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Ryan Woods races during the CCAA Championships at Spring Lake Regional Park in Santa Rosa Saturday. The squad now looks to the NCAA West Regional Championship in Novemeber. PHOTO BY NELSON ESTRADA.

WHY THE GATOR CROSS COUNTRY TEAMS ARE MOVING MOUNTAINS SEE STEP IT UP PAGE

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GOLDEN GATE XPRESS //

STUDENT-RUN NEWSPAPER PROUDLY SERVING THE SAN FRANCISCO STATE UNIVERSITY COMMUNITY SINCE 1927.

// 10.26.11

SUPER SENIORS

VOLUME LXXXXI ISSUE 10

DIVERTED FROM DEGREE HALLWAY RUNWAY Student designers begin to prep for their upcoming fall showcase with search for diverse models.

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BY SPENCER DEVINE

spencerd@mail.sfsu.edu

HAT SEPARATES man from animals? Some would say it’s opposable thumbs, others the use of tools, while a more select group would say that it’s the ability to do the perfect non-literal cat walk. The Fashion Network Association, based out of SF State, is preparing its fall showcase, set for Dec. 9, which will highlight specific looks that can be seen in the final show in the spring semester. The FNA is a group of current students and alumni that work to learn about, plan, design and produce fashion events and publications. Stephanie Starr, president of the FNA, said one of the most distinct things about the shows is that they are very campus-centric. Using only SF State designers and models, Starr hopes the FNA can bring San Francisco’s fashion identity to light. “We want to showcase our school and what we are all about,” Starr said. “It showcases our students because a lot of people don’t know that a fashion program like this even exists here.” FNA’s faculty adviser, Dr. Connie SEE MODELS ON PAGE 6

From economic hardships to difficulty getting into crowded classes, students face an uphill battle trying to finish their bachelor’s degree in the expected four years. BY KATHERINE YAU

kyau2022@mail.sfsu.edu

Robert Jackson was 18 when he entered college as a freshman and 35 years old when he finally received his bachelor’s degree in Spanish last spring, 17 years since he enrolled in his first college course. Although most students take less than 17 years in their educational journey, Jackson is part of a number of students proving that achieving a degree in four years is becoming more difficult due to various financial, economic and planning-related reasons. The term super senior informally refers to students who take more than four years to complete a bachelor’s degree. “I had a job offer so I decided to take one semester off, and one semester became two semesters and it just kind of went from there,” said Jackson, explaining why he took several year-long breaks from school between 1994 and 2011. According to the U.S. Department of Education, more than 30 percent of students earned their bachelor’s degrees within five years, while 20 percent took six years in 2009. In a report by the Office of Academic Institutional Research for SF State, 8 percent of fall 2004 freshman were still working on their four-year degrees in 2010. Kim Altura, director of SF State’s advising center, noted she had seen an increase in students taking longer to graduate and cited economic factors as a key component. “You can’t underestimate that we live in a really expensive area, and a lot of students have to work during school,” Altura said. “Students end up taking only 12 units a semester. You can do the math: It’ll take 5 years to graduate at the earliest.” Jo Volkert, SF State’s vice president of enrollment management, said for at least the past decade, four-year degrees have taken longer to earn on a national scale, a number she said that is steadily improving. “Five years is the norm,” Volkert said. “But we’ve put certain things in place to improve these rates.” SEE GRADUATION ON PAGE 2

ART BY SARA DONCHEY sdonchey@mail.sfsu.edu

2 CAMPUS

SF SPEAKS OUT WHAT’S YOUR CRAZIEST HALLOWEEN STORY?

WE WENT OUT AND BOUGHT THIS BLOCK OF ICE AND SHAVED A PATH IN THE MIDDLE. THEN WE’D DUMP THESE SHOTS OF LIQUOR DOWN THEM AND PEOPLE WOULD CATCH IT AT THE END. WE CALLED IT THE LIQUOR LUGE. ANTHONY AGRESTI THEATER ARTS, SENIOR

MY FIRST HALLOWEEN EXPERIENCE THAT COMES TO MIND IS MY FIRST KISS. IT WAS WITH THE FIRST GIRLFRIEND I HAD AND WE WERE BOTH PIRATES. TAYLOR JOHNSON BECA, JUNIOR

10.26.11

Learning to live organically Sustainability events taking place on campus this week intend to provide fun ways to learn how to compost, eat organically and to become enviornmentally friendly.

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CHOP: Erin Lares, a senior dietetics major, chops fresh cauliflower for a roasted vegetable dish during the Veggie Iron Chef in Burk Hall Monday. PHOTO BY REBEKAH DIDLAKE

BY DEVERY SHEFFER

dsheffer@mail.sfsu.edu

F STATE, WITH THE COOPERATION OF its organizations and departments, will promote environmentally friendly lifestyles through events and awareness for Sustainability Days, which began Monday. Transforming SF State into a more environmentally friendly campus has been priority since 2007 when President Robert A. Corrigan signed the American College and University Presidents’ Climate Commitment. This year the campus was named one of the greenest in the country by Princeton Review in part because of the Climate Action Plan that was comprised in 2009. In order to achieve the goals of the CAP and to raise awareness among students and faculty, Physical Planning & Development, the Dietetics department and ECO Students put together a series of on-campus events to take place this week. These events focus on how to live a lifestyle that isn’t damaging to the natural surroundings. Liza Sternik, student sustainability coordinator at SF State, has been helping to plan Sustainability Days since she started working for the PP&D in September. “Having sustainability in the curriculum and in the school environment is so crucial for our future generations to be able to fully understand the problems and the issues that are facing this world, I think for me is the most important thing,” said Sternick of the upcoming events. Monday was Sustainable Food Day. Activities promoted eating more organic and locally-grown produce along with meat that has been raised in a healthy and humane environment. Michelle Gallemore is a 24-year-old environmental studies junior and campaign co-chair of ECO Students. “San Francisco being a progressive city, we need to have a progressive school as well and we need to be proactive instead of

HARD TO LEAVE: GRADUATION HARD TO DO CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

THERE WAS THIS PARTY IN BEVERLY HILLS UP IN THIS RICH, EXPENSIVE HOUSE. THESE GROUP OF KIDS WITH A LOT OF MONEY WERE TRYING TO RECREATE A KEN KESEY ACID TRIP. THEY WERE DROPPING ACID ON PEOPLES TONGUES OLD FASHIONED STYLE. NEIL PETTIJOHN PHILOSOPHY, GRAD STUDENT

MORE STORIES AT GOLDENGATEXPRESS.ORG PHOTOS BY GREGORY MORENO COMPILED BY MIKE HUBER

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Volkert cited developments such as academic road maps and restrictions that prohibit students from repeating courses infinitely as measures that aim to help students speed up their progress. Volkert also said students changing majors, enrolling part time for work and taking semester-long breaks are other reasons students take longer to graduate. Altura said that while students come to plan their schedules, they don’t do so on a long term basis and lack the classes to graduate. Super senior Karina Magana is in her fifth year of school, and is double majoring in Latino/a studies and history, because she didn’t know Latino/a majors weren’t accepted by the teaching program. “You have to study what you’re teaching and Raza studies isn’t accepted by the teaching program,” Magana said. “But I have to study what I am passionate about.” Even with the roadblocks students face toward graduation, Altura said not all students have to be in school for longer than they need. “With careful planning, it’s still possible to graduate in four years,” Altura said. Despite the long journey and academic difficulties, Jackson said he benefited from the setbacks. “I would definitely say I was a lot more serious when I came back a second time around,” said Jackson who is currently exploring his options as a translator for start-up companies in downtown San Francisco.

reactive,” Gallemore said. Davin Wentworth-Thrasher, technical services coordinator at SF State, helped put together the Veggie Iron Chef contest, which took place Monday. Students from the dietetics program gathered in BH 406 to cook with an assortment of fresh produce. Local vendors donated the majority of the food including fresh corn, Thai basil and cauliflower, which was complemented by edible flowers and fresh flavors gathered from the herb spiral located in front of Burk Hall. What started off as a competition turned into a collaborated team effort. “I think we did a really amazing job,” said Erin Lares, a dietetics senior who helped to prepare the food. “We only had two hours and so many ingredients.” The students made a variety of dishes including squash pasta in a cheese sauce, sauteed chard with sun chokes and horseradish hummus with flat bread. “What we’re really trying to do in a gentle way is talk about the values of reducing meat consumption and make it a fun social space,” Wentworth-Thrasher said. Other events Monday included a photo petition for better food on campus, meatless Monday at the Vista Room and a screening of the film “In Search of Good Food” directed by local San Franciscan Antonio Roman-Alcala. “If we want to change our food policies on campus at SF State, to have that community, student support is very important,” Sternick said. Wednesday is Campus Sustainability Day, which includes two education sessions about compost and recycling and a clothing swap. Students can help improve the campus by joining the Volunteer Work Park Thursday by the Science building on 19th Avenue, where they will be rolling out native meadow grass. “If this event affects one person and one person decided to make a change, I think it’s totally worth it,” Gallemore said. For more information about the events visit the Sustainable SF State events website.

CRIME BLOTTER DUDE, WHERE’S MY CAR?

While driving in San Francisco can be a hassle, it is often faster than waiting for the 28 or 29 busses. One individual took it upon himself last Saturday to forgo waiting for Muni and went “shopping” at one of the largest auto malls near SF State: the Stonestown Mall parking lot. While inspecting a car (probably with a bent coat hanger) campus police caught and arrested the individual.

HALL OF (DE)FAME Remember sore losers back in elementary school? There was always some kid yelling at everyone on their team because their team lost. While this often disappears by adulthood (for some), it apparently didn’t for one person who decided to damage the SF State Hall of Fame photos in the gym last Wednesday, October 19. Perhaps they were infuriated at the excellence that the Gators sports teams have put forth over the years? Or maybe it was jealous lover tampering with the photo of a former companion? Either way, police are looking into the matter.

HOLLER, HOLLER, HOLLER, HOLLER, HOLLER While dodging cat-callers on the street isn’t always too difficult, it’s harder when they do it in a dorm hallway. Just that happened last Saturday when a man followed a female student and her friends all the way to her dorm in Mary Ward Hall. The man, who was described as a black male with a red shirt and beard, was cited and barred from the campus. While his description could account for several thousand different people in San Francisco alone, it’s worth nothing for future reference.

10.19 through 10.24 Compiled by Aaron Williams

10.26.11

CAMPUS 3

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TRAVELING EUROPE BY THE SEAT OF HIS PANTS

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BY HUNTER MULICH

hunter@mail.sfsu.edu

YLER CORNFIELD WAS NEARLY six thousand miles away from home when he ran out of money. He had to make a choice. The lanky SF State student, who majors in Spanish and Creative Writing, had been living in Madrid through the school’s International Program for almost a year. When the semester ended in May, most of the other students went home. Cornfield, whose pockets were penniless by that point, had time to kill. “My flight wasn’t until July,” Cornfield said with a slight grin. “So I decided to make the best of it.” Before the trip, Cornfield worked at SF State as a resident assistant in the dorms on campus and also as the chairman of the board for the Cesar Chavez Student Center in between classes. The adventurous musician, known as Wes Leslie when he’s sporting a guitar or freestyle rapping, decided Spain would be a fun place to study abroad and went for it. But at that point in May, trapped in Spain without a work visa and with dwindling funds, he turned to teaching English under the table. By using the Spanish version of Craigslist to score clients, Cornfield was able to set up lessons in coffee shops and bars. The few extra Euros kept him traveling. “I didn’t have any money,” Cornfield said. “I was just looking for the cheapest place I could go.” And so with his last 15 Euro he bought a one-way flight to Poland. It was “the best bang for the buck.” Cornfield still needed money to survive in Poland though, and this is where he got creative. He could have kept teaching his underground English lessons for a few bucks here and there, but instead he used his knack for marketing and took to the internet. With the help of a filmmaker friend in Spain, Cornfield put

SF State student resorts to YouTube and social media to earn money to fund travels after exchange program.

castic car salesman approach to get his message across. He stood by himself in the streets of Madrid with a series of signs explaining his situation and asking for donations to continue his trip around Europe – the signs were a nod to Bob Dylan’s music video for the song “Subterranean Homesick Blues” admitted Cornfield. “The video was very over-the-top shameless self promotion,” Cornfield said. “I love marketing, I think it’s hilarious. But I have no respect for it.” He wasn’t, however, just panhandling for money. With each contribution, Cornfield offered the donators special gifts such as custom postcards, short stories, limericks, or songs. He also made it clear that he was willing to do things such as giving himself a ridiculous haircut or getting a tattoo of the donator’s choice on his butt cheek. One of the more heartfelt things that Cornfield did was a ballad. “I wrote a song and shot a video for this guy whose wife is pregnant and they’re having their first child,” Cornfield said. “He wanted me to write the ballad of them. So I did. And he gave me $120 for it.” In the end there were no silly hairstyles or tattoos, but Cornfield did receive a fair amount of donations and managed to collect a little more than $300 to help continue his travels across Europe. The only reason he came back was to attend his brother’s wedding. “I tried to convince him to push it back another year, but he’s Christian and was abstaining from sex until marriage,” Cornfield said. “So I understand his hurry.” One of the contributors was former American Idol finalist Rachel Zevita, who met Cornfield previously ENTERPRISING: Tyler Cornfield, SF State Spanish major, went broke while traveling through Israel. She purchased a Skype while traveling in Spain and used YouTube and social media websites date with Cornfield, hoping to catch up with an old to fund the rest of his travels. PHOTO BY ANDREW LOPEZ friend and possibly work on music together. “My first thought when I saw the video was ‘Oh together a sort of modern day SOS broadcast – a video on YouTube. In the video he used cheesy after-effects and a sarSEE TRAVEL ON PAGE 9

CATHOLIC CAMPUS MINISTRY NEWMAN CLUB St. Thomas More Church Father Labib Kobti, Pastor 1300 Junipero Serra Blvd. San Francisco, CA 94132

(415) 452-9634

www.stmchurch.com/newman email: newman@stmchurch.com Weekly Meeting, For Current Activities: Cesar Chavez Student Center: St. Thomas More: (415) 452-9634 Mondays: 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM Close to campus! Please call Verbum Dei: (415) 573-9062

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X

4 SPORTS

10.26.11

PLAYER

ZULEIMA JIMENEZ

WEEK

WOMEN’S CROSS COUNTRY

of the

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The Xpress sports staff has again chosen Zuleima Jimenez as our athlete of the week. Jimenez was voted by the coaches of the CCAA as the 2011 Conference Newcomer of the Year. She finished fourth in Saturday’s CCAA championship. Her 22:30 time set a new SF State record for a 6km race.

PHOTO BY TYLER DENISTON/SF STATE SPORTS

CROSS COUNTRY TEAMS STEP IT UP BY MICHAEL BEBERNES

I

Earning high marks as individuals, the squad now turns its attention to up-coming regional championship.

bebernes@mail.sfsu.edu

T’S HARD FOR A CROSS COUNTRY TEAM TO BE BADASS. IT’S JUST NOT ONE OF THOSE SPORTS. THERE’S NO CONTACT. THE ATHLETES ARE PETITE BY NECESSITY. NOTHING ABOUT CROSS COUNTRY IS INHERENTLY COOL. However, take a look at the 2011 SF State cross country squad. Watch the crimson mane of Will Zentmeyer or Ernesto Rodriguez’s onyx locks as they bounce behind them like a blur streak from a cartoon. See Tyler Deniston’s Ralph Macchio headband. View the electric pulse of the fluorescent green kicks strapped to the feet of Zuleima Jimenez. These Gators have a swagger that is usually reserved for the glory-hog sports. Coach Tom Lyons’ squad is, especially for a bunch of skinny people wearing purple short-shorts, a little bit badass. Winning is a great way to add to your street cred. Both the men’s and women’s squads had banner years for the program. The men’s team has done nothing but win all year. They finished their regular season slate undefeated, having finished first in each of their four meets. This feat is made more impressive when considering the fact that no previous men’s team on record has won more than two meets in a season. The Gators also had a record showing at the California Collegiate Athletic Association championship. Their second-place finish was the highest any SF State cross country squad has ever ranked. It has been a collaborative effort for the men this season. Three different runners have finished a meet as the number one Gator. Not one Gator has finished as the top runner overall in a given race, but strong team scores have given SF State the win each time. A number of times this year, the top-five scoring pack for the Gators has finished within ten seconds of each other.

PUSHING IT: Ernesto Rodriguez is trailed by teammate Bruk Assefa as they run to the finish line as both SF State cross country athletes finish a race Saturday at the California Collegiate Athletic Association Championships at Spring Lake Regional Park in Santa Rosa, Calif. PHOTO BY NELSON ESTRADA

The emotional leaders of the team are Deniston and fellow junior Brian Trejo. Other standout runners include Rodriguez, sophomore Bruk Assefa, sophomore Ryan Chio, and junior Will Zentmyer. Rodriguez and Assefa earned all-conference honors by virtue of their top-15 finishes at the CCAA

finals. The women’s team has not had the resounding success of the men’s, but still has much to be proud of for their 2011 season. They finished in the top five of each of their regular season meets and sixth in the CCAA championship. Two newcomers to the squad established themselves as front runners. Jimenez, a sophomore transfer student, and freshman Paxton Cota have led the Gators in each race. Cota opened the season by being named conference runner of the week for her second-overall finish in the Notre Dame De Namur Invitational. Jimenez was the first Gator finisher in each of the other four races on the year. She finished in the top five in every meet. Jimenez had a day for the record books at Saturday’s CCAA championship. Her 22 minute, 30 second time in the 6 km race shattered the school record at that distance by 22 seconds. Jimenez finished in fourth place at the race, which featured all-American level competition. Conference coaches voted Jimenez as the CCAA female conference newcomer of the year. Cota also earned all-conference honors by finishing fourteenth in the finals. The Gator women are bolstered by a strong pack, including Sue Choi, Kendall Dye and Courtney Stephens. Six SF State runners in history have earned allCCAA honors before this season. Four Gators accomplished the feat this year. The squad now turns its attention to the NCAA Division II West Regional Championship Nov. 5 at Spokane, Wash. A top-four finish there would mean a bid to the national finals. For a squad that has only ever known the doldrums of conference competition, it’s remarkable for them to be thinking about competing for a national title. That’s pretty badass.

CLUB SPORTS RUNNING LOW ON CASH, SPACE Intramural teams are impacted by lack of access to fields, but hope that approved rec center will be a solution. BY KEALAN CRONIN

kealan@mail.sfsu.edu

The case of the Recreation Department is a peculiar one. While it grows ever-larger and more rapidly than any other group on campus, the reach of its resources is actually getting thinner. The department collects student fees of $9 per semester to cover facilities, equipment and wages for employees. “People spend more on food in one day than it takes to run our department,” said Ajani Byrd, campus recreation director. “(We) run less than a meal deal at McDonald’s costs.” Almost all of these teams play and practice in the gym because despite growing participation, funding restricts alternative options. “Field space is a major issue for our sports,” said Ryan Fetzer, intramural and sports club coordinator. “This department is very impacted…we’re not allowed access to Cox Stadium or other campus facilities except for the gym.” There are 11 club and three intramural sports that use the gym. “It would be great if we could play outside,” said Emily Clark, a senior at SF State who has played intramural soccer for two semesters. “It gets really hot in the gym and (indoor soccer) is totally different than outdoor.” More than 70 of the department’s employees are students, who participate in athletic events such as referee-

ing soccer games. “I believe in putting money back into your pockets,” said Byrd, who emphasized the importance of the program being student-run. “All student positions develop leadership.” Ajani said the minimal funding the department receives is sufficient, but in the future there will need to be an increase. These increases will come from the set student fee committed to the department. “I do not want to ask for more money from students,” Ajani said. “But we’ve grown exponentially, so I try to spread that money thin. I break pennies in half.” In 2009 Associated Students Inc. cleared a student petition for the construction of a recreation center; the building’s estimated completion is 2017. “There’s not really any other venue to support (recreational sports),” said Franko Ali, ASI vice president of university affairs. “Making more space for recreational sports was a big part of why (the project) was pursued.” The construction for the recreation center is a multimillion dollar project that will take years to complete, but Ali said the process has started. Students pay a $35 fee included in their tuition to help fund the construction, but Ali said that fee would probably be increased when construction starts. Until the center is complete, the Recreation Department has looked into alternative possibilities within budget to provide more space for their programs. Byrd and Fetzer said the department has looked into offcampus facilities. “We’ve looked at other options,” said Fetzer, who also commented that any alternatives would need further funding. “Like renting out the field at Lowell (High School) or gaining access to Cox Stadium.”

JUST FOR KICKS: Meteb Alfaez, a member of the intramural soccer team at SF State, plays in a game at the gym Monday. The team must play indoors because club sports are denied access to Cox Stadium. PHOTO BY HENRY NGUYEN

Fetzer said club and intramural sports aren’t permitted to use Cox Stadium and the baseball fields because official athletic games take priority and there is concern the field will be further damaged. “I’d rather be outdoors, obviously,” Clark said. “But I’m just happy I get the chance to play.”

10.26.11

SPORTS 5

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GATORS’ SPORTS SCHEDULE FRIDAY, OCT. 28 MEN’S SOCCER SF State at UC San Diego at 4:30 p.m. (San Diego, Calif.) WOMEN’S SOCCER SF State at UC San Diego at 7 p.m. (San Diego, Calif.) VOLLEYBALL SF State at Cal State East Bay 7 p.m. (Hayward, Calif.) SATURDAY, OCT. 29 VOLLEYBALL SF State at Cal State Monterey Bay at 7 p.m. (Monterey, Calif.) SUNDAY, OCT. 30 MEN’S SOCCER SF State at Cal State San Bernardino at 11:30 a.m. (San Bernardino, Calif.) WOMEN’S SOCCER SF State at Cal State San Bernardino at 2 p.m. (San Bernardino, Calif.)

SCORES FROM THE LAST WEEK OF GATOR SPORTS

MEN’S SOCCER Oct. 21 SF State at Cal

LOSS State Los Angeles 0-3 Oct. 23 SF State at CSU

LOSS Dominguez Hills 0-1

WOMEN’S SOCCER LOSS

LOSS

Oct. 21 SF State at Cal State Los

Angeles 2-3

Oct. 23 SF State at CSU Dominguez Hills 2-6

VOLLEYBALL WIN

Oct. 21 SF State vs. Cal State Stanislaus 3-1

WIN

Oct. 22 SF State vs. Chico State 3-1

MEN’S CROSS-COUNTRY 2nd of Oct. 22 CCAA Championships (67 points) 8

WOMEN’S CROSS-COUNTRY 6th of 12

Oct. 22 CCAA Championships (129 points)

Xpress magazine Fall 2011 edition OUT OCT. 26 GET YOUR COPY advertise in the next one 32,000 readers will see your ad Eva Charles

415.338.3133 echarles@sfsu.edu

6 A R T S & E N T E R T A I N M EN T

10.26.11

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HAIGHT STREET EDITION For many, Haight Street might conjure up images of hippies with flowers stuck into their long hair, but the truth is that this street runs through two distinct neighborhoods. While the Upper Haight is still a hotbed of counterculture, the Lower Haight offers a much more contemporary atmosphere. There are a wealth of dining options regardless of which side of Divisadero you’re on.

SWEET TOOTH

COCO LUXE HINT: This shop takes the classic chocolate truffles and dresses them up with a hit of original flavors like angel food cake and malted milk. Don’t miss their seasonal chocolate truffles with flavors like candy cane and champagne. WALK IT: SF State freshman Leah Blumenthai, 18 (right), practices her runway walk down the fourth floor hallway of Burk Hall for the Fashion Network Association model call Oct. 18. SF State student Crystal Ricca, 25 (left), preps clothing for the show. PHOTOS BY HENRY NGUYEN

MOLDING MODELS: Fashioning an education CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Arts & Entertainment

Ulasewicz, an associate professor in fashion merchandising, said that the FNA is necessary because clothes have a deeper meaning than just cloth. “What people should know is that we all communicate through clothes and what we put on our bodies,” Ulasewicz said. “This group is people who like to take that idea and play with it and explore fashion.” Last week the FNA invited potential models, some with no training at all, to fill out a form, get photographed, measured and to practice their model walk. In some ways it was more model training than model selection, which is set to happen this week. There were no unfair expectations on the models, as they were allowed to mess up and try again with constructive notes from Starr and other organizers. Starr said that designers and models came from all sorts of different majors from English to biology, and she knew not all of them would be trained professionals. “Our models are different because nobody in San Francisco is normal,”

BOTTOM OF THE HILL 20 YEAR ANNIVERSARY FREE CONCERT WITH HANK IV, TOTAL B.S., DJ FOODCOURT + DJ NATE Wednesday, Oct. 26 9 p.m.

WHO: Fashion Network Assn. WHAT: Fall Showcase highlighting specific looks that can be seen in the final show in the spring semester. WHEN: 7 p.m. Dec. 9 WHERE: Jack Adams Hall

Starr said. “None of the models are going to look alike, especially when you hit a college campus because they are just people.” Ulasewicz said that the universality of clothing made a lot of traditional fashion choices seem ridiculous.

CELEBRATING 40 YEARS: WOMEN AND GENDER STUDIES Friday, Oct. 28 All Day at SF State Humanities Building Room 587

“Clothing is something we all wear, everyone participates,” Ulasewicz said. “The idea of who is a model is false because we are all models, and you don’t have to be an anorexic wafer to be one because these are real people.” Giovanni Vito, an 18-year-old freshman and Japanese major, embodies the FNA spirit. Vito, with his own style and charm, does not have the traditional model look or background, but quickly began to adapt. Vito said he hadn’t had much interest in clothing until his sophomore year of high school, and since then the idea of wearing clothes suited for him caught hold. “It sounded fun and seemed like a good opportunity,” Vito said. “I hope to get more insight into the world of modeling and help build myself some more self-confidence.” The theme for the show has been labeled “Impressions,” and Starr says this refers to the subjectivity of fashion. The audience can look at a piece and get a million different things from it, and everyone’s opinion on a design is different.

CAPTURE THE FLAG: HALLOWEEN EDITION COSTUME ARE STRONGLY ENCOURAGED! Saturday, Oct. 29 12 p.m. to 3 p.m. at AIDS Memorial Grove Golden Gate Park

DOWNTOWN THROWDOWN 2011: URBAN SNOWBOARDING Saturday, Oct. 29 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. at Fulton and Larkin streets

1673 Haight St.

CHEAP EATS

ROSAMUNDE SAUSAGE GRILL HINT: There are two kinds of people: those who are in love with the sausages served out of this hole in the wall, and those who have yet to discover its wonders. It’s no surprise to regulars that there’s usually a line out the door for their beer sausage. 545 Haight St.

ROMANTIC

UVA ENOTECA HINT: This sweet little Italian restaurant is the perfect cozy hideout for a date. Split one of their thin crust pizzas and a bottle of wine from their long list of moderately priced bottles for a romantic night out. 568 Haight St.

WILDCARD

CHA CHA CHA HINT: One of the best places in the city for a night out with friends. Order a pitcher of their signature sangria and choose from a wide selection of tapas plates that offer everything from spicy shrimp to spinach and bacon salad. 1801 Haight St.

AN XPRESS GUIDE TO DINING IN THE CITY. COMPILED BY A&E REPORTER KC CROWELL, WHO WENT TO SCHOOL FOR BAKING AND PASTRY ARTS, AND HAS COOKED HER WAY THROUGH A NUMBER OF RESPECTED BAY AREA RESTAURANTS.

10.26.11

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT 7

| GOLDENGATEXPRESS.ORG THEATER

Sound to Sight: Lucullus’ plight Giving it a body to match its voice, SF State theater group reimagines radio play on stage.

started, but this does deal with the distribution of spencerd@mail.sfsu.edu wealth among the few versus the many, as well as ADIO BRINGS MANY THINGS the actions of government to a modern world, like irrelevant during war time,” Schechone-hit-wonders from the ‘90s, ter said. that dream doctor show at obsolete Robbins agreed that hours and ... the condemnation of the message of war was a Roman generals to Hades? prevalent one in the piece Assistant professor of musical theater at SF and also spoke to a very State Barbara Damashek, along with master’s current environment. degree graduate coordinator and theater profes“The play really asks sor Joel Schechter, bring to the stage a rethe question, ‘In war, imagined version of “The Trial of Lucullus,” a where does responsibilplay intended for the radio by German dramatist ity lie?’” Robbins said. Berolt Brecht. Instead of its original home on the “It asks, ‘In the end, is radio, Damashek and Schechter have made it a there anything such as real visual piece by having actors play it all out on an patriotism in the sense that SF State stage this week. whatever is good for Rome The performance details the trial of a harsh or the United States is the Roman general named Lucullus whose fate must SCULPTING IMAGINATION: Drew Reitz and Monica Lenk rehearse for the upcoming play “The Trial of Luculone good?’” be determined: send him to Hades or the Elysian lus,” opening tomorrow in the SF State Studio Theater. PHOTO BY CINDY WATERS. Robbins said that the fields, where the virtuous and heroic go to rest. ideas were present and Schechter said they had to re-imagine the when it was written and why it was written,” Letzel relatable, but are never quite addressed in a societal piece as a whole in order to create a staged version. said. “They really want us to know the intention of our context. “It’s an experiment in the sense that it’s not staged characters and understand why we are saying what we “Can you benefit from society without hurting anvery often and it’s a challenge to do so along with the are.” other society?” Robbins said. “When you get something songs and dialogue,” Schechter said. “We are in reOne intricate part of Damashek and Schechter’s for your own society, are you not by its own nature takhearsal trying new things out every night until we figure co-directed piece is the music, which Damashek looked ing from another?” out exactly what we want.” over as musical director of the performance. Beyond the imaginative staging and stringing toAs a radio adaptation, certain homages to its original Casey Robbins, a 21-year-old theater major who gether the essence of both radio and theater, Schechter format are woven into the new staging of the piece. plays Lucullus, said the music is his favorite part. wishes to have audiences leave with more than they Most of the winks to radio are subtle, like the unique “I love working with Barbara and the music she came with. contrast of pure narration versus dramatized staging, found from the Brecht library, and also the music she “I hope audience members will leave with a greater while some, like the “On Air” sign that glows on stage, produced herself for the piece,” Robbins said. “It’s a appreciation of Brecht and the capacity of the theater to serve to remind the audience of the piece’s roots. challenge figuring out where to put music in a show that reconsider history and so called ‘victories’ of the past,” Julia Letzel, a 20-year-old junior and theater major is not a musical.” Schechter said. “What Romans saw as a victory we can who plays several roles in the performance, said that Schechter said that he thinks the political turmoil now see as an error and a grave loss of human life.” Schechter and Damashek want to draw a full and inand questioning of officials is something that speaks “The Trial of Lucullus” opens in the SF State Studio formed performance from all the actors. directly to current day issues. Theater, running tomorrow and Friday at 8 p.m. and “They both drill us with information about the piece, “There was no Occupy Wall Street or SF when we Saturday and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets are $5. BY SPENCER DEVINE

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8 OPINION

10.26.11

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EDITORIAL

REALITY CHECK: 4 years in college is a miscalculation A PUBLICATION OF SAN FRANCISCO STATE UNIVERSITY KELLY GOFF

EDITOR IN CHIEF kgoff@mail.sfsu.edu

SARA DONCHEY

ONLINE MANAGING EDITOR sdonchey@mail.sfsu.edu

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PRINT MANAGING EDITOR caitpat@mail.sfsu.edu

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WEB DIRECTOR aarOn@mail.sfsu.edu

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OPINION EDITOR maolson@mail.sfsu.edu

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A&E EDITOR sgraf99@mail.sfsu.edu

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CAMPUS EDITOR juand@mail.sfsu.edu

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CITY EDITOR jterman@mail.sfsu.edu

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COPY CHIEF cassbeck@mail.sfsu.edu

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BREAKING NEWS EDITOR ch3no2@mail.sfsu.edu

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PHOTO EDITOR erikv@mail.sfsu.edu

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SPORTS EDITOR gvasquez@mail.sfsu.edu

GIL RIEGO JR.

MEDIA EDITOR griegojr@mail.sfsu.edu

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ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR nenhenry@mail.sfsu.edu

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PHOTO ADVISER tucker@sfsu.edu

Let’s tell the truth, almost no one gets their bachelor’s degree The super senior label seems to fit just right because facing in four years anymore. more than four years of these challenges does create a type of That’s why super seniors exist, college students who take five academic superstar. or more years to complete their “four-year degree.” Here are some tips to quicker graduation from the Xpress And what can anyone expect when you can’t expand an 168seniors: hour week, and have an essential need to sleep. -Freshmen: Get your GEs out of the way but have a clear According to the University, more than 80 percent of SF State plan as to what your major and minors are so that the classes you students take classes full time, a minimum of 12 units each sechoose all have an impact on your ability to graduate faster. mester. Three units can mean up to nine hours per week of outside - If you’re unsure of what you want your major to be, take class work. For 12 units that’s up to 36 hours a week of homeclasses at community colleges while figuring it out to save money. work, and about 10 hours of class time. We no longer are afforded the leisure of being able to take classes That leaves only 122 hours of free time a week. Get a partjust because. time job, subtract 30 hours, and - If you know what you want your all that is left is about 13 hours major to be, declare it early. Somea day. times majors change from one year Take away the eight hours of to another, and often include adding suggested sleep, and you’re left extra classes. with five hours to eat, be merry - If you have questions about your and get the required reading major, your department chair is your done on the toilet. best bet. Too bad for the students who - Check, double check and triple have to commute. check your University bulletin. It will If the CSU system could act as a road map to your next few lower tuition, then maybe the years in college. Follow the guidepart-time job could be sublines exactly, making sure to check tracted. pre requisites and exactly how many The recent 22 percent tuition of each categorized classes you need increase doesn’t make anything so you’re not taking too many or easier or faster for anyone on a registering for something you are not college schedule. eligible for. Each semester, students cram - Prioritize classes. Don’t assume into classes to see if they can that no one will sign up for something even get a seat in their major you really need. Other students are courses. Unable to get those scrambling just as much as you are, classes, students often end up and that boring class you figured taking classes that don’t pertain would get overlooked will probably to their degree paths just to meet be full by your next registration date. the minimum units to maintain If you are having trouble deciding on residency and financial aid a hierarchy of classes to register for, benefits. start planning for the next semester so In 2010, of the 2,649 classes you can get a picture of what classes offered, more than half had more are urgent and others that can be ART BY SARA DONCHEY than 30 students, according to the pushed around. sdonchey@mail.sfsu.edu University common data set of - Students can get their segment III 2010-2011. classes to also fulfill requirements for More students pack into the classroom as the number of protheir majors or minors at the same time. Kill two birds with one fessors lowers. stone. From 1991 to 2010 the percentage of tenure-tracked professors - If transferring, check which classes carry over. Look at www. in the CSU system dropped by 14.2 percent. assist.org for help. Yet the number of students in CSUs has only dropped by about - Take every exemption test you can. They cost between $20one percent. 30 and can get you out of taking a three-unit class. http://www. With so many students in class, maybe the system can just sfsu.edu/~testing/tests.html skip faculty in the classroom altogether and we can start teaching - If you have the luxury of picking between different profeseach other. sors for the same class, check out www.ratemyprofessor.com for One out of 30 plus students should know the ancient history of reviews. It’s a lot easier to make it through a semester when you Mesopotamia. like the person teaching you. Or not. Submit your tips to www.goldengatexpress.org.

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COLUMN

Withdrawal brings sigh of relief BY BRIAN BALISI

A

bbalisi@mail.sfsu.edu

FTER NEARLY nine years of occupying Iraq, President Barack Obama has announced the complete withdrawal of American troops by December. I know what you’re thinking — finally, right? — but if Iraq wasn’t stable enough for troops to pull out years ago, what is the difference now? Should we still have an American presence in Iraq, or is the withdrawal of troops just a political ploy by Obama to keep another campaign promise in hopes of re-election? I believe it’s time and it’s better late then never. As students, we must understand why the Iraq war has provided more problems than solutions for our ravaged nation. Nearly 4,400 military members have been killed overseas, while 32,000 have been severely injured since the Iraq invasion in 2003. Do we need to lose more

lives while families get torn apart with a loss of a child, parent or significant other? Let’s not forget these soldiers gave their lives for our country fighting a war fueled by vengeance. After the terrorist attack on 9/11 the Bush Administration invaded Afghanistan, but came up empty handed. In an attempt to grab onto something productive many soldiers were redeployed to Iraq in search of weapons of mass destruction and Saddam Hussein. After Hussein’s capture in 2003, the Obama Administration killed the original target earlier this year: AlQaeda leader Osama Bin Laden. Now that the jobs are done I don’t see a real need for troops to still be in the Middle East. With the troops withdrawing from Iraq, the country will now have an opportunity to govern their future without the oppression of a dictator or pressure from the United States military. This is what independence is all about, right? The United States fought hard for the freedoms of the Iraqi people, now let’s allow them to fix

their fragile government and make their own decisions. With the financial crisis hitting the U.S. hard, we have to invest all resources back into our own economy. The Iraq war cost taxpayers more than $1 trillion. According to the Congressional Budget Office we will be spending $1 billion to withdraw, but it is nominal compared to the estimated $30 billion spent from 2010 to 2011 on additional operating and personnel costs. With the complete withdrawal from Iraq, Obama can now focus problems within our own nation. Let’s make sure troops will at least have a stable economy to come back to. Both countries can now look forward to rebuilding their nations. Obama keeps his promise of ending the Iraq war, and Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki’s gets rid of the American military presence and moves forward to a solid government. After all the money and lives that were given to the war efforts in Iraq, now is the time to finally bring the troops back home.

10.26.11

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MULTIPLE PARTNERS: SF State student Emily Irving and her boyfriend Phil Russo pose for a portrait. They are in a polyamorous relationship. PHOTO BY NICK MOONE

A DIFFERENT KIND OF LOVE PART TWO IN A RELATIONSHIP SERIES BY RUBY PEREZ

F

rubyp@mail.sfsu.edu

IRST DATES USUALLY start with conversations about music preferences, living situations and work. But most people won’t declare “Just so you know, I’m not monogamous,” as SF State senior Emily Irving, 21, does. Irving is in a polyamorous relationship with Philip Russo, 36, who introduced her to the lifestyle. They have been together for three years. Polyamory, a relationship that involves open and multiple partners, is an alternative to monogamy. “I really liked him and I thought that, maybe if I didn’t understand the idea of it at first, a few dates couldn’t hurt me,” Irving said. “I went out with him and we talked about it more and I really liked the idea of being that unrestricted and un-smothered in a relationship.” Irving then entered a serious relationship with Russo, who at the time was already seeing two other women. She then began living with Russo and one of the women, which she described as a challenge. “It was all about balancing time and making sure that I got to sleep in Emily’s bed two times a week and negotiating things with Terry so that she didn’t feel left out,” Russo said. The relationships not only depend heavily on juggling schedules, but also largely on trust. “It’s very much about trust. It’s not like monogamy where I trust you not to go falling in love and sleeping with other people,” Irving said. “But that I trust you to be an individual and do whatever you like to do because I know you trust me just the same.”

One misconception is that polygamy is the same as polyamory. “It generally is defined as consensual, mutual, intimate sexual relations among multiple adults,” said Associate Professor of sociology at SF State Christopher Carrington. Irving feels that polyamory is the opposite of cheating because her relationship with Russo is open and honest. If she feels attracted to someone or feels jealous, she will tell Russo. “The main point is that it’s not so much about sex but it’s about falling in love with people. In monogamy, you can’t tell someone if you’re attracted to someone because that’s not what you’re supposed to do,” Russo said. “We talk about it. Polyamory is about openness, trust and communication.” Russo and Irving feel that their relationship is as legitimate as a monogamous couple’s. “People think that it’s this weird sex fest orgy,” Russo said. “We have a house, I have a job, she goes to school and has straight As. We’re normal, upstanding citizens.” Russo and Irving plan to move to New York City after she graduates in the spring. In the case that they decide to have children, Irving and Russo will raise the kids with their other partners. “With something like a relationship like ours, if she had another partner and I had another partner, that just adds to the people that can build the family and that can actually effectively raise a child,” Russo said. Even then, Irving and Russo are determined to stay who they are. “When they ask me, well why isn’t one partner enough? Well, is one friend enough? Is having one child in your life enough? Is having one pet enough? I don’t see why a sexual relationship with someone has to be exclusive when no other one is,” Irving said.

TRAVEL FUNDED BY CREATIVITY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 3

my god, I miss Tyler so much!’” Zevita said. “This is the free spirited, hilarious, talented person who I fell in love with on a soulful level. He’s one of those people who is so talented that he makes you feel bad about yourself.” Zevita, who is currently in Los Angeles working on her music career, credits part of that to Cornfield. “Seeing Tyler just travel through Europe just by the seat of his pants inspired me to get off my butt in New York and pursue my dream,” Zevita said. “So in his own way, without even really realizing it, he kind of inspired me to get the ball rolling on my career.” Another donor was long time friend Christian Bannister. For his donation Bannister received a unique and personal postcard made by Cornfield on one of his train rides through Warsaw. Bannister said that Cornfield has a long

history of thinking outside the box when it comes to earning money. “If he wanted to he could have sold something on eBay and gave something away, like material possessions, but instead he wanted to find a more creative and enticing way of earning money,” Bannister said. “It’s kind of what he does.” These days, Tyler is completing his final semester at SF State and working as a resident assistant in University Park North. He sings and plays guitar in his six person band, Wes Leslie and his Deadly Medley, and plans to stick around San Francisco if they do well. If not, he wants to move to Berlin after graduating. He’s also busy dreaming up his next adventure. “I’m thinking of taking a solo road trip through the South,” Cornfield said with that same grin. “I’ve never been there before.”

10 C I T Y

10.26.11

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MEDICINAL MARIJUANA: THE BATTLE CONTINUES college, junior college or university. In addition, dispensaries can be penalized if they are within 100 feet of a public or private youth cenHE WAR ON MEDICAL MARIJUANA ter, public swimming pool or video arcade facility. took a new turn recently as landlords Among the local medical dispensaries that are who rent to medical marijuana dispensalocated close to schools are 208 Valencia Street ries were threatened with prosecution by Caregivers and Medithrive. the federal government in California. A worker at Medithrive, who wishes to remain anonymous, said the landlord has Earlier this month, dozens of dispensaries were ordered to not given them any notice to leave and that, as far as they know, they are not being shut down within 45 days. If the owners or landlords do not comply with the warning, they face criminal charges or seizure of affected. Peter Avila, the principal at Marshall Elementary, said that even though the school their property, according to a press release issued by the Department of Justice. is located right behind Medithrive, he does not have any issues with the dispensary. Federal procedures could have sizable consequences in California, where an “Alcohol and other ilestimated $1.5 billion medical licit drugs are much more of a marijuana transactions have problem in our neighborhood,” taken place annually, accordAvila said. “I have not had one ing to an economic analysis by complaint about Medithrive, California’s National Organizanot one.” tion for the Reform of MariThe Marin Alliance for juana Laws. Medical Marijuana also reCalifornia receives roughly ceived a letter asking the land$100 million in sales taxes from lord to evict the dispensary or dispensaries yearly. Numerous risk imprisonment. cities, including Sacramento, Greg Anton, a lawyer who have sought to make up for represents MAMM, said that depleted assets by taxing local the federal government is medical marijuana dispensaries. going to accomplish the exact “They don’t have the opposite of what they are tryreasonable amount of money ing to do. to shut down every dispensary “The federal government is in the state,” said Dale Jones, indirectly supplying marijuana spokeswoman for “Yes on to children,” Anton said. “If Proposition 19 also known as they close dispensaries down, the Regulate, Control and Tax people will take marijuana to Cannabis Act” and also executhe streets where there won’t tive chancellor at cannabis trade be any regulation.” school Oaksterdam University According to Anton, in Oakland. “It’s going to be MAMM is one of the oldest like a tornado - some will get and longest running dispensadestroyed while others will be ries in the state. left untouched.” “It will probably close Federal officials are primardown after 15 years of no ily going after medical dispensa- MEDITHRIVING: Medical marijuana dispensary Medithrive employee Tiana Fields, 22, helps regular Joshua Pritchard, 24, Monday. “This is the only place I go,” Pritchard said. “Everyone is really cool and helpful.” Medithrive is located in close proximity to complaints,” Anton said. ries that may be near children. In 2009, the DOJ sent out Marshall Elementary school, but the principal said he has never had any issues with the dispensary. PHOTO BY JESSICA GOSS “Marijuana stores operating a memo saying that prosecuin proximity to schools, parks tors would not seek to arrest and other areas where children medical marijuana users and suppliers as long as they complied with state laws. Howare present send the wrong message to those in our society who are the most impresever, federal prosecutors and the DEA have continued to arrest and prosecute medical sionable,” said Melinda Haag, the United States Attorney for the Northern District of California, in the DOJ press release. “Although our initial efforts in the Northern Dis- marijuana providers. Students at SF State have mixed feeling about the consumption of cannabis. trict focus on only certain marijuana stores, we will almost certainly be taking action “The traditional ways that people use marijuana, like for getting in touch with against others. None are immune from action by the federal government.” the spirits or for medical use, is fine by me,” said Chantal Roberts, 23, consumer and Dispensaries in the Bay Area, including San Francisco and Marin counties, were family sciences major. “But right now a lot of people are abusing it and it’s getting sent letters warning that California’s medical marijuana law does not protect against harder to regulate.” property seizure or prosecution under federal law. Gary Lamb, 33, psychology major, believes that while the use of medical mariUnder state law, dispensaries cannot operate within 600 feet of schools. However, juana is understandable, it’s also understudied in terms of its effects. under federal law Title 21 USC 860, dispensaries can be subjected to penalization if “It’s kind of hypocritical because alcohol is just as dangerous,” Lamb said. “But they participate in the sale or distribution of controlled substances within 1,000 feet of more research needs to be done on the effects that marijuana has on the brain before a public or private elementary, vocational or secondary school, or a public or private we try to legalize it.”

T

BY SANDRA LOPEZ

selopez@mail.sfsu.edu

Dispensaries in California face a new threat as federal prosecutors warn landlords to shut down clinics or face property seizure.

Route changed for busy line BY MICHAEL HUBER

W

mphuber@mail.sfsu.edu

in the morning so when a fullypacked 28 blows by me while I’m ITH BUDGETS ALWAYS waiting and in a rush it’s not a being cut, the commute to SF good thing. The Limited is a great State isn’t getting any easier. alternative but it’s unreliable at A change was made October best. 17 to the frequency of the 28Now that they are cutting L, a crucial route for SF State some stops it’s going to be even students. The Limited will stop serving the Golden harder to make it outbound to Gate Bridge, but will extend to Fort Mason. campus. With all the financial The most notable stop eliminations for the problems though, I’m sure they Outbound limited, which is used to commute to are trying to do their best.” SF State, are Park Presidio and Balboa, 19th and SF State students are facing Noriega, and 19th and Eucalyptus. This greatly similar problems. affects students commute to SF State because the “The Limited is way betfrequency of the 28 is already low. ter and way faster,” said Serra “It’s a pilot project, a test,” said Paul Rose, a Naiman, a junior theater major at spokesman for the San Francisco Municipal Transit SF State. “I take it almost every Agency. “Every month we audit some of our worst day to go to and from work. I performing lines. We talk to riders and operators WAITING: Passengers wait for the 28 Muni line at Holloway Avenue Monday. The route of the 28 didn’t even know they cut it. to see if there are ways to improve the service. The Limited was recently changed, which will impact the line as a whole. PHOTO BY ERIK VERDUZCO Wow, that really sucks.” changes made are reflections on those conversaThe only thing anyone can do is tions.” acknowledge the reality and the budgetary constraints wait and see if the changes will have During peak hours, it’s not uncommon for a positive or negative impact. commuters to see a fully packed 28 bus pass by without under which Muni operates. “I work at SF State and I used to live on 19th “We’re going to see how it works and take it from stopping. There is little that people can do as they Avenue,” said Lane Hollister, formal post-bachelor’s there,” Rose said . “This is going to be an ongoing desperately count down the minutes in their head until admissions coordinator. “I have to be there very early process.” they are late for class or work. However, both sides

10.26.11

C I T Y 11

| GOLDENGATEXPRESS.ORG

DISTRICT ATTORNEY CANDIDATES GEORGE GASCÓN is the current DA. He served as chief of police prior to replacing Kamala Harris, who left to become state Attorney General. Gascón intends to focus on improving neighborhood safety, reducing crime and protecting crime victims.

VU VUONG TRINH is a former deputy public defender and currently is the Commissioner for the State Bar of California’s Criminal Law Advisory Commission. Trinh intends to improve current law enforcement, correct the criminal justice system and make courts cost efficient and open.

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BILL FAZIO who ran for district attorney once before in 1995, is seeking the position once again. Fazio is currently a defense attorney in San Francisco. He intends to focus on prosecuting serious crimes, avoiding the death penalty and the rehabilitation of juvenile offenders.

The duties of the district attorney are to manage the prosecutor’s office, investigate alleged crimes in cooperation with law enforcement and file criminal charges or bring evidence before the Grand Jury. George Gascón is the current district attorney.

COMPILED BY LISA CARMACK lcarmack@mail.sfsu.edu

DAVID ONEK former police commissioner and criminal justice expert, intends to forge partnerships between communities and law enforcement to make neighborhoods safer. Onek wants to completely reform and refocus the criminal justice system.

SHARMIN BOCK is a veteran prosecutor of Iranian descent in the Alameda County district attorney’s office. With her 22 years of experience, Bock hopes to curtail and prevent violent crime in San Francisco.

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10.26.11 | GOLDENGATEXPRESS.ORG

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Golden Gate Xpress Issue 10