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August 2014 • greatlakesboating.com

Prestige 550

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LELAND Display until Sept. 15, 2014

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SUMMERDRONES FREE Boat Ad p61

PUBLISHER’S NOTE

Happy summertime,

WHERE BOATERS GO FOR NEWS

and I hope that you’re spending a lot of time on your boat. This issue commemorates one of summertime’s great

Publisher & Editor in Chief F. Ned Dikmen

holidays, the Fourth of July. This celebration of our country’s independence reminds me of the same fundamental values we espouse in recreational

Managing Editor Karen Malonis

boating, i.e., life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

Associate Editor Jerome A. Koncel Contributing Writers Ron Banks Emma Norton

If you’re looking for a boat that will make your days on the water a perfect celebration, then look no further than the Prestige 450, 500, 550, and 620 featured in this issue. They represent all that is needed to make your days on the water peaceful and relaxing.

Editorial Intern Brandon Smith

Prestige designs, engineers, and builds all of its boats with the care and comfort of

Art Direction Steve Jones

boaters foremost in mind. As a result, all their boats combine luxury and comfort with the latest in state-of-the-art propulsion technology. Speaking about new technology, Evinrude’s ETEC G-2 outboard motor is not just another

Advertising | Sales Inquiries Neil Dikmen p 312.266.8400 • f 312.266.8470 e info@greatlakesboating.com

new outboard. Analysts are calling it a “game-changer,” and you can read all about in our article on page 16. If the Prestige boats and Evinrude outboards bring a smile to your face, then another thing that makes boaters very happy is their pets, specifically their dogs. Boating and pets are a natural combination, and nearly every Great Lakes marina describes itself as “pet-friendly.” It is estimated that between 10 to 33 percent of marina slipholders have pets on their vessels. Most marinas don’t have any specific rules and regulations about pets. They just ask boaters to use common sense. Read the article on page 30 to discover the “joys” they experience when they have their pets onboard. They’re part of the family.

GREAT LAKES BOATING® Magazine (ISSN 1937-7274) ©

2014 is a registered trademark (73519-331) of Chicago

Boating Publications, Inc., its publisher, 1032 N. LaSalle Drive, Chicago, Illinois 60610. For editorial inquiries, contact Great Lakes Boating

If there’s one variable that can put a “crimp” in boating, it’s the weather. The recently

Magazine at 1032 N. LaSalle, Chicago, IL 60610

released National Climate Assessment Report provides some startling news on this

p 312.266.8400 or e kmalonis@greatlakesboating.com.

topic for boaters and sportsfishermen.

Great Lakes Boating Magazine is available online at

The report’s major message is that climate change is occurring now, human activity is a major cause of climate disruption, and now is the time to do something about this or face more dire consequences in the future.

greatlakesboating.com and at any of the distribution centers and newsstands in areas surrounding the Great Lakes. Postmaster should forward all undelivered issues to Great Lakes Boating Magazine,

As far as the Great Lakes are concerned, the report notes that climate change does not

1032 N. LaSalle Drive, Chicago, Illinois 60610.

have the same negative effects as it does on the two coasts. Still warmer temperatures,

All manuscripts should be accompanied by a self-

more severe rainfall events, and less ice cover will exacerbate our water quality

addressed stamped envelope. Great Lakes Boating

problems, increase the number of invasive species in our waters, and change the distribution of fish species. Find out more about climate change’s impacts by reading our article beginning on page 26. If you’re looking for something new and exciting this summer, check out our article on drones (page 34). While most of us picture drones as those armed vehicles flying the skies in Afghanistan, those are the “steroid” version of drones. We’re talking about unmanned vehicles that boaters can equip with cameras to capture fishing and sailing events. A terrific spot for any boating activity this summer is Leland, Mich., our destination spotlight. This historic area caters to all the members of the family and offers plenty of fun things to do when you arrive at Leelanau Peninsula. See our story on page 20. And don’t forget to do more boating this summer! It’s fun, relaxing, and the perfect summertime activity.

4 GLB | July/Augus t 14

Magazine is not responsible and will not be liable for non-solicited manuscripts, including photographs. Great Lakes Boating Magazine does not assume liability or ensure accuracy of the content contained in its articles, editorials, new product releases and advertising. Inquiries may be directed to the authors through the editorial office. Products, services and advertisements appearing in Great Lakes Boating Magazine do not constitute an endorsement or guarantee of their safety by Great Lakes Boating Magazine. Material in the publication may not be reproduced in any form without written consent of the Great Lakes Boating Magazine editorial and executive staff. Past copies may be purchased by sending a written request to the offices of Great Lakes Boating Magazine. For reprints contact: FosteReprints, p 800.382.0808 or f 219.879.8366.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

FEATURES Features

20

OTC PRESTIGE 550 FLYBRIDGE

• PRESTIGE ................................. 10 • LELAND MICHIGAN ....................... 20 • CLIMATE CHANGE ........................ 26 • PETS ON BOATS ........................... 30

Spotlight

THE NEWS InIN the News

• GREAT LAKES ..............................42 42 • FISHING .................................... 46 • MARINAS.................................. 48 • NATIONAL ................................. 50 • SAILING .................................... 52

16

DEPARTMENTS Departments

• PUBLISHER’S NOTE...........................04 • EDITORIALS ........................................ 08 • NEW PRODUCTS ...............................54 • BOAT CARE AND FEEDING..................56 • EVENTS CALENDAR ..........................58 • MARINE MART..................................60 • ADVERTISER INDEX ..........................61

• READ •

GREAT LAKES BOATING

on your tablet or smartphone

visit: greatlakesboating.com

GLB NEWSLETTER

A L E RT !!!

Great Lakes Boating now offers boaters a free weekly digital newsletter to keep them informed about news, issues, and events of the Great Lakes.

Visit www.greatlakesboating.com and register by entering your email address into the appropriate box.

Sell your boat on our NEW redesigned Classified Section 6 GLB | July/Augus t 14

.................... 58’9”

BEAM:

.................... 15’8”

DRAFT (HULL):

....................3’10”

FUEL:

SPOTLIGHTS • EVINRUDE’S NEXT GENERATION .. 16 • SWIMMING SAFETY ................... 18 • NY SEA GRANT SAFETY ............ 24 • BOATS AND DRONES ................ 34 • PERSONAL WATER SAFETY ....... 38

LOA:

....................581 gals

The 550 Flybridge from Prestige Yachts represents a harmonious blend of design, power, and safety. Graceful lines and luxurious materials are paired with optimal use of onboard space and classic style for a “prestige” feel. There are four gathering areas and an aft galley in its open floor plan design. Three staterooms plus crew quarters are located below. The full-beam master stateroom provides plenty of privacy and comfort. In addition, the forward sunpad and forward stateroom offer innovations that expand their usefulness. The sunpad has a bench seat at its forward end and a pop-up shade to provide protection from too much sun, while the forward stateroom has twin berths that can be converted to a queen-sized bed. The Prestige 550 features a pod propulsion system and a specially designed hull that deliver exceptional performance, notable fuel efficiency, and unparalleled handling at sea. The v-shaped hull and the optimal deadrise at the transom ensure comfortable steering and stability through choppy seas, along with extremely low noise and vibration levels. It is the perfect vessel for those boaters who seek the seamless integration of form with function. PRESTIGE NORTH AMERICA 105 Eastern Ave, Ste.202, Annapolis, MD 21403 410-280-2775 www.prestige-yachts.com SPRING BROOK MARINA 623 N 2553rd Rd. Seneca, IL 61341 815-357-8666 www.springbrookmarina.com

EDITORIALS

NEW DIRECTIONS FOR BOATING’S FUNDS When the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) announced in May that it would be distributing more than $16 million to boost recreational boating across the nation, not everyone involved with boating and fishing viewed it as good news. Here’s why.

A closer look at where these funds go shows that much of it is used to construct, renovate, and maintain facilities for transient boaters (those staying 10 days or fewer) who pilot vessels that are 26 feet or more in length and are used for recreation.

USFWS awarded $14.27 million in Boating Infrastructure Grant (BIG) competitive grants to 10 states and the District of Columbia. The Service also provided approximately $2.48 million to 27 states, commonwealths and territories that were willing to match smaller, non-competitive grants dedicated to boating infrastructure projects.

There’s nothing wrong with the overall goal of this effort, which is to fund projects that will benefit recreational boating, sportsfishing, and fish and wildlife habitats. The problem is in the execution, that is, the selecting of projects that will receive these funds.

The money for these BIG grants comes from recreational boaters and sportsfishermen. Specifically, USFWS receives money from the Sport Fish Restoration and Boating Trust Fund, whose funds come from manufacturers, boaters, and sportsfishermen who routinely pay excise and other taxes on certain fishing and boating equipment, gear, and gasoline. Th is tax money goes directly to the Trust fund, which entrusts it to USFWS, which selects projects that will benefit recreational boaters and sportsfishermen, along with fish and wildlife habitats.

JOIN US

The VOICE of 4.3 Million Boaters

greatlakesboatingfederation.org 8 GLB | July/Augus t 14

The nation doesn’t need to build more transient slips because we already have an excess, particularly in the Great Lakes. It seems as though this money is being wasted bacause the BIG program is building more transient slips at a time when the number of transient boaters is diclining. Th is must change. We need to set new directions in where we’re putt ing our money. Sett ing new priorities, changing directions will not be easy because USFWS is hamstrung by federal regulations in awarding these grant funds. They have been awarding BIG funds for the same projects for more than 30 years, and it’s time for a change. Instead of routinely reauthorizing these grant funds, our federal legislators should take a second look and determine the “best use of these funds.” These funds come from boaters and anglers and should be used to benefit boaters, and anglers, but what’s the best use for them? We believe the best use is for dredging our harbors and maintaining our decaying infrastructures. We wrote about this in the March/April issue (pgs. 24-26), and now we reiterate the need for funds to maintain our marinas and harbors throughout the Great Lakes. The time has come to change what we consider “boosts to recreational boating.” The BIG program uses money from boaters for the good of boating. But the money must be used wisely if recreational boating is to grow, thrive, and develop well into the 21st century and beyond. It cannot and should not be spent on just any projects, but rather on essential ones that help our existing marinas and harbors maintain and grow their operations.

LEGISLATIVE STANDOUTS In many of our editorials, we often criticize various government agencies for their lack of concern for the needs and desires of recreational boaters and sportsfishermen. Th is issue, we offer our gratitude to two legislators who work tirelessly to promote and support recreational boating and sportsfishing: Rep. Candace Miller (10th District) and Sen. Debbie Stabenow, both of Michigan. When President Obama signed the Water Resources Reform and Development Act (WRRDA) into law in June, he acknowledged that recreational boating is a significant contributor to the nation’s economy as well as a growth engine for local communities. Recreational boaters and sportsfishermen applauded this legislation, which now requires the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to consider other factors besides tonnage in making dredging funding decisions. WRRDA is a prime example of government hearing the cries of boaters for more dredging of small harbors to secure free and easy access to the waters of the Great Lakes, and for this they owe a great deal to Rep. Candace Miller, who spearheaded the efforts to pass this bill. As the only Great Lakes legislator on the House and Senate conference committee resolving the language of WRRDA, Rep. Miller spoke passionately about the Great Lakes as a national treasure the country cannot afford to ignore. She urged her conferees to add a provision to WRRDA that classifies the Great Lakes as a unified navigation system. Th is will qualify the Great Lakes for more funding, ensuring that individual ports aren’t competing against each other for federal funds.

The way to do this is by having the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers dredge the small harbors on the Great Lakes. Sen. Debbie Stabenow is Chairwoman of the Senate Agriculture Committee. She co-wrote the Farm Bill of 2014 and was instrumental in having it include a $2.4 billion, five-year investment in farming conservation efforts—the Regional Conservation Partnership Program (RCPP)— that will also go a long way in keeping the waters of the Great Lakes clean. The RCPP seeks to develop public-private partnerships to foster soil conservation and promote better farming methods. Sen. Stabenow got the Great Lakes to be designated as one of eight priority regions across the country that will receive RCPP funds to keep phosphorusladen farm soil out of the streams and rivers leading to the Great Lakes. We applaud Sen. Stabenow for her efforts to not only keep the soil on the farm, but also out of the rivers and streams leading into the Great Lakes. It is this type of thinking and action that will keep our waters clean. If you know of any outstanding efforts by local, state, or federal legislators to aid recreational boating and sportsfishing on the Great Lakes, please send us that information by phone: 312-266-8400 or email: info@ greatlakesboating.com so that we can acknowledge them.

WANT TO KNOW THE LATEST NEWS? AGR EE? DISAGR EE?

In shepherding the bill through the House of Representatives, Rep. Miller said that federal funding to the Great Lakes has been sparse. She insisted that WRRDA designate 15 percent of the Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund each year for the dredging of smaller recreational harbors in the Great Lakes.

Want to Comment?

Miller said the Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund money comust be used to benefit all harbors, not just large ones.

GreatLakesBoating.com?

Then skip on over to

greatlakesboating.com | 9

10 GLB | July/Augus t 14

Specifications: LOA ..................................................................................... 58’9” Beam .................................................................................. 15’8” Draft ................................................................................... 3’10” Fuel..................................................................................... 581 gal.

PRESTIGE 550 When people talk about “classics,” they’re describing vessels whose

enhanced comfort and products of skilled craftsmanship for a

design and functionality are timeless. Such is the case with the

touch of luxury.

Prestige 550, a one-of-a-kind classic that showcases how power and security can be built in harmony with outstanding design. The first thing that strikes boaters boarding the 550 is the elegant, distinctive design of the flybridge, which features an elongated profile with sleek lines.

The main deck houses the galley, dining area, and lounging spaces. The Prestige 550 has three cabins that can accommodate as many as six guests, and if need be, the crew cabin is available for additional guests. The master stateroom has a private access from the salon and features an en suite head with a separate

The boat’s interior design is contemporary, yet exhibits an innovative

shower stall. It is the only boat this size with a walk-in closet in the

flair in the layout of living spaces, incorporating clever details for

master stateroom.

greatlakesboating.com | 11

PRESTIGE 450 For Prestige engineers and designers, the opportunity to join

an optional fixture). A large amount of storage is accessible from

the Volvo IPS propulsion system with the Prestige hull would be

the platform, which is able to hold a six foot deflated dinghy. The

the ultimate combination. Today, that marriage is a reality in the

flybridge has a large sun deck at the front, a dual pilot bench, and a

Prestige 450.

large lounge at the rear. The wide gunwale gives easy access to the

Prestige designed the hull on its 450 model specifically for use with

sun deck.

Volvo’s D6 IPS 500 and 600 engines. To optimize all the advantages

The 450 has a dual-cabin layout with independent access to the

of this propulsion system, Prestige came up with a hull that results

full beam master cabin with its en suite head and separate walk-in

in easy maneuverability, superior performance, increased fuel

shower. The forward cabin opens to the second head and shower.

efficiency, and reduced vibration and noise.

There’s also a separate entrance to the companionway, which allows

The Prestige 450 is surprisingly comfortable on board. Its large cockpit overlooks the rear and hydraulic swim platform (which is

this to also serve as a day head.

Specifications: LOA ..................................................................................... 45’9” Beam .................................................................................. 14’1” Draft ................................................................................... 3’5” Fuel..................................................................................... 317 gal.

12 GLB | July/Augus t 14

PRESTIGE 500 The concept behind the 500 Prestige rests on two key principles:

Located near the galley and sheltered by the large flybridge, the

perfect harmony in design and the assurance of power and safety.

cockpit features direct access to the generous master cabin that is

With 180 units of this model sold, the Prestige 500 is unparalleled

flooded with natural light and has its own private head and shower

among 50-foot flybridge luxury yachts.

compartment. The 500 also features two additional cabins that can

The deck plan is designed to facilitate life onboard, with a wide

be configured with double or single berths.

side deck, a forward sun deck sheltered by a sun awning, and

For the boater who wants to feel the integration of form with function

a spacious cockpit that opens onto the aft swim platform and

with the assurance of riding in a safe and secure vessel that can

hydraulic gangway.

withstand rough seas and storms, the 500 Prestige is the answer.

The open cockpit, the interior saloon, the helm station, and cabins have been designed for relaxed gatherings while still providing space for privacy.

Specifications: LOA ..................................................................................... 49’10” Beam .................................................................................. 14’9” Draft ................................................................................... 3’5” Fuel..................................................................................... 343 gal.

greatlakesboating.com | 13

PRESTIGE 620 A new world of luxury, comfort, and high technology awaits the

The Prestige 620 is the first model of the Prestige Yachts division,

individual on the Prestige 620.

whose goal is to combine luxury, comfort, and state-of-the-art

Designed by the Garroni Design group, the Prestige 620 shows a fine balance between its exterior design and light-filled interior. The interior space has been maximized to include a large saloon and separate dining area, a centered galley and three cabins, all furnished with the finest materials. Michael Peters, one of the world’s most renowned yacht designers,

technology in a yacht that is synonymous with all that the Prestige brand stands for.

Specifications: LOA ..................................................................................... 63’11” Beam .................................................................................. 16’9”

designed the boat’s infusion-molded hull. This allows the Prestige

Draft ................................................................................... 4’3”

620 to use Volvo’s IPS propulsion system, which is at the cutting

Fuel..................................................................................... 740 gal.

edge of current technology, and enables the yacht to ride smoothly and make smooth calculated turns even in rough waters.

www.prestige-yachts.com See the Prestige models at the exclusive Great Lakes Prestige dealer that is located in the heart of Chicagoland.

SPRING BROOK MARINA 623 N. 2553rd Rd. Seneca, IL 61341

815-357-8666

www.springbrookmarina.com

14 GLB | July/Augus t 14

EVINRUDE

Power & Choice

16 GLB | July/Augus t 14

BRP recently unveiled a new two-stroke outboard engine that it promises will produce up to 75 percent fewer total regulated emissions, 15 percent better fuel efficiency, and 20 percent more torque than other leading four-stroke engines. In showcasing the engine to reporters in June, BRP said its Evinrude E-TEC G2 outboard engine delivers unrivaled performance with best-in-class torque and fuel efficiency, along with the lowest total emissions of any outboard. The E-TEC G2 will be available this fall in sizes ranging from 200 hp to 300 horsepower. Evinrude says the new engine offers the first and only customizable look in the marketplace, while combining clean rigging with fully integrated digital controls. The innovations of the E-TEC G2 allow boaters to choose the perfect combination of boat and engine. The E-TEC G2 gives customers hundreds of customizable color combinations. Users can choose from five side panel colors, five top and front panel colors, and 14 accent colors to design an engine look that matches that of any boat. The angular look of the G2 engine is unlike any other outboard in the market, and Evinrude said that’s by design. The engineering expertise behind the E-TEC G2 engine is fluid dynamic computer modeling that produced the most efficient piston/cylinder design in the industry. The two piston chambers are the source behind the engine’s outstanding torque and long-term reliability. Evinrude says this engine provides 15 percent better fuel efficiency than competitive outboards. Additional features like the new i-Trim system and dynamic power steering give users an unparalleled amount of control. The i-Trim automatically trims the boat out at any speed, giving even the newest of captains the ability to trim their vessel like a seasoned pro. The hydraulic power steering is integrated directly into the midsection of the engine and provides three levels of assistance that are designed to deliver superior handling and more control in tight turns. Evinrude engineers completely redesigned the engine’s fully integrated digital controls to give captains better command of the engine. The ICON Touch display is rugged, easy-to-use, and provides all of the necessary information needed while on the water. It allows for dynamic power steering modes, activates i-Trim, and allows the user to toggle between foot and hand throttle. The next generation engine is backed by an unmatched warranty and best-in-class fuel efficiency. Evinrude’s G2 engines come with a 5-year engine warranty, 5-year corrosion warranty, and 500 hours with no dealer-scheduled maintenance.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE ENGINE AND HOW TO BUILD A CUSTOM E-TEC, VISIT

www.chooseyouretec.com greatlakesboating.com | 17

US SWIM SCHOOL Association

Provides TIPS TO STAY SAFE While Boating NATURAL BODIES OF WATER CAN POSE A GREATER DROWNING RISK THAN SWIMMING POOLS

W

hile many parents worry about their children’s safety around swimming pools, as they should and need to do, drowning incidents can also occur in natural bodies of water. Safety precautions need to be taken around all water environments. According to the Center for Disease Control, about half of all drowning incidents occur in natural water settings such as lakes, rivers, or oceans. And, almost 75 percent of people killed in boating accidents die as a result of drowning. As the summer boating season begins, there are steps parents can be taking to keep their children safer in the water. The United States Swim School Association has put together the following guidelines to help keep children safe while boating this summer.

• MAKE SURE YOUR CHILDREN KNOW HOW TO PROPERLY WEAR A LIFEJACKET. ALWAYS HAVE CHILDREN UNDER 12 WEAR A LIFEJACKET AT ALL TIMES WHEN BOATING OR USING PERSONAL WATERCRAFT. • PERSONAL FLOTATION DEVICES (PFDS) SHOULD ALWAYS BE U.S. COAST GUARD APPROVED. NEVER SUBSTITUTE WATER WINGS OR OTHER RECREATIONAL TYPE FLOATING TOYS FOR AN APPROVED PFD. • CREATE A WATER SAFETY PLAN FOR YOUR FAMILY AND HAVE WATER EMERGENCY DRILLS WITH YOUR KIDS COVERING HOW TO RECOGNIZE THE SIGNS OF SOMEONE STRUGGLING IN WATER AND WHAT TO DO IN THIS TYPE OF EMERGENCY. • TEACH YOUR CHILDREN THE “THROW, DON’T GO” RESCUE METHOD. INSTEAD OF ENTERING THE WATER TO HELP A STRUGGLING PERSON, TEACH YOUR CHILD TO THROW IN A ROPE, REACH WITH A STICK, PADDLE OR OTHER OBJECT TO PULL THE PERSON IN. • IF YOU TAKE YOUR KIDS ON A SHORE EXCURSION WHILE BOATING, BE AWARE OF TIDES AND CURRENTS AND OTHER RISKS THE OCEAN OR BEACH MAY HAVE. • NON-MOTORIZED BOATS CAN ALSO POSE A RISK. IF YOUR FAMILY IS CANOEING OR KAYAKING BE SURE YOUR CHILD IS WEARING A LIFEJACKET AND KNOWS WHAT TO DO IF THE BOAT FLIPS. • IF YOUR CHILD IS PLAYING NEAR A NATURAL BODY OF WATER AND ACCIDENTALLY FALLS IN, TEACH YOUR CHILD TO ROLL OVER ON HIS OR HER BACK AND FLOAT UNTIL HELP ARRIVES IF EXITING THE WATER IS NOT AN OPTION. • NEVER USE FLOTATION DEVICES OR WATER WINGS TO KEEP YOUR CHILD SAFE IN THE WATER. RELY ON YOUR DIRECT SUPERVISION. Swimming lessons are a great addition to help keep your child safer while boating and around open water. For more information about swimming lessons and water safety and to find a Unites States Swim School Association member swim school near you, visit: www.usswimschools.org.

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Leland Leland

…..A Historic Harbor of Beauty MORE THAN 100 YEARS AGO, THE “LEELANAU THEME SONG” WAS WRITTEN, AND ITS LYRICS PAINT A PICTURE OF THE MAGIC AND WONDER OF LELAND:

Remember the picnics we had in the spring The sails in the moonlight the Sunday night Sing The calm of the lake on a still summer night, Leelanau, Leelanau Land of Delight. Carefree days, starry nights, cherry blossoms, northern lights The after glow when the sun has set.. These are things I’ll never forget…..

The words of this theme song are as true today as they were a century ago.

20 GLB | July/Augus t 14

History

The options

The history of Leland, Mich., centers around Fishtown, a collection

Leland is known as one of the best sportsfishing ports

of fishing shanties, smokehouses, overhanging docks, and fish tugs

in Michigan, and Charter Captain Jack Duffy explains why.

that line the Leland River. Today, this weathered collection still exists

“There are fishing trips and then there are fishing adventures...

thanks to the efforts of the Fishtown Preservation Society, and it is

a fishing adventure is a happening, a wonderful outdoor

still the first thing visitors spot when they arrive at Leland Harbor.

experience, and one filled with angling excitement that will keep a hot fire burning inside every person aboard the boat,” said Duffy.

A stroll through historic Fishtown uncovers shanties that are now

That’s the Leland fishing adventure.

filled with eclectic shops and food emporiums along the Carp River below the dam. Who can resist a stop at the Dam Candy Store? Or

Salmon and trout are plentiful in the deep waters that run through

lunch on the deck at Rick’s Café? Or simply spending a day at The

the Manitou Passage. Those individuals who want their fish without

Cove while watching salmon jump the rapids?

the adventure can stop at Carlson’s Fishery for the fresh catch of the day. A visit to Carlson’s is a step back in time as the Carlson family

Transient boaters arriving at Leland Harbor will discover a newly

has operated this local fishery for more than a century. Nels Carlson,

renovated marina with 61 slips, along with a new welcome center

who emigrated from Norway, passed the fishery down to Will,

that offers showers, free WiFi, and other amenities. They’ll also have

Lester, Bill, and now fifth generation Nels Carlson with co-owner Joe

time to view spectacular sunsets over North and South Manitou

Campo. While providing delicious fresh and smoked fish every day,

Island that display a pallet of oranges, pinks, purples, and deep

Carlson’s Fishery preserves a remarkable working model of history.

blues that are extraordinary every night.

One block up from the harbor is Main Street and a picturesque small

Don’t take our word about these amazing sunsets. Check out USA

town of fun shopping, great food, and wine tasting that visitors fall

Today, which voted Leland’s sunsets as the “2nd Best Sunset in

in love with. Morning coffee and breakfast starts at 7 a.m. at Trish’s

America” in 2013. This ever-changing kaleidoscope of colors is

Dishes, The Early Bird, and Leelanau Books. For the very early

spectacular any time, but may be even better with an ice cream in

risers, Sisson’s Specialty Foods, one block to the north, is the place

hand from the Harbor House.

to go because it brews its coffee well before sunrise.

Visitors looking for a day trip can pack a lunch from the Village Cheese Shanty and jump aboard one of the Manitou Transit ferries for a trip out to South Manitou Island. This trip is noteworthy because it passes the now automated Manitou Shoal Light House and the impressive natural beauty of Sleeping Bear National Park,

All photos by Meggen Watt Petersen

voted “the most beautiful place in America” in 2012.

greatlakesboating.com | 21

Leland

At night, Leland has a range of casual to fine dining options. The

On a rainy day, visitors can check out the Leland Historical Museum

Bluebird Tavern & Restaurant has been Leland’s anchor eatery for

and the local library, which are just one block south of the bridge.

almost 90 years. The Leland Lodge is the spot for an evening of

And visitors should also check out the Old Art Building’s calendar

fine wine tasting, tapas, and great dining overlooking North Lake

for music, film, and art events.

Leelanau. When they’re ready for dinner, visitors can call the Leland Lodge and it will send its souped up “green machine” golf cart to pick them up at the dock. For the ultimate dining experience, visitors can dine at the Riverside Inn on the bank of the Leland River. Its fivestar service, food, and wine list are only dwarfed by the small inn ambiance that makes every patron want to call this place “home.” Leland also caters to shoppers with options for everyone. Visitors can stock up on provisions and prepared foods at the Leland Mercantile. From there, they can visit the Leland Toy Co. for everything from checkers to the latest games and party supplies, and a stop at the famous Hot Dog Cart is a must. Local artists display their beautifully crafted “Leland Blues” and Petoskeys at Becky Thatcher’s, Roxanne’s, and Aurora Borealis, while Two Fish Galleries, Tampico, and At the Lake not only feature local artists, but also quality gifts galore. Leland’s Lizzie Lambert started her Haystacks clothing dynasty on Main Street, from which the fashion

Don’t forget the biking trails. Leelanau Peninsula is one of the most beautiful places to bike in the country. It’s home to the M22 Challenge and numerous marathons, triathlons, and bike races. The trails are open to boaters who keep their own bikes on board their vessels or to those who want to rent bikes by going to George’s, which is three blocks up River Street. Leelanau Peninsula invites everyone to work off all that fabulous food and get energized for the day ahead by taking a bike ride. Heading up from the harbor, bikers can turn right or left on Main Street (M22) and be off on a 15-mile ride around spectacular North Lake Leelanau. Bikers will cross the bridge in the town of Lake Leelanau, where they might just stop to visit more shops or take in a local spot for wine and food. Hint: many cyclists are attracted to the Pedaling Beans coffee and food shop, and this is where cycling enthusiasts will find plenty of company.

hunt can continue at Molly’s, Rustic Roots, Leland Gal, Green

For those people who would rather be on Lake Leelanau instead

Goodness, and more!

of biking around it, stop in at Stander Marine to rent jet skis and

When the sun is shining, the area’s pristine beaches are the perfect spot to “chill.” Grab a towel, pack a picnic, and head north or south from the harbor to find sandy beaches. To the south, Van’s Beach, named after Leland’s four-generation specialty auto repair and classic car shop, offers a wide stretch of sand for sunbathing, swimming, and rock hunting. To the north, North Beach is just

pontoon boats, paddleboards from the Harbor House, or head down to Meadow’s Bay below the Leland Lodge for a great day at the beach on the six-mile inland sand bottom lake. Russell Dzuba is Leland’s Harbormaster, and he promises to help boaters with transportation and other arrangements no matter if they’re staying for a day or a week.

beyond the breakwall. Here one can eat lunch and hike for miles and miles along the towering Clay Cliffs.

22 GLB | July/Augus t 14

For more information, visit the website: www.lelandmi.com.

YORK NEW SEA GRANT OFFERS A TOP NOTCH

SAFETY PROGRAM WHEN THE U.S. COAST GUARD REPORTED EARLIER THIS YEAR THAT BOATING FATALITIES HAD REACHED AN ALL-TIME RECORD LOW, IT PROMPTED GLB TO ASK WHY AND TO SEE IF THERE WERE ANY EXEMPLARY SAFE BOATING EDUCATION PROGRAMS IN THE GREAT LAKES. WHILE WE FOUND MANY OUTSTANDING PROGRAMS THROUGHOUT THE REGION, IT DIDN’T TAKE LONG FOR US TO RECOGNIZE NEW YORK SEA GRANT’S (NYSG) CLEAN & SAFE BOATING EDUCATION CAMPAIGN AS A TOP NOTCH SAFETY PROGRAM. THE GOAL OF THIS EFFORT IS TO KEEP THE PUBLIC UP-TO-DATE ABOUT REQUIRED SAFETY EQUIPMENT, ENVIRONMENTALLY SOUND BOATING PRACTICES, AND EFFECTIVE METHODS TO REDUCE THE TRANSPORT OF INVASIVE SPECIES.

HISTORY

said Patti White of Pirate’s Cove Marina and Resort on the Oneida

Since its inception in 2008, the Discover Clean & Safe Boating

encourage every boater to be safety conscious in any size boat.”

River in Clay, N.Y., who has donated the use of the boat. “We need to

campaign, which NYSG developed in partnership with the Boating Industries Association of Upstate New York and with extensive support from marine industry representatives, has educated more than half-a-million boaters about how to be legal, safe, and environmentally friendly on New York waters. The annual campaign features a different type of vessel provided by New York state manufacturers and dealers each year. The traveling exhibit equips the boats with all the required and recommended equipment for clean, safe, and lawful boating. The 2014 Discover Clean & Safe Boating educational vessel is a

NYSG’s Coastal Recreation and Tourism Specialist Dave White developed the award-winning campaign, and it incorporates the National Safe Boating Council’s Wear It! message to encourage the use of lifejackets. It also uses the Stop Aquatic Hitchhikers materials and the “Clean, Drain, Dry” message to encourage boaters to help slow the spread of aquatic invasive species. “‘Clean, Drain, Dry’ refers to easy-to-implement steps boaters can take whenever they launch their boats to help reduce the spread of invasive species that can impact boating venues and the coastal economies that thrive on marine-related activities,” said White.

two-seat ‘water mouse’ just 10 feet long. “I love that my little boat is traveling on a public service mission with New York Sea Grant,”

STATS AND OUTREACH Since its founding more than six years ago, the campaign has

N.Y. SEA GRANT IS PRESENTING ITS CLEAN AND SAFE BOATING PROGRAM AT THE FOLLOWING PLACES IN THE COMING WEEKS: JULY 25-27: Skaneateles Antique and Classic Boat Show, Skaneateles Lake, Skaneateles, N.Y. AUGUST 5-7: Empire Farm Days, with in-pond demonstrations at Rodman Lott and Son Farms, Seneca Falls, N.Y. AUGUST 21-SEPTEMBER 1: The Great New York State Fair, Syracuse, N.Y. SEPTEMBER 5-7: Clear ‘Em Out Fall Boat Show and Sale, Syracuse Fairgrounds, Syracuse, N.Y.

steadily expanded its educational outreach: • More than 500,000 boaters/potential boaters have seen the exhibit at 50+ events • More than 60 media interviews have featured the project— including Great Lakes Boating! • A 12-foot canoe was added to include paddlesports and is now a permanent part of the exhibit • Outreach has developed to include diverse audiences, including deaf and hearing-impaired boaters, anglers, paddlesport enthusiasts, dog owners, and first responders • Watercraft inspection education was added See next page

24 GLB | July/Augus t 14

• In-water lifejacket/safety demonstrations have educated hundreds of people about personal safety for themselves, their families,

OTHER RESULTS

passengers and pets.

In 2011, the Clean and Safe Boating campaign gained a little more acclaim when it became a May-October monthly Discover Better

TESTIMONIAL

Boating segment that aired, and is still on a cable television system

In 2014, New York’s first responders who handle water-related

series is driven by New York Sea Grant and sponsored by the BIA of

emergencies received Cold Water Rescue Training from White at

Upstate New York.

the 2014 Central New York State Boat Show. In the weeks following the training, Dale Currier, Oswego County Office of Emergency Management Director, received a letter from the City of Oswego Fire Department in appreciation for the training. The letter noted that two of the department’s professional firefighter-paramedics applied the training to save a life within a week of the show. Firefighter-Paramedic Raymond Abbott said, “Within a week of the training, we responded to a hypothermia call with an unresponsive victim. We applied the training that was a good review for us and the victim later walked out of the hospital without any deficits.”

reaching 25 counties with approximately 550,000 viewers. The

Comments on public survey forms distributed at the N.Y. shows offering the Clean and Safe Boating Program indicate an increased awareness of the importance of wearing lifejackets and of the most current boating laws and regulations. Anecdotally, NYSG has seen more PFD displays and stuffed animals wearing lifejackets at the CNY Boat Show each February. This past February, the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 21 presented White with its 2013 Wear It! award for excellence in teaching the public about lifejacket safety. White and Currier also received letters of appreciation from U.S. Coast Guard District

Firefighter-Paramedic Christopher Stupp added, “The work of fire

9/Great Lakes. In addition, four international marine industry

and EMS providers is so diverse now that we are constantly training.

conferences have recognized the Discover Clean & Safe Boating

The cold survival training [received] at the February boat show

campaign as a model marine industry partnership program.

refreshed the finer details for a type of call that we do not often respond to in the city.” “Maintaining our own well-being and safety (as emphasized in the training) is a priority so that we can help those in need,”

For more information, contact Dave White at 315-312-3042,

www.nyseagrant.org.

Abbott noted. Photos by Brian P. What tam

greatlakesboating.com | 25

Third National Climate Assessment (NCA) report came out on May 6 and delivered a stark message: climate change is real, it’s happening right now, humans are the major driving force behind climate disruption, and if we don’t act now to do something about climate change, we’ll face dire consequences in the future.

After the long, cold, snowy winter that the Great Lakes endured in 2013-2014, it’s hard to believe these major findings are true. At the same time, nearly everyone believes this past winter was

One of the good things about this voluminous report is that it

an aberration and not a true indicator of the region’s normal

breaks down the effects of climate change on various sectors of the

winter climate.

economy and regions of the country, including the Midwest and the

Perhaps the most startling fact from the NCA report is that it singles

Great Lakes.

out human activity, primarily the burning of fossil fuels, as the major

As far as the Great Lakes are concerned, the NCA report states

force behind climate disruption. The report states: “Human activities

that this region can expect to see more warmer days, less ice

have dramatically altered the world’s climate, oceans, land, ice

cover, more intense rainstorms, and these changes will probably

cover, and ecosystems, resulting in impacts on almost every sector,

exacerbate certain risks already existing, most notably the influx of

including human health, agriculture, infrastructure, and natural

more invasive species, the formation of blue-green algae blooms,

resources. In the United States, climate change has already resulted

and the disruption of the marine ecosystem. On the positive side,

in more frequent heat waves, extreme precipitation, larger wildfires,

climate change in the Great Lakes will result in longer growing

and water scarcity. These are serious challenges that directly affect

seasons for crops and longer seasons for commercial navigation

families, communities, and jobs across the nation and all over the

and recreational boating.

world. The only way to prepare and respond effectively is with a sound understanding of the changes underway and the threats and opportunities they present over time.”

So how do the major findings of the NCA report mesh with this past winter, which saw more than 90 percent of the Great Lakes covered by ice and average temperatures that were among the coldest since

For those people who doubt, question, or dismiss this report as

temperatures were first recorded? The answer is that the NCA report

another example of government exaggeration, please note that

extracts trends from the last 50 years, while the winter of 2013-14

97 percent of the nation’s scientists believe climate change is

was one of a kind.

real. Moreover, this NCA Report is the culmination of a three-year analytical effort undertaken by a team of more than 300 climate scientists, who were aided by input from 70 technical workshops held across the country, along with numerous interviews with countless stakeholders.

26 GLB | July/Augus t 14

Two basic climate change trends the NCA report highlights about the Midwest and Great Lakes are warmer temperatures and less ice cover. “From 1973 to 2010, Great Lakes average annual ice cover declined by 71 percent. Lake levels have been near a record sustained low since reaching record highs in the 1980s,”

said Elizabeth Gibbons, project manager, Great Lakes Integrated

A failure to confront climate change will limit the potential

Sciences + Assessments Center (GLISA), Ann Arbor, Mich.

success of restoration efforts, including those of the Great Lakes

When asked how climate change will impact recreational boating and sportsfishing on the Great Lakes, Gibbons responded, “There will be more frequent and severe storms, increased risk of harmful algal blooms from agricultural runoff, and great stress on some coldwater fish species that may negatively impact boating and fishing.” On the other side of the coin, Gibbons noted that longer, ice-free seasons and warmer temperatures may give recreational boaters and sportsfishermen more of an opportunity to enjoy their activities for much longer timeframes. This will certainly be good news for the region’s tourism and recreational economies, specifically marinas and fishing locations. In the short-term, Gibbons notes that climate change will have little affect on the activities of recreational boaters and sportsfishermen in the Great Lakes, especially when compared to the changing variability these sportsmen already encounter on a yearly basis. A review of the NCA report shows that boaters and fishermen should not ignore the impacts of climate change. They must learn to adapt to climate change. In fact, the report urges everyone to make decisions to limit the amount of climate change caused by human beings and limit the extent of its damaging impacts. The unstated implication is that if we don’t do something about it now, we will face

Restoration Initiative (GLRI), a federal initiative designed to restore the environmental integrity of the region. A recent analysis of GLRI efforts by the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) found that while they were quite successful, any assessment of the program’s efforts were limited because they did not include any review of the climate assessment’s impact. When asked what impact, if any, climate change will have on future GLRI efforts, Cameron Davis, senior advisor to EPA Region 5 administrator Susan Hedman, said, “The Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Action Plan covering FY15-19 will help guide investments to make sure projects stand up to the test of a changing climate.” Great Lakes Sea Grant programs and researchers at universities and colleges in the region point out that climate change will exacerbate a range of risks to the Great Lakes. When asked what these risks are, Amy Samples, project coordinator, Michigan Sea Grant (MSG), Ann Arbor, Mich., replied: —changes in the range and distribution of certain fish species —increased risk of invasive species — an increase in the number and size and harmful effects of algal blooms on the Great Lakes —longer commercial navigation and boating seasons.

severe problems down the road. It’s difficult to understand how longer boating seasons could be detrimental to recreational boaters on the Great Lakes, but Samples pointed out that boaters may overlook some of the The reaction of Great Lakes boaters, sportsfishermen, and other

potential pitfalls that may accompany such change, including the

stakeholders to this report has been well thought out.

possibility of more and larger algae blooms, a greater influx of

The Heal Our Waters Coalition, which represents several major environmental organizations, including the National Wildlife

invasive species, and a changing ecosystem that might reduce certain popular fish species.

Coalition, the National Defense Fund, and others, said that climate

Samples said these risks are prompting scientists and researchers

change definitely threatens the health of the Great Lakes as less

to ask communities, boaters, and sportsfishermen to be more

ice covers the lakes in the winter and water temperatures rise in the

resilient, more adaptive to climate change. In this regard, GLISA is

summer. In addition, warmer water temperatures will pose the threat

currently supporting MSG in a project to assist marina and harbor

of more blue-green algae forming, which are potentially harmful to

operators in sector-specific problem identification, decision-making,

fish, water quality, wildlife habitat, and even humans.

and planning related to climate change adaptation. The project team will also develop an online training module that will be tested at workshops targeting marina and harbor operators. greatlakesboating.com | 27

MSG is working with state agencies, a research team, and six small communities with recreational boating harbors to write up case studies and develop tools that will lead to sustainable small harbor management plans.

In recent years, researchers have taken a look at climate change and its impact on various aspects of the Great Lakes. For example, Sarah Nichols, a Michigan State University professor, has written a white paper for GLISA describing how climate change affects recreational tourism. She notes that warmer water temperatures can harm summer tourism because boaters won’t be out on the water that much when the temperatures are above 90 degrees. And in the winter, these warmer temps will mean less snow and ice for the winter sports of snowmobiling, snow skiing, cross-country skiing, ice fishing, and downhill skiing. Climate change is also apparent in discussions of water levels on All Photos by Michigan Sea Grant

the Great Lakes. A GLISA Report entitled “Assessing the Impact of Climate Variability and Change on the Great Lakes Evaporation”

Samples cited three specific things that will help marinas and

suggests that the reduced ice cover in the winter, warmer summer

harbors deal with climate change: enhancing and developing new

water temperatures, and enhanced evaporation rates are the culprits

design standards for marinas, promoting an updated master plan

behind the recent decline in Great Lakes water levels.

and vision for our coastal harbors and waterfronts, and getting more funds from the Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund for dredging and updating the coastal infrastructure of the Great Lakes. This latter action was recently achieved when President Obama signed into law

The NCA Report notes that while the Midwest region is a

in June the Water Resource Reform Development Act of 2014.

disproportionate source of pollution, it also can be a leader in

“One of the big problems that we have is the large number of small harbors along Michigan’s shorelines that are owned and operated by municipalities that lack the resources to adequately manage this asset,” Samples said. She notes that these municipalities depend on these harbors for core economic activity, tourism, and

mitigating the risks of climate change. The focus here is to limit climate change by changing human behavior. The first step in this regard took place in June when the Federal EPA called for a 30 percent drop in carbon pollution from fossil fuel burning utilities by 2030.

revenue. When climate changes disrupt planned activities, these

Although no one knows for sure how soon climate change will affect

harbors quickly change from low maintenance assets to large

the way people do recreational boating and sportsfishing on the

capital liabilities. “We need to develop sustainable small harbor

Great Lakes, there is one thing that we know for sure: the more we

management plans that help anticipate climate change, as well

know about climate change, the better off we will be in adapting to

as updating old infrastructure,” Samples said. That’s why in 2015

its impact on our daily lives.

28 GLB | July/Augus t 14

By Jerome A. Koncel

F

or those boaters who have pets and who describe themselves as “pet lovers,” this will come as no surprise. To those people who are not “pet lovers,” but are fascinated about the attachment boaters have to their pets, here’s the explanation. Boaters consider their pets to be members of their family. That’s why they take them wherever they go, including on their boats and on the water.

The love affair between boaters and pets is not new. actually, it’s

that is 10 minutes from downtown Toronto and within easy access to

been around for a long time. In fact, the Biblical story of Noah and

Lake Ontario. He lives year-round on a 50-foot 1964 restored Chris-

the Ark was probably one of the first written accounts of the close

Craft boat, and his constant companion is Maxine. “Half of my life

relationship between humans and animals, and that relationship

revolves around her,” Carr said. Indicative of this close association

continues on to this day.

is the flag that flies on the boat with the initials “JRT,” which stands

Calls to marinas/harbors on the Great Lakes indicated that nearly

for Jack Russell Terrier, Maxine’s breed.

all of them consider themselves to be “pet-friendly.” Moreover, the

Listening to Carr talk about Maxine, a bundle of energy, is like

number of slipholders who keep pets on their vessels range from

listening to anyone talk about their wife or best friend. For Carr,

10 percent to nearly 40 percent. Although we did not undertake a

Maxine is certainly more than just a dog. “We sail all over the

scientific survey of all Great Lakes marinas to reach this conclusion,

Great Lakes, and she’s at my side whenever and wherever we go,”

not one of the dozen marinas contacted for this story said they

Carr said.

excluded pets from the premises. On the contrary, there was an almost universal acceptance.

Carr, who holds a captain’s license and is a marine handyman by profession, said that Maxine was born on a boat, and has made

Half my life

it her home for the past nine years. Carr said that Maxine even

Although most recreational boaters are not shy about talking about

200-foot long Tall Ship. When he’s not working, Carr said that he

their pets, Ron Carr stands out. A year-round liveaboard boater, Carr

and Maxine are inseparable.

and his dog, Maxine, are probably one of the best examples of why boaters and pets are so intimately connected.

accompanies him on many of his work trips, including work on a

“I can’t begin to tell you all the fun and joy I’ve had with her,” said Carr. “She’s my partner, my best friend, even my waterskiing

Captain Ron, as he is known to his many friends, docks his vessel

partner.” Yes, Maxine has her own set of skiis, and Carr takes her

at the Outer Harbour Marina in Toronto, Ontario, a 650-slip facility

waterskiing whenever the opportunity presents itself.

30 GLB | July/Augus t 14

Carr’s relationship with Maxine goes a lot further than that of

Open spaces, water, and pets are also a great combination for

most animal lovers. He willingly tells anyone who listens that

Lee and Jennifer Meinke, who dock their boat at SkipperBud’s

Maxine keeps him sane. “She’s full of life, and keeps me grounded

Marina in Marblehead, Ohio. The Meinkes own two dogs. One is

in the things that really count,” said Carr. He added that he doesn’t

a little Pomeranian named Missy. The other is a large Chesapeake

need an exercise program with Maxine around, because she’s

Bay Retriever named Heath who the Meinkes describe as “living

always on the go.

for the water.”

When asked if he takes any special precautions with Maxine, Carr

The Meinkes don’t spend a lot of time on their boat when it’s docked

said “No.” He notes that Maxine knows her way around the Chris-

in the marina, so when the dogs get on the boat they know they’re

Craft, so he doesn’t put a lifejacket on her. “I do put a lifejacket on

going somewhere for a good time. “East Harbor State Park is

her when we’re traveling because you never know when rough seas

nearby [to the marina] and has a large section of beach designated

and storms will hit,” said Carr.

for dogs,” said Jennifer Meinke. “We’ll often go out from the marina,

Carr may be that “exception,” when it comes to boating and pets, but the rule for most boaters and their pets is that they like being

anchor off the beach, and let the dogs jump into the water and run around the beach.”

out on the water for a good time. Carr notes, for example, that his

Missy, the little Pomerian, has a lifejacket that goes on her whenever

boat is docked next to an island, so even if he and Maxine aren’t out

she’s on the boat because she is so small. On the other hand, Heath

on the water, he can take Maxine to the land nearby where there’s

loves to be in the water, Jennifer Meinke said.

plenty of room for her to run around and enjoy the outdoors.

When asked if the dogs are any trouble, the Meinkes replied, “The dogs are part of the family. Being on the boat is a big part of our family time, so it just wouldn’t be the same if they [the dogs] weren’t with us.”

pet lifejackets are essential greatlakesboating.com | 31

Pet Safety

choosing their lifejackets, large dogs have a great amount of

If pets are part of the boating family, then boaters know they need to

our friends that sport a little more fur.

take care of them. That’s why pet lifejackets are essential.

surface area, which is a factor on a hot summer day, especially for

For extra-large dogs, such as the Chesapeake Bay retriever that the

Choosing a pet lifejacket may sound like a simple task, but dog

Meinkes own, lifejackets need to be more forgiving when it comes to

owners know it’s not something they should take lightly. Although

getting a good fit. Adjustments, when needed, should be made quite

it might seem as if all dogs have an innate ability to swim, many

easily, and the price for the extra-large jackets average around $50.

dogs simply don’t take well to the water. Low fat types such as grayhounds and others that are old and might have health issues, are particularly at risk. To determine the best lifejackets for pets, BoatUS tested pet lifejackets and published its results in an article that has become an expert guide on the subject (http://www.boatus.com/magazine/2012/ june/ItsADogsLifeJacket). In testing pet lifejackets, BoatUS found that there was no one lifejacket for all size dogs and there are also different types of foam and construction materials in use today, as well as inflatable models. With prices ranging from about $20 to more than $100, there’s a lifejacket for every budget. Before purchasing a pet lifejacket, BoatUS recommends asking a few questions: Is the dog likely to jump in the water? Is the dog heavy? Will the dog want to lie down, or will it be active? Answers to these questions are important prerequisites in selecting a lifejacket, but BoatUS said the most important factor in selecting a lifejacket is to take your dog to the store to try it on. While at a store, such as West Marine, BoatUS recommends that boaters try on several models to see how each fits, and how hard or easy it is to adjust for a good fit. Check where the straps hit the animal—you don’t want the straps or buckles rubbing

Pet friendly marinas As noted earlier, most marinas describe themselves as “pet friendly facilities.” Although this conclusion is not based on any scientific survey, nearly all of the marinas we talked with said that many of their slipholders had pets, the vast majority being dogs, although there were also cats, birds, and other animals. When asked what percentage of slipholders have pets, the answers ranged from 10 percent to 40 percent. Although the marina leases indicated that pets are allowed on the premises, there were no restrictions other than “keeping their dogs on leashes and following the rules of the local city or municipality.”

sensitive parts. Also, you’ll want to check the way the foam

Michelle Shrider, marina manager, Washburn Marina, Washburn,

padding rides on the dog—too much foam in the wrong place

Wis., said that dogs are not usually a problem, but recently a

will make it uncomfortable.

slipholder complained that some dogs were barking too loudly at

One feature that testers found universally important: make sure the lifejackets have a lifting strap/handle, which makes getting the dog

night and disturbing his sleep. Shrider simply talked with the owner of the dogs, explained the situation, and everything was OK.

back into the boat much easier. Other safety features to consider

“To make sure there are no more problems, we added [to our lease]

include reflective tape and a jacket made of bright colors to make it

that dog owners must keep their pets on leashes and follow the pet

easier to spot the dog in the water in adverse conditions. And keep

rules of the city of Washburn,” said Shrider. She indicated that the

in mind, if the jacket has Velcro-style closures, your dog’s shedding

city’s rule on dogs, barking, and other pets aren’t very many, but

might clog it up, and necessitate frequent cleaning.

certainly cover any problems her marina would encounter.

Small dogs such as Carr’s Jack Russell Terrier and the Pomeranian

Rich Larson, president and general manager of Manitowoc Marina,

the Meinkes own require special fitting attention. Everything from

Manitowoc, Wis., said he’s never had any problems with boaters

strap and buckle location to the amount and placement of the foam

and pets, and has nothing written in his leases to cover this matter.

needs to be just right for this size dog to be comfortable.

“We presume that common sense will dictate pets and boating,”

For medium dogs, boaters should note substantial size differences between small and medium pet lifejackets. BoatUS notes that there are a variety of lifejackets, so chose the one that is best for these dogs. BoatUS said that large dogs, such as a 62-pound golden retriever, are more at home in the water than they are on the shore. In

32 GLB | July/Augus t 14

said Larson.

Pets are family The joys that boaters experience when bringing pets on their boats is genuine, and they want their pets on their vessels everywhere they go. As Ron Carr notes, “My dog is my pet, but she’s also the best part of my family.”

BY BRANDON SMITH

THE PILOTING OF DRONES IS A RAPIDLY EMERGING PHENOMENON. THERE IS NO TELLING HOW MANY ARE CURRENTLY BUZZING AROUND IN THE SKY, AND IT MAY NOT BE LONG BEFORE DOCK MATES ARE PASSING DRINKS FROM ONE SLIP TO ANOTHER VIA MINIATURE HELICOPTERS, BUT BEFORE THIS OCCURS THERE ARE SOME KNOTTY ISSUES THAT NEED TO BE UNTANGLED, THE MOST PRESSING OF WHICH IS PRIVACY.

W

hether spending a weekend at a marina or yacht club, or simply rafting on a river, boaters enjoy their privacy. The idea of drones peeping at their decks and into their cabins is inconceivable. Although it may be legal for boaters to hover

their camera-laden systems over a neighbor’s gunwale to see what kind of cocktail they’re drinking, marina managers will likely exclude it in their leases. Carrie Neubecker, the general manager of Reef Point Marina, Racine, Wis., said it’s hard to determine what kind of rules marinas might put in place because the concept is so new. “There will definitely have to be some policies enforced. Privacy will be one of the biggest issues to face, along with many more unforeseen negativities,” she said. “Although the negatives seem to outweigh the positives already, I can also see some benefits from them. It will be an interesting topic when the time arises.”

34 GLB |July/Augus t 14

Drones defined The word “drone” tends to spike a bit of fear in the mind’s eye. Most people think of the large

will produce any number of boaters launching, flying, then trying to land their devices back onto the vessel.

militarized Reaper and Predator drones most

Most of the drones on the Great Lakes are

known for their missions in war zones. Though

either prefabricated with expensive cameras or

it won’t be long before these machines begin

mounted with the ever-popular GoPro—a high

returning home—some already have—they

definition, waterproof, and shockproof handheld

are not the “drones” boaters will see whizzing

video camera. Because of this eye-in-the sky

around the marina.

capability, the question of privacy is always at

The personal consumer-grade drone looks more

the forefront of any discussion.

like a helicopter with anywhere from one to eight

When it comes to drones, most state laws

rotors. Some are as small as a hummingbird,

currently address their use by police for public

and others as big as a person. Their cost varies

surveillance. At least one state, Texas, has

greatly. Recreational devices range from the

recently passed legislation that fines hobbyists

$20 toy helicopter kids play with, up to $5,000

for taking photos or videos of people or

depending on custom jobs and accompanying

property. The law states that anyone taking

camera gear, and sometimes more.

photos of people or property with an unmanned

On the Great Lakes, drones are already conducting research, creating maps and images, monitoring ecosystems, and in some cases, saving lives. The little robots are being

vehicle without permission can be fined for up to $500, with civil penalties of the person or property owner reaching $10,000.

used to film sailboat races and other water

Applications

sports, and one company—Lakemaid Beer in

As with any new technology, the use of drones is

Wisconsin—even delivered cases of beer to ice

not commonplace. On the other hand, the little

fisherman before the FAA forced them to stop.

unmanned systems can be a lot of fun and are

For now, it appears that boating drone hobbyists

used for some very nifty things.

are few and far between, but that doesn’t mean

Filmmaking has really caught on in the drone

they don’t exist. A quick search on YouTube

community and there are a lot of independent

greatlakesboating.com | 35

photographer/drone pilots popping up. Putting an

to come back for more because the shots he

expensive high-definition camera onto a machine that

can get of the boats racing are unparalleled.

the double digits of miles per hour can produce some of the most stunning videos and images anyone can imagine. Images that once had to be taken by a pilot in a helicopter or airplane can now be produced for a fraction of the cost, and with minimal risk. Keith Brash, a content contributor at SailingAnarchy.com, a website that covers sailboat racing, has been operating camera mounted quadcopters for six months and uses them to primarily film sailboat races. In addition to the joystick that tells his system where to go, he wirelessly syncs his drone camera to a pair of glasses resembling a 3D simulator that gives him a first-person view from the chopper. Though Brash has recorded more than 300 hours of flight time over the water, he admits that it can still be a little risky. “I’ve lost two [drones] to the water so far,” he said. “One of them I lost filming a surf session, and the other fell in the water from some random engine failure.”

“The cost [of using drones] is so much lower than using traditional helicopters,” he said. “Plus, they’re less invasive, and they offer angles and perspectives that can’t be achieved any other way.” The kind of shots Brash captures is likely the wave of the future for extreme sport filming. It can also be easily transferred into family videos. The day may come when people go on vacation with more than one camera at their disposal, and a mini drone will likely be in the toolkit.

Perspective Although drones aren’t common now, statistics point to exponential growth in the near future. According to a 2013 report by the Association for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles International, the world’s largest and oldest non-profit advocacy group for UAVs, drones are projected to become a $13.6 billion industry within the next five years. It’s a booming industry;

Fortunately for Brash, there are now waterproof options

the technology is becoming cheaper and more user

available like the QuadH2o, and further customization

friendly with many personal systems being piloted from

gives the pilot a lot of relief while flying over the water.

smart phones, and it’s only a matter of time before

Despite losing some expensive devices, Brash continues

drones are everywhere.

36 GLB |July/Augus t 14

All photos by Keith Brash

can fly hundreds of feet in the air and reach speeds in

SAFE PERSONAL Watercraft Operations

By United

States Coast Guard Division of Boating Safety

TRUE OR FALSE:

A PERSONAL WATERCRAFT (PWC) IS NOT A BOAT, AND THEREFORE ISN’T SUBJECT TO BOATING LAWS AND REGULATIONS.

FALSE!

A PWC IS A VESSEL, SUBJECT TO THE SAME FEDERAL LAWS THAT GOVERN A MOTORBOAT IN THIS CLASS. MANY STATES AND LOCALITIES HAVE ADDITIONAL, SPECIFIC LAWS RELATING TO PWCS. PWCs are generally described as boats less than 13 feet in length,

• The National Association of State Boating Law Administrators

powered by jet pumps, where persons stand, kneel, or sit on—

(NASBLA) (www.nasbla.net/courseListing.php) provides

not in—the boats. PWCs have been among the fastest growing

a database of boating safety courses nationwide, including

segments of the boating community over the past few decades.

PWC courses.

Powerful and highly maneuverable, PWCs are great fun, but they are high-performance boats, not toys. Because they often are used by younger and less experienced operators, PWCs are unfortunately involved in a high percentage of reportable boating accidents. As with any type of boating, PWC safety starts with knowing your vessel, learning how to operate it properly, and understanding the rules of the road. The best way to learn is by taking a course; PWC boating safety resources include:

• The PWC Safety School (www.pwcsafetyschool.com) offers an online course for several states, developed in cooperation with NASBLA. • The Coast Guard Auxiliary (www.cgaux.org/boatinged/) sponsors a basic PWC safety course that can be taken in conjunction with other boating safety courses. • The Personal Watercraft Industry Association (www.pwia.org/) offers excellent resources that promote safe PWC operation.

38 GLB | July/Augus t 14

By law, a PWC must be registered and display its identification number. The PWC operator and all passengers must wear U.S. Coast Guard approved life jackets. Other required safety equipment includes an appropriate fire extinguisher, daytime distress signal for inland waterways, and a sound-producing device, such as a whistle or horn. PWC manufacturers recommend that all passengers wear wet suits or wet suit bottoms. It’s also smart to wear eye protection, gloves, booties or boat shoes, and helmets. Recommended equipment includes a basic first aid kit, water and snacks, sun protection, a current chart for the area, anchor and tow line, extra engine cut-off lanyard, portable marine VHF radio, and a tool kit for simple repairs. Other optional equipment includes an impeller protector and a telescoping paddle. Before going out on the water, make sure to understand the regulations in the particular state and locality. Age requirements for operators and passengers vary by state, and some jurisdictions require a certificate of Personal Watercraft Operations. There may also be local regulations pertaining to speed and hours in areas of operation. And, of course, file a float plan with a close friend or family member for every outing.

greatlakesboating.com | 39

Safe Operating Tips for PWCs • Get plenty of practice in calm, uncrowded waters. • Learn how the PWC maneuvers when the throttle is off. Some newer models have technology that assists in turning when not throttling, but the PWC responds differently than with the throttle on. On older models, steering is lost when not throttling. • Maintain safe speeds. PWCs can reach speeds of 65-70 miles per hour—frequently way too fast for water, weather, or boat traffic conditions. Even if the PWC is equipped with a braking system, there can be a substantial stopping distance. Be aware that quick turns at high speeds can result in the operator and passengers falling in the water.

Ensure that an adult spotter is watching the skier at all times. Check whether the state requires rear view mirrors when towing an individual. • Plan trips to get back to shore well before sunset. PWCs are designed for daytime use, and most states ban their use at night (and often one half-hour before sunrise and sunset). • Never exceed the PWC’s passenger capacity or allow a passenger to ride in front of the operator. • Practice re-boarding before going out on the water because it can be surprisingly hard. The operator may want to consider getting a

• K now and follow local regulations regarding speed limits, whether posted or not. In congested areas, lower speed; avoid operating near swimmers, divers, anglers, and canoeists. • Don’t jump other boats’ wakes. It’s extremely dangerous and usually illegal.

PWC boarding ladder. • Avoid running out of fuel by allowing 1/3 tank to go out, 1/3 tank to return, and 1/3 as reserve (not counting your reserve tank). • Don’t let an untrained or inexperienced operator borrow or use a PWC.

• Scan constantly, operate defensively, and avoid aggressive maneuvers. • Be prepared to maneuver out of the way. Remember that other boats don’t have brakes—and larger vessels cannot stop quickly. • Never apply the throttle when anyone is at the rear of the PWC—hair, loose clothing, or life jacket straps can get entangled in moving parts, and forceful water or debris from the jet can cause injury. • Be aware of blind spots—don’t pass too quickly behind another boat, as that boat can block the view of oncoming boats, and vice versa. Because PWCs are both small and fast, they are often hard for larger boats to see. • Realize that fatigue can affect a PWC operator quickly; it’s common to become tired and experience soreness in the back, knees, and elbows after about six miles. Plan outings accordingly, and take frequent breaks. The operator and passengers should drink water, juice, or non-caffeinated soft drinks to stay hydrated. • Never operate or ride on a PWC under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

SAFE PERSONAL Watercraft Operations All photos U.S. Coast Guard

40 GLB | July/Augus t 14

• Don’t tow a skier with a PWC designed for less than three persons.

Great Lakes

OHIO COAST GUARD STATION LEADS NATION IN BUI ARRESTS The U.S. Coast Guard reported that the station based out of

Boater Freedom Act in 2013. This law says that Ohio law enforcement

Marblehead, Ohio, which watches over western Lake Erie, led the

agencies may only stop a vessel if there is reasonable suspicion

nation in the number of boating under the influence arrests in 2013.

the vessel or its operator are in violation of marine law. Legislators

The Coast Guard reported that the officers charged 67 people with

passed this legislation after numerous complaints from boaters about

boating under the influence. It made 32 arrests in 2011 and 43 in 2012.

being stopped and boarded by numerous state agencies,

The station patrols the waters along Port Clinton, Sandusky, and

According to news reports, the western part of Lake Erie has long had

the Lake Erie islands. It was also the actions of this Coast Guard

a reputation for being a party destination for boaters. This is backed

station, along with those of state agencies patrolling the area, that

up by the fact that the Marblehead area has led the Great Lakes in the

prompted the Ohio legislature to pass and sign into law the Ohio

number of boating under the influence arrests for some years.

John G. Shedd Aquarium

GREAT LAKES GOVERNORS BATTLE INVASIVE SPECIES states and provinces respond to serious

The first-of-its-kind agreement was one of

AIS threats in a collaborative manner, and

many outcomes at the annual executive

encouraging further cooperative actions

meeting of the Council of Great Lakes

among participants to combat AIS. The

Governors held in Chicago. Council Co-

governors and premiers also announced a

Chairs Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn and Michigan

renewed public communications campaign

Gov. Rick Snyder, and also Wisconsin

to inform citizens of actions they can take to

Gov. Scott Walker, senior representatives

help prevent the spread of AIS.

of Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, Minnesota

The agreement recognizes that if aquatic Eight Great Lakes governors and the

invasive species invade any one of our

premiers of two Canadian provinces, all

waterways, they will have a ripple effect on

bordering the Great Lakes, signed a mutual

every individual, community, and business

aid agreement on April 26 pledging to work

that relies on the world’s largest freshwater

together to keep aquatic nuisance species

system. In addition, the agreement seals the

out of the Great Lakes.

already collaborative effort to protect this

The agreement outlines three main goals —preventing the introduction and spread of aquatic invasive species (AIS), helping

shared resource, while also empowering Great Lakes states and provinces to share staff and expertise to prevent the

Gov. Mark Dayton, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, Ohio Gov. John Kasich, Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne, Pennsylvania Governor Tom Corbett, and Québec Premier Philippe Couillard also signed agreements to protect the marine ecosystem, promote business growth and development, and better integrate the St. Lawrence-Great Lakes maritime system into a multi-modal transportation system.

introduction and spread of invasive species.

NEW FEDERAL FARM BILL PROTECTS GREAT LAKES Agriculture Sec. Tom

greatest need. The new program will also fund state and national

Vilsack and Sen. Debbie

conservation projects to improve soil quality, water quality, and

Stabenow (MI), Chair

wildlife habitat through a competitive, merit-based process.

of the Agriculture Committee, announced a new Farm Bill that Sec. Vilsack

Sen. Stabenow

provides financial

support to farmers to take action to improve the health of Great Lakes rivers, streams, and wetlands to stop algal blooms on the Great Lakes. The Regional Conservation Partnership Program (RCPP) will complement the efforts of the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative to heal the Great Lakes. The new Farm Bill designates the Great Lakes as one of eight priority regions across the country that will receive funding as part of a new $2.4 billion, 5-year program in the recently passed Farm Bill. The RCPP targets conservation funding on agricultural land to areas of 42 GLB | July/Augus t 14

Federal conservation efforts in the Great Lakes will focus on reducing harmful algal blooms, similar to the one that hit Lake Erie in the summer of 2011, that are caused by phosphorus flows off of farm fields and into rivers and streams that feed the Great Lakes. The algal blooms that are produced by this runoff can close beaches kill fish, foul drinking supplies, and cause economic harm to local businesses. Vilsack described the projects to be funded as “clean water startup operations” that will benefit communities and watersheds, a departure from the department’s more traditional approach of focusing on individual operators adopting practices such as no-till cultivation or planting buffer strips to prevent runoff into streams.

BRP WINS WISCONSIN BUSINESS ENVIRONMENTAL AWARD BRP was named

BRP’s Evinrude facility in Sturdevant, Wis., developed the emissions

the winner of this

sampling equipment to research isobutanol, a biologically produced

year’s Wisconsin

alternative fuel being tested in engines to identify if it could be a

Business Friend of

cleaner, more environmentally friendly substitute for gasoline.

the Environment Award for the unique emissions sampling equipment it developed in support of the U.S. Department of Energy’s search for a more environmentally friendly gasoline alternative. “BRP is making great strides in the areas of marine engine emission reductions and biofuel research,” said Eric Bott, Director of Environmental and Energy Policy for Wisconsin Manufacturers and Commerce. “They’re not just improving the efficiency of their engines or viability of new potential fuels. They’re inventing the testing equipment necessary to prove these advancements.”

“This is the first instrument designed specifically to measure and quantify engine exhaust emissions from in-use recreational boats,” said Jeff Wasil, BRP’s Engineering Manager on the project. “We are working closely with the National Marine Manufacturers Association and the American Boat and Yacht Council on a comprehensive test program which is leading toward a better understanding of exhaust emissions from recreational marine products.” The award recognizes businesses that demonstrate environmental soundness in pollution prevention, innovative technology and environmental stewardship. The program aims to communicate to businesses, state policymakers, and the public that these environmentally conscious practices have a positive impact on Wisconsin.

GRAND BANKS ASSOCIATION HOLDS RENDEZVOUS of the century, Harbor Springs and its

to moor 25 to 30 reasonably sized boats, a

surrounding areas offer an abundance of

place to hold meetings, good restaurants,

natural beauty and four seasons of outdoor

be located centrally in the Great Lakes, and

activities. It is also the home of this year’s

have interesting attractions.

GLGBA Summer Rendezvous, Aug. 7 to 9.

Nestled along the deepest harbor in the Great Lakes lies the waterfront community of Harbor Springs, Mich. with

The fleet will be docked at the Harbor

Harbor Springs is an extremely popular port

Springs Municipal Marina, which includes

of call during the summer months. The city

46 transient slips, 30- and 50-amp power,

fathers, after several significant persuasive

restrooms, and showers. The marina is

arguments from a local resident, who

located one block from downtown. The

happens to be a GLGBA member, agreed

docks at the city marina are fixed.

to let GLGBA hold its 2014 rendezvous in its harbor.

approximately 1,900 residents. A bustling

To qualify as a potential rendezvous

tourist destination since before the turn

destination, a candidate must have a harbor

www.glgba.org

REGISTRATION FOR DISCOVERY CRUISES NOW OPEN Michigan Sea Grant and Michigan State University Extension, in

water and range in price from $10 to $25 per person. Ages six and

cooperation with the Huron-Clinton Metropolitan Authority, said

older are welcome on the cruises.

registration is now open for its Summer Discovery Cruises, which are open to anyone interested in exploring Lake Erie, the Detroit River, and Lake St. Clair. The cruises offer individuals an opportunity to get out on the water for an educational experience. Cruisers can learn about many aspects of the lakes, from lighthouses, shipwrecks, bootleggers and history and culture of the region to fish, ecology, restoration and wind, waves and water — and much more, depending on the cruise theme. Michigan Sea Grant said there are more than 20 cruise themes to choose from. Most cruises range from 2.5 hours to 4 hours on the

To register for these cruises from Lake Erie Metropark and Lake St. Clair Metropark, individuals should first choose their departure location, check out the cruise descriptions and time schedules, and then register through the online form. ANYONE INTERESTED IN THESE EDUCATIONAL CRUISES SHOULD GO THE FOLLOWING WEBSITES: • Lake Erie Metropark: www.miseagrant.umich.edu/sdc/category/ lake-erie-cruises/ • Lake St. Clair Metropark: www.miseagrant.umich.edu/sdc/ category/lake-st-clair-cruises/ greatlakesboating.com | 43

Great Lakes

STATE BOWFISHING CHAMPIONSHIP SET FOR JULY The Bowfishing Association of Illinois, in cooperation with the Illinois

DNR said the tournament has become a popular mid-summer event

Department of Natural Resources, has scheduled the third annual

for bowfishing anglers and has helped remove tens of thousands of

Director’s Shoot/Innerloc State Bowfishing Championships for July

invasive Asian carp from the Illinois River each year.

19-20 on the Illinois River at Starved Rock State Park near Utica, Ill. Officials said the tournament helps to remove tens of thousands of Asian carp from Illinois rivers each year.

The state agency says the bowfishing event has numerous competitions, including a grand prize of $1,000. Entry fee for the tournament is $30, which includes a free lunch between shoots and

The daytime portion of the tournament will be held from 5 a.m. until 2 p.m., July 19, and consists of a Big 6 Daytime Championship, an Invasive Numbers competition, and many big and small fish competitions. The nighttime fishing championships start at 8 p.m.

a large array of door prizes. For registration and more information, contact BAI President Ed Devries at eddevries@illinoisbowfishing.net

on July 19 and end at 5 a.m. on July 20, and will consist of a Big 30 weight championship and an Invasive Numbers competition.

PORT WASHINGTON TO HOLD MARITIME HERITAGE FESTIVAL the general grounds is free, there is a fee required for touring the boats. In addition to the boat tours and sailings, the festival will offer free historic tours, education displays, guided/interactive harbor tours, children’s activities, a food and beverage court, and two live musical stages. A highlight of this year’s festival will be Cardboard Regatta racing, and there will be two races this year. On Saturday, visitors

Port Washington (Wis.) will hold its annual

from 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. on Saturday,

will be treated to cardboats that were built

Aug. 16; and from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on

in advance of the festival and will now be

Sunday, Aug. 17.

racing against each other. On Sunday,

Maritime Heritage Festival in the new Coal

Visitors will have the opportunity to tour

Dock Park Aug. 15 to 17. Celebrating all

and even sail on various boats, including

things that have made the community

fishing trawlers, tugboats, U.S. Coast

a historical lakefront destination, Port

Guard vessels, harbor cruisers, and some

Washington’s festival will be open from

handcrafted wooden boats that have been

noon to 9:00 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 15;

recently restored. Although admission to

visitors can watch the “Built in a Day” race. For this race, participants were provided with supplies on Saturday, told to build their boats within one day, and will be showing their efforts on the water on Sunday afternoon.

REPORTS CALLS FOR REDUCTION OF PHOSPHORUS RUNOFF A report from the EcoFore-Lake Erie Project

of phosphorus pollution heading into Lake

coupled with severe spring rainstorms

calls for a nearly 50 percent reduction in the

Erie each year. The study noted that while

have led to increased amounts of DRP

amount of phosphorus runoff into Lake Erie

the amount of phosphorus heading into the

coming into Lake Erie. To protect the lake

to prevent the formation of algal blooms and

lake has not changed significantly since

against extensive algae blooms similar

the growth of oxygen-starved regions in the

1991, a new type of phosphorus—dissolved

to the one that occurred in 2011, the

lake known as “hypoxic zones.”

reactive phosphorus (DRP)—has come to

researchers recommend a 78 percent

the fore and when DRP meets algae, the

reduction in the annual DRP load coming

algae bloom grows quite quickly.

into the lake each year.

EcoFore-Lake Erie Project presented their

The researchers note that farmers have

Learn more about the research and

major findings about Lake Erie and called

changed their fertilization practices,

recommendations at graham.umich.edu/

for a 46 percent reduction in the amount

increasing the amount of DRP, and this fact

news/ecofore-media.

In an online study published in the Journal of Great Lakes Research, members of the

44 GLB | July/Augus t 14

ANTIQUE BOAT MUSEUM PARTNERS WITH HOSPITAL Creative Arts Therapy. In addition to the exhibition,

The Antique Boat Museum (ABM), based in Clayton,

participants in the RCWP will also be given the

N.Y., is partnering with River Hospital of Alexandria

opportunity to explore the region’s beauty by

Bay, N.Y., to support our armed forces.

climbing aboard one of the museum’s in-water

Running through the early fall, ABM will feature

boats to cruise the islands for relaxation and

a new exhibition that will relate to the River

meditation time, as required by the program.

Community Wellness Program (RCWP) based at

In addition, ABM announced that it will

River Hospital.

again serve as one of more than 2,000 Blue Star

River Hospital’s RCWP is the only program of its kind in the United States, keeping military members close to home while they are healing and learning to cope, using multiple forms of therapies such as cognitive processing therapy, group

Museums across the country that provide complimentary admission to active military and their immediate families.

and individual therapy, movement therapy, peer-to-peer therapy,

Also, River Hospital will now serve as the Official Sponsor of

imaginal and in vivo exposure therapy, as well as psychiatry and

the Armed Forces at the Museum throughout the 2014 season,

medication management.

underwriting admission fees, as well as the admission fees of all

Through this new partnership, ABM will display the artwork and creative writing that has been done in recent years as part of

active and retired military members attending the upcoming 50th annual Antique Boat Show to be held Aug. 1-3.

ESD AWARENESS CAMPAIGN NOW UNDERWAY The Energy Education Council and Safe Electricity.org are highlighting the experience of Kevin and Sheryl Ritz, who lost their 8-year old son Lucas to electric shock drowning (ESD), as the centerpiece of a national campaign to promote ESD awareness among boaters and marina owners and operators. Molly Hall, executive director of the Energy Education Council, said at a May 21 press conference in Chicago that her group is working through the Safe Electricity’s “Teach Learn Care TLC” program to make boat owners and marina operators aware of ESD. In addition, they are striving to teach people how to avoid and prevent ESD. Boaters can help prevent ESD accidents by inspecting and maintaining all their electrical systems on or near the water. They should have their vessel’s electrical system checked at least once each year, and if any maintenance is needed, a professional familiar with marine electrical codes should perform it. Boats with AC

Pictured left to right: Chief Glen Lovelace, USCG Marine Safety Unit; Molly Hall; Kevin Ritz

At docks, a ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) should be installed on the circuits feeding electricity to the dock. In addition, marinas should comply with the National Electrical Code and National Fire Protection Codes. Finally, marinas should inspect their electrical systems at least once a year.

systems should install isolation transformers or equipment leakage

For more information about the ESD awareness campaign, contact

circuit interrupter protection to prevent ESD from occurring.

Molly Hall at 217-546-6815 or email her at: mollyh@illinois.edu.

TRAVERSE CITY STUDIES FISHING PIER OPTION Traverse City, Mich., officials are using

city’s Mayor, Michael Estes, is a strong

for people with wheelchairs and physical

a $232,000 grant from the Great Lakes

supporter of the public fishing pier saying

limitations, and there’s no easy access to

Fishery Trust to determine the feasibility

that it would be a huge attraction for both

emergency services.”

of putting in a 550-ft. long fishing pier

residents and visitors.

that would extend from the mouth of the Boardman River into Grand Traverse Bay, according to AP news reports. The city recently hired an engineering firm to complete the design, preliminary engineering, environmental studies and construction drawings for the pier. The

Commissioner Ross Richardson, who

The proposed pier’s location has

shares Estes’ desire for the pier, also

drawn some criticism, according to

said the Boardman River location may

local news reports.

be too far away from the city center and

“It’s just the wrong spot,” said former city Commissioner Deni Scrudato, who docks a boat in the Boardman River. “There’s no parking, there’s no easy access

parking. “There are real questions about how accessible it is there and if it’s not accessible, how much use is it going to get,” Richardson said. greatlakesboating.com | 45

Fishing

WISCONSIN DNR OFFER FREE FISHING APP Wisconsin’s Dept. of Natural Resources has updated its Pocket

The Wisconsin Dept. of Natural Resources collaborated with the

Ranger mobile app to include a full array of fishing information.

Wisconsin Interactive Network and ParksByNature to create this app

The free app for Apple and Android devices provides essential

free for the public.

information for prospective, novice, and experienced anglers.

“Users should find something for everyone in the initial launch of

The app includes information on fish species, where to fish, fishing

the fishing side of the DNR app, and we’ll expand the information

basics, lake information, access information, licenses and permits,

and update it throughout the year to provide anglers with a more

rules and regulations, fishing seasons, and much more.

comprehensive look at Wisconsin fishing,” said Karl Scheidegger, Dept. of Natural Resources fisheries outreach leader.

MINNESOTA PROPOSES NEW WALLEYE REGULATIONS The Minnesota Department of Natural

walleye as well, suggesting that the number

straightforward, in that it will

Resources (MDNR) is looking for public

of young fish that will make it to adulthood

protect population numbers in the

feedback on potential new walleye fishing

is probably declining.

lakes as a whole. MDNR adds that it

regulations for Cook County. Growing concerns from anglers, as well as MDNR assessments of the walleye population, are prompting the agency to propose these new regulations.

The proposed new regulations call for catches to be at least 17 inches, with a bag

will post signs with these limits at access points on all affected waters.

limit of three, and only one fish longer than

The state agency said that it wants

20 inches. The minimum size limit is being

public input on these fishing regulations

suggested to protect the number of small

throughout the summer. It will hold public

The state agency has found that both the

fish being caught in hopes the population

meetings on the subject in late September

number of walleye in Saganaga, Sea Gull,

will remain stable and maximize returns

in Grand Marais and St. Paul. Questions

and Gull lakes is apparently on the decline,

from stocking and natural spawning. The

and comments can be directed to the

and their size is diminishing. In addition,

proposal for a single 20 inches limit is

DNR fisheries office in Grand Marais at

fishermen in these lakes are reporting a

already in line with statewide regulations

218-387-3056.

noticeable decline in the number of smaller

for the fish. The bag limit is more

EXPERIMENTAL TROUT REGULATIONS FOR UPPER PENINSULA Cory Kovacs, a fisheries biologist at the DNR’s Newberry Fisheries Division and the person responsible for collecting and monitoring the data of the project, said the process of collecting input from trout fisherman is an ongoing project that will help determine the health of the trout population in a number of rivers through the Upper Peninsula. The regulation experiment seeks to determine whether fisherman David Kenyon, Michigan DNR

prefer a 10 bag limit of brook trout or a 5 bag limit. Data from Creel and postcard surveys collected from 268 anglers in 2013 showed that anglers prefer a 5 bag limit over the 10 bag, but only slightly. Kovacs notes that those anglers who prefer the 10 bag limit are generally keeping the fish to eat, while people who like the 5 bag limit are likely to catch and release the fish. Information regarding which rivers are part of the study can be found at the MDNR’s website. The study is ongoing throughout the The Michigan Department of Natural Resources (DNR) is continuing

summer, and brook trout anglers are encouraged to either meet with

its experimental trout regulations and survey work in the Upper

the Creel surveyors or turn in postcards regarding their experience

Peninsula for a second season.

and opinions.

46 GLB | July/Augus t 14

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Marinas

MARINA DEVELOPER INDICTED FOR FRAUD The developer of the Riverdale (Ill.) Marina, an 80,000 sq. ft. port with

The indictment alleges that Riverdale gave Thomas’ company,

a restaurant and space for 100 boats, was indicted in April for money

Nosmo Kings, LLC, $900,000 in tax increment financing to revamp

fraud, according to an April 19 article in the Chicago Tribune.

the marina. Federal charges allege that Thomas used $370,000 of

The federal indictment alleges that John Thomas, a real estate

this amount to pay off personal debts, legal fees, even his rent.

developer, fraudulently spent $370,000 intended for the marina

The Tribune article said that Thomas submitted false invoices to

development to pay off personal debts.

conceal his illegal use of the money. Prosecutors charge that Thomas

News reports indicate the marina is currently in shambles. There are no boats in any of the marina slips; the Dixie Star restaurant located on the property sits unused; and the rest of the facility, including

submitted a $256,000 invoice for construction supplies from a company that was actually a currency exchange, according to the Tribune piece.

restrooms and offices, is decimated as a result of light fixtures,

“This project has been a disaster for the village of Riverdale,”

toilets, and hardwood flooring being ripped out.

said Mayor Lawrence Jackson. “We’re out a lot of money, and unfortunately, I don’t know if we’ll ever get it back.”

CITY STUDIES FUTURE OF MENTOR LAGOONS MARINA The city of Mentor, Ohio, recently

$600 a lineal foot; removal of the Mentor

hired CT Consultants to analyze and

Harbor Bridge at an estimated cost of

evaluate various aspects of the facility

$300,000; possible rehabilitation of the

in order to plan for its future, according

Mentor Harbor channel to improve the

to an article by Betsy Schmidt on the

safety of the harbor entrance for boaters;

website: www.courier-herald.com.

and ongoing channel dredging.

The contract has two phases. In phase

City Manager Ken Filipiak said the

one, the consultants will assess onsite

impetus for getting this long-range

conditions, determine the marina’s

planning started now is a strong bond

place within the regional marketplace,

market. He added that the major projects

and prepare costs estimates for marina

would be bonded out over 25 years. The city has already invested in a new road

repairs and upgrades. In phase 2, the consultants will develop a plan to maximize facility capacity and

system, waterlines to boat docks, new curbing, and additional green

boater amenities for the most favorable financial performance. This

space for the public, Filipiak said.

would include construction estimates for the needed repairs and a 10-year operating plan.

The marina is currently at full capacity, with 80 people on a waiting list. It currently meets all its operational costs, including debt service

The city is currently facing high-priced infrastructure repairs,

for bonds used to purchase the marina in 1997.

including replacement of more than three miles of dockwall at about

LAKE MACATAWA MARINA PROJECT DELAYED AGAIN A proposed $3 million marina, part of the

modified multiple times to satisfy the

Macatawa Area Residents for Fair

Point West I development proposed for

demands of USACE and the Michigan DEQ,

Development, which opposes the marina

the western edge of Lake Macatawa, has

which must approve the proposal before

and the development, released the

been put on hold as the U.S. Army Corps of

construction can begin.

following statement: “This new plan fails to

Engineers (USACE) and the Michigan Dept. of Environmental Quality (DEQ) awaited public comments on the project, according to article by Andrea Goodell on the website: www.hollandsentinel.com.

Most of the boat slips would be 40- to 60feet long, a few would be 80 feet, and one would be 25 feet, said Harmsen. He added that construction of the marina, along with a clubhouse and swimming pool, would

acknowledge the objections and concerns expressed by USACE, the Michigan Dept. of Natural Resources, the U.S. Coast Guard, and many local boaters and fishermen who depend on the area for recreation.”

The proposed marina would have 80 slips,

prompt more prospective buyers for the

At press deadline, MDEQ and USACE

three docks, and its longest dock would

development. “We’re discovering that people

scheduled public hearings on the project,

stretch 355 feet into Lake Macatawa. Mark

are waiting on the sidelines to see if the

and the status of the marina project was

Harmsen, the developer’s representative,

marina gets approved,” said Harmsen.

still unknown.

said marina plans have already been 48 GLB | July/Augus t 14

RACINE COUNTY FILLS IN BELLE HARBOR MARINA Racine County will use an $80,000 grant to

Wis.; Bear Development of Kenosha, Wis.;

site and will use this information in offering

fill in Belle Harbor Marina along the Root

and Construction Services Group of West

the company’s formal redevelopment

River, creating a 4.1-acre redevelopment

Dundee, Ill.

proposal. The company indicated that it

parcel of land that has attracted three potential developers of the property. At press deadline, the county had not set a timetable for developing the property. The three developers that have expressed an interest in the Wisconsin property are Richard Barrett, president and founder of Barrett Visionary Development of Milwaukee,

Barrett did not have a specific proposal for the site, but indicated that it would have to

would have a definite development proposal ready sometime this summer.

be something that would light up and attract

Construction Services Group is a firm that

people to downtown Racine.

typically works with major hotel chains

Bear Development is part of the Bear Real Estate Group. The company said that it is in the process of gathering information on the

to construct new hotels. It is interested in putting a 110-room to 120-room hotel on the redeveloped property. The building would be nine to 10 stories high.

WYANDOTTE RECEIVES $1.1 MILLION FOR MARINA As part of its more than $16 million Boating Infrastructure Grant

of a 21-slip transient marina along the Detroit River. The new marina

(BIG) Program, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has awarded

will have floating slips with electrical pedestals and other amenities.

Wyandotte, Mich., a $1,170,5000 matching grant to build a transient marina at Bishop Park.

In addition to Wyandotte, another Michigan marina, Bayshore Marina in Munising, Mich. received a $1,466,577 BIG program award. The

In making the grant announcement, Dan Ashe, USFWS director,

city will partner with Michigan DNR, Alger County, and the Sault Ste.

said, “Anglers and boaters make these grants possible, helping

Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians to provide matching funds for a new

communities build and enhance facilities that provide recreational

marina with 28 transient slips.

opportunities, while supporting jobs and economic growth.”

Bayshore Marina is an important “harbor of refuge” for boats

As part of its grant application, the city of Wyandotte said that it

traveling a remote 80-mile stretch along the Upper Peninsula of

would partner with the Michigan Dept. of Natural Resources, Division

Michigan. The marina will now to be able to accommodate those

of Parks and Recreation, to provide matching funds for the building

larger boats seeking refuge from storms on Lake Michigan.

ROGERS CITY MARINA GETS A NEW FUEL DOCK

A new fuel dock has been in the works for the marina for some time. The city originally had received a $27,000 grant from the Michigan Waterways Commission and a $24,000 grant from the U.S. Dept. of Agricultural Rural Development in 2013. However, the Waterways Commission grant was

The city council voted in May to purchase a new fuel dock from Flotation Docking Systems of Cedarville, Mich. for $53,450. Harbormaster Roger Wenzel and Mayor Tom Sobeck told city

put on hold in 2013 after Rogers City also received a grant for up to $227,000 as part of an emergency dredging program put together by the state in response

council members that this was fair price for the fuel dock.

to record low lake levels.

The next step in the process is to get permits from the Michigan

Wenzel said the fuel dock will provide an easier, safer platform for

Dept. of Natural Resources, and city manager Joe Hefele indicated this would not be a big problem because the DNR had worked with

those fueling boats at the marina. It will be attached to the wall near the fuel pumps and slide up and down on rails.

the company before on fuel dock projects. greatlakesboating.com | 49

National

BOAT FATALITIES ARE AT ALL-TIME RECORD LOW

The fatality rate of 4.7 deaths per 100,000 registered recreational vessels reflected a 13 percent decline from the previous year’s rate of 5.4 deaths per 100,000 registered boats. Property damages in these incidents totaled $39 million, according to USCG. The report states that alcohol use was the leading known contributing factor in fatal boating accidents, having been cited as the major factor in 16 percent of deaths. Operator inattention, improper lookout, operator inexperience, excessive speed, and machinery failure ranked as the top five primary contributing factors

U.S. Coast Guard

Boating fatalities were at a record all-time low of 560 in 2013,

in accidents.

according to the 2013 Recreational Boating Statistics Report issued

In cases where the cause of death was known, USCG reported

by the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) on May 14.

that 77 percent of the fatal boating accident victims drowned. Of

Deaths in boating-related accidents dropped 14 percent from 2012 to 2013, from 651 to 560, while the number of boating-related injuries decreased 12.7 percent, from 3,000 in 2012 to 2,620 in 2013. The

this number, 84 percent were not wearing a life jacket. The most common type of vessels involved in reported accidents were open motorboats, personal watercraft, and cabin motorboats.

total number of recreational boating accidents reported in 2013 was

To view the complete report, go to: www.uscgboating.org/assets/1/

4,062, a 10 percent decrease from the 4,515 in 2012.

AssetManager/2013RecBoatingStates.pdf.

RBFF HISPANIC OUTREACH CAMPAIGN NOW UNDERWAY The Recreational Boating & Fishing

11 percent from 2006 to 2011. The Hispanic

basics, how-to fish videos, an interactive

Foundation (RBFF) has launched the

population in the U.S. is currently 53 million

where-to fish and boat map, fishing license

first phase of a five-year plan to increase

and is projected to reach 65 million by 2020.

and boat registration information, and

awareness of fishing and boating among Hispanics, and engage the fastest growing segment of the U.S. population in these activities. It recently produced a new Spanish-language microsite, VamosAPescar.org, along with targeted advertising, to motivate Hispanics to partake in fishing and boating.

At the center of RBFF’s multi-channel outreach campaign is VamosAPescar.

mythbusters to help dispel the perceived barriers to getting out on the water.

org, the Spanish-language microsite. It

Outreach for the campaign will include

was created as an information hub to

digital advertising and search engine

overcome the Hispanics’ lack of familiarity

marketing, as well as radio and event

with the sport and knowledge of licensing

marketing in Texas and Florida. The

requirements. The site provides everything

campaign will target family-oriented outdoor

a beginning angler or boater would need

lovers who are seeking outdoor activities.

According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife

to know. Built on a flexible web layout

Service (USFWS), Hispanic participation in

that detects the visitor’s screen size

fishing has remained stagnant over the past

and orientation and changes the layout

5 years, while overall participation has risen

accordingly, the site includes boating

More information is available at TakeMeFishing.org/corporate.

CANADA’S EFFORTS TO STOP ASIAN CARP FROM GREAT LAKES The Minister of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO)

She noted that those funds were allocated

had originally been transferred from Asia

told an April meeting in Owen Sound (Ont.)

over five years for the prevention, early

to North America in the 1960s and 1970s,

that the federal government has to remain

warning, and management of this potentially

prefer cool to moderate water temperatures

vigilant in the fight to prevent Asian carp

destructive invasive species.

like those found in the Great Lakes. If they

from becoming established in the Great Lakes, according to an article by Tom Sasvri in the Manitoulin Expositor.

The government of Canada takes the threat posed by Asian carp very seriously, Shea said. It has recently passed new

become established, they could eat the food native to fish in the Great Lakes and crowd them out of their habitats, causing significant damage to the sports and

DFO Minister Gail Shea told a group of

requirements that prohibit the importation,

anglers the federal government has taken

transportation, and possession of live

several steps to address the Asian carp

aquatic invasive species in Canada

Shea added that so far no species of carp,

threat, including authorizing the spending

including Asian carp.

including bighead, silver, grass and black

of up to $17.5 million to protect Canada’s Great Lakes from the threat of Asian carp. 50 GLB | July/Augus t 14

The Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR) has reported that Asian carp, which

commercial fisheries.

carp, have been found in Canada, and the federal government aims to keep it this way.

Sailing

LAKE ERIE SOLO CHALLENGE The Lake Erie Solo Challenge represents the

Lakes. While Lake Erie may be the smallest

commercial freighter traffic, and the

fourth Great Lakes Singlehanded Society

and shallowest of the Great Lakes, those very

ingredients are in place for a challenge

membership-granting event on the Great

characteristics make for some extraordinarily

on par with those of any other lake.

difficult sailing at times. Winds can quickly produce large, steep-faced waves in minutes, and summer storms can turn a placid body of water into a tempest just as quickly. Throw in a high concentration of pleasure craft, fishermen, and fishnets interspersed with

The Lake Erie Solo Challenge begins Aug. 16, with a start off of North Cape Yacht Club near Monroe, Mich., and the fleet proceeds past Pelee Island, Ontario and eastward to a rounding of the Seneca Shoal Light near Buffalo, N.Y., then on to a finish off of Presque Isle Harbor at Erie, Pa. The course measures 312 statute miles, and in terms of comparison to the other GLSS Challenges, it ranks fourth behind the Trans Superior Solo, the Lake Ontario Solo Challenge, and the Chicago to Mackinac Island Solo Challenge. The 2014 event will mark the eighth running of the Challenge.

© Great Lakes Singlehanded Society

BELL’S BAYVIEW MACKINAC RACE The message read: “Sail your race,” but what former President

specific sports team whose boat wins the Pro Team Challenge then

Franklin D. Roosevelt meant was that the Bayview Mackinac

hosts the boat crew at one of their games.

Race was too precious to cancel. The race will celebrate its 90th anniversary on July 12.

From its traditional start in southern Lake Huron, the fleet will head north on one of two courses. The shorter course, called the

A fun factor has been added to the race in the form of the Bayview

Acura Shore Course, covers 204 nautical miles along the Michigan

Mackinac Pro Team Challenge, which was created by the club

shoreline before heading west to Mackinac Island Bell’s Beer finish

five years ago to generate more exposure for the race by having

line. The longer Quantum Sails Cove Island Course is 259 nautical

Michigan sports teams—the Pistons, Red Wings, Tigers and Lions—

miles and takes sailors around a buoy off the tip of the Bruce

each sponsor a different boat in the race.

Peninsula in Canadian waters before heading west toward the

Jim Brandstatter (Lions), Dave Rozema (Tigers), Ken Kal (Red

finish line.

Wings) and Rick Mahorn (Pistons) selected their 2014 boats after

This year, five Divisions will be offered: Cove Island Racing;

John Mason, the Pistons’ public address announcer, introduced

Shore Course Racing; Shore Course Cruising; Multi-Hull; and

them. The athletes will not have to sail in the race, but their teams

Double-Handed. All competitors will be handicapped using

provide the crews of the selected boats shirts, hats, and a flag. The

Performance Handicap Racing Fleet system.

2014 CORSAIR US NATIONALS & RENDEZVOUS This event is being hosted from July 31 to Aug. 1, during the Inter-

Bay Week Regatta at South Bass Island for 120 years. The ILYA holds

Lake Yachting Association’s (ILYA) Bayweek Regatta. The event will

three regattas on the island each summer including junior, power,

be held at Put-in-Bay, a major tourist and vacation destination located

and sail boating competitions all at the Put-in-Bay Yacht Club. PIBYC

on South Bass Island in the western end of Lake Erie.

will be the site for all the on-shore activities during the 2014 Corsair

Established in 1885, ILYA is one of America’s oldest yachting

Nationals & Rendezvous Regatta.

associations. ILYA is comprised of 146 member clubs from all around

The event is open to all Corsair-built trimaran models, and racing and

the Great Lakes. Furthermore, the ILYA has been hosting the Annual

cruising divisions will be formed as registration details progress.

52 GLB | July/Augus t 14

THE CORINTHIAN CLASSIC YACHT REGATTA The racing is done in “Pursuit”

This year’s Corinthian Classic is being held in Marblehead, Mass.,

format and will be sailed with no

Aug. 9 and 10.

spinnakers. Long reaching legs

When builders began working with Glass Reinforced Plastic

will be emphasized and beats

(GRP) as a material, they were well aware that they were

will be minimal. The reasonable

building something to last. What has transpired is that many

entry fee includes mooring

of those yachts have been around for so many decades that

(first come, first served). Social

their designs have

events include live bands Friday

in fact become “classic.”

and Saturday nights, and an

The Corinthian Classic Yacht Regatta continues to encourage and welcome Classic GRP (Classic Plastic) boats designed to the CCA rule or “spirit of tradition” philosophy, to participate.

authentic pig roast. The racing will be low key, but it is an excellent opportunity to stretch those sea legs, put a beautiful boat on display, and mingle with those who share that sailing passion. www.corinthianclassic.org

ASHBRIDGE’S BAY YACHT CLUB [ TORONTO] TO HOST LAKE YACHT RACING ASSOCIATION REGATTA The regatta takes place from July 26 to

In addition to the championships, the

distance race on July 31. Determined to

Aug. 3, and includes long distance races,

organizing committee has announced a

attract the most competitive sailors, the

point-to-point races, and three days of

number of enhancements to the 2014 edition

ABYC organizing committee is also offering

course racing.

of the annual regatta including scheduling

a number of incentives including an intra-

the signature long distance event—the

club challenge to encourage club rivalries.

Freeman Cup—for the weekend of July 26 to

Skippers can also take advantage of

27, and including divisions for double- and

bonuses for registering for more than one

single-handed crews.

event. With the support of UK Sailmakers

LYRA 2014 will feature two major championships; the IRC North American Championship and the PHRF Lake Ontario Championship. The regatta will also include a number of one-design classes competing

With support from the Youngstown Yacht

in title events.

Club, the Centennial Cup is scheduled as a point-to-point race on July 28, and the

Toronto, all entrants are also eligible for the Great UK Sailmakers Giveaway. www.LYRA2014.com

Founders Cup is scheduled as a mid-

UNSALTED SAILING FLOTILLA The Great Lakes Sailing Company will be hosting its fourth freshwater

The itinerary is packed with activities. Nature hikes, wine

flotilla Aug. 16 through 22.

tastings, and a special regatta are just a few of the things that

Over a seven-day trip, the flotilla will harbor hop from Grand Traverse and Little Traverse Bay to Suttons Bay, Northport, Charlevoix, Omena Bay, Elk Rapid, Bower’s Harbor, Marion Island, and back to Traverse City, Mich.

will be experienced along the way. The flotilla is also a great opportunity to explore the islands, beaches, towns, and harbors of Northern Michigan. There are several ways to join the flotilla: renting a charter from the GLSC fleet, taking a sailing or cruising course depending on experience, booking a cabin on a captained boat, or sailing on a personal craft for a fee. For beginners or those looking for a thorough refresher, the ASA 101/103 combo course is offered and the 104 bareboat certification and 105 coastal navigation courses are also offered for those individuals with a little more experience. To view the itinerary, pricing, and ways to join the flotilla, visit the Great Lakes Sailing Co. website. www.greatlakessailingco.com/unsalted-events/ unsalted-sailing-flotilla/ greatlakesboating.com | 53

NEW PRODUCTS

HIGH WIND BIMINI TOP MATE USA has introduced the Black Velvet bimini top, designed to withstand wind speeds up to 33 knots. The wind tunnel tested, easy-to-assemble Black Velvet features a patented plastic cylinder system that adds strength to the supporting tubes and keeps the assembly screws aligned, enhancing longevity. The new top also features unique spider netting that reduces ultraviolet (UV) radiation and enhances air flow throughout the covered area on board. A fast-mounting storage cover is included. $2,800 // 954-463-5757 // www.mate-usa.com

FLOW-TROLL Frabill’s redesigned Magnum Flow-Troll is a beefier version of the 6-quart Flow-Troll. Although the basic design hasn’t changed, the new Flow-Troll holds up to 10 quarts allowing room for a much larger number of bait. The Flow-Troll is designed to sit half submerged in the water, and whether it’s being pulled behind a boat or bobbing in the wake, the vented doors and aeration holes work in tandem to keep the product upright and filter oxygen keeping bait fish perky. The plastic is durable and can withstand collisions with rocks and docks alike. $12.99 // 800-558-1005 // www.frabill.com

WIRELESS BOW THRUSTER JOYSTICK For boaters looking to install external bow and stern thrusters, or for those who already utilize them, the new wireless joystick from Sideshift greatly reduces the amount of time it takes to install a thruster system. The wireless joystick eliminates the necessity of hull drilling and running lines of wire. For boaters who already own a Sideshift thruster kit, the package can be upgraded to the wireless format. The wireless joysticks work just like the old format, but they make DIY installations faster and less stressful. Upgrade: $395; New Kit: $3,495 // 847-662-9070 // www.sideshift.com

54 GLB | July/Augus t 14

WIRELESS REMOTE CONTROL STEERING For fishermen adjusting a troll, or captains just looking to relax, the new Intellisteer remote control steering unit from Canada Metal allows for course adjustments at a distance. Intellisteer comes in a variety of models that are supported by a number of autopilot systems. For boats already equipped with an autopilot, a standalone Intellisteer system can be purchased as a wireless upgrade. The wireless controller can also be configured for kicker and outboard motors used for trolling. The controller is waterproof and comes with a lanyard to support one-handed use. $299 // 604-940-2010 // www.canmet.com

TRIM TAB LED LIGHT MOUNT Perko has designed LED lights that can be mounted with removable brackets onto the surface of a vessel’s trim tabs. The lights are 12 V, 7 W with a white version producing 75 lumens and a blue version producing 27. The lights are housed in a non-corrosive black polymer mold, and have 8 feet of 18 AWG marine grade electrical wiring attached. The lights can be mounted vertically or horizontally on the trim tabs, and can also be mounted on the surface of the transom. Adjusting the trim tabs in turn will adjust the angle of the lights. Double Pack: $400; Single: $200 // 305-621-7525 // www.perko.com

MR. BEAMS SECURITY SPOTLIGHT A high-tech security lighting system installed at a dock can help deter unwanted trespassers, but the costs can be prohibitive and if dock space is rented, installing electrical may not be allowed. Mr. Beams has created a wireless motion-detecting LED spotlight that can be mounted in less than five minutes. All that’s needed is a few batteries and screws. The spotlight instantly turns on when it detects motion from up to 25 feet away. A light sensor helps to prevent the light from activating in daylight. Tight seals and UV-resistant material allow it to work in all weather conditions. $39.99 // 877-298-9082 // www.mrbeams.com

greatlakesboating.com | 55

BOAT CARE & FEEDING

GAS/WATER SEPARATION MUFFLER Gen-Sep™ from Centek Industries works in tandem with a Vernalift™ muffler system on generator sets to separate cooling water from exhaust gases. The gas/water separator is an easy and effective upgrade for any generator system, especially where engines are located amidships or well forward in the hull. The product is also effective at reducing exhaust noise. The device is available for both gasoline and diesel engines in a wide range of sizes to fit any generator. It comes in a variety of colors and finishes. $180-$537 depending on size // 229-228-7653 // www.centekindustries.com

SEWAGE SYSTEM CLEANER Clogs and nasty odors can be removed quickly and safely from sewage systems with safe, non-toxic, and biodegradable SEWClean® from TRAC Ecological Green Products. SEWClean® efficiently and economically cleans onboard sewage systems—without dismantling any piping or creating a mess. It’s compatible with all metals, plastics, gaskets, and other materials commonly found in sewage systems. Use to remove uric scale and clean sewage systems from toilet to tank. One gallon of SEWClean® makes five to eight gallons of ready-to-use solution. One quart is needed for a single cleaning. $71.72 // 954-987-2722 // www.trac-online.com

MARINE FABRIC TREATMENT The Marine Fabric Armour by FLITZ is designed to coat any fabric that is threatened by water. It can be used to coat any textile. sailcloth, awnings, canvas, cushions, leather, cotton, even plastics and acrylics. The spray can be applied twice with a drying period in between for optimal effect, and will protect from acid rain, dirt, grease, soil, oils, and hard water. The product comes in a 16 oz. spray bottle. $17.95 // 262-534-5898 // www.flitz.com

56 GLB | July/Augus t 14

RINSE FREE WASH-N-WAX Meguiar’s has introduced a new rinse free wash-n-wax spray. The product is specifically designed for marine units and can be applied to wet or dry surfaces. The spray can be used on any surface: gelcoat, fiberglass, metal, plastic, and glass surfaces can all be cleaned with the product. The spray removes dirt and other unsightly grime, and leaves a hydrophobic glossy surface that enables water beading. $19.95 // 800-347-5700 // www.meguiars.com

AEROSOL GELCOAT The GelMatch™ All-In-One Gelcoat Aerosol Can is pre-filled with a proprietary All-InOne Gelcoat that is matched perfectly to a boat’s original factory colors. It features a two-component can that houses the M.E.K.P. catalyst in an inner chamber, which is easily activated by simply breaking the inner seal at the bottom of the can—no mess, no mixing. The can’s outer chamber is pre-filled with Dolphinite’s proprietary All-In-One gelcoat formula color matched to original factory colors utilizing Dolphinite’s GelMatch™ Gelcoat Color Matching System. This system allows users to enter year, make, model, and length of a boat dating back to 1984. 978-948-3900 // www.dolphinite.com

FUEL TREATMENT AND STABILIZER STA-BIL 360° Marine Ethanol Fuel Treatment and Stabilizer is an ethanol treatment that delivers corrosion protection for marine engines above and below the fuel line. STA-BIL 360° Marine releases a vapor inside the fuel system that coats all metal parts, including the fuel tank, fuel sending unit, valves, carburetor, fuel injectors, and intake manifold to deliver 360 degrees of corrosion protection. It is safe and recommended for use at every fill-up to treat all types of gasoline from ethanol-free fuel to E85 blends to protect 2- and 4-cycle marine engines. It is available in 12- and 40-ounce bottles. $24 and $9.99, respectively // 800- 621-1251 // www.stabil360marine.com

greatlakesboating.com | 57

EVENTS CALENDAR

FLORIDA

INDIANA

SEPTEMBER 5-7

JULY 12

AUGUST 8-10

Progressive Insurance Tampa Boat Show

Cardboard Boat Dash

Alanson Riverfest

Washington Park Launch Ramp Michigan City

Various venues Alanson

219-872-6294

www.visitmichiganupnorth.com/stories/ alanson_ michigan_ riverfest

Tampa Convention Center Tampa www.tampaboatshow.com

JULY 31 – AUGUST 3

ILLINOIS JULY 19

Chicago Yacht Club’s Race to Mackinac Chicago Yacht Club Chicago

Great Lakes Super Boat Grand Prix Washington Park Beach Michigan City www.michigancitysuperboat.com

Top O Michigan Outboard Marathon National Boat Races DeVoe Beach, Indian River Burt Lake www.marathonnationals.com

AUGUST 21-24

AUGUST 16-24

www.cycracetomackinac.com

Progressive Insurance Michigan City In-Water Boat Show

JULY 26-27

Washington Park Marina Michigan City

Grand Traverse/Little Traverse bays Traverse City

www.michigancityboatshow.com

www.Unsaltedsailing.com

Grafton Towboat Festival Grafton Riverfront Grafton www.greatriverroad.com

MICHIGAN

AUGUST 7

JULY 6-10

Living Lands & Waters Barge Party

Trout Youth Camp

Schwiebert Park Rock Island www.livinglandsandwaters.org

AUGUST 9

Harborfest Village Park, 2700 Ninth Street Winthrop Harbor

Higgins Lake Ralph A. MacMullan Conference Center Kalamazoo

Unsalted Sailing Flotilla

AUGUST 30-31

Red Fox Regatta Charlevoix Yacht Club Charlevoix www.charlevoixyachtclub.org

AUGUST 31

www.miseagrant.umich.edu/news

Annual Labor Day Festivities—Pirate Fest

JULY 12

Algonac Harbour Club Marina Algonac

Bell’s Beer Bayview to Mackinac Race

www.algonacharbourclub.com

SEPTEMBER 5-7

www.whpd.org

Bayview Yacht Club Detroit

AUGUST 16-17

www.bycmack.com

Woods n Water Outdoor Weekend

AUGUST 8-9

Eastern Michigan Fairgrounds Imlay City

Chicago Air and Water Show Chicago Lakefront Chicago www.cityofchicago.org

Antique & Classic Boat Show Port Sanilac Harbor Port Sanilac www.portsanilac.net

58 GLB | July/Augus t 14

AUGUST 16

www.imlaycitymich.com/events

SEPTEMBER 6-7

AUGUST 8-10

AUGUST 21-24

Antique & Classic Boat Show

Antique Raceboat Regatta

Multiple venues Black River, St. Clair River, Port Huron

Antique Boat Museum Clayton

Progressive North American Demo Boat Show

www.michacbs.com

SEPTEMBER 10-11

Colony Marine Corn Roast & Boat Show Algonac Harbour Club Algonac www.colonymarine.com

SEPTEMBER 11-14

Boating & Outdoor Festival Lake St. Clair Metropark Harrison Township

www.abm.org

www.cedarpointboatshow.com

AUGUST 16

House Tour by Boat Old Forge Pond Old Forge www.viewarts.org

SEPTEMBER 5-7

CNY Fall Boat Show New York State Fairgrounds Syracuse www.cnyboatshow.com

www.boatingandoutdoorfest.com

MINNESOTA JULY 30 – AUGUST 2

Lake Bemidji Dragon Boat Festival 300 Bemidji Ave. N Bemidji www.bemidjidragonboat.com

AUGUST 9-10

Fish-A-Rama Longyear Park/Boat Landing Coleraine www.fish-a-rama.org

NEW YORK JULY 12

Antique Wooden Boat Show & Fulton Chain Rendezvous

Cedar Point Sandusky

OHIO JULY 12

Putt Around the Lake Indian Lake Indian Lake

WISCONSIN JULY 19-27

K/D Salmon Tournament Various Ports Sturgeon Bay, Baileys Harbor, Washington Island, Algoma, Kewaunee www.kdsalmon.com

AUGUST 2-3

Classic and Wooden Boat Show & Festival Door County Maritime Museum Sturgeon Bay www.dcmm.org/events-activities/ special/classic-and-wooden-boatfestival/

937-843-5392

JULY 12-13

Toledo Lighthouse Waterfront Festival Near Maumee Bay State Park Oregon www.toledolighthouse.org

CANADA JULY 25-27

Muskoka In-Water Boat & Cottage Show Muskoka Wharf Gravenhurst, Ontario www.muskokashows.com

JULY 19

Great Maumee River Dragon Boat Festival

AUGUST 10

International Park/Maumee River Toledo

Port of Orillia Orillia, Ontario

www.partnerstoledo.org

Cardboard Boat Race www.ontarioslakecountry.com/event/ cardboard-boat-race

Public Docks Old Forge www.acbs.org/calendar/index. php?eID=779

greatlakesboating.com | 59

MARINE MART

SAILBOATS 1998 Catalina 28 MKII: Tall rig, wing keel, full batten main, 150 genoa, roller furling, bimini, dodger, auto helm, Raymarine instruments, Garmin GPS, more. 585-721-6719. $41,900.

maintained. Your dream awaits! Delivery to you a possibility. Located in Georgian Bay Ontario. Chris, 416-571-8147; chris@chrisrichie.com. $199,900 US. chris@chrisrichie.com (see photo below)

V ISIT NOW!

BOATING FEDERATION

NEW

IMPROVED MOBILE FRIENDLY! GreatLakesBoatingFederation.com 60 GLB | July/Augus t 14

Contact: Eddy A. Dingman Lic: Marina real estate/business broker

847-987-6626

National Marina Properties Group Financing available to qualified buyers. AMI MEMBER (association of Marina industries)

Visit: http://nationalgolfandmarina.com

SELL YOUR BOAT ON OUR

NEW REDESIGNED SECTION CLASSIFIED

GREAT LAKES

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eddy@nationalgolfandmarina.com

POWERBOAT 1991 Ocean: Well maintained and updated, fresh water live aboard, entertain, enjoy! This vessel is ready to go where your dreams take you. Stabilizers, full walk in engine room, 3 staterooms with full baths, recent electronics, appliances, big screen, updated top, bottom and a lot in between. Always professionally

MISCELLANEOUS

MARINE MART

PRODUCTS & SERVICES FREE ADS GOT A BOAT TO SELL? Complimentary 25-word classified boat advertisements and PHOTO in the Sept./Oct. 2014 issue. (NO STRINGS ATTACHED!)

Email your text-only advertisement to:

classifieds@greatlakesboating.com Free classified boat advertisement offer limited to one per reader. All classified ads are subject to publisher’s approval. Space is limited. Free ads will be accepted on a first-come, first-served basis. Advertisements for the Sept./Oct. 2014 issue must be received by Aug. 9, 2014.

Advertiser Index Allstate Insurance .................................. BC Antique Boat Museum ............................ 41 BoatU.S. .................................................. 15 Chicago Harbors/Westrec ...................... 2 Cruisers Yachts ...................................... 47 Donzi Boats............................................. 1 Leland Harbor Marina ............................ 33 Manistee Hops & Props .......................... 37 NOPC ...................................................... 51

SUBSCRIBE Online! SUBSCRIPTION RATES US Customers 1 yr $21.50 (6 issues) 2 yr $40.00 (12 issues)

North Point Marina ................................. 3 Prestige Yachts ...................................... 23 Pro-Line Boats........................................ 63 Progressive Insurance ........................... IFC RBFF ....................................................... 29 SkipperBud’s .......................................... 5, 64 Spring Brook Marina............................... IBC

CANADA (USD) 1 yr $27.50 (6 issues) 2 yr $46.00 (12 issues)

Stop Aquatic Hitchhikers ........................ 39 Vicem Yachts .......................................... 7 Waukegan Harbor ................................... 19

VISIT:

GreatLakesBoating.com or CALL: 312.266.8400

greatlakesboating.com | 61

For complete specs & photos of these boats visit:

SKIPPERBUDS.COM

B11114

2004

30’

SEA RAY

$99,900

B8780

2004

37’

FOUR WIN

$139,900

B9802

2005

30’

BAJA

$79,000

B10511

2006

37’

FOUR WIN

$149,995

B10580

2005

30’

BAJA

$89,900

B11398

2006

37’

FOUR WIN

$134,995

B12228

2005

30’

MAINSHIP

$89,900

B11266

2004

38’

MERIDIAN

$169,900

B12581

2007

30’

BAYLINER

$69,900

B12233

2004

38’

SEA RAY

$149,900

B12801

2004

31’

TIARA

$144,900

B12393

2005

38’

FOUNTAIN

$109,000

B12008

2004

31’

MAXUM

$49,900

B12746

2013

38’

CRUISERS

$349,000

B12472

2004

31’

TIARA

$139,900

B12118

2004

39’

SEA RAY

$179,999

B12822

2009

31’

SEA RAY

$159,900

B7169

2005

39’

SEA RAY

$385,000

B10394

2010

31’

SEA RAY

$159,995

B12501

2005

39’

CARVER

$189,900

B12648

2012

31’

RINKER

$129,900

B12841

2008

39’

MERIDIAN

$249,000

B12091

2013

31’

TIARA

$289,000

B11623

2011

39’

TIARA

$589,000

B12863

2004

32’

TIARA

$209,900

B12248

2006

40’

SEA RAY

$234,900

B10475

2007

32’

TIARA

$229,900

B12779

2008

40’

SEA RAY

$299,900

B11798

2007

32’

SEA RAY

$129,500

B5978

2004

41’

MERIDIAN

$279,900

B12608

2005

33’

CARVER

$124,000

B12848

2005

41’

RINKER

$158,000

B12540

2008

33’

CRUISERS

$159,900

B12494

2012

41’

CRUISERS

$499,900

B12599

2008

33’

FOUR WIN

$149,900

B12101

2005

42’

SEA RAY

$299,900

B12186

2009

33’

SEA RAY

$215,000

B12770

2007

42’

CARVER

$299,000

R0482A

2011

33’

CHAPARRA

$169,995

B12833

2009

42’

CRUISERS

$335,000

B12311

2005

34’

SEA RAY

$139,000

B11943

2005

43’

SILVERTO

$309,900

B7884

2005

34’

SEA RAY

$179,995

B10712

2006

43’

TIARA

$399,900

B12673

2005

34’

FOUR WIN

$139,900

B11899

2007

43’

CRANCHI

$415,000

B11406

2006

34’

SEA RAY

$134,900

B12388

2008

43’

AZIMUT

$449,000

B12322

2006

34’

SEA RAY

$139,000

B12807

2009

43’

SEA RAY

$549,900

B12199

2008

34’

SEA RAY

$149,000

B12489

2004

44’

TIARA

$395,000

E0303A

2004

35’

REGAL

$129,995

B11551

2009

45’

FORMULA

$479,900

B12328

2006

35’

CARVER

$154,500

B12750

2014

45’

CRUISERS

$699,995

B12497

2006

35’

SILVERTO

$159,900

B12776

2005

46’

SEA RAY

$439,000

B11335

2007

35’

RINKER

$165,000

B8085

2005

46’

SEA RAY

$375,000

B10545

2007

35’

LARSON

$129,000

B12827

2010

47’

SEA RAY

$582,000

B12408

2008

35’

SEA RAY

$214,900

B12351

2005

50’

SEA RAY

$489,900

B11258

2008

35’

SEA RAY

$182,900

B12496

2005

50’

SEA RAY

$525,000

B11444

2005

36’

TIARA

$199,900

B12682

2004

54’

CRUISERS

$479,000

B12172

2006

36’

TIARA

$239,900

B10470

2008

55’

SEA RAY

$995,000

B12208

2013

36’

TIARA

$449,900

B12119

2004

59’

MARQUIS

$715,000

B12128

2004

37’

FORMULA

$128,000

B9579

2007

62’

AZIMUT

$1,099,000


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