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BLUESMAN JOHN HAMMOND JC MUSEUM REOPENS MASTERING MARTIAL ARTS SMOKESTACK SHOCKER 6/,5-%s.5-"%2 &!,,s7).4%2

Jersey CITY Magazine ~ FALL & WINTER 2012/13 •

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CONTENTS JCM

FEATURES

16

16 POWERHOUSE REVISITED SMOKESTACKS EXTINGUISHED

COVER 20 MUSIC SCENE COVER PHOTO OF JUNIOR METRA BY CHRISTIAN DIAZ

24 FLIGHT OF THE FLAMINGO A DINER EVOLVES

26 ART SEEN JC MUSEUM REOPENS

DEPARTMENTS 12 CONTRIBUTORS 14 EDITOR’S LETTER 20 15 EMERGING JERSEY CITY 30 PEOPLE POWER JOHN HAMMOND

32 EDUCATION GRADS REGROUP

39 NICHE BATTLING BULLIES – PHOTO ESSAY

40 HOW WE LIVE HOUSE PROUD

56 HOW WE WORK SMALL BUSINESSES ON THE JOB WITH

61 VANISHING JERSEY CITY 62 HOODS 26 OGDEN AVENUE

64 SPORTS CORNER MARTIAL ARTS

68 THE STUDIO LARRY FELDMAN

68 THE ARTS GALLERY LISTINGS

70 DATES DINING OUT 72 MARITIME PARC 76 RESTAURANT LISTINGS 4 • Jersey CITY Magazine ~ FALL & WINTER 2012/13

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Jersey CITY Magazine ~ FALL & WINTER 2012/13 •

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Jersey City Magazine is published two times a year by the Hudson Reporter Associates, L.P., 1400 Washington St., Hoboken, New Jersey 07030, (201) 798-7800, Fax (201) 798-0018. Email jcmag@hudsonreporter.com. Subscriptions are $10 per year, $25 for overseas, single copies are $7.50 each, multiple copy discounts are available. VISA/MC/AMEX accepted. Subscription information should be sent to JCMagazine Subscriptions, 1400 Washington St., Hoboken, NJ 07030. Not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or other unsolicited materials. Copyright ©2012, Hudson Reporter Associates L.P. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without written permission is prohibited.

Jersey City Magazine is a publication of The Hudson Reporter Associates, L.P. 1400 Washington Street, Hoboken, New Jersey 07030 phone 201.798.7800 • fax 201.798.0018 e-mail: jcmag@hudsonreporter.com jerseycitymagazine.com

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Jersey CITY Magazine ~ FALL & WINTER 2012/13 •

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CONTRIBUTORS JCM

CONTRIBUTORS ARLENE PH ALON BALDASSARI has worked as an actress, for a literary agency and book publisher, and in the restaurant industry. She lives in Hoboken with her husband Mike and daughter Sophie.

TERRIANN SAULINO BISH began her career as a graphic designer more than 15 years ago. She not only creates images but captures them with her camera. Her work has appeared in many publications including Best of Photography 2006 & 2007. She currently works for the Hudson Reporter. Her work can be viewed at tbishphoto.com.

ARLENE PHALON BALDASSARI

ALYSSA BREDIN is a recent graduate of Saint Peter’s College, Jersey City, with a degree in graphic arts. She hopes to pursue a career in photography. Her work can be seen at tbishphoto.com.

ANDREW HANENBERG

CHRISTIAN DIAZ is an artist of many media. When he’s not busy making people look good as a barber in downtown Jersey City, he is taking photographs and creating websites to do the same. A native of Puerto Rico, he has spent the past nine years learning Bon Jovi lyrics. View his work at buenosdiaz.us.

TERRIANN SAULINO BISH

MICKEY MATHIS

LANA ROSE DIAZ is a freelance writer, Jersey girl, and paramour of concrete and trees. A graduate of Lehigh University and former staff writer for The Hudson Reporter, she lives, works, and plays in her beloved Jersey City. For more info, visit lanarosediaz.com.

ANDREW HANENBERG began documenting his rock climbing trips throughout the country while in college. After a residence at the Maine Media Workshop, he worked with the industries’ top photographers. He is dedicated to creating inspiring portraits that depict real-life stories. Find more at www.awhphoto.com.

ALYSSA BREDIN

STEFANIE JACKOWITZ

STEFANIE JACKOWITZ is a Hoboken writer whose work has appeared in AM New York, Millburn-Short Hills Magazine, Suburban Essex magazine, and online at Glide Magazine and Cinema Blend. You can follow her at www.stefaniejackowitz.wordpress.com.

VICTOR M. RODRIGUEZ CHRISTIAN DIAZ

ANNE MARUSIC is a freelance writer and publicist who has called the Jersey City waterfront home for the past four years. Look for her on the boardwalk chasing her sons, Nicholas and Alan.

MICKEY MATHIS

ANNE MARUSIC

is a freelance photographer who studied at the International Center for Photography in New York City. A Jersey City resident, he can be seen wandering around town with his dog, Indie, and a camera slung around his neck.

VICTOR M. RODRIGUEZ

LANA ROSE DIAZ

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has studied publication design, photography, and graphic design. “I’ve been fascinated by photography for 17 years,” he says. One of his jobs as a construction project manager is to photograph job sites.

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PHOTO BY MARIE PAPP

"PAID FOR BY OR IN PART BY THE JERSEY CITY URBAN ENTERPRISE ZONE PROGRAM"

EDITOR'S LETTER JCM

FALL FOR US A lot of folks think of fall as the true start of the year, especially when it comes to cultural events. The summer hiatus is over, and the arts community gets down to business. A couple of our stories highlight the city’s arts offerings. The Jersey City Museum, which had been closed since December 2010, reopened in the summer. Art lovers will be able to enjoy the first-floor galleries on weekends. And you can see some of the museum’s beautiful pieces in our pages. Reporter Lana Rose Diaz surveys the JC music scene, while Arlene Phalon Baldassari profiles jazz legend and Jersey City resident John Hammond. In the area of treasured landmarks, we offer a retrospective of the former and much-loved Flamingo Diner, and we have some sad news about the Powerhouse. Ogden Avenue also has a rich history. This issue’s “Hoods” section highlights that historic and scenic part of town. It’s a tough job market for college grads. We talk to a few who graduated from our local colleges and are bucking the odds as they look for work. A good way to keep warm this winter is to join a martial arts club. We’ll tell you where to find one that suits your fighting needs. We always welcome your contributions. Do you know of a great space for “How We Live?” Do you have a great photo for “Emerging” or “Vanishing” Jersey City? Or a fabulous seasonal photo? Fall colors or a towering snow bank? Send them on. Find us on Facebook and give us your feedback. — J CM

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EMERGING JC JCM

PHOTO BY KATE ROUNDS

What’s With

110 First Street?

PHOTOS COURTESY OF BLDG MANAGEMENT CO.

There are big plans for that empty lot across from the big empty lot where the famed 111 First Street factory/ arts enclave used to be. Real estate investor Lloyd Goldman— who owned and razed both 110 and 111 First Streets—is planning a tower that will have about 500 units. Goldman, city officials, and local artists have been mired in controversy over affordable housing requirements for the building. But the project finally got the necessary approval from the City Council.—Kate Rounds

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Will the Powerhouse still be the Powerhouse without her most distinctive feature?

P

icture this: Mount Rushmore without that guy with the wooden teeth. Lady Liberty without her torch. Big Ben without her clocks. The Taj Mahal without her dome. You get the picture. Well, that’s what the future holds for the Powerhouse, which is set to lose—you guessed it—her smokestacks. In our Spring/Summer 2011 issue, we did a cover story on the Powerhouse, which featured Camilo Godoy’s haunting images. At that time, we promised to keep you updated on what’s going on with Jersey City’s most iconic structure. Bob Antonicello, executive director of the Jersey City Redevelopment Agency, called a few months ago to deliver the unfortunate news. “The stacks have to come down,” he said. “They’ve been significantly degraded structurally over the years.” The concern is that one or more stacks could collapse, damaging a wall of the structure.

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Beyer, Blinder, and Belle (BBB), architects noted for historic restorations, including the Hoboken terminal waiting room and the Hoboken ferry terminal, were called in to evaluate the smokestacks. One problem was that nobody had ever gotten close enough to analyze their condition. Enter Vertical Access, a company that specializes in “industrial rope access.” They brought in a 200-foot boom, one of only three in the world, according to Antonicello. BBB then issued a report, which found that the smokestacks were a

“threat to safety and sustainability of the building,” recommending removal of three extant stacks and the remnants of the fourth. Next steps included “replacement of the iconic elements” and stabilizing the building.

And the rest is history John Gomez, Jersey City’s go-to guy for all things historic, was audibly devastated. “It’s obviously a troubling situation and should never have gotten to this point,” he said, “but there is no alternative but to take them down because of the structural issues.” It was more than 100 years of rain that ruined the stacks. Gomez said the stacks were made in pieces with a brick interior surrounded by steel, so you can’t dismantle them in one piece. There are a number of options: Never replace them, or create new smokestacks that look like the originals. The decorative cornices on top of the stacks could be displayed as museum pieces or kept in front of the

structure as sculptures. Or four holograms of the stacks could be displayed in a light show, much like the ones that featured the ghosts of the Twin Towers after Sept. 11, 2001. Last spring, the New York Times wrote a story about New York City’s many beautiful powerhouses. Renowned architect Stanford White designed the one at 11th Avenue and 59th Street. “Its Renaissance-style exterior could just as well have clothed an opera house,” wrote reporter Christopher Gray, “although the five colossal stacks gave it away.”

All the powerhouses in this story were built around the same time as the one in Jersey City—early 1900s–and those “colossal stacks” are a signature feature of each. “The smokestacks are a major part of the powerhouse, which is an icon of our industrial past,” said Antonicello. “They will be a part of the ultimate renovation and restoration, but you can’t take what has been 50 to 60 years of neglect and look to undo it.”—Kate Rounds PHOTOS COURTESY OF VERTICAL ACCESS

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REBECA VALLEJO PHOTO BY MATT SIMPKINS

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JUNIOR METRA PHOTO BY CHRISTIAN DIAZ

CAN YOU WITH NO PARTICULAR PLACE TO GO, JC MUSIC THRIVES EVERYWHERE

BY LANA ROSE DIAZ

Walk down any block in Jersey City and you’re bound to hear the sound of music—bass pounding from a car passing, bells ringing from the church on the corner, a lone saxophone crying out along the avenue. But listen closer and you might hear something else. Is that the sound of a blues band jamming in a cupcake shop? Classical musicians putting on a live performance of Vivaldi in the furniture store? Jersey City may not (yet) be home to an elaborate music venue like NJPAC or Lincoln Center, but it hasn’t stopped our music scene from growing exponentially over the past few years. Jazz and drum beats flow out of Grassroots Community Space and The Art House downtown. The mic is open and ready at Moore’s Lounge uptown. Unable to be contained in one spot, the world-class musicians of our city have instead permeated the streets, looking for any church, store, or café to fill with their sweet sounds. From hip hop to chamber music, Jersey City has it all—and it’s all over town.

HEAR

IT?

Musical evolution While the visual arts have held solid ground in Jersey City for quite a while, the music scene was slower to take root. When Madrid-born Rebeca Vallejo arrived here 12 years ago, she says the scene was all but nonexistent as far as she could see. But as the jazz-flamenco vocalist/composer got to know her surroundings and her fellow artists, she realized there was a movement afoot. “It’s evolved,” she says. “There’s a much stronger appearance of music everywhere. People are taking the lead on events.” Unintentionally, Vallejo has become one of those people. In the interest of sharing her own genre of music with local residents, she recently collaborated with Beth Achenbach to take the lead on a special event close to her heart. A spin-off of Achenbach’s famed “Ladies on the Mic” series, a show last summer featured jazz and World musicians, spotlighting the incredible assortment of musical genres in the city. “I think that there is a lot of potential for appreciation of this type of music in Jersey City,” says Vallejo. “Not everybody is just into rock.” Indeed, the monthly series has already proved that the city is a tapestry of musical tastes. In response to the interest displayed by various rock, hip hop, and R&B acts, Achenbach coordinated a Jersey CITY Magazine ~ FALL & WINTER 2012/13 •

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special event, Ladies that Rock, last fall to celebrate artists beyond the typical poetry and spoken word offering of Ladies on the Mic. But those tastes don’t always extend throughout the neighborhood. Ladies on the Mic was suspended for a few months last year due to residents’ complaints about the fact that Made With Love, the bakery café which hosts the series, was holding live entertainment in its space. Although an entertainment ordinance has since been passed, in every section of town and every genre of music, the main struggle for Jersey City musicians seems to be finding a place to share their flavor with the masses. “It’s definitely an issue,” says Achenbach. “It’d be cool if a few venues popped up where there could be a little thriving for both the business and the musician.” Vallejo, who has performed at various spots in Jersey City, including Bar Majestic, Groove on Grove, and the steps of City Hall, agrees that finding the right place to play is the biggest concern. It’s especially important for folks like Vallejo who make

The 23-year-old has been independently promoting himself for nearly two years, popping up at New Jersey shopping centers and on the streets of New York City to croon at passersby with a pocketful of mixtapes. But while the strategy has been successful for him thus far, what he would like to see is more unity among Jersey City artists. “There’s a lot of talent in Jersey City,” he says. “I wanna see people supporting each other instead of hating on the next person. We gotta work together.” It’s an approach that Junior Metra is familiar with—the musica urbana artist promotes his mix of Spanish rap, reggaeton, and mambo by collaborating with local DJs and doing cross promotion with other artists on his independent label. Although he began rapping in the Dominican Republic, Metra said he started taking his music seriously in Jersey City because here, the possibilities seemed endless. “Jersey City is like a path,” he says. “You’ve got different cultures, different people, but everybody’s intertwined.”

believe that even if they don’t know it yet, people are hungry for it.” The value in chamber music, according to Ames, is its portability. With simple equipment, they are able to bring historically masterful works to life as well as incredible pieces by living composers, some of whom live right next door to us here in Jersey City. “Chamber musicians are so far outside of the mainstream,” she says. “We just realize we have to do it ourselves.” One of Ames’s favorite places to play with Con Vivo Music is at Kanibal Home because the small home furnishings store is an unexpected venue full of “wonderful distractions.” But wherever they play in Jersey City, Ames says it is the people who make the music scene in Jersey City so beautiful. “The audience is so amazing here,” she says. “Whenever we play it’s really a twoway thing, it’s not just the performers on stage. There’s such a great energy here. I can’t really put my finger on why, but that’s what makes it so rewarding.”

CON VIVO MUSIC

their livings as musicians. But she maintains a positive outlook about the JC music scene. “It’s doing nothing but growing,” she says. “It makes me have faith.”

Pocketful of mixtapes, heart full of dreams While some are hard at work trying to create venues for music, other musicians are making their own scene wherever they happen to be. Take D. Jackson, a young, up-and-comer with hip hop swag, who set up shop in the middle of Newport Mall one day this summer. “I’m just doing what I can and letting people hear me,” says Jackson of his guerilla marketing campaign. “I love how I sound in the mall, the acoustics are dope.” The young singer’s love story with music is a familiar one—his singing career started in the church choir and he began to take his music seriously after a rousing audience response at a high-school talent show. But his trek to stardom since then has been one of pure Jersey City determination.

And, like D. Jackson, he isn’t waiting for someone to come along and promote his music for him. Instead of having his mixtapes lost at sea in a music store, he’s learned to bring them directly to the bodegas and the barber shops to reach his audience, which includes both Spanish and English speakers. “Music speaks for itself,” says Metra.

Take it outside – or inside The tenacious desire to bring music directly to the people isn’t confined to only one genre. In Jersey City, even classical musicians are taking it to the streets. Violist Amelia Hollander Ames never had any gigs here in her hometown until she created them for herself—and some fellow musicians—by founding Con Vivo Music. The collective brings chamber music to the nooks and crannies of Jersey City by playing free concerts everywhere from farmers markets and community centers to churches and local stores. “There hasn’t been chamber music here,” she says. “I just really love it and I strongly

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GROOVE ON GROVE PHOTO BY LANA ROSE DIAZ

D. JACKSON PHOTO BY CHRISTIAN DIAZ

A space for sound Despite eager musicians and enthusiastic crowds, there simply aren’t enough venues to display the musical cornucopia that Jersey City has to offer. But there is one venue that almost everybody agrees is the ultimate place to play in town right now— Groove on Grove. The free weekly outdoor music series takes place at Grove Street Plaza throughout the warmer months. But what are music lovers to do when things get a little colder in Chilltown? Beth Achenbach suggests that maybe the auditorium in Jersey City Museum should be opened up for music shows. Junior Metra, on the other hand, is hoping that the Boys and Girls Club will be opened for concert use as a great way to not only showcase music but also to provide a musical outlet for the city’s youth. “One place run by the right people could make all the difference in the Jersey City music scene,” says Achenbach. But, in the meantime, she—like many other city residents—is just happy that so many musicians have taken it upon themselves to bring their music to the masses wherever they can find the space. “One of the cool things is there’s so much going on in different places,” she says. “It’s kind of a good thing that you can’t decide where to go.” It’s undeniable that music is everywhere in Jersey City, you just have to know where to find it.—J CM

RESOURCES Con Vivo Music convivomusic.org Twitter: @convivomusic Facebook: convivojc D. Jackson theycallhimjackson.com Twitter: @djackson201 Groove on Grove Facebook: grooveongrove Junior Metra Twitter: @purosincorte Ladies on the Mic Facebook Group: Ladies on the Mic The Landmark Loews Jersey City Theatre 54 Journal Sq. (201) 798-6055 loewsjersey.org loewsjersey@gmail.com Uptown Crew (917) 536-2682 info@uptowncrew.org Rebeca Vallejo rvproject.info Jersey CITY Magazine ~ FALL & WINTER 2012/13 •

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PHOTO BY MICKEY MATHIS

How a legendary diner became “Hip & Delicious”

I

f you’re like most folks who haunt the commercial area down by Exchange Place, you witnessed the closing of the old Flamingo diner a few years ago and then the long interregnum when it was boarded up, with old newspapers and notices plastered on the windows. A few months ago, it was reborn as “The City Diner,” with the tagline “Hip & Delicious.” Gone is the old pink, geographically challenged flamingo sign. Gone, the classic allnight-diner gestalt, with plates of

burgers and eggs and veal parm balanced on the strong, outstretched arms of the Flamingo’s middle-aged wait staff. Andreas Diakos opened the diner at 31 Montgomery St. on the corner of Greene in 1968. A Greek immigrant, he was 16 when he came to the United States, finding work as a busboy across the street from the Flamingo. In a garish affirmation of the American Dream, he was a restaurant owner by age 20. For years, the Flamingo withstood an onslaught of eminent-domain

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PHOTO COURTESY OF THE GIAKOUMATOS BROTHERS

"PAID FOR BY OR IN PART BY THE JERSEY CITY URBAN ENTERPRISE ZONE PROGRAM"

challenges. In late June 2002, the city threatened to acquire the property and demolish the 1848, five-story building, so that they could ease traffic by widening Greene Street. Why widen the street? This was a time when the area, which borders historic Paulus Hook, was being developed with high-rise office towers and condos. Specifically, the tallest building in New Jersey, the 42-story Goldman Sachs building, was going up just blocks away. It would bring some 6,000 lunchtime patrons to the burgeoning Jersey City financial district. Diakos blew off the $1.5 million he was offered by the city for the property. Patrons pointed to the restaurant’s reasonable prices that allowed senior citizens and poor people to get a decent meal out. And Diakos’s three high-powered daughters, one an HBO executive, threw their weight behind the effort to save their family business. By April 2003, a compromise had been struck. Instead of widening the street, city officials agreed to make it one-way. The building and its beloved neighborhood diner had been spared the wrecking ball. “We grew up in the diner,” says Kalliope, the daughter who is an HBO executive. “The whole family worked there. My father came from Greece and worked there his whole life, seven days a week. We would have breakfast with him there. He was there for 43 years. It was his passion, and this area was in his heart.” By February 2007, the property was on the market for $4 million. But Diakos did not sell it then. That happened about two years ago, when Diakos sold the diner to the Giakoumatos family, GreekAmericans, who are also in the restaurant business. At press time, brothers Nick, Mike, and Lefty were getting ready for the grand opening. Lefty was on the phone ordering everything from anchovies to lentil soup, sometimes in Greek, sometimes in English. The place looks like an upgraded diner, with a beautiful new bar, and that’s just what the family wants. “It’s a diner with a nice look,” Nick says. In addition to the usual diner food, you can get a kosher Cuban sandwich, chicken chili fries, 12 beers on tap, and a latte or cappuccino. So, yes, things have changed, but some things never do. “You can get casual, trendy comfort food any time of day at diner prices, not restaurant prices,” Nick says. Hence, the “Hip & Delicious” label. And the brothers are happy to be in downtown JC. “-It’s come a long way,” Nick says. “It’s a vibrant, alive location.” –Kate Rounds

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Art Seen

The Jersey City Museum is back in business PHOTOS BY TERRIANN SAULINO BISH AND ALYSSA BREDIN

When the Jersey City Museum closed in December 2010, it was a sad day for many in Jersey City’s happening arts community—not just for artists but for collectors and the many local art lovers who had come to enjoy the exhibits, films, and events that the museum offered. In late June, the museum reopened. The Jersey City Medical Center, which purchased the building in early 2012, has allowed the museum to use the first floor—which includes a 152-seat theater—to exhibit artworks from its 10,000-piece collection. The first exhibit, “Masters of the Collection,” featured watercolors by August Will and landscapes by Charles Linford. Initially, the museum will be open to the public only on weekends. “It has been a tremendous undertaking to reorganize this collection,” said Mark S. Rodrick, Jersey City Museum board treasurer. “The dedication of many volunteers made this possible.”

Volunteer Michele Larsen organized the collection, labeled every piece, and created a digital slideshow from traditional art. “I love seeing what is in the collection,” she said. “I can get a feel for what we really have here.” Stephen Escott of Summit Frame & Art in Summit, N.J., is also a volunteer. “I was happy to donate my time to the reopening,” he said. “It is historically important. These are original pieces from the 1800s.” Board Chairman Benjamin Dineen III was also on hand. “We are delighted the museum is open again,” he said. “To be able to share the collection with the community is one of our main goals.”—Alyssa Bredin

28 • Jersey CITY Magazine ~ FALL & WINTER 2012/13

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Hometown

Blues Hero

Blues great John Hammond has found peace and harmony in JC BY ARLENE PHALON BALDASSARI

“John’s sound is so compelling, complete, symmetrical and soulful with just his voice, guitar and harmonica, it is … impossible to imagine improving it.”—Tom Waits Legendary bluesman John Hammond has spent the better part of the last 50 years on the road. In 2008 his booking firm, The Rosebud Agency, announced his 4,000th show since joining them in 1977. How many gigs has he played overall? “Oh, I really don’t know,” Hammond says. “Hard to say, but it’s in the thousands.” Probably 6,000 if you do the math—all over the world— sometimes with a band, sometimes alone with a guitar and harmonica. After logging all those miles, after seeing all those places, where did Hammond and his wife, Marla, decide to call home? Jersey City.

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John Paul Hammond’s story is well known, especially among blues enthusiasts. He grew up in Greenwich Village, the son of John Hammond Jr., a record producer and talent scout who influenced the likes of Benny Goodman, Billie Holiday, Pete Seeger, Bob Dylan, Aretha Franklin, and Bruce Springsteen, among many others. His parents split when he was very young, and Hammond was raised by his mother, actress Jemison McBride. Growing up, he saw his father only a few times a year, but during one of those visits, at the age of 7, his father took him to see Big Bill Broonzy. “Clearly, he made a big impression on me” says Hammond. Through his teens, he was a fan of blues-

PEOPLE POWER JCM based rock artists like Bo Diddley, Chuck Berry, and Jackie Wilson. Then he discovered classic country blues artists like Robert Johnson, Leroy Carr, and Blind Willie McTell, “... and I became a fanatic,” he says. Hammond bought his first guitar at 18 and was on the road at 19, playing mostly in coffeehouses in Los Angeles. Returning to New York City in 1962, “I landed my first gig at Gerde’s Folk City, which was the club to book back then,” he says. Hammond found himself at the epicenter of the blues renaissance. “I was in the right place at the right time,” he says. He forged friendships with likeminded artists, including Richie Havens (also a Jersey City resident); Bob Dylan; and Jose Feliciano. “I felt like I’d found my place,” he says. Around this time he also met Neil Young, who opened a show for Hammond at the Cellar Door in D.C. in 1969. Over the years, Hammond has opened for Young multiple times, and their friendship endures. Time and again, Hammond put together friends to form a band and tour, or record. He famously had Jimi Hendrix and Eric Clapton in the same band, albeit for only five days. Longer-lasting collaborations were with Muddy Waters, JJ Cale, Tom Waits, The Band, and John Lee Hooker. He’s recorded 34 albums and counting. What would a Hammond dream band look like? “Oh God, that’s too hard,” he says. “I’ve worked with so many phenomenal players, from Dr. John to Mike Bloomfield, Robbie Robertson, Duane Allman ... it’d be way too many people.” Hammond and Marla moved to Jersey City in 1995. “It didn’t look anything like it does now,” he says. But they were attracted to the community and for a traveling man, transportation options were excellent. “We’re 12 minutes to Newark Airport, which is delightful when we’re going overseas or across the country,” he says. “Everything is very convenient here.” And he’s performed

locally as well, most notably at the Landmark Loews Jersey Theatre in 2010. “I was on the bill with Duke Robillard,” he says. “It’s a beautiful theater and they did a great job of restoring it. We also love Hoboken and do a lot of shopping there.” They’ve been known to visit Maxwell’s, keeping up with newer artists. “We saw another friend, G. Love, there some time ago,” Hammond says. “He’s got a lot of style and brings a hip-hop take to the blues.” Hammond travels with two primary guitars, an acoustic that was custom made for him in England, and a 1935 steel-bodied National Duolian, a gift from Marla on his 48th birthday. “This was what street players had, back in the day before electric guitars,” he says. “It was the loudest you could possibly get.” He often visits the Guitar Bar in Hoboken for supplies. Hammond has been nominated for Grammies numerous times and won in 1985 for his album, “Blues Explosion.” In 2011 he was inducted into the Blues Hall Of Fame in Memphis along with Alberta Hunter and Robert Cray. “Fifty years on the road, I guess I’ve outlived my critics,” he jokes. “To be included with Muddy Waters, Howlin’ Wolf, my idols, is just such an honor.” Last year, he was inducted into the New York City Blues Hall of Fame. Ten years ago, he was awarded the Key to the City of Jersey City. “They gave me a plaque,” he says. “I’m very proud of that.” Hammond is a J C Mag fan. “We love J ersey City Magazine,” he says. “We look forward to it every time it comes out, because it’s so nice to see an acknowledgement of this area that has so much history. Seeing this scene becoming so vibrant, it’s just terrific. We’re very happy here.” Our hometown bluesman stays upbeat about his work as well. “I’m a very fortunate person to do what I love and make a living at it,” he says. “I make my living playing the shows, and that’s the real deal.”—J CM

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EDUCATION JCM JANE SEPULVEDA

PHOTOS BY TERRIANN SAULINO BISH AND ALYSSA BREDIN

All Dressed Up With No Place to Go COLLEGE GRADS FACE A BLEAK JOB MARKET BY ANNE MARUSIC

Fresh and eager college grads are pounding the pavement looking for work, despite grim odds. The unemployment rate for recent grads hovers at 53 percent, the highest in 11 years, according to research complied by the AP. Students at our three local colleges—New Jersey City University (NJCU), Hudson County Community College (HCCC), and St. Peters College—reflect the trend. Jane Sepulveda, a Greenville resident and recent NJCU grad who now holds a Bachelor’s degree in geoscience, is trying to be patient. “As I have been applying to jobs this spring, I have found that they are looking for professionals with five or more years of experience,” she says. “So I changed my strategy and I am now looking for jobs that might pay less in order to gain work experience and skills to help me land a better job later on.” She is considering applying for her Master’s degree in sustainability management, health administration, environmental management, or environmental education. “Going back to school will help me gain a more advanced skill set and add another dimension to my education, making me more marketable,” she says. “My long-term goal is to get my PhD and to be involved in sustainable community development and urban planning.” There are job opportunities in her field in the Midwest and Arizona, but she isn’t willing to relocate. “I can work as a bank teller,” she says. “At first, it appears I am stepping out of my field. But I can gain a great skill set, manage my hours, and still go back to school. The bank work will teach me about small business loans and will help me meet my long-term goal.” Eventually, she hopes to work at a nonprofit organization, securing investors interested in protecting our environment. “There is a lot of money out there,” she says. “You have to find and tap into it.” It took NJCU grad Ramon Aponte eight years to graduate. He expected to graduate in 2009, but he was deployed three times to Iraq. For the last eight years, he has attended school full time and worked two jobs: as a full-time Jersey City police officer and as a Marine. Somehow, he was able to take 15 credits per semester. He has a five-year-old daughter. When NJCU started providing daycare, allowing him to get some sleep at night, his GPA skyrocketed. After graduation, he will continue working as a cop, patrolling the Heights. This fall, he may be deployed to Africa. In the summer he

RAMON APONTE

Jersey CITY Magazine ~ FALL & WINTER 2012/13 •

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got the good news that he got into graduate school at NJCU to study criminal justice. He wants to pursue his PhD and teach criminal justice at the college level. “Most of the students think that simply earning a criminal justice degree will guarantee them a job as a police officer,� Aponte says. “Not true. What does help is passing the civil service test, but you still have to get a 92 or above to be considered. There is a lot of competition, and jobs are scarce, but college grads still have an advantage over high-school kids.� Travel a couple of miles to Journal Square to HCCC and you will find Iris Charles. With a major in liberal arts-special education, Charles is not your typical student. At age 45, she went back to school after a 23-year break from her studies. Born and raised in Jersey City, she’s experienced gang life, single parenting, divorce, eviction, and domestic abuse. Since January 2012, she’s worked as a teacher’s aide at Horace Mann Elementary School in Bayonne. She landed the gig by networking with the Bayonne superintendent whom she just happened to meet one day while at her older daughter’s school. “I’m a go-getter. I figured why not go directly to the top while I had the chance?� Charles expects to get her Bachelor’s degree from NJCU in January 2013. She wants to be a teacher. “People say there aren’t a lot of jobs out there, but there are jobs; you just have to go out there and make it happen. Sometimes you have to lower your expectations just slightly and use a job as a stepping stone to get to where you want to be later on in life.� Diane Gotlieb, coordinator of career services at HCCC, agrees that there is no substitute for hard work and persistence. “It is grim out there in terms of entrylevel positions, and companies continue to cut back,� she says. “Students have to take responsibility for their future. Freshmen and sophomores need to ask themselves, ‘What do I need to do today to prepare for my future?’� Gotlieb says, “As it turns out, there might be 100 resumes for one job opportunity, so the resume has to be strong and the interview has to be strong. The same tools are relevant today as they have always been: Internships can help a student stand out. Networking is key, and by all means, don’t discount anybody in your life—the corner deli owner might be the connection you need to succeed.�

EDUCATION JCM

Meanwhile, half a mile down JFK Boulevard at St. Peter’s College, Walter Stacey has just earned his degree in accounting with a minor in business law. He credits his ability to secure a job to hard work. Starting his sophomore year, he started to look for jobs on Monster.com and CareerBuilder.com. After these websites proved to be dead ends, he went to his college’s career services office. Enzo Fonzo, director of the office of career services, got Stacey an interview at Lehman Brothers, which led to an internship in its corporate tax department. (Though Lehman filed for bankruptcy in 2008, the corporate tax department was still viable). “The Lehman internship catapulted me ahead,” Stacey says. “I started thinking seriously about future careers.” After a little networking his junior year, he realized one of his professors had a relative who worked at JP Morgan Chase. He used this connection and landed a job there for a year and four months, while continuing his studies full time. When JP Morgan went on a hiring freeze, Stacey had to do more digging. “I went back to Mr. Fonza,” Stacey says. “He put me on a list for an interview with KPMG.” Stacey started his full-time job last August as an audit analyst in KPMG’s Short Hills office. As the first person in his immediate family to go to college, Stacey “didn’t want to mess it up.” Says Fonzo: “The job situation has improved slightly from 2011. Students who secure even what appears to be an unrelated job will be better off in the long run. By utilizing our office and approaching their job search in a focused way, almost like a course, students have a lot better chance of securing a job.” The career services team offers networking with alumni and various organizations, interview preparation, and postinterview advice. “What you say and how you say it is so critical in the interview,” Fonza says. “Students must ask themselves, ‘What qualities and talents distinguish me? What sets me apart from the other 99 students applying for this job?’ It is imperative that students not only articulate their accomplishments, but then show how they can leverage these successes in the workplace.” The first thing employers look for, Fonza says, is solid written and verbal communication skills, as well as evidence that candidates can prioritize tasks and

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WALTER STACEY

work well on a team. But he cautions that even for the top candidates, it could take five or six no’s before they get a yes. Peter Gotlieb, Ph.D., associate dean at the center for experiential learning and career services at St. Peter’s, has been in the education business for more than three decades. (He is married to HCCC’s Diane Gotlieb.) “We constantly follow up with our students,” Gotlieb says. “We encourage them to stay in touch. We hope that our relationship is something they take advantage of as they move forward through the job-search process.” Students should start working with career services their freshman year. “Overall, the current job market is not only poor, but it is different from the job markets we have witnessed in the past,” Gotlieb says. “All the college majors have been affected by this particular recession.” Finally, alumni relationships are more important than ever in terms of recruitment, counseling, and providing real-world support. Says Gotlieb: “It all comes down to affirming what you have to offer the employment world and going out there and selling yourself.”—J CM

36 • Jersey CITY Magazine ~ FALL & WINTER 2012/13

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Jersey CITY Magazine ~ FALL & WINTER 2012/13 •

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PHOTOS BY MICKEY MATHIS

Bullies

Beware!

Funding for the state’s anti-bulling initiative covers just a fraction of the real cost to public schools, according to school officials in Hudson County. Jersey City, which has some 28,000 students, received just $3,211. It is heartening to know that students are on the case, despite the funding shortfall. As part of the “Be Bold Ban Bullying” student art project, Goldman Sachs officials selected several paintings that have been on display since last January near its waterfront tower. Thirty students in grades six through 12 submitted their work. — J CM

Jersey CITY Magazine ~ FALL & WINTER 2012/13•

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PHOTOS BY VICTOR M. RODRIGUEZ

SEVENTH STREET

J

orge Mastropietro, Mark Stahl, and their threeyear-old son have lived in this 1860 brownstone for five years. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on a beautiful, leafy block with

JORGE MASTROPIETRO

MARK STAHL

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41

other brownstones, very typical of this section of downtown Jersey City. Stahl is a Google engineer. Mastropietro, an architect, designed the renovation himself. “It was not a gut renovation,” he says. “It had been a two-family home, and we restored the house to its original function as a one-family home.” Original features include some molding and window casings in the parlor and part of the wrought-iron fence in the front, where there is a small garden. The house has four floors, three bathrooms, and three bedrooms, one of which is used as an office. They modernized the bathrooms and the ground-floor kitchen. “I am very minimalist in every detail,” Mastropietro says. “The furnishings are modern, the bathroom is very dark brown with concrete countertops. Everything is white with not many colors on the walls.” Next to the kitchen is a very colorful (and organized!) playroom, leading to a

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backyard with a patio and deck, which Mastropietro “built from scratch.” Before coming to Jersey City, the family lived in New York City. “We love all the local restaurants, and we love Hamilton Park,”

44 • Jersey CITY Magazine ~ FALL & WINTER 2012/13

Mastropietro says. “There’s a sense of community here that I did not feel in New York City. Here, you know who lives next door, almost everyone on the block.”

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parlor has high ceilings, a huge mirror, and magazines dating from the 1930s artfully arranged on the coffee table. Original working gaslights over the fireplace come in handy during power outages. White gauzy curtains accent the heavy, dark furniture. The four-floor structure boasts four bedrooms and two and a half baths with stained-glass skylights. A formal dining room, complete with dumbwaiter and buzzer under the table to call the maid, is used for holiday parties. And, like most homes from this era, the kitchen is on the ground floor. The backyard features a raised pool.

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Rolling doors that still seem to work separate some of the rooms. In a Downton Abbey touch, there is a speaking tube on the third floor, which would have been much needed when servants bustled in and out of what was once a brand new mansion. The house has lots of working fireplaces—some wood, some gas–two pianos, one an 1869 Steinway, and lots of what Doran calls “church stuff,” including a lectern holding a huge dictionary. The walls are covered with both art and historic images, including a picture of Saint John’s Church and a newspaper reporting on the sinking of the Titanic. Doran’s son, Andrew, lives in the upstairs maid’s quarters. A big, flat-screen TV is the only nod to the 21st century.

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THIRD STREET

R

ocky and Sheila Kaushik live in a renovated condo, known as the Wave. Only one wall of the preexisting building was kept. What’s unique about the structure is how its flatiron shape makes for interesting wedged spaces. Construction of the building, which was designed by Lindemon Winkelmann Dupree Martin Russell (LWDMR) in Jersey City, was finished about two years ago. John Winckelmann was the project manager. “We love the layout with floor-toceiling glass and vaulted ceilings,” Rocky says. “The construction feels very solid. It was well executed. They took care in putting the building together.” The unit, on the top floor, has huge windows which offer lots of light and city views of trees, steeples, and other low rooftops, which distinguish this

ROCKY KAUSHIK

section of downtown. “It’s different from looking at all high-rises,” Rocky says. “It feels neighborhoody.” Both Rocky and Sheila are attorneys. She works in New York City, and he works in Newark, so the location is perfect. “We were considering looking in Brooklyn,” Rocky says, but you get more space for the price in Jersey City. It’s more comfortable and convenient to our families in Manhattan.”

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Downtown Jersey City, he says, has the same feel as Brooklyn. And they take full advantage. “We go all over the place for brunch, a new spot every Sunday,” says Rocky. “Our favorite places are Skinner’s Loft, and Michael Anthony’s right on the water. We love hanging out in Hamilton Park, which is just a seven-minute walk from our place, and we love Pecoraro’s Bakery across the street, which bakes fresh bread.”

PATERSON PLANK ROAD

T

his sprawling condo complex is tucked into the cliffs that separate Jersey City from Hoboken, in the shadow of the Second Street light-rail stop. Though only five stories high, the

MYKAL STICKNEY building seems to take up about five city blocks, and in fact it is said that half the structure is in Jersey City and half in Hoboken. Mykal Stickney and Glenn Rabbach live in a condo with their silkie terrier, Ollie, on the Jersey City side. Ron Russell of the architectural firm LWDMR was the project manager of this renovated former factory, appropriately dubbed the Cliffs. Stickney and Rabbach were attracted to the style of the building and have lived there for three years. “It is well-kept, which was a major factor,” Stickney says. “And every apartment is different. They are not cookie cutter. It has high ceilings and exposed brick and is very appealing.” Stickney describes their taste as “urban modern eclectic.” Both Stickney and Rabbach are in the

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54 • Jersey CITY Magazine ~ FALL & WINTER 2012/13

design field, and the space reflects a spare, sophisticated aesthetic, with warm colors, rich woods, and original art on the walls. To say that it is uncluttered is an understatement. “Most of our pieces have their own little story,” Stickney says, “which adds an additional layer of character to the apartment. Lots of it was just picked up over the years from different places and smaller artists we stumbled across.” The couple takes full advantage of the locale. “There are good restaurants in the area, and it is so convenient to the city. You can walk to the PATH in 15 minutes, but

there is also a shuttle here that goes back and forth to the PATH.” In fact, the complex has a range of amenities, including indoor parking, a fitness center, dog run, and a courtyard with communal grills. “The back of the building is really beautiful stone with plants rising up probably five stories into the air,” Stickney says. Stickney, a Wisconsin native, has found a serene oasis at the Cliffs. He says, “It’s an escape and a peaceful break from the craziness of the city.”—JCM Interviews by Kate Rounds Jersey CITY Magazine ~ FALL & WINTER 2012/13 •

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ON THE JOB WITH —

CROSSING GUARDS

UNDERAPPRECIATED, BUT OH SO IMPORTANT, CROSSING GUARDS HAVE YOUR BACK

SYLVIA RIVERA DARRYL JONES

PHOTOS BY MICKEY MATHIS

During the morning rush hour, they’re at practically every intersection. You’ve seen them. They wear bright green florescent vests, they’re blowing whistles, holding up stop signs, and generally keeping mayhem at bay. Sylvia Rivera has been standing at the corner of Grand and Marin for three years and 10 months. But she’s an 11-year veteran. Her former post was near Sacred Heart School at Martin Luther King Boulevard and Bayview. Though she walks with a cane when she’s off duty, when she’s on the job, she moves briskly—all eyes and ears as she patrols the busy intersection. On one corner is OLC/The Little Harbor Academy. Schools are obviously an important place for crossing guards to be posted. Rivera, who was born in Manhattan, has lived in Jersey City since 1971, currently in the Greenville section. She’d been jumping from job to job when she started noticing crossing guards. “I’m a people person,” she says. “I put in my application, and I’ve been dealing with people and kids from all walks of life ever since.” Saint Peter’s Prep is also nearby. “I interact with everybody,” Rivera says. “Children in high school, college students, lawyers, and teachers.” The job can be stressful. Rivera relates an incident in which a parent was crossing the street with two kids on bikes, and a car almost failed to stop in time. “I put up my hand, but they didn’t hear or see me,” Rivera says. She says the whistle, the uniform, the vest, and one white-gloved hand all help. “It’s not safe to be crossing babies on this wide street where I work,” she says. And that’s where she comes in. “As long as God lets me work, I’ll stay on the job,” Rivera says. “As long as He lets me get up and go to work, I have no problem being a crossing guard.”

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SULTAN GOODMAN

The intersection where Sultan Goodman works is so busy, it’s downright scary. I, for one, would never attempt a State Highway crossing without him. He’s at John F. Kennedy Boulevard, where cars whip around the corner right at the entrance to 1 and 9. Goodman, who’s been on the job eight years, doesn’t wax poetic when he explains why he went for the gig. “I wanted to work for the city,” he says. “There was nothing else at the time of interest to me, and I was honored. They didn’t have to hire a 26-yearold from the projects.” He says he gets to know the people. “A few know me by name if they can pronounce it,” he says. Goodman, who grew up in Jersey City, lives nearby and can walk to his intersection. “Guys fly around the corner,” he says. “I get them to stop with a whistle, and they stop on a dime.” He’s had some close calls. “I’ve saved a number of lives over the years,” he says. “Some feel they don’t need me to cross them, but I do it anyway. That’s my job.” He says there are therapists’ offices nearby. “A few therapy patients look for me to be there on their schedule,” he says. “Before I took that post, they had a hard time getting across the street. Guys were constantly running lights.” Goodman and his wife, who is a school bus aid, have four kids. He’s 35 and thinks he can retire by age 50 or 60. Until then, he says, “I like the job. I like keeping the community and people in the city safe.” I used to notice Darryl Jones, who works on the corner of Grand and Washington, because kids called to him by name. Jones, a youthful 52-year-old, has been on the job for 19 years, working at a number of different intersections. A Jersey City native, he used to work at a liquor store but wanted the benefits that he could get from a city job. He also works as a security guard at night. “After about six months, I get to know the kids by name,” he says, referring to the elementary school students at P.S. 16. Until then, he’ll use “Missy” and the like. Though crossing guards are not allowed to touch kids, he doesn’t hesitate to grab one by the waistband if he or she is in danger of getting hit by a car. But, he says, “Kids know not to cross without me.” He brings out the big gun—his whistle— only when a fire truck or ambulance comes by. Cars usually stop when Jones uses hand motions. Sometimes drivers, even school bus drivers, get a little mad if kids are taking too long to cross the street, but Jones uses his people skills to smooth things over. He’s sad that an older woman named Stella, who was a fixture in the neighborhood, walking her dog, Clark Gable, recently died. “I talk to the same people every day,” he says. “If you’re grumpy to people, you can’t work here. I’m here to cross, not to argue.”— Kate Rounds Jersey CITY Magazine ~ FALL & WINTER 2012/13•

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PHOTOS BY ANDREW HANENBERG

LEE SIMS CHOCOLATES 743 Bergen Ave. (201) 433-1308 leesimschocolates.com Admit it. We’ve all done it. It’s Valentine’s Day, and that special someone gives you a beautiful box of assorted chocolates. And you bite into each one, just to see what gooey surprise is hidden beneath that dark, shiny veneer.

Valerie Vlahakis, a member of one of Jersey City’s most legendary chocolate families, has not lost that sense of awe. In fact, she says, “I sometimes go home sick” from sampling her delectable wares. Along with her sister, Alison, Vlahakis is co-owner of Lee Sims Chocolates. Their grandfather was the original owner. He bought the shop in the 1940s from two women who operated it as a soda fountain. He learned the chocolate trade from a German confectioner. Vlahakis makes the creations on site. “I do all the confections here,” she says “and enrobe them in chocolate.” Enrobe them? That’s the professional lingo, and it would be hard to come up with a better word for this extreme comfort food. At this point, Vlahakis references Lucille Ball. Folks of a certain age or young people obsessed with old reruns will recall Lucy’s most momentous screw-up—trying to enrobe chocolates on an assembly line. Vlahakis talks about “making candy.” She never uses the word manufacture. That calls to mind smokestacks, she says. “It’s the quality of ingredients that matter,” she says. “And we make small batches, so that we can keep the price and value at a good level.” Though Jersey City is not her home, Vlahakis has worked here so long that she says, “I identify with Jersey City as my community, and McGinley Square has a strong sense of place.” Vlahakis says her parents were “not thrilled” that both she and her sister wanted to work in the family business. “They expected my sister and me to have professions,” Vlahakis says. But she’s never looked back. “It’s a great thing to see what you’ve done at the end of the day when you have 250 pounds of what you made on the shelf,” she says. When she was a kid, she says, “I’d come home from school and there’d be chocolate in the air, like a big hug.” The more things change, the more they stay the same. It makes you want to take to your bed with a box of bon bons.

VALERIE VLAHAKIS

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HELEN’S PIZZA 183 Newark Ave. (201) 435-1507 helens-pizza.com

STEVE KALCANIDES

Steve Kalcanides owns and runs this family business, which has been around since 1968. “Pizza has changed a lot over the years,” Kalcanides says. “It’s more exotic. When we first opened, there was just cheese pizza, and the first topping to come around was pepperoni.” Now, they have 20 different toppings in myriad combinations. For lunch and dinner, they feature two combinations, which are put on display. In the old days, he says they offered fountain drinks, orangeade, and grapeade. “Now you have so many types of drinks available, bottles of Snapple, white and green teas, as well as canned and bottled soft drinks.” Helen’s is not noted for either thin or thick-crust pizzas. “It’s medium, leaning toward thin,” Kalcanides says. Making good pizza is all about quality and coordination. You’ve seen pizza chefs heaving the dough in the air. “You have to stretch it evenly with no thin spots,” Kalcanides says. “You have to lay down the sauce evenly and use just the right amount of cheese.” The family has a secret recipe for its tomato sauce, and they get their cheese from all around the country, but Kalcanides says he is partial to Wisconsin cheese. Kalcanides, who is Greek, claims that pizza was invented in Greece around 300 BC.

JILL PEDERSEN Licensed clinical social worker (917) 913-3999 jillpedersentherapy@gmail.com

JILL PEDERSEN

Jill Pedersen has cornered the local market on a certain kind of therapy—outdoor therapy. That’s right, don’t think couch, think park. “I’m trying to do work without office space,” she says. “Walk and talk therapy. There’s something about walking that the defenses are not as high. When you’re physically engaged, you don’t have your defenses up, and information and work flow more fluidly.” Though a few therapists around the country do it, it is not a traditional therapy. “Most therapists feel more comfortable in their own familiar environment,” Pedersen says. “It’s a hierarchical relationship, with the clients in the therapists’ domain.” Fresh-air therapy can be less stressful for new patients. “So many people simply haven’t been in therapy before,” Pedersen says. “It’s daunting finding one you click with, sitting in their office face to face and talking about the most vulnerable parts” of your life. “Walking is an easy way to try out new therapy,” Pedersen says. “It’s not so intimidating, and it’s a great method for anybody active or who has difficulty sitting for an hour. Motion and walking are therapeutic.” Pedersen, who is a licensed clinical social worker, says that her unique therapy methods “help people too busy to fit traditional therapy into their schedules.” She usually walks in the Exchange Place area, where folks working in the high-rise office buildings can easily get away for a stroll. Even in winter, the walk/talk therapy can be bracing but effective. Pedersen is married with a small child. A Massachusetts native, she has lived in downtown Jersey City for seven years. “It’s the first place that felt like home since Massachusetts,” she says. “It’s very friendly, very neighborly, and very warm.”

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MARGIE TORRES

HOW WE WORK JCM

ENCHANTING FOR FINE WOMEN’S FASHIONS 34 Exchange Place (201) 915-5252

Where Quality meets Affordability

This go-to place for women’s clothes has been in business for 15 years, and manager Margie Torres has honed her knack for helping women find just the right outfit for work, parties, weddings, or when they just want to feel sharp and stylish. “We have young women, older women, corporate working women—funky, evening, dressy, all different kinds of clothes,” Torres says. “You come in here, and you go out with something, whether it’s for work or a wedding.” Women who shop here are not likely to run into other women wearing the same

Haircuts for Men, Women and Children Visit our website for more information

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thing. Every occasion is different, and every woman is different. “You won’t see my clothes at Macy’s or the Short Hills mall,” Torres says. Torres, who was born and raised in downtown Jersey City, says she is “overwhelmed by the changes. I’m still in shock. I can’t believe it’s downtown Jersey City. I walk around, and I’m amazed. It’s so beautiful down here near the water with new buildings and restaurants.” Torres likes to put together the whole package, not just the dress or suit. “Earrings, pocketbook, scarves, hats, jewelry, the whole thing,” she says. “If they try an item and ask my opinion, I will say it is not for you. It’s not just about making money. I want them to come in here and go out happy.”— JCM

VANISHING JC JCM

VANISHING JERSEY CITY PHOTO BY KATE ROUNDS THE OLD KOLONIA ON COMMUNIPAW AVENUE IS STILL UP FOR GRABS SEND YOUR VANISHING JERSEY CITY PHOTOS TO JCMAG@ HUDSONREPORTER.COM. BE SURE TO WRITE “VANISHING” IN THE SUBJECT LINE.

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PHOTO BY STEFANIE JACKOWITZ

Breathtaking views and a rich cultural history BY STEFANIE JACKOWITZ

W

hile walking along Ogden Avenue, at the edge of the Palisades Cliff, it’s easy to feel a sense of the past in every step. From the cracks in the sidewalk to the overgrown shady trees lining the block, it’s evident that there were plenty of Heights residents who, over time, have gazed out the very same Ogden Avenue windows, looking down at Hoboken and New York City. But new construction, a variety of neighborhood-organized events, and an influx of young families have brought a fresh sense of community and diversity to the area. “It’s less expensive than downtown Jersey City or Hoboken,” says Becky Hoffman, chair of the Riverview Neighborhood Association and Ogden Avenue resident, “while also being accessible to those places.” Hoffman, who lives in one of 20 converted Pohlman Hall condos,

moved to Ogden Avenue from Weehawken in 2000 because she felt the street “had great views and a lot of character.” Her current home at Ogden Avenue and Ferry Street was originally built in 1874 as a threestory German athletic and social club named Pohlman’s Hall, the only location in the Heights listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Dennis Doran, city historian and trustee of the Jersey City Landmarks Conservancy, says that the Germans flooded into the Heights area in the late 19th century and in addition to Pohlman’s Hall, there were numerous German churches, plenty of beer halls, singing societies, and concert halls. German was taught in public schools, and the Heights provided easy access to 14th Street in Manhattan, the center of German life at the time. “The area along the Palisades Cliff (Ogden Avenue) was particularly known for its German artists. It was

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Fisk Riverview Park

Ogden Avenue Arch (Photos courtesy of Jersey City Free Public Library, The New Jersey Room)

HOODS JCM

PHOTO BY STEFANIE JACKOWITZ

a ‘Little Bohemia’” or ‘Little Montmarte,’” says Doran. With the heavy population of actors and artists living in the area, two Frenchmen, the Pathé Brothers, built their silent movie studio at Ogden Avenue and Congress Street in 1910. The studio went on to produce the film serial The Perils of Pauline in 1914, starring New Jersey native Pearl White. “Jersey City Heights certainly has a long and very interesting history,” says Hoffman, who doesn’t live too far from The Ogden-Conrad House, built in 1760 and named after former New Jersey Governor Aaron Ogden. “A lot of people have lived here for years,” Hoffman says, “but I’ve noticed that many more families with young babies are moving to Ogden Avenue.” Current Heights resident Aaron Epstein, 29, says “you can’t beat the bang for the buck.” Having lived with his girlfriend on Mountain Road since 2008, Epstein says that the community is doing a lot to add to its character, like building a new public golf course that he hopes to frequent. Hoffman cites a number of additional projects in the works like the restoration of the 100 Steps, originally closed down in the 1920s, connecting Hoboken to the Heights. New restaurant Trolley Car Bar & Grill, which opened on New Year’s Day 2012 at the corner of Palisade Avenue and

Ferry Street, is now hosting rotating art exhibits. “We’re trying to provide a forum for showing work,” Hoffman says. “The intention is to continue the exhibitions and support the local arts scene.” Ogden Avenue residents can also check out the Riverview Farmers Market in Riverview-Fisk Park every Sunday through October, featuring fresh produce from New Jersey farmers and other local products. The highlight of the fall event calendar is the annual Halloween dog parade, held this year on Oct. 28. Ogden Avenue, says Hoffman, “is a very vibrant and friendly place to live.”—J CM

James Ogden (Courtesy of Jersey City Free Public Library, The New Jersey Room)

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Throws and Blows

No, we’re not talking about street fighting! Martial arts fit the bill for fun and fitness. FAMILY FITNESS MIXED MARTIAL ARTS

BY ANNE MARUSIC

As the weather turns cold and leaves crackle underfoot, folks start to think of indoor sports and fitness. As it turns out, Jersey City has a lot to offer if you are in the market for any of the various fighting techniques that involve kicking, punching, striking, and throwing. From Brazilian jiu-jitsu and kickboxing to special-needs-kids karate, a range of options are available. Take Family Fitness Mixed Martial Arts, at 419 Central Ave. in the Heights. Its Kids Jersey City Karate School is an exciting, high-energy program that helps build strength, stamina, confidence, and discipline. The Muay Thai Kickboxing program burns body fat and gets participants into fighting shape while reducing stress, enhancing focus and concentration, boosting eye/body coordination, and increasing strength, stamina and flexibility. The mixed martial arts program offers no-contact and full-contact classes, combining karate, kickboxing, American boxing, ground defense, and jiu-jitsu. “Our martial arts practice goes beyond karate’s kicks and punches,” says Master Instructor and Director Vinh Dang. “The practice affects a student’s life. To be sure this happens, our martial arts instructors are in regular contact with parents to be sure that students’ academics, chores, and manners are in check. Only then, will we promote them to the next belt level.”

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PHOTOS BY TERRIANN SAULINO BISH AND ALYSSA BREDIN

SPORTS CORNER JCM

UNIVERSAL WARRIOR ARTS

In Greenville at 1683 Kennedy Blvd. is Universal Warrior Arts (UWA). Grand Master Hanshi Austin Wright, a karate and jiu-jitsu champion, runs the school, which offers karate, jiu-jitsu, kickboxing, kung fu, and fitness programs. “Our academies offer a multi-discipline martial arts practice that has been in our family for three generations,” Wright says. “We have mastered traditional Asian martial arts. Through our extensive experience in the military and air force, we have taken the practice to the next level and created our own customized American martial arts system. We regularly compete and win in tournaments across the United States and all over the world.” UWA offers specially trained special-needs instructors to help children focus their energies and hone their skills.

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WAY OF THE WINDS

RESOURCES D.K. Park Taekwondo 32 Journal Square dkparktkd.com (201) 656-9099

The Way of the Winds at 180 Ninth St. in the Community Educational & Recreation Center, founded by Ronald Duncan, offers a comprehensive system of self-defense concepts that focuses on Jujutsu/Taijutsu, Japanese terms for “body skill” or “body art,” which employs essential defensive body movements. Duncan’s son, Gregory, who has more than 40 years of martial arts experience and has been honored with many Martial Arts Hall of Fame awards, is the chief instructor. Gregory, like his father, excels in Jujutsu, Taijutsu, and Ninjutsu as well as the weapons art of Kobujutsu. Both have garnered national acclaim in that art. “We continue to develop innovative concepts and approaches in the martial arts,” says Gregory, “while at the same time respecting the deep traditions that sustain the Way of the Winds system.” Classes are available for adults and for kids starting at age 3. “Our martial arts put the individual in a mindset that the more they do, the more they can do,” says Gregory. “This philosophy translates into a power to do more in everyday life.”—JCM

Family Fitness Mixed Martial Arts 419 Central Ave. ffmanj.com (201) 222-8996 Jang Star Tae Kwando School Inc. 299 Central Ave. jangstartkd.com (201) 792-0797 J.C. Kickboxing 233 Ninth St. njkickbox.com (201) 918-6112 JKA Shotokan Alliance 124 Storms Ave. jkasakarate.com (201) 435-4572

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Jersey City Tae Kwan Do and Kickboxing Academy 150 Newark Ave. jctkd.com (201) 333-1006 Don Nagle’s Isshinryu Karate 371 Central Ave. (201) 723-0270 Philippine Integrated Martial Arts 779 Bergen Ave. (201) 432-6441 Universal Warrior Arts 1683 John F. Kennedy Blvd. (201) 360-0951 Way of the Winds System of Martial Arts 180 Ninth St. (201) 386-9029 (908) 349.8619 duncanmartialarts.com greg@duncanmartial.com

SPORTS CORNER JCM

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THE STUDIO JCM

larry

FELDMAN L

arry Feldman is one of those artists who “discovered” Jersey City during the heyday of the 111 First St. era. The old Lorillard factory, which was torn down in 2007, was a haven for artists looking for affordable space in the late 1990s. Feldman, a stained-glass artist, first put down a deposit for the building at 110 First (See story on page 15) and then ended up at 111, where he lived for four and a half years. He now works in a studio on Halliday Street in the Bergen/Lafayette section of town where lots of artists landed after 111 First was razed. “Stained glass started as a hobby,” Feldman says. “An old boyfriend of my mom’s was working with stained glass and showed me a couple of things.” Feldman grew up in Greenwich Village. “When I was a kid in high school, after hours,

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PHOTO BY ELAINE HANSEN

PHOTO BY ELAINE HANSEN

I would get scrap glass out of the bins at Capital Glass and Sash,” he relates, “and I would practice cutting it.” Living in Manhattan, he was accustomed to visiting antique shops on Hudson Street, where he acquired an eye for nice things. Feldman refers to himself as a self-taught,

The Arts The Arts Call ahead or look online for schedules 18 Erie Gallery, 18 Erie St., (201) 3697000, balancehair.com/18_er ie_gallery/18_erie_gall ery.htm. 58 gallery, 58 Coles St., fifty8.com. 140 Gallery, 140 Bay St., (908) 296-7679, myspace.com/ 140gallery. 919 Gallery, 150 Bay St., (201) 779-6929, 919gallery.com. Abaton Garage, 100 Gifford Ave., abatongarage.com. By appointment. Actors Shakespeare Company, West Side Theater, New Jersey City University, 285

full-time artisan. He has no “day job,” working on commission, making lamps and windows and doing repairs and restorations. He has a very large piece on the third floor of City Hall in Jersey City. “No other medium deals with light in quite the same fashion that stained glass

West Side Ave., Box office: (201) 200-2390, ascnj.org. Afro-American Historical Society Museum, 1841 Kennedy Blvd., Top floor, (201) 547-5262. ARTBUILDERS, 193 Montgomery St., (201) 433-2682. Arts on the Hudson, 282 Barrow St., (201) 451-4862, webspawner.com/users/grigur. The Attic Ensemble, The Barrow Mansion, 83 Wayne St., (201) 413-9200, atticensemble.org. Beth DiCara Ceramics Studio, 11 Monitor St., (201) 3887323, eveningstarstudio.net. The Brennan Gallery, Justice William Brennan Court House, 583 Newark Ave., (800) 542-7894, visithudson.org.

The Brunswick Window, 158 Brunswick St., (201) 978-8939, brunswickwindow@rogersayre.c om. Curious Matter, 272 Fifth St., (201) 6595771, curiousmatter.blogspot. com Fish With Braids, 190 Columbus Dr., (201) 451-4294, fishwithbraids.blogspot.com. Gallerie Hudson, 197 Newark Ave., (201) 434-1010, galleriehudson.net. The Gallery Space at Grace Church Van Vorst, 39 Erie St., (201) 659-2211, gracevanvorst.org. Harold B. Lemmerman Gallery, New Jersey City University, Hepburn Hall, Room 323, 2039 Kennedy Blvd., (201) 200-3246, njcu.edu/dept/art/gal-

does,” he says. “Light doesn’t just bounce off surfaces, it is transmitted through.” It’s a fluid medium. “Stained glass, when installed architecturally, will change throughout the course of the day, depending on the intensity of the light,” he says. “It’s beautiful and magical.”– Kate Rounds

leries. Jersey City Dance Academy, 107 West Side Ave., (201) 4358943, jerseycitydanceacademy.com. Jersey City Museum, 350 Montgomery St., (201) 413-0303, jerseycitymuseum.org. John Meagher Rotunda Gallery, City Hall, 280 Grove St., (201) 547-6921, jcnj.org. Kearon-Hempenstall Gallery, 536 Bergen Ave., (201) 333-8855, khgallery.com. The Kennedy Dancers, Inc., 79 Central Ave., (201) 659-2190, kennedydancers.org. The Landmark Loew’s Jersey Theatre, 54 Journal Square, (201) 7986055, loewsjersey.org. Lex Leonard Gallery, 143 Christopher Columbus Dr., Suite 2,

lexleonardgallery.com. Mana Fine Arts Exhibition Space, 227 Coles St., (800) 3309659, manafinearts.com. NY/NJ Academy of Ceramic Art, 279 Pine St., (201) 432-9315, nynjceramics.com. Pro Art, 344 Grove St., (201) 736-7057, proartsjerseycity.org. The Upstairs Art Gallery, Inc., 896 Bergen Ave., (201) 963-6444. Visual Arts Building Gallery, New Jersey City University, 100 Culver Ave., (201) 2003246, njcu.edu/dept/art/galleries. Windows on Columbus, Christopher Columbus Dr. near Washington St., (201) 736-7057.

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DA T ES Want your event listed? Please email us at jcmag@hudsonreporter.com and put “calendar listings” in the subject line.

grassrootscommunityspace.com. Various arts workshops, fitness events, dance classes – even hula hoop – held weekly and monthly. Uptown Crew Open Mic, Moore’s Lounge, 189 Monticello Ave, uptowncrew.org. Poetry, music, readings, spoken word, comedy, dance, and more. Sunday Night Film Forum, Jersey City Art School, 326 Fifth St., jcartschool.com. Film series featuring unusual films. Hosted by writer Yvonne Vairma. 7:30 p.m. Free. Soul Taize, St. Paul Lutheran Church, 440 Hoboken Ave. Chant from a variety of sacred traditions and meditative takes on classic soul and gospel music. First Thursday of the month through January. 7:00 p.m. JC Slam, 54 Coles St. 9 p.m. sign-up, 10 p.m. start. Weekly poetry slam series held every Friday. JC Slam is a certified member of Poetry Slam, Inc. (PSI). $5 admission, $3 with a student ID. Community Rhythm, Grassroots Community Space, 54 Coles St., (201) 500-5483, grassrootscommunityspace.com. Second Friday of each month. 7-9 p.m. Family-friendly drum circle. Experimental Jazz Night, Grassroots Community Space, 54 Coles St., grassrootscommunityspace.com. Third Thursday of the month, 9 p.m.-midnight. Musicians and composers perform and discuss their music to provide a better understanding of music being composed today.

ONGOING

Riverview-Fisk Park, Sundays through October, 9 a.m.-3 p.m.

All in the Family Art Exhibit, Brennan Gallery, 583 Newark Ave., (800) 5427894. Through Oct. 15. Free parking. Building is barrier-free.

Creative Grove, Grove Street PATH plaza, creativegrove.org. Local artists and designers display goods. Fridays year-round. 3-9 p.m.

Farmers Markets, Van Vorst Park, Jersey Ave. and Montgomery St. Saturdays through November. 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Grove Street PATH Plaza, Mondays through December, 4-8 p.m. Sussex St. Tuesday through December, noon-7 p.m. Harvest Square, 492 Bramhall Ave., Tuesdays through October, 3-6 p.m. Kennedy Blvd. at Journal Sq., Wednesdays through November, 11 a.m.- 7 p.m. Hamilton Park, Wednesdays through December, 4-8 p.m. Grove Street PATH Plaza, Thursdays through December, 4-8 p.m. Kennedy Blvd. at Journal Sq., Fridays through November, 11 a.m.-7:30 p.m. Van Vorst Park, Saturdays through November, 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Webb Park, Saturdays through October, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Paulus Hook, Saturdays through December, 11 a.m.-4 p.m.

Ice Skating, Pershing Field Skating Rink, Summit Avenue and Pershing Plaza, (201) 547-4392. Public skate begins at 3:30 p.m. weekdays. Skate rental and sharpening. Call for opening dates. Ice Skating, Newport Skates, 95 River Dr., (201) 626-RINK, newportskates.com. Weekdays 4-9 p.m., Saturdays and holidays 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sundays 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Friends of LSP’s Volunteer Garden Program, Liberty State Park, (201) 915-3418, folsp.org. Saturdays, 9 a.m.-noon, throughout the year except holidays. Grassroots Community Space, 54 Coles St., (201) 500-5483,

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Down with Technic, Grassroots Community Space, 54 Coles St., grassrootscommunityspace.com. Third Sunday of the month, 6-9 p.m. Open turntable DJ program. Rotunda Gallery Exhibition, Rotunda Gallery, City Hall, 280 Grove St., Weekdays, 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; Weekends 11 a.m.-4 p.m. (201) 547-6921

OCTOBER Flowers of Winter, Actors Shakespeare Company, 285 West Side Ave., runs through March 2013. (201) 200-2390 asnj.org

1-31 Hispanic Heritage Month Group Exhibition, Rotunda Gallery, City Hall, 280 Grove St. Weekdays 8 a.m.8 p.m.; Weekends 11 a.m.-4 p.m. (201) 547-6921

2 Art Opening, LITM, 140 Newark Ave., (201) 536-5557, litm.com. Art opening featuring the paintings of Katherine Ramos.

4Performance & Open Mic – Jennifer Egert, Art House Productions, Hamilton Square, 1 McWilliams Place, sixth floor, (201) 915-9911, arthouseproductions.org. Poets, musicians, performance artists. 8-10 p.m. $5.

7 Columbus Day Parade, jerseycitynj.gov. Noon-6 p.m. Location TBA.

11 Elements, Art House Productions, Hamilton Square, 1 McWilliams Place, sixth floor, (201) 915-9911, info@arthouseproductions.org, arthouseproductions.org. A visual art exhibition. Opening reception 7-10 p.m. Free admission.

11-14 Golden Door International Film Festival, Various locations, goldendoorfilmfestival.org. Four-day festival showcasing a diverse array of films. Check website for screening times. Jersey City Artists Studio Tour “Kick Off Crawl,” Newark Ave., 5-10 p.m. (201) 547-6921

13 4th Street Arts & Music Festival, Fourth St. from Newark Ave. to Merseles St. Noon-6 p.m. Parks & Crafts, Riverview-Fisk Park, notyomamajc@gmail.com, notyomamasaffairs.com. Not Yo’ Mama’s Affairs sets up shop along with WFMU Music Festival and JC Studio Arts Tour. Noon5 p.m.

13 & 14 Jersey City Artists Studio Tour, Citywide, jerseycitynj.gov. Noon-6 p.m. A two-day walking tour of artists’ studios, group exhibitions, and art in public spaces.

14 Jersey City Artists Studio Tour Closing Party, 6-10 p.m. (201) 547-6921, Location TBA

19 The Brennan Coffee House Series, The Brennan Gallery, 583 Newark Ave., (800) 542-7894, brennancoffeehouse.com. Music by Jimmy Thackery. Doors open at 7 p.m., show begins at 7:30. Free parking. The building is barrier-free. Call for reservations.

25 Elements, Art House Productions, Hamilton Square, 1 McWilliams Place, sixth floor, (201) 915-9911, info@ arthouseproductions.org, arthouse productions.org. A visual art exhibition. Closing reception 7-10 p.m. Free admission.

26 From Farm to Table, Made With Love Bakery & Café, 530 Jersey Ave., (201) 451-5199, madewithloveorganics.com. Celebrate the bounty of fall with a communal dinner. 8 p.m. Call for reservations.

27 The Big Dig/National Make A Difference Day, Various locations, citywide plantings.

27-28 Oh No! Volcano! Liberty Science Center, 222 Jersey City Blvd., (201) 200-1000, lsc.org. Create a working volcano in this month’s installment of the Retro Science exhibit.

31 Halloween Event for Children, Van Vorst Park, (201) 547-6921, jersey citynj.gov. 3-8 p.m.

NOVEMBER 1 Performance & Open Mic – Matthew Thornburn, Art House Productions, Hamilton Square, 1 McWilliams Place, sixth floor, (201) 915-9911, arthouse roductions.org. Poets, musicians, performance artists. 8-10 p.m. $5.

3 The Laugh Tour, Art House Productions, Hamilton Square, 1 McWilliams Place, sixth floor, (201) 915-9911, thelaughtour.com. Poets,

musicians, performance artists. 7 p.m. mixer, 8 p.m. show. $15 advance, $20 door.

6 Art Opening, LITM, 140 Newark Ave., (201) 536-5557, litm.com. Art opening featuring the paintings of Megan Gülick.

8-11 Your Move Modern Dance Festival, Art House Productions, Hamilton Square, 1 McWilliams Place, sixth floor, (201) 915-9911, arthouseproductions.org. Annual dance festival featuring emerging movement artists in the tri-state area. Thursday through Saturday at 8 p.m., Sunday at 4 p.m. $10.

9-18 “Rope,” The Attic Ensemble, 83 Wayne St., (201) 413-9200, atticensemble.org. 8 p.m. Play by Patrick Hamilton. $20 adults, $15 students.

12 Veterans Day Memorial Services, (201) 547-5248, jerseycitynj.gov. Location TBA. Call for details.

arthouseproductions.org. ThursdaySaturday at 7 p.m., Sunday at 2 p.m. $12 adults, $8 youth (under 18), $15 at the door. Advanced purchase recommended.

7 Pearl Harbor Day, Laying of wreath in the Hudson River at the foot of Washington St. Time TBA. (201) 547-5248, jerseycitynj.gov for more information. JC Fridays, Citywide, (201) 915-9911, jcfridays.com. Seasonal citywide series with art, music, film, and JC Fridays business discounts. Free.

9 The Wars of the Roses, Actors Shakespeare Company, 285 West Side Ave., (201) 200-2390, asnj.org

11 City Hall Menorah Lighting, City Hall, 280 Grove St. 3 p.m.

22-23 Fulcrums, Levers, and Pulleys! Oh My! Liberty Science Center, 222 Jersey City Blvd., (201) 200-1000, lsc.org. Kids will lift their parents up and perform other tasks using simple machines.

17-18

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Bridge It! Liberty Science Center, 222 Jersey City Blvd., (201) 200-1000, lsc,org. Exploration is an important part of the scientific process. Build bridge out of popsicle sticks, toothpicks, and other materials.

Kwanzaa Celebration, City Hall, 280 Grove St., 6-9 p.m.

DECEMBER 1&2 2nd Annual Happy Holiday Fair, Downtown JC, notyomamasaffairs.org. Not Yo’ Mama’s Affairs returns for a second holiday craftacular. Location TBD.

4 City Hall Christmas Tree Lighting, City Hall, 280 Grove St. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. “Little Wonders,” LITM, 140 Newark Ave., (201) 536-5557, litm.com. Art opening featuring the work of various artists.

6-9 Annie, JR., Art House Productions, Hamilton Square, 1 McWilliams Place, sixth floor, (201) 915-9911,

JANUARY Opening January 2013 Curious George Exhibition, Liberty Science Center, 222 Jersey City Blvd., (201) 200-1000, lsc.org. Curiosity and inquiry are the guides as children explore science, math, and engineering through activities and familiar locales from the book and television series.

19-20 Duct Tape Mania, Liberty Science Center, 222 Jersey City Blvd., (201) 200-1000, lsc.org, Build structures and perform various tasks using duct tape in this month’s installment of the Retro Science exhibit.

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FEBRUARY 1-28 Black History Month Group Exhibtion, Rotunda Gallery, City Hall, 280 Grove St. Weekdays 8 a.m.– 8 p.m.; Weekends 11 a.m.-4 p.m. (201) 547-6921.

1 Black Liberation Flag Raising, City Hall, 280 Grove St. 2-4 p.m.

2 KidFest!, Art House Productions, Hamilton Square, 1 McWilliams Place, sixth floor, (201) 915-9911, arthouse productions.org. A day of free family fun including live music, face painting, demos, and raffle. 10 a.m.-1 p.m.

15-24 “Having Our Say,” The Attic Ensemble, 83 Wayne St., (201) 4139200, atticensemble.org. 8 p.m. Play by Emily Mann. $20 adults, $15 students.

16-17 The Great Take Apart, Liberty Science Center, 222 Jersey City Blvd., (201) 200-1000, lsc.org. Children will see how electronic equipment, appliances, and toys work by taking them apart (safely).

21 Black Orpheus , Actors Shakespeare Company, 285 West Side Ave., (201) 200-2390, ascnj.org

MARCH 1-31 Women’s History Month Group Exhibition, Rotunda Gallery, City Hall, 280 Grove St., Weekdays 8 a.m.8 p.m.; Weekends 11 a.m.-4 p.m. (201) 547-6921.

1 JC Fridays, Citywide, (201) 915-9911, jcfridays.com. Seasonal citywide series with art, music, film, and JC Friday’s business discounts. Free.

Annual Snow Ball, Art House Productions, Hamilton Square, 1 McWilliams Place, seventh floor, info@arthouseproductions.org, (201) 915-9911, arthouseproductions.org. Champagne Gala for Art House’s Innovative Arts Programs. Music, silent auction, food. 8-11 p.m. Black Tie Creative. $80.

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DINING OUT JCM

PHOTOS BY TERRIANN SAULINO BISH

MARITIME PARC BY KATE ROUNDS

We visited this gorgeous waterfront restaurant on the most beautiful June evening you can imagine. The New York City skyline stood out sharply against a crystal clear sky. Flags on sailboat masts flapped in the breeze. But I have visited Maritime Parc in the dead of winter when moonlight glistened off the snow, and the inside felt as cozy as a fireside chat. The truth is, you can visit any time of year. If you go in fall, you can even sit on the patio, where large, attractively designed heaters glow cheerily in the dark and keep you nice and warm throughout your meal. And speaking of that meal â&#x20AC;Ś Photographer Terriann Saulino Bish started off with a really pretty cocktail called a Francis Perkins, made with

azul tequila, strawberry basil puree, lime juice, and agave. I had a bracingly cold German Jever pilsener. Pricilla was a fabulous waiter, giving us suggestions and explaining various items on the menu. She brought me a sample of a River House Summer Blonde ale, which was a nice, gentle warm-weather brew. You get a complimentary pickle plate featuring onions, radish, and fennel. The fresh bread comes in handy to soak up the delicious dressing. Terri and I shared a beautifully constructed salad of baby spinach, grilled peaches, feta cheese, spiced pecans, and herb vinaigrette. This was a new creation from executive chef and owner Christopher Siversen, who came out to greet us. The kitchen, in this spare, modern dining room, is right out front, where diners can view the staff at work.

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Our entrée choices show just how versatile this restaurant is. Terri selected an elegant coconut poached lobster with carrot vadouvan spice puree, spring greens, and coconut sauce. She cleaned her plate. I was in the mood for a hamburger, cooked to order the way I like it. They serve it with Califon tomme cheese, grilled onions, and “special sauce.” It comes with one of their specialties—duck fat fries with garlic and parsley. I’ve had this before, and it never disappoints. For dessert, we split a “16 layer bittersweet chocolate cake, fudge, pistachio crunch ice cream.” Don’t expect a vertical tower of dessert. The layers are flat on the plate and come decorated with a thin wafer. The pistachiochocolate combo is inspired. We ended this wonderful dining experience with smooth cappuccinos. If you visit in fine weather, be sure to take a stroll on the patio between courses and enjoy the view of the boats and the harbor.—Kate Rounds Maritime Parc 84 Audrey Zapp Drive Liberty State Park (201) 413-0050 info@maritimeparc.com

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"PAID FOR BY OR IN PART BY THE JERSEY CITY URBAN ENTERPRISE ZONE PROGRAM"

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DINING OUT JCM

BOX ASIAN BISTRO 176 NEWARK AVENUE (201) 432-1670 www.boxjc.com

176 Newark Avenue (201) 432-1670 www.boxjc.com Think inside the BOX at our unique restaurant, which features the most popular dishes of Southeast Asia, such as Korean barbeque short ribs, Malaysian curry noodles, Cantonese style over rice and noodles, Sichuan shredded beef, sushi, mango duck, Chilean sea bass, and more. Experience this journey in our softly lit dining room, where great food meets great prices.

CONFUCIUS ASIAN BISTRO

THE DAVINCI ROOM

www.abcpos.com/confuciusbistro/ Confucius Asian Bistro is a perfect mix of ambiance, excellence, friendly service, delicious food served with an attractive presentation, large portions, and affordability. Stop in for lunch and take advantage of the specials or for dinner to experience a tasty meal in a serene environment.

www.thedavinciroom.com The DaVinci Room offers a blend of traditional & innovative Italian cuisine. Whether it’s an intimate dinner for two, a night out with friends or a private event, The DaVinci Room will surely exceed your expectations. Ala carte, prix fixe and family style menus are available. Live entertainment on Thursday, Friday and Saturday add to a superb dining experience. Conveniently located 3 short blocks from the 8th Street Light Rail Station.

558 Washington Boulevard (201) 386-8898

165 Broadway, Bayonne 201.535.5050

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201-451-3606

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EDWARD’S STEAK HOUSE 239 Marin Boulevard (201) 761-0000

www.edwardssteakhouse.com Edward’s Steak House offers steak, seafood, and other sumptuous fare with an elegant bistro flare. Tucked into a historic townhouse in downtown Jersey City, Edward’s is comfortably upscale. The menu includes all the classic steaks and chops—aged prime sirloin, porterhouse, filet mignon, and more. You’ll enjoy the atmosphere whether you’re celebrating a special occasion or stopping by for a steak sandwich at the bar.

HELEN’S PIZZA 183 Newark Avenue (201) 435-1507

"PAID FOR BY OR IN PART BY THE JERSEY CITY URBAN ENTERPRISE ZONE PROGRAM"

"PAID FOR BY OR IN PART BY THE JERSEY CITY URBAN ENTERPRISE ZONE PROGRAM"

www.helens-pizza.com Helen’s Pizza, a family owned restaurant, has been serving downtown Jersey City since 1968. Using only the finest ingredients they provide customers with the best tasting pizza, dinners, sandwiches, salads, and now a wide selection of homemade desserts. They have earned their reputation for the best pizza in town. Come taste the difference at Helen’s Pizza. Open seven days: Mon. – Sat. 11 a.m.11 p.m. Sun. 3-11 p.m.

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HONSHU RESTAURANT 31 Montgomery Street second floor (201) 324-2788/0277 honchulounge.com

"PAID FOR BY OR IN PART BY THE JERSEY CITY URBAN ENTERPRISE ZONE PROGRAM"

When craving an exciting Japanese dish or looking for new cuisine with an enjoyable atmosphere, we have the answer— smoking appetizers, sizzling entrees, fresh seafood, noodles, and sweet desserts. No matter your selection, rest assured we use the finest and freshest ingredients to bring out the unique taste of our superb menu items.

IBBY’S FALAFEL 303 Grove Street (201)432-2400

One of downtown’s most popular eateries, Ibby’s Falafel has been serving Jersey City for more than 17 years. The menu consists of original Middle Eastern cuisine made with authentic ingredients, along with new and innovative additions—the falafel that made falafel famous. Ibby’s offerings are now 100 percent officially halal certified. Open seven days. Catering available. Also located in Freehold. Delivery to all of Jersey City.

The Griffin Hath Cometh

FOOD

DRINK

"PAID FOR BY OR IN PART BY THE JERSEY CITY URBAN ENTERPRISE ZONE PROGRAM"

IRISH AMERICAN PUB FOOD 15 DOMESTIC • IMPORT CRAFT • DRAFT BEERS 8 LARGE SCREEN TVs OUTDOOR BEER GRADEN INTERNET JUKE BOX 35 SEATS AT THE BAR

TAVERN PJ RYAN’S TAVERN • 292 BARROW ST. • JC 201.333.8752 • PJRYANSJC.COM

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KOMEGASHI

103 Montgomery Street (201) 433-4567

www.komegashi.com Located in Jersey City’s financial district, Komegashi offers fresh, well-presented sushi along with traditional Japanese favorites and an extensive selection of fresh shellfish. Locals and visitors from around the world find this a perfect spot to dine in casual elegance. Open seven days.

KOMEGASHI TOO Town Square Place Newport Financial Center (201) 533-8888

www.komegashi.com Komegashi too offers an authentic Japanese dining experience with a spectacular view of the New York Skyline. The menu includes perfectly prepared sushi and sashimi, kaiseki, teriyaki, and tempura. Located on the river at Newport Financial Center, Komegashi too is open seven days.

MICHAEL ANTHONY’S 502 Washington Blvd. (201) 798-1798

www.mar-jc.com From the moment you step into Michael Anthony’s you can’t help but be impressed by the nautically inspired décor. High ceilings, boat-shaped bar, ten-foot sails for the indoor and outdoor bars, and waterfall walls separating the banquet room and restaurant enhance your fine Italian dining experience. Enjoy a cordial on the deck overlooking the spectacular Manhattan skyline. Join us for happy hour, dinner, or a private social event. "PAID FOR BY OR IN PART BY THE JERSEY CITY URBAN ENTERPRISE ZONE PROGRAM"

MORE

281 Grove Street (201) 309-0571 www.morejc.com

Visit the newest addition to the Grove Street scene, offering a wide selection of Thai and Japanese offerings, and more. Whether you stop by for a meal or take one to go, the experience will be satisfying. more is located across the street from City Hall.

THE POINTE AT PORT LIBERTE’ 2 Chapel Avenue (201) 985-9854 www.thepointerestaurant.com

Drink up the ambience along with your favorite cocktail while indulging yourself with the great cuisine of this fine waterfront restaurant. This popular Jersey City eatery boasts unobstructed views of downtown Manhattan and The Statue of Liberty and offers outdoor dining in warm weather. Call about our Sunday brunches and private parties. Open seven days for lunch and dinner.

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PJ RYAN’S

292 Barrow St. (201) 333-8752 www.pjryansjc.com

2 Locations in Jersey City NJ

One of Jersey City’s newest hot spots, P.J. Ryan’s is the place to go for satisfying comfort food, great entertainment, and a fun atmosphere. For a laid-back experience, kick back with a beer and a burger while playing on an Internet jukebox or watching the game on TV.

Japanese Cuisine

103 Montgomery Street

PUCCINI’S RESTAURANT AND CATERING 1064 West Side Avenue (201) 432-4111 www.puccinisrestaurnant.com

TEL: 201.433.4567 www.komegashi.com

Excellent food, gracious service, and the elegant surroundings at Puccini’s are all you need for a perfect evening out. Chef Pasquale Iengo, a Naples native, creates authentic Italian dishes the way they were meant to be served and offers an impressive wine list to complement your meal. Expert catering is also available in two exquisitely appointed and expanded banquet halls, a perfect setting for your wedding or special event. Puccini’s Restaurant is open for lunch and dinner Tuesday through Friday and for dinner Saturday and Sunday.

RITA & JOE’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT 142 Broadway (201) 451-3606 www.ritaandjoes.com.

A Jersey City favorite, Rita and Joe’s is the next best thing to Mama’s Italian cooking. This family-run restaurant serves delectable homemade dishes served in the comfort of a cozy and intimate dining room. On- and off premises catering are available.

Modern Japanese

99 Town Square Place

TEL:

201.533.8888 “Wine Spectator” AWARD OF EXCELLECE 2 years in the row Follow us!

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@Komegashi Komegashi

Photos © Takako Suzuki Harkness

Something new every night.

RUSTIQUE PIZZA 611 Jersey Avenue (201) 222-6886 www.rustiquepizza.com

"PAID FOR BY OR IN PART BY THE JERSEY CITY URBAN ENTERPRISE ZONE PROGRAM"

Welcome to Rustique Pizza! The Rosiello family warmly invites you to wake up your taste buds with our delicious food in the casual, friendly atmosphere of our dining room. If you’d rather enjoy your meal at home, we offer free delivery or the option of picking up your entrées or pizza. Our bread, dough, and mozzarella are made fresh daily in-house, ensuring satisfaction each time you dine with us.

SALUMERIA ERCOLANO 1072 Westside Avenue (201) 434-4604

Jersey City’s newest and most talked about Italian deli and market is brought to you by Chef Pasquale, who has delivered top quality to Puccini’s for more than 27 years. With a fresh menu that changes daily, Salumeria Ercolano offers delicious sandwiches, panninis, wraps, and salads along with daily, fresh-fresh mozzarella, and desserts. Whether you eat in or take it home, you owe it to yourself to make this your next stop for lunch or a take-home dinner. Quality

146 Newark Avenue, Jersey City 07302

201.915.0600 M skinnersloft.com

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catering for all occasions is available. Open Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday, from 9:30 a. m. to 5 p.m. Free parking.

SAWADEE

137 Newark Avenue (201) 433-0888 www.sawadeejc.com

Offering exceptional Thai cuisine, Sawadee is a dining experience that will please both the eye and palate! Enjoy lunch, dinner, or a refreshing cocktail in an inviting atmosphere. Sawadee is conveniently located just steps from the Grove Street PATH.

SKINNER’S LOFT 146 Newark Avenue (201) 915-0600. www.skinnersloft.com

This long-awaited restaurant was created by the former owners of the popular Hamilton Park Ale House. A chic, loftstyle eatery, it features a warm, spacious interior with exposed brick walls, high ceilings, and total attention to detail. It’s a perfect spot to enjoy a cocktail and a fine meal.

SKY THAI

62 Morris Street www.skythaijc.com

This new Jersey City eatery near Exchange Place serves traditional Thai cuisine in a warm and beautiful atmosphere. Enjoy a cocktail before dinner and get ready for an authentic Asian feast.

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Jersey City Magazine