Issuu on Google+

Harvard Public Health Review

Winter 2012

mHEALTH How cellphones are transforming public health

The 2011 GiFt Report Also Inside:  Oregon’s Novel Medicaid Experiment Raw Milk Debate Heats Up

HARVARD

School of Public Health

Dean’s Message

The Quest for Innovation

T

he history of public health is

Underwriting research at a critical

a history of innovation. From

early stage of development can

the germ theory of disease to genetic epidemiology, public health revolu-

have profound consequences—both

tions have always sprung from inven-

for science and for humankind.

tive ideas fueled by moral urgency. the Review makes clear. Katherine

makers weighing evidence to make

tury ago, Harvard School of Public

Baicker’s study of a rare natural

Health has embodied this pioneer-

policy experiment—Oregon’s brief

ing spirit. Our world-class scientists

lottery for state government-financed

paved the way for a polio vaccine,

health care—became an instant clas-

prevented millions of cholera deaths

sic when it was published this sum-

by promoting simple oral rehydra-

mer. And HSPH researchers wield-

enlightened decisions. As a new year begins, I urge you to support the School in its public health mission and its quest to find new and better ways of bringing health and well-being to all.

tion therapy, described both the bio-

ing cutting-edge mobile technology

logical mechanisms of AIDS and the

to reverse age-old health inequities in

epidemic’s human rights dimensions,

impoverished nations are carving out

discovered the tick vector of Lyme

new territory for the entire field.

Since its founding nearly a cen-

disease, helped set global standards

Those of you who support these

for protection against environmental

efforts by giving to the School are

toxins, invented new ways of mea-

also pioneers. Over the years, you

suring the burden of disease, popu-

have seen how underwriting research

larized the term “designated driver”

at a critical early stage of develop-

in the United States, campaigned to

ment can have profound conse-

eliminate harmful trans fats from

quences—both for science and for

food, led the charge for worldwide

humankind.

tobacco control, exposed the links

And you understand that, in the

between health and wealth, devel-

end, innovation is all about human

oped new approaches to improving

beings. New ideas and methods must

health system performance—the list

empower people, whether as patients

goes on and on.

taking charge of their own health or

tion never ceases, as this issue of

the health of loved ones, or as public health workers seeking to save lives across populations, or as policy-

2

Harvard Public Health Review

Kent Dayton/HSPH

The School’s drive for innova-

Julio Frenk Dean of the Faculty and T & G Angelopoulos Professor of Public Health and International Development, Harvard School of Public Health

Harvard Public Health Review

Winter 2012

14 mHealth Cellphones are transforming public health research and practice.

24

2 Dean’s Message The Quest for Innovation

31 Harvard School of Public Health Annual Gift Report 2011

22 Raw Milk: The Debate Heats Up Should farms be allowed to distribute unpasteurized milk?

33 Event Highlights

24 Hitting the Lottery  Oregon’s experiment with Medicaid was a golden research opportunity.

22

Also in this Issue 4 Frontlines 8 Alumni Award Winners 11 Philanthropic Impact 29 Continuing and Professional Education Calendar 30 In Memoriam

Image Credits: From top, ©Ultra.F/gettyimages.com; Kent Dayton/HSPH; gettyimages.com

The Gift Report 37 Alumni 41 Individuals 45 Institutional Partnerships 47 Annual Giving 51 Financial Aid & Named Scholarship Funds 54 Tribute Gifts 55 Faculty, Staff, and Faculty Emeriti 56 Founders Circle 58 Volunteers 61 Financial Highlights

front lines Rural Health Care is Ailing In the first national study of care at critical access hospitals* (CAHs) in the rural U.S., HSPH researchers have found that CAHs have fewer clinical capabilities, lower quality of care, and worse patient outcomes than other hospitals. Patients admitted for heart attack, heart failure, or pneumonia were at 30 to 70 percent

7 Billion and Counting...

greater risk of dying within 30 days than those at other hospitals. Karen Joynt, an instructor at both HSPH and

If you think the world is crowded now, just wait

Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the study’s lead au-

a few years. Between today and 2050, our 2011

thor, said CAHs “face a unique set of obstacles to pro-

global population of roughly 7 billion could ex-

viding high-quality care,” which current health policy

pand by another 1.1 to 2.6 billion people. David

efforts don’t address. The study recommends partner-

Bloom, HSPH’s Clarence James Gamble Profes-

ships with larger hospitals, greater use of telemedicine,

sor of Economics and Demography, writes that

or joining national quality-improvement efforts to help

already-strained developing countries will likely

CAHs ensure, in Joynt’s words, “that all Americans re-

face tremendous difficulties supplying food, water,

ceive high-quality care, regardless of where they live.”

housing, and energy to their growing populations—with worldwide repercussions for health, security, and economic growth.

*CAHs are geographically isolated facilities with no more than 25 acute care beds.

To Know, or Not to Know? Our Dilemma about Alzheimer’s

W

Learn More Online Visit the Review Online at http://hsph.me/frontlines for links to press releases, news reports, videos, and the original research studies behind Frontlines stories.

4

Harvard Public Health Review

Illustration, Shaw Nielsen; Photograph, JJRD/Vetta, Getty Images

ould you want to know? An international survey designed and analyzed by HSPH and Alzheimer Europe found that 85 to 95 percent of respondents from five countries (the U.S., France, Germany, Spain, and Poland) said that if they were experiencing memory loss and confusion, they would go to a doctor to determine if the cause was Alzheimer’s disease. Although currently no single test can reliably diagnose Alzheimer’s, 38 to 59 percent of respondents believe there is such a test. In four of the five countries, Alzheimer’s was the second-biggest health fear after cancer. While fear of getting Alzheimer’s disease was highest among those aged 60 and over (20 to 47 percent), even among 18–34 year-olds, 6 to 22 percent reported that Alzheimer’s was the disease they most feared getting.

China and U.S. Health Leaders Convene at HSPH

I

n China, health care quality in rural areas often lags behind that in cities. In the United States, lack of com-

munication among health care providers sometimes results in inadvertent harm to patients. These deficiencies, and how to address them, were just two of many issues discussed during the first annual Harvard America-China Health Summit held at Harvard School of Public Health in September. Keynote speakers included Chen Zhu, China’s Minister of Health, and Sherry Glied, Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The two-day event, sponsored by HSPH’s China Initiative, drew more than 700 health officials and other participants from China, the U.S., and beyond to exchange information on problems and solutions in health care. Both the United States and China have embarked on ambitious health reform plans. Both share key goals—such as expanding access, improving quality, and lowering costs. And both are striving to achieve these goals amid mounting medical costs, rising rates of chronic disease, technological challenges, and other factors. Chen listed many recent improvements in Chinese health care, including drops in maternal and infant mortality rates, increases in life expectancy, and reductions in out-of-pocket medical expenses. Glied likewise outlined progress in the U.S. since the passage of major health care reform legislation last year. She mentioned popular new proviKent Dayton/HSPH; Courtesy of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

sions such as the inclusion of adults up to age 26 on their parents’ health care plans as well as lower medication costs for seniors.

At top, participants in the Harvard-China Health Summit. Above, left to right, Yuanli Liu, senior lecturer on international health and founding director of the HSPH China Initiative, China’s Minister of Health Chen Zhu, and Guo Baocheng, vice chairman of People’s Congress of Yulin City, Shaanxi Province.

Some 50 speakers discussed topics including traditional Chinese medicine, chronic disease control, information technology in health care, the relationship between doctors and drug companies, and telemedicine.

Dean Frenk inducted into the American academy of Arts and sciences HSPH Dean Julio Frenk was among a group of the nation’s most influential artists, scientists, scholars, authors, and institutional leaders who were inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences at an October ceremony in Cambridge. The Academy, which was founded during the American Revolution, is one of the nation’s oldest and most prestigious societies of scholars and leaders. Dean Frenk is shown signing the Academy’s Book of Members.

Winter 2012

5

front lines Noncommunicable Diseases to Cost $47 trillion Reports about the growing threat from noncommunicable diseases, or NCDs—such as cancer, heart disease, and diabetes—have appeared prominently in headlines in recent months. At a September 2011 conference convened by the Washington Post, HSPH Dean Julio Frenk described a “moral imperative” to prevent and treat NCDs in poor countries, similar to the international anti-AIDS effort made a decade ago. A report released the same month, jointly authored by the World Economic Forum and an HSPH team led by David Bloom, Clarence James Gamble Professor of Economics and Demography, and Elizabeth Cafiero, a research assistant in the Department of Global Health and Population, noted that the global economic impact of NCDs over the next two decades will total a staggering $47 trillion. And in June, a major international study on worldwide trends in diabetes, published in The Lancet, found that the number of adults with the disease reached 347 million in 2008—more than double the number in 1980. The study was co-led by Goodarz Danaei, HSPH assistant professor of global health. Today, an estimated 63 percent of deaths worldwide are caused by NCDs, making them the world’s leading killer.

Energy-Efficient Buildings: Hazardous to Your Health?

T

Massachusetts Girls Land on Planet Health

6

Harvard Public Health Review

Harvard Public Health Review now on Kindle Take the Review on the road in your Kindle e-book reader. Visit the Amazon.com Kindle Store and search for “harvard public health” to download. Coming soon on other e-readers.

Illustration, Mary Anne Lloyd; Photographs, Aubrey LaMedica/HSPH

Planet Health—an obesity and eating disorders prevention program developed at HSPH and first implemented at five Massachusetts middle schools— saved an estimated $14,000 in total medical expenses for the 254 girls enrolled in the program by averting the costs of treating obesity and eating disorders. The girls, aged 10 to 14, learned about the benefits of healthy eating, less TV, and more physical activity. Girls who went through the program were about half as likely as others to purge or use diet pills to control their weight. Planet Health is now offered at thousands of schools nationwide.

alk about unintended consequences: Energyefficient building weatherizations, retrofits, and upgrades can cause dampness, poor ventilation, excessive temperatures, and emissions from building materials. These factors can degrade air quality and trigger respiratory problems such as asthma and other health problems. These are the findings of a new Institute of Medicine report requested by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and prepared by a committee chaired by John Spengler, HSPH Akira Yamaguchi Professor of Environmental Health and Human Habitation. Spengler says that “America is in the midst of a large experiment” with weatherization and energyefficient retrofits that affect air quality. He recommends that the EPA make “an upfront investment to … avoid problems where they can be anticipated,” and that doing so will “yield benefits in health and in averted costs of medical care, remediation, and lost productivity.”

Offthe Cuff

Michelle Williams New Chair, Department of Epidemiology Stephen B. Kay Family Professor of Public Health

I s epidemiology a beautiful science?

I started to see beauty in science as an undergrad, looking at embryonic development. There is nothing more

beautiful than watching a single cell turn into an organism. It contains all the signals needed to dictate which cells become a wing, which a thorax, which an eye. The beauty is the apparent simplicity hiding an enormous complexity. Epidemiology might seem dry to most people—but it’s just turning the beauty of biology into numbers. When epidemiologists get together, they might look at a table or a graph and say, ‘We’ve distilled this down to its essence.’ One of the most beautiful charts I’ve seen has two graphs, each representing a 50-year time span, overlaying each other. One graph shows the declining number of hours that Americans are sleeping at night— its line is going down. The other shows the percentage of Americans who are overweight or obese—its line has the same slope and curvature as the sleep line, but it’s going up. The beauty of this chart is its simplicity. It encapsulates two important trends that we can’t deny are occurring. We have to be careful that we’re not oversimplifying their connection, but it begins the conversation.

Kent Dayton/HSPH

That’s why I think it’s beautiful. Learn More Online

Visit the Review Online at http://hsph.me/frontlines for links to press releases, news reports, videos, and the original research studies behind Frontlines stories.

Winter 2012

7

front lines

New Awards Honor Trailblazers in Public Health In 2011, HSPH awarded three new alumni awards: the Emerging Public Health Professional Award, the Leadership Award in Public Health Practice, and the Public Health Innovator Award. Emerging Public Health Professional Award Hilarie Cranmer, MPH ’04 For leadership in humanitarian work and commitment to teaching.

My interest in public health became clear when I worked in Kosovo for Physicians for Human Rights, shortly after the war and the return of the refugees, documenting war crimes. It was obvious I needed more of a skill set to deal with the complex milieu of health concerns, crimes, water, health structure. Eyes open! I was thrown into the thick of it. I continued to have this passion for the humanitarian field. And having an MPH is like carrying a green card when you want to do international health—it is the recognized currency of global work training. A background in public health helps you make sense of what you’re seeing, by looking at the statistics, by understanding the data and trends, and by gaining insight into the bigger picture. It’s a much grander scale than working with an individual. Whether your patient is malnourished, has measles, or has just come across a border crossing: How do you put a voice to the issue? How do you have a bigger impact on the community that this patient represents? What truly lies behind what you are seeing? This patient with measles represents a much larger breakdown of a health care system: How do we heal that larger problem? Public Health Innovator Award Trishan Panch, MPH ’10 For envisioning the potential of mHealth through Sana Mobile and improving health care access worldwide.

HSPH redefines what is possible. It sets a higher floor for what’s possible and raises the ceiling—in fact, it removes the ceiling. What particularly fascinates me is using creativity and science together to impact public health problems.

8

Harvard Public Health Review

Françoise Bouchard, MPH ’86; Trishan Panch, MPH ’10; Hilarie Cranmer, MPH ’04

I want to create the conditions for people in technology to say to people in public health, “I’d like to solve health problems and have an impact on the world by using my engineering skills.” And for public health professionals to say to technologists, “I have this idea, but I don’t know how to do it and I feel technology could have an impact.” There’s a lot of creativity in the public health community, but it is often not nurtured. I want to be a part of defining a new path for public health action. Leadership Award in Public Health Practice Françoise Bouchard, MPH ’86 For contributions to equitable delivery of care and commitment to public health in Canada.

My work in the Canadian correctional system placed me in an environment where there were conflicting values: One focused on restriction and punishment, the other on rehabilitation. As a public health professional, we need to recognize these different value sets in order to advance a health agenda. Over time, we were able to gain funding and enhance programs such as HIV, Hepatitis C, and methadone treatment, as well as mental health services. We do get into trouble when challenging the status quo. But by applying a public health and population perspective to organizations and societal issues, we create transformative value.

Alumni Award of Merit Winners on Why Public Health is Compelling Left to right, E. Francis Cook, SM ’77, SD ’83; William N. Rom, MPH ’73;

Each year, Harvard School of Public Health awards four distinguished graduates the Alumni Award of Merit—the highest honor presented to an alumna or alumnus. The award is given to individuals whose leadership, community service, contributions, and commitment to the field of public health exemplify the School’s ideals. Hugh S. Fulmer, MPH ’61 For a career spent putting public health theory into practice through community-oriented health care and preventive medicine programs.

From 1958–1960, I worked at the Navajo-Cornell Field Health Research Project at Many Farms, on the Navajo Reservation in Arizona, as clinic medical director and research associate. I was repeatedly confronted with what I didn’t know about public health and the science of epidemiology. An HSPH physician grad student, visiting us as

and Hugh S. Fulmer, MPH ’61

a consultant, helped me see my ignorance. We had cases of anemia on the reservation. In preparation for his arrival, I had pulled the charts of all 36 patients with anemia from our clinic’s family- and communityoriented record system. He looked through them and said, “You have continued Winter 2012

9

Kent Dayton/HSPH

J. M. Yolène Vaval Suréna, MPH ’81;

front lines a significant public health problem. But to study it further, you can’t just review their charts as a clinician— you have to take a random sample of the whole community, get hematocrits, establish the prevalence of anemia in the population.” That episode was startling to me. Not only was it part of my introduction to “denomina-

Award winners worked the wards at Bellevue Hospital, tended earthquake victims in Haiti, researched anemia on a Navajo reservation, and inspired students in Argentina.

tor” medicine, but it sparked a career-long focus on the need for merging medicine and public health in educa-

are really sick. Deciphering their illnesses and deciding

tion and practice.

how to manage them is a huge challenge. What I’ve learned over the years is that public

` J. M. Yolene Vaval Suréna, MPH ’81 For decades of on-the-ground work addressing public health challenges and disaster response in her native Haiti.

health is science-based. Once you have the data and

Day Six after the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, we were

something, you just have to keep at it. You are one little

tired, food was scarce, and we had been sleeping on

cog in the wheel—but your little contribution helps

small mattresses outside for only a few hours at a time.

make the wheel go around.

The city smelled bad, flies were all over the place, and we were threatened with rain. The teams were showing signs of exhaustion. Around 6:45 am, I dropped a medical team at a hospital and congratulated the night shift for its work, putting smiles on exhausted faces. I attended the 7:00 am meeting between national and international head agencies to plan and coordinate responses with the Prime Minister and prepare his address to the nation. By 10:00 am, I had located 200 tents and sent a team to set them up. Everyone’s determination was inspiring. William N. Rom, MPH ’73 For contributions to environmental and occupational medicine through clinical research, public policy, and advocacy for the underserved.

In July, I work on the wards at Bellevue, when we get all the new interns and fellows. We hear half a dozen different languages from our patients—from Farsi and Bengali to Polish, Mandarin, and Spanish. These patients

10

Harvard Public Health Review

the scientific argument down pat, you can win the day. I’ve also learned about the importance of perseverance. Whether it’s going after grants or trying to achieve

Earl Francis Cook, Jr., SM ’77, SD ’83 For contributions to clinical epidemiology and impassioned teaching and mentorship.

In public health and clinical medicine, epidemiology is a core basic science—if not the core basic science. It involves a set of skills that is used in other areas of public health. One epidemiology professor used to say “It’s the queen science of public health.” As a teacher, the best thing is to see our students become teachers. I take great pride in the Program in Clinical Effectiveness that we helped develop in Argentina, which is modeled after our program at Harvard; our students at Harvard became faculty in Argentina’s program. It’s a lot more effective to take the training program to the audience than to bring the audience to Harvard. Adrianne Appel is a Boston-based science writer. Learn More Online Visit the Review Online at http://hsph.me/frontlines for links to press releases, news reports, videos, and the original research studies behind Frontlines stories.

philanthropic impact

Kay Professorship Attracts Leader in Maternal and Infant Health

S

Russ and Judy Carson renewed their support for the Carson Family Scholarship Program at Harvard School of Public Health. Established in 2001, the program has bolstered scholarship funding for students throughout the School. The Carsons also provide generous support to HSPH students through the Carson Family Fellowship in Health Policy and Management. Since 1994, nearly 100 students, with financial assistance from the Carson Family, have attended the School to gain the skills needed to become public health leaders, and more will soon

be funded. Russ is a founding partner of Welsh, Carson, Anderson & Stowe, one of the nation’s largest investment firms specializing in the purchase of privately owned companies in the information

Kent Dayton/HSPH, Suzanne Camarata

tephen Kay decided to establish a new professorship in epidemiology at Harvard School of Public Health with a straightforward goal: to alleviate sickness and reduce deaths. Kay, who has also supported student financial aid at HSPH, called the School “extraordinary.” Stephen Kay Kay, AB ’56, MBA ’58, PA, a Goldman Sachs senior director and longtime Harvard supporter, said the first person to be named the Stephen B. Kay Family Professor of Public Health—Michelle Williams, who is the new chair of the Department of Epidemiology—has conducted impressive research on the health of mothers and infants. “I hope that her work can save lives,” he said. Formerly a professor of epidemiology and global health at the University of Washington School of Public Health, Williams is an expert in women’s reproductive health and child health. Her work focuses on integrating genomic sciences and epidemiological research methods to identify risk factors, diagnostic markers, treatments, and prevention targets for disorders that contribute to maternal and infant mortality. She currently has research and teaching collaborations with epidemiologists in Chile, Ethiopia, Peru, and Thailand (see related article on Williams on page 7). David Hunter, Vincent L. Gregory Professor in Cancer Prevention and Dean for Academic Affairs, commented that in addition to conducting important research, Williams has “a stellar track record of mentoring.” Earlier this year, President Barack Obama presented Williams with the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring. Hunter added that having named chairs provides crucial support for department leadership, such as setting strategic direction or recruiting talented faculty. The establishment of the Kay Professorship, he said, “was very helpful in trying to attract Michelle here from her highly successful, well-established career at the University of Washington.”

Carson Family REnews Scholarship support Across HSPH

services and health care industries. Judy is the founder and executive director of Learning to Look, a program that teaches art appreciation to inner-city children. Read why Russ Carson thinks scholarship funding is an important investment in the future on page 52.

Winter 2012

11

philanthropic impact For Maternal Health, a Crucial Boost $12 million Gates Foundation grant to HSPH supports one-of-a-kind task force Each year, more than 340,000 women around the world die from complications of pregnancy and childbirth. To help lower that alarming number and improve maternal health in developing countries, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has awarded Harvard School of Public Health a three-year, $12 million grant for an initiative called the Maternal Health Task Force (MHTF)—a sort of one-stop shop for all maternal health information and research around the world. According to Gates Foundation senior program officer France Donnay, the MHTF “is the only consensusbuilding forum that exists on maternal health.” The MHTF was established in 2008 at EngenderHealth, a global organization involved in family planning, maternal health, and gender equity. It was led at the time by Ana Langer, who is now professor of the practice of public health and coordinator of the Dean’s Special Initiative on Women and Health at HSPH. Donnay says the Gates Foundation award should help build on the MHTF’s previous efforts and strengthen its research and education components. Langer calls the Gates grant crucial. “Without the Gates Foundation’s support, the task force would not exist,” she says. Over the next three years, the MHTF will fight for improved maternal health on several fronts around the world, with emphasis on three countries struggling hardest with the issue: Nigeria, Ethiopia, and India.

H

SPH Associate Professor Atul Gawande’s research group recently received two generous gifts in support of the Health Systems Innovations Research Fund.

Support from Mala Gaonkar, managing director of Lone Pine Capital LLC, and an anonymous donor will help Gawande and his colleagues develop clinical systems innovations with high public health impact and enduring value by reducing harm to patients and improving treatment results. Current projects include development and testing of the World Health Organization’s safe childbirth checklist for improving neonatal and maternal health; development of systems for improved end-of-life care; and investigation of methods for hospital management to improve patient care. Gawande’s team has also begun researching the patterns underlying effective and ineffective implementation of the WHO Safe Surgery Checklist. And Gawande is developing a surgical checklist program to reduce patient harm in the most common crisis situations in operating rooms and high-risk specialty surgery. Read what Gaonkar looks for when deciding what projects to support on page 43.

12

Harvard Public Health Review

This page, REUTERS/Reinhard Krause; opposite Kent Dayton/HSPH

Two Gifts Support Work on Checklists and Global Health Systems

For example, the group will widely disseminate the latest scientific news about maternal health, primarily through a website currently available in four languages and soon to be available in more. It will encourage and support major research and innovation. And it will create internships for students at maternal health organizations. “There are many very good maternal health projects and programs in the world,” explains Donnay. “But there is only one place where you can get such a wealth of information and fully understand what’s going on in the field—and that’s the Maternal Health Task Force. We think that being hosted at a prestigious school of public health will elevate its credibility, its convening power, and its level of recognition.”

Gift from Former Dean Bloom Supports Financial Aid Barry R. Bloom, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor and Joan L. and Julius H. Jacobson Professor of Public Health, made a gift to complete the endowment for the Barry R. and Irene Tilenius Bloom Fellowship Fund at Harvard School of Public Health. A group of Bloom’s friends and colleagues, with other supporters, created the fund following the end of his 10-year tenure as dean in 2008. The fund provides critical financial aid—one of Bloom’s priorities as dean—that can transform a student’s vision of a public health career into a reality. Recipients will be selected on academic merit, leadership potential, and commitment to improving public health in fields and areas of the world in greatest need. Read why Bloom chose to give to the School on page 55.

Medtronic Grant Supports Global Health Education Overhaul

A

new grant from the Medtronic Foundation will help support an ambitious effort by Harvard School of Public Health and several international partner institutions to transform health education for public health leaders, doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and other health professionals around the globe. The project aims to create new curricula for up-and-coming health professionals at a time when chronic diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer are on the rise. Technology will play a key role; the Internet will be used to disseminate information about best practices in health education as well as workable solutions to health problems. A portal will serve as a clearinghouse for information, a virtual gathering place for faculty and students, and a platform for virtual meetings, workshops, and focus groups. “Global health is at a crossroads, and education is critical to training the next generation of leaders to meet these challenges,” said Ian Lapp, HSPH associate dean for strategic educational initiatives. “We greatly appreciate the Medtronic Foundation for being the first to support this effort.”

The Medtronic Foundation The two-year, $500,000 grant is also renewing its support for to fund HSPH’s “Teaching to another HSPH initiative: the China Transform Global Health” initiaInitiative Senior Executive Education tive comes from the Medtronic Foundation, part of the Minnesota-based medical technology company Medtronic. Through the initiative, experts from HSPH and its partner institutions will develop a competency framework that will inform global health education at the School and help health educators worldwide develop new curricula at their institutions. Left to right, Hiten Chawla, senior group manHeather Page, director of ager, international marketing, Medtronic; Sarah Branstrator, associate director of institutional the Medtronic Foundation, partnerships, HSPH Office for External Relations; says the company chose to Herb Riband, vice president, external affairs, fund HSPH’s “Teaching to Medtronic International; Wendy Bennett, conTransform” initiative because sultant, Medtronic; Ian Lapp, associate dean for strategic educational initiatives, HSPH “it connects public health Training Program, which since 2005 concerns with medical eduhas offered four-week programs to cation. This is crucial if we are going to provide health care for ‘the help Chinese health policymakers and senior health executives develop bottom billion’ ”—those who live strategic vision, technical knowledge, in the world’s poorest nations. The impetus for the initiative stems from political skills, and an ethical orientation toward formulating and implea critique of health professional education outlined in a 2010 Lancet menting health policy. Medtronic, which has funded the initiative annureport by HSPH Dean Julio Frenk ally since 2006, is now providing and Lincoln Chen of the China another $750,000 for three years. Medical Board.

Winter 2012

13

Mobilizing a Revolution

How cellphones

deadly infection spread by contaminated drinking

water—struck hundreds of victims in Rwanda. In response, Nathan Eagle, Harvard School of Public Health

“We could build a surveillance system that alerts local ministries of health if we detect what looks like an outbreak,” Eagle says. Making this prediction model possible are giant data

adjunct assistant professor of epidemiology and an engi-

banks run by cellular service providers with records of

neer by training, tapped an unusual source to develop a

every phone’s history. When a phone receives or sends

simple model for predicting cholera outbreaks: cellphone

a message, or moves in or out of a cell tower’s range,

data. His model was predicated on the hypothesis that

the network records it. In aggregate, all of the call data

he might find a telltale sign of an outbreak by tracking

records from a given provider can give researchers an in-

people’s locations. For instance, if the movements of 100

valuable picture of how people behave.

people within a 10-mile radius suddenly slow, the cause might be illness—and a looming epidemic.

14

Harvard Public Health Review

Information that users generate as they move around and use their mobile phones, when combined with other

Field photographs courtesy of Patrick Vinck; portraits, Kent Dayton/HSPH

B

etween 2006 and 2008, outbreaks of cholera—a

are transforming public health

data such as public health records, is called “Big Data”

The new field of “mHealth”

because of its volume and variety. But as Eagle discov-

Eagle is part of a growing movement at HSPH and within

ered, moving from theory to practice in the emerging

the global health community to leverage the explosion in

world of Big Data-driven public health still means work-

mobile phone availability—and the data cellphones can

ing out the kinks.

share and produce—to change how public health and

“What I built turned out to be not a cholera predic-

medical problems are identified, prevented, and treated.

tor, but a flood detector,” he says with a laugh. People

This burgeoning field, which has expanded exponentially

moved around less, not because they were sick, but be-

in the last five years, is called “mHealth.”

cause the roads were washing out. Yet fortuitously, Eagle’s

The variety of mHealth applications under devel-

prediction model also applied to cholera—because out-

opment or available worldwide is staggering and ever

breaks generally erupt about two weeks after a flood.

evolving. In addition to using Big Data to track people’s movements and predict potential public health threats, continued

Winter 2012

15

mHealth is putting medical records, appointment remind-

mHealth has the potential to help patients, doctors,

ers, health tips, and detailed standards of care literally

and researchers make healthier, more informed choices by

in the hands of health workers and patients, whether in

doing what no other technology can do: deliver valuable,

Tanzania or Tucson. Today, there are mHealth applica-

actionable information to the right people at the moment

tions that diagnose medical ailments, manage chronic dis-

it is needed, no matter where they are. And with projects

eases, and support mental health therapies and addiction

ranging from outbreak prediction to humanitarian aid,

control.

HSPH is among the vanguard institutions defining this new terrain.

There are 6 billion cellphones on the planet—and most subscribers live in the developing world. “Our faculty have always been leaders in developing interventions to improve health,” says Karen Emmons, HSPH associate dean for research. “mHealth provides an important opportunity to explore how to take those interventions to scale, to deliver them in remote places, and to fundamentally change the access of whole populations to evidence-based interventions.” Cellphones curbing drug-resistant malaria?

Caroline Buckee, HSPH assistant professor of epidemiology, uses call data records from the largest service provider in Kenya to track the movements of 15 million people and correlate those movements with data about malaria. Her work focuses on understanding how human

Nathan Eagle, HSPH adjunct assistant professor of epidemiology, built a cholera prediction model based on cellphone location data.

behaviors, such as where people travel and with whom they interact, influence the spread of diseases. Though using mobility data to make predictive models of the spread of disease is nothing new, the data have generally been either inaccurate or unfeasible to collect Left, smartphones integrate audio, video, text, data, and geolocation all in one place, making them the ideal tool for mHealth. Right, using smartphones during research interviews to record information reduces errors and saves time.

16

Harvard Public Health Review

less devices, is the rapid spread of mobile phones into remote niches. According to the mHealth Alliance, a research and advocacy organization hosted by the United Nations Foundation, close to 90 percent of the world’s population has wireless coverage. There are 6 billion cellphones on the planet—and 7 billion people. Moreover, 65 percent of subscribers reside in the developing world. While the Internet revolution passed by without appreciably changing the lives of many people in the developing world, mobile technologies offer immediate advantages: they are far cheaper, they don’t demand steady supplies of electricity, and they don’t require the same extensive infrastructure to reach into people’s homes. For all these reasons, mHealth technologies are leap-frogging ahead of the personal computer. “The use of cellular phones for health care and public health is one of the most promising developments in the

“Never before have we been able to look at individual people on this scale, moving in real time. It’s a huge deal for infectious disease researchers.”

—Caroline Buckee, assistant professor of epidemiology

at large scales. “Never before have we been able to look at individual people on this scale, moving in real time,” says Buckee. “It’s a huge deal for infectious disease researchers.” In the future, Buckee plans to use these models to

quest to achieve universal health coverage worldwide,” notes HSPH Dean Julio Frenk, “because mobile phones are rapidly becoming the communication technology of choice—and increasingly so among the poor.”

continued

Tracking pandemic flu In 2009, HSPH graduate student Martin Lajous, SM ’04, SD ’11, successfully collaborated with a large cellphone company in Mexico, surveying Mexican residents to characterize outbreaks of H1N1

intervene at key moments—by sending text messages to

influenza. Lajous pitched the idea as a test to

travelers heading into malaria-plagued zones, detecting

determine whether cellphone technology could be

when their phones enter the range of a cell tower in that

used for public health response and surveillance. The

zone and reminding individuals who have opted to receive

cellphone company agreed, and the effort showed

notifications to take precautions such as wearing long

that cellular surveys may be a practical, inexpensive,

sleeves and pants and sleeping under a mosquito net.

and timely complement to traditional surveillance.

Reaching the unreachable

One of the driving forces behind this new field, in addition to the emergence of the smartphone and other wire-

Winter 2012

17

Improving maternal and child health

Marc Mitchell, a pediatrician, management specialist, and lecturer on global health at HSPH, says 70 percent of the population in Tanzania has access to a mobile phone. He is among those leading the way in evaluating potential mHealth interventions in the developing world, having spent 20 years designing, validating, and delivering clinical protocols to guide health workers through examinations, diagnoses, and treatments. Mitchell is a firm believer in mHealth as an effective and inexpensive means of getting such step-by-step protocols into the hands of health care practitioners when and where they’re needed. mHealth extends the reach of these protocols to remote places and makes them easier to apply. Mobile technologies automatically keep protocols current with the latest medical advances and supplement them with other valuable features such as digital appointment management tools and electronic patient records, two systems that many clinics in the developing world lack. In

“mHealth is going to happen no matter what. I believe it can happen in one of two ways. In one, it benefits people equitably. In the other, it goes to the highest bidder.” —Marc Mitchell, HSPH lecturer on global health

some clinics, the only records of patient visits are logbooks that patients sign on arrival, and the only records of diagnoses and treatment plans are on index cards that patients themselves carry. Mitchell has launched several pilot projects in Tanzania using mobile phones to improve maternal health, child health, and malnutrition using time-tested protocols. Through his not-for-profit organization D-Tree (which stands for “decision tree,” a type of flowchart that is part of many clinical protocols), Mitchell runs a maternal health program in Zanzibar funded by the Bill

Left, a village leader in Ombella, Central African Republic, draws a map of the village. Interviewers use the map to plot a geographic sampling of households and individuals. Right, a solar charger (background) provides energy to operate smartphones without access to electricity.

18

Harvard Public Health Review

& Melinda Gates Foundation. Also in Zanzibar, in a

mHealth and women’s health

project funded by UNICEF, a mobile app that assists health workers as they screen children for malnutrition

“Mothers wanted us to lever-

has helped reduce errors in health care delivery. If pilot

age the one piece of technology

projects such as this prove effective, says Mitchell, the

they have access to: the mobile

next step will be scale-up.

phone,” says Priya Agrawal, a visiting scientist and obstetrician

International impact

Just a few years ago, according to Erica Kochi, co-lead

and gynecologist working with the Women and Health Initiative at HSPH. The resulting tool, the Mother/Baby

of the Tech Innovations Team at UNICEF, people

7-day mCheck, was designed by mothers, for mothers. The

weren’t interested in using mobile technologies in

checklist-based intervention cues mothers to examine their

health care in the developing world. “They laughed

infants for common danger signs during the first week af-

when we brought it up,” she says. After all, just five

ter birth.

years ago, only the urban rich owned mobile phones

Of mothers and babies who die during childbirth, two-

in the developing world. Today, there are mobile

thirds die in these critical first seven days. Mobile phones

phone owners in even the most remote villages. “Now,

not only remind mothers to do the checks, but also help

everyone is including mobile technology in their plans.”

them connect to medical aid and transport, when needed.

mHealth applications enable aid workers to map

ing to threats of violence, disease, or malnutrition.

Cellphones and incentives for better health

Applications also provide patient monitoring, send text

In addition to his role at HSPH,

messages reminding patients to take needed medica-

Nathan Eagle is CEO of Jana (for-

tions, or offer suggestions for maintaining health while

merly txteagle), a technology

where a crisis is unfolding in real time, giving researchers and aid workers a better shot at swiftly respond-

company that has built a platform

pregnant, even in war-ravaged places. For organizations like the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization, with missions to avert dangerous epidemics, “this technology is a potential powerhouse,” adds Phuong Pham, a research scientist at

capable of awarding billions of people with free mobile airtime in exchange for completing surveys or purchasing products. This arrangement sprang from one of Eagle’s first mHealth projects, helping a hospital in rural Kenya prevent frequent blood supply shortages. He developed a

HSPH and director of evaluation and implementa-

text message application enabling nurses to alert the

tion science at the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative,

main blood bank about shortages before they became

a University-wide program dedicated to developing

emergencies. But the project fell flat; the cost of send-

ways to improve the delivery of health services in

ing daily text messages is a big chunk of a rural nurse’s

areas facing war, conflict, or natural disasters. “In

income.

epidemiology, determining person, place, and time are

Eagle responded with airtime compensation, a

crucial. If you can look at those three components in

system that automatically gives users free service in

real time, you can immediately make informed deci-

exchange for data transmission charges for each mes-

sions and take action.”

sage sent. The scheme worked, and the nurses started

continued

texting again. Winter 2012

19

Long-term research studies using mHealth

But will mHealth deliver on its early prom-

Mobile technologies are also energizing the workhorse

ise? The answer depends largely on who invests in

of public health research—longitudinal studies, which

mHealth and how. If the biggest investments are

collect behavioral and health data over time to reveal

made by those who stand to profit, then, according to

factors that may threaten or improve health.

Mitchell, “mHealth would not reach those who most

For example, HSPH is developing a program to

need it,” particularly those who cannot afford mobile

monitor the day-to-day behaviors of half a million peo-

phones without assistance, such as under-resourced

ple in sub-Saharan Africa over several decades, gather-

clinics, women, and the poorest of the poor. Mobile

ing information on what they eat and drink, where they

health care could become boutique health care.

live, and whether they smoke or exercise. The first study

Privacy is another issue. Even though Buckee and

of its kind in this region, it will use an mHealth survey

Eagle depersonalize the data they use, there are no

platform developed by Eagle that enables researchers to

international standards that define what needs to be

survey people in places too remote to reach with paper

done to call data before it is handed off to researchers.

or personal interviews. “Longitudinal data may be the most promising

Equity is also a key issue. In Africa, for example, mobile phone owners still tend to be male and rela-

area in mHealth,” Eagle says. “It could change how we

tively affluent. “We need to be cognizant of the bias,”

think about preventative health.”

says Eagle. “It’s easy to slip into the idea that we’ve discovered a universal law of human behavior, when

Risks and Obstacles

really we’ve identified a pattern in a subset of behav-

Scientific evidence that mHealth interventions actu-

ioral data from a subset of mobile phone subscribers in

ally work is beginning to emerge. Recent studies, for

one country.”

instance, have shown that mobile phones have assisted

A major concern is that academia and technology

in relief effort coordination in Haiti and that text

don’t typically operate on the same time frames. In the

message reminders about proper malaria treatment

years it takes an investigator to write a proposal, sub-

have improved the care of sick children in Kenya.

mit it, and get it reviewed and funded, what had been cutting-edge mobile technology may become obsolete. And if mHealth applications race ahead of scientific and regulatory safeguards, the trend could backfire and do more harm than good. Left, smartphones are plugged in and synchronized locally, allowing researchers to analyze data on the ground. Right, solar batteries charge smartphones at night.

20

Harvard Public Health Review

mHealth and human rights In a decade-long mission asking survivors of war and mass conflict how they were faring and what they and their societies needed to heal, Patrick Vinck and his wife Phuong Pham often felt hampered by standard paper-and-pencil surveys. Both work at the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative (HHI)— Vinck as director of the Program on Vulnerable Populations, and Pham as the director of Evaluation and Implementation Science. Today, with open-source software that they themselves developed, called KoBo, the researchers are able to document both the complexities of postwar suffering and the most pressing public health needs in ravaged populations. “mHealth technology represents the second wave of humanitarian assistance,” says Vinck. “When you ask victims how to redress war suffering, they will often say, ‘Help me

“mHealth technology represents the second wave of humanitarian assistance.” ­­

—Patrick Vinck, director of the Program on Vulnerable Populations, Harvard Humanitarian Initiative get prosthetics for my injuries. Build a hospital for my children. Improve the health care system.’ In the past, we’ve seen billions of dollars poured into proceedings meant to help the victims—but nobody was asking the victims exactly what they wanted and needed. With digital technologies, we can do just that.” Adds Pham, “We wanted smartphones that integrated audio, video, text, data, and geolocation all in one place, and we wanted it to be freely available.” Compared with conventional data-gathering tools, their mobile digital technology is more secure, more costeffective, easier for trained health workers to use, and its results can be swiftly translated into case management and timely evidence-based policy recommendations. Ultimately, the phones could help health care workers diagnose disease, document human rights violations, photograph (through an attachment to a light microscope) a smear of blood potentially laced with malaria parasites, and even gauge through surveys how post-traumatic stress disorder colors postwar attitudes toward transitional justice and reconciliation.

Despite these questions, there is a gathering momentum and sense of inevitability about the nascent technology. “I’m doing this because mHealth is going to happen no matter what,” Mitchell says. “I believe it can happen in one of two ways. In one, it benefits people equitably. In the other, it goes to the highest bidder.”

—Elizabeth Dougherty is a freelance science journalist and novelist living in central Massachusetts. Winter 2012

21

Students

W

ith the continuing trend toward ever more “natural” diets, the raw-milk debate has gathered steam—including here in Massachusetts, where law-

makers have been considering legislation to loosen restrictions on selling raw milk for the nearly 30 dairy farms in the state. The question at hand is whether these farms should be allowed to deliver raw milk—which is neither pasteurized nor homogenized—to customers. Pasteurization heats milk to kill disease-causing microorganisms, and homogenization prevents a cream layer from separating out of the milk. Currently, the farms can only sell raw milk directly to customers at the farm. While the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (DPH), like other public health agencies and organizations, had concerns about health consequences associated with consumption of raw-milk products, it was critical to look more broadly across the U.S. at the prevalence of foodborne illness and to better understand economic impacts associated with the distribution of raw milk. Unfortunately, DPH didn’t have the resources to thoroughly explore these issues. State turns to Harvard for analysis So DPH Commissioner John Auerbach turned for answers to the public health research expertise at Harvard Catalyst | The Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center and their Community Health Innovation and Research Program (HC-CHIRP). The HC-CHIRP staff includes research faculty from Harvard School of Public Health. HC-CHIRP teams up HSPH students with sci-

HSPH student

entists across Harvard University, its 11 schools, and 18 academic health care centers to conduct

helps Massachusetts

in-depth studies of public health issues that

Department of

a stipend, paid by Harvard Catalyst through

Public Health analyze

directly affect public policy. The students get National Institutes of Health funding, and they conduct their project research while completing

consequences of

regular coursework.

raw-milk distribution

the health of the Commonwealth’s residents,

To fulfill their responsibility for safeguarding

rawmilk the debate heats up

Harvard Public Health Review

Kent Dayton/HSPH

22

DPH needed comprehensive information concerning the health consequences, costs, and arguments for and against increasing access to raw milk. Auerbach was confident that HC-CHIRP would be able to provide timely, accurate, credible information. This is the second time that DPH has turned to this program and HSPH students for help solving a public policy issue. Given the positive results thus far, it appears that many more opportunities will arise in the future. Raw-milk advocates claim that pasteurization destroys nutrients as well as enzymes important for calcium absorption. Opponents, among them scientists from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and other public health officials, warn of the danger of consum-

HSPH doctoral student Kathryn Falb (left) and Harvard Medical School epidemiologist Sharon Greene

ing the product. Raw milk, they say, may carry at least

the boarding and milking of a cow), as well as the re-

11 disease-causing organisms that can lead to diarrhea,

strictions in the 26 states where raw-milk sales are legal.

stomach cramps, vomiting, and, less commonly, kidney

Those restrictions include where the raw milk can be

failure, paralysis, chronic disorders, and even death.

sold (on the farm, in retail stores, by delivery) and rules

Kathryn Falb, a third-year doctoral student in HSPH’s

regarding advertising, warning labels, permits, licenses,

Department of Society, Human Development, and

and bottling. The report also investigates the economic

Health, jumped at the chance to be paired with Sharon

cost to dairies of loosening restrictions, given the in-

Greene, an epidemiologist in the Department of Popu-

creased monitoring such changes may require.

lation Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Harvard

What rose to the surface in her analysis? From 2006

Pilgrim Health Care Institute, and an expert on food-

to 2008, the states with the most restrictions on the sale

borne illnesses. Greene was paired with Falb by Charles

of raw milk had the lowest annual rate of illnesses from

Deutsch, a senior research scientist at HSPH and head of

raw-milk outbreaks—just 0.01 per 100,000 people. Mod-

the HC-CHIRP effort, who used the Harvard Catalyst Pro-

erately restrictive states came in a close second: 0.02–

files to find the best faculty adviser for this project.

0.04 illnesses per 100,000 people. The least restrictive

“A lot of our coursework centers on research meth-

states had the highest annual rate: 0.04–0.13 illnesses

odology and study design and analysis,” said Falb. “This

per 100,000 people. Over the 11-year span the report

provided the opportunity to work with people mak-

covered, a total of 1,204 illnesses were reported.

ing real, concrete policy at DPH, where you know your Opposite, Getty Images; right, Aubrey LaMedica/HSPH

research will be implemented almost immediately and

Further analysis raises estimates of illness

help people make informed decisions.”

But Falb and Greene didn’t stop the analysis there. Because such illnesses are both underdiagnosed and

Looking at state-by-state data

underreported, the scientists adjusted their figures to

With Greene’s guidance, Falb scoured CDC databases

estimate the true incidence of foodborne illnesses as-

on foodborne outbreaks around the country from 1998

sociated with raw milk. The difference is striking. “We

through 2008, the scientific literature on the epidemiol-

estimate that approximately 35,000 illnesses may have

ogy of raw-milk disease outbreaks, and current raw-milk

occurred,” says Greene, referring to the 11-year pe-

statutes. Her detailed 16-page report provides a state-

riod. Most of those—some 23,000—were linked to the

by-state analysis of the legality of raw-milk sales and

Campylobacter organism.

cow-sharing programs (in which consumers pay a fee for

continued on page 29 Winter 2012

23

Health Policy

24

Harvard Public Health Review

In March 2008, a colleague burst into the office of HSPH health economics professor Katherine Baicker at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) in Cambridge, Massachusetts. She breathlessly told Baicker about a story she’d just heard on the radio: The state of Oregon was expanding its Medicaid coverage, and it was choosing recipients by lottery. Baicker’s brain lit up. Researchers have been

Oregon’s experiment

studying the effects of Medicaid on recipients since 1965, when the subsidized health insurance program

with Medicaid

was created. But because so many differences between

gives an HSPH economist

education—underlie health issues, it has been nearly

a rare chance to analyze effects of extended coverage.

insured and uninsured groups—such as income and impossible to untangle the effects of the insurance from those other factors. Baicker immediately saw a golden research opportunity: to observe the effects of Medicaid in a real-world, population-based experiment, in which the

Hitting the Lottery only difference between insured and uninsured groups would be the luck of the draw. “This was an unprecedented chance to gauge the effect of insurance expansions in the context of a randomized lottery, which had never been done before,” she says. For a health policy researcher, it was like hitting the lottery. Ordinarily, public health studies take months of planning to rigorously consider every aspect of experimental design before they kick into gear. Baicker Kent Dayton/HSPH

and her colleague, MIT economics professor Amy Finkelstein, knew they didn’t have that luxury. “I thought, ‘Oh my God. This was a drop-everythingand-must-look-into-it moment,’” says Finkelstein. continued Winter 2012

25

Medicaid recipients were 10 percent more likely to screen negative for depression and 25 percent more likely to report their health as “good, very good, or excellent.” Katherine Baicker, HSPH professor of health economics. A quick study

are able to fare as well as those with Medicaid. (Some

Already, the state was drawing names for participants.

have even claimed that because of the poor quality of

“We frantically called anyone we knew who had ever

care offered through Medicaid, having coverage may

worked in Oregon and got in touch with the right people,”

actually be worse than not having it.)

says Baicker. Partnering with local researchers in Oregon,

Baicker, Finkelstein, and colleagues have shown defin-

the team began distributing surveys to applicants almost

itively that both positions have flaws. For their study, they

immediately, even as they were still developing the experi-

mailed questionnaires to more than 70,000 applicants to

mental design for the study. “We hit the ground running a

the Oregon program, targeting 35,000 who were selected

week after the lottery started.”

in the lottery for access to Medicaid and 35,000 who were

Their urgency paid off. The study they eventually pro-

not. Using these surveys, along with hospital admissions

duced, the first part of which was released in July 2011 as

data and credit reports, they were able to demonstrate that

an NBER working paper, is already being called a classic

those who gained access to Medicaid utilized more health

in the field of health economics. It has also fundamentally

care, reported better physical and mental well-being, and

changed the way Medicaid is viewed.

were in better financial circumstances than those who didn’t—with fewer bills sent to collection, and a decline in

Challenging conventional wisdom

the average amount of medical collections of about $400.

While the average person might consider it obvious that Clear benefits, quickly

those without, the benefits of Medicaid have actually

The benefits that Medicaid recipients reported are

been a hotly debated policy question. Some say that

impressive. In addition to having fewer unpaid bills and

despite flaws in the system, having Medicaid gives people

bills sent to collection, recipients were 10 percent more

access to more care, and saves money by reducing inef-

likely to screen negative for depression and 25 percent

ficient care. Others counter that with emergency room

more likely to report their health as “good, very good, or

visits and free care, low-income people without insurance 26

Harvard Public Health Review

Kent Dayton/HSPH

people with health insurance would fare better than

excellent.” Even more dramatically, recipients reported

kids? Do I pay half my rent so I can afford my medica-

themselves happier overall after receiving coverage,

tion? That kind of living is really stressful and difficult.”

with a 32 percent increase in the number of respondents calling themselves “very happy” or “pretty happy” (as

No free lunch

opposed to “not too happy”) after just one year.

prescriptions. It was only after insurance afforded a pre-

These benefits do not come without a price tag. The study shows that expanding Medicaid increases overall health costs, since recipients in Oregon with insurance utilized more health care than those without insurance. Over the course of a year, for example, recipients were 30 percent more likely to undergo some hospitalization, with a 45 percent increase in the number of procedures they underwent. According to the researchers’ back-of-the-envelope calculation, those with Medicaid spent about $778 more per year than those without, a 25 percent increase.

scribed dose that they reported experiencing the health

Preliminary results from the study do not support

Subjects’ health decisions also shifted dramatically, with many reporting substantial changes in their treatments as soon as they acquired insurance—for example, by taking their full dose of medication, now that they could afford it. “They were trying to make a prescription stretch by taking a smaller dose, or taking a dose every other day. Friends and family would try and help by sharing leftover

benefits of treatment,” says Heidi Allen, a research scientist

the argument, often made by insurance advocates, that

with Providence Health & Services in Oregon, one of the

those costs are offset by insured people making fewer

lead investigators who coordinated qualitative in-person

emergency room visits. “People have argued we should ex-

interviews as part of a follow-up study that has bolstered

pand Medicaid and it will pay for itself,” says Finkelstein.

the original results and provided surprising new anecdotal

“Wouldn’t it be nice if it were a free lunch, but our initial

evidence of Medicaid’s benefits.

results suggest it is probably not the case.”

“Our study shows that Medicaid does, in fact, use resources, but that it also significantly helps people. As a society, we need to weigh the program’s financial costs against the tangible and intangible improvements in beneficiaries’ lives.” —Professor Katherine Baicker

In other cases, recipients went through with long-

The researchers did find that compliance with preventive

delayed surgeries they couldn’t afford without coverage.

care—such as mammograms, cholesterol testing, and Pap

“One woman had been sent out of the emergency room

smears—went up for insurance recipients, which could lead

with a broken ankle in an ACE bandage years earlier,”

to a decrease in health care costs down the line, but there was

says Allen. “The first thing she did when she got Medicaid no decline in spending in the first year. Furthermore, they was get orthopedic surgery to repair the damage. For her,

don’t believe their results necessarily reflect a “pent-up de-

that was life changing. Now she can exercise and she is

mand” for care that would wane over time, since the spend-

losing weight.” For those without insurance, meanwhile,

ing remained constant over the yearlong study.

the stress of not being able to afford care influenced even simple decisions in daily life. “One man said, ‘I would

Profound policy implications

go for that bike ride—but, man, if I crashed that bike, I

The findings could reverberate for a long time. The

wouldn’t be able to afford to go to the doctor,’” says Allen. new national health care law mandates an expansion “People are forced into making difficult choices—do I get of Medicaid by 2014, but that law has been challenged high-quality child care, or get my neighbor to watch my

both in the courts and in Congress, where Medicaid has become a political football in the debate over cutting the national budget.

continued Winter 2012

27

With the new study, while

example, it doesn’t weigh the

house from burning down, but

policymakers can still argue that

benefits of Medicaid against those

to ensure you aren’t thrown into

Medicaid is not worth the cost

of subsidizing private insurance,

financial ruin if it does.”

and debate whether expanding

a comparison Baicker says is not

Medicaid is good policy, says

possible with current data. “It’s hard

recipients are protected from

Baicker, the study “makes it much

to imagine a circumstance in which

runaway medical bills may spur

harder to argue that Medicaid

people were randomized between

other benefits, from increased

shouldn’t be funded because it

Medicaid and private insurance,”

productivity to lower crime to

doesn’t help beneficiaries at all.”

she says. Moreover, it may not be

family stability—as well as reduced

valid to extrapolate the results for

stress for beneficiaries. “Those

new data are released, the study

the relatively small population to

benefits are harder to measure and

will continue to provide invaluable

policymakers might think about

Professor of Applied Economics

Before Medicaid coverage, study participants had tried to make their prescriptions stretch by taking a smaller dose, or taking a dose every other day.

at Harvard’s Kennedy School of

which insurance was expanded in

study shows that Medicaid does,

Government. “Their research

Oregon to the nation as a whole.

in fact, use resources, but that it

As additional results analyzing

insights, not only in terms of numbers but also by putting a human face on a debate that has so far played out in Washington in abstract terms. “The country is preparing to insure 30 million more people, and we haven’t got a clear sense of what that means,” says David Cutler, Otto Eckstein

Ensuring that Medicaid

them differently,” says Baicker. The multitrillion-dollar question is whether all those benefits are worth the price. That’s a question no study, no matter how groundbreaking, can answer. “Economics can’t tell lawmakers what their policy priorities should be, but it can help inform decision making,” Baicker says. “Our

shows that while Medicaid isn’t a

What the study does do is

also significantly helps people.

perfect program, it is better than

give lawmakers wrestling with the

As a society, we need to weigh

not having coverage. Now we know

healthcare debate a more complete

the program’s financial costs

that these programs are essential

and complex picture of what they

against the tangible and intangible

in two ways: health impact and

are getting for their money. Cost-

improvements in beneficiaries’ lives.”

financial impact. That should give

benefit analyses are economists’

us pause in cutting them.”

bread and butter, but some of the

Michael Blanding is a Boston-based magazine writer and a fellow with the Safra Center on Ethics at Harvard University.

With the debate over health

benefits found in the study may

care in Washington still simmering,

be harder to quantify than others,

Baicker is careful to point out

including recipients’ increased

the limitations of her study. For

financial and emotional well-being. After all, says Baicker, “you don’t get fire insurance to prevent your

28

Harvard Public Health Review

Raw Milk continued from page 23 Still, from a policy perspective, the small difference in re-

ample, they found that in other states, when stricter standards

ported cases between the most restrictive and the moderately

were set, income stayed constant because students spent their

restrictive states provides food for thought. “Of course, even

money on school lunches if they didn’t like the healthier fare in

a small difference matters to the people who get sick,” says

the vending machines.

Falb. “But it will be up to the legislators to interpret how that difference will be meaningful regarding policy.”

“The project was a spectacular experience for both the students and myself,” said Rimm, associate professor in HSPH’s

The raw-milk report will help Massachusetts legislators

Departments of Epidemiology and Nutrition. “We got to see

determine raw-milk policy. DPH has shared the report with staff

how research directly impacts policy and implementation in a

from other Massachusetts agencies, as well as with policy lead-

setting of forward-thinking and extremely motivated govern-

ers in other states and at the CDC.

ment employees in the Massachusetts DPH.”

Students study “competitive” foods in schools Falb and Greene’s raw-milk project is HC-CHIRP’s second commission from the Massachusetts DPH, and several more are in the works. The first, which began in the fall of 2010, helped a Massachusetts nutritional-standards interagency work group develop guidelines for “competitive” foods in schools based on the latest science. “Competitive” foods are those that are not part of the school meal program, including offerings in vending machines, school stores, and fundraisers. For that project, HSPH Department of Nutrition doctoral students Juliana Cohen and Jessica Garcia worked with faculty adviser Eric Rimm to ensure not only that the new standards would be realistic but also that schools would not lose money because of their implementation. Regarding the latter, for ex-

The food guidelines that the HSPH team helped DPH develop mirror the rigorous Institute of Medicine (IOM) standards—and, in some cases, go even farther. For example, whereas the IOM requires that all snack items be whole grain, the Massachusetts proposal requires that all grain-based foods—even pizza and hot dog buns—be whole grain. “These will be both the most progressive guidelines in the United States and also the most realistic,” says Cohen. DPH Commissioner Auerbach has praised HC-CHIRP in several public meetings. DPH is grateful for the continuing collaboration. To develop evidence-based policy, DPH needs to locate and evaluate a great deal of research quickly and without additional cost outlay. In these severely constrained times, HC-CHIRP’s assistance is especially valuable.

—Thea Singer is a Boston-based science journalist and author.

Continuing Professional Education Programs, 2012 Where theory informs practice and practice informs theory January 2012 January 22–27 and May 14–18 Leadership Strategies for Information Technology in Health Care March 2012 March 12–14 Basic Hands-On CAMEO Training March 19–22 Analyzing Risk: Science, Assessment, and Management March 22–25 Healthy Kitchens, Healthy Lives: Caring for Our Patients and Ourselves Napa Valley, Calif.

March 26–28 Management and Leadership Skills for Environmental Health and Safety Professionals April 2012 April 23–26 Safety in Design and Construction: A Lifecycle Approach May 2012 May 7–11 Guidelines for Laboratory Design: Health and Safety Considerations May 14–16 Effective Risk Communication: Theory, Tools, and Practical Skills for Communicating about Risk

June 2012 June 4–6 Advanced Hands-On CAMEO Training June 4–8 Radiation Safety Officer Training for Laboratory Professionals June 11–15 Comprehensive Industrial Hygiene: The Application of Basic Principles All programs are held in Boston unless otherwise noted.

Customized programs are also available. Foster the growth of your executives and your organization as a whole by developing a custom program that will address the specific challenges you are facing in today’s marketplace. CCPE brings custom programs to organizations around the globe. For a complete list of topics and faculty, or to register, visit: https://ccpe.sph.harvard.edu/ email: contedu@hsph.harvard.edu call: 617-384-8692 Harvard School of Public Health Center for Continuing Education 677 Huntington Ave. CCPE-Dept. A Boston, MA 02115 Winter 2012

29

In Memoriam

DADE MOELLER

D

ade Moeller died on September 26, 2011 at age 84. Moeller joined Harvard School of Public Health in 1966 as a professor of environmental health engineering and served as chair of the Department of Environmental Health until 1981. Before his retirement in 1993, Moeller also held positions as associate dean for continuing education and associate director of the Harvard-National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Center for Environmental Health. A popular teacher, Moeller was a frequent winner of the student body’s Golden Apple teaching award. He continued teaching until recently in the Center for Continuing Professional Education and earlier this year published the fourth edition of his textbook, Environmental Health. Moeller’s work focused on ensuring the health and safety of workers, the public, and the environment from the hazards of ionizing radiation. Following his retirement, Moeller and his son, Matt (SM ’84), founded the environmental consulting company Dade Moeller & Associates.

Christopher Walker

30

Harvard Public Health Review

Top, © Richard Chase; left, ©Joanne S. Lawton/ Washington Business Journal

C

hristopher Walker, a friend and benefactor of HSPH’s Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, died on August 31, 2011, at age 66. A Washington, D.C.-area commercial real estate developer with a keen interest in science, Walker provided generous support for scientific programs and scholarly activities at the School through the Christopher W. Walker, Esq. Fund for Tuberculosis Research and Information Sharing.

HARVARD School of Public Health

2011 Gift Report

Winter 2012

31

ACTS of kindness

“R

emember, there’s no such thing as a small act of kindness,” wrote cartoonist Scott Adams, the creator of “Dilbert.” “Every act creates a ripple with no logical end.” Adams was describing a few words of support that helped him overcome early

rejection, but he might just as well have been speaking about the acts of encouragement and generosity—some small and some very large—so many of you make when you support financial aid at HSPH. Last year, Dean Frenk made financial aid his top priority, and we set the ambitious goal of raising $1 million more than the previous year’s financial aid funding. I am truly delighted Ellie Starr

that we did not just meet this goal, we more than doubled it. Thanks to your extraordinary generosity, we raised over $2.5 million for financial aid in fiscal year 2010, more than $2 million over the year before, realized largely due to gifts from former Dean Barry Bloom and longtime benefactors Russ and Judy Carson. Financial aid is only one area where your support makes a difference at HSPH. Thanks to generous gifts from the hundreds of individuals and organizations listed in these pages, HSPH raised $51.1 million in new gifts, pledges, and non-federally sponsored research grants between July 1, 2010, and June 30, 2011, more than twice what was raised last year. Here are just a few examples of what your support has helped us accomplish over the past year: We have built on our core strengths in the biological, quantitative, and social sciences with two new endowed professorships, thanks to Richard Menschel and Steve Kay and family. We have advanced Atul Gawande’s work on checklists and health systems innovation, with a gift from Mala Gaonkar. We have launched a new ministerial health leadership program in collaboration with the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, thanks to support from the Children’s Investment Fund Foundation. We have improved public health education and continued the important work of the China Executive Education Program, with support from the Medtronic Foundation. We have established a new academy for humanitarian workers, with seed funding from J. Fred Weintz, Jr. through the Harbor Lights Foundation. The sense of energy, urgency, and mission around HSPH is palpable. However, uncertain federal funding, coupled with an unpredictable economy, makes philanthropic support more critical than ever. As Dean Frenk has said, “We are committed to public health as both a field of inquiry and an arena for action to improve the lives and health of people everywhere.” To all of you who share this commitment, thank you. Together we are changing the world. Gratefully,

Ellie Starr, Vice Dean for External Relations, Harvard School of Public Health

32

Harvard Public Health Review

2011 Event Highlights Board of Dean’s Advisors Discuss Advancing HSPH’s Goals and Mission Established in 2010 by Dean Julio Frenk, the HSPH Board of Dean’s Advisors (BDA) convened at the School for the first of its biannual meetings on March 3–4 and October 19–20, 2011. The group is comprised of business, health, and philanthropic leaders from around the world. Members help advance the School’s mission and goals by sharing their perspectives and insights and by broadening HSPH’s circle of supporters. The group met with members of HSPH’s senior leadership, who shared the School’s challenges and agenda for future growth. Next year, members

Dean Julio Frenk and BDA member C. Boyden Gray, AB ‘64

will join an HSPH delegation to visit the School’s programs in India.

BDA member Katherine Vogelheim

BDA member Gerald Chan, SM ’75, SD ’79, and Douglas Dockery, SM ’74, SD ’79, chair of the Department of Environmental Health

Kent Dayton/HSPH, Steve Gilbert

BDA member Jack Connors, Jr.

Winter 2012

33

2011 Event Highlights HSPH Leadership Council Annual Meeting: Global Health Security October 20–21 On October 20–21, 2011, the HSPH Leadership Council annual meeting explored the many facets of global health security, from infectious disease pandemics to universal access to health care to protection against the devastating financial consequences of David Gergen, LLB ’67, senior political analyst at CNN and public service professor at Harvard Kennedy School, spoke with Dean Frenk about building political leadership around global health security.

medical treatment. Thursday’s keynote session by Dean Julio Frenk and David Gergen, senior political analyst at CNN and a professor at Harvard Kennedy School, discussed building political leadership around those interlocked issues. Faculty sessions on Friday tied maternal mortality in the developing world to global health security, and addressed the challenges of water security, planning for pandemics, responding to wars and humanitarian disasters, and training leaders to respond effectively to crises.

Volunteer Leadership Award recipients Mrs. William McCormick Blair, Jr. (second from right) and Maurice Tempelsman (far right) were honored for their work with the HSPH AIDS Initiative. Blair and Tempelsman are members of the HSPH Leadership Council. They are joined by Dean Julio Frenk and PhD candidate in biological sciences Wen Xie, who received the Volunteer Leadership Award Scholarship.

Left, Snowden Henry and HSPH Leadership Council Executive Committee member Paula Ivey Henry, SM ’95, celebrated their wedding anniversary at the Leadership Council meeting. The pair met at HSPH when Paula was a student. Right, HSPH Leadership Council members Stephen Kay, AB ’56, MBA ’58, and Lilian Cheung, SM ’75, SD ’78. Cheung is a lecturer in HSPH’s Department of Nutrition, the department’s director of health promotion and communication, and editorial director of the department’s Nutrition Source website. 34

Harvard Public Health Review

Alumni Weekend: Friends and Colleagues Gather for Annual Reunion September 23–25 Harvard School of Public Health alumni, students, and guests gathered at the School on September 23–25 to reconnect with former classmates, network, and examine current topics in public health. For the first time, the classes of 1961, 1986, and 2001 celebrated milestone years at a gala dinner. This year’s Alumni Weekend Symposium focused on health reform initiatives. Alumni honored the 2011 recipients of the Harvard School of Public Health Alumni Award of Merit, the highest honor presented to an alumna/us. The award recognizes leadership, community service, contributions, and commitment to the field of public health. This year’s recipients are E. Francis Cook, SM ’77, SD ’83, Hugh Fulmer, MPH ’61, William Rom, MPH ’73, and J. M. Yolène Vaval Suréna, MPH ’81 (see interviews on page 9–10). New alumni awards were also presented: Emerging Public Health Professional Award (Hilarie Cranmer, MPH ’04), Leadership Award in Public Health Practice (Francoise Bouchard, MPH ’86), and Public Health Innovator Award (Trishan Panch, MPH ’10) (see interviews on page 8).

Left to right, Michael Olugbile, MPH ’11, Yolène Vaval Suréna, MPH ’81, Kiran Kamble, MPH ‘10

Dean Julio Frenk and former Dean Harvey Fineberg

See more pictures from this event at http://hsph.me/alumniweekend

Convening Leaders, Debating Public Health Issues The School’s new Division of Policy Translation and Leadership Development convened political, academic, and other thought leaders at HSPH this year to debate critical issues in public health and to share leadership strategies with students. Speakers at The Forum at Harvard School Kent Dayton/HSPH, Steve Gilbert

of Public Health have included U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder on youth violence, Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick on health care reform, and philanthropist and global health activist Ted Turner. Through the Decision-Making: Voices From the Field speaker series, students learned about leadership challenges from former ABC news anchor Charles

Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick

Gibson, former New Mexico Governor Bill Richardson, and others.

Winter 2012

35

2011 Event Highlights AIDS@30: Engaging to End the Epidemic December 1–2

M

arking the 30th anniversary of the first official report of

AIDS, in June, 1981, Harvard University convened a major international symposium, hosted by HSPH. Global health leaders, elected officials, scientists, artists, and activists gathered on World AIDS Day to reflect on what we have learned from AIDS and how to apply those lessons to end the epidemic.

Panelists discuss the future of HIV prevention.

Left to right, HSPH Dean Julio Frenk; Richard Marlink, executive director of the Harvard School of Public Health AIDS Initiative; and Paul Farmer, Kolokotrones University Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine and founding director, Partners in Health

Alan Garber, provost of Harvard University and professor at Harvard Medical School and Harvard Kennedy School

Florence Ngobeni-Allen of the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation and Ambassador Eric Goosby, U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator

36

Harvard Public Health Review

Alumni The School is profoundly grateful for contributions from alumni—often unsung heroes who are now working around the world to improve the lives of millions of people. Their generosity is testament to their confidence in the School’s ability to train generations of public health leaders. We thank all alumni for their support and recognize, in the following list, those who made cumulative gifts of $100 or more during the 2011 fiscal year. 1942 James H. Steele, MPH ‘42 * 1944 Catherine H. Petrou, ‘44 * 1948 Doris Wilson, ‘48 1949 Martin P. Hines, MPH ‘49 * Hyman Israel, MPH ‘49 * 1951 Augusta F. Law, MPH ‘51 1952 Mary B. Brink, MPH ‘52 1953 Isabelle Valadian, MPH ‘53 * 1955 Joyce W. Hopp, MPH ‘55 * Craig S. Lichtenwalner, MPH ‘55 Chau-Ching Lin, SM ‘55 Leonard C. Mandell, SM ‘55 * 1956 Irene R. Mahar, MPH ‘56 * 1957 Lenore Harney, MPH ‘57 Lewis E. Patrie, MPH ‘57 * 1958 Marion E. Highriter, MPH ‘58, SD ‘69* Margaret G. Kane, MPH ‘58 Ruth B. Kundsin, SD ‘58 * 1959 Robert T. Cutting, MPH ‘59 Roger J. Meyer, MPH ‘59 Serene L. Piboonniyom, SM ‘59, SD ‘63

Vern L. Schramm, SM ‘65 John J. Speidel, MPH ‘65 * 1966 Stephen J. Garza, MPH ‘66 * William M. Moore, MPH ‘66 * William P. Reagan, SM ‘66 * James H. Warram, Jr., SM ‘66, SD ‘88 * Dorothy L. Wilson, MPH ‘66

1960 J. Robert Dille, MIH ‘60 James G. Kelly, SM ‘60 Joseph M. Miller, MPH ‘60 Alfred K. Neumann, MPH ‘60 Vaun A. Newill, SM ‘60 Judith S. Stern, SM ‘60, SD ‘70 1961 Thomas L. Hall, MPH ‘61 George C. Mohr, MPH ‘61 * Stephen J. Plank, MPH ‘61, DPH ‘64 James F. Wittmer, MPH ‘61 *

1967 Myron Allukian, Jr., MPH ‘67 * Dorothy J. Ganick, SM ‘67 * Judith D. Goldberg, SM ‘67, SD ‘72, ‘73 * Frederick C. Hoesly, MPH ‘67 * Charles T. Kaelber, MPH ‘67, DPH ‘69 * George W. Mathews, Jr., MPH ‘67 * Richard R. Monson, SM ‘67, SD ‘69 * Reinhard Sidor, SM ‘67, SD ‘73 Anthony N. Tse, SM ‘67 * Jonathan B. Weisbuch, MPH ‘67

1962 Kenneth H. Cooper, MPH ‘62 * C. Richard Dorn, MPH ‘62 * Carlton J. Peterson, MPH ‘62 1963 Theodor Abelin, MPH ‘63 Joseph D. Brain, SM ‘63, SD ‘66 Earle R. Heine, MPH ‘63 * Samuel Levey, SM ‘63 * Donald J. Rosato, MPH ‘63 David Schottenfeld, SM ‘63 Bernard Shleien, SM ‘63 * Robert E. Yoder, SD ‘63

1968 N. Bruce Chase, MPH ‘68 Joseph A. Cook, MPH ‘68 * Ronald D. Eckoff, MPH ‘68 * Douglas I. Hammer, MPH ‘68, DPH ‘76 Leonard J. Kirschner, MPH ‘68 Brian V. Mokler, SM ‘68, SD ‘73 Ronald T. Rozett, MPH ‘68 * George B. Schreiber, SM ‘68

1964 Kathleen H. Acree, MPH ‘64 Stanley L. Dryden, SM ‘64 * Warren W. Hodge, MPH ‘64 Hope H. Snider, MPH ‘64, ‘67 * Captane P. Thomson, SM ‘64 1965 Justin L. Conrad, MPH ‘65 Michael A. Davis, SM ‘65, SD ‘69 Johanna T. Dwyer, SM ‘65, SD ‘69 * Joseph F. Fraumeni, Jr., SM ‘65 Tomio Hirohata, SM ‘65, SD ‘68 Wayne A. Johnson, MPH ‘65 Lionel M. Lieberman, MIH ‘65, SM ‘66 Royce Moser, Jr., MPH ‘65 * Alvan G. Renthal, MPH ‘65

1969 Lynne M. Ausman, SM ‘69, SD ‘73 * Charles J. Gibson, MPH ‘69 * Anita F. Highton, MPH ‘69 Alan R. Hinman, MPH ‘69 Augustine E. Moffitt, Jr., SM ‘69, SD ‘73 Louise B. Rogers, SM ‘69, ‘74 Henry W. Vaillant, SM ‘69 * 1970 Jane H. Chretien, MPH ‘70 * Glenn E. Haughie, MPH ‘70 Ralph H. Henderson, MPH ‘70 * Donald R. Hopkins, MPH ‘70 Margaret T. Howe, SM ‘70, SD ‘75 Bernard E. Kreger, MPH ‘70 John D. Mull, MPH ‘70 Scott H. Nelson, MPH ‘70 Kenneth E. Powell, MPH ‘70 * Gloria A. Rudisch, MPH ‘70 Eleanor G. Shore, MPH ‘70, ‘71 * Gary F. Stein, MPH ‘70 Robert J. Szot, SD ‘70

1971 Kenneth Bridbord, MPH ‘71 * Connie J. Evashwick, SM ‘71, SD ‘74 Katherine A. Forrest, MPH ‘71 * Kathleen A. Gaffney, MPH ‘71 Carol A. Greenfield, SM ‘71 William H. Hollinshead III, MPH ‘71 * John C. Kepper, MPH ‘71 John C. Leadbeater, MPH ‘71 * Alan Leviton, SM ‘71 William V. Lipton, SM ‘71, SD ‘76 * Rudolph W. Pierce, MPH ‘71 James M. Taylor, MPH ‘71 William H. Wiese, MPH ‘71 * 1972 Lawrence J. D’Angelo, MPH ‘72 Andrew G. Dean, MPH ‘72 James D. Felsen, MPH ‘72 * Joyce E. Gibson, SM ‘72, SD ‘74 * Leslie J. Graitcer, SM ‘72 * Joel Kavet, SD ‘72 * Robin D. Moore-Orr, SM ‘72, SD ‘79 Walter L. Pelham, MPH ‘72 * Ronald A. Walter, SM ‘72 * 1973 Catherine DeAngelis, MPH ‘73 Jennie A. Duffy, SM ‘73 * David H. Gundy, MPH ‘73 Maria P. Liteplo, SM ‘73, MPH ‘73 Frederick B. Oleson, Jr., SM ‘73, SD ‘78 John C. Perry, MPH ‘73 * Arthur R. Rhodes, MPH ‘73 * Stephen L. Silberman, MPH ‘73, DPH ‘75 * Walter C. Willett, MPH ‘73, DPH ‘80 Beverly Winikoff, MPH ‘73 * 1974 Louis M. Alpern, MPH ‘74 * Michael C. Alpert, MPH ‘74 * Richard A. Bienia, MPH ‘74 John D. Blum, SM ‘74 John D. Boice, Jr., SM ‘74, SD ‘77 * Dorothy C. Browne, MPH ‘74, DPH ‘80 Kathleen R. Crampton, MPH ‘74 Douglas W. Dockery, SM ‘74, SD ‘79 * Patricia T. Gabbe, MPH ‘74 * Bruce S. Gillis, MPH ‘74 Siew-Ean Khoo, SM ‘74, SD ‘77 Ramona Lunt, MPH ‘74 Harold L. May, MPH ‘74 * Nancy E. Mueller, SM ‘74, SD ‘80, ‘81 Philip T. Nicholson, SM ‘74 * Stephen C. Schoenbaum, MPH ‘74

continued

*individuals who have made a gift for five or more consecutive years. Winter 2012

37

Alumni (continued) 1975 Peter M. Barkin, SM ‘75 * Gerald L. Chan, SM ‘75, SD ‘79 Louis J. DiBerardinis, SM ‘75 Christopher T. Hitt, SM ‘75 Chander M. Kapasi, MPH ‘75 Craig N. Melin, SM ‘75, ‘81 Kathleen M. Rasmussen, SM ‘75, SD ‘78 Carol H. Rice, SM ‘75 Deborah Rose, SM ‘75 * William B. Stason, SM ‘75 Howard R. Steinberg, MPH ‘75 1976 Amy C. Barkin, MPH ‘76 * Baroline H. Bienia, SM ‘76 Phillip G. Clark, SM ‘76, SD ‘79 Cynthia L. Cohen, SM ‘76 Anthony D. Cortese, SD ‘76 Gail E. Costa, SM ‘76 Homero R. Garza, MPH ‘76 Elaine Goodson, SM ‘76 Patricia Hartge, SM ‘76, SD ‘83 * Gordon T. Johnson, MPH ‘76 Richard A. Kaslow, MPH ‘76 * Jack C. Keane, SM ‘76 Sew-Leong C. Kwa, MPH ‘76, MIH ‘77 Walter T. Lawrence, MPH ‘76 Shirley F. Marks, MPH ‘76 Beth Myers, SM ‘76 Helen H. Wang, MPH ‘76, DPH ‘79 * 1977 Marcia J. Armstrong, SM ‘77, SD ‘79 * Rita D. Berkson, SM ‘77 * Judith B. Colla, SM ‘77, SD ‘00 Malcolm J. Curtis, SM ‘77 * Karen A. Donato, SM ‘77, ‘78 * Wendy L. Everett, SM ‘77, SD ‘80 Samuel A. Forman, MPH ‘77, SM ‘80 Daniel Guyton, ‘77 Ole B. Hovind, MPH ‘77 Marion A. Jordan, SM ‘77 Thomas W. Kalinowski, SM ‘77, SD ‘81 * Maurice E. Keenan, MPH ‘77 Walter H. McDonald, SM ‘77 * Linda C. Niessen, MPH ‘77 Lonnie H. Norris, MPH ‘77 Bernard M. Olsen, SM ‘77 * Barbara A. Ormond, SM ‘77 * Jonathan M. Samet, SM ‘77 * Steven L. Sneddon, SM ‘77, SD ‘79 Cheryl E. Stone, SM ‘77 Jeffrie R. Strang, MPH ‘77 Jay S. Weisfeld, MPH ‘77 *

38

Harvard Public Health Review

Scott T. Weiss, SM ‘77 Earnestine Willis, MPH ‘77 John M. Witherspoon, MPH ‘77 1978 Elizabeth N. Allred, ‘78 * Sheila R. Bloom, SM ‘78 * Melanie C. Clarke, SM ‘78 Karen L. Davis, SM ‘78 * Azimah P. Ehr, MPH ‘78 Lois C. Howland, MPH ‘78, SM ‘94, DPH ‘98 Peter A. Howland, MPH ‘78 Peter C. Karalekas, Jr., MPH ‘78 * James M. Laster, MPH ‘78 John R. Lovell, SM ‘78 Louise P. MacMillan, SM ‘78 Claudia R. Sanders, SM ‘78 * Eileen Storey, MPH ‘78 Arnold E. Washington, SM ‘78, ‘79 1979 Kathryn A. Angell, SM ‘79 Debra D. Carey, SM ‘79 Lynne M. Cavanaugh, SM ‘79 * Barry S. Collet, MPH ‘79 Jean M. Doherty-Greenberg, MPH ‘79 Deborah A. Enos, SM ‘79 William C. Feng, SM ‘79, ‘81 Frances G. Forster, SM ‘79 Elaine M. Hart-Brothers, MPH ‘79 Eileen P. Hayes, SD ‘79 Pin-Hua Huang, SM ‘79, SD ‘82 Edgar N. James, MPH ‘79 James M. Jaranson, MPH ‘79 Stephen P. Kelly, ‘79 Christine T. Knupp, MPH ‘79 Therus C. Kolff, MPH ‘79 David Kotelchuck, MPH ‘79 Harold B. Leabman, SM ‘79 Jeanne E. Loughlin, SM ‘79 Maria E. Mazorra, SM ‘79 Eileen D. Pearlman, SM ‘79 * Jo A. Shifrin, SM ‘79 Mark S. Siskind, SM ‘79 Marcia L. Weisman, SD ‘79, ‘81 Georgiana K. White, SM ‘79 * 1980 Elie M. Abemayor, SM ‘80 * Virginia W. Arnold, ‘80 Catherine S. Berkey, SD ‘80 * Joseph C. d’Oronzio, MPH ‘80 * Viola L. Dwight, MPH ‘80 Rose H. Goldman, MPH ‘80, SM ‘81 David A. Greenberg, MPH ‘80 Bernard Guyer, MPH ‘80 Chung-Cheng Hsieh, SM ‘80, SD ‘85 *

Charles H. Klippel, SM ‘80 Robert B. Lutes, SM ‘80 James A. Manganello, MPH ‘80 Charles B. Millstein, MPH ‘80 * Jane W. Newburger, MPH ‘80 Edwin S. Spirer, MPH ‘80 Meir J. Stampfer, MPH ‘80, DPH ‘85 Jane A. Weintraub, MPH ‘80 1981 Stanley M. Aronson, MPH ‘81 Lisa S. Barnes, SM ‘81 * Arthur E. Brown, MPH ‘81 * Susan Wilner Golden, SD ‘81 Elizabeth E. Hatch, SM ‘81 * Sonny V. Joseph, MPH ‘81 Amy F. Judd, SM ‘81 * Marie H. Keegan, SM ‘81 David G. Kern, MIH ‘81, SM ‘82 Carol I. Master, SM ‘81, DPH ‘89 William P. Naylor, MPH ‘81 * William L. Paly, SM ‘81 Reneida E. Reyes, MPH ‘81 Richard W. Rowe, MPH ‘81 Stephen H. Soboroff, MPH ‘81, SM ‘81 * Francisco S. Sy, SM ‘81 Richard W. Valachovic, MPH ‘81, SM ‘82 Laura L. Wallins, SD ‘81 Marvin Zatz, MPH ‘81, SM ‘82, ‘83 * 1982 Paul R. Branch, SM ‘82 * Mary E. Chamberland, MPH ‘82 Rowland W. Chang, MPH ‘82 * Richard J. Fennelly, SM ‘82 Alan D. Fetterman, MPH ‘82 Julie A. Goldstein, SM ‘82 * Douglas N. Klaucke, MPH ‘82 * Eugene A. Mickey, MPH ‘82 * Julianne Piatek, SM ‘82 Stephen E. Piwinski, MIH ‘82 * Wendy G. Rockefeller, SM ‘82 * Carolyn A. Webster, SM ‘82 * Robert J. Williams, MPH ‘82 1983 Olayiwola B. Ayodeji, MPH ‘83 Julie E. Buring, SD ‘83 * J. Jacques Carter, MPH ‘83 * Yung-Cheng J. Chen, MPH ‘83 Fernando A. Guerra, MPH ‘83 Juan-Pablo Illanes, MPH ‘83 Patricia L. Moody, MPH ‘83 Thomas D. Polton, SM ‘83 * Barbara A. Poremba, MPH ‘83 Richard W. Steketee, MPH ‘83

1984 George T. Au, MPH ‘84 Chantal Z. Buchanan, SM ‘84 * Bettina Burbank, SM ‘84 * Jennifer S. Cassells, SM ‘84 Roger S. Day, SD ‘84 G. Rita Dudley-Grant, MPH ‘84 Gorman H. King, Jr., MPH ‘84 Joan B. Koransky, SM ‘84 JoAnn E. Manson, MPH ‘84, DPH ‘87 * Matthew P. Moeller, SM ‘84 George C. Piper, MPH ‘84 * David J. Thurman, MPH ‘84 Bruce A. Weiss, MPH ‘84 1985 Catherine P. Boyce, SM ‘85 Kevin C. Chang, MPH ‘85 Walter K. Clair, MPH ‘85 Maria B. Creavin Plaus, SM ‘85 Tammy C. Harris, MPH ‘85 * David J. Hunter, MPH ‘85, SD ‘88 Raja Iglewicz, ‘85 Vera G. Kurlantzick, SM ‘85 * Hollis H. Lee, MPH ‘85 Keith J. Maxwell, SM ‘85 Dale L. Morse, SM ‘85 Carl M. Reddix, MPH ‘85 Gary L. Rosner, SD ‘85 * Elizabeth F. Ryder, SM ‘85 * Donna Spiegelman, SM ‘85, SD ‘89 Catherine A. Spino, SM ‘85, SD ‘89 * Paul J. Styrt, MPH ‘85 Carol Jean W. Suitor, SM ‘85, SD ‘88 Margaret M. Sullivan, SM ‘85 Susan P. Wood, MPH ‘85 * 1986 David W. Archibald, SD ‘86 * Elizabeth L. Baum, MPH ‘86 Christina I. Braun, MPH ‘86 * Katherine M. Coughlin, SM ‘86 Nancy J. Fox, SM ‘86 Patricia A. Fraser, SM ‘86 Sheila T. Goins, SM ‘86 Linda M. Haar, MPH ‘86 Unae K. Han, MPH ‘86 Neil C. Hawkins, SM ‘86, SD ‘88 Nancy E. Isaac, SM ‘86, SD ‘89 Leslie A. Kalish, SD ‘86 * Wyman W. Lai, MPH ‘86 Xuan V. Le, MPH ‘86 Michael F. Mayo-Smith, MPH ‘86 Thomas J. McElligott, Jr., MPH ‘86 Deborah A. Roth, SM ‘86 * Stephen J. Roth, MPH ‘86 Todd Rowe, MPH ‘86

As the recent chair of the School’s Alumni Award of Merit committee and immediate past president of the Alumni Association, I have been impressed by the significant contributions our graduates are making in senior positions around the world. Unfortunately, many exceptional students don’t have the resources to come to the School without financial aid. Scholarships enabled me to do things that I otherwise wouldn’t have been able to do, so my wife and I have tried to support opportunities for others through our annual gifts and now through our gift to the Scholarship Fund. Even though I am retiring, I plan to continue to give to this great cause. With HSPH’s world-renowned teachers, students can participate in work of such importance that they can’t even imagine the beneficial impact it will make on people’s health. —Royce Moser, Jr., AB ’57, MD ’61, MPH ’65, a member of the HSPH Leadership Council, and Lois Moser

Douglas C. Scott, MPH ‘86 Joseph A. Stankaitis, MPH ‘86 Maxine A. Whittaker, MPH ‘86 Barbara S. Wrightson, SM ‘86 * 1987 David C. Bellinger, SM ‘87 Paul H. Campbell, SD ‘87 * Charles Deutsch, SD ‘87 Alison M. Dorries, MPH ‘87 Cathy J. Kopy, SM ‘87 Thomas H. Lee, Jr., SM ‘87 * Robert L. Mittendorf, MPH ‘87, DPH ‘91 * Mariette G. Murphy, MPH ‘87, ‘89 Susan Putnam Peck, SM ‘87, SD ‘91 * Garrett R. Tucker III, MPH ‘87 Nancy Ung, MPH ‘87 Leonel Vela, MPH ‘87 Kristian Vetlesen, MPH ‘87 Brent C. Williams, MPH ‘87 Albert S. Yeung, SM ‘87, SD ‘92 * 1988 Jesse A. Berlin, SD ‘88 Roger B. Davis, SD ‘88 * Thomas B. Hanley, SM ‘88 Mimi Y. Kim, SM ‘88, SD ‘90 Michael D. Kneeland, MPH ‘88 * James M. Kulikowski, MPH ‘88 * John W. Lehmann, MPH ‘88

Joel S. Lippman, MPH ‘88 Daniel R. Lucey, MPH ‘88 James C. Lynch, SM ‘88 * Solofo R. Ramaroson, MPH ‘88 Eric Ruder, SM ‘88 Carl A. Soderland, MPH ‘88 Peter G. Stringham, SM ‘88 Heejoon Y. Sun, MPH ‘88 Jesus Vioque Lopez, MPH ‘88, ‘92 Elizabeth A. Wuerslin, MPH ‘88 1989 Susan G. Albert, SM ‘89 * Alison C. Cullen, SM ‘89, SD ‘92, ‘94 Kirsten E. Frederiksen, SM ‘89 * Kimberlee K. Gauvreau, SM ‘89, SD ‘92 * Janet M. Grimes, SM ‘89 Courtney A. Jennings, SM ‘89 Elsbeth G. Kalenderian, MPH ‘89 Georgia Karapanos, SM ‘89 Matthew P. Longnecker, SD ‘89 Nancy J. Marr, SM ‘89 Wolfgang Munar, SM ‘89 Suresh Santanam, SD ‘89 * Jill Sickle Schield, SM ‘89 * Simon D. Spivack, MPH ‘89, ‘97 Susan O. Widmann, SM ‘89 1990 Gilbert Burgos, MPH ‘90 * Mary J. Corrigan, SM ‘90 David J. Cullen, SM ‘90

Kenneth M. Davis, SM ‘90 Rita G. Grossman, SM ‘90 Russ B. Hauser, MPH ‘90, SD ‘94 * Philip P. Huang, MPH ‘90 Masaru Kamei, SM ‘90 Sarah A. Marshall, SM ‘90 * Marcus G. Rothenberg, SM ‘90 Srinivas M. Sastry, MPH ‘90 Stephen C. Shannon, MPH ‘90 1991 Terry A. Adirim, MPH ‘91 Martha S. Bayliss, SM ‘91 Bonnie B. Blanchfield, SM ‘91, SD ‘95 Peter W. Choo, MPH ‘91, DPH ‘96 Gary C. Curhan, SM ‘91, SD ‘96 Joel Diringer, MPH ‘91 Julie E. Henry, MPH ‘91 * Marjorie E. Kanof, MPH ‘91 * Irene H. Kim, MPH ‘91 Farzad Mostashari, SM ‘91 Abbe F. Rosenbaum, MPH ‘91 Thomas M. Slyter, MPH ‘91 * Man-Sung Yim, SM ‘91, SD ‘94 1992 Deborah L. Blacker, SD ‘92 Stephen N. Kales, MPH ‘92 Paul M. LeVine, SM ‘92 Colleen T. Manley, SM ‘92 Risa C. Shames, SM ‘92 * Priscilla Szneke, SM ‘92

Diana K. Verrilli, SM ‘92 Fair H. Wang, SM ‘92 * 1993 Haleh Armian, SM ‘93 Linda G. Baer, SM ‘93 Gabrielle Bercy, MPH ‘93 Joseph C. Cappelleri, MPH ‘93 Lena E. Dohlman-Gerhart, MPH ‘93 * Marian G. Ewell, SD ‘93 Chia-Wen Hsu, MPH ‘93 Zene Matsuda, SD ‘93 Valerie J. Ricker, SM ‘93 Phillip W. Sarocco, SM ‘93 Kristin K. Snow, SM ‘93, SD ‘00 Sharon L. Swindell, MPH ‘93 * Lois A. Wetmore, SD ‘93, ‘94 John J. Whyte, MPH ‘93 1994 Susan E. Andrade, SD ‘94 Jeanine Boyle, MPH ‘94 Joanna Buffington, MPH ‘94 * Christopher P. Duggan, MPH ‘94 * Michael A. Egboh, MPH ‘94 Rinly R. Gecosala, MPH ‘94 Shari I. Gelber, SM ‘94 Cheryl L. Hamlin, MPH ‘94 Peggy C. Hsieh, SM ‘94 Michael R. Jarrard, MPH ‘94 David P. Kraft, MPH ‘94 Youcheng Liu, SM ‘94, SD ‘97, ‘98

continued

*individuals who have made a gift for five or more consecutive years. † deceased

Winter 2012

39

Alumni (continued) Nanette E. Moss, SM ‘94 A. E. C. Rietveld, MPH ‘94 Deborah L. Snyder, MPH ‘94 Nanako Tamiya, SM ‘94 Hideki Yamamoto, MPH ‘94 1995 Arnold Y. Chen, SM ‘95 Jay A. Clemens, MPH ‘95 Karen Donelan, SD ‘95 Alison E. Field, SD ‘95 Kirsten E. Fleischmann, MPH ‘95 Amy W. Grace, SM ‘95 * Stanley W. Hatch, MPH ‘95 Paula K. Ivey Henry, SM ‘95 Peter A. Merkel, MPH ‘95 * Geoffrey G. Mount-Varner, MPH ‘95 Ju-Hyeong Park, SM ‘95, SD ‘99 * Laury E. Saligman, SM ‘95 Mary D. Sammel, SD ‘95 Kevin J. Schwartzman, MPH ‘95 * Grace E. Song, MPH ‘95 Pa-Chun Wang, SM ‘95 1996 David J. Berck, MPH ‘96 * Elizabeth R. Bertone-Johnson, SM ‘96, SD ‘99 Jane S. Burns, SM ‘96, SD ‘05 Mary Cushman, SM ‘96 * Mei Sheng Duh, SD ‘96 Edmond F. Feeks, MPH ‘96 Uma R. Kotagal, SM ‘96 Teresa L. Lee, MPH ‘96 Rogerio C. Lilenbaum, SM ‘96 Salima M. Lin, SM ‘96 Pamela S. Lotke, MPH ‘96 Lynn M. Marshall, SD ‘96 Joy R. Mockbee, MPH ‘96 * Shunsuke Ono, SM ‘96 Margaret B. Ruttenberg, SM ‘96 Ibou Thior, SM ‘96 Michael J. VanRooyen, ‘96 1997 Andrea J. Apter, SM ‘97 * Bruce B. Borgelt, MPH ‘97 Elizabeth S. Chabner Thompson, MPH ‘97 Robert A. Frick, MPH ‘97 Cheryl H. Hayes-Todisco, SM ‘97 Onyekachi Ifudu, SM ‘97 Nancy E. Isaac, MPH ‘97 * Tripti C. Kataria, MPH ‘97 Vicki E. Light, MPH ‘97 * Joshua P. Metlay, SM ‘97 * Howard H. Moffet, MPH ‘97 * Cynthia A. Moylan, SM ‘97

40

Harvard Public Health Review

Siobhan M. O’Connor, MPH ‘97 Allyn E. Segelman, SM ‘97, SM ‘03 Marcia Slomowitz, SM ‘97

Mary L. Brown, MPH ‘01, ‘06 Humayun J. Chaudhry, SM ‘01 Shannon M. Escalante, SM ‘01 * Kristin Ciriello Pothier, SM ‘01 1998 Victoria R. Hopkins, MPH ‘01 Jennifer A. Hanner, MPH ‘98 * Roxana Y. Io, MPH ‘01 Joseph O. Jacobson, SM ‘98 Soichi Koike, MPH ‘01 Shari M. Kessel Schneider, SM ‘98 Theodore W. Marcy, MPH ‘01 Roderick K. King, MPH ‘98 Raul A. Mendoza-Sassi, PDS ‘01 Kathleen M. Koehler, MPH ‘98 * Sean A. Norris, SM ‘01 Michael P. Lazarski, MPH ‘98 Fredrick K. Orkin, SM ‘01 Charles Lu, SM ‘98 * William T. Peruzzi, SM ‘01 Mark E. Ralston, MPH ‘98 Hyun S. Ryu, SM ‘01 Jennifer Retsinas, MPH ‘98 Jeffrey L. Schnipper, MPH ‘01 * Tabitha L. Rice, ‘98 * Lisa V. Stone, MPH ‘01 Donald C. Simonson, MPH ‘98, SM ‘99, Rich Wittman, MPH ‘01 SD ‘06 Yongyu Wang, MPH ‘98 * 2002 Wendy J. Wolf, MPH ‘98 Caitlin M. Cusack, MPH ‘02 Beow Y. Yeap, SD ‘98 Joseph C. Finetti, SM ‘02 1999 Robert A. Bethel, MPH ‘99 * Wendy Y. Chen, MPH ‘99 Eunyoung Cho, SD ‘99 * Susan M. Duty, SM ‘99, SD ‘02 Michelle B. Frye, SM ‘99 Nicholas J. Horton, SD ‘99 Jessica A. Kahn, MPH ‘99 Kotagal S. Kant, SM ‘99, ‘00 James A. Kaye, MPH ‘99, DPH ‘01 * Paul C. Lu, SM ‘99 Marjorie L. McCullough, SD ‘99 Sidney W. Rosen, MPH ‘99 * Mary E. Wewers, MPH ‘99 * Nathan D. Wolfe, SD ‘99 Zui-Shen Yen, MPH ‘99 Ying Zhu, MPH ‘99 2000 Jean-Marie Arduino, SD ‘00 Ritu S. Batra, MPH ‘00 Debra Buchan, ‘00 Jonathan L. French, SD ‘00, ‘01 Chandak Ghosh, MPH ‘00 Ellen S. Lerner, SM ‘00 Tina T. Powderly, SM ‘00 * Michael S. Radeos, MPH ‘00 * Janet Y. Schrodi, MPH ‘00 Beverly G. Siegal, MPH ‘00 * Gary M. Strauss, MPH ‘00 Jennifer L. Tomasik, SM ‘00 Tonya L. Villafana, MPH ‘00 2001 Imtiaz Ahmad, MPH ‘01 Mary T. Brophy, MPH ‘01

D. Jay Gloeb, MPH ‘02 Camilla S. Graham, MPH ‘02 Alan D. Guerci, SM ‘02 * Ming-Rong Harn, ‘02 Sok-Ja K. Janket, MPH ‘02 * Yi Y. Jung, SM ‘02 Carolyn M. Kaelin, MPH ‘02 Noel S. Lawson, SM ‘02 Joyce J. Lee Ibarra, SM ‘02 Lisa M. Letourneau, MPH ‘02 John R. Madril, MPH ‘02 James L. McGee, SM ‘02 Joseph S. McLaughlin, SM ‘02 Takeshi M. Morimoto, MPH ‘02 Mikiko Muraki, SM ‘02 Beth G. Raucher, SM ‘02 John D. Seeger, DPH ‘02 James M. Steven, SM ‘02 * Joel Yohai, SM ‘02 2003 Marina G. Anderson, MPH ‘03 Athos Bousvaros, MPH ‘03 John D. Bullock, MPH ‘03 Jaroslaw Harezlak, ‘03 James R. Hendricks, MPH ‘03 Amita Kamath, MPH ‘03 Janice S. Kwon, MPH ‘03 Cyril S. Rakovski, ‘03 Jennifer A. Schumi, ‘03 Lon G. Sherman, MPH ‘03 Paul A. Testa, MPH ‘03 Erik J. Won, MPH ‘03 Tsz-Pei Wu, SM ‘03 Summer L. Zheng, ‘03 *

2004 Clement A. Adebamowo, SD ‘04 Amy A. Adome, MPH ‘04 Mohammed S. Al Olama, MPH ‘04 Ruth S. Arestides, SM ‘04 Eugene D. Choi, SM ‘04 * Anthony Dias, MPH ‘04 Barry C. Dorn, SM ‘04 Stacey J. Drubner, MPH ‘04 Roland D. Eavey, SM ‘04 Eric W. Fleeger, MPH ‘04 Daniel W. Gillette, SM ‘04 Ira R. Horowitz, SM ‘04 * Jacob Kaplan, SM ‘04 Sandeep V. Karnik, MPH ‘04 Caroline T. Korves, SD ‘04 Margaret Makumi, PDS ‘04 Lamberto F. Manzoli, MPH ‘04 Patricia A. Moran, MPH ‘04 Thomas R. Mote, MPH ‘04 * Erinn T. Rhodes, MPH ‘04, ‘07 * John W. Robinson, SM ‘04 * Kelly C. Simon, SM ‘04, SD ‘07 * Bolanie O. Soyannow, MPH ‘04 Andrew M. Wiesenthal, SM ‘04 * 2005 Edward J. Alfrey, SM ‘05 Jeffrey B. Cohn, SM ‘05 William R. DeFoor, MPH ‘05 * Herbert C. Duber, MPH ‘05 Jennifer L. Kowalski, SM ‘05 Timothy J. Mahoney, SM ‘05 Mary Ellen McCann, MPH ‘05 Maritza Morell, SM ‘05 Michael T. Rowland, MPH ‘05 Kenneth R. Rubin, SM ‘05 Steven H. Silber, SM ‘05 Eric E. Smith, MPH ‘05 Boyd V. Washington, SM ‘05 Janice L. Weiner, MPH ‘05 A. Eric Whitney, SM ‘05 Anson E. Wright, SM ‘05, ‘07 2006 Angela M. Bader, MPH ‘06 Richard Y. Bae, SM ‘06 Johanna R. Bell, SM ‘06 Anthony L. Chen, MPH ‘06 Royce E. Clifford, MPH ‘06 Chitradeep De, MPH ‘06 Jim M. John, MPH ‘06 Stephanie R. Kayden, MPH ‘06 Nikheel S. Kolatkar, MPH ‘06 Elizabeth A. Kurs, SM ‘06 Karen C. McKoy, MPH ‘06 Yuki Murakami, SM ‘06

Individuals Kris Natarajan, SM ‘06 Lee S. Prisament, MPH ‘06 * Jeffrey Tingle, ‘06 2007 Michael E. Brown, SM ‘07 Jane H. Cardoso, SM ‘07 Gauthier R. Desuter, SM ‘07 Abhishek Kumar, MPH ‘07 Beverly J. Loudin, MPH ‘07 Mauricio A. Maza Segura, MPH ‘07 Maame B. Nketsiah, SM ‘07 Mark Phillippe, SM ‘07 Arathi R. Setty, MPH ‘07 Xiaotian Zhong, MPH ‘07 Edwin T. Zishiri, SD ‘07 2008 Zeina N. Chemali, MPH ‘08 Lindsey A. Cole, SM ‘08 Herbert O. Davies, SM ‘08 Sean M. Dunbar, SM ‘08 Barbara S. Gold, SM ‘08 Sean E. Hunt, SM ‘08 Courtenay L. Kessler, SM ‘08 John McNelis, SM ‘08 Stephen J. Meraw, SM ‘08 Margaret M. Parks, SM ‘08 Nadine B. Semer, MPH ‘08 Kanwaljit Singh, MPH ‘08 2009 Joseph Atallah, SM ‘09 Greg A. Burnett, SM ‘09 Paul M. Carter, SM ‘09 Lyndon V. Hernandez, MPH ‘09 Ei Ei Khin, MPH ‘09 Katherine E. Kobus, SM ‘09 Jeremy H. Pertman, SM ‘09 Sivabalan Vasudavan, MPH ‘09 2010 Teresa Chahine, SD ‘10, PDS ‘12 Francisco Loya, SM ‘10 Catherine M. Mullaly, MPH ‘10 Anuj S. Narang, SM ‘10 Kate W. Sedgwick, MPH ‘10 * Hailu Tilahun, SM ‘10 Hiroshi Tsuji, MPH ‘10 2011 Craig T. Shelley, MPH ‘11

*individuals who have made a gift for five or more consecutive years. † deceased

The generosity of individuals is vital to HSPH’s mission of pursuing new knowledge, educating public health’s future leaders, and communicating health messages to the public. Their gifts sustain the School and in turn will have far-reaching implications for the global mission of public health. The following list acknowledges individuals who made cumulative contributions of $250 or more during fiscal year 2011, July 1, 2010 to June 30, 2011. $1,000,000+ Mala Gaonkar $500,000 - $999,999 George D. Behrakis Barry R. Bloom * Judith Carson * Russell L. Carson * Richard L. Menschel * Ronay A. Menschel * Penny S. Pritzker * Emmanuel Roman Deborah Rose, SM ‘75 * Bryan Traubert * $250,000 - $499,999 Mrs. William McCormick Blair, Jr. Ellen Feldberg Gordon C. Boyden Gray Richard W. Smith J. Frederick Weintz, Jr. * Nathalie Wong Stephen R. Wong $100,000 - $249,000 James D. Chen Bruce S. Gillis, MPH ‘74 Sarah B. Glickenhaus * Seth M. Glickenhaus * Bayard Henry * Julie E. Henry, MPH ‘91 * Charlotte von Clemm Iselin James E. Issler * John L. McGoldrick * Mary Revelle Paci * Melvin R. Seiden † Shanda Stephenson Louisa von Clemm * Stefanie C. von Clemm $50,000 - $99,999 Jonathan S. Bush Lammot du Pont Copeland, Jr. * Evelyn Byrd Donatelli Mike M. Donatelli Michael S. Feldberg Melvin W. First † Serena M. Hatch

Peter M. Hecht William C. Hsiao Ruth F. Lazarus Jorge Paulo Lemann Christopher W. Walker † Jeffrey Zients Mary M. Zients $25,000 - $49,000 Anonymous Christine Allen * Thorley D. Briggs * Phyllis D. Collins * Frank Denny Elizabeth R. Foster William A. Haseltine George Hatch Florence R. Koplow Matthew B. McLennan Monika McLennan Bernard Salick Gloria Salick Marina Tubio Isabelle Valadian, MPH ‘53 * Michael P. Walsh Cyrille G. White $10,000 - $24,999 Anonymous Sloan Barnett Roger L. Barnett David E. Bloom Lakshmi R. Bloom Gail Blout Derek C. Bok Marc E. Buyse, SD ‘90 Elizabeth S. Chabner Thompson, MPH ‘97 Gerald L. Chan, SM ‘75, SD ‘79 Kenneth H. Cooper, MPH ‘62 * Howard Cox Joan P. Curhan * Ronald C. Curhan * Barrie M. Damson Lawrence J. D’Angelo, MPH ‘72 John J. Danilovich Mary M. Finnegan Paul J. Finnegan

continued Winter 2012

41

Individuals (continued) Dorothy J. Ganick, SM ‘67 * Enid Gleich Martin Gleich Laurence J. Hagerty Robert M. Holster Priscilla S. Hunt Richard M. Hunt Joan L. Jacobson * Julius H. Jacobson II * Mark E. Jennings Charles H. Klippel, SM ‘80 Eric C. Larson * Per Lofberg Francisco A. Lorenzo * Nancy T. Lukitsh * Sarah H. Lupfer John H. MacMillan IV Louise P. MacMillan, SM ‘78 Jay Markowitz Beth V. Martignetti * Carmine A. Martignetti * Kristin W. Mugford Stephen A. Mugford Roslyn B. Payne Muriel K. Pokross † * Irene Pollin Robert O. Preyer * Jeannine M. Rivet * Srinivas M. Sastry, MPH ‘90 Kate W. Sedgwick, MPH ‘10 * Charles B. Sheppard II Eleanor G. Shore, MPH ‘70, ‘71 * Miles F. Shore Michael C. Smith Polly Smith Richard M. Smith Paula Sneddon Steven L. Sneddon, SM ‘77, SD ‘79 Irene M. Stare * Howard H. Stevenson * Natasha Pearl Stowe Richard H. Stowe Edwin J. Taff * Linda Tao * John T. Triphyllis Fair H. Wang, SM ‘92 * Mary Stare Wilkinson * Doris Wilson, ‘48 Barbara J. Wu * Jason Yeung $5,000 - $9,999 Anonymous Kenneth S. Abramowitz Jeffrey Arnstein Jonathan S. Auerbach

Jane Carpenter Bradley * John M. Bradley Joseph D. Brain, SM ‘63, SD ‘66 Judith B. Brain John W. Brown Carrie S. Cox Kenneth C. Cox Christopher L. DeLong Michelle K. Jacobs DeLong Michael S. Field Samuel A. Forman, MPH ‘77, SM ‘80 Larry S. Gage Holly D. Hayes * Snowden M. Henry Paula K. Ivey Henry, SM ‘95 Edgar N. James, MPH ‘79 Tsuneko Konno Joel Lamstein * Rogerio C. Lilenbaum, SM ‘96 Marguerite Littman Eugene A. Mickey, MPH ‘82 * Royce Moser, Jr., MPH ‘65 * William A. Oates, Sr. * Carol Paraskevas * Elizabeth T. Peabody Samuel P. Peabody Susan Putnam Peck, SM ‘87, SD ‘91 * Susan Butler Plum Michael R. Pollard, MPH ‘74 Penelope Pollard Irwin Schneiderman † Roberta Schneiderman * Alan R. Steinert, Jr. Carl W. Stern * David Thompson Josef H. von Rickenbach John J. Whyte, MPH ‘93 Dyann F. Wirth * Peter K. Wirth * $2,500 - $4,999 Paula Alprin * Loreen J. Arbus David J. Berck, MPH ‘96 * Humayun J. Chaudhry, SM ‘01 Peter W. Choo, MPH ‘91, DPH ‘96 Cynthia L. Cohen, SM ‘76 Prudence S. Crozier * Tom Daschle Karen L. Davis, SM ‘78 * Jean M. Doherty-Greenberg, MPH ‘79 Julio Frenk Maria Furman Katie H. Gambill Els Goetghebeur David A. Greenberg, MPH ‘80

Frank Guidara * David P. Harrington Eileen P. Hayes, SD ‘79 Judith E. Hicks * Michael E. Jacobson * Barry D. Jennings Courtney A. Jennings, SM ‘89 James A. Kaye, MPH ‘99, DPH ‘01 * Daman M. Kowalski Nisha Kumar Elizabeth K. Liao * James A. Manganello, MPH ‘80 Douglas McClure Robert L. Mittendorf, MPH ‘87, DPH ‘91 * Carole C. Moore William M. Moore, MPH ‘66 * Wanda Olsen Carol Raphael * Louise M. Ryan Gloria W. Sakata Phillip W. Sarocco, SM ‘93 David I. Scheer * Ruth C. Scheer Ellie Starr George H. Strong Amy Tashjian Victoria Tashjian Ming T. Tsuang Snow H. Tsuang Ronald A. Walter, SM ‘72 * Stephen H. Wise Migs S. Woodside Joan K. Wyon * $1,000 - $2,499 Kathleen H. Acree, MPH ‘64 Laurent H. Adamowicz Clement A. Adebamowo, SD ‘04 Elisabeth S. Allison Robert M. Bahn Barbara D. Beck Susanna E. Bedell Jesse A. Berlin, SD ‘88 Baroline H. Bienia, SM ‘76 Richard A. Bienia, MPH ‘74 Dana Black J. Brandon Black Gerald H. Blum * Jeanine Boyle, MPH ‘94 Paul R. Branch, SM ‘82 * Irene S. Briedis * John Briedis * Alice Brooks Joseph E. Brooks

Nancy Budge Buffy B. Cafritz J. Jacques Carter, MPH ‘83 * Lynne M. Cavanaugh, SM ‘79 * Hennessey Chang Kevin C. Chang, MPH ‘85 Gail E. Costa, SM ‘76 Norma Dana Douglas W. Dockery, SM ‘74, SD ‘79 * Mitchell L. Dong Robin LaFoley Dong Harvey V. Fineberg * Fred N. Fishman * Frederick Frank * A. Alan Friedberg Barbara J. Friedberg Niki Friedberg * Keith Garde M. Dozier Gardner David L. Gilmour Douglass B. Given David E. Golan Barbara S. Gold, SM ‘08 Susan Wilner Golden, SD ‘81 Susan M. Guillory * Lan Jiang Guo David W. Haartz Olive W. Holmes Anula K. Jayasuriya Gordon T. Johnson, MPH ‘76 Anthony Kales Joyce Kales Stephen N. Kales, MPH ‘92 Thomas W. Kalinowski, SM ‘77, SD ‘81 * Miltos Kambourides Ellen L. Kaplan * Robert S. Kaplan Simeon M. Kriesberg * Anton O. Kris John W. Lehmann, MPH ‘88 Kathleen S. Lehmann Jeanne E. Loughlin, SM ‘79 Daniel R. Lucey, MPH ‘88 Isabel W. Malkin * Peter L. Malkin * JoAnn E. Manson, MPH ‘84, DPH ‘87 * Linda D. Masiello Carol I. Master, SM ‘81, DPH ‘89 Sherry Mayrent Shaw McDermott * Philip E. Miles, Jr. Rumiko Mizuuchi-Adamowicz Augustine E. Moffitt, Jr., SM ‘69, SD ‘73

*individuals who have made a gift for five or more consecutive years. † deceased 42

Harvard Public Health Review

I am interested in improving health care in resource-poor settings. When deciding what projects to support, I look at who is doing the strongest, most innovative work, and whether they have the capability to test their concepts in multiple locations around the world. I first encountered Atul Gawande through his writing and was quickly impressed by the elegant simplicity of his checklist concept. A great deal of money is being invested in pharmaceutical and biotechnology research these days, but very little is devoted to less glamorous ideas in systems innovation that have real potential to improve health care delivery around the world. The Health Systems Innovation Research Fund has enabled Atul to scale up his work on safe surgery and safe childbirth checklists and develop a new checklist-based approach to improving end-of-life care. —Mala Gaonkar, AB ’91, MBA ’96

Geoffrey G. Mount-Varner, MPH ‘95 Wolfgang Munar, SM ‘89 Linda C. Niessen, MPH ‘77 Thomas L.P. O’Donnell * William T. Peruzzi, SM ‘01 Stephen J. Plank, MPH ‘61, DPH ‘64 Carl M. Reddix, MPH ‘85 Carol H. Rice, SM ‘75 Donald J. Rosato, MPH ‘63 Margaret B. Ruttenberg, SM ‘96 Jack W. Schuler * Renate Schuler * David M. Shaheen Linda Shaheen Sara J. Singer Alix Smullin Joseph I. Smullin Eliot I. Snider Hope H. Snider, MPH ‘64, ‘67 * Kristin K. Snow, SM ‘93, SD ‘00 Robert Snyder Victoria Brooks Stafford Meir J. Stampfer, MPH ‘80, DPH ‘85 Howard R. Steinberg, MPH ‘75 Carol Jean W. Suitor, SM ‘85, SD ‘88 Richard Suitor Ming Tsai Gerald Tulis *

Richard W. Valachovic, MPH ‘81, SM ‘82 Michael J. VanRooyen, ‘96 Leonel Vela, MPH ‘87 Kelly Victory Robert C. Waggoner Virginia G. Watkin Irene M. Weigel * Lynn B. Weigel, Jr. * Eric C. Weintz Andrew M. Wiesenthal, SM ‘04 * Nathan D. Wolfe, SD ‘99 Bertram A. Yaffe Marc Zammit Ellen M. Zane * Summer L. Zheng, ‘03 * Paul J. Zofnass $500 - $999 Elie M. Abemayor, SM ‘80 * Mary T. Adelstein S. James Adelstein Louis M. Alpern, MPH ‘74 * Michael C. Alpert, MPH ‘74 * Jean-Marie Arduino, SD ‘00 Virginia W. Arnold, ‘80 George T. Au, MPH ‘84 Elizabeth L. Baum, MPH ‘86 Leonard Berkowitz Linda Berkowitz

Linda M. Bollettino John D. Bullock, MPH ‘03 Gilbert Burgos, MPH ‘90 * Mary E. Chamberland, MPH ‘82 Yung-Cheng J. Chen, MPH ‘83 Walter K. Clair, MPH ‘85 Melanie C. Clarke, SM ‘78 Joseph A. Cook, MPH ‘68 * Anthony D. Cortese, SD ‘76 Mary Cushman, SM ‘96 * Gauthier R. Desuter, SM ‘07 Lena E. Dohlman-Gerhart, MPH ‘93 * Mei Sheng Duh, SD ‘96 Wendy L. Everett, SM ‘77, SD ‘80 Edmond F. Feeks, MPH ‘96 Rose H. Goldman, MPH ‘80, SM ‘81 Sofia M. Gruskin Fernando A. Guerra, MPH ‘83 Tammy C. Harris, MPH ‘85 * Stanley W. Hatch, MPH ‘95 Glenn E. Haughie, MPH ‘70 Earle R. Heine, MPH ‘63 * Tomio Hirohata, SM ‘65, SD ‘68 Mari-Ann Hogan William W. Hogan Donald R. Hopkins, MPH ‘70 Jane B. Horton Ole B. Hovind, MPH ‘77 Lois C. Howland, MPH ‘78, SM ‘94, DPH ‘98

Peter A. Howland, MPH ‘78 Chia-Wen Hsu, MPH ‘93 Joseph O. Jacobson, SM ‘98 Polly O.L. Kam Stephen P. Kelly, ‘79 Kyungmann Kim Bernard E. Kreger, MPH ‘70 Lucian L. Leape Martha P. Leape Justice E. Chouteau Levine * William M. Levine * Chau-Ching Lin, SM ‘55 Barbara J. Lind Robert B. Lutes, SM ‘80 Timothy J. Mahoney, SM ‘05 Lynn M. Marshall, SD ‘96 Maria E. Mazorra, SM ‘79 Catherine M. Moeller Matthew P. Moeller, SM ‘84 Patricia A. Moran, MPH ‘04 Beth Myers, SM ‘76 Elizabeth M. Nicholson * Philip T. Nicholson, SM ‘74 * Stephen E. Piwinski, MIH ‘82 * Ruth S. Polton Thomas D. Polton, SM ‘83 * Ross L. Prentice Lee S. Prisament, MPH ‘06 * Dorina Radeos Michael S. Radeos, MPH ‘00 *

continued Winter 2012

43

Individuals (continued) Solofo R. Ramaroson, MPH ‘88 Marcia Rappaport Erinn T. Rhodes, MPH ‘04, ‘07 * Jonathan M. Samet, SM ‘77 * Suresh Santanam, SD ‘89 * Kevin J. Schwartzman, MPH ‘95 * Norman C. Severo Donald C. Simonson, MPH ‘98, SM ‘99, SD ‘06 Steven J. Skates Donna Spiegelman, SM ‘85, SD ‘89 Richard W. Steketee, MPH ‘83 Eileen Storey, MPH ‘78 Michael A. Stoto Jeffrie R. Strang, MPH ‘77 Lindsay Stratton Jennifer L. Tomasik, SM ‘00 Helen H. Wang, MPH ‘76, DPH ‘79 * Boyd V. Washington, SM ‘05 Jay S. Weisfeld, MPH ‘77 * Dorothy L. Wilson, MPH ‘66 Beverly Winikoff, MPH ‘73 * Rich Wittman, MPH ‘01 James F. Wittmer, MPH ‘61 * Erik J. Won, MPH ‘03 Anson E. Wright, SM ‘05, ‘07 Beow Y. Yeap, SD ‘98 $250 - $499 Theodor Abelin, MPH ‘63 Terry A. Adirim, MPH ‘91 Mohammed S. Al Olama, MPH ‘04 Elizabeth N. Allred, ‘78 * Marina G. Anderson, MPH ‘03 Susan E. Andrade, SD ‘94 Mark J. Barer Amy C. Barkin, MPH ‘76 * Lisa S. Barnes, SM ‘81 * Rita D. Berkson, SM ‘77 * Sheila R. Bloom, SM ‘78 * John D. Blum, SM ‘74 Mary B. Brink, MPH ‘52 Arthur E. Brown, MPH ‘81 * Debra D. Carey, SM ‘79 N. Bruce Chase, MPH ‘68 Zeina N. Chemali, MPH ‘08 Anthony L. Chen, MPH ‘06 Eugene D. Choi, SM ‘04 * Jane H. Chretien, MPH ‘70 * Royce E. Clifford, MPH ‘06 Jeffrey B. Cohn, SM ‘05 Lindsey A. Cole, SM ‘08 James Conway Mary J. Corrigan, SM ‘90 Kathleen R. Crampton, MPH ‘74 Caitlin M. Cusack, MPH ‘02

Robert T. Cutting, MPH ‘59 Kenneth M. Davis, SM ‘90 Andrew G. Dean, MPH ‘72 Barry C. Dorn, SM ‘04 Joseph C. d’Oronzio, MPH ‘80 * Luise Druke Stanley L. Dryden, SM ‘64 * Alison E. Field, SD ‘95 Lucy Fisher Laurence B. Flood * Nancy J. Fox, SM ‘86 Joseph F. Fraumeni, Jr., SM ‘65 Robert A. Frick, MPH ‘97 Kathleen A. Gaffney, MPH ‘71 Homero R. Garza, MPH ‘76 Rinly R. Gecosala, MPH ‘94 Judith D. Goldberg, SM ‘67, SD ‘72, ‘73 * Janet M. Grimes, SM ‘89 Alan D. Guerci, SM ‘02 * Ming-Rong Harn, ‘02 Patricia Hartge, SM ‘76, SD ‘83 * Elizabeth E. Hatch, SM ‘81 * Francis W. Hatch III * Neil C. Hawkins, SM ‘86, SD ‘88 Warren W. Hodge, MPH ‘64 Pin-Hua Huang, SM ‘79, SD ‘82 Sean E. Hunt, SM ‘08 Boris Iglewicz Raja Iglewicz, ‘85 Jason Jagatic Sok-Ja K. Janket, MPH ‘02 * Dean R. Johnson Wayne A. Johnson, MPH ‘65 Amita Kamath, MPH ‘03 Marjorie E. Kanof, MPH ‘91 * Kotagal S. Kant, SM ‘99, ‘00 Tripti C. Kataria, MPH ‘97 Keith W. Kauppila Mary M. Kauppila Joel Kavet, SD ‘72 * Jack C. Keane, SM ‘76 Therus C. Kolff, MPH ‘79 Caroline T. Korves, SD ‘04 Uma R. Kotagal, SM ‘96 Ruth B. Kundsin, SD ‘58 * Augusta F. Law, MPH ‘51 John C. Leadbeater, MPH ‘71 * Teresa L. Lee, MPH ‘96 Samuel Levey, SM ‘63 * Paul M. LeVine, SM ‘92 Alan Leviton, SM ‘71 John H. Lichten Youcheng Liu, SM ‘94, SD ‘97, ‘98 Leonard C. Mandell, SM ‘55 * Shirley F. Marks, MPH ‘76

Nancy J. Marr, SM ‘89 Keith J. Maxwell, SM ‘85 James L. McGee, SM ‘02 John McNelis, SM ‘08 Peter A. Merkel, MPH ‘95 * Mary Milgrom Mikiko Muraki, SM ‘02 Anuj S. Narang, SM ‘10 Kris Natarajan, SM ‘06 Melissa Natarajan William P. Naylor, MPH ‘81 * Joseph P. Newhouse Margaret Newhouse Frederick B. Oleson, Jr., SM ‘73, SD ‘78 Bernard M. Olsen, SM ‘77 * Shunsuke Ono, SM ‘96 John C. Perry, MPH ‘73 * Mark Phillippe, SM ‘07 Tina T. Powderly, SM ‘00 * Beth G. Raucher, SM ‘02 Arthur R. Rhodes, MPH ‘73 * Valerie J. Ricker, SM ‘93 A. E. C. Rietveld, MPH ‘94 John W. Robinson, SM ‘04 * Christy Robson Wendy G. Rockefeller, SM ‘82 * Sidney W. Rosen, MPH ‘99 * Abbe F. Rosenbaum, MPH ‘91 Deborah A. Roth, SM ‘86 * Marsha Roth Rebecca Roth Gloria A. Rudisch, MPH ‘70 Laury E. Saligman, SM ‘95 Jill Sickle Schield, SM ‘89 * Stephen C. Schoenbaum, MPH ‘74 David Schottenfeld, SM ‘63 Janet Y. Schrodi, MPH ‘00 Jennifer A. Schumi, ‘03 Nadine B. Semer, MPH ‘08 Stephen C. Shannon, MPH ‘90 Craig T. Shelley, MPH ‘11 Jo A. Shifrin, SM ‘79 Bernard Shleien, SM ‘63 * Shanna R. Shulman Reinhard Sidor, SM ‘67, SD ‘73 John Simon * Kelly C. Simon, SM ‘04, SD ‘07 * Kanwaljit Singh, MPH ‘08 James H. Steele, MPH ‘42 * Judith S. Stern, SM ‘60, SD ‘70 James M. Steven, SM ‘02 * Lisa V. Stone, MPH ‘01 Priscilla Szneke, SM ‘92 Robert J. Szot, SD ‘70 Paul A. Testa, MPH ‘03

Henry W. Vaillant, SM ‘69 * Diana K. Verrilli, SM ‘92 Michael W. Voligny Carolyn A. Webster, SM ‘82 * Jonathan B. Weisbuch, MPH ‘67 Marcia L. Weisman, SD ‘79, ‘81 Bruce A. Weiss, MPH ‘84 Scott T. Weiss, SM ‘77 Mary E. Wewers, MPH ‘99 * Georgiana K. White, SM ‘79 * Maxine A. Whittaker, MPH ‘86 Thomas B. Wilinsky Walter C. Willett, MPH ‘73, DPH ‘80 Earnestine Willis, MPH ‘77 Robert E. Yoder, SD ‘63 Joel Yohai, SM ‘02 David R. Younkin * Shirley Younkin *

*individuals who have made a gift for five or more consecutive years. 44

Harvard Public Health Review

Institutional Partnerships The School gratefully acknowledges the invaluable support of its many corporate, foundation, and institutional donors and sponsors. Through their engagement, these organizations are helping to improve the health of people around the world. The following lists recognize organizations that, in fiscal year 2011, have provided gifts and grants of $1,000 and above, or have made matching gifts to the School. $1,000,000+ Branta Foundation, Inc. The Children’s Investment Fund Foundation ExxonMobil Foundation The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Robert Wood Johnson Foundation The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation $500,000 - $999,999 Behrakis Foundation Carson Family Charitable Trust Center for Science in the Public Interest Charina Endowment Fund, Inc. Joyce Foundation The Medtronic Foundation Ambrose Monell Foundation Pritzker & Traubert Family Foundation Deborah Rose Foundation Susan G. Komen Foundation $250,000 - $499,999 African Comprehensive HIV/AIDS Partnerships Alliance for Aging Research American Heart Association, Inc. Harbor Lights Foundation Panasonic Risk Management Foundation Searle Scholars Program Wong Family Foundation $100,000 - $249,000 Anonymous Alzheimer Europe American Diabetes Association American Hospital Association ASISA Biogen, Inc. Breast Cancer Research Foundation Broad Institute Cancer Research Institute, Inc. Chronic Fatigue Initiative Commonwealth Fund The Ellison Foundation

Footwear Association Charity Event, Inc. General Mills, Inc. Glickenhaus Foundation Japan Foundation for the Promotion of International Medical Research Cooperation Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center at ColumbiaPresbyterian National Multiple Sclerosis Society New Horizon Foundation North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System Not On Our Watch, Inc. Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation T.J. Martell Foundation J.T. Tai and Company Foundation, Inc. Michael & Louisa von Clemm Foundation William J. Clinton Foundation $50,000 - $99,999 Anonymous American Lung Association Arthritis Foundation Culinary Institute of America Mike and Evelyn Donatelli Foundation Entertainment Industry Foundation First Eagle Investment Management Gilead Sciences, Inc. Greenwall Foundation Harvard Club of New York Foundation Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation Raymond P. Lavietes Foundation A.G. Leventis Foundation Massachusetts General Hospital Helen and William Mazer Foundation Margaret T. Morris Foundation National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression National Asphalt Pavement Association New York Community Trust Okinaga Foundation Oxfam America Pennsylvania State University Pew Charitable Trusts Pfizer, Inc. Scleroderma Research Foundation Teikyo Foundation, Inc. The TriZetto Group Vertex Pharmaceuticals Incorporated Zients Family Foundation

$25,000 - $49,000 The Brinson Foundation Cabot Family Charitable Trust California Walnut Commission Dillon Fund Family Health International Humanity United International Committee of the Red Cross Florence & Richard Koplow Charitable Foundation Max Kade Foundation, Inc. Microsoft Office Ergonomics Research Committee The Stare Fund Towers Watson Ushahidi, Inc. $10,000 - $24,999 American Legacy Foundation Derek Bok Advised Fund Charles River Fund Chevron Energy Technology Company Clermont Charitable Trust Conrad Hilton Foundation Clarence and Anne Dillon Dunwalke Trust Generation Partners Management, LLC HMS Business Services, Inc. Richard M. and Priscilla S. Hunt Charitable Lead Annuity Trust Institute of International Vaccine Development, Inc. International Drug Development Institute, Inc. John S. and James L. Knight Foundation MAC AIDS Fund Morningside Foundation Oncology-Hematology Clinic Open Society Institute Payne Family Foundation Pinkerton Foundation Robert O. Preyer Charitable Lead Unitrust The Springfield Foundation Stevenson Family Charitable Trust Stowe Family Foundation Frank Strick Foundation Thompson Foster Street Foundation, Inc. University of Virginia $5,000 - $9,999 Boston University Cooper Clinic Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Paul P. Dosberg Foundation, Inc. Eastern Charitable Foundation Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc. Google, Inc. Health Research, Inc. John Snow, Inc. Kenneth & Nira Abramowitz Foundation Mary Norris Preyer Fund

continued Winter 2012

45

Institutional Partnerships (continued) McLemore Charitable Trust PAREXEL International Corporation Michael and Penelope Pollard Fund Ropes & Gray, LLP Samaritan’s Purse Scripps Health T. Rowe Price Program for Charitable Giving, Inc. The Safe Futures Fund of the Foundation for Enhanced Communities, on behalf of Mrs. Susan Orkin Whole Foods Market $1,000 - $4,999 Erna Yaffe Foundation Abbott Laboratories Allison Family Charitable Foundation Anthem Blue Cross Loreen J.G. Arbus Charitable Lead Trust AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals, LP Bethesda Retina, LLC Blum Family Foundation, Inc. Buffy Cafritz Trust Account Catholic Relief Services Celgene Corporation Concern Worldwide Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America Crozier Family Fund Cypress Fund for Peace & Security Dolphin Capital Partners Dossia Foundation

Environmental Health & Engineering, Inc. Erwin O. and Rosalind H. Freund Foundation The David B. Gold Foundation The Maxine Goldenson Charitable Lead Unitrust Goldman Sachs & Co. Gradient Haber Family Charitable Fund Harvard Pilgrim Health Care, Inc. Health Assurances, LLC Healthways Illumina, Inc. Malkin Fund Plato Malozemoff Foundation Massachusetts Medical Society Ming East-West, LLC NECOEM New York Community Trust The Oak Fund of Triangle Community Foundation Partners HealthCare System PKA Management, Inc. Donald J. Rosato Charitable Foundation Derald H. Ruttenberg Foundation Scappaticci-Steinberg Foundation Schuler Family Foundation Schwab Charitable Fund David and Linda Shaheen Foundation Sinco, Inc. Snider Charitable Trust Tulis, Miller & Company Uno Restaurants, LLC

The health landscape has changed dramatically in Africa and India over the last decade, with much more significant expectations around what we can achieve for the broad population, as well as a new and substantial influx of donor resources to achieve these goals. As a result, to be successful and competitive for donor funds, health ministers and ministries now need a complex basket of skills ranging from the political to managerial. The curriculum for the new HSPH Ministerial Leadership Program we are funding is designed around the actual skills and assets needed by ministers, rather than a theoretical or academic approach. There also will be follow-up support, as well as an accountability mechanism for ministers to implement their plan and report progress to their peers. —Jamie Cooper-Hohn, MPA’94, president of the Children’s Investment Fund Foundation.

46

Harvard Public Health Review

Matching Gift Companies Abbott Laboratories Fund Aetna Foundation Incorporated The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Boeing Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation Burness Communications Elizabeth Doolittle Charitable Trusts DTE Energy Foundation Eli Lilly and Company Foundation Elsevier Foundation Exelon ExxonMobil Foundation Genentech General Electric Foundation IMS John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation McKesson HBOC Foundation, Inc. Merck Company Foundation Matching Gifts Odyssey America Reinsurance Corp. Pfizer, Inc. Philips Electronics North America Co. Walt Disney Company Foundation Wells Fargo Foundation

Annual Giving The success of Annual Giving in fiscal year 2011 was the result of hard work on the part of many loyal HSPH alumni and friends. These donors understand that annual giving plays a critical role in meeting ongoing needs for student financial aid, seed funding for innovative research, and general operating support. These funds allow the Dean and senior administration to apply funds where they are needed most. Henry Pickering Walcott Society ($25,000+) Henry Pickering Walcott (1890-1927), a noted physician and chairman of the Massachusetts Board of Health, was a member of the Harvard Corporation and was influential in the founding of HSPH. Christine Allen Phyllis D. Collins Sarah B. Glickenhaus Seth M. Glickenhaus George Hatch Florence R. Koplow Matthew B. McLennan Monika McLennan Richard L. Menschel Ronay A. Menschel Mary Revelle Paci Deborah Rose, SM ‘75 Bernard Salick Gloria Salick Marina Tubio James Steven Simmons Society ($10,000 - $24,999) James Steven Simmons (1890 -1954) was an Army medical officer and Dean of the Faculty at the Harvard School of Public Health. Anonymous Sloan Barnett Roger L. Barnett David E. Bloom Lakshmi R. Bloom Derek C. Bok Elizabeth S. Chabner Thompson, MPH ‘97 Gerald L. Chan, SM ‘75, SD ‘79 Kenneth H. Cooper, MPH ‘62 Howard Cox Barrie M. Damson Mary M. Finnegan Paul J. Finnegan Dorothy J. Ganick, SM ‘67 Enid Gleich Martin Gleich Laurence J. Hagerty Robert M. Holster Priscilla S. Hunt Richard M. Hunt Charlotte von Clemm Iselin Joan L. Jacobson Julius H. Jacobson II † deceased

Mark E. Jennings Charles H. Klippel, SM ‘80 Francisco A. Lorenzo Nancy T. Lukitsh Sarah H. Lupfer John H. MacMillan IV Louise P. MacMillan, SM ‘78 Jay Markowitz Beth V. Martignetti Carmine A. Martignetti Kristin W. Mugford Stephen A. Mugford Irene Pollin Robert O. Preyer Jeannine M. Rivet Srinivas M. Sastry, MPH ‘90 Kate W. Sedgwick, MPH ‘10 Charles B. Sheppard II Eleanor G. Shore, MPH ‘70, ‘71 Miles F. Shore Michael C. Smith Polly Smith Richard M. Smith Howard H. Stevenson Natasha Pearl Stowe Richard H. Stowe Edwin J. Taff Linda Tao Louisa von Clemm Stefanie C. von Clemm Fair H. Wang, SM ‘92 Jason Yeung

Shattuck Family Society ($5,000 - $9,999) The Shattuck family has provided a financial foundation for many important School initiatives and priorities over the generations. Anonymous Kenneth S. Abramowitz Jeffrey Arnstein Jonathan S. Auerbach Jane Carpenter Bradley John M. Bradley John W. Brown Carrie S. Cox Kenneth C. Cox Christopher L. DeLong Michelle K. Jacobs DeLong Michael S. Field

Larry S. Gage Holly D. Hayes Snowden M. Henry Paula K. Ivey Henry, SM ‘95 Edgar N. James, MPH ‘79 Rogerio C. Lilenbaum, SM ‘96 Marguerite Littman Eugene A. Mickey, MPH ‘82 William A. Oates, Sr. Fredrick K. Orkin, SM ‘01 Susan L. Orkin Carol Paraskevas Elizabeth T. Peabody Samuel P. Peabody Susan Putnam Peck, SM ‘87, SD ‘91 Susan Butler Plum Michael R. Pollard, MPH ‘74 Penelope Pollard Irwin Schneiderman † Roberta Schneiderman Paula Sneddon Steven L. Sneddon, SM ‘77, SD ‘79 Carl W. Stern David Thompson Josef H. von Rickenbach John J. Whyte, MPH ‘93 Dyann F. Wirth Peter K. Wirth

Milton J. Rosenau Society ($2,500 - $4,999) Milton J. Rosenau (1869-1946) was a founding faculty member of the Harvard and Massachusetts Institute of Technology School for Health Officers, which later became the Harvard School of Public Health. Loreen J. Arbus David J. Berck, MPH ‘96 Humayun J. Chaudhry, SM ‘01 Peter W. Choo, MPH ‘91, DPH ‘96 Prudence S. Crozier Tom Daschle Karen L. Davis, SM ‘78 Julio Frenk Katie H. Gambill Els Goetghebeur David A. Greenberg, MPH ‘80 Frank Guidara David P. Harrington Eileen P. Hayes, SD ‘79

continued Winter 2012

47

Annual Giving (continued) Judith E. Hicks Michael E. Jacobson Barry D. Jennings Courtney A. Jennings, SM ‘89 James A. Kaye, MPH ‘99, DPH ‘01 Daman M. Kowalski Nisha Kumar Elizabeth K. Liao James A. Manganello, MPH ‘80 Douglas McClure Robert L. Mittendorf, MPH ‘87, DPH ‘91 Carole C. Moore Wanda Olsen Carol Raphael Gloria W. Sakata Phillip W. Sarocco, SM ‘93 David I. Scheer Ruth C. Scheer George H. Strong Amy Tashjian Victoria Tashjian Ming T. Tsuang Snow H. Tsuang Ronald A. Walter, SM ‘72 Migs S. Woodside Joan K. Wyon

Jonathan M. Mann Society ($1,000 - $2,499) Jonathan Mann (1947-1998) served as head of the World Health Organization’s global AIDS program and was the first François-Xavier Bagnoud Professor of Health and Human Rights at HSPH. Kathleen H. Acree, MPH ‘64 Laurent H. Adamowicz Clement A. Adebamowo, SD ‘04 Elisabeth S. Allison Susanna E. Bedell Jesse A. Berlin, SD ‘88 Baroline H. Bienia, SM ‘76 Richard A. Bienia, MPH ‘74 Dana Black J. Brandon Black Gerald H. Blum Jeanine Boyle, MPH ‘94 Paul R. Branch, SM ‘82 Irene S. Briedis John Briedis Alice Brooks Joseph E. Brooks Nancy Budge Buffy B. Cafritz J. Jacques Carter, MPH ‘83 Lynne M. Cavanaugh, SM ‘79 Hennessey Chang

48

Harvard Public Health Review

Kevin C. Chang, MPH ‘85 Gail E. Costa, SM ‘76 Douglas W. Dockery, SM ‘74, SD ‘79 Mitchell L. Dong Robin LaFoley Dong Harvey V. Fineberg Fred N. Fishman Frederick Frank A. Alan Friedberg Barbara J. Friedberg Niki Friedberg Keith Garde M. Dozier Gardner David L. Gilmour Douglass B. Given David E. Golan Barbara S. Gold, SM ‘08 Susan Wilner Golden, SD ‘81 Susan M. Guillory David W. Haartz Christopher T. Hitt, SM ‘75 Olive W. Holmes Anula K. Jayasuriya Gordon T. Johnson, MPH ‘76 Anthony Kales Joyce Kales Stephen N. Kales, MPH ‘92 Thomas W. Kalinowski, SM ‘77, SD ‘81 Ellen L. Kaplan Robert S. Kaplan Simeon M. Kriesberg Anton O. Kris John W. Lehmann, MPH ‘88 Kathleen S. Lehmann Jeanne E. Loughlin, SM ‘79 Daniel R. Lucey, MPH ‘88 Isabel W. Malkin Peter L. Malkin JoAnn E. Manson, MPH ‘84, DPH ‘87 Linda D. Masiello Carol I. Master, SM ‘81, DPH ‘89 Sherry Mayrent Shaw McDermott Rumiko Mizuuchi-Adamowicz Augustine E. Moffitt, Jr., SM ‘69, SD ‘73 Geoffrey G. Mount-Varner, MPH ‘95 Wolfgang Munar, SM ‘89 Linda C. Niessen, MPH ‘77 Thomas L.P. O’Donnell William T. Peruzzi, SM ‘01 Stephen J. Plank, MPH ‘61, DPH ‘64 Carl M. Reddix, MPH ‘85 Carol H. Rice, SM ‘75 Donald J. Rosato, MPH ‘63 Margaret B. Ruttenberg, SM ‘96 Louise M. Ryan Jack W. Schuler

Renate Schuler David M. Shaheen Linda Shaheen Sara J. Singer Eliot I. Snider Hope H. Snider, MPH ‘64, ‘67 Kristin K. Snow, SM ‘93, SD ‘00 Robert Snyder Victoria Brooks Stafford Meir J. Stampfer, MPH ‘80, DPH ‘85 Ellie Starr Howard R. Steinberg, MPH ‘75 Carol Jean W. Suitor, SM ‘85, SD ‘88 Richard Suitor Ming Tsai Gerald Tulis Richard W. Valachovic, MPH ‘81, SM ‘82 Michael J. VanRooyen, ‘96 Leonel Vela, MPH ‘87 Kelly Victory Robert C. Waggoner Michael P. Walsh Irene M. Weigel Lynn B. Weigel, Jr. Eric C. Weintz Andrew M. Wiesenthal, SM ‘04 Nathan D. Wolfe, SD ‘99 Bertram A. Yaffe Marc Zammit Ellen M. Zane Paul J. Zofnass

Alice Hamilton Society ($500 - $999) Alice Hamilton (1869-1970) was a leader in the field of industrial health and was the first woman appointed to the Harvard University faculty. Elie M. Abemayor, SM ‘80 Mary T. Adelstein S. James Adelstein Louis M. Alpern, MPH ‘74 Michael C. Alpert, MPH ‘74 Jean-Marie Arduino, SD ‘00 Virginia W. Arnold, ‘80 George T. Au, MPH ‘84 Elizabeth L. Baum, MPH ‘86 Linda M. Bollettino John D. Bullock, MPH ‘03 Gilbert Burgos, MPH ‘90 Mary E. Chamberland, MPH ‘82 Yung-Cheng J. Chen, MPH ‘83 Walter K. Clair, MPH ‘85 Joseph A. Cook, MPH ‘68 Anthony D. Cortese, SD ‘76 Mary Cushman, SM ‘96 Lena E. Dohlman-Gerhart, MPH ‘93

Pam Francis Photography

Mei Sheng Duh, SD ‘96 Wendy L. Everett, SM ‘77, SD ‘80 Edmond F. Feeks, MPH ‘96 Rose H. Goldman, MPH ‘80, SM ‘81 Sofia M. Gruskin Fernando A. Guerra, MPH ‘83 Lan Jiang Guo Tammy C. Harris, MPH ‘85 Stanley W. Hatch, MPH ‘95 Glenn E. Haughie, MPH ‘70 Earle R. Heine, MPH ‘63 Tomio Hirohata, SM ‘65, SD ‘68 Donald R. Hopkins, MPH ‘70 Jane B. Horton Ole B. Hovind, MPH ‘77 Lois C. Howland, MPH ‘78, SM ‘94, DPH ‘98 Peter A. Howland, MPH ‘78 Chia-Wen Hsu, MPH ‘93 Joseph O. Jacobson, SM ‘98 Polly O.L. Kam Stephen P. Kelly, ‘79 Bernard E. Kreger, MPH ‘70 Eric C. Larson Lucian L. Leape Martha P. Leape Justice E. Chouteau Levine William M. Levine Chau-Ching Lin, SM ‘55 Barbara J. Lind Robert B. Lutes, SM ‘80 Timothy J. Mahoney, SM ‘05 Lynn M. Marshall, SD ‘96 Maria E. Mazorra, SM ‘79 Catherine M. Moeller Patricia A. Moran, MPH ‘04 Beth Myers, SM ‘76 Elizabeth M. Nicholson Philip T. Nicholson, SM ‘74 Stephen E. Piwinski, MIH ‘82 Ruth S. Polton Thomas D. Polton, SM ‘83 Lee S. Prisament, MPH ‘06 Dorina Radeos Michael S. Radeos, MPH ‘00 Solofo R. Ramaroson, MPH ‘88 Marcia Rappaport Erinn T. Rhodes, MPH ‘04, ‘07 Suresh Santanam, SD ‘89 Kevin J. Schwartzman, MPH ‘95 Donald C. Simonson, MPH ‘98, SM ‘99, SD ‘06 Steven J. Skates Richard W. Steketee, MPH ‘83 Eileen Storey, MPH ‘78 Jeffrie R. Strang, MPH ‘77 Lindsay Stratton Jennifer L. Tomasik, SM ‘00

For me, the Harvard School of Public Health opened the door to a higher level of public health practice. I would likely have become a public health officer in a small town. I was encouraged to apply as the School’s first veterinarian by Dean Cecil Drinker. Shortly before I graduated in 1942, I was discouraged to see that all the public health jobs required an MD, but Dean Drinker told me, “Why don’t you fly under one flag?” as a public health veterinarian. That was the best advice I ever got. I was commissioned in the U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS). After the war, I established the Veterinary Public Health Program at the Centers for Disease Control. The program became a model for state and international agencies, including the World Health Organization. I’ve traveled around the world making the case for veterinarians in public health—and I never could have done it without the support of HSPH. —James Steele, MPH ’42, is known worldwide as the “ father of veterinary public health.” His many contributions to the field during his more than 60year career include helping develop a rabies vaccine model and pushing for stronger food safety standards in the poultry industry. Steele advised the World Health Organization on veterinary public health for more than 50 years. He also served as an assistant surgeon general in the USPHS and was involved in the elimination of tuberculosis in the cattle and swine populations. A recipient of financial assistance as a student at HSPH, Steele has steadily supported the School for the past 40 years. Steele is the School’s oldest known alumnus.

continued Winter 2012

49

Annual Giving (continued) Boyd V. Washington, SM ‘05 Jay S. Weisfeld, MPH ‘77 Dorothy L. Wilson, MPH ‘66 Beverly Winikoff, MPH ‘73 Rich Wittman, MPH ‘01 James F. Wittmer, MPH ‘61 Erik J. Won, MPH ‘03 Anson E. Wright, SM ‘05, ‘07 Barbara J. Wu Beow Y. Yeap, SD ‘98 Summer L. Zheng, ‘03

Cecil K. and Philip Drinker Society ($250 - $499) Cecil Drinker (1887-1956), Dean of HSPH from 1935-42, and his brother Philip (1894-1972), inventor of the iron lung, were pioneers in environmental health and bioengineering. Theodor Abelin, MPH ‘63 Terry A. Adirim, MPH ‘91 Elizabeth N. Allred, ‘78 Marina G. Anderson, MPH ‘03 Susan E. Andrade, SD ‘94 Amy C. Barkin, MPH ‘76 Rita D. Berkson, SM ‘77 Sheila R. Bloom, SM ‘78 John D. Blum, SM ‘74 Arthur E. Brown, MPH ‘81 Debra D. Carey, SM ‘79 N. Bruce Chase, MPH ‘68 Zeina N. Chemali, MPH ‘08 Anthony L. Chen, MPH ‘06 Eugene D. Choi, SM ‘04 Jane H. Chretien, MPH ‘70 Royce E. Clifford, MPH ‘06 Jeffrey B. Cohn, SM ‘05 James Conway Mary J. Corrigan, SM ‘90 Kathleen R. Crampton, MPH ‘74 Caitlin M. Cusack, MPH ‘02 Robert T. Cutting, MPH ‘59 Kenneth M. Davis, SM ‘90 Andrew G. Dean, MPH ‘72 Barry C. Dorn, SM ‘04 Joseph C. d’Oronzio, MPH ‘80 Luise Druke Stanley L. Dryden, SM ‘64 Alison E. Field, SD ‘95 Laurence B. Flood Nancy J. Fox, SM ‘86 Joseph F. Fraumeni, Jr., SM ‘65 Robert A. Frick, MPH ‘97 Kathleen A. Gaffney, MPH ‘71 Homero R. Garza, MPH ‘76 Rinly R. Gecosala, MPH ‘94

50

Harvard Public Health Review

Judith D. Goldberg, SM ‘67, SD ‘72, ‘73 Janet M. Grimes, SM ‘89 Alan D. Guerci, SM ‘02 Ming-Rong Harn, ‘02 Patricia Hartge, SM ‘76, SD ‘83 Elizabeth E. Hatch, SM ‘81 Francis W. Hatch III Neil C. Hawkins, SM ‘86, SD ‘88 Warren W. Hodge, MPH ‘64 Pin-Hua Huang, SM ‘79, SD ‘82 Sean E. Hunt, SM ‘08 Jason Jagatic Sok-Ja K. Janket, MPH ‘02 Dean R. Johnson Wayne A. Johnson, MPH ‘65 Amita Kamath, MPH ‘03 Marjorie E. Kanof, MPH ‘91 Kotagal S. Kant, SM ‘99, ‘00 Tripti C. Kataria, MPH ‘97 Joel Kavet, SD ‘72 Jack C. Keane, SM ‘76 Therus C. Kolff, MPH ‘79 Caroline T. Korves, SD ‘04 Uma R. Kotagal, SM ‘96 Ruth B. Kundsin, SD ‘58 Augusta F. Law, MPH ‘51 John C. Leadbeater, MPH ‘71 Samuel Levey, SM ‘63 Paul M. LeVine, SM ‘92 Alan Leviton, SM ‘71 John H. Lichten Leonard C. Mandell, SM ‘55 Shirley F. Marks, MPH ‘76 Nancy J. Marr, SM ‘89 Keith J. Maxwell, SM ‘85 James L. McGee, SM ‘02 John McNelis, SM ‘08 Peter A. Merkel, MPH ‘95 Mary Milgrom Mikiko Muraki, SM ‘02 Anuj S. Narang, SM ‘10 Kris Natarajan, SM ‘06 Melissa Natarajan William P. Naylor, MPH ‘81 Frederick B. Oleson, Jr., SM ‘73, SD ‘78 Bernard M. Olsen, SM ‘77 Shunsuke Ono, SM ‘96 John C. Perry, MPH ‘73 Tina T. Powderly, SM ‘00 Beth G. Raucher, SM ‘02 Arthur R. Rhodes, MPH ‘73 Valerie J. Ricker, SM ‘93 A. E. C. Rietveld, MPH ‘94 John W. Robinson, SM ‘04 Christy Robson Wendy G. Rockefeller, SM ‘82

Sidney W. Rosen, MPH ‘99 Abbe F. Rosenbaum, MPH ‘91 Deborah A. Roth, SM ‘86 Marsha Roth Rebecca Roth Laury E. Saligman, SM ‘95 Jill Sickle Schield, SM ‘89 Stephen C. Schoenbaum, MPH ‘74 David Schottenfeld, SM ‘63 Janet Y. Schrodi, MPH ‘00 Jennifer A. Schumi, ‘03 Nadine B. Semer, MPH ‘08 Craig T. Shelley, MPH ‘11 Bernard Shleien, SM ‘63 Reinhard Sidor, SM ‘67, SD ‘73 John Simon Kelly C. Simon, SM ‘04, SD ‘07 Kanwaljit Singh, MPH ‘08 James H. Steele, MPH ‘42 Judith S. Stern, SM ‘60, SD ‘70 Lisa V. Stone, MPH ‘01 Priscilla Szneke, SM ‘92 Robert J. Szot, SD ‘70 Paul A. Testa, MPH ‘03 Henry W. Vaillant, SM ‘69 Diana K. Verrilli, SM ‘92 Michael W. Voligny Jonathan B. Weisbuch, MPH ‘67 Marcia L. Weisman, SD ‘79, ‘81 Bruce A. Weiss, MPH ‘84 Scott T. Weiss, SM ‘77 Mary E. Wewers, MPH ‘99 Georgiana K. White, SM ‘79 Maxine A. Whittaker, MPH ‘86 Walter C. Willett, MPH ‘73, DPH ‘80 Earnestine Willis, MPH ‘77 Robert E. Yoder, SD ‘63 Joel Yohai, SM ‘02 David R. Younkin Shirley Younkin

Financial Aid Committment to educating the next generation of public health leaders and providing financial support for students are top priorities. The HSPH Scholarship Fund provides immediate support to our students on an annual basis. The School gratefully acknowledges the individuals who made gifts of $250 or more in fiscal year 2011 in support of the HSPH Scholarship Fund and other funds used to pay tuition, cost of attendance, and stipends for matriculated students in degree programs. Donors who made gifts to support post-doctoral fellowships, traveling fellowships, and student prize funds in fiscal year 2011 are listed in other sections throughout this report. Theodor Abelin, MPH ‘63 Elie M. Abemayor, SM ‘80 Kathleen H. Acree, MPH ‘64 Clement A. Adebamowo, SD ‘04 Terry A. Adirim, MPH ‘91 Mohammed S. Al Olama, MPH ‘04 Elizabeth N. Allred, ‘78 ASISA AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals, LP George T. Au, MPH ‘84 Robert M. Bahn Mark J. Barer Barbara D. Beck Leonard Berkowitz Linda Berkowitz Rita D. Berkson, SM ‘77 Jesse A. Berlin, SD ‘88 Baroline H. Bienia, SM ‘76 Barry R. Bloom Sheila R. Bloom, SM ‘78 John D. Blum, SM ‘74 Blum Family Foundation, Inc. Jeanine Boyle, MPH ‘94 Joseph D. Brain, SM ‘63, SD ‘66 Judith B. Brain Thorley D. Briggs Arthur E. Brown, MPH ‘81 John D. Bullock, MPH ‘03 Gilbert Burgos, MPH ‘90 Debra D. Carey, SM ‘79 Carson Family Charitable Trust Judith Carson Russell L. Carson J. Jacques Carter, MPH ‘83 Elizabeth S. Chabner Thompson, MPH ‘97 Mary E. Chamberland, MPH ‘82 N. Bruce Chase, MPH ‘68 Zeina N. Chemali, MPH ‘08 Yung-Cheng J. Chen, MPH ‘83 Peter W. Choo, MPH ‘91, DPH ‘96 Jane H. Chretien, MPH ‘70 Walter K. Clair, MPH ‘85 Lindsey A. Cole, SM ‘08 Mary J. Corrigan, SM ‘90

Joan P. Curhan Ronald C. Curhan Caitlin M. Cusack, MPH ‘02 Lawrence J. D’Angelo, MPH ‘72 Kenneth M. Davis, SM ‘90 Douglas W. Dockery, SM ‘74, SD ‘79 Lena E. Dohlman-Gerhart, MPH ‘93 Mike and Evelyn Donatelli Foundation Evelyn Byrd Donatelli Mike M. Donatelli Barry C. Dorn, SM ‘04 Stanley L. Dryden, SM ‘64 Mei Sheng Duh, SD ‘96 Eastern Charitable Foundation Wendy L. Everett, SM ‘77, SD ‘80 Edmond F. Feeks, MPH ‘96 Michael S. Feldberg Melvin W. First † Lucy Fisher Elizabeth R. Foster Nancy J. Fox, SM ‘86 Julio Frenk Robert A. Frick, MPH ‘97 Glickenhaus Foundation Sarah B. Glickenhaus Seth M. Glickenhaus Susan Wilner Golden, SD ‘81 Alan D. Guerci, SM ‘02 Fernando A. Guerra, MPH ‘83 Tammy C. Harris, MPH ‘85 Patricia Hartge, SM ‘76, SD ‘83 William A. Haseltine Glenn E. Haughie, MPH ‘70 Health Assurances, LLC Earle R. Heine, MPH ‘63 Tomio Hirohata, SM ‘65, SD ‘68 Mari-Ann Hogan William W. Hogan Olive W. Holmes Donald R. Hopkins, MPH ‘70 Ole B. Hovind, MPH ‘77 William C. Hsiao Chia-Wen Hsu, MPH ‘93 Pin-Hua Huang, SM ‘79, SD ‘82

Joan L. Jacobson Julius H. Jacobson II Edgar N. James, MPH ‘79 Sok-Ja K. Janket, MPH ‘02 Wayne A. Johnson, MPH ‘65 Thomas W. Kalinowski, SM ‘77, SD ‘81 Amita Kamath, MPH ‘03 Marjorie E. Kanof, MPH ‘91 Kotagal S. Kant, SM ‘99, ‘00 Ellen L. Kaplan Robert S. Kaplan Keith W. Kauppila Mary M. Kauppila Joel Kavet, SD ‘72 Jack C. Keane, SM ‘76 Tsuneko Konno Florence R. Koplow Florence & Richard Koplow Charitable Foundation Caroline T. Korves, SD ‘04 Uma R. Kotagal, SM ‘96 Ruth B. Kundsin, SD ‘58 Raymond P. Lavietes Foundation Augusta F. Law, MPH ‘51 Ruth F. Lazarus A. G. Leventis Foundation Samuel Levey, SM ‘63 Alan Leviton, SM ‘71 Jeanne E. Loughlin, SM ‘79 Nancy T. Lukitsh Robert B. Lutes, SM ‘80 Timothy J. Mahoney, SM ‘05 James A. Manganello, MPH ‘80 JoAnn E. Manson, MPH ‘84, DPH ‘87 Lynn M. Marshall, SD ‘96 Keith J. Maxwell, SM ‘85 John McNelis, SM ‘08 Peter A. Merkel, MPH ‘95 Catherine M. Moeller Matthew P. Moeller, SM ‘84 Royce Moser, Jr., MPH ‘65 Geoffrey G. Mount-Varner, MPH ‘95 Wolfgang Munar, SM ‘89 Mikiko Muraki, SM ‘02 Beth Myers, SM ‘76 Anuj S. Narang, SM ‘10 Kris Natarajan, SM ‘06 Melissa Natarajan William P. Naylor, MPH ‘81 New Horizon Foundation Joseph P. Newhouse Margaret Newhouse Linda C. Niessen, MPH ‘77 Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation Frederick B. Oleson, Jr., SM ‘73, SD ‘78 Bernard M. Olsen, SM ‘77 Shunsuke Ono, SM ‘96

† deceased

continued Winter 2012

51

Financial Aid (continued) I chose to become involved with HSPH because the School has the capacity to affect not just a small population, but the entire world. I have yet to identify another organization with such a global footprint. The great advantage of funding scholarships is that it brings supporting public health down to a personal level: here is the individual whom your money is going to help. These students will go on in their careers to help people in ways I can’t even imagine. —Russ Carson, a founding partner of Welsh, Carson, Anderson & Stowe, and Judy Carson.

Fredrick K. Orkin, SM ‘01 Susan L. Orkin Mary Revelle Paci Muriel K. Pokross † Penny S. Pritzker Pritzker & Traubert Family Foundation Solofo R. Ramaroson, MPH ‘88 Carl M. Reddix, MPH ‘85 Arthur R. Rhodes, MPH ‘73 Erinn T. Rhodes, MPH ‘04, ‘07 Valerie J. Ricker, SM ‘93 A. E. C. Rietveld, MPH ‘94 Deborah Rose, SM ‘75 Deborah Rose Foundation Margaret B. Ruttenberg, SM ‘96 Derald H. Ruttenberg Foundation Louise M. Ryan The Safe Futures Fund of the Foundation for Enhanced Communities, on behalf of Mrs. Susan Orkin Bernard Salick Gloria Salick Jonathan M. Samet, SM ‘77 Suresh Santanam, SD ‘89 Phillip W. Sarocco, SM ‘93 David I. Scheer Jill Sickle Schield, SM ‘89 Irwin Schneiderman † Roberta Schneiderman Stephen C. Schoenbaum, MPH ‘74 David Schottenfeld, SM ‘63 Kevin J. Schwartzman, MPH ‘95

Nadine B. Semer, MPH ‘08 Craig T. Shelley, MPH ‘11 Jo A. Shifrin, SM ‘79 Shanna R. M. Shulman Reinhard Sidor, SM ‘67, SD ‘73 Donald C. Simonson, MPH ‘98, SM ‘99, SD ‘06 Kanwaljit Singh, MPH ‘08 Alix Smullin Joseph I. Smullin Paula Sneddon Steven L. Sneddon, SM ‘77, SD ‘79 Hope H. Snider, MPH ‘64, ‘67 Kristin K. Snow, SM ‘93, SD ‘00 Donna Spiegelman, SM ‘85, SD ‘89 Meir J. Stampfer, MPH ‘80, DPH ‘85 The Stare Fund Ellie Starr Richard W. Steketee, MPH ‘83 Lisa V. Stone, MPH ‘01 Eileen Storey, MPH ‘78 Priscilla Szneke, SM ‘92 Robert J. Szot, SD ‘70 T. Rowe Price Program for Charitable Giving, Inc. Thompson Foster Street Foundation, Inc. David Thompson Bryan Traubert Henry W. Vaillant, SM ‘69 Isabelle Valadian, MPH ‘53 Michael P. Walsh Boyd V. Washington, SM ‘05 Marcia L. Weisman, SD ‘79, ‘81

Bruce A. Weiss, MPH ‘84 Mary E. Wewers, MPH ‘99 Georgiana K. White, SM ‘79 Earnestine Willis, MPH ‘77 Dorothy L. Wilson, MPH ‘66 Dyann F. Wirth Peter K. Wirth James F. Wittmer, MPH ‘61 Robert E. Yoder, SD ‘63 Joel Yohai, SM ‘02

† deceased

52

Harvard Public Health Review

Named Fellowships at Harvard School of Public Health Harvard School of Public Health is extremely grateful to the donors who have established and contributed to the following named fellowship funds. These funds are a vital source of support for many of our students, and serve as an example of leadership for generous student financial support.

Helen Thayer Adams Scholarship Fund

Lewis W. Hackett Scholarship

Andelot Scholarship Fund

Florence Koplow International Term Scholarship Fund

ASISA Fellowship Fund

Kay Family Public Health Scholarship Fund

Benjamin M. Banks Fellowship Fund

Vasilios Stavros Lagakos Fellowship in Biostatistics Fund

Berkowitz Fellowship in Public Health Nutrition

Raymond P. Lavietes Biostatistics Fellowship Fund

Barry R. and Irene Tilenius Bloom Fellowship

A.G. Leventis Fellowship Fund for Greek Cypriot Students

Joseph D. Brain Fellowship Fund in Environmental Health

A.G. Leventis Fellowship Fund for Nigerian Students

Thorley D. Briggs Scholarship Fund

Lilly Scholarship in Pharmacoepidemiology

Wanda Lane Buck Fellowship Fund

Bernard Lown Fund in Cardiovascular Health

Cabot Fund for International Scholars

The Jere Mead Fellowship Fund

Carson Family Fellowship Fund

John Bruce Nichols and Margaret L. North Nichols Memorial Scholarship Fund

Carson Family Scholarship Program D’Angelo Family Scholarship in Public Health Dillon Family Fellowship in Population and Development Studies Dillon Family Fellowship in Population and International Health Mike M. and Evelyn B. Donatelli Fellowship Fund

Novartis Doctoral Student Training Fellowship Paci Family Fellowship Fund in Public Health David H. Peipers Fellowship Fund Margaret D. Penrose Scholarship Fund

Endowment Fund for Education of Physicians from Taiwan

Muriel K. and David R. Pokross and Joan P. and Ronald C. Curhan Doctoral Student Support Fund in Nutrition

Myron E. Essex Fellowship Fund for Students From Africa

Donald and Sue Pritzker Scholarship Fund

Sumner L. Feldberg Fellowship Fund

Bernard and Gloria Salick Fellowship in Public Health

The Benjamin Greely Ferris, Jr. Fellowship Fund in Environmental Epidemiology

Joel E. and Joan L. Smilow Fellowship Fund

Mitchell L. Dong and Robin LaFoley Dong Scholarship Fund

Harvey V. Fineberg Fellowship in Cancer Prevention Mary E. Wilson and Harvey V. Fineberg Education Fund Mary E. Wilson and Harvey V. Fineberg Fellowship in Infectious Diseases Melvin W. First Fellowship Fund Glickenhaus Financial Aid Fund Horace W. Goldsmith Fellowship Fund George Gund Endowment Fund

Mortimer Spiegelman Fellowship in Demographic Studies Irene M. and Fredrick J. Stare Nutrition Education Fund John F. and Virginia B. Taplin Fellowship Fund Gohar and Valad Valadian Fund Thomas H. Weller Fellowship Fund Edwin Bidwell Wilson Memorial Fund Herbert S. Winokur, Jr. Fellowship in Public Health

Winter 2012

53

Tribute Gifts Tribute Gifts offer a meaningful way to advance public health while also recognizing a beloved family member, special friend, or colleague. Individuals who were honored with a tribute gift in fiscal year 2011 are listed below. The names of their corresponding donors appear throughout this report.

Honored Jade Applegate Mrs. William McCormick Blair, Jr. Barry R. Bloom Joseph E. Brooks Earl F. Cook, Jr. Diane Davis Carola Eisenberg Miguel A. Hernan Sarah LaVenture Elizabeth K. Liao Erin Lyons Alexander McCall Smith E. John Orav Mary Revelle Paci Anand A. Piramal Elizabeth Preyer Jill Preyer Shan V. Sayles John D. Spengler Virginia B. Taplin Nancy Turnbull Alicia E. Yamin Marvin Zelen Thelma Zelen Memorialized Irene Tilenius Bloom James W. Bridges Deanne C. Dorn Melvin W. First Dona Halecki Rella Halecki Jeremiah Mead Muriel K. Pokross Melvin R. Seiden John F. Taplin Armen H. Tashjian, Jr. Selia Ukponmwan Charles F. Wilinsky

54

Harvard Public Health Review

Mel First was a practical man who valued research for the solutions it provides to issues in the real world. Not content simply to identify public health problems, Mel’s life purpose was to solve them. He conducted groundbreaking research on cleaning the air of pollutants, and methods he developed—some of which are still used today—helped factory workers and people living near industrial plants breathe easier. Mel’s students and colleagues will remember him as a man with firm opinions that were rooted in his commitment to protect public health through the application of sound engineering principles. Those who shared his principles and who had earned his respect through the quality of their work could count on his help and support. He always made time for his students and they were devoted to him. The Melvin W. First Fellowship Fund, which supports doctoral students in environmental health engineering, honors Mel’s many contributions to the School and to the field. —The above tribute was written by three individuals who were students of Mel First and contributed to his tribute fund: Steve Rudnick, SM’70, SD’78, lecturer on industrial hygiene engineering at Harvard School of Public Health; David Leith, SD’75, professor and associate chair of the Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina School of Public Health; and Douglas Dockery, SM’74, SD’79, professor of environmental epidemiology and chair of the Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health. Rudnick and Leith were students of Mel First.

Faculty, Staff, and Faculty Emeriti Deep gratitude is due to members of the faculty and staff who extended their already extraordinary commitment to the School with contributions of financial support. We thank all members of our HSPH community that work to make a difference every day and recognize those who made gifts of $100 or more in fiscal year 2011 in the following list. Anonymous David C. Bellinger, SM ‘87 Deborah L. Blacker, SD ‘92 Barry R. Bloom David E. Bloom Joseph D. Brain, SM ‘63, SD ‘66 Julie E. Buring, SD ‘83 Paul H. Campbell, SD ‘87 James Conway Gary C. Curhan, SM ‘91, SD ‘96 Roger B. Davis, SD ‘88 Douglas W. Dockery, SM ‘74, SD ‘79 Barry C. Dorn, SM ‘04 Christopher P. Duggan, MPH ‘94 Johanna T. Dwyer, SM ‘65, SD ‘69 April D. Edrington Alison E. Field, SD ‘95 Harvey V. Fineberg Melvin W. First † Julio J. Frenk Kimberlee K. Gauvreau, SM ‘89, SD ‘92

Richard D. Gelber Els Goetghebeur Rose H. Goldman, MPH ‘80, SM ‘81 Sofia M. Gruskin David P. Harrington Russ B. Hauser, MPH ‘90, SD ‘94 William C. Hsiao Chung-Cheng Hsieh, SM ‘80, SD ‘85 David J. Hunter, MPH ‘85, SD ‘88 Stephen N. Kales, MPH ‘92 Joel Lamstein Lucian L. Leape Thomas H. Lee, Jr., SM ‘87 John H. Lichten JoAnn E. Manson, MPH ‘84, DPH ‘87 Richard R. Monson, SM ‘67, SD ‘69 Nancy E. Mueller, SM ‘74, SD ‘80, ‘81 Joseph P. Newhouse Louise M. Ryan John D. Seeger, DPH ‘02 Sara J. Singer

Alix Smullin Donna Spiegelman, SM ‘85, SD ‘89 Meir J. Stampfer, MPH ‘80, DPH ‘85 Ellie Starr Michael A. Stoto Lindsay Stratton Ming T. Tsuang Isabelle Valadian, MPH ‘53 Michael J. VanRooyen, ‘96 Michael W. Voligny Scott T. Weiss, SM ‘77 Walter C. Willett, MPH ‘73, DPH ‘80 Dyann F. Wirth

When I was dean, we found that among the top admitted students identified by each department, nearly all chose to come to HSPH when they were offered financial aid for both living expenses and tuition. If we aspire to train public health leaders who will make a difference in the world, then it is essential that we attract the best students from around the world, regardless of their means. Students have told me year after year that interacting with classmates of widely different backgrounds and experiences was the most rewarding part of their time at HSPH. I chose to contribute to help preserve this diversity and also to recognize the sacrifices that students make to come here—in many cases traveling great distances, interrupting careers, accumulating debt, and temporarily leaving families behind. —Barry R. Bloom, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor and Joan L. and Julius H. Jacobson Professor of Public Health. Bloom was dean of Harvard School of Public Health from 1999 to 2008.

† deceased

Winter 2012

55

Founders Circle Harvard School of Public Health is grateful to the members of the Founders Circle, individuals who have demonstrated special foresight by making gifts to the School through their wills or estate plans. Their planned gifts help ensure that HSPH faculty and students will continue their pioneering work for decades to come. Joanne H. Allport, MPH ‘87 Joan M. Altekruse, MPH ‘65 and Ernest B. Altekruse Dorothy Q. Arnold and David B. Arnold, Jr. Nelson K. Aweh III Katherine L. Rhyne and Charles W. Axten Joan R. and Arthur Bugs Baer Amy C. Barkin, MPH ‘76 Terry M. Bennett, MPH ‘69 Eugene P. Berg, Jr. Mrs. William McCormick Blair, Jr. Marie C. McCormick and Robert Blendon Barry R. Bloom Stanley P. Bohrer, MPH ‘75 Gary P. Bond, SM ‘76 Robert D. Brodley Annette B. Burke and Joseph A. Burke, SM ‘72 Deanna Lee Byck, SD ‘98 Howard E. Chaney, SM ‘60 Steven D. Colome, SD ‘98 Johanna F.H. Coy, ‘48 Barrie M. Damson and Joan Selig Damson Frank Denny Jean M. Doherty-Greenberg, MPH ‘79 and David A. Greenberg, MPH ‘80 Mary Kerr Donaldson Patricia A. Donovan and William B. Donovan, SM ‘70 G. Rita Dudley-Grant, MPH ‘84 Nancy Elliott and Paul T. Johnston Sumner Feldberg Virginia O. Fine

Katherine A. Forrest, MPH ‘71 Niki Friedberg and A. Alan Friedberg Barbara Gales, SM ‘91 Douglas I. Hammer, MPH ‘68, DPH ‘76 Peter O. Haughie, SM ‘98 Francis J Helminski, MPH ‘85 Robin C. Herman and Paul F. Horvitz Jose R. Hernandez-Montoya, MPH ‘80 Olive W. Holmes Lilli Hornig and Donald F. Hornig Howard Hu, MPH ‘82, SM ‘86, SD ‘90 Joan L. Jacobson and Julius H. Jacobson II Marion A. Jordan, SM ‘77 Apa Juntavee, MPH ‘95 Stephen B. Kay Maurice E. Keenan, MPH ‘77 Karim F. Lalji, SM ‘91 Stanley N. Lapidus Mary Ann Lavin, SM ‘74, SD ‘78 Paul S. Lee, Jr. Ann M. Lewicki, MPH ‘76 Chunhua Liu, SM ‘98, SD ‘00 Nancy J. Marr, SM ‘89 Keitaro Matsuo, SM ‘03 Walter F. Mazzone, SM ‘64 Steven U. McKane, MPH ‘79 Marjorie J. McLemore Jeffrey W. Mecaskey, SM ‘90 Diana H. Melvin and S. Noel Melvin Roger J. Meyer, MPH ‘59

Robert L. Mittendorf, MPH ‘87, DPH ‘91 Theodore A. Montgomery, MPH ‘55 Royce Moser, Jr., MPH ‘65 Richard Ng, SM ‘74 Chong Moo Park, MPH ‘54 George Putnam Kakaraparti V. Rao, SM ‘72 Helen Z. Reinherz, SM ‘62, SD ‘65 Rita D. Berkson, SM ‘77 and Randolph B. Reinhold Jerome S. Rubin Louise G. Schloerb and Paul R. Schloerb Adnan Shakir, SM ‘54 † Marjorie W. Sharmat and Mitchell B. Sharmat † Bernard Shleien, SM ‘63 Joan Smilow and Joel E. Smilow Ruth Snider and Eliot I. Snider Peter B. Strong Virginia B. Taplin Lee L. Traub and Marvin S. Traub Isabelle Valadian, MPH ‘53 Hasi Venkatachalam, MPH ‘68 Helen M. Wallace, MPH ‘43 Marilyn R. Walter and Ronald A. Walter, SM ‘72 Jay S. Weisfeld, MPH ‘77 Thomas G. White, SM ‘52 Doris Wilson, ‘48 Enid Wilson Dyann F. Wirth and Peter K. Wirth Elihu York, MPH ‘69 Anthony J. Zangara, MPH ‘62

† deceased

56

Harvard Public Health Review

I believe that when you identify the strongest scientists, you back them all the way. Given the inflexibility of federal funding for scientific research, what is needed is more support for innovation. From the beginning, HSPH’s Max Essex recognized that HIV/AIDS would become a global pandemic of unimaginable proportions. He saw that the only solution would be rigorous and imaginative basic research. He and his colleagues at the HSPH AIDS Institute not only do groundbreaking work, but also train the next generation of scientists to take on research challenges such as the virulent subtypes of HIV currently decimating so much of Africa. —Mrs. William McCormick Blair, Jr. is director emeritus and former vice president of the Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation. She has been actively involved with the Harvard AIDS Initiative and Harvard School of Public Health since 1982, and in 2011 received the Volunteer Leadership Award from the School’s Leadership Council.

Winter 2012

57

Volunteers The School is tremendously grateful to the many volunteers who, in partnership with faculty members and staff, are helping to advance the field of public health. The following individuals are recognized for their commitment to HSPH and their service as volunteers for the 2011 fiscal year. Visiting Committee Jeffrey P. Koplan, MPH ‘78, Chair Ruth L. Berkelman Joshua S. Boger Walter K. Clair Nicholas N. Eberstadt Tore Godal Jo Handelsman Risa J. Lavizzo-Mourey Bancroft Littlefield, Jr. Nancy T. Lukitsh Vickie M. Mays Michael H. Merson Anne Mills Kenneth Olden John W. Rowe Bernard Salick Burton R. Singer Alumni Council (as of June 30, 2011) Royce Moser, Jr., MPH ‘65, President Elsbeth G. Kalenderian, MPH ‘89, President-Elect Anthony Dias, MPH ‘04, Secretary Mark S. Clanton, MPH ‘90, Immediate Past President Marina G. Anderson, MPH ‘03 Teresa Chahine, SD ‘10 Rey de Castro, SD ‘00 G. Rita Dudley-Grant, MPH ‘84 Sean M. Dunbar, SM ‘08 Sameh G. El-Saharty, MPH ‘91 Cecilia Gerard, SM ‘09 Chandak Ghosh, MPH ‘00 Maxine A. Whittaker, MPH ‘86 Board of Dean’s Advisors (as of November 21, 2011) Jeanne B. Ackman Theodore Angelopoulos George D. Behrakis Katherine S. Burke Gerald L. Chan, SM ‘75, SD ‘79

† deceased ^former member 58

Harvard Public Health Review

Lee M. Chin, SM ‘75, SD ‘79 Jack Connors, Jr. Jamie A. Cooper-Hohn Antonio O. Garza C. Boyden Gray Rajat K. Gupta Mala Gaonkar Richard L. Menschel, emeritus Roslyn B. Payne Swati A. Piramal, MPH ‘92 Alejandro Ramirez Carlos E. Represas Richard W. Smith Howard H. Stevenson Samuel O. Thier Christy Turlington Burns Katherine Vogelheim HSPH Leadership Council Executive Committee Barrie M. Damson Mitchell L. Dong Julie E. Henry, MPH ‘91 Paula K. Ivey Henry, SM ‘95 Nancy T. Lukitsh Beth V. Martignetti Kate W. Sedgwick, MPH ‘10 HSPH Leadership Council Christine Allen Marina G. Anderson, MPH ‘03 Loreen J. Arbus Ian Arnof Phyllis August, MPH ‘02 Arthur Bugs Baer ^ Roger L. Barnett Sloan Barnett George D. Behrakis David J. Berck, MPH ‘96 Mortimer Berkowitz III Roger S. Berkowitz Edward A. Bogdan, Jr. Joan T. Bok Jeanine Boyle, MPH ‘94 Jane C. Bradley Katherine S. Burke Gilbert Butler, Jr.

J. Jacques Carter, MPH ‘83 ^ Lynne M. Cavanaugh, SM ‘79 Melinda A. Cavicchia, MPH ‘01 Teresa Chahine, SD ‘10, PDS ‘12 Walter Channing, Jr. ^ Humayun J. Chaudhry, SM ‘01 Lilian W. Cheung, SM ‘75, SD ‘78 Tammy S. Ching Bernard K. Chiu ^ Peter W. Choo, MPH ‘91, DPH ‘96 Mark S. Clanton, MPH ‘90 ^ Cynthia L. Cohen, SM ‘76 Lawrence H. Cohn Ambika Collins Phyllis D. Collins Francis L. Coolidge Tyler C. Cooper, MPH ‘05 Lammot du Pont Copeland, Jr. Gail E. Costa, SM ‘76 Howard Cox Prudence S. Crozier Joan P. Curhan Barrie M. Damson Lawrence J. D’Angelo, MPH ‘72 John J. Danilovich Karen L. Davis, SM ‘78 Rey de Castro, SD ‘00 Anthony Dias, MPH ‘04 Alan Doft Jean M. Doherty-Greenberg, MPH ‘79 Mike M. Donatelli Mitchell L. Dong Robin LaFoley Dong G. Rita Dudley-Grant, MPH ‘84 ^ Sean M. Dunbar, SM ‘08 ^ Benjamin B. Edmands Sameh G. El-Saharty, MPH ‘91 Michael S. Feldberg Marilyn A. Fingerhut, SM ‘81 Paul J. Finnegan Fred N. Fishman James W. Fordyce Elizabeth R. Foster John H. Foster Robert B. Fraser ^ A. Alan Friedberg Larry S. Gage Michael E.A. Gellert Cecilia Gerard, SM ‘09 Chandak Ghosh, MPH ‘00 Sarah B. Glickenhaus Seth M. Glickenhaus Maxine W. Goldenson C. Boyden Gray David A. Greenberg, MPH ‘80 Susan M. Guillory

Rajat K. Gupta Laurence J. Hagerty Glenn E. Haughie, MPH ‘70 Eileen P. Hayes, SD ‘79 Holly D. Hayes Bayard Henry Julie E. Henry, MPH ‘91 Judith E. Hicks Christopher T. Hitt, SM ‘75 Olive W. Holmes James J. Hummer Tsontcho A. Ianchulev, MPH ‘99 Joseph A. Ierardi, SM ‘80 Paula K. Ivey Henry, SM ‘95 Joan L. Jacobson Julius H. Jacobson II Edgar N. James, MPH ‘79 Anula K. Jayasuriya Courtney A. Jennings, SM ‘89 Mark E. Jennings Gordon T. Johnson, MPH ‘76 Elsbeth G. Kalenderian, MPH ‘89 Ruth J. Katz, MPH ‘80 Stephen B. Kay James A. Kaye, MPH ‘99, DPH ‘01 Maurice E. Keenan, MPH ‘77 Rachel K. King Roderick K. King, MPH ‘98 ^ Frank L. Klapperich, Jr. Charles H. Klippel, SM ‘80 John H. Knowles, Jr., MPH ‘02 Therus C. Kolff, MPH ‘79 Florence R. Koplow Daman M. Kowalski Nisha Kumar Joel Lamstein William C. Landreth Eric C. Larson Catherine C. Lastavica, MPH ‘65 Per Lofberg Barbara N. Lubash Nancy T. Lukitsh Monisha R. Machado-Pereira, SM ‘07 Louise P. MacMillan, SM ‘78 James A. Manganello, MPH ‘80 Beth V. Martignetti David H. Matheson Shaw McDermott John L. McGoldrick Robin B. McLay Matthew B. McLennan Monika McLennan Richard L. Menschel Eugene A. Mickey, MPH ‘82 Robert L. Mittendorf, MPH ‘87, DPH ‘91

Augustine E. Moffitt, Jr., SM ‘69, SD ‘73 Ahmed Mohiuddin James F. Moore ^ William M. Moore, MPH ‘66 Royce Moser, Jr., MPH ‘65 William A. Oates, Sr. Thomas L.P. O’Donnell Mark O’Friel Adebayo O. Ogunlesi Adeoye Y. Olukotun, MPH ‘83 Fredrick K. Orkin, SM ‘01 Mary Revelle Paci Carol Paraskevas Dinesh Patel Roslyn B. Payne Susan Putnam Peck, SM ‘87, SD ‘91 William T. Peruzzi, SM ‘01 Steven C. Phillips Muriel K. Pokross † Michael R. Pollard, MPH ‘74 Irene Pollin Thomas D. Polton, SM ‘83 Robert C. Pozen Robert O. Preyer James H. Rand IV Carol Raphael Jeannine M. Rivet Deborah Rose, SM ‘75 Jerome S. Rubin Gloria A. Rudisch, MPH ‘70 ^ Bernard Salick Charles A. Sanders Phillip W. Sarocco, SM ‘93 Srinivas M. Sastry, MPH ‘90 David I. Scheer Ruth C. Scheer Roberta Schneiderman Thomas A. Scully ^ Kate W. Sedgwick, MPH ‘10 Risa C. Shames, SM ‘92 Eleanor G. Shore, MPH ‘70 Miles F. Shore Charlotte V. Smith Richard W. Smith Steven L. Sneddon, SM ‘77, SD ‘79 Eliot I. Snider Helen B. Spaulding James A. Star Carl W. Stern Howard H. Stevenson Natasha Pearl Stowe Richard H. Stowe George H. Strong Ming T. Tsuang James M. Usdan Randall G. Vickery † deceased ^former member

Most people view medical research in a patient-centric way. But I’ve come to see that public health research provides the foundation. I am impressed with the breadth of the work at HSPH, from demographics to genetics. With faculty members who are not only world-leading researchers but also oriented toward implementation, the School is uniquely prepared to deliver on its mandate to make the world a better place. HSPH is at an interesting point in its evolution, with new initiatives such as Women and Health, training for health ministers, and the Forum events building on a multigenerational track record of pioneering research. But this growth is put at risk by potential cuts in federal funding for research. We felt this was a great opportunity to contribute to a great cause. —Matthew McLennan, Head of Global Value, First Eagle Investment Management, and his wife Monika McLennan. Matthew McLennan is a member of the Harvard School of Public Health Leadership Council.

continued Winter 2012

59

Volunteers (continued) Kelly Victory Robert C. Waggoner Michael P. Walsh Ronald A. Walter, SM ‘72 Kenneth B. Waltzer, MPH ‘85 Fair H. Wang, SM ‘92 Irene M. Weigel Lynn B. Weigel, Jr. J. Frederick Weintz, Jr. Maxine A. Whittaker, MPH ‘86 ^ John J. Whyte, MPH ‘93 Herbert S. Winokur, Jr. Stephen H. Wise Nathan D. Wolfe, SD ‘99 Migs S. Woodside Barbara J. Wu Joan K. Wyon ^ Bertram A. Yaffe Ellen M. Zane Paul J. Zofnass HSPH AIDS Initiative International Advisory Council Maurice Tempelsman, Chair Mrs. William McCormick Blair, Jr., Co-Chair Bruce A. Beal Peter A. Chernin Joanne M. Cipolla Susan M. Curren † Norma Dana Mitchell L. Dong Robin LaFoley Dong Pierre G. Durand Douglass B. Given Cathy B. Graham David A. Hamburg Lisa M. Henson John A. Lithgow Marguerite Littman Vincent P. McCarthy Mary Revelle Paci Susan Butler Plum Sidney Poitier Kate W. Sedgwick, MPH ‘10 Richard M. Smith Salwa J. Smith Victoria Brooks Stafford Barbara J. Wu Soon-Young Yoon

Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies Partners Council Patricia Baker Lammot du Pont Copeland, Jr. Mitchell L. Dong Niki Friedberg Paula K. Ivey Henry, SM ‘95 James F. Moore Mary Revelle Paci Valerie Ann Rowe Ruth C. Scheer Migs S. Woodside Health Policy and Management Executive Council Jeannine M. Rivet, Chair Kenneth S. Abramowitz James J. Bochnowski John W. Brown Carrie S. Cox Howard E. Cox, Jr. Tom Daschle John H. Foster Larry S. Gage Katie H. Gambill Laurence J. Hagerty Robert M. Holster Mark E. Jennings Stephen B. Kay Charles H. Klippel III, SM ‘80 Per Lofberg Carol Raphael Thomas A. Scully David B. Snow Richard H. Stowe James M. Usdan Josef H. von Rickenbach Michael P. Walsh Ellen M. Zane Nutrition Round Table Steering Committee Roger S. Berkowitz Lilian W. Cheung, SM ‘75, SD ‘78 Joan P. Curhan Robin L. Dong Susan M. Guillory Barbara J. Lind Irene Pollin Edwin J. Taff

Nutrition Round Table Edwin J. Taff, Chair Laurent H. Adamowicz Susanna E. Bedell Roger S. Berkowitz Jane C. Bradley Martin T. Breslin Nancy Budge Lilian W. Cheung, SM ‘75, SD ‘78 Kenneth H. Cooper, MPH ‘62 Prudence S. Crozier Joan P. Curhan Ronald C. Curhan Mitchell L. Dong Robin LaFoley Dong Maria Furman Frank Guidara Susan M. Guillory Elizabeth M. Hagopian Holly D. Hayes Ned Hentz Thomas Herskovits Judith E. Hicks Lee A. Iacocca Michael E. Jacobson Ellen L. Kaplan Louisa K. Kasdon Mollie Katzen Eric C. Larson Barbara J. Lind Francisco A. Lorenzo Louise P. MacMillan, SM ‘78 Carmine A. Martignetti Linda D. Masiello Ted Mayer Steven E. Miller Ahmed Mohiuddin Patricia Mohiuddin Martha Mugar William A. Oates, Sr. Muriel K. Pokross † Irene Pollin Gloria W. Sakata Srinivas M. Sastry, MPH ‘90

Nina F. Simonds ^ Robert Snyder Jennifer W. Steans Ming Tsai Randall G. Vickery Robert C. Waggoner Joan K. Wyon Bertram A. Yaffe Peter M. Yeracaris, MPH ‘98 Youko Yeracaris Marc Zammit Unfinished Agenda of Infectious Diseases Executive Committee David I. Scheer, Chair Adeoye Y. Olukotun, MPH ‘83 Steven C. Phillips Stephen H. Wise

Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the 2011 Gift Report. We apologize for any errors. Please report any discrepancies to Anna Sangalang, Assistant Director of Donor Relations.

† deceased ^former member

60

Harvard Public Health Review

Phone: (617) 432-8445 Email: acembrol@hsph.harvard.edu

Fiscal Year 2011 Financial Highlights July 1, 2010 – June 30, 2011 Fiscal Year 2011 Operating Revenue 49.9% Federal Sponsored Research

M

anagement at Harvard School of Public Health continued to face financial challenges

exacerbated by the global economic climate. HSPH closed fiscal 2011 with total operating revenues of $343.2 million, a 2.8% increase from the prior year. This increase reflects growth in current use gifts and corporation and foundation grants to the School, offset by a second year of declining operating support

10.4% Non-federal Sponsored Research

13.6% Research Facility & Administrative Costs Recovery 12.0%  4.6%  Endowment Gifts & Income Other Revenue

9.5% Tuition & Executive Education

from endowment funds. While grants received through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) contributed to a 2.8% increase in federal sponsored revenue, without ARRA grants federal funding would have declined by 2.7%. Expense growth outpaced revenue growth, increasing by 3.4%, a result of inflationary increases on our expense base as well as costs of additional leased

Fiscal Year 2011 Operating EXPENSES

space. In response to the need to arrest a trend of declining annual operating results, a combination of

49.0% Federal Sponsored Research

efforts has begun to improve operational efficiencies, diversify our revenue sources, and enhance our ability to compete for both federal and non-federal grants. Fundraising Highlights 2.5% University Assessment

8.3%  Non-federal Sponsored Research 19.7%  Academic Support

10.5% Facilities

10.0% Administration & Development

In fiscal year 2011, Harvard School of Public Health raised $51.2 million in new gifts, grants, and pledges, doubling the funds raised in fiscal year 2010. Financial aid was a top fundraising priority in fiscal year 2011. HSPH raised $2.5 million in financial aid, quadrupling prior year results. Alumni donors totaled 1,178, and alumni giving participation increased to 12.1%. HSPH is tremendously grateful for the generous contributions of our donor community, who provide essential support for

Fiscal Year 2011 operating expenses were $349.3 million.

the research and teaching mission of our school.

Winter 2012

61

Harvard Public Health Review Dean of the Faculty Julio Frenk

Visiting Committee Jeffrey P. Koplan, MPH ’78 Chair

Alumni Council As of November 2011

Ruth L. Berkelman Joshua Boger Walter Clair Nicholas N. Eberstadt Tore Godal Jo Handelsman Risa Lavizzo-Mourey Bancroft Littlefield Nancy T. Lukitsh Vickie M. Mays Michael H. Merson Anne Mills Kenneth Olden John W. Rowe Bernard Salick Burton Singer

Officers Elsbeth Kalenderian, mph ’89 President Anthony Dias, mph ’04 President Elect Ramon Sanchez, SM ’07, SD ’11 Secretary Royce Moser, MPH ’65 Immediate Past President Alumni Councilors 2009-2012 Marina Anderson, mph ’03 Rey de Castro, SD ’00 Cecilia Gerard, SM ’09* 2010-2013 Teresa Chahine, SD ’10* Sameh El-Saharty, MPH ‘91 Chandak Ghosh, MPH ‘00

Board of Dean’s advisors Jeanne B. Ackman Theodore Angelopoulos George D. Behrakis Katherine S. Burke Christy Turlington Burns Gerald L. Chan Lee M. Chin Jack Connors, Jr. Jamie A. Cooper-Hohn Mala Gaonkar Antonio O. Garza C. Boyden Gray Rajat K. Gupta Richard L. Menschel* Roslyn B. Payne Swati A. Piramal Alejandro Ramirez Carlos E. Represas Richard W. Smith Howard Stevenson Samuel O. Thier Katherine Vogelheim

*emeritus

2011-2014 Haleh Armian, SM ‘93 Michael Olugbile, MPH ‘11* Alison Williams, PD ‘10 *Class Representative

For information about making a gift to the Harvard School of Public Health, please contact: Ellie Starr Vice Dean for External Relations Office for External Relations Harvard School of Public Health 90 Smith Street Fourth Floor Boston, Massachusetts 02120 (617) 432-8448 or estarr@hsph.harvard.edu For information regarding alumni relations and programs, please contact, at the above address: Jim Smith, Assistant Dean for Alumni Affairs (617) 432-8446 or jsmith@hsph.harvard.edu www.hsph.harvard.edu/give

62

Harvard Public Health Review

The Harvard Public Health Review is published three times a year for supporters and alumni of the Harvard School of Public Health. Its readers share a commitment to the School’s mission: advancing the public’s health through learning, discovery, and communication. Harvard Public Health Review Harvard School of Public Health Office for External Relations 90 Smith Street Fourth Floor Boston, Massachusetts 02120 (617) 432-8470 Please visit www.hsph.harvard.edu/review and email comments and suggestions to review@hsph.harvard.edu. Dean of the Faculty Julio Frenk T & G Angelopoulos Professor of Public Health and International Development Vice Dean for External Relations Ellie Starr Associate Vice Dean for Communications Julie Fitzpatrick Rafferty Director, Strategic Communications and Marketing Samuel Harp Editor Madeline Drexler Assistant Editor Amy Roeder Senior Art Director Anne Hubbard Principal Photographer Kent Dayton Marketing and Communications Coordinator Rachel Johnson Contributing Writers Adrianne Appel, Michael Blanding, Luisa Cahill, Beth Dougherty, Karen Feldscher, Thea Singer © 2011/2012 President and Fellows of Harvard College

“If you can empower one person who can bring about change, what you give is multiplied a thousand times. It’s not one person who is helped—it’s everybody.” —Patience Ugwi, MPH ’12

Patience Ugwi, MPH ’12 is a physician from Nigeria. Before coming to HSPH, she spent a year serving as one of just two doctors for 23 small rural villages in the northern part of the country. She remembers one little girl who came into her clinic with severe malaria—unconscious and desperately malnourished. Patience thought the child was going to die. But with immediate treatment the girl was able to pull through. Yet Patience wondered why she hadn’t seen the girl earlier, before her condition became life-threatening. How many others were there that she would never see? This was the moment she knew that she wanted to work on a bigger scale. To better serve her patients, she collaborated with state and local government to establish a mobile clinic that could bring health care to people who needed it. And she began applying to schools of public health. When Patience was admitted to HSPH, it was a dream come true. But she didn’t think she could afford to come. The real joy came a few days later, when she learned that she had been awarded a grant of full tuition from the President’s Fund. Today, Patience’s ambition is to help bring universal health care to Nigeria.

Please give to support financial aid today. To find out how, visit http://hsph.harvard.edu/give/ or call Morgan Pendergast at +1 (617) 432-8436.

HARVARD

School of Public Health

Nonprofit Org. U.S. Postage PD Burlington, VT Permit No. 586

Office for External Relations 90 Smith Street Boston, Massachusetts 02120

Change Service Requested

HSPH Alumni

Join the new online community now! Catch up with classmates, friends, and colleagues in a new community website http://alumni.sph.harvard.edu just for HSPH alumni. Easily connect with fellow alumni, exchange ideas, and network in a secure, privacy-protected environment. Share as much or as little information as you like. The site features a secure, password-protected alumni directory, a suite of networking tools, and other resources for HSPH graduates. A temporary password unique to each alum is required to register for the community. To get yours, check any recent

Join the more than 1,000 alumni

e-mail from HSPH or look for a message in your inbox in the

who have already signed up!

next few days with this information. Then go see what’s new with your fellow HSPH alumni.


Harvard Public Health Review, Winter 2012