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©2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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WIRE NEWS

©2010 GWPCA

S n o o k e

Ch. Aimnhi Scotian Color of Money

Ch. Idawire’s a Few Good Men x Ch. Devata’s Rip it Up at Scotia, UT I

Bred by: Jim & Carolyn Isom & Laura Reeves Owned by: Laura Reeves, Leslie Puppo & Rhae Drijber

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Wire~News

The Journal of the German Wirehaired Pointer Club of America

D E PA RT M E N T S Fall 2010 - Judge’s Issue

Letters 8 From the Editor

Club Business

9 Staff & Board Members 14 Advertising Information 16 Local GWP Clubs 17 Code of Ethics 18 AKC GWP Breed Standard 19 Treasurer’s Report 20 GWPCA Board Minutes 25 Application for Membership 28 AKC Delegate’s Report 96 New Members 97 Bulletin Board

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©2010 GWPCA

Photos by Kurt Kraft - NW Montana

Index to Advertisers

Cover Hilltop Farms & K-S-Tzarr GWPs Inside Front Boyd/Wilkinson 3 Scotia Kennel 6-7 Cynister/Idawire - Magoon/Quesnell 10 Reece Kennel - Johnson 11 Hilltop Farms & K-S-Tzarr GWPs 12 Game On Kennel - Rakowski 43 Purina 46 Herminghaus/Wallace - Idawire GWPs 47 Hard Headed Kennel - Ed Shupp 50-51 Courtelis, Witt & Wilkinson 54 Windmill & Aspendel - Watkins 55 Inverness Kennel - Myles 91 Medlock/Carter 92 Top Shelf Kennel 92 The Haven Kennel 92 Inverness Kennel 93 Reece Kennel - Johnson 94 Claddagh - Wehking, Vogel & Bastian 95 Wireworks Kennel - Milowski Inside Back Afterhours - Neuwirth, Whitmore & Johnson Back Cover Willamette GWPs - Popescu

TABLE OF CONTENTS

A RT I C L E S Re g u l a r Fe a t u r e s

32 ABC’s of CHIC 34 New CHIC Dog 35 OFA 36 Open Range 42 Update on SD Dogs 49 Wired Living 52 Becky’s Letter 62 In the Company of Dogs 78 Agility and Our Dogs 79 Agility Standings 80 Obedience & BIS Standings 81 Rally & Breed Standings 82 New Titles 84 NAVHDA Statistics 86 Field Top Ten 88 Junior Talk

Photo by Jim Boyd - 2009 National Water Test

S p e c i a l Fe a t u r e s 44 56 58 66 68 69 72 76

2010 Nationals Canine Anaplasmosis - One Story, One Experience To Catch A Theif Veterans in the Show Ring Del Val GWP Specialty SoCal GWP Specialty Nebraska GWP Specialty Wisconsin GWP Specialty

On the Cover

“Marco” Grand Champion K-S-Tzarr-Balkanoff Vom Sepp A special Thank You to Judge Mr. Donald Emslie for this wonderful Group win! It is an honor to make Marco AKC’s first GWP ever to complete his Grand Championship! And, he achieved that honor in the first two weekends that the title was available! Marco has exceptional breed type, a beautiful correct coat, and a wonderful and willing attitude. A very special dog, with very special owners! Thank you Betty Stroh and Kosta Sunda for allowing us to handle Marco!

Bob and Sean Perry

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Sire: BISS Ch Cynisters In the Center Ring (OFA Good)

“Rosa”

Ch Cynister Idawire Rose Red (OFA Pending) OWNED BY: JODI QUESNELL & TONY WAGNER

Rosa will be bred to Cruiser—DC/AFC Jetset’s Ragtop Day at Scotia, in 2010. This Cruiser grand-daughter has what it takes! She is an excellent hunting dog, who happens to have very nice conformation. And, what a sweetie! Cruiser was the first GWP dual champion to win an Allbreed Best in show… Talk about Dual Quality! Reservations now being accepted. Email Idawire for more information: idawiregwps@isp.com or phone: (307) 673-0349

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Dam: Ch Cynister Idawire Rose Quartz (OFA Good)

“Dolly”

Ch Cynister Idawire Childs Play (OFA Good) OWNED BY: JODI QUESNELL & ADAM CUNNINGHAM

Dolly has been bred to Fritz—Ch Idawire Field of Dreams (OFA Good) Dolly has been a great hunting dog, and finished her show championship owner-handled by Adam. Fritz has a group placement, and is working on his Master Hunter title. Puppies should have nice conformation for the show ring, and excellent hunting ability. Puppies due Aug. 2010—Inquiries Invited. Find out more at www.Ironwiregwp.com Or phone Adam at (303) 720-2275

“Zora”

“Paris”

Ch Cynister N Idawire Electric Zombie

Ch Cynister N Idawire Shattered Image

OWNED BY: CATHIE MAGOON & JODI QUESNELL

OWNED BY: CATHIE MAGOON & JODI QUESNELL

“Cecil”

Ch Cynister N Idawire Final Fantasy (OFA Good) OWNED BY: CATHIE MAGOON & JODI QUESNELL

Corbin

Fall 2010—

“Corbin”

Ch Cynister’s Demon in Disguise (OFA Good) OWNED BY: TREVOR ZEBARTH, CATHIE MAGOON & JODI QUESNELL

will be bred to Apple—Ch Idawire American Pie (OFA Good). Pups should be outstanding hunters with

excellent coats & conformation—definitely dual purpose. Inquires welcome! Contact Idawire GWPs for more information.

Cynister Wires

Idawire GWPs

Cathie & Don Magoon (951) 734-2939 www.cynisterwires.com

Jodi & Tom Quesnell (307) 673-0349 www.idawire.com ©2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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FROM THE EDITOR

Fr o m t h e E d i t o r I’m one of those people who is really in tune with the seasons. It’s no wonder I didn’t enjoy Houston as a place to live, since there is only one season there - not enough change for me. It’s been around 100 for 3-4 weeks now, but there is change coming. Rain and cooler temps are on their way, and fall is just around the corner. I love fall, and I hope I can celebrate it with GWPCA members at the Nationals. And, the venue in Washington state is so enticing for a fall vacation - I can only dream about the chill in the air. Great venues aside, it would also be great to meet in person those members from the west coast clubs that I’ve only met through email. Thanks to those who have worked hard to organize the event - it’s no easy task; especially for those who volunteer their time in addition to their regular workload. Angie Johnson has written a compelling article that relates to such volunteer work. We appreciate you Angie - seems like you’re finding your writing voice, so I hope we can hear more from you. Everyone should look over the list of Wire~News topics; pick one; start playing around with it; send it to me for editing; and voila, we’ve got good reading and food for thought. Take Diana Wise, photographer extraordinaire, she sent me an interesting article on anaplasmosis and wondered if I would be interested in publishing it. I think it came out great, and you will find it interesting, too. Keep them coming, Diana! Actually, she already sent met another article that I’ll use in the next issue. Our Junior Talk writer, Katie Webb is back, at least for now. I’m quite impressed with her writing skills and hopes she keeps in practice by writing for the Wire~News. Thanks again to all those who submit on a regular basis - this publication relies on you to take it from a dog-breed ditty to a great publication. Enjoy the Final Shot - it’s a great tribute to Fall.

Ellen Herminghaus

GW P C A S h o w Fu t u r i t y C h a n g e s The first show futurity was held with the Washington National Events in 1991 and was instituted and managed by Dr. Aloysia Hard. Aloysia based the rules on the show futurity she started for the German Shorthaired Pointer club in the early 1970’s. As the Nationals return again to the Northwest, it’s time for Aloysia to step down from running the futurity she has so loved. Due to poor health, she is unable to continue operating the program. Please keep Aloysia in your thoughts and prayers. Effective immediately, all litter nominations, renominations and questions should be directed to: Laura Myles, 21526 W. Lost Lake Rd., Snohomish, WA 98296, 360-668-2841, invernesskennels@verizon.net. 8

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©2010 GWPCA

WIRENEWS STAFF

GWPCA & Wire~News Staff Wire~News Editor - Ellen Herminghaus - wirenewseditor@gmail.com 6313 Saintsbury Ct, Oklahoma City, OK 73132 (405) 722-0743 Column Across the Pond Agility Agility & Obedience Standings Becky’s Therapy Dog Update Canine Health Down Under Field Top 10 From the Whelping Box In the Company of Dogs Junior Talk NAVHDA New Titles Open Range Obedience OFA Rescue column Show standings Wired Living Yuppie Puppy

Contact Alexandra Friar Ashlee Trotter Lori Sargent Ann Duffin Robin Nelson Patricia Beckett Lynn Sandor Laura Myles Richard Hirneisen Katie Webb Courtney Vogel Lori Sargent Diane Turner Greg Dubois Cathy Milachek Laura Myles Lori Sargent Beth Hollenberg Kata Kobli

Email contact info alex@sashal.co.uk training@creativepaws.com birddog@windsweptwires.net gr8gwp@yahoo.com GWPoint@aol.com kobnkogwp@bigpond.com sandorcpa@comcast.net invernesskennels@verizon.net rich.hirneisen@gmail.com ppuppylover14@aol.com courtneyvogel@hotmail.com birddog@windsweptwires.net DTurner596@aol.com grgdubois@comcast.net Ciaradoc@aol.com invernesskennels@verizon.net birddog@windsweptwires.net patokagwp@verizon.net katababa@aol.com

GWPCA Breeder Referral Bernee Brawn, 1408 Pineville Rd, New Hope, PA 18938

justagwp@tradenet.net

GWPCA Delegate to the AKC Patricia Laurans, 54 Mount Pleasant Rd, Newtown, CT 06470 plaurans@earthlink.net

2010 GWPCA Board of Directors President Laura Reeves, 5000 Waverly Rd, Lincoln, NE 68514 (206) 979-3758 reevesLJ@earthlink.net Vice President Ray Calkins, 13235 SW Bell Rd, Sherwood, OR 97140 (503) 682-2968 gwpcascade@aol.com Secretary Michelle Boyd, 617 Taylor St., Greenville, IL 62246 (618) 664-2250 jboyd1@newwavecomm.net Treasurer Sue Mueller, W 12203 - 870th Ave, River Falls, WI 54022 (715) 425-9863 st.croix.wirehairs@pressenter.com Eastern Director Garnett Persinger, 13838 St. Highway 198, Conneautville, PA 16406 (814) 587-2365 shoalwater@hughes.net Midwest Director Elizabeth Dixon, N7815 County Rd N, Spring Valley, WI 54767 (715) 778-4675 bkwdsgwp@svtel.net Western Director Robert Perry, 527 NW Elm Ave., Suite 3, PMB 200, Redmond, OR 97756 (541) 504-9197 aspendel@aol.com Š2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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ADVERTISING INFO

WIRE~NEWS FLASH! Wire~News Ad Submission Guidelines In order to accommodate the increasing complexity of ad designs submitted for publication in the Wire~News, it has become necessary to make some changes to the submission guidelines. Please make note of the following, and don’t hesitate to email the editor if you have any questions.

Ads must be submitted by deadline. Ads must be camera ready. If a client is waiting on photos, etc., ad space must be RESERVED (B&W or color) by deadline and camera ready ad must be submitted no later than one week after the posted deadline. Within 1 week of ad submission, ALL ADS will be approved or notice will be given the ad won’t print well and why (size, photo resolution, over all resolution). Client will have up to 5 days to fix and resubmit. For a fee, editor or publisher may create or work on ads. Fee will be established before work begins. A proof will be sent to the client for an ad created or modified in any way by the editor or publisher, and written/email approval must be received prior to publication. Payment of ads must be made by deadline. If an ad is not printed because quality issues cannot be resolved, the payment will be returned. Design fees are due once ad is approved. ALL ad space & design fees MUST be received by the editor prior to going to press or the ad in question will be removed. Typically this would be 2 weeks from the deadline. ©2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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ADVERTISING INFO

Guidelines for images submitted to the Wire~News

Images taken with a digital camera Most digital cameras have a setting allowing you to choose the output format. The most common formats are JPG and TIFF. Some cameras may also produce PNG image files. With any format – larger is better. We can always reduce the size of an image with limited or no loss of quality. Making a smaller image larger will result in a loss of quality. TIFF is the preferred format for electronic submission. We realize this format produces large files, but it does not lose any information. You get whatever the camera sees.

Scanned Images Scanners give you an option change the resolution of the output image. Most scanners set the default resolution to 200 dpi. If you are scanning an image for submission please change the resolution to 300 dpi. Some scanners will then prompt you to change it back with a note that such high resolution is not necessary. Please leave it at 300 dpi. If the option exists the output format should be TIFF. If not, the highest quality JPG image (no compression) should be used. PLEASE clean the scanner glass and the photo to insure that all lint and dust is removed prior to scanning. Unacceptable: GIF images should not be submitted, as they only support 256 colors.

PNG is the next best format, as any file compression can be reversed.

Articles

JPG Images should be at the highest quality the camera will produce (largest pixel format such as 2400 X 1900 or similar numbers. Snapshot style images (400 X 300) pixels will probably not be good enough for publication.

Pictures must be sent seperate from Word documents - please send a document file, .doc and a picture file(s), .jpg.

Downloaded web images are frequently compressed and of a quality that is fine for the web, but will not be suitable for printing.

8.75 inches 1/2 inch

Digital images should be at least 1 MB in size.

Ad Example

All text and photos should be at least 1/2 inch inside of the outside of the page

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Š2010 GWPCA

1/2 inch

If you would like to place an ad so that the color goes all the way to the border of the page with no white showing, this is called full bleed. Your ad will need to be slightly larger than normal to accommodate for the printer to trim the page. Please size your ad to the following dimensions: 8.75 inches x 11.25 inches. You should keep all of the text and wording at least one half inch inside of each side to make sure nothing gets cut off when the printer trims the page to size.

11.25 inches 1/2 inch

Ad Sizes for Full Bleed

ADVERTISING INFO

GWPCA Wire~News

The GWPCA Wire-News is published by the German Wirehaired Pointer Club of America, Inc. The GWPCA is a non-profit Michigan corporation which was founded in 1959 to promote and develop the German Wirehaired Pointer. Since 1959, the GWPCA has been recognized by the American Kennel Club as a member club responsible for the development of the GWP in the United States. The GWPCA Wire-News is published for the members of the GWPCA and is a benefit of membership in this club. The editors of the GWPCA WireNews wish to encourage everyone to send articles of information of interest to our members. The editors of the GWPCA Wire-News reserve the right to edit or refuse to print any letters or articles sent into the GWPCA Wire-News. Articles or letters appearing in the Wire-News do NOT necessarily reflect the views of the GWPCA, the GWPCA Wire-News, or its staff. Individuals interested in membership in the GWPCA should contact the club membership director.

Publishing Schedule

Issue

Winter 2010 (Nationals Issue) Cover reserved for 2010 NFC, NAFC, or BISS Spring 2011 (Performance Dog/Top Dog/Breeder Issue) Cover Available Summer 2011 (Field Dog Issue) Cover Available Fall 2011 (Judges Issue) Cover Available

Deadline

November 1, 2010 February 15, 2011 May 15, 2011 August 1, 2011

NOTE: Please mail payments for ads to the Wire~News editor.

Non“Add Box Rates for Advertising Rates” Advertising Member Member

Front Cover (Color)—Includes inside story and 1 photo Back Cover (Color)—includes 1 photo Inside Front or Back Cover (Color) —includes 1 photo Full Page Black & White*—includes 1 photo Half Page Black & White*—includes 1 photo Quarter Page Black & White*—includes 1 photo Center Spread Black & White*—includes 1 photo Second Ad B&W*(same advertiser, same issue, full page) Business Card Black & White* (one year) Additional Photos Reverses(writing over photo) Bleeds (pictures running edge to edge) *Color (Contact the Editor for availability)

NEW

$250 $300 $200 $250 $200 $250 $75 $100 $60 $75 $40 $50 $150 $225 $65 No Disc. $50 $75 No Charge No Charge No Charge $100 additional

Wire~News Ad Submission Guidelines

Ads must be submitted by deadline.

NEW

Ads must be camera ready.

If a client is waiting on photos, etc., ad space must be RESERVED (B&W or color) by deadline and camera ready ad must be submitted no later than one week after the posted deadline. Within 1 week of ad submission, ALL ADS will be approved or notice will be given the ad won’t print well and why (size, photo resolution, over all resolution). Client will have up to 5 days to fix and resubmit. For a fee, editor or publisher may create or work on ads. Fee will be established before work begins. A proof will be sent to the client for an ad created or modified in any way by the editor or publisher, and written/email approval must be received prior to publication. Payment of ads must be made by deadline. If an ad is not printed because quality issues cannot be resolved, the payment will be returned. Design fees are due once ad is approved. ALL ad space & design fees MUST be received by the editor prior to going to press or the ad in question will be removed. Typically this would be 2 weeks from the deadline. ©2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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LOCAL CLUBS

President: Gary Wickwire Vice President: Ray Calkins Treasurer: Kathy Green Secretary: Mary Hanson (503) 632-1162 hansonm@bctonline.com www.geocities.com/oregongwp

President: Charlie Kissinger Vice President: Linda Krepak Treasurer: LuAnn Walsh Secretary: Bernee Brawn

President: Rhonda Haukoos Vice President: Tom Lococco Treasurer: Jan Erbe Secretary: Chuck Casanova 2005 S. 141st Circle Omaha, NE 68144 (402) 691-9489

ccasanova@tconl.com

President: Sue Ireland Vice President: Penny Ljungren Treasurer: Paul Wy;mer Secretary: Kathy Wymer 361 NE Matthew Dr. Belfair, WA 98528 (360) 275-4245 aanjwymer@hotmail.com www.seatacgwpc.com

President: Richard Hirneisen Vice President: Mike Braddock Treasurer: Bill Schmidt Secretary: Lori Sargent 5775 N. Chester Rd. Charlotte, MI 48813 (517) 667-0007 birddog@windsweptwires.net www.fdgwpc.org/

GWP Club of Wisconsin President: William Bastion Vice President: Vern Grimslid Treasurer: Carol Piette-Cagle Secretary: Carol Piette-Cagel W8489 Grandview Drive Appleton, WI 54944 (920) 779-6608 GWPPiette@aol.com

GWP Club of Southern California President: Ellis Herz Vice President: Linda Ercoli Treasurer: Karla Weber Secretary: Karen Nelsen P.O. Box 6390 Chino Valley, AZ 86323 928-636-9939 ruwyrd@aol.com www.gwpsocal.com/

President: Cathy DuBois Vice President: Maura Rakowski Treasurer: Al Brady Secretary: Nancy Ondrus www.GWPCI.com

President: Cynthia Heiller, DVM Vice President: Randall Berry Treasurer: Diane Marsh Secretary: Debbie Lewis 101 Carlton Ave. Vacaville, CA 95687 (707) 447-1172 gsp_sbmom@comcast.net

Suncoast German Wirehaired Pointer Club President: Jim Givens Vice President: Larry Murphy Treasurer: Carrie Proux Secretary: Jack Arnold 257 NW Outlook Vista Dr. Bend, OR 97701 (541) 771-9319 www.gwpcco.org 16

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President: Belinda DeLaby Vice President : Erika Brown Treasurer: Deb Wadsworth Secretary: Angie Johnson 1450 Marker Rd. Polk City, FL 33868 (863) 576-3064 angiehef@aol.com www.suncoastgwpc.com

President: Bob Karrick Vice President: Wayne Starkson Treasurer: Tom Weber Secretary: Stacy Risler email: blauermondgwp@charter.net

CODE OF ETHICS

German Wirehaired Pointer Club of America Code of Ethics The members of the GWPCA are devoted to the continued preservation, protection and improvement of the German Wirehaired Pointer. This Code provides guidelines for ethical practices and care, and seeks to promote good sportsmanship. RECORDS GWPCA members will maintain complete and accurate records for each dog and litter. BREEDING GWPCA members will evaluate any dog or bitch used for breeding, using the criteria set forth by the breed standard. Only those dogs free of recognized genetic defects shall be used in a breeding program. Breeders will be selective with respect to the physical and mental soundness, health, temperament, and natural hunting ability of the dog or bitch. CARE AND TRANSFER OF DOGS No puppies or adult dogs shall be bred, sold or consigned to pet shops or other commercial enterprises Proper care shall be provided for bitch and puppies. Puppies shall be kept until seven weeks of age. All prospective buyers should be carefully screened to assure that puppies have a safe, loving and stimulating home. An honest evaluation of the quality of the puppy will be made. Purchasers are encouraged to spay or neuter all dogs that will not be used for breeding. New owners will receive the following documentation: 1. Written sales contract or co-ownership agreement 2. Copy of the AKC registration 3. Feeding instructions 4. Medical records 5. Three-generation pedigree 6. Training recommendations 7. Copy of this Code of Ethics GWPCA members are prepared to assist puppy buyers when questions or problems arise for the life of the dog. New owners are encouraged to become involved in GWPCA activities, regional GWP clubs, dog training, and/or dog performance events. SPORTSMANSHIP GWPCA members shall always conduct themselves in a manner which will reflect credit upon themselves, their dogs, and the sport of dogs, regardless of location or circumstance.

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ADVERTISING INFO

The German Wirehaired Pointer Breed Standard GENERAL APPEARANCE The German Wirehaired Pointer is a well muscled, medium sized dog of distinctive appearance. Balanced in size and sturdily built, the breed’s most distinguishing characteristics are its weather resistant, wire-like coat and its facial furnishings. Typically Pointer in character and style, the German Wirehaired Pointer is an intelligent, energetic and determined hunter. SIZE, PROPORTION, SUBSTANCE The height of males should be from 24 to 26 inches at the withers. Bitches are smaller but not under 22 inches. To insure the working quality of the breed is maintained, dogs that are either over or under the specified height must be severely penalized. The body is a little longer than it is high, as ten is to nine. The German Wirehaired Pointer is a versatile hunter built for agility and endurance in the field. Correct size and balance are essential to high performance. HEAD The head is moderately long. Eyes are brown, medium in size, oval in contour, bright and clear and overhung with medium length eyebrows. Yellow eyes are not desirable. The ears are rounded but not too broad and hang close to the head. The skull broad and the occipital bone not too prominent. The stop is medium. The muzzle is fairly long with nasal bone straight, broad and parallel to the top of the skull. The nose is dark brown with nostrils wide open. A spotted or flesh colored nose is to be penalized. The lips are a trifle pendulous but close to the jaw and bearded. The jaws are strong with a full complement of evenly set and properly intermeshing teeth. The incisors meet in a true scissors bite. NECK, TOPLINE, BODY The neck is of medium length, slightly arched and devoid of dewlap. The entire back line showing a perceptible slope down from withers to croup. The skin throughout is notably tight to the body. The chest is deep and capacious with ribs well sprung. The tuck-up apparent. The back is short, straight and strong. Loins are taut and slender. Hips are broad with the croup nicely rounded. The tail is set high, carried at or above the horizontal when the dog is alert. The tail is docked to approximately two-fifths of its original length. FOREQUARTERS The shoulders are well laid back. The forelegs are straight with elbows close. Leg bones are flat rather than round, and strong, but not so heavy or coarse as to militate against the dog’s natural agility. Dewclaws are generally removed. Round in outline the feet are webbed, high arched with toes close, pads thick and hard, and nails strong and quite heavy. HINDQUARTERS The angles of the hindquarters balances that of the forequarters. A straight line drawn vertically from the buttock (ischium) to the ground should land just in front of the rear foot. The thighs are strong and muscular. The hind legs are parallel when viewed from the rear. The hocks (metatarsus) are short, straight and parallel turning neither in nor out. Dewclaws are generally removed. Feet as in forequarters. COAT The functional wiry coat is the breed’s most distinctive feature. A dog must have a correct coat to be of correct type. The coat is weather resistant and, to some extent, water-repellent. The undercoat is dense enough in winter to insulate against the cold but is so thin in summer as to be almost invisible. The distinctive outer coat is straight, harsh, wiry and flat lying, and is from one to two inches in length. The outer coat is long enough to protect against the punishment of rough cover, but not so long as to hide the outline of the dog. On the lower legs the coat is shorter and between the toes it is of softer texture. On the skull the coat is naturally short and close fitting. Over the shoulders and around the tail it is very dense and heavy. The tail is nicely coated, particularly on the underside, but devoid of feather. Eyebrows are of strong, straight hair. Beard and whiskers are medium length. The hairs in the liver patches of a liver and white dog may be shorter than the white hairs. A short smooth coat, a soft woolly coat, or an excessively long coatis to be severely penalized. While maintaining a harsh, wiry texture, the puppy coat may be shorter than that of an adult coat. Coats may be neatly groomed to present a dog natural in appearance. Extreme and excessive grooming to present a dog artificial in appearance should be severely penalized. COLOR The coat is liver and white, usually either liver and white spotted, liver roan, liver and white spotted with ticking and roaning or solid liver. The head is liver, sometimes with a white blaze. The ears are liver. Any black in the coat is to be severely penalized. GAIT The dog should be evaluated at a moderate gait. Seen from the side, the movement is free and smooth with good reach in the forequarters and good driving power in the hindquarters. The dog carries a firm back and exhibits a long, ground-covering stride. When moving in a straight line the legs swing forward in a free and easy manner and show no tendency to cross or interfere. There should be no signs of elbowing out. The rear legs follow on a line with the forelegs. As speed increases, the legs will converge toward a center line of travel. TEMPERAMENT Of sound, reliable temperament, the German Wirehaired Pointer is at times aloof but not unfriendly toward strangers; a loyal and affectionate companion who is eager to please and enthusiastic to learn. Approved October 10, 2006; Effective January 1, 2007 18

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CLUB BUSINESS

January 1, 2010- August 4, 2010 By Sue Mueller, Treasurer, GWPCA INCOME 2010 Membership AKC Delegates Fund Inc Breeder' List Canine Health Inc Interest Inc Rescue Fund Wire News Inc

$    24,089.62      14,143.84        1,350.00        1,035.00        1,048.85              24.43        1,555.00        4,932.50

EXPENSES 2010 Nat FT Exp 2010 Nat Regional Exp 2010 Nat Specialty Exp Advertising AKC Delegate Exp AKC Delegates Fund Exp Bank Charge Canine Health Exp Donation GWPCA Web Page Judge's Ed Exp Misc Professional Exp Secretary Expense Treasurer Postage Treasurer Misc WireNews Exp Overall Total

$  (27,650.94)          (900.00)            (15.00)            (15.00)          (435.35)          (600.00)       (1,017.80)            (30.68)       (1,048.85)          (300.00)          (198.00)          (347.87)               (6.18)          (750.00)          (665.76)          (290.87)            (36.90)    (20,992.68) $     (3,561.32)

GWPCA Checking Balance Rescue Fund Balance Money Market

$      3,985.67 $    12,141.87 $    12,274.13 ©2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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CLUB BUSINESS

GWPCA BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING MINUTES Wednesday, April 28, 2010

On motion the meeting was called to order at 7:40 pm. Members Present: Laura Reeves, Sue Mueller, Garnett Persinger, Michelle Boyd, Ray Calkins, Bob Perry, Liz Dixon. Approval of minutes from March meeting. On motion the minutes from the March meeting were approved. President’s Report: Laura Reeves reported the following - AKC has a motion regarding deaf dogs and has asked for input from Member Clubs. On motion the board supports the proposal of allowing deaf dogs to compete in obedience, rally and agility events. The board was also asked for reasons why or why not this would be a good idea. The board feels this gives the dog a life and purpose; however, the board feels that deaf dogs shouldn’t be bred. Laura Reeves will send this information to AKC. AKC Stud Dog Registry: On motion the board appointed Garnett Persinger to be in charge of the stud registry for the GWPCA, and to have communications sent to her. Treasurer’s Report: Sue Mueller reported the following - Checking Account $10,296.42; Money Market-$12,263.68; Rescue-$11,991.87; Sue reported that another $150.00 charge has been added to 2009 National expenses which means we lost $1,841.88 for the 2009 National. Secretary’s Report: Michelle Boyd reported the conformation, rally and obedience applications have been turned into AKC. Committee Reports By-laws: On motion the board voted to send Mark Sargent the approval to move communications forward. The consensus is that the corresponding secretary position would be non-voting due to Roberts Rules of Order. Input from Sue Mueller and Michelle Boyd should be used. Garnett will look into bonding for new treasurer and adding to by-laws. CHIC: No report. GWPU: Joy Brewster reported the following: I have most things basically setup with Laura Myles. I did contact the Obedience judge via email sometime ago, but he has not gotten back to me. I haven’t had time to follow-up again, but will do so after mid-June if not before. My biggest stumbling block is to try to locate a projector for a PowerPoint presentation. I don’t see paying the hotel $250 to rent one. I thought perhaps there might be a member who could either rent or borrow one and bring it. Or, rent it cheaper ourselves from a rental store in the local area? Here in the east it is $125 to rent from a party store - shouldn’t be more than that in Washington. Obviously the hotel has a 100% markup that I consider excessive. The projector is for the Purina representative. Judge’s Education: Judy Cheshire reported the following – There is a JE Seminar planned for 2011 in Texas. Betsy Watkins and Ann Kostishak have agreed to do it. The JE for the Nationals will be on Thursday - I’ve given the information to Laura Myles and asked her to arrange for a room, equipment, etc. We’re thinking it will be on Thursday, early evening, but the exact time may be dependent on the entry for the Sea-Tac club. AKC has the information for the Gazette and will also put it on line. FEAC Report: Liz Dixon reported the following - Judges for the National Amateur Championship 20

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CLUB BUSINESS will be Borine and Hill.  The judges for the Open Championship will be Sullivan and Minolli. The hunt test judges are Laura Myles and Heinz Ahlman, who will also judge the water test. SEAC Report: Judy Cheshire reported the following - an informal poll has shown that most respondents don’t have a problem with dogs entering more than one National Sweeps; unfortunately, there were not too many people responding to the question. It seems that in order to encourage entries and try to increase revenue, there shouldn’t be a restriction. It won’t affect that many dogs. NEAC Report: No report. Old Business Tax information: Sue Mueller reported she met with her accountant and was given the information. She will file a report with the IRS. She is also moving ahead on the not-for-profit status. 2010 National: Gary, Joe, Randy and Penny were at field trial grounds and ran doga two different directions. The camping area is huge. There are fox tails and grass seeds, a big flat area to put a tent, and plenty of parking. It’s about a mile south of where the Gun Dog Championship was held. The castoff will be 15 feet from camp. The pickup area will be 50 yards from area. Proposal for Breeder of the Year Award: No report. New Business Nominating Committee: On motion the board voted that Garnett Persinger will head the nominating committee as chair. The following people will be asked to be part of the committee: Angie Johnson, Penny Ljungren, Cindy Heiller and Robin Nelson. Wire News Guidelines: On motion the board voted to approve the following items regarding the Wire News: NEW guidelines for submitting advertisements to the Wire News. - Ads must be submitted by deadline. - If a client is waiting on photos, etc., ad space must be RESERVED (B&W or color) by deadline and camera ready ad must be submitted one week after the posted deadline. - Ads must be camera ready. - Within 1 week of ad submission, ALL ADS will be approved or notice will be given the ad won’t print well and why (size, photo resolution, over all resolution). Client will have up to 5 days to fix and resubmit. - For a fee, editor or publisher may create or work on ads. Fee will be established before work begins. - A proof will be sent to the client for an ad created or modified in any way by the editor or publisher, and written/email approval must be received prior to publication. - Payment of ads must be sent by deadline. If an ad is not printed because quality issues cannot be resolved, the payment will be returned. Design fees are due after ad is approved. - ALL ad space & design fees MUST be received by the editor prior to going to press or the ad in ©2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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CLUB BUSINESS question will be removed. Typically this would be 2 weeks from the deadline. Canine Health Foundation Donation Request : On motion the board voted to give $1,000.00 to both the y-chromosome and the non-hodgkins lymphoma research. Rescue and ROM Positions: On motion these items will be tabled until next month. The persons who have applied for these positions will need to present formal proposals. Date for next months meeting: May 26, 2010 On motion the meeting was adjourned at 10:06 pm. Respectfully submitted,

Michelle Boyd GWPCA Secretary

Photo by Diana Wise

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CLUB BUSINESS

GWPCA BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING MINUTES Wednesday, May 26, 2010

On motion the meeting was called to order at 7:36 pm.   Members Present:  Laura Reeves, Bob Perry, Liz Dixon, Sue Mueller, Michelle Boyd, Ray Calkins. Garnett Persinger. Approval of minutes from April meeting: On motion the minutes were approved with corrections from Ray Calkins. President’s Report :   Laura Reeves reported most of her input will be covered under other items on the agenda . AKC  Founding Member pledge drive is asking for a grant from the club as a founding member for $1,000.00.   On  motion the board voted not to donate any money to this. Treasurer’s Report:   Sue Mueller reported the following - GWPCA checking   $12,762.11; Rescue Fund   $12,076.87; Money Market  $12,267.01.  She also reported that her accountant almost has everything filed and ready to go for the IRS regarding our tax return and not-for-profit status.  The next treasurer will have to file a return with the IRS. Secretary’s report:     Michelle Boyd reported that Judges applications are in for conformation, obedience and rally.   Committee Reports   By-laws: No report from Mark Sargent.  Garnett Persinger reported she found out that bonding must be done in the state in which the person resides for a treasurer.      CHIC: No report.    GWPU:  Joy Brewster reported the following - Chris Cornell, the obedience judge, will be happy to participate in the GWP-U in the morning session.  I will follow up more at the end of June.     Judge’s Education:  Judy Cheshire reported the following - Plan continues for JE at the Nationals to be on Thursday after judging of the Sea-Tac Specialty.  Notice was sent to the Gazette, and Laura Myles is aware of the need for a room at the hotel, equipment, etc. for JE.  JE packets will be sent to list of judges (Sweeps and Regular classes) given to me by Laura Myles.   FEAC Report:  Liz Dixon has received three responses from judges.  Liz will prepare premiums for field trial, and Mary Hanson will prepare premiums for hunt tests.  Bernee Brawn needs premiums in two weeks.  They will go in an information packet in the Wire~News.     SEAC Report:  Judy Cheshire reported the following - the judge’s selection ballot for 2011 has been sent for publication in the Wire ~News.  NEAC Report: Laura Reeves reported that Laura Myles and Angie Johnson have been busy posting information to the facebook page and GWPCA National page.   

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CLUB BUSINESS Old Business  2010 National:  Everything is proceeding.  Proposal for Breeder of the Year Award:   No report. Volunteers for Rescue and ROM:  The motion was tabled last month.  After discussion, On motion the board voted to ask Diane Turner to fill the position of Rescue chair. On motion the board voted to ask Sean Perry to fill the position of ROM chair.   Michelle Boyd will e-mail Ellen Herminghaus to let her know we have asked people to fill those positions and Sean Ferraro-Perry to offer her the position.  Laura Reeves will contact Diane Turner to offer her the position. Nominating Committee:  Everyone has agreed to be on the Nominating Committee and things are moving forward. New Business National Rotation Schedule for 2012: On motion the board will instruct Bernee Brawn to offer the 2012 National to a west coast club and if they do not want to pick it up, it will be offered to the Midwest.  The deadline for the West Coast clubs to respond will be August 31.  Policy regarding unpaid monies owed to GWPCA:  On motion the board voted to table the discussion regarding payment of amounts owed to GWPCA in order to research previous policies regarding this item. Date for next month’s meeting:  June 16, 2010 On motion the meeting adjourned at 8:52 pm. Respectfully submitted,

Michelle Boyd GWPCA Secretary

Another great photo from Diana Wise! 24

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Photocopy and mail this page to apply for GWPCA Membership

German Wirehaired Pointer Club of America Application for Membership GWPCA dues are payable on or before January 1st of each year. Your membership will be considered lapsed and will automatically be terminated if dues are not paid by March 31st. If dues are not paid by January 31st, you’re membership will not lapse, but your name(s)will not be included in the roster. Lapsed members must re-apply for membership! Make your check payable to the GWPCA. Foreign payments must be made in US Dollars, and should be transmitted via international money order. All members now receive their Wire~News 1st Class Mail

Activities engaged in: Field Trials

Hunt Tests

Obedience Trials

Hunting

Agility

GWP Rescue

NAVHDA Other

Conformation

.

.

Number of GWP’s in your household______

Please check here if you are applying for membership for the first time______ Payment is enclosed as follows:

Membership dues for US (Single $45/ Family $50)

$_______

New Member Initiation Fee ($5.00)

$_______

Membership dues for Canada or Mexico (Single $50/ Family $55)

$_______

Membership dues for all other countries (Single $60/ Family $65)

$_______

Breed Rescue Donation

$_______

TOTAL ENCLOSED

$_______

APPLICANT(S) NAME Last

First

Initial

Last

First

Initial

Address City Phone #

State

Zip

Email address

Send Payment to: Sue Mueller, Treasurer W12203-870th Ave River Falls, WI 54022 Email: st.croix.wirehairs@pressenter.com ©2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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AKC NEWS

German Wirehaired Pointer Club of America Honor/Memorial Fund Contribution Form for the

AKC Canine Health Foundation  

Please type or print all information. Thank you.

I (we) wish to make a gift in the amount of: $

Name: Address:

Please make your checks payable to the AKC Canine Health Foundation and mail to the following address:

Michelle Boyd 617 Taylor Street Greenville, IL 62246 Gifts to the AKC Canine Health Foundation are tax-deductible to the fullest extent of the law.

This gift is in Honor of:

This gift is in Memory of:

Your donation will be listed in the Wirenews.

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AKC NEWS

First Ten AKC Grand Champions in Each Breed to Receive a Special Medallion First-Ever AKC Grand Champion “Stoli” recognized at Oklahoma Dog Show New York , NY - In recognition of the newest American Kennel Club® Grand Champion conformation title, a special blue enamel AKC Medallion will be sent to the owners of the first 10 Grand Champion title holders in each AKC-recognized breed to mark this historic achievement. To kick off the Grand Champion medallion program Director of AKC Event Management Michael Canalizo, joined by AKC Board Member Lee Arnold and Executive Field Representative Sue Vroom, made a special presentation to the first-ever Grand Champion, GCH Monterra’s Best Bet, MH, a 4-year-old Weimaraner affectionately known as “Stoli” bred and owned by Elizabeth Krupinski and co-owned by Timothy Bintner of Elizabeth, Colorado and handled by Tad Walden. Stoli received a special gold AKC Medallion at the Oklahoma City Kennel Club show on July 2, 2010. “We are pleased to present the first 10 Grand Champions in each breed with this special AKC Medallion,” said Robin Stansell, AKC Vice President of Event Operations. “Completing the Grand Champion title is quite a feat and we are excited to recognize the dogs and their owners for all that they have accomplished.” AKC will send a congratulatory letter and one medallion to the owners following verification of the title. Owners and co-owners may order extra medallions by written request. For more information, contact Bobby Birdsong, Director of AKC Event Operations at bwb@akc.org. All dogs that complete their Grand Championship will receive an invitation to the AKC/Eukanuba National Championship in Long Beach, California to be held on Dec. 4 and 5, 2010. As Grand Championships are completed all dogs will be listed on the AKC website. For more information on the Grand Champion title visit AKC Rules Applying to Dog Shows.

Congratulations! The First-Ever AKC Grand Champion German Wirehaired Pointer “Marco” is rwecognized on June 1st at the Coeur d’Alene Dog Fanciers Show on June 1, 2010.

Photo by Christy Marley ©2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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AKC NEWS

AKC June 2010 Delegate’s Report The June 2010 meetings were held June 7 and 8 in Atlanta, Georgia. On the first day beginning at 8:30AM, I co-chaired the Parent Club Conference Meeting. This event will take place in Raleigh,NC. Our representative will be Garnett Persinger. Following this meeting I chaired the Parent Club Committee meeting where the major presentations and discussion were: Alternative registration, AKC Club Insurance, Notifying Parent Clubs re: dogs removed from the registry, Changes in the AKC Gazette, Breeders Registration Coupons, The 2010 Parent Club Conference, Meet the Breeds in Long Beach and New York, The Parent Club Rescue Survey, The Parent Club Code of Ethics Project, and facing the impact of declining registrations. This meeting was followed by the Delegate Caucus and then the Coordinating Committee meeting. The meetings ended at 6:00PM The next day started with a meeting on Legislative Issues, after that a Dock and Crop Meeting, and a Delegates Forum Presentation. Following these we had the Delegates meeting where we listened to reports dealing with Finances, Registrations and moving forward. There was a vote on a proposed amendment to Chapter 14 - additional wording on National Championship Events of the Field Trial Rules and Standard Procedure for Pointing Breeds Rules for Pointing Breed Field Trials. This amendment establishes minimum standards for National Championship Events. The amendment was adopted with a two-thirds vote. There was also discussion re: the new Grand Champion title. Last month, conformation added the Grand Champion title. Judges now have the opportunity of awarding Grand Championship points to their Best of Breed and Best of Opposite winners as well as to additional AKC Champions with the Select Dog and Select Bitch award. The first GWP to get his Grand Championship is: Betty Stroh and Kosta Sunda’s Ch. (now Grand Champion) K-S-Tzarr-Balkanoff Vom Sepp All dogs that complete their Grand Champion title will receive an invitation to the AKC / Eukanuba National Championship and the first 10 in each breed will receive an AKC award. AKC statement re: The new title. “AKC Conformation is meant to be an evaluation and showcase for breeding stock. Many Champions are retired after earning their titles and this creates a dilemma for breeders. We are excited to offer the Grand Champion title as a way to encourage these quality dogs to return to the ring…..AKC Companion and Performance events offer multiple titles to celebrate achievement in competition at various levels in the sport. It is only natural to offer a Grand Champion title to Conformation exhibitors so that they too can compete and excel with their dogs at a whole new level.” 28

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AKC NEWS Competition for this new title will be judged during the Best of Breed/Variety competition at all-breed, group and specialty shows. All Champions of Record entered in the Best of Breed/ Variety competition will be eligible to compete for Grand Championship points. There is no additional entry fee. Grand Championship points are awarded, at the judge’s discretion, to the following placements: Best of Breed/Variety, Best of Opposite Sex, Select Dog and Select Bitch. Select Dog and Select Bitch are Champions that were recognized as the top quality of their sex after BOB and BOS have been awarded. Grand Championship points are calculated using the same AKC Point Schedule as is used for Championship points. (Dogs entered in non-regular classes are not counted in the computation of Championship or Grand Championship points.) Champions of Record including champions that are non-regular class winners (i.e. Veterans Class Winners) or dogs that have been “moved up” to Best of Breed competition for the show are the only dogs eligible for Grand Championship points. Although Winners Dog or Winners Bitch can win Best of Breed or Best of Opposite Sex, in no case will they be eligible for Grand Champion competition. Grand Championship points may be awarded to eligible dogs as follows: •

Best of Breed – All dogs of both sexes in the breed or variety exhibited in the regular classes and Best of Breed competition will be counted

Best of Opposite Sex to Best of Breed – All dogs of the same sex in the breed or variety exhibited in the regular classes and Best of Breed competition will be counted

Select Dog or Select Bitch – The total number of dogs of the same sex in the breed/variety defeated in the regular classes and BOB competition will be counted. (i.e. 2 dogs less than the total number of the same sex)

Completion of the title requires all of the following: •

Twenty five Grand Championship points

Three “majors” (three or more points earned at a single show) won under three different judges

At least one or more of these points won under a fourth judge

Must have defeated at least one other AKC Champion of Record at three shows

Companion events starting this summer: AKC will offer a new Beginner Novice obedience title. This title is an excellent competitive event for both the novice handler and dog. Most exercises, a blend of Rally and Companion Dog, are completed on-leash. Parent Clubs have a variety of breed specific sports and events. The Board recently approved a program to allow the recording of parent club performance event titles if AKC does not provide a test for these breed-specific skills. Last month the Board approved a fee for Conformation Judges excluding Delegates and those approved only for Junior Showmanship. The Board and staff listened to the many concerns that were expressed and decided to withdraw the structure and perform additional due diligence. The September meeting will be held in Newark,NJ. Respectfully submitted,

Patricia W. Laurans, GWPCA Delegate ©2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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BREEDERS CORNER

Having an Eye for a Dog By Claudia Waller Orlandi, Ph.D., reprinted with her permission

What is an Eye for a Dog?

An “eye for a dog” is an old dog man’s expression referring to a person’s “almost instinctive ability to know what is true quality in animals and what is not” (Nicholas, 1979). Grossman (1992) defines the term as “the ability to select a good dog without a lot of effort” and concludes that this attribute, more than any other, is the most important thing a breeder can possess. In addition to having a greater ability to visualize the potential impact of various ancestors in a dog’s pedigree, breeders with an “eye” tend to more easily grasp abstract breeding concepts such as balance. The following analogy by Grossman (1991), which refers to coated dogs, offers a clever explanation of an “eye for a dog” than I am certain both men and women can appreciate! “What do I mean by an eye for a dog? Let me draw an analysis for you. When my wife goes shopping, she flips through acres of dresses on racks. To me, they look like floppy things on hangers. To her, knowing her measurements and what color and style flatter her build, it’s easy for her to visualize the necessary accessories to finish the outfit. You, as a breeder, need to do the same sort of things: What kind of build do you want your puppies to have; what should their color be; what accessories, texture and length of coat, ear set, etc., do you want. You have to be able to visualize the sire and dam and their parents and grandparents. Then you can create by breeding one almost like the ones you have visualized.”

Characteristics of People Who Have an Eye of a Dog

As breeders, they consistently produce animals of high quality. They can evaluate any dog quickly and easily. They have an instinctive ability to recognize quality and soundness in almost any breed. They place a high priority on, and can recognize the intangible element of “balance.”

Acquiring an Eye for a Dog: A Mentor Can Help

“To some breeders, “having an eye for a dog” is second nature. Breeders lacking this natural talent can become self-taught provided they have the intelligence and motivation to discern between the good and poor specimens put before them.” (Grossman, 1983)  Breeders who consistently produce fine dogs may have a natural eye for a dog, while other persistent, dedicated individuals have taught themselves to have an “eye for a dog.” The artist has an eye for balance and elegance. So too must the breeder of dogs. For those needing to train their “eye,” working with a knowledgeable mentor can put you on a fast track to acquiring an “eye.” An experienced mentor can literally place your hands on various parts of a dog’s anatomy and expertly guide you through many aspects of evaluating a dog’s physical make-up.

Training Your Eye

Breeders can begin to train their “eye” by learning to evaluate a dog’s outward appearance or phenotype. Several things helpful in evaluating phenotype include: (1) a copy of your breed’s official Standard and Illustrated Standard; (2) A list of faults in your breed that are considered Very Serious, Serious and Minor; (3) an illustration of the anatomical parts of the dog; (4) a scoring system and (5) a recording system which allow you to keep your evaluations for future use.

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in

BREEDERS CORNER

The process of training your “eye” to evaluate the conformation features of a dog involves the following steps: Locating the parts of the dog Knowledge of a dog’s basic body parts is an absolute necessity for any dog fancier. Study your breed Standard and illustrated standard, and with the help of an anatomical chart, locate on a “living, breathing” dog each conformation feature. Locating each part on your dog is essential to deciding if it meets the Standard for correctness and is a crucial step in training your “eye.”.   Evaluating the parts of the dog After locating the parts of the dog, the breeder must evaluate their correctness based on the Standard. As Grossman (1983) notes: “The concept of relating the various parts of the dog to each other and viewing this relationship as a whole, rather than as a series of individual good or bad traits, is the key that so many breeders never grasp” – this is the all important crucial concept of balance. Training your “eye” to evaluate balance takes persistence and experience. Annotating your evaluations Make notes of your evaluations for future reference. Many master breeders devise numerical scoring systems that are quick and easy to use when planning future breedings. Formulating a plan Based on your scores and notes, formulate a plan to improve features which do not meet the Standard. Scoring and making notes on the first three generations of ancestors in a pedigree can help a breeder “visualize” how a future mating might turn out. The ability to visualize the ancestors behind a sire and dam is an integral part of having an “eye” for a dog. A color coded stick figure pedigree can be especially useful in this regard. It is important not to breed two dogs that possess the same faults and to realize that closely linebred animals (i.e., those having a common ancestor behind the sire and dam in the first three generations) may be more apt to pass their physical features on to offspring.

An Eye for the Ideal

A starting point in strengthening a breeder’s “eye” is the ability to locate and evaluate the conformation features, unique characteristics and structural balance which define a breed. Having the “eye” to visualize a sire’s and dam’s ancestors, combined with the use of scoring and recording systems, can provide valuable information on the traits parents are likely to pass on to offspring. A breeder’s goal is to create his ideal dog. Having an “eye,” that is, having the ability to recognize quality in a dog, as well as the ability to visualize ancestors in a pedigree, is one of the most important things a breeder can possess in order to create his ideal.

References: Battaglia, C. L. 1986. Breeding Better Dogs. Atlanta, GA, BEI Publishing. Grossman, A. 1983. The Standard Book of Dog Breeding. Fairfax, VA, Denlinger. Grossman, A. and B. Grossman. 1992. Winning With Purebred Dogs. Wilsonville, OR, Doral. Nicholas, A.K. 1979. The Nicholas Guide To Dog Judging. New York, Howell.

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G W P H E A LT H I N F O

The ABC’s of CHIC Canine Health Information Center

A

merican Kennel Club/Canine Health Foundation and the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) jointly sponsor the CHIC program which stands for Canine Health Information Center, a centralized canine health database.

B

reeders, owners, and scientists can use the CHIC database as a source of health information to assist in the breeding of healthy dogs.

CHIC Number is issued when test results are entered into the database satisfying each breed

specific health screening requirement, and the owner has opted to release the results to the public.

PLEASE NOTE The CHIC # itself does not automatically imply normal test results, only that “ALL” the breed requirement health screenings were performed and the results were made publicly available. CHIC is designed to encourage health testing and sharing of all results normal and abnormal, so that more informed breeding decisions can be made in an overall effort to reduce the incidence of genetic disease and improve the health of our dogs.

Database for CHIC is by consent only. All information remains confidential unless the owner

authorizes its release. Owners are encouraged to share all test results realizing it is in the best health interests of the breed and the information greatly increases the depth and breadth of any resulting pedigree analysis. For those not quite ready to accept open sharing of information, there is still value in submitting their results. All test information entered into the database is available collectively for research and statistical reporting purposes, but does not disclose identification of individual dogs. This allows for improved information regarding prevalence of a disease, as well as information regarding progress in reducing the incidence of the disease.

Everyone benefits from the CHIC program.

 For breeders, CHIC provides a reliable source of information regarding dogs one might select for a breeding program. Information is accessible to the public via the internet OFA site or the CHIC site. You can readily analyze pedigrees for health strengths and weaknesses as well as evaluate dogs for performance and conformation traits.

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G W P H E A LT H I N F O

 For buyers, CHIC provides accurate information about what a breeder tests for and the results of the tests.  For scientists and researchers, CHIC provides confidential and accurate collective information on multiple generations of dogs.  Great search engines allow queries to be very broad or very specific. You can search kennel names or an individual dog can be selected for review. Detailed information is provided including whether the health screening has been done, age at the time of testing, test results, and a pedigree analysis. It’s easy to evaluate the sire, dam, siblings and offspring of a selected dog.

For your information, our German Wirehaired Pointer CHIC requirements include:

 Hip Dysplasia – OFA evaluation or PennHipp evaluation  Elbow Dysplasia – OFA evaluation  Autoimmune thyroiditis – OFA evaluation  Eye Clearance – CERF  Von Willebrand’s Disease – OFA evaluation from VetGen  Congenital Cardiac Database (optional) – OFA evaluation  Patellar Luxation (optional) – OFA evaluationw

Go to www.caninehealthinfo.org CHIC makes all its health information readily accessible to the public through their user-friendly website. Click on CHIC breeds. 1. Find German Wirehaired Pointers in the alphabetical list 2. Click on GWP and our breed requirements will appear 3. Click on (search) and you’ll find the 16 dogs with CHIC #’s. 4. Click on each individual dog to review their test results.

The German Wirehaired Pointer Club of America Is excited to offer the following two health clinics at the 2010 Nationals:

von Willebrand’s disease Test Kits

The GWPCA is excited to offer a health clinic to purchase von Willebrand’s disease test kits at a discounted price. These test kits are $140.00 if ordered directly from VetGen, but GWPCA members can order these kits for $99.00*. Testing for von Willebrand’s disease is required for German Wirehaired Pointer’s to receive CHIC certification. So don’t pass up this opportunity to obtain a test kit at such a great price. If you are interested in purchasing a von Willebrand’s disease test kit, please notify Robin Nelson and mail payments no later than September 15th. Go to the GWPCA National Events Website and “Health Clinic” for an order form.

Make checks payable to VetGen and mail to: Dr Robin K. Nelson, C/O VetGen Test Kits, 19910 Platteview Rd, Gretna, NE 68028

*An additional fee of $7.50 is charged by OFA to have results included in the OFA Database and CHIC certification.

AKC Microchip & AKC DNA Tests

Also available at this year’s National, during both the show and field events, will be AKC Microchipping and AKC DNA test kits. Money from these tests will support GWPCA national rescue. ©2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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G W P H E A LT H I N F O

OFA Results OFA Number Cardiac GWP‐CA35/28M/P‐VPI GWP‐CA36/21M/C‐NOPI

Registration#

Registered Name

Results

SR46257901 SR51058905

GRIFFS XPLOSIVE GRIZZLIE INVERNESS THE MIGHTY QUINN

NORMAL ‐ PRACTITIONER NORMAL ‐ CARDIOLOGIST

SN91068902 SR15746701 SR18868602 SR33102006 SR34927202 SR35821101 SR38004511 SR44876603 SR45736607 SR46257901 SR46612903 SR48697509 SR49519801 SR49599301 SR49962001 SR50034807 SR50045101 SR50045102 SR50045105 SR50801908 SR50801909 SR53451601

CYNISTERS SHOOTING STAR,CH CYNISTERS COFFIN KEEPER, CH RICHMOND'S DELLA SMITH HEYWIRE 'N CEDRBROOK JUSTA SURE SHOTRN, CH CYNISTERS IN THE CENTER RING, CH OL SUT'S MADCHEN VON ETTA JAY‐MAR'S LITTLE MISS HOT TO TROT WIRESWEST MARDI GRAS RED BARN'S HERE TO STAY GRIFFS XPLOSIVE GRIZZLIE RLB'S MARVLOUS MRS MACY PUREPOINT FIELD LEGEND AIMN HI SCOTIAN COLOR OF MONEY WESTWINDS PASS THE BUCK CASCADE SOPHIA V BLITZEN HARVEST MEADOW'S SINGIN GERDIE BIRDCH, JH REECE AFTERHOURS PRETTY IS AS PRETTY DOES REECE AFTERHOURS THE BUCK STOPS HERE,CH, JH REECE AFTERHOURS MAJOR TEMPEST CYNISTERS DEMON IN DISGUISE CH CYNISTERNIDAWIRES FINAL FANTASY CH SOLVRAEVENS FIE

NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL

1096071 SR14100602 SR18868602 SR27128204 SR29137301 SR33102006 SR35821101 SR38004511 SR38315803 SR40124801 SR44082402 SR44876603 SR45062503 SR45736607 SR47441510 SR48540808 SR48697502 SR48697509 SR49020101 SR49519801 SR49599301 SR49848102 SR49962001 SR50034807 SR50045101 SR50045102 SR50045105 SR50180302 SR50801908 SR50801909 SR50801917 SR53227506 SR53451601

BORA APEL VICTORIA VON SHANHOLTZER RICHMOND'S DELLA SMITH SMOKE CREEK'S GRACE BYER'S LADY GRETAL HEYWIRE 'N CEDRBROOK JUSTA SURE SHOTRN, CH OL SUT'S MADCHEN VON ETTA JAY‐MAR'S LITTLE MISS HOT TO TROT SURE SHOTS JAMESTOWN NC GIFT CH MT VIEW'S RIPSNORTER ASSAULT CH DAKOTA ARBACH XIV WIRESWEST MARDI GRAS SCHWARZWALD'S BROCK RED BARN'S HERE TO STAY TOP SHELF'S HOLY SMOKIN MARLEY SAGE VI CAPTAIN MORGAN PUREPOINT FIELD LEGEND DEUTSCH DUALLY'S BIRD SHARK AIMN HI SCOTIAN COLOR OF MONEY WESTWINDS PASS THE BUCK CYNISTER CELTIC HEIR O' CANDO CASCADE SOPHIA V BLITZEN HARVEST MEADOW'S SINGIN GERDIE BIRDCH, JH REECE AFTERHOURS PRETTY IS AS PRETTY DOES REECE AFTERHOURS THE BUCK STOPS HERE,CH, JH REECE AFTERHOURS MAJOR TEMPEST SCOTIAN WHERE THERE'S SMOKE CYNISTERS DEMON IN DISGUISE CH CYNISTERNIDAWIRES FINAL FANTASY CH CYNISTER IDAWIRE CHILDS PLAY BLUE COLLAR CHEYENNE SOLVRAEVENS FIE

GOOD FAIR GOOD EXCELLENT EXCELLENT GOOD GOOD GOOD GOOD EXCELLENT GOOD GOOD EXCELLENT GOOD GOOD FAIR EXCELLENT GOOD GOOD GOOD GOOD EXCELLENT EXCELLENT FAIR GOOD GOOD GOOD GOOD GOOD GOOD GOOD EXCELLENT EXCELLENT

SR13719404 SR43476504 SR44876601 SR44876603 SR45135308 SR46445702 SR48697509 SR49504701 SR49519801 SR50010702 SR50045101 SR50045102 SR50045105 SR50180302 SR59070601

AFTERHOURS LET THE WOOKIE WIN INVERNESS NESTLE' QUICK WIRESWEST FIRST DIBS WIRESWEST MARDI GRAS INVERNESS ODIN WILD HUGEL'S KATIE PUREPOINT FIELD LEGEND AFTERHOURS CUTE AS A BUTTON, JH, CGC AIMN HI SCOTIAN COLOR OF MONEY GERMANUS GO GET YOUR GUN REECE AFTERHOURS PRETTY IS AS PRETTY DOES REECE AFTERHOURS THE BUCK STOPS HERE,CH, JH REECE AFTERHOURS MAJOR TEMPEST SCOTIAN WHERE THERE'S SMOKE TIMO II V. BOCKENHAGEN AT KIMMAX

NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL

SR09070903

SCOTIAN XTRA TIME, CH

GENOTYPICALLY CLEAR 

Elbows GWP‐EL446M87‐PI GWP‐EL447M69‐PI GWP‐EL450F69‐VPI GWP‐EL457M50‐PI GWP‐EL448M39‐VPI GWP‐EL445F40‐PI GWP‐EL444F41‐VPI GWP‐EL443F30‐VPI GWP‐EL455F30‐VPI GWP‐EL453M28‐VPI GWP‐EL464F32‐VPI GWP‐EL459M25‐VPI GWP‐EL458M25‐NOPI GWP‐EL462M24‐VPI GWP‐EL461F25‐VPI GWP‐EL456F24‐PI GWP‐EL454F24‐VPI GWP‐EL449M24‐VPI GWP‐EL460M24‐VPI GWP‐EL452M24‐VPI GWP‐EL451M24‐VPI GWP‐EL463F24‐VPI

Hips GWP‐3513G47F‐PI GWP‐3532F56F‐PI GWP‐3524G69F‐VPI GWP‐3522E61F‐NOPI GWP‐3517E58F‐VPI GWP‐3533G50M‐PI GWP‐3516G40F‐PI GWP‐3515G41F‐VPI GWP‐3538G42M‐VPI GWP‐3535E44M‐NOPI GWP‐3518G31F‐NOPI GWP‐3514G30F‐VPI GWP‐3521E43M‐NOPI GWP‐3530G30F‐VPI GWP‐3528G31M‐VPI GWP‐3519F24F‐NOPI GWP‐3520E24M‐VPI GWP‐3536G25M‐VPI GWP‐3539G25F‐VPI GWP‐3534G25M‐NOPI GWP‐3542G24M‐VPI GWP‐3525E24F‐VPI GWP‐3540E25F‐VPI GWP‐3531F24F‐PI GWP‐3529G24F‐VPI GWP‐3523G24M‐VPI GWP‐3537G24M‐VPI GWP‐3545G25F‐NOPI GWP‐3527G24M‐VPI GWP‐3526G24M‐VPI GWP‐3541G27F‐VPI GWP‐3543E24F‐VPI GWP‐3544E24F‐VPI

Thyroid GWP‐TH175/75M‐VPI GWP‐TH187/34F‐VPI GWP‐TH182/30F‐VPI GWP‐TH183/30F‐VPI GWP‐TH185/32M‐VPI GWP‐TH174/27F‐VPI GWP‐TH184/25M‐VPI GWP‐TH176/24F‐VPI GWP‐TH181/25M‐NOPI GWP‐TH186/37F‐VPI GWP‐TH179/24F‐VPI GWP‐TH148/24M‐VPI GWP‐TH177/24M‐VPI GWP‐TH180/23F‐NOPI GWP‐TH178/46M‐VPI

Von Willebrand's GWP‐VW40/81F‐VPI

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OPEN RANGE

Open Range If you travel through the west, along many roads and highways you will notice bold yellow road signs specifying “Open Range.” The designation “Open Range” means that there are no fences or boundaries to restrict our cattle or our horses--they are free to roam where they choose. In this column no boundaries apply. I plan to ‘roam.’ through a variety of issues--some controversial, some simply informative and some lighthearted. But always, I will try to provide you the most accurate information and most current facts so that you are free to form your own opinion about the topic at hand. If there is a subject that you would like for me to explore or if you have comments please contact: Diane Turner at dturner596@aol.com.

Not Just a Cinderfella Story

AKC’s New Policies Encourage Commercial Breeding of GWP’s By Diane Turner

Step back in time to the summer of 2005 . . . The mid-June sun blazes in the cloudless Arizona sky. The sun bakes the east wall of a Phoenix home and reflects onto the concrete floor of the attached dog run--the temperature in the kennel quickly soars to a searing 120 degrees. Locked inside, a year-old GWP male pants and whines as he huddles in a quickly depleting sliver of shade. Each time the dog moves from the shadow his pads blister, yet he braves the pain as he paces and stares at the turquoise water of the in-ground swimming pool just yards away. Next door, Nate Reynard, a 71-year-old retired Air Force fighter pilot steps out onto his patio. Hearing the whines Reynard pauses, cocks his head to listen, then strolls across the

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cool, shaded yard. He pokes his head over the wall dividing the properties and peers down. The tormented pup looks up, docked tail wagging, he wiggles over and despite the heat radiating from the wall, he jumps up and plants both front feet on the blocks greeting Reynard. As he quickly surveys the small enclosure Nate sees that there is no water and the pup is trouble. “What’s the matter, fella? Are you thirsty? Just hold tight and I’ll get somebody.” But after a trip next door neither the water nor the shade arrived. Finally Nate opened the gate and took the water into the young dog. As the days passed the situation for Clint, the rail-thin GWP, did not improve much. Amazed by the young dog’s resilience and his continued good nature, Reynard approached the dog’s owner, a thirty-some year old electrician, and attempted to reason with him about the care of the dog. “A dog’s just a dog and what he’s got is good enough for a dog.” The former Lt. Colonel knew Clint needed more food, and water constantly available. So each morning after Clint’s owner left for work, Nate got the ladder and clambered up to the top of the wall. He dropped food into the run, then got the hose and dragged it up so he could fill Clint’s water bucket and cool down the run. The heat of summer in the southwest faded into the cold of winter. Often temperatures drop to

OPEN RANGE freezing in the desert and when the winter rains arrive everything floods. Clint had no shelter. Cold and wet the GWP shivered in the pounding rain and slept sitting up because the water in the run was too deep for him to lie down. Finally Nate could stand it no more-- he bought a dog house and gave it to the owner as a gift for Clint. As the spring came with summer not far behind, the old pilot was becoming attached to dog, though their relationship was still physically distant. So Nate, the Viet Nam veteran, swallowed his pride and went next door once again. This time he remained calm and asked, “What if I take that dog to my yard everyday so he can play in the grass and lay in the shade?” And that began an odyssey for Nate and Clint that was to last nearly five years. Each day Reynard took the young GWP from his run and in the evening the dog returned to the kennel. Twice in the months to follow there were serious confrontations between Nate and the owner regarding Clint’s lack of care. On one occasion, the argument was so heated that nearby residents called the police. So angry about the arrival of the officers, the owner threatened to take Clint and put

him down. Then seeing it was too late in the evening, the younger man tormented Nate by threatening to dump Clint in the desert. When Nate protested, saying that the coyotes would kill Clint, the owner placed a rope around Clint’s neck and tied him in the back of a pick-up truck. The owner revved the engine and as the truck roared away the tight tether jerked Clint down into the bed of the truck. Hours passed and Nate’s panic increased. Late that night he heard the truck return. Nate padded to the window where he watched with relief as the owner returned Clint to the run. Others in the neighborhood were also concerned for Clint and day after day they talked about contacting the authorities but not only did they fear for Clint, but they also feared reprisal. So the days passed with no real resolution to Clint’s worrisome situation. When Clint’s owners moved to a house in a new neighborhood, Nate braved the traffic each day to get the dog. Nate bought Clint toys, raised bowls so the ants and roaches could no longer get into the dog’s meager serving of cat food. When Clint’s owner went on vacation Nate placed a shade covering over the new run. During the day, at his house, Nate made certain that Clint had food—lots of it and in the

Clint’s fate was in the hands of many dedicated individuals

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OPEN RANGE

Clint with 2 members of the Boros family who adopted him. Clint’s found a home!

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afternoons they shared ice cream and Twinkies. Clint’s owner and Nate reached a peace-of- sorts— they simply avoided each other for months at a time, but one evening in February of 2010 the younger man approached Nate as he returned Clint. “The dog is worthless. I’m gonna have him put down at the end of the week.” Once again Nate swallowed his pride and begged for time to find Clint a home. As he left Clint that night and climbed into his car, tears welled up in Nate’s eyes. He didn’t know how he would find a home for the, now very big and very active GWP. Arriving home, Nate called his young friend Amy. He broke down on the phone, trying to explain Clint’s predicament. Amy did her best to calm Nate and promised to go online and print out a list of rescues. True to her word, the next morning Amy arrived with a list of local groups that sheltered animals. Nate began calling. Organization after organization refused to consider taking Clint. As he got to the end of the list, Nate was feeling desperate. He made one last call. By now he was so upset, that the woman at the rescue had trouble understanding him. At last, he was able to explain Clint’s desperate situation. Nate was heartbroken to find that his last hope only rescued cats. “Don’t give up yet. I can send an e-mail message to every rescue group in Arizona. Maybe there is someone or some group that can take him,” the woman offered. That evening, the foster coordinator of the Foundation for Animals in Risk (FAIR), a Tucsonbased rescue group, saw the message and called me. Clint was transferred to Tucson, on February 21st and joined our family to be fostered. Clint spent six weeks with us and through the efforts of FAIR he was adopted by a wonderful new family. Clint now lives with the Boros Family of Tucson and shares his life with their three daughters who adore him. The girls are all University of Arizona co-eds and Clint is enjoying collegiate life. In the end, things turned out well for Clint. His story is a tribute to the resilience of his spirit, to the decency, dedication and love of an elderly fighter pilot and to the kindness of an adoptive family. But there is more here than a warm and fuzzy GWP Cinderfella story. Clint’s situation is a pointed reminder that there are numerous Wires in commercial breeding facilities throughout the United States and more puppies are whelped each and every day. Last September a South Dakota commercial

OPEN RANGE breeding facility specializing in sporting dogs was raided by the HSUS, a rescue group and, local law enforcement authorities. A number of GWPs were among the 178 confiscated dogs. Instantly, two of our regional GWP rescue groups offered help but the dogs were considered evidence and could not be released.

pleasant and seemed genuinely fond of Wires. She told me that she no longer has any because they are “too difficult to keep.” I asked her where she got the Wires she had used for breeding and she told me that she had heard of a young couple in southern Missouri who were moving and needing to place their dogs. They had an unrelated male and female and the puppy-mill owner purchased both of them Recently, the South Dakota Supreme Court found and bred several litters before selling the pair to a that the search warrants were in error and ordered hunter. that all of the dogs be returned to the owner. The For this article, I made phone calls to four PetLand owner has made conflicting statements. On one Stores in four regions of the county—Texas, occasion he stated that he wanted all of his dogs Missouri, Indiana and New York. Each store told back and on another he insisted that after 40 years me that currently they had no GWP puppies in, in the business he was ruined and could no longer but I could “special order” one. The prices quoted earn a living breeding dogs. ranged from $799-$1499 and Currently, the GWPs are in limbo all required a deposit for the but our Wire rescue volunteers are special order. I was told that I hoping that the dogs will soon be could choose the sex and color I was shocked to find released and transferred to them. of the puppy. And that the When Nate picked Clint up for transaction could be handled that two back are the last time, Clint’s owner handed over the phone with a credit some of our breed’s Nate a packet of paperwork. It card. Once the puppy arrived, was Clint’s AKC registration form, I could just come in and pick most prestigious dogs pedigree and puppy health records. it up. On their website some and within the three One glance through the paperwork PetLand Stores advertise, determined that Clint was the “That all puppies come from generations there product of a Missouri puppy USDA approved breeders and are dogs from seven mill. In checking United States professional hobbyists.” Department of Agriculture (USDA) Several years ago, the of GWPCA’s mostinspection records, at last count American Kennel Club (AKC) respected and topthe puppy mill where Clint was Board of Directors considered whelped housed 84 adult dogs and an alignment with the PetLand winning breeders. 23 puppies. chain. The idea was met with At eight weeks of age Clint resistance from most of the was sold to H & H Pets of Elkland, AKC Breed Club Delegates. MO, a division of the notorious It was GWPCA’s delegate, Hunte Corporation, a commercial broker of dogs. In Pat Laurans, who at the September 2006 meeting past years, it has been documented that the Hunte responded to AKC’s plan. “I would like to call Corporation purchases nearly 100,000 puppies a attention to every single parent club’s code of year from commercial breeders, then transports ethics that says we will not sell to pet stores.” The them to pet stores throughout the United States transcript of the meeting also quotes Lauran as for resale. Clint was sold to the PetLand Store saying, “I would like to call attention to the fact #169 in Mesa, AZ. And it was there that he was that, from my humble belief, we are selling our purchased as a puppy and when that family moved birthright for a few shekels.” out of state, Clint was given to Nate’s neighbor as a Yet the revenue from commercial dog breeding “watchdog.” facilities has been and continues to be a viable and Clint’s first owner had ordered a pedigree. I was important source of income for AKC. At the same shocked to find that two back are some of our meeting, David Merriam from the Duluth Kennel breed’s most prestigious dogs and within the three Club reluctantly pointed out that in the past nearly generations there are dogs from seven of GWPCA’s 96% of AKC’s income came from registrations. most-respected and top-winning breeders. “That money did not come only from the Fanciers I made a phone call to Clint’s breeder who still or the Sport that money came from all the dogs… owns the commercial facility in Missouri She was which means it was backyard breeders and it was ©2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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OPEN RANGE commercial breeders.” withdraw registrations on those pups. Today dog ownership is up, yet AKC Those fanciers who found AKC’s purposed registrations are dwindling. With the attempts alignment with the PetLand Stores objectionable of AKC to insure healthy pups with documented heaved a sigh of relief when the contract pedigrees through more inspections, frequent between the two entities was exposed at a sires DNA confirmation and health and care delegate’s meeting. The angry reception from the requirements, many commercial breeders breed club delegates caused AKC to suddenly have deserted AKC and formed their own backtrack on the merger. But there was a reason “registration bodies.” for the sudden change in direction and that In his article for the Canine Chronicle, was the new Administrative Pedigree Research “Two Left Turns Don’t Make It Right,” Dr. Al program that was waiting in the wings. Grossman, an AKC Delegate, in reference to This program is designed to increase AKC’s these upstart registries states, “ . . . no need income by luring registrations away from the for a stud book, inspections, DNA testing, upstart registries that cater to commercial or whatever. You now have a purebred dog breeders and to register pets sold either registered on the cheap. With without papers or on limited a PC and a printer you too can registration. If a pet-quality become a registration body. puppy is sold or placed with Just print a meaningless no papers or on limited Those fanciers who document and collect the registration and there is dough. . . . At last count, AKC no written contract signed found AKC’s purposed had 26 competitors.” by all parties, AKC simply alignment with the To offset some of this chooses to ignore the breeder’s competition and make it intention and registers the PetLand Stores easier for backyard breeders dog. And even if there is a objectionable heaved and puppy mills to register valid contact, if the puppy or their dogs, AKC has initiated the older dog is transferred a sigh of relief when several programs including to a subsequent owner the the contract between the policy to allow name contract is considered invalid changes once a puppy or dog and AKC will register the dog the two entities was is sold and the Administrative it can then be used for exposed at a delegate’s and Pedigree Research (APR) breeding. And all one need meeting. program. do to receive full registration In March 2008 AKC on a dog sold on a limited approved the allowance registration is to claim the of name changes for dogs loss of the original paperwork whelped in the US. This and provide a pedigree or in change passed quietly with little resistance from some cases simply the name of the sire and dam. the fancy. Most breeders did not realize the According to Chapter 3 Section 6 of the AKC ultimate ramifications this policy would have. Rules Applying to Registration and Discipline, For a $25 fee buyers can re-name their dog and “ Dogs or litters may qualify for registration if that can be an inconvenience for those breeders pedigrees show no break in AKC linage and all who track wins and keep up with the progeny of dogs and litters originate from AKC registrable the dogs they breed. But that is the least of the stock.” Therefore a dog bred in a commercial problems. facility and registered by one of the competing Owners of pet quality puppies with no registries may receive full AKC privileges under registration privileges can apply and be granted the APR program. full registration under the APR program. Once The rules state that AKC requires there be no the name is changed the reputable breeder will break in lineage, however, an unsubstantiated have a difficult time discovering that this puppy report by an attendee at a recent Southwest was the one that was sold as a pet. And if it is Kennel Auction in Missouri states that, at the discovered and the dog has produced a litter it end of the sale, the auctioneer announced that is darned near impossible to convince AKC to those buyers who purchased dogs that were not 40

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OPEN RANGE registered with AKC could do so by providing a copy of the pedigree from an alternate registry and sending it to Dave Roberts at AKC. The auctioneer provided the fax number to Roberts’ office and stated that AKC would only require one ancestor on top and one on the bottom of the pedigree to be AKC registered. And an added bonus – AKC would register the dogs for free! Beginning in December of 2008 AKC began a running series of articles in Kennel Spotlight, an industry publication for the high-volume professional breeder. The first article stated, “We at the American Kennel Club recognize that high quality professional breeders are a part of our history—and an important part of our future.” And following in the February/March 2009 issue in an article entitled, “AKC Dedicates New Breeder Relations Department” states , “ The American public’s right to own a pet of its choice is under attack. You—the ethical breeder—are an important part of that strength. That is why we are pleased to introduce the brand new AKC Breeder Relations Department. Michele Baker understands how much dedication you put into your breeding practices, and looks forward to stepping up communications with an important part of AKC’s customer base. “ Without the income generated from these breeding facilities, most experts agree that AKC cannot sustain itself and we will not only see a decline, but the demise of the 120-yearold registry within the next five years. Stop for a moment and think about that—no AKC registered puppies, no obedience trials, no agility competitions, no all-breed or specialty shows and no field trials. It is a quandary and there seems to be no quick and easy solution for this dilemma. Somewhere in the coming months and years AKC must find a balance. But until that happens it is clear that with all of these “registries” cropping up, AKC’s recent rule regarding name changes, the APR program and AKC’s courting of large volume breeders that we must take more care than ever before when selling and placing our puppies and especially our older dogs.

As breeders and fanciers it is imperative that we protect our breeding stock and our stud book by: • Carefully screening potential buyers or adoptive homes. • Insisting that new owners sign a contract stating they in the event they cannot keep the dog that it will be returned to the breeder. • Requiring that any dog not to be used for breeding be altered before it leaves the breeder’s control. • Requesting show quality puppies be sold on a contract stating that they will be bred only with the permission and guidance of the breeder. You can write the best contract, yet if you lose touch with the new owner, you may not know that the dog has developed problems and they have chosen to re-home it or drop it off at the nearest shelter. No longer can we afford to believe that once a puppy is sold the decisions regarding the future of the dog are solely the responsibility of the new owner. As dedicated breeders our responsibility is for the lifetime of the dogs we breed. The story of Clint, the puppy-mill GWP, is the perfect example of the cycle from commercial breeder to rescue—his story is only one of many that we see in rescue each year. And there will be more. All of us who share our hearts and our homes with a Wire also share responsibility for every GWP no matter when or where it was bred. It is only through our diligence and dedication that the German Wirehaired Pointer will disappear from the ranks of the commercial breeding facility.

©2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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IN THE COMPANY OF DOGS

Update on South Dakota GWPs By Diane Turner – GWPCA Rescue Coordinator

Last September 172 sporting dogs were taken from Dan Christensen’s property in Hurley, South Dakota. HSUS, Second Chance Rescue and local law enforcement officers confiscated all of the dogs at the 40-year-old commercial breeding facility. According to Brian Radke, Christensen’s attorney, who responded to the scene, condition of the kennel and of the dogs was the basis for the warrants, but “not one piece of poop was seen in any kennel and I have reviewed hours of video tape shot during the raid. Even the vets said the dogs were in acceptable condition,” Radke said. According to Radke, the care of the dogs has declined since their seizure. Local animal control did not have the facilities to house the dogs, so they were taken to the Turner County Fairgrounds and a local ice skating rink. There they have been housed in small pens with no heat, fresh air or sunshine and little human interaction, Radke indicated that many of the dogs have now contracted diseases.

In February, Judge Tami Bern ruled that the two search warrants served at the property were based on misleading information provided by the director of Second Chance. Recently the South Dakota Supreme court ordered that all of the dogs be returned to Christensen. Currently, the dogs are in limbo. “Over 100 dogs are missing and we intend to file a motion requesting that Second Chance be required to give an accounting of where these dogs are and what happened to them,” Radke explained. “Mr. Christensen is broke; he had to sell some of his land to support the family over the past year. Now, Second Chance is insisting that he pay board and vet bills. I get fired up about it.” “We will ask the court to order Second Chance to hold the dogs until Dan can make arrangements for them. But that may not happen. The court may simply say for him to take them,” Radke said. “As it stands today (Aug. 11, 2010), once we have an accounting of each dog, he will try to sell some of them and try to place others into good homes. But it is his decision,” Radke said.

Anyone interested in adopting one of the Christensen Wires may contact Brian Radke, Attorney at Law at 605-575-2603.

He is your friend, your partner, your defender, your dog. You are his life, his love, his leader. He will be yours, faithful and true, to the last beat of his heart. You owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion. -- Author Unknown

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COU

S

The birds are scarce, but he continues his search working the ditches and fence rows quartering through the field. He slams on point and you say to yourself, "this is what it‘s all about." His breeding, your training/conditioning combined with high-quality nutrition have made this possible. Give him the high-quality nutrition that helps keep him in the field when other dogs are heading for the truck. Feed what many top field trialers feed — Purina® Pro Plan® Performance Formula.

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©2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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2 0 1 0 N AT I O N A L S 

2010 GWPCA Nationals Event IMPORTANT DATE!

ENTRIES CLOSE SEPTEMBER 15TH! SEND ENTRIES TO ONOFRIO FOR ALL EVENTS – SHOW, OBEDIENCE, RALLY, SWEEPSTAKES, & SHOW FUTURITY If you cannot download a premium, please contact Bernee Brawn at (215) 598-3990, or justagwp@verizon.net and a hard copy will be mailed to you. Contact Information: Show Chair - Laura Myles invernesskennels@verizon.net Obedience Chair - Ann Kostishak gwplvr@yahoo.com Show Futurity Chair - Aloysia Hard afh@tscnet.com Field Trial Chairs - Gary Wickwire wickwiregwp@msn.com & Ray Calkins gwpcascade@aol.com Field Trial Secretary - Mary Hanson hansonm@bctonline.com Hunting Test Chair - Joe Proulx gradelinebend@aol.com Hunting Test Secretary - Lori Sargent birddog@windsweptwires.net Horses will be rented by the day and possibly by the brace for the field trial - YOU MUST MAKE PRIOR ARRANGEMENTS WITH THE WRANGLER - Terry Zygalinski Home (831) 728-1796Cell (831) 818-5932

Host Hotel for Show Events - Make sure you tell them you are with the GWPCA! Red Lion Hotel — Richland Hanford House, 802 George Washington Way, Richland, WA 9935 (509) 946-7611 1-800-RED-LION (733-5466) www.redlion.rdln.com CODE: GERM0929 Room Rate: $87 per night

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Need Trophies!! You can sponsor a specific trophy, or donate to the general trophy fund. For more information on the trophies, please visit http://www.gwpcanational.com/Trophies.htm or, contact Stacy Risler at blauermondgwp@wwt.net (715) 874-5082

CHECK THE WEBSITE FOR UPDATES, MERCHANDISE AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

  

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2 0 1 0 N AT I O N A L S

You are invited to attend the 4th Annual GWP University at 2010 National Event Thursday September 30, 2010 & Friday, October 1, 2010 Seminars Thursday, September 30 Obedience/rally discussion by Mr. Chris Cornell @ show grounds/obedience rings. This session will be 60 minutes before judging of obedience/rally. Friday, October 1 Purina Guest Speaker, Brian M. Zanghi, PH.D., will present: “Optimal Nutrition Helps to Optimize Performance”. The main topics addressed will be the nutritional advantages of using a Performance formula to optimize nutrient delivery compared to a maintenance formula; as well as daily and annual feeding recommendations related to optimizing performance. Brian M. Zanghi, Ph.D. is a Research Scientist in Basic Research at Nestle Purina PetCare The cost for both seminars is just $10.00

GWP U Mission Statement The goal of German Wirehaired Pointer University (GWP U) is to provide continuing educational programs in all areas of GWP interest and in so doing, help carry forth the mission of the German Wirehaired Pointer Club of America. It is GWP U’s hope to preserve our breed’s past and present experiences and legacies and to educate future GWP fanciers in a manner that is on-going and available for years to come. As is true with our dogs, GWP U will be an on going and evolving educational experience, which we hope will grow and mature with time. We would like to thank Joy Brewster for her time and efforts in getting this project off the ground. As the years go by, our plans are to share educational materials and work hand in hand with our dedicated breeders for the betterment of our breed. The building and continued progression of the GWP U depends on the support, cooperation and input from everyone; notwithstanding, the pictures, information, suggestions and most of all attendance.

What Is GWP U? GWP U is a practical educational concept developed by the Basset Hound Club of America and is being adapted for German Wirehaired Pointers. The University is designed as an on-going school of learning in which courses on owning, breeding, competing and judging GWP’s are available year round. GWP U is dedicated to preserving the past and educating future breeders, owners, exhibitors and judges of the German Wirehaired Pointer. The concept of GWP U is similar to correspondence degree programs, where GWP breeders, owners, exhibitors and judges can take courses and complete them at their own pace at home. These at home materials will be available to you in the not so distant future. BHU was designed to be used as a model for parent clubs of all breeds of dogs. We would like to thank the originators of this concept for allowing other breeds to participate.

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New Champion

Rlb’s Got Moxie at Drakkar MH NAI (CH RLB’s Jessie the Body MH X CH Drakkars All Eyes on Me CD)

Owner: Edwin A. Shupp Breeders: Roger Bultman, Lois Bultman, Terrance Boldin Handled Exclusively by Dana A. Bryson

Moxie finished in five consecutive shows with three straight majors! Special thanks to Dana A. Bryson for an exceptional job from grooming to handling with utmost professionalism. I couldn’t have done it without her. Also, thank you to the judges who recognized Moxie. Breeding planned for Spring 2011, inquries welcome. Ed Shupp (717) 586-8836 Ad Design By Lacey Wilson - KMK Design - www.kingsmillkennel.com/kmkdesign.html ©2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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READER’S VOICE

Why Am I a Member? Submitted by Angie Johnson Why am I a member of the German Wirehaired Pointer Club of America? I contemplated this question, during a recent conversation with a long-time GWPCA member who was considering dropping his membership this year. He voiced concerns about the direction of the breed, decisions being made in the club by the board of directors, and reservations about the club’s value. I listed the benefits of supporting the GWPCA as members: “You receive the Wire~News, and members receive an advertising discount.”; “At Nationals only members can participate in Futurity.”; “Only members can receive the annual awards”; “Only members can be listed on the GWPCA breeders list and be referred by the GWPCA breeder referral.” And I threw out a couple of more reasons. At this point I think he saw some benefits but was not totally convinced. So I decided to email about 30 GWPCA members, ranging from senior members to novices. I explained the reason behind my questions and how I was doing research for an article; I then asked “What does the GWPCA have to offer me, my dogs, and the breed as a whole?” As I was clicking the Send button, I wondered what kind of responses I would get. Do people agree with this member? Would they finally shed some light on GWPCA problems, and spell out what the club should do for ME? Wait a second, let me go read that question again. “What does the GWPCA have to offer ME and MY dogs…?” Then I kept reading that one little word over and over again, ME, ME, ME! Was the GWPCA formed for ME? Is my ego so consuming that all I care about is what this club can do for me? Maybe I need a reminder on why the GWPCA came into existence. I decided to start by reading the objectives in the bylaws. A. To do all possible to bring the natural qualities of the German Wirehaired Pointer to perfection. Not one statement about ME in that first objective. So I continued reading and believe it or not there was no mention of ME. So that question I asked, “What does the GWPCA

have to offer ME and MY dogs?”, is the very root of the problem with the GWPCA. Too few of us ask, “What can I do for the club? What can I do for the breed?” Active membership in the GWPCA gives you numerous opportunities to answer the question “What can I do for the breed?” The GWPCA offers education through the Wire~News, GWP U, Judges Education, Meet the Breed sponsorship, health clinics, and more. When did you last write an article, participate in one of these events or belong to a committee? Then there are the GWPCA National events. Without the GWPCA and its hard working members there would be no Specialties, no National Championship, no chance to showcase our wonderful breed. These events allow members from across the country to gather in one place, to share stories, experiences and tips. They allow members to get together to talk about the breed we love so much. New friendships can be formed and mentors can be gained. The GWPCA allows us to do so much more than we could do as individuals. Membership dues fund thousands each year in numerous health studies into canine lymphoma, epilepsy, brucella and many more health issues that affect all of our dogs. The GWPCA allows us to speak loudly with one voice on how the breed standard should be represented, and what code of ethics GWP breeders should follow, and which health screenings should be considered before breeding. The GWPCA provides a rescue organization for the less fortunate GWP’s; this rescue group might not exist without our membership funds. This brings me back to the original concern from that long-time GWPCA member who was considering dropping membership. We may not always agree with everything the GWPCA and its board do, but the GWPCA does have a lot to offer ME! Is that its purpose? Or, would you get more satisfaction out of the club and be able to have a bigger voice in the direction of this breed we all love so much, if you ask,

What can I do for the German Wirehaired Pointer Club of America? “Thanks to John Daly for assisting with editing this article.” 48

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WIRED LIVING

The Great Experiment By Beth Hollenberg

There is an explosion of new dog foods. Fancy, expensive and organic and holistic dog foods fill the shelves and empty our pockets. Do they really make a difference? Are they worth the cost? Do our dogs really, really like them? I decided to “spoil” my dogs last winter when I got a temporary job. Good nutrition is very important for all mammals – human and canine. I’ve always wanted to feed my dogs properly. (I’ve also wanted them to s#$! gold bricks.) My first litters back in the 1980’s were fed Hill’s Science Diet. This was before they were sold and the formula changed. Hill’s had a very good reputation and their sales reps were at all the dog shows. Does anyone remember the pocket weekly calendars with all the dog shows listed? I spent hours studying it during my third shift work schedule deciding which shows were close enough to go to, anxiously awaiting Jo’s six-month birthday so we could start her career. I miss those calendars. It was so useful. It didn’t tell the judges; but back then I didn’t know the judges very well. My favorite judge of all time was Peggy Adams. One fancier described her as having the best hands for puppies. Peggy is gone and I miss her. I remember watching her at Cleveland when Jo was eight-months old. Back to dog food. I’ve fed almost all brands of dog food. Angus told a psychic that one food sat like cardboard on his stomach. Again, the Cleveland show was where he told me this. They had a psychic there. We were offered a ride back to our grooming site after showing (I had thrown up), and he tried to ram the agility ring. We walked after that. My dogs have always been chow hounds. So, I bought an organic salmon based food for them. They loved it when I cooked salmon, this should be a winner, right? At the beginning they loved it. No more adding canned food. This should save money down the road? Well, they got tired of it. I tried a different food – a turkey, duck, chicken combination. Dinah and Angus quit eating. They

carried their bowls spilling the food on the floor. They didn’t “hoover” it up. I tried different foods for 4 months. I gave up and went back to Diamond Adult Maintenance. Now they are eating. And, they go into their crates to eat, which they had refused to do for the fancy, expensive food. I looked at the empty wallet. This was ridiculous, so with the dogs back on Diamond, we’re all happy. They are staring at me right now because it’s time for them to eat. Angus is taking deep breaths, which will turn into barking if it takes me too long to finish at the computer. He typically doesn’t start barking until I pull his food out of the oven – no I’m not baking it. I soak the food in cold water during the summer. I put it in the oven to protect it from their “grab” skills. There is no place safer from them. They have figured out how to open every other secure area in the house. I could have saved a lot of money by sticking with Diamond; but now I know this is the food they prefer. And the best thing is that it is affordable.

All packed for Nationals – are you?

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D E LTA T H E R A P Y D O G S

Hi everyone, At the hospital lately, there have been a few incidences that occurred, amazing even my mom. One incident involved a small child (guessing by the size of the operating room table being rolled in) that was whimpering. It was all my mom could do to hold on to my leash; I knew that small child needed me. Once the door closed into the operating room area, I didn’t want to leave. My mom had to use her stern voice on me, which normally she doesn’t have to do. There have been lots of people in the waiting areas of the hospital that have needed “my therapy” too. They think I am so wonderful, and yet what I do is such a small thing. Those people waiting on their loved ones are the ones that are truly dedicated and loyal. Usually in the radiation area of the cancer section, there are often family members and friends with the patient. Somehow, I can tell who the patient is and I go straight to them. After I have loved on the patient, or let them love on me, I will move towards the family and friends and give them a chance to get my therapy. I miss school but there have been lots of children visiting at the hospital who have needed me; although, somehow it isn’t like reading. I hope that you are all having a wonderful summer and enjoying your fuzzy faced friends. Becky 52

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Proudly Introducing “Ruby”

Inverness Rubiyat

(BISS Ch. Mountain View’s Mr. Jack, SH x Ch. Inverness Earendil)

Ruby’s limited show career to date includes a 4-pt major and two BOB wins at just a year old.

Inverness Kennels

Jack & Laura Myles Snohomish, WA www.invernesskennels.com ©2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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Canine Anaplasmosis - One Story, One Experience By: M. Diana Wise

What is anaplasmosis? It’s a tick-borne illness that mimics Lymes disease. What are the symptoms? Vomiting and diarrhea, fever over 102, joint pain, swelling, and lameness that goes from leg to leg. Also, there are changes in behavior: depression or lethargy. And loss of appetite, kidney and liver issues, that resolve with treatment. There are neurological symptoms: neck pain, loss of balance, seizures, tremors, stumble and the dog may appear drunk, display a change in their gait, lay down, or fall down and cannot get up. Okay, let’s all breathe. The dog may experience some of the above symptoms or none at all. Symptoms may appear from a mild form to severe. How do you know your dog has anaplasmosis? The vet draws blood - if your dog has it, it will show up without a doubt. Course of treatment is antibiotics for 28 days because this disease is a bacterial infection. If your dog has

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symptoms, the dog will start feeling and acting better within 24 to 48 hours after the course of treatment has started. Dog One: I had heard about this disease from my daughter. One day, her beagle would not come out of her crate, and when she finally did, she hardly moved at all. When put outside to potty, the dog came back in and went back to her bed. Dog went off to the vet, gave blood, got the meds happy beagle once again. Dog Two: A hunting dog, was out in the swamp, laid down in the middle of the swamp, and could not get back up. The owner had to go pick up the dog and carry him to the car. Then, dog was carried into the vet, gave blood, got the meds, and on medication for three 28-day cycles. He is better now - a happy hunting dog. Dog Three: Now my story, my experience. I took my dog, Argo to the vet for a rash, most likely from either water or seeds from the fields. My vet took a blood sample and gave Argo some medication for the rash. Just as I was paying the bill, the vet tech came to the counter and showed my vet the anaplasma test. Wow, he said, he really is positive. Positive? Positive to what? Oh, he just has anaplasmosis. And what symptoms should I be looking for? Well, he seems fine now, but if he starts limping really bad, or can’t walk anymore, just bring him in and we will give him some drugs. Ok, I’m thinking I knew of two dogs that had the same thing and they couldn’t walk and they are fine now. I didn’t go on-line to checkout the disease, I just figured if the vet wasn’t concerned I shouldn’t be either. Gradually over the course of a month, Argo started changing. Sleeping a lot. If Brian went up stairs, Argo didn’t follow him like he always had before. Argo started to sleep really soundly it took a lot to wake him up. So un-dog like. Out in the field, he hardly left Brian’s side, and he had no interest in roaming out into the field to find anything.

in

Argo in Action – Photo by the author, Diana Wise

G W P H E A LT H I N F O

We thought perhaps we had been working too much on basic manners: heel, come, down, sit, stay. One day just recently Brian sent Argo out in the water for a duck. And Argo swam, but he would only go half way across the pond before he came back. This was a pond Argo could swim across many times before he would tire. Once more Brian sent Argo out, but this time Argo struggled in the water. He was drowning, he was exhausted, he was in trouble. Argo barely made it to shore, Brian let him rest and they walked to the car and came home. In the door they both walked, Argo promptly laid down and went to sleep, and Brian said call the vet on Monday, that dog is not right. Monday came, the vet was called, Argo got his drugs, and within 24 hours we had an overzealous, energetic, bouncing off the walls dog again. A week later he was at a training day for water searching. Two ducks were put out for him to find and he brought back four. We have our Argo back. In hindsight, we almost lost Argo because I didn’t check out the ‘symptoms’ for anaplasmosis. I didn’t know the less severe symptoms, which should have sent us to the vet long before our dog almost drowned. Lesson learned. After reading and studying, I discovered Argo was showing early warning and tell-tale signs of the disease. He could have been started on the medication the day we were at the vets when he tested positive for the disease. Argo will be on the first 28-day course of treatment. He may need another round, he may not. As for the next time the vet says he has something and doesn’t seem to shook up by it, I WILL research it myself. Why? Because I know my dog better than the vet, and I’m more aware of the gradual changes that may go unnoticed until . . . And all this because of a little deer tick that is also know as a brown dog tick. It is so good to have a happy, healthy, hunting dog again. Go Argo Go Go!

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To Catch a Thief Witnessing a seizure in a young healthy dog is devastating. I wrote this article to educate those unfamiliar, encourage those coping, and recruit those willing to make a difference!

By Robin K. Nelson, DVM

Idiopathic epilepsy afflicts many breeds of dogs including German Wirehaired Pointers. It is a syndrome characterized by chronic recurring seizures for which there is no identifiable cause. Seizures, fits, convulsions are synonymous terms referring to abnormal brain function frequently characterized by loss of consciousness and sustained muscle contractions. The seizure itself has several components. Before the seizure, a period of altered behavior may occur called the aura. Dogs may hide, appear nervous, or seek out their owners at this time. The ictus or actual seizure typically lasts an extremely long one to two minutes. Clinical signs vary and include loss of consciousness or memory, sustained contractions of the limbs and masticatory (chewing) muscles, alteration of sensation, disturbance of the autonomic (involuntary) nervous system, (salivation, urination, defecation) or other psychic manifestations. After the seizure (postictal state), the dog may return to normal in seconds to minutes or may remain restless, lethargic, confused, disoriented, or blind for minutes to hours. Some dogs have milder seizures in which consciousness is maintained or focal seizures in which only part of the body is involved (lip smacking, fly-snapping, or aggression). With idiopathic epilepsy there is no evidence of ongoing neurological problems between seizures. Idiopathic epilepsy affects dogs one to five years of age and is slightly more common in males and larger breeds. By the time a dog is evaluated by a veterinarian the physical exam is typically normal. Idiopathic epilepsy is a clinical diagnosis based on age of onset, lack of persistent neurological deficits, and exclusion of other potential causes of seizures after laboratory testing. Unfortunately, there are no positive diagnostic findings to substantiate the diagnosis. A minimum database should be completed for

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every patient having more than one seizure. The complete blood count is usually unremarkable. A serum chemistry profile and urinalysis are run to rule out other potential causes of seizures. The breed, the age, and the history are highly suggestive especially if a familial history of seizures exists. An owner must provide important historical information including vaccination status, travel history, potential of trauma and exposure to toxins. Other causes of seizure-like activity must be ruled out. These include: 1. Metabolic disorders- liver disease including portosystemic shunts (abnormal blood vessel closure) seen in young dogs and cirrhosis or fibrosis of the liver, hypothyroidism with associated fasting hyperlipidemia, low blood sugar, low blood calcium, and polycythemia (too many red blood cells) 2. Toxins such as lead, ethylene glycol(antifreeze), organophosphate insecticides, strychnine, chocolate, garbage, and accidental exposure to human medications 3. Brain malformations-hydrocephalus 4. Inherited degenerative diseases-rare, but exist

G W P H E A LT H I N F O 5. Encephalitis (sleeping sickness), canine distemper, tick borne infections 6. Neoplasia- primary and metastatic brain tumors 7. Blood vessel lesions-clots or hemorrhages 8. Head injury 9. Syncope or fainting 10. Exercise induced collapse 11. Vestibular (balance) dysfunction A CT scan or an MRI and cerebrospinal fluid analysis are indicated in dogs presenting with seizures younger than one year of age or older than five. A dog with onset of seizures after the age of 5 years most likely has acquired disease, not idiopathic epilepsy. Unfortunately, brain tumor is high on the list of differentials in older seizing dogs, even when no other neurologic signs are present. Dogs diagnosed with idiopathic epilepsy often require lifelong therapy to control their seizures. Daily medication isn’t indicated in patients with a single seizure or isolated seizures separated by long periods of time. Daily medication is indicated in patients with more than one isolated seizure per month, clusters of multiple seizures per day or a clear pattern of increasing frequency or severity. Status epilepticus (one seizure after another without complete recovery between seizures) and cluster seizures (multiple seizures during a 24 hour time period) require emergency treatment to prevent possible life threatening complications such as hyperthermia (overheating) and brain damage. Prolonged seizures become progressively refractory to treatment. In some patients intravenous valium or anesthesia is necessary to stop an active seizure. The goal of epilepsy therapy is to reduce the frequency and severity of seizures to a level that doesn’t substantially compromise the patient’s or family’s quality of life, while avoiding severe side effects. No single drug or combination of drugs works in all cases. Adjustments in the dosage, the schedule, or the combination will probably be required. Finding the right combination for each dog usually occurs by trial and error. In most cases of idiopathic epilepsy

requiring medical treatment, the drug of choice is phenobarbital administered twice daily. The dosage is adjusted based on clinical effects and therapeutic monitoring. Common side effects of phenobarbital, usually temporary, include drinking more water with resulting increased urine output, ataxia, (staggering gait) and sedation. Some seizures aren’t managed well with phenobarbital alone or a patient’s liver prohibits the use of phenobarbital, in which case potassium bromide is added to the treatment regimen. Second line drugs available in epilepsy cases resisting control include zonisamide, levetiracetam, gabapentin, clorazepate and felbamate. For dogs that suffer clusters of multiple seizures despite daily medication, at home administration of valium per rectum can decrease the need for emergency veterinary care. Phenobarbital, while preventing seizures may decrease the effects of some commonly prescribed drugs such as corticosteroids, doxycycline, propranalol, and metronidazole. Possible complications to anticonvulsant therapy include phenobarbital-induced liver disease, a potentially reversible condition if the problem is diagnosed and the drug stopped early enough. Phenobarbital serum levels and liver function tests should be part of managing a dog on medication for idiopathic epilepsy. Fortunately, new nondrug alternative therapies are also being developed. These include acupuncture, massage, hypoallergenic diets, herbal remedies and homeopathic preparations or treatments. Their success is being determined. Approximately 70% of dogs with idiopathic epilepsy can be treated with medication or alternative therapy and enjoy a good quality of life with a normal lifespan. However, some dogs with recurrent episodes of status epilepticus requiring emergency treatment with intravenous anticonvulsants have a decreased life expectancy. Epilepsy is a highly variable disease making it an extremely worrisome, frustrating disease to treat. Epileptics who appear well controlled can suddenly have a terrible month and conversely, dogs with chronic problems can “smooth out” and do well for a while. In human patients, more than 25 genes have been identified to cause idiopathic epilepsy. Idiopathic epilepsy has been shown to have a genetic basis in many dog breeds as well. A partial list includes: Beagles, Belgian Tervurens,

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Boxers, Cocker Spaniels, Collies, Dachshunds, Dalmations, German Shepherds, Golden Retrievers, Irish Setters, Irish Wolfhounds, Keeshonden, Labrador Retrievers, Pointers, Poodles , (all varieties) Saint Bernards, Schnauzers, (Miniature and Standard) Siberian Huskies, Vizslas, Welsh Springer Spaniels, and Wire Fox Terriers. The most complicated aspect of the genetics of idiopathic epilepsy is that IE is not a single disease. Disease expression both across and within breeds is highly variable. While most studies have suggested a polygenic mode of inheritance, the disease in certain breeds like Vizslas and Keeshonds fits with a simple autosomal recessive trait. The specific genes for the common forms of idiopathic epilepsy in dogs have not yet been identified and presently there are no genetic tests available. Until someone does a pedigree analysis of epilepsy in German Wirehaired Pointers to determine the genetics of epilepsy in our breed, it’s difficult to make recommendations regarding breeding of relatives of affected individuals. For research of any hereditary condition, including epilepsy, scientists need family pedigrees with one or more affected dogs. Ideally, DNA samples from affected individuals and all siblings and parents are requested. A pedigree with affected individuals in more than one generation is the 60

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perfect family for genetic research. A family with one affected parent and more than one affected offspring yields at least 6 times more genetic information than a family with a single affected individual. A family with multiple affected offspring from non-affected parents is also very useful. A dog suffering from idiopathic epilepsy should not be bred, but we have so much to learn regarding recommendations for littermates and other family members. The Canine Epilepsy Project is a collaborative study into the causes of epilepsy in dogs. It is supported by grants from the AKC/Canine Health Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, individual breed clubs, and private donations. The project’s goal, pure and simple, is to find the genes responsible for epilepsy in dogs so that wise breeding can decrease its incidence. The Project’s objectives are: 1. Recruit samples from a large number of affected individuals and their immediate family members from many breeds of dogs 2. Evaluate the genotype of selected families to search for linkage between DNA markers and clinical epilepsy and use this information to identify the causative mutation(s).

G W P H E A LT H I N F O 3. Devise a DNA marker test that detects and distinguishes normal and mutant (epilepsy causing) alleles and make this test available to dog breeders so they can produce epilepsy-free dogs. Do other fanciers love their breed more than we do? Idiopathic epilepsy affects German Wirehaired Pointers and we need to help solve the mystery behind this devastating heritable disease. Sadly, our breed has not contributed DNA from one sibling pair (affected dog/ unaffected littermate). Presently, all breeds with more than 20 affected dogs are being evaluated and prepared for possible gene mapping. If you own a dog suffering from idiopathic epilepsy and are willing to supply a sample and information for the project, please go to www. canine-epilepsy.net. Click on sample submission for easy to follow instructions. Researchers request blood DNA from the affected dog and DNA from a normal sibling or parent. Contact your veterinarian about submitting samples for the epilepsy project. Many clinics support genetic research and won’t charge a fee for collecting the blood sample. Please contact your breeder for help collecting DNA samples from littermates, parents, and grandparents. Once the genes are mapped, family groups are extremely important. If you are a breeder of German Wirehaired Pointers, please acknowledge this disorder exists and provide blood samples and information on the sire and dam when requested. All information submitted to the Canine Epilepsy Project remains confidential. If you have donated your dog’s DNA for the CHIC Repository and learn of a relative affected with idiopathic epilepsy, please notify Liz Hansen by email at hansenl@missouri.edu . She can retrieve your dog’s stored DNA for the epilepsy project. If you are concerned about idiopathic epilepsy in our breed and promoting its research, you can personally support the project by donating to the AKC/Canine Health Foundation. The CHF often matches the funds donated by clubs or individuals thus doubling the impact your donation may have. Specify your contribution be used for epilepsy research.

If you own a dog with idiopathic epilepsy or have bred a dog with this heritable disease, please do your part to help solve the problem. Begin by checking out www.canine-epilepsy. net. You will find valuable information to support your own veterinarian’s advice regarding treatment and management of your dog’s seizures as well as information about the epilepsy project. Please feel free to contact me with any questions or for help submitting samples. Robin K. Nelson, DVM at gwpoint@aol.com or 402-691-9489.

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IN THE COMPANY OF DOGS

Richard Hirneisen, the author and his dog, Georgie.

Dog 2, Hunter 0

By Richard Hirneisen with the author’s photos

It was the tail end of another disappointing pheasant hunting season in Michigan. It’s the damn predators,” grumbled a friend who lives in Michigan’s “thumb,” an area we used to call “pheasant heaven.” We bagged lots of pheasants on his farm over the years, but the bird population started a steady downhill slide several years back, and it’s in freefall now. He blames coyotes; they were rare when he was a boy, but their population has skyrocketed. Foxes, raptors, skunks, and free-ranging housecats make the list of culprits too. Some hunters shoot cats they see in the fields. Beware, Tabby. Predators have played a role in bird mortality since the first successful release of pheasants in Michigan in 1917, but research suggests that role has always been a minor one. West Nile virus, often blamed for the dwindling pheasant population, affects crows, red-winged blackbirds, starlings, grackles, and other corvids, but rarely pheasants, which are in the gallinaceous family.

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Some researchers suspect that, like ruffed grouse, pheasants have population cycles, but this has not been proved. Others say too many birds are killed in Michigan’s late pheasant season, which takes place in December several weeks after the regular season has closed, when the birds are already stressed and vulnerable. But anecdotal evidence does not support this theory. Late-season roosters tend to be smart roosters, survivors. Besides, not many people hunt the late season, and it’s doubtful they bag enough birds to make a difference I think it’s mostly economics. Farmers must increase yields to prosper. That means adopting modern farming practices. When I started hunting pheasants in Michigan twenty years ago, cattail-choked drainage ditches and tree-lined creeks snaked through many crop fields. Foxtail and other weedy cover grew in with the corn, providing food and abundant cover for wildlife. Brushy fencerows hemmed in the fields. Fallow ground and woodlots dotted the landscape. Improved farm machinery created bigger fields, fencerows disappeared, and the cover around drainage ditches and creeks was cleaned out. Modern chemistry cleared the ground beneath the crops. Goodbye to the “dirty fields” we used to love so much. And, goodbye pheasants. Changing demographics had an impact, too. Suburbs radiated out from the cities and towns. Farmers who couldn’t make a go of it sold their land to developers.

IN THE COMPANY OF DOGS Whatever the cause, Michigan pheasant numbers are way, way down. I’ve seen grizzled octogenarians get misty, far-away looks in their eyes when they reminisce about the 1940s, when ringnecks were so plentiful that “you didn’t need a bird dog, you just walked out in the fields and stepped on ‘em.” They claim they didn’t even need bird dogs because they could flush pheasants with any old beagle or the family cocker spaniel or even a mutt. In 1944, when hunters’ ranks were greatly thinned by WWII, 1.5 million roosters were shot in Michigan. This year’s kill is expected to be less than 100,000. Last year, with the season almost over, and only one rooster to my credit, I phoned Paul, a long-time friend and hunting buddy, whose take for the year was zero. I figured he’d be willing enough on such short notice to join me. He was. I crated Georgie, the older and wiser of my two wirehairs, in the back of my truck, slid in my 20 gauge side-by-side and a box of sixes, and picked

up Paul and Kaiser, his Brittany. We drove fifteen miles north from my home in suburban Detroit to the Bald Mountain State Recreation Area. My decision to go to there required a prodigious leap of faith. Even when pheasant numbers were up, it was rare to see a pheasant at Bald Mountain. If I shot a rooster there, even if it had the stubby spurs and short, scraggly tail of a young bird, I considered it a trophy. But Bald Mountain had a couple things going for it. First, it was only twenty minutes from home. Second, I had exercised several generations of my wirehairs there, and much of its 4,600 acres are as familiar to me as my back yard. The “mountain” in question, on the edge of the recreation area, is actually a huge landfill, a treeless, grassless, dome so big that double-bottom garbage haulers and bulldozers crawling around near its summit look like toys. Scavenging seagulls swirl and dive around the big machines as they dump their malodorous cargo. In cynical moments I wonder if this gigantic mound of refuse is an unintended metaphor for what’s happened to the Bald Mountain State Recreation Area. For decades the Michigan Department of Natural Resources (MDNR) managed the recreation area to improve habitat. Farmers planted corn, beans, sunflowers, sorghum, and native grasses on parcels of leased acreage. Crop fields were not plowed after the autumn harvest, leaving food for deer, pheasants, waterfowl, turkeys, and other game and non-game species in the harsh winter months.

Kaiser with a deer carcass – Bald Mountain

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IN THE COMPANY OF DOGS The trash barrels in the gravel parking lots were used by hunters, hikers, and trail bikers. Contractors regularly emptied the barrels, cleaned the lots, and plowed the snow in winter. MDNR officers patrolled the roads, checking licenses and game bags. It was an orderly, well-managed chunk of public land, within easy traveling distance of Detroit and its many suburbs. All that began to change in the 1990s. Subdivisions, apartment complexes, shopping malls, and industrial parks began to sprout up all around. Some roads were paved. Household trash and construction debris overflowed the trash barrels. The MDNR removed them. People dumped their refuse on the ground. Because of the auto industry’s woes, Michigan’s economy was already in freefall when the recession hit the rest of America in 2007. State budgets had already been slashed; now they were cut to the bone. Bald Mountain’s crop-leasing program was cut. Officers were taken out of the field. Through it all, Paul and I were incurable optimists. We continued to exercise our dogs there. We found a woodcock covert and hunted it with great success. If we were really hard up, we even went after late-season pheasants. So it was that we found ourselves in the shadow of Bald Mountain, not far from one of the funky parking lots. Paul and Kaiser were off exploring a fencerow a few hundred yards distant. Georgie was close in front of me, deep in a patch of thick cover at the edge of a little woodlot, frozen on point, looking like a Master Hunter, which she is. Just as I raised my Binelli and stepped in for the flush, Georgie darted forward, evidently forgetting she was a Master Hunter, and sprinted off, nose to the ground, tail wagging furiously. She disappeared into a weedy field, its perimeter guarded by ugly patches of chest-high cockleburs. I hit the “locate” button on her beeper to get a proper fix on her location, then hit it again. She was standing still. Had to be on point, I thought, as I walked toward her. That’s when the weeds began to thrash violently back and forth, punctuated by the sound of frantically flapping wings. Then, utter silence. The weeds parted and out trotted Georgie, plastered with cockleburs, with a startled rooster pheasant, very much alive, clamped firmly in her jaws. She brought it directly to me and dropped it

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gingerly into my hand, now behaving like a Master Hunter. I killed the bird, stuffed it into my vest, and patted Georgie’s head, carefully to avoid the burs. “Good girl,” I told her, not quite sure if that was correct. “I didn’t hear you shoot,” Paul said when I showed him the rooster. His laugh hinted that it could be some time before I would live down Georgie’s unorthodox retrieve. Dog 1, Hunter 0.

Georgie covered in cockleburs with her pheasant – Bald Mountain

I plucked fistfuls of cockleburs from Georgie. Minutes later, we were hunting an overgrown fencerow, Paul on one side and me on the other, with Georgie and Kaiser working the cover in between. Georgie got birdy and dove into a maze of blackberry vines. Paul hollered that she was on point, and when I looked in, all I could see of her was a wee bit of her snout, nostrils flared. Kaiser was standing outside the fencerow, backing. Paul unloaded his Beretta autoloader, laid it in the grass, cautioned Kaiser to stay, and headed in to make the flush. I guess he figured that since it was my dog on point, it should be my shot. That’s when I saw a red spot a few inches in front of Georgie’s nose, against the backdrop of a light dusting of new snow. The spot moved and became the head of a crouching rooster pheasant.

IN THE COMPANY OF DOGS Paul was almost on top of Georgie when she lunged forward. Snow flew, wings flapped, Kaiser bolted, Paul hollered, and Georgie came out of the thorns with a live and startled rooster in her mouth and dropped it into my hand. Another perfect Master Hunter retrieve. Dog 2, Hunter 0. Yes, I know Georgie could just as easily have grabbed hens. Though very smart, she does not discriminate between the sexes. Nevertheless, I patted her on the head and thanked her again for a job well done. Sort of. I had my limit without firing a shot.

This story is dedicated to Paul Schiebold (19552010), my good hunting buddy, who died this summer from amyloidosis, a rare and as yet incurable blood disease. He will be greatly missed; especially this autumn, when I find myself at Bald Mountain without him and his beloved Brittany, Kaiser. Paul, Kaiser and Georgie at Bald Mountain.

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FOR THE LOVE OF DOGS

Veterans in the Show Ring

Regional Specialty Award of Merit Veteran – DC RLB’s Tigger DeVille SH

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“I see that the “Smiths” have entered their dog in the Veterans Class. Apparently there is no one in this Club who knows that it is customary to offer a round of applause for those that are entered. Six months ago, at this same show, I entered my Veteran Dog in this same class. Not one person applauded. Not one person came up and said anything. Not one person came over to give him a kind word or a pat. Not one person made him feel he belonged again. He was no threat to anyone. He wasn’t going to beat anyone, take any points, or win anything. He was just an old dog who thought he was special again - back in the ring for the first time in many years. Maybe he even recalled his “Glory Days”. He would have loved to have met anyone there. He would have welcomed you like an old friend. You didn’t have to say anything nice about him if you didn’t want to. But just in case you can’t think of anything to say about a Veteran Dog, here are some suggestions: “It was nice to see him out there”. Or go up to him and tell him he’s a “Good Boy”. Or tell his owner that you are glad that they brought him. Those aren’t exactly compliments, but they will please his owner and make him glad that they brought him. I don’t think that’s asking too much. One day, all too soon, all your beautiful young dogs will be old dogs too. Maybe one day you’ll enter them in a Veterans Class. And I hope that you do. Or, like many of us, you remember that old friend, now gone, and wish you still had the chance. They deserve it. It may be their final time in the sun - their last time out in front of people. Their last time to ever be in the ring. My old dog is a Fool. He thought he was wonderful that day. He thought he belonged. Instead, he was ignored. I have thought about this for six months now, and wasn’t going to say anything. But on his behalf, and that of any other Veteran, I hope that something like this never occurs again. As a Club of (Breed) Fanciers, you should feel ashamed. Even if you dislike the dog or his owner, at least show Good Sportsmanship and do the Right Thing. Show others that you have respect for your breed. Make that Veteran Dog feel wanted and special again.

FOR THE LOVE OF DOGS Let him know that you are glad to see him. It will make his day. You may never get the chance again. Thank you.” As Lynda began reading it, the hush that fell over the room was incredible. Bless her heart, my friend Lynda broke into tears as she struggled through reading this. EVERYONE in the room lowered their heads, and many of them began to cry also, including the President (who is a man). I tried my best to hold my head up and refrain from tears, again. The President strode over to where I was sitting and in a broken voice said “Terry...... ..I am SO sorry. He is such a wonderful dog. There is no excuse for what happened to you. And to him.” As I started to say that I “wasn’t going to say anything” again, the room nearly burst with everyone trying to talk at once. The discussion that followed was both eye-opening and of valuable purpose. Many came up to me in tears, with hugs and apologies. I am a very private and shy person, not given to sharing my deepest feelings easily. This had been an incredibly difficult thing for me to do, but in honor of my Veteran and all the others out there, I felt it must be done. Was it worth it? When “Mr. Smith” took his lovely 12 1/2 year old dog (neutered due to testicular cancer) into the ring, our entire membership remained - and applauded and “whooped and hollered” him with every move. The Judge moved to the center of the ring on his final go round and applauded, as did her ring stewards. Others nearby, watching other breeds, came over and remarked on how wonderful it was to see a Veteran being treated like that. Many (including me) asked to take his picture. Everyone complimented him and his owners. If only my old dog had enjoyed such a day. Was it worth it? You tell me. Sorry for the length of this, but so many in other breeds who heard about what happened have already asked me for a copy of my written paper that I thought perhaps it was something that needed to be shared. Amazing how quickly word spreads amongst us dog people. It’s often said “You can’t teach an old dog new tricks”. But I know one old dog who taught something of great value.”

National Specialty Award of Merit Veteran – CH Scotian Jetset’s Dreamcatcher

Permission to post this lovely piece was given by Terry Russo

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Delaware Valley GWP Specialty – May 9, 2010 Submitted by Joyce Wilkinson

The Delaware Valley German Wirehaired Pointer Club Specialty show was held on Sunday, May 9, 2010 in conjunction with Trenton Kennel Club. The judge was Mrs. Patricia Mowbray Morgan. Winner’s Dog: Heywire ‘N Cedarbrook RN’s Fancy, bred by Bruce Ross and Judy Cheshire, owned by Richard and Wendy Warwick and Audrye Meinke. Winners Bitch, Best of Winners and Best of Opposite Sex: RLB’s Got Moxie at Drakkar, MH , bred by Roger and Lois Bultman, and Terrrence Boldin, owned by Edwin Shupp Best of Breed: Ch. Mt. View Ripsnorter Assault followed in the footsteps of his dam, and two brothers by going Best of Breed at the Specialty. Hal was bred by Helen George Witt, and Claire and Kelly Wisch. He is owned by Chris Berg. “Hal” – Best of Breed is presented and owned by Chris Berg.

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GWP Club of Southern California Specialty – June 6, 2010 SWEEPSTAKES – Judge: Mrs. Patricia Ulloa Puppy 9 months and under 12 months Dogs 2. IDAWIRE N CYNISTERS GRAVEYARD SHIFT, SR5743501 6/30/09. Breeder: Cathie Magoon & Jodie Quesnell. By Idawire Superdog V Ripsnoter -- CH Cynister Idawire Rose Red. Cathie Magoon and Jodi Quesnell. 1. CYNISTER’S JUST IN TIME CANDO, SR58523703 8/11/09. Breeder: Cathie Magoon. By Cynister’s Shooting Star -- Cynister’s She Devil. Claudia Burk. Cheryl Claypool, Agent. 12 months and under 15 months Dogs 1. SUREFIRE’S SECRET LITTLE SPOT, SR56797905 5/26/09. Breeder: J and A Payton. By DCH Nyramskov’s H Hector -- CH Surefire’s Secret Moonshine RN JH. Andy and Joan Payton. Puppy 9 months and under 12 months Bitches 2. JUSTA GOTTA KEEP THE FAITH, SR58085407 7/17/09. Breeder: Bernee Brown. & Francis Sakin By DCH NAFC Ariels Justa Gotta Go Now -- FC Jereline Justa Stacked Deck. C. Heiller. 1. WIREWORKS TEA PARTY FOR TWO, SR59060201 7/30/09. Breeder: Angela Milowski & Shon Michael. By CH Larkspur’s Windmill Winstar -- CH Mountain Views Ripsnorter Pink Star. Angela Milowski and Shon Michael. 12 months and under 15 months Bitches 1. SUREFIRE’S IMBIBED LITTLE SECRET, SR56797901 5/26/09. Breeder: Owners. By DCH Nyramskov’s H. Hector -- CH Surefire’s Secret Moonshine JH RN. Andy and Joan Payton. Wireworks Tea Party for Two

Best In Sweepstakes: WIREWORKS TEA PARTY FOR TWO Best Opposite In Sweepstakes: SUREFIRE’S SECRET LITTLE SPOT

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REGULAR CLASSES – Judge: Dr. James D. Sillers Puppy 9 months and under 12 months Dogs 2. IDAWIRE N CYNISTERS GRAVEYARD SHIFT, SR5743501 6/30/09. Breeder: Cathie Magoon & Jodie Quesnell. By Idawire Superdog V Ripsnoter -- CH Cynister Idawire Rose Red. Cathie Magoon and Jodi Quesnell. 1. CYNISTER’S JUST IN TIME CANDO, SR58523703 8/11/09. Breeder: Cathie Magoon. By Cynister’s Shooting Star -- Cynister’s She Devil. Claudia Burk. Cheryl Claypool, Agent. Bred by Exhibitor Dogs 2. SUREFIRE’S SECRET LITTLE SPOT, SR56797905 5/26/09. Breeder: J and A Payton. By DCH Nyramskov’s H Hector -- CH Surefire’s Secret Moonshine RN JH. Andy and Joan Payton. 1. JAY-MAR’S OVER THE LIMIT JH, SR43510210 7/3/07. Breeder: Nickol Litwin. By CH Jay-Mar Surefire’s Big Secret JH RN -- CH Jay-Mar’s Star Spangled Banner MH. Nickol Litwin and Patricia Hieber. Open Dogs JAY-MAR’S COLONEL MUSTARD, SR43510201 6/3/07. Breeder: Nickol Litwin. By CH Jay-Mar Surefire’s Big Secret RN,JH -- CH Jay-Mar’s Star Spangled BannerMH. Aimee Wolfe and Lauren Libeu and Susan Heller. Larry Libeu, Agent. 2. RIPSNORTER’S GENES WEST, SR16416102 1/28/04. Breeder: Charles Irvin, Jeffrey Geroge,. Lisa George By Cadenberg Victor V Trey -- CH Ripsnorter’s It’s in The Genes. Jeffrey C George. 3. RLB’S SOMETHING TO TALK ABOUT, SR53204512 10/18/08. Breeder: Roger Bultman. By CH RLB”S Mac The Knight MH -- CH Scotion Xtra Time. Cynthia L. Heiller and Kathi Boyd. 1. JAY-MAR’S HOT SUMMERS KNIGHT , SR38004504 9/17/06. Breeder: Nickol Litwim, Craig Troncale. and Leslie Troncale By CH Cynisters Coffin Keeper -- CH Jay-Mar’s Liver and Onions. Claudia Wolfe and John Woods. 4. DRAKKAR’S RLB’S EASY ON THE EYES AT JAY MAR’S, SR51817507 8/4/08. Breeder: Rodger and Lois Bultman &. Terrance Bolden & Joyce Wilkinson By CH Ripsnorter’s Mt. View Lookout CH Drakkar’s I Didn’t Do It At RLB. Nickol Litwin and Patricia and Chris Hieber. Winner’s Dog: JAY-MAR’S HOT SUMMERS KNIGHT Reserve Winner’s Dog: RIPSNORTER’S GENES WEST Puppy 9 months and under 12 months Bitches 2. JUSTA GOTTA KEEP THE FAITH, SR58085407 7/17/09. Breeder: Bernee Brown. & Francis Sakin By DCH NAFC Ariels Justa Gotta Go Now -- FC Jereline Justa Stacked Deck. C. Heiller. 1. WIREWORKS TEA PARTY FOR TWO, SR59060201 7/30/09. Breeder: Angela Milowski & Shon Michael. By CH Larkspur’s Windmill Winstar -- CH Mountain Views Ripsnorter Pink Star. Angela Milowski and Shon Michael. Bred by Exhibitor Bitches 1. SUREFIRE’S IMBIBED LITTLE SECRET, SR56797901 5/26/09. Breeder: Owners. By DCH Nyramskov’s H. Hector -- CH Surefire’s Secret Moonshine JH RN. Andy and Joan Payton. American Bred Bitches 1. RLB’S FLIRTING WITH FAME, SR53204514 10/18/08. Breeder: Roger Bultman. By CH RLB’s Mac The Knight MH -- CH Scotian Xtra Time. Diane and Francis Marsh and Cynthia Heiller. 70

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Open Bitches 1. RIPSNORTER’S DEFYING GRAVITY, SR49757101 5/1/00. Breeder: Jeffrey George. By DC, AFC Jetset’s Ragtop Day At Scotia JH -- Piemonte Nettle V Ripsnorter NAVHDA. Lisa George & Jeffrey George 2. WEIDENHUGEL HOPE V JOEY, SR50836801 6/7/08. Breeder: owner. By CH NFC AFC Tumalo Joe -- CH Weidenhugel Beccca V Blitz JH. Cynthia L. Heiller and Kathi Boyd. Winner’s Bitch: WIREWORKS TEA PARTY FOR TWO Reserve Winner’s Dog: RIPSNORTER’S DEFYING GRAVITY Best of Breed CH WEIDENHUGEL ABBY V JESSIE, SR33205502 3/18/06. Breeder: Cynthia Heiller & Kati Boyd. By CH RLB’s Jesssie The Body -- CH Weidenhugel Xtra Spcl V Bama. Cynthia L. Heiller and Kathi Boyd. CADENBERG ENZO V SEP, SR53320202 10/7/08. Breeder: Silke Alberts. By DCH Nyramskov’s H Hector -- CH Weidenhugel Ypsilon V Einer JH. Theresa and Gary Bonini. CH CYNISTERIDAWIRES FINAL FANTASY, SR50801909 2/14/08. Breeder: owner. By CH Cynister In The Center Ring -- CH Cynister Idawire Rose Quartz. Cathie Magoon and Jodi Quesnell. Kristin N. Crouch-Coronado, Agent. CH TAGALONG’S CHERRY BOMB, SR46306404 11/12/07. Breeder: Merrill Marley. By CH Geronimo’s Flying Calypso -- CH Drakkars Hot As Ice. Merrill Marley. Ric Plaut, PHA, Agent. CH AFTERHOUR’S REECE HAVE GUN WILL TRAVEL, SR50045103 4/11/08. Breeder: M A and Johnson and C Whitmore. By CH Ripsnorters MT View Lookout -- CH J & J Afterhours Dana. Christine Whitmore and Franz Neuwirth. Oscar Quiros, Agent. Best of Breed: CH WEIDENHUGEL ABBY V JESSIE Select Dog: CH CYNISTER IDAWIRES FINAL FANTASY Best of Winner’s: WIREWORKS TEA PARTY FOR TWO Best of Opposite: CH AFTERHOUR’S REECE HAVE GUN WILL TRAVEL

Ch Weidenhugel Abby V Jessie ©2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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GWP Club of Eastern Nebraska Specialty – July 16, 2010 By Ellen Herminghaus The competition was hot! It was a hundred degrees and the humidity pushed the heat index to one hundred and twenty, or close to it. There were great prizes at stake - Diana Wise’s hand-made boxes and Sean Perry’s original note cards to mention a few. Laura’s dog Melody presented well in the Sweepstakes for Judge Julie Simmons. She is still a youngster, but shows lots of enthusiasm and potential. There was no competition for her today, but she’s looking for some!

This was one of those days when all the entries won their classes, so everybody got to compete against Scout and Chico in Best of Breed. It didn’t take anyone long to figure how it would turn out – in fact, I surmised our fate the night before the event when I drove into the arena parking lot and saw Mr. Frank Murphy’s outfit parked next to Laura Reeves’! The Judge, Mr. Eugene Blake did a splendid job judging the Specialty. He went over every dog with a keen eye, and all the dogs were given careful consideration. Eventually, all five dogs entered were awarded AKC recognition and a prize. Congratulations Scout for going Best of Breed! Thanks to Rhonda Haukoos for helping out as our Steward for the day, and to Robin Miller and Chuck Casanova who worked hard at making this such a nice event. And thanks to Laura Reeves who also worked hard putting the event together, and who showed my dog Chico with intensity. See them in action on the following pages. Also at the Specialty, Ch Root’n Scoot’n Blowing Going RE was competing for the last leg of his Judge Eugene Baker takes a hard look with “Snippet” and her handler watching. Sherry and “Jerry” ©2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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G W P S P E C I A LT Y R E S U LT S obedience title. “Jerry” is owned by Sherry Rife. Sherry said this last leg has been the toughest one yet as Jerry is getting a little ambivalent towards the commands she is giving him in the ring, but they managed to work together and the CD title is now in hand and paw. Congratulations Jerry! SWEEPSTAKES - Judge: Julie Simmons Junior Bitches 12 - 18 Months 1. AIMN HI FOR JETSET’S DANCING WITH THE STARS. 04/02/2009. BREEDER: Jim & Carolyn Isom & Genevieve Capstaff. By AFC DC JetSet’s RagTop Day at Scotia CD JHCh Wildacres Ima Gypsy Dancer MH. OWNER: Robert & Jane Bonaccorso & Laura Reeves. Best In Sweepstakes (pictured at above right): AIMN HI FOR JETSET’S DANCING WITH THE STARS

“Melody” with Judge Julie Simmons and Rhonda Haukoos on the far left.

REGULAR CLASSES - Judge: Mr. Eugene Blake Dogs Open A. DARNELLE’S MAKIN’ THE SHOT. 06/27/2007. BREEDER: Dana & Ellie Pusateri & C Vogel & W Bastain. By Ch Ripsnorters Makin A Statement-Ch Drakkars She’s All That. OWNER: Jose Herrera & Dana Pusateri. 1. DRAKKAR’S I KNOW EVERYTHING. SR518175/08. 08/04/2008. BREEDER: Roger Bultman Terrance Boldin Joyce Wilkinson. By Ch Ripsnorter’s MT View Lookout-Ch Drakkar’s I didn’t do it of RLB. OWNER: Scott Greenfield. Winner’s Dog: DRAKKAR’S I KNOW EVERYTHING Bitches 12 - 18 Months 1. AIMN HI FOR JETSET’S DANCING WITH THE STARS. SR564630/03. 04/02/2009. BREEDER: Jim & Carolyn Isom & Genevieve Capstaff. By AFC DC JetSet’s RagTop Day at Scotia CD JHCh Wildacres Ima Gypsy Dancer MH. OWNER: Robert & Jane Bonaccorso & Laura Reeves. Bitches Open A. RIPSNORTER’S MT.VIEW AFFIRMED. SR401248/08. 09/04/2006. BREEDER: Helen George & Claire & Kelly Wisch. By Ch Ripsnorter’s Thunder Hart-Ch Mountain View’s Next Strike. OWNER: Victor Malzoni Jr. AGENT: Candace McMahon.Bitches Bred-By-Exhibitor Bitches Veteran 7 – 10 Years 1. CH BRILLOW ALLY’S LI’L SNIPPET. SN780359/11. 10/17/2000. BREEDER: Rhonda D Haukoos & Brian Amundson. By Ch Willy Point Roosters SH-Ch Ansel’s Brillow Ally. OWNER: Julie Cockrum. Winner’s Bitch: AIMN HI FOR JETSET’S DANCING WITH THE STARS Best of Breed Competition CH RIPSNORTER’S MT VIEW LOOKOUT. SR401248/04. 09/04/2006. Dog. BREEDER: Helen George & Claire & Kelly Wisch. By Ch Ripsnorter’s Thunderhart-Ch Mountain View’s Next Strike. OWNER: Kiki Courtelis & James & Helen Witt & J Wilkinson. AGENT: Frank Murphy, AKC Reg. Handler. 74

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CH IDAWIRE FISTFUL OF DOLLARS. SR447868/07. 08/14/2007. Dog. BREEDER: Jodi QuesnellIdawire GWPs. By DC AFC Jetset’s Ragtop Day At Scotia CD JH-Ch Idawire Zip A Dee Do Dah. OWNER: Don Scott Wallace & Ellen Herminghaus. Best of Breed: CH RIPSNORTER’S MT VIEW LOOKOUT Select Dog: CH IDAWIRE FISTFUL OF DOLLARS Select Bitch: CH BRILLOW ALLY’S LI’L SNIPPET Best of Winner’s: DRAKKAR’S I KNOW EVERYTHING Best of Opposite: AIMN HI FOR JETSET’S DANCING WITH THE STARS Best of Breed is “Scout” shown by Frank Murphy, and seen below with Judge Eugene Blake and Rhonda Haukoos

Select Dog is “Chico” - Working him after the “down-and-back” is Laura Reeves

All five dogs line up for judging: Scout, Chico, Snippet, I Know Everything, and Melody

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GWP Club of Wisconsin Specialty – July 31, 2010 By Courtney Vogel

The German Wirehaired Pointer Club of Wisconsin held their annual Specialty in conjunction with the Waukesha Kennel Club shows in Waukesha, WI on Saturday, July 31. There were a total of 9 GWP’s entered. The WI Club provided a lunch hospitality following the show. Much appreciation goes out to the members who helped make it a success and for the out-oftowners who made the trip!

SWEEPS - Judge: Dr. Lin Sell Bitches 12 - 15 Months 1. CLADDAGH’S HOTCAKES AT SANGRUD. 06/25/2009. BREEDER: James & Helen Witt and Courtney Vogel & William Bastian. By Ch Darnelle’s “Party On” JH-Ch Ripsnorter’s Mt. View Explorer SH. OWNER: Paul & Kristin Wehking Courtney Vogel William Bastian. Best In Sweeps (pictured at right): CLADDAGH’S HOTCAKES AT SANGRUD REGULAR CLASSES - Judge: Dr. Steven D Herman “Katie” Dogs Bred-By-Exhibitor 1. DEVATA’S ASPHALT COWBOY. 06/18/2008. BREEDER: Sherry Jackson. By Ch Devata The Sun King-Devata All You Need Is Love. OWNER: Carol & John Reininger & Sherry Jackson. Dogs Open 1. LAGER V DEN DREI TEUFELN. 04/12/2008. BREEDER: Jeff Funke. By Axel V Den Drei TeufelnHeidi Vom Wiredhaus. OWNER: Jeff Funke & Allison Schultz. AGENT: Nancy Martin. Winner’s Dog: Withheld Bitches 12 - 18 Months 1. CLADDAGH’S HOTCAKES AT SANGRUD. 06/25/2009. BREEDER: James & Helen Witt Courtney Vogel William Bastian. By Ch Darnelle’s “Party On” JH-Ch Ripsnorter’s Mt. View Explorer SH. OWNER: Paul & Kristin Wehking Courtney Vogel William Bastian. 2. EBBTIDE NO SLEEP BLUES. 06/30/2009. BREEDER: Garnett P Persinger. By Jay-Mar’s We Don’t Do It For The Money-Ch Ebbtide Miss Jerre. OWNER: Carol Reininger & Garnett Persinger. Bitches Bred-By-Exhibitor 1. DEVATA OB-LA-DI OB-LA-DA. 06/15/2004. BREEDER: Owner. By Ch Side by Side’s Chatanuga Choo MH-Ch Scotian Sagebrush Renegade. OWNER: Sherry Jackson. Bitches Open 1. DRAKKAR’S RLB’S VINTAGE CABERNET. 08/04/2008. BREEDER: Roger Bultmann & Terrence Boldin & Joyce Wilkinson. By Ripsnorter’s Mt View Lookout-Drakkars Ididn’t Do It Of RLB RN. OWNER: Joann Randall. Winner’s Bitch: CLADDAGH’S HOTCAKES AT SANGRUD Reserve Winner’s Bitch: DRAKKAR’S RLB’S VINTAGE CABERNET 76

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Best Of Breed Competition CH TIMO II V. BOCKENHAGEN AT KIMMAX. 06/06/2006. BREEDER: Antonius Kohues. By Ero III Del Zeffiro-Kira II V. Bockenhagen At Kimmax. OWNER: Peter & Maxine McCullough. CH DRAKKAR’S RLB CELTIC PRIVATE EYE.. 08/04/2008. BREEDER: Roger Bultman & Terrence Boldin & Joyce Wilkinson. By Ch Ripsnorter’s Mt View Lookout-Ch Drakkar’s I Didn’t Do It Of RLB RN. OWNER: Jim & Michelle Boyd & Joyce Wilkinson. CH DARNELLE’S GET THE PARTY STARTED. 04/19/2006. BREEDER: D & E Pusateri & T Boldin. By Ch Ripsnorter’s Thunderhart-Ch Drakkar’s She’s All That. OWNER: Carol & John Reininger. Best of Breed: CH DRAKKAR’S RLB CELTIC PRIVATE EYE Select Dog: CH TIMO II V. BOCKENHAGEN AT KIMMAX Best of Winner’s: CLADDAGH’S HOTCAKES AT SANGRUD Best of Opposite: CLADDAGH’S HOTCAKES AT SANGRUD

Select Dog is “Timo” shown by Courtney Vogel

Best of Breed is “Magnum” shown by Jim Boyd

©2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

77

AGILITY AND OUR DOGS

Introducing Your Dog to Agility Obstacles Part II: Tunnel and Chute By Ashlee Trotter

The Tunnel is one of the easiest obstacles to teach the dog. Start with a regular tunnel shortened as far as it will go – usually this is only about 1-2 feet in length, make sure a helper is holding it steady or use tunnel holders/sand bags to keep it in position. Use food or a toy or even simply call the dog to you through the tunnel and reward the dog. If the dog refuses or shows any anxiety about entering the tunnel, reward for any interaction with the tunnel, even if it’s just the dog poking his nose into the opening. DO NOT force the dog into the tunnel. Once the dog is happily passing through, slowly increase the length of the tunnel, until it is stretched out to full length, but still in a straight line. You can slowly start to add curves to the tunnel by shortening the length and adding the curve a few degrees at a time. The Chute should be started after the dog is confidently doing full length regular tunnels with large curves. Start with just the barrel portion of the chute and introduce it as you did the regular

tunnel – the only thing the dog needs to adjust to, is the feel of the solid barrel under their feet vs. the softer material of the regular tunnel. Once the dog is comfortable with the barrel, attach the fabric of the chute to the barrel. The dog will have to ultimately learn to push through the fabric and drive forward despite not being able to see where it is going, so confidence is key. It is best if you have a helper to hold and shorten the fabric so the dog can pass through it easily as you have with the regular tunnel and barrel. As the dog continues to be confident, slowly stretch the fabric out a little at a time until you have reached the full length of the chute; remember to have the helper hold the fabric fully open so that the dog can pass through it as if it were a regular tunnel. Once the dog is confidently racing through the open fabric, slowly start to lower the top of the fabric so that the opening the dog has slowly gets smaller. The dog will also start to feel the fabric on his back and sides as he moves through it, eventually the dog will be passing through the chute with the fabric laying flat. When working with the chute with the fabric lying flat, make sure after every pass that the fabric is laying straight out behind the barrel. Failure to do so may result in the dog becoming tangled in the fabric and that can lead to a scary incident for the dog that will set your training back. If the dog does become tangled, don’t let the dog “work it out”. Move as quickly as you can to free the dog from the fabric. Finally, never ever leave the fabric of the chute attached to the barrel if the equipment and the dog are in the yard unattended. There have been several instances of agility dogs becoming tangled in the chute fabric and suffocating/ strangling in their own back yards.

Rumor’s Big Leap! In training for Agility? Photo by Diane Marsh 78

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GWP PERFORMANCE STANDINGS

2010 Agility Standings These rankings are based on competition during the period January 1 – April 30, 2010 as reported in AKC Awards through Vol. 30 No. 6, June 2010 – compiled by Lori Sargent. Each dog’s score is added to the number of seconds under time for that run and tallied for the year. The highest 3 scores are summed to determine total points. Ties will be broken using highest average score. NOVICE 1. Jed’s Easy Street NA NAJ – E&B Tucker

305

NOVICE PREFERRED 1. High Power’s Jesse James RAE JH NJP – N. Ondrus 2. Red’s Emerald Cut CD RN – T&C Guschi

289 105

OPEN 1. Weidenhugel Sylvie V Merlin CD RE MX MXJ NAP NJP NFP – J&B Rowley 2. Ch. Scotian Whiskey River NA NAJ – C. Eberhardt/L. Reeves-Lococo 3. Madeline’s Prince Charming OA OAJ – S. Rainwater

320 217 210

EXCELLENT 1. Afterhour’s Frosted Mocha MX MXJ MXF – D. Philibert/M. Rosenblatt 2. Vom Grafenauer’s Free Spirit MX MXJ XF – A. Trotter 3. Ch. Scotian the Man in Black JH MX MXJ MXF – S&J Rainwater/L. Reeves 4. Ch. Aspen Grove’s Get Serious Syd SH OA AXJ – C. Bettinson/D. Smolen 5. SGR Dirty Witch SH AX AXJ AXP AJP – T. Brooks 6. Ch. Scotian Movin On Up RN MX MXJ XF – S. Jackson 7. Afterhours Major’s Sunny Sky CD RE AX AXJ OF – S. McKeever/J. Quattrochi 8. Weidenhugel Sylvie V Merlin CD RE MX MXJ NAP NJP NFP – J&B Rowley 9. Ch. Cynister’s Jumpin Jack Splash OA AXJ – D&A Anderson 10. Madeline’s Prince Charming OA OAJ – S. Rainwater

373 368 339 331 319 310 216 203 191 111

EXCELLENT FAST 1. Vom Grafenauer’s Free Spirit MX MXJ XF – A. Trotter 2. Afterhour’s Frosted Mocha MX MXJ MXF – D. Philibert/M. Rosenblatt

©2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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79

GWP PERFORMANCE STANDINGS

2010 BIS/Group Competition These rankings are based on competition during the period January 1 – January 31, 2010 as reported in AKC Awards through Vol. 30 No. 3, March 2010. The number following each entry represents the number of BIS, Group 1, Group 2, Group 3, Group 4 (left to right) placements for the calendar year - compiled by Lori Sargent. 1. Ch. Ripsnorter’s Mt. View Lookout (D) – K. Courtelis/J&H Witt/J. Wilkinson 2. Ch. Star K’s Mile Hi Valentine (B) – R&L Stark/V. Malzoni 3. Ch. Afterhours Reece Have Gun Will Travel (D) – C. Whitmore/A. Johnson

3,320 – 0/2/4/4/1 1,248 – 0/3/2/1/1 133 – 0/0/0/0/1

These rankings are based on competition during the period January 1 – January 31, 2010 as reported in AKC Awards through Vol. 30 No. 3, March 2010.

2010 Obedience Standings

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Ch. Ripsnorter’s Mt. View Lookout (D) – K. Courtelis/J&H Witt/J. Wilkinson 50 These rankings are based on competition during the period January 1 – April 30, 2010 Ch. K-S-Tzarr-Balkanoff Vom Sepp (D) – K. Sunda/B. Stroh 21 as reported in AKC Awards through Vol. 30 No. 6, June 2010 – compiled by Lori Sargent. Ch. Star K’s Mile Hi Valentine (B) – R&L Stark/V. Malzoni 13 The highest 3 scores are summed to determine total points. Ch. Afterhours Reece Have Gun Will Travel (D) – C. Whitmore/A. Johnson 12

Ch. Weidenhugel Abby V Jessie (B) – C. Heiller/K. Boyd NOVICE Ch. Schnellberg’s Freedom Reigns (D) – S. DeGraw 1. Weidenhugle Dylan V Ernst RE CD – E. Gray Claddagh’s Hotcakes at Sangrud (B) – P&K Wenking/C. Vogel/W. Bastian 2. Andra V Argos RN – P. Menotti Timo II V. Bockenhagen at Kimmax (D) – P&M McCullough 8. Jay-Mar’s Always a Hot Topic JH (B) – N. Litwin OPEN 9. Ch. Mountain View’s Mr. Jack SH – R. Brannan 1. Jed’s Blue Angel UD RAE – K. Braddock 10. Ch. Afterhours Just One Look JH (B) – M. Rakowski/C. Whitmore 2. Pryor Creek’s Gracie Mae VCD1 UD VER MH RAE – C&T Cagle 3. Larkspur’s Glengarry Gus VCD1 UD JH – L. Swisher 4. Wireswest Shady Lady CDX MH – M. Eden 5. Zoe Unjai II Vom Kervinshot CD – G. Schoeppner UTILITY 1. Larkspur’s Glengarry Gus VCD1 UD JH – L. Swisher 2. Prince Zachery Von Duffin CDX RE – D&B Leveque 3. Pryor Creek’s Gracie Mae VCD1 UD VER MH RAE – C&T Cagle 4. Jed’s Blue Angel UD RAE – K. Braddock

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©2010 GWPCA

10 8 561.5 7 360.5 7 6 4 574.5 2 558.5 391.0 386.0 188.0 582.5 372.0 359.0 186.5

2. Ch. Star K’s Mile Hi Valentine (B) – R&L Stark/V. Malzoni 1,248 – 0/3/2/1/1 3. Ch. Afterhours Reece Have Gun Will Travel (D) – C. Whitmore/A. 133 – 0/0/0/0/1 Johnson GWP PERFORMANCE STANDINGS

2010 Breed Point Competition These rankings are based on competition during the period January 1 – January 31, 2010 as reported in AKC Awards through Vol. 30 No. 3, March 2010. Ch. Ripsnorter’s Mt. View Lookout (D) – K. Courtelis/J&H Witt/J. Wilkinson Ch. K-S-Tzarr-Balkanoff Vom Sepp (D) – K. Sunda/B. Stroh Ch. Star K’s Mile Hi Valentine (B) – R&L Stark/V. Malzoni Ch. Afterhours Reece Have Gun Will Travel (D) – C. Whitmore/A. Johnson Ch. Weidenhugel Abby V Jessie (B) – C. Heiller/K. Boyd Ch. Schnellberg’s Freedom Reigns (D) – S. DeGraw Claddagh’s Hotcakes at Sangrud (B) – P&K Wenking/C. Vogel/W. Bastian Timo II V. Bockenhagen at Kimmax (D) – P&M McCullough 8. Jay-Mar’s Always a Hot Topic JH (B) – N. Litwin 9. Ch. Mountain View’s Mr. Jack SH – R. Brannan 10. Ch. Afterhours Just One Look JH (B) – M. Rakowski/C. Whitmore 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

50 21 13 12 10 8 7 7 6 4 2

2010 Rally Standings These rankings are based on competition during the period January 1 – April 30, 2010 as reported in AKC Awards through Vol. 30 No. 6, June 2010 – compiled by Lori Sargent. The highest 3 scores are summed to determine total points. NOVICE 1. Andra V Argos RN – P. Menotti 2. Ch. JNJ’s Cascade Crackshot JH RN – J. Daigneau/J. Deaver 3. Ch. Drakkar’s RLB’s Secora RN – L&O Popescu 4. Afterhours Memphis Red Hot Lover – S. McKeever/J. Quattrochi 5. Ch. Cynister’s Jumpin Jack Splash OA AXJ – D&A Anderson Ch. Cynister’s Ringmaster – A&D Anderson 6. Ch. Drakkar’s RLB He Caught My Eye RN – D&B Leveque

295 273 271 169 162 162 99

ADVANCED 1. Ch. Drakkar’s RLB’s Secora RN – L&O Popescu 2. Afterhours Major’s Sunny Sky CD RE AX AXJ OF – S. McKeever/J. Quattrochi 3. Ch. Darnelle’s All That N Then Some RN – D. Vacca/E. Pusateri EXCELLENT 1. Jed’s SF Blue Belle RE JH – M&K Braddock 2. Ch. Drakkar’s RLB’s Secora RN – L&O Popescu 3. Afterhours Major’s Sunny Sky CD RE AX AXJ OF – S. McKeever/J. Quattrochi 4. Lorbas Joker Vom Hessenjaeger RA – M. Brzoska

282 190 77 296 256 183

©2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

98 81

NEW TITLES

N1,ew T itles 2010 - A 30, 2010

March

CHAMPION CH Inverness Odin (D) SR45135308 (1/18/10) by Tazmanian Mike Call Me Ike JH x CH Inverness Earendil; Breeder: Laura Myles & Dan Staber; Owner: Laura Myles CH Afterhours Cute As A Button JH (B) SR49504701 (4/10/10) by CH Afterhours Let The Wookie Win x CH Adpg Independence Day; Breeder: Linda D Medlock & Beth Carter & Danielle Gerbert; Owner: Alexis Chism & Christi Chism & Allison Chism CH Reece Afterhours Pretty Is As Pretty Does JH (B) SR50045101 (4/3/10) by CH Ripsnorter’s Mt View Lookout x CH J an J After Hours Dana; Breeder/ Owner: Michael R Johnson & Christine Whitmore & Angela E Johnson FIELD CHAMPION FC Wiredwest Sureshot Oakley MH (B) SR33591108 (3/6/10) by McNally’s Calahoo MH x Solts’ Maggilla Gorilla; Breeder: Matthew Solt & Chandra Solt; Owner: Nichole Solt NAFC DC Ariels Justa Gotta Go Now (D) SR1777850 (4/23/10) by CH Sure Shot’s Rock On JH x CH Justa Ariel Too Tuff To Tame CD SH NA NAJ; Breeder: Mary Patrice Ezzo V.M.D & Bernee Brawn; Owner: Mary Patrice Ezzo V.M.D. & Bernee Brawn AMATEUR FIELD CHAMPION AFC Big Oaks Black Magic Woman MH (B) SR13066007 (4/17/10) by NAFC DC AFC Cascade Jagd Freund x Okk Ebony Flo Laveau; Breeder: John E Schoonover & Ruth A Schoonover; Owner: Vern Grimslid FC AFC Overbaron’s Chix Dig Me MH (D) SR13066008 (4/23/10) by NAFC DC AFC Cascade Jagd Freund x Okk Ebony Flo Laveau; Breeder: John E Schoonover & Ruth A Schoonover; Owner: ANTHONY MCGRANE NOVICE OBEDIENCE Weidenhugel Dylan V Ernst CD RE (D) SR36847307 (3/25/10) by CH Weidenhugel Ernst V Einer MH x CH Weidenhugel Liberty V Boeing; Breeder: Mildred L Revell; Owner: Elaine Gray OPEN OBEDIENCE Wireswest Shady Lady CDX MH (B) SR07123901 (4/4/10) by NFC NAFC DC AFC Rudolph’s Blitzen Von Duffin x CH Von Duffin’s Lady Bug CDX MH; Breeder: Ann P Duffin & Meg Eden; Owner: Meg Eden 82

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©2010 GWPCA

pril

RALLY NOVICE Andra V Argos RN (B) SR56624501 (4/3/10) by Furst Vom Bandorfer Forst x Katja Ii V Bockenhagen; Breeder: Jonathan Prescott; Owner: Pamela Menotti CH Drakkar’s Rlb He Caught My Eye RN (D) SR51817503 (4/29/10) by CH Ripsnorter’s Mt View Lookout x CH Drakkars IdidntDo It Of Rlb RN; Breeder: Roger Bultman & Joyce Wilkinson & Terrence Boldin; Owner: Donna Leveque & Bob Leveque CH Jnj’s Cascade Crackshot RN JH (D) SN73239202 (4/11/10) by NFC NAFC DC AFC Cascade Ike MH x Marie’s Cascade Indiana; Breeder: Raymond L Calkins & Lynn M Calkins; Owner: Jeff Daigneau & Judy Deaver RALLY EXCELLENT CH Drakkar’s Rlb’s Secora RE (B) SR51817505 (3/28/10) by CH Ripsnorter’s Mt View Lookout x CH Drakkars Ididnt Do It Of Rlb RN; Breeder: Roger Bultman & Joyce Wilkinson & Terrence Boldin; Owner: Lisa Popescu & Octavian Popescu Jed’s SF Blue Belle RE JH (B) SR48693303 (3/6/10) by CH Jed’s Wild Turkey x Jed’s Lexus Lx Von Duffin; Breeder: Edward Tucker & Barbara Tucker; Owner: Mike Braddock & Kay Braddock JUNIOR HUNTER Afterhours Cute As A Button JH (B) SR49504701 (3/21/10) by CH Afterhours Let The Wookie Win x CH Adpg Independence Day; Breeder: Linda D Medlock & Beth Carter & Danielle Gerbert; Owner: Alexis Chism & Christi Chism & Allison Chism Reece Afterhours Pretty Is As Pretty Does JH (B) SR50045101 (3/21/10) by CH Ripsnorter’s Mt View Lookout x CH J an J After Hours Dana; Breeder/ Owner: Michael R Johnson & Christine Whitmore & Angela E Johnson CH Reece Afterhours The Buck Stops Here JH (D) SR50045102 02-10 (3/20/10) by CH Ripsnorter’s Mt View Lookout x CH J an J After Hours Dana; Breeder/Owner: Michael R Johnson & Christine Whitmore & Angela E Johnson Rimrock’s Huckleberry Harvest JH (D) SR37000002 (3/28/10) by Rimbock’s Buffalo Buster x CH Rimrocks Touch Of Spice; Breeder: Katherine Rager; Owner: Michael Brown & Angela Kiser-Brown Surefire’s Imbibed Little Secret JH (B) SR56797901

NEW TITLES (3/28/10) by DC Nyramskov’s H. Hector x CH Surefire’s Secret Moonshine RN JH; Breeder/Owner: Joan Payton & Andy Payton CH Farmgates Hipoint Heaven Scent CD RE JH NA NAJ (B) SR14502403 (4/17/10) by DC St Croix’s Diamond Jim x Farmgates Gretchen JH; Breeder: Paula L Moebius & Jude Moebius; Owner: Becky Blevins & Albert Brady Hipoint Brady Artistic Endeavor JH (D) SR53466502 (4/18/10) by CH Farmgate’s Freeway Reese Piece CD RE SH x CH Farmgates Hipoint Heaven Scent CD RE JH NA NAJ; Breeder/Owner: Becky Blevins & Albert Brady RLB’s Sage Sedona Timecam JH (B) SR53204513 (10/25/09) by CH Rlb’s Mac The Knight MH x CH Scotian Xtra Time; Breeder: Roger Bultman; Owner: Mr. Al Brazdzionis & Mrs. Paula Brazdzionis Surefire’s Thorny Little Secret JH (B) SR56797902 (4/11/10) by DC Nyramskov’s H. Hector x CH Surefire’s Secret Moonshine RN JH; Breeder/Owner: Joan Payton & Andy Payton CH Weidenhugel Ace V Jessie JH (D) SR33205501 (4/10/10) by CH Rlb’s Jessie The Body MH x CH Weindenhugel Xtra SPCL V Bama MH; Breeder: Cynthia Heiller & Kathleen Boyd; Owner: Cynthia Heiller & Mary Ingerson Whitetail’s Highfalutin Hank JH (D) SR54078103 (4/10/10) by CH Dke Liberty Aztec JH x Whitetail’s Iowa Ice JH; Breeder/Owner: Debbie Darby SENIOR HUNTER Vom Britt’s Iz A Belle SH (B) SR42751007 (3/28/10) by Warren Ii V.D. Wissower Klinken x Blackbriar’s Angel Hannah; Breeder: Robert J Britten; Owner: Leo O Boman CH High Power’s Victoria Acesfull CD SH (B) SR31167501 (4/17/10) by CH Rlb’s Jessie The Body MH x CH Abigail Von Blu Sands VCD2 UD MH; Breeder/ Owner: Gregory A Dubois & Cathy Dubois Paradox Sgr Lady Madonna SH (B) SR47646105 (4/25/10) by SGR Burnt Toast x SGR Poison Ivy JH; Breeder: Gail Richardson; Owner: Jerry Falk & Paula Falk River Valleys Eve Of Blu Sands SH (B) SR41958306 (4/24/10) by NAFC DC AFC Jay-Mar’s Cina’s Runaway Train MH x Blu Sands Sweetness; Breeder: Guy Rezzardi & Lori Rezzardi; Owner: Dennis Forsberg

MASTER HUNTER Big Oaks Black Magic Woman MH (B) SR13066007 (3/20/10) by NAFC DC AFC Cascade Jagd Freund x Okk Ebony Flo Laveau; Breeder: John E Schoonover & Ruth A Schoonover; Owner: Vern Grimslid Ripsnorter’s Genes West MH (D) SR16416102 (3/27/10) by DC Cadenberg Victor V Trey MH x CH Ripsnorter’s It’s In The Genes JH NA; Breeder: Charles Irvin & Lisa George & Jeffrey George; Owner: Jeffrey George FC Overbaron’s Chix Dig Me MH (D) SR13066008 (4/18/10) by NAFC DC AFC Cascade Jagd Freund x Okk Ebony Flo Laveau; Breeder: John E Schoonover & Ruth A Schoonover; Owner: ANTHONY MCGRANE NOVICE AGILITY Jed’s Easy Street NA NAJ (B) SR36438504 (4/18/10) by Dual Rivers Trampoline x Brushbuster Starts Em Right; Breeder: Gordon Bigelow; Owner: Edward Tucker & Barbara Tucker NOVICE AGILITY JUMPER PREFERRED High Power’s Jesse James RAE JH NJP (D) SR31167502 (3/7/10) by CH Rlb’s Jessie The Body MH x CH Abigail Von BluSands VCD2 UD MH; Breeder: Gregory A Dubois & Cathy Dubois; Owner: Nancy E Ondrus OPEN AGILITY JUMPER Madeline’s Prince Charming OA OAJ (D) PAL201024 (3/6/10) Owner: Stephanie Rainwater OPEN AGILITY PREFERRED Weidenhugel Sylvie V Merlin CD RE MX MXJ OAP OJP NFP (B) SN57198509 (4/10/10) by CH Weidenhugel Merlin V Nico CD MH x CH Weidenbach Ulla V Rap CD JH; Breeder: Cynthia L Heiller Owner: Judith M Rowley & Barratt Rowley OPEN AGILITY JUMPER PREFERRED Weidenhugel Sylvie V Merlin CD RE MX MXJ NAP OJP NFP (B) SN57198509 (3/20/10) by Ch Weidenhugel Merlin V Nico CD MH x CH Weidenbach Ulla V Rap CD JH; Breeder: Cynthia L Heiller; Owner: Judith M Rowley & Barratt Rowley EXCELLENT AGILITY JUMPER SGR Dirty Witch SH AX AXJ AXP AJP (B) SR16769201 (3/6/10) by DC SGR Dirty Laundry x Oakhylls Witching Hour; Breeder: Gail Richardson; Owner: Terrie Brooks

©2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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GWP PERFORMANCE STANDINGS

NORTH AMERICAN VERSATILE HUNTING DOG ASSOCIATION

German Wirehaired Pointer’s Tested 1/1/2010 to 7/31/2010 Natural Ability

Date

Chapt

ADOLF'S UGLY MUG 5/22/10 RMC ALELA VOM SEEBLICK 6/6/10 FLC ALENA VON ARGOS 4/26/10 HRC ANGUS MATTHIESEN 3/20/10 LSC TEETH: UNDERSHOT ASPEN VON ARGOS 4/26/10 HRC BACK FORTY ELSA 6/5/10 HKE TEETH: MISSING 405 & MALOCCLUSION 101,201,401 & 301 BALDRIK V.D. BRANDENBURG 5/16/10 MTS TEETH: EXTRA 205 BEAR V.D. BRIESE 5/22/10 UMO BEAST V.D. BRIESE 5/15/10 WRR COAT LACKS FURNISHINGS BECKY VOM DORNKAAT 6/6/10 NCW BESSIE V.D. BRIESE 7/18/10 KMC BIRDCRAZY STELLA 6/19/10 STC BIRDCRAZYS TURBO TOBY 6/13/10 RRV BLISS V.D. BRIESE 6/5/10 NCW BLITZ VOM ANIMAS 6/20/10 FRO BONE POINT'S HAVOC 5/22/10 TVN TEETH: MISSING 205 BONE POINT'S HAWKEYE 5/22/10 TVN TEETH: MISSING 105,205 & 305 COAT: NO FURNISHINGS BONE POINT'S HI ROLLIN BECKY 5/22/10 TVN BITE: UNDERSHOT BONE POINT'S HOGAN 5/2/10 WMV BITE: OVERSHOT BONE POINT'S HUNTER 3/20/10 LSC TESTES: NEUTERED BONE POINT'S ILLUSION 5/23/10 TVN BONE POINT'S INDIGO 6/5/10 TVN BONE POINT'S INFINITY 6/5/10 TVN BONNIEDALE'S DORIS JANE 5/22/10 NIL BONNIEDALE'S LAST MINUTE SURPRISE 5/22/10 NIL BONNIEDALE'S PLAYING IN THE RAIN 6/19/10 WIC BOSCH HOWIE WILDGRAF 6/5/10 NCW BOURG ROYAL'S IF BORIS 6/26/10 EQC BOURG ROYAL'S IF FRANZ 6/26/10 EQC TEETH: BUTT BITE 302 & 402 COAT: NO FURNISHING BOURG ROYAL'S IF GRETA 6/26/10 EQC BRENNA VOM L.B. BRIE V ARGOS TEETH: 404 MISALIGNED CITORI V.D. FLUSSWINDUNG TEETH: EXTRA 105 CLADDAGH'S HOTCAKES AT SANGRUD DAKOTA ROSE ALLIE DAKOTA ROSE DOUBLE DUCE DARK STAR'S ALBERTA DARK STAR'S ABENDSTERN WIRE NEWS ©2010 GWPCA DARK84STAR'S ALFIE

Yr-Mo

Points

Prize

Owner

15.81 15.47 15.90 13.16

112 112 112 108

I I I II

CODY C MORRIS GERALD MERKEL KYLE T HOUGH MARY E LEWIS

15.90 13.07

112 100

I III

NICOLAS A DE LA IGLESIA MICHAEL W CASWELL

5.77

101

II

CHAD CARLSON

12.00 11.77

110 112

I I

RUSSELL G RUNGE MARCUS B LIETZOW

13.77 13.87 8.97 8.77 12.43 15.80 15.97

112 112 101 79 110 110 112

I I II None I I I

THOMAS F MCCULLICK AUDRA L KRETSCHMER TRAVIS J REINERT PAUL J TRONSGARD LINDA B WOLDT MATTHEW J PTAK CONOR MALONE

15.97

90

III

TYLER J GREENE

15.97

112

I

EDWARD RATTERMAN

15.32

110

I

JEFFERY L MACK

13.90

105

II

PETER F BENSHETLER

10.03 10.43 10.43 9.77 9.77 10.67 15.70 12.90 12.90

110 112 112 112 110 112 108 96 94

I I I I I I I II III

KELLY D JOBES JAMES R PEASE KELLY D JOBES FRANK SWARTZ BONNIE J CRAWFORD BONNIE J CRAWFORD ROBIN K SENN RENEE FORTIER ANDRE MARTINEAU

12.90

91

II

RENEE FORTIER

6/5/10 4/26/10

SDC HRC

14.60 4.90

110 112

I I

KERT J MC KEONE KEVIN M LONG

5/23/10

SPC

15.68

97

II

TERRY T HUEBBE

7/18/10 6/6/10 6/5/10 6/6/10 3/6/10 4/24/10

KMC SDC SDC FLC CAR APP

12.77 11.53 11.50 13.27 10.29 11.87

110 112 112 112 112 112

I I I I I I

PAUL WEHKING THOMAS G ASKEW BRADLEY D BLADOW LAURENCE W MACKNIGHT JOHN G REILLY VINCENT J WEHRLE

CLADDAGH'S HOTCAKES AT SANGRUD 7/18/10 KMC 12.77 110 I PAUL WEHKING DAKOTA ROSE ALLIE 6/6/10 SDC 11.53 112 I G W P P E R F O R M ATHOMAS N C E S GT ASKEW ANDINGS DAKOTA ROSE DOUBLE DUCE 6/5/10 SDC 11.50 112 I BRADLEY D BLADOW DARK STAR'S ALBERTA 6/6/10 FLC 13.27 112 I LAURENCE W MACKNIGHT DARK STAR'S ABENDSTERN 3/6/10 CAR 10.29 112 I JOHN G REILLY DARK STAR'S ALFIE 4/24/10 APP 11.87 112 I VINCENT J WEHRLE DARK STAR'S AUSTIN'S NITRO 6/5/10 SAC 13.23 91 III ALBERT W WATSON DC WIREHAIRED'S MAX 5/15/10 OGR 15.81 99 II GORDON E BRAID DEE BEE'S TINKER BELLE 5/16/10 MNC 13.97 102 III RICHARD M BASTIEN DEEP ROOTS TILLIE 6/12/10 MNC 15.93 110 I DAMON RAMAKER TEETH: UNDERSHOT 201 & OVERSHOT 301 DUAL SHOT'S BEHIND BARS 5/23/10 TVN 13.74 112 I KIM YAMASHITA DUAL SHOT'S MIDNIGHT RIP OFF 6/5/10 TVN 14.13 82 None KARLA HAWKINS USED BIRD AT WATER EIGER V D WESTMARK 5/23/10 RMC 11.61 112 I JOHN K BARNES TEETH: EXTRA 202 FANCY FEATHER V HAYWIRE 6/13/10 RRV 13.70 112 I ADAM M DAHLSTROM COAT NO FURNISHING FAWN VOM GOTTESACKER 6/6/10 SHE 10.77 110 I DONALD D ZARRA FELDA VOM ENTENMOOR 5/23/10 SPC 15.84 90 II BOBETTE L BENSON GROWLED AT JUDGE WHEN TAKING BIRD FROM MOUTH IN THE FIELD GRIFFS VIKING CHEWBACCA 6/6/10 SDC 11.13 93 None JOHN N NUNNES TEETH: MISSING 305 GRIFFS VIKING GUS 6/5/10 SDC 11.10 112 I DEAN NEUMANN GRIFFS VIKING PRAIRIE DUSTIN' DAISY 6/5/10 SDC 11.10 103 II LEO O BOMAN TEETH: BUTT BITE 101,201,301 & 401 GRIFFS VIKING WENZIG 5/15/10 MTS 10.42 104 III PERRY L RIVARD TEETH: EXTRA 205 GUSS VOM KERNHAUS 5/30/10 TOC 16.39 112 Eval ALEX PAPALAZAROY HEISS DRAHT DANGEROUS INFATUATION 6/13/10 MIC 6.90 103 II VALERIE F POTTER TEETH: UNDERSHOT HEISS DRAHT DIGGING FOR THE HORIZON 6/13/10 MIC 6.90 110 I VALERIE F POTTER HEISS DRAHT DREAMS COME TRUE 6/13/10 MIC 6.90 112 I VALERIE F POTTER TEETH: EXTRA 305 LB'S GOOD GOLLY MISS DOTTY 4/30/10 HRT 13.43 112 I LEO O BOMAN LB'S POINTDACIOUS JAZZY JAVA 6/5/10 SDC 14.60 110 I TRENTON M WEBB LENA VOM HERBSTWIND 5/15/10 SUS 12.55 100 II DAVID F RHOADS LEOPOLD VOM TAPFEREN HERZEN 5/22/10 UMO 13.90 112 I MATTHEW W ROTH LHD GOLDEN SUNRISE ANNEX 5/2/10 HRT 15.90 112 I DALE J LINDBECK LORD VOM HERBSTWIND 6/13/10 MIC 13.47 106 I BRUCE A POTTER LOUIE VOM BUFFELTALER 6/6/10 FLC 10.87 112 I CHESTER W FANNON III MASON CREEK CAESAR AUGUSTUS 5/22/10 UMO 6.06 110 I GREGGORY F DOUGAN MIDNIGHT STAR'S ARNO 6/12/10 GCA 15.90 106 II SERGIO PERTICUCCI MIDNIGHT STAR'S CROWN JEWEL 3/20/10 LSC 13.16 72 None DENNIS W FRIEDRICH MIDNIGHT STAR'S ONCE IN A BLUE MOON 3/20/10 LSC 13.16 98 III TIM BICKFORD BITE: BUTT BITE MIDNIGHT STAR'S VALIANT WARRIOR 3/20/10 LSC 13.16 97 II JEFFREY G SUGGS DOG SHYED FROM JUDGES AT BEGINNING AND AT PHYSICAL ATTRIBUTES EXAM TEMP: Sensitive MORK VOM ORION 5/15/10 MNC 15.26 102 III PAUL A SHARIFF TEETH: MISSING 405 & 305 NATASHA VOM ORION 4/11/10 SND 13.17 106 II MARK MILLER PANJA VOM FUCHSFLUESSCHEN 6/6/10 FLC 15.07 110 I DOUGLAS E WERTH PERLE VOM ELDERBACH 6/12/10 GCA 15.67 110 I BLAINE HANSEN SANDCOUNTY AXEL 5/1/10 HRT 12.68 110 I RYAN CRUMLY BITE: BUTT BITE 101,201,301 & 401 STEALTH POINT'S HERSHEY 6/12/10 RRV 14.27 112 I BO J ALLEN TEETH: MISSING 207 & 305 TAMMY III VOM ALTMOOR 6/13/10 DVC 14.13 93 None CARL R MERTENS THUNDERHILLS SALTY BUS 5/23/10 SPC 13.61 112 I BARRY PEARSON TOP SHELF'S JUKEBOX JUNKIE 5/2/10 WMV 11.16 98 None JAMES R WELCH TOP SHELF'S JUMPIN JAZZ FLASH 6/13/10 RRV 12.50 112 I JEFF L JALBERT TRAILBLAZERS SEPTEMBER SKYE 6/12/10 RRV 10.17 94 II APRIL M COLLMAN ©2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS 85 TRAILBLAZERS SUMMER SLAM 6/12/10 RRV 10.17 93 II TORY ZIMMERMAN

TEETH: MISSING 207 & 305 TAMMY III VOM ALTMOOR 6/13/10 G THUNDERHILLS W P P E R F O RSALTY M A N BUS C E S T A N D I N G S5/23/10 TOP SHELF'S JUKEBOX JUNKIE 5/2/10 TOP SHELF'S JUMPIN JAZZ FLASH 6/13/10 TRAILBLAZERS SEPTEMBER SKYE 6/12/10 TRAILBLAZERS SUMMER SLAM 6/12/10 TRIXI OF TAZ 6/12/10 TEETH: EXTRA 105 UPLANDS WIND TALKER SADIE 5/15/10 COAT: LACKS FURNISHINGS WESTWINDS DUDE 5/15/10 WILDWING GRETTA 5/29/10 XARAH II VOM WILDFLUGEL 5/22/10

DVC SPC WMV RRV RRV RRV MIC

14.13 13.61 11.16 12.50 10.17 10.17 11.53

93 112 98 112 94 93 112

None I None I II II I

CARL R MERTENS BARRY PEARSON JAMES R WELCH JEFF L JALBERT APRIL M COLLMAN TORY ZIMMERMAN GARY L RASMUSSEN

MNC

13.16

112

I

KEITH A BAER

WRR BGS UMO

10.55 11.97 9.84

104 84 112

III III I

MORRIS A LINK LAURIE LOHRER MICHAEL J ARMBRUSTER

Prize

Owner

II

KEVIN SNELBAKER

Prize

Owner

Utility Preparatory Test

Date

Chapt

Yr-Mo

Points

ABBI VOM JAGERGLUCK

5/15/10

SUS

3.42

Utility Test

Date

Chapt

Yr-Mo

ALEK V D BRIESE BIBBI VD WESTMARK TEETH: MISSINIG 305 BLUE COLLAR BRON

5/15/10 6/4/10

WRR NCW

4.41 2.63

173 191

None II

JEROME SCHENCK JOE E AUMANN

5/22/10

RMC

3.09

201

I

ARTHUR T TRUJILLO

168 Points

Field Top Ten January Through May 2010 Field Top Ten Rankings are based on dogs defeated. Submitted by Lynn Sandor email sandorcpa@comcast.net NumDog Name

Owner

Dogs Number of Defeated Placements

OPEN SENIOR DOGS (GUN DOGS) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 10

NAFC DC Ariels Justa Gotta Go Now NAFC DC AFC Griffiths Willy Be Mine? NFC DC AFC Tumalo Joe FC Wiredwest Sureshot Oakley MH AFC Big Oaks Black Magic Woman MH DC Wildwings Shameless Cascade Honest Abe FC Wilson's Dp Trish JH CH Sure Shot's Red Baron Raymond NFC FC Backwoods Longshot NFC FC Brillows Wild West Show

M Ezzo/B Brawn, PA C & D Griffith, OR J & S Williams, OR N Solt, UT V Grimslid, WI L Sandor, CA R & L Calkins, OR J Houghton O Williams E Kalmes R Haukoos, IA

182 64 41 38 35 34 29 28 26 25 25

5 3 4 2 3 2 2 1 1 1 2

In Open Senior Gun Dogs, a total of 18 GWPs placed 36 times, defeating 619 dogs. AMATEUR SENIOR DOGS (GUN DOGS) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 868 9

Wingfield's High Cotton JH AFC Big Oaks Black Magic Woman MH FC AFC Overbaron's Chix Dig Me MH Big Oaks Jacpine Savage Sure Shot's Pretty Please DC Cascade Tumalo Tess Ruger's And Your Point Is Zippin WIRECalahoo NEWS ©2010 GWPCA FC Wiredwest Sureshot Oakley MH

D & P Coller V Grimslid, WI A McGrane, IA V Grimslid, WI S & J Sorenson, WA J & S Williams, OR G & M Juarez Q Wiseman N Solt, UT

39 33 29 20 18 17 14 13 12

2 2 3 2 1 1 1 1 1

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 10

AFC Big Oaks Black Magic Woman MH FC AFC Overbaron's Chix Dig Me MH Big Oaks Jacpine Savage Sure Shot's Pretty Please DC Cascade Tumalo Tess Ruger's And Your Point Is Zippin Calahoo FC Wiredwest Sureshot Oakley MH FC AFC Okk Left To Do It Samantha V Krieger

V Grimslid, WI A McGrane, IA GW V Grimslid, WI S & J Sorenson, WA J & S Williams, OR G & M Juarez Q Wiseman N Solt, UT J & R Schoonover, IN M Marigoni

P PERFO

33 29 R20M 18 17 14 13 12 10 10

ANCE

2 3 2S 1 1 1 1 1 2 1

TANDINGS

In Amateur Senior Gun Dogs, a total of 13 GWPs placed 19 times, defeating 229 dogs. JUNIOR DOGS (PUPPY/DERBY COMBINED) 1 2 3 4 4 6 7 8 8 10

Jay-Mar's Walk The Line Cascade Tina Jay-Mar's How Do You Like Me Now JH Jay-Mar's Ready To Run Okk Burlap Snips Sugar Cookie JH Rlb's Flirting With Fame JH Cascade Dasha Brillow's Wild West Ponder Rosa Wiredwest Most Wanted

M Braddock/N Litwin R & L Calkins, OR P & C Hieber/N Litwin, CA P & C Hieber/N Litwin, CA D Vater B Roe, GA D & F Marsh/C Heiller, CA R & L Calkins, OR J Sodoro J Barner, UT

40 28 25 20 20 19 17 14 14 9

5 5 2 3 1 2 3 4 1 1

In Junior Dogs, a total of 18 GWPs placed 38 times, defeating 246 dogs. DC, FC or AFC Titles Earned Dual Champion, Field Champion: NAFC DC Ariels Justa Gotta Go Now (D) SR17778504 9-09 (4/23/10) by CH Sure Shot's Rock On JH 9-04 x CH Justa Ariel Too Tuff To Tame CD SH NA NAJ 7-02 Breeder: Mary Ezzo VMD & Bernee Brawn Owner: Mary Ezzo VMD & Bernee Brawn Field Champions: Amateur Field Champion: AFC Big Oaks Black Magic Woman MH (B) SR13066007 6-06 (4/17/10) by NAFC DC AFC Cascade Jagd Freund 6-02 x Okk Ebony Flo Laveau 3-04 Breeder: John & Ruth Schoonover Ower: Vern Grimslid

FC AFC Overbaron's Chix Dig Me MH (D) SR13066008 (4/23/10) by NAFC DC AFC Cascade Jagd Freund 6-02 x Okk Ebony Flo Laveau 3-04 Breeder: John & Ruth Schoonover Ower: Anthony McGrane

Photo by Diana Wise Š2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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JUNIOR TALK

Hey Juniors! This article that is very close to my heart and it shows that death of a dog is hard, but they are always apart of us through memories and through the loving bonds we shared with our dogs. Death of best friends and family members is always tough and dealing with it takes time. Always discuss your feelings with your family and friends when you lose a dog. It’s important that these feelings are voiced. As always you can call me at (520) 404-4839, or email me at ppuppylover14@aol.com. Thanks for reading!

Sadie, Still In Our Hearts By Katie Webb

I can remember that day so clearly. I could almost taste the Arizona air. You could still smell the rain from the night before as he came driving down the driveway. Curious, I run out the door, to greet my grandfather and open the car door to find a puppy in the passenger seat. He said, “There’s two more. I could only catch this one. Kate, go get your grandmother.” I held the pup to my chest as I ran inside. We got the puppy cleaned up a bit and my Grandma packed him back into the car and we headed out. Once we got to the road, we coaxed both a momma dog and another puppy with food, and finally they came to us and we got them into the car. The tick-covered momma dog lay sprawled out with her head on my lap. I can see that she loves me for saving her life. Soon they are all cleaned up. Yet, days later they are still nameless and the time comes for me to leave my grandparents and go back to Missouri. Six weeks later I returned to Arizona to stay for good! By then, both of the puppies had been adopted but the momma dog was still here. Her name was Sadie. All that school year, every time I left the house without her, Sadie lay at the front door waiting for my return home. She went

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“Sadie”

everywhere with me from then on. Sadie became my first “show dog”. I trained her in obedience and showmanship, and we worked a little in agility, though with her weight she was a little off balance - we all took that in good humor. Sadie never missed a meal. That year my grandmother allowed me to be in 4-H. We worked once a week on Monday afternoons, and then that year, we entered her into pre-novice obedience and showmanship at

JUNIOR TALK

the Pima County Fair. We were awarded blue ribbons in both classes. Sadie was excited just to be with me, wagging her tail and begging for treats. Later that year, I entered her in a Canine Good Citizen test. Because she was a great dog with a wonderful attitude she qualified with flying colors and was granted her CGC certificate, which entitled her to be known as Sadie CGE for the rest of her life. It was at the CGC test that a local sheltie breeder noticed us and offered me a show quality puppy from her next litter. We waited but no puppies arrived, yet it was Sadie’s wonderful working ability that got us noticed and eventually because of her I was given Cali, my GWP. The second year in 4-H, Sadie and I were eligible for novice obedience. After a year of hard work, we won Grand Champion in Novice Obedience class at fair. I was so proud. Though showmanship was never her thing, we did get another blue ribbon that year. She always became too excited while we were gaiting in the showmanship ring. I smiled and I’m sure she thought gaiting meant “run” which, to be honest, I didn’t mind. She was happy and so was I. With such promise in her great training and willingness I even swore to Sadie that when AKC began to accept mix breed dogs, I’d get her CD title in novice obedience. Why not since she had already won the class at fair? She deserved it for being such a capable loving dog. But that day, the day she didn’t eat her meal nothing seemed too wrong to my grandparents, but I knew something was horribly wrong. I was frantically holding her all that night. Stroking her head and telling her about how great and wonderful she has been all these years. She was my best friend; my companion and my “man’s best friend” - she was everything to me. She seemed to have recovered quite nicely over a few days, and my hopes were beginning to shine again, that whatever it was had passed. We were away at dog shows and came home to find Sadie out in the yard unable to get up.

She was bloated - her stomach was huge, like she was pregnant. We all knew instantly that she was bleeding internally, By now she was aged, and I knew it was definitely her time. My grandfather and I took her immediately to the vet. Though I knew better, of course, I hoped we could save her, but when we arrived, I knew she wasn’t going to live much longer. I talked to the vets, they checked her and did an x-ray and explained to me there was not much hope for such an old dog. Then they graciously left me alone with Sadie. I held her close. She stared into my eyes, so much love still behind them. My grandfather has always been there for me and Sadie, and he offered to go ahead and try the surgery, but she was fading fast. I couldn’t allow her to suffer any longer. Grandfather allowed me to make the decision, but in the end it was Sadie who made the final choice - she knew best. I held her as the vets put the needles into her leg. She gave me one final kiss arm and closed her beautiful eyes. I couldn’t help it tears streamed down my face. She was gone though. She left me that very moment. She is gone but only physically, because she lives within my heart. Good luck in your shows, because we all know show season is on the way,

©2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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WIRE~NEWS TOPICS

Wire~News Needs You! Topics provided by Jodi Quesnell It seems I’m getting fewer articles every issue, so I need more writers to keep this a great publication. Everyone needs to contribute something – we can’t expect the busy people who contribute issue after issue to always carry the burden. Even if you don’t think you can write, just start putting something on paper and send it to me. I’ll make sure the grammar and spelling are right – that’s what editors do! But I need something to work with. There is also a need for high resolution images – 1 MB plus. Pictures really make the issue, so please share yours! Also, we need you to write-up the news and send photos from your local shows and events – you’re the only one that can do it! Take your camera and some paper to your next event! Following is a great list of Wire~News Article Topics that are looking for a writer. If you see something you are knowledgeable about, please go for it! Field Dog Articles So you’ve entered your do in your first Derby/Puppy Stake - how can you prepare your dog for the best performance possible, and what to expect Preparing for a JH test, and what to expect Top 10 mistakes people make with their new pup (i.e.—what not to do if you want a good bird dog) How to select a field trainer Meet the GWP field trial Pros. Preparing for the GWP Water Test Nurturing a natural retriever The differences between a JH and a NAVHDA NA test Introducing your puppy to birds The value of Wing on a String—pros and cons, and when if ever it should be used Getting serious at field trials—what to look for in a field trial horse Training with pigeons vs game birds (chukkar & quail); raising & maintaining training birds Things you can try to do to “fix” a gun-shy dog/how to introduce your pup to the gun shot Master Hunters vs Field Trial Dogs TAKEN! Methods for conditioning dogs—“roading” (w/chains or off a 4-wheeler), treadmills, running (turning the dog lose to free-exercise)—how long/how much/how often/when is a dog too young or too old to road Preparing your dog for hunting season—conditioning and training Conditioning in weather extremes—hot and cold

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Performance Dog Articles “Puppy Kindergarten” training series Fear stages Introducing your pup to strangers/strange dogs The pros and cons of dog parks House training your puppy Beginning obedience Crate training (including reintroducing a dog to the crate who is afraid of crates) Tips for selecting a trainer/class for your dog What you need to know before you try competing with your dog in AKC Obedience Fixing problems (barking, jumping up, possessiveness, shyness, aggressiveness, pulling on walks) Clicker training Rally Tips Rally stories Fly Dog   Agility Articles Introducing your dogs to agility obstacles TAKEN! Building your own agility obstacles Tips for improving your time and/or accuracy for better scores Focusing on contact points How to maximize your walk-thru What are some common problem issues, and how to fix/avoid them   Other Article Ideas Dress for success in the show ring Training a successful stack; also training a successful freestack Keeping it “fun” for your puppy in the ring, while keeping pup focused on you. Building a web-page/the advantages of having a web-page  Temperaments—what judges should expect in the show ring, appropriate vs inappropriate responses   Breeding topics Inbreeding vs Linebreeding vs outcrossing Health testing Factors in deciding on a stud-dog (prioritizing temperament, health, conformation & field ability) What a pedigree can tell you about a dog (reading a pedigree) The heritability of temperaments, coats, etc Early puppyhood temperament testing Things to do to socialize pups while they are still with their mom & littermates Types of whelping boxes—pros and cons of each Multiple sire litters, pitfalls, AKC rules, costs, etc. Supplementing a bitch in whelp and a bitch nursing pups Puppy contracts Co-ownerships—pros and cons TAKEN! Things to look for when hiring a professional handler— things to ask before you hire them. Building a kennel—things to consider, including flooring, walls, landscaping, drains, etc.

©2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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The Wire Warehouse Stuff about Wires and with Wires on it! Orange Ball Cap with GWPCA Logo—$15 GWPCA Sweatshirts with Logo—$30 GWPCA Lapel Pins—$10 The yearbooks contain photos and pedigrees of GWPs from 1959 to present day and are the only photographic history of the GWP in America. These are “must own” items for anyone considering a breeding program. Vol. III 1973-1975 $20 Vol. IV 1976-1977 $20 Vol. V 1978-1979 $20 Vol. VI 1980-1981 $20 Vol VII 1982-1987 $28 Vol. VIII 1987-1989 $20 Vol. X 1993-1995 $38 (with binder) Vol. XI 1996 $15 (fits in binder) Combined 1993-1996 $50 (without binder) Combined 1993-1998 $65 (with binder) Where noted, the yearbooks are contained in a gold embossed binder that will hold 10 years worth of yearbooks. To order your GWPCA items today, send a check (US funds) to:

Liz Dixon N. 7815 City Rd. N. Spring Valley, WI 54767 (715)778-4675 bkwdsgwp@svtel.net

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©2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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CLADDAGH’S HOTCAKES AT SANGRUD JH

(CH. DARNELLE’S “PARTY ON” JH X CH. RIPSNORTER’S MT. VIEW EXPLORER SH)

Katie’s 2010 record to date:

Best of Breed from 6-9 puppy class - Mr. Dana Cline Best In Sweeps - Illinois Specialty - Mr. Stanley Matsumoto WB, BOW, BOS - Illinois Specialty - Mr. Peter Baynes Best In Sweeps - Wisconsin Specialty - Lynn Sell M.D. WB, BOS - Wisconsin Specialty - Dr. Steven Herman AKC Junior Hunter NAVHDA Natural Ability Prize I

Owners: Paul & Kristin Wehking sangrud@verizon.net WIRE NEWS ©2010 GWPCA 94

Co-Owners: Courtney Vogel & WIlliam Bastian Claddagh Kennel www.claddaghkennel.com

Breeders: Courtney Vogel & William Bastian James & Helen Witt

©2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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WELCOME

New Members Lois Yancy & Dusty Maxwell 1843 Pineview Drive Glasgow, VA 24555 (540) 460-5601 schilauefer@yahoo.com

Joseph Bonanno PO Box 1332 Redding, CT 06875 (917) 751-8511 jbonanno0819@sbcglobal.net

Darlene Lemiuex 2104 E 6th Ave Spokane, WA 99202 (509) 534-3402

Joni & David Cornell PO Box 7686 4561 Portulaca Drive Indian Lake Estate, FL 33855 (863) 605-2273 dusty505@aol.com

Patty & Matt Diehl 1573 Waterbury Woods Ln Centerville, OH 45458 (937) 885-4171 thornwood@voyager.net

Sookie - Heywire’s Thru the Looking Glass at Kenshaw 96

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BULLETIN BOARD

Wire~News Bulletin Board MEMBERS

the 2010 GWPCA Things to do before 10 of September 15, 20 National Deadline PCA Nationals - Mail Entries for GW l Catalog - Place ad for Nationa ations for Nationals - Make Dinner Reserv for Versatile Award - Submit Application - Sign up for GWP U the AllStar - Mail Entry for my for Invitational the 2010 Nationals - Sponsor a Trophy for - Vote for 2011 Judges

You spoke, GWPCA

HIP DUES TO BE PAID BY JANUARY 1 , 2011

e the backbone GWP Local Clubs ar to the GWPCA. ail. ts added to the Wire~M Have your clubs even ub events to Send all GWP Local Cl angiehef@aol.com

Board Answered!

ail. Updates with Wire~M Receive Monthly Club ail e-m ur yo ve l.com to ha Contact angiehef@ao mailing list. e th to address added

The Final

Keep up-t o-date wit h all GWP 2010 Natio CA n al News a www.GWP t : CANationa l.com and Facebook “G WPCA Nati onals 2010 ”

Shot!

Please sen d in your g reat photos Wire~New to the s editor to be considere recognition d for on this new page in the Wire~New s. To quali fy, photos m in a digital ust be sent file format as high reso images tha lution t are at lea st 4 megab title of you ytes. The r photo and the photog name will rapher’s be printed along with informatio any other n you may want to incl regarding ude the circum st ances, cam etc. All ph era type, otos submit ted may be on this pag featured e or for oth er applicati the Wire~N ons ews at som e time. If co in is available lor in a certain issue, the p will print in hoto color; howe ver, there a guarantees. re no If you don’t converted to want your photo grayscale fo r printing black and w on a hite page, please speci fy.

sh again, Fall Recipe Too good not to publi nningham of submitted by Adam Cu This great recipe was ng on his nti e many, Adam has hu ’d like to Parker, Colorado. Lik you s ipe rec y r! If you have an yea of e tim s thi nd mi m to the editor. share, please send the

Pheasant Sausage

Patties

Ingredients: , rooster or other game 3 1/2 pounds pheasant • bird meat fat or fatty bacon 1/2 to 3/4 pound pork • s salt 38 or 8 teaspoons gram • gano ore 1/4 cup chopped fresh • cked black pepper cra s 10 or 2 teaspoons gram • rlic oons minced fresh ga 50 grams or 10 teasp • ns fennel seed 10 grams or 2 teaspoo • Grated zest of a lemon o • apricot and/or jalapen You can also add dried • to taste the ts easier to cut, chill To make the ingredien the and all of the bowls in pheasant, fat (bacon) t up the ur before you start. Cu freezer for about 1 ho , mix in small cubes and pieces pheasant and fat into grinder if xture through a food spices and run this mi into patties. you have one. Make ©2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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the final shot

fall greetings TRISH HIRNEISEN & BUZZ

Photo by richard hirneisen

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Wire~News 2010 Fall