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2012

Helen Bader School of Social Welfare

Annual Report

Our Alumni ... Improving lives. Strengthening communities.

2012 Annual Report From Dean Stan Stojkovic ............................................ 3

Alumni ...................................................................... 5 - 22 Teaching and Engagement ............................. 23 - 53 Social Work Graduate Students Get Federal Hearing School Prepares Students for New Jobs in Crime Analysis Field Graduate Student Merits Mayo Clinic Internship Diversity Fellows Visit Study Abroad Programs: Global Opportunities Expand Improving Safety in Washington Park: HBSSW Playing Crucial Role Research on Path to Improving Foster Care Interventions HBSSW Evaluates Firearm Surrender Protocol HBSSW Welcomes New Faculty Why We Should Stay Ready to Alter Our Views CABHR: Current Projects Pool Various Disciplines

Improving lives lives and and strengthening strengtheningcommunities communitiesthrough through

Helen Bader School of Social Welfare New Certificate Program in Social Science Analytics UWM Works with FEMA to Improve Emergency Management Responses HBSSW Teams Up With Community Theater to Help Child Welfare Case Workers Potential Health Care Savings Draw Businesses and Agencies to TCARE速 Institute for Urban Agriculture and Nutrition Dean Stojkovic Honored by His Alma Mater Professional Development Reaches 800 Professionals Student Services Expansion Includes New Director, Advisors

Awards, Donors, Retirements.......................... 54 - 66 Awards Night Applauds Students, Donors, Faculty, Staff, Community Partners and Alumni In Recognition of Generosity 2011-2012 Donors Retirements

research, education and community partnerships

From Dean Stojkovic — A Tribute to Our 10,000 Alumni

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e have achieved many great things in 2012: developed one of the first specializations in crime analysis and criminal intelligence in the country; graduated our first doctoral student, Ms. Patty Lee King; began a relationship with Concordia University’s new pharmacy school; and launched TCARE® (Tailored Caregiver Assessment Referral system for family caregivers) into a spin-off company. It has been one successful year! Equally amazing are our alumni’s accomplishments. This academic year (2011/12) we awarded 230 bachelor’s degrees in criminal justice and social work, 73 master’s degrees in criminal justice and social work, and again, our first doctoral degree in social work. These newly minted alumni join the ranks of about 10,000 others who graduated from the UWM Helen Bader School of Social Welfare since its founding in 1965. More than 75 percent still live in southeast Wisconsin. In this annual report, we introduce you to a few of these men and women. Their stories reveal the reach and impact that our 10,000 graduates have on communities. If you, too, are an alumnus, please let us know how you are doing. We are always striving to maintain contact with our many talented alumni. We look forward to hearing from you. Stan Stojkovic, Ph.D. Dean and Professor 3

Annual Report 2012 Helen Bader School of Social Welfare 2400 E. Hartford Avenue P.O. Box 786 Milwaukee, WI 53201 414 229-4851 www.hbssw.uwm.edu Editor Carolyn Bucior Writers Carolyn Bucior Bonnie Halvorsen Beth Stafford

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he Eye Behind the Camera — UWM Photographer Peter Jakubowski (BFA ‘07) took most of the alumni portraits in this annual report. Whether he was working with a graduate outside on a chilly February day or a group inside a warm building, Peter never failed to make subjects relax and reveal something to the camera. In doing so, he accomplished what words could not: the pride, determination, and warmth that HBSSW graduates exude. We hope you agree that serious photography — and photographers like Peter Jakubowski — are integral to telling our stories.

Jakubowski photographs the HBSSW student services advisors for the 2012 Annual Report.

Design Ellen Lafouge Photography Troy Fox Peter Jakubowski Meaghan Kulas Alan Magayne-Roshak Susan Rose Copy Proofreader Carol Kozminski

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“HBSSW gave me the confidence to communicate effectively with the diverse population in our community. This includes family members, doctors, and other professionals in the field.”

Crystal Williams, BS CJ ‘99, MS CJ ‘04 Milwaukee County Medical Examiner’s Office Forensic Investigator

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hey dedicate their

work lives to helping individuals, families and communities. They volunteer in their off hours. And they carry out our mission of improving lives and strengthening communities. Meet 14 of the 10,000 graduates of UWM’s Helen Bader School of Social Welfare.

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or 12 years, Milwaukee native Crystal Williams has worked as a forensic investigator for the Milwaukee County Medical Examiner’s Office. Most people understand one aspect of her job—investigating deaths that occurred in Milwaukee County to determine the cause and manner of death. A less obvious facet involves helping families through their grief. “I have a connection with the community and with the families,” says Williams. “When a family is going through a time of grief, it’s comforting for them to have a contact person from the Medical Examiner’s Office with whom they can address their related questions and concerns.” Williams earned both of her criminal justice degrees while living in Milwaukee, working full time and raising her children. She is a diplomat with the American Board of Medicolegal Death Investigators and an adjunct instructor at HBSSW and Bryant and Stratton College.

“When I interview people, I use what I learned from my own professional history of hitting a wall and changing my course. Policing is not just about policing skills. It’s about critical thinking and broadening your horizons beyond what you are accustomed to.”

Greg Peterson, BS CJ ‘80, MS CJ ‘92 Grand Chute (WI) Police Department Chief of Police

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erhaps the most profound professional experience for Greg Peterson was not receiving a promotion. “It was a turning point,” he recalls. “I decided to prepare myself for future opportunities.” He returned to HBSSW for his master’s degree in criminal justice and, six years after graduation, was named deputy police chief of Appleton, Wisconsin. In 2010, Peterson was appointed chief of police in neighboring Grand Chute. Grand Chute has 21,000 residents, yet balloons to 77,000 each day, due in large part to the Fox River Mall. “We do so many things that people don’t categorize as policing, efforts that are less about enforcement and more about bringing people together,” Peterson says. These range from improving neighbor relations to creating an alliance of the town’s 20 hoteliers to address crimes occurring within the hotels. Peterson also established a mall ambassador program to stay abreast of crime trends and improve safety for employees and shoppers. Peterson is a graduate of the FBI Academy, Wisconsin Executive Development Institute, and is president of the governing board of the Wisconsin Law Enforcement Accreditation Group. 6

Kenneth Meuler, MS CJ ‘90

“Of all the police management schools I’ve completed, UWM’s graduate program in criminal justice laid the best foundation for the challenges I’ve faced as a police manager.”

City of West Bend (WI) Chief of Police

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enneth Meuler has kept one foot in a classroom and one in a police department since 1974. While he was being promoted up the ladder at Milwaukee Police Department – from police aide, to police officer, to detective, to lieutenant to captain—he was completing his undergraduate work (graduating cum laude from Marquette University) and graduate studies (at UWM). When those courses ended, Meuler continued his education, graduating from Northwestern University Police Staff and Command School and the FBI National Academy. Meuler was named the West Bend chief of police in 2003, a job he holds today. Since earning his master’s degree, he has taught college courses every semester at UWM or MATC, including courses in police management and the philosophy of law enforcement. He is past president of the Wisconsin Chapter of the FBI National Academy Associates, past president of the Wisconsin Police Executive Group, and current president of the Boys and Girls Club Board of Washington County. 7

Karyn Behling, BS CJ 2006

Milwaukee County District Attorney’s Office Assistant District Attorney

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aryn Behling (photo right) made the most out of her internship opportunity when she was a criminal justice student at HBSSW. Today, she is an assistant district attorney for Milwaukee County, assigned to a general crimes team in which three of the five members graduated from HBSSW (Francesco Mineo, BS CJ ’00, photo center, and Catelin Ringersma, BS CJ ’07, photo left). Behling is in court “all day, every day,” prosecuting people charged with armed robberies, burglaries and other felonies. It was her internship as an intelligence analyst at the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) that opened the door to her current career, she says. At HIDTA, she became interested in combining criminal justice and law. “My internship and the prosecutors I met there definitely helped me get where I am today,” she says. The Sturgeon Bay native graduated from UWM summa cum laude with degrees in criminal justice and chemistry. Before earning her law degree, Behling saw more opportunities at UWM and completed three certificate programs (forensic science, forensic toxicology and death investigation).

“The professionalism and dedication of UWM’s criminal justice professors helped me prepare for my career as a prosecutor. In both classroom and courtroom, the focus is social justice.”

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Scott Hefty, BS CJ ‘88 Lakewood (CO) Municipal Court Chief Probation Officer “HBSSW Professor Carl Pope convinced me of the positive impact you could have by working in the juvenile justice system. He encouraged me to never accept the norm and that the key to improving the juvenile justice system lay in validated assessments and evidence-based interventions.”

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uvenile justice has been the constant of Scott Hefty’s career since he graduated from UWM. He is chief probation officer for the Lakewood (CO) Municipal Court, where his unit supervises about 1,300 juvenile and adult defendants. Hefty has helped champion innovative programs for the court including a teen court program, a juvenile mental health court partnership with the local school district, a specialized prostitution supervision program, and a program to address homelessness and the criminal justice system. Prior to his current position, Hefty worked as a juvenile advisory member of the Colorado Sex Offender Management Board (SOMB), where he developed a white paper on juvenile sexting and played a key role in developing a guide for school personnel who work with juvenile sex offenders. Through professional conferences and the SOMB, Hefty trains a myriad of criminal justice and social services professionals nationwide on issues involving the supervision of juveniles charged with sexually abusive behaviors.

“My criminal justice professors at HBSSW were caring, intelligent, energetic and interactive individuals. They helped me understand that working within the criminal justice field was not just a job, but a rewarding career. They were right. I began my career over 17 years ago and I still enjoy protecting my community.”

Jeffrey Norman, BS CJ ‘96 Milwaukee Police Department (WI) Lieutenant

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ieutenant Jeffrey Norman supervises the detectives who work the night shift in the Milwaukee Police Department’s Metropolitan Investigations Division. As shift commander, he’s on the scene of many homicides, shootings and other serious criminal investigations while most of the city sleeps. Since his teenage years, Norman knew he wanted to become a police officer (MPD hired him as a street officer immediately upon graduation), lawyer (he earned his JD in 2002 from Marquette University while working for MPD) and a judge (he is an honorary court commissioner for Branch 47). Norman was born in Milwaukee, educated in Milwaukee, and says he chose a criminal justice career because “it combined excitement with the chance to help the city.” A graduate of North Division High School, Norman gives about 15 motivational talks annually to students about the importance of furthering their education.

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Michael Young, MS CJ ‘98 “I chose HBSSW for my graduate studies because of the opinions of my fellow officers. They had a lot of good things to say about the program and their opinion mattered greatly.”

Page 12 Photo Many HBSSW criminal justice majors rise to prominent positions with local, state and federal law enforcement agencies, including the FBI, ATF and U.S. Marshals Service. Several have ascended to the rank of police chief, and serve departments around the state of Wisconsin. Pictured (from left to right) are HBSSW criminal justice graduates: Rick Oliva, Chief of Police, Franklin; Daniel Tushaus, Chief of Police, Brookfield; Mike Young, Chief of Police, Whitefish Bay; Thomas Frank, Chief of Police, Cedarburg; Jed Dolnick, Chief of Police, Jackson. 11

Village of Whitefish Bay (WI ) Chief of Police

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ichael Young didn’t set out to work in criminal justice. In fact, his undergraduate degree was in social work and sociology. “The foundations of criminal justice and social work are similar,” he says. “Both professions support people in times of crisis and lifechanging issues.” After earning his undergraduate degree, Young worked briefly as a social worker before being hired by the Village of Grafton as a police officer. His work included interviewing and investigating neglected children and he drew on his training in social work. Over time, Young developed an expertise in police management and administration. In his 28 years with the Milwaukee Police Department, he climbed the ranks to captain of police assigned to the Milwaukee High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area, the Intelligence Division and district commander. In 2012, he was appointed chief of police in Whitefish Bay. Young graduated from Northwestern University Police Staff and Command School and completed the Wisconsin Law Enforcement Executive Development Program. He has served as a board member for the Mental Health Association of Wisconsin, Southeastern Wisconsin Terrorism Alert Center, and Southeast Wisconsin Homeland Security Partnership.

HBSSW Graduates, Police Chiefs

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“Through my UWM student field placement, I became actively involved in Milwaukee’s civil rights movement. I felt that I was a part of an important change and, as a result, Milwaukee became my community and my permanent home.”

June Perry, MSW ‘71 New Concept Development Center Co-Founder

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n 1975, June Perry and fellow social worker Geri McFadden (MSW ‘71) co-founded New Concept Development Center, a comprehensive human service agency providing culturally relevant services to Milwaukee’s African American residents. Over the next 38 years, New Concept grew to a business employing more than 50 people and serving 7,000 families annually. These services include a father’s resource center (Milwaukee’s first), a mentoring program for girls (Milwaukee’s first), a first-time juvenile offenders program, counseling, case management for HIV patients, and prenatal care. Perry, who retired from New Concept in 2006, has received numerous awards that recognize her leadership and impact on the Milwaukee community, including the Sacagawea Trailblazer Award (given to women in Southeast Wisconsin who have made significant achievements in their profession), and the Milwaukee Business Journal’s Women of Influence Award. 13

“The education that I received from HBSSW provided me with a much broader understanding and insight into how our social welfare and state government systems work. My education enhanced my more than 20 years of work experience. It is never too late to go back to school.”

Denise Johnson, BSW 2012 IndependenceFirst Project Coordinator

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enise Johnson has dedicated her professional life to helping Wisconsin’s deaf and hard of hearing community. She is currently working to improve AODA services for this community in ways ranging from handson instruction to state policy changes. For the past 10 years, Johnson has worked at IndependenceFirst as project coordinator for the Statewide Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Project for the Deaf, Deaf-Blind and Hardof-Hearing. In this role, she provides technical assistance and training for AODA treatment providers and other service providers throughout Wisconsin. Among her many advocacy activities, Johnson serves on the Wisconsin State Council on Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Diversity Sub-Committee, the Mental Health Steering Committee for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Adults, and the Wisconsin Governor’s Council for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing. Johnson is deaf. 14

Johanna Hauck, BSW 2009 “Before becoming a part of HBSSW, I bounced around from major to major trying to find my niche and passion. I always came up short and with an unmet desire to do something bigger. HBSSW helped me find my passion, realize my dreams and equip me with the tools necessary to conquer them.”

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United States Peace Corps Volunteer

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or the past two years, Johanna Hauck has been stationed with the Peace Corps in the Bulgarian town of Samokov, population 35,000. There, the Ridgeland, Wisconsin, native works with the Roma (gypsy) youth population in after-school programs that address issues including HIV/AIDS, dental hygiene, human trafficking, and basic life skills. The job demanded that she quickly learn a new language, adapt to a new culture, and live far from her mom, dad and siblings. It’s the hardest work she has ever done, she says, but her social work education had given her the skills to adapt and successfully work with the Roma people. Hauck plans to earn her MSW and continue to work with at-risk youth.

John Pilmaier, MSW 2010 Survivors Network of Those Abused by Priests Wisconsin Director

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ohn Pilmaier is the Wisconsin Director of SNAP, the Survivors Network of Those Abused by Priests, where he advocates for the rights of children and adults who have been abused by religious figures of all denominations. SNAP is the world’s oldest and largest such support group. In his work to bring attention to the issue and justice to the victims, Pilmaier has testified to the Wisconsin State Senate and Assembly on behalf of the Child Victim’s Act. In addition, he appears in a documentary – produced by the National Association to Prevent the Sexual Abuse of Children and aired by PBS – called “Saving Children: The Sex Abuse Tragedy.” In Wisconsin, he has helped expose the criminal behavior of clerics throughout the state and has provided outreach to victims impacted by the decision of the Milwaukee archdiocese to file for bankruptcy protection.

“HBSSW helped shape my views and beliefs concerning the importance of working to change systems and the wider culture when advocating for meaningful social change.”

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Christopher Hernandez, MSW 2010

“I was inspired by an HBSSW adjunct instructor who incorporated her real life experience as an emergency center medical social worker into the curriculum.”

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University Hospital, San Antonio (TX) Trauma Services Medical Social Worker

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fter learning that the Department of Veteran Affairs would pay for his graduate education, Christopher Hernandez searched for a social work program that emphasized direct practice, rather than research. On his way to graduating magna cum laude, Hernandez, a disabled Army veteran from Bay View who served in Iraq, secured a field placement at Froedtert Hospital’s trauma unit. Through his practicum and studies, a career plan took shape. Today, Hernandez works as a trauma services medical social worker at University Hospital in San Antonio, Texas. His goal is to work within the Department of Veteran Affairs, using his skills and personal experiences to meet the diverse needs of fellow veterans.

Patricia Lee King, Ph.D. Social Work 2011

“My dad earned his MSW from HBSSW when I was an infant. His work in the years that followed influenced me a lot. I wanted to affect the social problems that matter most to me and the community.”

University of Southern California School of Social Work Postdoctoral Student

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ith an undergraduate in mathematics from Northwestern University and a master’s degree in social service administration from the University of Chicago, HBSSW’s first doctoral graduate could have pursued further studies at any number of schools. Yet Patricia Lee King chose HBSSW because here, she believed, academic rigor met community relevance. During her research assistantship with the school’s Center for Applied Behavioral Health Research, she was oriented to community-based research and learned the crucial role that collaboration plays in making such endeavors successful. Lee King currently is a postdoctoral scholar at the University of Southern California’s School of Social Work, where her research interests include maternal depression, service integration, and racial and socioeconomic disparities in health outcomes. 18

Duncan Shrout, MSW ‘72 “The professors, instructors and other students greatly influenced me. At UWM, I fell in with people who believed in service. My volunteer work is an extension of my beliefs and interests.”

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St. Benedict the Moor Meal Minister Volunteer

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etirement hasn’t stopped Duncan Shrout’s service to Milwaukeeans in need. He recently retired as vice president of public policy and government affairs at IMPACT Alcohol & Drug Abuse Services, Inc., where he worked for 33 years. Still, most days find the Wauwatosa resident wiring electricity for a Habitat for Humanity home, serving as a meal minister at St. Benedict the Moor Community Meal Program, or serving on the Milwaukee County Combined Community Services Board (which is charged with ensuring the efficient delivery of human services) or the Wisconsin State Council on Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse, where he is vice chair. Shrout predicts that when he’s 70 years old, he’ll quit volunteering to work on public policy issues that affect Milwaukeeans. We have our doubts.

George Kelling, MSW ’62, Honored for Significant Contributions to Crime Reduction

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eorge Kelling received one of the four Distinguished Alumnus awards bestowed by UWM in 2012. The award celebrates outstanding graduates whose professional achievements and commitment to the community bring honor to the university. Kelling has assisted communities around the world in managing and confronting crime. Stan Stojkovic, dean of UWM’s Helen Bader School of Social Welfare, believes that in the last 40 years, Kelling has had a more significant impact on the creation of effective crime reduction strategies than any other U.S. academic or police professional. After receiving his MSW from UWM, Kelling went on to earn his Ph.D. in social welfare from UW-Madison. He is now professor emeritus in the School of Criminal Justice at Rutgers University; senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute; and professor emeritus in the College of Criminal Justice at Northeastern University. He is known for his work on the importance of “broken windows” policing (take care of the little things and the larger crimes will not follow), and how police can become more engaged in their communities to improve the quality of urban life. Police chiefs describe how Kelling develops his facts, theories and significant body of work by working in the streets, neighborhoods and police cars of the subjects he writes about. He “walks his talk” – one of the reasons his work has resonated and influenced practitioners over the years. In addition to his extensive writings, Kelling has taught and mentored a generation of graduate students who have gone on to influential positions in policing and at leading universities and think tanks. Kelling is currently involved in writing a book on policing in Milwaukee, consulting with police departments and cities around the country, and lecturing. 20

Gretchen Mead, MSW 2004 Named UWM Graduate of the Last Decade Mead has helped people improve their lives at individual and community levels through her innovations in the local food movement. In 2008, she founded the Victory Garden Initiative in response to the city’s lack of a sustainable local food system that delivers healthy and affordable food.

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retchen Mead was named a UWM Graduate of the Last Decade in 2012. The award recognizes alumni who have achieved professional success and brought credit to themselves and UWM. Mead has helped people improve their lives at individual and community levels through her innovations in the local food movement. In 2008, she founded the Victory Garden Initiative in response to the city’s lack of a sustainable local food system that delivers healthy and affordable food. VGI promotes the use of yards, rooftops and patios for food production and has attracted national attention for its successful policy work to legalize cultivation of front-yard city properties. Since winning the GOLD award, Mead helped the city of Milwaukee become one of 20 finalists in Bloomberg Philanthropies’ Mayors Challenge, a national competition to find local solutions to national problems. Finalists submitted replicable ideas that showed clear public benefits. Mead’s initial proposal to Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett – which was for a government-supported

program to equip Milwaukee’s unemployed and poor with the resources to grow food in blighted neighborhoods— edged out 99 others locally. The Mayor’s Office tweaked it and entered it in the national competition. (The city did not win.) “Gretchen’s work is social work—empowering people to improve themselves and their communities,” says HBSSW Dean Stan Stojkovic. “Her ideas build upon current urban agriculture programs and address poor nutrition, obesity and community revitalization.” Deborah Padgett, associate professor and chair of the Department of Social Work, adds that Mead’s work exemplifies the importance of community practice. “Our master’s degree students can choose direct practice, community practice or an option that combines the two,” she says.

Since winning the GOLD award, Mead helped the city of Milwaukee become one of 20 finalists in Bloomberg Philanthropies’ Mayors Challenge, a national competition to find local solutions to national problems.

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Social Work Graduate Students Get Federal Hearing

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ight social work graduate students had the ear of Earl Johnson, director of the Office of Family Assistance in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, when Johnson visited their classroom during their end-ofthe-year policy presentations. Johnson visited the campus in June 2012 on the invitation of David Pate, associate professor, social work. For their final project, each student had selected a policy meant to alleviate poverty, analyzed its effects on people across race and gender, and presented their findings to the class. “Master’s students had to convince Director Johnson that they understood the policy, while doctoral students had to suggest new policies,” said Pate. “He looked at whether students had chosen a policy that truly was poverty-based, and why they chose that particular policy. In the case of the doctoral students, he critiqued their suggestions and had them defend their research.” Johnson listened to each student and provided feedback. “Based on their presentations and dialogue with the class, they seem well on their way to participating in the larger public-policy debates in their respective fields of interest,” Johnson said. “It was a pleasure to see the thoughtfulness and intellectual rigor that Professor Pate’s students gave to important social science issues.” Johnson’s feedback provided students with a rare opportunity. “It was nerve-racking and exhilarating, but such a positive experience,” said Jayme Berggren, a master’s student. “It gave me the confidence that one day I will be able to present in front of a larger committee to affect change.” Laura Voith, a doctoral student, found the experience very helpful. “This opportunity moved learning from the classroom to the stage of the real world,” she said. “It helped prepare me for future policy work as a professional.” (Photo) (top left to bottom right) David Pate, Jr., Earl Johnson, HBSSW doctoral students.

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School Prepares Students for New Jobs in Crime Analysis

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n the spring semester of 2013, HBSSW began to offer a specialization in crime analysis to criminal justice majors and pre-majors. Crime analysis is perhaps the fastest growing field within criminal justice. The field is relatively new and the job outlook is extremely good. There will be many jobs in this area at the local, state and federal level, says Stan Stojkovic, dean, HBSSW. The curriculum was designed in partnership with federal and local criminal justice agencies to ensure graduates have the real-world skills that are in high demand. Crime analysts study crime and disorder data. Using GIS, spatial statistics and other skills, they identify and analyze crime patterns, trends and problems and work with law enforcement to solve, reduce and prevent crimes. Agencies at all levels – including municipal police departments, state bureaus of investigation, the FBI and many other federal agencies – are successfully using crime analysts to detect crime patterns, make faster headway into crimes that are an immediate threat to communities, help police make informed decisions on increasing or decreasing police presence, and advise leaders on strategic and tactical strategies or initiatives. At HBSSW, criminal justice students who pursue this specialization will learn to apply cutting-edge technologies to address crime. The program includes classroom work and field experience with a crime analysis unit of a law enforcement agency. Faculty members involved in this specialization are Associate Professor Steven Brandl, Associate Professor Kimberly Hassell, and Assistant Professor Aleksandra Snowden. Senior Lecturer Nicole DeMotto (Crime and Intelligence Specialist, Milwaukee Police Department Intelligence Fusion Center) is the lead instructor in the specialization and supervises field placements at the Fusion Center. During 2013, this specialization is expected to become a minor, meaning it will be open to students in other disciplines, such as information studies and sociology. In addition, two of the required classes are expected to be available online starting in fall 2013. 24

Graduate Student Merits Mayo Clinic Internship “Each experience teaches me how to adapt in times of uncertainty and the importance of developing compassion for each person I meet.”

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t UWM, career preparation begins with a strong academic foundation, and is strengthened by university connections to field education, jobs and professional networks that only a vibrant city can offer. When it is time for their field education, HBSSW students choose from hundreds of affiliate sites that represent the full spectrum of criminal justice and social work fields. This year, social work graduate student Sheila Angha received a $10,000 scholarship from the American Cancer Society to develop her skills with pediatric oncology patients and parents at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN. Angha competed for this internship against several other Midwestern MSW students and began her 640-hour internship in January 2013. “My greatest hope is to support and inspire others in living fully, just as I have been supported by so many to do the same,” Angha says. “I am deeply grateful and honored to receive this scholarship and opportunity to expand my education with such respected professionals.” When she interviewed for the scholarship, Angha impressed the interdisciplinary medical team at Mayo Clinic with her calm demeanor and eclectic set of skills that integrate Eastern and Western modalities. Angha, who has an undergraduate degree in family life education from UW-Stevens Point, worked as a licensed massage therapist, studied yoga in Rishikesh, India, 25

and worked in Thailand and South Korea as an English as a Second Language teacher for children and youth. Angha completed her first HBSSW field education placement at Richard’s Place, a group home in Waukesha for people with AIDS. There, she developed an interest in AIDS education, specifically as it relates to alleviating the emotional stigma suffered by those with the disease and their loved ones. “Each experience teaches me how to adapt in times of uncertainty and the importance of developing compassion for each person I meet,” Angha says.

Diversity Fellows Visit

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n 2012 UWM welcomed five diversity fellows. HBSSW worked with the program’s first international fellow, Melissa Redmond, a doctoral candidate from the FactorInwentash Faculty of Social Work at the University of Toronto. The Diversity Fellows Program, which started in 2009, provides an avenue for UWM to strengthen its academic programs while pursuing the university’s commitment to diversity, inclusion and preparing students to live in, work in, and appreciate a pluralistic world. Diversity fellows are underrepresented students who have recently earned doctoral or terminal degrees, or are Ph.D. candidates. Diversity fellows may conduct research in their areas of discipline or teach. While at HBSSW for the summer, Redmond taught a course in cultural diversity. Redmond’s research focus is child protection workers and how legislation and regulatory requirements within organizations impact them, including employee retention. “Retention of child protection workers is a very hot topic right now,” Redmond says. “I hope to be able to contribute to that discussion.”

Other 2012 UWM diversity fellows included: Shaun Ossei-Owusu, a doctoral candidate from University of CaliforniaBerkeley’s Department of African-American Studies; Jacqueline Nguyen, a postdoctoral fellow in the Child Development Laboratory at St. Joseph’s University in Philadelphia: Selina Gallo-Cruz, a doctoral candidate in sociology at Emory University, Atlanta; and Joseph Flipper, a doctoral candidate in religious studies at Marquette University.

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Study Abroad Programs: Global Opportunities Expand

“In a global society, it’s critical that social welfare students are exposed to a variety of approaches that address issues of social justice,” says Stan Stojkovic, dean, HBSSW. “I cannot imagine a person graduating today without an opportunity for a global experience or internship.”

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uilding on the growing popularity and importance of its current study abroad opportunities in England, Austria and Costa Rica, HBSSW began in 2012 to consider expanding the program to South Africa, Cuba and India. “In a global society, it’s critical that social welfare students are exposed to a variety of approaches that address issues of social justice,” says Stan Stojkovic, dean, HBSSW. “I cannot imagine a person graduating today without an opportunity for a global experience or internship.” School representatives – Stojkovic, Linda Britz, senior lecturer, social work, and Susan Rose, professor, social work -- visited two universities in South Africa to research study abroad opportunities for HBSSW students: University of Pretoria and University of the Free State. Plans are currently underway to obtain a U.S. Treasury license to visit Cuba in the fall of 2013 and to visit Rajiri University, Kerala, India in January of 2014.

The school’s study abroad programs expose about 25 students annually to various cultures, social welfare systems and policies, and treatment models. In the summer of 2012, social work and criminal justice students earned credits through international exchange programs with the Central American Spanish Academy in Grecia, Costa Rica; the University of Bristol, England; and the Upper Austria University of Applied Science, Linz, Austria. A different, yet related, opportunity exists for students closer to home. For the third year, social work students participated in a UWinteriM service learning course held in New Orleans during the 2011-12 academic year. Students in the17-day service learning course examined how the consequences of Hurricane Katrina continue to expose racial and socioeconomic disparities. “Students who study varying responses to social welfare issues report that such experiences are invaluable and that they learned an incredible amount in a short period of time,” Stojkovic says.

“Students who study varying responses to social welfare issues report that such experiences are invaluable and that they learned an incredible amount in a short period of time.”

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Improving Safety in Washington Park:

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“The key to lowering crime rates, improving the quality of life and continued revitalization is collective efficacy — the willingness of residents to come together and act on each other’s behalf,” Hassell says. “Community input is essential to addressing neighborhood crime and safety issues.” 29

imberly Hassell, associate professor, criminal justice, is serving as the research partner for a federally-funded crimereduction initiative that has a neighborhood focus. The $600,000 Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant aims, in large part, to improve the public safety of Milwaukee’s Washington Park neighborhood, doing so with significant involvement from residents and community organizers. The heart of the Byrne Initiative is to improve public safety and the effectiveness of law enforcement through relationship building and collaborative problem solving among Milwaukee Police Department personnel, Washington Park residents, and community organizations. Hassell is playing a key role in the planning and evaluation of this three-year, research-based initiative, which started January 2013. She was asked to fill the crucial role of research partner by the Milwaukee Police Department, Byrne Initiative’s grantee. Other partners include Washington Park Partners, Safe & Sound and LISC (Local Initiatives Support Corporation). Signs of revitalization have recently appeared in this west-side neighborhood of 15,000 residents, including the construction of 150 homes and businesses, the restoration of hundreds of acres of public parkland and the introduction of an ecology center and arts gallery.

HBSSW Playing Crucial Role Such improvements speak to a robust infrastructure and active citizenry. But crime issues continue to plague the area. Compared to Milwaukee as a whole, the rates of criminal offenses and victimization are disproportionately higher in Washington Park; for example, residents are more than twice as likely to be violent crime victims than are Milwaukee residents overall. “The key to lowering crime rates, improving the quality of life and continued revitalization is collective efficacy — the willingness of residents to come together and act on each other’s behalf,” Hassell says. “Community input is essential to addressing neighborhood crime and safety issues.” In the first few months of planning, Hassell has worked with an MPD crime specialist, MPD patrol and community prosecution officers, individual Washington Park residents, and community groups to identify six crime hotspots in the neighborhood. In focus groups around each hotspot, she asked residents about their concerns and responses they would like to see from police and community agencies in their neighborhoods. “I’m the conduit between the groups,” she says. When she met residents who were afraid of retaliation if they spoke up, she found safe ways to solicit their input. Hassell will construct a baseline survey, a tool she will use annually to measure the Byrne Initiative’s impact on citizen perceptions. “The relationship police have with community groups is essential to whether law enforcement enhancements are on target and if they will make a difference,” she says.

Photo: Back row (left to right): Michael Schmitz, MPD, lieutenant; Matt Melendes, Washington Park Partners, sustainable communities director; Mandy Potapenko, Safe & Sound, community prosecution unit coordinator; Kimberly Hassell, UWM, associate professor, criminal justice; John Connelly, LISC, community safety coordinator; Christopher Ladwig, Milwaukee County District Attorney’s Office, assistant district attorney. Front row (left to right): Bess Earl, Washington Park Partners, sustainable communities coordinator; Phoua Vang, Safe & Sound, drug free communities organizer; Hue Kong, MPD, community liaison officer.

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Research on Path to Improving Foster Care Interventions Treating young foster children is more cost effective than delaying treatment, but most foster care interventions target older children, says Dimitri Topitzes, assistant professor, social work. “Money to help foster children is not distributed proportionately,” he says. “Young children, while they make up most of the kids in foster care, receive less money for treatment relative to older children.” Photo: Dimitrii Topitzes, Joshua Mersky.

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very high percentage of young foster children display problem behaviors including aggression, lack of concentration and defiance. In fact, foster children present with these behaviors at two to six times the rate of the general population. Left untreated, their issues often devolve into school failure, substance abuse, and mental health problems, all of which carry significant social and personal costs. Treating young foster children is more cost effective than delaying treatment, but most foster care interventions target older children, says Dimitri Topitzes, assistant professor, social work. “Money to help foster children is not distributed proportionately,” he says. “Young children, while they make up most of the kids in foster care, receive less money for treatment relative to older children.” Topitzes, along with his colleague Josh Merksy, associate professor, social work, University of Illinois at Chicago, are researching a potential solution. Their two-year study examines the effectiveness of adapting a

well-validated, individualized treatment, called parentchild interaction therapy (PCIT), to groups of foster parents and children aged 3 to 6. They have replaced the traditional PCIT model – in which a clinician works with one parent-child dyad over 12 to 15 weeks – with one in which a clinician works with a group of five to eight parent-child dyads during two, seven-hour trainings. “The group dynamic introduces therapeutic benefits,” Topitzes says. “Parents learn from watching each other, sharing solutions, and modeling.” Group trainings are supplemented by phone consultations. Proven benefits to this model include improvements in the following areas: parent-child bonding, parent-child management skills, child language skills (receptive and expressive), and children’s emotional regulation skills. Topitzes’ research will show whether these benefits hold true when the therapy is delivered intensively over a short period of time to a group of foster families. PCIT includes parent training, behavioral therapy and play therapy. During play therapy, while a foster parent interacts with a child, a clinician watches remotely and through ear buds, guides the caretaker. For example, a therapist may guide a foster parent who is displaying a “business relationship” with a child (instructing a child how to stack blocks to form a house, for example) to chit-chat instead, calmly and verbally labeling the child’s emotions and behaviors. “One way in which parents of young children help children regulate behaviors is to label them,” Topitzes notes. “To do this often requires that the parent changes his or her interaction patterns.” Topitzes’ research, which began in 2011, is funded by a $300,000 grant from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Partners include: Milwaukee Child Welfare Partnership for Professional Development, Bureau of Milwaukee Child Welfare, St. Aemilian-Lakeside, Inc., University of Illinois at Chicago, and West Virginia University. 32

HBSSW Evaluates Firearm Surrender Protocol The results were clear: the pilot program was a success, Brandl says. “In addition to guns being surrendered, the protocol required minimal court time and no additional significant costs to law enforcement agencies.” The counties were initially concerned they’d be overwhelmed with work, he explains, but that was not the case.

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hen is a law little more than words on paper? When it’s not enforced. In Wisconsin, when people have domestic abuse or child abuse restraining orders put on them, they are required by law to surrender any firearms in their possession to law enforcement personnel or another person approved by the court. But until recently, this law has not been systematically enforced, says Steven Brandl, associate professor, criminal justice. The law stops short of requiring law enforcement to confiscate the firearms but does require follow-up to ensure compliance with the firearm surrender requirement, he explains. In 2012, the Wisconsin Office of Justice Assistance turned to Brandl to evaluate their solution – a new firearm surrender protocol. As a pilot program, they tested it in four counties – Winnebago, Sauk, Waushara and Outagamie – in 2010 and 2011. Before rolling

it out statewide, they asked Brandl to evaluate the implementation and provide information that would help other counties as the protocol expands. Brandl is an expert in issues related to firearm possession. In his landmark study on the Milwaukee gun market, funded by the Joyce Foundation, he found that Milwaukee’s illegal gun market was fueled by Badger Outdoors – a former West Milwaukee gun shop – and that people who were legally prohibited from buying or possessing guns had easy access to them. In the Office of Justice Assistance pilot program, law enforcement and court procedures were created and implemented that specified the particulars of how firearms are to be surrendered by restraining order respondents. The purpose was to create a process by which the law could be enforced. The results were clear: the pilot program was a success, Brandl says. “In addition to guns being surrendered, the protocol required minimal court time and no additional significant costs to law enforcement agencies.” The counties were initially concerned they’d be overwhelmed with work, he explains, but that was not the case. Brandl’s evaluation also noted victim advocates’ support of the new protocol. “The protocol made victims feel safer and may have enhanced their actual safety,” Brandl says. “The point is to prevent guns from being in the hands of a person in times of rage and anger.”

In 2012, the Wisconsin Office of Justice Assistance turned to Brandl to evaluate a new firearm surrender protocol. As a pilot program, they tested it in four counties – Winnebago, Sauk, Waushara and Outagamie – in 2010 and 2011. Before rolling it out statewide, they asked Brandl to evaluate the implementation and provide information that would help other counties as the protocol expands.

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Aleks Snowden Joins CJ Faculty

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ssistant Professor Aleksandra Snowden joined the Criminal Justice faculty in 2012. Snowden recently earned her Ph.D. in criminal justice at Indiana University, where she developed skills needed for crime mapping and analysis, through application of ArcGIS and GeoDa softwares. Her knowledge of this emerging area within criminal justice strengthens the department’s new specialization in crime analysis. In addition to the use of spatial analytical methods, Snowden’s primary research interests include alcohol and violence, police reform in post-conflict societies, and criminal justice education. She is a member of the American Society of Criminology and the Kettil Bruun Society for Social and Epidemiological Research on Alcohol.

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Mark Williams Joins SW Faculty

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ssistant Professor Mark Williams joined the Social Work faculty in 2012. Williams, who has worked as a hospice grief counselor, recently earned his Ph.D. in social welfare from the University of Washington, where he was an adjunct professor. Williams researches the health of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender older adults, specifically examining the relationship between intimate partnership status and health outcomes. His other areas of expertise include health disparities and aging, and health care social work practice. An ordained United Methodist pastor, he hopes to teach social work students about working with people of faith.

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Why We Should Stay Ready to Alter Our Views By Michael Fendrich, Director Center for Applied Behavioral Health Research

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ur boundless curiosity and capacity for life-long learning are amazing. My 82-year-old motherin-law, who spends a great deal of time writing poetry, recently enrolled in an introductory physics class. Poetry may seem to have little in common with physics, but by opening herself up to new ways of seeing the world, she is expanding her universe, allowing herself to draw on new visions and metaphors to enhance her poetic craft in her ninth decade. Being trained in a discipline is a double-edged sword. On the one hand, it gives a person a set of tried-andtrue tools and a perspective that allows him to answer questions, build knowledge, and solve practical and important problems within his field. On the other hand, it can narrow one’s worldview to the point that it limits the ability to both see and solve those problems. As we mature as scientists, especially if we experience success, we tend to work within our disciplinary comfort zone, replicating patterns and practices that worked before and becoming set in our ways. One of the toughest challenges scientists face is staying open-minded. We live in difficult times that require open-minded, collaborative approaches to science. HIV, drug addiction, trauma, and mental illness—the core research areas at the Center for Applied Behavioral Health Research, or CABHR—are complex societal and psychological problems, and scientists have made little progress in resolving them after decades of research. Extramural funding agencies such as the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have demanded that we step up our game and create science that accelerates the pace at which we understand and solve these problems and their numerous ramifications. 37

It is increasingly difficult to receive NIH funding. The review process can be brutal and discouraging. Available funds for research support are dwindling. A decade ago, NIH funded one in three grant proposals; now it funds less than one in six. While sustaining CABHR under these conditions is a formidable challenge, our scientists currently hold $4.8 million in research grants. Seven years ago I was drawn to lead CABHR partly because of its potentially strong ties to the emerging social work doctoral program in the Helen Bader School of Social Welfare and the appealing prospect of helping to educate the next generation of behavioral scientists. Our students come from across campus and add vital energy and inventive spirit to our scientific enterprises, the very ingredients we need to meet current challenges. The 26 students who currently work on CABHR research projects represent eight disciplines including social work, public health, sociology, educational psychology, nursing and criminal justice. CABHR is committed to strengthening interdisciplinary relationships among researchers at all levels. As we work to make a difference, we could learn from the example set by my mother-in-law, and structure our training in ways that help us move outside our comfort zone. In the words of the Vietnamese philosopher Thich Nhat Hanh, “For things to reveal themselves to us, we need to be ready to abandon our views about them.”

“Being trained in a discipline is a double-edged sword. On the one hand, it gives a person a set of tried-and-true tools and a perspective that allows him to answer questions, build knowledge, and solve practical and important problems within his field. On the other hand, it can narrow one’s worldview to the point that it limits the ability to both see and solve those problems.”

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Center for Applied Behavioral Health Research

CABHR’s core scientists represent many disciplines and focus on behavioral health and research that makes a difference in people’s lives. Pictured: (front row) Paul Florsheim, associate professor of public health; Jennifer Doering, assistant professor of nursing; Lisa Berger, associate professor of social work; Tina Freiburger, associate professor of criminal justice. (back row) Susan Rose, professor of social work; Michael Fendrich, CABHR director; Tom LeBel, associate professor of criminal justice; Jonathan Kanter, associate professor of psychology; Young Cho, associate professor of public health; Laura OttoSalaj, CABHR associate director. 39

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ased in the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee’s Helen Bader School of Social Welfare, the Center for Applied Behavioral Health Research, or CABHR, is led by core academic scientists with broad interests in applied behavioral health. CABHR conducts cutting-edge epidemiological and clinical research. 2012 projects include the following: Risk and Resilience in African American Women Principal Investigator: Laura Otto-Salaj, CABHR associate director, associate professor, social work. Stories to Tell, a National Institutes of Health study of African American women in Milwaukee housing developments, examines how individual, interpersonal, community, and sociocultural factors affect risk and resilience to HIV infection, substance use, and victimization. Final results will be used to develop programs to help women reduce risk. Resources for Incarcerated Mothers Principal Investigator: Susan Rose, CABHR scientist, professor, social work. Co-principal Investigator: Tom LeBel, CABHR scientist, associate professor, criminal justice. Keeping Families Together - Expanded, funded in part by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, studies a low-cost

Current Projects Pool Various Disciplines intervention for incarcerated, substance-abusing mothers of minor children and pregnant women. The goals are to help women, once released from jail, seek treatment for substance abuse and other health-related issues, re-unite with their children, and improve the health outcomes of their newborns. Health Benefits of Smoking Bans Co-author: Daniel Fuhrmann, CABHR statistician. The study authors found that community-wide smoking bans affect heart attack prevalence. Communities and states that adopted various levels of workplace smoking bans experienced significant reductions in fatal heart attacks among people 25 to 54 years old. Depressions’ Effect on HIV Treatment Student Principal Investigator: Angela Wendorf. Co-principal Investigator: Katie Mosack, CABHR affiliated scientist, assistant professor, psychology. This study examined the effect of depression on treatment adherence among people infected with HIV. The findings: Depression erodes a person’s motivation to adhere to an antiretroviral treatment regimen, a finding that could be used by clinicians when treating this population. Effects of Neighborhood on Substance Abuse Treatment Principal Investigator: Young Cho, CABHR scientist, associate professor, Zilber School of Public Health. This project, funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, explored the effects of neighborhood environments on substance abuse treatment outcomes. Results showed that a clinic’s neighborhood mattered; neighborhood stability and concentrated immigration were positively associated with treatment completion. New Alcohol Biomarker Investigators: Michael Fendrich, CABHR director, professor, social work; Lisa Berger, CABHR scientist, associate professor, social work; Daniel Fuhrmann, CABHR statistician. In this study, funded by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, researchers worked with U.S. Drug Testing Laboratories in Des Plaines, IL. The focus of their study was a newly discovered alcohol biomarker known as ethyl glucuronide (EtG), which holds promise as a long-term alcohol biomarker. Current biomarkers detect alcohol’s health consequences, whereas EtG tests can detect alcohol use. College Students and Energy Drink Use Principal Investigator: Michael Fendrich, CABHR director, professor, social work; Co-investigator: Lisa Berger, CABHR scientist, associate professor, social work. In this study, researchers collected data on risk behaviors of young adults. They found that when compared with hazardous drinking of alcohol alone, hazardous drinking of alcohol 40

CABHR (continued) mixed with energy drinks was significantly associated with having unprotected sex; furthermore, in the past year, 66 percent of those in the study had consumed alcohol mixed with energy drinks. Alcohol Treatment in Family Medicine Settings Site Co-principal Investigator: Lisa Berger, CABHR scientist, associate professor, social work; Principal Investigator: J.C. Garbutt, professor, medical director, Alcohol & Substance Abuse Program at UNC School of Medicine. This study, funded by the Forest Research Institute, looked at the efficacy of the drug acamprosate in helping alcoholdependent patients abstain from drinking in a family medicine setting. Findings suggest that patients whose goal is abstinence (as opposed to drinking less) were significantly more likely to increase their percent days abstinent, suggesting that such patients may be most responsive to treatment in a family medicine setting. Evaluation of Milwaukee County Drug Treatment Court Principal Investigator: Michael Fendrich, CABHR director, professor, social work; Co-Principal Investigator: Tom LeBel, CABHR scientist, associate professor, criminal justice. In December 2012, investigators completed an initial threeyear evaluation of this initiative – which was funded by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and Bureau of Justice Assistance – and provided valuable feedback to key Milwaukee drug court decision makers. The data and analyses enhance our understanding of the changing demographics of drug court participants and of factors associated with program completion and termination. A new, three-year SAMHSA grant was awarded in October 2012 to Milwaukee County’s Behavioral Health Division, and the investigators will work with the drug court’s team as the evaluators over the next three years.

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New Certificate Program in Social Science Analytics

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new, 18-credit certificate program – Graduate Certificate in Applied Data Analysis Using SAS® – can help social workers boost their social science analytic skills. Used by more than 60,000 business, government and university sites, SAS is the world’s largest privately held software company. Social welfare agencies use the software to monitor and evaluate human service programs. The certificate was launched in 2012 by CABHR in conjunction with UWM’s departments of social work, educational psychology, political science, public health and business administration and business management. It is designed for students with diverse career goals, but it focuses on the job role of programmer/analyst. “The certificate is designed for post-baccalaureate, graduate and non-degree seeking students who want to acquire highly marketable skills in data management and analytics using SAS software,” says CABHR statistician Daniel Fuhrmann, who was instrumental in creating the certificate. “In a multidisciplinary environment, students learn how to access and manage data, perform complex queries, conduct and interpret statistical data analysis and derive insight from data using graphical methods.” In the workforce, job candidates who possess SAS skills have the edge, Fuhrmann says. “There’s a huge demand for folks who have mastered the skills taught in this program.”

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UWM Works with FEMA to Improve Emergency Management Responses The people and communities most affected by disasters may generate the best solutions to deal with similar challenges in the future, according to FEMA officials. Housed in the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, FEMA is tasked with coordinating responses to disasters that overwhelm local and state authorities, including extreme heat, tornados and flooding. 43

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n 2012, an HBSSW criminal justice alumna and a criminal justice student worked with officials from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to help coordinate the nation’s first FEMA Think Tank, which was held at UWM. The think tank aims to improve FEMA services with input from multiple groups. The people and communities most affected by disasters may generate the best solutions to deal with similar challenges in the future, according to FEMA officials. Housed in the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, FEMA is tasked with coordinating responses to disasters that overwhelm local and state authorities, including extreme heat, tornados and flooding. More than 600 participants from throughout the United Stated “dialed in” during the first think tank conference call, while representatives from emergency planning organizations throughout Wisconsin attended in-person at UWM. Topics were “Incorporate Preparedness into School Curriculums,” “U.S. National

Grid as the Response Language of Location” and “Community Mapping to Implement the Whole Community Concept.” Stephanie Sikinger (BS CJ 2009, MS CJ 2011) and Andrew Boese (senior, criminal justice) were among the huge drivers who helped create the FEMA Think Tank, which includes an online forum and monthly conference call discussions. Following internships with Milwaukee’s Office of Emergency Management/Homeland Security, Sikinger and Boese met voluntarily to brainstorm with their former supervisor and UWM alumna Desiree Matel-Anderson (BA 2006), a project manager/fiscal and compliance monitor at the Milwaukee office. These discussions were the springboard for the Think Tank initiative. “This is a great example of how our Helen Bader School of Social Welfare students and recent graduates are making a difference,” says Stan Stojkovic, dean of HBSSW. That first think tank led to another first – a UWM/FEMA summit in early 2013. This event, attended by about 10 FEMA officials and 70 faculty, staff, students and community members, laid the foundation to create new partnerships aimed at improving emergency management responses.

UWM Chancellor Michael Lovell and FEMA Deputy Administrator Richard Serino. Photo, page 43, left to right: Desiree MatelAnderson, Stan Stojkovic, Stephanie Sikinger, Richard Serino, Andrew Boese.

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HBSSW Teams Up With Community Theater

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The Wisconsin 50 Department ANNIVERSARY! of Children and Families requires that all new case workers throughout the state complete job-specific training within 18 months of being hired. HBSSW trains about 100 new child welfare case workers like Gray annually. Since 2008, the school has partnered with In Tandem Theatre to supply actors to play the roles of traumatized adults on the brink of losing their children. TH

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nappropriate smiling has gotten Jessica Gray into trouble before; a drill sergeant once yelled at her for smiling during Army National Guard training. Now her smile is about to cause trouble during her training to become a child welfare case worker in Milwaukee. An angry “client,” red-headed Wilma, storms into the room and slams the door. “Let’s get this shit out of the way,” Wilma says angrily to Gray, her “social worker,” by way of introduction. Wilma’s enraged, on the hook for behavior that could lead to the state separating her from her children. Gray smiles. “Do you mind if I sit here?” she asks Wilma quietly, eyeing a chair in the sparse room. “Do what you want. It’s a free country,” Wilma snaps as she plunks in a chair and folds her arms across her lap. Still smiling, Gray tries to engage Wilma in conversation about her three children, her difficult relationship with her mother, her imprisoned husband. Wilma’s answers are snippy, her body language closed, and the client-social worker interview lurches uncomfortably along.

to Help Child Welfare Case Workers Gray, who has earned her undergraduate and graduate degrees in social work, is in what amounts to an apprenticeship to be a Milwaukee child welfare case worker. “Wilma” is a Milwaukeean with a theater background, whose real name is Jessie Moffat (Anthropology 2003). The two women represent an unusual and successful partnership whereby social work educators enlist the help of local theater actors to boost the skill level of new child welfare case workers. While medical colleges have long used actors to help students hone clinical skills, Wisconsin social work educators have only started to do the same in earnest in the past few years. “Social workers who take the training are significantly better at determining when children are unsafe and when action needs to be taken to protect them,” says Julie Brown, the person responsible for growing the idea. Brown is director of HBSSW’s Milwaukee Child Welfare Partnership for Professional Development (MCWPPD). The Wisconsin Department of Children and Families requires that all new case workers throughout the state complete job-specific training within 18 months of being hired. HBSSW trains about 100 new child welfare case workers like Gray annually. Since 2008, the school has partnered with In Tandem Theatre to supply actors to play the roles of traumatized adults on the brink of losing their children. On this eight-hour training day in the Glendale offices of the MCWPPD, 18 future case workers each meet with six different “clients.” In addition to Wilma, they include Daniel—an exhausted, 38-year-old single father with limited resources and a depressed teenage son—and Diana—who is raising her three grandchildren and is frustrated with her daughter’s drug use. “The actors are given scenarios and they hold the ground of the character throughout the interview,” says Chris Flieller, In Tandem’s artistic director (MFA ’84). When Gray is done with her client interview, the room opens up for analysis, which is when Moffat targets the smile. “The smile was off putting,” she says. “I do smile when people are yelling at me,” Gray says. “It’s hard to relate if you don’t meet me where I’m at,” Moffat says. According to Mike Kluesner, curriculum and instruction manager with MCWPPD, social workers’ success will be limited if they don’t master learning to talk and listen in ways that earn trust from clients. “A hint of judgment in a voice can really affect the relationship,” he says. Gray was glad to have the feedback. “A lot of people aren’t so up front as the actors,” she says. “It’s very helpful to know how you come off.”

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Potential Health Care Savings Draw Businesses Initially created for use with those caring for relatives with dementia, TCARE® has been adapted for families of injured soldiers and the developmentally disabled, and its benefits have been well documented. Care managers overseeing caregiver clients reported feeling better about the services they provided, more professional and more helpful. Caregivers reported increased positive feelings about caregiving, lower levels of stress and depression, and a diminished likelihood of moving the cared-for person out of the home.

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ssuming care for a loved one is challenging,” says Rhonda Montgomery, Helen Bader Endowed Chair of Applied Gerontology. Often, the emotional strain of caregiving is harder than the physical tasks. “As more care is required, roles and relations change in ways that are very stressful.” Many caregivers don’t recognize the signs of burnout, deepening depression, or the impact of caregiving on their own health. TCARE® (Tailored Caregiver Assessment and Referral) is a system designed by Montgomery and her UWM team that provides care managers—specialists assisting family caregivers—with a step-by-step tool to tailor care plans. For example, a care manager and a caregiver husband meet face to face and, through TCARE’s web-based protocol, they assess that caregiver’s needs and strengths. The resulting “map” might pinpoint the husband’s need for help in acquiring medical equipment, obtaining counseling or finding respite care. The care manager then identifies local resources that could provide him with specific assistance. TCARE Navigator LLC licensed TCARE through the UWM Research Foundation as one of UWM’s recent startups. “The program has been used by state agencies and organizations for several years,” says Montgomery. “This new company is promoting TCARE to private insurers, accountable-care organizations, self-insured employers and U.S. government agencies.” “TCARE is expected to offer significant savings associated with delaying placement of the patient in institutionalized care, as well as avoiding future health care costs for the caregiver, say Norrie Daroga, chief executive officer of TCARE Navigator. “The system will deliver high value to our clients by easing the burdens experienced by caregivers, decreasing absenteeism in the workplace and ultimately lowering health care costs for all payers.”

and Agencies to TCARE®

Initially created for use with those caring for relatives with dementia, TCARE has been adapted for families of injured soldiers and the developmentally disabled, and its benefits have been well documented. Care managers overseeing caregiver clients reported feeling better about the services they provided, more professional and more helpful. Caregivers reported increased positive feelings about caregiving, lower levels of stress and depression, and a diminished likelihood of moving the cared-for person out of the home. Ultimately, those receiving care may benefit the most. “Our families are the best hope for sustained, quality and loving care,” says Montomery. (Photo) (left to right) Norrie Daroga, Rhonda Montgomery, Stan Stojkovic.

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel selected 15 of 2012’s most interesting “big ideas” to have been generated from within Wisconsin. One of those ideas was TCARE® the newly commercialized caregiver support system created at the Helen Bader School of Social Welfare.

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Institute for Urban Agriculture and Nutrition

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The hardest hit urban (Milwaukee) neighborhoods reported a median family income from 2007-2011 below $28,000, dramatically limiting their access to high-quality food. An equitable and affordable food system created by and for the people of Milwaukee is paramount to addressing food-related health outcomes such as diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, and undernourishment.

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n behalf of UWM, HBSSW Dean Stan Stojkovic in 2012 took the lead of a new coalition of businesses and universities that aims to address shortcomings in Milwaukee’s food system. The coalition – the Institute for Urban Agriculture and Nutrition (IUAN) – wants to find ways to bring fresh food to city residents, who often lack access to fresh food and over-consume processed food. “Access to healthy food is a social welfare issue,” says Stojkovic. While our current food system provides an abundance of healthy food options to those who can afford it, many who cannot are left with low-nutrient, high-calorie foods, or go hungry. This inequity can have devastating impacts on community health. For example, in 2011, Milwaukee ranked 69th out of 72 Wisconsin counties for residents suffering from diabetes. The hardest hit urban neighborhoods reported a median family income from 2007-2011 below $28,000, dramatically limiting their access to high-quality food. An equitable and affordable food system created by and for the people of Milwaukee is paramount to addressing food-related health outcomes such as diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, and undernourishment. Addressing this complicated problem requires a “field to fork” approach that integrates major components of the urban food system. IUAN aims to identify and overcome barriers that limit the scale, community adoption and economic sustainability of community-driven urban agriculture and nutrition programs throughout Milwaukee. IUAN is the result of an urban food system symposium organized by UWM Chancellor Michael Lovell and Growing Power CEO Will Allen in September 2011. The symposium attracted 180 researchers, students and community practitioners interested in improving the urban food system in order to impact local public health and economy. A few months later, Lovell and Allen

convened a working group to organize the institute with representatives of academic, civic, and community organizations. IUAN pools the expertise and resources of six academic institutions (UW-Milwaukee, UW-Madison, UW Extension, Marquette University, Milwaukee Area Technical College and the Medical College of Wisconsin) with the City of Milwaukee, Growing Power, and the Milwaukee Food Council. IUAN’s next steps include creating a database of researchers and experts throughout the six academic partner institutions, and bringing together community practitioners and researchers to create a community collaborative council. This council will identify and prioritize areas for future research and identify best practices that address food system problems from an integrated perspective. Together, IUAN and its partners will clear a path for what Will Allen calls “the good food revolution.”

Addressing this complicated problem requires a “field to fork” approach that integrates major components of the urban food system. IUAN aims to identify and overcome barriers that limit the scale, community adoption and economic sustainability of community-driven urban agriculture and nutrition programs throughout Milwaukee.

Dean Stojkovic Honored by His Alma Mater

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tan Stojkovic, dean, HBSSW, earned his undergraduate degree in criminal justice from the University of Wisconsin-Platteville in 1977. In 2012, UW-P’s Department of Criminal Justice honored Stojkovic and four other alumni with “Pioneer in Criminal Justice” awards. The award notes Stojkovic’s outstanding achievement in the criminal justice field and his exceptional leadership. Stojkovic, who is known nationally for his contributions to correctional leadership and management, gave the keynote speech at his alma mater when this award was presented as part of the university’s first criminal justice alumni awards reception.

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Free trainings, offered as a community service, included Helping People and Families with Conversations and Choices about the End-of-Life. This training was spearheaded by Assistant Professor Jung Kwak (pictured right), social work, and drew more than 100 people from the social work community.

Professional Development Reaches 800 Professionals

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his academic year, HBSSW’s Professional Development and Outreach Program offered 35 trainings that attracted more than 800 participants from Wisconsin and Illinois. We also offered our first on-line workshop – Supervisory Training: Tools and Strategies – which attracted more than 100 registrants; the evaluations were excellent. Programs were offered at the UWM campus, Waukesha County Technical College, UWM’s Joseph J. Zilber School of Public Health, the Milwaukee Child Welfare Partnership for Professional Development, and various worksites, where they often were customized for employees. Our three most popular courses were: Is Burnout Inevitable? Balancing your burnout and blessings, taught by Associate Clinical Professor Roberta Hanus; Technology and Social Work Ethics, taught by Professor Emeritus Nick Smiar, social work, UW-Eau Claire; and Better than OK, Moving our Clients from Illness to Happiness, taught by Forensic Psychiatrist David Mays, UW-Madison. 51

Free trainings, offered as a community service, included Helping People and Families with Conversations and Choices about the End-of-Life. This training was spearheaded by Assistant Professor Jung Kwak, social work, and drew more than 100 people from the social work community. Another free program, The Evidenced-Based Practice Process: Steps, Integration and Evaluation, was taught by Associate Professor Lisa Berger and doctoral candidate Andrea Gromoske. Throughout the year, professional development brought customized trainings to worksites. About 300 social workers, nurses, pastoral care professionals and physicians attended our fourth conference on hospice care titled Integrating Palliative Care in Serious Illness. This workshop was done at the request of Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare Hospice and Circle of Life Foundation; J. Andrew Billings, MD, codirector of Harvard Medical School’s Center on Palliative Care, was the keynote speaker. Finally, we partnered with Milwaukee Public Television – to present its first Community Conversation focusing on Caring for the Caregiver – and St. Aemilian Lakeside, where Director of Field Programs Jeanne Wagner taught Boundaries and Ethics. For a listing of all workshops, visit www.hbsswceh.uwm. edu. Customized on-site programs also are available. Field instructors may take one free workshop every biennium.

For more information, please contact Linda Czernicki, program manager, continuing education: 414-229-6329 or czernick@uwm.edu

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School Student Services Expansion Includes New Director and Advisors Photo: Student Services staff include (from left to right): Kelby Spann, director; Amy Kirby, MSW specialist; Ashlie Schaffner, academic advisor; Elliott Nytes, associate advisor; and Kate Masshardt, academic advisor.

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elby Spann was named director of the HBSSW Student Services Office in 2012. With an eye on increasing student retention, Spann expanded services to the more than 1,400 undergraduate and graduate students in the criminal justice and social work programs. With the addition of two new undergraduate academic advisors and one graduate social work advisor, the Student Services Office now has dedicated academic advisors for freshmen, transfer students and those pursuing MSW degrees. “Our goal is to provide each student with the support they need to meet their educational goals,” Spann says. “Part of that means being readily accessible to students in person, by email, on the phone, or through Facebook.”

Awards Night Applauds Students, Donors, Faculty, Staff, Community Partners and Alumni

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he school’s fourth annual awards night brought together 200 people in May 2012. The celebratory annual event recognizes some of the outstanding researchers, community partners, teachers, students and donors who greatly help the school pursue its mission.

“The greatest adventure of my father’s life was moving to America...He wanted others to experience travel abroad.” -Peggy Tschetter (middle), Donor of the Year representative

“The goal of education is more than the ability to pay bills. We want more than that from our political leaders and educators. We want people who are abstract thinkers.” – Stan Stojokvic, Dean, HBSSW

“We couldn’t have done this without Kimberly Hassell and Tina Freiburger. We don’t have that ability.” – Lt. Ruben Burgos, Milwaukee Intelligence Fusion Center

“Seven invasive surgeries made me think I’d have to drop out. Thanks to Diane Miller, Josh Mersky and others, I was able to find several scholarships to help me continue with my education.” -- Brian Flynn, HBSSW student

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Awards Night (continued) “My years here were great and we helped each other graduate.” – Jerrold Braxton, MPS Social Worker, 2012 HBSSW Alumni of the Year, Social Work (photo above)

2012 HBSSW AWARDS ALUMNI AWARDS • Jerrold Braxton, Social Work • Rick Kohen, Criminal Justice DONOR OF THE YEAR AWARD The Family of Marianne and Joseph Nothum FACULTY AND STAFF AWARDS

School Awards Service Award, Social Work Julie Brown Service Award, Criminal Justice Rick Lovell Service Award, Non-Teaching Staff Mary Heller 55

Research Award, Criminal Justice Tina Freiburger Research Award, Social Work Joshua Mersky Teaching Award, Social Work Deborah Padgett Teaching Award, Criminal Justice Tina Freiburger Adjunct Faculty Teaching Award, Social Work Michael Casali Adjunct Faculty Teaching Award, Criminal Justice Danielle Romain

“We’re a small organization doing great work. We can do this through the work of our interns.” – Maryann Clesceri, Executive Director, Healing Center

Random Act of Kindness Awards

Chris Cigale, Danielle Costello, Eric Gresnick, Mary Heller, Heidi Janzen, Lydia LaGue, Joyce Love, Martha Manto, Laura Otto-Salaj, Barbara Robinson, Ramona Sledge UNIVERSITY AWARDS Distinguished Alumni Award George Kelling Graduate of the Last Decade Gretchen Mead

Length of Service Awards

• 5 years — Michael Darnell, Dario Elia, Jessica Russell • 10 years — Anne Basting, Lydia LaGue, Rhonda Montgomery, Laura Otto-Salaj • 20 years — Steven Brandl, Mary Heller, Sharon Keigher, Susan Rose • 25 years — Colleen Giaimo, José Torres

COMMUNITY AWARDS Agency Research Collaboration Awards • Luther Manor – Social Work • Milwaukee Police Department, Intelligence Fusion Center – Criminal Justice Community Agency of the Year • The Healing Center – Social Work • Wisconsin Department of Corrections Region 3 – Criminal Justice Outstanding Field Agency of the Year Award Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin 56

Social Work Field Instructors of the Year • Dana Dorn, Milwaukee Academy • Peggy Neal, Meta House • Deborah Wagner, Winnebago Mental Health Institute STUDENT AWARDS

Student Scholarship Awards These academic scholarships were made possible through the generosity of our donors. Catherine S. Chilman Family Studies Scholarship Brian Flynn, Timothy Walter Chancellor’s Fellowship Award for Criminal Justice Patrick Lowery, Rebecca Headley Chancellor’s Fellowship Award for Social Work Stacy Grams, Heather Schulze, Reina Takamura Dean’s Freshman Scholarship Alexander Simpkin Dean’s Scholarship for International Studies Gina Gross, Brianna Vejvoda Don and Helen Banta Scholarship Olivia Bruss General Scholarship – UWinteriM in New Orleans Bridget Harland Greater Milwaukee Area Realtors Youth Foundation Scholarship Brianna Vejvoda Harry and Esther Kovenock Scholarship Emily Conat Yolanda Vega-Will Alumni Scholarship Jessica Hickman, Ashley Oldenburg Helen Bader Center on Age and Community Scholarship Sharon Azinger, Nathaniel Brown, Ellen Nocun, Mark Thompson Helen C. Carey Trust Scholarship Courtney Lynn Neitzel Kathleen Scheller Memorial Scholarship Henriette Johnson Lucetta O. Bissell Graduate Scholarship Jessica Batcher, Rebecca Timmerman-Blagdon 57

Marianne and Joseph Nothum Scholarship for International Studies Sarah Goldman NOBLE Scholarship Sue Her Robert L. Stonek Memorial Scholarship Leah Letson, Elizabeth McDaris Social Welfare Community Organization Scholarship Katie Barrientos

Student Awards* Undergraduate Student Award in Criminal Justice Benjamin Grams, Christine Marie Tousignant Graduate Student Award in Criminal Justice Rebecca Headley Undergraduate Student Award in Social Work Luke Chojnacki, Tia Renier Graduate Student Award in Social Work Deborah Kavalar *The student awards in social work were made possible by a $5,000 earmarked gift from the Helen Bader Foundation.

“The students have been wonderful and we’ve hired several over the years.” – Jo Camarata, Director of Patient and Family Services, Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin

The 2012 HBSSW Awards Committee included the following faculty and staff members: Jerry Rousseau (Chair) and Linda Czernicki (Co-chair), Sue Braden, Julie Brown, Chris Cigale, Stephanie Collins, Tina Freiburger, Eric Gresnick, Roberta Hanus, Rebecca Headley, Mary Heller, Jennifer Hernandez-Meier, Sharon Keigher, Lydia LaGue, Katie Mangan, Barb Teske-Young, Dimitri Topitzes, and Wendy Volz Daniels 58

In Recognition of Generosity

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Chapman Society Anonymous Anonymous Paul Kovenock Judith Kramer ‘94, ‘97 Aileen Rockjordan* ‘61 Stan Stojkovic*

Chancellor’s Society Members of the Chancellor’s Society made gifts or pledges of $1,000 or more to HBSSW during the 2011-12 fiscal year. Don ‘69 & Helen Banta Concordia University Wisconsin Extendicare Foundation, Inc. Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund Irene Frye ‘75, ‘78 Helen Bader Foundation, Inc. Steven McMurtry* & Gwat-Yong Lie ‘80* Susan* & Robert Rose Stan Stojkovic* The Picker Institute, Inc.

* Indicates the donor is a current or retired member of the HBSSW faculty or staff.

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our contribution to the UWM Foundation on behalf of the Helen Bader School of Social Welfare makes you an essential partner in the effort to advance the school’s mission: to improve lives and strengthen communities through research, education and community partnerships. We are so very grateful that you have joined us. Thank you.

2011 - 2012 Donors Gail Albergottie ‘95 Arlie Albrecht ‘75 Ann Marie Allara Ecclesiastes ‘94, ‘96 & Therdo Allen Bethany Ames ‘95 Anonymous Donations Joyce ‘82, ‘85 & Steven Appel Meghan Augustine ‘06 Kurt Baker ‘77 Mary Kay Balchunas ‘78, ‘80 Denita Ball ‘03 Bridget Bannon ‘70, ‘74 Don Banta ‘69 Joseph Bauer ‘87 Georgia Becker ‘76 Darcia Behrens ‘81 Miss Gail Bembinster ‘71 Neil Berezowitz ‘77 Willie Bethune ‘79 Erik Bieck ‘80 Mary Boudry ‘01 Bruce Boyd ‘74 Angela Brannan ‘86 Stephen Brazell ‘90 Mary Brill ‘90 Rachel Brugman ‘05 Angela Brunhart ‘97 Trina Buck ‘82, ‘84 Linda Burris ‘83, ‘87

Renee Butz ‘81 Thomas Callan ‘81 Terry Carter ‘72, ‘74 Michael Castro ‘83 Michael Chmielewski ‘76 Eileen ‘63 & Art Clark Felicia Clavelle ‘98, ‘11 Barbara Claybaugh ‘77 Jennifer Clearwater Linda Combes ‘69 Concordia University Wisconsin Thomas Cook ‘65 Margaret Cory ‘89, ‘93 Mary Coulson ‘47, ‘65 James Cox ‘66, ‘76 Joan Crisostomo Joseph Crumrine ‘99 Linda Czernicki* Michael Czerwonka ‘98 Joan Dahlke ‘63 Mary Dallmann Kristine Davidson ‘75 Philip Demski ‘72 Lynn Detrie ‘75 Ramona Dicks-Williams ‘84 Mary Dillmann ‘07 Joyce Dirschl ‘86 Jed Dolnick ‘78 Johnny Doyle ‘78 John Drexler ‘92 Katherine Durben ‘92

2012 Donors - Alumni and Friends of HBSSW Alexander Durtka ‘73 Diane Edwards* ‘82 Steven Eigen ‘68 Saleem El Amin ‘74 Elliot M Lubar Revocable Trust Melissa Emberts ‘89 Wendy Erickson ‘86 Extendicare Foundation, Inc. Dale Faesi ‘71 Gretchen Fairweather ‘06 Virginia Fennema ‘88 David Fenner ‘89 Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund Mary Filosa Brown ‘84 Janet Flood ‘96 Donna Foote ‘04 Sarah Ford ‘73 Catherine Fouliard ‘08 Raymond Frank ‘73 Lynn Froh ‘78 Irene Frye ‘75, ‘78 Daniel Fuhrmann* Teresa Full ‘92 Susan Garny ‘89 Gerard Gierl ‘73, ‘75 Patricia Gilbertson ‘77 Michelle Glover ‘07 James Godin ‘06 Kurt Goeckermann ‘95 Jean Golner ‘81 Fiona Gordon MacLeod ‘78, ‘82 Dorothy Gore ‘66 Karen Gorske ‘76, ‘77 Ronald Grace ‘79 Barry Granrath ‘89 Terry Gray ‘78 M. Green ‘90 Doris Griffin ‘75 Roxanne Guenther ‘98, ‘00 Darlene Guernsey ‘55

Washington Guyton ‘67 Barbara Haag ‘76 Lisa Haas ‘87 Patrick Haggarty ‘66 David Harper ‘67 Barbara Hauck ‘81 Helen Bader Foundation, Inc. Herbert H. Kohl Charities, Inc. Ernest Herre ‘63 Ruth Hopgood ‘83 Marie Hornes ‘91 John Horngren ‘62 Millicent Houston ‘91 Barbara Hufschmidt ‘79 Mary Hunter ‘92, ‘95 Deborah Jacobs ‘77 Kristin Jensen ‘91 Jeffery Johnson ‘69 Rebecca Johnson ‘08 Virdell Jordan ‘01 Mark Kadunc ‘82 Goldie Kadushin* Carla Kaminski ‘89 Lonna Kannenberg ‘80, ‘83 Timothy Kathrens ‘87 Elizabeth Katz ‘08 Christopher Keadle ‘81 Sharon Keigher* Garret & Patricia Kennard Charles Kincaid ‘90 Ellen Kinde ‘89 Renee King ‘99 Gary Kirst ‘56 Joseph Kleiber ‘72 Thomas Klein ‘62 Georgeann Knier ‘01 Carol Knight ‘79 Diane Knight ‘70, ‘75 Bonnie Knippel ‘91 Edward Knuth ‘76

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In Recognition of Generosity Edwin Koepp ‘61 James Koleas ‘82 Susan Koppa McClurg ‘88 Molly Koranda ‘97 Dale Kostelnik ‘80 Debra Koval ‘79 Carol Kozminski* Mary Kressin ‘95 Fredlyn Kruglak-Viel ‘72 Ellen Kupfer ‘82 Marian Laev ‘70 Lydia LaGue* Marcia Larson ‘71 Daniel Lawton ‘69 Jennifer Lee ‘96 James Lehmkuhl ‘71 Dominic ‘76, ‘88 & Donna Leone Frieda Levine ‘75, ‘83 Robert Lewein ‘60, ‘61 Harry Lewis ‘73, ‘75 Joseph Liberto ‘52 Tricia Linde ‘09 Mary Linton ‘67 Beverly Lustig ‘71 Moreau ‘60 & Marilyn MacCaughey Robert Machotka ‘68 Jane Mackey* ‘08 Mary Madden ‘88 Douglas Mahy ‘69 Wayne Mainka ‘93 Patricia Makens ‘69 Patrick Malloy ‘73 Carolyn Mangan-Casey ‘88 Allan Marino ‘68, ‘69 James ‘75, ‘77 & Joan Maro Susan Marsolek ‘68 Francisco Martorell ‘76 James Martz ‘76 Michael Marzion* 61

Milena Masarik ‘96 Patricia Mauel ‘84 Margaret McCarthy ‘71 Norm McLure ‘75 Andrew McManus ‘69 Steven McMurtry* & Gwat-Yong Lie* ‘80 Mark McQuide Nancy McQuide ‘77 Kenneth Menting ‘68 George Meyer ‘64 Rhonda Montgomery* Roosevelt Morgan ‘80 Jeffrey Morzinski ‘80 Walt Morzy ‘70, ‘72 Lois Mulkey ‘90 Marybeth Murphy ‘85 Joan Naegeli ‘80 Paul Nannis ‘76 Jan Neilsen ‘83 Sonja Nelson-Gurda ‘80 James Neuser ‘66 Daniel Nolan ‘78 Sheniqua Norman ‘07 Julie O’Hara Miriam Oliensis-Torres ‘81 Jenann Olsen Michele Olshanski ‘95 Scott Olstad ‘80 Martin Ordinans ‘78 Laura Otto-Salaj* Susan Pauls ‘00 Susan Perry ‘79 Deborah Peterman ‘91 Greg Peterson ‘80, ‘92 Matthew Pietruszynski ‘09 Anna Pleas ‘93, ‘97 Janet Poff ‘10 Laura Price ‘78, ‘82 Ralonda Price ‘01, ‘04

Alan Quosig ‘91 Dena Radtke ‘91 Joyce Radtke ‘99 Wesley Rafn ‘95 Heather Reader ‘02 Charon Reed ‘07 Curtis Reid ‘77 Margaret Reilly ‘93 Dorothy Roberson ‘97 Mary Rohr ‘69 Sam Romano ‘73 Susan* & Robert Rose Carolyn Ruck ‘91 Rena Safer ‘64 Joann Sallmann ‘91 Calley Savage ‘89 Beth Schaefer ‘00 Debra Schampers ‘93 Judith Schmidt-Lehman ‘83 Christine Schneider ‘93 Cynthia Schneider ‘69 Jennifer Schultz ‘08, ‘11 Timothy Schwaller ‘75 Michael Serio ‘77 James Sherwood ‘95 Judith Shine ‘80 Fred Siggelkow ‘80 Stephanie Sikinger ‘09, ‘11 Nancy Sinclair ‘73 John Sliga ‘76 Marion Sobieski ‘77 Kathleen & Philip Sobocinski Jane Steingraeber ‘73 Barbara Stohl ‘80 Stan Stojkovic* Franklin Stoneburner ‘66 Elton Streich Victoria Streich ‘96 Jeffrey Sturm ‘83 Jean Sweetland ‘87

Catherine Swessel ‘73, ‘75 Maggie Taetsch ‘06 Sally Tarvid ‘01 John Teevan ‘73 Holly Tennison ‘83 Judith Teplin ‘69 Ann Terwilliger ‘81 Barbara Teske-Young* ‘01 The Picker Institute, Inc. Laura Thorsen ‘95 Michele Tietyen ‘88 Rosezelle Tornatore ‘77 Jose Torres* ‘72 Wendy Tupper ‘72 Gerald Urbik ‘89 Sheryl Van Haren ‘85 Corinthia Van Orsdol Linda Vance ‘96 David VanPietersom ‘01 Vincent ‘98 & Cynthia Vitale Allen Vogt ‘81 Carol Wacker ‘72, ‘76 Jeanne Wagner Newton* Lisa Walther ‘98 Curtis Washington ‘71 Marilyn Weber ‘78 Jo Weigandt ‘91 Wheaton Franciscan Services, Inc. David Whiteley ‘78 Marlene Widen ‘76 Jenell Williamson ‘73 Maxine Winston ‘85 Mindy Wirth ‘78 Kathleen Wolfgram ‘08 Mary Wright ‘01 Wright Innovation, Inc Susan Wundrow ‘84, ‘87 Justin Zarcone ‘97 Donna Zientek ‘78 Linda Zik ‘87

The accuracy of this list is very important to us. If we have listed your information incorrectly, please inform Richard Kessler, Director of Development (414) 229--6890 or via email at kessle23@uwm.edu.

To donate to the HBSSW: By check • Write check to the UWM Foundation. • Mail to: UWM HBSSW P.O. Box 786 Milwaukee, WI 53201 Online • www.hbssw.uwm.edu. • Click on Alumni and Friends 2012 HBSSW Alumni Board • Jerrold Braxton • Angie Brunhart • Sandra Chavez, President • Tobey Libber • Eliot Lubar • Brianna Vejvoda • Maxine Spears Winston Advisory: • Stan Stojkovic

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Retirements R.L. McNeely — Professor emeritus, social work, retired from HBSSW in 2012.

Much of McNeely’s work focuses on work satisfaction in human service organizations, work/family issues, domestic violence and racial justice. He co-edited Race, Crime, and Criminal Justice and Aging in Minority Groups, and wrote more than 80 articles, research monographs, and book reviews in social science and education journals. He co-authored the Milwaukee Urban League’s 1987 report Milwaukee Today: A Racial Gap Study, which received international attention, and co-authored the Milwaukee NAACP’s 2011 monograph Milwaukee Today: An Occasional Report. Both reports detail, demographically, the plight of Milwaukee’s minority citizenry. McNeely served as an American Council of Education fellow and is a research fellow of the Gerontological Society of America. His work in the field of domestic violence inspired the NBC documentary Of Macho and Men. He has testified before the U.S. Congress on domestic violence, served the U.S. Army as a domestic violence consultant, and appeared on CBS Morning News. Currently, McNeely—a practicing attorney at Midwest Legal Services—chairs a prison advisory board which seeks to assist the Wisconsin Department of Corrections in establishing strategies that enhance prospects for successful community reintegration by ex-offenders. Three of his most recent publications include “Notes on Newspaper Accounts of Male Elder Abuse” (Journal of Elder Abuse and Neglect), “Neighborhood Convenience Stores and Drug Paraphernalia: One Community’s Response” (Strategies of Community Intervention), and “Reflections on Racial Differences in Perceptions of Intimate Partner Violence,” (Social Justice in Context). McNeely is a member of the Milwaukee NAACP’s Executive Committee and a member of the Washington County Bar Association. He is listed in Who’s Who in Social Sciences Higher Education, Who’s Who in the Human Services, and Who’s Who in Aging. 63

Sharon Keigher — Professor, social work, retired in 2012. Keigher earned her Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 1985, taught at the University of Michigan, then joined HBSSW in 1992. In addition to teaching, she served as director of the Social Work Program in 1993. She was promoted to professor in 1995. Keigher served on numerous campus committees and was part of the campus initiative to establish the Center on Age & Community and the Graduate Certificate in Applied Gerontology. During sabbaticals Keigher worked in the Office of Aging, Disability, and Long-Term Care at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; Queen’s University of Belfast, UK; and Manchester University, UK. Keigher uses qualitative research methods to study how government policies at all levels affect low-income individuals. She wrote Housing Risks and Homelessness Among the Urban Aged, 1991 (Haworth) and co-authored Wages for Caring: Compensating Family Care of the Elderly,1990 (Guilford). She co-edited Aging and Social Work: The Changing Landscapes, highlighting the goals of the UN International Year of the Older Person (NASW Press). Keigher published some 50 sole- and jointly-authored scholarly journal articles. With professors Patricia Stevens and Eugenie Hildebrandt of the College of Nursing, Keigher worked on two large federally-supported qualitative studies, conducting in-depth interviews with Wisconsin women living with HIV/ AIDS. Publications from that work included Midlife and Older Adults and HIV: Implications for Social Services, Policy & Practice, 2004 (Taylor & Frances), research articles, and several doctoral student dissertations. The study of Milwaukee women who never gained employment through the Wisconsin W-2 (TANF) program was similarly productive. In 2008, Keigher initiated Spanish Immersion for Social Work Practice, a three-week, intensive language course in Costa Rica that continues today. “Despite current controversies over immigration, social workers are needed who can speak basic Spanish, and advocate effectively for immigrants,” Keigher said. 64

Diane Miller Retires

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t’s summer 2012 and, in preparation for retirement, I’m cleaning my office files—35 years of policies, procedures, and correspondence. My collection includes purple dittos (does anyone else remember those or the smell of ditto fluid?), ditto masters, and long documents typed on a real typewriter with no correction tape. As I sort papers, I’m also sorting memories of my life in HBSSW and the people I worked with, befriended, and lost. I still feel the loss of Bill Berg and Max Kurz, who were my dear friends and mentors, even with the rocky starts to our friendships. I miss Carl Pope and Elam Nunnally, too, and still expect to see them all walking the halls of Enderis. I find a ditto of a memo about incomplete grades, dated 1977. At the bottom, I see “SAK:dm” meaning it was Stuart Kirk’s memorandum and his secretary (me) typed it. Who knew when I started working here in 1976 as a clerk typist for an associate dean that I would become assistant dean of student services and find a profession I loved?

_, I rarely said, “I wish I didn’t have to go to work today.” I was always thrilled for students who made it to graduation, and I marveled at the hills many climbed to do so. I’ve been sad for those who couldn’t quite reach their goal, who struggled with full-time jobs, family problems, etc. Yet many tried again. That was one of the most rewarding parts of my work—working with someone who came back, sometimes just for the sake of finishing. When you work in one place as long as I have, you gain a second family. I think I have spent almost more time in Enderis than at home! It wasn’t all work. We had Halloween parties (complete with costumes!), Christmas/holiday parties, and Friday afternoon parties—families have to have their social time, too. And as with all families, we’ve shared the loss of parents, pets, friends and some dear students. My colleagues’ generous outpouring of support and helpfulness at such times has made me appreciate this fine family even more. I’ve been at UWM through at least six chancellors, five or six deans, countless students and co-workers. I was lucky to work with deans who assumed I knew how to do my job, didn’t question my work, and supported what I did. (Hopefully none of them had any regrets!) I had co-workers who were always willing to provide advice, assistance, and moral and physical support. Any success I had in my work is directly attributable to all the people I worked with; without their generosity of time and knowledge and helpfulness, I simply couldn’t have done it. Retirement offers me new adventures, and I’m ready to see where the road will lead. It’s exciting; but there is a huge lump in my throat. I can hardly say how much I’ll miss being a part of the Helen Bader School of Social Welfare. As I close my office door for the last time, I swallow that lump, and set off for the next phase with fond memories.

~ Diane Miller 66

Helen Bader School of Social Welfare P.O. Box 786 Milwaukee, WI 53201 www.hbssw.uwm.edu


2012 Annual Report of the Helen Bader School of Social Welfare