Issuu on Google+

PAGE 2 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MARCH 17, 2010

Leader

Serving Northwest Wisconsin

A cooperative-owned newspaper, the Inter-County Leader is published every Wednesday by the Inter-County Cooperative Publishing Association, Box 490, Frederic, WI 54837. Second Class postage paid at Frederic, WI 54837.

MANAGER Doug Panek dougpanek@centurytel.net EDITOR Gary B. King gbking@centurytel.net STAFF Nancy Jappe njappe@centurytel.net Tammi Milberg tammi@centurytel.net Marty Seeger mseeger@centurytel.net Brenda Sommerfeld brendals@centurytel.net Sherill Summer sherill33@gmail.com Gregg Westigard greggw@lakeland.ws Carl Heidel cheidel389@centurytel.net Priscilla Bauer cilla@grantsburgtelcom.net Mary Stirrat marystirrat@hotmail.com Greg Marsten marscafe@lakeland.ws EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Raelynn Hunter rael@centurytel.net

HOW TO REACH US Web page: www.the–leader.net E-mail: the-leader@centurytel.net (send all news releases here)

Subscription concerns: subscriptions@centurytel.net Advertisements: addept@centurytel.net Deadline for ads: 10 a.m. Tuesdays Deadline for copy: 4:30 p.m. Mondays

OFFICES Frederic P.O. Box 490, Frederic, WI 54837 (M-F, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.) 715-327-4236 Fax - 715-327-4117 (news copy) Fax - 715-327-4870 (ad copy)

Siren 24154 State Road 35, Siren, WI 54872 (M-F, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.) 715-349-2560 Fax - 715-349-7442

St. Croix Falls Box 338, St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 (M-W, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. T-F, 9:30 - 4 p.m.) 715-483-9008 Fax - 715-483-1420

How to subscribe: The Inter-County Leader [ISS No. 87509091] is published weekly. Subscription prices are $34/yr. in Polk and Burnett counties; $38/yr. in Barron, Chisago, Washburn, St. Croix counties; $41/yr. anywhere in the United States $23/yr. for servicemen or women; $23/yr. for students or schools (9 months). Payment is needed before we can start the subscription. No refunds on subscriptions. Persons may subscribe online at www.the-leader.net, write us at Inter-County Leader, Box 490, Frederic, WI 54837, or stop by one of our three offices.

Board of directors

Welding to blame in shed fire by Marty Seeger FREDERIC – On Friday, March 12, the Frederic and Luck fire departments responded to a shed fire at the Gerald Knauber residence on 3274 130th St. Knauber called 911 at approximately 11 a.m., when a piece of equipment he was welding ignited the fire. Both Frederic and Luck fire departments fought the blaze for approximately three hours, but they were unable to save the items inside the building, which included a skid steer and several tools. “It damaged everything inside,” said Frederic Fire Chief Brian Daeffler, and added that the siding on a garage next to Knauber’s work shed was also damaged. Tuesday accident The Frederic Fire Department and Northland Ambulance was also called out on the afternoon of Tuesday, March 16, on 350th Avenue, for a one-vehicle accident. The man, whose name could not be released at press time, drove off the road and struck a tree. He was unharmed in the accident, and didn’t need transport by ambulance, but the car he was driving was totaled. The Frederic Fire Department was initially called because smoke could be seen rising from the car, but when they arrived, no fire was reported, and the man was outside of the vehicle unharmed.

Seven-month-old Kate Reedy of Spooner delights in a 4-day-old goat at the Home Sweet Home Show held at Webster this past weekend, March 13 and 14. - Photo by Sherill Summer

Clouds on the ground

DA awaits evidence SIREN - No charges have been filed as of yet on the snowmobile fatality that killed Jeffery Busse of Webster on Feb. 4. Burnett County District Attorney Bill Norine explained that there is still some forensic information that is being collected on the fatality, and he wants to take his time to determine his options in this matter. He is not sure when a final decision will be made whether or not to file charges other than the operating while intoxicated and illegal operation of snowmobile on road that have already been charged to three individuals. The statutes of limitations is six years. - Sherill Summer

Program/from page 1 and ends with a specific challenge to parents and community leaders, showing them how they can reinforce the decisions their youth are making. School counselors, Julie Bever and Douglas Ramich, are helping prepare staff for activities for staff members to use with students before and after the program. Contact Ramich at 715-825-2101, ext. 2170 with any questions. Check out the Rachel’s Challenge Web site for more information. www.rachelschallenge.org — with submitted information

Thick fog provided a surreal backdrop in this photo and it also created some hazardous driving conditions for area drivers this week. - Photo by Gary King

Mudslide, flfloooding at Taylors Falls

Vivian Byl, chair Charles Johnson Merlin Johnson Janet Oachs Carolyn Wedin

An award-winning newspaper 2009 Member • National Newspaper Association • Wisconsin Newspaper Association

The Inter-County Leader is a qualified newspaper for the publication of legal notices, meeting the requirements as set forth in Chapter 985.03 of the Wisconsin Statutes. Every government official or board that handles public money should publish at regular intervals an accounting of it, showing where and how each dollar is spent. We hold this to be a fundamental principle of democratic government. Publisher reserves right to reject any advertisement or news release or letter of opinion at any time.

Hay, baby

A mudslide along Hwy. 8 north of Taylors Falls forced the closing of the highway last Thursday evening at about 6 p.m., March 11. Minnesota DOT crews had the highway cleared and open to traffic by late Friday. Runoff from melting snow, along with rain, also created flooding of the cement tour boat dock at Taylors Falls which usually stands at least 2 to 3 feet above water level (photo at right). Photo above kare11.com; photo at right by Rob Harrison

MARCH 17, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 3

Briefly BALSAM LAKE - The Polk County Historical Society will meet Tuesday, March 23, at 7 p.m. at the Community Room of the Polk County Justice Center. Speaker Linda Lee will present button history. The buttons of the past 300 years mirror great people and events of many eras. Reflecting back in history we have the George Washington button, the Victorian buttons, The National Recovery Act buttons and children’s buttons. Most people are attracted to buttons by their surprising beauty or uniqueness. Buttons are made of many materials from porcelain, colorful enamels, brass, glass and plastic. Button collecting has tripled in the past decade, according to Lee. She became a collector of buttons in 1989 and has collected buttons from all over the United States and in Canada. She inherited her grandmother’s button collection which she displays proudly. Lee has been past president of the local Button Club in Amery. She will be speaking about her travels and collection, care, value, and how to display your buttons. She will answer questions and will help identify your button. If you would like to know more about button associations she will bring convention information. - from PCHS ••• NEW RICHMOND - The Criminal Justice Club at Wisconsin Indianhead Technical College invites the public to attend a pancake breakfast with all the trimmings on Sunday, March 28, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Amery VFW. The breakfast is to help raise funds for students to visit and learn about prisons in other parts of the U.S. - from WITC ••• MILLTOWN - The Milltown Public Library will host a Meet the Candidates event this Thursday, March 18, from 6 to 8 p.m. Candidates for the Milltown Village Board and current members will be on hand to answer questions. Take this opportunity to share ideas about the future of the village in a casual environment. Refreshments will be served courtesy of the Friends of the Milltown Public Library. - with submitted information ••• FREDERIC - The Frederic Area Chamber of Commerce’s Annual Communitywide Garage Sale will be held May 8. The Chamber is encouraging all local residents to take part in this sale. Ad costs are priced at a low, reasonable price to benefit those who participate. Area businesses are also encouraged to place ads to support this event. Please contact Carol Thompson at 715-327-4271 for entry or ad information. - with submitted information

Nominations sought FREDERIC - The Frederic Area Chamber of Commerce is now taking nominations for the 2010 Volunteer and Citizen of the Year. Nominations can be submitted by calling Carol Thompson at 715-327-4271 or going to Affordable Quality on Main Street during the day to fill out a brief nomination form. All forms need to be received by March 31 for consideration. – submitted

Bank number looks good

Construction will resume soon on the St. Croix Tribe of Chippewa’s new casino, which is expected to be open by July 1, featuring more than 400 slot machines, 12 table games, a new restaurant, buffet, deli, bar and lounge. The facility will also include a convention center and an attached 50-room hotel with an indoor pool. Construction has been at a standstill for most of the past year as the economy made it difficult for the tribe to fund the project. This past week that changes with the securement of $55 million in loans. Miron Construction is the primary contractor for the project- Photo by Gary King

Tribe secures funding to complete casino Signing of loan papers last week marks a big step forward for St. Croix Tribe, area economy HERTEL - The St. Croix Chippewa of Wisconsin have announced that funding has been secured for the completion of their new casino in Danbury. A total of $55 million will be available to the tribe for the construction project. Heartland Business Bank of Green Bay is funding a $17-million conventional loan for construction and a $38-million loan guaranteed by the Department of the Interior.

Affairs office announced last year that it would be offering federally guaranteed loans for American Indian owned businesses “to significantly improve the quality of life in tribal communities nationwide. Overall, the Department of Interior will invest more than $3 billion through President Obama’s economic recovery plan. The St. Croix Tribe, with casinos in Turtle Lake, Hertel and Danbury, generates millions of dollars in revenue each year and employment for tribal members and hundreds of local residents in northwestern Wisconsin. - Gary King, with information from St. Croix Tribe

Governor acts on tribal chairman’s suggestion Taylor urges lawmakers to support bill to allow mutual aid between tribal law enforcement and sheriff’s department MADISON/HERTEL - Presenting the sixth-annual State of the Tribes address to legislators at the state Capitol recently, St. Croix Tribal Chairman Lewis Taylor suggested appointing a Native American to the University of Wisconsin Board of Regents. Lewis Taylor “If we can have some Native American sitting in the state Board of Regents as we develop curriculum for the future of our great state, recognizing sovereignty,” Taylor said Gov. Jim Doyle responded by appointing, last Thursday, the first Native American to the UW Board of Regents.

Two-vehicle accident

All thoughts of winter melted away when the thermometer at Grantsburg’s U.S. Bank branch hit a warm 61 degrees on March 14, making for a very pleasant and springlike Sunday afternoon. - Photo by Priscilla Bauer

Loan papers were signed at a special ceremony at the Hole in the Wall Casino & Hotel in Danbury last Thursday, March 11. “We need to show that we are progressive and competitive as a tribe and today is the start of that,” St. Croix Tribal Chairman Lewis Taylor said of the loan closing. Construction has been at a standstill for most of the past year as the economy made it difficult for the tribe to fund the project. Construction will resume on the Danbury project in late March. The tribe projects completion of the new facility by July 1. The Department of Interior’s Indian

Emergency responders tend to a vehicle driven by Stephen J. Perner, 70, Grantsburg, who was involved in an accident on Thursday, March 11. Perner was westbound on Assembly Road in Wood River Township when he pulled from a stop sign at the intersection of Assembly Road and Williams Road and into the path of a southbound vehicle on Williams Road driven by Spencer A. Wicklund, 23, Frederic. Wicklund’s vehicle is shown in the background. Perner was issued a citation for failure to yield the right of way. Melanie Perner, 62, of Grantsburg was injured in the accident and required medical transport. - Photo from the Burnett County Sheriff’s Department

Eau Claire attorney Ed Manydeeds will serve on the board, pending confirmation by the state Senate. Taylor said that’s fast work. “Yeah. As a matter of fact, what I think the atmosphere in Wisconsin is really changing in recognizing that Indian people have contributed greatly to society and now it’s an honor to them to serve us.” Taylor, wearing his signature white cowboy hat, addressed legislators on behalf of the state’s 11 tribal nations. He talked of the need for more school funding, improved highways, and better broadband access on reservations. He repeatedly stressed the need for more jobs, noting that the recession has hit “Indian Country” hard as with the rest of the nation. Taylor said tribal communities are being especially hard hit in part because of their remote locations. He added that Indian people have always been “dedicated to endure,” and native communities create employment that serves

both tribal and non-tribal communities. Mutual aid bill Taylor also called for action on Assembly Bill 737 that would help tribal police work more closely with their state counterparts and get the same retirement benefits. Right now the tribe’s law enforcement officers are unable to offer mutual aid to Burnett County officers - and vice-versa - due to an opinion issued by the state attorney general. “Is that what you call progress?” Taylor asked “I don’t think so. Let’s work together. Let’s protect each other - we need some relief in tribal law enforcement activity.” Taylors comments were met with applause. Taylor’s entire speech can be listened to at www.wrn.com/2010/02/state-ofthe-tribes-at-capitol/ - Gary King with information from Wisconsin Public Radio and National Public Radio

PAGE 4 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MARCH 17, 2010

B U R N E T T

C O U N T Y

H E A D L I N E S

Manthey retires from DNR by Carl Heidel GRANTSBURG - Wisconsin DNR avian ecologist Pat Manthey has decided it’s time to retire. Sort of. She’s really just shifting gears a bit as she moves from paid full-time staff to part-time volunteer. Friends and co-workers gathered at the Crex Center in Grantsburg last Friday evening, March 12, to celebrate her

work and to wish her well in retirement. Manthey’s passion for wildlife is lifelong. She started out to become a chemist, and then in graduate school became a biologist. But all she really wanted, according to her, was to have “someone give me a job watching birds.” That request was granted, but the watching involved a lot of restoring and rescuing. Manthey was instrumental in

Pat Manthey, retiring Wisconsin DNR avian ecologist, had a few tales to tell to the crowd gathered at her retirement party. – Photos by Carl Heidel

the successful efforts to reintroduce the trumpeter swan to Wisconsin after it was extirpated in the late 1800s by over harvesting, and in recent years she has led rescue operations to heal injured swans and return them to the wild. She has also had a role in other restoration projects, among them working to bring ospreys back again. And she has been a key figure in forging supportive relationships between wildlife groups

and commercial and industrial organizations. Manthey claims that now that she is retiring she plans to return to part-time volunteer work, but from the twinkle in her eye when she says that, and from the mud boots on her feet ready to slog out into the muck to rescue a bird, there is some question about “part time.” All that retirement will do, really, is give her more time to just watch birds.

Mary Wicklund (L), a volunteer worker in the avian rescue program, and Pat Manthey (R) swapped a few stories at Manthey’s retirement party.

Webster schools continue development of enrichment classes by Carl Heidel WEBSTER - Webster schools have their own version of No Child Left Behind, and it has nothing to do with failed federal educational programs. That was the word given to the Webster Board of Education at its meeting Monday, March 15. Three of the schools’ teachers told the board that staff and administration are continuing to develop and expand a plan to provide enrichment for all eligible students. For students who are struggling with their class work there is a growing

Kendra Avery, AP English teacher, described the benefits for students who complete the AP course work.

Kari Roppe, third-grade teacher, said that resources for elementary enrichment programs are abundant.

system of remediation activities to help these students to achieve at their grade level. For students who do not find sufficient challenge in regular classroom studies there is an expanding set of enrichment offerings to allow them to explore beyond classroom limits. Third-grade teacher Kari Roppe told the board that elementary teachers are offering both remedial programs and gifted and talented programs. Attempts to find the students who need these special offerings begin already at the kindergarten and first-grade levels. One of the big challenges that Roppe

sees is staff education. She said that resources for these programs are abundant, and teaching staff need to be informed as to what resources are available. Jill Norman, high school guidance counselor, provided a broad overview of efforts at the high school level to provide Advanced Placement classes. She indicated that students who participate in the AP program are in a better position when it comes to competing for acceptance by colleges and universities. Norman commented that these students are more readily accepted for admission to the higher education schools where recruiters are beginning to seek out students with AP classes in their resumes. In addition, students who have gone through the AP program have a better chance to get scholarships, and in many cases they can either test out of basic college classes or receive college credits for their high school AP work. High school language arts teacher and AP English teacher Kendra Avery said that even AP students who do not continue into college have an advantage as they enter the workforce. They have learned work skills such as collaboration, reasoning, problem solving and writing and communication skills that employers are looking for in the people they hire. Avery noted that although only about 16 percent of the students pass the rigorous final AP exam, 80 percent of those

High school guidance counselor Jill Norman described the Advanced pPacement program. – Photos by Carl Heidei who complete the course will succeed in college and manage to complete their college work in four years or less. And all students in the AP program are able to boost their grade point average scores. In other business the board: • approved open enrollment requests for 2010-2011; • approved a tuition agreement with the Siren School District; • and approved youth option requests from Anne Kelby, Shaina Pardun and Tiffani DeMarre.

Woman warned not to drive gets OWI WEBSTER – Lashane Oiyotte, 25, Webster, was arrested and charged with OWI, third offense, on March 14 shortly after midnight. The arresting officer reported talking to her when she was on foot at about 11:30 that night and she appeared quite intoxicated. She allegedly admitted to being drunk. She was trying to get her car door open at the time and the officer advised her not to drive. She walked off, but about an hour and a half later the officer saw the car drive by. He followed the car, stopped it, and arrested Oiyotte after giving field-sobriety tests. Other OWI arrests this past week included: • Veronica Blackburn, 37, Balsam Lake, was arrested and charged with OWI and

operating with prohibited alcohol content on March 14. Police were called to the Top Spot tavern in Balsam Lake with the report of a hit-and-run, a vehicle had hit another parked vehicle. Witnesses had gotten the license plate number. The officer went to the home of the registered owner and found Blackburn and the vehicle there. Blackburn admitted being at the Top Spot and said she didn’t realize she had hit another car. She was given field sobriety tests and arrested. Her breath test registered .14. • Emily Wirth, 28, Osceola, was stopped after a police officer that was following her vehicle saw her drive it into the ditch twice, then return to the road past the center of the road. She was given field sobriety tests, including a breath test, which

registered .208. She was charged with OWI, first offense. • Brian Kochendorfer, 37, Stillwater, Minn., was stopped while driving near

Osceola for speeding and erratic driving and was arrested for OWI, first offense. — with information from the Polk County Sheriff’s Dept.

Edina Realty Realtors receive recognition SIREN - Edina Realty recently announced that the following Realtors from the Siren office have been named members of Edina Realty’s President’s or Leadership Circles: Len Chute, President’s Circle; and Ann Boudewyns and Bobbie Knudson, Leadership Circle. Members of Edina Realty’s Circles are those who achieved an outstanding level of sales performance and customer service in 2009.

“Becoming a President’s and Leadership Circle member takes exceptional market knowledge, expertise, negotiation skills and a high level of customer service,” said Bob Peltier, Edina Realty president and CEO. “It’s because of these agents’ hard work, dedication, and outstanding skills that Edina Realty continues to outperform the market year after year.” - with submitted information

MARCH 17, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 5

P O L K

C O U N T Y

H E A D L I N E S

Liquor license for Wayne's denied again Luck looks to promote economic development by Mary Stirrat LUCK — For the second time in nine months, Wayne’s Foods in Luck has applied for and been denied a license to sell liquor at its store on Hwy. 35 at Butternut Avenue. The Luck Village Board voted on the application at its March 10 meeting, denying it on a vote of three to two. Voting in favor of granting the license were trustees Gene Cooper and Peter Demydowich, with Marsha Jensen, Lori Pardun and President Steve Nielsen opposed. Trustee Jen Nelson was absent from the meeting, and there is one vacancy on the board. When Wayne’s applied last July, the board denied the application by a vote of four to three. Since that time, the board has realized that an ordinance allowing only one liquor license in the village is somewhat vague, and that the board must provide a reason for the denial. The reason must fit criteria outlined by the state, including health and safety concerns, proximity to churches or schools, and public opposition. The discussion during the meeting as recorded in the minutes, said village attorney Adam Jarchow, will provide adequate reasoning. Discussion included reference to a petition with nearly 300 signatures opposing the license and the need to maintain the businesses on Main Street, the Bottle Shop in particular. Had the license been granted, the store would have built an addition of 2,800 square feet, using local contractors, at a

projected cost of $150,000 to $175,000. Three to five new employees would have been hired, some full time and some part time. “It will create new jobs in Luck,” said store manager Bob Determan while explaining the proposal. “There’s no doubt about that.” Determan said that the addition would be “contagious,” creating “a proactive climate of growth and prosperity.” The village would realize additional revenue through an expanded tax base, and the increased customer base would take advantage of downtown businesses. Resident Eric Dueholm spoke against issuing the license, saying that the total tax increase to the village would be about $1,100. He said that the village would stand to lose more than that since the current liquor store would most likely go out of business. Chuck Adleman also spoke against the license, believing it more important that business be kept on Main Street. “If we start losing things like the Bottle Shop,” he said, “we’re going to lose business after business after business. “Main Streets don’t die overnight,” he said. “They die one business at a time.” Both Cooper and Demydowich, the two trustees who spoke in favor of granting the license, said they believed that giving Wayne’s the ability to sell liquor will benefit the downtown businesses. Both also alluded to the fact that the board does not have the authority to grant or deny licenses to other businesses wanting to locate within the village, but the selling of liquor is under different regulations. Cooper told the board that he does not foresee new home or industrial construction within the village over the next few

years, and felt this is a good way to increase the tax base. He also said that a successful business must be able to expand in order to be competitive. “I see this as an absolute plus to the community,” he said. After the vote to deny the license, Determan asked if there was any appeal process that the store can take. Attorney Jarchow said that an appeal can be made through circuit court. In related business, the board discussed the need to change the village ordinance regarding the issuance of liquor licenses. The current ordinance allows only one such license in the village, but the wording is vague. According to discussion, the board will need to determine the number of licenses it wishes to allow, and firm up the language to indicate its decision. Economic development Similar to last summer, when the board denied Wayne’s application for a liquor license, the board went into a discussion on economic development. A flyer about economic development within the village has been developed, covering topics such as “What is economic development?” “Why should the public and private sectors be concerned about economic development?” “Does economic development really matter?” and “What is the economic impact of gaining or losing jobs?” The board discussed mailing the flyers out to residents of both the village and town of Luck, at a total estimated cost of $400. Demydowich asked whether the township was going to put any money toward the mailing, saying, “If this is going to benefit the town, too, I’d like to

see them kick in some tax dollars.” The board voted to mail the flyers only to village residents, at a cost of about $200, and ask the town to help with mailing them to township residents. Membership in the Polk County Economic Development Corporation was also discussed, with the board voting to put $1,000 toward membership. Actual membership requested was $1,226, or $1 per village resident. The board reduced that amount by $200 to cover the cost of mailing the flyers. Because the village may possibly be establishing a “Lucky Bucks” program that might cost $750, Demydowich opposed the $1,000 membership. Other business • Library director Jill Glover presented the annual report for the library, indicating total circulation of more than 42,000 items and more than 2,100 registered There were 288 programs users. throughout the year, with 1,561 participants, not including events like Santa Day. Glover thanked the board for its support, and also thanked the library volunteers who provide numerous hours to help the library operate smoothly. • The board approved the consolidation of the parks and recreation committee with the public works committee, calling it the public services committee. Demydowich was named chair of the committee, and Cooper and Nielsen were appointed as members. • The board accepted the resignation of parks and recreation employee Mike Smith. The letter of resignation was dated March 4 and was effective immediately.

Dates set for administrator hiring Applicant field narrowed to 10 by Gregg Westigard BALSAM LAKE – The hiring process for the selection of a Polk County administrator is moving ahead on schedule. The selection committee, at its meeting Monday, March 15, narrowed the field of applicants for the position and set the next dates for the process. The Polk County Board plans on hiring an administrator at a special board meeting April 13. There were 47 applications for the county administrator position. That field has now been narrowed to 10 names with three alternates. Those 10 will be interviewed on video and the taped interviews brought to the selection committee in two weeks. Information on the 47 was presented by Denise and Bill Frueh of Public Administration Associates, the firm hired to aid in the hiring process. The review on applications and narrowing was done in closed session at the end of the Monday meeting. Before that closed session, the committee set the dates for the rest of the process. First up is a meeting of the selection committee on Monday, March 29. The committee will narrow the field from 10 names to four at that meeting. Those four will be invited to an interview and get-acquainted meeting Friday and Saturday, April 9 and 10. The Friday date will be a reception where the finalists and their spouses will meet informally with the county board members and their spouses at Paradise Landing. The Saturday session will be a series of interviews and related exercises. Taking part in that session will be the selection committee and other county board members plus some county staff members. The full details on the Saturday involvement will be decided on March 29.

At the close of the Saturday session, the selection committee will discuss the candidates and make a recommendation of a county administrator candidate. The county board will meet Tuesday, April 13, to make a selection and extend a job offer. That meeting will be the final session for the present board. The new board, elected the previous Tuesday, April 6, will take office April 20. The Monday meeting was the first inperson meeting with the Fruehs. Present at the meeting were the three supervisors on the committee, Bryan Beseler, Patricia Schmidt and Ken Sample, and the five department heads on the committee, Sara McCurdy, Sherry Gjonnes, Gretchen Sampson, Deb Peterson and Todd Demers. Also present were Supervisors Bob Dueholm, Kathy Kienholz and Jim Edgell. The meeting was staffed by corporation counsel Jeff Fuge and employee relations manager Darlene Kusmirek. Supervisor candidate Jim Drabek and the press were present for the open part of the meeting.

Bill and Denise Frueh presented information on the 47 applicants for the Polk County administrator position. - Photos by Gregg Westigard

All members of the CA selection committee and several supervisors were present to review the county administrator applications.

PAGE 6 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MARCH 17, 2010

P O L K

C O U N T Y

H E A D L I N E S

Board defeats furniture purchase Approves unfunded training room study by Gregg Westigard BALSAM LAKE – The Polk County Board defeated a resolution to purchase $39,268 of office furniture improperly ordered last December. The vote came at the monthly county board meeting Tuesday, March 16. Only eight supervisors voted for the resolution which would have solved part of the issue of what to do with the 80 chairs and 40 tables from the voided order that are now stacked in two rooms at the government center. In a related vote, the supervisors approved a study of how to outfit some rooms in that building for use as training and conference rooms. The furniture was ordered by Human Services Director Sherry Gjonnes in late December. Her action violated three sections of the county purchasing policy and the order is void even though the furniture was delivered and paid for. The furniture would have been used to outfit conference and training rooms at the government center even though the training facility idea was not part of the county’s capital improvement plan. The furniture order had not been approved by the human services board. The vote to purchase the furniture after the fact was eight in favor and 14 opposed. It would have taken a two thirds majority, 15 votes, to approve the resolution. Voting to approve the purchase were Bob Dueholm, Patricia Schmidt, Marvin Caspersen, James Edgell, Ken Sample, Russ Arcand, Jay Luke and Gerald Newville. Voting against the purchase were Joan Peterson, Dean Johansen, Herschel Brown, Kathryn Kienholz, Wendy Rattel, Brian Masters, Craig Moriak, Mick Larsen, Diane Stoneking, Bryan Beseler, Larry Jepsen, Kim O’Connell, Gary Bergstrom and Larry Voelker. Neil Johnson was absent. The furniture issue drew a round of

Some of the 80 chairs and 40 tables purchased in December and now stored in the county conference rooms. - Photo by Gregg Westigard criticism during the public comment section of the meeting. James Drabek, Balsam Lake, called for the supervisors to be accountable to the taxpayers and vote the purchase down. Tom Magnafici, Garfield, said local businesses would have loved to bid on the order and called the proposed purchase an outrage. And James Duncan, Balsam Lake, said that the action gives every county employee a black eye. Duncan added, “fire the person” who made the voided order. Some supervisors argued for completing the purchase, saying that the purpose, setting up a conference/training facility, is valid and would save the county money. Sample said the vote should be a financial decision and not a personal vote on what was done. Schmidt said, “We must make the most of a bad situation.” Edgell said mistakes were made and will be dealt with by the human services board, but the purchase should be made. Sample asked if the supervisors were prepared to take a $20,000 loss getting rid of the furniture.

Bergstrom said the furniture was not budgeted and not necessary. He called the resolution “laundering a bad transaction.” Stoneking said the resolution bails out an unauthorized purchase. Jepsen said the county did not need the furniture and it had never been requested. Masters said there had been attempts to keep the invalid purchase hidden. Masters added that the people are livid about the issue. With the purchase of the furniture defeated, the board passed a resolution to dispose of the items by any means necessary. The seller, Staples, has said the items were special order and not returnable. The county property director was directed to dispose of the 80 chairs and 40 tables. The human services board will deal with the personnel issue related to the policies violations at a future meeting. Technology study The furniture was to be used as part of a project to equip several rooms at the

government center for use as training and conference rooms. The concept is that this could save money by requiring less staff travel time and expense for professional training. In addition, technology improvements in several rooms, including the county board room, would allow better public access to county business and increase government transparency, according to a resolution authorizing an evaluation of the technology. A similar resolution was defeated at the January board meeting. The resolution the board considered calls for an investigation of what it would take to purchase and install audio and visual equipment in the county board room and audio equipment in three conference rooms. The resolution is called a study of Purchase of Conference Room/Training Equipment. After much discussion, the resolution for the study passed by a vote of 15 to 7. Much of the discussion in a long debate was on whether to add $70,000 in funding for the completion of the study. During that discussion it became known that the study has already been done. Todd Demers, information technology director, presented a detailed plan titled Evaluation/Consideration of Purchase of Conference Room / Training Equipment. His plan said that the county board room could be equipped for sound and video and three conference rooms equipped for sound for $63,000. An alternate upgrade of the three conference rooms would bring the price up an additional $35,000 to $98,000. Another part of the Demers plan would equip the rooms for videoconferencing. That would add $18,000 to the cost. A January county board resolution on outfitting rooms for training and conferencing called for spending up to $200,000. With the Demers plan and the furniture issue, details on the cost of that January request are now available. The full technology segment would cost $116,000 and the furniture for the rooms $40,000 for a total of $156,000.

Polk Finance Committee opposes furniture purchase Human service chair calls for return by Gregg Westigard BALSAM LAKE – “Don’t buy the furniture” is the recommendation of the Polk County Finance Committee. A resolution to purchase the $39,000 worth of furniture improperly ordered by the human services department was considered at the county board meeting Tuesday evening, March 16. The finance committee, at its meeting Thursday, March 11, went on record opposing that resolution. On Monday, March 15, at a special meeting of the human services board, board Chair Diane Stoneking said that the furniture should be returned to the seller as soon as possible. Finance meeting The finance committee was unanimous

in recommending nonpassage of the furniture resolution. Jeff Fuge, corporation counsel for the county, said that the December purchase of training room equipment made by Human Services Director Sherry Gjonnes did not follow the county purchasing policy and is void. He added that the order of 80 chairs, 40 tables and other items was a special order from the supplier and cannot be returned. The items have been delivered and paid for and are stacked in two rooms at the government center. “Can we look at the taxpayers and justify a $40,000 expense?” county Board Chair Bryan Beseler asked. “Last fall we were talking about what jobs we could save. This project is the cost of a person. We have a training room. We don’t need five.” “Human services knew they were going to have a budget surplus last summer,” finance Chair Gary Bergstrom said. “They knew and they did not share that with us when we were working on the budget.”

(Gjonnes has said the funds for the training room furniture would come from the HS department 2009 surplus. Department surplus levy money returns to the county general fund). The motion to recommend nonpassage was made by Beseler and seconded by Kathryn Kienholz. Joining them in opposing the purchase were Bergstrom, Brian Masters and Mick Larsen. If the full board fails to approve buying the furniture, the county will need to dispose of the items. Fuge said there would probably be a financial loss in the process. “I don’t know when I have been that mad,” Beseler said, talking about his reaction when he first saw the rooms full of chairs and found out what had happened. The human services meeting “I have heard lots of outrage about this purchase,” Stoneking said. “I am not happy with this at all.” With that statement, Stoneking asked for

a motion to return the $39,000 invalid furniture order to Staples, the firm that sold the furniture and supplies the county with much of its office supplies. Stoneking said that Staples should make an effort to help the county dispose of the furniture, given the volume of business Polk County does with the firm. It was pointed out that the order of chairs and tables was a special order and not from stock and was not covered by a standard return policy. The committee approved a motion to work with Staples to attempt a return at the least loss to the county. During the discussion, Supervisor Craig Moriak asked Fuge who the furniture, now piled in two meeting rooms at the government center, belongs to. “The county is in possession of it but it does not own it,” Fuge said. “Ms. Gjonnes owns it.”

Candidates forum set for March 30 in Balsam Lake Sponsored by Community Education BALSAM LAKE – Community Education staff in Polk County are working together to create a public forum for Polk County Board of Supervisor candidates. On Tuesday, March 30, 6:30 to 8 p.m. at Unity School in Balsam Lake, Polk County residents and county board candidates will have the opportunity to meet face-to-face and discuss issues and concerns.

Unity Community Ed has hosted several candidate forums in the past, using a panel-style discussion with prepared questions and time-lines. This forum will be a departure from that format, with the intention of giving constituents the opportunity to speak directly to the representative(s) who are in the voters’ home districts. The inclusion of Community Ed staff from Amery, Osceola, Frederic, Luck and St. Croix Falls in planning and managing the forum will ensure that constituents and candidates from every district will be informed be-

fore the April 6 election. Letters of invitation have been sent to all candidates, and “response so far has been very good,” says Tanna Worrell of the host location, Unity School Community Ed. Coffee and refreshments will be available at the forum, and each resident will receive a handout with a map of the district areas, as well as a list of candidates running in each district. It is expected that discussions between candidates and residents will be genuine and respectful, and that each person will have the op-

portunity to spend time with the candidate(s) in their home district. Unity School is located on Hwy. 46, between Balsam Lake and Milltown. The forum will take place in the High School Cafeteria. For more information, please call your local Community Ed: Unity – 715-825-2101, ext. 1560; Amery – 715-2689771, ext. 220; Osceola – 715-294-2127, ext. 407; Frederic – 715-327-4868; St. Croix Falls – 715-483-9823, ext. 224; Luck – 715-472-2152, ext. 103. - submitted

MARCH 17, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 7

P O L K

C O U N T Y

H E A D L I N E S

Deputy takes stand in own defense Committee weighs over 20 hours of testimony; decision expected Tuesday by Greg Marsten BALSAM LAKE – The dismissal hearing focusing on embattled Polk County Sheriffs’ Deputy Eric Swan wrapped up on Wednesday, March 10, with the deputy himself taking the stand in his own defense. Previous testimony was outlined in a Leader story last week (March 10 issue). A decision on whether Deputy Swan will be dismissed is expected Tuesday, March 23. (See sidebar story). In the final day of testimony last Wednesday, Swan disputed allegations that he used “inappropriate force” in an incident in Amery last August where he assisted a municipal officer in a suspected DUI arrest, captured on a squad car dash cam. He also saw few discrepancies between his report of the incident and the video account. The video in question went through serious scrutiny, with sheriffs’ officials implying that it was merely the latest evidence in Swan’s lengthy disciplinary record that includes several squad car crashes and resulting disciplinary procedures, including a previous attempt to dismiss him when a motorcyclist was injured during one of his driving incidents. Administration officials cited the latest issue as another example of “overly aggressive” tactics used by the deputy in his nearly six years of employment with the PCSD. Swan’s union attorney contended that the policies he is accused of violating are too vague, dangerous and subjective to be applied reasonably, and also disputed his role in the video takedown incident, and subsequent reporting allegations. Sheriff Tim Moore moved to dismiss Swan from the force recently, which Swan appealed through his union, the Wisconsin Police Professionals Association. His case went before the county Public Protection and Judicial Committee in three days of testimony, culminating with Wednesday’s testimony by Swan and two of his supervisors, Sgt. Brent Waak and Sgt. Mike Stoffel. Both sergeants supported Swan’s use of his PR-24 nightstick in the disputed arrest on Aug. 30 in Amery, where he was assisting an Amery police officer in the control of a man suspected of driving while intoxicated. “He took rapid control of the subject,” Waak stated, supporting the so-called “arm bar takedown” and following thigh strike with the baton, while Amery officer David Drinkwine aimed his Taser at the subject. “He’s obviously not complying.” Sgt. Waak later admitted Swan could’ve followed several courses of action instead, and also revealed an incident where Swan may have been less than honest in an incident report. That issue goes back to when Swan’s squad car was damaged after colliding with a

Polk County Sheriff’s Deputy Eric Swan took the stand Wednesday in his own defense to allegations of “inappropriate force” in an arrest, and errors in his official report of that incident. – Photos by Greg Marsten signpost on Hwy. 8, claiming he was avoiding a driver in the wrong lane. ‘I though there was maybe some issues with how this happened,” Sgt. Waak stated. “When he reported it to me, he tried to minimize what happened.” Sgt. Mike Stoffel also supported his colleague’s conduct in the Amery arrest, calling it a “good use of force.” “They either comply, fight or flight,” Stoffel said. “You move to control the situation so they don’t do the other two [fight or flight].” However, Stoffel also admitted he had concerns about Swan’s driving, “at one time.” When put on the stand, Swan outlined his more than two decades of work in law enforcement, which included five years as the Clear Lake Police Chief, and various municipalities where he was an officer. He also admitted to being fired 26 years prior in Davenport, Iowa, for an alleged use of excessive force incident, in a brawl with an intoxicated man. (PCSD and Clear Lake officials were aware of the firing.) Swan also admitted to being the brunt of a dispute in Clear Lake prior to joining the PCSD, due to an arrest involving the son of the local fire chief. “Overnight I went from being a good guy...to otherwise,” he said with a shrug, adding later that the man’s blood alcohol level was “several times the legal limit,” and that he felt the arrest was “the right thing to do.” Swan was also put under the microscope in his review of the videotaped Amery arrest, and was adamant that the disputed incident report was correct, even though the timeline didn’t seem to jibe with his account at times. The primarily issue seemed to be over what he heard Amery Officer Drinkwine tell the subject of the arrest, Mark Robarge, as he made a stumbling move toward him. In dispute was whether Swan was even on the scene to hear Drinkwine’s comment to “stop sneaking up on me,” as Swan said in his report. PCSD attorney Oyvind Wistrom pointed out the sweep of his headlights as Swan arrives at the scene, several seconds after the “sneaking up” comments.

Members of the Polk County Public Protection and Judicial Committee and an administrator weighed a third day of testimony regarding the dismissal of Polk County Sheriff’s Deputy Eric Swan. Wistrom contended that the video clearly proved Swan’s report was in error numerous times, and in several critical details. Wistrom also set aside contention from Swan’s attorney that the use of force was necessary, or that he was singled out over the years in disciplinary matters. Swan’s attorney, Gordon McQuillen, outlined several meetings between his client and PCSD Chief Deputy Steve Moe, and had Swan explain why he refused to admit wrongdoing in the Amery arrest, suggesting that he was concerned about rumors he might be charged for possible federal civil rights violations. McQuillen dwelled heavily on the timeline of those meetings with administrators, and suggested Swan was never told those meetings were disciplinary in nature, and that he requested union representation all along, but claimed he was given conflicting information by Moe and others. McQuillen said Swan was not about to “set himself up” by admitting to Moe that he’d done something wrong, for fear of reprisal, stating his “could’ve would lead to should’ve.” He also quoted a 1989 U.S. Supreme Court ruling on an excessive force allegation (Graham v. O’Connor) siding with law enforcement, citing the Fourth Amendment’s “objective reasonableness” standard. “[The PCSD] has the luxury of 20/20 hindsight,” McQuillen said of the video, reviewing and criticism after the fact. “...but not for the officers who are there on the scene. They don’t have that luxury.” PCSD attorney Wistrom chided the “smoke and mirrors effort” in the union’s defense of Swan’s “failure to accept responsibility for his actions.” He told the committee Swan’s firing was all about the “inappropriate force” Swan allegedly used in the Amery stop, and his accompanying report with its inconsistencies, and how his truthfulness and trust would forever be questioned. “[Deputy Swan] has a long history of what we believe to be bad judgement,” Wistrom said. “And a reasonable review disputes his report...that it was, in fact, an after-the-fact justification.” The Public Protection and Judicial Committee went into closed session to

Swan decision next Tuesday by Gregg Westigard BALSAM LAKE – The Polk County Public Protection Committee will reconvene Tuesday, March 23, to continue its deliberations on the Eric Swan dismissal issue, according to the county’s Corporation Counsel Jeff Fuge. The committee will be expected to make a ruling on the issue at that meeting. The Tuesday meeting will include a closed session for those deliberations. It will include four of the five members of the committee; Kim O’Connell, Neil Johnson, Brian Masters and Joan Peterson. They are the ones who listened to three days of testimony on whether the dismissal of Sheriff’s Deputy Swan should be upheld or reversed. Committee Chair Jay Luke has removed himself from the hearing because of a longtime family acquaintance with Mark Robarge, the citizen involved in the incident that led to the dismissal issue. review over 20 hours of testimony and nearly three dozen exhibits, including the disputed dash cam video, PR-24 baton, numerous e-mails and communications, as well as the two county policies Swan was accused of violating. Should they decide to uphold Swan’s firing at their meeting on Tuesday, Swan has the right to appeal his dismissal to either the Circuit Court or a state employee relations arbitrator. Should Swan retain his position on the force, it is unclear how his assignments or future standing would be affected, if at all. This is the second time the PCSD has attempted to terminate Swan. CORRECTION: In last week’s Leader a story about a deputy dismissal suggested committee Chairman Jay Luke recused himself from hearings due to a long friendship with the deputy. His reference was actually to the subject of an arrest, Mark Robarge.

Fair number of GM dealers may be spared STATEWIDE - General Motors is offering to renew contracts with 600 of the 1,100 dealerships it had originally slated to close this fall. Last year, the automaker sent letters to an undisclosed number of Wisconsin dealers, telling them that they should prepare to wrap up their operations. Shocked and frustrated, at least 52 dealers have filed lawsuits to stay open or reach a settlement.

Bill Sepic of the Wisconsin Auto and Truck Dealers Association has no exact data, but figures there’ll be a fair number of GM dealerships here that’ll be reinstated. “I think we’ll probably track pretty close to what’s the national percentages,” he says. GM officials say they’ll be evaluating dealerships on customer satisfaction, profitability and sales, the same criteria

used to initially decide which dealerships should close by October. Many local dealers – including Leonard Ironside – are still fuming over that announcement. He says he and his family worked for 26 years to build their business in Wisconsin Rapids. “And to have that pulled out from under you and then have the uncertainty of the past eight months is maddening.” Ironside filed for arbitration after he

got his letter last year. And just last Friday, March 12, he got another letter from GM – offering to renew his contract. He thinks he’ll take it. Meanwhile, other dealerships have already shuttered their doors or switched to used-car sales. Those who choose to renew with GM must comply with specific sales requirements. - Kirk Carapezza, Wisconsin Public Radio

Sign up for e-mails of breaking news and updates @ www.the-leader.net

PAGE 8 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MARCH 17, 2010

L e a d e r

F O R U M Best bet

We b Po l l

Results from last week’s poll:

This week’s question: Should schools be looking at four-day weeks to save money? 1. Yes 2. No

To take part in our poll, go to www.theleader.net and scroll down to the lower left part of the screen

J o e H e l l e r

Aside from the spring weather, this week’s best bet to step out of the house would be Tuesday evening’s hour-long presentation at Unity Schools titled “Rachel’s Challenge.” (See front page story). Rachel Scott was the first person killed at Columbine High School on April 20, 1999. The program is based on the message Rachel embraced and lived prior to becoming a victim of the school shooting in Colorado that impacted us in numerous ways as a society. “I have this theory that if one person can go out of their way to show compassion then it will start a chain reaction of the same,” Rachel wrote for a class writing project. It’s not just that message, but a message she created as a young girl that seemed to set the stage for the millions of people who have been touched by her story. Without giving away the program, let’s just say you’ll be moved by the stories in this program, created and presented by Rachel’s father, brother and sister - in schools across the nation. Unity students will see the program during class hours, the public, including parents and community leaders, are invited to the evening program. It starts at 7 p.m. An entertaining - and better yet - life-changing program. Mark your calendar. If you can’t make it, consider watching a brief video at rachelschallenge.org. Editorials by Gary King

Area News at a Glance Judge stops Stillwater bridge plan STILLWATER, Minn. - This was not the news supporters of a new river crossing at Stillwater wanted to hear. On Thursday, March 11, after considering the matter since Sept. 14, 2009, U.S. District Judge Michael Davis issued an opinion to stop the proposed new bridge over the St. Croix River. “I think it’s a very disappointing decision,” said U.S. Rep. Ron Kind Thursday afternoon. He added he’s already been on the telephone with area leaders about the ruling and he’s committed to working with local authorities to push the bridge plan forward. “We’re going to work very hard to fix this,” he said. “Every year we delay this, the price tag for the bridge gets higher and higher.” He said anyone who has driven on the bridge recently realizes that it needs to be replaced. In his opinion, Davis agreed with the Sierra Club, which brought the lawsuit, noting the construction plans violate the U.S. Wild and Scenic Rivers Act. Davis noted the National Park Service’s previous position in 1996 that a new bridge would dramatically impact the river’s scenic status was ignored when the bridge was eventually approved. The Park Service and the U.S. Secretary of Interior violated the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act, Davis claimed, when the bridge was given the green light to proceed. The St. Croix River was designated a wild and scenic river in 1964, giving it special protections. Kind said he was surprised at the decision, noting that officials went through a thorough process that attempted to address all the concerns. - rivertowns.net No snowmobile ‘sting’ HAYWARD - Department of Natural Resources Conservation Warden Sue Miller refuted “wild stories” that have circulated recently about the actions of a snowmobile law enforcement accident and drunk driving reduction team that was active in Sawyer, Bayfield and other northern counties this winter. Speaking at Monday’s meeting of the Sawyer County Forestry Committee, Miller said the effort “was not a sting, not a secret. We were very visible. We set up a trailer beside a major business at an intersection in Cable. We sat with marked machines and in full uniform right where the trail crossed the road and they (snowmobilers) would fly right past us.” - haywardwi.com (Sawyer County Record)

Views expressed on these pages or by columnists elsewhere in the paper do not necessarily represent those of the Inter-County Cooperative Publishing Association management or board.

Where to Write President Barack Obama 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. Washington, D.C. 20500 www.whitehouse.gov/contact/ Gov. Jim Doyle P.O. Box 7863, Madison, WI 53707 wisgov@mail.state.wi.us Congressman David Obey (7th District) 2462 Rayburn Office Bldg. Washington, D.C. 20515 or Federal Building, Wausau, WI 54401 (715) 842-5606 Rep. Nick Milroy (73rd District) Room 221 North, State Capitol P.O. Box 8952, Madison 53708 E-mail: rep.milroy@legis.state.wi.us

T h e

Rep. Ann Hraychuck (28th District) State Capitol, P.O. Box 8942 Madison, WI 53708 Phone: 608-267-2365 • Toll free: 888-529-0028 In-district: 715-485-3362 rep.hraychuck@ legis.state.wi.us Rep. Mary Hubler (75th District) Room 7 North, State Capitol P.O. Box 8952, Madison, WI 53708 or 1966 21-7/8 St., Rice Lake 54868 (715) 234-7421• (608) 266-2519 rep.hubler@legis.state.wi.us U.S. Sen. Herb Kohl 330 Hart Senate Office Bldg. Washington, D.C. 20510 (715) 832-8492 (608) 264-5338 senator_kohl@kohl.senate.gov

Sen. Robert Jauch (25th District) Room 19 South, State Capitol P.O. Box 788, Madison, WI 53707 E-mail: Sen.Jauch@legis.state.wi.us Sen. Sheila Harsdorf (10th District) State Capitol, P.O. Box 7882 Madison, WI 53707 (608) 266-7745 • (715) 232-1390 Toll-free - 1-800-862-1092 sen.harsdorf@legis.state.wi.us U.S. Sen. Russ Feingold SDB 40, Rm. 1, Washington, D.C. 20510 or 1600 Aspen Commons Middleton, WI 53562-4716 (608) 828-1200 senator@feingold.senate.gov

Teen sentenced to 30 days RICE LAKE – A 15-year-old girl will spend 30 days in secure juvenile detention and onee year on probation for causing the drunken-driving death of a 17year-old girl last summer. The girl, who was 14 years old at the time of the crash, appeared in Barron County juvenile court Tuesday, March 9, for sentencing after pleading guilty last month to homicide by intoxicated use of a vehicle. She was convicted of causing the death of her passenger, Rhonda Hellstern of Turtle Lake, after she rolled the pickup truck she was driving in the town of Vance Creek on July 4. A second passenger, Danielle Nordquist, 17, of Clayton, was injured in the crash. A later investigation revealed that the girls had been at an underage drinking party. Judge James Babbitt sentenced the girl to the recommendations of District Attorney Angela Beranek and defense attorney Andrew Nielsen of Minneapolis, with the exception of changes to curfew times and restitution. The recommendation, according to Beranek, was the most comprehensive sentencing the girl could receive given the juvenile conviction. At the start of the hearing, Beranek read a victim impact statement written by the Hellsterns. They wrote about Rhonda’s warm smile and outgoing personality. “We will not get to see our baby grow up, graduate from high school and fulfill her dreams,” the Hellsterns wrote. “We will have no grandchildren. “It is hard to get the mail and see all the college information,” they wrote. “It is a constant reminder of all that we have lost.” The Hellsterns lost their other child, 23-year old Tony Hellstern, in an automobile crash in Polk County nine months before Rhonda was killed. Nielsen said that his client was not a violent person, did not have a juvenile record and that the act was not premeditated. He said the girl had “a lot of remorse” and was not “a bad seed.” He agreed with Beranek’s recommendations. Babbitt offered the girl a chance to speak before sentencing her. She turned slowly toward the Hellsterns and cried, “I can’t tell you how sorry I am for all that I did. I don’t expect to ever forgive myself.” - Rice Lake Chronotype

I n t e r - C o u n t y

L e a d e r

i s

a

MARCH 17, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 9

Letters t o t h e e d i t o r United Way grateful I would like to recognize the generous folks who donate through Polk-Burnett Electric Cooperative’s Operation RoundUp for their donation to the United Way of Polk County. I realize that it is the Operation Roundup Board that makes the final decision where the dollars are directed. But, I also realize that it is members of the community that make this fund possible by rounding up each of their month’s bills. I am grateful for the generosity of our community members and of Polk-Burnett Electric Cooperative’s staff and board in administering this program for the community. You are all, through this program, an asset to this place we call home. Carolyn Matosky Reginal Director United Way of Polk County Centuria

Morals and ethics This morning, after catching some more news about Ben Roethlisberger and a 20year-old female who is pressing charges for sexual assault, something hit me. We all know that the pro athletes are continuously in the public eye for moral and ethical standards. Look at the new charges against Roethlisberger, Tiger Woods’ infidelity, Kobe Bryant’s infidelity, Mark McGuire for steroids, the Canadian women’s hockey team drinking beer after winning the gold medal, and a host of others over the past 10 years. The public is always shocked, dismayed and appalled by the actions of these athletes. We tend to say “another overpaid athlete doing stupid things.” We tend to make a judgment long before the court case ever comes up. We tend to call them “spoiled brats” and a host of other derogatory names. I’ve got an idea: Let’s subject our politicians to the same scrutiny. Let’s hold them to the same moral and ethical standards we hold the pro athlete to. Let’s judge them in public long before the case comes to trial. If we held the politicians to the same standards, there wouldn’t be but one or two politicians left in the entire United States. We have deadbeat dads (several), Rangell of New York for accepting vacations from corporations, liars (only those that speak out loud), bribery (any one of them that accept PAC money, soft money, and campaign contributions), collusion (the people that negotiated the Medicare medicine rates and ended up pharmaceutical executives making over $1 million), domestic assault (at least five have restraining orders), infidelity (too numerous to count), etc. Look at the damage this scrutiny does to the athletes. Most lose lucrative endorsements and livelihood (game suspensions). Man, we could save a bundle by subjecting them to suspension of pay for anything from one day, equal to $628, to a year, equal to $228,000. Or, we could take the public opinion polls which they use extensively to get us to believe one thing or another, and pay them by their poll ratings. Congress, as of two weeks ago, had an overall approval rating of 19 percent. We multiply their annual salary of $228,000/year times 19 percent, and they would now get paid $43,320/year. No automatic raises, no COLA raises (just like Social Security), no per diem, no committee compensations (which range from a couple of thousand dollars a year to $50,000 additional), no nothing. If the voters truly want control of government, now that would be the way to do it. Remember that congressmen and senators can retain their jobs, salaries, and all benefits after being convicted of felonies. Private sector positions aren’t afforded the same luxury: you are dismissed almost immediately. The way to really take control back from the special interests and lobbyists is to not vote for any incumbent on the local, county, state and federal levels. Dave Wilhelmy Siren

Help for Haiti Let’s give Robin Fornengo a great sendoff. She’s a licensed practical nurse who is medically trained to help people. She will be raising money to buy supplies in Florida and then take the supplies to Haiti where she will help the ill, injured and others at orphanages and clinics. We will be selling tickets for raffles, doing bake sales and much more. One of the beginning fundraisers will be May 1 and May 22 at the Cloverton Town Hall in Cloverton, Minn. If you want to donate or help, call us at 320-242-3147 or 715-244-3324. Bonnie Fornengo Dairyland

The new IRS, part II According to the Burnett County Comprehensive Planning Public Opinion Survey Report, “The predominant reason people gave for living in Burnett County was the natural beauty (64 percent).” In 2006, the surrogate power of the Burnett County Board turned down an offer of nearly $500,000 for the former Evans property on Little Trade Lake, and the proposed buyer would have wanted to keep the property in its natural beauty. The county wisdom was that they could get more and have it developed. Well folks, last time I heard, that property is still in county hands, with no property taxes but yours being collected. Join the New IRS - also known as the Incumbent Replacement System. The Burnett County Land Committee meeting of Feb. 2, where the Whispering Pines proposal was discussed, resembled an assembly of vultures feeding on the perceived benefits of development which will likely be short term at best. In 20 years, the current land committee people will be long gone, and Spirit Lake will likely see degraded water quality, algae blooms, increased weed populations and elimination of wild rice beds. Say goodbye to the “natural beauty” – the predominant reason people gave for living in Burnett County. There were 237 signed petitions from nearby landowners opposing the Whispering Pines development on Spirit Lake. The following 10 county board supervisors voted yes to approve the development: Brent Blomberg, Priscilla Baur, Gene Olson, Chuck Awe, Ed Peterson, Norm Bickford, Emmett Byrne, Gary Lundberg, Maury Miller and Gerry Pardun. Join the New IRS. Vote these tyrants out of office at the next election. Leon Moe Trade Lake

Soften the blow Now that our Wisconsin assemblymen and senators have removed our local control and parental involvement from the kindergarten through 12th grade sex education curriculum of our schools, what can we expect? Whether our children are ready or not (and parents usually know this best) our children will be learning about human growth and sexual development, applications of condoms, abortifacient methods of birth control, sexually transmitted diseases, masturbation and diversity of sexual orientation, such as homosexuality, transvestitism, etc. …and no abstinence program included. Do you know who will teach this most delicate, controversial, personal information? As I understand, it may be Planned Parenthood. PP does receive thousands of our tax dollars. Do our children need all of this in addition to the complexities of adolescence? Where does this so-called education lead our children? This education certainly does not teach trust, loyalty, caring for others and the other characteristics of integrity that are necessary for family/society to succeed and so create a world we want to live in. Gov. Doyle already made it known, he will sign this bill. So, now what?

Some amendments/addendums may be added to this bill S.B. 324. Hopefully, they will be in a follow-up letter to the editor. Then you who are not pleased with this bill can call your representatives. Tell them how you feel and what you think. Maybe we can soften the blow to our precious children. Bernadette L. Tolan Luck

Government control The folks in Bone Lake Township really should attend their annual meeting April 13. There is a proposal on page 16 of the Indianhead Advertiser from March 8, 2010. The Bone Lake Planning Commission is proposing the addition of a “sustainability component” to the Bone Lake Comprehensive Plan. The only reason to have a comprehensive plan is to carry it out with – as yet unwritten regulations. That’s what a plan is. It states what the authors of the plan intend to do if the plan is adopted. That can only happen if enforceable regulations are adopted to enable the plan. Goal No. 1 states, “The Town of Bone Lake will foster improved local energy production, efficiency, conservation and diversification.” Really? Just how will they do that?? They list efforts to “disseminate information.” OK. But all this information is readily available already through the extension office in Balsam Lake or other sources. Do the taxpayers of Bone Lake Township want their taxes to increase to hand out information that is already available for the asking? Goal No. 2 states, “Encourage citizens to embrace energy policies and practices as a part of strategy to meet future energy needs.” Encourage? Encourage with what? Regulations?? Warm, fuzzy thoughts?? Objective No. 3 under Goal No. 2 states ‘Encourage all forms of renewable energy projects including wind, solar, bio energy and others that become available.” Oil, coal and natural gas are being created as we speak which, I think would technically make them renewable sources of energy, but Al Gore and the global-warming liars have told us they are bad. Do we want the government to tell us what forms of “renewable” energy would best serve each of us? Goal No. 3 states “Encourage sustainable practices by citizens in the town for obtaining food.” What the heck? Since when is it any of the government’s business what “practices/lifestyle choices” citizens utilize in pursuit of their food?? Goal No. 4—“Conserve, protect and maintain our clean water supply.” The last time I checked I thought EPA and DNR were already doing that—with a vengeance. This is the “creepy creeping Marxism” that we should all be guarding against. This proposal has the fingerprints of the misguided Jeff Peterson groupies and tree huggers all over it. I frankly don’t care what others do. Let the buyer beware. But when they attempt to use the government to impose their lifestyle choices on the rest of us, they need to be stopped. I don’t know any farmer or businessman that isn’t acutely aware of the need to operate their business in a “sustainable” way. This nonsense is not about sustainability. It is about government control of the citizens at all levels of government. This will be voted on at the Bone Lake Township annual meeting on April 13. Bob Blake Rural Frederic

Rich Hess Trade Lake

Political letters No letters will be published during the campaign from political candidates and their immediate family, campaign managers or spokespersons, paid consultants, public relations firms or major contributors to specific candidates or ballot measures.

Letters to the editor

How do you reach your local officials? How do we contact public incumbents that serve us? The tax bill that all property tax payers receive has all the spenders on it. No phone numbers or e-mail addresses; why? Well, maybe next year. I checked our two local papers and no local information to be found. We just had a county and local survey

c o o p e r a t i v e - o w n e d

done and it says 51 percent of us, are connected to the Internet. I search Trade Lake and found the names and telephone numbers of the three supervisors, but no e-mail addresses. A form e-mail! I tried it and after two weeks, no response. Responsibility and accountability? Next, I tried the Grantsburg School Board. No phone numbers for the seven. I found e-mail addresses supplied by the district. The seven folks listed are not the last seven elected, unless one has resigned and been appointed. I need to check the minutes later. Next, I tried the county. All 21 supervisors had phone numbers and six had e-mail addresses. Why the 15 shy folks do not have a county e-mail address and a workstation set up at the county is a good question to be asked. Since all the county employees do not have e-mail, I again tried the form email. Three weeks and no response. Form e-mail lacks accountability. In summary, folks who have Internet have varied access to the incumbents. Since the taxpayer is common to all groups, why can’t we have all phone numbers and all direct e-mail addresses? The incumbents are to be open to listening to those they serve, right? How do the 49-percent who do not have Internet access find out who and how to contact the incumbents? The Burnett County Directory has a wealth of information in it. It is also on the county Web page. Wanda and team: Thank you! Next, I went after how we are informed. Our two local papers keep us informed every seven days and cover about 40 percent of us. They do a good job of reporting the facts and this week is Sunshine Week, which is openness in government and freedom of information. Without our local newspapers we are blind. To Gary, Todd and your teams, thank you for protecting our freedoms. Someday I would like to see more reporters who report the facts and then state their opinion. These folks have a wealth of information and opinions. Reporters get edited and those of us who need more detailed information have to go to the specific Web page for details in the minutes of meetings. Since papers update us every seven days I look to be updated every 8 days by them. The Grantsburg School Board produces a draft of minutes in the shortest time. The town is then next. The county has no sunshine! Thirty days of minutes is not acceptable. Do county supervisors read 30-day-old newspapers? If the two other big taxing units can produce a draft in eight days or less, than why can’t you? The county by its own admission is poor in communication. Well, share your information in eight days or less. If you don’t, you feed the perception that you are hiding information from those you serve.

The Leader welcomes letters to the editor. Letters are subject to being edited for length, taste and/or clarity, and we urge writers to be brief and limit their letters to 500 words or less. Writers must provide their name and give their complete address and phone number. Content that will cause letters to be rejected include: Crude language, poor taste, disrespectful comments regarding a group’s or individual’s ethnicity, gender, religion, culture, sexual orientation or race; other incendiary language or personal attacks.

n e w s p a p e r

PAGE 10 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MARCH 17, 2010

Important information about the 2010 U.S. Census Recently, you should have received a notice in the mail letting you know that the U.S. Census form will soon be delivered to your home. Please do not ignore the census form when you receive it. It is actually your constitutional duty to fill out your form since the U.S. Constitution requires a census to be completed every 10 years. It is important that you respond and make sure that our community is accurately counted. That data will be used for drawing the boundaries of legislative districts, in addition to ensuring that states and communities receive their fair share of funding from the federal government. Locally, accurate census data will help determine how federal and state government can best allocate their resources to local hospitals, schools, job training cen-

ters, public works, and transportation departments. I was recently asked, “Do I have to fill out the form?” The answer is yes. Federal law does require the census form to be accurately filled out and returned. In 2000, Nebraska and Ann Wisconsin had the Hraychuck highest response rates to the census at 28th District 75 percent. Assembly I understand that there are some concerns about privacy and the personal information that is asked. For example, why do they need the full names of all persons living in your household? These are not new questions to the census. In case you

didn’t know, the U.S. Census Bureau asks for full names to ensure that people are not counted twice, to eliminate simple errors like counting “Jane Doe” as a male, and to allow only you to obtain a record from the Census Bureau at a later date if you need to prove your residence for the purposes of a passport or Social Security benefits. The information that is collected by the Census Bureau is protected by federal law, is strictly confidential, and is only used for statistical purposes. Federal courts have upheld that no agency, including the IRS, FBI, or CIA, can have access to census data. Information collected by the census is kept sealed for 72 years, after which time it becomes subject to public review. This year’s census form only has ten questions and should only take about 10 minutes. If you would like more information on the U.S. Census, or would like to review the questions ahead of time, you can do so by visiting the U.S. Census Bu-

reau Web site at: http://2010.census.gov/2010census/. If you are currently unemployed or are looking for some additional employment, the U.S. Census Bureau is still looking for individuals to assist with the collection of census information in Burnett County. The Chicago Regional Census Center is encouraging job seekers to call, toll-free, 866-861-2010 – or to visit www.2010censusjobs.gov – to register to test for these unfilled positions which pay between $11.50 and $15 per hour. Testing dates, times and locations across Wisconsin are available by calling that toll-free phone number.

If you have questions about the 2010 U.S. Census, please feel free to contact my office. I can be reached toll-free at 888-529-0028 or by e-mail at Rep.Hraychuck@legis.wisconsin.gov.

Senator Harsdorf listens

Nexen Operations Manager Dan Conroy takes State Sen.Sheila Harsdorf on a tour of their Webster facility, explaining the advanced manufacturing technology. – Photos submitted State Sen. Sheila Harsdorf held listening sessions in Polk and Burnett counties on March 15. Here a group of over 20 in Siren asked Harsdorf, a variety of questions about state issues.

Free hearing tests for veterans

Canary Ruled Pads Limit 6 per customer. Stock number UNV-10630

Burnett County Veterans Service Officer, Chris Sower presented a certificate of appreciate to Dianne Thompson of Miracle Ear, Siren, for providing free hearing tests for veterans of Burnett County. Through her efforts many veterans have received service connected compensation for hearing loss. - Special photo

79¢ Each

Bonus Buy Good 3-15-10 thru 3-19-10

Rubber Stamps We offer Brother self-inking rubber stamps. Great for return addresses, marking items, endorsements, signatures and many other uses.

Great Selection of HP Ink Cartridges We have a large variety of cartridges in stock. If we don’t have it, we can get it.

We Ship UPS from our Frederic & St. Croix Falls stores

Inter-County Cooperative Publishing Association 303 N. Wisconsin Ave. 107 N. Washington St. Frederic, Wis. St. Croix Falls, Wis.

715-327-4236

715-483-9008

24154 State Rd. 35N Siren, Wis.

715-349-2560

11 West 5th Ave. Shell Lake, Wis.

715-468-2314

505452 19a,b,c,d 30r,L

Zeiler named AFP WI Volunteer of the Year WISCONSIN DELLS — Americans for Prosperity Wisconsin has named grassroots coordinator Jim Zeiler their volunteer of the year. Zeiler, of Grantsburg, received the award Saturday, March 13, at the Defending the American Dream Summit at the Chula Vista Resort in the Wisconsin Dells. Zeiler was presented the award by talkradio host, author and Fox business commentator Herman Cain. The Wisconsin State Director for Americans for Prosperity, Mark Block, says Zeiler’s tireless work in protecting the nation’s freedom is inspiring. “Taxpayers have a friend in Jim Zeiler. He believes in our nation and Wisconsin and fights for our freedoms every day,” Block said, “Wisconsin’s citizens are more engaged because of the efforts of Jim Zeiler. Volunteers like Jim make our state a better place to live in.” Block highlighted the many tea parties, town hall meetings and events in northern Wisconsin that would not have been possible without the leadership of Zeiler. Americans for Prosperity of Wisconsin is a grassroots organization with more than 54,000 members statewide. Its mission is to educate citizens about economic policy

Jim Zeiler of Grantsburg accepts the Americans for Prosperity Wisconsin Volunteer of the Year award from talkradio host, author and Fox business commentator Herman Cain. - Special photo and mobilize them to achieve fiscal and regulatory restraint by state governments and to return the federal government to its constitutional limits. More information can be found by visiting ww.fightbackwisconsin.com - from AFP

MARCH 17, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 11

B U R N E T T

C O U N T Y

H E A D L I N E S

Burnett County Historical Society remembers county roads Educational program draws crowd by Carl Heidel DANBURY - The Great Room at Forts Folle Avoine was filled with enthusiastic history buffs Sunday, March 14, as Clayton Jorgensen led a memory journey down the historical roads of Burnett County. The program was part of the ongoing series of historical presentations that the Burnett County Historical Society has been offering during the winter months. Jorgensen is the master of some 50 years of research into the history of Burnett County, and his specialty is the system of trails that grew into the present county roads. Backed by an array of maps, research notebooks and historical ledgers of one kind or another, Jorgensen told the stories of “how it was then.” From waterways and landing points, to lumbering camps and railways, to trails and tote roads and stagecoaches and “real” roads, ferries and the first bridges, he led the crowd from one end of the county to the

One of the visitors takes notes as he checks out a map of Burnett County in 1915.

One of Jorgensen’s notebooks draws the interest of this visitor.

Backed by an array of maps, Clayton Jorgensen tells the story of how Burnett County’s road system grew.

other as he spun out his word pictures of how it all came to be. There were descriptions of settlements that needed to be connected, and how the wagons navigated stumps left by the lumbering in order to make a crude road to the next settlement. And there were even stories from the Civil War days, and

how those times gave Grantsburg its name (after Civil War General Ulysses S. Grant). Watch for more of these historical programs to be presented at the Forts in coming months. In the meantime, check the photos and dream of roads through a new world.

A crowd of history enthusiasts fills the Great Room as Jorgensen spins his tales. – Photos by Carl Heidel

A visitor at the program checks out an old county plat book.

Burnett Dairy Cooperative to deed land to the village by Sherill Summer WEBSTER - It has been several years since the Burnett Dairy Cooperative closed the Webster location and put the property up for sale. The property was divided into three lots. The two build-

ings were each on separate lots and a 290-by-70-foot lot made up the southern border of the property. The Burnett Dairy Cooperative has sold both buildings now, but has been unable to sell the 290-by-70-foot lot.

Moose Lodge accepts donation

Cindy Ambelang (L) who, with her husband Phil, are the proprietors of the Hideaway Bar VFW in Lewis, stopped at Bremer Bank, Frederic, Wednesday, March 10, to present a gift check for $500 to Dave Goranson Sr., two-term past governor and current prelate of the Burnett County Moose Lodge 1194, Siren. Cherrise Miller, representing Bremer Bank, was also on hand for the check presentation. The money enables the Moose Lodge to offer a $250 scholarship this year to a graduating senior from Frederic High School, in addition to the $250 scholarship the lodge already gives to a senior from Siren and Webster high schools. The Moose Lodge is a nonprofit organization that provides these scholarships from donations and money that comes in from their fundraising activities. – Photo by Nancy Jappe

The cooperative offered to donate the nonbuildable lot to the village at the Webster Village Board meeting on Wednesday, March 10. The Burnett Dairy Cooperative will handle the legal work needed to donate the property. Village changes pay schedule The Webster Village decided to pay village employees once every two weeks instead of weekly. Prior to the decision the idea was discussed with village employees and most employees did not object to the idea. Paying the village employees every two weeks will save money because the village clerk / treasurer will spend less time on payroll. Library update The library board is finalizing the building plans for the new library building. There are plans to install more monitoring wells around the former Larsen building where the new library will be placed; however, the pumps will not slow the construction process down at all. The final design is expected at the end of this month or early April. The bids will be reviewed in June or July, and construction is expected to begin later this year. The project should be complete in February or March 2011. The Nexen challenge brought $37,000 to the library building funds. In other business The Webster Village has offered the Webster Police Department $1,500 a year to subsidize the village costs in prosecuting truancy in the school district. So far this year there have been 55 truancies reported, and police Chief Michael Spaf-

Cliff Gipp from the Burnett Dairy Cooperative offered the village a portion of the former cooperative property in Webster at the village board meeting on Wednesday, March 10. The dairy co-op has sold both buildings, but they still own a nonbuildable lot that runs south of the buildings. Photo by Sherill Summer ford explained that it costs over $40 to prosecute each case. The village received a bid of up to $18,790 to inspect one of the village wells. The well is relatively new, only 16 years old, but it has not been inspected since it was installed. The well is working properly for now, but the inspection is considered routine maintenance. However, because of the bid amount, another bid is being sought and no decision has been made as of yet.

PAGE 12 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MARCH 17, 2010

P O L K

C O U N T Y

H E A D L I N E S

Change made to Frederic High School handbook by Brenda Sommerfeld FREDERIC – High school Principal Ray Draxler asked the Frederic School Board for approval of a change to the high school handbook during the monthly meeting Monday, March 15. Draxler asked that it be stated that seniors must attend school at least 80 percent of the scheduled days in order to participate in the graduation commencement. The board approved for the book to state seniors will need to attend at least 144 days of their school year in order to take part in commencement. A change to the credit requirements is also being discussed. They are looking to add a 0.5 credit of general science requirement. Financial literacy has been removed from the one credit of information pro-

cessing/financial literacy, but will still be taught. The vote to change the credits will take place at the April meeting. Teachers to teach teachers Two Frederic teachers, Pat Anderson and Stacy Cox, have been asked to teach at Star Academy over the summer. They will be bringing teachers up to date on some newer technology. Some of the activities in their course include podcasts, Web 2.0 tools, Photo Story, WebQuests, wikis and advanced SMART Board. Food service retirement Anna Runnels wrote a letter asking the board to accept her request for retirement. Runnels has served in the food service department for the past 27 years. She will retire at the end of this school

year, her last day on June 7. As Runnels leaves, the board accepted two volunteer sports coaches onto the school team. Steve Jensen was approved as a volunteer coach for baseball and Eric Olson a volunteer coach for track. Other business •The 2010-11 school calendar is set and was approved for holidays, early releases, teacher inservices and graduation. •A motion was made for buses No. 2 and No. 11 to be put up for sale. •A discussion is being had with a vendor about print management. A savings in classroom print costs may be possible. •The data analysis retreat is set for April 21 and 22 during the school day. It is to look at the WKCE results and decide goals for the following year.

•Open enrollment was approved for the 2010-11 school year. There are 24 residents of Frederic open enrolling in other school districts and seven students open enrolling in Frederic. It is unknown if these numbers have improved over last year, but Superintendent Jerry Tischer is going to get that information for the board. •Over 30 students will be inducted into the National Honor Society this year. •Rubber mulch is being priced to replace the wood chips on the elementary playground. •The Senior Tax Exchange Program was approved for next school year. S.T.E.P. is a program where people receiving Social Security do work for the district and receive a tax credit of $400.

Golden Age Manor reserve fund approved by Gregg Westigard BALSAM LAKE – The March meeting of the Polk County Board took almost six hours to complete. Most of that time was involved with discussion on how to deal with the invalid furniture purchase and whether to proceed with the conference/training-room idea. The board did act on 17 resolutions including approval of a reserve fund for Golden Age Manor. The meeting started with approval of the appointment of Wendy Rattel to the board, replacing Keith Rediske in District 8, the St. Croix Falls seat. Rattel was appointed to the seat by county board Chair Bryan Beseler in January and has been serving on two committees since then. The GAM resolution establishes a cap-

ital improvement reserve account for the county-owned nursing home in Amery. The account would be funded from GAM funds, but only in years where GAM shows a profit. The funding would be limited to the amount of the nursing home’s depreciation expense, not to exceed the year’s operating profit. The GAM resolution, supported by the majority of the GAM governing board, was approved by a vote of 14 to 8. Voting yes were Supervisors Bob Dueholm, Dean Johansen, Kathryn Kienholz, Marvin Caspersen, Ken Sample, Craig Moriak, Russ Arcand, Jay Luke, Diane Stoneking, Larry Jepsen, Kim O’Connell, Larry Voelker, Gerald Newville and Beseler. Opposed were Supervisors Joan Peterson, Patricia Schmidt, Herschel Brown, Rattel, Jim Edgell, Brian Masters, Mick Larsen and Gary Bergstrom. Neil Johnson was absent. Other resolutions included correcting

Burnett Community Library Monday through Thursday 10 a.m. - 7 p.m. Friday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Closed Sunday Main Street

Webster

460220 43Ltfc

COME MEET THE ST. CROIX FALLS SCHOOL BOARD CANDIDATES The School District of St. Croix Falls invites the general public, of the St. Croix Falls School District, to an open house on Tuesday, March 16, 2010, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. in the High School/Middle School Media Center, to meet the three candidates, Sheri Norgard, Tilford Hellie Jr. and Troy 506818 29L De Smet, who are running for the school board.

What: KINDERGARTEN KAMP Where: Frederic Elementary Kindergarten

Rooms When: Friday, March 26 Time: 12:15 - 3:20 p.m. (11:45 lunch option) If you have a child who will be FIVE before September 1 and entering kindergarten who DID NOT attend the Mite-y-Vikes program or the Polk County Early Learning Center, please call to register at 715327-4221. The kindergarten staff will work with the children throughout the afternoon on various activities while continuing the assessment process. A written invite is being sent to all parents with children enrolled in the above program and others on our roster. Registration for our Mite-y-Vikes program will be at a later date. We look forward to hearing from you. 506643 29-30L 20a A lifetime of learning starts here.

a finance department fund transfer made last year, authorizing a grantfunded energy independence team, and transferring some zoning duties from the land use committee to the board of adjustment. This was the last regular meeting for the present board. The supervisors will meet in a special session April 13 to select a county administrator. Two of the 23 supervisors are retiring but 21 are running for the board in the April 6 election. Wendy Rattel was sworn in as the newest member of the Polk County Board Monday night. Rattel will represent District 8, the St. Croix Falls city area, replacing Keith Rediske. - Photo by Gregg Westigard

Closet is hiding place of preference Several arrests at Balsam Lake party BALSAM LAKE – Police were called to a juvenile alcohol party at a home in Balsam Lake on March 13 at about 3:30 a.m. People at the home were told to leave the party and several who didn’t leave as requested were eventually arrested. Ryan Wedekind, 20, St. Croix Falls, and Trevor Nowack, 20, Lindstrom, Minn., were arrested for obstruction after officers found them hiding under a blanket in a closet about a half-hour after they had been told to leave. Cory Traynor, 19, was also arrested and charged with disorderly conduct and possession of paraphernalia.

In a separate incident, Edwin Dayton, 45, Amery, was arrested and charged with two counts of disorderly conduct and resisting an officer after police were called to his home. When police arrived, Dayton was lying on the floor in the closet near the patio door of the home. Dayton allegedly said he was “too drunk to stand up.” Apparently Dayton had been trying to get into the home by kicking the patio door. Then he realized he had the key and entered the home. As police were sorting through the situation, Dayton yelled and cursed at the police and at his wife, and he was eventually arrested. He was taken to the Amery hospital to be checked but during the ride he kicked the cage and cursed and yelled loudly. This continued at the hospital with the result that the doc-

tor refused to treat him and he was taken to jail. — with information from the Polk County Sheriff’s Dept.

R se Garden GIFTS, FLORAL & GREENHOUSE 308 Wis. Ave. S Frederic, Wis.

715-327-4281 1-800-676-4281 • Fresh Flowers & Plants • Gifts • Complete Weddings • Flowers • Tuxedo Rental • Invitations • Linen Rental • Spring Garden Center “The Professional Florist with the Personal Touch” 440497 9Ltfc 51atfc

THANK YOU

YOGA

Son & daughters and spouses; grandchildren; greatgrandchildren for such a great day for my birthday. Super day! I think the church is still standing.

Ethel Lane Also all the cards and wishes!

Sample a class - FREE!

507138 30Lp

Visit www.earthartswi.org Click on “upcoming classes” Demo Week starts 4/13/10

CONSCIOUS LIVING ARTS Certified Kripalu Yoga Instructors

715-268-2860

consciouslivingarts@hotmail.com spreading peace - creating mindfulness

507139 30Lp 20dp

Rattel takes supervisor oath

Paid for by Mary Lynne McAlonie.

507125 30Lp

MARCH 17, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 13

Home Sweet Home Show RIGHT: (L to R): Pippi of Osceola and Josie of St. Croix perform at the Home Sweet Home Show held on Saturday and Sunday, March 13 and 14, at the Webster High School. The two 5-year-olds were the youngest members of the River City Cloggers, the multigeneration clogging team that gave multiple performances over the weekend. Janet Swenson from Curves in Webster demonstrates hula-hooping techniques at the Webster Home Show on Saturday. According to Swenson, hula hoops are a great form of exercise. Weighted hula hoops are sold at Webster Curves for anyone interested in giving the hoops a whirl.

Photos by Sherill Summer

Jaws of Life Serena Peck shows the collage she made at the home show. The Burnett Area Arts Group provided a make-and-take activity for kids, just one of the many activities for the whole familty.

Scott Township Volunteer Fire Chief Jerry Okonek (L) accepts a $1,000 check from Sharon Rochel, member of the Webb Lake Community Club. The donation will help defray the cost of a new Jaws of Life to be shared between Scott, Jackson and Webb Lake town fire departments.

Frederic FFA’s co-president wins award

Danielle Peterson (L) was presented with the Dekalb Ag Accomplishment award. Her co-president, Terri McKinney, and fellow officer, Zach Tietz, presented her with the award on Friday, March 12, during school. FFA Adviser Earl Lee nominated Peterson for this award, basing his nomination on ag appreciation and because she plans to go to UW-River Falls in the fall of 2010 to major in animal science and biology with a field of study in pre-vet. Lee said he feels Peterson is the best person to receive this award. “She has done many thing to honor the Frederic FFA and aquaculture and is very deserving of this award.” - Special photo

507091 30L

507115 30L

Fire Chief Jerry Okonek demonstrates to some community club members how the Jaws of Life works. - Photos/info submitted by Kim Sundet and Laura Main

PAGE 14 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MARCH 17, 2010

Blue Star Banner presented Commander Arlen Peterson of Indian Creek American Legion Post 396 presents a Blue Star Banner to Michelle Mesecher, mother of Jeremiah Mesecher (photo at right). The Legion presents banners to families who have family members serving in the armed forces and are serving overseas or who are heading overseas. Jeremiah is in the Army with the 950th Clearance Company based out of Spooner and will be going to Iraq in April. If anyone has a family member on active duty, serving overseas or within the United States, and would like to receive a Blue Star Banner free of charge, please contact the American Legion Post 396 by calling Peterson at 715-497-2222 or Robert Carlson, adjutant, at 715-566-1078, or e-mail arlenpeterson2@yahoo.com. - Special photos

Burnett County circuit court Timothy H. Ainley, Grantsburg, operate w/o valid license, not guilty plea. Arlu L. Ames, Grantsburg, seat belt violation; operating while revoked; nonregistration of auto, etc., not guilty pleas. Mark R. Anderson, Clio, Mich., speeding, $180.00. Amy L. Armstrong, Grantsburg, operating while under influence, $817.50, license revoked 8 months, alcohol assessment; failure to keep vehicle under control, $213.10. Philip D. Ashley, Chetek, speeding, $183.30. Daneil R. Barnard, Shell Lake, knowingly operating while suspended and cause property damage, not guilty plea. Brian J. Baus, Sturgeon Bay, fish w/o license, $192.70. Matthew J. Bealka, Circle Pines, Minn., speeding, $200.50. Gary D. Bearhart, Danbury, seat belt violation, $10.00. Erin R. Bearheart, Webster, underage drinking, possess, 1720, $263.50, alcohol assessment class. Gregory S. Belanger, Danbury, operating while under influence; operating with PAC .08 or more; driving too fast for conditions, not guilty pleas. Debbie M. Belland, Grantsburg, parking during snow removal, $185.00. Michael R. Belland, Webster, operate snowmobile while intoxicated; operate snowmobile w/ PAC >+.08<.10; illegal snowmobile operation on highway; fail to stop for law enforcement officer, not guilty pleas. Shannon M. Bellanger, Webster, theft, Fourwinds Market, $150.00. Thomas J. Bengel, St. Paul, Minn., passing in no-passing zone, $198.60. Clifford W. Benjamin, Danbury, seat belt violation, $10.00. Adam C. Benson, St. Paul, Minn., speeding, not guilty plea. Angela S. Berger, Edina, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Nicholas A. Birrenbach, Webster, operating while suspended, $200.50; failure to notify police of accident, $263.50. Tami M. Boese, Siren, operate snowmobile while intoxicated; illegal snowmobile operation on highway, $641.50, order for assessment. Carey A. Boutin, Danbury, operating while under influence, not guilty plea. Jeffrey D. Brathal, Hudson, operate snowmobile at unreasonable speed, $175.30. Joshua J. Bremer, Frederic, operating while suspended, $200.50. Matthew N. Caelwaerts, Newald, interstate record of duty status, $200.50. Brandon R. Chenal, Frederic, seat belt violation, $10.00. Dorothy L. Chenal, Frederic, seat belt violation, $10.00. John A. Childs, Webster, operate snowmobile-fail./comply signs; operate snowmobile while intoxicated; operate snowmobile PAC >=.08<.10, not guilty pleas. Mark A. Christensen, Hinckley, Minn., seat belt violation, $10.00; operate w/o valid license, $200.50. Derek Churchill, Webster,

theft, DVD movies; operate w/o valid license, not guilty pleas. Crystal Contreras, Siren, theft, movies and games, $460.00. David S. Corty, Rush City, Minn., speeding; violation of child safety restraint requirements, child 4 yrs., but less than 8 yrs., not guilty pleas. Michael D. Covey, Siren, improper animal shelter-sanitation, $250.00. Andrew P. Cummings, Mantorville, Minn., waterskipping, $154.50. Michael P. Decker, Marshfield, seat belt violation, $10.00. Travis L. Demarre, Webster, operate snowmobile while intoxicated; operate snowmobile PAC >=.08<.10; illegal snowmobile operation on highway, not guilty pleas. Jacqueline D. Duncan, Webster, violation of child safety restraint requirements, child 4 yrs., but less than 8 yrs., $150.10. Joseph P. Effinger, Maplewood, Minn., operate snowmobile w/o safety cert., $162.70. Jared E. Ellevold, New Richmond, underage drinking-possess 17-20, $263.50 and attend alcohol class; speeding, $200.50. Christopher L. Erhart, Shorewood, Minn., speeding, $200.50. Ryan A. Estridge, Danbury, seat belt violation, $10.00. John W. Fallstrom, Grantsburg, disorderly conduct, $150.00; drink open intoxicants in MV, $200.50. Justin R. Folson, Mankato, Minn., underage drinking-possess, $263.50. Alex D. Forsythe, Roseville, Minn., operate snowmobile w/o trail sticker, $200.50. Foster Trucking Inc., Ham Lake, Minn., violate Class A Hwy. weight limits, not guilty plea. Charles J. Frenette, Chippewa Falls, speeding, $225.70. Kari L. Gardner, Maplewood, Minn., automobile following too closely, $200.50. Dustin R. Gavin, Webster, driving too fast for conditions, $213.10; Failure to notify police of accident, $263.50. Steven E. Geiger, Grantsburg, speeding, not guilty plea. Gene J. Gioielli, Lakeville, Minn., speeding, $186.00. Dennis G. Goepfert, Grantsburg, seat belt violation, $10.00. Michael G. Gravning, Grantsburg, unsafe backing of vehicle, $175.30. Amber C. Guevara, Siren, speeding, $200.50. Tyler P. Hamblin, Canton, Miss., speeding, $175.30. Todd M. Hamilton, Brooklyn Park, Minn., operate snowmobile w/o trail sticker, $200.50. Anthony S. Hanson, Siren, seat belt violation, $10.00. Keith D. Hanson, Chetek, speeding, $175.30. Curtis L. Harmon, Grantsburg, seat belt violation, $10.00. Matthew D. Hatfield, Sandstone, Minn., operate w/o valid license, $186.00. Cortney M. Hedrick, Danbury, seat belt violation, $10.00. Mary L. Heier, Webster, speeding, $175.30.

Belinda K. Hernandez, Webster, seat belt violation, $10.00. Dean H. Hiller, Maple Grove, Minn., fish with unattended lines, $182.70. David M. Hood, Lino Lakes, Minn., failure to keep vehicle under control; failure to notify police of accident, not guilty pleas. Bradley A. Huber, Brooklyn Park, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Randy J. Hunt, Webster, operate unregistered snowmobile, $199.00. Elizabeth E. Icard, Shell Lake, operating while suspended, $200.50. Morgan R. Jensen, Duluth, Minn., speeding, not guilty plea. Tina M. Jenson, Spooner, speeding, $200.50. Cole A. Johnston, New Richmond, underage drinking-possess 17-20, $263.50, attend alcohol class. Brian C. Jorgensen, Danbury, seat belt violation, $10.00. George H. Kasper, Danbury, seat belt violation, $10.00. Theresa E. Kegel, Siren, seat belt violation, $10.00. Ethan R. Klawitter, Frederic, speeding, $225.70. Wayne K. Koball, Siren, operate unregistered snowmobile, $199.00. Norma J. Kroll, Grantsburg, seat belt violation, $10.00. Susan D. Kush, Little Canada, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Gregory J. Lafrance, Inver Grove Heights, Minn., operate unregistered snowmobile, not guilty plea. Lon S. Larson, Ham Lake, Minn., speeding, $200.50. Michael E. Larson, Grantsuburg, operate unregistered snowmobile, $199.00. Troy E. Larson, Cottage Grove, Minn., operate snowmobile w/o trail sticker, not guilty plea. Daniel R. Lescarbeau, Eden Prairie, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Derek Lindemann, Webster, theft, movies, $250.00. Matthew J. Lindgren, Forest Lake, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Donald J. Lowry, Siren, seat belt violation, $10.00. Jacob W. Lubich, Webster, fail./yield while making left turn, not guilty plea. Michael P. Lunsman, Danbury, nonregistration of vehicle, not guilty plea. Michelle M. Main, Bloomer, snowmobile owner permit unauth. operation, $187.90. Troy D. Main, Webb Lake, speeding, $175.30. James C. Mares, Milwaukee, speeding, $175.30. Thomas J. Mariette, Grantsburg, operating while under influence; operating with PAC .02 or more; operating while revoked, not guilty pleas. Scott L. Martin, Siren, operate unregistered snowmobile, $199.00. Jerry M. Martinez, Forest Lake, Minn., disorderly conduct, not guilty plea. Patrick A. Mcevoy, Minnetonka, Minn., speeding, $175.30. A. McGuiggan, Daniel Grantsburg, underage drinkingpossess 17-20, $263.50, attend

alcohol class. Stephen J. Mead, Siren, disorderly conduct, not guilty plea. Reyes R. Mendoza, Almena, operate w/o valid license, $200.50. Joshua A. Merrill, Balsam Lake, speeding, $175.30. Lalita Merrill, Onamia, Minn., fail./stop at stop sign, $160.80. David G. Moeller, Golden Valley, Minn., speeding, $225.70. Daniel Scott Mogen, Rochester, Minn., speeding, $175.30. James A. Mogen, Frederic, speeding, not guilty plea. Laura M. Moose, Webster, operating while suspended, $200.50. William L. Morrin, Grantsburg, operating while under influence; operating with PAC .10 or more, not guilty pleas. Kevin M. Morse, Danbury, place/transport uncased firearm/vehicle, not guilty plea. JaNeen Mosay, Webster, possess open intoxicants in MV, $200.50. Darrell M. Museus, Danbury, possession of illegal-sized fish, $222.90. Nicole M. Nefs, Siren, operating while under influence; operating with PAC .10 or more, not guilty pleas. Christopher G. Nelson, Roseville, Minn., operate recreation veh. in unauth. area, $175.30. Susan M. Nelson, Andover, Minn., speeding, $200.50. Kenneth P. Neumann, Stillwater, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Cory D. Niles, Grantsburg, speeding, $200.50. Michael D. Noreen, Frederic, speeding, $175.30. Robert F. Perkins, Apple Valley, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Jason L. Pierce, Siren, operate snowmobile while intoxicated; operate snowmobile PAC >=.08<.10; illegal snowmobile operation on highway; fail./transfer snowmobile registration, not guilty pleas. Harry J. Pijanowski, Danbury, seat belt violation, $10.00. Georgia M. Pittman, Danbury, operating while under influence; reckless driving-endanger safety, not guilty pleas. Ryan J. Priestly, Shoreview, Minn., operate snowmobile w/o safety cert., $162.70.

Todd M. Pysick, Plymouth, Min., operate snowmobile while intoxicated; operate snowmobilefail./comply signs, not guilty pleas. Matthey S. Ramstrom, Webster, operate snowmobile w/o headlight, not guilty plea. Jennifer G. Raygor, Webster, seat belt violation, $10.00. Rhonda K. Reed, Webster, seat belt violation, $10.00. Ronald J. Reis Jr., Danbury, operating with PAC .10 or more, not guilty plea. Debra K. Remmen, St. Paul, Minn., operate w/o valid license, $200.50. Jamie M. Robb, Grantsburg, operating while suspended, $200.50. Danielle R. Romanowski, Grantsburg, fail to stop/improper stop at stop sign, $175.30. Kim S. Rood, Arden Hills, Minn., operate snowmobile w/o trail sticker, $200.50. Alicia M. Roper, Webster, seat belt violation, $10.00. Ricardo R. Ruiz, St. Paul, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Corinne M. Scheele, Grantsburg, failure to keep vehicle under control; failure to notify police of accident; operating while under influence; operating with PAC .10 or more; operating left of centerline, not guilty pleas. Michael J. Schriener, Balsam Lake, seat belt violation, $10.00. Jerry L. Schultz, Siren, seat belt violation, $10.00. Donna L. Sigsworth, Amery, operating while under influence; improper parking on roadway, not guilty pleas. Benjamin R. Simon, New Richmond, violate absolute sobriety law, $389.50. Matthew J. Simonson, Brooklyn Park, Minn., operate snowmobile w/o trail sticker, $200.50. David D. Slowinske, Minneapolis, Minn., speeding, $200.50. Charles A. Sprinkle, Pine City, Minn., speeding, $200.50. Dennis R. Stadler, Webster, seat belt violation, $10.00; speeding, $175.30. Danielle L. Staples, Webster, no tail lamp/defective tail lamp, night, $162.70; nonregistration of auto, etc., $175.30; nonregistration of other vehicle, $263.50.

Gary U. Stelzer, Rice Lake, speeding, $200.50. Brian E. Stevens, Farmington, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Benjamin R. Stewart, Siren, nonregistration of vehicle <=10,000 lbs., not guilty plea. Christine M. Stoll, Webster, seat belt violation, $10.00. Kimberly N. Strate, Hayward, speeding, $175.30. Patrick H. Stuart, Webster, operate w/o valid license, $200.50. Marty D. Swanson, Champlin, Minn., passing in no-passing zone, not guilty plea. Rebecca Syring, Webster, theft, movies, $240.00. Sarah A. Taylor, Shell Lake, inattentive driving, $187.90; failure to notify police of accident, $263.50. Robert W. Thomas, Amery, seat belt violation, $10.00; speeding, $175.30. Chelsea M. Thompson, Rice Lake, underage drinking-possess 17-20, not guilty plea. David M. Thoreson, Grantsburg, operate unregistered snowmobile, $199.00. Cathie J. Tietz, Hugo, Minn., operate snowmobile-fail./comply signs, $175.30. Brian S. Tinkle, Siren, operate unregistered snowmobile, $199.00. David W. Tomberlin, Somerset, seat belt violation, $10.00. Robert B. Villebrun, Danbury, driving too fast for conditions, not guilty plea. Pamela J. Warmboe, Hastings, speeding, $200.50. Thomas W. Wiesenberger, Spooner, operate w/o valid license, $200.50. Jamie E. Windbiel, Webster, speeding, $175.30. Bryan D. Winslow, Grantsburg, operating while under influence, $817.50, 8 months license revocation, alcohol assessment. Cory J. Wittmer, Baldwin, modify snowmobile to exceed noise emissions, not guilty plea. Jared B. Yerke, Grantsburg, underage drkining-possess 1720. Tanya D. Zielinski, Danbury, theft, movies, $240.00. Ralph Zuech, Siren, seat belt violation, $10.00.

Burnett County criminal court Kathleen L. Hedy, 46, Newport, Minn., failure to keep vehicle under control, $213.10. Joel L. VenPelt, 37, Luck, waterskipping, $154.50. Russell G. Abel, 25, Hayward, speeding, $175.30. Frank C. Hamer, 56, Shell Lake, speeding, $173.50. Jonathan M. Dietrich, 36, speeding, Inver Grove Heights, Minn., $203.50. Anthony J. Petersen, 20, Webster, underage drinking, $137.50. Ryan A. Estridge, 19, Danbury, underage drinking, $263.50. Michael K. Kurkowski, 20, Webster, underage drinking, $137.50. Kevin M. Packard 17, Webster, underage drinking, $137.50.

Jordan K. Werdier, 18, Webster, underage drinking, $137.50. Cori B. Gustafson, 19, Grantsburg, operate without carrying a license, $200.50. Violet S. Reynolds, 29, Siren, disorderly conduct, oneyear probation, sentence withheld, alcohol assessment, $100.00. Terri A. Wilcox, 30, Webster, theft, $330.50. Tracee R. Belisle, 25, Webster, disorderly conduct, oneyear probation, sentence withheld, $200.00. Trisha L. Griffin, 29, Rush City, Minn., OWI, $916.00, 5-day jail sentence, Huber release granted, license revoked 12 months, alcohol assessment. Kevin J. Hicks, 25, Glenwood City, Lewd, lascivious behavior,

two-year probation, $150.00; battery, two-year probation, $108.32 restitution, must send letter of apology to victim and attend victim / offender mediation, $165.42. Jason A. Johnson, 26, Grantsburg, battery, two-year probation, sentence withheld, no abusive contact with victim, complete domestic violence classes, $200.00. Randall S. Decker, 48, Webster, OWI, $1,042.00, 20-day jail sentence, Huber release granted, license revoked 16 months, alcohol assessment. Robert J. Oiyotte, 50, Webster, disorderly conduct, $500.00.

PAGE 24 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MARCH 17, 2010

Polk County circuit court Lorena R. Benjamin, Luck, failure to notify police of accident, $263.50; unreasonable and imprudent speed, not guilty plea. Franklin D. Blondin, Elmore, Minn., interstate record of duty status, $263.50. Ronell D. Brady, Howard, Ohio, interstate record of duty status, $263.50. Christopher E. Bretheim, Lindstrom, Minn., operate snowmobile w/o trail sticker, $200.50. Gail A. Brown, White Bear Lake, Minn., bicyclist speeding,

$150.10. Robert C. Carlson, Dresser, failure to provide proper holdingtank servicing contract, $312.00. Michael J. Cherveny, Burnsville, Minn., failure to keep vehicle under control, $213.10. Rick A. Clemenson, Luck, passing in no-passing zone, not guilty plea. Marvin D. Coleman, Amery, seat belt violation, $10.00. Randy J. Colsen, Milltown, interstate record of duty status, $263.50.

Siren police report

(Feb. 24, Mar. 3, 10, 17, 24, 31) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY AnchorBank, fsb, f/k/a S & C Bank, Plaintiff, vs. Lawrence D. Land Defendant. NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Case No. 08 CV 392 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on May 14, 2009, in the amount of $117,155.41, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: APRIL 8, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down, in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is: and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: The front lobby of the Polk County Judicial Center located at 1005 West Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: That part of Government Lot 1, Section 22-33-15, described as follows: Lot 2 of Certified Survey Map recorded in Volume 8 of Certified Survey Maps, page 185, Document No. 528946, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 260 85th Avenue, Clayton, Wisconsin 54004. Dated this 1st day of February, 2010. /s/Timothy G. Moore Polk County Sheriff Ronald L. Siler VAN DYK, WILLIAMSON & SILER, S.C. Attorney for Plaintiff 201 South Knowles Avenue New Richmond, WI 54017 Van Dyk, Williamson & Siler, S.C., is attempting to collect a debt on our client’s behalf and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose. If you previously received a discharge in a chapter 7 bankruptcy case, this communication should not be construed as an attempt to hold you personally liable for 505508 WNAXLP the debt.

At 6:15 p.m., the Siren officer on duty called a husband to give a safe ride home for a woman believed to be under the influence of alcohol and the children riding with her. The woman refused to take a PBT (breath) test. March 9: Damage was done to the left-rear bumper of a vehicle driven by Judith A. Johnson, Siren, while the vehicle was parked in the Holiday Station parking lot. No information is known about the vehicle that inflicted the damage, nor its driver. March 10: Lacey Eskola, Frederic, was cited for theft of three movies from Siren Auto Stop after previous attempts to contact here were ignored. March 11: A student at Siren School was cited for smoking a cigarette on school property, a second violation this school year. An officer was sent at 10:17 p.m. to Sudsy’s Laundromat because a change machine had been broken into and money taken. The theft was found when the night employee came in to lock up the building. March 12: Between 7:15 and 7:30 p.m., the theft of a one-liter bottle of Svedka vodka was re-

Notices (March 10, 17, 24) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. Plaintiff, vs. KERRY L. LYSDAHL, et al. Defendants. Case Number: 09 CV 29 AMENDED NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on April 9, 2009, in the amount of $109,736.42, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: April 7, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Front Entrance to the Polk County Justice Center located at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: Lot 2 of Certified Survey Map No. 4134, recorded June 26, 2003, in Volume 18 of Certified Survey Maps, on Page 164, as Document No. 660373, in the Town of Eureka, Polk County, Wis. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2284 190th St., Centuria, WI 54824. TAX KEY NO.: 020-00279-0120. Dated this 5th day of March, 2010. /s/Timothy G. Moore Sheriff of Polk County Christina E. Demakopoulos State Bar #1066197 Attorney for Plaintiff 13700 W. Greenfield Avenue Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to http://www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for this purpose. (189771)

506623 WNAXLP

Feb. 25: Derek Churchill, Webster, was cited for theft of movies from Siren Auto Stop after previous requests to bring back the rented movies were ignored. March 4: At 6:49 p.m., the Siren officer on duty responded to a call regarding an out-of-control juvenile at a Siren residence. The juvenile had left the residence, but was found by the officer a short distance away at 7:06 p.m. Social services was contacted. March 5: An out-of-control juvenile at Siren School was involved in a case of simple assault and damage to property. At 5:57 p.m., Kevin A. Schwartzbauer, 47, Grantsburg, was cited for speeding on Hwy. 70 and Railroad Avenue. March 8: At 3:51 p.m., Brenda G. Marsh, 25, Siren, was cited for operating a vehicle without a license (second offense). Marsh was stopped on Hwy. 35 and Bacon Street. At 5:34 p.m., Jennifer D. Hansen, 39, Grantsburg, was cited for speeding on Ellis Avenue and East Doctor’s Lake Trail.

ported at Jackpine Liquor at the south junction of Hwys. 35 and 70. An employee saw the thief take off in a white van with black trim. March 13: Around midnight, two men were found on Burnett Lane and First Avenue after the theft of church-collected pop cans. According to the report, the license plate of the vehicle the men were driving was covered by what appeared to be a black sock and both men were dressed in black. Drew Neil Jaspers, 23, Grantsburg, was cited for petty theft. Mark W. Higgins Jr., 19, Luck, was cited for violating absolute sobriety and being a driver with an open intoxicant in the vehicle. Further charges are pending on both men for felony bail jumping and violation of bond. Pending against Higgins are charges for operating after suspension and being a minor transporting alcohol. At 12:06 p.m., Barbara A. Rawlings, 49, Shell Lake, was cited for theft of pots and pans from the Acorn Pantry, Siren. March 14: A 14-year-old juvenile was picked up for a driving a car on CTH B and Fourth Avenue at 2:46 p.m.

Notices (Mar. 10, 17, 24, April 7, 14) Claudio M. 31,Contreras, Champlin, Minn., speeding, STATE OF WISCONSIN $175.30.CIRCUIT COURT Paul D.POLK Cornelison, Siren, hit COUNTY and run, unattended vehicle, The RiverBank, $263.50. a David Minnesota J. banking Deflorin, Harris, corporation Minn., operate snowmobile w/o 26777registered, Fallbrook $160.80. Avenue being Wyoming, Minnesota 55092 Catherine Donovan, Clear Lake, no land-use permitPlaintiff, for a mobile, $438.00.vs. Luke Lake J. Duncan, Centuria, Magnor Villas, LLC, fish w/unattended lines,company $182.70. a Wis. limited liability Antone W. Erickson, Balsam 846 Moonbeam Road West Hudson, Wisconsin 54016, John Doe, Mary Roe and XYZ corporation, Defendants. Case Type: 30404 Case No.: 09CV541 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE, that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered in the aboveentitled action on October 21, 2009, the Sheriff of Polk County, Wisconsin, will sell the following described real property at public auction as follows: TIME/DATE: April 29, 2010, at 10 a.m. TERMS: 10% of successful bid must be paid to Sheriff at sale in certified funds, with the balance due and owing on the date of confirmation of the sale by the Court. PLACE: Lobby of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, WI 54810. LEGAL DESCRIPTION: Lot 5, Magnor Lake Assessor Plat, Polk County, Wis. (“Property”). (FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY: Plaintiff believes that the property address is 870 Magnor Lake Lane, Clayton, Wis. 54005.) Dated this 5th day of March, 2010. Timothy G. Moore Sheriff of Polk County, Wis. THIS INSTRUMENT WAS DRAFTED BY: ANASTASI & ASSOCIATES, P.A. 14985 60th Street North Stillwater, MN 55082 651-439-2951 DCA/14376 506682 WNAXLP

Lake, group deer-hunting violation, $303.30. Brian P. Fewer, White Bear Lake, Minn., operate snowmobile at unreasonable speed, $186.00. Peter N. Forster, Balsam Lake, speeding, $175.30; seat belt violation, $10.00; operating while under influence and operating with PAC .10 or more, $817.50. Ashley A. Goodman, Clear Lake, failure to keep vehicle under control, $213.10. Anthony R. Hach, St. Croix Falls, speeding, $183.30. Michael R. Harrison, Luck, operating left of centerline, $213.10. Dan Helling, Turtle Lake, failure to submit pumping reports, $213.00. Samantha L. Helsing, Osceola, speeding, $175.30. Jay A. Higgins, Forest Lake, Minn., operate snowmobile w/o trail sticker, $200.50. Howes Milk Transfer, Menomonie, violate Class A Hwy. weight limits, $343.06. Dale L. Jensen, Frederic, failure to submit pumping reports, $312.00. Steven Jerrick, St. Croix Falls, failure to submit pumping reports, $312.00. Cassandra L. Johnson, Luck, seat belt violation, $10.00. Fernandez M. Johnson, Amery, operate w/o valid license, $200.50; driving too fast for conditions, $213.10; nonregistration of auto, etc., $175.30. Gordon T. Johnson, Osceola, failure to notify police of accident, $263.00. Joshua D. Johnson, Cumberland, blocked vehicle from leaving, verbally abusive, $248.00. Karin R. Johnson, St. Croix Falls, speeding, $175.30. Randall C. Johnson, Brooklyn Park, Minn., operate snowmobile, fail. comply signs, $160.80. Daniel R. Kaiser, Luck, passing in no-passing zone, $213.10. Mikaela E. Kalinczok, Milltown, auto. following too closely, $200.50. Norman Kirchner, Turtle Lake, failure to submit pumping reports, not guilty plea. Becky R. Koehler, Star Prairie, driving too fast for conditions, not guilty plea.

APARTMENTS FOR RENT Frederic & Siren

715-327-8638 494252 1Ltfc 43atfc

Matthew D. Koehler, Amery, speeding, $175.30. Henry F. Kuehndorf, Star Prairie, speeding, $175.30. Joshua J. Lauersdorf, Oconto Falls, operate w/o valid license, $200.50. Tyler R. Leggett, Frederic, illegal snowmobile operating on highway, not guilty plea. Federico Leon, Chicago, Ill., four seat belt violations, $10.00 four times. Faith A. Lichtschiedl, Shafer, Minn., operate snowmobile w/o trail sticker, $200.50. Jason L. Lindner, Amery, seat belt violation, $10.00. Richard L. Loomis, Osceola, driving too fast for conditions, $213.10; seat belt violation, $10.00. David J. Ludwig, Amery, fail./yield while making left turn, $175.30. Lucas M. Markus, Luck, fish > 3 hooks/lines/baits, $182.70. Vicente A. Martinez, Shafer, Minn., license restriction violation – Class D or M vehicle, $200.50. Lisa M. McCarty, St. Paul, Minn., operate snowmobile w/o trail sticker, $200.50. Ryan McKenzie, Luck, failure to submit pumping reports, $312.00. Tony J. Meyer, St. Croix Falls, place/transport loaded firearm/vehicle, $258.10. Mindi M. Miller, Comstock, operate snowmobile at unreasonable speed, $186.00. Miller Transfer Inc., Roberts, violate Class A Hwy. weight limits, $313.33. Rita Molitor, Cannon Falls, Minn., failure to submit pumping reports, $312..00. Dahkota J. Monson, Clear Lake, operate motor vehicle w/o proper tires, $175.30. Mark A. Monson, Clear Lake, place/transport uncased firearm/vehicle, $312.00. Curt D. Munson, Clayton, failure to submit pumping reports, $312.00. Steve J. Nelson, Stillwater, Minn., failure to submit pumping reports, $312.00. Delight Olson, Milltown, operate snowmobile, fail./comply signs, $160.80. Robert D. Pooler, St. Paul, Minn., operate snowmobile w/o trail sticker, $200.50. Trevor J. Porembo, Baldwin, fish > 3 hooks/lines/baits, $182.70. Pamela J. Puttbriese, Milltown, seat belt violation, $10.00. Tammie J. Radzwill, Chisago City, Minn., operate snowmobile w/o trail sticker, $200.50. Jamison M. Riedman, Luck, operate w/o carrying license, $150.10.

Jessica L. Rohm, St. Croix Falls, inattentive driving, $187.90. Mario E. Romero, San Elizario, Texas, interstate record of duty status, $263.50. Jason R. Sandford, Frederic, illegal snowmobile operation on highway, $200.50. Terry J. Schaffer, Clayton, operating while revoked, not guilty plea. Dallas Schauls, Frederic, building w/o obtaining a land-use permit, not guilty plea. Gerald Schlagel, Osceola, fish with unattended lines, $182.70. Pamela J. Schmidt, Osceola, operating while under influence, $691.50, ? Mark E. Schultz, Vadnais Heights, Minn., speeding, $175.30; operate w/o valid license, $200.50. Nicholas P. Seaton, Cottage Grove, Minn., operate snowmobile w/o being registered, $160.80. Zachary A. Shabatura, Shoreview, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Lona M. Siebenthal, Grantsburg, seat belt violation, $10.00. Keith A. Simmerman, Centuria, violation of child safety restraint requirements, child under 4, $175.30. Jeffery F. Simon, Frederic, fish w/o license, $202.70. William C. St. Sauver, Scandia, Minn., violate Class A Hwy. weight limits, $208.50. Jerimiah J. Tenold, Cedar, Minn., nonregistration of auto, etc., $175.30. William L. Teske, Doylestown, interstate record of duty status, $200.50. Larry W. Tjaden, Amery, failure to provide proper holdingtank servicing contract, $312.00. Carol L. Tomandl, Luck, failure to submit pumping reports, $312.00. Ryan G. Tulgrem, St. Croix Falls, fail./stop at stop sign, $175.30. Stephen D. Tyler, Clear Lake, failure to provide proper holdtank servicing contract, $312.00. Jiobahn D. Vanderpaardt, Frederic, seat belt violation, $10.00. James R. Widder, Minneapolis, Minn., place garbage in recycling containers at recycling center, not guilty plea. Timothy R. Wienke, Clear Lake, failure to submit pumping reports, $312.00. Anna J. Williamson, St. Croix Falls, speeding, $175.30.

FOR RENT

FOR RENT

$

450 per mo.

Available now.

Water, sewer & garbage incl. On-site laundry. No Pets. Background check. First month’s rent and damage deposit.

612-280-7581

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians; pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-6699777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1800-927-9275. 445101 8a-etfcp 19Ltfc

2nd-Floor Apartment Available In Frederic

Two-BR Apartment Downtown St. Croix Falls 506638 19-20a,d 30-31L

Jason L. Aherns, Oakdale, Minn., operating while revoked, $263.50. Bruce L. Ahlstrand, North Branch, Minn., operate snowmobile w/o trail sticker, $200.50. David J. Anderson, Osceola, operate w/o valid license, $200.50. Travis Beauvais, Balsam Lake, failure to submit pumping reports, $312.00. Christopher A. Beestman, Clayton, driving too fast for conditions, $213.10.

No smoking or pets. Garage included.

375/month

$

Plus security deposit. Call Carol at

715-472-8670

or 715-554-0009 504712 14atfc 25Ltfc

AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY FOR RENT IN LUCK, WIS. Deluxe Twin Homes in 8th St. Court – Spacious 2-bedroom, 1-bath home includes refrigerator, dishwasher, stove and washer and dryer. Also included is an attached 2-car garage with an auto. door opener. Monthly rent of $775 includes lawn care, garbage 506695 service and snow removal. 29Ltfc 19a,dtfc

Kyle Johansen, 715-472-4993

Bruce & Lisa Olson

RE/MAX Northwoods Inc. Experienced, full-time team. Serving Polk & Burnett Counties. If you are thinking of buying or selling we can help you. 507117 30L

715-349-7777

and qualifications, please visit our Web site at www.co.polk.wi.us, Employment Opportunities, or in person at 100 Polk Co. Plaza, #229, Balsam Lake, WI 54810, 715-485-9176. AA/EEOC MARCH 17, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 25

POLK COUNTY POSITION ANNOUNCEMENTS

Burnett Co. sheriff's report Arrests and citations March 12: Rodney A. Lawrence, 36, Shell Lake, was arrested on a probation warrant. March 14: Edmund J. Brixen, 24, Siren, was arrested on a probation warrant. Other incidents March 6: Michael J. Riedel, Bloomington, Minn., reported two military uniforms, a jacket, military medals, baseball cards and an air compressor taken from his cabin. The incident is under investigation.

506198 WNAXLP

(March 3, 10, 17) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY MAIN STREET ACQUISITION CORP. P.O. Box 2529 Suwanee, GA 30024-2529 Plaintiff, vs. LISA J. CLEVEN 1921 60th Avenue Osceola, WI 54020-4500, Defendant(s). Case No. 10-CV-58 Daubert Law Firm File: 09-07520-0 SUMMONS THE STATE OF WISCONSIN To each person named above as a Defendant: You are hereby notified that the Plaintiff named above has filed a lawsuit or other legal action against you. Within 40 days March 3, 2010, you must respond with a written demand for a copy of the Complaint. The demand must be sent or delivered to the Court, whose address is Clerk of Court, Polk County Justice Center, 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, WI 54810, and to plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is One Corporate Drive, Suite 400, P.O. Box 1519, Wausau, WI 54402-1519. You may have an attorney help or represent you. If you do not demand a copy of the Complaint within 40 days, the court may grant judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the Complaint, and you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the Complaint. A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future, and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. Dated: February 24, 2010. Daubert Law Firm LLC Attorneys for the Plaintiff Melissa A. Spindler State Bar No.: 1060672 One Corporate Drive Suite 400 P.O. Box 1519 Wausau, WI 54402-1519 715-845-1805

507224 30-31L

DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY Proposed Base Flood Elevation Determination for the Village of Luck and the Unincorporated Areas of Polk County, Wisconsin. The Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Management Agency solicits technical information or comments on the proposed Base (1-percent-annual-chance) Food Elevations (BFEs) shown in the Preliminary Flood Insurance Study (FIS) and on the Preliminary Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) for your community. These proposed BFEs are the basis for the floodplain management measures that your community is required to either adopt or show evidence of having in effect in order to qualify or remain qualified for participation in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). For a detailed listing of the proposed BFEs and information on the statutory period provided for appeals, please visit FEMA’s Web site at https://www.floodmaps.fema.gov/fhm/ Scripts/bfe_main.asp, or call the FEMA Map Assistance Center toll-free at 1-877-FEMA MAP. 506344 29-30Lp WNAXLP (March 3, 10, 17, 24, 31) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, L.P. Plaintiff Vs THOMAS C. CREE, et al Defendants AMENDED NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Case Number: 08 CV 734 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on March 6, 2009, in the amount of $116,365.89, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: April 13, 2010, at 10 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Front Entrance to the Polk County Justice Center located at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin. DESCRIPTION: The Northwest 1/4 of the Northwest 1/4 of Section 23, Township 34 North, Range 16 West, in the Town of Apple River, Polk County, Wisconsin, except the East 20 acres thereof. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 792 150th Avenue, Amery, WI 54001. TAX KEY NO.: 004-006330000. Dated this 1st day of March, 2010. /s/ Timothy G. Moore Sheriff of Polk County Christina E. Demakopoulos State Bar #1066197 Attorney for Plaintiff 13700 W. Greenfield Avenue Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C. is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. (189165) 506242 WNAXLP

(Feb. 24, March 3, 10, 17, 24, 31) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY Bremer Bank, National Association, Plaintiff, vs. Northwest Homes of Wisconsin, Inc. and Polk County, Defendants. Case No. 09-CV-749 Code No. 30404 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of the Polk County Circuit Court entered on February 1, 2010, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: April 15, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: Pursuant to said judgment, 10% of the successful bid must be paid to the sheriff at the sale in cash, cashier’s check or certified funds, payable to the clerk of court (personal checks cannot and will not be accepted). The balance of the successful bid must be paid to the clerk of court in cash, cashier’s check or certified funds no later than ten days after the court’s confirmation of the sale or else the 10% down payment is forfeited to the plaintiff. The property is sold “as is” and subject to all real estate taxes, specials assessments, liens and encumbrances. PLACE: The lobby of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, Balsam Lake, WI 54810. DESCRIPTION: Lot 5, Block 2, C.H. Johnson’s Addition to the City of Amery, Polk County, Wisconsin; said property being located upon Mill Lot “A” in the City of Amery, Polk County, Wisconsin. TAX KEY NO.: 201-00256-0000 PROPERTY ADDRESS: 130 Maple Street East, Amery, WI. Dated this 15th day of February, 2010. Timothy G. Moore Polk County Sheriff Adam C. Benson Benson Law office LLC Attorney for Plaintiffs P.O. Box 370 Siren, WI 54872 715-349-5215

$10.18/hr.

Must have excellent people skills and be detail-oriented. Retail experience preferred, but not required. Flexible schedule and benefits available. Add’l. $2.50 per hour for weekend hours.

YOU MUST COMPLETE A POLK CO. EMPLOYMENT APPLICATION TO BE ELIGIBLE. For applications, complete job description and qualifications; please visit our Web site at www.co.polk.wi.us, Employment Opportunities, or in person at 100 Polk Co. Plaza, #229, Balsam Lake, WI 54810, 715-485-9176 or Golden Age Manor, 220 Scholl Ct., Amery, WI, 715-268-7107. AA/EEOC 507126 30L (March 3, 10, 17, 24, 31, April 7) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY CitiMortgage, Inc. Plaintiff, vs. KARL W. NELSON, et al Defendants. Case Number: 08 CV 595 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on July 15, 2009, in the amount of $259,258.46, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: April 14, 2010, at 10 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Front Entrance to the Polk County Justice Center located at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: Lot 1 of Certified Survey Map No. 2955 recorded in Volume 13 of Certified Survey Maps on Page 209 as Document No. 593634, located in the Southeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter (SE 1/4 of NE 1/4), Section 30, Township 32 North of Range 17 West, Town of Alden, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1704 W. Church Road, Star Prairie, WI 54026. TAX KEY NO.: 002-00783-0100. Dated this 17th day of February, 2010. /s/ Timothy G. Moore Sheriff of Polk County Chaz M. Rodriguez State Bar #1063071 Attorney for Plaintiff 13700 W. Greenfield Avenue Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. (188040)

505869 WNAXLP

Lauren M. Bowers, Dresser, and Justin A. Sutton, Brooklyn Center, Minn., issued March 8. Teresa M. Johnson, Milltown, and Brian P. Geraghty, Milltown, issued March 10.

Yard, Sales & Cashier

$10.18/hr.

Laundry Aide - Casual A.M. & Weekends

505566 WNAXLP

Polk County marriage licenses

GOLDEN AGE MANOR Housekeeper - Casual A.M. - P.M. & Weekends

THE ESTATE OF ROBERT RAMBO NOTICE You are hereby advised as the owner or secured party that I have impounded the following mobile home: Year Make Serial Number Determined Value 1970 Kenwood #27602 2009 - $8,200.00 The mobile home has been impounded as an abandoned vehicle. It will be held in impoundment for a minimum of 14 days after the date of this notice. During the period of impoundment it is being held in Siren Trailer Court, 23642 St. Rd. 35, Lot 35, Siren, WI 54872. You have the right to reclaim the vehicle during that time period by paying all costs incurred by the Village of Siren in regard to the impoundment. If you fail to reclaim the mobile home within 14 days, your inaction shall be deemed a waiver of all rights in and to the mobile home and consent to its sale. Dated this 10th day of March, 2010. 506345 29-30L Village of Siren, by: Chief Christopher P. Sybers, Village of Siren Police Chief

Apply In Person At...

MENARDS 1285 208th St. St. Croix Falls, WI 54024

(March 10, 17, 24) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. Plaintiff, vs. JAMES A. BURNS, et al Defendants Case Number: 09 CV 82 AMENDED NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on August 5, 2009, in the amount of $465,366.28, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: April 7, 2010, at 10 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Front Entrance to the Polk County Justice Center located at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: Lot 1 of Certified Survey Map No. 5273, filed September 19, 2006, in Volume 23 of Certified Survey Maps, Page 180, as Document No. 722502, located in the Northeast 1/4 of the Northwest 1/4 of Section 9, Town 32 North, Range 18 West, in the Town of Alden, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 493 213 Street, Star Prairie, WI 54026. TAX KEY NO.: 002-01107-0000. Dated this 5th day of March, 2010. /s/ Timothy G. Moore Sheriff of Polk County Benjamin J. Pliskie State Bar #1037985 Attorney for Plaintiff 13700 W. Greenfield Avenue Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. (189772)

506622 WNAXLP

Evelyn L. Green, 95, Luck, died Feb. 20, 2010. Virginia P. Bille, 87, Luck, died Feb. 26, 2010. Arnold C. Swanson, 86, Centuria, died March 2, 2010. Myrtle A. Abrahamson, 92, Lindstrom, Minn., died March 3, 2010. Helga A. McClain, 104, Apple River Township, died March 8, 2010.

PART-TIME POSITIONS AVAILABLE

506675 29-30L 19-20a,d

Polk County deaths

(Feb. 10, 17, 24, Mar. 3, 10, 17) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY THE RIVERBANK Plaintiff, vs. SCOT A. LANGNESS and CHERYL LANGNESS, and MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. and GB HOME EQUITY, LLC, Defendants. Case No. 09 CV 498 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE By virtue of and pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-entitled action on August 31, 2009, in the amount of $136,925.99, I will sell the described premises at public auction at the Main Front Entrance of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West main Street, in the Village of Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin, on Wednesday, March 31, 2010, at 10:00 o’clock a.m. TERMS OF SALE: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeiture of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. DESCRIPTION: Lot 1 of Certified Survey Map No. 2295, recorded in Volume 11 of Certified Survey Maps, on Page 02, as Document No. 558836, located in the Northeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (NE1/4 of NW1/4), Section Thirty-three (33), Township Thirty-six (36) North, Range Seventeen (17) West, Village of Luck, Polk County, Wisconsin. PIN: 146-00585-0000. STREET ADDRESS: 10 East Butternut Avenue, Luck, WI 54853. Dated at Balsam Lake, Wisconsin, this 1st day of February, 2010. Timothy G. Moore, Sheriff Polk County, Wisconsin Steven J. Swanson / #1003029 Attorney at Law P.O. Box 609 105 South Washington Street St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 715-483-3787 505055 WNAXLP

WEB MANAGER Applications are currently being accepted from learningfocused, creative and dynamic candidates for a full-time Web Manager at Wisconsin Indianhead Technical College. Office location will be determined upon hire. Qualifications include: Associate Degree with preference to Information Technology related field, two years of work experience as a web developer, experience managing and maintaining a complex Web site and experience in project management from concept to delivery.

WISCONSIN INDIANHEAD TECHNICAL COLLEGE

Deadline to apply: April 7, 2010 For a complete list of qualifications and to apply visit our Web site at www.witc.edu/employ. 506822 TTY #888-261-8578 19-21a-e 30-32r,L

WITC is an equal opportunity/access/employer and educator.

PAGE 26 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MARCH 17, 2010

Notices

(March 3, 10, 17, 24, 31, April 7) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY FIRST NATIONAL BANK & TRUST, Plaintiff, vs. NATHAN L. HIBBS and GAIL J. HIBBS -andTAHOE-I, LCC -andHSBC BANK NEVADA -andCAPITAL ONE BANK -andATLANTIC CREDIT & FINANCE, Defendants. NOTICE OF MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Case No. 09 CV 614 Classification No.: 30404 Under and by virtue of Judgment for Foreclosure in the above-entitled action issued by the Court aforesaid on the 7th day of October, 2009, I am commanded to sell the following described property: Lot 2 of Certified Survey Map No. 5085, Volume 22, Page 192, being a part of the Southeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 13, Township 36 North, Range 16 West (in the Town of Bone Lake), Polk County, Wis. Tax Key No.: 012-00245-0200. PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on the 14th day of April, 2010, at 10 o’clock a.m., on that day at the front entrance of the Polk County Courthouse located in Balsam Lake, Wisconsin, I will sell the abovedescribed real estate to satisfy said judgment with interest and with costs to the highest bidder for cash. TERMS OF SALE: 1. This is a cash sale. A certified check or bank check in the amount of 10% of the amount bid must accompany the bid, with the balance due upon confirmation of the sale by the court. 2. Sale is subject to all unpaid real estate taxes and special assessments. 3. Purchaser shall pay any Wisconsin real estate transfer fee. 4. The property is being sold in an “as is” basis without warranties or representations of any kind. Dated at Balsam Lake, Wisconsin, this 1st day of February, 2010. Tim Moore, Sheriff Polk County, Wisconsin Drafted by: Andrew S. Lawton, Attorney at Law P.O. Box 119 Spooner, WI 54801 Ph.: 715/635-7525 State Bar No.: 1000824

505870 WNAXLP

506039 WNAXLP

(March 3, 10, 17) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY AnchorBank, fsb f/k/a S&C Bank 25 West Main Street P.O. Box 7933 Madison, WI 53707, Plaintiff, vs. Joseph R. Juleff 843 Barron/Polk St. Clayton, WI 54004, Defendant. SUMMONS Case No. 10 CV 82 Case Code: 30301; 30303 Judge: R.H. Rasmussen THE STATE OF WISCONSIN, to each person named above as a DEFENDANT: You are hereby notified that the Plaintiff named above has filed a lawsuit or other legal action against you. The complaint, which is attached, states the nature and basis of the legal action. Within 20 days of receiving this summons (45 days if you are the State of Wisconsin or an insurance company, 60 days if you are the United States of America), you must respond with a written answer, as that term is used in chapter 802 of the Wisconsin Statutes, to the complaint. The court may reject or disregard an answer that does not follow the requirements of the statutes. The answer must be sent or delivered to the court, whose address is Polk County Clerk of Circuit Court, Polk County Justice Center, Ste. 300, 1005 West Main Street, Balsam Lake, WI 54810, and to Nicholas J. Vivian, Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is ECKBERG, LAMMERS, BRIGGS, WOLFF & VIERLING, P.L.L.P., 1809 Northwestern Ave., Stillwater, MN 55082. You may have an attorney help or represent you. If you do not provide a proper answer within 20 days, the court may grant judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the complaint, and you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the complaint. A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future, and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. Dated: January 27, 2010 ECKBERG, LAMMERS, BRIGGS, WOLFF & VIERLING, P.L.L.P. By: /s/Nicholas J. Vivian, Esq. Attorney for Plaintiff State Bar I.D. No.: 1047165 1809 Northwestern Avenue Stillwater, Minnesota 55082 651-439-2878

506522 WNAXLP

Agenda 1. Call to order and seek approval of the agenda - Robert Clifton. 2. Consideration of previous minutes - LeRoy Buck 3. Presentation of vouchers - Amy Dueholm. 4. Treasurer’s Report - Amy Dueholm. 5. Recognition of guests or delegates. A. Alex Smith - Student representative. 6. Administrative Reports. A. Mr. Palmer. B. Mr. Gobler. C. Mrs. Goldbach. 7. Old Business A. Building and facility use/rental. 8. New Business A. Participation fees for extracurricular activities. B. Resignation of Rodger Wroge, Asst. Baseball Coach. C. Recommendation for assistant baseball coach. D. Resignation of Connie Kerkhoff, Kitchen Staff. E. Garden fundraiser. F. Request for an early release on April 9. G. Any other business that may properly come before the Board. 9. Motion to convene into executive session per WI Statute 19.85(1)(a)(c)(f) for discussion of employee performance, contract discussion and negotiations with staff and renewal of administrative contracts. 10. Possible action on Administrative contracts. 507174 30L 11. Motion to adjourn.

(Feb. 10, 17, 24, March 3, 10, 17) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY Key Community Bank 5684 Bishop Avenue Inver Grove Heights, MN 55075 Plaintiff, vs. Pamela J. Smith 24847 6th Street NE Isanti, MN 55040 David Faffler 10306 Fox Run Bay Woodbury, MN 55129 And, J. Doe I-V, Mary Roe and XYZ Company I-V. Defendants. Case No. 08-CV-584 Foreclosure of Mortgage 30404 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure made in the above-entitled action on December 30, 2008, in the amount of $195,314.05, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: March 25, 2010, at 10 a.m. TERMS: Pursuant to said judgment, 10% of the successful bid must be paid to the sheriff at the sale in cash, cashier’s check or certified funds, payable to the clerk of courts (personal checks cannot and will not be accepted). The balance of the successful bid must be paid to the clerk of courts in cash, cashier’s check or certified funds no later than ten days after the court’s confirmation of the sale or else the 10% down payment is forfeited to the plaintiff. The property is sold “as is” and subject to all liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Foyer area of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, Balsam Lake, WI 54810. DESCRIPTION: Lot 13, Rolling Hills First Addition “A County Plat,” Garfield Township, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1879 98th Ave., Dresser, WI 54009 By Timothy G. Moore, Sheriff Peterson Fram & Bergman, P.A. /s/Paul W. Fahning Attorneys for Plaintiff 55 E. 5th Street, Suite 800 St. Paul, MN 55101 Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (15 U.S.C. Section 1692), we are required to state that we are attempting to collect a debt on our client’s behalf and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose, unless the debt has been discharged in bankruptcy. 504875 WNAXLP

Burnett County warrants

JOINT MEETING AND PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE ORDINANCE TO ADOPT THE TOWN OF JACKSON 2030 COMPREHENSIVE PLAN PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the TOWN OF JACKSON TOWN BOARD and PLANNING COMMISSION will conduct a joint meeting and public hearing on a proposed ordinance to adopt the TOWN OF JACKSON YEAR 2030 COMPREHENSIVE PLAN. The joint meeting and public hearing will be held on the 22nd day of March, 2010, at 6 p.m., at the TOWN HALL, 4599 COUNTY ROAD A, WEBSTER, WI. The TOWN OF JACKSON 2030 COMPREHENSIVE PLAN is a policy document that will be used by the town plan commission and the town board as a guide for making decisions regarding land use and development in the community. The plan contains background information and goals, objectives, policies and recommendations addressing each of the following nine (9) plan elements required by Wisconsin’s Comprehensive Planning law: 1. Issues and Opportunities 2. Housing 3. Transportation 4. Utilities and Community Facilities 5. Agricultural, Natural and Cultural Resources 6. Economic Development 7. Intergovernmental Cooperation 8. Land Use and 9. Implementation A “Recommended Plan” of the TOWN OF JACKSON YEAR 2030 Comprehensive Plan and plan adoption ordinance will be available for review beginning MARCH 5, 2010, at the TOWN OFFICE of the Town Clerk and Burnett Community Public Library. Residents and landowners are encouraged to review the plan and submit verbal and/or written comments at the public hearing. Please contact Town Chairperson DIANNE CONNOR at 715-866-4645 OR Town Supervisor NANCY GROWE at 715-866-4589 for more information about the public hearing process. 506792 30L WNAXLP (March 17, 24, 31, April 7, 14, 21) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT Branch 2 POLK COUNTY WESTCONSIN CREDIT UNION 444 South Broadway Menomonie, WI 54751, Plaintiff, vs. ROBERT J. BURROWS 465 280th Street Osceola, WI 54020, and KIMBERLY J. BURROWS, a/k/a Kimberly J. Klabunde 1221 Hialeah, Apt. #2 Osceola, WI 54020, Defendants. Case No. 09CV625 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Code: 30404 By virtue of and pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-entitled action on October 23, 2009, I will sell at public auction at the Polk County Courthouse in the Village of Balsam Lake, in said County, on May 5, 2010, at 10 o’clock a.m., all of the following described mortgaged premises, to-wit: Lot 2, of Burrows Subdivision, on CSM No. 4138, recorded in Volume 18, Page 168, located in the Southeast Quarter (SE 1/4) of the Northeast Quarter (NE 1/4), Section Eight (8), Township Thirty-two (32), Range Nineteen (19) West, Town of Farmington, Polk County, Wisconsin. The above property is located at 465 280th Street, Osceola, WI 54020. TERMS: 1. 10% cash or certified check down payment at time of sale, balance upon confirmation by Court. 2. Sale is subject to all unpaid real estate taxes and special assessments. 3. Purchaser shall pay any Wisconsin real estate transfer fee. 4. Property is being sold on an “as is” basis without warranties or representations of any kind. 5. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining possession of property. Dated at Balsam Lake, Wisconsin, this 26th day of February, 2010. Timothy Moore, Sheriff Polk County, Wisconsin SCHOFIELD, HIGLEY & MAYER, S.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff Bay View Offices, Suite #100 700 Wolske Bay Road Menomonie, WI 54751 715-235-3939

(March 10, 17, 24, 31) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P., AS SERVICER FOR BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE CERTIFICATE HOLDERS, CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2007-18CB MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-18CB Plaintiff vs. RONALD JAMES SANOSKI JR., et al. Defendants. Case Number: 08 CV 687 AMENDED NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on August 5, 2009, in the amount of $253,098.32, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: April 13, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Front Entrance to the Polk County Justice Center located at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin. DESCRIPTION: The South Half of the Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (S1/2 of NW1/4 of NW1/4), Section 24, Township 33 North, Range 18 West, Town of Garfield, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 882 190th St., Dresser, WI 54009 TAX KEY NO.: 024-00853-0100 Dated this 8th day of March, 2010. /s/Timothy G. Moore Sheriff of Polk County

506641 WNAXLP

(March 10, 17, 24) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF John Hickey Notice to Creditors (Informal Administration) Case No. 10 PR 21 An application has been filed for informal administration of the estate of the decedent, whose date of birth was Dec. 20, 1944, and date of death was June 2, 2009. The decedent died domiciled in Polk County, State of Wisconsin, with a post office address of: 1346 Clam Falls Drive, Frederic, WI 54837. All interested persons have waived notice. Creditors’ claims must be filed with the probate registrar on or before May 28, 2010. Jenell L. Anderson Probate Registrar February 22, 2010 David L. Grindell Attorney Grindell Law Offices, S.C. P.O. Box 585 Frederic, WI 54837 715-327-5561

Monday, March 22, 2010, 6 p.m. Boardroom

506791 WNAXLP

SCHOOL DISTRICT OF LUCK REGULAR BOARD MEETING

Christina E. Demakopoulos State Bar #1066197 Attorney for Plaintiff 13700 W. Greenfield Avenue Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for this purpose. (187156)

Stewart Eagleman, 58, Cumberland, warrant - failure to appear, March 8. Ryan S. Friel, 20, Webster, failure to pay fines, March 10. Dennis J. LaSarge, 30, Webster, warrant - failure to appear, March 10. Claudette L. Matrious, 31, Danbury, warrant - failure to appear, March 10. Gregory A. Miller, 56, Milwaukee, failure to pay fines, March 10. Kristen L. Moline, 41, Shakopee, Minn., warrant - failure to appear, March 10. Jonathon C. Oiyotte, 31, Webster, warrant - failure to appear, March 10. Danielle Reynolds, 24, Shell Lake, warrant - failure to appear, March 10.

Burnett County civil court Voyager Village vs. John Stavio, Brooklyn Park, Minn., $2,365.30. Benson Law Office vs. Justin L. Hakenson, Siren, $92 (March 3, 10, 17, 24, 31, April 7) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY BRANCH 2 ASSOCIATED BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. MICHAEL P. KOHNEN, RHU & ASSOCIATES, INC.; MPK CO.; MICHAEL P. KOHNEN and MICHAEL P. KOHNEN, II, Defendants Case No. 09-CV-585 Case Code No. 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE STATE OF WISCONSIN : : SS. COUNTY OF POLK : By virtue of and pursuant to a judgment of foreclosure entered in the above-entitled action on October 23, 2009, I will sell the following-described mortgaged premises at public auction in the foyer area of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin, on April 28, 2010, at 10:00 a.m.: Lot 21, Plat of First Addition to Camelie Heights, Village of Clayton, Polk County, Wis. TAX PARCEL NO.: 112-0035100000. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 602 Clayton Avenue, Clayton, WI. The property will be sold subject to all legal encumbrances. TERMS OF SALE: Cash. 10% down in the form of cash, certified check or cashier’s check, or money order must be paid at the time of sale. No personal checks or letters of credit will be accepted. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin real estate transfer tax from the proceeds of the sale. The balance of the price shall be paid to the Clerk of Courts by cash, certified check or cashier’s check no later than 10 days after confirmation of the sale by the Court. If the balance is not paid within that 10-day period, Bidder forfeits the down payment made. DATED at Balsam Lake, Wisconsin, this 22nd day of February, 2010. /s/Timothy G. Moore, Sheriff Polk County, Wisconsin THIS DOCUMENT DRAFTED BY: Metzler, Timm, Treleven, Pahl, Beck, S.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff By: Ronald F. Metzler WI Bar Member No.: 1010044 222 Cherry Street Green Bay, WI 54301-4223 920-435-9393 505898 WNAXLP

MARCH 17, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 27

506481 18-19a,dp 29-30Lp

506459 WNAXLP

(Mar. 10, 17, 24, 31, April 7, 14) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY WELLS FARGO BANK, NA as Trustee under Pooling and Servicing Agreement Dated as of February 1, 2005, Asset-Backed Pass-Through Certificates Series 2005 WHQ1 c/o Homeq Servicing Corporation, Plaintiff, vs. RYAN S. BAILLARGEON and JANE DOE, unknown spouse of Ryan S. Baillargeon, and J.M. BAILLARGEON a/k/a JOY BAILLARGEON and JOHN DOE, unknown spouse of Joy Baillargeon, and JOHN DOE and/or JANE DOE, unknown tenants and STATE OF WISCONSIN, and ARGENT MORTGAGE COMPANY, LLC, and UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, and UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Defendants. Case No. 09-CV-101 Code No. 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage Dollar Amount Greater Than $5,000.00 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on October 23, 2009, in the amount of $166,268.96, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: April 28, 2010, at 10 o’clock a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center located at 1005 West Main St., Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: Lot Twelve (12) of Certified Survey Map No. 627 recorded in Vol. 3 of CSM Pg. 119, as Doc. No. 393296, and Lot Thirteen (13) of CertiFied Survey Map No. 2745 recorded in Vol. 12 of CSM, Pg. 232, as Doc. No. 584218, all located in the Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (SE1/4 NW1/4) and Government Lot Two (2) in Section Thirty-Two (32), TownShip Thirty-Three (33) North, Range Sixteen (16) West, Town of Lincoln, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1070 Wood Court, Town of Lincoln. TAX KEY NO.: 032-00990-0000 Timothy G. Moore Sheriff of Polk County, WI O’DESS AND ASSOCIATES, S.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff 1414 Underwood Avenue Suite 403 Wauwatosa, WI 53213 414-727-1591 O’Dess and Associates, S.C., is attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If you have previously received a Chapter 7 Discharge in Bankruptcy, this correspondence should not be construed as an attempt to collect a debt.

POSITION AVAILABLE School District of Shell Lake Job Title: Network Administrator/Information Technology Technician. Job Description: The School District of Shell Lake is seeking qualified applicants for the position of Network Administrator/Information Technology Technician. This is a 50% time position with a yearlong contract. Salary will be based on education and experience. Benefits will be based on hours of employment. Qualifications and Responsibilities: Associate degree or higher in Information Technology or equivalent training and experience. Further information is posted on the School District of Shell Lake Web site: www.shelllake.k12.wi.us. How to apply: Send letter of application, resume, transcript (if applicable) and three letters of recommendations to: Brian Nord, District Administrator School District of Shell Lake 271 Highway #63 Shell Lake, WI 54871 506240 28-30r,L Applications are due by 4 p.m., March 26, 2010.

Notice is hereby given that sealed bids for the following tractor will be received until 4 p.m. March 31, 2010, at the Luck Municipal Building, 401 Main Street, Luck, WI 54853. The Luck Golf Course is requesting bids for the sale of a late 1960s Ford 2110 tractor. This tractor is 2-wheel drive and includes turf tires and rear hydraulics. Tractor is sold as is. Appointments to view this tractor can be made by contacting Seth Petersen at 715-491-3424. The Village of Luck reserves the right to reject any or all bids, or to accept any bid considered most advantageous to the Village of Luck. 507007 30L WNAXLP (Mar. 17, 24, 31, April 7, 14, 21) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY Bradley C. Krehbiel 67860 County Road 9 Lake City, MN 55016 Prime Security Bank 1305 Vierling Drive Shakopee, MN 55379 Plaintiffs, vs. Gregory S. Schmidt 2213 90th Avenue Osceola, WI 54020 Equity Bank 5220 Spring Valley Road Suite 415 Dallas, TX 75254 John Doe and Mary Rowe Unknown, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Case No. 09-CV-739 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on February 2, 2010, in the amount of $280,599.12, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: May 5, 2010, at 10 a.m. TERMS: Pursuant to said judgment, 10% of the successful bid must be paid to the sheriff at the sale in cash, cashier’s check or certified funds, payable to the clerk of the courts (personal checks cannot and will not be accepted). The balance of the successful bid must be paid to the clerk of the courts in cash, cashier’s check or certified funds no later than ten (10) days after the court’s confirmation of the sale or else the 10% down payment is forfeited to the plaintiff. The property is sold “as is” and subject to all liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Foyer, Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, in the City of Balsam Lake. DESCRIPTION: A part of Outlot No. 112 of the Outlot Plat of the Village of Osceola as the same appears on file in the Office of the Register of Deeds for Polk County, Wisconsin, described as follows: Beginning at a point on the North line of the right of way of the Minneapolis, St. Paul and Saulte Ste. Marie Railway Company, 150 feet Easterly from the point where said North line strikes the East Line of Highway No. 35 in the Village of Osceola, Polk County, Wisconsin; thence West along said North line of said right of way, 150 feet; thence in a Northerly direction along the East line of said Highway 120 feet; thence due East 50 feet; thence in a Northeasterly direction to a point which is 80 feet due North of the point of beginning; thence South to the point of beginning, Polk County, Wisconsin, Excepting therefrom lands conveyed for highway purposes to the State of Wisconsin in Volume 987 of Records, Page 505, as Document No. 715368. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 98 Cascade St., Osceola, WI 54020. Dated: March 10, 2010. Messerli & Kramer P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff 100 South Fifth Street 1400 Fifth Street Towers Minneapolis, MN 55402 MESSERLI & KRAMER, P.A. Michelle R. Jester (#1046403) 1400 Fifth Street Towers 100 South Fifth Street Minneapolis, MN 55402 Telephone: (612) 672-3718 ATTORNEYS FOR PLAINTIFF

506980 WNAXLP

Apply in person at Shear Image Salon Hwy. 8, Glacier Drive St. Croix Falls, Wis. ask for Sherrie

(March 17, 24, 31, 2010) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P., AS SERVICER FOR THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON F/K/A THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-OC10, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006OC10 Plaintiff vs. CHRISTOPHER J. HEINN, et al. Defendants. Case Number: 09 CV 442 AMENDED NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on August 25, 2009, in the amount of $438,473.58, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: April 13, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Front Entrance to the Polk County Justice Center located at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: Lot Four (4) of Certified Survey Map No. 2677 recorded in Volume Twelve (12), of Certified Survey Maps, Page One Hundred Sixty-Four (164), Document No. 581439, Located in the Northwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (NW 1/4 SW 1/4), Section TwentySeven (27), Township ThirtyTwo (32) North, Range Seventeen (17) West together with easements located in the South Half of the Northwest Quarter (S 1/2 NW 1/4), Section Twenty-Seven (27), Township Thirty-Two (32) North, Range Seventeen (17) West, as described in Volume 518 of Records, Page 211, Document No. 459339, Polk County, Wisconsin. The above property is situated in Polk County, State of Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 152 147th Street, Deer Park, WI 54007. TAX KEY NO.: 002-00705-0400. Dated this 15th day of March, 2010. /s/Timothy G. Moore Sheriff of Polk County Christina E. Demakopoulos State Bar #1066197 Attorney for Plaintiff 13700 W. Greenfield Avenue Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. (190389)

507144 WNAXLP

Stylist For Busy Salon

505897 WNAXLP

HELP WANTED

(March 3, 10, 17, 24, 31, April 7) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P., AS SERVICER FOR HSBC BANK USA, N.A. FOR THE BENEFIT OF ACE SECURITIES CORP. HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST, SERIES 2006-NC3, ASSET BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES Plaintiff, vs. LORI REUTER, et al. Defendants. Case Number: 09 CV 717 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on January 5, 2010, in the amount of $114,538.54, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: April 21, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Front Entrance to the Polk County Justice Center located at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: Part of the Southwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (SW1/4 SE1/4), of Section Twenty-Five (25), Township Thirty-Seven (37) North, of Range Seventeen (17) West, Town of West Sweden, Polk County, Wis., described as follows: Commencing at a point which is the Southeast Corner of the Southwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 25-37-17; thence North along the Quarter Line to the middle of the Town Road as now laid out and traveled, said Town Road being 310th Street, which is the point of beginning; thence from the beginning North 262 Feet along the Quarter Line to a point; thence West 391 Feet to a point; thence South to the middle of 310th Street; thence along the Center of 310th Street to the point of beginning. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1239 310th Avenue, Frederic, WI 54837 TAX KEY NO.: 048-00597-0000 Dated this 23rd day of February, 2010 /s/Timothy G. Moore Sheriff of Polk County Chaz M. Rodriguez State Bar #1063071 Attorney for Plaintiff 13700 W. Greenfield Avenue Brookfield, WI 5305 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose.

NOTICE OF SALE ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS VILLAGE OF LUCK

(March 17, 24, 31, April 7, 14, 21) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY THE RIVERBANK, a Minnesota banking corporation, 304 Cascade Street, Osceola, WI 54020 Plaintiff, vs. FREBERG CONSTRUCTION, INC. a Minnesota corporation, c/o Joel Freberg, 3475 Shorewood Drive, Rush City, MN 55069; JOEL FREBERG, an individual, 3475 Shorewood Drive, Rush City, MN 55069; POLK COUNTY ASSESSOR c/o Polk County Treasurer 100 Polk County Plaza, Suite 150 Balsam Lake, WI 54810. Defendants. Case No.: 09 CV 650 Case Code: 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on October 8, 2009 in the amount of $89,033.70 against Freberg Construction, Inc. and Joel Freberg, jointly and severally, and amended order entered on March 1, 2010, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: April 28, 2010 at 10 a.m. TERMS: Pursuant to said judgment, 10% of the successful bid must be paid to the sheriff at the sale in cash, cashier’s check or certified funds, payable to the clerk of courts (personal checks cannot and will not be accepted). The balance of the successful bid must be paid to the clerk of courts in cash, cashier’s check or certified funds no later than ten days after the court’s confirmation of the sale or else the 10% down payment is forfeited to the plaintiff. The properties are sold “as is” and subject to all liens and encumbrances. PLACE: In the foyer area of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, in the City of Balsam Lake, Polk County. DESCRIPTION: Lots EightySeven (87) and Eighty-eight (88) of Gateway Meadows, said plat being located and subdivision of part of the Northeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (NE1/4 of SE1/4), the Southeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (SE1/4 of SE1/4), the Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (NW 1/4 of SE1/4) and the Southwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (SW1/4 of the SE1/4), Section Twenty-Six (26), Township Thirty-three (33) North of Range Nineteen (19) West; also being part of Outlots 169 and 170 of the Osceola Outlot Plat, Village of Osceola, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1220 Corey Court and 1230 Corey Court, Osceola, WI. MURNANE BRANDT Attorneys for Plaintiff 30 E. 7th Street, Suite 3200 St. Paul, MN 55101-4919 Timothy G. Moore Polk County Sheriff Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (15 U.S.C. Section 1692), we are required to state that we are attempting to collect a debt on our client’s behalf and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose. 507176 WNAXLP

TOWN OF JACKSON MONTHLY MEETING NOTICE NOTE CHANGE OF DATE FOR MARCH ONLY. The March 2010 Monthly Town Board Meeting Will Be Held On March 22, 2010, Following The Public Hearing Comprehensive Plan Meeting At The Town Hall The full agenda posted on March 19, 2010, at the town hall, town office and Crow Bar. For the town board 506772 30L Lorraine Radke, Clerk (Feb. 24, Mar. 3, 10, 17, 24, 31) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY BRANCH 2 Security Bank 112 East Main Street New Auburn, WI 54757 Plaintiff, vs. Paul J. Larson 1470A 15th Street Turtle Lake, WI 54889 Defendant Diana L. Larson 1470A 15th Street Turtle Lake, WI 54889 Defendant Midland Funding c/o Attorney Joel S. Tilleson Kohn Law Firm, S.C. 312 E. Wisconsin Avenue Suite 501 Milwaukee, WI 53202-4305 Defendant Bank of Turtle Lake P.O. Box 25 Turtle Lake, WI 54889 Defendant. NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Mortgage Foreclosure Code Number: 30404 Case Number: 09CV592 Please take notice, that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered in the aboveentitled action on January 28, 2010, the undersigned sheriff of Polk County, Wisconsin, will sell at public auction as follows: TIME: In the city of Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin, on the 7th day of April, 2010, at ten o’clock in the forenoon of that day, (10:00 a.m.); TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale, with the balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale. Failure to pay balance due will result in a forfeiture of deposit to the plaintiff: 2. The property is being sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens, encumbrances and unpaid real estate taxes on said property, which purchaser assumes and agrees to pay. 3. Purchaser to pay all delinquent and unpaid real estate taxes. PLACE: The property will be sold in the foyer of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, Balsam Lake, WI. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY TO BE SOLD: Lot 1 of Certified Survey Map No. 2690, recorded in Volume 12 of Certified Survey Maps, page 177, Document No. 582045, located in part of the SW-NE, Section 23-34-15, Polk County, Wisconsin. Parcel No.: 08-613-0100 Address: 1470A 15th Street Turtle Lake, WI 54889 Dated this 8th day of February, 2010. Tim Moore Polk County Sheriff Attorney for Plaintiff Kostner & Kostner, S.C. Richard J. Kostner 1102 17th Ave. Bloomer, WI 54724 Bar No. 01015984 Kostner & Kostner, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information will be used for that purpose.

505507 WNAXLP

Notices/ Employment

PAGE 28 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MARCH 17, 2010

1285 208th Street St. Croix Falls, Wis. 506677 29-30L 19-20a,d

POLK COUNTY HIGHWAY COMMISSION IS NOW ACCEPTING REQUESTS FOR PROPOSALS FOR THE FOLLOWING, DUE ON MARCH 29, 2010, AT 3 P.M. • Asphalt, Shaping & Pulverizing • Line Painting • Road Oil • Gravel • Crack-Sealing Materials • Rock • Culverts & Liners • Erosion-Control Materials

BIDS WILL BE OPENED PUBLICLY ON TUESDAY, MARCH 30, 2010, AT 9 A.M., AT THE POLK COUNTY HIGHWAY OFFICE. For additional information, please write or call: Polk County Highway Commission P.O. Box 248, Balsam Lake, WI 54810 715-485-8700

507003 30-31L WNAXLP

All products may be used for Local Road Improvement Projects. The Highway Committee reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids and to accept the bid most advantageous to Polk County.

JOIN THE POLARIS/WESTAFF TEAM Seasonal Employment opportunities with a Great Company!

Accepting Online Applications For

INDUSTRIAL SEWERS 2ND SHIFT APPLY TO: westaffpolaris.com For More Information, Contact:

The WESTAFF Office At: 715-485-3076 Balsam Lake, WI Requirements: Minimum 1 year manufacturing experience, provide work reference, drug screen, excellent attendance, background check and high school diploma or equivalent. 507019 No Walk-in Applicants Please 30L 20a-e

JOINT PUBLIC INFORMATION MEETING AND PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE ORDINANCE TO ADOPT THE TOWN OF SIREN YEAR 2030 COMPREHENSIVE PLAN PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT the Town of Siren Town Board and Planning Commission will conduct a joint public information meeting and public hearing on a proposed ordinance to adopt the Town of Siren Year 2030 Comprehensive Plan. The joint public information meeting and public hearing will be held on Monday, March 29, 2010, at 7 p.m. and 8 p.m. respectively at the Town of Siren Hall, 7240 South Long Lake Road, Siren, WI 54872. The Town of Siren Year 2030 Comprehensive Plan is a policy document that will be used by the town plan commission and town board as a guide for making decisions regarding land use and development in the community. The plan contains background information and goals, objectives, policies and recommendations addressing each of the following nine (9) plan elements required by Wisconsin’s Comprehensive Planning Law: 1. Issues and Opportunities; 2. Housing; 3. Transportation; 4. Utilities and Community Facilities; 5. Agricultural, Natural and Cultural Resources; 6. Economic Development; 7. Intergovernmental Cooperation; 8. Land Use; and 9. Implementation A “Recommended Plan” of the Town of Siren Year 2030 Comprehensive Plan and plan adoption ordinance will be available for review beginning February 24, 2010, at the Town of Siren Hall and Webster Public Library. The plan can also be accessed on the comprehensive planning Web site. Just go to www.burnettcounty.com/sirencompplan. Residents and landowners are encouraged to review the plan and submit verbal and/or written comments at the public hearing. Please contact Mary Hunter, Town Clerk, at 715-349-5119 for more information. Written comments will also be accepted by the town at any time before the public hearing or within 10 days after the hearing and should be sent to the clerk at 23340 Soderberg Road, Siren, WI 54872. 506793 30L WNAXLP

Federal Law P.L. 99-499 was enacted in October 1986 by the United States Congress to protect and inform all citizens of the existence of hazardous chemicals that may be manufactured, stored, distributed or used in a community. Public Law 99-499 is the Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act of 1986, Title III of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (S.A.R.A.) Information about these hazardous chemicals and locations is available for public review at the following location between the hours of 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday thru Friday. Emergency Management Office Polk County Justice Center 1005 W. Main St., Suite 900 Balsam Lake, WI 54810 Information available includes lists of facilities reporting, Material Safety Data Sheets, inventory forms of chemicals, emergency response plans and if any are filed, follow-up emergency notices of releases from facilities. Telephone inquires as to specific information contained in the files will be accepted. Copies of the documents may be made at the expense of the requestor and at rates established by Polk County Records Control Ordinance. Information available is limited to compliance with P.L. 99499 and does not include all chemicals that may pose a threat to humans, animals or the environment. Questions related to this notice should be addressed to Kathy Poirier, Coordinator, Polk County Emergency Management for the Local Emergency Planning Committee (L.E.P.C.) 715-485-9280. This legal notice is published to inform the general public 507168 30L and complies with Section 324 of P.L. 99-499. WNAXLP (Mar. 17, 24, 31, April 7, 14, 21) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P., AS SERVICER FOR THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATE HOLDERS CWABS ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATE TRUST 2005-BC4 Plaintiff, vs. BRADLEY A. ANDREWSON, et al Defendants. Case Number: 09 CV 785 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on February 4, 2010, in the amount of $191,949.35, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: May 5, 2010, at 10 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Front Entrance to the Polk County Justice Center located at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: The South 246.25 Feet of the North 626.25 Feet of the West 417.5 Feet of the Northwest 1/4 of the Northwest 1/4 of Section 23, Township 34 North, Range 18 West, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1490 200th Street, Saint Croix Falls, WI 54024. TAX KEY NO.: 044-00553-0000. Dated this 9th day of March 2010. /s/Timothy G. Moore Sheriff of Polk County Shannon K. Cummings State Bar #1033710 Attorney for Plaintiff 13700 W. Greenfield Avenue Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Petermann, S.C. is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. (189995)

(March 3, 10, 17, 24, 31, April 7) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY U.S. Bank National Association, Plaintiff, vs. John G. Peterson and Unknown Spouse, and Allyson E. Meyers and Unknown Spouse, Defendants. Case Code: 30404 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Case No. 09 CV 877 Hon. Robert H. Rasmussen PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on the 8th day of January, 2010, the Sheriff of Polk County will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: DATE/TIME: April 15, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 10% of successful bid must be paid to the Sheriff at sale in cash or by certified check. Balance due within 10 days of court approval. Purchaser is responsible for payment of all transfer taxes and recording fees. Sale is AS IS in all respects. PLACE: Lobby of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, Balsam Lake, WI 54810. DESCRIPTION: Parcel I: Lot Four (4) of Certified Survey Map No. 1131 recorded in Volume 5 of Certified Survey Maps, page 121, Document No. 439240, located in the Southwest Quarter of Northwest Quarter (SW1/4 of NW1/4), Section Sixteen (16), Township Thirty-Four (34) North, Range Seventeen (17) West, Polk County, Wis. Parcel II: Together with an easement for ingress and egress as indicated on said Certified Survey Map and on adjoining Certified Survey Maps #1131, #1132 and #1035 to the Town Road. (FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY: Plaintiff believes that the property address is xxxx 157th Street, Balsam Lake, WI) Timothy G. Moore Sheriff of Polk County Stein & Moore, P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff 332 Minnesota St. Ste. W-1650 St. Paul, MN 55101 651-224-9683

ORDINANCE #2010-01 COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AN ORDINANCE TO ADOPT THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN OF THE TOWN OF CLAM FALLS, WISCONSIN The Clam Falls Town Board, Town of Clam Falls, Polk County, Wisconsin, does ordain as follows: Section 1. Pursuant to Section 59.69(2) and 59.69(3) of the Wisconsin Statutes, the Town of Clam Falls is authorized to prepare and adopt a comprehensive plan as defined in Section 66.1001(1) and 66.1001(2) of the Wisconsin Statutes. Section 2. The Town Board of the Town of Clam Falls, Wisconsin, has adopted written procedures designed to foster public participation in every stage of the preparation of a comprehensive plan as required by Section 66.1001(4)(a) of the Wisconsin Statutes. Section 3. The Plan Commission of the Town of Clam Falls, by a majority vote of the entire commission recorded in its official minutes, has adopted a resolution recommending to the Town Board the adoption of the document entitled “Town of Clam Falls Comprehensive Plan 2009-2029” containing all of the elements specified in Section 66.1001(2) of the Wisconsin Statutes. Section 4. The Town of Clam Falls has held at least one public hearing on this ordinance in compliance with the requirements of Section 66.1001(4)(d) of the Wisconsin Statutes. Section 5. The Town Board of the Town of Clam Falls, Wisconsin, does, by enactment of this ordinance, formally adopt the document entitled “Town of Clam Falls Comprehensive Plan 2009-2029” pursuant to Section 66.1001(4)(c) of the Wisconsin Statutes. Section 6. This ordinance shall take effect upon passage by a majority vote of the members-elect of the Town of Clam Falls. Adopted by the Clam Falls Town Board of the Town of Clam Falls, Polk County, Wisconsin, this 10th day of February, 2010. /s/ Gregory S. Anderson, Chairman 507099 30L /s/ Betty Knutson, Clerk

(March 3, 10, 17, 24, 31, April 7) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY AnchorBank, FSB Plaintiff, vs. ERIC LEE ERICKSON, et al Defendants. Case Number: 09 CV 301 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on June 5, 2009, in the amount of $125,717.24, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: April 21, 2010, at 10 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Front Entrance to the Polk County Justice Center located at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: That part of the Northeast 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4 of Section 34, Township 33 North, Range 15 West (in the Town of Clayton) described as commencing at a point 50 feet South of the Northeast corner; thence West 480 feet; thence South 990 feet; thence East 480 feet; thence North 990 feet to the place of beginning. Said land being in the Township of Clayton, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 691 20th Street, Clayton, WI 54004-3317. TAX KEY NO.: 016-00834-0000. Dated this 23rd day of February, 2010. /s/ Timothy G. Moore Sheriff of Polk County Chaz M. Rodriguez State Bar #1063071 Attorney for Plaintiff 13700 W. Greenfield Avenue Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. (188597)

(Feb. 17, 24, March 3, 10, 17, 24) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. JILEEN GLADYS MARQUARDT and JOHN DOE, unknown spouse of Jileen Gladys Marquardt; and JANE DOE and/ or JOHN DOE, unknown tenants, Defendants. Case No. 08-CV-561 Code No. 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage Dollar Amount Greater Than $5,000 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on February 1, 2010, in the amount of $170,081.54, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: April 8, 2010, at 10:00 o’clock a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center located at 1005 West Main St., Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: Lot Thirty-Three (33), Plat of Poplar Lake Park, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2156 Poplar Lane, Town of Osceola. TAX KEY NO.: 042-01257-0000. Timothy G. Moore Sheriff of Polk County, WI O’DESS AND ASSOCIATES, S.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff 1414 Underwood Avenue Suite 403 Wauwatosa, WI 53213 414-727-1591 O’Dess and Associates, S.C., is attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If you have previously received a Chapter 7 Discharge in Bankruptcy, this correspondence should not be construed as an attempt to collect a debt.

505263 WNAXLP

MENARDS

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW

505874 WNAXLP

5 a.m. - 9 a.m. Weekdays No Nights or Weekends! Apply In Person At:

Notices/ Employment

505902 WNAXLP

Town of McKinley Deborah Grover, Clerk

507101 30L

Town of McKinley Cemetery Board will meet Tuesday, March 30, 2010, at 7:30 p.m.

MORNING STOCK CREW

506789 WNAXLP

NOTICE

MARCH 17, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 29

Notices/ Employment COACHING OPPORTUNITIES The Frederic School District is accepting applications for the following coaching positions:

• Middle School Baseball Coach • Middle School Softball Coach Send letter of application, resume and credentials to: Bob Pyke, Athletic Director, Frederic School District, 1437 Clam Falls Drive, Frederic, WI 54837. Telephone 715-327-4223.

• Head High School Volleyball Coach • Assistant High School Volleyball Coach Send letter of application, resume and credentials to: Jeff Carley, Athletic Director, Frederic School District, 1437 Clam Falls Drive, Frederic, WI 54837. Telephone 715-327-4223. 506978 19a 30-31L All positions are open until filled. The Frederic School District is an Equal Opportunity Employer

NOTICE OF EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY GRANTSBURG SCHOOL DISTRICT Job Title: H.R. Contact: Contact Phone: Job Description: Qualifications:

Requirements:

How to Apply:

Employer:

Job Address: Web Site: Description: 507135 30-31L

Elementary Teacher Kathleen Coppenbarger 715-463-2320 100% FTE Elementary Classroom Teacher for Grantsburg Elementary School Appropriate Wisconsin Certification: 71Early Childhood-Middle Childhood (BirthAge 11) or equivalent. The ideal candidate will have experience with differentiation, Everyday Math and Guided Reading. Desire to work in a team of collaborative progressive thinking educators focused on the development of the whole child. Candidate must have the ability to provide a safe and positive learning environment for all students. Technology literacy is also desired. Send letter of application, resume, e-mail address, credentials, including three letters of recommendation, transcripts and a copy of license by April 5, 2010. Grantsburg School District 475 E. James Ave. Grantsburg, WI 54840 Same as the employer address. http://www.gk12.net Grantsburg School District is a K-12 school system of 1,000 students that is located in NW Wisconsin. It is located just over an hour from the Twin Cities Metro area. Grantsburg is located on the St. Croix National Scenic Riverway and is the home of Crex Meadows Wildlife Center.

The School District of Grantsburg does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age or handicap.

Ordinance No. 2010-1

AN ORDINANCE TO ADOPT THE RECOMMENDED DRAFT OF THE TOWN OF SAND LAKE YEAR 2030 COMPREHENSIVE PLAN (WITH EDITORIAL CHANGES NOTED AT THE PUBLIC HEARING) AS A FINAL DRAFT The Town Board of the Town of Sand Lake, Burnett County, Wisconsin, does ordain as follows: SECTION 1: Pursuant to section 60.22(3) and 62.23(2) and (3), Wisconsin Statutes, the Town of Sand Lake is authorized to prepare and adopt a comprehensive plan as defined in sections 66.1001(1)(a) and 66.1001(2), Wisconsin Statutes. SECTION 2: The Town Board of the Town of Sand Lake has adopted written procedures designed to foster public participation in every state of the preparation of a comprehensive plan as required by section 66.1001(4)(a), Wisconsin Statutes. SECTION 3: The Town of Sand Lake Plan Commission, by a majority vote of the entire commission recorded in its official minutes, has adopted a resolution recommending to the Town Board the adoption of the document entitled Town of Sand Lake Year 2030 Comprehensive Plan containing all of the elements specified in section 66.1001(2), Wisconsin Statutes. SECTION 4: The Town of Sand Lake has provided numerous opportunities for public involvement in accordance with the Public Participation and Education Plan adopted by the Town Board and Burnett County Board including public informational meetings, open Plan Commission/Committee meetings, public opinion surveys, news releases, newsletters, and a planning process Web site. A Public Hearing was held on March 8, 2010, in compliance with the requirements of Section 66.1001(4), Wisconsin Statutes. SECTION 5: The Town Board of the Town of Sand Lake does, by the enactment of this ordinance, formally adopt the two documents composing the Town of Sand Lake Year 2030 Comprehensive Plan (including “Plan Recommendations Report” and the “Inventory and Trends Report”) pursuant to section 66.1001(4)(c), Wisconsin Statutes. SECTION 6: This ordinance shall take effect upon passage by a majority vote of the members-elect of the Town Board and publication/posting as required by law. ADOPTED this 8th day of March, 2010. Voting Aye: 3 Voting Nay: 0 Published/posting on: March 15, 2010. Neil Ambourn, Town Chair ATTEST: Peggy Tolbert, Clerk 507177 30L 20a

VILLAGE OF LUCK ORDINANCE 2-2-4: STANDING COMMITTEES

SCHOOL DISTRICT OF SIREN

JOB VACANCY Position: Hours:

Driver/Paraprofessional 9/hrs. week (2:30 - 5:30 p.m.) Remainder of school year only. Description: A responsible adult is needed to transport a male student to and from an after-school program and serve as a classroom aide from 3 to 5 p.m., three days a week. Qualifications: Candidates must possess a valid Wisconsin driver’s license; hold a minimum of a high school diploma; and be willing to work toward paraprofessional certification. How to Apply: Submit a letter of interest stating qualifications to: Scott Johnson, District Administrator, Siren 507029 30L School District, P.O. Box 24022, Siren, WI 54872. Deadline: This position will be filled as soon as possible. (March 3, 10, 17, 24, 31, April 7) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY First National Bank & Trust, Plaintiff vs. Curtis Ventures, LLC Jeffrey M. Curtis Rebecca L. Curtis Michael James Curtis Beverly Curtis & Warren Smidt The RiverBank Schannon Mortgage, Inc. Bull Dozin, Inc. Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Case No. 08 CV 522 Classification No.: 30303 Under and by virtue of Judgment for Foreclosure in the above-entitled action issued by the Court aforesaid on the 31st day of July, 2009, I am commanded to sell the following described property: Barron County Real Estate: The Southeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter; the North one-half of the Northeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter; the Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter; all in Section 8, Township 32 North, Range 14 West (in the Town of Vance Creek), Barron County, Wisconsin. Tax Key #050-0800-05-000, 050-080017-000, 050-0800-19-000. Washburn County: Lots 3 and 4 of Certified Survey Map #3309, Volume 15 of CSM, Page 137, being part of the Northeast Quarter of the Fractional Northwest Quarter and the Northwest Quarter of the Fractional Northwest Quarter of Section 2, Township 37 North, Range 13 West. AND, Outlot 1 of Certified Survey Map #3645, Volume 17 of CSM, Page 147, a Redivision of Outlot 1 of Certified Survey Map No. 3310, Document No. 311586, and Lot 9 of Certified Survey Map No. 3311, Document No. 311587, and Lots 10 and 11 of Certified Survey Map #3312, Document No. 311588, all located in the Northeast Quarter of the Fractional Northwest Quarter, Northwest Quarter of the Fractional Northwest Quarter, and the Southwest Quarter of the Fractional Northwest Quarter, Section 2, Township 37 North, Range 13 West. AND, Lot 5 of Certified Survey Map #3310, Volume 15 of CSM, Page 138, being part of the Northeast Quarter of the Fractional Northwest Quarter; the Northwest Quarter of the Fractional Northwest Quarter and the Southwest Quarter of the Fractional Northwest Quarter of Section 2, Township 37 North, Range 13 West. AND, Lot 10 of Certified Survey Map #3645, Volume 17, Page 147, a Redivision of Outlot 1 of Certified Survey Map #3310, Document No. 311586, and Lot 9 of Certified Survey Map #3311, Document No. 311587, and Lots 10 and 11 of Certified Survey Map #3312, Document No. 311588, all

located in the Northeast Quarter of the Fractional Northwest Quarter, Northwest Quarter of the Fractional Northwest Quarter, and the Southwest Quarter of the Fractional Northwest Quarter, Section 2, Township 37 North, Range 13 West. AND, Lot 17 of Certified Survey Map #3313, Volume 15, Page 141, being part of the Northeast Quarter of the Fractional Northwest Quarter; the Northwest Quarter of the Fractional Northwest Quarter and the Southwest Quarter of the Fractional Northwest Quarter of Section 2, Township 37 North, Range 13 West. Tax Key #s.: 65-002-2-37-13-02-2 02-000-006000 65-002-2-37-13-02-2 01-000-006000 65-002-2-37-13-02-2 01-000-001010 65-002-2-37-13-02-2 02-000-001010 65-002-2-37-13-02-2 01-000-002000 65-002-2-37-13-02-2 01-000-004000 65-002-2-37-13-02-2 03-000-002000 Polk County Property: Lot 1 of Certified Survey Map #2392, recorded in Volume 11 of Certified Survey Maps, Page 99, Document No. 564643, located in the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter, Section 22, Township 35 North, Range 17 West, Town of Milltown, Polk County, Wisconsin, Tax Key #04000577-0100. All of the real estate shall first be offered for sale as one parcel. Thereafter, the real estate in each county will be offered for sale as one parcel. Thereafter, the parcels in each county will be sold individually. The highest bid will then be accepted as the sale price. PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on April 21, 2010, at 10:00 o’clock a.m., on that day at the front entrance of the Polk County Justice Center in the foyer thereof, located in Balsam lake, Wisconsin, I will sell the above-described real estate to satisfy said judgment with interest and with costs to the highest bidder for cash. TERMS OF SALE: 1. This is a cash sale. A certified check or bank check in the amount of 10% of the amount bid must accompany the bid with the balance due upon confirmation of the sale by the court. 2. Sale is subject to all unpaid real estate taxes and special assessments. 3. Purchaser shall pay any Wisconsin real estate transfer fee. 4. The property is being sold on an “as is” basis without warranties or representations of any kind. Dated at Balsam Lake, Wisconsin, this 9th day of February, 2010. Tim Moore, Sheriff Polk County, Wisconsin 505899 WNAXLP

The Luck Village Board, at their March 10, 2010 Village Board Meeting, adopted the Change in Ordinance 2-2-4 and amended the Ordinance to have a Public Services Committee. A copy of the Ordinance may be viewed at the Luck Village Hall, and is effective upon this publication. Signed Steven Nielsen, Village President and Kathy Hanson, Village Clerk/Treasurer. 507160 30L

FREDERIC BOARD OF EDUCATION Regular Meeting Monday, February 15, 2010 The President, Mr. Nelson, called the regular meeting of the Frederic School District Board of Education to order at 6:30 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 15, 2010, in the 7 - 12 School, Room 107. Board members present: Mrs. Amundson, Mr. Engen, Mr. Holicky, Mrs. Matz and Mr. Nelson. Administration present: Mr. Draxler, Mrs. Steen and Mr. Tischer. Motion Matz/Amundson that this meeting was properly noticed. Motion carried 5 - 0. The following persons were also present for this meeting: Nick and Mande Kuechenmeister. Staff Sgt. Kuechenmeister presented flags to the district for display in each building. These flags were flown in Iraq on December 25, 2009, in honor of the Frederic Schools. Motion Engen/Holicky to approve the 1-18-10, regular meeting minutes (Shari Matz as acting clerk). Motion carried 5-0. Mr. Nelson provided a summary of the 1-18-10, closed session minutes. Motion Matz/Engen to approve the 12-21-09, closed session minutes. Motion carried 5-0. The invoices for January 2010 were presented as follows: Regular invoices (#7986-8039 & 38218-38262)...........................$353,073.87 Payroll account.....................................................$180,939.64 Motion Amundson/Holicky to authorize and confirm the money payments of the invoices presented. Motion carried 5-0. Mr. Engen presented receipts for January 2010, totaling $558,706.72. Mr. Tischer reviewed the 2009-2010 budget. The administration presented building and district reports. Reports were submitted and presented by food service, and buildings and grounds. Motion Holicky/Engen to table the boiler and air handling equipment update/replacement. Motion carried 5-0. Motion Matz/Engen to approve the 2010 summer school program (6-6-10 - 6-30-10). Motion carried 5-0. Motion Engen/Nelson to approve contracts for advisors for extracurricular activities. Motion carried 5-0. Motion Holicky/Matz to approve the following resignations with appreciation for the coaches’ work with the students: Kelly McCoy, assistant varsity volleyball coach; and Erin Hansford, junior high softball coach. Motion carried 5-0. Motion Amundson/Matz to approve an OPEB Contract with Key Benefits to perform the valuation of post employment benefits. Motion carried 5-0. Motion Matz/Engen to approve an agreement with Grantsburg Insight School for 2010-2011. Motion carried 5-0. The 2010-2011 calendar was presented for a first review. The High School Graduation Credit Policy was presented for first review. The WKCE Opt Out procedure was brought to the board for discussion. Mr. Nelson announced to members of the Board that they should consider adjourning to closed session for the purpose of negotiations and personnel matter. Mr. Nelson informed the Board that the closed session would be proper and is authorized by s. 19.85 9 (1)(c)(f)(i) of the WI Statutes. Motion Matz/Amundson to adjourn to closed session. Vote by roll call was unanimous to convene in closed session and the motion carried 5-0. Time: 8:28 p.m. The regular meeting reconvened at 9:45 p.m. Motion Holicky/Engen to schedule a special meeting on Tuesday, February 23, at 7 a.m. for negotiations and personnel matters. Motion carried 5-0. Motion Matz/Engen to adjourn. Motion carried 5-0. Time: 9:46 p.m. Rebecca Amundson, Clerk

FREDERIC BOARD OF EDUCATION Special Meeting Tuesday, February 23, 2010 The President, Mr. Nelson, called a special meeting of the Frederic School District Board of Education to order at 7 a.m. on Tuesday, February 23, 2010, in the 7 - 12 School, Room 107. Board members present: Mrs. Amundson, Mr. Engen, Mr. Holicky, Mrs. Matz and Mr. Nelson. Administration present: Mr. Draxler, Mrs. Steen and Mr. Tischer. Motion Amundson/Matz that this meeting was properly noticed. Motion carried 5-0. Mr. Nelson announced to members of the Board that they should consider adjourning to closed session for the purpose of negotiations and personnel matters. Mr. Nelson informed the Board that the closed session would be proper and is authorized by s. 19.85 (1)(c)(f)(i) of the WI Statutes. Motion Matz/ Engen to adjourn to closed session. Vote by roll call was unanimous to convene in closed session and the motion carried 5-0. Time: 7:02 a.m. The regular meeting reconvened at 8:23 a.m. Motion Engen/Holicky to adjourn. Motion carried 5-0. Time: 8:24 a.m. 507208 30L Rebecca Amundson, Clerk

PAGE 30 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MARCH 17, 2010

DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTIES AND MANNER OF SALE: Parcel ID No. 281-01395-0000 (“Parcel #1”) That part of the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter (NW1/4 of NE1/4) of Section 33, Township 34 North, Range 18 West, Polk County, Wisconsin, which is contained within the following legal description: The East One-Half of the Northwest Quarter (E1/2

of NW1/4) and the West OneHalf of the Northeast Quarter (W1/2 of NE1/4 )of Section 33, Township 34 North, Range 18 West, EXCEPT the following three parcels: 1. All that part platted as Glacier Ridge. 2. Lot One (1) of Certified Survey Map No. 1587, recorded in Volume 7 on Page 166 as Document No. 506531, located in the N1/2 of the NW1/4 of said Section 33, Township 34 North, Range 18 West. 3. That part of the NE1/4 of the NW1/4 and the NW1/4 of NE1/4 deeded to the State of Wisconsin, Department of Transportation in that certain quit claim deed dated January 10, 1984, and recorded in Volume 464 on Page 82 as Document No. 424367. PROPERTY ADDRESS: No property address listed, St. Croix Falls, WI. Parcel ID No. 281-01398-0000 (“Parcel #2”) That part of the Northeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (NE1/4 of NW1/4) of Section 33, Township 34 North, Range 18 West, Polk County, Wisconsin, which is contained within the following legal description. The East One-Half of the Northwest Quarter (E1/2 of NW1/4) and the West One-Half of the Northeast Quarter (W1/2 of NE1/4) of Section 33, Township 34 North, Range 18 West, EXCEPT the following three parcels: 1. All that part platted as Glacier Ridge. 2. Lot One (1) of Certified Survey Map No. 1587, recorded in Volume 7 on Page 166 as Document No. 506531, located in the N1/2 of the NW1/4 of said Section 33, Township 34 North, Range 18 West. 3. That part of the NE1/4 of the NW1/4 and the NW1/4 of NE1/4 deeded to the State of Wisconsin, Department of Transportation in that certain quit claim deed dated January 10, 1984, and recorded in Volume 464 on Page 82 as Document No. 424367. PROPERTY ADDRESS: No property address listed, St. Croix Falls, WI. Parcel ID No. 281-01396-0000 (“Parcel #3”) That part of the Southwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter (SW1/4 of NE1/4) of Section 33, Township 34 North, Range 18 West, Polk County, Wisconsin, which is contained within the following legal description. The East One-Half of the Northwest Quarter (E1/2 of NW1/4) and the West OneHalf of the Northeast Quarter (W1/2 of NE1/4) of Section 33, Township 34 North, Range 18 West, EXCEPT the following three parcels: 1. All that part platted as Glacier Ridge. 2. Lot One (1) of Certified Survey Map No. 1587, recorded in Volume 7 on Page 166 as Document No. 506531, located in the N1/2 of the NW1/4 of said Section 33, Township 34 North, Range 18 West. 3. That part of the NE1/4 of the NW1/4 and the NW1/4 of NE1/4 deeded to the State of Wisconsin, Department of Transportation in that certain quit claim deed dated January 10, 1984, and recorded in Volume 464 on Page 82 as Document No. 424367.

TOWN OF LAKETOWN The Monthly Board Meeting Will Be Held Tuesday, March 23, 2010, At 7:30 p.m. At The Cushing Community Center Agenda: Clerk’s report; treasurer’s report; open forum; discuss nonmetallic mining reclamation ordinance; annual burning restriction; road report; pay bills 507161 30L & adjourn. Patsy Gustafson, Town Clerk

PROPERTY ADDRESS: No property address listed, St. Croix Falls, WI. Parcel ID No. 281-01399-0000 (“Parcel #4”) That part of the Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (SE1/4 of NW1/4) of Section 33, Township 34 North, Range 18 West, Polk County, Wisconsin, which is contained within the following legal description. The East One-Half of the Northwest Quarter (E1/2 of NW1/4) and the West One-Half of the Northeast Quarter (W1/2 of NE1/4) of Section 33, Township 34 North, Range 18 West, EXCEPT the following three parcels: 1. All that part platted as Glacier Ridge. 2. Lot One (1) of Certified Survey Map No. 1587, recorded in Volume 7 on Page 166 as Document No. 506531, located in the N1/2 of the NW1/4 of said Section 33, Township 34 North, Range 18 West. 3. That part of the NE1/4 of the NW1/4 and the NW1/4 of NE1/4 deeded to the State of Wisconsin, Department of Transportation in that certain quit claim deed dated January 10, 1984, and recorded in Volume 464 on Page 82 as Document No. 424367. PROPERTY ADDRESS: No property address listed, St. Croix Falls, WI. The Manner of Sale The above parcels shall be offered for sale as follows: A. Parcel #1 shall be offered for sale separately; B. Parcel #2 shall be offered for sale separately; C. Parcel #s 1 and 2 shall be offered for sale as a whole; D. Parcel #3 shall be offered for sale separately; E. Parcel #4 shall be offered for sale separately; F. Parcel #s 3 and 4 shall be offered for sale as a whole; and G. Parcel #s 1, 2,3 and 4 shall be offered for sale as a whole. Each parcel sold separately, or parcels sold together as a whole, shall be sold to the highest bidder. However, anyone that bids on parcels 1 and 2 as a whole as specified in Paragraph C above shall only be the successful bidder if their bid exceeds the collective value of the bids for Parcels 1 and 2 sold individually pursuant to Paragraph A and B above. Similarly, anyone that bids on Parcels 3 and 4 as a whole as specified in Paragraph F above shall only be the successful bidder if their bid exceeds the collective value of the bids for Parcels 3 and 4 sold individually pursuant to Paragraphs D and E above. Finally, anyone that bids on Parcels 1, 2, 3 and 4 as a whole as specified in Paragraph G above shall only be the successful bidder if their bid exceeds the collective value of the bids for Parcels 1, 2, 3 and 4 whether bid on individually or as a whole pursuant to Paragraphs A - F above. Timothy G. Moore Polk County Sheriff MURNANE BRANDT Attorneys for Plaintiff 30 E. 7th Street, Suite 3200 St. Paul, MN 55101-4919 Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (15 U.S.C. Section 1692), we are required to state that we are attempting to collect a debt on our client’s behalf and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose. 505842 WNAXLP

Notices/Employment LUCK KINDERGARTEN REGISTRATION LUCK KINDERGARTEN REGISTRATION FOR THE 2010-2011 SCHOOL YEAR WILL TAKE PLACE ON THURSDAY, APRIL 8, AT 6 P.M. IN THE LUCK SCHOOL CAFETERIA

This evening is designed for parents only, so they may have a better understanding of the kindergarten program and details of their child’s day at school. If your child is currently enrolled in the 4-K Program in Balsam Lake, your child will bring home a registration packet to be completed by you and returned on April 8. If your child does not go to the 4-K Program, then a packet may be picked up at the Luck Elementary School Office anytime. Parents of those children that are not enrolled in 4-K will also need to bring their child’s birth certificate and immunization records. A school physical will be required to attend kindergarten. According to state law, (chapter 429, section 118.14), a child must be five years old on or before September 1, in order to go to kindergarten in the fall. If you have questions regarding this, please call us at 715507030 30-33L 20-22a 472-2153, ext. 108.

MORTGAGE LENDING OPPORTUNITIES WESTconsin Credit Union, a growing credit union in Western Wisconsin, has openings in our Mortgage Lending Department! At WESTconsin Credit Union we are dedicated to hiring highly talented employees. Our family-oriented organization places a large emphasis on quality, professional service and teamwork.

MORTGAGE LOAN ORIGINATOR

We have an opportunity for a self-motivated, goal-oriented professional committed to selling and servicing a full range of mortgage lending products in our Amery office location. Position will be paid on a full commission basis. Five years of experience (or a combination of education and experience) in real estate/mortgage lending/origination preferred with demonstrated sales ability and excellent written and oral communication skills.

MORTGAGE LOAN UNDERWRITER

This position will be responsible for underwriting real estate loans including in-house (portfolio) loans, Fannie Mae (FNMA) and FHA loans. This person is responsible and accountable for the credit, appraisal and property condition to meet secondary market or in-house loan requirements at the time of closing. They are also responsible to ensure the loan is in compliance with all federal and state requirements. WESTconsin Credit Union offers a competitive salary and an excellent benefit package including: • Excellent 401(k) Retirement Plan with generous company contribution • Medical, Dental and Vision insurance Please mail or fax your resume by Monday, March 22, 2010 to:

Attn.: NLY • P.O. Box 160 • Menomonie, WI 54751 Fax: 715-232-4996 or e-mail resume to: employment@westconsincu.org We are an Equal Opportunity Employer

506740 29-30L

(Mar. 17, 24, 31, April 7, 14, 21) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY CitiMortgage, Inc. Plaintiff, vs. THOMAS A. SAVINDA, JR. A/K/ A THOMAS A. SAVINDA, et al Defendants. Case Number: 09 CV 445 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on October 30, 2009, in the amount of $97,874.19, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: May 6, 2010, at 10 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Front Entrance to the Polk County Justice Center located at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: Lot 16 and the Westerly 1/2 of Lot 15, Amundson and Johnson’s Addition, being a part of the Southeast 1/4 of the Northwest 1/4 of Section 28, Township 33 North, Range 16 West, in the City of Amery, Polk County, Wisconsin. EXCEPTING the South 60 feet thereof. ALSO DESCRIBED AS: Lot 16 and the Westerly 1/2 of Lot 15 Amundson and Johnson’s Addition to the City of Amery, according to the official plat thereof on file and of record in the Office of the Register of Deeds in and for Polk County, Wisconsin, said lots lying in and comprising of a part of the Southeast 1/4 of the Northwest 1/4 of Section 28, Township 33 North, Range 16 West, Polk County, Wisconsin, Except the South 60 feet thereof. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 234 Summit Avenue, Amery, WI 54001. TAX KEY NO.: 201-00012-0000. Dated this 3rd day of March, 2010. /s/ Timothy G. Moore Sheriff of Polk County Christina E. Demakopoulos State Bar #1066197 Attorney for Plaintiff 13700 W. Greenfield Avenue Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. (188766)

506790 WNAXLP

(Feb. 24, Mar. 3, 10, 17, 24, 31) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY THE RIVERBANK, Plaintiff, vs. Biermann Investment, LLC, a Wisconsin limited liability company, M.B. Development, LLC, a Wisconsin limited liability company, Mark P. Biermann, an individual, Gregory R. Palen, an individual, Michael J. Seeland, an individual, Kirtland Co. Woodhouse, an individual, Sammon Heating & Air Conditioning, Inc., Plummer Concrete, Inc., T. Kroll’s, Inc., Merchants Bank, Biermann Amery, LLC, Homes by Biermann Amery, LLC, Biermann Homes Amery, LLC, Biermann Contracting, Inc., Homes by Biermann St. Croix Falls, LLC, Biermann Homes Turtle Lake, LLC, Bernco, a division of United Building Centers, Simon Electric Const. Co. Inc., Arrow Building Center, Consolidated Lumber Company, Defendants. Case No.: 09-CV-04 Case Code: 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on August 31, 2009, in the amount of (a) $6,644,381.73, against Biermann Investment, LLC, in the amount of (b) $3,321,283.89, against MB Development, LLC, and in the amount of (c) $4,983,739.79, against Mark P. Biermann; and Amended Order entered on February 15, 2010, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: April 8, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: Pursuant to said judgment, 10% of the successful bids must be paid to the sheriff at the sale in cash, cashier’s check or certified funds, payable to the clerk of courts (personal checks cannot and will not be accepted). The balance of the successful bids must be paid to the clerk of courts in cash, cashier’s check or certified funds no later than ten days after the court’s confirmation of the sale or else the 10% down payment is forfeited to the plaintiff. The properties are sold “as is” and subject to all liens and encumbrances. PLACE: In the foyer area of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, in the City of Balsam Lake, Polk County.

NOTICE

WEBSTER ELEMENTARY PRE-K TINY TIGER AND KINDERGARTEN REGISTRATION ATTENTION!

WHAT SHOULD I BRING? • Child’s Birth Certificate • Child’s Social Security Card • Child’s Health Record

Do you have a child who will be four on or before September 1? If so, it’s time to bring them to our Pre-K Tiny Tiger Registration at Webster School on March 25 & 26, by appointment! If you have a child who will be FIVE before September 1, and entering kindergarten who did not attend the Pre-K Tiny Tiger Program, please call to schedule an appointment. Registration for your child will be with the kindergarten team on March 26.

Come and join the Tiny Tiger and Kindergarten teachers for a fun-filled session! Parents will be registering and children will be having fun at school!

Place: Webster Elementary Dates: March 25 & 26 RSVP: Please call the Elementary Office at 715-866-8211 to set up your session time!

506124 28-30L

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

Pursuant to Wis. Statues 66.1001(4)(d) the Town of McKinley Board will hold a Public Hearing on Tuesday, April 20, 2010, at 7:30 p.m., at the McKinley Town Hall, McKinley, WI. The meeting will be called to order and the Board will consider: Gordon Hibbs request to rezone 30 acres of Exclusive Ag Property; Legal description of property to be rezoned: North 30 Acres of Govt. Lot 2, Section 18 T36 R15W, Town of McKinley, to Commercial Property for the purpose of Mud Bogging. The Board will take into consideration the resolution made by the Plan Commission. Interested parties may appear or otherwise express their position. Deborah Grover, Clerk, Town of McKinley 507100 30L WNAXLP Dated: March 13, 2010

MARCH 17, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 31

artspage Jessica Golz Jessica Golz, 16, offers examples of her photography, painting and poetry in this installment of artspage. She is a Unity High School student active in Girl Scouts and FFA and is a member of the town royalty. She says she “adores” playing the clarinet in the pep band. Her love of animals is the one thing that exceeds her love of writing. She visits the Arnell Memorial Humane Society as often as she can. Their family Chihuahua/mutt, Kira, was adopted from there. “I don't see myself as ordinary, rather, abstract and random,” Jessica notes. “When I put my thoughts to paper, it just seems to make sense...life, I mean. Being a teenager never gets easier, but even through all the hard times, I think about what I'm going to have to do in order to live. That's my inspiration – school, turmoil, and (who doesn't write about it?) love. Love is a scary thing, and I think I'm still too young to truly understand it. But that sure as heck doesn't stop me from writing about anything! “The night scares me with what creatures could jump out and kill, but I love the serenity and clarity it brings to my mind. Being outside on a mellow night with everything lit up by the moon is amazing.Yes, I was looking at the February 24th issue (of the Leader) when I wrote this! Thanks to Cecelia (Andrewson) and Kelly (Green) for reminding me that I want to be recognized as well.” Trapped I can't help but be distressed I want and I want it now The affection that I crave so deeply Is wrong, dishonest, and sad

“Hang”

Already engaged with relationship I would never be that person Who leads the betrayal But I can't go without affection

“Sunset Island” Letter In My Mind The letter I never wrote stays in the back of my mind; constantly changing, nervously rearranging, never wanting life.

Untitled Kill what I desire Never going to be I wish I fail Miserably Love drawn into being By a lust so clear All in the world is corrupt Can't save what has fallen So leave Walk away Let me be Alone

Dying inside, desperate to live Going to regret anything I do Still being selfish, I break And end the entrapment

“Spring pig”

“The Long Road” Are you a local artist, writer, photographer or poet wishing to highlight your work on this page? Send images of your work and yourself in jpeg form, short poetry, prose and bio in the body of an e-mail, to: winterboo@centurytel.net or theleader@centurytel.net

Background

PAGE 32 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MARCH 17, 2010

With snow melt comes requirement for burning permits All area counties affected CUMBERLAND – As of March 15, burning permits are required in all of the Northwest Wisconsin counties of Washburn, Burnett, Rusk and Sawyer and in the following townships in Barron County: Bear Lake, Cedar Lake, Chetek, Dover, Doyle, Lakeland, Maple Plain, Sumner, and the portion of Stanley and Prairie Lake townships east of CTH SS. Also included are the Polk County townships of Lorain, Clam Falls, West Sweden, Sterling and portions of McKinley, Bone Lake and Luck townships north of Hwy. 48. In the remainder of Barron and Polk counties check with local government officials as regulations vary greatly. Burning permits are required when most of the snow has melted from forest and field. Rural residents and visitors are reminded that burning permits are needed to burn leaves, brush, and other woody debris. Permits can be obtained from any Department of Natural Resources Service Center or Emergency Fire Warden. Burning permits must be renewed annually. A new permit system was instituted in 2008 requiring customers to only apply once per year for their permit. “This new system offers real improvements in ease and efficiency and makes it easier to check local fire danger conditions prior to burning,” said Trent Marty, chief of DNR forest protection services. “That helps to reduce the number of wildfires. Permits now are good for an entire calendar year so folks only have to make one trip to their emergency fire warden, ranger station, or DNR office.” Customers can use either the toll-free phone number 888-WIS-BURN or an online interactive Web site http://dnr.wi.gov/forestry/fire/index.htm. to find out

The DNR reminds area residents that burning permits are required now that snow has left the ground. Fire-fighting crews fought their first fire recently in the town of Dewey. St. Croix Hertel Fire Department and Spooner DNR units responded to an escaped debris fire threatening a barn on County Line Road. The crews extinguished an 8-acre fire burning in grass and brush. The owner was attempting to burn a large stump by piling brush and scrap lumber and had started the fire on March 1 with snow cover surrounding the pile. Rain and sun melted the snow last weekend. Sparks held over and ignited the grass when the sun dried the grass surrounding the pile. The brush fire was extinguished and the barn was saved. The open fields and wetlands are snow free and the snow in the woods is rapidly melting. - Special photo

Pe r s o n a li ze d G ra d u at i o n O p e n H o u s e C ar d s 2 D iffe re nt S i ze s a n d 5 A cc e n t C o l o r s To C h o o s e Fro m

es 10 Styl se To C h o o Fro m

P r i n te d F u l l C o lo I n r C a r d S to O n ck

Picture Release Forms May Be Needed. Check With Your Photographer.

These fit in an A-7 envelope which is not included.

Minumum Order Is 24 Cards For All Designs All Envelopes Are Available To Purchase At Our Stores. Prices shown do not included $5 handling fee.

5" x 4" Cards 24 cards............................$15.00 48 cards............................$20.00 72 cards............................$25.00 96 cards............................$30.00

FIRE WARDENS: Washburn County Barronett: Fred and Ellen Smith, Speedy’s C-Stop Bashaw: Lynn Hoeppner (County Clerk’s Office), Brigitte and Craig Hanson, Kent and Bernadette Wabrowetz Bass Lake: Clarence Wood Beaver Brook: Gary and Dorene Frank, Clarence Rummel (Rummel’s Tap) Birchwood: Ed and Jan Hoge, Stacy Rurup (Ed’s Pit Stop), Pat Schue Brooklyn: Kelly Grimes (Mac Lake Tavern), Orvus Helgerson Casey: Robert and Betty Jo Brown, George Basgall (Twin Oaks Tavern) Chicog: Bonnie Crosby (Pappy’s Bar) Evergreen: Kathy Ferguson Evergreen: Kati Hanson Frog Creek: Tracey Okonek and Frank Block Gull Lake: Brian Gooderham, Robert Haddick Long Lake: Bill and Barbara Burdick, Dan and Linda Lubensky (Marawaraden Resort), Darlene Martinson Madge: Jim McCabe (The Rockford House) Minong: Todd and Debbie Smith, Kurt and Linda Featherly, Bob Gruslewski (Gruzy’s), Dan and Bonnie Myers. Sarona: Tom and Gloria Elliott Spooner: Mert Zillmer, Donald and Carol Strunk Springbrook: Lawrence Neste, Greg Thompson Stinnett: Thomas and Sandy Johnson Stone Lake: Gerard McAllister, Judy Payne (Lakes Community Co-op) Trego: Dave and Dawn Dodge, Theresa Rizzo, Jeff Fox (Trego Travel Center) Eastern Burnett County Roosevelt: Wayne and Bobbie Boyd (G-Spot Bar and Grill) Dewey: Renee VanSelus, Art Swan, Lorraine Daniels Scott: Harold Hills, Kim Simon (Town of Scott-Clerk) Webb Lake: Todd Main (Main Store), Donald and Sophie Slipher Eastern Polk County Lorain: Earl and Sharon Jensen McKinley: Penny and Ken Schockman Northern Barron County Lakeland: Speedy’s C-Stop (Barronett), Sue and Terry Delong (The Country Store) Bear Lake: Hills Village Grocery (Haugen), Robert Philip, Roy Wetzel Maple Plain: Brigadoon Resort, Steve King - submitted

505518 18-27a,b,c,d 29-38r,L

3+ Pics 2 Pics 5" x 7" Cards 1 Pic 24 cards..........$22.00..............$25.00...............$30.00 48 cards..........$32.00..............$35.00...............$40.00 72 cards..........$42.00..............$45.00...............$50.00 96 cards..........$52.00..............$55.00...............$60.00

whether or not they can burn and the current burning restrictions for the day. “Permits are especially important in the spring when low humidities, high winds, and dry leaves and grass provide ideal conditions for wildfires,” said Forest Ranger Jay Riewestahl Riewestahl advises people who have burned a large debris pile to please be certain that it is out if left unattended. Fires can escape from hot coals that have held over from a brush pile burned when the ground was snow covered a few weeks previously. Spooner DNR Units responded to an 8-acre fire on March 14 caused from a burn pile ignited on March 1. Burning permits in intensive forest protection areas http://dnr.wi.gov/forestry/fire/fireprotectionareas.htm are required before any outdoor burning is allowed, whenever the ground is not completely snow covered. Intensive Protection Areas are the most heavily forested and contain the most fire hazards and risk in the state. The only exception to the permit requirement is for campfires used to cook food or warm the person. Broadcast burning (burning of material not in a pile) of areas greater than 1 acre and burn piles greater than 6’ X 6’ X 6’ must be inspected by personnel from the DNR before a permit can be issued.

POLK COUNTY EARLY LEARNING CENTER Invites all children interested in attending 4-year-old kindergarten classes at our Center this fall, along with their families to a BIRTHDAY PARTY!

These fit in an A-2 envelope which is not included. These 4 cards fit inside most formal graduation announcements

Thursday, March 25, 2010

INTER-COUNTY COOPERATIVE PUBLISHING ASSOCIATION 303 North Wisconsin Ave. Frederic, Wis.

24154 State Rd. 35N Siren, Wis.

107 N. Washington St. St. Croix Falls, Wis.

11 West 5th Ave. Shell Lake, Wis.

715-327-4236

715-349-2560

715-483-9008

715-468-2314

From 5 to 6:30 p.m. 400 Polk County Plaza, Balsam Lake Cake, punch, birthday crowns and party bags will be provided!

PLEASE RSVP BEFORE 3-22-10 BY CALLING 715-485-3413 ALL LUCK SCHOOL DISTRICT 4-YEAR-OLDS ARE INVITED! 506542 30L

MARCH 17, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 1

Currents N

‘Follow the Leader’

O R T H E R N

News and views from the NW Wisconsin community

From a handful of spectators to more than 4,000 Webb Lake’s St. Patrick’s Day parade has come a long way - and marks its 20th year this Saturday by Jill Schaaf WEBB LAKE - Webb Lake will be turning green before the trees bud this year. As it has the past 20 years. Plans for the 20th anniversary of the Webb Lake St. Pat’s Parade, a unique event that has grown dramatically from the first few years, are under way. This year’s parade begins at 1 p.m. this Saturday, March 20. The idea came a couple of years after the very Irish CiCi Abbott moved to Webb Lake in 1985. She and her family always attended the St. Patrick’s Day parades in St. Paul. She missed the celebration of her Irish roots. The first couple of years, while working at the Lumberjack, Abbott put up decorations and had small parties. One year, town Constable Richard “Dick” Morgan, a well-respected Webb Lake resident, helped celebrate by letting Abbott tattoo his belly with shamrocks, while lying on the pool table, at Roamers Inn. By 1990, Abbott wanted a parade. She became the first Ms. Shamrock by one vote. Her own! Since then, the parade has become an annual event. A kid at heart herself, Abbott tries to make it a fun day for all kids, of all ages. Her Irish pride is contagious. The first parade had about 11 or 12 participants and floats, with only a handful of spectators. It was a cloudy day and the parade only lasted about 10 minutes. It started at the Main Store in downtown Webb Lake and ended at the Lumberjack. Vicki Main, the majorette, started the parade in her green cheerleading-style outfit. She has started the parade all but two years out of 20. Her fondest memories have been the wonderful tradition she and her mother, Geneva Main, shared together. They made goofy costumes to wear each year. Her biggest pleasure was seeing her mother’s smile, as they walked the mile-long parade route handing out

Vicki Main has led the Webb Lake St. Patrick’s Day parade for all but two of its 20 years. Here she leads off the first parade in 1990. – Photos by Jill Schaaf candy to young and old. The second year of the parade had a few more spectators. Ken and Shirley Johnson from Webb Lake had their lawn chairs and umbrella set up and patiently waited for the start of the parade. Boone’s Septic was

Then and now - the first parade in downtown Webb Lake - and the crowd at

507102 30L

in the parade and someone had the idea that they should give out Tootsie Rolls. Each year there has been a Ms. Shamrock queen contest. Most candidates represent the area bar/restaurants. The candidates, creatively dressed up in their green attire, campaign around town the day before the parade. Voting has always takes place at the Lumberjack on Friday from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. People stop by and cast their vote for their favorite candidate. Votes are carefully counted and monitored. Ms. Shamrock crowning is at 10 p.m. The green cape and tiara are passed on to the new queen. The former Ms. Shamrocks are CiCi Abbott, Evie Sabo, Rona Madsen, Julie McDonald, Wendy Purcell, “Mick the Chic,” Kathy Kasel, Lori Tanski, Heather Goucher, Jennifer Angell-Sabatka, Amy Monicken, Diane Meister, Lynda Schaaf-Hunt, Delores Staples, Denni Olson, Karen O’Toole and the only male Ms. Shamrock was John Angell in 1992. Angell proudly wore his dyed-green and lace, wedding-style gown and large green earrings! On March 17, 2007, the golden 17th year of the parade, Abbott took back her title and the former queens gathered to ride on the queen float. Through the years the float contest has consisted of first through third place for the best and/or most creative float. First place received $75, second place -$50 and third place was a 12-pack of beer until 1996. That is when 7-year-old Zach Schaaf won, with his team of Irish miniature goats, pulling him in his wagon. Thirdplace prize was quickly switched to a 12-pack of pop. The most memorable float was in 1992, the huge Ice Castle, from Big McKenzie Lake Chamber of Commerce. A name and idea created by a small group of people – McKenzie Landing’s Ray and Arlys Piller, What The Heck’s Marilyn Heck and son Chris Heck, West Point Lodge’s Dale Peterson and Dawn Simonson, Carolyn Askov-Beitel, Mary Askov, Arlo Forseth, Randy Townsend and others. The five layers of ice blocks were cut from the lake and loaded onto Peterson’s flatbed trailer, by using his crane. The castle was colored green and decorated with lights and other trimSee Webb Lake parade, page 2

PAGE 2 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - MARCH 17, 2010

Kite show at Siren

Brad Klages, secretary, historian and newsletter editor for the Minnesota Kite Society, was one of four society members on hand in Siren Saturday for the Kite Flying sponsored by the Siren Chamber of Commerce. Due to the warm weather, the show was transferred from Crooked Lake to the Siren School grounds. The Minnesota Kite Society sponsors events in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, the Dakotas and Illinois for the purpose of encouraging interest in kites and kite flying. For more information, check out their Web site at www.mnkites.org.

“It’s 40 degrees out, and there’s wind – a good day for kite flying,” commented one of the members of the Minnesota Kite Society in Siren Saturday, March 13. The show was one of the events on the Minnesota Kite Society’s 2010 “Flight Schedule,” and kites could be seen high in the sky over Siren Satafterurday noon, March 13.

Three Girl Scouts from Troop 51072; Caitlin Daniels, Laurel Kannenberg and Brittany Merrill, were on hand at Siren School Saturday, March 13, to help members of the Minnesota Kite Society set up their kites. The Scouts got their chance to try kite flying, as shown in this photo.

Juli Kannenberg, wife of Siren Chamber of Commerce President Gary Kannenberg, was all smiles as she tried her hand at kite flying in Siren this past Saturday. Members of the Minnesota Kite Society brought kites for people to fly, but people could also bring their own kites. “If somebody is having trouble, we will get their kite in the air,” promised society director Ken Wilkowski. – Photos by Nancy Jappe

Webb Lake parade/from page 1 mings. Other memorable participants have been “The Bagpiper,” horses, dogs, clowns, Irish potatoes, Betty Kester in 1992 with her “McScud Missile,” St. Patrick and the snake, Gary Vandelinde as the Human Fly, Al Baker (a Webb Lake resident in his 90s) in 2000 as the grand marshal, Webster High School band, a very large “Spuds McKenzie” balloon, the Tice brothers band, Big Bamboo, and the crowd favorite, Hummers, just to name a few. The Hummers are from Indiana. They came to Webb Lake with a group of underprivileged kids on a camping trip one summer. The group was rained out and stayed at The Lodge next to the Lumberjack. After learning about the parade celebration, they decided to return to Webb Lake and participate in the parade. In the past 14 years, the Hummers have donated a variety of great items to the crowd. A very, very generous company and group of people that has been greatly appreciated every year! This may be their last year.

“Jameson” the bagpiper, in his mid20s, has been playing the bagpipe for quite a few years. CiCi Abbott called and invited him to play in the parade. Jameson has also been a crowd favorite the past five years. Everyone enjoys his playing of official Irish music along with his outfit. Look for him in the beginning of the parade! The first 10 years were the manageable small-town parade years. As the crowd and celebration increased, the cost of putting on the parade, providing for everyone’s safety and the need to have control of the event also grew. The past four years, a parade committee was formed. All participating Webb Lake area businesses share the cost and work for the event. This includes prizes, insurance, portable toilets, security, advertising, trash, setup, cleanup, parking and the emergency/parade route. Volunteers are always needed. Each year attendance of this event has increased and brought in much revenue to the county. Last year was estimated to

“Jameson” the bagpiper, Cici Abbott and Dan Murphy at the 2003 parade. – Photos by Jill Schaaf

Members of the crowd during the 2004 parade. - Leader file photo be a minimum of 4,000 people. At this time of year, it is greatly needed and appreciated. This year the prizes for Best Float/Group were; first place -$300, second place - A round of golf at Voyager Village for four, third place - weekend (one room) at the Webb Lake Motel (Todd and Laura Main). There is limited parking along the parade route. There will be No Parking areas blocked off along and near the parade route for emergency purposes. There are a few “pay & park” areas near the parade route which also will have room for buses. The parade starts at 1 p.m. CTH H/Namekagon Trail and also CTH H /North Bear Lake Road will be temporarily closed and detoured at noon to approximately 3 p.m. Watch for signs. There are commemorative buttons on sale for $1 each. They are available before and on the day of the parade at the local businesses. They were designed by Greg Atkinson, a former Lumberjack em-

ployee. Be sure to get your button and support the parade event and the area businesses: Charlie’s Lumberjack, Oak Ridge Inn, Rosenthal’s Resort, The Cabaret, Main Store, Lunker’s Lodge, Northwoods Inn, Webb Lake Marine, Webb Lake Motel, The Shop Bar, A & H Store, Voyager Village, Swanie’s Country Store, Marty’s Pest Control and Greg Main-4 Star Sports. They all help to make this event possible. For questions or to register your float for the parade, Please call; Charlie’s Lumberjack Saloon at 715259-3329. Look for CiCi The Clown and her gigantic Irish smile! She just may make a balloon animal for you! This is a great event for everyone to celebrate the start of spring and find a bit O' Irish in everyone! Bring your candy and trinket bags for the kids, a photo ID for the adults and enjoy the day safely and responsibly. Small children must be supervised. The goal is safety first and fun second! See you at the parade!

MARCH 17, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 3

Last

December my brother opened an envelope from the electric company. It was a card that read,”Happy Holidays From Your Power Company.” The week after he got another letter from the electric company. This one read,”Happy Holidays from Your Power Company. Second Notice.” ••• My uncle was in the doctor’s office about his broken arm. He says,”Doctor, how long will my arm be in this cast?” The doctor Just for replies, ”About six weeks.” “When you take off the cast will I be able to play the violin?” my uncle continues. “Of course,” says the doctor. “Great!” yells my uncle,”I could never play it before!” ••• My oldest son asked me why anyone would spend years writing a novel when you can buy one for about $20. Then I slapped him. ••• My youngest son is so lazy. He’ll step into a revolving door and just wait.

Joe Roberts

Laughs

Retired educators to host retirement system seminar LUCK – The Polk-Burnett Retired Educators Association will host a free seminar for participants of the Wisconsin Retirement System on Monday, April 19, from 7 to 8:30 p.m., at the Luck High School library, 810 7th St. S, Luck. The focus will be on the Wisconsin Retirement System pension benefits and options. This seminar is geared to WRS participants, including teachers, administrators, support staff, spouses and school personnel who are planning to retire or are beginning to think about it. The presenter from the Wisconsin Retired Educators Association will be Roger Byers, a former retirement benefit specialist at the Department of Employee Trust Funds. WREA, which was organized in 1951, is a statewide association of over 13,000 members. It is recognized for protecting the public pension fund and promoting public education. With a central office in Middleton, WREA maintains a strong lobbying presence by representing the views of retired educators. Please RSVP by Thursday, April 15, to either Sheila Staples at 715-653-2234 or Clayton Jorgensen at 715-463-5725 or e-mail gramputt@grantsburgtelcom.net. – submitted

I returned from Africa to a whole lot of

vivors, stick arms drooping to the ground. It was a grim sight, after all that clean, white mud. snow. I felt an edge of panic, watching the I think March is a depressing month. comfort of the white world I have come to There is nothing new about March unless know disappear and the world beneath it you count mud, and I don’t. revealed. Spring may signal new beginnings, but (Why do you like me? Are you going to March is not so much the beginning of anyleave me?) thing as the end of what was: a comforting I came home and Milo was lying in the blanket of clean white snow that masked yard, his white belly covered with March the particulars of our landscape and made mud, chewing on a nasty, soggy rawhide everything smooth and featureless and buried since autumn. The sky was gray and new. There are few sights more dismal than the air was damp. Daniel was three hours what is revealed in the retreat of the meltaway and I felt a terrible sense of gloom. ing snow. Then I checked my e-mail and was in(Is that a dead animal or a mitten? Did I formed my first order of seeds had shipped. leave my garden hose outside all winter?) Letters from (Chocolate Cherry Tomato - 140 seeds! Daniel tells me that spring is the time for Belle Pepper mix - 50 seeds!) Mini love, and maybe that is true. But love They don’t seem very real right now, my means greater intimacy, and intimacy Chocolate Cherry Tomatoes (what will I do means lots of stuff gets revealed. I met with 140 seeds?) and my Mini Belle Pepper mix, but Daniel in the unreality of holiday twinkle lights and they are on their way. I don’t even have a garden to shiny decorations, when everything was covered put them in yet. But, ready or not, they are on their with a coat of clean, fresh snow. (You really don’t own a paring knife or a dish- way. I put a leash on Milo and we went for a run. The towel? You honestly don’t know when you last had snow was retreating quickly and I noticed that nothan oil change?) Now it is spring and we are confronted with the ing really horrible had emerged. It was just what I remnants of long-defunct relationships that litter the could not fully see—what I had left behind, what I emotional landscape of our lives. I get a slipping feel- might discover—that had made me uneasy. As the ing, as the familiar world literally melts away, and snow disappeared, I realized there was nothing to the gnawing conviction that what is slowly being re- fear, just mud. I got home and Daniel called. He misses me and I vealed could possibly be frightening, and almost cersee him this weekend. And by the weekend, will tainly disturbing. more snow will be gone. There will be less that is hid(Your ex-husband owns half your house? You still den, and less to fear. I am planning a garden now. It pay your ex-wife alimony?) Yesterday I went for a long drive. It was foggy and is just an imaginary garden at present, but I am lookoccasionally it drizzled. I saw decomposing trash, ing out my window and I can see 140 Chocolate distressed remnants of holiday ornaments clinging Cherry Tomatoes bursting out of the mud. forlornly to dripping evergreen trees, and the skeleTill next time, tal remains of snowmen looking like death camp sur– Carrie

Carrie Classon

Home

FPD to host pancake breakfast FREDERIC - The Frederic Police Department is hosting a pancake breakfast at the Frederic Senior Center on March 20. This is a fundraiser event to help raise money toward the Frederic Children’s Activity Fund. “We as a department are inviting everyone in the community to come down to the senior center and to start their day off with an excellent breakfast cooked by our

fine officers,” noted Police Chief RJ Severude. On the menu will be pancakes, bacon, orange juice and coffee. Serving of breakfast will start at 8 a.m. and continue to 1 p.m. A $2 donation will be accepted and proceeds will go towards the Frederic Children’s Activity Fund. - with submitted information

A Country Boy moves into the “hood” Editor’s note: Dick Ugland of Luck offers the following story about his childhood that will be presented in a series in this space over the coming weeks. by Dick Ugland This is a story about a country child’s adventures moving from a Minnesota farm to South Milwaukee, and bicycling out. These adventures take place within the space of a few years in the 1940s. I was born in a little farm house in Kanabec County, Minn., near the town of Mora. I had a brother, Ted, 15 months older than I. Life was generally comfortable and predictable on the farm, my biggest adventures being the 1941 blizzard (with snowdrifts up to the telephone wires) and playing “cowboys” in a barn, armed with “rubber guns” made from wood, rubber bands (inner-tube rubber) and a clothespin. Almost as scary as a rubber gun was what I call “the circle of laps” – my relatives and neighborhood women, in the living room after Sunday dinner, waiting for Ted and I to sit in their lap for a big kiss and a smothering hug. I now know that the ladies meant well, and these were the last kisses I believe I had to put up with until my junior year in high school, when it was only a little bit less scary. My father, Arthur, was born on a small farm on the hill looking over the Snake River Valley. The supply of potential brides being limited in the valley, he and his brother, Gerhard, married the two girls who lived across the road, Harriet and Betty Spellum. The reader must consider that gas money was scarce during the Depression. There was the expression, “Don’t marry for money, go where money is and fall in love,” but there was no serious money anywhere in Kanabec County, much less along the Snake River, where they lived. Therefore, Harriet, who had once lived in St. Cloud, Minn., and had dated Byron Ellsworth (later known as movie actor, Gig Young), was now facing fewer choices. Art was a good man, even if poor – his only steady income then was from the WPA, a government program which paid the poor to take care of roads and

Dick Ugland

other public properties.

Enter Adolph Hitler and World War II In September of 1941, after Hitler had begun his war in Europe, our parents, now with a third child, Mitzi, decided to move to South Milwaukee. Mother’s brother, Maurice, had moved to South Milwaukee years before. He wrote to tell us that there were job openings at the Bucyrus Erie Co. where he was employed. At this factory, large guns were being forged for our growing Navy. (Two of Mother’s other brothers served in the Navy and the Army Air Force during this, the Second World War). We left the farm and drove the 500 miles at a maximum speed of 35 miles per hour (government tire rubber-saving campaign). We were accompanied by another family from our Minnesota valley. Our first home in South Milwaukee was in a second-story flat above a church.The noise level during ceremonies below us, even in the late hours, was so loud that after a year we moved to the neighborhood referred to in the title of this writing – the “White Hood.” Before moving, brother Ted and I greeted a couple of the neighborhood boys in the alley behind our second-story flat. During this first contact we were told by one of the guys that his name was Ted Szatmary. “Ted?” we asked. Now this was the first time we had heard of anyone claiming to have “our names,” so we went home and told our mother that they were a couple of liars. She tried to explain to us that sometimes children do have the same first name. Eventually we got used to it. This South-Milwaukee Ted and the other guy, Joe Agabashian, would become very important friends later. “Teddy Z” was Bohemian and Joe had Armenian heritage. These were like new races to my brother and I, who had met few non-Scandinavians.

Ted and Dick Ugland Entering the hood Our new neighborhood was across the street from the storage yards of the Bucyrus Erie Company. There were rows of giant gun barrels laying in those yards, waiting to be shipped to the war zone. On the corner of our block, across from Bucyrus Erie, was Sam’s Tavern, and then a few flats on our block leading to our first-floor flat on Minnesota Avenue. There were, at that time, 52 taverns in South Milwaukee and only a half-dozen churches. Fortunately for us, our new landlord owned a vacant lot next to our flat, and we were permitted to plant a vegetable garden. Sadly for them, our secondfloor neighbors didn’t participate in the gardening. They usually ate at Sam’s Tavern after leaving work and having “a few brewskis.” (My laptop just suggested “blue skies” but I’m sticking with “brewskis”). I would also take issue with our neighbors’ use of the word “few.” I heard him sing and play the guitar upstairs after “a few brewskis at Sam's,” and it wasn’t pretty. NEXT WEEK: Reality hits me

PAGE 4 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - MARCH 17, 2010

The Farm (written in 1907) by Sam Clemens I spent some part of every year at the farm until I was twelve or thirteen years old. The life which I led there with my cousins was full of charm, and so is the memory of it yet. I can call back the solemn twilight and mystery of the deep woods, the earthy smells, the faint odors of the wildflowers, the sheen of rainwashed foliage, the rattling clatter of drops when the wind shook the trees, the far-off hammering of woodpeckers and the muffled drumming of wood pheasants in the remoteness of the forest, the snapshot glimpses of disturbed wild creatures scurrying through the grass–I can call it all back and make it as real as it ever was, and as blessed. I can call back the prairie, and its loneliness and peace, and a vast hawk hanging motionless in the sky, with his wings spread wide and the blue of the vault showing through the fringe of their end feathers. I can see the woods in their autumn dress, the oaks purple, the hickories washed with gold, the maples and the sumacs luminous with crimson fires, and I can hear the rustle made by the fallen leaves as we plowed through them. I can see the blue clusters of wild grapes hanging among the foliage of the saplings, and I remember the taste of them and the smell. I know how the wild blackberries looked, and how they tasted, and the same with the pawpaws, the hazelnuts, and the persimmons; and I can feel the thumping rain, upon my head, of hickory nuts and walnuts when we were out in the frosty dawn to scramble for them with the pigs, and the gusts of wind loosed them and sent them down. I know the stain of blackberries, and how pretty it is, and I know the stain of walnut hulls, and how little it minds soap and water, also what grudged experience it had of either of them. I know the taste of maple sap, and when to gather it, and how to arrange the troughs and the delivery tubes, and how to boil down the juice, and how to hook the sugar after it is made, also how much better hooked sugar tastes than any that is honestly come by, let bigots say what they will. I know how a prize watermelon looks when it is sunning its fat rotundity among pumpkin vines and “simblins”; I know how to tell when it is ripe without “plugging” it; I know how inviting it looks when it is cooling itself in a tub of water under the bed, waiting; I know how it looks when it lies on the table in the sheltered great floor space between house and kitchen, and the children gathered for the sacrifice and their mouths watering; I know the crackling sound it makes when the carving knife enters its end, and I can see the split fly along in front of the blade as the knife cleaves its way to the other end; I can see its halves fall apart and display the rich red meat and the black seeds, and the heart standing up, a luxury fit for the elect; I know how a boy looks behind a yard-long slice of that melon, and I know how he feels; for I have been there. I know the taste of the watermelon which has been honestly come by, and I know the taste of the watermelon which has been acquired by art. Both taste good, but the experienced know which tastes best. I know the look of green apples and

Collected by

River Road

Ramblings

The Rambler’s sixth great-grandparents making maple syrup in Connecticut in the 1660s as photographed by Currier and Ives. – Photo submitted peaches and pears on the trees, and I know how entertaining they are when they are inside of a person. I know how ripe ones look when they are piled in pyramids under the trees, and how pretty they are and how vivid their colors. I know how a frozen apple looks, in a barrel down cellar in the wintertime, and how hard it is to bite, and how the frost makes the teeth ache, and yet how good it is, notwithstanding. I know the disposition of elderly people to select the specked apples for the children, and I once knew ways to beat the game. I know the look of an apple that is roasting and sizzling on a hearth on a winter’s evening, and I know the comfort that comes of eating it hot, along with some sugar and a drench of cream. I know the delicate art and mystery of so cracking hickory nuts and walnuts on a flatiron with a hammer that the kernels will be delivered whole, and I know how the nuts, taken in conjunction with winter apples, cider, and doughnuts, make old people’s old tales and old jokes sound fresh and crisp and enchanting, and juggle an evening away before you know what went with the time. I know the look of Uncle Dan’l’s kitchen as it was on the privileged nights, when I was a child, and I can see the white and black children grouped on the hearth, with the firelight playing on their faces and the shadows flickering upon the walls, clear back toward the cavernous gloom of the rear, and I can hear Uncle Dan’l telling the immortal tales which Uncle Remus Harris was to gather into his book and charm the world with, by and by; and I can feel again the creepy joy which quivered through me when the time for the ghost story was reached–and the sense of regret, too, which came over me, for it was always the last story of the evening and there was nothing between it and the unwelcome bed. I can remember the bare wooden stairway in my uncle’s house, and the turn to the left above the landing, and the rafters and the slanting roof over my bed, and the squares of moonlight on the floor, and the white cold world of snow outside, seen through the curtainless window. I can remember the howling of the wind and the quaking of the house on

FREDERIC PUBLIC LIBRARY Main Street

Russ Hanson

Frederic, WI 54837

715-327-4979

HOURS: Monday 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Friday 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Tuesday 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Wednesday 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sunday Closed 445673 19Ltfcp Thursday 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.

FREE WIRELESS INTERNET ACCESS

stormy nights, and how snug and cozy one felt, under the blankets, listening; and how the powdery snow used to sift in, around the sashes, and lie in little ridges on the floor and make the place look chilly in the morning and curb the wild desire to get up–in case there was any. I can remember how very dark that room was, in the dark of the moon, and how packed it was with ghostly stillness when one woke up by accident away in the night, and forgotten sins came flocking out of the secret chambers of the memory and wanted a hearing; and how ill chosen the time seemed for this kind of business; and how dismal was the hoo-hooing of the owl and the wailing of the wolf, sent mourning by on the night wind. I remember the raging of the rain on that roof, summer nights, and how pleasant it was to lie and listen to it, and enjoy the white splendor of the lightning and the majestic booming and crashing of the thunder.It was a very satisfactory room, and there was a lightning rod which was reachable from the window, an adorable and skittish thing to climb up and down, summer nights, when there were duties on hand of a sortto make privacy desirable. I remember the ‘coon and ‘possum hunts, nights, with the negroes, and the long marches through the black gloom of the woods, and the excitement which fired everybody when the distant bay of an experienced dog announced that the game was treed; then the wild scramblings and stumblings through briers and bushes and over roots to get to the spot; then the lighting of a fire and the felling of the tree, the joyful frenzy of the dogs and the negroes, and the weird picture it all made in the red glare–I remember it all well, and the delight that everyone got out of it, except the ‘coon. I remember the pigeon seasons, when the birds would come in millions and cover the trees and by their weight break down the branches. They were clubbed to death with sticks; guns were not necessary and were not used. I remember the squirrel hunts, and prairie-chicken hunts, and wild-turkey hunts, and all that; and how we turned out, mornings, while it was still dark, to go on these expeditions, and how chilly and dismal it was, and how often I regretted that I was

Mark D. Biller Specializing In Criminal, Traffic and OWI Mark D. Biller Trial Lawyer P.O. Box 159 Balsam Lake, WI 54810

Telephone 715-405-1001 Fax 715-405-1002 billerlaw@lakeland.ws

317350 36Ltfc

well enough to go. A toot on a tin horn brought twice as many dogs as were needed, and in their happiness they raced and scampered about, and knocked small people down, and made no end of unnecessary noise. At the word, they vanished away toward the woods, and we drifted silently after them in the melancholy gloom. But presently the gray dawn stole over the world, the birds piped up, then the sun rose and poured light and comfort all around, everything was fresh and dewy and fragrant, and life was a boon again. After three hours of tramping we arrived back wholesomely tired, overladen with game, very hungry, and just in time for breakfast. Notes from the Rambler: I recently read Mark Twain’s memories of his Uncle Daniel’s farm. He remembers things as they were in the 1840s. This excerpt comes from his autobiography about 1906. The story is out of copyright so we can reprint it for your enjoyment. As a farm boy growing up 100 years after Twain’s childhood, I too remember much of what he does. I just can’t express it so well. I hope it brought back memories of your own. We got back from our short jaunt south and have begun maple syrup season at the cabin. The cabin was just as I had left it in mid-November when the ambulance rushed me to the emergency room, other than what a dozen mice can do with four months freedom. We tapped the trees, but as of Sunday, they hadn’t started running yet. My $72,000 overhauled knee and leg are holding up pretty good as I slide around the muddy hillsides. It was hard to come back to see all the snow at Pine Island, but it was much better at Cushing with more snow gone and a much better-quality mud. In the pile of accumulated mail, besides the bills, I got a form to fill out to attend the St. Croix Falls class of 1965 reunion. It hardly seems like 45 years except when I look at some of my classmates who have aged greatly compared to me. I am getting ready for the reunion by planning to lose 25 percent of my weight, have my teeth whitened, dye my hair, get deep-blue contact lenses, buy a Corvette and Armani suit and get used to wearing socks and laced shoes. I am not sure what to do with Margo. The reunion is July 17 and is put on by the Dresser kids. If you are from an adjacent class, fill in the form and pay the fee and come too. You can find it online at http://riverroadrambler.blogspot.com/ 2010/03/class-of-1965-st.html. March 25, 7 p.m., the Luck Historical Society program will be Russ Hanson with a slide and movie show entitled “Making Maple Syrup 1650-2010.” Maple syrup experts will be on hand to teach you how to tap a maple tree and make syrup yourself. Door prizes: maple syrup. FREE!

Burnett Community Library

Monday through Thursday 10 a.m. - 7 p.m. Friday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Closed Sunday Main Street

Webster

460220 43Ltfc

MARCH 17, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 5

Hodge podge

But then, there’s no accounting for taste.

Sunday night Andy Rooney talked about the post office crisis: closing a number of post offices, eliminating Saturday deliveries, raising the price of stamps again, etcetera. Don’t blame me for reduced rate of U.S. Postal Service. I write many letters, thank-you notes, postcards. My one-time Abrahamzon bridesmaids and maid of honor have written back and forth since 1939, almost every week. In fact, they still use fountain pens and have beautiful writing. Question: If we have no Saturday mail delivery, what happens when we have Monday holidays? Three straight days without mail? Talk about being cut off from our friends. Use the telephone? That gets expensive if you live in Lewis because every place is long distance: Siren, Luck, Cushing, Trade Lake, Grantsburg. We can only call Lewis and Frederic without toll. No, we don’t use a cell phone. You’d think we’d get rewarded for that, but we are charged for a phone on the wall, outside line, inside lawn, etc. We don’t even know what some of the charges are. Quite a few taxes, and we wonder how all of those were added. But I’m off the subject of post offices. Whatever happened to “neither rain nor sleet nor snow keeps us from our appointed rounds.” We try to keep our lives simple. No computers, no e-mail, no answering service, no call waiting. Isn’t it the latter that allows you to be rude to two people at once? Waiting for the mail used to be one of the highlights of the day. Postcards from Hawaii with all that lovely scenery, black sand beaches, flowers and trees or the Eiffel Tower in France, the mountains of Switzerland, the Grand Canyon and rafting down the river. We subscribe to four farm newspapers including The Country Today, Agriview, Ag News and Wisconsin State Farmer. We also get my hometown newspapers, but newspapers are also in jeopardy. The Evening Telegram in Superior is published only two days a week. To encourage circulation some farm publications are free as advertising covers the cost. A world without newspapers is hard to believe. Our world is changing and not always for the best. As Andy Rooney says, “I’d rather get junk mail than e-mail,” and I agree.

Bernice

Behind the Signpost

Lonesome for spring This is the time of the year when I miss the greenhouses on our home place. I used to open the door of the potting shed and the warm, moist, sweet air of the greenhouses used to greet me. Inside were the beds of calla lilies, forget-me-nots, begonias, cinerarias, pansies, orchids growing in baskets of sphagnum moss overhead, all the blended sweetness of good scents. When we first moved to this Frederic area, I’d stop at the greenhouse and ask Lew Lawson “Do you mind if I walk through to sniff the air?” He always said, “Go ahead.” I seldom left without a small plant, a philodendron perhaps or other green plant. He had a stephanotis that he babied along for years, clipping a few blossoms for wedding bouquets. My father had an orange tree in a huge tub and it bloomed, bore fruit, and they turned a weak orange. Not warm enough in Wisconsin but interesting nevertheless. I remember one year when my schoolteacher aunt brought us some cotton bolls from down South. They were interesting, too. Good thought "Do what you can with what you have, with where you are." – Theodore Roosevelt And another "Life is like a 10-speed bike. Most of us have gears we never use." – Charles M. Schultz (When I quoted the above to my sons, they said, “You fall off a lot.”) And finally "You can’t turn back the clock, but you can wind it up again." – Bonnie Prudden Until next week, Bernice P. S. I have something nasty to say about gel pens that don’t work, too.

St. Croix Falls students to DECA international conference ST. CROIX FALLS - Kristina Cipelli Stelmakh, foreign exchange student at St. Croix Falls High School, will represent the state of Wisconsin in Louisville, Ky., at DECA’s International Career Development Conference scheduled to take place from April 24-27. DECA competitive events are learning activities designed to enable students to engage in activities that will extend their interests and competencies in marketing and measure the degree to which competencies have already been acquired. There are three levels of competition - district, state, and international. At the state level, over 2,400 students choose an occupational series in which to apply the marketing skills that they have acquired through school and work. Students are required to take an occupational cluster marketing/hospitality exam, an economics/marketing math exam, and compete in two role plays. The seven students with the highest overall scores in each occupational series advance to the next level of competition. St. Croix Falls had six students compete at the State Career Development Conference in Lake Geneva. on March 9-11. Justin Becker received a first-place medal for one role play in the Retail Management occupational series and placed 10th overall in this series, and Kristina Cipelli Stelmakh received two first-place medals for both role plays in the Hotel and Lodging occupational series and was granted the opportunity to compete at the international conference. The local St. Croix Falls DECA chapter was started eight years ago by marketing teacher Tracie Crowley. DECA is a cocurricular, student-centered organization

Compiled by Bernice Abrahamzon

50 Years Ago Specials at Route’s Super Market, Frederic, included oranges at 2 lbs. for 69¢, sugar at 10 lbs. for 98¢, smoked liver sausage at 33¢ lb.–Juveniles were arrested for Burnett County cabin robberies.–There were 32 cars derailed on Soo Line north of Danbury.–Ninety completed a civil defense course in Burnett County.–The Webster Creamery returned $30,000 to its patrons.–Fire destroyed the Harold Haaf home in Jackson township.–Mrs. Henry Dupont of Siren passed away.–Over 300 attended the Farm Institute at Grantsburg.–Rudell Motor Co. had a sale on used cars in Frederic. (Do you remember those 1958-1960 Fords?).–Tollander’s coin-operated laundry would soon open in Webster.–Beautiful pastel glazed pottery coffee cups were on special as the March bargain of the month at Our Own Hardware, Carlson Hardware, Frederic. The price, three cups for 53¢.–A dance was held at the Indian Creek Hall on March 5 with music by the Badger Dutchmen.–Mrs. A.P. Sondergard’s home, Frederic, was damaged by fire.–Only 17 ballots were cast at Frederic caucus.–Clam Falls voters will decide on election site, whether to move the town hall to the former Maple Valley school or remain at the Lewis Amusement/dance hall.–The annual meeting of the West Creamery was set for March 10.–A new star route mail system was in operation.

40 Years Ago

The school board named Wallace Koel as the new Frederic administrator.–A dog was shot and killed by motorists near Frederic. Owner of the black Lab/Border collie cross were Mr. and Mrs. Trevor Lundeen and that was a front-page story.–Specials at Route’s Super Market, Frederic, include Shasta pop at 6 cans for 59¢, Pepsi at 8 cans for 79¢; and tuna fish at 31¢ a can.–Specials at the Frederic Co-op Store include 20 lbs. russet potatoes at 99¢, Rome Beauty apples at 3 lbs. for 49¢, and Aldon’s white bread dough at 5 for 68¢.–Bervie Scott was pastor of Siren, Lewis and Grantsburg Methodist churches.–Pastor of St. Dominic Church, Frederic and Immaculate Conception church, Grantsburg was Marion B. Schuetz.–Richard Alger was pastor of the Atlas, Frederic and Lorain Methodist churches.–The Siren Chamber of Commerce elected officers for 1970.–A Spring Festival dinner was set for April 1 at St. John’s Church, Webster (chicken and meatballs).–New officers were elected to head Butternut Dairy Cooperative.–Red Arrow Sports in SCF was advertising Alumacraft boats beginning at $199 and up.–Illegal reflectors must be removed from driveways.–Clifford Grandstrand set an auction for April 4 of 102 head top quality dairy cattle, milking equipment, etc.–Don Byerly of Frederic was promoting sales for Voyager Village.

20 Years Ago

Kristina Cipelli Stelmakh and Justin Becker. Special photo specifically designed to provide activities that will motivate students to learn marketing competencies that will prepare them to become skilled, employable workers in marketing, management and entrepreneurship. submitted

Everything you wanted to know about maple syrup and more LUCK - At 7 p.m. on Thursday, March 25, noted local author and historian Russ Hanson will present a slide and movie show on the making of maple syrup from 1650-2010. Learn how the gathering and processing began and has changed over the years; learn too how you can tap maples and make your own syrup. Time will be allowed to ask questions and tell stories about maple seasons past. There will be maple syrup door

Do you remember ?

prizes. A short business meeting precedes the program, which ends about 8:30 p.m.. Stay until 9 p.m. if you care to socialize over coffee/tea and cookies. Historical society meetings are held at the Luck Historical Museum on Main Street and Third Avenue. Call 715-472-4378 if you have questions. - with submitted information

A former Cushing resident, Jill (Siverson) Negrete, was nominated for a Literacy Awards.–Home Economics underwent a name change to Family and Consumer Education.–Tobacco was prohibited on school grounds.–Eylvan Erickson was written up as a man who liked to make people laugh in an Eye-toEye feature article.–Heather Olson was crowned the 1990 Luck Winter Carnival Queen on Feb. 10.–Obituaries included J. Raymond Swedberg, Rupert Fisk, Clarence Lee, Richard Meyer, James Rand, Timothy Antonson, Francis Laqua, Elsie Skerik, Harold Ratty, Harold L. Lindahl, Henry Huebscher and Herman Hansen.–It was explained how the new nutrition site operates in Frederic.–Free nitrate testing was offered.–Ag policy priorities were explained.–The seventh-annual Clam Falls Winter Carnival was observed.–Wisconsin Gas Co. gained Burnett County village franchises.–Mike Heier of Webster found the medallion worth $500.–Village boards agreed to purchase trail property.–Bringing a gun within 1,000 feet of a school may be federal offense.–A fire at the Don Bjelland place south of Grantsburg destroyed a barn filled with sawdust.–Congressman Dave Obey liked it when the tribe announced spearing limitations.–The forestry program was in jeopardy said Charles Tollander.

Brought to you by

OLSEN & SON DRUG

Serving the community since 1882

24106 St., Hwy. 35 • Siren, WI Phone 715-349-2221 • Fax 715-349-7350

Tom Moore, Owner Brian Johnson - RPh

PAGE 6 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - MARCH 17, 2010

TOWN TALK/COUNTRY CHATTER Lewis

653-4281 Did you hate getting up Sunday morning in the dark? Good old spring-ahead daylight savings. Surprisingly, church attendance was good that day. It was Ethel Lane’s landmark 80th birthday, and she had requested no party but she was in for a surprise anyway. Family members came to church and enjoyed the service and fruit and a huge cake after the service. Good chance to visit over the coffee cups. The Coulter girls also had a birthday.

Earlier in the month birthdays of Gail Lane and Nicole Nelson were celebrated. Ann Nelson was home from Superior, and, Jessica and Brian Ford were also home. It was a happy occasion for Ethel and her family and friends. The Northwest Regional Writers met Friday at Sunrise Apartments, Frederic, with around 11 there plus a visitor who joined the group as a member. A lot of fun was had with the assignment “What is that?” The April assign-

Bernice Abrahamzon

ment is to write something humorous, perhaps about April Fool’s Day or something funny. The last of the Writers Club books are now on sale at the Leader office. The book was printed by the Leader staff. This week’s Lenten service will be held Wednesday at 7 p.m. at the Lewis church, preceded by a supper served by the men of the church. Members of the Lewis church are respon-

Siren Senior Center If you hadn’t noticed by now, the in-house diners and meals on wheels recipients didn’t get their hearty meat loaf on Monday as the menu stated. Due to refrigeration problems, liver and onions replaced the meat loaf dinner and the hearty meat loaf will be served on March 29. We’re happy to say a lot of folks crossed over our threshold this week. We had good attendance at Dime Bingo, 500 and Spades. Thirty-two people dined on Tuesday and 42 for Dining at Five. Laverne Chell was the winner of the monthly door prize at the evening dinner. CeCe also held an auction consisting of foodstuffs and managed to make several dollars for the Burnett County Humane Soci-

ety. Our donation box is still available for all who are interested in donating to our furry friends at the humane society. Please think of them when you are out and about doing your shopping, they really appreciate all the help they can get. The April Dining at Five dinner will be back on the usual first Thursday of the month, which is the first of April (no joke, folks). We have a new addition to our library thanks to Dave Wilhemy. For people who have poor vision or for any other reason, Dave brought in quite a selection of audiocassettes, which may be borrowed from the center. If anyone is interested, ask whoever are

Siren

349-2964 Just as I thought, this warm weather has brought those big black critters out and about earlier than usual. It has been said that a small 2-year-old has been seen in the Webster area, a sow and her three yearling cubs were spotted around the Grantsburg area and just this past Saturday, a 3-year-old or so boar has been seen in the Luck area. Watch out for your small dogs and your outside cats, these critters are hungry and will take almost anything. None have been seen so far out in bear country but we are prepared. The one I called Pee Wee will likely show up soon as he is usually the first to appear in the spring.

Fran Krause

in charge at the center and they will be able to assist you. Other donations this week were given by the Chattering Squirrel (hamburger buns and cole slaw) and some books on World War II from Dave Dayman. Winners at 500 this week were Darleen Groves, Anke Olesen, Marie Van Guilder, Gerry Vogel and Carl Link. Spade winners were Cora de’Jong, Gerry Vogel, Marie Bentley, Arvid Pearson and Clara Palomaki. Treats for the cardplayers were furnished by Marie Van Guilder and Marge Nyberg. Reminder, the Good Friday breakfast will be held in a few weeks so plan on coming out and having a really great meal. We will be

Last fall he was still the size of a large 2-yearold but had the same arrogance as a much larger boar. Stan and Erna Lueck stopped in last Monday for a visit at Bev Beckmark’s and dropped off a birthday card for her. Dorothy Lahners stopped in on Wednesday and they enjoyed visiting over tea and cookies. Even though it’s early, mark your calendars now so you don’t forget, the Siren seniors will once again be serving their annual Good Friday breakfast from 7 to 11 a.m. on Friday, April 2, at the center. This breakfast is one of the best around the area. Adults just $5 and

Orange

Congratulations to the Webster boys basketball team on a great season. They lost by one point to Eau Claire Regis in Somerset on Friday night. A large crowd from Webster attended the game. Fran Krause attended the basketball game and on Sunday went to the Home Show at the high school. Wednesday Fran attended the Sarah Circle meeting hosted by Ethel

SUV It appears that the most dangerous vehicle on the road is something the media calls an SUV. The genesis of the SUV moniker was a veiled attempt to portray trucks and vans as evil vehicles that caused accidents. They are the only vehicles that are involved in accidents. I haven’t read about any F150, Suburban, Charger, Hummer, Beetle, Mini Cooper, Corvette, Mustang, Mercedes or Buick involved in an accident in the past 10 years. Most accounts of vehicle accidents

Brooke Biedinger

Irregular

Columnist

LaVonne O'Brien

Daniels. With no school Friday, the Orange 4-H worked on their project for the cultural arts fair coming this weekend. Thursday John and Reeny Neinstadt visited Bud and Betty Flagstad in Bethel, Minn., Saturday night Mike and LaVonne O’Brien went to see Tylyn O’Brien in the play “Sleeping Beauty” put on by the Prairie Fire Theater at the Frederic Elementary School.

state that “SUV overturns in ditch, alcohol suspected.” They never mention how the SUV got the alcohol, but I suspect it’s either the 10-percent mix or E85. Everybody knows you can’t burn alcohol and drive. I think SUVs should be banned because they apparently use alcohol to propel them. Apparently, poor drivers also prefer the SUV because SUVs drive themselves. I’ve read and heard thousands of accounts that stated “SUV involved in crash” and most don’t have a driver, only passengers. I want to scream every time I hear about an SUV that has gone amok. I would like reports of vehicle accidents to be more comprehensive, like “Mini Cooper squashed by H1 Hummer; driver didn’t see Mini Cooper parked behind him.” I like living in a rural area because most people drive BATs and cars. My e-mail address is biedingerb@wildblue.net.

Academic news MINNEAPOLIS – Augsburg College has announced its dean’s list for the 2009 fall semester for its day college program. To qualify, a student must be full-time student and earn a grade-point average of 3.50 or higher.

The following is a local student who was named to the dean’s list: Holly Stoner of Frederic, an elementary education major and the daughter of Steve and Terri Stoner. – submitted

sible for working at the Frederic Food Shelf every Thursday in March. Mission Sunday next Sunday is also earmarked for donations for the food shelf. Please bring something to church for that. Where are this year’s pussy willow reports or first robin seen? Isn’t it about time? Hurrah! The snow is going, going, gone! Even if it snows a time or two now, it won’t last long!

Barb Munger serving from 7 to 11 a.m.; no reservations required, the cost is only $5 for adults and $3 for children 12 and under. Plans are also in the making for our firstannual 500 Card Party, which will be held on Saturday, May 1, at 2 p.m. All of you cardplayers out there pass the word, as this should be a great party, good prize money and door prizes. The center is open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily, Monday through Friday. For information call 715-349-7249 or to make a dinner reservation call 715-349-2845.

Bev Beckmark

kids under 12 eat for just $3. Hope to see you there. Sympathy to the family of Charles “Stretch” Tucker who passed away Feb. 27. Mark your calendars for Tuesday, March 30, as Our Redeemer Lutheran Church in Webster will be serving March’s Food and Friends community dinner from 5 to 6 p.m. Come early as the food goes fast. This is a free meal but donations are accepted. Congratulations to elementary student Abby Kosloski, middle-schooler Tiffany Jacobs and high-schooler Jamie Fischbach for being chosen Siren Schools students of the

week. Art and Bev Beckmark spent last Sunday in Cambridge, Minn., enjoying lunch and a winter family catch-up visit with her sister, Mary Lou Olson and husband, Mark. Art Beckmark spent last Saturday afternoon at the residence of J.D. Glover, southeast of Grantsburg, watching a chain-saw demo. About 50 people from Wisconsin, Iowa and Minnesota attended the event, some even participated. This is the fifth year for this event and it is put on by the Glover brothers J.D., Joel and Jon. Two chain saws were given away as prizes.

Cloverton-Markville

Fran Levings

320-242-3933

Maple syrup season has arrived in the little townships of Arna and New Dosey. Dave Fornengo, Markville, Minn., and his son Dave, Cloverton, Minn., and his brother Pete, Superior, have hung out over 100 sap-catching buckets so far. Dave Baker is being low-key this year. He plans to make some repairs on his fire pit and not put out as many buckets as in the past. The group of young syrup-makers from the Twin Cities that rents a “sugar bush” on state land off Hay Creek Road is back. They actually camp on the grounds and work around the clock making syrup. Patty Koehler and Bob Brewster joined the adventure last year by hanging out a few sapcatching buckets also. Awhile back, when the ground was still snow-covered, the young Fornengo men took their children on a long snowmobile journey up to Askov and Bruno. They took a break from the ride to have some pizza in Bruno. Dave Fornengo took his daughter Julia, while Jason brought Adam and Dominic. Joining in the fun was Dave’s brother Brian, Friesland. Marlene Mishler and Fran Levings attended the monthly meeting of the SevenCounty Senior Federation in Mora, Minn., last week. The group is making final plans for the annual convention in Moose Lake, Minn., next month. Marge and Al Wolf spent a week in Hast-

ings recently so they could attend the games of granddaughter Danielle’s hockey tourney. The team did well and 9-year-old Danielle made two goals. Sandi and Dave Drake had a wonderful time during their week’s vacation to Sedona, Ariz. Sedona is an arts community, so time was spent going through the various arts and crafts shops. A highlight of the trip was a 12hour bus tour of the Grand Canyon. The stop at a trading post for lunch was enjoyable also. Last Saturday, the Drakes went to Anoka, Minn., for a 50th birthday party for their daughter Patti and her husband, Dave Erickson. This was a surprise event hosted by Patti and Dave’s daughter Gracia. Deloris Schirmer made a trip into Askov and Sandstone, Minn., last week on errands. Granddaughter Bailey was in good hands last week when Cheryl and Gene Wickham went to the Cities to take care of her for four days. Cheryl hosted her weekly Bible study group after she returned. Gladys Nelson came over from Cloverdale to lead the discussion. Dave Baker went over to Minong, to join artists Steve Carlson (musician), Jeff Lewis (poet and painter), and Marty Pearson (potter) for their monthly get-together. Sing a little tune, wherever you are.

Dewey - LaFollette Karen and Hank Mangelsen visited Marlene and Bruce Swearingen Wednesday morning. That evening they called on Dick Quinton. Diana Mangelsen, Lida Nordquist, Marlene Swearingen, Ruth Rydberg, Kay Krentz, Karen Mangelsen and Mary Dunn were Thursday afternoon guests of Donna Hines. They enjoyed a time of visiting and playing cards. They also celebrated Diana’s birthday. Hank and Karen Mangelsen visited Bob and Pam Bentz Friday evening. Saturday visitors of Gerry and Donna Hines were Mark, Sue and Dianne Hines, Edgar,

Roxy and Jack Rodriguez and Donna Miller. Don and Lida Nordquist went to the play “Sleeping Beauty” in Frederic Saturday evening. Their granddaughter, Hannah Schott, was one of the actresses in the presentation. Weekend visitors of Karen and Hank Mangelsen were Larry, Celie, Baxter, Jake, Hannah and Grace Mangelsen and Dave and Mandy Close. Lida and Don Nordquist were guests at the home of their daughter and son-in-law, Joleen and Richard Funk, Sunday.

MARCH 17, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 7

TOWN TALK/COUNTRY CHATTER Hi, everybody! Blacky here from Humane Society of Burnett County. Well, I had to go and do it. I could not resist. I found something to roll in, and roll I did! I basked for an entire evening, sitting outside and letting the stench that was glued to my fur waft around and up into my nostrils. It was glorious! Then, I got a midnight scrub-down when my mom got home from work. She was not pleased, and it was rather humiliating getting my neck and ears scrubbed so hard right there out in the moonlight. I felt like a 5-year-old … errrr, wait. I am 5. Oh well, at least now I can come back inside the house. I’d better not do that again, though, until after the St. Patrick’s Day parade this Saturday in Webb Lake, or I’ll be sitting home all by myself. I’ve got all kinds of new friends to tell you about this week, so I’ll put stories of my odiferous self aside and get down to business. We’ve got puppies again at the shelter eight of them! I’ve known about them for a couple of weeks, but they were too little for people to visit yet so I had to keep mum. That was hard! They are so cute and cuddly that I wanted to shout from the rooftops, “Puppies!!” As I said, there are eight of them, and they’re all girls. They are yellow Lab and husky-mix pups, and there are four white pups and four black (mostly) ones.

Some have brown eyes and some have blue. They’re a mix, for sure, but they are all adorable and are now old enough to start being considered for adoption. They are a little over 8 weeks old now, and their names are Hannah, Lilly, Emma, Goldie, Anabelle, Cindy, Chloe and Polly. Not to be outdone, there are also older puppies YAPpenings some that have joined the ranks as well. Kaylee is a boxer/pit mix, and she is about 9 months old. She is very cute. Kaylee is almost all white except for one black ear and a black spot near one eye. If she was a boy, I bet they would have called her “Petey.” Kaylee didn’t come by herself to the shelter; her friend, Natalia, came along with her. Natalia is also around 9 months old, and she is a rott/husky mix. She is beautiful, with black and brown rott markings, and bright-blue husky eyes. She loves attention, and quietly cries if you talk to another dog. Next there’s Lyle. He looks to be the product of a

Blacky Shelter

Maxwell is a 4-yearold bichon-Maltese. He is a happy fellow with spunk and charm, the curly coat and tail of a bichon. Max is friendly and playful with dogs large and small, cats and young children. He requires regular grooming and light daily exercise. Max also needs a new caregiver who will continue the crate training we have begun at the shelter. He is house-trained for the most part, but needs a refresher course on proper indoor etiquette. He is used to a crate and so needs to be watched when you are home. Maxwell comes with a full set of instructions required to successfully relearn house-training. With consistent signals from you, he will

Arnell Humane Society Happy Tails

Await

beagle and a black-and-tan coonhound. It’s hard to say. Lyle was picked up between Siren and Lewis and is about 1 to 2 years old, although he acts a lot more mature and mellow. Gus is next on my list, and he is an adult yellow Lab - maybe 5 or 6 years old. He was found in the vicinity of Pike Lake Road and has an injury to a front leg. It’s not as bad as how Josef came to us, but I can tell it hurts him when he tries to run around. Finally, there is Carley. She was found in a Siren trailer park and brought to the shelter. Carley is a dainty English Springer spaniel mix, and she, too, is very, very cute. She’s about 4 months old, black, with a white nose, chest and feet. I tell you, if my own hair grows in any whiter, that will describe me before too long! I’ll have to change my name. Wow! That’s 13 new dogs if you add them all up. Luckily, two more of my friends got adopted last week, and that will help to make room for the newcomers. Keith, the beagle mix, went home last Friday, and so did my little buddy Josef. I was there when his new family came to pick him up. He was so excited that he almost forgot to say goodbye to me! If he had, I wouldn’t have been upset. There’s nothing that makes me happier than seeing one of my friends on “moving day,” because I know what it’s like when that day finally comes and someone takes you home

who’s going to love you forever. Even if you roll in a foul-smelling bonus! I was not handed a list of things we need this week, so I will just remind you that our spaghetti dinner fundraiser is coming up on Saturday, April 17, at the Siren Moose Lodge, and this week I do have the times and prices. The dinner goes from 4:30 until 7:30 p.m., and besides spaghetti and garlic toast, there will be goodies galore! The cost is $8 for adults, and $6 if you’re under 15. You can still purchase raffle tickets up until the dinner also, if they aren’t all gone before then. The drawing will be held at the dinner. You still have time to donate a new item or your service to the silent auction that will be happening at the fundraiser, too. My friends at the shelter do all kinds of things to help our furry friends and are counting on your support. Well, that’s about all the news I have for you this week. Besides, there’s a new tree rat in my backyard, and he is a bad hombre. I’ll tell you about him next week. Now, he’s in my woodpile and I need to run him out of town. With the help of my brother, of course. We’re a team. Take care, everyone, and I’ll see you at the parade! HSBC is saving lives, one at a time. www.hsburnettcty.org, 715-866-4096.

reprogram and make a great family pet. Adoptions were fast and furious last week. It is amazing how the Internet gets dogs and cats adopted. No sooner are the newest arrivals added to Petfinder.com and the phone begins to ring. The Web site, arnellhumane.org, is updated with new adoptables approximately every two weeks or as the number of new pets requires. Not all of the pets at Arnell are available for adoption as all strays must wait seven days to give their owner a chance to reclaim them. After the seven days, pictures are taken, edited and a brief description written to add them to the adoptable roster on our Web site and Petfinder.com. Surrendered pets are available for adoption after a brief “get to know me” period lasting three to seven days, so the staff can reliably recommend a pet for potential adopters. Pets needing medical or behavior

help may stay a little longer to ensure that they are healthy and ready to make a good impression in their new homes. Maxwell has been at Arnell since Feb. 17 as a surrendered pet, receiving refresher crate training and daily walks. The annual Arnell garage sale fundraiser is scheduled for Saturday, May 22. Anyone wishing to support the shelter by donating lightly used practical items and too-good-tothrow-out treasures should start collecting now. Donations for the garage sale will be accepted at the shelter May 1 through May 21. No clothing or TVs can be accepted. Please call ahead to donate large items – furniture, boats, cars. The Arnell garage sale is a major fundraiser for the shelter. We look forward to putting your donated treasures to good use for the animals. Arnell Memorial Humane Society, Amery, 715-268-7387 or online at arnellhumane.org.

St. Croix Falls Rotary Students of the Month

The St. Croix Falls Rotary Club is pleased to announce the March 2010 Rotary Club Students of the Month from St. Croix Falls and Osceola, Katie Burns of St. Croix Falls and Cera Nelson of Osceola. Shown in photo at left are Katie Burns, Matt Beversdorf, most influential teacher, and Terry Hawkins, Rotary president. In the photo at right, Cera Nelson is shown with Sara Henke and Terry Hawkins, Rotary president. - Photos submitted

Births Born at Osceola Medical Center:

A girl, Abbigail Rose Huttner, born March 4, 2010, to Mara Bloom and Eric Huttner, Centuria. Abbigail weighed 5 lbs., 15-1/2 oz. ••• A girl, Cosette Lucia McKeen, born March 6, 2010, to Heather and Alan McKeen, Bloomer. Cosette weighed 7 lbs., 5 oz. •••

Born at St. Croix Regional Medical Center:

A boy, Bryson Greene McKenzie, born March 9, 2010, to Kelly Sandman and Ryan McKenzie, Milltown. Bryson weighed 8 lbs., 5 oz. ••• A girl, Eliannah Luella-Kay Lade, born March 4, 2010, to Leah and Zachary Lade, Grantsburg. Eliannah weighed 7 lbs., 7 oz. •••

A boy, Cassidy Lee Gasper, born March 10, 2010, to Brittany Roth and Shane Gasper, Turtle Lake. Cassidy weighed 7 lbs., 11 oz. ••• A boy, Jonah Gordon Richter, born March 5, 2010, to David and Julie Richter, Luck. Jonah weighed 8 lbs., 6 oz. ••• A boy, Kale Williams Tober, born March 9, 2010, to Keith and Jennifer Tober, Milltown. Kale weighed 8 lbs., 2 oz. ••• A boy, Wilfred James Chatelois VI, born March 5, 2010, to Wilfred V and Amy Chantelois, Osceola. Wilfred weighed 7 lbs., 13 oz. •••

Frederic Senior Center by Ardyce Knauber Spades was played on Monday, March 8, with the following winners: Carl Link in first place, Willis Williams in second place, Donald Danielson in third place and Shirley Sandquist in fourth place. Tuesday several of our group enjoyed dime Bingo at Siren Senior Center. Wednesday and Friday the Pokeno players enjoyed their time together. Thursday 500 cards was played at 6:30

p.m. with the following winners: Larry Anderson in first place, Phyllis Peterson in second place, Shirley Sandquist in third place and Barb Munger in fourth place. Edna Utley and Elinor Bonneville have entered the Frederic Nursing Home Care Center and Ralph Lurek is also a resident there. We will have no buffet on Saturday, March 20. Instead, there will be a pancake breakfast from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., put on by the Frederic Police Department. A $2 donation is appreciated.

Check out the Leader ’s E-edition a t w w w. t h e - l e a d e r. n e t

PAGE 8 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - MARCH 17, 2010

TOWN TALK/COUNTRY CHATTER Burnett Community Library

Federal and state tax forms are available on the lower level of the library.

August.

National Library Week

• “The Lighthouse Keeper’s Daughter” by Colleen Coble • “The Hawk and the Dove” by Penelope Wilcock • “Split Image” by Robert B. Parker • “Apple Turnover Murder” by Joanne Fluke • “Fantasy in Death” by J.D. Robb • “Big Girl” by Danielle Steel • “Aunt Dimity Down Under” by Nancy Atherton • “Ink Death” by Cornelia Funke (young adult) • “House Rules” by Jodi Picoult • “The Yellow House” by Patricia Falvey

Here are some of the activities we are planning: • Food for Fines Amnesty – the library will forgive $1 worth of fines for every can or box of non-perishable food brought to the library during National Library Week. All food items will be donated to the local food pantry. • Culver’s Coloring Contest for kids 11 and under – when the coloring sheet is returned to the library the kids will receive a certificate for a free Culver’s ice-cream cone. There will also be a random drawing for two prizes. • There will be a drawing for adults for a free gift certificate to a local restaurant. • We are having a contest to guess how many books we have in our library’s collection.

Preschool story hour

Story hour meets every Wednesday morning at 10:30 a.m. The library staff enjoyed the company of the Hertel Headstart children this week and they plan to visit us every Wednesday for a story.

Adult book club

The book club meets at 10 a.m. on the fourth Tuesday of each month on the lower level of the Burnett Community Library. March 23 will be the next meeting of the discussion group. We will be reading “Our Town,” by Thornton Wilder, as a part of the Big Read event. If you need a copy of the book, please call me at the library and I will order a copy for you. Everyone is welcome! The Friends of the Library are revising and expanding the “Wild Rice Cookbook” published several years ago, and we would like your help. If you have any cranberry or blueberry recipes that you would like considered for publication in the revised cookbook, please send them to verla@umn.edu (please put “wild rice cookbook” in the subject line), or mail them to: Verla Johansson, 29937 S. Nicaboyne Lake Rd., Webb Lake, WI 54830. Plans for the new library facility are moving ahead. It looks like construction could start in

New adult fiction books

New adult nonfiction books

• “The Politician” by Andrew Young • “Elder Rights and Benefits” by CWAG • “A Consumer Guide to Elder Rights and Benefits” by CWAG • “Mastering the Art of French Cooking” by Julia Child • “Making Rounds With Oscar” by David Dosa

New audio books

• “Split Image” by Robert B. Parker

New DVDs

• “Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince” • “The Time Traveler’s Wife”

Juvenile books

• “I Promise I’ll Find You” by Heather Patricia Ward • “Tired Trucks” by Melinda Melton Crow • “Mighty Machines Picture Puzzles” by Matt Bruning • “Duck Goes Potty” by Michael Dahl (board book) • “When the Library Lights Go Out” by Megan McDonald • “Tiberius Goes to School” by Keith Harvey • “Let’s Take Care of Our New Rabbit” by Berta Garcia Sabates • “Noisy Books” by Paul Harrison • “Yes We Can” by President Barack Obama

Engagement

• “Jedi Adventures- Star Wars: The Clone Wars” by Heather Scott • “Horrid Harry Tricks the Tooth Fairy” by Francesca Simon • “I Spy Little Hearts” by Jean Marzollo (board book) • “Happy Valentine’s Day, Mouse!” by Laura Numeroff (board book) • “Lola at the Library” by Anna McQuinn (board book) • “Duck and Goose Find a Pumpkin” by Tad Hills (board book) • “Dora and the Rainy Day” by Jessica Echeverria (board book) • “Dora’s Summer Parade” by Wendy Wax (board book) • “Extreme Rescue Dolphin Mission” by Erica David (graphic novel) • “Wiggle and Waggle” by Caroline Arnold • “The Silver Horse Switch” by Alison Lester • “ On the Farm” by Victoria Taylor • “Marley’s Big Adventure” by John Grogan • “Belle” by Elizabeth Mills • “Bedtime Kiss for Little Fish” by Lorie Ann Grover (board book) • “Beatrice Doesn’t Want To” by Laura Numeroff • “The Adventures of an Aluminum Can” by Alison Inches • “The Adventures of a Plastic Bottle” by Alison Inches • “Chester” by Melanie Watt • “Dinosaurs Galore: A Roaring Pop-Up” by Paul and Henrietta Stickland • “26 Big Things Small Hands Do” by Coleen Paratore • “Dirt On My Shirt” by Jeff Foxworthy • “Diego’s Arctic Rescue” by Erica David • “Wolves of the Beyond: Lone Wolf” by Kathryn Lasky • “The World Almanac for Kids 2010” by Robert Famighetti

Hours and information:

Monday-Thursday 10 a.m. – 7 p.m.; Friday 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. For more information, contact the library at 715866-7697, Web site: http://webster.wislib.org. catalog: Online http://merlin.nwls.lib.wi.us/search.

Michaud/Scheumann Ashlee Faith Michaud of Charlestown, N.H. and Jeremiah Floyd Scheumann of Webster, along with their parents, Mitch and Gina Michaud of Charlestown, N.H., and Leroy and Joyce Scheumann of Isanti, Minn., are pleased to announce their engagement. Ashlee graduated from the Honor Academy in 2006 and Jeremiah graduated from Scheumann Home School in 2004 and Northwestern College in 2006 with a bachelor's degree and 2008 with a master's degree in theological studies. The bride-to-be is employed at Michaud’s Cleaning Service. The groom-to-be in employed at Webster First Baptist as a youth pastor. The couple plan to be married on Aug. 14, 2010, at Christ Community Church in Planfield, N.H., with Craig Johnson and Leroy Scheumann officiating the ceremony. – submitted

Upcoming class series focuses on medicinal herbs LUCK – Luck Community Education is excited to offer a series of classes throughout April and May that will focus on identifying and using medicinal herbs. The instructor, H. Leah Wolfe, MPH, is a community herbalist with a background in behavioral health research and community organizing for health. She completed a master’s degree in public health at Portland State University and studied herbalism at the Elderberry School of Botanical Medicine. Wolfe is a member of Mutual Aid Street Medics, an organization that teaches basic first aid and provides medical support during emergency situations and convergences. Wolfe is also the founder of The Serpentine Project, http://serpentine-project.org, an educational endeavor to protect and cultivate medicinal plants and traditional approaches to healing. Each class is held from 6-8 p.m., and class fee is $12. Contact Amy Aguado at Luck Community Ed at 715-472-2152, ext.

103, or e-mail: amya@lucksd.k12.wi.us to preregister for one, some, or all of the classes listed below. Spring Detox - Tuesday, April 6 Many of those early green leaves are plucked by bears to stimulate and detox the system after that long winter sleep. Learn how to use herbal medicine to help your body adjust to the change in season. Growing Medicinal Plants - Tuesday, April 13 Learn how to grow medicinal plants in your backyard or on your farm including easy-to-grow medicinals, at-risk plants and indigenous plants. Backyard Medicine - Tuesday, April 20 Learn more about the plants that are already in your garden. And, most importantly, learn how to embrace “weeds” as some of the most useful medicines available to us everywhere we go. Protecting At-Risk Medicinal Plants Tuesday, April 27 Meet the plants that need our help as

70th-annual membership meeting of WESTconsin Credit Union WESTERN WISCONSIN – WESTconsin Credit Union invites all accountholders (members) to its 70th-annual membership meeting to be held on Tuesday, March 30, at 7 p.m. at the Menomonie High School auditorium. This is an opportunity for all members to share in the accomplishments and decisions of their financial institution. A complimentary meal will be served before the meeting from 5:30 to 6:45 p.m. in the high school’s large cafeteria. The meeting will consist of the election of two directors, complete reports, door prizes and entertainment. Members are asked to bring a nonperishable food item or paper product for the Interfaith Food Pantry.

WESTconsin Credit Union has been serving members since 1939, and membership is open to anyone who lives or works in the Wisconsin counties of Barron, Buffalo, Burnett, Chippewa, Dunn, Eau Claire, Pepin, Pierce, Polk, Rusk, St. Croix, Sawyer, Trempealeau or Washburn, or the Minnesota counties of Chisago, Dakota, Goodhue or Washington, with a $5 minimum deposit in a Membership Savings Account. Credit unions are financial institutions owned by their accountholders, and member funds are federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration up to at least $250,000. - submitted

much as we need theirs. Find out how to preserve habitat, cultivate and ethically gather these important medicines. Tree Medicine - Tuesday, May 4 The forest canopy holds medicine of its own. Learn how to use and make medicine

from Northeastern trees. Herbal First Aid - Tuesday, May 11 Learn about kitchen herbs, garden weeds, and other herbal remedies for minor first aid injuries and illnesses. - submitted

THANK YOU

Friends of Mary Yambrick would like to thank all who gave so generously for the benefit on Sunday. What a blessing to see so many people come and share in this special day. We thank each one of you for making the event successful. Small towns really do have big hearts! Thank you to all who contributed gifts, time, talent and money. Moms For Kids United Methodist Church Bethany Lutheran Church Thrivent Assembly of God Church The Lodge at Crooked Lake music by: Lori and Web Macommber Jay Stackhouse Intensive Care Brad Alden and The Crossed Paths Band Boy Scouts Siren Girls Basketball Team SHE Club Siren Methodist Youth Group Chuck’s Garage Yourchuck’s True Value Hardware Big Mike’s The Pizza Place Affordable Auto Sales In Style Salon Nouveau Salon and Day Spa The Pet Store The Bargain Bin Mary’s Friends in Mary Kay Parker Hannifin Corp. Flying Blue Wood Products Hometown PC Bethany Lutheran Quilters Bremer Bank U.S. Bank Furniture & Flooring Outpost Custom Cycles Austin Lake Greenhouse Best Western Jake & Holly Mangelsen Christmas Valley Quilting Company Main Street Cafe Arlene Elliot Rene Ones Kaefer Family Dentistry

Peggy’s Fashion Rack The D’Jock Families Tim D’Jock Jackpine Siren Blanket and Scarves The Leader Office Hot Stuff Pizza Nancy Anderson Main Attraction Got Nails Madden’s Steakhouse Kris’ Pheasant Inn Auto Stop Johnson Lumber Pour House The Tap Larry’s LP Adventures Restaurant Kinetico Water North States Industries Inc. The Gallery North Wind Arts Jenneman’s Hardware Hank Siren National Siren Telephone Company Siren Floral Dairy Queen Little Mexico American Family Insurance Earth Energy Vasatka Motor Express Kelly’s Day Care Hedlund Gas Burnett Co. Family Resource Blue Collar Sales & Service Fishbowl Insurance Agency Tom and Sandy Sterger Arlan and Pat Pope Laurie Bakkum Debbie Jaskolka Maynard Mangelsen Karen Huebschman Dawn Straub

Gene Olson Brian McBroom Jeanette Laqua Dayton Daniels Pastor Tom & Jane Cook Carl & Cheryl Mangelsen Annabelle Pearson Shirley Bloom Karleen Braun Barb Carlson Carrie, Stacey Jenna, Angela Shara Stewart Harold and Donna Brackin Diane Tewalt Wally and Rose Nelson Leo Maslow Best Shot Photo Judy Engstrom Syren General Store Doug and Laura Coyour Jeanne Taczala Karen Howe Sharon D’Jock Lisa Douglas Tina Erickson Becky Strabel John and LaVonne Boyer Kara Alden Bernice Abrahamzon Donis Taylor Gordie & Angie Chelmo Cherie Fischer Frank and Ginger Baker Steve and Gail Ward Wendy Larson Judy Roe Ruth Stickland Rich Hutchison Janet Thomas Heather O’Brien Kingsway Bible and Gifts.

Thank you to the many anonymous donors and to anyone we may have missed.

Friends of Mary Yambrick

506846 19ap Lp

MARCH 17, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 9

Raconteurs, werewolves and will-o’-the-wisps The French term raconteur refers to the once important niche of storyteller. All during the settlement of French Canada and especially as voyageurs and fur traders expanded their canoe routes across the continent, one finds reference to the value placed on good singers and skilled storytellers. Singers could of course set out the canoe rhythms via the pace of their tunes, while jaunty choruses allowed the paddlers (sometimes four – eight men per 25-foot birch bark canoe) to stroke in unison and establish an energetic flow. Storytellers, on the other hand, could while away the incredibly long nights once a winter trading area such as the Folle Avoine country was reached. Because of geography, the fur trade routes in and out of the area favored those stretching from the Great Lakes and beyond, back to the St. Lawrence River in the east. Recruiting from the

Folle Avoine Chronicles Woodswhimsy the gnome French colonial areas of Quebec and Montreal, it was a given that many of the crews were predominantly of French Canadian ancestry. Thus many of the tales told (and the songs sung) can actually be traced back hundreds of years to old France. Around a roaring fire, with the bitter wind howling ‘bout the cracks in the log-sided walls, one can almost see, can almost hear, a skilled raconteur as he held his audience spellbound, repeating stories he had learned as a child in French Canada. These traditional tales were often given a local setting to make them more humorous or frightening. Sometimes the stories were told about actual people, but often fictional names

I could not wait to write this article.

I have to tell you what happened. On Saturday, March 6, at 7:30 a.m., 15 men and boys showed up at our house to cut wood. Interfaith Caregivers had three semi-truck loads of 10-foot logs that had to be cut and split and stacked so they could dry for next winter’s Heat-AHome project. They brought their saws with looooong chains and their skid steer and their sons and got to work. By 11:30 they were ready to go to lunch and the entire three piles were cut. Of course, the cookies I made kept them going. Actually, they barely stopped for a break long enough to have a cookie. These guys were from Wisconsin and Minnesota. Some had driven halfway across the state of Minnesota to be here. There is a Web site, Arborist.com, and one of the blogs is about cutting wood for charity. Mike Peterson and J.D. Glover from Grantsburg put the word out and they came and got the job done. They are cutting wood somewhere else this weekend and it is going to be given to Interfaith Caregivers. These men and boys were terrific.

I read the blog and on the third or fourth page they mentioned the Log Cabin and the great food and the good people of Danbury. This is giving, this is donating your time and energy to see that people will have Blodgett heat for their homes next winter. We can’t meet all the needs, but we can try. I remembered when we moved here, Denny was cutting wood for us and our fireplace. Then he thought he might sell some and the piles grew and grew. I said that was fine as long as he did not take away the scenery. Today the scenery is cut and stacked wood. We no longer sell wood, we give it to people who cannot afford to heat their homes. After the energy assistance money is gone that is when we step in. We don’t

Barb

Caregivers

Gifts

Thank You

HAPPY SWEET SIXTEEN NBC!

507034 30Lp

boats, or...? But in voyageur folklore, what he was experiencing was the specters known as feu follets, will-o’the-wisps – those whitish, swirling glows of ethereal eeriness around marshes and waterways said in olden times to lure travellers to their deaths, or at least into precarious situations. While in this case the voyageur merely lost his hat in the river (later retrieved), in fur trade times the story would have easily been turned into one of superstitious layerings involving ghosts and goblins, good and bad spirits, the devil (and his disguises), and on and on and on and on and on. Modern people smile at these stories but one wonders if something besides curiosity has been lost in the demise of storytelling. Perhaps places like Forts Folle Avoine will help re-create, if nothing else, at least an appreciation for the long-lost art of the raconteur.

always have enough, but we provide to as many as possible. This year Interfaith Caregivers had enough donations to buy two loads of wood. Another load was donated by a wonderful couple from Minnesota. We are so blessed to be able to do this. OK, now I will calm down. This has been such a big event to us, my blood pressure was rising. Now I have to slow down and take a deep breath and move on to other things. Here is another thing. I know it is early and I will mention it again and again, but we are having our annual Memorial Day rummage sale, but we are doing it the weekend before Memorial Day. There are so many that day that we hoped to get ahead of the game. We will need donations, but not yet. Give us a couple of weeks to figure out where everything will go and then bring what you want to donate. This year there will be a freewill offering for some things but some things will be marked. You will read this after St. Patrick’s Day and I will have cooked our traditional corned beef and cabbage and I will still be airing out the house to get

the cabbage smell out. There are some foods that when cooked leave an aroma in the house that seems to linger forever. My father-in-law loves onions with his eggs in the morning. For some reason the smell permeates whatever I am wearing. I once took a lady to the hospital in Grantsburg and she mentioned she realized I had onions for breakfast. Speaking of smells, my favorites are, of course, chocolate, fresh bread, a baby after a bath, gardenias, lily of the valley, and White Shoulders. You know, the perfume. My mother always wore it and I can smell it in a church full of people if only one lady is wearing it. Well maybe not that much and I probably am smelling my perfume and not someone else’s. I love the smell of new-mown grass, but my allergies don’t let me smell that too much. And, oh yes, Denny’s cologne. I know he changes it but I always love the smell. Maybe it is because I buy it for him and I buy what I like.

Signed, Woodswhimsy

Until next time. Blessings, Barb

A variety of insurance for the variety in your life. Auto. Home. Business. Health. Life. Farm/Ranch. We offer it all under one roof.® Call me today for coverage that fits all your needs.

Thank you for all the cards, well-wishes, visits, food and prayers during my illness. I really appreciate everything.

Brenton Thompson

or nicknames were used, especially with the more universally told stories. Many refer to the supernatural, and are full of references to goblins (lutins), will-o’-the-wisps (feu follets) and werewolves (loup garous). Flying canoes – omens of death – also appear in many tales, as do references to the devil or other evil beings. Of course, in tribal areas the tales of French origin became mixed with tales told by natives. Stories to listen to in front of the fire, and then recall as one crawled into one’s blanket or curled up in a bedroll on the floor. Nowadays such stories are easily laughed off by some; this wasn’t at all the case in cultures where nature, folklore and fantastic tales wove a tight embrace around people’s daily lives. Will-o-the-wisps still factor into the modern story of Forts Folle Avoine. Seems there was this voyageur fellow last summer who, after socializing some following one of the fur trade re-enactments held there, was lured into the Yellow River at night by what he was sure were lights. In modern terms, he of course must have been seeing lights from houses along the riverbank; or

*Some products not available in every state.

American Family Mutual Insurance Company and its Subsidiaries American Family Insurance Company Home Office – Madison, WI 53783 amfam.com

506771 30L

©2008

002136 – Rev. 11/08

Richard P. Tims, Agency 24996 State Road 35 Siren, WI 54872 715-349-2239 Bus. rtims@amfam.com

504778 14-21ap 25-32Lp

We Love You!

Mom, Grandma & 507098 Haley 30Lp

C & J MINI STORAGE Milltown, WI

25.00 35.00 $ 10x16.............. 40.00 $ 10x20.............. 45.00 $ 10x24.............. 50.00 $ 10x40.............. 90.00 $

5x10................

$

10x10..............

Call 1-800-919-1195 or 715-825-2335 & 715-646-2777 445914 eves. 9a,dtfc 20Ltfc

507137 30L

PAGE 10 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - MARCH 17, 2010

Highlighted friendship Katie was a first-grader when she and Melanie first started doing things together. She was full of spunk and attitude – a perfect match for Melanie’s easygoing, humorous outlook on life. Ten years later, the same spunk, attitude, and easygoing humor exist, this time as an 11th-grade young lady and her mentor sit down to talk about their match. The two girls find much to do together, but when asked which is their favorite, “food” unanimously came out of their mouths, followed by a round of laughter. Jokingly, they said some of their success in lining up fun things to do together was in finding things that Gene, Melanie’s husband, doesn’t enjoy doing, perhaps giving it a bit of that girlfriends feel. Some of these things in-

clude shopping, seeing a good movie, and going out to eat. Most recently their times have together weighted heavily around college visits and searching out information on the Web. Katie is looking to pursue a degree in early childhood education, specializing in special education. She says that Melanie is her go-to person whenever academics are the issue. “Melanie pushes me to do better and gives me a whole different view on things.” Katie has a great relationship with her mom, but says that there are just times that it is easier to listen to Melanie than to Mom. This match thrives on sharing interests, knowledge and personal strengths. One of the things that makes their

Kinship of Polk County

SCRMC's Ted Smith to retire March 31 ST. CROIX FALLS - Born and raised on a dairy farm in Roberts, Ted Smith went to Asbury College in Wilmore, Ky., where he met his wife, Loretta. The two were married in 1968. Ted soon began studying to be a pastor, working as a student pastor in three churches in addition to being in school full time. When the Smith’s young son, Chris, became critically ill, Ted put his seminary training on hold and was never able to return to school. After his son’s recovery, Smith took a position at Norlake Industries, a commercial refrigeration company in Hudson, where he worked for eight years. He spent the next three years as pastor in a Christian Fellowship Center in Centuria and then, in December 1989, he joined St. Croix Regional Medical Center’s materials management department, where he’s worked ever since. “I’ve been continually amazed at how our medical center has just continued to grow every year, in physical size and in the number of employees,” he said. “We have three clinics now, and a new surgery center. It’s hard to remember that 20 years ago, this was a much smaller organization.” When asked about important or striking changes he’s seen over the years, Smith said he’s most noticed “the continual positive growth in employee and employer mutual respect, as well as the continuing improvement in the medical center’s physical plant/campus. It’s gratifying,” he noted, “to have been part of an organization that’s really doing a good job helping people. I have no regrets … SCRMC has been a wonderful place to work.” Ted and Loretta will celebrate their 43rd wedding anniversary this June, and now both are retired. “Chris, our son, lives in Honolulu and just loves it there,” said Ted. “He’s working at The Willows restaurant and finishing his education.”

Ted Smith will retire March 31 from St. Croix Regional Medical Center's materials management department. – Photo submitted As for his future, Ted says that he and Loretta would first like to travel to Hawaii to see their son. Their daughter, Becky, works in a medical clinic in New Richmond, and is completing a degree to become a physical therapist. Her son, Josh, their grandson, is 13 years old and attending school in Osceola. “We also started a nondenominational church in Osceola,” said Smith, “so we’re sure we’ll be busy with that work, too.” When asked to think of one unforgettable experience at SCRMC, Ted said, “Frankly, I feel that my whole 20-plus years here has been unforgettable. I’ve been blessed with some wonderful friendships acquired over the years. I have many fond memories and I will always be thankful for the opportunity to work at SCRMC with all the wonderful staff there.” - from SCRMC

Mina Copeland Head Starts visits grocery store The children and staff from Mina Copeland Head Start recently made a trip to Wayne’s Foods Plus in Webster. After a tour with Brenda, the children used their grocery lists to buy food for the center. For more information on the Head Start program please call 715-866-4867. - Special photo

Katie and Melanie. - Special photo match great is their ability to learn from one another. “Just the other day,” Melanie said, “Katie was helping me learn to use Photoshop. We had a great time putting our heads on my cat or putting my cat on the Taj Mahal.” Melanie also credits Katie for keeping her up to date on popular lingo. Their match has taken them through

Feeling stretched caring for a loved one? Attend Powerful Tools for Caregivers class Learn how to bring balance into your life as you care for someone you love, whether they are elderly or an adult with disabilities. Powerful Tools for Caregivers is an educational series designed to provide you with the tools you need to take care of yourself. This program will help family caregivers: reduce stress, improve self-confidence, better communicate their feelings, balance their lives, and increase ability to make tough decisions and locate helpful resources. Classes consist of six 2-1/2-hour sessions, held once a week. Two class leaders, Karen Krupa from Interfaith Caregivers and Nancy Reeves from

many grades, hairstyles and phases of life, and for them that has been part of the magic. What have been some of the best things being a part of Kinship of Polk County? Melanie responded, “We have enjoyed the benefits that some generous local businesses have offered to Kinship matches and have had fun at the variety of Kinship-sponsored events. And, as Katie became older, it became helpful to chat with other mentors and share the experience.” Punctuated with, “It has been fun to watch her grow up,” Katie added, “I am proud to be in the Kinship program. Whenever people ask me about it, I tell them to do it – it is great!” For more information on how to get involved, contact Kinship of Polk County at 715-268-7980 or visit their Web site at www.polkkinship.org.

Aging will conduct each session. Interactive lessons, discussions and brainstorming will Polk County help you take the tools you choose and put them into action for your life. There is a nominal fee of $15 for program materials. Each participant will receive a free $25 book, “The Caregiver Helpbook,” provided by a grant from the St. Croix Falls and Taylors Falls Rotary. Classes will be held from 1 - 3:30 p.m., at the Government Center in Conference Rooms A and B. Sessions will be held Thursdays, March 25, April 1, 8, 15, 22 and 29. For more information or to register by March 19 deadline, contact Polk County Aging Programs at 715-485-8599. - submitted

Interfaith Caregivers

of

Free courses offered to seniors ST. CROIX FALLS – The St. Croix Falls Public Library and Good Samaritan Society – St. Croix Valley are partnering to sponsor Senior College – Spring 2010. This opportunity is provided by The Evangelical Lutheran Good Samaritan Society in conjunction with Southwest Minnesota State University and Minnesota West Community and Technical College in Marshall, Minn. Four courses, each 12 hours long, are being offered to area seniors free of charge. Each course will be facilitated by a Good Samaritan staff member, and presented by college level instructors via video presentations. Take advantage of these new lifetime learning opportunities. • These courses are offered at no cost to seniors. • Senior College courses are taught by experienced instructors. • The point of these classes is to learn and have fun. • Classes are being held in your community at the new St. Croix Falls Public Library and at the Forest Heights Apartments in St. Croix Falls. • You can attend classes with your friends. • Enjoy classroom discussions and debate. • Questions or comments for the in-

structors, simply send them an e-mail. • Never been on a computer? Course facilitators will be there to help. • Enjoy benefits of classroom learning without leaving your community. Interested seniors may pick one or all of the courses below. Course 1 - Parables of Jesus: Ancient Wisdom for a 21st Century Faith Thursdays, April 22, 29, May 6, 13, 20, 27; Time 1 – 3 p.m.; Location: Forest Heights Apartments – 408 Tower Road – St. Croix Falls, WI Course 2 - Current Events at Home and Abroad Mondays, April 19, 26, May 3, 10, 17, 24; Time 1 – 3 p.m.; Location: St. Croix Falls Public Library Course 3 - Active Aging: Health and Wellness for Seniors Tuesdays, April 20, 27, May 4, 11, 18, 25; Time 1 – 3 p.m.; Location: St. Croix Falls Public Library Course 4 - Family and Local History Wednesdays, April 21, 28, May 5, 12, 19, 26; Time 1 – 3 p.m.; Location: St. Croix Falls Public Library For more information and to register please call: Sarah Adams at the St. Croix Falls Public Library 715-483-1777 or Ginger LaMotte at Good Samaritan Society – St. Croix Valley 715-483-2720. - submitted

Wisconsin Interstate Park Nature story time ST. CROIX FALLS - Join naturalist Julie Fox at 10 a.m. on Thursdays through March at the Ice Age Center at Wisconsin Interstate Park for a story and activity chosen especially for preschoolers and their parents. Please bring clothing for outdoor play (weather permitting).

Interstate Park is located in St. Croix Falls on Hwy. 35, just 1/2 mile south of Hwy. 8. Nature story time is free of charge, but a state park sticker is required to enter the park. For more information call Julie at 715-483-3747. - from Interstate Park

MARCH 17, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 11

"Sleeping Beauty" presented by Frederic students FREDERIC – Prairie Fire Children’s Theater teamed up with local students to present an original musical version of the classic tale “Sleeping Beauty,” on Friday and Saturday, March 12 and 13 at the Frederic elementary school. The play was written by PFCT Associate Director Megan K. Pence and actor Daniel Stock. This version of the story takes place on a movie set where everything seems to go wrong, but Sleeping Beauty can save the day if she wakes up. There was a full house both nights. It was a great success.

RIGHT: Jenna Laqua, Karl Pederson and Kendra Mosay were part of the movie crew in “Sleeping Beauty,” presented last Friday and Saturday at Frederic. - Special photos

Some of the cast members of “Sleeping Beauty”: Back row: Zach Peterson, Isabel Lexen, Ashley Bergeron, Karl Pederson, Kendra Mosay, Ian Lexen, Ben Kurkowski, Cathryn McConnell and Frankie Knuf. Middle row: Olivia Schauls, Trent Nefarious T Ne’er-do-well, the vilAlexis Hufstedler, Jenna Laqua, Chris Kuechenmesiter, Austin Ennis and Leopold Chenal. Front row: Kuechenmeister, lian, was played by Chris KuechenKayla Nelson and Marissa Olby-Nelson as Sleeping Beauty. mesiter.

“Sleeping Beauty” cast members also included: Back: Abbey Pickard, Allison Anderson, Isabelle Burton, Jamie Taft, Tylyn O’Brien, Bailey Hufstedler. Front: Tatyana Abasheva, AJ Kurkowski, Kinzie Matz, Ann Chenal, Olivia Tuynman.

Haley Ennis played a sheep in Prairie Fire Children’s Theatre performance of “Sleeping Beauty.”

PAGE 12 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - MARCH 17, 2010

Siren’s St. Patrick's parade • 2010

Even though the St. Pat’s Day parade in Siren wasn’t a long one Saturday, The champion Burnett Blizzard Bantam team rode on a float during the St. kids were able to scoop up some candy thrown out to them. This candy Pat’s Day parade in Siren Saturday, March 13. The Wisconsin State Hockey Peewee 3B Tournament was going on all day March 13 and 14 in The Lodge thrower was riding on the unit sponsored by Starwire Technologies, Webster. – Photos by Nancy Jappe Center Arena, Siren.

Lucy, an 8-month Maltipoo owned by Cait Skjeie, Lake Mills, Iowa, cuddled up to keep warm against Each year for the last many years, members of the Saint Paul Winter Carnival royalty and their attendthe cold wind that was blowing during the St. Pat’s ing Vulcans have paid a visit to Siren the Saturday preceeding St. Patrick’s Day. Saturday, March 13, was Parade in Siren Saturday, March 13. no exception, with carnival royalty and Vulcans walking the parade route down Main Street, to the delight of many watchers.

Vulcans from the St. Paul Winter Carnival waltzed down the parade route in Siren Saturday, March 13, leaving their green Vulcan-V sign on St. Pat’s Day parade watchers.

Green necklaces were handed out by St. Paul Winter Carnival Vulcans during their trip down the parade route in Siren this past Saturday.

MARCH 17, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 13

Siren’s St. Patrick's parade • 2010 LEFT: King Boreas Rex LXXIV from the St. Paul Winter Carnival, Arthur Blakey Jr., and his Queen of the Snows, Gretchen Spicer, led the group of carnival visitors who traveled to Siren Saturday, March 13, for the village’s annual St. Patrick’s Day parade. The carnival royalty are treated to lunch at the Pour House before the parade, which is where this photo was taken.

Photos by Nancy Jappe

The Prince of the West Wind from the St. Paul Winter Carnival stopped to greet watchers as he walked the parade route in Siren last Saturday.

Hunter Schaaf, 9-yearold from Danbury, was on hand for the St. Patrick’s Day parade in Siren this past Saturday. Hunter always gets dressed up for St. Patrick’s Day but, when asked, admitted he doesn’t know if he has Irish ancestry.

Follow the Leader. 506915 30L

Sign up for e-mails of breaking local news and updates @

w w w. t h e - l e a d e r. n e t

PAGE 14 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - MARCH 17, 2010

Four-school district AODA presents Talent Showcase

Webster 10th-grader Miranda Burger performed a vocal solo as her talent in the Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Awareness Program Talent Showcase held at the Grantsburg High School auditorium on Sunday, March 14. Frederic, Grantsburg, Siren and Webster School students participated in the fundraiser for the post-prom event and other student activities to help students be drug and alcohol free.

Seth Pardun performed his original song, “The Search,” at the AODA Showcase Sunday afternoon at the Grantsburg High School. The Webster senior sang and played acoustic guitar at the talent program sponsored by the fourdistrict AODA to raise funds for a post-prom event this spring.

Photos by Priscilla Bauer

Wearing his bright-orange shirt, Webster first-grader Zachary Zelinski represented his school enthusiastically as he performed Sonata No. 11 by Mozart and Symphony No. 7 by Beethoven at the AODA Talent Showcase held on Sunday, March 14, at Grantsburg High School. Students from four school districts, Frederic, Grantsburg, Siren and Webster, competed for the title of Most Talented School.

Siren student Samantha Rosado gave a moving a capella performance of the song “Lean On Me” at the AODA Talent Showcase Sunday afternoon at the Grantsburg High School auditorium.

All eyes were on Courtney Rausch and her twirling techniques as the Grantsburg student performed her baton routine.

Isabel Lexen and Joel and Bradley Knauber accepted the trophy for the Most Talented School at the AODA Talent Showcase held at the Grantsburg High School on Sunday, March 14. Students from four school districts, Frederic, Grantsburg, Frederic high school student Siren and Webster performed in the talent show judged by four school staff memBradley Knauber showed he had bers, one from each of the participating schools. The Frederic students talent perbalance and talent while per- formances won their school the coveted title. The four-district AODA plans to make forming his juggling act. the talent showcase, a post-prom fundraiser, an annual event with the trophy traveling from school to school each year.

Two talented Frederic High School students, Joel and Bradley Knauber, who just happen to be brothers, entertained the audience with a performance of their original song, “Side of You.”

Grantsburg freshman Abby Wilson had all the right moves as she performed an original dance routine.

MARCH 17, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 15

Legion to celebrate 91st birthday ST. CROIX FALLS – The American Legion calendar says “Born in the crucible of war the American soldiers fighting World War I recognized the need to band together, and talked about creating an organization of war veterans. When war ended they met in St. Louis and adopted the ‘American Legion’ as their new organization’s official name.” Instrumental in the early organization were line officers of the American Expeditionary Forces in France of which William Titus of Cato was a representative. They drafted a constitution with a preamble, “For God and Country, we associate ourselves together.” This preamble is still recited at American Legion meetings. The U.S. Congress officially chartered the American Legion in September 1919 and two months later a national convention of war veterans in Minneapolis approved the constitution. The National American Legion headquarters was in Indianapolis, Ind., where it continues today.

Also at this convention was passed a resolution to support the newly founded Boy Scouts of America. The American Legion is today the chartering agency for more that 1,700 Scouting units that involve 64,000 young people. In 1921, the Legion also promoted the creation of the U.S. Veterans Bureau, the forerunner of the Veterans Administration and the Department of Veterans Affairs, to make sure veterans got the health, education and housing benefits promised them. In 1923 the Legion drafted a “Flag Code” adopted by Congress in 1942 to honor and protect the flag and prohibit physical desecration. The American Legion also supports healthy youth by sponsoring baseball teams. More than 60 percent of today’s professional baseball players and some 90,000 high school athletes have played on Legion-sponsored baseball teams. By 1931, the American Legion counted a million members. In 1935, the Legion created Boys State to promote patriotism,

Miss Centuria attends St. Paul Winter Carnival ST. PAUL, Minn. – Miss Centuria 2009, Jessica Raboin, attended the St. Paul Winter Carnival where she participated in the opening and Grand Day parades and many activities throughout the busy weekend. Of the many highlights she enjoyed was her participation in the royalty talent show, where she performed a routine from the Unity Dance Line, winning the crowd’s approval. Raboin is very active with the Centuria Royalty and enjoys representing and promoting her town with great pride. She was instrumental in adding a new activity to Centuria’s Cozy Christmas with a royalty bowling tournament, which increased the participation in all the activities of this celebration. In honor of Centuria’s 110th anniversary and 45 years of royalty this year, Jessica and her court are planning to host special festivities with the past years royalty during Memory Days, July 9-11. Miss Centuria is also planning to put together a memory book to commemorate the 45 years of royalty that have represented Centuria and requests that the past royalty members (or any community members that might also have this information) help by providing the following, as soon as possible: • Queen name (married name), current address, e-mail address, home telephone numbers. • List of court members and their address information.

Miss Centuria 2009, Jessica Raboin, attended the St. Paul Winter Carnival. – Photo by Nancy Harr • A picture of the royalty court (please label pictures clearly) • A picture of the court in the Memory Days parade (please label pictures with names and year of royalty). • Any special memory or event you would like to share about your year representing Centuria. This information can be mailed (at your very earliest convenience please) to: Miss Centuria, Jessica Raboin, P.O. Box 202, Centuria, WI 54824-0202; or e-mailed to: jessicarraboin@yahoo.com. - submitted

Knights of Columbus winners announced

Chris Parker

Gus Johnson

P O L K / B U R N E T T / WA S H B U R N COUNTIES – The following individuals will advance to the state level of competition in the Knights of Columbus Knowledge Bowl contest at Wisconsin Rapids on Saturday, March 27: Chris Parker, seventh-grade math, Grantsburg; Olivia Zappa, seventh-grade spelling,

Olivia Zappa

Luck; and Gus Johnson, eighth-grade spelling, Grantsburg. Following are the students who placed third and are alternates (if either of the first two places cannot go): Claire Palmquist, fifth-grade math, Grantsburg and Austin Handie, eighth-grade math, Grantsburg. – Photos submitted

democracy, and the experience of government at work. In 1938, the Legion held its first high school oratorical contests for greater understanding of the U.S. Constitution and to award college scholarships. The Legion Charter was amended in 1942 to accept new members from World War II, adding another 2 million veterans. In 1943, America’s GI Bill of Rights was made by law by Franklin D. Roosevelt. The American Legion has supported the American Heart Association, the National Association for Mental Health, and the Child Welfare Foundation over the years. In 1952, Korean War veterans were approved for membership. In 1966, Vietnam veterans were approved for membership, and in 1982 the American Legion donated $1 million to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., the largest donation to the project. The Legion sponsored an independent study on the effects of Agent Orange and

continues to advocate for the unique needs of Vietnam veterans and to press for answers about POW/MIAs in Vietnam. In 1990, veterans of Lebanon, Granada, and Panama hostilities were approved for membership in the American Legion and the Legion formed the Family Support Network for assisting families of soldiers deployed during Desert Storm. Also, in 1990, veterans of Desert Shield and Desert Storm were approved for membership. It continues today with a national campaign, “I Am Not a Number,” to lessen the delays veterans face in securing medical treatment. The Legion birthday celebration is set for Saturday, March 20, at Post 143 in St. Croix Falls. Ray Chaplinski will be the speaker. Dinner will be at 6 p.m., followed by a program and Bingo. - submitted

Fine artists and artisans sought for August festival SIREN — Fine artists and artisan crafters are invited to participate in the Burnett Arts Festival set for Aug. 7 at the Lakeview Event Center, Siren. The BAF is designed to showcase work by Wisconsin artists and fine crafters, particularly in Burnett and neighboring counties. The event is organized by the Burnett Area Arts Group, co-sponsored by North Wind Arts. The festival is open to any artist or artisan crafter who produces high quality, original, handmade works of fine art in any medium. There are up to 45 indoor and 30 outdoor booth spaces available. Electricity is also available for a small fee. Registration is open on a first-come, first served basis; the deadline is June 30. Entries will be screened for quality and to ensure a variety of mediums. The BAF is listed in the 2010 Midwest Art Fair catalog and will be extensively advertised in print and broadcast media, organizers said. The BAF is held in conjunction with the Siren Summerfest and includes a special exhibit, details of which will soon be released. There will also be food, artist demonstrations, live entertainment, and a free art project for children. Last year’s art festival featured more than 45 participating artists and attracted nearly 2,000 attendees from the region and the Twin Cities. More than 100 children of all ages participated in the make-and-take art project. The registration package is available by e-mailing northwindart@sirentel.net, or by calling Jenny Goalen, 715-349-8448,

Kathy Recke, BAAG member and potter, is one of the artists registered to show her work at the 2010 Burnett Arts Festival set for Aug. 6 at the Lakeview Event Center. BAAG is looking for local/regional artists to exhibit and sell their fine arts and crafts. — Photo by H. Rice or Kathy Recke, 715-656-3322. The registration form is also downloadable from the BAAG Web site, www.baagart.org. — from BAF

Free vaccine for protection against H1N1 still available POLK COUNTY - Leading public health experts are anticipating the pandemic 2009 H1N1 flu strain to be around for a while. Last week the World Health Organization and the federal FDA’s Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee recommended including the 2009 H1N1 flu strain in the 2010-2011 influenza season’s vaccine. H1N1 has led to nearly 260,000 hospitalizations and approximately 12,000 deaths in the United States. Wisconsin has had 1,314 hospitalizations and 55 deaths since April 15, 2009. Whether a third wave hits yet this spring, in the fall or beyond that, there is no need for anyone to become infected. The vaccine is safe and recommended for all people aged 6 months and older.

Children under 10 years of age will require a second dose 28 days after the first dose to acquire full immunity. Getting vaccinated now can protect you and your family against H1N1 while the strain continues to circulate. “No one should have to become ill from the H1N1 flu virus and miss school or work. There is enough vaccine available at no cost through your local county health department,” says Gretchen Sampson, Health Officer for Polk County. Free vaccines are offered by appointment on Thursdays at the Polk County Health Department. Please call 715-4858500 to make an appointment. - from the Polk County Health Dept.

PAGE 16 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - MARCH 17, 2010

Luck speakers advance A total of 26 students from Luck presented at the subdistrict Forensics contest and all 26 advanced to the district contest. The students will next present their six individual and four group entries during the district contest in Hudson on March 27. Luck’s Forensics squad is advised by Karl Wicklund. Luck’s Forensics squad is comprised of (L to R) front: David Franzel, Chris Aldrich, Eryn Taber, Sarah Elert, Kyle James, Michael Jenssen and Morgyn McGinnity. Middle: Matt Pennington, Cole Mortel, Taylor Horsager, Carson Giller, Diana Kufalk, Elie Lewis, Jordan Lundmark and Katie Gutzmer. Back: Sabrina Lane, Peter Langeness, Maia Lehmann, Kayla Karl, Karissa Giller, Logan Potvin, Hannah Karl, Katelyn Dinnies, Mary MaidenMueller and Lena Ueke-Foster. Missing: Kristine Wortman, Nick Leal and Coach Karl Wicklund. Special photo

Unity Community Education To register and for more information for any Unity Community Education class, contact 715-8252101, ext. 1560, or e-mail tworrell@unity.k12.wi.us. Ongoing classes Water aerobics WITC Catalog 42-807-412. Sixweek sessions beginning April 6 and May 18. Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5 to 5:45 p.m. New: sign up for six or 12 classes, and come on Tuesdays and/or Thursdays. Cost: $19.21 for six classes, $34.42 ($4 for seniors age 62 or better). Please write check out to WITC. Red Cross swim lessons. Lessons are offered at Unity twice per year – mid-July for two full weeks, and Saturday for six weeks during the winter months, usually starting in January. Classes available: Infants – for ages 6 months to 3 years, parent

or guardian gets in the water with child. Preschoolers – age 3 – 5. Red Cross levels 1-6 – for students ages 5 and up. Class dates and times, when established, will be placed the on Web page, local newspapers and in the Eagles’ Nest newsletter. Basic education for adults. Classes held at Polk County Job Center in Balsam Lake: Tuesdays, 1-4:30 p.m., Wednesdays, 1-4 p.m., Thursdays, 12:30-3 p.m. Cost: Free, please register by calling Polk County Job Center at 715-485-3115. Instructor: Becky Peterson. Brush up on the basic skills that you need to continue your education or to enter the workforce with confidence: reading, English, grammar, science, social studies and math. These classes are also for those preparing to earn their GED/HSED and are self-paced with instructor as-

sistance. You can enroll anytime. Creative writing – The Relevant Personal Story. Wednesdays, March 24, March 31, April 7 and April 14, 7 – 8:30 p.m. Cost: $49.99. Instructor: Kathleen Melin. Candidate forum for Polk County Board of Supervisors. Tuesday, March 30, 6:30 – 8 p.m., at the high school cafeteria. Candidates will be seated at tables with extra seating to foster small group discussions among community members within the same Polk County District. Come with your questions and concerns, so that you can be informed for the April 6 election. Kids’ gymnastics. For ages 4 and up. Beginners on Tuesdays, April 6 to May 11, 3:45 to 5:15 p.m. Intermediates on Thursdays, April 8 to May 13,

3:45 to 5:15 p.m. (To be in the intermediate class, child must be able to do a back bend from the standing position.) Meet by the office after school, then we’ll go together to the upper gym. Instructors: Jolene Lindner and Janine Fahrendorff. Cost: $49 per child, payable to Community Education. Registrations must be received by noon on Thursday, April 1. If registering by phone, please leave a voicemail, all calls will be returned for confirmation. If registering by mail, please allow one week for delivery. No late registrations will be accepted. Line dancing workshop. Saturday, April 10, 2:30 - 4:30 p.m., auditorium. $15, payable to Community Ed. Instructor: Marcia Freed.

Luck Community Education Luck Community Education has a variety of classes lined up. Below are some upcoming classes. Preregistration is required. Classes must have a minimum number of participants to run; there is also a maximum limit. To register, call Amy Aguado at 715-472-2152 ext. 103, e-mail amya@lucksd.k12.wi.us or visit the Luck School Web site at www.lucksd.k12.wi.us. Massage for family and friends. Thursdays, March 11, 18 and 25, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Course fee: $19.21/$4 ages 62-plus.

Recycled wind chimes. Thursday, March 11, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Course fee: $14.14 /$4 ages 62plus. Cooking: Asian dishes. Monday, March 15, 6 – 8 p.m. Course fee: $10.25 (no reduced fee for seniors) plus supply fee. Gluten-free baking: Breads. Tuesday, March 16, 5:30 – 8:30 p.m. Course fee: $25. T’ai Chi Chih. Thursdays, March 18 – April 22, 9 – 10:15 a.m. Course fee: $24.28/$14 ages 62plus.

Quilting: T-shirt Memory Quilt. Saturday, March 20, 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Course fee: $19.21/$4 ages 62-plus. Painted rocks. Thursdays, March 25, April 1, 5:30 – 8:30 p.m. Course fee: $19.21/$4 ages 62plus. Cooking: Hosting a tea. Monday, March 29, 6 – 8 p.m. Course fee: $10.25 (no reduced fee for seniors) plus supply fee. Medicinal herbs. Spring detox: Tuesday, April 6, 6 – 8 p.m. Course fee: $12. Growing medicinal

plants: Tuesday, April 13, 6 – 8 p.m. Course fee: $12. Backyard medicine: Tuesday, April 20, 6 – 8 p.m. Course fee: $12. Chop ‘n’ chat: Grilling great foods. Monday, April 19, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Course fee: $10.25 (no reduced fee for seniors) plus supply fee.

WHAT’S FOR LUNCH???

Menu LOCATION

FREDERIC

MARCH 22 - MARCH 26

MONDAY

TUESDAY

BREAKFAST Breakfast pizza. LUNCH Pizza dipper with marinara sauce, green beans OR buffalo chicken salad.

BREAKFAST Pancake on a stick. LUNCH Sub sandwich, raw veggies, dip, chips OR chicken-strip salad.

LUNCH Quesadilla, rice, peas, mandarin oranges, apples, oranges, bread basket.

WEDNESDAY Long john.

BREAKFAST

THURSDAY Hot pocket.

BREAKFAST

FRIDAY Combo bar.

BREAKFAST

LUNCH Turkey stacker with cheese, mixed vegetables OR ham salad.

LUNCH Tacos, assorted toppings, corn OR turkey salad.

LUNCH Pizza, raw veggies, dip OR tuna salad.

LUNCH Mini corn dogs, scalloped potatoes, sliced carrots, sliced peaches, apples, oranges, bread basket.

LUNCH Sub sandwich with fixings, chicken noodle soup, crackers, fresh veggies, applesauce, apples, oranges, bread basket.

LUNCH Pizza casserole, bread stick, lettuce salad, green beans, ice-cream treat, apples, oranges, bread basket.

LUNCH Grilled cheese sandwich, tomato soup, crackers, fresh veggies, pickle spear, banana, apples, oranges, bread basket.

BREAKFAST Cereal/French toast. LUNCH Lasagna, bread sticks, winter mix, fruit sauce. Alt.: Chicken patty, 7-12.

BREAKFAST Cereal/muffin. LUNCH Mozzarella pizza dippers, dipping sauce, green beans, fruit sauce. Alt.: Hot dogs, 7-12.

BREAKFAST Cereal/breakfast pizza. LUNCH Build your own sub, chips, corn, fresh fruit. Alt.: Chicken nuggets, 712.

BREAKFAST Cereal/long john. LUNCH Barbecues, french fries, creamed corn, fruit sauce. Alt.: Hot dog, 7-12.

BREAKFAST Cereal/cinnamon roll. LUNCH Sausage or cheese pizza, rice, peas, fresh fruit. Alt.: Hamburger, 7-12.

BREAKFAST Assorted cereal and toast, juice and milk. LUNCH Chicken burger, tritaters, green beans, coleslaw, peaches. Alt.: Corn dog.

BREAKFAST Breakfast pizza, juice and milk. LUNCH Lunch Brunch: Cheese omelet, French toast sticks, sausage, applesauce, banana, veggies, baked beans. Alt.: Orange-glaze chicken.

BREAKFAST Assorted cereal and toast, juice and milk. LUNCH Hamburger rice hotdish, Tostitos, shredded lettuce, peas, apples, oranges. Alt.: BBQ ribber.

BREAKFAST Cheese omelet and toast, juice and milk. LUNCH Hot shaved ham and cheese, tiny pretzels, veggies, peas & carrots, pears. Alt.: Tender wrap.

BREAKFAST Assorted cereal and toast, juice and milk. LUNCH Cheese quesadilla, lettuce salad, refried beans, corn, pineapple, mandarin oranges. Alt.: Cook’s choice.

ST. CROIX FALLS

BREAKFAST Cereal bar and toast. LUNCH California burger, potato salad, green beans, fruit juice bar. Alt.: Spicy chicken patty.

BREAKFAST Waffles and sausage. LUNCH Taco salad, fixings, steamed peas, pineapple, cinnamon rolls.

BREAKFAST Scrambled eggs and toast. LUNCH Pork riblets, potato wedges, corn, applesauce. Alt.: Egg-salad sandwich, chicken noodle soup.

BREAKFAST Yogurt parfait with toast. LUNCH Turkey gravy, mashed potatoes, biscuits, mixed vegetables, peaches. Alt.: Hot ham and cheese.

BREAKFAST Apple cinnamon bakes. LUNCH Chicken patty, tater tots, carrots, chocolate pudding, fresh fruit. Alt.: Fish wedge.

BREAKFAST

UNITY

BREAKFAST Breakfast pizza. LUNCH Barbecues and hash browns.

BREAKFAST Oatmeal and toast. LUNCH Lasagna or ravioli, green beans and garlic toast.

WEBSTER

LUNCH Corn dog, baked beans, sliced potatoes, fruit cocktail.

GRANTSBURG Each building will have their own breakfast menu.

LUCK

SIREN

Waffles.

LUNCH Pizza calzones and corn.

LUNCH Cook’s choice OR chicken gravy, mashed potatoes, corn, cranberries, peaches.

LUNCH Taco salad, salsa, tortilla chips, pears.

Omelet.

BREAKFAST

LUNCH Sub sandwich, cottage cheese and chips. EARLY RELEASE LUNCH Hot ham and cheese bun, seasoned sliced potatoes, green beans, pineapple.

Long johns.

BREAKFAST

LUNCH Fish sticks and waffle fries.

LUNCH Fish patty with cheese, bun, chips, fresh veggies, fresh fruit.

MARCH 17, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 17

"Our Town" to perform at Festival Theatre Local performers highlight production ST. CROIX FALLS - Thornton Wilder’s classic American drama “Our Town” will be on stage at Festival Theatre March 23 to 28. The production is part of the St. Croix Valley Big Read, funded in part by the National Endowment for the Arts. There are four public performances in downtown St. Croix Falls at the historic Auditorium, 210 N. Washington Street. “These performances will serve as the culminating activities for our 2010 Big Read,” said Festival Theatre director Danette Olsen. “We chose the works of Thornton Wilder, a Wisconsin native son, in part because his writing provides the

Playing the stage manager, Jaclyn Johnson.

Director with wedding scene (Bill Perron, Neal Mellon, Jaclyn Johnson and Maddie Sullivan).

The Webbs (Jana Lansing and Bob Fedderly).

opportunity to celebrate small-town life. Another bonus is the privilege of staging ‘Our Town’ – clearly a much-loved play. Our cast is made up of actors from all three counties involved in the Big Read: Polk and Burnett in Wisconsin and Chisago in Minnesota.” Directed by Bill Perron of Dresser, starring professional guest artist Jaclyn Johnson of Minneapolis, with stage mangement and costume design by Gina Bonin of Taylors Falls, the “Our Town” cast includes Bob Fedderly, Wyoming, Minn.; Paul Dennison, North Branch, Minn.; Jana Lensing, Lindstrom, Minn.; Alan Duball, Taylors Falls, Minn.; Nick

Piszczek and Neal Mellon, Luck; Hunter Teasley, Somerset; Maddie Sullivan, Cushing; Nyla Greenberg, Grantsburg; Sheri Rude, Dresser; and from St. Croix Falls are Liz Reddy, Sarah Skadsberg, James Peterson and Emma Wondra. Public performances dates are Tuesday, March 23, at 12:30 p.m., Thursday, March 25 and Saturday, March 27 at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday, March 28, at 2 p.m. Tickets prices for the “Our Town” performances are $12.50 for adults and $5 for youth and can be purchased by calling the Festival Theatre box office 715483-3387 or online at www.festivaltheatre.org where more deThe choir (L to R) back row: Alan Duball, James Peterson, Hunter Teasley and Paul Dennison. Front: Sarah Skadsberg, Sheri Rude and Nyla Greenberg.

The Gibbs (Liz Reddy and Nick Piszczek).

tails can also be found about the 2010 Big Read.. The Big Read is an initiative of the National Endowment for the Arts designed to restore reading to the center of American culture. The NEA presents The Big Read in partnership with the Institute of Museum and Library Services and in cooperation with Arts Midwest. For more information about The Big Read please visit www.neabigread.org. - from Festival Theatre

George and Emily, Neal Mellon and Maddie Sullivan.

Ongoing events E V E RY M O N .

Amery Senior Center

• Wii golf, 9 a.m.

Frederic Senior Center St. Croix Falls Senior Center

• Spades, 1 p.m.

EV E RY TU E S .

EV E RY W E D.

• Ruby’s, Siren, 10 a.m.-4 p.m

Tax Assistance

• Amery Senior Center Mar. 23, 30 April 6, 13 715-268-6605

Meat Raffles

• Cushing Legion At Suzy Q’s, 6:30 p.m. • Siren Lions At Midtown Tavern, 5 p.m.

TOPS

• Good Sam, St. Croix Falls, 5:45 p.m. 715-483-3666

E V E RY T H U R S .

E V E RY M O N .

E V E RY F R I .

• Bingo Every Second & Fourth Friday, 1 p.m.

• Pokeno, 1 p.m.

• 500, 6:30 p.m.

•!Pokeno, 1 p.m.

•!Mini Flea Market, 2nd Wednesdays, 9:30 a.m.-7 p.m.

•!Exercise, 10 a.m. •!Skipbo, 11 a.m. • 500, 6:30-10 p.m.

• Bridge, 10 a.m.-Noon

Webster Senior Center Food Shelf

E V E RY T H U R S .

EV E RY SAT.

•!Dining at Five Every Second Thursday, 5 p.m., 715-866-5300 •!Ruby’s, Siren, 11 a.m.-7 p.m. • Food Shelf, Frederic, 2-6 p.m. • Grantsburg Library April 1, 2, 8, 9 715-463-2244

E V E RY T H U R S .

E V E RY F R I .

• Siren Senior Center April 5, 12 715-349-7810

E V E RY F R I .

• Danbury Fire & Lions Club, Yellow River Saloon, 5 p.m.

• Fishbowl Sportsmen’s Club At Smitty’s Saloon, Webster, 5-7 p.m. • Snowciables At Thirsty Otter, 6 p.m.

• Siren Lions At Jed’s Laker Lounge, 5 p.m. • Lake Country Riders At The Pour House, 5:30 p.m.

EV E RY TU E S .

EV E RY TU E S .

EV E RY SAT .

•!Luck Senior Center, 5 p.m., • Trinity Lutheran Church, 715-472-2341 Osceola, 8:30 a.m., •!Comforts of Home, Frederic, 715-755-3123 5:30 p.m.

EV E RY SAT.

• YLRA At Yellow Lake Lodge, Webster, 3-5 p.m • Siren Lions At Bobbie’s World, 4 p.m.

E V E RY F R I .

• Webster Senior Center April 2, 9 715-866-5300/4334

E V E RY S U N .

• Wonderland At Yellow Lake Golf Course, 4 p.m.

EV E RY SAT.

PAGE 18 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - MARCH 17, 2010

CHURCH NEWS News from the Pews at Pilgrim Lutheran Church

A desperate woman, ready to abort her baby or commit suicide because she had been rejected, abused and then raped, cried out to God. “What shall I do?” she asked. God answered in a clear, strong voice: “Have this baby. He will bring joy to the world.” The baby did. After years of hardship, doubt and shyness, he became a great evangelist after he too heard God’s voice. We may never know all the ways in which God speaks to us Perspectives humans. He spoke to Moses in a burning bush, to Balaam the Prophet through words uttered by a donkey, through Jesus’ disciples and other followers, and through Paul the Apostle. Other biblical characters heard his voice—in dreams and visions and other ways. God’s main method of communication is through his Word. But Christians throughout the world continue to hear his voice in other ways. People have testified of hearing a strong, yet inaudible voice tell them to change directions while driving, and later learning they avoided disaster. Some have sensed a presence nearby and knew it was either an angel or Jesus protecting them. Some hear God’s distinct voice in their head or their thoughts—a voice undisputedly not their own. Job 33:14-18 says, “For God may speak in one way, or in another, yet man does not perceive it. In a dream, in a vision of the night, when deep sleep falls upon men, while slumbering on their beds, then he opens the ears of men and seals their instruction. In order to turn man from his deed and conceal pride from man, he keeps back his soul from the pit and his life from perishing by the sword.” God’s voice can be heard by any of us—if we’ll only allow ourselves to hear. Misunderstandings usually come about because we allow our biases to shut our ears to what others are trying to say. We’re all guilty of not listening well to others, and to God. Perhaps that’s why he tries to get our attention in ways other than through his Word. It’s vitally important for followers of Christ to read, study, meditate on, and obey God’s Word. But as in any other relationship, we need to keep our eyes, ears and hearts open to his personal voice as well. If it’s truly his voice, it will be confirmed through his Word. Lord, unstop our ears that we may hear your voice. Thank you for speaking words of instruction and encouragement that we can follow and share with others. In Jesus’ name, amen. Mrs. Bair may be reached at www.sallybair.com.

Sally Bair Eternal

Zen Hair Studio

This past Sunday was the fourth Sunday in Lent with Holy Communion. The choir sang an appropriate song about the 40 days of Lent. Everyone is invited to join Pilgrim for midweek Lenten services which begin at 6:30 p.m. The confirmation students are doing special readings throughout the Lenten season. A light supper will be served before the service at 5:30 p.m. The Sunday school students, along with the confirmation classes, are busy rehearsing a skit they will perform for the congregation on Palm Sunday. The title of the skit is “The Littlest Donkey.” The book club is going strong and the book they are presently reading is Elizabeth Gilbert’s book “Eat, Pray, Love.” The club will meet on Thursday, April 8, at 6:30 p.m. at the church in the lower fireside room to discuss the book. Anyone who wants to can get the book from the library and join the group. The more the merrier! Spring is in the air and it will soon be time to refurbish and update your family’s summer wardrobe as well as furnishings for your home. There is a committee working very hard on the churchwide garage sale that will be held on Saturday, April 24, from 8 a.m. till 2 p.m. in the basement of the church via the lower back entrance to the church. Everything from “soup to nuts” will be on display and for sale. Some of the items

Open Arms invites you to community meals ST. CROIX FALLS — Whether you’re looking for a safe place to meet people, to gather with friends and family, or just to enjoy a good meal now and then, Open Arms might be the place for you. Sponsored by Alliance Church of the Valley, Open Arms is “a gift to the community, a complimentary meal,” once a month, starting Tuesday, March 23. Its mission, according to organizers, is “to reach out, care for and strengthen our community by providing food, fellowship and encouragement in a loving and caring environment.” Free of charge, the meal will be held at ACV on the fourth Tuesday of each month from 5 to 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 1259 Hwy. 35, St. Croix Falls. Dates for the next months are March 23, April 27, May 25 and June 22. “Our purpose is simply to love and care for people in

THANK YOU

We are so very grateful for the support of family and friends during Jim’s recent stay at Regions Hospital for colorectal cancer surgery. Thank you to each one who prayed, sent cards, flowers, visited and helped with chores at home. Your prayers were answered; he is now cancer-free. We know he was on many prayer lists and that meant so much to us.

Thank you! Jim and Joyce Glover

102 South Washington, St. Croix Falls • 715-483-5688

Ask about our health & wellness evenings.

Want A Brighter Smile?

STOP DREAMING - START FLYING!

Thursday, March 25

$155 + materials. 10 weeks, 1 night/week For information & to preregister call Woody 715-557-0395

2 p.m. 24534 State Rd. 35/70 North of Siren

Instrument Rating for licensed pilots starts January 2011 L.O. Simenstad Airport, Osceola, Wis.

Anyone who gets hungry qualifies. Register 30 minutes before distribution. $15 Cash Donation Bring your own baskets, boxes or carts.

Private Pilot Ground School Starts Tuesday, March 30, at 6:30 p.m.

www.OsceolaAero.com

506773 30-31Lp

1/2 OFF

507149 30Lp 20dp

Presents

20 Years’ Experience Stop in for Free Consultations Eyebrow Waxing

our community, in a tangible way that meets people’s felt needs,” said associate pastor Jeff Naegelen. “It’s a place that people can plan to come on a regular basis to get a well-balanced meal and be connected to others.” Supervised children’s activities will be taking place to allow adults to visit before and after their meals, he said. While the church hopes Open Arms will be a blessing to people under financial stress, said Naegelen, it is also designed for people wanting to connect with their neighbors, whom they may or may not know already. “It’s for people who want to get together with others while enjoying a meal,” he said. In addition to the monthly community meals, Open Arms will be giving away garden produce in the months of June, July, and August. Also in August will be a backpack and school supplies giveaway. For more information please contact Alliance Church of the Valley at 715-483-1100, or HYPERLINK “mailto:office@stcroixalliance.com” office@stcroixalliance.com. — Mary Stirrat, with information from Alliance Church of the Valley

RUBY’S PANTRY FOOD DISTRIBUTION

507127 30Lp

Tues. 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Wed. 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Thurs. 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri. 7 a.m.-5 p.m.

JEWELS LANGLEE

will include antiques, family heirlooms, household items, appliances, furniture, tools, shoes, women’s jewelry, and clothing will include infants, toddlers, teens, women and men, etc. There will not be any electronics or TVs for sale. If you would like to donate items, they have to be in good, clean, useable/working condition and you can drop them off at the church on Saturday, April 17, from 1 to 4 p.m. or the following Monday, April 19, through Thursday, April 22, from 9 a.m. until noon, again using the lower back entrance of the basement of the church. If you have large items that you would like to have picked up, call RaeLynn Neumann-Johnson at 715-327-8484 and discuss it with her. There will be a freewill donation for most items, although some items will have a price on them. To make your shopping experience a pleasure, coffee, homemade bars and hot dogs will be available. Recycling is a great thing! Pilgrim invites everyone to join them for Sunday morning worship services at 10 a.m. Sunday school starts at 9 a.m. and all children from pre-K through sixth grade are welcome to come. For more information about the church or any of the up-and-coming events, call the church office at 715-327-8012 or go to their web site www.pilgrimlutheranfrederic.org.

507145 30L

God speaks

Receive a FREE Crest Professional Whitestrips Kit!

New adult patients at their new patient appointment which includes: New Patients • Examination Welcome! • Cleaning • X-Rays • Crowns • Bridges will receive a FREE Crest • Partials • Dentures Professional Whitestrips Kit! • Fillings To serve our patients better, • Extractions • Root Canals we now have DIGITAL X-RAYS. This means very low exposure to X-Ray for patients & no waiting for developing them. Emergency patients call before

Open Mondays ‘til 8 p.m. 10 a.m. for same day appointment

Gary Kaefer, D.D.S. Family Dentistry

Webster Office

715-866-4204

492033 49Ltfc 39a,btfc

Grantsburg Office

715-463-2882

It’s time for Luck’s

Spring Show LUCK HIGH SCHOOL

9:30 a.m. For All Children

Ages 2-10 3 different age category hunts: 2-4; 5-7; 8-10

Friday & Saturday, March 26 & 27 7:30 p.m. Adults $5 Students & Seniors $3

Saturday, March 27

EASTER EGG HUNT

Cool Door Prizes

(Bikes, Games, Toys & Videos) at

Alliance Church of the Valley

507179 30-31L

Get $1 off with a donation to the food shelf

1259 State Rd. 35 • St. Croix Falls, WI 715-483-1100 www.stcroixalliance.com 507028 30-31L

MARCH 17, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 19

OBITUARIES

Evelyn M. Larson Evelyn M. Larson, Centuria, died Sunday, March 14, 2010, at St. Croix Regional Medical Center. Evelyn was preceded in death by her parents; husband, Philip; infant son, Peter; daughter, Julie; daughter-in-law, Carole; grandson, Jason Whittier; brothers, Paul and Joseph; sisters, Verona and Cecelia. She is survived by her children, Lynette (John) Benson of Stillwater, Minn., Bruce (Cheryl) Molitor of White Bear Lake, Minn., Richard of Milltown, Thomas (Cindy) of Taylors Falls, Minn., Roberta (David) Whittier of St. Croix Falls, Patricia (Russell) Kicker of Luck, Pam (Al) Lunde of St. Croix Falls and Philip (Colleen) of Scandia, Minn.; numerous grandchildren, great-grandchildren, other relatives and friends. Mass of Christian burial will be celebrated at 2 p.m. on Thursday, March 18, at Our Lady of the Lakes Catholic Church in Balsam Lake. Visitation will be one hour before the mass. Interment will be at the Wolf Creek Cemetery. The Grandstrand Funeral Home, Osceola, was entrusted with arrangements.

Jane M. Johnson Jane M. Johnson, 60, St. Croix Falls, died March 11, 2010. Jane was born Feb. 18, 1950, in St. Cloud, Minn., to Marcellus (Sally) and Odelia (Dil) Rau. She grew up in St. Cloud, Minn., and attended school there, until she met her husband, Randy (Happy) Johnson in 1970. They then moved to St. Croix Falls, where they still reside with their children, Sarah and Frank. Jane loved to cook, garden and be with family and friends. She loved to have her family over for new recipes that she was going to make. Jane loved to show everyone her gardens, weeds and all. She is survived by her husband, Randy Johnson; son, Frank (Angel) Rau and daughter, Sarah (Lucas) Covey; grandchildren, Brittany, Dominic, Sadie, Reis and Shilo; mother, Odelia Rau; brother, Bob (Joyce); and sisters, Diane (Robert) Perfecto, Kathy (Ken) Schutz and Margo (Perkins) Peterson; brother-in-law, Bob Petro. She was preceded in death by father, Marcellus; and sister, Connie Petro. A gathering of remembrance will be held on Tuesday, March 16, at the St. Croix Valley Funeral Home and Polk County Cremation Society, St. Croix Falls, from 5 – 8 p.m. The St. Croix Valley Funeral Home and Polk County Cremation Society, St. Croix Falls, was entrusted with arrangements.

EDLING FUNERAL HOME

715-483-3141

ROWE FUNERAL HOME AND CREMATION SERVICES Luck – Frederic

www.rowefh.com Large Chapels, Lounges, Modern Facilities For Traditional And Memorial Services • Preplan & Customize: Caskets, Urns, Vaults or Services • Monument Sales

Contact:

Generations Of Trusted Service

of Frank Svoboda,

who passed away Feb. 23, 2004 &

Agnes Svoboda,

who passed away April 10, 1988. Gone are the days we used to share, But in our hearts you are always there, Each day has many moments, when we need you here, And though we miss you desperately, we always feel you near, With tender love and deep regret, We who love you will never forget.

Jane Violet Keckeissen Jane Violet Keckeissen, 85, of Sarasota, Fla., formerly of Seven Lakes, N.C., died March 11, 2010. Jane was born in Cushing to Oliver and Violet Gronlund on April 1, 1924. She graduated from the University of Wisconsin at River Falls in 1944. She was a teacher and librarian in the Bloomfield, N.J., school system. She and her husband, Arthur J. Keckeissen, retired to Seven Lakes, N.C., where she enjoyed traveling, golf, gardening, church and investment club activities. Jane and Art were dedicated volunteers for many years for Meals-on-Wheels in Moore County, N.C. She is survived by her husband of 63 years, Arthur J. Keckeissen; brother, Sherwin Gronlund; son, Arthur S. (Lynn) Keckeissen; daughter, Judy (Russell) Behanan; grandchildren, Jennifer Lowinger, Steven Keckeissen, Craig Sawayer and Lauren Sawayer. She was preceded in death by her brother, Roger Gronlund of Edina, Minn. A memorial service will be held on Monday, March 15, at 2:15 p.m., at Bahia Oaks Lodge, 2186 Bahia Vista Street, Sarasota, Fla. A memorial service in Seven Lakes, N.C., will be held at a later date. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to Meals-on-Wheels, c/o/ Moore County Department of Aging, P.O. Box 487, Carthage, NC 28327 or St. Paul Lutheran Church Food Pantry, Sarasota, Fla. The Toale Brothers Funeral Home in Sarasota was entrusted with arrangements.

Cremation Society Of Northwest Wisconsin

“Affordable Options For Every Family” Now Serving: Burnett, Polk, Washburn & Surrounding Counties

715-349-7200

P.O. Box 408 • 7697 Johnson St. 506532 19a 30L Siren, WI 54872

506770 30L

715-327-4475 Or 715-472-2444

Dana Donald, 37, formerly of Frederic, died March 7, 2010, at her residence in Balsam Lake. She was born May 17, 1972, to Walter and Kathryn (Conrad) Donald at the Barron Memorial Hospital. She was one of a set of twins. She was born with many medical disabilities and conquered them with courage. In January 2007, she got cancer. Dana attended special education at Unity School, then later went to special education at Balsam Lake and graduated from there. Her family held together through many trials and still remain close. Dana had many collections. She loved her rings, watches, stuffed animals and John Denver music. She also loved shopping with her mom and visiting people. She is preceded in death by her dad, Walter; and brother, Travis. Dana is survived by her mom, Kathryn, sisters, Julia (John) Amrhien, Lori (Doug) Johnson, Dawn (Mike) Lunsmann; twin sister, Darcy (Tom) Binfet; brothers, Dustin (fiancée Lisa McCoy) Donald, Cody Donald, Clint Donald; special friend of Dana’s Karla Brumberg; 11 nieces and nephews; and one great-nephew; and her circle of friends at the Aurora Residential Alternatives home in Balsam Lake where she lived for the last 1-1/2 years of her life. Funeral service was held Friday, March 12, at the Georgetown Lutheran Church with Pastor Weltzin officiating. Spring interment will be at McKinley Cemetery. The St. Croix Valley Funeral Home and Polk County Cremation Society, St. Croix Falls, was entrusted with arrangements.

(Crematory Located In Webster, Wis.)

507205 30L

Bruce Rowe Or Ray Rowe

Carolyn Berkland, formerly of Grantsburg, died Thursday, March 11, 2010, of lung cancer at the home of her daughter, Jillian. She was enrolled in Hospice Care. Carolyn was born at home in a log house, six miles from the source of the Mississippi River. There was no electricity in the family home and the family learned to live off the land during the Great Depression. At age 5, Carolyn started grade school in a large two-class building that taught all eight grades, together, all day long. By age 13, Carolyn was ready for high school. There was no bus transportation out that far, so she worked for her room and board by baby-sitting and housework, becoming very homesick. She graduated from Bemidji High School in 1949, and then attended Bemidji State College until she was old enough to be accepted into the three-year, yearround nursing school at Hamline University in St. Paul, Minn. Her first job was at the Red Lake Indian Reservation Hospital. During her second year, she met Ted Berkland, a bachelor pastor at Nymore and Aardahl Lutheran churches, south of Bemidji, Minn. She enrolled at Lutheran Bible Institute for two semesters of learning the Bible and educational skills. Her next job was night supervisor at Luther Hospital in Bemidji, Minn. Ted and Carolyn were married Aug. 27, 1955, and two sons were born, Phil in 1956 and Bernt in 1958. In 1964, Ruth Ann was adopted at the age of 6 months and Jillian Marie was adopted at the age of 3 months in 1968. During this time, Ted was called to Clayton and Marsh Lake Lutheran churches in Clayton and Moe Lutheran Church in Clear Lake; and then to an associate pastorship at Gethsemane and Peace Lutheran churches in Baldwin. Carolyn worked part-time jobs including hospitals in Amery and Baldwin, Luther Point Bible Camp nurse and Burnett Medical Center. She also volunteered at Regional Hospice Volunteers, Habitat for Humanity and Loss and Grief Support Network. She is survived by son, Phil, of Austin, Texas, his wife Christine, his stepson Donny (Emily) and children, Katy and Cory, and his stepdaughter, Valerie of Seattle, Wash.; son, Bernt of Bloomington, Minn.; daughter, Ruth and family of Grantsburg, Ruth’s partner, Joe Paquette, daughter, Grace and her daughter, Haley; daughter, Alisha, her son, Avery and fiancé Curt; daughter, Amber (John Erickson) Johnnie, Aden and Josie and Ruth’s four younger daughters, Lora, Kayla, Melanie and Ruthie; and by Carolyn’s daughter, Jillian (James Rowan) of Eagan, Minn., and children, Niibin and Bimose. She was preceded in death by her infant brother; parents; adult sister; and husband, Ted Berkland. In lieu of flowers, please gift to one of Carolyn’s favorite charities: Regional Hospice, Hospice of the Lakes, CaringBridge, Habitat for Humanity and ELCA Ministries. Funeral services will be held Thursday, March 18, at Faith Lutheran Church in Grantsburg, at 11 a.m. Visitation was Wednesday from 5 – 8 p.m. at the Edling Funeral Home in Grantsburg.

507008 30Lp

506769 30L

Traditional & Cremation Services D a v i d E d l i ng 715-463-2994

Dana Donald

In Loving Memory

Serving our community since 1903.

Funeral Director Grantsburg St. Croix Falls

Carolyn Berkland

PAGE 20 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - MARCH 17, 2010

CHURCH NEWS

Parent-child separation can be devastating for family QUESTION: Everyone knows that divorce is tough on children. What about parent-child separation that occurs for reasons other than divorce? Is the pain any less intense for kids when a parent has a good reason to be away? DR. DOBSON: Research confirms that the consequences of any parent-child separation can be severe. In one study of fathers whose jobs required them to be away from their families for long periods of time, the children tended to experience numerous negative reactions, including anger, rejection, depression, low self-esteem, and commonly, a decline in school performance. Those findings have been confirmed in other contexts, as well. Some of those conclusions were presented at a White House conference at which I spoke a few years ago. The other speaker was Dr. Armand Nicholi, professor of psychiatry at Harvard University. That day, Dr. Nicholi explained how family circumstances that make parents inaccessible to their children produce some of the same effects as divorce itself. Cross-cultural studies make it clear that parents in the United States spend less time with their children than parents in almost any other nation in the world. For decades, millions of fathers have devoted themselves exclusively to their occupations and activities away from home. More recently, mothers have joined the workforce in huge numbers, rendering themselves exhausted at night and burdened with domestic duties on weekends. The result: No one is at home to meet the needs of millions of lonely preschoolers and latchkey children.

Dr. Nicholi expressed regret that his comments would make many parents feel uncomfortable and guilty. However, he felt obligated to report the facts as he saw them. Most important (and the point of his address), Dr. Nicholi stressed the undeniable link between the interruption of parentchild relationships and the escalation of psychiatric problems that we were then seeing and that are even more pronounced today. If the numbers of dysfunctional families and absentee parents continued to escalate, he said, serious national health problems were inevitable. One-half of all hospital beds in the United States at that time were taken up by psychiatric patients. That figure could hit 95 percent if the incidence of divorce, child abuse, child molestation and child neglect continue to soar. In that event, Dr. Nicholi said, we would also see vast increases in teen suicide, already up more than 300 percent in 25 years, drug abuse, crimes of violence and problems related to sexual disorientation. I have reason to understand a measure of the pain spoken of by Dr. Nicholi. I experienced it when I was 6 years old. My mother and father left me with my aunt for six months while they traveled. That last night together, I sat on my mother’s lap while she told me how much she loved me and that she and my father would come back for me as soon as they could. Then they drove away as the sun dropped below the horizon. I sat on the floor in the dark for an unknown period of time, fighting back the tears as depression

Dr. James

Dobson Focus on the Family

engulfed me. That sorrowful evening was so intense that its pain can be recalled instantly today, almost seven decades later. In short, even when parent-child separation occurs for valid reasons in a loving home, a boy or girl frequently interprets parental departure as evidence of rejection. If we have any choice in the matter, we should not put them through that painful experience. ••• QUESTION: What would your recommendation be to a young wife and mother whose husband is extremely violent and frequently abuses her and their children? DR. DOBSON: She should get herself and her kids out of the home immediately. Abuse of spouses and children simply must not be tolerated. It’s against the law, and the law must be enforced. No one has to live in an abusive environment today. ••• Dr. Dobson is founder and chairman emeritus of the nonprofit organization Focus on the Family, Colorado Springs, Colo. 80995 (www.focusonthefamily.org). Questions and answers are excerpted from “Complete Marriage and Family Home Reference Guide” and “Bringing Up Boys,” both published by Tyndale House. COPYRIGHT 2009 JAMES DOBSON INC., DISTRIBUTED BY UNIVERSAL UCLICK, 1130 Walnut St., Kansas City, Mo. 64106; 816-581-7500

Brought to you by:

Frederic Evangelical Free Church Frederic

Church listings sponsored by the following area businesses: BREMER BANK, N.A. Full-Service Banking Member FDIC Frederic - Danbury - Siren

DAEFFLER’S QUALITY MEATS, INC. Wholesale & Retail Meats Custom Butchering & Processing Phone 715-327-4456

INTER-COUNTY CO-OP PUBLISHING ASSOCIATION Printers & Publishers Office Supplies

Frederic, Wis. - 715-327-4236 Shell Lake, Wis. - 715-468-2314 Siren, Wis. - 715-349-2560 St. Croix Falls, Wis. - 715-483-9008

STATE FARM INSURANCE COMPANIES

Corey T. Arnold, Agent Frederic, Wis. Phone 715-327-8076

BEAN’S COUNTRY GRIDDLE Hwys. 35 & 48 Downtown Frederic Phone 715-327-5513

“Your Electric Servant” Serving Polk & Burnett Counties “Use Energy Wisely”

WEBSTER CASHCO BUILDING SUPPLIES Complete Lumber & Building Supplies

CARLSON-ROWE FUNERAL HOME

Phone 715-866-4238 Hwy. 35 N. Webster, Wis. Tom & Becky O’Brien, Owners

MEDICINE SHOPPE

HOPKINS SAND & GRAVEL, INC.

Frederic, Wis. 715-327-4475 110 Oak Street Frederic, Wis. 715-327-4208 Monday - Friday 8:30 - 5 Not Open On Saturday Duane Lindh

HAULING

• Gravel • Sand • Rock • Top Soil • Trackhoe 715-472-2717 Mobile 715-491-1861 1065 290th Ave. Frederic, Wis.

LUCK VAN METER’S MEATS

Government Inspected Slaughtering and Processing, Sausage making • Ham and Bacon Cured and Smoked Sides and Quarters of Beef and Pork Available Old-fashioned Fresh Meat Counter Tim Van Meter and Ross Anderson, Owners Luck, WI 54853 Plant 715-472-2141

Sand, Gravel, Ready-Mix, Concrete, Black Dirt, Dozer Work, Landscaping & Septic Tanks Installed

ALPHA BASS LAKE LUMBER • Complete Line of Building Supplies & Lumber • Cabot’s Stains Grantsburg, Wis. 715-488-2471 or 715-327-8766

BURNETT DAIRY CO-OP 1988 World Champion Cheesemaker Earl Wilson, Cheese Plant Mgr. Clif Gipp, Ag. Supply Mgr. for Feed, Propane & Fertilizer Alpha, Wis. 715-689-2468 • 715-689-2467

CUSHING CUSHING COOPERATIVE SOCIETY Feed Mill - Grain Dept. Cushing, Wis. 715-648-5215

Hwy. 35 North Webster, Wis. Phone 715-866-4157 M.P.R.S. #03059

SWEDBERG-TAYLOR FUNERAL HOME Webster, Wis. Phone 715-866-7131

BRUCE’S AUTO REPAIR & TOWING

Churches 12/09

FREDERIC

NORTHWESTERN WISCONSIN ELECTRIC CO.

Wrecker - Flatbed Air Conditioning & Computerized Car Service - Cold Weather Starts

Webster, Wis. 715-866-4100 Days • 715-866-8364 Eves.

SIREN OLSEN & SON

Your Full-Service Drugstore Siren, Wis. Phone 715-349-2221

Any area business wishing to help sponsor the church listings should contact the Leader at 715-327-4236.

MARCH 17, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 21

Church Directory ADVENTIST

SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST - FREDERIC

609 Benson Road. Pastor Curtis Denney Sat. Worship 11 a.m.; Sabbath Schl. 9:30 a.m. ALLIANCE

ALLIANCE

ALLIANCE CHURCH OF THE VALLEY Senior Pastor Bob Morton 1259 Hwy. 35 S., St. Croix Falls Sunday Worship: 8:30, 9:45 & 11 a.m.

BIBLE FELLOWSHIP

BIBLE FELLOWSHIP

WORD OF LIFE CHURCH

Meeting in homes. Elders: Cliff Bjork, Jon Zens, 715-483-1357 and 715-755-3048 Sun. Fellowship - 10 a.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. LUTHERAN

LUTHERAN

BALSAM LUTHERAN CHURCH

1115 Mains Crossing, 1/2 Mile South Hwy. 8 On 110th St.; Pastor Matt Faarem Sun. Worship 9 a.m.; Sun. School 10:15 a.m. Wed. Bible Study 8:30 a.m.; Wed. LOGOS 3:20 p.m.

BEAUTIFUL SAVIOR LUTHERAN (WELS) Gene E. Jahnke, Pastor, 715-635-7672, Hm. 715-354-7787, Hwy. 70 at 53, Spooner Sun. Wor. - 9:30 a.m.; Sun. School & Bible Classes For All - 10:45 a.m.

BETHANY LUTHERAN - BRANSTAD Pastor Jay Ticknor, 715-463-5746 3 miles So. of Grantsburg on Hwy. 87 Sun. Schl. - 9:30 a.m.; Worship - 11 a.m.

BETHANY LUTHERAN - SIREN

Hwy. 35, 1/2 blk. N. Main St. Interim Pastor Andrew Hinwood Pastoral Serv. 715-349-5280 Sun. Schl. 8:15 a.m.; Sun. Wor. - 9:30 a.m.

BETHESDA LUTHERAN - DRESSER (LCMC) www.bethesdalutheran.ws

Pastor Mark Richardson, 715-755-2562 Pastor Mike Winick 1947 110th Ave., Dresser Praise Serv. 8:15 a.m.; Heart Song Serv., Adult Ed & Sun. Schl. 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Trad. Serv. 10:45 a.m.

BONE LAKE LUTHERAN bllc@lakeland.ws

Pastor Mary Ann Bowman, 5 mi. E. of Luck on Hwy. 48, 1/2 mi. S. on I; 715-472-8153, Office/Kit. - 715-472-2535 Sun. Schl. & Adult Bible Study 9 a.m.; Fellowship 10 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m. Holy Communion 1st & 3rd Sundays

CHRIST LUTHERAN (LCMS)

Pipe Lake CTH G & T, 715-822-3096 Pastor Steve Miller Sun. Serv. 10:45 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9:15 a.m. during schl. yr.; Holy Communion 1st & 3rd Sun. www.christlutheranpipelake.com

CLAM FALLS LUTHERAN (AALC)

Pastor Gary Rokenbrodt - 715-653-2630 Communion 1st Sunday Worship 9 a.m.; Sunday School 9 a.m.

FAITH LUTHERAN - BALSAM LAKE

faithlutheran@lakeland.ws Pastor Diane Norstad 715-485-3800; CTH I & Mill Street Worship 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 10:40 a.m.; Holy Communion 1st & last Sundays

FAITH LUTHERAN - GRANTSBURG

Pastor Victor St. George, 715-463-5388 Worship 9:30 a.m.; Sun. School 10:45 a.m.

FIRST EVAN. LUTHERAN

5561 Chestnut St., Taylors Falls, MN 651-465-5265 Traditional Wor. 8:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. & Youth 9:45 a.m.; Adult Learning 10 a.m.; Contemp. Wor. 11 a.m.

FIRST LUTHERAN - CUSHING

Pastor Dorothy Sandahl, 715-648-5323 or 715-648-5324 Sun. Wor. 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9 a.m.

FRISTAD LUTHERAN - CENTURIA

ELCA - 501 Hwy. 35, 715-646-2357, Mel Rau, Pastor Sun. Wor. & Holy Communion - 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - 10:40 a.m.

GEORGETOWN LUTHERAN - ELCA

Rt. 1, Balsam Lake, WI (Fox Creek) Pastor Neal Weltzen; GT Office - 715-857-5580, Parsonage - 715-822-3001, TR Office - 715-822-3001 Wors. Serv. 10:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9:15 a.m.; Holy Communion - 1st Sun. of each month

GRACE LUTHERAN - WEST SWEDEN

Phone 715-327-4340, 715-327-8384, 715-327-8090 Pastor David Almlie Worship 9:15 a.m.; Sun. School 10:30 a.m. Communion - 1st & 2nd Sundays

IMMANUEL LUTHERAN - FREDERIC

(Missouri Synod) Pastor Jody R. Walter, 715-327-8608 Sun. Schl. - 8:45 a.m.; Service - 10:45 a.m. Communion - 1st & 3rd Sun.

LAKESIDE COMMUNITY LUTH. - ELCA

CTH H, 1/2 mi. N. of CTH A & H on H Church Off. 715-635-7791 Roger Pittman, Pastor Sun. Schl. 9 a.m.; Worship Serv. 10 a.m.

LAKETOWN LUTHERAN - CUSHING

Pastor Dorothy Sandahl Sun. Wor. 10:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 10:30 a.m.

LUCK LUTHERAN

510 Foster Ave. E. Office 715-472-2605; Home 715-472-8424 Worship Service 10:30 a.m.

MILLTOWN LUTHERAN

113 W. Main St.. W., Phone 715-825-2453 Pastor Danny G. Wheeler 9:15 a.m. Worship 10 a.m. Sunday School

NEW HOPE LUTHERAN CHURCH

METHODIST

METHODIST

ATLAS UNITED METHODIST

Pastor Carolyn Saunders, 715-463-2624 Sunday School - 11 a.m.; Worship - 11 a.m.

ST. FRANCIS XAVIER

Pastor Father Daniel Bodin, 651-465-7345 25293 Redwing Ave., Shafer, MN Sunday 9 a.m.

ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST

Pastor Carolyn Saunders, 715-463-2624 Worship - 9 a.m.; Sun. School - 10:30 a.m.

Pastor Michael J. Tupa, 715-866-7321 Cedar & Muskey Ave. - Webster Mass Sun 10:45 a.m., Wed. 5:45 p.m. (SeptMay), Fri. 9 a.m. (Summer) Sat. 8:15 p.m. on Sept. 1

Pastor Maggie Isaacson, 715-825-3559 3 mi. W. of Milltown on “G” Sun. Wor. - 9:15 a.m. Holy Communion 1st & 3rd Sundays

DANBURY UNITED METHODIST

ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC

OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN, (LCMS) WEBSTER

Cindy Glocke, Pastor, 715-866-8646 Sunday Worship - 10:30 a.m.

Emory Johnson, Interim Pastor at Siren High School Auditorium Sunday Worship Service 9:30 a.m.

NORTH VALLEY LUTHERAN

CENTRAL UNITED METHODIST GRANTSBURG

Cindy Glocke, Pastor, 715-866-8646 Sun. Worship - 9 a.m.

GRACE UNITED - WEBSTER

404 Wis. Ave., Amery, 715-268-7717 Father John Drummy, Pastor Sat. Mass 4 p.m., Sun. Mass 8 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. Sacrament of Reconciliation Sat., 3:30 p.m. or by appt.

HOLY TRINITY UNITED METHODIST

ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC

Rev. Jody Walter, Interim, Phone 715-327-8608; Church Phone 715-866-7191 Sun. Wors. - 9:15 a.m.; Communion 1st & 3rd Sundays

Holytrinity@wisconsinumc.org 1606 165th Ave., CTH I, Centuria Paul Foulke, Pastor, 715-485-3363 Sun. Wor. - 9 a.m.

PEACE LUTHERAN - DRESSER (ELCA)

LAKEVIEW UNITED - HERTEL

2355 Clark Road, Dresser, WI, 715-755-2515 Web site: plcdresser.org Pastor Wayne Deloach, Intern Lori Peper Sun. Wor. 8:30 & 11 a.m., Sun. Schl. 9:35 a.m.

PILGRIM LUTHERAN - FREDERIC (ELCA)

Pastor Catherine Burnette 507 Wisconsin Ave. N., 715-327-8012 Sunday Schl. 9 a.m.; Sunday Wor. - 10 a.m.; Holy Communion 1st & 2nd Sundays www.pilgrimlutheranfrederic.org

REDEEMER EV. LUTHERAN

(Wisconsin Synod) Pastor Gene DeVries 200 N. Adams St., St. Croix Falls Sun. Wor. - 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - 8:30 a.m.

ST. JOHN’S EV. LUTHERAN (Wis. Synod) 350 Michigan Ave., Centuria Sun. Wor. - 10:45 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - 10 a.m.

ST. PETER’S LUTHERAN - LUCK

1614 CTH, North Luck Office Ph.715-472-2605; Dial-A-Devotion 715-472-2345 Sun. Worship - 9 a.m.

SHEPHERD OF THE VALLEY LUTHERAN

(Missouri Synod) 140 Madison St. South, St. Croix Falls Pastor Mark K. Schoen Sun. Service - 9 a.m.; Sun.School - 10:30 a.m.

TRINITY LUTHERAN - ELCA

10 mi. W. of Cumberland on Hwy. 48 (McKinley) - Pastor Neal Weltzin GT Office 715-857-5580, Parsonage 715-822-3001, TR Office - 715-822-3001 Wor. Serv. - 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - 10:15 a.m. Holy Communion - 1st Sunday

TRINITY LUTHERAN LCMS, DANBURY

Rev. Jody Walter, Interim Home 715-327-8608; Church 715-866-7191 Sunday Worship Service - 7:45 a.m. Holy Communion 1st & 3rd Sundays

TRINITY LUTHERAN - FALUN

Hwy. 70 East, 715-689-2271, Pastor: Carl Heidel Worship 9 a.m.; Sunday School 10:15 a.m. Communion -Every Sunday

TRINITY EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN OSCEOLA

300 Seminole Ave. (CTH M) Mark Kock, Pastor, 715-294-2828 Sunday Worship at 8 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. Sunday School (ages 4 thru 12th grade), Fellowship, Adult Bible Class at 9:15 a.m.

WEST DENMARK LUTHERAN

Pastors Mike & Linda Rozumalski 1 mi. west of Luck on N, 2478 170th St., Luck Sun. Schl. 9 a.m.; Fellowship 9:45 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m.

WEST IMMANUEL LUTHERAN - ELCA

Rev. Rexford D. Brandt 447 180th St., Osceola, 715-294-2936 Sun. Wor. 8 & 10:30 a.m.; Sun Schl. 9:15 a.m. Communion 1st & 3rd Sunday of the month

YELLOW LAKE LUTHERAN

1/2 mi. W. of Hwy. 35 on U, 715-866-8281, Pastors Douglas Olson and Roger Kampstra Services begin at 9:30 a.m.; Communion 1st & 3rd Sunday

ZION LUTHERAN - BONE LAKE (AALC)

Pastor Gary Rokenbrodt - 715-653-2630 5 mi. E. of Frederic on W, 2 mi. south on I; Sun. School 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m. Communion - 1st Sunday

Rev. Thomas E. Thompson, 715-294-2243 255 E. 10th Ave., Osceola Masses: Sun. 10:30 a.m., Tues. 5 p.m. Thurs. at 10 a.m. at Osc. Nursing Home

ASSEMBLY

Pastor Jack Starr Wor. - 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - during worship hour

ASSEMBLY

LEWIS MEMORIAL UNITED METHODIST Tom Cook, Pastor Worship 8:45 a.m.; Sunday Schl. 10 a.m.

Pastor Don Wiltshire, 715-640-6400 Centuria - Phone 715-646-2172 Sunday Service: 10 a.m.

McKINLEY UNITED METHODIST

OSCEOLA COMMUNITY CHURCH

Pastor Annie Tricker Sun. Wor. 11 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 11 a.m. Potluck dinner 1st Sunday

OSCEOLA UNITED METHODIST

CENTURIA ASSEMBLY OF GOD

Pastor Larry Mederich, 715-294-4332 www.occconnect.org Mtg. @ St. Croix Art Barn; Sun. Serv. - 9 a.m. Nursery and children church

SIREN ASSEMBLY OF GOD

oumc@centurytel.net 306 River Street, Osceola, 715-755-2275 Pastor Mark Gilbert Adult Class - 8:30 a.m.; Sunday Schl. 10 a.m. Sunday Worship - 10 a.m.; Holy Communion 1st Sunday

Pastor Andrew Bollant Sun. Schl. - 9:15 a.m.; Morn. Serv. - 10:15 a.m.; Supervised Nursery; Wed. Evening - Worship Serv. 6:30 p.m.

ST. CROIX FALLS UNITED METHODIST

EVANGELICAL

Rev. Mike Weaver Sunday Worship Service - 10 a.m. Sun. School is at 9 a.m., Nursery available

EVANGELICAL

TRADE RIVER EVAN. FREE

Pastor Arveda “Freddie” Kirk, 715-327-4436 Early Wor. 8:30 a.m.; Sun. Wor. 10 a.m. Souper service Wed. 5:15 p.m.

Pastor Dale VanDeusen, 715-488-2296 or 715-488-2653 20296 Hwy. 87, Grantsburg Morning Worship - 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School - 10:45 a.m.; Nursery provided for all services

SIREN UNITED METHODIST

APPLE RIVER COMMUNITY (EFCA)

ST. LUKE UNITED - FREDERIC

Tom Cook, Pastor Sunday School 9 a.m. Worship - 10:15 a.m. (Nursery available)

TAYLORS FALLS UNITED METHODIST

Pastor Bruce Tanner, 715-268-2176 942 U.S. Hwy. 8, Amery Sun. Schl. 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible study 7 p.m.

WOLF CREEK UNITED METHODIST

Pastor Greg Lund, 715-327-8767 700 Churchwood Lane; 505 Old CTH W Sun. Schl. - 9 a.m.; Morn. Worship - 10:15 a.m.; Nursery provided for all services

290 W. Government Street, 715-294-4436 Reverend Dr. Rolland Robinson Sunday Service - 10 a.m. with nursery Sunday School - Sept. - May at 10 a.m. Rev. Mike Weaver Sunday Worship - 8:15 a.m. COVENANT

COVENANT

CALVARY COVENANT - ALPHA

Pastor Scott Sagel, 715-689-2541 Sun. Schl. 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Wor. 10:30 p.m.; Elevator provided, welcome

SIREN COVENANT

Pastor Dave Guertin 7686 Lofty Pines Drive, Siren, 715-349-5601 Worship 10 a.m.; Sunday School 9 a.m.

UNITED COVENANT - CLEAR LAKE

Pastor Gary Tonn Praise Time 8 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m. Sunday School 9:20 a.m. CATHOLIC

CATHOLIC

ASSUMPTION OF THE BLESSED VIRGIN MARY

Rev. Thomas E. Thompson, 715-247-3310 255 St. Hwy. 35, East Farmington Mass Friday 9 a.m.; Sacrament of Penance Sat. 3:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF ST. JOSEPH

Pastor - Father Daniel Bodin 490 Bench St., Taylors Falls, 651-465-7345 Sat. Vigil 5:30 p.m.; Sun. 7:30 & 10:30 a.m. Tues. - Thurs. 7:30 a.m.

OUR LADY OF PERPETUAL HELP

FREDERIC EVAN. FREE CHURCH

BAPTIST

BAPTIST

EAST BALSAM BAPTIST - BALSAM LK.

Pastor David Sollitt 715-857-5411 or 715-268-2651 Worship Service - 9 a.m.; Sunday School-10:15 a.m.

EUREKA BAPTIST

2393 210th Ave., St. Croix Falls Pastor Willis Christenson, 715-483-9464 Sunday School - 10 a.m.; Worship Service - 11 a.m.

FAITH FELLOWSHIP

Hwy. 35 and CTH N., Luck Bill McEachern Pastor, 715-485-3973 Sun. Bible study - 9 a.m.; Sun. Wor. - 10 a.m.

FIRST BAPTIST - AMERY

131 Broadway St., 715-268-2223; www.fbcamery.org Pastor Charlie Butt, Lead Pastor Sunday Worship: 9 - 10:15 a.m. & 10:30 -11:45 a.m.; Childrens church ages 3-4 Sun. Schl. for Pre-K to 5th; Sun. Schl. for Jr./Sr. high meet in teen center Nursery available

WESLEYAN

WESLEYAN

WOODLAND WESLEYAN

Dairyland - Rev. Andrea Wittwer 715-244-3649 Sunday School - 10 a.m.; Worship - 11 a.m.

FULL GOSPEL

FULL GOSPEL

WOOD RIVER CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP

Pastor Dan Slaikeu 4 mi. SE of Grantsburg on Williams Rd. Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m.

HOPE FELLOWSHIP OF SOMERSET 231 Bluff Drive, 715-247-2435 Services are Sundays at 10:30 a.m.

CHRISTIAN CENTER

CHRISTIAN CENTER

EL SALEM/TWIN FALLS CHRISTIAN CENTER

1751 100th Ave., Dresser Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship 10:30 a.m. Evening Services Sun. 6 p.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. Call Pastor Darryl Olson at 715-755-3133 for information and directions

ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN

CHRISTIAN ORTHODOX

HOLY TRINITY ORTHODOX

523 1st St., Clayton, 715-948-2493 Fr. Christopher Wojcik, Pastor Saturday Vespers - 5 p.m.; Sunday Liturgy - 9:30 a.m.

HOLY CROSS ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN

Meeting at Zion Lutheran Church, 28005 Old Towne Rd., Chisago Lakes, MN hcomm.org Sunday Worship Service 9:30 a.m. NAZARENE

NAZARENE

CALVARY CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE

510 S. Vincent, St. Croix Falls Pastor Lori Ward, 715-483-3696 Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:45 a.m. & Wed. 6:30 p.m.

FAITH COMMUNITY

7535 Peet St., Danbury, 715-656-4010 Reverend R.A. Luebke Adult Bible Service 9 a.m.; Services: Sun. 10 a.m.; Sunday School during church service.

NONDENOMINATIONAL

NONDENOMINATIONAL

CENTERPOINT CHURCH “Come as you are”

Interim Pastor Craig Jorgenson Sun. Worship 10 a.m.; Children’s Church: K to 6th Grade

OUR LADY OF THE LAKES

FIRST BAPTIST - TAYLORS FALLS, MN

Meets at Dresser Elem. School, Dresser Pastor Michael Brand, 715-417-2468 Adult Class 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9:45 a.m.; Worship Service 9:45 a.m.; Nursery available

FIRST BAPTIST - WEBSTER

Rev. Bruce Brooks - 715-483-3550 719 Nevada St. , (between Simonson & Tower Roads) , St. Croix Falls Worship - 10 a.m. (Nursery provided) Sun. Schl. - Child.- 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - Adults 8:45 a.m.; Communion 1st Sunday

Minister Garret Derouin, 715-866-7157 Musky & Birch St., Avail. in office 9 a.m. - noon, Tues.-Fri.; Sun. Bible Study 9:30 a.m. Worship 10:30 a.m.

NEW LIFE COMMUNITY - AMERY

SACRED HEARTS OF JESUS & MARY

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN

CHURCH OF CHRIST - WEBSTER

Pastor Marlon Mielke, 715-825-3186 Sunday School 9:45 a.m.; Worship 11 a.m., 7 p.m.

ZION LUTHERAN - MARKVILLE

PRESBYTERIAN

CHURCH OF CHRIST

CHURCH OF CHRIST

FIRST BAPTIST - MILLTOWN

Pastor Martin Weigand - 715-294-3489 Sun. Schl. 9 a.m.; Adult Bible Class 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m.

PRESBYTERIAN

Pastor Andy McDaniel, 715-327-8402 Sun. Schl. - 9:15 a.m.; Wor. Serv. - 10:15 a.m.; Nursery provided.; www.tradelakebaptistchurch.org

Danbury - 7586 St. Rd. 77, 715-866-7321 Pastor - Father Michael J. Tupa Mass - Wed. 5 p.m. (Summer), Fri. 9 a.m. (Sept.-May). Reconciliation as per bulletin & by appt.

Located across from elemen. school on West St., Pastor, Dr. Kevin Schumann; 651-465-7171 Sun. Morn. - Sun. Schl. for all ages - 9 a.m. Morn. Worship - 10:15 a.m.; Nursery provided.

Pastor David Almlie, 715-327-8384, 715-327-8090 Fellowship - 10:30 a.m., Sun. Schl. 9:45 a.m.; Worship 11 a.m., Communion - 1st & 2nd Sundays

TRADE LAKE BAPTIST

Pastor Kevin Miller Associate Pastor Roger Inouye Sunday School - (all ages) - 9:30 a.m. Church Serv. - 10:45 a.m.

Balsam Lake - Rev. John A. Drummy, Pastor - 405-2253 Mass: Sat. eves. 6 p.m.; Sun. 8:30 a.m.; Tues. 5:30 p.m.; Fri. 9 a.m.Sacrament of Reconciliation 7:30 a.m. Sun. or by appt.

ZION LUTHERAN - TRADE LAKE

Pastor Doug McConnell Youth Pastor Chris Radtke At Grantsburg High School, 715-463-5794 Sun. Serv. 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 11 a.m.

Pastor Dick Enerson, www.centerpointstcroix.com 715-294-1833, Meeting at SCF High Schl. - Main entrance 740 Maple Drive, St. Croix Falls Sunday Worship 10 - 11:15 a.m.

FIRST BAPTIST - FALUN

ZION LUTHERAN - EAST FARMINGTON (WELS )

Pastor Tim Faust Worship - 11 a.m.; Sun. School - 10 a.m. Holy Communion - 1st & 3rd Sunday

LIVING HOPE CHURCH

Pastor Father Michael J. Tupa CTHs A & H - 715-866-7321 Crescent Lake Voyager Village area. Mass Sun. 8:15 a.m., Thurs. 11:30 a.m. Reconciliation as per bulletin and by appt.

ST. DOMINIC - FREDERIC & IMMACULATE CONCEPTION - GRANTSBURG CATHOLIC MASS SCHED.

Pastor: Rev. Dennis M. Mullen, 715-327-8119 St. Dominic: Sat. 4:30 p.m.; Sun. 10:30 a.m. Immaculate Conception: Sun. 8:30 a.m. Call the office for daily & holy day Mass times

ST. ANNE PARISH

Rev. Thomas E. Thompson, 715-247-3310 139 Church Hill Rd., Somerset Mass Sun. 8:30 a.m.; Wed. 9 a.m. Sacrament of Penance Sun. 8 a.m.

Church Phone 715-866-4111; Rev. Merrill Olson - Pastor Sun. Schl. - 9:30 a.m.; Wor. - 10:45 a.m (Nursery Provided)

GRACE CHURCH OF OSCEOLA “The Cure for the Common Church”

722 Seminole Ave., Osceola Pastor Dr. Kent Haralson; 715-294-4222 or 715-755-3454; info@gracechurchosceola.com Sun.: Praise & Worship Serv. 9 am., Adult Bible Study 10:45 a.m., Children’s Sun. Schl. 10:45 a.m.

GRACE BAPTIST - GRANTSBURG

716 S. Robert St., Grantsburg, 715-463-5699 Sr. Pastor Brad Moore David Ahlquist, Assoc. Pastor Sun. Wor. 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 11 a.m.

NEW LIFE CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY

NEW WINE CHURCH - CENTURIA

309 5th Street, 715-338-2751 Pastors Randy and Pam Stone Sunday 10 a.m.; Wednesday 7 p.m.

NORTHERN PINES FRIENDS WORSHIP

GROUP 715-733-0481 or 715-733-0480 for time of meeting.

INTERDENOMINATIONAL

INTERDENOMINATIONAL

RIVER VALLEY CHRISTIAN

1289 160th St. (Hwy. 65), St. Croix Falls 715-483-5378 Pastors Dan and Claudia Denissen Sunday Adult Bible Class 9 a.m. (No child care available) Worship and Children’s Sunday Schl. 10 a.m.

church directory

ADVENTIST

PAGE 22 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - MARCH 17, 2010

HELP WANTED TRUCK DRIVER

Leasing 3/4 - 1 ton trucks. Deliver RV’s nationwide. Must be 23 yrs., clean MVR, 6 months verifiable over road driving experience within last 3 years OR own personal RV, verifiable past 5 years. Bennett 574-848-7315. (CNOW)

MISCELLANEOUS

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING WORKS! Make one call and place your 25 word classified ad into 176 newspapers in Wisconsin. Call this newspaper or 800-227-7636. (CNOW)

OLD VINTAGE FIREWORKS and firecracker packs, brick & bundles wanted. Paying cash. Will pick up. 608-799-0815. (CNOW)

EQUIPMENT FOR SALE

NEW Norwood SAWMILLS LumberMate-Pro handles 34” diameter, mills boards 27” wide. Automated quick-cyclesawing increases efficiency up to 40%! www.Norwood Sawmills.com/300N 1-800661-7746 Ext 300N (CNOW)

HEALTH AND BEAUTY

IF YOU USED TYPE 2 DIABETES DRUG AVANDIA AND SUFFERED A STROKE OR HEART ATTACK? You may be entitled to compensation. Call Attorney Charles Johnson 1-800-535-5727 (CNOW)

www.the-leader.net Dr. Daniel C. Satterlund Hours: Tues., Thurs., Fri. 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

Phone (715) 472-2121

715-866-4700

SEE US FOR ALL YOUR VISION CARE NEEDS. Exams, Glasses & Contacts, Foreign Body Removal, Treatment of Eye Disease www.stcroixeye.com

Mon.-Fri. • 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Swedberg-Taylor Funeral Home Webster, Wisconsin

“Distinctive Funeral Service”

THE BOUNTY HUNTER REPO MEN

(R) Fri., Mon.-Thurs: 5:15, 7:20, 9:30 Sat.-Sun.: 1:00, 3:10, 5:15, 7:20, 9:30

(R) Fri., Mon.-Thurs: 5:25, 7:30, 9:40 Sat.-Sun.: 1:05, 3:15, 5:25, 7:30, 9:40

SHUTTER ISLAND

SHE’S OUT OF MY LEAGUE (R) Fri., Mon.-Thurs: 5:15, 7:15, 9:15 Sat.-Sun.: 1:15, 3:15, 5:15, 7:15, 9:15

ALICE IN WONDERLAND

(PG) Fri., Mon.-Thurs: 5:10, 7:15, 9:20 Sat.-Sun.: 1:00, 3:05, 5:10, 7:15, 9:20

Rated R, 138 Minutes. Fri.-Sun.: 1:30, 4:30 & 7:30 p.m.; Mon.-Thurs.: 6:00 p.m.

SHUTTER ISLAND

DIARY OF A WIMPY KID

Rated PG, 91 Minutes. Fri.-Sun.: 1:00, 3:00, 5:00, 7:00 & 9:00 p.m.; Mon.-Thurs.: 5:00 & 7:00 p.m.

THE CRAZIES

(R) Fri., Mon.-Thurs: 4:45, 7:10, 9:40 Sat.-Sun.: 1:30, 4:45, 7:10, 9:40

CHECK WEB SITE FOR SHOW TIMES: www.evergreen-entertainment.com

Robert L. Nelson New York Life Insurance Company Box 313 Luck, Wis. 54853 Phone

715-472-2502

NEW YORK LIFE

See us for all your printing needs.

• Shell Lake, 715-468-2314 • St. Croix Falls 715-483-9008

Visit The Leader’s Web Site:

www.the-leader.net

Silent Auction - Kids Games 2/$1 Family-style Karaoke

Milltown Community Center Sale Saturday, March 20, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Business Donations/Volunteers call 715-554-2142

HACKER’S LANES

All shows and show times before 6 p.m. $5.00. Shows and show times subject to change. Visit us on our Web site: www.timberstheatres.com

413 Wis. Ave. S., Box 45, Frederic, WI 54837 Phone: 715-327-9969 • Fax: 715-327-8535 E-mail: 10pin@centurytel.net

Free Bowling Saturday, March 20 Kindergarten thru Grade 6 1 p.m. - 3 p.m. Sponsored by: Frederic Youth Sports Unlimited

Daily: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. AUSTIN LAKE GREENHOUSE & FLOWER SHOP

• WEDDING BOUQUETS • FUNERAL DESIGNS • CUT FLOWERS • GIFTS • BALLOONS • BEDDING PLANTS • POTTED PLANTS • TUXEDO RENTAL BY SAVVI • ANTLER KING PRODUCTS Hwy. 35 & “FF,” Webster Flowers Phoned Anywhere

Call 715-866-7261

Let’s Thrive.®

Cris A. Moore, FICF, FIC Senior Financial Consultant

Joel L. Morgan, FIC

Assistant Financial Associate

Matt P. Bobick Financial Associate

507116 30L

INTER-COUNTY COOPERATIVE PUBLISHING ASSOCIATION

ROSIE BLY REWARD FUNDRAISER Rummage Sale - Bake Sale Donation Drop Off Friday, March 19, 4 to 8 p.m. 1/2 Price Sale Sunday, March 21, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Rated R, 101 Minutes. Fri.-Sun.: 1:00, 3:40, 6:00 & 8:40 p.m.; Mon.-Thurs.: 5:00 & 7:40 p.m.

Rated PG, 109 Minutes. Fri.-Sun.: 1:00, 3:30, 6:00 & 8:30 p.m.; Mon.-Thurs.: 5:00 & 7:30 p.m.

Friday, March 26, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday, March 27, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, March 28, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Reservations: 715-483-9190

I wish to thank the Tribal Council for all the help they’ve given me, and thank you to all the people who have helped me through the years! Once again, “Thank you, Tribal Council.” I pray every night for each and every one of you. Sincerely, 506917 30Lp Elizabeth Dearbin, Webster

GREEN ZONE

AT THE LODGE

Dresser, Wis.

TRIBAL COUNCIL

(PG-13) Fri., Mon.-Thurs: 5:20, 7:25, 9:35 Sat.-Sun.: 1:00, 3:10, 5:20, 7:25, 9:35

(R) Fri., Mon.-Thurs: 5:25, 7:30, 9:35 Sat.-Sun.: 1:15, 3:20, 5:25, 7:30, 9:35

24226 1st Ave. No. Siren, WI Local Movie Line 715-349-8888 Timbers1@starwire.net SHOW TIMES FOR FRI., MARCH 19 THRU THURS., MARCH 25

TROLLHAUGEN GUN SHOW 507006 30Lp

(PG) Fri., Mon.-Thurs: 5:05, 7:05, 9:05 Sat.-Sun.: 1:05, 3:05, 5:05, 7:05, 9:05

CRAZY HEART

• Commercial Printing • Office Supplies • Daily UPS Pickup • Fax & Copy Service

• Frederic, 715-327-4236 • Siren, 715-349-2560

DIARY OF A WIMPY KID

Phone 715-268-2004

Eye health exams, glaucoma checks, foreign body removal, full line of street wear, safety and sport wear, contact lenses

WEBSTER EYE ASSOCIATES

SHOWS AND SHOW TIMES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. ALL SEATS $6.50 UNTIL 6 P.M.

OPTOMETRIST 119 Arlington Drive Amery, Wis.

304 1st St. So., Luck, Wis.

715-463-2370

March 19 - March 25

Dr. T.L. Christopherson

Family Eye Clinic

GRANTSBURG EYE ASSOCIATES

SHOWS AND SHOW TIMES

Every page in color in our E-dition Go to: www.the-leader.net

ALICE IN WONDERLAND

Subscribe online!

2179 E. Hwy. 8 Between Tractor Supply and Wal-Mart www.evergreen-entertainment.com

507151 30Lp

MODEL HOME CLOSEOUT! 3 Bedroom 2 Bath Ranch includes kitchen appliances, washer & dryer, floor coverings, window treatments and much more for only $49,900. at Town & Country Housing, Bus Hwy 53 between Eau Claire & Chippewa Falls, (715) 8341279 (CNOW)

FOR SALE ANTIQUES, COLLECTIBLES

715-483-1471

All Stadium/Digital

506698 19a 30L

MANUFACTURED HOMES

ALL CASH VENDING! Do you earn $800 in a day? Your own local candy route. Includes 25 Machines and Candy. All for $9,995. 1-888745-3358 Multi Vend, LLC (CNOW)

WE HAVE PARTS for tractors, combines, machinery, hay equipment and more. Used, new, rebuilt, aftermarket. Downing Tractor Parts, Downing, Wis., www. asapagparts.com 877-5301010. 32Ltfc FOR SALE: 45-inch-tall piano, excellent condition. Call 715-327-8702. 28-29Lp LOST: White gold necklace and pendant. Please call 715-483-3046. 29-30Lp

ST. CROIX FALLS

507164 30L 20a,d

DONATE VEHICLE Receive $1,000 grocery coupon. Noah’s Arc Support NO KILL Shelters, Research To Advance Veterinary Treatments. Free Towing, Tax Deductible, Non-Runners Accepted 1866-912-GIVE. (CNOW)

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

Cinema 8

507113 30L 20a

AUTOMOBILE DONATION

WANT ADS

201 Main St. S. • Luck, WI 54853

715-472-8107 office 800-500-2936 toll-free 22854A N1-07

200700115 12/09

506750 30-31r,L

MARCH 17, 2010 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 23

Students of the Week GRANTSBURG

FREDERIC

Sydney Domagala has been chosen Frederic Elementary School’s student of the week. She is in third grade and the daughter of Scott Domagala. Sydney is an excellent student who is helpful and friendly to everyone. She likes coloring, dancing, singing and playing with her friends and neighbors.

Isabelle Burton has been chosen Frederic Middle School’s student of the week. She is in seventh grade and the daughter of Phil Burton and Tammy Zarn. Isabelle is a very capable and conscientious student who gets involved in classroom activities. She is involved in youth group, track and volleyball. Isabelle enjoys hanging out with friends and swimming. The greatest influence in her life has been her mother.

Kali Otte has been chosen Frederic High School’s student of the week. She is a sophomore and the daughter of Tim and Luann Otte. Kali is a very conscientious and responsible student who is polite and works well with others. She is involved with youth group and works at United Pioneer. She enjoys being outside and camping, baby-sitting and hanging out with friends and family. Kali plans to go to college to be a pediatric RN or an elementary teacher.

Faith Fiedler has been chosen Grantsburg Elementary School’s student of the week. She is in second grade and the daughter of April and Kraig Fiedler. Faith is a hard worker in all areas of school, especially reading. Her favorite subjects are reading and math. Faith enjoys playing outside.

Aaron Sorenson has been chosen Luck High School’s student of the week. He is a senior and the son of Harlan and Lindy Sorenson. Aaron is constantly smiling and is always willing to help out with almost any task at the drop of a hat. He is involved in FFA and delivers the Yellow Paper on Saturdays. Aaron enjoys cutting wood and helping his neighbor saw lumber.

Bruce Campion has been chosen Luck Middle School’s student of the week. He is in seventh grade and the son of Jessica and Bruce Campion. Bruce is a sincere and respectful student who works hard. He communicates well and strives to do his best on his school work. He is involved in school activities and sports. Bruce enjoys video games, swimming and mowing the lawn. The greatest influence in his life is his mom.

Sam Glenna has been chosen St. Croix Falls Elementary School’s student of the week. He is in kindergarten and the son of Jim and Hallie Glenna. Sam loves to read and do his schoolwork. He loves playing games in phy. ed. Sam loves building with Legos and playing with his little sister Emilie. He has three dogs and someday hopes to have chickens. Sam is a respectful and hardworking student.

Alex Johnson has been chosen St. Croix Falls Middle School’s student of the week. He is in fifth grade and the son of Mark and Jill Johnson. Alex enjoys basketball, football, baseball, hunting, fishing and spending time with family. His favorite subject is social studies because he likes learning about the past. Alex is an enthusiastic student with excellent manners. He adds a great deal to the classroom.

Jessica Berganini has been chosen St. Croix Falls High School’s student of the week. She is a sophomore and the daughter of Steve Berganini. Jessica has one sister, Nicole, who is a senior. She enjoys reading, swimming, sleeping and singing. Jessica is involved in FFA.

WEBSTER

SIREN

Grace Schultz has been chosen Siren Elementary School’s student of the week. She is a new student to our district and is doing a wonderful job. Grace finishes all her work correctly and on time. She is very artistic. Grace is helpful to all her classmates and especially her teacher. She is a joy to have in class. Grace is a good leader and always tries her best. She enjoys playing with her bunnies and drawing.

Christina Moore has been chosen Grantsburg High School’s student of the week. She is a sophomore and the daughter of Lisa Moore and Matthew and Sara Moore. Christina is a primary mover who takes personal initiative to express her creativity and knowledge. She is a role model to others. Christina enjoys drawing, sign language, art, color guard, writing poetry, guitar, piano, sax, dancing and singing. She would like to become an oral and sign language interpreter.

ST. CROIX FALLS

LUCK

Sommer Asper has been chosen Luck Elementary School’s student of the week. She is in first grade and the daughter of Chris and Amber Asper. Sommer is a fun girl and she works hard on her schoolwork. She likes to play at recess with friends. When she is at home she likes to play Wii.

Lora Glover has been chosen Grantsburg Middle School’s student of the week. She is in seventh grade and the daughter of Ruth and J.D. Glover. Lora is always willing to volunteer and get the job done. She is kind, polite and has a sunny disposition. Lora always follows through with what she says she will do and goes above and beyond expectations. Her favorite class is science. Lora is involved in choir and student council where she often takes a leadership role.

Arron Johnson has been chosen Siren Middle School’s student of the week. He is in eighth grade and the son of Dionne and Theodore Johnson. Arron is very polite and respectful and always displays a positive attitude. Arron enjoys basketball as well as other sports and seeing his friends. Science is his favorite subject.

Josh Lemieux has been chosen Siren High School’s student of the week. He is a freshman and the son of Lori and Mike Lemieux. Josh demonstrates his academic ability by consistently making the honor roll. He is responsible, hardworking, has a great attitude, is willing to help others and has a good sense of humor. Josh is involved in football, basketball, baseball and coaches T-ball and basketball. He enjoys going up north. Josh plans to attend college to become a physical therapist.

Jenna Ruiz has been chosen Webster Elementary School’s student of the week. She is in second grade and the daughter of Ruben and Jamie Ruiz. Jenna is a very conscientious worker, she always does her work and is dedicated to doing her best. Jenna is involved in softball and hockey. She loves strawberries. Her favorite pastime is drawing and doing art projects. She would like to be a cosmetologist when she grows up.

Elizabeth Freymiller has been chosen Webster Middle School’s student of the week. She is in sixth grade and the daughter of Dave Glienke and Susan Freymiller. Elizabeth is a hard worker and completes her work on time. She has a great sense of humor and gets along well with her classmates. Her favorite subject is science and her favorite school activity is art. Elizabeth enjoyed a family trip to Boscobel and someday she would like to travel to Tokyo.

Brooke Bird has been chosen Webster High School’s student of the week. She is a freshman and the daughter of Heidi Bird and Shawn Bird. Brooke is a very solid student who always comes to class with a great attitude and smile. She treats others with respect and kindness. Brooke enjoys photography and anything outdoors. Her future plans include going to college.

UNITY

Proudly Supporting Our Students Electricity • Propane 1-800-421-0283 www.polkburnett.com

Supporting our area students and their accomplishments. INTER-COUNTY

Serving Northwest Wisconsin

Stop In or Call Us Today

2547 State Road 35, Luck, Wis. (in the Evergreen Plaza)

715-472-4088 www.sterlingbank.ws

If You Would Like To Be A Sponsor Of

STUDENT OF THE WEEK Please Call 715-327-4236

Caleb Vos Benkowski has been chosen Unity Elementary School’s student of the week. He is in second grade and the son of Paul and Jennifer Vos Benkowski. Caleb is a positive role model and is always ready to help other students. His favorite subject is reading. Caleb’s favorite sports are basketball and football.

James VanderWyst has been chosen Unity Middle School’s student of the week. He is in seventh grade and the son of Mike and Tonya VanderWyst. James is a hard worker and has a good sense of humor. He is kind to everyone and is full of smiles. James is a pleasure to have in class. His attention to detail is appreciated.

Brittany Petznick has been chosen Unity High School’s student of the week. She is a senior and the daughter of Scott Petznick and Monica Holdt. Brittany is involved in volleyball, basketball and track. She is an active member of student council and she mentors a middle-school student. Brittany represented Unity at Badger Girl’s State last summer. She will be attending UW-River Falls for elementary education.

PAGE 24 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - MARCH 17, 2010

MARCH

THURSDAY/18 Frederic

• Lioness Club is sponsoring a St. Patrick’s Day Bingo Party at Sunrise Apartments Community Room, 5:30 p.m. Monthly Lioness meeting after party.

Luck

Coming events

• American Legion Auxiliary meeting and Legion birthday potluck at the village hall, 6:30 p.m.

Siren

• Burnett County Republican Party will meet in Room 162 in the government center, 7 p.m.

St. Croix Falls

• “Our Town” at Festival Theatre, 12:30 p.m., 715-4833387, boxoffice@festivaltheatre.org. • Open Arms invites you for food & fellowship at Alliance Church of the Valley, 5-6:30 p.m., 715-483-1100.

Webster

• Diabetes Alert Day hosted by Webster Lioness, at Yellow River Pharmacy and Wayne’s Foods Plus, 10 a.m.2 p.m.

Milltown

• Open house at the library to meet candidates for local public office, 6-8 p.m.

THURSDAY/25

FRIDAY/19

• Red Cross blood drive at the community center, 2-7 p.m., 715-825-3733, givebloodgivelife.org.

Cushing

Amery

Grantsburg

• Northern Lakes Center for the Arts presents “Tobacco Tins,” 7:30-9 p.m., 715-268-6811.

• High school solo and ensemble at 8 a.m.

Luck

Luck

• History of maple syrup making, presentation at the museum/library, 7 p.m., 715-472-4378.

Milltown

• Ruby’s Pantry at 24534 Hwy. 35/70. $15 donation, 2 p.m.

• ACS Run/Walk kickoff breakfast at Café Wren, 7 a.m., 715-472-2654.

Siren

• VFW Post 6856 fish fry, 4:30 p.m.-?

Siren

St. Croix Falls

• Fish fry at Burnett County Moose Lodge, 5:30-7:30 p.m., 715-349-5923.

• “Our Town” at Festival Theatre, 7:30 p.m., 715-4833387, boxoffice@festivaltheatre.org.

SAT. & SUN./20 & 21

FRI.-SUN./26-28

Milltown

Dresser

• Fundraiser for Rose Bly reward fund at the community center. Sat. 8 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.-2 p.m., 715-5542142.

• Trollhaugen Gun Show, Fri. 5-8 p.m.; Sat. 9 a.m.5 p.m.; Sun. 9 a.m.-3 p.m., 715-483-9190.

Rice Lake

• Ham radio class, www.scvhamradio.com or e-mail: n9upc@yahoo.com.

Roberts

• Rod & gun club show at UW gym. Sat. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Sun. 9 a.m.-3 p.m.

FRIDAY/26

SATURDAY/20

Frederic

Amery

• The Elvis Experience at Cricket’s, tickets available at the senior center, 2 p.m. • Northern Lakes Center for the Arts presents “Somethin’ for the Wearin’ o’ the Green,” 7:30 p.m., 715-2686811.

Centuria

• Spring art & craft extravaganza at Fristad Lutheran Church, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., 715-464-2357.

Frederic

• Pancake breakfast at the senior center, 8 a.m.-1 p.m. • Ruby’s Pantry at the school bus garage, $15 donation. Doors open 7:30 a.m. Distribution 8-9:30 a.m., 715-3274143. • Kids bowl free at Hacker’s Lanes, grades K-6, 1-3 p.m., 715-327-9969.

• ACS run/walk kickoff at Hacker’s Lanes, 7 a.m., 800ACS-2345, 715-653-2684.

Melting water rushes over fallen leaves, a promising sign that spring has arrived. - Photo by Gary King

Webb Lake

• St. Patrick’s Day parade, 1 p.m.

SUNDAY/21 Frederic

TUESDAY/23

St. Croix Falls

• Polk County Historical Society meeting at the Justice Center, 7 p.m. • Rachel’s Challenge program at Unity school, 7 p.m.

• Presentation, “Christ in the Passover,” at the Evangelical Free Church, 10:15 a.m., 715-327-8767.

Milltown

• Sunday morning breakfast at the American Legion Post 143, 8 a.m.-noon.

St. Croix Falls

MONDAY/22

• Unity Area Soccer Club dinner fundraiser at Milltown Lutheran Church, 4-7 p.m., 715-825-3926. • American Legion 91st birthday celebration at the Legion Post 143, social 5 p.m., dinner 6 p.m., followed by program & Bingo.

Turtle Lake

• Home & Garden Expo at the casino, 800-846-8946.

Dresser

• The St. Croix Falls Lioness Club invites anyone interested to a Membership Open House at the Village Pizzeria, 6:30 p.m.

Amery

• The German Club will meet at the senior center, 1:30 p.m., 715-268-8706.

Centuria

Balsam Lake

Grantsburg

• Annual meeting of the Anscarius Cemetery Association at Chuck & Delores Swenson’s, 7 p.m., 715-6892403.

Luck

• High school jazz contest.

• Polk County Geneaology Society meets at the Wester home, 12:30 p.m., 715-646-1447.

SATURDAY/27 Amery

• Scrapbooking event at the senior center. Call to reserve space. 9 a.m.-9 p.m., 715-268-6605.

Balsam Lake

• Fire & rescue department spaghetti fundraiser at the station, 4-8 p.m.

St. Croix Falls

• “Our Town” at Festival Theatre, 7:30 p.m., 715-4833387, boxoffice@festivaltheatre.org. • Children’s Easter Egg Hunt at Chateau St. Croix Winery, 2 p.m. • Easter Egg Hunt at Alliance Church of the Valley, ages 2-10, 9:30 a.m., 715-483-1100, www.stcroixalliance.com.

Webster

• Potluck dinner at the senior center, noon.

SUNDAY/28 St. Croix Falls

• “Our Town” at Festival Theatre, 2 p.m., 715-483-3387, boxoffice@festivaltheatre.org.

Antique and Vintage Snowmobile Show

Kevin Kenny, Forest Lake, Minn., took first-place Best of Show in the Siren St. Patrick’s Day Antique and Vintage Snowmobile Show at Crooked Lake Park Saturday, March 13. The competition was sponsored by the Siren Chamber of Commerce. Kenny is shown with his original 1972 Harley-Davidson machine. “I was on snowmobile more this year than in other years. It was a wonderful year,” Kenny said. The machine on the left in the photo, which took second place in Best of Show, is a restored 1973 Starfire owned by Eugene Glenna, Shafer, Minn. Ken Ruhn, Frederic, brought this original 1978 Chrysler Sno Runner to the Antique and Vintage Snowmobile Show at Crooked Lake Park, Siren, Saturday, March 13. The show was sponsored as one of the day’s St. Patrick’s Day activities by the Siren Chamber of Commerce.

Phil and Pickles Stener from Balsam Lake brought two snowmobiles to Siren Saturday, March 13, for the Antique and Vintage Snowmobile Show. They took home third place in Best of Show for their restored 1970 Scorpion Stinger (shown on the right). The snowmobile on the left is a 1970 Ski-Doo Blizzard. – Photos by Nancy Jappe

See our virtual edition @

www.the-leader.net


Leader|march 17|2010