will simulcast a special benefit for terrorist attack victims tonight. ‘‘America: A Tribute to Heroes’’ will air from 7-9 p.m. in the Treasure Valley on the major stations — KBCI Channel 2, KTVB Channel 7, KTRV Channel 12 and KIVI Channel 6 — as well as cable networks such as TNT, Lifetime, Comedy Central, HBO and Showtime. Univision and the Telemundo network also have opted to participate. Tom Cruise, Julia Roberts, Bruce Springsteen, the Dixie Chicks, Ray Romano and Kelsey Grammer have all agreed to participate. It’s believed to be the first time the four major networks have agreed to air the same program simultaneously. The networks haven’t said whether they will set up their own relief organization for victims of the World Trade Center and Pentagon attacks or direct viewers to existing groups. Viewers will be told how they can donate on the show. The four networks will pay for the event and all of the stars are donating their time.

‘We will not falter’

School Board’s Tom Luna seeks Idaho’s top education position By Brad Hem Idaho Press-Tribune

NAMPA — Tom Luna hit the road Thursday to officially begin his campaign for the state’s top education post. The Nampa School Board member announced his Republican candidacy for state superintendent of public instruction in front of local supporters and politicians at Park Ridge Elementary School. Afterward, Luna, his wife and their six children began their campaign journey, with a stop scheduled in the Tom Luna Magic Valley later Thursday. Seeks state post By the time he and his family return to Nampa on Monday night, Luna will have spoken to crowds in Idaho Falls, Lewiston and Coeur d’Alene. “I will take my 20 years of successful business experience and balance it with my six years of involvement in education to raise public education in Idaho to new levels of achievement,” he said. Luna said he has to get busy because he is a relative newcomer to politics outside the Treasure Valley. Please see Luna, 4A

‘Y’ backers venture to Boise center

Iraq offers aid to U.S. CNN reported late Thursday night that Iraq would be willing to aid the United States in the wake of last week's terrorist attacks in New York and Washington. "I say, if the Americans asked the Iraqis for their experience, perhaps the Iraqis would agree," CNN reported Thursday, quoting from an official Iraqi news agency release attributed to Saddam Hussein. Saddam said the offer was "for humanitarian reasons and not for the American government," the report said. The official statement added: "Yes, the hand of God is on the arrogant and the oppressor, but that does not change our concern for people."

▼ Idaho Lottery Rolldown: 5 23 25 42 46 Pick 3: 7 2 3

▼ Deaths Zane Eckles Raymond Edde Victor McKenzie Ilene Nelson

Marie Ross Verbal Watson Sidney Williams John Young

Obituaries and death notices, 5A

▼ Today’s edition Business, 1D Classifieds, 5D Comics, 3C Connections, 1C Legals, 7A Movies, 4C

Canyon County residents plan to start own center in Caldwell

Bush braces nation for war By David Espo AP Special Correspondent

The president’s speech

WASHINGTON — President Bush summoned all nations to wage war on terrorism Thursday night and vowed ‘‘justice will be done’’ against those who killed thousands in last week’s attacks. With warplanes and ships on the move, he urged an anxious America to be calm,‘‘even in the face of a continuing threat.’’ Bush issued a series of demands — not open to negotiation or discussion — to Afghanistan’s rulers to turn over Osama bin Laden, the suspected mastermind of the attacks, and his al-Qaida network.

For the text of President Bush’s speech, visit idahopress.com, where a link to the speech will be posted this morning.

‘‘The Taliban must act and act immediately.They will hand over the terrorists, or they will share in their fate,’’ he said. Bush spoke as American military personnel began moving out from bases around the country, fully aware they could soon be in harm’s way. Nine days after the suicide attacks that leveled the once-soaring World Trade Center and wounded the

By Nathaniel Hoffman Idaho Press-Tribune

mighty Pentagon, Bush addressed a joint session of Congress and a nationwide television audience counted in the millions. ‘‘Tonight we are a country awakened to danger and called to defend freedom,’’ he said ‘‘Our grief has turned to anger, and anger to resolution.’’ Security concerns were high enough to keep Vice President Dick Cheney away from the Capitol. The 35-minute speech won robust bipartisan applause 30 times. And then, in a vivid display of national unity, the president stepped off the rostrum to embraces from the Democratic leaders of the House and Senate. Please see Bush, 6A

CALDWELL — Backers of a YMCA in Caldwell want people to look to Boise for inspiration. Caldwell residents can experience the Downtown Boise Y today as Caldwell moves closer to building a center of its own. The Boise YMCA is helping a Caldwell com- What mittee to decide if it should it is feasible to build a include? similar Y in Caldwell. Visitors touring the You can visit the Boise center can get recently-renovated a firsthand look and Downtown YMCA in enjoy many activities, Boise today for a including swimming workout and fill out pools, gyms, fitness a survey to help a classes, weightlifting steering commitequipment and other tee determine what features. should be included Caldwell partici- in a Caldwell YMCA. pants are asked to The Boise building is fill out a brief survey located at 1050 W. after their visits to State St. and is open help a steering com- until 10 p.m. mittee determine how a Caldwell YMCA could serve the community best. The survey asks what services and activities — from child care to health screenings — Caldwell residents desire. Survey results will be released at an Oct. 18 town hall meeting in Caldwell. Some Caldwell residents visited the West Family YMCA in Boise on Thursday. Residents have worked on a Caldwell YMCA plan for more than a year. According to Carl Woodburn, a Caldwell Y committee co-chairman, supporters have already raised $60,000 for the initial feasibility study. “I feel that the more this thing goes on, the more people want it,” he said.

Mountain Home AFB mobilizes

Opinion, 8A Puzzles, 6D TV listings, 2A Valley, 4A Weather, 2A

Associated Press and IPT staff

Today’s news section was produced by News Editor Drew Munro, Assistant Managing Editor David Woolsey, Valley Editor Sean Deter, and page designers Melissa Wilson and Rosemary Gray. Copyright © 2001 Printed on recycled newsprint

Vol. 22, No. 83, 40 pages

on the web: idahopress.com

AP

President Bush holds the police sheild of New York Police officer George Howard, who died while trying to save others in the World Trade Center, during his address to a Joint Session of Congress on Capitol Hill Thursday.

Idaho has joined preparations for a military response to terrorist attacks that killed thousands of Americans on the East Coast. Mountain Home Air Force Base got deployment orders Thursday for the 34th Bomb Squadron’s B-1B longrange bombers, the Air Force said. Master Sgt. Renee Nelson confirmed the bombers will be deployed but declined to announce where the planes were headed, or when they might return. Ships and aircraft from across the nation are moving toward the Middle East. The Bush administration ordered the Air Force to send a mix of air-

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craft to the Persian Gulf area, totaling between 100 and 130 planes, a senior defense official said Thursday. The 34th’s B-1Bs are part of the Air Force’s composite wings, which also includes F-15 Eagles, F-16 Fighting Falcons, and KC-135 fuel tankers. The B-1, nicknamed the ‘‘Lancer,’’ was built as a long-range bomber but was converted during the 1990s to a strictly non-nuclear role. It was first used against Iraq in 1999. Idaho’s congressional delegation asked for thoughts to be with those in the military. “Our prayers are behind Idaho’s servicemen and women heading into likely combat tonight from Mountain Home,” U.S. Sen. Mike Crapo said

classifieds: 467-9253

Thursday. “We have maintained all along how important the role of the B-1 bomber is to our national defense, and it is not a surprise Idaho’s finest are among those on the front line of that defense.” U.S. Rep. Mike Simpson, who represents the Mountain Home area, called the Idaho base’s personnel “among our nation’s best and brightest.” “I am given great comfort knowing that the men and women (from Mountain Home) will be defending freedom, protecting our nation’s interests, and rooting out terrorism as part of Operation Infinite Justice,” he said.“The people of Idaho are forever proud of them.”

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Day 11

America Recovers

Inside today ➤ Taliban troops deploy, 3A ➤ Military buildup continues, 5A ➤ Economists: Recession likely, 7A ➤ Overseas suspects detained, 8A

Saturday

Sunny, 87

September 22, 2001

s e rv i n g t h e w e s t e r n t r e a s u r e va l l e y

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Nation stands watchful Iowa

test back again

At stadiums, beauty pageant security is tight coast to coast

Vallivue · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 35 Caldwell · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 18 Nampa · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 35 Boise · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 28 Skyview · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 42 Kuna · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 28 Marsing · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 30 Melba · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 20 Parma · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 35 New Plymouth · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 0 Nampa Christian · · · · · · · · · · · · 33 Borah JV · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 8 Notus · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 66 Greenleaf · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6 Eagle · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 35 Centennial · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 14

Investigators find knives hidden on other planes According to a report by the Washington Post, federal investigators found box cutters similar to those used in the Sept. 11 hijackings on at least two airplanes during sweeps conducted in the aftermath of the deadly attacks. Two were stuffed into seat cushions on a flight out of Boston, the report said, and one was found in a trash bin on an Atlanta jetliner headed for Brussels.

USA Today: Special Forces on the move USA Today reported Friday that U.S. Special Forces are moving into countries bordering Afghanistan. Their mission is to capture or kill indicted terrorist Osama bin Laden, the report said, anonymously quoting senior U.S. and Pakistani officials.

Republican Central Committee clarification A brief that appeared on 4A of the Sept. 10 Idaho Press-Tribune stated the Canyon County Republican Central Committee has endorsed the power plant proposed near Middleton and approved a resolution calling for solutions to the energy shortage. Although several committee members support the plant, the group has never formally voted to endorse it. The group did endorse President Bush’s efforts to solve the summer’s energy crisis.

Theater correction There is no Sunday matinee for the Boise Little Theatre’s performance of “Visit to a Small Planet.” A story on Page 1C Tuesday contained incorrect information.

Blaine Morris Marie Ross Merritt Seacord Clara Strat Verbal Watson John Young

Kempthorne: ‘We are one community’

Obituaries and death notices, 5A

Opinion, 6A Puzzles, 6D TV listings, 2A Valley, 4A Weather, 2A

Today’s news section was produced by News Editor Drew Munro, Assistant Managing Editor David Woolsey, Valley Editor Sean Deter, and page designers Sergio Brown and Rosemary Gray. Copyright © 2001 Printed on recycled newsprint

Vol. 22, No. 84, 86 pages

on the web: idahopress.com

By Nathaniel Hoffman Idaho Press-Tribune

AP

Baltimore Orioles’ Cal Ripken carries the American flag onto the field during a pregame ceremony Friday before the game against the New York Yankees. Security has been heightened at sporting events across the nation this weekend after last week’s terrorist attacks. Boise State University is heightening security at Bronco Stadium starting with today’s game against the University of Texas-El Paso. Fans will not be allowed to bring glass or plastic bottles, thermos containers or backpacks into the game. They also should plan some extra time for security procedures.

Islam forum

By Nathaniel Hoffman Idaho Press-Tribune

▼ Today’s edition Business, 1D Classifieds, 5D Comics, 3C Connections, 1C Legals, 5A Movies, 4C

Funding threatened by dropping skills test

Governor joins in Muslim prayer

Pick 3: 1 7 3

Otto Cross Robert Elford Pauline Gentry Beverly Heinbach Sibyl Holsinger Victoria Johnson Agnes Lyle

With no-fly zones declared over stadiums and bomb-sniffing dogs deployed at the Miss America Pageant, Americans head into what might have been a festive weekend in a state of watchfulness. Several Hollywood studios have canceled tours and increased patrols after an FBI warning to the industry about possible follow-up attacks to the devastation of Sept. 11. An official in Ohio said water departments across the country also received an FBI warning Friday to be alert for saboteurs. Authorities in many areas said they had no credible information about a specific, new terrorist threat. But an array of precautions were being taken even as civic leaders urged the public to go about their pursuits as normally as possible. ‘‘This is the time to stand up to fear,’’ Massachusetts Attorney General Thomas Reilly said. ‘‘Now is the time to visit the city and go wherever you want to go.’’ Reilly joined with Boston’s mayor and police chief to reassure the public Friday, following news that U.S. Attorney General John Ashcroft had notified officials the city might be a possible terrorist target. Boston FBI spokeswoman Gail Marcinkiewicz said agents have investigated and discredited the threats there. In Columbus, Ohio, water division administrator Jeff Hubbard said the FBI sent an e-mail to water departments nationwide, telling them to take extra precautions on Saturday. FBI warnings also were issued this week to fertilizer dealers, urging them to be alert for suspicious attempts to purchase ammonium nitrate or urea. Ammonium nitrate was used in the bomb that destroyed the federal building in Oklahoma City in 1995. Saturday and Sunday will mark the full-scale return of college and professional football, after games were called off last weekend. Fans were told not to bring backpacks or containers into stadiums, and the Federal Aviation Administration banned all aircraft from flying within three miles of major sporting events. Please see Security, 5A

▼ Idaho Lottery ▼ Deaths

By David Crary AP National Writer

Gov. Dirk Kempthorne and Boise Mayor Brent Coles joined area Muslims in facing the holy city of Mecca and studying verses from the Koran on Friday at the Islamic Center in Boise. After a call to prayer, Tariq Kergay of the Mosque in Salt Lake City told the assembly that Islam is an open and tolerant religion. Muslims recognize the prophets of Judaism and Christianity in addition to the Prophet Mohammed, Kergay said. Kergay recited verses from the Muslim holy book, called the Quran, that backed up all of his statements. After a closing prayer, Kempthorne told the crowd of about 50 Muslims from all over the world that everyone had the same reaction to last week’s news: “My God, my God, how can this happen?”

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Treasure Valley residents can learn more about Islam at a community forum Sunday night at Boise State University. The event, which will outline the history and religious aspects of Islam, will be held in Jordan Ballroom A at 6 p.m. in the Student Union Building.

“May I affirm to you that we are one community,” Kempthorne said. Kempthorne thanked the congregation for their contributions to society and asked for an effort toward mutual understanding. “There will be challenges to all of us in the days ahead,” he said. Mayor Coles told the assembly that he was recently in Jerusalem where he visited the Dome of the Rock — Islam’s third holiest site — and witnessed the three great religions of the world interacting. “Boise, Idaho, is truly an international city,” Coles said. After the service, attendees lined up to shake hands with

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Dick Selby/IPT

Idaho Gov. Dirk Kempthorne greets Azad Abdullah and his son, Naim, 6 months old, after Friday’s Muslim service at the Islamic Center in Boise.

Kempthorne and Coles and filtered out of the small Islamic Center. “He views the Muslim members as part of this community,” Islamic Center President Said Ahmed-Zaid said. Ahmed-Zaid said that many members of the Muslim community are very worried about

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hate crimes and hostility toward Muslims, and that the governor and mayor’s remarks were welcome. “He’s giving us support of the highest level,” Ahmed-Zaid said. ■ To contact Nathaniel, call 465-8169 or e-mail nhoffman@idahopress.com

news hot line: 465-8124

NAMPA — After scrapping the traditional measure of student achievement for a new computerized test, the Nampa School District will again administer the Iowa Test of Basic Skills in classrooms this October. After two months of giving the districtwide Measures of Academic Progress test — a computerized test that, unlike the Iowa, provides results that teachers can use immediately in the classroom — the district has discovered that some of its funds are threatened if it doesn’t bring the Iowa back. The district decided to drop the Iowa and replace it with the MAP this year, after a State Board of Education temporary rule no longer re­quired districts to give the Iowa test. But to receive federal funds, Nampa must provide test scores from more than one year to the state. “We really felt like the information we would get from the MAP would provide us with all the information we need,” school district Testing Coordinator Ruby Brackett said. “The bottom line is we’re not going to do anything that would adversely affect the students.” State Department of Education spokeswoman Allison Westfall said Friday that Idaho Schools Super­ intendent Marilyn Howard had informed the state Education Board districts could have problems with funding if they drop the Iowa test completely. “We’ve been transitioning to a new testing system, but you can’t just eliminate everything until you have something else in place,” Westfall said. Tom Luna, a Nampa school trustee and candidate for state superintendent, said the Iowa is an outdated test. “The unfortunate part about it is that we’ve been encouraging the State Department of Education to move away from that for years, and because of their procrastination we’ll be spending about $860,000 (statewide) again,” he said. Nampa was the only Idaho district planning to drop the Iowa completely this year. But other districts may drop it in the near future. Nampa officials hope this will be the last. “My best guess is that this will be the last year, but I’m not sure,” Brackett said.

■ Visitors try new test, 4A.

Iowa tests, again

Third- through eighth-graders will take the Iowa Test of Basic Skills and high school students will take a related test some time in October.

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CY M K

Day 12

America Recovers

Inside today ➤ Miss Oregon wins crown, 3A ➤ Sensors unnerve motorists, 4A ➤ Idaho eyes terrorism laws, 4A ➤ Black boxes yield clues, 6A ➤ ‘Hijacker’ living in Morocco, 9A

Sunday

Mostly sunny, 92

September 23, 2001

s e rv i n g t h e w e s t e r n t r e a s u r e va l l e y

w w w. i d a h o p r e s s . c o m

Return flags to full staff President Bush’s order to fly flags at half staff to honor Americans killed in Sept. 11’s terrorist attacks ended at sunset Saturday. The president encourages Americans to continue to fly flags, but no longer at half staff.

Vauk will receive Purple Heart Nampan dies in the line of duty at Pentagon By Vickie Holbrook Idaho Press-Tribune

Nampa firefighters hold benefit today NAMPA — Nampa firefighters will hold a benefit today at Nampa’s Lakeview Park for the families of their fallen brothers in New York. A free concert will be held from 1:30 to 6 p.m. and will feature music by Nada Brahma, Reckless, Sparky Parks and the Aardvarks and the Divas. Donations will be collected to add to the $25,000 the Nampa department had raised as of Saturday. Here’s how you can help the Nampa and Caldwell fire departments’ fund-raising drives: ■ In Nampa, drop off checks or cash at any fire station or at City Hall. Donations also can be mailed to: Nampa Firefighters, 1103 2nd St. S., Nampa, Idaho, 83651. The department asks that “New York Firefighters” be written on checks. ■ Caldwell donations can be mailed to or dropped off at the station, 310 S. 7th Ave., Caldwell, Idaho, 83605.

PRICE: $1.00

NAMPA — One of Nampa’s sons — Naval Reservist Lt. Cmdr. Ronald James Vauk — will get a Purple Heart next Friday. Actually, his wife will receive it in Ron Vauk’s honor because he died serving his country on the day that changed America. Jennifer Vauk is the mother of his son, Liam, and is expecting their second child. On Sept. 11, terrorists used

To honor and remember

➤ Mass of Christian Burial will be held at the Arlington National Cemetery Chapel on 12:45 p.m. Saturday. He will be buried at Arlington National Cemetery. A Navy Flag Admiral will present a flag to Jennifer. ➤ A Memorial Mass will be celebrated at 10 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 6, at St. Paul’s Catholic Church in Nampa by the Rev. Jerry Funke. ➤ In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Ronald James Vauk Benefit Fund at any Wells Fargo Bank. ➤ To read the complete obituary, see Page 5A today.

passenger jets to kill thousands of Americans in four separate attacks on the United States. “His family and community should be proud of him for many obvious reasons. But quite simply ... he died at his post, doing his job, for the love of a country that

is just now remembering what it means to be patriotic,” fellow Navy Reservist Don Ward wrote of his friend who died that day. “God bless Ron and his family and all of the victims of these Courtesy photo tragic events.” Ron Vauk, right, poses in this family photo with wife, Jennifer, and son, Liam. Please see Vauk, 7A The Navy Reservist was killed in the terrorist attack on the Pentagon.

Financial fallout not over

Cropduster manual concerns investigators U.S. investigators found a manual on how to operate cropdusting equipment while searching suspected terrorist hideouts, government sources told TIME magazine in an issue that will be released Monday, according to a report late Saturday by CNN. CNN reported that the discovery has heightened concerns among counterterrorism experts that the bin Laden conspirators may have been planning — or may still be planning — to disperse biological or chemical agents from a cropdusting plane normally used for agricultural purposes. Among the belongings of suspected terrorist Zacarias Moussaoui, sources told TIME, were manuals showing how to operate cropdusting equipment that could be used to spray fast-killing toxins into the air, the CNN report said. The discovery resulted in the grounding of all cropdusters nationwide on Sunday Sept. 16th, the report said. The dusters have been allowed back up, but are not allowed to take off or land from what traffic controllers refer to as Class B airspace, or the skies around major cities.

▼ Idaho Lottery Powerball: 23 27 34 39 42 PB:40 PP:1x Rolldown: 1 10 23 37 52 Wild Card 2:: 1 5 23 24 25 Ace of clubs Pick 3: 7 1 4

▼ Deaths Finn Bentsen Elfreda Burge Ruth Carr Richard Christner Otto Cross Karol Eagle Gloria Fisher Agnes Lyle Blaine Morris

Flora Noel Vicki Johnson Opal Rigby Ronald Scarbrough Merritt Seacord Clara Strat J. Kindall Strope Marguerite Urresti Ronald Vauk

Mike Vogt/IPT

Sheila Garcia, 8, of Nampa staples another star from a donor to help out in the terrorist attack relief fund Saturday afternoon at the Boys and Girls Club in Nampa. Hundreds of people gathered to support the club and raise cash for the families of firefighters killed or injured during the Sept. 11 attack on the World Trade Center.

House raffle raises $175K Money will benefit Nampa Boys and Girls Club

First-ever event promotes healthy families, youth By Sam Bass Idaho Press-Tribune

Today’s news section was produced by News Editor Drew Munro, Assistant Managing Editor David Woolsey, Valley Editor Sean Deter, and page designers Sergio Brown and Rosemary Gray. Copyright © 2001 Printed on recycled newsprint

The flowers never showed in Davie, Fla., and neither did the dinner rush at a seafood restaurant in San Francisco. Factory workers in Frank­ Inside fort, Ky., went ■ Text of President home for a Bush’s Thursday address weeklong layto the nation, 14A off, while halibut fishermen in Alaska put their unsold catch in the freezer. In ways big and small, the economic aftershocks of the terrorist attacks are spreading across the country. Some already feel the pain; for others, business is no worse or even better. Economists say a recession is at hand and wider fallout is on its way. The worrisome picture was illustrated in interviews Friday and Saturday with business owners, workers, store managers and economists by reporters for The Associated Press in all 50 states. ‘‘We’re a ripple effect,’’ said Monica Clark, spokeswoman at Montaplast, the Frankfort car parts manufacturer that laid off 100 workers. The attacks disrupted shipping, which left the company unable to make intake manifolds. It hopes to be back at full staff in a week, Clark said. Please see Economy, 6A

Caldwell festival celebrates community spirit

Opinion, 16A Puzzles, 5D TV listings, 2A Valley, 4A Weather, 2A

Vol. 22, No. 85, 48 pages

foot, four bedroom home in Southeast Nampa. The Nampa Boys and Girls Club, located on Russell McKee of Nampa won the Stampede Drive near Lakeview Park, is in house, raffled for $100 a ticket to raise need of donations year-round to help serve money for the club. McKee said he area youth. If you’re interested in helping, didn’t really know what he would do call the club at 461-7203. with the new home because he had not expected to win. otic music and celebrate more than He had considered the $100 he $175,000 raised to help the club paid Monday for the ticket a donation, keep giving kids a safe option to the so he hadn’t given much thought to streets. winning. To top it off, one man walked away the new owner of an 1,800-squarePlease see Raffle, 6A

To help out

NAMPA — As America prepares for an extended war against terrorism, local residents are helping shore up life on the homefront. Several hundred people gathered at the Nampa Boys and Girls Club to enjoy a barbecue, listen to patri-

Obituaries and death notices, 5A

on the web: idahopress.com

By Robert Tanner Associated Press National Writer

By David Woolsey Idaho Press-Tribune

▼ Today’s edition Business, 1D Classifieds, 4D Connections, 1C Legals, 3C Movies, 8C

Sept. 11 attacks affect companies large and small

CALDWELL — At Caldwell’s Memorial Park on Saturday, Canyon County residents raised cash for the Red Cross and helped build a healthier community. The first-ever Caldwell Fall Festival, a family-oriented community event designed to promote a safe and healthy environment for youth, families and community organizations, was sponsored by the Western Canyon Youth and Family Coalition. The event featured live musical performances, clowns and Hispanic dancers in bright costumes. “The Festival is something nice that people can bring their families to, and have fun,” dancer Gabriela

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Festival benefits Red Cross Much of the money from Caldwell’s first-ever Fall Festival will be given to the American Red Cross of Greater Idaho. Western Canyon Youth and Family Coalition Executive Director Priscilla Chavez said the amount raised should be known by Tuesday.

Casteñeda, 14, of Nampa said. Sparky the fire dog, aka Melinda Allgood, also was on hand. Sparky promotes positive interaction between children and the fire department and helps them feel safe,Allgood said. One of the popular spots was a booth operated by Linda McMillin of Parma, whose face-painting skills were a hit with the youngsters. McMillin estimated more than 40 children had their faces painted within the first hour-and-a-half. On a more serious note, the community was introduced to a program that aims to help at-risk youth.

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The Gaining Responsibility After School Program, or G.R.A.S.P, works with students from Syringa Middle School and Jefferson Junior High School. It helps students improve their grades, attendance and discipline referrals as well as improve social skills, program Supervisor Sonia Perez said. Caldwell City Councilwoman Shannon Ozuna said events such as the Festival are important. “They say it takes a village to raise a child,” she said. “I believe it takes a whole community working together to raise successful children and young adults.”

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Rob Bartholomew / IPT

Bryan Snyder of Caldwell, left, plays with Caldwell toddler Nick Fulgenzi Saturday afternoon during the Caldwell Fall Festival Saturday afternoon. The free event, which featured food and family-friendly entertainment, was sponsored by the Western Canyon Youth and Family Coalition.

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CY M K

Day 13

America Recovers Monday

Inside today ‘News is Everywhere’

A Literacy Day Special Section

➤ Bush’s popularity soars, 3A ➤ FBI grounds crop dusters, 11A ➤ A look at Muslim, Arab beliefs, government and origins, 1C

Mostly sunny, 90

September 24, 2001

s e rv i n g t h e w e s t e r n t r e a s u r e va l l e y

w w w. i d a h o p r e s s . c o m

▼ Breaking news

Reuters news service reports that the United States has warned its allies of a possible second round of attacks by the end of this week following the deadly strikes on New York and Washington, Jiji news agency quoted Japanese government sources as saying. The next round of attacks could be on a greater scale than the assaults by hijacked aircraft on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, according to information provided to Japan by Washington, Jiji reported.

Report: American troops take positions in Uzbekistan ABC News reports at least two C-130 transport planes today were reported to have arrived in Uzbekistan, to the north of Afghanistan, along with several hundred U.S. troops. But in addition to Uzbekistan, sources told ABCNEWS that small teams of specially-trained American ground troops are also in Tajikistan.

Taliban say they've lost contact with bin Laden ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (AP) — Afghanistan's ruling Taliban have been unable to locate Osama bin Laden for the past two days, the Taliban ambassador to Pakistan said Sunday. U.S. officials cast doubt on the claim, saying the Taliban may be trying to elude President Bush's demands that they hand over bin Laden or face retribution along with the Saudi exile for the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon Sept. 11. Bin Laden is the top suspect in those attacks.

Opposition claims major victory against Taliban Fox News reports that The Northern Alliance, a loose confederation of Afghan opposition groups, announced it captured a key district of Balkh province and killed at least 80 Taliban militia fighters. Gen. Abdul Rasheed Dostum, chief of the Jumbish-e-Milli opposition group, said in a telephone interview that at least 200 Taliban fighters were captured and that his side had two men injured. A Taliban official in Kabul confirmed the fighting but insisted the opposition alliance had made no gains in the region, 185 miles northwest of the Afghan capital. The official spoke on condition of anonymity.

Jo Ella Avera Finn Bentsen Robert Black Ruth Carr Gloria Fisher Viola Hogan

Vicki Johnson Patricia Kinney Blaine Morris Flora Noel Gordon Schlafke

Obituaries and death notices, 5A

▼ Today’s edition Classifieds, 1D Comics, 8C Connections, 1C Legals, 6A-9A, 12A, 3C-6C, 7C Movies, 9C

Nampa firefighters honor fallen brothers in New York By Brad Hem Idaho Press-Tribune

NAMPA — From more than 2,000 miles away, Canyon County residents opened their hearts and wallets to help the families of New York City firefighters who died trying to save people they never knew. Hundreds of people laughed and cried Sunday at Lakeview Park, where a local alcoholism and drug addiction recovery group held a concert and prayer vigil to help raise money for relief efforts in New York. The $2,800 raised will be added to money collected by the Nampa Fire Department and will go directly to the families of the estimated 400 firefighters who died on Tuesday, Sept. 11. “Their fathers aren’t coming home,” Nampa Battalion Chief Larry Richardson said. “Firefighters are a brotherhood. We feel a loss because they feel a loss.” With Sunday’s donations, the department has collected nearly $31,000. Richardson said the department’s goal is to take $50,000 with them when six Nampa firefighters fly to New York to deliver the money in person. In an unusual partnership, the All 12 Step Club of Caldwell sponsored Sunday’s celebration and fund-raiser. Club President Barry Smith said it was appropriate for former alcoholics and drug addicts to help firefighters as part of their recovery process because firefighters and paramedics saved a lot of their lives. “They do a lot of things I probably wouldn’t do,” he said. “They’re different from the rest of us. It absolutely broke my heart knowing they went into that building knowing they might never come out.” Smith said the unity local people showed at the park on Sunday should send a strong message to the terrorists responsible for last week’s attacks. “They expect to break us, and this country doesn’t do that,” he said. “We are stronger now than ever.”

Rumsfeld: Brute force best way to get al-Qaida leader By Nancy Benac The Associated Press

Mike Vogt/IPT

Bailey Rosenthal, 3, of Meridian waves her flag as her dad, a member of the musical group the Divas, prepares to perform Sunday afternoon at Nampa’s Lakeview Park. Hundreds attended the All 12 Step Club of Caldwell-sponsored event, which featured a concert and prayer vigil to help raise cash for relief efforts in New York.

Thousands gather for prayer service New York’s Yankee Stadium fills with faith, resolve By The Associated Press NEW YORK — Representatives of New York’s broad spectrum of faiths took the field of Yankee Stadium on Sunday for a flag-draped gathering of prayer for the victims of terrorism. ‘‘We need faith, wisdom and strength of soul,’’ said New York’s Roman Catholic archbishop. Security was heavy for ‘‘A Prayer for America,’’ which mixed solemn words with patriotic and inspirational songs. Mourners had to run a gauntlet of police officers and state troopers checking tickets. No bags, backpacks or coolers were allowed. Police officers were stationed

in the stadium’s light stanchions. One after another, members of the clergy — Jews, Roman Catholics, Muslims, Hindus, Protestants, Sikhs, Greek Orthodox — stepped up to offer prayers. ‘‘Our skyline will rise again,’’ pledged Mayor Rudolph Giuliani, the hero of the moment who was cheered loudly when he was introduced. Giuliani was careful to call it a prayer service rather than a memorial service, insisting that hope was not lost for some of the 6,333 people missing in the wreckage of the trade center. No survivors have been pulled from the ruins since the day after the Sept. 11 disaster. AP ‘‘On Sept. 11, New York City suffered An unidentified member of a police departthe darkest day in our history. It’s now ment outside of New York waves an American up to us to make it its finest hour,’’ the flag as she reacts to the the memorial service. mayor said.

WA S H I N G T O N — A solemn President Bush returned the American flag to full staff Sunday as the United States promised to lay out evidence making Osama bin Laden’s guilt in the terrorist attacks George W. Bush ‘‘very obvious to the world.’’The administration scoffed at Taliban claims he cannot be found. Secretary of State Colin Powell said the government would ‘‘put before the world, the American people, a persuasive case that ... it is al-Qaida, led Osama bin by Osama bin Laden, Laden who has been responsible.’’ Administration officials and congressional leaders turned their appearances on Sunday’s TV talk shows into a twopronged effort to show the government’s resolve to choke off the terrorists and to encourage Americans to return to a more normal routine — crucial to getting the recession-bent economy moving again. As the U.S. military got ready to strike, Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld suggested that brute force may not be the best way to get at bin Laden. ‘‘Is it likely that an aircraft carrier or a cruise missile is going to find a person?’’ Rumsfeld asked reporters. ‘‘No, it’s not likely; that isn’t how this is going to happen.’’ Rather, he said, ‘‘This is going to happen over a sustained period of time because of a broadly based effort where bank accounts are frozen, where pieces of intelligence are provided, and where countries decide that they want to change their politics.’’ Nonetheless, U.S. forces around the world were being repositioned. A Defense Department team arrived in Pakistan to discuss military cooperation in a possible strike against bin Laden’s network. ‘‘What we’ve been doing is getting our capabilities ... arranged around the world, so that at that point where the president decides that he has a set of things he would like done, that we will be in a position to carry those things out,’’ Rumsfeld said on CBS’ ‘‘Face the Nation.’’ Please see Evidence, 5A

Student’s projects win awards

Opinion, 14A Puzzles, 2D TV listings, 2A Valley, 4A Weather, 2A

Chelsea Mackey makes clothes, soap and more

Today’s news section was produced by Valley Editor Sean Deter, and copy editors Sergio Brown, and Melissa Wilson Copyright © 2001 Printed on recycled newsprint

Vol. 22, No. 86, 38 pages

on the web: idahopress.com

President Canyon raises relief money promises bin Laden evidence Firefighters remembered

More attacks possible this week in the United States

▼ Deaths

PRICE: 50 Cents

By Michelle Cork Idaho Press-Tribune CALDWELL — Chocolate and pear-cucumber are Chelsea Mackey’s favorite scents of her own homemade soaps. The Treasure Valley native and 17-year-old senior at Caldwell High School also makes her own facial masks and scrubs, bubble bath and body splash. For now, she gives her

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soap as gifts, but would like to sell her handiwork. “I like that you can kind of personalize it — make what appeals to you,” she said. Her soap-making project earned Mackey, a nineyear member of the Busy Bugs 4-H Club — led by her mom, Janet — an Award of Excellence at this year’s Canyon County Fair and Festival. That, coupled with taking first prize in her division for her work as a 4-H camp counselor and bookkeeper

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made her Grand Champion in the miscellaneous category. The accomplished seamstress also took home awards for making and modeling a blue wool coatdress and a red prom gown like the bridesmaid dress Julia Roberts wore in the film “My Best Friend’s Wedding.” Chelsea Mackey remembers her first sewing project: a broomstick, or wrinkled rayon, skirt she made in the fifth grade. Please see Kid, 5A

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Rob Bartholomew / IPT

Chelsea Mackey, a 17-year-old Caldwell High senior, makes her own award-winning soap and other cosmetic items. The soap earned Mackey, also an accomplished seamstress, a top prize at this year’s Canyon County Fair and Festival.

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CY M K

Day 14

America Recovers

Inside today

➤ Attack survivors struggle, 9A ➤ Pilots want guns, 10A ➤ Hollywood raises millions, 10A ➤ Boeing designs hijack-proof planes, 4D

Tuesday

Mostly cloudy, 77

September 25, 2001

Terrorist looked into crop dusters for possible attack Mohamed Atta, a suspected ringleader in the recent terror attacks in New York and Washington, made repeated visits to a cropdusting airfield in Florida, according to Willie Lee, the chief pilot and general manager of South Florida Crop Care in Belle Glade. Lee identified Atta to the FBI, telling agents the suspected hijacker came to the airfield as recently as the Saturday before the Sept. 11 attacks, asking questions about the capabilities of crop-dusters, including how many gallons of chemicals they could hold.

U.S. puts freeze on terrorists Weiser Bush places holds on network assets, urges others to do same By The Associated Press WASHINGTON — President Bush ordered a freeze Monday on the assets of 27 people and organizations with suspected links to terrorism, including Islamic militant Osama bin Laden, and urged other nations to do likewise. Foreign banks that don’t cooperate could have their own transactions blocked in the United States. ‘‘Money is the lifeblood of terrorist operations,’’ Bush said. ‘‘Today, we’re ask-

ing the world to stop payment.’’ The move was an effort to choke off financial support for bin Laden, whom the United States considers the prime suspect in the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks against the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. The list names 12 individuals, including bin Laden and an Egyptian militant suspected to be his top deputy; 11 organizations, including bin Laden’s al-Qaida network; three charities and one business. Missing from the list are Hamas, Islamic Jihad and Hezbollah, militant groups that are on the State Department’s roster of terrorists but that some Arab nations see

as legitimate fighters against Israel. Bush acknowledged that terrorists’ assets in the United States were small. But his order also gives the Treasury Department wider authority to go after transactions of foreign banks that refuse to cooperate in the campaign against terrorism. ‘‘It puts the financial world on notice,’’ Bush said in a Rose Garden appearance. ‘‘If you do business with terrorists, if you support or sponsor them, you will not do business with the United States of America.’’ Please see Freeze, 3A

C r o p - d u st e r b a n

Colombian rebels detail possible U.S. attack BOGOTA, Colombia (Reuters) — A Colombian guerrilla leader has spoken of a plan to attack U.S. interests in both Colombia and in the United States in a tape recording that Colombian security sources confirmed on Monday was the voice of the military commander of the Marxist FARC rebels. "To combat them wherever they may be, until we get to their own territory, to make them feel the pain which they have inflicted on other peoples," said the voice — which Reuters correspondents recognized as strongly resembling Briceno's.

Wall Street made strides toward recovery Monday Stocks surged higher Monday after Wall Street attempted to bounce back from one of its worst weeks ever after the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. But no one was banking on lasting gains. Business, 1D

Flag correction

Recipe correction The Recipe of the Day for Creamy Cucumber Salad that ran on 2C in Friday’s Idaho PressTribune included an incorrect ingredient. The correct recipe is printed today on 2C.

Headline correction A headline on 1A of Monday’s PressTribune should have read: “Rumsfeld: Brute force may not be the best way to get at bin Laden.”

▼ Idaho Lottery Pick 3: 2 6 0

▼ Deaths Ruth Carr Edith Foreman Beverly Heinbach Viola Hogan Charles Lundy

Wayne Paris Bernice Robinson James Scaggs

Obituaries and death notices, 5A, 6A

Opinion, 8A Puzzles, 6D TV listings, 2A Valley, 4A Weather, 2A

By Lane Bettencourt Idaho Press-Tribune NAMPA — Small airports like Nampa and Caldwell are getting increased attention from federal authorities trying to prevent another catastrophic terrorist attack like the one that killed thousands of Americans on the East Coast. Crop-dusting planes nationwide were grounded for a second day Monday while authorities worked to tighten security to prevent them from being used to spread toxic chemicals or deadly diseases. Local flight instructors have also been asked by federal agents about their recent trainees. Experts say a chemical or biological attack on a large U.S. city could kill tens of thousands of people. Gary Hubler of Valley Air Service in Caldwell said the shutdown did not have a

Lt. Cmdr. Ronald Vauk of Nampa honored in naval service By Nathaniel Hoffman Idaho Press-Tribune

Today’s news section was produced by Assistant Managing Editor David Woolsey, Valley Editor Sean Deter, and copy editors Sergio Brown and Julius Tigno Copyright © 2001 Printed on recycled newsprint

Vol. 22, No. 87, 28 pages

on the web: idahopress.com

Bioattack a possibility Reuters news service reports U.S. officials suspect that a group led by fugitive Saudi-born millionaire Osama bin Laden has been contemplating attacks using biological and chemical weapons, such as sarin nerve gas, for years, according to the sources quoted by Jiji, a Japanese news agency. The United States has information that the group has already acquired small airplanes to spray bacteria causing smallpox or anthrax from the air, Jiji quoted the sources as saying.

great impact locally because this is a slow time of the year for crop spraying. “If it (the ban) had happened in the middle of the summer, it would have broke us,” Hubler said. The government’s grounding of thousands of crop-dusters across the country came after it was learned that one of the suspected hijackers in the attack on the

World Trade Center, Mohamad Atta, had shown interest in crop-dusters and that another person now in federal custody had downloaded information about the planes, Attorney General John Ashcroft said. Ashcroft told lawmakers on Capitol Hill that the FBI had gathered information raising fears that the small farm planes could be used in a biological or chemical attack. But he said there was ‘‘no clear indication of the time or place of these attacks.’’ The FBI is believed to be investigating a group of Middle Eastern men — including Atta — who repeatedly visited a Florida fertilizer company before the Sept. 11 attacks. J.D.‘‘Will’’ Lee, general manager of South Florida Crop Care in Belle Glade, said Monday he told FBI agents that the men, in groups of two or three, visited nearly every weekend for six or eight weeks before the attacks. The visits included the weekend before the assaults. Please see Probe, 3A

CALDWELL — A former Canyon County deputy prosecutor was appointed to a 3rd District judgeship Monday by Gov. Dirk Kempthorne. Veteran Washington County Magistrate Gregory Culet, based in Weiser since 1980, will move into the seat held by District Judge Gerald Weston, who will move to part-time senior status. Weston, who was appointed to the 3rd District Court in the late 1980s, is taking semiretirement and will continue to perform some judicial duties. In making the selection, Kempthorne noted Culet’s involvement in launching a family drug court in the judicial district. “Greg’s long and distinguished record as a magistrate judge, his work on launching a family drug court in Canyon County,his strong belief in the 10th Amendment, and state’s rights, and his extensive community involvement makes him an excellent choice to serve on the district court bench,” Kempthorne said in announcing the appointment. Canyon County Prosecutor Dave Young also spoke highly of Culet. “I think he’s a great choice,” Young said. “He’s got a lot of solid experience and has good decision-making abilities. Culet has served as chief criminal deputy prosecutor and as a deputy prosecutor for Canyon County. He also taught business law at Treasure Valley Community College in Ontario on a parttime basis from 1985 to 1988. A native of San Antonio,Texas, he earned both is bachelor’s degree in political science and his law degree from the University of Idaho. Cutlet and his wife, Paula, have two grown children.He was selected for the judgeship over 3rd District magistrate judges Thomas Ryan of Homedale and Renae Hoff of Nampa. The district: Idaho’s 3rd Judicial District serves Adams, Canyon, Gem, Owyhee, Payette and Washington counties.

Submariner vets remember fallen soldier

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Dick Selby/IPT

Cory Armstrong of Valley Air Service in Caldwell works a fuel system component Monday for the crop-dusting plane behind him. The company is one of the Canyon County businesses being affected by crop-dusting shutdowns and federal investigations in the wake of the Sept. 11 attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon.

Crop-dusters grounded; agents scour flight-training records

Culet will step into 3rd District seat Idaho Press-Tribune staff and The Associated Press

Probe affects Canyon businesses

Your Front Porch on 1C of Monday’s Idaho Press-Tribune gave the incorrect price for laminated flag posters being sold at the newspaper office. The posters are $4 each, with a portion of the proceeds going to the New York firefighters fund. The posters are available at the PressTribune, 1618 N. Midland Blvd., Nampa.

judge to replace Weston

BOISE — Close to a dozen United States submarine veterans gathered at the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 63 in Boise Monday night to remember Lt. Cmdr. Ronald James Vauk of Nampa. None of the soldiers knew Vauk personally. But to them, the young Naval Reservist who died at his post in the Sept. 11 attack on the Pentagon was a fellow submariner. Mitchell Lint, commanding officer of the Boise Base of United States

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Submarine Veterans, called Vauk a shipmate, friend and defender of the flag during a memorial service heavy with images of war and peace at sea. The prayers asked for the Supreme Commander to protect Vauk, now on eternal patrol, from storms and to calm the seas. World War II veteran Jack Shindledecker of Boise attended the memorial because his son-in-law is Vauk's cousin. He said the news of Vauk's death was devastating not only because Vauk was a fellow naval officer, but because he was a human being. During the ceremony, Jack Gilmour tolled a bell for all subs that sunk during the month of September since the early 20th Century.

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"There ain't much we can do with subs now except fire missiles, and like Bush said, it doesn't make much sense to fire a $2 million dollar missile at a $10 tent," Gilmour said. Vauk, a 1982 Nampa High School graduate, served on the submarines USS Glenard P. Lipscomb and the USS Oklahoma City. He was a Naval Reserve officer on watchstand duty at the time of his death. Retired Lt. Cmdr. Fred Wagner wants to see positive action in response to the attacks, but not random action. "I have seen the devastation of war," he said. "For us to do anything on this, I want us to be sure."

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Dick Selby/IPT

John King of Boise prays for the family of Lt. Cmdr. Ronald James Vauk, the Nampa native who died at his post at the Pentagon during the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. During the memorial service, conducted Monday by the Boise Base of United States Submarine Veterans, Vauk was called a shipmate, friend and defender of the flag.

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CY M K

Day 15

America Recovers

Inside today ➤ Air base aids families, 3A ➤ Russia vows to fight terrorism, 6A ➤ House approves defense bill, 7A ➤ Terrorists train with poisons, 8A

WEDNESDAY

Partly cloudy, 77

September 26, 2001

Celebrating goodness Ashcroft warns war on terrorism

Hall of Fame ceremony reflects on Sept. 11

Dusting takes hit Twice since the Sept. 11 terrorist assaults on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, the government has grounded crop-dusting planes out of fear of chemical attacks. Cropdusting bans have had profound effects on some in the industry, yet many Americans don’t realize the vital role crop-dusting plays in the nation’s agricultural health and economy. Business, 1D.

Handling hungry teens A r e hoards of hungry teenagers descending on your house for parties or after-school snacks? Find some handy tips for coping with the onslaught on your pantry in Connections, 1C.

Red Cross helps families NEW YORK — The American Red Cross launched a $100 million gift program Tuesday to help the families of nearly 7,000 people dead or missing following the attacks on Washington and New York. The organization will give grants of up to $30,000 to the families of those who died or are reported missing in the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. The money is meant to help people with short-term expenses such as mortgage or rent and funeral costs. Families could also use the grants for transportation, food, clothing and other living costs.

UN: Open borders to Afghan refugees

Caldwell Council correction Caldwell City Council candidate Paul Alldredge’s name was misspelled in a story on 4A of Tuesday’s Idaho Press-Tribune.

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Geraldine Bailey Roberta Bailey Marvin Beliveau Mildred Corkins Nancy Freeman

Obituaries and death notices, 5A

Reduction leaves 646 employees in Nampa

NAMPA —  Financially beleaguered electronics manufacturer MCMS said Tuesday it will lay off another 94 workers as the company continues to suffer from declining business. A week ago,MCMS announced plans to seek bankruptcy and sell its Nampa plant and most other assets to a Massachusetts electronics manufacturing services company. The potential owner, Manufacturers’ Services Limited, said it intended to keep the Nampa site open and retain the “vast majority” of the workforce. The layoffs made public on Tuesday leave the company with 646 employees in Nampa. Joseph Schadeberg, vice president of human resources, said the jobs cuts were related to the continuing phase out of MCMS’ business with computernetworking giant Cisco Systems. MCMS reported that Cisco was its largest customer for the nine months ending May 31, representing more than 38 percent of

Historical Society director says Nampa depot unique

Opinion, 10A Puzzles, 6D TV listings, 2A Valley, 4A Weather, 2A

By Sam Bass Idaho Press-Tribune

Today’s news section was produced by News Editor Drew Munro, Assistant Managing Editor David Woolsey, Valley Editor Sean Deter, and page designers Sergio Brown and Julius Tigno. Copyright © 2001 Printed on recycled newsprint

Vol. 22, No. 88, 34 pages

on the web: idahopress.com

MCMS lays off 94 more

AG warns of ‘clear and present danger’ By Karen Gullo The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Attorney General John Ashcroft warned Tuesday there was a ‘‘clear and present danger’’ of additional terrorist attacks that could include trucks carrying hazardous chemicals. About 20 people have been charged with trying to obtain fraudulent licenses to drive tankers, officials said. Some of those arrested in connection with the hazardous tanker licenses may have connections to the hijackers, the Justice Department said. The new warning came as the investigation into the Sept. 11 hijackings made progress across the globe. French authorities detained several people in connection with an alleged plot against the U.S. Embassy in Paris. U.S. authorities detained three Middle Eastern men in California as material witnesses — meaning they could have information useful in the case — and also released a Saudi doctor living in Texas who had been taken into custody and brought to New York for questioning earlier in the investigation.

Saudi Arabia abandons Taliban ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (AP) — All but sealing Afghanistan’s isolation, Saudi Arabia formally severed relations with the hard-line Taliban government on Tuesday. Stung, the Taliban denounced the Saudi move as intolerable to all Muslims and accused it of siding with ‘‘the infidel forces.’’ From the organization of Osama bin Laden, the accused terrorist mastermind at the heart of the hardening confrontation between Afghanistan and a U.S.-led coalition, came a volley of new threats. ‘‘Wherever there are Americans and Jews, they will be targeted,’’ said a statement issued in the name of Naseer Ahmed Mujahed, military chief for bin Laden’s al-Qaida network.

In Washington, Ashcroft told Congress that there is continuing danger from terrorism, and that the FBI is examining whether trucks that carry toxic chemicals may be targets. ‘‘Terrorism is a clear and present danger to Americans today,’’Ashcroft told senators. ‘‘Intelligence information available to the FBI indicates a potential for additional terrorist incidents.’’

IPT file

MCMS said Tuesday it would lay off nearly 13 percent of its Nampa workforce.

its net sales. MCMS said in its most recent quarterly report that Cisco intended to disengage with the company. MCMS anticipated completing manufacturing services for Cisco sometime before the end of 2001. The loss of Cisco was compounded by the departure of another major customer, Nokia. The company said Tuesday it would have no additional comment about the layoffs. But MCMS officials said in the quarterly report that they were looking to build the client base. MCMS said last week it had

several offers from companies willing to buy its assets. Executives assured employees and the community that the company’s leaders would never have chosen to sell to MSL if they believed the new owners would have problems retaining most the MCMS employees. The Chapter 11 bankruptcy filing and a“debtor-in-possession” option offered by several banks will allow MCMS to continue day-to-day operations, including paying its employees’ wages and benefits and doing business with its suppliers and customers.

AP

Northern Alliance fighters ride in a vehicle toward the front line positions some 18 miles north of Kabul, Afghanistan, Tuesday. The opposition alliance is battling Taliban troops to try to take strategic areas near Kabul.

Businesses face Museum marks 25th year labor uncertainty

Thomas Jenkins Patricia Kinney Charles Lundy Olyve Payne Lucille Rush

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NAMPA — For many, the World Sports Humanitarian Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony could not have come at a better time. Honoring the humanitarian spirit in light of the recent terrorist attacks allowed the inductees and the audience to reflect on the good in the world. The ceremonies included a moment of silence for the victims in New York, Washington, D.C., and Pennsylvania, and an emotional song about America’s strong foundation. “To be part of this tradition and celebrate goodness in this world, it is truly an honor,” said Greg Lewis, comaster of ceremonies. “We can have a wish for a better world by emulating Rob Bartholomew / IPT our inductees.” Basketball star A.C. Green admires his World Sports Humanitarian Hall of Fame Please see Hall, 5A inductee award Tuesday night at Northwest Nazarene University’s Brandt Center.

Idaho Press-Tribune staff

UNITED NATIONS (AP) — U. N. SecretaryGeneral Kofi Annan on Tuesday called for Afghanistan's neighbors to open their borders and for humanitarian aid for millions of starving Afghan refugees locked in the country's harsh mountainous region. "In accordance with international law, the borders must be open to civilians seeking refuge," Annan said in a statement. Annan's appeal follows reports of a new humanitarian disaster unfolding in the country. Millions of poor people are faced with not only the possibility of fierce military strikes but also the onset of winter without enough food and medical aid.

▼ Deaths

of truck attack

By Kevan Lee Idaho Press-Tribune

NAMPA — Supporters of the Canyon County Historical Museum in Nampa celebrated 25 years of service to the community on Tuesday. Given the historic downtown railroad depot’s struggle to reach such a milestone, the birthday was truly a cause for celebration among the group. The museum was scheduled for demolition in 1972, but locals formed the Canyon County Historical Society for the expressed purpose of saving the landmark structure. Union Pacific Railroad gave the building to the society in 1974, Museum

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Curator Wendy Miller said, and the museum opened its doors in 1976. In two years, the depot building will mark its 100th birthday. It was extremely important to save the building, said Arthur Hart, director emeritus of the Idaho State Historical Society. “Every town owes its identity to its buildings,” he said. “What other memorable building does Nampa have? The depot is architecturally unique.” Communities need to save significant buildings, Hart added. The noted Idaho historian also presented a slide show featuring significant buildings in the county. He cited the loss of Canyon County’s former courthouse and Caldwell’s City Hall in years past as reasons to preserve irreplaceable history. Visitors to the museum con-

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Museum hours

The Canyon County Historical Society Museum is located at 1200 Front St. and is open from 1 to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. When the Farmer’s Market is open on Saturdays, the museum opens about 9 a.m. The museum offers presentations, education, interpretation of local history and provides a site to store and preserve artifacts, Curator Wendy Miller said.

tinue to increase. About 3,000 came last year, and that number has already been reached this year. “People are always seeking information about their homes, businesses, and other interests,” Miller said.

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Calls for military duty cut into worker ranks By Adam Geller AP Business Writer

NEW YORK — The other drivers call him ‘‘Sarge,’’ and with his crewcut, seniority and relish for giving orders rather than taking them, James Jenkins wears his nickname like a medal. But if Jenkins — who really is a sergeant, in the Marine Corps Reserve — is called for active military duty, his co-workers at a United Parcel Service depot in Philadelphia will have to march on without him. ‘‘They’ve been asking what are the possibilities that I’ll be going, and I told them as soon as I found out,

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I’ll let them know,’’ Jenkins said Tuesday. UPS and other employers are facing uncertainty as the first reservists are called on to join the U.S. military response to terrorism. With 1.3 million Americans in the reserves, a major activation could cut into the ranks of scores of companies. Still, many employers are feeling more generous now than they did about deployment of troops during the Gulf War or to the Balkans, when some grumbled about losing workers. Several large companies, including The Home Depot, Boeing, UPS and Intel, say they will make up lost pay and continue health care coverage for workers called to serve.

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Please see Workers, 5A

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CY M K

Day 16

America Recovers THURSDAY

Mostly sunny, 82

September 27, 2001

s e rv i n g t h e w e s t e r n t r e a s u r e va l l e y

w w w. i d a h o p r e s s . c o m

Grant provides public fire-safety awareness Caldwell firefighters received a special grant that will help them train the public on how to escape from and prevent fires. The grant money will be used to buy a fire trailer that acts as a demonstration site for firesafety education. Details, 4A.

National sweep nets 10 arrests Authorities seek to prevent hazardous-materials attack By Karen Gullo The Associated Press

New shelter breaks ground in Nampa Homeless families will soon have a place to stay. Ground has been broken for a 56-bed shelter that will serve women, children and families. The shelter will be located south of downtown Nampa. Details, 4A.

Americans warned to avoid Indonesia

WASHINGTON — Law enforcement authorities arrested 10 Middle Eastern men in three states Wednesday on charges of fraudulently obtaining licenses to transport hazardous materials.The arrests were made in connection with the terrorist attacks. The arrests in Missouri,Michigan and Washington state followed FBI warnings that terrorists may strike

next using chemical or biological weapons. Authorities said as many as 20 people who had the bogus permits, some of whom may have connections to the 19 hijackers involved in the Sept. 11 attacks, have been charged but may not be linked to the attacks. FBI affidavits for the 10 arrested said a total of 18 people from seven states had falsely obtained licenses in Pennsylvania to haul hazardous materials between July 1999 and February 2000. Those arrested got the licenses from the state of Pennsylvania, where a driver’s license examiner in Pittsburgh provided permits to

people who didn’t take required tests, had suspended licenses or were otherwise not eligible, according to court records. In court papers, the FBI said a Middle Eastern man named Abdul Mohamman, known as ‘‘Ben,’’ acted as a middleman in the scheme, bringing in as many as 30 drivers who fraudulently obtained hazardous materials hauling licenses. The FBI quoted the examiner, identified in the affidavit only as CW-1, as saying that he was introAP duced to ‘‘Ben’’ about six years Navy reservist Gerald Heng, center, of Nampa cringes as he ago. gets one of his five shots Tuesday at Submarine Base Bangor, in Please see Arrests, 5A Silverdale, Wash.

Citizens question county meeting

Jumping for freedom

The state department is warning Americans traveling abroad to stay clear of Indonesia. Several anti-U.S. protests have taken place in Indonesia which is predominately Muslim. Details, 9A.

Commissioners criticized for lack of meeting notice

U.S. needs information before getting bin Laden The United States has told allies that it is seeking more information on terrorists and their whereabouts before waging war. There are also concerns that any U.S. forces may be subject to chemical or biological attacks. Details, 11A.

By Brad Hem Idaho Press-Tribune CALDWELL — The heads of two Canyon County activist groups have filed a joint complaint against Canyon County Commissioners, alleging the commission held an illegal meeting Tuesday that included discussion of a debated Middleton power plant.

Delta cuts 13,000 jobs Delta is the last major airline to slash jobs in the wake of the terrorists attacks that rocked the United states Sept. 11. The company will eliminate as many as 13,000 jobs over the coming months. Details, 8A.

The Treasure Valley will host Pavarotti, the ‘King of the High C’s,” Saturday at 7 p.m. at the Boise State University Pavilion. Proceeds will go to Idaho Public Television. It is the first time that the famed opera singer has visited Idaho. Connections, 1C.

Focus on New York attack could jeopardize local needs By Brad Hem Idaho Press-Tribune

▼ Idaho Lottery Powerball: 18 26 30 35 44 PB:19 PP:4x Rolldown: 1 7 24 30 55 Wild Card 2: 7 8 9 13 15 Jack of hearts Pick 3: 0 3 2 Paul Mouser ▼ Deaths August Rohwer Muriel Dennis Iva Webster Eleanora Doo Jeanette Williams Thomas Jenkins Carol Kowallis Death notices, 5A

Dick Selby / IPT

Above: A skydiver drifts to the ground at New Plymouth Elementary School Wednesday as part of the ceremonies for Grand­parents Day. The day took on a patriotic tone with skydivers and an air show. Left: Students crane skyward to catch a better view of skydivers and an air show at New Plymouth Elementary School Wednesday.

▼ Today’s edition Opinion, 10A Puzzles, 6D TV listings, 2A Valley, 4A Weather, 2A

Today’s news section was produced by News Editor Drew Munro, Assistant Managing Editor David Woolsey, night editor Andrea Scott, and page designers Melissa Wilson and Rosemary Gray. Copyright © 2001 Printed on recycled newsprint

Vol. 22, No. 89, 40 pages

on the web: idahopress.com

Under Idaho law, a notice must be posted at least 24 hours in advance announcing any meeting of elected officials. But the meeting held Tuesday between the commissioners and the county Planning and Zoning Commission was never announced ahead of time. The commissioners’ agenda posted outside their office did not mention the evening meeting, and neither did the agenda posted on the county Web site. Please see Meeting, 5A

Local charities still in need of donations

Pavarotti is coming, tickets still available

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NAMPA — Struggling not to sound selfish, the heads of two large charitable organizations in the Treasure Valley expressed concern that their coffers might be dangerously low this year. With area residents donating thousands of dollars to theAmerican Red Cross to help relief efforts in New York and Washington, D.C., Treasure Valley United Way Director Sally Zive and Nampa Salvation Army Lt. John Stennett said they are worried there won’t be much money left to help local people who need help. “There’s some concern that people will have given all they can give,” Stennett said. Zive shared that concern but said it is too early to tell what the real effects will be. The United Way started its annual fund-raising drive Sept. 6. It will be the end of November, when the drive ends, before she can tell whether

donations have decreased much. The Sept. 11 attacks came at the beginning of the United Way drive, which was already expected to produce less money than in years past because of layoffs at area high-tech companies. Stennett said he is hopeful people will still be able to give when Salvation Army volunteers start ringing bells during the Christmas season. He said in addition to the help needed on the East Coast, there are still plenty of needs here at home. This week, the Salvation Army will begin construction on a new Nampa homeless shelter that still needs $500,000 for completion. That said, Zive and Stennett said people should donate to whomever they think needs the money the most.They said it is hard to talk about local concerns amidst a national crisis without sounding selfish. They have been impressed by the outpouring of support for people far away. If that hurts local efforts, Zive and Stennett said they will survive. “We’ll do the best we can and be grateful for what we have,” Zive said.

Idaho universities plan new campus in Boise U of I, ISU plan to expand programs in the valley By Brad Hem Idaho Press-Tribune The University of Idaho and Idaho State University are moving forward with plans for a joint campus in Boise. Construction is scheduled to begin in December for the new Idaho Water Center, which

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would combine business, government and research interests in a new building on four acres at the intersection of Broadway and Front Street. Across Front Street, on six acres, will be Idaho Place, a satellite campus similar to the University Place campus in Idaho Falls. The site will consist of three buildings with classes in health professions, architecture and Boise’s first-ever law programs, among others.

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“There is tremendous opportunity here,” ISU President Richard Bowen said. The new buildings are scheduled to be ready for students and workers in time for school to start in the fall of 2003. The two universities, the University of Idaho Foundation and some private development and business interests are sharing the $140 million project bill. Roy Eiguren, a member of the U of I Foundation Board of

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Directors, said the project will not require any state money. It will be financed by the foundation with low-interest bonds. The universities will pay rent, similar to what they already pay for space in Boise, but will also gain equity in the new buildings. Officials expect private donations to cover part of the cost. University of Idaho President Robert Hoover said the project is not intended to compete with Boise State University. The

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programs to be offered at Idaho Place will be ones not offered at BSU, and many of them will be graduate-level programs. The university presidents said the Boise center would in no way affect funding for the BSU Canyon County satellite campus in Nampa. There won’t be dormitories at the Boise campus. Hoover said the site will mostly draw parttime students and adults looking to earn advanced degrees.

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CY M K

Day 17

America Recovers FRIDAY

Partly cloudy, 78

September 28, 2001

s e rv i n g t h e w e s t e r n t r e a s u r e va l l e y

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Caldwell’s Nancolas unopposed But three will vie for Nampa’s top elected job Idaho Press-Tribune staff

the state had to turn in their signatures by the close of business. In Nampa, however, a third candiGarret date tossed Nancolas a hat in the ring for the job now held by incumbent Mayor Maxine Horn. In addition to a challenge from City Councilman Tom Dale, new-

More coverage

■ A roundup of candidates on this year’s ballot, 4A. ■ Third candidate seeks Nampa mayor post, 4A. ■ Candidate seeks Caldwell City Council seat, 4A.

tested in other area cities, including Homedale, Notus and Greenleaf. Nampa will have two contested races for City Council. Opponents also vie for two City Council seats in Caldwell; a candidate for a third seat is unopposed. Council races will be held in many cities across the valley, ranging from Middleton to Marsing. In Caldwell, Nancolas said he was pleased by the voters’ confidence shown by no one

choosing to run against him. He said the city faces challenges and opportunities with unprecedented growth, and he wants to continue his agenda to guide the city forward. Nancolas’ lack of opposition means he can maintain his city duties without the distraction of a campaign. “I can continue working and stay on focus with the tasks ahead of us,” he said. “I will keep doing what I love — serving the people of Caldwell.”

Guide inside today

Caldwell Mayor Garret Nancolas will be unopposed on the ballot in the Nov. 6 city election, all but assuring him of another four-year term. Nancolas was the only candidate to file for Caldwell chief executive as of Thursday’s deadline. Hopefuls for mayoral and city council seats across

Powell says Jackson trip wouldn’t serve a purpose

Bush: Put Guard at airports Recall

For a preview of this weekend’s “Big Toys for Big Boys” show Saturday at Karcher Mall, plus stories about cars, ATVs, snow and water motorsports and outdoor gear, check out the special section inside today’s newspaper.

WASHINGTON (AP) — Secretary of State Colin Powell said Jesse Jackson would probably solve nothing by visiting Afghanistan’s ruling Taliban militia because the United States has nothing to negotiate. ‘‘He is free to travel,’’ Powell said Thursday. ‘‘I don’t know what purpose would be served right now, since the position of the United States and the international community is quite clear.’’ Jackson is considering whether to lead a delegation to Taliban officials to try to persuade them to hand over Osama bin Laden, the prime suspect in the Sept. 11 terrorism attacks on the United States. The civil rights activist said he does not know when he will decide on his plans.

Giuliani reported to be seeking more time The New York Post reported Thursday that New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani disclosed that he is asking the mayoral candidates to make an deal with him to “maintain the unity” in the city — apparently by delaying the Jan. 1 inauguration so he can continue serving for a brief period. Sources close to state Senate Majority Leader Joseph Bruno, who discussed Giuliani’s wishes with him, said Bruno is “open to legislation to extending the mayor’s term for perhaps 60 days,” the report said. Other sources said Giuliani was hoping for a threemonth extension.

Allied warplanes strike sites in southern Iraq RIYADH, Saudi Arabia (AP) — U.S. and British warplanes struck two artillery sites Thursday that were a threat to aircraft patrolling Iraq’s southern ‘‘no-fly’’ zone, a U.S. Air Force spokesman said. Meanwhile, in Baghdad, Iraq’s Deputy Prime Minister Tariq Aziz denied his country had been involved in the Sept. 11 terror attacks against the United States, but warned that Washington may use the strikes as an excuse for an eventual assault on Iraq.

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▼ Deaths Roberta Bailey Shirley Basham Jackie Borman Lovey Doo Nancy Freeman

Marjorie Geddes Daisy Gushwa Charles Lundy Everett Morrison Monte Rohwer

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By Sonya Ross The Associated Press

backer heads to court

allow air traffic controllers to

take control of a plane if the pilot was incapacitated.

CHICAGO — President Bush asked the nation's governors to post National Guard troops at airports Thursday as a first step to take federal control of airline security and coax Americans back into the skies. "This nation will not live in fear," he said. Bush's plan envisions stationing 4,000-5,000 troops at the nation's 420 commercial airports for up to six months while the federal government prepares to step in. Also, many more in-flight air marshals would be trained and a federal agency would be set up to oversee the screening of passengers and luggage. Governors prepared callup orders. "When you're in a time of war, you don't question the commander-in-chief," said Minnesota Gov. Jesse Ventura. However, the nation's mayors and some Democratic leaders said Bush's plan was inadequate. The president announced his program at a pep-rally style event at O'Hare International Airport 16 days after suicide hijackers slammed jetliners into the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. He urged the crowd not to give terrorism a victory by staying on the ground. "Get on the airlines, get about the business of America," Bush said. "Fly and enjoy America's great destination spots." He said nine of his Cabinet secretaries would travel the country on commercial flights on Friday to show Americans that they, too, can feel comfortable boarding airplanes again. Bush authorized $500 million in grants to the airlines to strengthen cockpit doors and study technology that would

The president's proposal stopped short of assigning federal workers to perform security duties at airports, as is done

Foe of Middleton mayor says vote unfairly blocked

in some other countries. The

By Brad Hem Idaho Press-Tribune

U.S. Conference of Mayors said Bush hadn't gone far enough, and appointed a task force to come up with further security measures. "We want a federal force that is equal to or even better than the ones they have in Israel and Germany and France," said executive director Tom Cochran. "We do not have faith in the airlines to develop a security system for our airports."

■ Idaho Guard deployed, 3A.

Airliner returns to LAX under F-16 escort LOS ANGELES (AP) — A passenger allegedly uttered an anti-American threat during a confrontation with flight attendants Thursday, prompting an airliner to return to Los Angeles under escort by Air Force jet fighters. The FBI identified the passenger as Javid Naghani, an Iranian citizen in the United States legally. He was in custody Thursday evening being questioned by investigators. Authorities would not describe the threat. ‘‘Shortly after departure a male passenger was apprehended smoking in the lavatory,’’ said Nicole Couture-Simard, spokeswoman for Air Canada in Montreal. ‘‘The passenger became verbally abusive and uttered an antiAmerican threat.’’ Two F-16s escorted the Air Canada flight into the airport, authorities said.

Generals control shoot-down decisions WASHINGTON (AP) — Two Air Force generals have been authorized to order the military to shoot down any civilian airliner that appears to be threatening U.S. cities, Pentagon officials said Thursday. Seeking to reassure America’s travelers of their safety, Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld said: ‘ There are a lot of safeguards in place.’ White House spokesman Scott McClelland said that every attempt will be made to follow the chain of command from the commander in chief on down before any order to down a plane is issued.

MIDDLETON — The Middle­ ton man trying to remove the town’s mayor from office wants a judge to review the city’s handling of his recall efforts. Clifford Martin has worked since July to collect the 188 signatures needed to warrant a recall election of Mayor Frank McKeever. But City Clerk Ellen Smith has repeatedly found legal problems with his effort. Last week, Smith sent Martin a letter saying his recall campaign was dead because he had not met the Sept. 17 deadline required by law. The letter was dated Sept. 18 — the day after a deadline that Martin said Smith had previously told him was extended until Oct. 5. While Martin thought he had another two weeks to finish his job, Smith had decided she made a mistake in extending the deadline. But the letter informing him wasn’t sent until after the time was past. Please see Recall, 5A

Related news ■ Timeline of the effort to recall the Middleton mayor, 5A. ■ Opponents of Middleton power plant have their say, 4A. ■ Prosecutor will consider whether county officials held illegal meeting, 4A.

Fiesta Idaho ready to go through weekend

Opinion, 6A Puzzles, 6D TV listings, 2A Valley, 4A Weather, 2A

Hispanic culture event delayed after attacks

Today’s news section was produced by News Editor Drew Munro, Assistant Managing Editor David Woolsey, and page designers Melissa Wilson and Rosemary Gray. Copyright © 2001 Printed on recycled newsprint

Vol. 22, No. 90, 36 pages

on the web: idahopress.com

Troops first step toward federal control of security

comer Lorraine Ramsey filed at the 11th hour to run for the seat, saying she’s concerned about the city’s image and appearance. Mayor’s races are also con-

By Lora Volkert Idaho Press-Tribune NAMPA — The Hispanic Cultural Center of Idaho will kick off the second annual Fiesta Idaho today, with a range of events planned throughout the weekend. The three-day event was originally scheduled for Sept. 14-16 to coincide with Mexican Independence Day on Sept. 16, but was rescheduled in the

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aftermath of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Tickets for the Sept. 14 performance are good for tonight’s program. Fiesta Idaho celebrations will focus on the cultural and artistic contributions of the state’s Hispanic population, including mariachi music, Mexican folk dances, and a menudo — spicy tripe stew — cookoff. The festivities begin tonight when the Los Angeles-based female mariachi group Las Adelitas performs at 7 p.m.in the Northwest Nazarene University Brandt Auditorium. Saturday’s events start at

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11 a.m. in Nampa’s Lakeview Park with opening ceremonies. Sunday opens with Catholic Mass at 10 a.m. in Lakeview Park. The following events also take place in Lakeview Park: ■ Various folk arts, such as making tortillas and paper flowers, will be demonstrated from noon to 5:30 p.m. Saturday and 1 to 5 p.m. Sunday. ■ Kids can get their faces painted and make piñatas and corn husk wreaths from noon to 5 p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. ■ Music and dance groups

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will perform on the main stage from noon to 6 p.m. Saturday and 1 to 6 p.m. Sunday. ■ Los Rebeldes de Durango will perform for an outdoor dance, which the public is invited to join, from 6 to 8 p.m. Saturday at the main stage. ■ Custom car owners will show off their vehicles 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday. Owners can register from 10 a.m. to noon that day. ■ The menudo cookoff for a $300 prize will be 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday. To enter, contact Janie Archuleta at 455-2200.

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Tickets Tickets purchased for the original performance on Sept. 14 are good for tonight’s program. Tickets are available at the door or through Select-a-Seat. Prices are $8 for adults, $6 for students and senior citizens and free for children younger than 5.

To learn more For more information about the Fiesta Idaho celebrations, contact the Hispanic Cultural Center of Idaho at 442-0823.

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CY M K

Day 18

America Fights Back SATURDAY

Sunny, 79

September 29, 2001

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U.S. ‘in hot pursuit’ Officials say special forces operating in Afghanistan

Bishop Kelly · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 45 Nampa · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 0 Kuna · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 23 Vallivue · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 8 Skyview · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 42 Caldwell · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 22 McCall-Donnelly · · · · · · · · · · · · 51 Middleton · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 0 Parma · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·

By David Espo AP Special Correspondent WASHINGTON — Presi­dent Bush says the United States is in “hot pursuit” of the perpetrators of the Sept. 11 attacks and federal officials confirmed that Pentagon special forces were operating inside Afghanistan. “Make no mistake about it, we’re in hot pursuit of terrorists,” Bush told reporters Friday. He did little to flesh out his remark, but added that he understood it was “very hard to fight a guerrilla war with conventional forces.” The Pentagon has begun a redeployment of ships, planes and personnel around the globe to prepare for a military strike, but officials have said little to suggest any type of attack is imminent. Reuters reported late Friday the United States is preparing the groundwork to bomb military installations in Afghanistan and that U.S. planes would also drop leaflets and food for the Afghan people. ABC News said special forces on the ground in the landlocked central Asian nation were laying the groundwork for a campaign that would begin with the bombing of a number of strategic military installations of the ruling Taliban government, especially those related to air defense. The reports also indicated that because of the famine that has imperiled the lives of several million Afghans, U.S. planes will also drop food supplies. In addition, there will be drops of leaflets designed to explain to AP / U.S. Navy, Jason Scarborough the civilian population what is In this handout picture from the U.S. Navy made available Friday, an aviation boatswain’s mate directs an F/A-18 happening. “Hornet” into position for launch from the flight deck aboard USS Theodore Roosevelt. The Roosevelt is on a scheduled Please see Pursuit, 5A six-month deployment, but the Pentagon has not released its whereabouts.

Big Toys for Big Boys show today in Nampa If you’re looking for action, a good place to start is Karcher Mall today. The Idaho Press-Tribune’s Big Toys for Big Boys show will feature vendors, displays and information about everything from snowmobiles and watercraft to computers and all-terrain vehicles. Several cars and trucks from local dealerships will also be featured on display. The show runs from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. inside Karcher Mall. Several drawings will be held at various booths. Admission is free. Vocalists who want to show off their talents and help a good cause can also sign up for a karaoke contest to benefit the New York Fire Department relief fund. Children’s contests run from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. and 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Entries for the younger set are $5. Adults will compete from 2 to 2:30 p.m. and 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. Adult entries are $10. Prizes will be awarded to top winners. For more information, check out the Rock ’N’ Rooster DJ & Karaoke booth in the central mall area. A portion of the entry fees will be donated to firefighters’ families affected by the East Coast terrorist attacks.

FAA warning to pilots: Do not stray

Vauk remembered at ceremony

CNN reports that pilots may be shot down by the U.S. military if they enter restricted or prohibited air space. The agency says that drastic action would be the military's last resort -- after attempting to intercept and force down the aircraft. The new warning, first reported Thursday by CNN's John King, stems from the terrorist hijackings on September 11.

Purple Heart awarded to Nampan killed in attack on the Pentagon By Vickie Holbrook Idaho Press-Tribune

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Today, family and friends will meet at Arlington National Cemetery to bury Lt. Cmdr. Ronald James Vauk — a family member, researcher and dedicated patriot. On Friday, more than 700 family and friends honored the 1982 Nampa High School graduate and 1987 Naval Academy graduate at a special ceremony at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md., where he worked. As a Naval Reservist, Vauk was in

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▼ Deaths Shirley Basham Sherman Goodman Jeanette Williams

Death notices, 5A

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Regulators say Idaho Power can collect most expenses The Associated Press

BOISE — State regulators say it’s OK for Idaho Power Co. to get another big increase in electric rates to cover the cost it paid to buy power on the wholesale market. The rate hike will boost the average residential customer’s bill another $4 to $6 a month on top of an average $12 increase Rate hike in monthly Idaho Power’s rate bills that took increase will cause effect last these increases for May. the next year: I d a h o Public Utilities ■ 7 percent for most Commission residential customm e m b e r s ers. accepted the ■ 7.5 percent for irric o n t e n t i o n gation customers. of the state’s ■ 5 percent for small largest elec- commercial customtric utility that ers. it had used ■ 7.8 percent for the proper large commercial mechanism to customers. calculate the ■ 9.3 percent for cost of whole- industrial customers. sale power bought last fall from an unregulated corporate affiliate. But the commission criticized the company for what it called ‘‘quite mechanical’’ transactions in a power market that was experiencing volatile day-to-day fluctuations.The company should have done more analysis in an attempt to save consumers money, the commission said. Commissioners found ‘‘this handsoff attitude to be troublesome and a weak justification to explain why the company did not take action to minimize ratepayer costs.’’ The commission also threatened to revise the formula that splits the cost of purchased power between ratepayers and shareholders. Shareholders now absorb 10 percent of the cost. The Public Utilities Commission said that does not appear to be enough to convince utility executive to get the best deal possible. Idaho Power Vice President Ric Gale said the ruling, even though it rejected nearly $12 million in the utility’s request, was a ‘‘clear signal that our trading practices were completely above board.’’ Gale declined to address the commission’s criticism of the way Idaho Power handled itself during the transaction, and spokesman Dennis Lopez said the company is reviewing its options on the portion of the rate request that was denied. Please see Rates, 5A

Nampan honored for work with Fiesta Idaho

Schachtell also leader of Hispanic Cultural Center

Today’s news section was produced by News Editor Drew Munro, Assistant Managing Editor David Woolsey, Valley Editor Sean Deter, and page designers Sergio Brown and Rosemary Gray.

By Sam Bass Idaho Press-Tribune NAMPA — Ana Maria Schachtell of Nampa was honored Friday for her work to organize Fiesta Idaho events in Nampa and the Treasure Valley. U.S. Sen. Mike Crapo presented Schachtell, president of the board of directors for the Hispanic Cultural Center of Idaho, with his “Spirit of Idaho”

Copyright © 2001 Printed on recycled newsprint

Vol. 22, No. 91, 78 pages

on the web: idahopress.com

charge of the Navy’s nerve center, the Watch Command Center, when the Pentagon was attacked Sept. 11. The 37year-old son of Hubert and Dorothy Vauk of Nampa was serving his two-week duty and was on the telephone with a commanding officer discussing the attacks on the World Trade Center in New York. A particularly touching moment of the emotional and patriotic hour-long ceremony Friday was when Vauk’s young son, Liam, proudly received a small, polished wooden box to keep his father’s medals — including the Purple Heart awarded Friday. The 3-year-old boy took KBCI Channel 2 the box to his mother, Jennifer, who is Jennifer Vauk accepts the Purple Heart in honor of expecting another child in November. her husband, Ron, who was killed in the Sept. 11 Please see Vauk, 5A attack of the Pentagon.

Utility gets big rate hike

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award. U n d e r S c h a c h t e l l ’s leadership and vision, the annual Fiesta Idaho celebration has blossomed into a Ana Maria major event, Schachtell Crapo said. “Ana’s commitment is what makes the people of Idaho so wonderful,” he said. “She is part of Idaho’s spirit.” Schachtell said she was humbled by the honor.

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The award

U.S. Sen. Mike Crapo suggested the Spirit of Idaho Award program during his first year of office, spokeswoman Susan Wheeler said. About 20 awards have been given since 1999.

“There are so many people who deserve it, too,” she said. “So many who work so hard to make our community better.” Crapo prepared a videotaped presentation, which was be shown Friday night during

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opening ceremonies on the Northwest Nazarene University campus for this year’s Fiesta Idaho celebration, which continues today at Lakeview Park in Nampa. Crapo and his staff made plans to present the award to Schachtell at the event. Crapo also congratulated Schachtell for her work to help secure the development of the Hispanic Cultural Center. The center will be built on a site on Garrity Boulevard, north of Lakeview Park. Recently, the senator joined

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Schachtell and other members of the Cultural Center’s board, community citizens and leaders, to announce a $2.8 million federal grant through the Economic Development Administration. The grant will allow construction of the Hispanic Cultural Center to get under way next year. Fund-raising for operating expenses continues. ■ For more about Fiesta Idaho, including ticket information and event schedules, see 4A today and Sunday’s Idaho Press-Tribune.

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CY M K

Day 19

America Fights Back SUNDAY

Sunny, 84

September 30, 2001

s e rv i n g t h e w e s t e r n t r e a s u r e va l l e y

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Idaho teams battle

Food hits Afghanistan before attack Pakistan closes doors on militant Islamic group By the Associated Press

Pullman, Wash., sets stage for 31st encounter between cross-state rivals,

Poll: Americans ready to give up some rights WASHINGTON (Reuters) — Americans, firmly behind the administration's war on terrorism, are ready to give up some civil liberties if it helps catch those responsible for the Sept. 11 attacks in New York and Washington, according to a poll released on Saturday. The poll of 1,215 Americans, published in The Washington Post, showed that nine out of 10 people believed President Bush was doing a good job — a figure in line with other surveys conducted since the deadly attacks. A similar number favored a military response to the attacks and said the United States needed to capture or kill Saudi-born militant Osama bin Laden, who the administration holds responsible for the plot, and dismantle his al Qaeda network.

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ISLAMABAD, Pakistan — Fearing widespread starvation in Afghanistan if America attacks, the United Nations on Saturday sent its first food shipments there since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, a U.N. spokesman said. In Afghanistan, the trial of eight foreign aid workers was put off for a day, until Sunday.The eight were arrested last month by the hard-line Taliban government for allegedly spreading Christianity in the strictly Muslim country. Meanwhile, Pakistan shut down a

major militant organization which the United States has branded a terrorist organization.The Harakat ul-Mujahedeen, or Movement of the Holy Warriors, has been fighting Indian soldiers in the disputed Kashmir region.A Harakat commander, Sajjad Shahid, blamed ‘‘American pressure’’ for the crackdown. The move came a day after the United Nations passed a resolution ordering member states to crack down on terror groups. Harakat ul-Mujahedeen has strong ties to Afghanistan, and some of its members were trained there. Scores of Harakat volunteers are believed to be fighting alongside the Afghanistan’s ruling Taliban in its battle against opposition guerrillas in the north. In Islamabad, a spokesman for the

World Food Program, Khaled Mansour, said convoys carrying 200 tons of wheat left the Pakistani border city of Peshawar on Saturday for the Afghan capital, Kabul. Other shipments would be dispatched in a few days for Kabul and the western city of Herat, he said. ‘‘We are resuming food deliveries into Afghanistan on a trial basis,’’ Mansour said. ‘‘Once we ensure that food aid is reaching the most needy ... we will move more food into Afghanistan.’’ Humanitarian groups have been warning of impending starvation inside Afghanistan because of political turmoil, drought and the threat of American attack. The Taliban are sheltering Osama bin Laden, chief suspect in the Sept. 11 suicide airplane attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon.

Nampa Fiesta Idaho fights gangs, drugs chief wants gun money C ultu r al c e l e b r ati o n

Nampa festivities provide good influence for kids By Lora Volkert Idaho Press-Tribune

Taliban denies report of captured U.S. troops DUBAI/KABUL (Reuters) — A Gulf television station said on Saturday that Afghan security forces had seized members of the U.S. special forces in Afghanistan, but the ruling Taliban swiftly denied the report. Quoting a military source from Osama bin Laden's al Qaeda network, Qatar's al-Jazeera television said the five Americans — two of whom it described as Afghans with U.S. citizenship — were U.S. special forces scouting near the Iranian border with modern weapons and some maps of al Qaeda sites. Asked about the report, the Taliban's defense minister, Mullah Obaidullah Akhund, told Reuters: "It is totally wrong, we deny this news that they have come to our areas."

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▼ Deaths Shirley M. Basham Howard Davies, Sr. Muriel Dennis Bud Goodman Baylee Karlson

Carol Kowallis Blaine Morris Irving Price, Jr.

Obituaries and death notices, 5A

NAMPA — One reason Nampan Elida Ruiz likes the Hispanic Cultural Center of Idaho’s Fiesta Idaho is that it helps kids find identity in culture instead of gangs. “I think it’s important because some of the Hispanic kids around here don’t really know what Mexican culture is like,” Ruiz said. Instead of getting involved in their culture, she said kids get involved with gangs. R.J.Valdez, a 15-year-old from Caldwell and one of Saturday’s breakdancing competitors, said he practices all the time. “It keeps me out of trouble, away from gang violence,” he said. First Assembly of God minister Jessie Salinas, 24, of Caldwell breakdances and raps for Jesus. “You can have fun without being in a gang and you can have fun and be a Christian,” he said. Gangs aren’t the only danger Fiesta Idaho tries to combat. Gracie Ramos hopes to spread the message that people can enjoy themselves without alcohol and tobacco. Ramos, of the Idaho Commission on Hispanic Affairs and the Tobacco Prevention Youth Group, served no-alcohol margaritas, piña coladas and strawberry daiquiris to raise money for the American Red Cross. Alcohol often accompanies tobacco, Ramos explained. Offering mocktails at the fiesta is one way she promotes not smoking.

NAMPA — Nampa Police Chief Alan Creech wants to buy guns for all the officers on the force. Unlike most large police departments, Nampa officers provide their own weapons. Creech would like to see that change. “We think it’s time to do a department-wide issue of handguns so we can standard- Caldwell ize what our people police are carrying,” he said. “It’s a legal issue, cost Caldwell Police Chief Bob issue and officer safety Sobba said his department has some loaner weapons issue.” Creech is request- that officers can use while ing a commitment of they’re contemplating what $4,425 from the city kind of weapon they want to go along with fed- to carry. They must meet eral grant money that the department rangemashe would use to buy ter’s criteria. Many officers handguns for his 81 already have their gun when they join the departofficers. Public comment ment. Officers also can buy will be taken during guns through a discount Monday’s Nampa City arrangement and have payCouncil meeting for the ments deducted without Police Department’s request for funds to purchase the firearms. According to Creech’s proposal, the department has been approved for a $39,824 grant this year.The city must match that grant with $4,425 of its own money. This year’s grant money can be held over until next year, when Creech hopes similar grant money will be available. The pooled money will amount to the nearly $100,000 it will cost to purchase semi-automatic handguns for each of the department’s officers, Creech said. “We’ve had supportive comments from the public for the most part, but they will have an

Opinion, 16A Puzzles, 5D TV listings, 2A Valley, 4A Weather, 2A

Pilots say terrorist threat ends travel’s routine nature

Today’s news section was produced by Assistant Managing Editor David Woolsey, Valley Editor Sean Deter, and copy editors Sergio Brown, Melissa Wilson and Rosemary Gray. Copyright © 2001 Printed on recycled newsprint

Vol. 22, No. 92, 48 pages

on the web: idahopress.com

Today’s events begin with Catholic Mass at 10 a.m. Menudo cookoff entries simmer from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Music and dance groups perform from 1-6 p.m. Arts including folk dances, wax-dipped flowers and piñatas will be demonstrated from 1-5 p.m. Children’s crafts are offered from 11 a.m.-5 p.m. and a Mexican horsemanship show will be held from 3-4 p.m. All events take place at Lakeview Park or the area across Garrity Boulevard.

Rob Bartholomew / IPT

Bernadette Moore waits to perform at the Fiesta Idaho celebration at Lakeview Park Saturday. The event, which continues today, is organized by the Hispanic Cultural Center of Idaho and celebrates Hispanic contributions to the state’s culture and economy.

Hijackings change flying forever

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Creech wants standardized weapons for police officers

Event continues

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AP

World Food Program workers load wheat donated by the United States for Afghan refugees in Peshawar, Pakistan Saturday.

By Michael Collins Scripps Howard News Service From the cockpit, pilot Jeff Gorman listens for unusual noises as he jets across America. A sudden thump comes from the cabin. Was it luggage shifting? Someone entering the lavatory? Or signs of a struggle? Gorman surveys the landscape below and searches for an open field where he can set the plane down in case there are terrorists on board. In the skies over America, com-

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mercial pilots are going about the business of flying with the sobering recognition that their profession changed forever when terrorists hijacked four jetliners on Sept. 11 and used them as instruments of death and destruction. "Being pilots, part of your basic makeup is preparing for an emergency,'' Gorman said. But, he concedes, "This is a new world.'' Now, routine checks before takeoff involve a thorough review of passenger lists and discussions about how to defend the cockpit against terrorists. Pilots instruct flight attendants to alert them to any suspicious passengers or the first sign of trouble. In

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at least one case, a pilot announced over the plane's intercom system that passengers themselves should be prepared to fight off hijackers by throwing pillows, blankets, seat cushions or anything else they could get their hands on. Since the terrorist attacks in New York and Washington, Delta pilot Andy Deane has made a point of wandering through the cabin before take-off and introducing himself to the passengers.The greetings serve a dual purpose: Passengers feel more at ease if they can see the pilot up close. And Deane gets to size up the passengers.

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School site needs improvements District overcomes several barriers; location could be annexed Monday By Nathaniel Hoffman Idaho Press-Tribune NAMPA — The Meeting Nampa City Council could give the final Monday’s Nampa City go-ahead Monday to Council meeting begins annex a site for a new at 7 p.m. at City Hall, 411 3rd St. S. elementary school. Before the school is built however, the city, Nampa School District and neighbors have to reach a compromise. They have to decide who will pay for the improvements needed to ensure students get to school safe and receive basic services, such as sewer and water.

Please see Pilots, 5A

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CY M K

Day 20

America Fights Back MONDAY

Sunny, 88

October 1, 2001

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England puts freeze on Taliban bank account BRIGHTON, England (Reuters) - Britain will announce today that it has frozen almost $90 million of assets of Afghanistan's ruling Taliban movement, which is refusing to hand over Osama bin Laden. Claiming a lead in the international financial crackdown on "terrorists," finance minister Gordon Brown will say that the freezing of a large account in a European bank based in London last week had placed funds worth $88.4 million out of bounds. "We call upon all nations to ensure that just as there is no safe haven for terrorists, nor is there safe hiding for terrorist funds," Brown will tell his ruling Labor Party's annual conference, an aide told Reuters.

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Ashcroft: More attacks probable White House demands Taliban turn over bin Laden By Susanne M. Schafer The Associated Press WASHINGTON — The Taliban government confirmed Sunday that Osama bin Laden still is in Afghanistan but the White House flatly rejected an overture to negotiate his fate. Meantime, Attorney General John Ashcroft warned of a ‘‘very serious threat’’ of new terrorism against Americans that may increase if the United States retaliates for the Sept.

11 attacks. ‘‘We believe that there is the likelihood of additional terrorist activity. And it is our job to do whatever we can to interrupt it, to disrupt it,’’ Ashcroft said on CBS’s ‘‘Face John Ashcroft The Nation.’’ ‘‘We believe there are others who may be in the country who would have plans,’’ Ashcroft said when asked about the ongoing hunt for those behind the strikes against the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. Also on Sunday,Taliban leader Mullah

Mohammed Omar told his people in a radio address not to worry about a U.S. attack because ‘‘Americans don’t have the courage to come here.’’ Earlier, a Taliban envoy acknowledged for the first time that bin Laden is in Afghanistan and under the control of the Taliban. He said negotiations might be possible if the United States offered evidence linking bin Laden to the attacks. ‘‘He’s in a place which cannot be located by anyone,’’ Taliban ambassador to Pakistan Abdul Salam Zaeef told journalists in Islamabad. Zaeef said the Taliban, who have rejected a series of appeals to hand over

bin Laden and avert a military confrontation, were willing to talk. ‘‘We are thinking of negotiation,’’ he said, adding that if direct evidence against bin Laden were produced,‘‘it might change things.’’ White House Chief of Staff Andrew Card responded:‘‘The president has said we’re not negotiating.’’ Card said the Taliban government has been told what to do. ‘‘They’ve got to turn not only Osama bin Laden over but all the operatives of the al-Qaida organization.They’ve got to stop being a haven where terrorists can train,’’ he said on ‘‘Fox News Sunday.’’ Please see Attacks, 5A

New war Police station nearly complete strains world relations C a l d w e l l r e no v at i on

Three million Afghans in danger of starvation TEHRAN, Iran (CNN) — A top official for the U.N.'s relief agency Sunday said three million people in Afghanistan "are at grave risk." Filippo Grandi, chief of mission in Afghanistan for the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees, said up to three million may be going hungry or may lack other necessities, such as medicine and shelter. People are said to be moving out of cities throughout Afghanistan and headed to the countryside. Some may have only one solution to survival — crossing the border.

Terror crackdown may create array of foreign policy problems By Deb Riechmann The Associated Press

Investigators find new money links to attacks WASHINGTON (CNN) — Investigators say there is mounting evidence in Europe of a terrorist network with close links to Osama bin Laden. A series of police raids and more than 20 arrests around the continent in recent days have shed more light on links between groups of terrorists at work, from the Netherlands to Spain. At least four of the 19 suspected hijackers implicated in the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks against the United States trained at camps in Afghanistan run by suspected terrorist mastermind bin Laden, an intelligence source familiar with the federal investigation said Saturday. Government say they also believe the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks were funded, developed and conceived in England, Germany and the United Arab Emirates (UAE). According to a law enforcement source speaking with The Associated Press, attacks were financed with a $500,000 bankroll, and the FBI has sent more agents to Germany, as the search widens for the architects of the plot.

▼ Deaths Albert Blaser Howard Davies, Sr. Bud Goodman Gloria Hapgood James Hass Jacoba Hiatt Eunice Jolley

Robert Lamb Flora Lewis Virginia Mitchell W. Paul Tate Edna Thompson Violet Walker

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Caldwell dedication ceremony set for mid-November By Beckie Ferguson Idaho Press-Tribune CALDWELL — The day is fast approaching when Caldwell police personnel, who for years have battled cramped quarters, will have some breathing room. Invitations to a Nov. 15 dedication ceremony for the city’s new $5.6 million police station will soon go out, according to Police Chief Bob Sobba. The public will have a chance to tour the 26,400-square-foot building that afternoon and the next day, he said.

Patty Cuchillo’s donation part of West Middle School fund-raiser

Today’s news section was produced by Valley Editor Sean Deter, copy editors Sergio Brown, Rosemary Gray and Melissa Wilson. Copyright © 2001 Printed on recycled newsprint

Vol. 22, No. 93, 32 pages

on the web: idahopress.com

Paul Bates of Commercial Constructors of Nampa works on the barrel ceiling of Caldwell’s new police station, scheduled to be dedicated in midNovember. The $5.6 million, 26,400-square-foot structure will give officers something they’re not used to: space.

The structure will replace the 53year-old Main Street building, which Sobba said is in poor condition and need of repair. While a final decision hasn’t been made yet, the old station — less than one-third the size of the new building — will most likely be torn down and replaced with a parking lot, according to Sobba. Voters passed a 20-year bond to build the new station a year ago and construction began in November. The two-story complex is in the final construction stages, with all the exterior and interior walls nearly complete. Some rooms have already been painted. Come November, police personnel who have been crammed into tight

quarters for years will have the space they need to provide more efficient service to the public, Sobba said. “We’re very proud of our new building,” Sobba said during a recent inspection of the structure. “It’s been needed for a long time.” The building’s first-floor design features include a 1,200-square-foot workout room, with showers and a locker room, along with space for report-writing and interview, records, media, evidence, patrol and briefing rooms. Police administrative offices and additional report-writing, interview and briefing rooms are housed on the upper floor. Please see Station, 4A

Student gives savings to relief efforts

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Rob Bartholomew / IPT

WASHINGTON — Like the opening shot in billiards that sends the balls ricocheting in directions unknown, America’s war on terrorism could have unintended consequences far and wide. U.S. policy-makers are aware that as they take their best shot against terrorism, they could set in motion problems of a different sort. The risk of bolstering Islamic radicals, perhaps giving them enough power to overthrow moderate governments in the Arab world, is among the most apparent consequences and helps explain why the Bush administration is picking its way so carefully in responding to the Sept. 11 terror attacks. Instability in Pakistan, which has supported the hardline Taliban regime in Afghanistan but also is cooperating with the United States, is a particular danger. A takeover by fundamentalist Islamic factions there could be calamitous, said Jim Steinberg, deputy national security adviser for President Clinton. ‘‘You’d have an armed Islamic nuclear state,’’ he said. ‘‘That would be a very serious unintended consequence.’’ The gathering U.S. military response has already sent Afghans fleeing to borders that have been sealed off by neighboring states, and food shortages are feared with the onset of winter. There is also the risk of upheaval in former Soviet republics in central Asia, where America has friends but border disputes are heating up and extremism is taking root.

By Michelle Cork Idaho Press-Tribune NAMPA — When Patty Cuchillo watched television news coverage of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and saw people jumping from the 110-story Twin Towers, she cried. Then, the West Middle School eighthgrader gathered all the money she had saved from working in the fields. She gathered up the $50 and some odd cents she earned from weeding and picking cherries with her family and donated it

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to American Red Cross relief efforts. “I was going to spend the money on something else, but I started to think and I decided to donate it,” Patty said, adding she probably would have spent it on clothes or candy. But she decided others, particularly the New York firefighters, need it more. “They’ve risked their lives to get people out,” she said. In four days, Patty and other West students donated more than $300, which the school’s student council has pledged to double. The students paid $.25 to put their names on red, white and blue paper hearts that were taped on hallway walls in the shape of American flags. Please see Cuchillo, 5A

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Patty Cuchillo, an eighth-grader at West Middle School in Nampa, responded with generosity after the Twin Towers fell Sept. 11. Although she said she was going to spend the money on something else, she gave $50 she had saved from weeding and picking cherries to the American Red Cross. Dick Selby/IPT

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Day 21

America Fights Back TUESDAY

Sunny, 82

October 2, 2001

s e rv i n g t h e w e s t e r n t r e a s u r e va l l e y

w w w. i d a h o p r e s s . c o m

D.C.’s Reagan National Airport will reopen WASHINGTON (AP) — President Bush will authorize reopening Reagan National Airport outside Washington with new security measures, allowing a limited number of flights at the only commercial airport left dark since the Sept. 11 hijackings, administration officials said Monday. Bush signed off on a new security package at a White House meeting Monday and will announce his plans as early as Tuesday, said several officials involved in the discussions. Federal officials closed the airport — and briefly considered shutting it down for good — because flight paths bring planes close to the White House, the Capitol and the Pentagon. A plane hijacked from Virginia’s Dulles International Airport farther out from the city crashed into the Pentagon two weeks ago, shortly after two other planes struck the World Trade Center in New York. The officials said Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport, located in Arlington, Va., across the Potomac River from Washington, could open in a matter of weeks under new security rules, which include limiting the number of incoming and outgoing flights and placing air marshals on all planes using the airport. Discussions have focused on adding extra security to prevent hijackers from taking control of planes either arriving or leaving. Other possible security improvements include increasing screening of passengers and luggage and securing the cockpits of all airplanes.

Post office unveils new patriotic stamp

Meeting correction An article that appeared on 4A of Saturday’s Idaho Press-Tribune included incorrect information about a joint meeting between the Canyon County Board of Commissioners and the Planning and Zoning Commission. The groups did not discuss P&Z commissioners visiting existing power plants. The power plant proposed for Middleton was discussed at the meeting.

▼ Idaho Lottery Pick 3: 9 0 3

Jacoba Hiatt Eunice Jolley Robert Lamb Virginia Mitchell Edna Thompson Violet Walker

Evelyn Bow Dennis Carpenter Lucille Randolph Robert Thompson

Obituaries and death notices, 5A

Opinion, 6A Puzzles, 5D TV listings, 2A Valley, 4A Weather, 2A

By Lane Bettencourt Idaho Press-Tribune NAMPA — The Nampa City Council wants the Nampa Public Library Board to consider adopting new policies about materials some residents say are inappropriate for children.

The request came after a presentation Monday by longtime library critic and Nampa resident Allen Marsh, who delivered a petition with nearly 400 signatures. Marsh said the library has a history of offending Nampa residents with books that are sexually explicit and available to minors. He asked Nampa to end its affiliation with the American Library Association, which he said had a “diseased philosophy.” Marsh went on to suggest a new partnership with Family Friendly Libraries,

an organization he said will guard the sensibilities and vulnerabilities of the young and aid the preservation of the traditional family. The board will have the chance to address points raised in the presentation. Although there was agreement among the council with some of the criticism, they determined the decision to make any policy changes should be left to the library board. “You cannot ignore 400 signatures,” said council member and mayoral candi-

date Tom Dale, who wants to see a headto-head comparison of the American Library Association’s policies and those of its suggested replacement. However, council member Lynda Clark defended the association and questioned the integrity of Marsh’s claims. “Much of what Mr. Marsh said is overstated,” she said. “(The library association) is not some liberal, left-wing, radical group.” Please see Library, 4A

High court ruling may get Hoffman sentence revised

W a r o n te r r o r is m

Taliban faces end Pakistan: U.S. strike against Afghanistan appears likely

Federal justices refuse to hear state’s appeal

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan — All but giving up on efforts to mediate the standoff over Osama bin Laden, Pakistan’s president said Monday a U.S. military strike against Afghanistan appears likely, and the Taliban’s days are probably numbered. That blunt assessment by Gen. Pervez Musharraf came as the first relief convoy since the start of the crisis reached Afghanistan’s hungry capital, Kabul, and Taliban forces reported gains in the hit-andrun warfare being waged with opposition fighters across Afghanistan’s mountainous north. TheTaliban were also bolstering their garrison in the Afghan capital. More than 6,500 fresh troops have arrived in recent days, according to Taliban officials in Kabul. Pakistan has been in a quandary ever since the Sept. 11 terror attacks that tore through a wing of the Pentagon and toppled the twin towers of the World Trade Center. It does not want to see its ally, the United States, do battle with the Taliban, the austere Islamic movement that rules next-door Afghanistan with a heavy hand but has brought a measure of stability to the warbattered country. Pakistan is only government in the world to recognize the Taliban as Afghanistan’s legitimate rulers. After suspicion in the suicide hijackings focused on bin Laden, Pakistan agreed to lend its full support to the United States in the war on terror. But it made repeated efforts to persuade the Taliban to take steps to stave off an American

By Beckie Ferguson Idaho Press-Tribune and The Associated Press BOISE — A convicted Owyhee County murderer who was sentenced to death in 1989 could be resentenced or even receive a new trial. The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to consider the state’s appeal of a 9th Circuit Court’s ruling, which said Maxwell Alton

Case history Maxwell Alton Hoffman was convicted in 1989 of the Sept. 11, 1987, murder of Denise Williams, 28, whose body was found in a remote area of Owyhee County in late summer 1988. He was sentenced to death by 3rd District Judge Gerald L. Weston.

Hoffman’s Sixth Amendment right to legal counsel was violated during a pre-sentencing interview. An evidentiary hearing on the matter is set for Oct. 29. Please see Inmate, 3A

Power credit offsets some of rate hike Measure cuts average bill by $3.60 a month

Idaho Press-Tribune staff

AP

U.S. Army Reserve Stf. Sgt. William Meloy, right, gets a kiss from his wife, Shannon, and a hug from his children before reporting for duty at Fort Stewart, Ga., Monday.

retaliatory strike — namely by surrendering bin Laden, their ‘‘guest’’ of the past five years. During that time, bin Laden made Afghanistan the field headquarters for a wide-ranging terror network known as al-Qaida, or ‘‘the base.’’ Please see Taliban, 3A

Those without new visas refused access at border The Associated Press

Today’s news section was produced by Assistant Managing Editor David Woolsey, Valley Editor Sean Deter and copy editors, Sergio Brown and Julius Tigno Copyright © 2001 Printed on recycled newsprint

Vol. 22, No. 94, 24 pages

on the web: idahopress.com

City Council asks library board to consider changes

Clash imminent Reuters news service reports an Afghan opposition official predicted a U.S. strike on the land-locked country could take place in a matter of days and the Taliban's defense minister exhorted his soldiers to be ready to fight hard.

BOISE —  Idaho Power customers will get a credit to their bills that will help offset part of a rate increased approved last week by state regulators. On Monday, the Idaho Public Utilities Commission approved a rate credit agreement between the Bonneville Power Administration and Idaho Power that will cut power bills for most residential and small farm customers. The average Idaho Power residential customer uses about 1,200 kilowatt-hours a month. Under the new agreement, the average customer will get a credit of about $3.60 a month. But the credit falls on the heels of a rate increase that will actually cause bills to rise.

Regulators said Friday it’s OK for Idaho Power to increase electric rates to cover the cost it paid to buy power on the wholesale market. That rate hike will boost the average residential customer’s bill $4 to $6 a month on top of an average $12 increase in monthly bills that took effect last May. So, even after the credit, you’ll be paying more for power. The rate credit also applies to small farm customers. A farm using 100,000 kilowatthours will get a reduction of about $300. Idaho’s utilities commission negotiated the agreement with officials from Washington, Oregon and Montana. “There were multiple negotiation sessions,” commission President Paul Kjellander said. “We are grateful that these benefits could come at a time that offsets some of the increases we’ve seen.”

U.S. shuts out millions of Mexican nationals

▼ Today’s edition Business, 1D Classifieds, 4D Comics, 3C Connections, 1C Legals, 8A Movies, 4C

Critic targets Nampa library materials

By Laura King AP Special Correspondent

WASHINGTON (AP) — A new postage stamp reflecting the surge of patriotism in the wake of the terrorist attacks will be unveiled today by the Postal Service. The design of the 34-cent stamp will be made public by Robert F. Rider, chairman of the postal governing board, and Postmaster General John E. Potter. It will show a large American flag above the words ‘ United We Stand.’ While this stamp is planned for the standard first-class rate, some members of Congress have proposed a stamp with a surcharge to raise money for the families of those killed at the Pentagon and World Trade Center. Currently, there is a surcharged stamp on sale to raise funds to fight breast cancer, but that is scheduled to go off sale. Reps. Lois Capps, D-Calif., and Christopher Shays, R-Conn., have introduced a bill to create the new surcharged stamp at a rate of 40 cents, with the extra 6 cents designated for the families. Other proposals have also been made, including legislation to create a stamp to help the families of the New York rescue workers and to produce a national commemorative coin.

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McALLEN, Texas — About 2 million Mexicans failed to convert their bordercrossing cards into new high-tech IDs by the Oct. 1 deadline. Hundreds were turned back Monday when they tried to get into the United States. Some said they were unaware of the cutoff date for getting the new ‘‘laser visas,’’ while others said they had been expecting the U.S. government to grant an extension, as some members of Congress have requested. The new ID cards are required along

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the 1,962-mile-long U.S.-Mexican boundary in California, Arizona, New Mexico and Texas. Lopez Flores, 66, traveled 4 1/2 hours from the interior town of Aldama, Mexico, so she could go to JC Penney in McAllen to buy a new pair of glasses. ‘‘They told me this wasn’t good anymore. I had no idea,’’ Flores said, shocked. In Arizona, about 100 people were turned back early Monday, said Russell Ahr, Immigration and Naturalization Service deputy district director. ‘‘The awareness of the new card is greater than we probably expected, and the inconvenience has been minimal,’’ Ahr said.

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Congress mandated the use of the new cards in 1996, but has extended the deadline at least twice. About 5.5 million of the old permits, which look like a driver’s license, were issued. The new ones arrive 60 to 90 days after they are applied for and feature fingerprints and data encrypted in magnetic strips, which officials hope can prevent fraud and forgery. The cards permit Mexicans to enter the United States and travel within 25 miles of the border for up to 72 hours at a time. They are important to cities like McAllen, which in the past decade have exploded with strip malls and theme restaurants catering to residents from both countries.

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AP

Brigida Fuentes Ramos holds the new laser visa the Immigration and Naturalization Service issued for her in May, before crossing into the United States from Reynosa, Mexico, on Monday.

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Day 22

America Fights Back WEDNESDAY

Sunny, 77

October 3, 2001

s e rv i n g t h e w e s t e r n t r e a s u r e va l l e y

w w w. i d a h o p r e s s . c o m

Report: Hijacker’s will found in bag at Logan Mohamed Atta, the suspected leader of the Sept. 11 hijackings in the United States, left behind a will that said he wanted to be buried "next to good Muslims" and that he wanted one-third of his money "donated to the poor and needy," according to a report by CNN Tuesday. The will, obtained by German magazine Der Spiegel and translated into English and confirmed to CNN by investigative sources, was found in a bag at Logan Airport that never made into American Airlines Flight 11, the report said. The CNN report quoted the will as saying, "Those who will sit beside my body must remember Allah, God and pray for me to be with the angels ... I don't want pregnant women or a person who is not clean to come and say goodbye to me because I don't approve of it ... I don't want women to go to my funeral or later to my grave." Law enforcement sources have said Atta piloted flight 11, the first jet to strike on Sept. 11. It slammed into the north tower of the World Trade Center. Ninety-two people were aboard the plane. The sources have said Atta is believed to have been the ringleader of the attacks in the United States and that he had at least $100,000 from Pakistan wired to him in the last year.

Pakistani President backs exiled leader

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Rumsfeld heads to Middle East Defense secretary will consult with U.S. ‘friends’

Rumsfeld is making the trip at the request By Robert Burns of President AP Military Writer Bush, said Defense WASHINGTON — Defense Department Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld spokeswomDonald H. will travel to the Middle East Rumsfeld an Victoria for talks with political and Clarke. He will military leaders as the Bush administration presses its war hold ‘‘a series of meetings on on terrorism, the Pentagon defense-related efforts in the war on terrorism’’ and discuss announced Tuesday.

other topics, she said. Rumsfeld was leaving Tuesday evening but plans hadn’t been completed on which countries he would visit or which officials he would meet, Clarke said. ‘‘This is to continue the consultations that have already started,’’ she said. White House spokesman Ari Fleischer said Rumsfeld’s mission will be information sharing and consultation with

friends. Asked why Bush chose to send Rumsfeld to the region rather than Secretary of State Colin Powell, Fleischer replied, ‘‘Because he’s the appropriate person to go.’’ Many of the U.S. forces in the region are based in Saudi Arabia, and others are in smaller Persian Gulf countries such as Bahrain and Kuwait. Saudi officials reportedly have expressed reservations about the use of bases on their soil

Flu vaccine America’s flying again undersupply looms again back in the sadDle

But shots should be available this month

Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf has backed a plan to invite Afghanistan's exiled king to move to Pakistan and convene a tribal council as an alternative to Taliban rule, a former Pakistani president told The Washington Times. Farooq Leghari, who served as Pakistan's president from 1993 to 1997, said he presented the plan to Musharraf, who “enthusiastically endorsed” it, The Times reported.

By Sam Bass Idaho Press-Tribune

Giuliani eyed to head Trade Center agency The leading Democrat in the New York Legislature suggests that New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani become head of the powerful agency that owns the World Trade Center and oversee rebuilding of the site. “Rudy may very well be the appropriate guy" to be executive director of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver said. The previous executive director, Neil Levin, was lost in the Sept. 11 attack.

Sports correction In the high school roundup on 3B of Tuesday’s paper, Kristy Benight’s last name was misspelled

▼ Idaho Lottery Rolldown: 31 39 45 46 52 Pick 3: 1 9 2

▼ Deaths Evelyn Bow Donald Gross Robert Lamb Catherine Leeson Gene Peirsol

M. Lucille Randolph Lulu Rowan Mary Schuck Robert Thompson Jack Wells

Obituaries and death notices, 5A

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Dick Selby/IPT

Capt. Matt Barley of the Idaho National Guard watches a traveler pass at the Boise Airport on Tuesday. Guard members are providing extra security at airports nationwide following terrorist attacks using jetliners three weeks ago.

Treasure Valley travelers head back to flights By David Woolsey Idaho Press-Tribune Idahoans are joining travelers across the country in a return to the skies. The number of passengers on major airlines fell sharply after the Sept. 11 hijacking and crash of four jet flights on the East Coast at the hands of terrorists. But confidence in security measures, including the addition of

By Lane Bettencourt Idaho Press-Tribune

Opinion, 10A Puzzles, 5D TV listings, 2A Valley, 4A Weather, 2A

Today’s news section was produced by News Editor Drew Munro, Assistant Managing Editor David Woolsey, and page designers Sergio Brown and Julius Tigno. Copyright © 2001 Printed on recycled newsprint

Vol. 22, No. 95, 32 pages

on the web: idahopress.com

National Guard patrols at Boise and other major airports, is helping restore an increasing number of passengers to air travel. John Anderson, director of the Boise Airport, said passenger loads are increasing on airlines that serve the Treasure Valley, but several have also reduced the number of flights they have in and out of Boise. Still, he said, passengers should be able to find connections to all destinations.

Air travel guide

For a complete look at what to expect when you return to air travel, check our rundown on 12A today.

More than two-thirds of seats on domestic flights Sunday were full, the highest level since the terrorist attacks nearly three weeks ago. But midweek flights have averaged only about half full. Please see Flying, 12A

Underpass contract a go

Nampa’s 11th Avenue project could start soon

▼ Today’s edition

to launch retaliatory strikes against Osama bin Laden and his al-Qaida terrorist network. Support for the anti-terrorism campaign in Muslim countries is considered important to counter claims by bin Laden supporters that the United States is waging war against Islam. Rumsfeld’s trip comes as the U.S. continues to beef up its military presence in the region.

NAMPA — Work could start as early as November on Nampa’s 11th Avenue underpass expansion project after transportation officials awarded a $16 million construction contract Tuesday. The winning bid was submitted by Harcon Construction of Spokane. When work starts, two-way traffic will be allowed during daylight hours until Jan. 7. Shortly after that, the underpass will be closed to all traffic. Most motorists will be diverted to the 16th Avenue overpass. “We want to provide as much traffic flow as possible during the holiday season,” project engineer James Porter of J.U.B. Engineering of Boise said. The construction work, which

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At a glance

■ Project: 11th Avenue underpass widening. ■ Cost: $16 million. ■ Timetable: Could start before December and be complete by October 2002. ■ Closures: No complete shutdown until January. ■ Work Involved: Expanding the roadway from two lanes to four, adding a new pedestrian overpass.

will take place both day and night, is expected to be completed by the end of October 2002. The project is designed to be a complete makeover for the narrow underpass that funnels traffic between downtown, the city’s north side and Interstate 84. The underpass will be expanded from two lanes to four and clearance will be raised to 16 1/2 feet, four feet higher than it is now. The Front Street bridge and

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the six-track railroad bridge that run atop the underpass will also be replaced. However, trains will be able to continue to use the railroad bridge on a restricted basis because the structure will be replaced over time. A permanent pedestrian overpass also will be built across 11th Avenue just north of the railroad bridge. Merchants in the area say the project may inconvenience some customers, but they feel it will be beneficial over the long run. “It will be a negative while it’s closed, but a positive when it opens back up,” Scott Newland, owner of the Little Kitchen restaurant, said. At King’s Pro-Tire Center a block south of the underpass, owner Darrell King is not expecting a big effect during construction. An estimated 22,600 vehicles a day pass through the 11th Avenue underpass. Traffic is expected to grow to 30,000 vehicles by 2025.

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CALDWELL — A delay in the shipment of this year’s flu vaccine will result in a limited supply this month in Idaho. Only 25 percent of the expected amount of the influenza vaccine will be available beginning Oct. 10. The rest will come in unpredictable batches, Southwest District Family Health Services director Jan Edmonds said. “We really don’t recommend people begin getting flu vaccines until November because the flu season peaks from December to

February,” she said. It is unclear why the vaccine delivery is slow. Edmonds said 265 different types of viruses may cause the flu, and pharmaceutical companies try to isolate the ones that are expected to cause the most symptoms. High-risk individuals will receive their flu shots first, followed by others when additional quantities of vaccine become available. October and November are the optimal months for receiving influenza vaccination. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says more vaccine is expected to be available this flu season than in previous years. Please see Shots, 5A

Water watchers await wet winter Records show rainy weather trails dry years The Associated Press BOISE — State water experts hope for better luck in the upcoming winter to replenish Idaho’s dwindling reservoirs. Ron Abramovich, a hydrologist with the Natural Resources Conservation Service, presented a historical state water picture that left room for optimism as he addressed a two-day groundwater conference that continued Tuesday. Usually the driest of years have been followed by wet years, he said. ‘‘Let’s be praying that’s what happens again this year,’’ Norm Young of the Idaho Department of Water Resources said. Abramovich said it will take a normal year to meet water demands in 2002 — and several wet years to replace storage virtually depleted this year. Representatives of hydroelectric power producers, city water supplies and fish habitat shared water needs. For the most part, they had the same concerns.

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Fish had a tough year because of dried-up reservoirs. But Cindy Robertson of the Idaho Department of Fish and Game said stocks have come back before. ‘‘Fish have survival mechanisms to deal with periodic drought,’’ she said, but repeated drought years could devastate populations. As it is, some trophy fishing areas could take several years to recover after they are restocked, Robertson said. Much of the twoday water conference is devoted to an exchange among scientists on the latest water quality data and research techniques used to explain the mysteries of the Eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer. Researchers want to gain a better understanding of how water flows and filters through geologic layers to the aquifer. The information would guide state management of groundwater and surface water and how the use or the pollution of one affects the supply or quality of the other.

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CY M K

Inside

Day 23

America Fights Back

➤ Congress considers guards for Western dams, 2A ➤ Quilts honor local heroes, 4A ➤ Evidence links bin Laden to attacks, 6A ➤ Internet sites toned down after attacks, 7A ➤ Arab-Muslim conference denounces U.S., 9A

THURSDAY

Sunny, breezy, 77

October 4, 2001

s e rv i n g t h e w e s t e r n t r e a s u r e va l l e y

w w w. i d a h o p r e s s . c o m

Major developments in wake of terrorist attacks

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end of the line for Sawtooth?

By The Associated Press ➤ President Bush urges Congress to approve economic stimulus plan of up to $75 billion to avert recession triggered in part by the attacks. Details, 6A. ➤ Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld arrives in Saudi Arabia for meetings with defense minister and other leaders. He also plans to visit Oman, Egypt and Uzbekistan — key nations in the fight against Osama bin Laden’s al-Qaida organization. ➤ FBI says passengers aboard United Flight 93 probably saved the lives of people on the ground by rushing their captors. The hijacked plane crashed in Pennsylvania. ➤ Anti-Taliban alliance in Afghanistan says it is coordinating its offensive with the United States and expects to receive fresh supplies of weapons soon from Iran and Russia. Story, 10A. ➤ Bush administration officials say some of the terrorists involved in the attacks also took part in the attack on the USS Cole in Yemen a year ago and the 1998 U.S. Embassy bombings in Africa. ➤ Bush visits New York for second time since the attacks, meeting with firefighters, school children and business leaders near the World Trade Center rubble. ➤ Winter Olympics organizers ask Congress for money to boost security for the Games in Salt Lake City in February. Story, 3A. ➤ Authorities say 4,96 people missing at the World Trade Center and 369 confirmed dead. Death tolls unchanged at Pentagon (189) and at Pennsylvania crash site (44).

Wood plant may move

First in series of meetings will focus on city’s key issues

Reconstruction plan may be proposed   Sen. Joseph Biden, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, is expected to propose legislation for a longterm reconstruction and development plan in Central and South Asia following any military campaign against Afghanistan, according to a report by CNN. The senator will propose the plan, similar in nature to the Marshall Plan's reconstruction of Europe after World War II, in an effort to create an economic and social climate in which terrorists will not be able to operate, the report said.

Bush offers compromise on airport security bill With legislation aimed at improving airport security stalled in the Senate, the Bush administration offered a proposal Wednesday that would compromise on the issue of making airport security screeners federal employees, CNN reported Wednesday. Transportation Secretary Norman Mineta met with key senators on both sides of the aisle Wednesday after Republicans blocked Democratic efforts to bring the bill to the Senate floor. Mineta's proposal would put the federal government in charge of security screening, but would not necessarily make all workers doing the screening federal agents, according to a senior Republican aide.

Powerball: 2 20 23 35 49 PB: 25, PP: 5x Wild Card 2: 3 9 18 19 30 King of hearts Pick 3: 9 7 8

▼ Deaths Helen Bronson Jacoba Hiatt Ronnie Jackson Catherine Leeson

By Brad Hem Idaho Press-Tribune

About the plant

MELBA —  Carie Nash and other neighbors of Sawtooth Forest Industries have complained for six years about the wood pellet factory that wakes them up in the middle of the night and spews sawdust into the air near their homes. But now the complaints will end. Today, Canyon County Com­

Obituaries and death notices, 5A

Sawtooth Forest Industries uses mill end wood that is run through a grinder, then superheated to make fuel pellets. The ground wood has natural resins that form a selfadhesive that bonds the finished product.

missioners are expected to approve a settlement agreement that will lead to the plant’s departure from

its site near Melba. Two months ago, the two sides entered voluntary mediation to reach an agreement that would allow Sawtooth to keep operating without angering the people who live nearby. While that one-day mediation failed, lawyers for both sides kept talking. On Wednesday, Lance Salladay, who represents more than a dozen families in the area, said there is a truce. Please see Plant, 5A

NAMPA — Tonight, Nampa’s highprofile effort to get the community involved in setting a course for the future moves into high gear. Starting at 7 p.m., residents will meet at Skyview High School in the first of a series of four town hall meetings for the “Forward Nampa” project. It’s a massive project to involve average folks in decisions about the city’s needs, priorities and critical issues. More than 45,000 fliers about the meetings have been distributed, most of them doorto-door by high If you go school students. Gatherings, tele- Four “Forward Nampa” phone trees, community meetcivic groups, and ings will be held this radio and news- month. They all run paper ads have from 7 to 9 p.m. also been used ■ Tonight: Skyview to drum up citi- High School ■ Oct. 11: Nampa zen interest. The flyer Civic Center reads: “You are ■ Oct. 18: Skyview invited to tell High School city government ■ Oct. 25: Skyview where to go ... High School they have agreed to listen!” By this evening, the city will have a good idea whether citizens have taken that message to heart . Those attending have been encouraged to offer opinions about whatever they think is important. It may be growth, crime, and traffic. It could be urban renewal and city spending. And any other issue of concern is in order. Each meeting is intended to build upon what is accomplished at the last. Linda Marnoch of Nampa, the local contact person for the out-of-state consulting firm handling the town meetings, said she’s optimistic about a good turnout tonight. She has received about 50 inquiries from people who have seen the flier. Please see Nampa, 5A

Walgreens looking at downtown Caldwell CALDWELL — Walgreens appears to be looking at a Caldwell site for a new drugstore. Hawkins Companies submitted an application for a zone change on the block between Cleveland Boulevard, Dearborn

Kenneth Miller Gene Peirsol Shirley Pollworth Margaret Smith

What’s next

14,490 square-foot pharmacy with a drive-through window The zone change application for a on the site, now occupied by site that could be a new Walgreens residences and businesses. drugstore goes before a hearing Carol Hively, corporate examiner Oct. 24. If approved, spokeswoman for Walgreens, it would then go on to the City would not confirm the plans, Council in November. After that, saying there are no records Walgreens would be able to apply Walgreens has approved the for permits and begin construc- project. tion. But Caldwell community development director Steve Street and 10th and 11th ave- Hasson said he’s confident the nues. The zone change would national drugstore chain would allow Walgreens to develop a not have spent the energy and

money on research and consulting if the company were not serious about marketing in Caldwell. “We’ve passed the first major hurdle,” Hasson said, “maybe even the second or third. If they move forward, this will be another confidence chip in Caldwell.” If the project is approved, plans are for all the houses and businesses on the block to be torn down except the Hamburger Connection.

Hasson is pleased that the burger joint will stay. “That hamburger place should be a national treasure,” he said. “And Walgreens coming to town is big news,” he added. Hasson hopes that Walgreens will help frame the area. The company is known for its good designs and generous landscaping, he said. ■ To contact Lora, call 465-8118 or e-mail lvolkert@idahopress.com.

Some fear we’ve crossed the church-state line

Opinion, 8A Puzzles, 6D TV listings, 2A Valley, 4A Weather, 2A

Prayers now common in government forums

Today’s news section was produced by News Editor Drew Munro, Assistant Managing Editor David Woolsey, night editor Andrea Scott, and page designers Melissa Wilson and Rosemary Gray. Copyright © 2001 Printed on recycled newsprint

Vol. 22, No. 96, 30 pages

on the web: idahopress.com

Neighbors end six-year battle over dust and noise

By Lora Volkert Idaho Press-Tribune

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Mike Vogt/IPT

Carie Nash stands at the end of her property with Sawtooth Pellet Company in the background. Nash and other neighbors have complained for years about the plant, which may move by September 2002.

Drugstore chain declines to confirm store plans

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Nampans address the future

By Angela K. Brown The Associated Press WAXAHACHIE, Texas — A hush fell over the stadium as players, cheerleaders and band members made their way to the end zone. Then, the students on the field recited the Lord’s Prayer. ‘‘If we want to pray, we ought to be able to pray,’’ said Martha Howell, whose son is a football

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coach here. ‘‘And we sure do need it.’’ Since the terrorist attacks, schools and local governments seem to be blurring — some say crossing — the line between church and state. ‘‘I think you’re going to see more Americans not putting up with those secularists trying to make the public square a religionfree zone,’’ said Richard D. Land, president of the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission, the policy arm of the based Southern

Baptist Convention. ‘‘The constitutional rights of the religious minority cannot be shoved aside in a time of national crisis,’’ said Barry W. Lynn, executive director of Americans United for Separation of Church and State, based in Washington. ‘‘I hope these efforts to cross constitutional bound­­aries stop.’’ Some worry that the wave of patriotic and religious fervor washing over the country might discourage people from speaking out against such actions.

In fact, last week in Fargo, N.D., a group called the Red River Freethinkers announced it was postponing a campaign to remove the Ten Command­ments from City Hall plaza. ‘‘Our pursuit of the monument issue irritates that fraction of the community that equates Christianity and patriotism, that regards un-Christian as AP un-American,’’ group secreWaxahachie, Texas, High School football players, cheerleaders tary Davis Cope wrote in a and band members gather on an end zone and recite the letter to the newspaper. Lord’s Prayer. Since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, some say Please see Prayer, 5A local governments are crossing the line between church and

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CY M K 70 and counting ...

Day 24

America Fights Back

San Francisco Giants slugger Barry Bonds hits No. 70, tying Mark McGwire’s record. Bonds has three more games to hit more homers. Details, 1B.

FRIDAY

Sunny, 69

October 5, 2001

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Inside

Aftermath of U.S. terrorist attacks

➤ Officials worry about threat from bioterrorism, 6A ➤ Bush pledges aid to Afghanistan, 7A ➤ Pakistan agrees evidence against bin Laden sufficient, 11A

CNN reports that a retired Army general said in an e-mail last month that those targeted by the United States in the war on terrorism would “be killed suddenly, in significant numbers and without warning.” Barry McCaffrey, who commanded the 24th Mechanized Infantry Division in the Persian Gulf War, made the comments during an e-mail exchange last month with a cadet at West Point, where McCaffrey teaches. The exchange took place Sept. 19 and has since been distributed widely to friends and associates in the national security community, CNN said. McCaffrey identified multiple objectives — to increase domestic security, build a strong coalition and finally “take the gloves off and use integrated military power to find, fix and destroy” terrorist organizations. CNN said he told the cadet: “We are going to disrupt these people through preemptive attack ... we will deceive them, we will run psyops on them, at selected points and times they will be killed suddenly, in significant numbers, and without warning.” The message depicted this assessment of the strategy that could be preparing to battle terrorists: “Tomahawk missiles, 2000-pound laserguided weapons dropped from B2s or F22s at very high altitude, remote control, booby traps, blackmail and at places, small groups of soldiers or SEALs will appear in total darkness, blow down the doors and kill them at close range with automatic weapons and hand grenades.” McCaffrey went on to say: “We will find their money and freeze it. We will arrest their front agents. We will operate against their recruiting and transportation functions. We will locate their training areas and surveil or mine them. We will isolate them from their families. “We will try to dominate their communication function and alternately listen, jam or spoof it. We will make their couriers disappear. If we can find out how they eat, or play or receive rewards, or where they sleep — we will go there and kill them by surprise.” CNN also quoted a U.S. military official who was shown McCaffrey’s comments and said they were the “insights of a very smart guy.”

Sports Correction The Football Forecast on 1B of Thursday’s Idaho Press-Tribune included an incorrect match-up. Homedale plays Melba, not Payette. The game has been thrown out of the forecast. All participants picked Homedale.

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Dana Boyd Leora Deppe Ibrahim Godusevic

By Sarah Karush The Associated Press

Opinion, 10A Puzzles, 5D TV listings, 2A Valley, 4A Weather, 2A

Today’s news section was produced by News Editor Drew Munro, Assistant Managing Editor David Woolsey, Valley Editor Sean Deter, and page designers Melissa Wilson and Rosemary Gray. Copyright © 2001 Printed on recycled newsprint

on the web: idahopress.com

WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. — A 63year-old Florida man lay near death Thursday with an extremely rare and lethal form of anthrax that could be a weapon in the hands of terrorists. U.S. health officials said there was no evidence of terrorism, but the FBI and CDC were called in to investigate. ‘‘There’s no need for people to fear they are at risk,’’ said Dr. Jeffrey P. Koplan, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. He and others emphasized that the disease is not contagious and there is no evidence yet of other people infected. But he said a deliberate release of the germ by terrorists is one of several possibilities under investigation. ‘‘We have that on the list,’’ he said. The man, Bob Stevens, photo editor of the supermarket tabloid The Sun, was hospitalized Tuesday with what was diagnosed as inhalation anthrax and was reported to be gravely ill. The Lantana, Fla., man’s identity was released by the tabloid’s publishing company. ‘‘We’re praying that he pulls through,’’ said Rita Stevens, a daughterin-law who lives in Tallahassee. She said the family did not know how he contracted the disease. ‘‘We’re devastated.’’ Anthrax has been developed by some countries as a possible biological weapon. But the disease can be contracted naturally, often from livestock or soil. Officials said the Florida man is an avid outdoorsman. The most recent previous U.S. case of anthrax was earlier this year in Texas. But that was the more common skin form, not inhalation anthrax, an especially lethal form in which the disease settles in the lungs. ‘‘We will develop a very intense investigation of this case,’’ Koplan said. ‘‘We are in a period of heightened risk and concern in this country. It’s our responsibility to make sure people know what is going on and we control it as quickly as possible.’’ CDC investigators were dispatched to both Florida and North Carolina, since Stevens was said to have visited Duke University in Durham, N.C., about a week ago. The FBI is also investigating. Please see Anthrax, 6A

Terrorists, errant missile possible explanations

Obituary and death notices, 5A

Vol. 22, No. 97,52pages

By Amanda Riddle The Associated Press

ADLER, Russia — A Russian airliner carrying at least 76 people from Israel exploded and plunged into the Black Sea on Thursday, raising fears of a terrorist attack. U.S. officials said a missile fired during Ukrainian military exercises apparently downed the plane. But Russian President Vladimir Putin said terrorists may have caused the crash and he had no reason to doubt a Ukrainian denial stressing that missiles used in the exercise did not have the range to reach the airliner. However, a senior U.S. administration official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said there was no evidence of terrorism and that a Ukrainian military exercise probably led

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Locals tapped to bear torch

Canyon County runners picked for Olympic relay By Brad Hem and Sam Bass Idaho Press-Tribune

AP

Father Brian Jordan, second from left, blesses a cross of steel beams Thursday. The cross was found amidst the rubble of the World Trade Center by a laborer two days after the collapse of the twin towers. The beam was from World Trade tower One, and was found in World Trade building Six and moved to its present location Wednesday. Other rescue and construction workers join Jordan for the ceremony.

Facts about anthrax ■ Anthrax is a severe infectious disease caused by the spore-forming bacterium Bacillus anthracis. ■ Symptoms of disease vary depending on how the disease was contracted, but usually occur within seven days after exposure. It can take up to 60 days for them to develop. ■ Forms of human anthrax are inhalation anthrax, where spores are breathed into the lungs; cutaneous anthrax, which enters the skin; and intestinal anthrax, which occurs from consuming contaminated food or water. ■ Initial symptoms of inhalation anthrax infection may resemble a common cold. After several days, the symptoms may progress to severe breathing problems and shock. Inhalation anthrax is often fatal. ■ Initial signs of the intestinal form of anthrax include nausea, loss of appetite, vomiting, and fever are followed by abdominal pain, vomiting of blood, and severe diarrhea. ■ Direct person-to-person spread of anthrax is extremely unlikely, if it occurs at all. Therefore, there is no need to immunize or treat contacts of persons ill with anthrax, such as household contacts, friends, or coworkers, unless they also were also exposed to the same source of infection. ■ In persons exposed to anthrax, infection can be prevented with antibiotic treatment. Early antibiotic treatment of anthrax is essential — delay lessens the chances for survival. Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Russian plane explodes, crashes

Marion Newhall Dorothy Norell Raymond Wilmer

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Anthrax infects man U.S. government calls in FBI, health officials to investigate

CNN: Retired general outlines blunt strategy

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to the crash. The chartered Tupolev 154 went down in pieces 114 miles off the Russian coastal city of Adler, located on the Georgian border, said Vasily Yurchuk of the Emergency Situations Ministry. The Sibir Airlines plane was on its way from Tel Aviv to the Siberian city of Novosibirsk, about 1,750 miles east of Moscow,Yurchuk said. An Armenian airline pilot flying nearby witnessed the explosion and crash. ‘ I saw the explosion on the plane,which was above me at an altitude of 36,300 feet,’ said Garik Ovanisian. ‘ The plane fell into the sea, and there was another explosion in the sea. After that I saw a big white spot on the sea and I had the impression that oil was burning.’ President Bush, who spoke to Putin by telephone Thursday, said he was deeply saddened. A Defense Department official in Washington, speaking

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AP

Anti-aircraft missiles are fired during a military exercise near Kerch in Crimea, Ukraine, Thursday in this image from television. A Russian chartered airliner exploded in flight Thursday and crashed into the Black Sea coast with at least 76 people on board Thursday. A senior U.S. military official said that it may have been downed accidentally by a missile fired during a military exercise in Ukraine.

on condition of anonymity, said a long-range anti-aircraft missile — believed to be an S-200 — appeared to have hit the plane after being launched from the Crimean region of Ukraine.

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Senior military and administration officials had initial doubts about the terrorism claims, raising suspicions for hours in the upper reaches of government, including the White House.

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BOISE — A pair of runners, Jennifer McPherson and Matthew Watson only need about a minute to run twotenths of a mile, but the high school students from Nampa said they plan to take longer on Jan. 25. That’s the day Skyview’s McPherson, Nampa High’s Watson and nearly 75 other Treasure Valley residents will run, walk and roll their segments in the Salt Lake City 2002 Olympic Torch Relay. “I’m going to jog really, really slowly,” McPherson said. Of the thousands of people awarded the right to carry the torch on its 65-day, 13,500-mile journey beginning in Atlanta, 10 are from Canyon County. They were honored along with the rest of the Treasure Valley delegation Thursday at ceremony hosted by Boise Mayor Brent Coles. The announcement was originally scheduled for Sept. 12 but was delayed because of the previous day’s terrorist attacks. Please see Torch, 5A

■ Meet the torch bearers, 5A

Payne verdict: guilty Prosecutor plans to ask for the death penalty By Beckie Ferguson Idaho Press-Tribune BOISE — Darrell Edward Payne was found guilty late Thursday of the first-degree rape, kidnapping, robbery and murder of Samantha Blomberg Maher. Payne, 35, was charged with Maher’s murder July 8, 2000, two days after the 22-yearold newlywed disappeared while on her way to a Boise State Darrell Payne Univer sity Convicted of murder class. Her body was found in a slurry pit behind Payne’s Amity Road home near Nampa. Maher had been raped and shot once in the head. As the prosecution wound up its case, defense attorney Amil Myshin offered no defense. He later told news reporters he didn’t think the prosecution had proved that Payne planned to kill Maher. Please see Payne, 5A

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CY M K

Bonds blasts record

Day 25

America Fights Back

See Sports, 1B

SATURDAY

Sunny, 74

October 6, 2001

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Solis convicted of murder U.S. food Defense attorney surprised by jury’s guilty verdict Skyview · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 42 Nampa · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7 Bishop Kelly · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 28 Vallivue · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7 Kuna · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 28 Emmett · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 27 Melba · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 40 Homedale · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 19 Nampa Christian · · · · · · · · · · · · 17 Parma · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 13 Marsing · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 26 New Plymouth · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 20 Fruitland · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 40 Middleton · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 14 Caldwell · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 35 Mountain Home · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7

By Beckie Ferguson Idaho Press-Tribune CALDWELL — A Caldwell man faces life in prison after being convicted of first-degree murder Friday for a shooting last May in a local restaurant. A jury took about three hours to find Roberto Orozco Solis, 27, guilty of shooting Hugo Baez-Aburto, 33, seven times during a May 14 argument in the Las Hadas restaurant in Caldwell. The jury’s decision sparked strong reactions from defense attor-

Sentencing scheduled Roberto Orozco Solis’ sentencing has been set by 3rd District Judge James Morfitt for Nov. 13.

neys, who maintained their client acted in self-defense. “I can’t believe it,” defense attorney Scott Fouser said. Co-counsel Klaus Wiebe was more vocal about the decision. The shooting was clearly a case of self-defense, he said. “Apparently, self-defense is no longer alive and well in Idaho,” Wiebe said as he left the Courthouse.“If ever there was a case of self-defense, this was it. I’ve never seen anything like

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it in my life.” During the trial, which began Tuesday, Wiebe showed the jury an 8-inch-long metal rod investigators found in the restaurant near the victim’s right side. The lawyer said his client was attacked by Baez-Aburto with the homemade weapon, which had been sharpened to a point and had a handle attached to it. Deputy Prosecutor Aaron Lucoff said if anyone had a claim to selfdefense, it was the victim. The most important evidence against selfdefense was the pathologist’s testimony that all seven shots hit the victim from the back to the front, he said after the verdict was read.

Officials: Mission for hungry Afghans a full military operation By John J. Lumpkin The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Air drops of food to hungry Afghans, beginning as early as this weekend, could require major military protection and even lead to the first known shots being fired at U.S. forces in the campaign against terrorism. And the U.S. could fire back, according to a Pentagon spokesman, Rear Adm. Craig Quigley, who said the food planes would likely have fighter escorts. They could bomb any anti-aircraft sites that attack the relief flights. The announcement comes on the heels of reports from CNN and Fox News that U.S. government officials believe the Sept. 11 terrorism network's plotting against the United States is far from over. At a  classified briefing earlier this week, in response to a senator's question about the probability of a new terrorism threat, one intelligence official said there is a "100 percent" chance of an attack should the United States strike Afghanistan,  sources familiar with the briefing told The Washington Post. Air Force C-130 Hercules cargo planes would be the best bet to drop in supplies of food, said John Pike, a military specialist with GlobalSecurity.org, an Alexandria, Va., think tank. These rugged, if slow, propeller-driven planes can be expertly piloted through Afghanistan’s mountains regions, flying low enough to drop supplies — but also low enough to expose them to anti-aircraft fire. While the Taliban regime is not believed to have an especially capable air defense system — certainly nothing like those American forces withstood in Yugoslavia or Iraq — the ruling militia does have anti-aircraft guns and probably some U.S.-supplied Stinger surface-to-air missiles that can hit low-flying aircraft. Please see Food, 5A

Please see Murder, 5A

C ourt h ous e sa f e ty

Security shuts out weapons

Straw houses “You can heat them with a candle and cool them with an ice cube,” the owner of a house constructed with straw said. Find out why straw is making a comeback as a viable construction option in Connections, 1C

Albertson’s honors alumni

Terrorist threat jolts America

During a ceremony to coincide with Alumni and Family Weekend, Albertson College will honor former graduates for their contributions to the campus. Local news, 4A

Post-attack tax relief

Dick Selby/IPT

With intentions of boosting an economy still reeling from the aftershocks of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, President Bush on Friday asked Congress for billions in tax relief for individuals and businesses. Business, 1D

Pipeline oil spill Nearly 300,000 gallons of oil spewed from the Alaska pipeline north of Fairbanks Friday. Police suspect alcohol and a man with a rifle are to blame. Story, 3A

▼ Idaho Lottery Pick 3: 2 1 0

▼ Deaths Homer Couture Leora Deppe Ronnie Jackson Carrie McGill Dan Moore

Glenn Palmer Richard Watkins Alice Wheeler

Obituaries and death notices, 5A

Opinion, 8A Puzzles, 6D TV listings, 2A Valley, 4A Weather, 2A

By Brad Hem Idaho Press-Tribune CALDWELL — The bank of lockers near the main door at the Canyon County Courthouse holds some scary things. Throwing stars. Butterfly knives. Brass knuckles. Razor blades. A sixinch safety pin like the one that nearly killed Sheriff’s Deputy Ken Fisher when he was a police officer in New Mexico. Today, Fisher is a member of the Courthouse security team responsible for keeping potential weapons out of the building. Despite signs warning of the county’s year-long ban on all weapons — big or small — in

Slow tourism, tech contribute to more local layoffs

Today’s news section was produced by Assistant Managing Editor David Woolsey, Valley Editor Sean Deter, copy editors Sergio Brown and Rosemary Gray, and graphic designer Samuel Kahlke. Copyright © 2001 Printed on recycled newsprint

Vol. 22, No. 98, 86 pages

on the web: idahopress.com

Courthouse team turns back dangerous objects

Keeping weapons out From Oct. 1, 2000, to Sept. 30, 2001, Canyon County sheriff’s deputies guarding the Courthouse entrance have encountered the following: ■ 546,424 people ■ 9,355 “edged weapons” — knives, razor blades, etc. ■ 10 guns ■ 163 bullets ■ 119 “gas weapons” — pepper spray, etc. ■ 1,276 other weapons or potential weapons.

the Courthouse, Fisher and his colleagues have caught 10,923 potential weapons before they made it into the Courthouse. That is an average of more than 42 per day.

In an edgy time, problems of all sorts trigger fears of attacks

“A gentleman came in here with this the other day,” said Fisher, holding a straight razor with a 3-inch blade. “And he wasn’t a barber.” About five years ago, Canyon County judges asked for a metal detector and X-ray machine like the ones found at airports to be put at the Courthouse’s main entrance. The request came on the heels of several attacks in courtrooms that left judges fearful for their own safety and the security of witnesses and anyone else in the building. At first, the only items allowed were pocketknives with blades less than 2.5 inches long — and even those became taboo with last year’s ban. Since the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, security has tightened even more.

By Davod Crary AP National Writer Greyhound screeches its bus fleet to a halt. A plane explodes over the Black Sea. A Florida man’s rare disease raises fears of bioterrorism. Everywhere, people trying to recover emotionally from the Sept. 11 attacks find new reasons to worry almost daily. In skyscrapers and airports, at stadiums and bus terminals, uneasiness surfaces more quickly than a month ago. A fellow passenger, a package, a small plane on the horizon — all might now rouse suspicion. ‘‘Normally, most people deal with horrible things — a plane crash, an earthquake — by rationalizing to themselves, ’It couldn’t happen to me,’’’ said Jerilyn Ross, who runs an anxiety-disorder center in Washington. ‘‘But those are one-time events — they happen and then they’re over. Now, people don’t have closure. There’s this sense of ’When is the next shoe going to drop?’’’ Federal authorities have been sending mixed messages, urging Americans to go about their daily lives while cautioning that more terrorist attacks could occur. The result for some is that fear is compounded by mistrust. Reid Wilson, a psychologist in Chapel Hill, N.C., said some of his patients no longer believe government statements. ‘‘When that trust erodes, individuals are going to have even greater trouble,’’ he said. At home and abroad, each jarring news report seems to bring terrorism to mind, even without any concrete link. Americans wondering if their stress and anxiety is severe enough to warrant treatment have a chance to be screened next Thursday at any of 1,800 sites participating in National Depression Screening Day. Details can be obtained by calling 1-800520-6373.

Please see Weapons, 5A

Canyon jobless rate jumps again

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Canyon County deputy Ken Fisher watches as people unload their pockets of items before going through the metal detector at the Canyon County Courthouse. Fisher is a member of a security team responsible for keeping nearly 11,000 potential weapons out of the building during the past

The Associated Press and Idaho Press-Tribune staff The terrorist attacks on the East Coast had a ripple effect on the local economy, causing a slowdown in leisure industries that compounded more layoffs in the already troubled high-tech sector. Canyon County’s unemployment rate jumped three-tenths of a percentage point in September to 5.4 percent, up more than a full percentage point from a year ago.The statewide jobless rate also rose, going from 4.3 percent in August to 4.9

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percent in September. About 1,900 restaurant, hotel and recreation jobs were lost last month in the state, reflecting a drop off in tourism, analysts said. Losses also occurred in food store, industrial and commercial machinery and computer equipment jobs. Leisure-related industries took a big hit after the terrorist attacks, in part because tourists canceled vacations and partly because customers chose to stay close to their families. But because of the way the government calculates the unemployment rate, the full effect of those won’t be felt until the October report. Locally, where high-tech companies have laid off hundreds of employees, there’s less money avail-

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able for nights on the town. “Compared to last year we were down quite a bit,” said Angie Mori, managing partner at the Mona Lisa fondue restaurant in Nampa. “It’s kind of hit and miss.” Mori said the attacks contributed. “In the week after the Sept. 11 attacks, everyone was wanting to stay at home and watch their televisions instead of coming out to eat,” she said. But Mori was optimistic: “October seems to be picking back up.” Overall, the 33,800 people jobless in September was an increase of 2,300 from August. ■ National forcast grim, 4D.

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CY M K

Inside

Day 26

➤ Nations pledge to bolster world economy, 6A ➤ Military response to attacks takes shape, 11A ➤ Bush tells Taliban ‘time is running out,’ 11A ➤ Explosion in Saudia Arabia kills two, 13A ➤ Man attampts to hijack small plane, 18A

America Fights Back SUNDAY

Sunny, 74

October 7, 2001

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Relief funds near $1 billion Newsday reports that pledges for funds to assist victims of the World Trade Center attack are nearing the $1 billion mark, a figure that experts say far outstrips charitable giving for any other single disaster. But even as the money comes in, the nonprofit community is grappling with difficult questions on how to disperse the money. Newsday said officials with the charities are meeting to determine how broad victim funds should be distributed.

U.S. plans to rebuild Afghanistan after battle U.S. officials are laying the groundwork for a massive international effort to rebuild battle-scarred Afghanistan after the fighting stops, Knight-Ridder Newspapers reported. Senior officials told Knight-Ridder the effort is likely to include a United Nations peacekeeping force supplied by other Muslim nations, a major humanitarian de-mining effort and a multibillion-dollar program to revive the Afghan economy, rebuild schools, repair roads and bridges and improve health care.

Report: FAA warning precluded attacks MEXICO CITY — Two weeks before the Sept. 11 attacks on the United States, the Federal Aviation Administration warned airlines and airports that individuals with links to terror networks were planning to fly on U.S. airlines, a Mexican magazine reported on Saturday, according to Reuters. Based on a confidential memo obtained by Cambio magazine, FAA security chief Michael Canavan said the agency had received information about the travel plans of individuals associated with violent activities. The Aug. 28 memo listed the names of suspects — including several Pakistanis and two Bolivians — and ordered airlines and airports to take measures to prevent them from boarding passenger planes, the Reuters report said. “The FAA has received information that a number of individuals associated with terrorist activities are planning to travel by commercial aircraft operators,” the FAA memo said. An FAA spokeswoman said she could not comment on security matters related to the Sept. 11 attacks. Cambio said the memo from Canavan did not detail the source of the information on the list of suspects and none of the people on the FAA list correspond with those identified by the FBI as responsible for hijacking the four planes used in the attacks, Cambio said.

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Vauk still on watch Schools Fallen Navy officer stood watch for the nation on Sept. 11 By Vickie Holbrook Idaho Press-Tribune NAMPA — Ron Vauk, one of Idaho’s sons, made the ultimate sacrifice on the second day of a two-week reserve duty period when a terrorist-hijacked plane slammed into the Pentagon on Sept. 11. Lt. Cmdr. Vauk was in charge of the watch command for the Navy for the nation on that day, and “now he’s still on watch for all of us.”As the nation prepares for a difficult time and people ask what they can do, those at his Nampa memorial service on Saturday heard that they must do as Ron did.

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More coverage ■ More comments released to the media by the family, 7A. ■ Aunt Helen Schuler Chadez shares her poem, “In Memory of Ron,” 7A.

Memorials ■ In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Ronald James Vauk Benefit Fund at any Wells Fargo Bank.

“You must be at your post. Ron stood his watch faithful and diligently,” the Rev. Gerald Funke told a packed St. Paul’s Catholic Church Saturday morning as the community mourned the death of Hubert and Dorothy Vauk’s youngest son. Family, friends and leaders gathered in Nampa to

Nampa wants public comment about new middle school Mike Vogt / IPT

U.S. Navy Rear Admiral Mark Feichtinger, right, greets a family member after a Memorial Mass at St. Paul’s Catholic Church in Nampa on Saturday in honor of Ron Vauk, who died Sept. 11 at the Pentagon.

honor the 1982 Nampa High School graduate and 1987 Naval Academy graduate, husband and father. Vauk was buried Sept.

29 in the Arlington National Cemetery. His wife was awarded a Purple Heart for his service. Please see Vauk, 7A

Korean War vets honored Jack Rhoads of Boise salutes the flag as the national anthem plays Saturday at the Nampa Civic Center during the 51st Anniversary of the Korean War Veterans Day. During the event, presented by the Korean American Association of Idaho, the consul general of the Republic of South Korea in Seattle and the Vets Association of Idaho, medals were presented to veterans of “The Forgotten War.” The ceremony honored veterans of a war that claimed the lives of 126 Idahoans — 12 from Canyon County.

What do you believe a Caldwell Y should include? By Sam Bass Idaho Press-Tribune

CALDWELL — Plans are moving forward to develop a YMCA in Caldwell. But first, organizers want to know what programs and services the community would like to have. A group of volunteers is working to find the answers with the Boise Family YMCA, through a recentlyreleased survey. Survey findings will be announced at a future town hall meeting in Caldwell. About $40,000 has been raised for the project so far. Although that’s not enough to pay for a pair of vital studies — professional marketing and feasibility studies will cost $30,000 each — YMCA Financial Development Director Billie Bernasconi said no money is being sought at this time. “First, we must find out what the public wants,” Bernasconi said. “That’s the purpose of the survey.” For more than a year, supporters have been working toward establishing a YMCA in the community. The project is supported by the Western Canyon Youth Club, Caldwell Urban Renewal Agency, Boise YMCA and National YMCA officials. A 25-member steering committee was formed earlier this year to design the survey, as well as study costs, design, location, programs and develop a fund-raising campaign. The Boise YMCA is providing staff, volunteer support, office supplies and advice to the committee.

Rob Bartholomew / IPT

Lester Altringer Dana Boyd Gertrude Cantoni Lora Hansen Harmon Hughes Ronnie Jackson

Taliban fire at plane over Kabul

Ernest Kieselhorst Mark Lee Lucile McFarland Glenn Palmer Richard Watkins Vivian Wolfe

Anti-aircraft guns open up around capital city

Obituaries and death notices, 5A

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Today’s news section was produced by News Editor Drew Munro, Assistant Managing Editor David Woolsey, Valley Editor Sean Deter, and page designers Sergio Brown and Rosemary Gray. Copyright © 2001 Printed on recycled newsprint

Vol. 22, No. 99, 52 pages

on the web: idahopress.com

KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — An intense volley of Taliban anti-aircraft fire Saturday brought thousands of Afghans into the streets of Kabul, where they craned their necks to watch a plane. The plane was not hit. Taliban guns fired at the silver-colored aircraft as it flew over the capital at a high altitude. The origin and type of the plane were unknown. After a few minutes, the plane disappeared from sight and the firing stopped. Numbed to gunfire and explosions after more than 20 years of conflict, residents of the Afghan capital went about their business. Afghan gunners have fired anti-aircraft bursts in recent days in what Taliban authorities said were drills. However, the intensity

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NAMPA — The Nampa School District is preparing to build the city’s newest middle school —  and wants the public to help design the building. Opinions will be taken during two community forums this week. Teachers, administrators, students, On 5A parents and community leaders ■ New elemenmet at the end of taries will look September for an familiar. intense planning ■ What the bond session with archi- will buy. tects. They drew up two alternative plans for the school and will present them to the public at the forums and seek further comments.

‘Y’ survey asks for answers

Powerball: 1 5 9 21 31 PB:12 PP:1x Rolldown: 9 13 30 51 54 Wild Card2: 1 6 8 13 18 Queen of Clubs Pick 3: 6 2 0

▼ Deaths

By Nathaniel Hoffman Idaho Press-Tribune

Survey on 7A AP

Kabul residents gesture toward a high-flying plane passing over the Afghan capital Saturday. Taliban anti-aircraft guns fired Saturday at the aircraft as it flew over the city. The origin and type of the plane were unknown. of the gunfire Saturday was sance aircraft over Afghan­ a day later that the United much heavier, and the plane istan’s northern Samangan States had lost contact with was clearly visible. province. an unmanned drone but had On Sept. 22, the Taliban Defense Secretary Donald no reason to believe it had claimed it had shot down an unmanned U.S. reconnais- H. Rumsfeld acknowledged been shot down.

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You can find a copy of the survey to determine what types of programs and activities should be featured in a Caldwell YMCA in today’s Idaho Press-Tribune. Surveys also are available at Caldwell’s Carpenter Screen Printing, the Boise YMCA and other area businesses. You also can link to the survey from the IPT’s Web site at: www.idahopress.com.

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Day 27

America Fights Back MONDAY

October 8, 2001

Idaho reacts to attacks BOISE (AP) — Idaho residents had mixed reactions to U.S. military strikes in Afghanistan ranging from support to apprehension about what the future will bring. ‘‘I’m in support of what Bush is doing,’’ Caldwell High School Senior Vikki Elvori said. ‘‘But I am worried about some of my friends and my cousin’s husband. He’s an Army ranger so he’ll be right in it.’’ Elvori said she is afraid there will be more terrorist attacks on U.S. soil but she does not think any attacks will be aimed at Idaho. ‘‘I’m starting to be even more concerned about what further actions are going to taken against us,’’ Lauren Bowie, 20, a student at Albertson College in Caldwell said. ‘‘I think they’re really far ahead of us in their planning.’’ Others, who have lived through past wars, were in full support of the strikes, saying the government had no alternative. ‘‘As a 20 year veteran of the United States Navy and retired another 20 years, I am in complete support of the president’s actions,’’ Gene Lowber, the night manager of Twentieth Century Bowling Lanes Mike Simpson in Boise, said. ‘‘We have Congressman to do it, there is no question in my mind.’’ Lowber, 62, who served during the Vietnam conflict said while he supports the current military action, he does not think the U.S. should get involved in a prolonged ground war in Afghanistan. ‘‘That’s a no win situation, but by hitting specific targets we’re forcing the issue and that is necessary,’’ he said. Idaho’s Congressional delegation also expressed their support for the military action Sunday. ‘‘To date, the United State’s response has been deliberate and carefully calculated,’’ Republican Congressman Mike Simpson said. ‘‘Unlike the terrorists, the U.S. is not targeting civilians, but military installations and terrorist camps.’’ Simpson also called for the support of all Idahoans. ‘‘As our military response begins, I ask for Idahoans’ patience and prayer in this continuing war against terror and fear,’’ he said. ‘‘The fight against terrorism will not end today, tomorrow or next week. We will not stop until those who perpetrated the September 11th attacks and their allies are destroyed.’’

Forces launch missile attack against Taliban By David Espo AP Special Correspondent WASHINGTON — American and British forces unleashed punishing air strikes Sunday against military targets and Osama bin Laden’s training camps inside Afghanistan, aiming at terrorists blamed for the Sept. 11 attacks that murdered thousands in New York and Washington. ‘‘We will not waver, we will not tire,’’ said President Bush, speaking from the White House as Tomahawk cruise missiles and bombs found targets halfway around the globe. ‘‘We will not falter and we will not fail.’’ The opening of a sustained campaign dubbed ‘‘Enduring Freedom,’’ the assault was accompanied by airdrops of thousands of vitamin-enriched food rations for needy civilians — and by a ground-based attack by Afghan opposition forces against the ruling Taliban. In a chilling threat, bin Laden vowed defiantly that ‘‘neither America nor the people who live in it will dream of security before we live it in Palestine, and not before all the infidel armies leave the land of Muhammad.’’That was an apparent reference to Israel and Saudi Arabia. He spoke in a videotaped statement prepared before the attacks, but both he

and the leader of the Taliban ruling council of Afghanistan were reported to have survived the initial aerial assault. In a fresh reminder of the potential for renewed terrorist attacks, the FBI said it was urging law enforcement agencies nationwide to ‘‘be at the highest level of vigilance and be prepared to respond to any act of terrorism or violence.’’ Bush gave the final go-ahead for the strike on Saturday, less than four weeks after terrorists flew two hijacked airplanes into the World Trade Center twin towers and a third into the Pentagon. A fourth plane crashed in the Pennsylvania countryside after an apparent struggle between AP passengers and terrorists on Dallas resident Rajinder Singh, with U.S. flag, a member of the Sikh faith, observes a moment of silence board. for all victims of terrorism and violence during an interfaith gathering Sunday at the Northway Christian Please see Strike, 9A Church in Dallas.

Attacks draw local support Nampa pub customers react to U.S. strikes By Mindy Kay Bricker for Idaho Press-Tribune

The Press-Tribune is looking for Canyon County residents who have relatives or loved ones involved in the U.S. military actions in Afghanistan. If you have a story you would like to share with us, call Valley Editor Sean Deter at 465-8158 and leave your name and phone number. Ardith Morrison Mildred Mulligan Jacob Norris Valda Pace Kalli Reed Mary Walker Alice Wheeler

Mike Vogt/IPT

Lisa Black and Dan Orand of Nampa watch the Seattle Seahawks and the Jacksonville Jaguars duke it out on the gridiron Sunday at Champions Sports Pub & Grill in Nampa. Sunday’s attacks on Afghanistan by the United States and Britain didn’t stop pub customers from enjoying an afternoon of sports and spirits.

Obituaries and death notices, 5A

Vallivue actor has lofty goals

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By Michelle Cork Idaho Press-Tribune

Today’s news section was produced by Valley Editor Sean Deter, page designers Sergio Brown, Rosemary Gray and Melissa Wilson. Copyright © 2001 Printed on recycled newsprint

Vol. 22, No. 100,34 pages

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U.S. strikes

Your stories wanted

John Baird Golda Eskeldson Cleo Gilchrist Lora Hansen Eric Henry Barbara Kaup Ernest Kieselhorst Carrie McGill

■ FBI issues high alert, 3A ■ Allies support action, 5A ■ Emmys canceled, 6A ■ Reaction varied, 7A ■ A detailed map of the targeted areas, 8A ■ Bin Laden: Thank God for attacks on U.S., 8A ■ Bush: We did not choose this mission, 8A ■ Blair: Britain on board, 8A ■ Airmen comment on strikes, 9A ■ Military details, 9A

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▼ Deaths

Mostly cloudy, 64

▼ Target: terrorism

CALDWELL — During a campaign speech in front of his constituents last spring, Vallivue High School Student Body President Jordan Rush slipped off his pants and shoes and left the podium dressed in gold sequin shorts he borrowed from the drama room. There was no real point to his surprise ending, Rush said, other than to get laughs. But it illustrates that the tone of student election politics at Vallivue High is not very serious. Please see Actor, 5A

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NAMPA — Even though America asserted its war on terrorism on Sunday, some locals enjoyed a few drinks and watched televised football games at Champions Sports Pub and Grill in Nampa. Five different football games prompted sporadic cheers with raised beer mugs, while one television showed CNN and raised the occasional eyebrow. “I was disappointed that the games were off for a while,” Bill Cornelison of Nampa said of the news coverage that temporarily pre-empted the gridiron action.

But he was not disappointed that America is retaliating. If he had to, he said he would go to Afghanistan and fight for America. But at 68, he said the military wouldn’t want him. “Sure, they don’t want to kill the innocent. But what do they think (the Taliban) did when they came over here?” he asked. “It’s fair play.” Lawrence Shippy, 38, of Caldwell flanked himself between CNN and four games so he could watch sports and breaking news. On Sunday morning, Shippy coached a softball tournament, which raised about $2,000 for the New York Relief Fund. “I was glad to see something be done,” he said. “It’s still hard to believe what the terrorists did

— we had to do something.” Champions owner Ransom Smith said that football should not be America’s first priority. “The end result — whether anyone wins at football — doesn’t make a dang bit of difference,” he said, adding what makes the difference is “whether or not we can rid terrorism.” Nampa resident T.J. McIntosh is concerned primarily with the economy and supports the use of military force. “The American people need to stop whining about this,” he said. “I’m kind of disappointed that there wasn’t more force. I think our president is the best president we’ve had. “I’m not for killing,” he added, “but there is a time and a place.”

Conference to discuss faith, action By Nathaniel Hoffman Idaho Press-Tribune NAMPA — A symposium at Northwest Nazarene University later this week will explore the roles, benefits and boundaries of religious participation in civic affairs. The B. Edgar Johnson Symposium, “Connecting Faith and Community”, will convene at NNU Thursday through Saturday. It features nationally-known speakers and workshops on topics ranging from the First Amendment to fundraising. The purpose is to help foster understanding and partnerships between faithbased organizations and the private and Rob Bartholomew/IPT public sectors with the ultimate goal of B. Edgar Johnson of Nampa, community resource assistant to the president of Northwest Nazarene helping build healthy communities. University, will present the Connecting Faith and Community symposium this week at NNU. The event will Please see Conference, 5A help foster healthy communities.

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CY M K

Day 28

America Fights Back TUESDAY

October 9, 2001

Railroads, trucking firms increase security The nation’s freight railroads restricted movement of some cargo and activated a full-time crisis center after U.S. military strikes against the Taliban, the industry’s trade group said Monday. Attorney General John Ashcroft said the FBI has advised 18,000 local law enforcement agencies and 27,000 corporate security managers to be on high alert. Warnings have also been sent to telephone companies, electrical power companies, banks, oil and gas facilities, computer companies, water service providers and railroads. Nuclear facilities are on the highest state of alert and are screening all employees and others who have access to such plants. The American Trucking Association said truck security was increased after the Sept. 11 attacks — especially after it was learned that suspected terrorists obtained commercial driver’s licenses for transporting hazardous materials.

The measures included: ➤ New background checks. ➤ Designated drivers for certain cargo. ➤ Keeping hazardous cargo from populated areas.

Reservist call-ups Another 1,071 members of the Army Reserve and Army National Guard were called to active duty as part of a mobilization authorized by Bush shortly after the Sept. 11 attacks. Among those called up are personnel who specialize in criminal investigation, infantry or special operations. In all, 27,025 reservists from 44 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico have been called up. Mountain Home Air Force Base deployed B-1 bombers.

Terror arrests near 600 Authorities have arrested or detained 614 people in connection with the terrorism investigation, including 165 people who have violated immigration laws. Investigators are still looking for 229 people who are either suspects or are believed to have information important to the case.

Giving tops $840 million Almost as soon as terrorists struck New York and Washington, Americans began donating money — and then asking each other to give more. They still are. More than $840 million has been donated so far. Fund-raising experts say there’s no end in sight, as long as Americans feel threatened and anxious about terrorism and the war to end it.

John Baird Florence Calloway Lloyd Carpenter Jessica Franklin Jeremy Gammett Leonard Hanold Lora Hansen William Hills Cenith Huckabee

Local news:

Nampa school moves forward Officials reached a compromise on the site of a new elementary school. Details, 4A Officer remembered A Nampa police officer who lost his battle with lung disease last week is being hailed for his contributions to the force. Story, 4A

Today’s news section was produced by Managing Editor Vickie Holbrook, Valley Editor Sean Deter, night editor Andrea Scott and copy editors Sergio Brown and Julius Tigno. Copyright © 2001 Printed on recycled newsprint

America pounds terrorist targets

Police boost patrols in strikes’ wake Local authorities brace for possibility of disaster By Andrea Scott Idaho Press-Tribune A candlelight vigil held Monday at the Statehouse in Boise took on a somber tone with city and state police on duty in the wake of recent terrorist attacks and the U.S. air strikes on Afghanistan. “Just like the FBI, local law enforcement is on alert,” Boise City Police Lt. Dan Miller said.“Even in a frontier town like this, we’re extremely vigilant. I don’t believe we could be on a higher alert status.” More personnel are on duty, Miller said, and they are creating more of a presence in places where they would not usually appear. “We’re now at vigils, athletic events, the Towne Square mall, anywhere people are gathering in numbers,” Lt. Miller said. An Idaho State Police dispatcher confirmed that parking on the streets immediately next to the Capitol is prohibited at the present time. Concrete barriers are now in place and surround the building. More security changes might be coming to the Boise Airport in the wake of the Afghanistan strikes. KTVB Channel 7 reported that National Guard troops still can be found at the airport, and security remains higher than ever. Additional security measures could be taken. “All of our officers are on standby throughout this now and we know where all the officers are at, at home or on pagers we have the ability to call everybody and go from there,” Mike Johnson,Airport Police Chief, told KTVB. The increased security at the airport also means cars could be searched.

By Ron Fournier AP White House Correspondent

WASHINGTON — The United States pounded terrorist targets in Afghanistan from the air for a second night, then followed up with daylight bombing early today in an effort to undercut the Taliban militia sheltering Osama bin Laden. Anti-Taliban forces inside Afghanistan appeared ready to strike in concert with the American barrage. As U.S. warplanes and naval forces unleashed assaults halfway around the world, the Bush administration raised its guard at home. ‘‘We’ve learned that America is not immune from attack,’’ President Bush said as he created an Office of Homeland Security and put former Pennsylvania Gov.Tom Ridge in charge. After a few quiet hours, a single jet dropped one bomb near the Kabul airport before dawn Tuesday, rattling windows in the capital. There were no immediate reports of damage or injuries. Then, around 8:15 a.m. local time, jets bombed the Taliban stronghold of Kandahar in southern Afghanistan,Taliban officials said. Taliban soldiers replied with heavy anti-aircraft fire. Feeding while firing, the U.S. operation dropped 37,000 packages of food rations on Monday — about the same number as Sunday. U.S. officials said the military strikes, expected to continue at least another day, were designed to destroy terrorist camps and bolster opposition forces fighting the Taliban. All of the aircraft returned safely, the Pentagon said.

AP

A Palestinian mourner carries a poster of accused terrorist Osama bin Laden in front of the body of Palestinian Raed Sharif, 23, during his funeral in the West Bank town of Hebron Monday. Bin Laden issued a call for Muslims to support the Palestinian cause the same day U.S. air strikes began in Afghanistan.

BOCA RATON, Fla. — The FBI on Monday took over the investigation into the anthrax death of a Florida man after the germ was found in the nose of a coworker and on a computer keyboard in their office. Hundreds of people who worked near the men lined up to get medical tests. Attorney General John Ashcroft said the case could become ‘‘a clear criminal investigation.’’ ‘‘We don’t have enough information to know whether this could be related to terrorism or not,’’ he said John Ashcroft during a news conferAttorney General ence in Washington. The FBI sealed off the Boca Raton building housing several supermarket tabloids, including The Sun, where both men worked. Agents donned protective gear before going inside. Please see Anthrax, 3A

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Ridge takes on task of U.S. safety By Sandra Sobieraj The Associated Press

By Amanda Riddle The Associated Press

Opinion, 6A Puzzles, 5D TV listings, 2A Valley, 4A Weather, 2A

on the web: idahopress.com

Strike & Defend

Ashcroft says a clear criminal investigation is at hand

Obituaries and death notices, 5A

Vol. 22, No. 101, 24 pages

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FBI takes over anthrax case

Dan Moore Dorothy Norell Martha Norland Jack Swafford Richard Timmons Margaret Treat Mary Walker

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Food, leaflets dropped, 7A More allies join effort, 7A

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▼ Deaths

Partly cloudy, 60

▼ Target: terrorism

Dick Selby/IPT

Treasure Valley residents gathered Monday night in Boise at the Capitol for a peace vigil organized by the Idaho Peace Coalition. During the vigil, held in response to U.S. attacks on Afghanistan, speakers called for an end to the cycle of violence.

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WASHINGTON — In a windowless space 10 paces from the Oval Office, Tom Ridge reported for duty Monday at the new Office of Homeland Security. His assignment: figure out where America is vulnerable to terrorist attack and try to ensure it doesn’t happen again. ‘‘The task before us is difficult, but not impossible,’’ said Ridge, who resigned as Pennsylvania governor just three days earlier to accept the daunting challenge laid out by President Bush. In an executive order, the president instructed Ridge to bring all federal, state and local agencies together in drawing up a plan ‘‘to detect, prepare for, prevent, protect against, respond to and recover from terrorist attacks within the United States.’’ It was a mouthful that Tom Ridge Ridge stumbled over as he restated his mission to an audience of family members and government VIPs in the East Room. He also said his job will be to find the gaps in America’s law enforcement and intelligence operations, and close them.

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CY M K ▼ Local news, 4A

Day 29

America Fights Back

■ Nampa considers moving school ■ Nampa School Board member reappointed ■ Caldwell School District looks at zone changes ■ Outback Steakhouse helps Red Cross ■ Authorities urge drivers to buckle

WEDNESDAY

Mostly sunny, 64

October 10, 2001

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Tuesday’s developments ➤ U.S. forces strike Afghanistan for third straight night and in daylight for first time. Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld says he is confident strikes have taken toll on al-Qaida terrorist network and ruling Taliban militia. There are 30,000 U.S. troops in the region. 6A ➤ President Bush ready to release most wanted list today, 6A. ➤ In a home-front scolding, President Bush accused Congress of leaking information about the global investigation into the attacks, 6A. ➤ Terrorism legislation hits snag in Congress, 8A. ➤ On Thursday, it will be one month since the attack. Organizers plan event to remember those lost, 8A. ➤ New York Mayor Rudolph Giuliani predicts city could lose 100,000 jobs and $1 billion in revenue by July, 8A. ➤ In Pakistan, Afghanistan’s neighbor and a fragile player in Bush’s coalition, the government tightened security in the capital and arrested three Muslim clerics who organized anti-American demonstrations. Four people, including a 13-year-old boy, died in new violence. 9A

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targeting terror

U.S. rules the skies

Nampa man only Migrant Council director in 30 years By Brad Hem Idaho Press-Tribune

In other home-front news: ➤ President Bush named two new staff members to his gathering anti-terrorism team, former Gen. Wayne A. Downing as deputy national security adviser on terrorism, and Richard Clarke as chief of cyberspace security. ➤‑The government released new rules to quickly strengthen cockpit doors. Four planes were hijacked in the Sept. 11 attacks. ➤ Federal Aviation Administration speeds up process for airlines to strengthen cockpit doors. Agency drops requirement that all crew members, not just the flight crew, have keys to the cockpit. ➤‑ United Nations confirms first civilian casualties: four killed in U.S.-led raids. ➤ Authorities say 4,815 people remain missing at the World Trade Center and 417 confirmed dead. Death tolls unchanged at Pentagon (189) and at Pennsylvania crash site (44).

‘Don’t Laugh at Me’ clarification

On 4A of the Oct. 5 Idaho Press-Tribune, Lincoln Elementary counselor Jacque Vulcano was referred to as one of the Nampa counselors who consider “Don’t Laugh at Me” curriculum one tool among many for talking to kids about understanding differences and getting along with others. Vulcano does not use the curriculum. However, some other schools in the district have tested the curriculum and found it useful.

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▼ Deaths Lloyd Carpenter Jeremy Gammett Leonard Hanold Anthony Holmquist Cenith Huckabee Barbara Kaup August Koch Robert McLaughlin

AP

An F-18 prepares to take off from the flight deck of the USS Enterprise in the northern Indian Ocean Tuesday. The USS Enterprise is one of the many ships involved in the attacks on Afghanistan, which are now taking place during daylight hours as well as at night.

Warplanes unchallenged day and night in Afghanistan By Ron Fournier AP White House Correspondent WASHINGTON — The United States hit Afghanistan with a third day of airstrikes, crushing Taliban air defenses, radars and airports to the extent that American warplanes can fly virtually unchallenged night and day, the Pentagon said Tuesday.

Dorothy Norell Martha Norland Vanita Stuart Lucile McFarland Richard Timmons Mary Walker Vivian Wolfe

FAA orders more changes after strikes By Beckie Ferguson Idaho Press-Tribune

Al-Qaida commends ‘good deeds’ of Sept. 11 The Associated Press

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CAIRO, Egypt — Osama bin Laden’s spokesman issued a strident, televised appeal Tuesday, for Muslims around the world to rise in a global holy war against the United States and its interests everywhere. Al-Qaida spokesman Sulaiman Abu Ghaith praised the hijackers who flew planes into the World Trade Center and Pentagon for their ‘‘good deed,’’ saying they had ‘‘moved the battle into the heart of America.’’ ‘‘The Americans must know that the storm of airplanes will not stop, God willing, and there are thousands of young people who are as keen about death as Americans are about life,’’Abu

Opinion, 10A Puzzles, 5D TV listings, 2A Valley, 4A Weather, 2A

Today’s news section was produced by News Editor Drew Munro, Managing Editor Vickie Holbrook, Valley Editor Sean Deter, and page designers Sergio Brown and Julius Tigno. Copyright © 2001 Printed on recycled newsprint

struck around Kandahar, the militia’s headquarters, and the northwest city of Herat. Four workers for a United Nations mine-clearing operation were killed in Monday night’s strikes. Rumsfeld said it wasn’t clear whether U.S. bombs or Taliban anti-aircraft fire killed the men. Please see Attacks, 7A

Airport tightens security again

▼ Today’s edition

on the web: idahopress.com

Early this morning, jets dropped three bombs near the airport in the city of Kandahar in the second straight morning of daylight raids,Taliban sources said. In the skies over Afghanistan, U.S. bombs streaked day and night toward sites connected with the ruling Taliban. Sources inside the Taliban said bombs

On 7A ■ What to do when you arrive ■ What you can carry on the plane ■ The screening process

of this week’s strikes on Afghanistan. Airport Director John Anderson said the new measures, which include limiting carry-on baggage and additional security checkpoints, will be in effect indefinitely. Please see Security, 7A

Bin Laden aide: Attack U.S. interests

Obituaries and death notices, 5A

Vol. 22, No. 102, 32 pages

‘‘The skies are now free,’’ President Bush said. The administration pushed for the surrender of Osama bin Laden’s terrorist network and the ouster of the Taliban regime that shelters him. Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld urged Afghan dissidents to ‘‘heave the Al-Qaida and the Taliban leadership ... out of the country.’’

BOISE — Gone are the days when you’ll see airline passengers racing through the Boise Airport hoping to catch a last-minute flight. The Federal Aviation Administration has directed Dick Selby/IPT Boise Airport and termiA National Guard soldier from Emmett patrols the Boise Airport with his M-16 nals nationwide to tighten rifle. After the Sept. 11 attacks — and continued U.S.-led strikes on Afghanistan already stringent security — security is tighter than ever at the terminal. measures in the aftermath

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Council fires Fuentes

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Ghaith said. The fierce warning — and appeal for help from fellow Muslims — came on the third day of U.S. and British strikes on al-Qaida posts in Afghanistan, and upon installations of Afghanistan’s Taliban regime. Defiant in the face of the attacks, the statement nevertheless made clear the pressure bin Laden’s network felt itself under — taking the unusual step at one point of urging Muslim women, as well as men, to join in fighting the United States. The message from Abu Ghaith, delivered in Arabic, was the second statement from al-Qaida since the launch of U.S.-led airstrikes against Afghanistan on Sunday. Bin Laden issued a videotaped message that same day, though it appeared to have been recorded before the attacks began.

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AP

Sulaiman Abu Ghaith, a spokesman for the Al-Qaida organization that is linked to Osama bin Laden, speaks on a videotape aired by the Al-Jazeera satellite network on Tuesday. He threatened future attacks on America, saying “The jihad is today the duty of every Muslim.”

‘‘The American interests are everywhere all over the world. Every Muslim has to play his real and true role to uphold his religion and his nation in fighting, and jihad is a duty,’’ he said.

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There was no explanation why the spokesman, rather than bin Laden, appeared in Tuesday’s tape.Taliban authorities have said that bin Laden has survived the U.S. strikes

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CALDWELL — The founder and leader of the state’s largest and most powerful Hispanic group is out of a job. As part of restructuring expected to have far-reaching effects on the Idaho Migrant Council, the board overseeing the organization fired Humberto Humberto Fuentes, the man Fuentes who founded the organization 30 years ago and has been its only director. Sam Byrd,a consultant for Diversity Works and a longtime advocate for Hispanic issues, took over as interim director Monday. He confirmed Fuentes was fired at the Council’s board meeting on Saturday. Please see Fuentes, 7A

Ida-West pitches plant site By Brad Hem Idaho Press-Tribune CALDWELL — While protesters picketed outside, Randy Hill told Canyon County GOP leaders why the Treasure Valley needs the power plant his company wants to build near Middleton. Hill, president and CEO of IdaWest Energy Co., told the county’s Republican Central Committee that the proposed Garnet Energy Facility would be clean, safe and an enormous benefit to the county’s tax base. “The power is not going to Mexico,” he said, disputing earlier media reports. Ida-West wants to build a 273megawatt natural gas-fired plant in Middleton’s impact area. The company would provide grants for city projects and scholarship money for the Middleton School District out of profits from the electricity it sells to Idaho Power. The Department of Environmental Quality and the Department of Water Resources are reviewing permit requests for the project and the county Planning and Zoning Commission is holding public hearings before it decides whether to allow the plant to be built. Although Hill’s comments mostly found sympathetic ears Tuesday, members of Citizens for Responsible Land Use protested outside, carrying signs saying:“Do I count?” and “We are Republicans, too.” After the meeting, Citizens spokeswoman Jonna Weber complained the GOP group refused to give her equal time to rebut Hill’s statement. Region 3 Republican Chair Helen McKinney said arrangements for Hill to speak were made a year ago, as part of a series of discussions on the energy crisis. She said the monthly meetings for the rest of the year were already booked when Weber asked for time.

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CY M K ▼ Local news, 4A

Day 30

America Fights Back

➤ Nampa symposium connects faith, community ➤ Nampans study new middle school designs ➤ Guilty pleas likely in club drug case ➤ Sale will net cash for Wilder center

THURSDAY

Rain, wind, 55

October 11, 2001

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Firefighters drill for emergency

‘Strange note’ diverts flight A Delta airliner bound for Los Angeles was diverted to Louisiana with an escort of two military planes Wednesday after a passenger handed a strange note to a flight attendant, officials said. Flight 357 from Atlanta, with 148 people aboard, landed safely in Shreveport. Edward A. Stephenson, 36, of Venice, Calif., was arrested and charged with interfering with a flight crew member and attendants, FBI spokeswoman Sheila Thorne said. Stephenson’s note was in response to an announcement by the pilot that they would be taking a different flight path because of bad weather, U.S. Attorney Bill Flanagan said. The man did not make any physical threats, Flanagan said. The Boeing 757 reported a problem at 2:43 p.m. and landed 26 minutes later.

Mountain Home AFB soldier dies in Mideast The first U.S. casualty of the U.S. air strikes against Afghanistan was from the Mountain Home Air Force Base. NewsChannel 7 has received word that Master Sgt. Evander Earl Andrews was killed in a heavy equipment accident while on duty at an undisclosed deployed location.  He was a member of the 366th Civil Engineer Squadron at Mountain Home. 

Authorities update Sept. 11 death toll Authorities say 4,815 people missing at the World Trade Center and 422 confirmed dead. Death tolls unchanged at Pentagon (189) and at Pennsylvania crash site (44).

By David Espo AP Special Correspondent

Rob Bartholomew / IPT

Caldwell firefighter Brad Carico, left, watches as Jesus Reyna cuts the top off a car Wednesday during training. Since Sept. 11, Caldwell firefighters, along with those throughout the nation, have rallied to the aid of the families of their fallen New York brothers. That sense of brotherhood is even stronger today — the one-month anniversary of the attacks — according to Caldwell fire driver/operator Jim Kemp.

▼ Deaths

Agencies collaborating to keep Idahoans safe By Brad Hem Idaho Press-Tribune

Under the new Office of Homeland Security, the state’s U.S. Attorney’s Office is coordinating law enforcement efforts here. Although he said he could not discuss specifics, Terry Derden, criminal chief in the office now headed by Tom Moss, said local, state and federal agencies are working together to keep Idahoans safe. Also, Idaho National Guard officials are updating disaster plans. Idaho State Police is working with local FBI agents to inves-

tigate hundreds, and possibly thousands, of leads regarding possible threats in Idaho. Again refusing to discuss specifics, Derden said investigators have not found anything to indicate a threat to public safety anywhere in the state. So far, there have been few changes to daily life here. National Guard soldiers are toting M-16s at the Boise Airport, where security has been tightened to comply with Federal Aviation Administration requirements. Earlier this week, officials banned parking on the streets surrounding the Capitol in Boise. Idaho Power has restricted access to dams around the state. But despite limited visible signs of changes, Derden said

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Idaho National Guard Disaster Services chief John Cline, 334-3460. PIO Lt. Col. Tim Marzano, 422-5268, 866-6145 (c) Hazardous Materials chief Bill Bishop, 334-3263.

Idahoans should expect to continue to see the results of last month’s terrorist attacks hit home. “I don’t think any of us will be the same after Sept. 11,” he said.

Crapo: Nation’s capital is very tense Attacks weighing heavily on folks in Washington, D.C.

Pledge day

U.S. Secretary of Education Rod Paige has contacted school principals nationwide to encourage them to have students participate in “Pledge Across America,” a nationwide, synchronized Pledge of Allegiance on Friday at 1 p.m. Details can be found on the Education Department’s Web site at www.ed.gov.

war with an enemy that has shown he is capable of horrific acts.” Fighter jets routinely fly over Wash­ington. There is talk of closing major roads around the Capitol Mall. Soldiers and police can be seen everywhere. Members of Congress and staffers have undergone intense security training. Evacuation plans hang on every door in the Capitol. Despite the concerns, Crapo said

the nation’s business must continue. Congress is rushing to finish spending appropriations, but Democrats are threatening not to act on President Bush’s judicial appointments if they don’t get their way on the spending bills. “We’re starting to see a little of that partisan bickering come back,” Crapo said, sounding almost happy for a return to normalcy. There is wide bipartisan support for the major post-Sept. 11 bills. The anti-terrorism and airport security measures are expected to pass the Senate, he said. Crapo said the anti-terrorism bill has been amended to protect civil rights. The airport security bill, he said, would federalize security at the Boise Airport.

Sources: Migrant Council was losing money

Today’s news section was produced by News Editor Drew Munro, Managing Editor Vickie Holbrook, Valley Editor Sean Deter, and page designers Melissa Wilson and Rosemary Gray. Copyright © 2001 Printed on recycled newsprint

Vol. 22, No. 103, 32 pages

on the web: idahopress.com

U.S. Attorney’s Office (coordinating law enforcement) Terry Derden, criminal chief, or PIO Jean McNiel. 334-1211.

Speaking from Wash­ing­ton, D.C., U.S. Sen. Mike Crapo said the mood in nation’s capital is tense. Today marks the one-month anniversary of the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon.That fact is weighing heavily on the people in Washington. Since the United States and its allies began retaliatory bombing in Afghan­istan, suspected terrorist mastermind Osama bin Laden AP has promised more attacks on Silhouetted workmen unload a cement barricade, one of many Americans. Crapo said Washington, being installed around the Capitol Wednesday in Washington. D.C., is an obvious target. Security has increased around all federal buildings since the Sept. “It’s on their minds,” he said of 11 terrorist attacks in New York and Washington. Capitol workers. “We are now at

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Emergency contacts

By Brad Hem Idaho Press-Tribune

Ruth Rhodes Margaret Sallee Vanita Stuart Duane Pilcher

WASHINGTON — With American pilots poised to unleash "bunker-busting" bombs against the Taliban, President George W. Bush declared Wednesday that "our calling" is eradicating terrorism around the globe. "Now is the time to draw the line in the sand against the evil ones," he said. At the FBI, Bush unveiled a new list of 22 most-wanted terrorists, Osama bin Laden among them.And the administration urged networks to

exercise caution in broadcasting prerecorded communications from bin Laden and his associates, lest they contain coded instructions for fresh terrorist strikes. Pentagon officials, speaking on condition of anonymity, said war plans included the use of 5,000-pound (2,250 kilogram) laser-guided bombs, first used during the Gulf War. The president spoke after a breakfast with senior congressional leaders, where they smoothed over a disagreement about the distribution of classified information concerning U.S. military actions.

Security hits home

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Bush: Fight ‘our calling’ Forces prepare to use ‘bunker-buster’ bombs

New developments in wake of terrorist attacks ➤ Military forces strike targets in Afghanistan for fourth consecutive night. Taliban says leader Mullah Mohammed Omar and terrorism suspect Osama bin Laden are alive, 8A. ➤ President Bush unveils list of 22 mostwanted terrorists, including bin Laden and several associates, 8A. ➤ Bush administration urges caution by media networks in broadcasting prerecorded communications from bin Laden and associates in case they contain coded instructions for fresh strikes, 8A. ➤ Violent anti-U.S. protests hit Indonesia for third consecutive day. Protesters also march in Karachi, Pakistan. ➤ U.S. water system operators ask for $5 billion from Congress to protect drinking water and wastewater plants from terrorism, 6A. ➤ Federal authorities say a third person in Florida has tested positive for anthrax and a criminal investigation is under way, 6A.

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Health and Welfare denies contract renewal By Brad Hem Idaho Press-Tribune

In the months leading up to Humberto Fuentes' firing from his position as head of the Idaho Migrant Council, the nonprofit group was losing money. Sources close to the 30-

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year-old Hispanic advocacy organization, which is not talking about why founder and Executive Fuentes was fired on Saturday, said Fuentes had lost credibility with some of the group's funding sources. At least one of those was the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare. Heather Taylor, acting program manager at the department's Adult Mental

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Health Center in Caldwell, said her office did not renew a contract with the Migrant Council's health and wellness arm, Salud y Provecho, last spring. The $20,000-contract provided funding for Salud y Provecho's psychological and social rehabilitation services for adults who only spoke Spanish. “They didn't seem to be able to do that," Taylor said of the Migrant Council's abil-

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ity to provide the required services. Fuentes, who helped found the council in 1971 after winning a legal battle with Treasure Valley Community College, was fired Saturday. Efforts to reach him at his Nampa home were unsuccessful. The group's board of directors who made the decision have refused to comment, calling it a personnel matter.

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But other sources related to the group — Idaho's largest and most powerful Hispanic Humberto advocacy Fuentes organization — said financial struggles there have existed for at least the last few years.

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CY M K ▼ Local news, 4A

Day 31

America Fights Back

➤ Nampa deaths believed to be homicide-suicide ➤ Minister says attacks changed our priorities ➤ Testimony continues on proposed power plant ➤ Award-winning author visits ACI

FRIDAY

Partly cloudy, breezy, 60

October 12, 2001

s e rv i n g t h e w e s t e r n t r e a s u r e va l l e y

w w w. i d a h o p r e s s . c o m

New developments By The Associated Press ➤ Military forces bomb Afghanistan’s capital in daylight for the first time as U.S.-led airstrikes enter fifth day. Story, 9A ➤ President Bush attends somber ceremony at the Pentagon to mark one-month anniversary of the attacks. Details, 9A ➤ Military says an Air Force sergeant killed in equipment accident in Qatar, the first announced American casualty of the war on terrorism. Story, 5A ➤ Government says at least 13 of the 19 hijackers were in the United States legally at the time of the attacks. Details, 9A ➤ Authorities say 4,776 people missing at the World Trade Center and 384 bodies identified. Death tolls unchanged at Pentagon (189) and at Pennsylvania crash site (44).

N.Y. rejects Saudi money New York City officials rejected a $10 million relief check from a Saudi prince Thursday after he suggested that U.S. policies in the Middle East were partly to blame for the World Trade Center attacks. Prince Al Waleed Bin Talal said in a statement released by his publicist during his visit to the site of the attack in New York: “At times like this one, we must address some of the issues that led to such a criminal attack. I believe the government of the United States of America should re-examine its policies in the Middle East and adopt a more balanced stance toward the Palestinian cause.” The comments, which a Saudi spokesman told NBC News “do not represent [the views of] the government of Saudi Arabia,” drew a sharp rebuke from Mayor Rudolph Giuliani. “When we became aware of Prince Alwaleed’s statements, we investigated whether the check had been deposited. The check has not been deposited,” he said in a statement reported by MSNBC. “The Twin Towers Fund has not accepted it.” MSNBC reported that Sunny Mindel, the mayor’s communications director, said bluntly: “We are not going to accept the check — period.”

U.N.: Taliban led massacres Fighters and commanders of Afghanistan’s ruling Taliban militia have committed systematic massacres in recent years while trying to consolidate control over northern and western Afghanistan, Newsday reported, citing confidential United Nations documents. The Long Island, N.Y., newspaper said the reports, written by U.N. personnel in Afghanistan, described the mass killings as ordered or approved by the Taliban leader, Mullah Mohammed Omar. U.N. officials who investigated a series of massacres of at least 178 people in January in north-central Afghanistan said they had found witnesses to radio conversations between Omar and the teams of Taliban troops conducting the killings, Newsday said.

Pledge correction Students at schools across the nation will say the Pledge of Allegiance at noon today in the Mountain Time Zone. The time of the synchronized pledge was listed incorrectly in a story on Page 1A Thursday. See details, editorial on pledge effort, 12A.

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“Unlike our enemies, we value every life and we mourn every loss, yet we’re not afraid. Our cause is just, and worthy of sacrifice. ... We will meet our moment and we will prevail.”

Bush: ‘We’ve got them on the run’

President suggests Iraq could be the next target

WASHINGTON — Presi­ dent Bush said Thursday night ‘‘it may take a year or two’’ to track down Osama bin Laden and his terrorist network in Afghanistan, but asserted that after a five-day bombardment, ‘‘we’ve got them on the run.’’ At a prime-time news conference at the White House, Bush said he did not know whether bin Laden was dead or alive. ‘‘I want him brought to justice,’’ he said of the shadowy figure believed behind the terrorist attacks in New York and Washington a month ago. Bush, at times forceful, emotional and funny, looked confidently beyond his war with the Taliban regime and suggested that the United Nations help rebuild Afghanistan with help from the United States. He warned other terrorist-harboring nations that they may be next, with an ominous nod to Saddam Hussein’s Iraq. ‘‘We’re watching him very carefully,’’ he said of Hussein, defeated by Bush’s father in the Persian Gulf War.The president called the Iraqi leader an‘‘evil man.’’ Bush said that an FBI warning issued earlier in the day was the result of a ‘‘general threat’’ of possible future terrorist acts the government had received. ‘‘I hope it’s the last, but given the attitude of AP the evildoers it may not be,’’ President Bush addresses a one-month anniversary service in remembrance of victims killed during the attack on he said. America at the Pentagon in Washington Thursday. Ron Vauk of Nampa, a Navy reservist, was among the victims at the Please see Bush, 5A Pentagon. Later, the president addressed the nation during the first prime-time press conference of his presidency.

Agency cites reports of more plots in U.S. soon

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Vol. 22, No. 104, 46 pages

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WASHINGTON — In a stark warning, the FBI said Thursday it has received information there may be additional terrorist attacks inside the United States or abroad in the next several days. The bureau said its information does not identify specific targets, but it has asked local police to be on the highest alert and for all Americans to be wary of suspicious activity. ‘‘Certain information, while not specific as to target, gives the government the reason to believe that there may be additional terrorist attacks within the United States and against U.S. interests overseas over the next several days,’’ the FBI said in its warning. President Bush said he had personally reviewed the intelligence that prompted the FBI alert. The intelligence represented ‘‘a general threat on America,’’ he said at a news

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Fired staff files lawsuit Migrant Council officials allege rigged vote By Nathaniel Hoffman Idaho Press-Tribune

By Ron Fournier AP White House Correspondent

FBI warns terrorist attack likely

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AP

A member of the Secret Service Tactical Unit peers through binoculars on top of the White House after security was tightened in Washington in the wake of U.S. military strikes in Afghanistan.

conference Thursday night. A U.S. intelligence official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said the government has received an increasing amount of intelligence in the last two days about terrorists plotting to wreak more havoc through this weekend. The possible threats ranged from attacks on diplomatic sites overseas to possible truck bombs in the United States, the official said. Amid the heightened cau-

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tion, authorities were taking all threats seriously. In Houston, authorities investigated the apparent theft of 700 pounds of explosives from a storage site. Federal agents said it was too early to tell if the theft from AirJac Drilling Incorporated was terrorist-related. In a taped interview for ABC’s ‘‘Nightline,’’ Attorney General John Ashcroft said, ‘‘I think the next several days are obviously important partially

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because of the environment in which we find ourselves in the initial response period in Afghanistan.’’ Justice Department spokeswoman Mindy Tucker said the department had received new intelligence within the past few days about a potential attack and decided to alert the public as well as law enforcement agencies. ‘‘We realize the importance of the public accurately understanding the kinds of alerts we are sending out to law enforcement,’’ said Tucker. She said since Sept. 11 the FBI has sent law enforcement agencies five or six alerts. One that urged extra security and vigilance over crop-dusting operations was eventually made public. It was the FBI’s second request this week that law enforcement move to its highest state of alert. The first was on Sunday. Thursday’s statement was the first to suggest attacks might occur within several days.

news hot line: 465-8124

CALDWELL — Former Idaho Migrant Council executive director Humberto Fuentes blasted his firing and that of several other council employees this week and has filed a lawsuit to undo what he calls a coup. Two council board members and four former employees, including Fuentes, filed a complaint in 3rd District Court Thursday, charging a rigged vote at Saturday’s board meeting in Idaho Falls and a series of illegal personnel actions since. “We’re trying to put some order to the chaotic actions that are happening to this organization,” Fuentes said. The complaint alleges that two of the 10 board members who voted in the Saturday meeting were not eligible to sit on the board. Imelda Soto was appointed to the board without notice just before the vote to fire Fuentes, the complaint said. It also charges Connie Hernandez, whose son is employed by the council, with violating the antinepotism clause of the council’s by-laws. Please see Suit, 5A

Library replies to critic

Panel agrees to examine ‘Family Friendly’ affiliation By Lane Bettencourt Idaho Press-Tribune NAMPA — Nampa Library Board members responded Thursday to criticism about its policies regarding material that could be inappropriate for children and agreed to reply in writing to concerns from a group of citizens. The board, meeting for the first time since a group approached the Nampa City Council with complaints about some of the library’s collection, also agreed to look into the merits of guidelines set by a conservative library organization. A formal request for a response was made to the Library Board by City Councilman Stephen Kren. At last week’s council meeting, critic Allen Marsh accused the library of offensive behavior for making several sexually explicit books available to patrons — including those under 18.

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31 Days After Sept. 11, 2001