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WED., APRIL 20, 2011 VOL. 78 • NO. 35 • 2 SECTIONS •

Readership: 13,800

An award-winning newspaper serving Northwest Wisconsin

Separation of church and state

Moonglow

Freedom From Religion Foundation asks for an end to prayer at county board meetings PAGE 4

CEO says it’s due to stronger than projected growth of company PAGE 3

ALSO INSIDE

• Two die in Hwy. 65 crash PAGE 2 • New judge to take office early PAGE 3 • Prosser declares victory PAGE 3 • Library project ahead of schedule PAGE 4 • Auditor: Luck in good shape PAGE 5 • Redistricting process begins PAGE 6 • County prepares for life after Budget Repair Bill PAGE 25 • Burnett County Board PAGE 14

Sneak peek into spring softball and track

SPORTS Inside this section

Watch our e-edition each week for stories and photos that don’t make our print edition. Go to www.the-leader.net to subscribe

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What’s your intuition about the economy? 1. Things are improving 2. Things are going to get worse 3. Cautious - it could go either way Go to our online poll at www.the-leader.net (Weekly results on page 8)

Midsummer election possible PAGE 3

Polaris will preserve 50 jobs at Osceola

The electronic edge!

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Harsdorf recall petition filed

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$1

A full moon finds its way above the trees on Sunday, April 17, glowing behind a thin veil of clouds. - Photo by Marty Seeger

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How eBay, over-theroad truckers and “the good Lord” created a story of one local man’s good fortune and faith

by Gary King Leader editor SPIRIT LAKE - The only thing better than finding a great deal on a vehicle is telling others the story about how you got it. Lydell Larson of rural Frederic has

that story - and more - depending on one’s view as to when a leap of faith becomes the real thing. For Larson the leap didn’t come when he increased his bid to top 14 competitors in an eBay auction for a 2001 Dodge Ram pickup truck. It was when he went to retrieve the vehicle by hitchhiking 1,200 miles from Northwest Wisconsin to New Jersey - over a period of three days in March. “My friends have asked me about my new truck and when they learn I

See No reserve, page 4

Deaths

• Jean M. Swanson • Arthur John Cardinal • Georgia May (Brethorst) Lalor • Lowell L. Carlson • Ruth Elaine Coen Hansen • Elaine C. Johnson • Jayme L. Bottolfson • Everett Lough • Ida Packer • David L. Kent • Jeffery S. Pomerleau • Patricia L. Peters • John Henry Barthman • Daryl Glover (p. 3) • Joe W. Mrkonich (p. 3) • John Glockzin (p. 3) Obituaries on page 13-15B

INSIDE

Briefly 3A Letters to the editor 8A Sports 15-22A Outdoors 23-24A Town Talk 6-8B Coming Events Back of B Currents feature 1B Behind the Signpost 5B Letters from Home 3B Cold Turkey 3B River Road Ramblings 4B Obituaries 22-23B Students of the Week 35B Focus on the Family 16B Church directory 16B Copyright © 2011 Inter-County Cooperative Publishing Association Frederic, Wisconsin

Lydell Larson of rural Frederic and the 2001 Dodge Ram truck he purchased on eBay. - Photo by Gary King

The Leader is a cooperative-owned newspaper • Since 1933

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Johnson, Magraw and Kinney to perform

E-mail story ideas, news tips and feedback to: the-leader@centurytel.net

ST. CROIX FALLS- Prudence Johnson, Dean Magraw and Michelle Kinney will perfom Friday evening, April 29, at the St. Croix Festival Theatre. They will be performing their new collaboration “Fearless and Fallen,” a fresh take on songs dating back to the 1600s telling stories about fearless, feisty females and a few fallen angels. The concert begins at 7:30 p.m. At 6:30 p.m. a silent auction will be held to benefit Concerned River Valley Citizens. General admission tickets for $15 can be purchased at the box office or by calling 651-271-8200. Prudence Johnson - Special photo submitted

Village hosts seventh-annual “Earth Week” event

TURLE LAKE - The village of Turtle Lake will be hosting their seventh-annual Earth Week event, April 22 - 29. This year’s theme is Food Integrity: Reaping What We Sow. On Wednesday, April 27, 9:30 a.m. – noon, there will be a viewing of a documentary film followed by a presentation at the Turtle Lake School in the auditorium. An evening showing of the film and brief presentation will begin at 6:30 p.m. at the same location. The event is open to the general public, and members of the community and surrounding area are encouraged to attend. In accordance with the 2011 theme, the film, “Food Inc.,” produced by Robert Kenner, explores the nation’s food industry, revealing the highly mechanized underbelly at the consent of the government’s regulatory agencies, USDA and FDA. The documentary digs deeper to expose how the nation’s food supply is now controlled by a handful of corporations. Results of a survey completed by the Turtle Lake High School and Middle School will also be shared during the presentation. The presentation will conclude with an opportunity to gain information and meet local farmers and growers who will share about their farming practices, extended growing season, product availability to local residents and a question-and-answer session. If you are a local producer and wish to participate, please contact Danielle at the village hall, 715-9862241, Ext. 2, by Tuesday, April 26. A rain date of Thursday, April 28, is set aside for inclement weather for daytime events of April 27. Regardless of such changes, the evening showing will take place on Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. for the general public. This annual Earth Week event is sponsored by the village of Turtle Lake and is made possible by the hard work and cooperation of many volunteers throughout the Turtle Lake community. - from the village of Turtle Lake

One-vehicle crash claims two lives

POLK COUNTY - A one-vehicle crash in southern Polk County claimed the lives of two people, Saturday evening, April 16. Jeffery S. Pomerleau, 35, Luck and Jayme L. Bottolfson, 22, Star Prairie, were both pronounced dead at the scene of the crash. According to the Polk County Sheriff's Department, a 911 call came in at 8:37 p.m. indicating there was a crash on Hwy. 65 near 40th Avenue, about four miles north of the Polk County/St. Croix County line, in the town of Alden. A 2007 Dodge Caliber operated by Pomerleau was traveling north on 65 when the vehicle left the west edge of the roadway and struck a number of trees. Bottolfson, the owner of the vehicle, was a passenger at the time of the crash. Authorities are investigating whether speed and alcohol may have been contributing factors. Obituaries for Pomerleau and Bottolfson can be found elsewhere in this issue. - Gary King

Jayme L. Bottolfson, 22, Star Prairie, a graduate of Osceola High School, was a passenger in a car that left the road and struck a number of trees along Hwy. 65, approximately four miles north of the Polk-St. Croix county line. - Special photos

NOTICE: Deadline for submitted copy is 4:30 p.m. Mondays. Deadline for ad copy is 10 a.m. Tuesdays.

Easter play

In a scene from “Easter Alive, How He Loves,” Abigail, whom Jesus cured when she was a leper, proclaims her love for Jesus. “He was the only one to touch me when no one else would.” This was the first acting and singing role for Kellie Myers, a junior from Shell Lake High School. Below, Clint Wickman poses with a young admirer after the play. The interaction of the audience and the performers is an integral part of the play, written and directed by Jennifer Slater. The play is free and open to the public. It will be performed Thursday, April 21, and Friday, April 22, at 7 p.m., at the Shell Lake Full Gospel Church, and the final performance will be on Saturday, April 23, at 2 p.m. - Photos by Larry Samson

Joe Heller

In limbo

Spring flowers are caught between two seasons these days as the region fluctuates between winter and spring. Another snowfall arrived late Tuesday evening, April 19, and light snow fell through much of the morning, April 20. - Photo by John Reed

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Inter-County Cooperative Publishing Association 303 N. Wisconsin Ave., Frederic, WI 54837 715-327-4236 • www.the-leader.net Doug Panek

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Gary King

Editor • gbking@centurytel.net

Board of directors Vivian Byl, chair Charles Johnson Merlin Johnson Janet Oachs Carolyn Wedin

A cooperative-owned newspaper, the Inter-County Leader is published every Wednesday by the Inter-County Cooperative Publishing Association, Box 490, Frederic, WI 54837. Second Class postage paid at Frederic, WI 54837.

The Inter-County Leader is a qualified newspaper for the publication of legal notices, meeting the requirements as set forth in Chapter 985.03 of the Wisconsin Statutes. Every government official or board that handles public money should publish at regular intervals an accounting of it, showing where and how each dollar is spent. We hold this to be a fundamental principle of democratic government. Publisher reserves right to reject any advertisement or news release or letter of opinion at any time.

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HOW TO SUBSCRIBE

The Inter-County Leader [ISS No. 8750-9091] is published weekly. Subscription prices are $34/yr. in Polk and Burnett counties; $38/yr. in Barron, Chisago, Washburn, St. Croix counties; $41/yr. anywhere in the United States $23/yr. for servicemen or women; $23/yr. for students or schools (9 months). Payment is needed before we can start the subscription. No refunds on subscriptions. Persons may subscribe online at www.theleader.net, write us at Inter-County Leader, Box 490, Frederic, WI 54837, or stop by one of our three offices.

STAFF MEMBERS

Nancy Jappe njappe@centurytel.net Tammi Milberg tammi@centurytel.net

Marty Seeger mseeger@centurytel.net Brenda Martin brendals@centurytel.net Greg Marsten marscafe@lakeland.ws

Sherill Summer sherill33@gmail.com Gregg Westigard greggw@lakeland.ws Carl Heidel cheidel389@centurytel.net

Priscilla Bauer cilla@grantsburgtelcom.net Mary Stirrat marystirrat@hotmail.com EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Raelynn Hunter rael@centurytel.net

• Briefly •

STATEWIDE - Roughly 76,000 people in Wisconsin may find themselves without heating or electricity soon. Wisconsin’s emergency winter period has just ended, meaning utility companies can now disconnect customers who are far behind on paying their bills. Last Friday, April 15, was the end of the state’s emergency winter period. Now very delinquent utility customers have to pay their bills or risk disconnection. People struggling to pay their utility bills are urged to work out payment plans with their provider, or to look into home energy assistance funds with their nearest county agency. - Wisconsin Public Radio ••• ST. CROIX FALLS - The National Park Service at the St. Croix National Scenic Riverway announces that the annual permit required for camping on the Lower St. Croix River is now available. The permit is required for anyone camping along the St. Croix River between St. Croix Falls - Taylors Falls, Minn., and the Soo Line High Bridge, river mile 29.5. Camping in this area is limited to designated campsites accessible only by watercraft. The camping permit is available free of charge at the St. Croix River Visitor Center. The visitor center is located at 401 North Hamilton St. in St. Croix Falls and can be reached at 715-483-2274. It is currently open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. The application for a permit is also available online at www.nps.gov/sacn for people to print, read, sign and mail to the visitor center. After reviewing the application, NPS staff will mail the permit. - from NPS ••• POLK COUNTY - Public support helps make it possible for the local chapter of the Red Cross to provide vital services to the community throughout the year. Because disaster never takes a vacation, the Red Cross must be ready to respond to the needs of the community every day of the year. Four families have lost their homes due to a fire since July 2010 in Polk County. Public contributions at this time are especially appreciated. In addition, those contributions help provide vital classes, information and services that help people prepare for, prevent and recover from disaster. Donations help empower people in the American Red Cross to perform extraordinary acts in the face of emergency situations. submitted ••• ST. CROIX FALLS - Effective Saturday, April 16, the St. Croix River Visitor Center of the St. Croix National Scenic Riverway is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. The St. Croix River Visitor Center is located at 401 North Hamilton St. in St. Croix Falls. It features exhibits on the river’s natural environment, the 18-minute film “The St. Croix: A Northwoods Journey,” and a bookstore. The St. Croix National Scenic Riverway, a unit of the National Park System, was established by the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act in 1968. It is one of a group of eight rivers in the country which first received this recognition. For 255 miles, the St. Croix River and its tributary, the Namekagon, flow through some of the most scenic and least developed country in the Upper Midwest. For additional information on the Riverway, please visit www.nps.gov/sacn or call 715-483-2274. submitted ••• SIREN - The Fishbowl Wooden Nickel Coin Club of Siren is celebrating the 88th-annual National Coin Week, April 17-23, at their regular meeting at the Siren Senior Center on Thursday, April 21, at 7 p.m. The theme for this year’s celebration of the 150th anniversary of the American Civil War is “Blue, Gray and the Greenbacks.” The theme focuses on the coins, paper money, tokens and medals of the Civil War. Another event is being held at the Centuria Public Library. Members of the Fishbowl Wooden Nickel Coin Club will be present at the library to assist anyone who would like to know about their old coin/coins. For more information contact Gary Schauls at 715-472-2002 (Luck). - with submitted information ••• HERTEL - Training for the Skywarn spotter program will be held this Thursday, April 21, at 5 p.m. at the St. Croix Tribal Health Dept. and May 11, at 6:30 p.m. in Room 165 of the Burnett Co. Government Center. The program is open to everyone. Persons do not have to register to attend. The program is a nationwide network of volunteers trained by the National Weather Service to report significant weather. For further information, call 715-349-2171 or e-mail bsichta@burnettcounty.org - submitted

Death notice: Joe Mrkonich

Joe W. Mrkonich, age 83, Minnetrista, formerly of Siren, and Duluth, Thief River Falls, and Eveleth, Minn. Born June 25, 1927, and died on April 14, 2011. Survived by wife of 58 years, Arlene; children Marko (Bobbi), Betty (David Hirschfeld Jr.) and Kathryn (Bruce Wilson) and five grandchildren. He was a longtime teacher and coach, retiring from Duluth East in 1987.

Harsdorf recall petition filed Midsummer election possible

by Gregg Westigard Leader staff writer NW WISCONSIN/MADISON – Petitions to call for the recall of 10th District Sen. Sheila Harsdorf, R-River Falls, were filed Tuesday, April 19, with the Government Accountability Board in Madison. According to local sources and the GAB Web site, an estimated 22,300 signatures were gathered since the recall drive started March 2. That would be about 46 percent more than the 15,744 signatures required. The GAB now has a month to determine if enough valid signatures were gathered. If the GAB certifies that the recall petition drive was successful, a recall election will be called. That recall election would be held on the Tuesday of the sixth week after the recall if certified, possibly in late June. In a recall election, the person being challenged is automatically on the ballot. Other candidates may file for either party. If more than one person files for either party, a primary will be held on the sixth Tuesday with the general election four weeks later. Harsdorf was elected to the Senate in 2000 and re-elected in 2004 and

2008. She had previously served in the Assembly from 1989 to 1997. Her district includes all of St. Croix County and parts of Burnett, Polk, Pierce and Dunn counties. According to Lowell Enerson, chair of the Polk County Democratic Party, a number of Democratic Party members interviewed six prospective candidate for the senate race last Friday, April 15. As of press time, the name of a possible challenger to Harsdorf has not been announced. The Democratic Party does not endorse candidates until after a possible primary. All 16 senators elected in 2008, eight Democrats and eight Republicans, are facing possible recalls. A person must serve one year before a recall drive can be registered. To date, petitions for four recalls have been filed with the GAB. The other three are Sens. Dan Kapanke, Randy Hopper, and Luther Olsen, all Republicans. Most of the petition drives to recall the eight Democrats were registered in late February and the 60-day period to gather signatures in those drives ends soon. The Republican recall drives were registered March 2, so a bit more time remains to gather signatures for the recalls of the other four Republican senators.

Harsdorf responds to recall effort

RIVER FALLS – Responding to reports that the special interest supporters who have organized the recall against her have submitted their petitions to the Government Accountability Board, state Sen. Sheila Harsdorf, R - River Falls, issued the following statement: “Balancing our budget without raising taxes means taking on entrenched special interests whose spending habits have shown a reckless disregard for the pocketbooks of middle-class taxpayers. I am committed to getting our state’s fiscal house in order so that homeowners aren’t hit with a $730 property tax increase and our children aren’t left holding the bag on a debt they cannot afford. “Let’s be clear, the recall petitions represent just 10 percent of the population of the 10th Senate District. Re-

ports have shown that out-of-state and out-of-district interests are behind the spending and organization of the recall campaign. We cannot have these special interests dictate spending levels that would crush job creation and lead our state into bankruptcy. “The special interests simply want to undo the election they lost last November. I am confident that voters have had enough of runaway government spending; they want leadership and reform. I am committed to stand with the taxpayer against what will surely be a campaign against me that will be led by out-of-state special interests that do not care about our taxes, our jobs or our state’s budget condition.” - from the Friends of Sheila Harsdorf

Polaris will preserve 50 assembly jobs in Osceola

Due to stronger than projected growth

OSCEOLA/MEDINA, Minn. - Polaris Industries announced Tuesday, April 19, it will keep some of its engine manufacturing operations in Osceola in response to stronger than projected growth for the company in recent months. A news release from Polaris headquarters said the company has worked closely with the state of Wisconsin and the Department of Commerce to keep some engine manufacturing in Osceola and preserve approximately 50 assembly jobs at the facility. Polaris’ current global employment base is approximately 3,300 people. “Since we announced the strategic

Services set for John Glockzin

FREDERIC - Funeral services will be held Friday, April 22, for John V. Glockzin of Frederic, who died Tuesday, April 19, at the age of 82. Services will begin at 11 a.m. at the Lewis United Methodist Church. Visitation is Thursday, April 21, from 4 to 7 p.m. at Rowe Funeral Home in Frederic. A full obituary will appear in a later edition. For further information call Bruce at Rowe Funeral Home at 715327-4475.

realignment last year, our volumes are up significantly in each of our businesses and our U.S. plants are full from a physical footprint standpoint,” said Scott Wine, CEO, Polaris Industries Inc. Last year the company reported $1.991 billion in sales. “While we have outperformed our original volume projections, the Osceola team has executed flawlessly and continues to produce world-class, quality products,” said Wine. “In order to meet escalating demand while maintaining our focus on quality, keeping some engine capability and output in Osceola was an obvious choice.” Keeping these manufacturing operations in Osceola allows Polaris dualplant production capability for off-road vehicle engines and provides production continuity for motorcycle and snowmobile engines. The company will utilize the capabilities and current infrastructure in Osceola to maintain continuity for the foreseeable future. Polaris also announced Tuesday that it is acquiring Indian Motorcycle, adding another brand to the Polaris stable of Victory cruiser and touring bikes. Indian will operate as an autonomous business unit. The company planned to expand on the announcements during a conference call and Webcast today (April 20). - Gary King with information from Polaris

Polk’s new judge to take office early

BALSAM LAKE — Polk County’s newly elected circuit court Judge Jeff Anderson spoke to the Polk County Board of Supervisors Tuesday evening, April 19, saying that he would be a common presence at their meetings. Anderson was to be sworn into office Aug. 1, but said the governor of Wiscon- Jeff Anderson sin is looking to appoint him May 16. The county has been one judge short since November, said Anderson, causing a backup in the civil calendar. — Mary Stirrat

Justice Prosser declares victory in high court race

by Gil Halsted Wisconsin Public Radio MADISON - Justice David Prosser has officially declared victory in his reelection bid. After a speech at the state Capitol Monday, April 18, he left questions about a possible recount to his campaign staff. Prosser never mentioned the word “recount” during his prepared speech. He attributed his victory over challenger JoAnne Kloppenburg to hundreds of volunteers and thousands of voters. “These women and men of all ages, races and religions are vitally committed to the betterment of our state of Wisconsin and the advancement of conservative values as the way to address and ameliorate our many problems." As to the possibility of a recount of any of the 1.5 million ballots cast in the election, attorney Jim Troupis – who now heads Prosser's legal recount team — says with Prosser's certified victory margin of 7,300 votes, a recount would be frivolous and expensive. “If there's some motive here that has anything to do with something other than trying to overturn a campaign, that's for politics. That's not for the public expense at a time when frankly we can't afford it." Kloppenburg's campaign manager says there's no decision yet on whether to request a recount. The less-than-half-percent margin in Prosser's victory allows Kloppenburg to have the counties pick up the expense of carrying out the process. Kloppenburg could ask for the expensive statewide re-count or for a smaller recount of one or two counties. That smaller process might take a week to 10 days. Canvas board members doing the recount are paid an average of $100 a day. Today, April 20, is the statutory deadline for the Kloppenburg campaign to submit a recount petition.

Services Tuesday for Daryl Glover

Daryl D. Glover, 43, Shell Lake, died April 18, 2011. Visitation is scheduled for Monday, April 25, from 5 to 8 p.m. at SwedbergTaylor Family Funeral Home, Siren chapel. Funeral services will be held Tuesday, April 26, at 11 a.m., with visitation 10-11 a.m., at Trinity Lutheran Church, Falun. A full notice will follow in a later edition. Arrangements were entrusted to Swedberg-Taylor Family Funeral Home, Siren. Online condolences can be made at www.swedbergtaylor.com

Separation of church and state

Freedom From Religion Foundation asks for an end to prayer at board meetings

by Mary Stirrat Leader staff writer BALSAM LAKE — Meetings of the Polk County Board of Supervisors begin with roll call, a prayer by a supervisor, and the pledge to the American flag, but the Madison-based Freedom From Religion Foundation is hoping to change the status quo. FFRF, in a letter to the board dated Feb.

7, is asking that the practice of praying at the meetings be discontinued. “Our national organization,” the letter states, “which works to keep state and church separate, has been contacted by members of our organization who strenuously oppose the practice of prayers at county board meetings.” Each month a different supervisor says a prayer, takes a moment of silence, or offers words of inspiration or advice as they deem appropriate. The process takes about 60 seconds. The letter from FFRF, signed by co-President Annie Laurie Gaylor, reads as follows: “Government prayer is unnecessary, in-

appropriate and divisive. Calling upon board members to rise and pray (even silently) is coercive, embarrassing and beyond the scope of secular government. Board members are free to pray privately or to worship on their own time in their own way. They do not need to worship on taxpayers’ time.” Gaylor goes on to say that by allowing public prayer the county gives its endorsement, power and prestige to something that excludes the nonreligious population, compounding the violation when the majority of prayers are Christian in nature. Citizens approaching the board on civil, secular matters “should not be subjected to a religious show or test,” she

writes, “or be expected to demonstrate religious obeisance at a county function. “We fail to see why divine guidance is needed over such earthly matters anyway,” she adds. Speaking on behalf of FFRF membership and our secular constitution, writes Gaylor, the board is urged to concentrate on county matters, setting a tone in line with the U.S. Constitution. “May we hear from you at your earliest convenience about what steps you are taking to remedy this First Amendment violation?” Gaylor concludes. The board took no action on the letter.

Webster Library project ahead of schedule

Closure for found contamination expected by end of month

by Sherill Summer Leader staff writer WEBSTER - The Webster Village Board absorbed good news about the library project at their regular monthly meeting, Wednesday, April 13. First of all, the library project is ahead of schedule. The new concrete floor slabs are in, and the interior wood framing is almost done. Work on the entry addition should begin soon, once the frost is out of the ground, and work will also begin on the exterior. The scheduled completion date is July 22, and the library should be able to move into the new location soon after completion. The final exterior color scheme has been finalized. A drawing of the color scheme is on view in the current library. The second piece of good news on the library front is that the state Department of Commerce is reviewing the closure requests for the contamination found at the new library site, contamination from the building’s previous life as Larsen’s Auto

Center and back even further when it was a gas station. The new floor in the library effectively capped the contamination found near the old hydraulic hoists, and no cap is necessary where the soil was excavated near the old fuel tanks. MSA expects conditional closure from the Department of Commerce by the end of the month. Once received, the test wells stationed around the property can be abandoned.

Street sweeper purchase The village board approved the purchase of a 2003 street sweeper to replace the current sweeper. The new-to-the-village sweeper has low hours, the village will receive $2,500 trade-in for the old sweeper, there is free delivery and the $47,500 price tag can be paid in two lump sums, half this year and half next year, with no interest charged on the balance to be paid next year. There is $12,000 set aside in a replacement fund for a sweeper. The balance of this year’s payment will be taken out of the streets fund. Restorative Justice donation The village donated $200 to the Restora-

No reserve/from page 1 hitchhiked to New Jersey to pick it up they almost always say ‘You did not!’ and then say I’m crazy,” Larson said, laughing. “I always say, ‘You don’t have to be crazy ... but sometimes it helps.’” Some might say it was a wise move. Larson saved as much as $800 by not having to buy a bus or plane ticket. And the more he thinks about his decision to hitchhike, the fewer reservations he has. It began as a quest for adventure and suspense, he said. “I wondered what kind of challenges God might put in front of me,” he said, smiling.

No reserve auction The discovery on eBay of a red Dodge Ram, V10, complete with snowplow, seemed like the answer to a six-month search Larson had conducted for a new truck - reasonably priced. The eBay listing was a “no reserve” auction, meaning the seller didn’t set a minimum price. The highest bidder, regardless of the price at the end of the auction, would win it. Larson said he did some research and discovered the value of the truck was approximately $7,300. He posted a bid of $3,000 and when he was outbid a day or so later by someone who bid $3,500, he countered with a bid of $3,900, thinking that was his limit. “You are currently the high bidder,” the eBay Web site proclaimed. “It was a Thursday and my son called me that night while I was bowling and said ‘Dad, you’re still the high bidder with only eight minutes to go ...’” Larson said. “I told him I’d probably get outbid at the last minute as usual.” It was a surprise when his son called again to say he had won the truck. Larson wired $200 within 24 hours to secure the bid, and over the next two weeks he kept in contact with the seller to

see when he could travel to Sussex, New Jersey and get it. And he pondered for a while before deciding to hitchhike, “Some people said there were some truckers who left this area for the East Coast - hauling cheese - on a regular basis,” Larson said. “I missed my ride by an hour the first Saturday, but it worked out the following Saturday.” Signing a waiver, Larson hopped on board the semi and it was smooth sailing through three states. They stopped at a truck stop, he bought the driver supper and they slept in the truck’s sleeper cab. Other than getting a little cold on the floor of the camper, the hitchhiking was going well. The next morning they made it most of the way through Pennsylvania. The trucker took Larson as far as he could, leaving him at a truck stop. “I talked to another trucker there and he was going the other way so that didn’t work out - but then my phone rang and it was the first trucker who said another truck would be coming through in 15 minutes. “ Larson made the connection and was back on the road, getting closer to his destination.

Real hitchhiking After an hour riding with the second trucker - who Larson found out was from Burnett County - the destination was within 42 miles. The trucker was heading further east, so Larson got out and started walking. “It’s getting late in the day now,” Larson said. “About 5:30 or so - and I’m walking for two or three miles, and a guy in a pickup drives by and slows down to pick me up.” “He said ‘I usually don’t pick up hitchhikers but you look pretty harmless ...” Larson said the guy commented on how

Incoming village President Jeff Roberts, re-elected trustee Kelly Gunderson and re-elected trustee Tim Maloney took their oath of office following the Wednesday, April 13, regular board meeting. Also elected was trustee Charlie Weis. Weis was not present at the April 13 board meeting and his swearing in will be at a later date. The election of trustee Jeff Roberts to the position of village president will leave a vacancy on the village board. - Photos by Sherill Summer

tive Justice program. The village has benefited from numerous community service hours in the past. The community service program is one of many services offered through Restorative Justice.

have been set. The dump will be open from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the last Saturday of April, April 30, and the first three Saturdays of May, which are May 7, May 14 and May 21.

he had to watch his speed because “the cops here will nail you for going two miles over (the speed limit).” “Then he informed me he was driving with an open container ... I made sure I had my seat belt on,” Larson said. After seven or eight miles the driver had to turn off and Larson was back to walking along the road. “Now it’s getting darker and colder maybe the upper 30s - and I put on a reflective sweatshirt for better visibility for my safety,” Larson said, noting the highway is similar to CTH W or Hwy. 65 locally. Little if any shoulders, and he can feel the breeze from the 100 or so cars that are passing him by. “That’s when I figured it was time again to talk to the good Lord and say ‘Don’t forget about me down here.’” Almost immediately after that, Larson noted, a New Jersey State Patrol car pulled up and the officer asked him questions. “He couldn’t fathom that I had hitchhiked all the way from Wisconsin,” Larson said. “He was concerned about whether I had weapons and made me sit in the back seat - glass separating us - but even though he was out of his area he decided to give me a ride to get me closer to my destination.” Larson said it was quite a ride. “We were going up to 95 miles an hour - anytime he came up behind a car he’d just turn on his lights and go around him.” They made the town of Newton - population 8,100 - in good time.

find a small number of customers. “I asked this gentleman, who was about to leave, how far it was to Sussex,” Larson said. “We visited for a while - he was just passing through - and then he offered to give me a ride to Sussex.” It turned out the gentleman lived just three blocks from Larson’s destination. “It’s proof how God can work,” Larson said. “And how he supplies our needs.”

Brush dump hours The 2011 spring brush dump hours

The McDonald’s connection Now it was 9:30 or so at night and Larson was still 15 or so miles from his destination - and hungry. The officer asked where he wanted to go - Pizza Hut? McDonald’s? Larson chose the latter, thanked the officer and walked into McDonald’s to

One more test The man gave Larson a tour of the town that evening and drove him around to different motels to show him the options. He walked to his destination from the motel the next morning, completed the transaction, filled the gas tank and hit the road back home in his new truck. “About 25 miles down the road I looked in the rear view mirror and saw a cloud of smoke coming behind me - I pulled over right away. The transmission line had burst.” As he waited for the seller to come with a tow truck, Larson said he pulled out a Bible promise book he carried with him and it fell open to the page that said “In times of trouble...” “They were very good verses that calmed me down,” he said. The seller took care of the costs of the tow truck and fixing the transmission line and - within an hour - Larson was back on the road - a nonstop journey marked by a few roadside naps - that brought him back home - safe and sound. “Everything fell into place - and I thank the Lord for that,” Larson said, adding that he has no reservations about his faith but next time he might choose a different way to put it to the test. “Would I do this again?” he asks. “I’m not sure ...”

Audit shows Luck is in good shape, with exceptions

Board votes not to pursue grant

by Mary Stirrat Leader staff writer LUCK — The village of Luck is in good financial shape, auditor Steve Scheidler of Larson Allen told the village board at its Wednesday, April 13, meeting, although an increase in water utility bills is likely. An increase in sewer rates starting with the fourth quarter of 2010 helped that utility to come into the black, he said, but the water utility continues to lose money. Revenue from water sales was down about $3,000 from 2009, leaving a net loss for the year of $4,200. Scheidler said the village would qualify for a simple rate increase that can be done without application to the public service commission. By providing public notice and holding a public hearing, the village can increase its sewer rates by 3 to 3.5 percent. He recommended the board pursue this increase. The general fund is in good shape, according to the audit, with about 35 percent of annual operating expenses held in fund balance. Village policies require the fund balance to be maintained at 30 percent of annual expenditures. At the close of 2010 there was $381,867 in fund balance, up from $336,362 at the end of 2009. About two-thirds, or $251,432, of the fund balance is undesignated. Of the remainder, $46,241 is reserved to retire debt at the golf course, $22,656 is designated for property revaluation, $10,000 is designated for streets and $13,000 was used to balance the 2011 budget. Smaller amounts are reserved for ordinances, a computer, election equipment, building upgrades, sidewalks, playground equipment and other items.

Members of the Luck Village Board ponder the 2010 audit report, presented at the April 13 meeting. From left are Trustees John Wilcoxon and Peter Demydowich, village clerk Kathy Hanson, President Steve Nielsen, and Trustees Marsha Jensen, Phil Warhol and Hassan Mian. Behind Wilcoxon, not visible, is Trustee Bob Determan. — Photos by Mary Stirrat

Grant An unsuccessful grant application from last December was almost given new life under a new name, but the board voted 5 to 2 to not pursue the new opportunity. Last December, the board directed village engineers MSA Professional Services to pursue funds from the Safe Drinking Water Loan Program to loop water mains that are dead ends at south Main Street, 1st Street, and 2nd Street.

The village has learned that it did not score very high on the project and will most likely not be funded, but MSA representatives attended the board meeting with a new grant opportunity that might be a better fit. The new grant is a community development block grant for public facilities, said MSA Vice President Clement Safranek and engineer Theresa Anderson. It would cover about 30 percent of the costs to loop the water mains and replace five blocks of Butternut Avenue that would be torn up in the process. The rough estimate for the project is about $500,000, which means the grant would cover about $150,000 and the village would be responsible for the other $350,000. MSA would help secure the village share, said Anderson, most likely through loans and a water rate increase. According to Anderson, application must be made within the next month or two. The grant is through the state of Wisconsin, and she cautioned that the availability of money may change before too long. “The climate has been very good,” Anderson told the board. “They’re trying to push the money out the door before the climate changes.” Steve Nielsen, chairing his last meeting as village president, said he was in favor of pursuing the grant to prepare for the future of the village. Since everyone hopes the village grows and thrives, he said, it will eventually be necessary to improve the road and utilities to the south side of the village. The project, however, with its estimated $350,000 commitment by the village, is not considered a priority by village staff. When asked by Trustee Hassan Mian how important it is, public works Director Seth Petersen said, “Right now, it probably isn’t a major priority.” United Pioneer Home is being built to meet its own needs, but Nielsen said he felt it wise to improve the utilities and street for future development. “Now we’ve got a cow trail going to this $10 million nursing home,” he said. In her report to the board, village Administrator Kristina Handt said the staff is concerned that the project does not align

CENTURIA - The Wisconsin Department of Transportation Northwest Regional Office in Superior is announcing a public information meeting to discuss the proposed improvements on Hwy. 35 from

Hwy. 8 to the south junction of Hwy. 48 in Polk County. The meeting is scheduled from 5-7 p.m. on Thursday, May 5, at the village of Centuria Village Hall, 305 Wisconsin Ave. The proposed project consists of resurfacing by milling and relaying approximately 13.9 miles of the existing pavement on Hwy. 35 between Hwy. 8 and Hwy. 48. Construction of this project is scheduled to begin spring/summer 2012 with a fall 2012 completion.

The public is encouraged to attend the meeting, provide input and ask questions concerning this project. A short presentation will be given to discuss the proposed improvements along Hwy. 35 and also sidewalk improvements within the village of Centuria. Maps and figures showing the proposed improvements will be on display. WisDOT and design consultant representatives will be available to discuss the project on an individual basis. Citizens who are unable to attend the

meeting, or would like more information, may contact Jane Olson, WisDOT Project Leader, at 715-395-3025. Written comments regarding the project can be mailed to Jane Olson, WisDOT, 1701 N. 4th Street, Superior, WI, 54880-1068. Citizens who are hearing-impaired and who require an interpreter may request one by contacting Olson at least three working days prior to the meeting. - from WisDOT

ST. CROIX FALLS - The Dresser traprock plant will be highlighted at the quarterly meeting of the St. Croix Falls Historical Society on Thursday, April 28, 7 p.m. at the St. Croix Falls City Hall. A representative of the plant, Vice President

Joe Winkel, is to be guest speaker. The Dresser traprock plant has been an iconic image of the rocky valley, established in 1914 by a German immigrant by the name of John Wunder. Jule Larson, superintendent of the Dresser quarry from

1930-1959, recorded that Wunder became interested in traprock after discovering that the crushed rock considerably strengthened his concrete buildings. Wunder had combined the rock quarry with his other business investment in the Go-

pher Sand and Gravel Company in Minneapolis. The Dresser traprock plant burned in early 1994, supposedly sparked from a welder’s torch during a renovating project. - submitted

Steve Nielsen chaired his last meeting of the Luck Village Board last week, hvaing chosen not to seek re-election. Peter Demydowich was sworn in as village president on April 19.

“It’s not excessive,” Scheidler commented on the $381,867 fund balance, “and it’s not real low. I think you’ve done a good job of managing your budget.” On the other hand, he said, the golf course financials are not looking so positive. “It’s not a good balance at the golf course,” he said. Operating revenue for the villageowned course was $326,529, down $50,000 from 2009, while operating expenses were only down $5,000. The course saw an operating loss of more than $17,000 in 2010, with a net loss in assets of $43,000. In 2009, income exceeded expenses by $27,700, with a net increase in assets of $4,850. The library was able to add $8,800 to its fund balance, but Scheidler warned that the governor may make changes in allowable revenue that would affect the library budget. In 2010 the library received nearly $58,000 from property taxes and $36,000 from Act 150, state law that requires public libraries to be reimbursed for usage by patrons outside the village. Scheidler noted that the governor’s budget may change the formula for assessing property taxes for the library, which currently requires municipalities to assess at no less than the average of the three previous years. He also said that Act 150 may be removed from the budget. In other audit issues, Scheidler reported that the village’s revolving loan for housing rehabilitation has 42 outstanding loans amounting to about $500,000. The program allows homeowners to borrow funds for improvements and repay the loans when the home is sold, returning the money to the fund for someone else to borrow.

Auditor Steve Scheidler of Larson Allen presented the 2010 audit report, showing that the village is in good financial shape with the exception of the golf course and the water utility.

with village priorities. Nielsen, however, believes it fits with future business development and street improvements that have been discussed. Incoming village President Peter Demydowich admitted that the project sounds great, but the village has other issues that should have priority. He added that the board should trust the recommendations made by the staff. When the vote was taken, Nielsen and Trustee Marsha Jensen were the two votes in favor of spending the $2,500 to find out if the village is eligible for the grant funding. Jensen said during the discussion that the 30-percent grant appeared to be a gift, and sometimes gifts need to be accepted. Voting against were Demydowich and Trustees Bob Determan, Mian, Phil Warhol and John Wilcoxon.

Other business • The board approved the hiring of Dennis Nelson, Grantsburg, as part-time parks and recreation seasonal employee. The position typically runs from May into October or November, at about 25 hours a week. The hourly wage is $8.50 per hour, plus life insurance and Wisconsin State Retirement benefits. • Wilcoxon, a member of the golf course commission, reported that there were six applicants for the position of associate golf course superintendent. The position was offered to three different candidates, all of whom turned it down due to the title and the pay. At the recommendation of village staff and the golf course commission, the board voted to eliminate the position, bring back the position of golf course superintendent and raise the salary to $1,300 to $1,400 biweekly. The position, which will run from February to November, will be advertised.

Public meeting scheduled for Hwy. 35 in Polk County

Meeting to focus on proposed improvements and anticipated impacts to traffic during the 2012 construction season.

Dresser traprock plant to be highlighted at SCFHS meeting

C h e c k u s o u t o n t h e We b @ t h e - l e a d e r. n e t

Polk County starts redistricting process

Proposed board lines due by July 1

by Gregg Westigard Leader staff writer BALSAM LAKE – Polk County has the new detailed 2010 census figures, and the process of drawing new district lines for the county board is under way. The board’s organizational committee started the redistricting when it met Monday, April 18. By July 1, the seven-member body must draw proposed lines for the 23 districts, get county board approval of those proposed lines, hold a public hearing on the proposal and adopt a tentative plan. After a review period of no more than 60 days during which municipalities review the proposal, the county board will

adopt a final plan in early fall. The new district lines will be in effect for the April 2012 county board election. Filing for the spring election starts next December. Polk County grew 7 percent over the decade and now has a population of 44,205. The largest growth was in the towns of Osceola, up 770 people, Eureka (up 311), Garfield (up 249), and Farmington (up 211). Six places lost population, led by Frederic, down 125 residents. Lincoln lost 96 people and the village of Luck was down 91. The ideal size for each of the 23 county board districts will be 1,922 people. Districts can deviate 10 percent, 192 people, above or below that number. A chart presented by county clerk Carole Wondra shows that seven districts exceed that 10-

percent margin. The greatest variation is in the Osceola districts. Districts 17 and 18 are each 25 percent over the ideal, while district 19, the village of Osceola, is 17 percent under the target number. The Farmington District 20 is also above the norm. This means that districts 17, 18 and 20 will need to be smaller, while the Osceola district will need to include more area. Most districts elsewhere in the county are still close to the ideal of 1,922 residents. However, two districts will need to have their lines adjusted, and those adjustments could set off a chain reaction for neighboring districts. District 7, the Eureka district, will need to be made smaller. And District 2, Frederic and West Sweden, will need to cover more area. The Eureka district might be adjusted by dropping the

southern part of the district, a portion of the town of St. Croix Falls. District 2 could gain the needed population by adding the portion of West Sweden now in District 1. But that change would force District 1 to add residents. With each new drawing of the supervisor district line, some new districts are created with no incumbent board member, and some old districts are combined, forcing incumbents to face each other. The 2001 redistricting combined seats in Amery and the Luck and Balsam Lake areas. New districts were created in the towns of St. Croix Falls, Black Brook and Osceola. Some of those areas will again be affected in the coming redistricting.

New lines might be easy for 11 districts

Shifts would affect north and east of county

by Gregg Westigard Leader staff writer BALSAM LAKE – New county board districts must have a population within 10 percent, or 192 residents, of the ideal district size of 1,922 people. The statutes governing redistricting lines also state that “whenever possible place whole municipalities within the same district.” The increase in population in Eureka and the population drop in Frederic and West Sweden mean that some adjustments will be needed in the lines for districts 2 (Frederic/West Sweden) and 7 (Eureka). Area

But those adjustments will force other changes in the surrounding districts. Using the allowed variance of plus or minus 192 people, lines could be drawn for 11 districts and 24 of the 36 municipalities that would divide only two municipalities, the towns of Milltown and Beaver, into two districts. This hypothetical redistricting would start with the village and town of Clear Lake, head north to Johnstown, west to Eureka, and south to include the city and town of St. Croix Falls. The municipalities in the southwest corner would not be included. In this plan, seven districts would be over the 1,922 ideal and four under. The possible lines for 11 districts, with variance from the 1,922 ideal population Population

Clear Lake village and town Clayton village and town, Turtle Lake, Beaver (part) Georgetown, Johnstown, Beaver (part) McKinley, Bone Lake, Clam Falls, Lorain West Sweden, Frederic Luck town and village Sterling, Laketown Milltown village and town (part) Eureka and Milltown town (part) Town of St. Croix Falls, Centuria City of St. Croix Falls

1,969 1,993 1,993 1,944 1,836 2,049 1,751 1,896 1,896 2,113 2,133

Variance

+47 +71 +71 +22 -86 +127 -171 -39 -39 +191 +211

Scott Mellon

Full-Time Realtor

533749 34-37L

235 Main St. • P.O. Box 357 Luck, WI 54853

Office: 715-472-8252 Fax: 888-880-2165 www.polkcountyrealty.com mail@scottamellon.com

TO ALL MY FRIENDS, CAREGIVERS AND RELATIVES IN THE WEBSTER/ BURNETT COUNTY AREA,

A big THANK-YOU to all of you for the many cards, calls and responses on the CARING BRIDGE network, to me and Alice during my near tragic episode in my life. I have been in and out of St. Joseph’s Hospital in St. Paul, Regina Hospital in Hastings, Bethesda Care Center, Prescott Care Center and Augustana Care Center in Hastings, since August 20, 2010. Presently we are at Park Ridge Apts. in Hastings, which is next door and connected by a tunnel to Augustana where I am receiving outpatient therapy. The event in my life started with a minor heart attack and a tick bite which resulted in ANAPLASMOSIS. Many other irregular things occurred in my body, but thanks be to God and my Guardian Angel, plus all the prayers of the people in the area, I survived the ordeal. The only loss was that of my left leg above the knee. God bless all of you and we will be seeing you soon. 534213 35-36L

534336 35Lp

Jim and Alice Henrich Park Ridge Apts. Hastings, MN 55033

Inter-County Leader: Connect to your community National Park Service to conduct April Membership Special: prescribed burns

time of the Journal Sentinel article, the Department of Commerce had committed $135.6 million and was on track to recoup over $164 million. The article also showed that the program has helped to create or retain 7,400 jobs in Wisconsin. “This legislation delivers the best of both worlds,” said Rivard. “It frees up much-needed capital for companies to expand or relocate to rural areas and more importantly, it provides for the creation and retention of good paying jobs that help our families and our state. I am thankful that my colleagues on both sides of the aisle supported this bill. “It’s time to turn things around for our rural areas. The erosion of rural jobs leads to the erosion of our rural communities, the backbone of this great state. I will continue to work to bring life back into our rural economy and make our district better for the generations that follow.” - from the office of Rep. Rivard

BURNETT COUNTY – More than 7 million Americans currently abuse prescription drugs, according to the 2009 Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration’s National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Each day, approximately, 2,500 teens use prescription drugs to get high for the first time according to the Partnership for a Drug Free America. Studies show that a majority of abused prescription drugs are obtained from family and friends, including the home medicine cabinet. In an effort to address this problem, DEA, in conjunction with state and local law enforcement agencies throughout the U. S., conducted the first-ever National Prescription Drug Take Back Day on Saturday, Sept. 25, 2010. The purpose of this National Take Back Day was to provide a venue for persons who wanted to dispose of unwanted and unused prescription drugs. Burnett County participated in this effort with a drop-off site at the Burnett County Sheriff’s Department. This effort was a huge success in removing potentially dangerous prescription drugs, particularly controlled substances, from our nation’s medicine cabinets. There were approximately 3,000 state and local law enforcement agencies through-

out the nation that participated in the event. All told, the American public turned in more than 121 tons of pills on this first National Take Back Day. Due to the overwhelming success of the first event, DEA has scheduled the second National Prescription Drug Take Back Day. This is an opportunity for those who missed the first event or who have subsequently accumulated unwanted, unused prescription drugs, to safely dispose of them. Burnett County Coalition for Healthy Living will offer five different sites for The Take Back Day on Saturday, April 30. The drop-off sites will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The sites will be located at: A & H Senior Center Burnett Government Center Danbury Tribal Hall Grantsburg Village Hall St. Croix Tribal Medical Clinic in Hertel What types of medication can you drop off? Controlled, noncontrolled and overthe-counter substances will be collected. What types of substances will not be accepted? Illicit substances such as marijuana or methamphetamine are not a part of this initiative, and intra-venous solutions, injectibles nor syringes will be accepted. - submitted

Call Kim Today!

715-349-CLUB(2582)

533912 34-35L 24-25a

RICE LAKE – Rep. Roger Rivard’s (RRice Lake) first piece of legislation passed the Assembly Monday, April 18. The legislation is designed to expand the very successful economic development zone program to rural Wisconsin. “This is a great moment for rural Wisconsin,” said Rivard. “The people of the 75th remember that I campaigned on the promise to bring economic vitality back to rural Wisconsin and today we have taken a huge step toward accomplishing that goal.” The bill, which passed the house 79-12, will increase the number of allowable economic development zones by eight and requires that five of those zones be located in rural areas. Not only is this a great investment in rural communities, it has the added benefit of paying for itself. A Milwaukee Journal Sentinel article showed how powerful the enterprise zones are as a tool. At the

Rivard passes Rural Jobs Act with bipartisan support

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THE DRESSER, OSCEOLA, GARFIELD FIRE ASSOCIATION

Thank You • Many Thanks • Thank You • Many Thanks • Thank You • Many Thanks • Thank You

Thank You • Many Thanks • Thank You • Many Thanks • Thank You • Many Thanks • Thank You • Many Thanks

other conditions under which a burn can take place, protection of adjacent properties, communications, needed manpower and equipment, safety and other considerations. If conditions are not favorable on the day when burning is planned, the burn will be rescheduled. The St. Croix National Scenic Riverway’s Fire Management Plan is available for viewing on the park’s Web site: www.nps.gov/sacn/parkmgmt/fireman agement.htm. For additional information, contact the St. Croix River Visitor Center in St. Croix Falls at 715-483-2274. The St. Croix National Scenic Riverway, a unit of the National Park System, was established by the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act in 1968. It is one of a group of eight rivers in the country that first received this recognition. For 255 miles, the St. Croix River and its tributary, the Namekagon, flow through some of the most scenic and least developed country in the Upper Midwest. - from NPS

Wishes to thank the following businesses for helping to make our Spaghetti Fundraiser such a great success.

Joyful Morning Coffee Shop Dresser Little Store Andre Electric Boss Equipment Grandstrand Funeral Home River Valley Pharmacy Cascade Bar and Grill MarketPlace Foods Menards Baribeau Implement Lamperts Kentucky Fried Chicken Dalles Auto Sales Kassel Tap Tires Plus Loggers Bar and Grill Mom’s Amish Kitchen Holiday Inn Express The Fox Beef Ranch Frandsen Bank & Trust Beyond Printing Robin Foster Party Barge Bus Service Frontier Ag & Turf Pizza Piazzio Autumn Winery In a Flash Photography

DK’s Cabinet & Countertop J & A Homes The Boulevard Bar & Grill R & R Custom Rebuilding Falls Photo Abrahamson Nurseries St. Croix Winery RiverBank Video Den Flying Pie Pizza Nail Time Lucky Panda Osceola Auto Body Osceola Auto Sales Fireworks Forever Uncle Donuts Pizza Planet Uhrammer Insurance Noah Insurance Osceola Vet Clinic Custom Fire Apparatus, Inc. The Jones Team Osceola Towing Paradise Pizza Dick’s Super Valu Bill’s Ace Hardware Crystal Ball Farms Verhasselt Construction

Thank You • Many Thanks • Thank You • Many Thanks • Thank You • Many Thanks • Thank You • Many Thanks

ST. CROIX FALLS - The St. Croix National Scenic Riverway plans to conduct two prescribed burns in the Riverway corridor in the spring of 2011. These burns may take place the week of April 25, depending on weather conditions. The National Park Service is conducting these prescribed fires to improve prairie and savanna habitat along the St. Croix River. The areas to be burned are: • Peaslee Island, 198 acres on the St. Croix River, just south of Wisconsin Interstate State Park and west of Dresser. This site is being restored to oak savanna, which is a globally imperiled ecosystem. • Sterling and Sunrise Prairies, 18 and 15 acres respectively, on the St. Croix River, either side of Sunrise Landing in Polk County. Sites are west of Wolf Creek and across the river from Wild River State Park. These sites are being restored to oak savanna and tallgrass prairie. The NPS has developed detailed plans for prescribed burns, and the fires are carried out by personnel trained and certified for prescribed burning. The plans address temperature, relative humidity, wind and

Bernick’s Pepsi Village Pizzeria Trap Rock Inn Larsen Auto Boyd’s Small Engine Ward’s Bar Trollhaugen Dresser Trap Rock Inc. Parts City Lad Auto Crushing Osceola Rod and Gun Club F & A Dairy Panda King RCU Bank St. Croix Outdoors Copy Shop Swank’s Old-fashioned Meats Shear Image Osceola Cleaners St. Croix Auto Body Jerry’s Restaurant Fashions of Manhattan Studio A Daeffler’s Quality Meats Indianhead Glass Deer Park Meat Locker Pleasant Lake Bed & Breakfast 534380 35L 25d

Thank You • Many Thanks • Thank You • Many Thanks • Thank You • Many Thanks • Thank You

National Prescription Drug Take Back Day scheduled locally

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Stay connected to your community.

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PAGE 8 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - APRIL 20, 2011

COMMUNITY

VIEWPOINTS

SEND YOUR VIEWS AND FEEDBACK TO: INTER-COUNTY LEADER, BOX 490, FREDERIC, WI 54837 OR E-MAIL the-leader@centurytel.net

• Letters to the editor •

• Joe Heller •

Honored

Thank you for running the “Badge number 905” article. With the 20th anniversary of Mike Seversen’s harrowing experience, it is good to reflect on the sacrifices he and his family have made. It is especially important to remember truly what an inspiration Mike has been not only to me, but to so many people young and old. We are blessed to have him among us. I am honored to be considered one of his friends and co-workers. Tom Barthman Former St. Croix Falls chief of police Hudson

Kill the debate format in government?

• Web poll results •

Last week’s question

To take part in our poll, go to theleader.net and scroll down to the lower left part of the screen • See front page for this week’s question

• Where to write • President Barack Obama 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. Washington, D.C. 20500 www.whitehouse.gov/contact/ Gov. Scott Walker Wisconsin State Capitol Madison, WI 53707 transition@wisconsin.gov

Congressman Sean Duffy (7th District) 1208 Longworth House Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510 202-225-3365

U.S. Sen. Herb Kohl 330 Hart Senate Office Bldg. Washington, D.C. 20510 715-832-8492 senator_kohl@kohl.senate.gov

Rep. Erik Severson (28th District) Room 6 North State Capitol Madison, WI 53708 608-267-2365 • 888-529-0028 FAX: 608-282-3628 rep.Severson@legis.state.wi.us Rep. Roger RIvard (75th District) State Capitol Room 307 North P.O. Box 8952, Madison, WI 608-266-2519 • 888-534-0075 rep.rivard@legis.wi.gov U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson 2 Russell Courtyard Washington, D.C. 20510 202-224-5323

Sen. Robert Jauch (25th District) Room 415 South, State Capitol P.O. Box 7882, Madison, WI 53707 Sen.Jauch@legis.state.wi.us Sen. Sheila Harsdorf (10th District) State Capitol, P.O. Box 7882 Madison, WI 53707 608-266-7745 • 715-232-1390 Toll-free - 800-862-1092 sen.harsdorf@legis.state.wi.us

Rep. Nick Milroy (73rd District) Room 8 North, State Capitol P.O. Box 8953, Madison 53708 rep.milroy@legis.state.wi.us

Debate defined: A discussion, involving opposing viewpoints. A formal contest in which the affirmative and negative sides of a proposition are advocated by opposing speakers. Usually creates strife, contention, win-lose, we vs. they, and this feeds the media that polarizes we, the people. We, the people, have had enough of this adversarial approach to getting the people’s business done. New approach: problem-solving format steps: 1. Governmental groups at each level list their top 10 problems. 2. Then, they put them in priority order, high to low. 3. Groups huddle up and vote on the top 10. 4. Groups look for best practices in other states, counties, schools, and towns in the U.S. and also the world. 5. Each group better defines the problems and comes up with their solution with risks and time lines in implementation. a. Identify the problem. b. Determine the causes of the problem. c. Investigate the problem. d. Consider the problem from several points of view. e. Propose and discuss possible solutions. f. Choose a solution. 6. Evaluate the process. 7. The appropriate American people are informed and get to weigh in on the problem and solutions. Web site: State, county, school, town, etc. TopProblems&Solutions.org 8. Now the government process kicks in; to get the problem solved. 9. Every quarter go through the steps again. The jawboners (talking/debating) is over. The backboners (doers) time is now. Where is the Democratic Party state budget plan? Rich Hess Trade Lake

Can we afford another empty building?

Frederic Village Council/Planning Board: I am the owner of Frederic Liquor Store, in the village of Frederic, approximately 1,260 residents. Since March 2008 the store has been an uphill climb, trying to bring the store up to the standards our customers deserve. It has been difficult to say the least. It seems everywhere you turn, the economy has put a bite into our wallets/bottom line. Yes, I am a business owner, yes, I chose to take up business residence in a small but quaint town. When I came to Frederic they greeted me with open arms. The local people have offered their views on what they would like us to provide for them in our store, and I have to the best of my ability. Yes, the climb is still uphill, but I was enjoying the effect of small

growth and a good customer base in the last year. Now it has been brought to my attention that the village board has pulled the chair out from under me and approved a Class A Liquor License for the Dollar General Store in town. Why! is the question. I don’t sell groceries, I don’t sell clothing, I don’t sell holiday decorations, I don’t sell greeting cards or anything else. I sell liquor, beer and closely related items. Yes, there are other places in town to buy products that I sell. So why should they hand out another liquor license in such a small town? Doesn’t it mean anything to deal with the owner/operator of a small-town business anymore? Our store offers personalized service. I am not a franchise store. This is my livelihood. A lot of the people who walked through our doors came in as customers and leave as friends. This is why I think maybe - just maybe - the little bit of the revenue acquired from the license fees and taxes that the city is going to make off approving another liquor license in this town is going to hurt the town more than help! Just look around - can we really afford another empty building? Sincerely, a proud business owner, Tom “Skip” Sofie Milltown

Let’s get the facts straight

It is regrettable that false and misleading information continues to be spread about the efforts in the state Legislature to bring government in line with what taxpayers can afford. Recent letters to the papers have been flat-out wrong on the facts. The truth is that the bill passed that requires government workers to make modest contributions to their pensions and to pay 12 percent of their health insurance premiums was done in an open manner. A 17-hour public hearing was held on the bill and a historic 60-hour debate was held in the state Assembly. More debate could have been conducted in the state Senate, but the Democratic state senators left their jobs to stay at a resort in Illinois. The facts are that, without reform, property taxes would increase by an average of $700. The out-of-state special interests that are flooding the state with money and political activists don’t care about how much Wisconsin taxpayers have to pay. But Sen. Sheila Harsdorf has consistently stood up for middle-class families and taxpayers by supporting reform and opposing property tax increases. As a member of the Legislature’s budget committee, she is now working to fix the $3.6 billion deficit left by Gov. Doyle without job-killing tax increases. We need to stand with Sheila and oppose the special-interest efforts to reverse last fall’s election. Eunice Tollander Webster

LETTERS

The Leader encourages readers to submit letters to the editor. All letters may be edited for length, clarity, grammatical accuracy and stylistic consistency. Letters more than 400 words in length may be returned to the writer for editing. Submitted letters should include the writer’s full name, address, daytime phone number and e-mail address (if available). E-mailed letters are preferred. Letters may be sent to theleader@centurytel.net or mailed to Inter-County Leader, Box 490, Frederic, WI 54837.

Views expressed on these pages do not necessarily reflect the views of management or board members.

T H E

I N T E R - C O U N T Y

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Duffy makes pitch for budget reform at town hall meeting

APRIL 20, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 9

by Nathaniel Shuda Daily Tribune Staff WISCONSIN RAPIDS — If the federal government does not make changes to Medicare and Social Security, the current systems will not be able to sustain themselves. However, the government should keep the current level of benefits for all people currently under such programs that are vital to maintaining a living wage for older Americans already on a fixed income. That was the message Monday, April 18, from U.S. Rep. Sean Duffy, R-Ashland, during his first town hall meeting in south Wood County since taking office in January. “For half of our seniors, the only income they get is Social Security; you cannot take that away from them,” Duffy told about

100 people at Mid-State Technical College’s Wisconsin Rapids campus. “I’ll fight tooth and nail to make sure that doesn’t happen.” That is why Duffy said he supports the Republican-created budget proposal, drafted in part by House Budget Committee Chairman and fellow GOP Rep. Paul Ryan of Janesville — a plan under which people 55 or older can keep their current level of Social Security and Medicare, Duffy said. When it comes to taxes, the government should simplify its tax code, eliminating the “nooks and crannies and loopholes” large corporations use, while still making sure they get tax breaks for creating jobs, he said. “We’ve got to streamline the tax code and make it fair and flatter,” he said. Other solutions to what Duffy referred

to as a spending problem, not a revenue problem, include returning to 2008 spending levels for five years and reducing higher-bracket tax rates to 25 percent and eliminating loopholes that allow companies to get out of having to pay their taxes due. For Linda Hobbs, 58, Rudolph, Monday’s event marked her first town hall meeting, though she occasionally attends leadership conferences in Washington, where she has heard lawmakers speak. “He was surprisingly open,” Hobbs said of Duffy’s willingness to take questions from sometimes critical audience members. “People have to give him a chance to do something. “I think he’s going in the right direction; the debt is there, and we need to do something about it,” she said. John Daven, co-chairman of the Wood

by Shawn Johnson Wisconsin Public Radio MADISON - A circuit court judge has dismissed one of the lawsuits challenging Gov. Scott Walker's collective bargaining plan. But the law remains on hold while the court weighs another case. The lawsuit dismissed Thursday, April 14, was brought by Dane County, Dane County Executive Kathleen Falk and Dane County Board Chair Scott McDonell. It challenged the collective bargaining plan on a variety of grounds. Among them: that a quorum was not present when senators

voted on the plan; and that the bill was not related to the special session called by the governor. In a written decision, Dane County Judge Maryann Sumi didn't touch on the merits of those complaints. She wrote instead that under long-standing Wisconsin law, Dane County did not have the authority to bring a challenge like this since it is essentially an arm of state government. Sumi's decision was by no means the final word on this plan. She's also the judge in the lawsuit brought by the Dane

County district attorney alleging legislators broke the open meetings act when they passed the collective bargaining plan. That case has proceeded much differently, with Sumi issuing a temporary restraining order blocking the law from taking effect. Sumi wrote that the differences in the cases are straightforward. She said the district attorney has explicit authority to enforce the open meetings law while Dane County does not.

One collective bargaining lawsuit dismissed

High water

Water levels of the St. Croix River between Taylors Falls, Minn., and St. Croix Falls reached a peak this past week. - Photo by Marty Seeger

• Letters to the editor • Tired of shenanigans

I, for one, am tired of the Democratic Party and their shenanigans. If they don’t get their way, they will use absolutely anything to waste taxpayer dollars to protect their largest campaign contributors. The teachers union spent more money for election campaigns than any other entity in the state and the country. They contributed more than the oil industry. Where does it all stop? If they don’t like what someone else proposes, they leave the state so they can play “hide and seek” at the taxpayer’s expense. If they don’t like whom the voters elected, they will have recall elections. The Democratic members of the state were charged with representing their constituents. How does leaving the state and

calling for re-elections serve the state as a whole? It is just one more of their games they play at the taxpayer expense. The Democratic Legislature increased our liability insurance before the last election under the guise it was good for the stupid voters who didn’t understand the “big picture.” It did get the Democrats campaign contributions from the insurance industry. The Democratic Party does not want voters to show proof of citizenship because a lot of their votes come from illegal aliens and other nonvoters. The Democratic Party does not want Prosser in office, so they are playing games there. Let’s have a recall election for Obama. A majority of Americans did not support ObamaCare. Yet, he found a way to circumvent the law and shove it down our throats. During the oil spill in the gulf,

Obama and the Democratic Party received over $4.7 million in campaign funding. I don’t believe I heard one Democratic Party member complain. When Elena Kagen was appointed to the Supreme Court, not one Democrat brought up the fact that she was Bill Clinton’s “mouthpiece” that baffled the Congress with his ignorance of what sex was. Let’s have a recall for Herb Kohl who used his influence to obtain state and county funding for his solely owned Milwaukee Bucks to have a new arena. It doesn’t matter who is in office when it comes to the education system. If the education industry can’t get what they want from the federal government, the state government or the local government, they just tack it onto your property taxes anyway.

C O O P E R A T I V E - O W N E D

County Democratic Party, said though some of Duffy’s views were fairly predictable, others came as somewhat of a surprise. “For the most part on the budget, it was kind of what I expected,” said Daven, who attended Monday’s meeting, noting, however, that Duffy did have some good points on closing tax loopholes for large corporations and on his willingness to reevaluate the country’s involvement in international military conflicts. Although it likely will be difficult, finding a solution to the budget issue is possible, Duffy said in a post-event interview while pulling on his signature flannel jacket, noting it will require sacrifice from all Americans. “If we continue on this course, this is unsustainable,” he said. - submitted by the office of Congressman Duffy

Legal ruling may allow outdoor night music again in Hayward

by Mike Simonson Wisconsin Public Radio HAYWARD - An ordinance that banned outdoor music late at night in Hayward has been ruled unconstitutional. The Hayward ordinance prohibiting outdoor music after 10 p.m. was passed Sept. 26, 2007. Two days later and a few minutes after 10 p.m., police raided Molly Scheer’s club and wine bar while her band was performing outside. Her attorney, Glenn Stoddard of Eau Claire, says it’s a victory for live music. “It’s a victory for freedom of speech and freedom of outdoor music, which is protected speech,” says Stoddard. “There’s been solid legal precedence protecting music as protected speech under the First Amendment for many years, but many municipalities, including the city of Hayward, have in the past adopted ordinances limiting outdoor music as well as in some cases indoor music.” Stoddard says local governments can limit decibel levels but not one type of sound like music. He says the decision April 8 by the Western District Court of Wisconsin could lead to a settlement paid by Hayward for lost profit and to damage Scheer’s reputation. A trial has been set for late September. Attorneys for Hayward and the city were not immediately available for comment.

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ObamaCare taxes on businesses that contribute to employee health have cost me my promised benefits during retirement. When I wrote to Kohl regarding this issue, his response was to reiterate the new ObamaCare law. Essentially, no answer. The above issues are what the Democratic Party is all about. I for one would vote for Saddam Hussein before I would ever vote for a Democratic Party candidate in the future. I believe he had far more integrity than anyone in the present Democratic Party. I am tired of their games and what they cost the Wisconsin taxpayers. Dave Wilhelmy Siren

N E W S P A P E R

Salvation Army fights hunger through backpack program

by Sherill Summer Leader staff writer WEBSTER - Of Wisconsin’s 424 public school districts, eight districts have the unfortunate distinction of having 70 percent or more of their students eligible for free and reduced lunch according to a DPI news release from last month. Both Siren and Webster are on that list of 70 percent or above. The same news release highlights Webster’s staggering eligibility rate of 76.8 percent. To qualify for free or reduced lunches, a household’s income must be at or below 185 percent of the poverty rate, or roughly an annual income of $40,800 for a family of four. Considering that the 2009 median household income in Burnett County was slightly over $41,000, it is not surprising that many households qualify for free and reduced lunch. Unfortunately, a district’s qualifying rate doesn’t begin to describe the difficulties faced by a family that is facing food

Help, one backpack at a time

hardships. Shirley Schoenberger of the Salvation Army unequivocally told a group of volunteers in Webster that there are children in the community that do not have much food outside school. To help, the Salvation Army provides about 90 backpacks full of food each week for students in Burnett County to take home on Friday night. Each backpack contains several meals and a milk coupon to ensure that a child has food over the weekend. Soon the Salvation Army will add 35 backpacks to the Burnett County total when the Mina Copeland Head Start will be added to the Burnett County list. In addition, the Salvation Army fills over 200 backpacks in Polk County. The backpack program in Webster got a little easier for the Salvation Army this month when they moved into a space in the Webster Community Center. Volunteers in both Siren and Grantsburg already filled backpacks for their respective districts, but the backpacks for the Webster School, up until now, were filled in Balsam Lake and transported to the school each week. Now that food is stockpiled at

Cheryl Campeau, Jean McLaughlin and Gladys Beers are shown (L to R) putting several meals worth of food into backpacks that will go home to some needy families in the Webster School District. The Salvation Army fills over 300 backpacks in Polk and Burnett counties that go home at the end of the week ensuring that students have food over the weekend.

Gladys Beers and Shirley Schoenberger are shown (L to R) unpacking granola bars in the Webster Community Center to be packed away for area students through the Salvation Army backpack program. - Photos by Sherill Summer

the community center, volunteers from the Webster Lioness Club and the Methodist church can fill backpacks for the Webster School and Head Start, once the backpack program starts up there, saving the Salvation Army money otherwise used for gas. Naturally, transporting food is not the only program cost for the Salvation Army, the food and milk also costs money. Schoenberger estimates the cost of the backpack program in both counties as $3,500 per week. A $30,000 start-up grant brought the backpack program to Burnett County this year, but once the grant is spent, the program will rely on community donations to continue. The Polk County program has been operating since 2009 and is already supported entirely from donations. There are many ways the community

can help with the program, explained Schoenberger. The Salvation Army is still putting together lists of volunteers in the Webster area to ensure that there is enough help, especially when food is delivered to the space in the Webster Community Center. The program also accepts donations for food. Cash donations are especially helpful, because the Salvation Army can purchase food from a regional food bank cheaper than shoppers can purchase food locally. Schoenberger further warns that many times when a program like this goes away, it does not come back. For more information on this program in Burnett County, contact Lori Heller at 715-234-8744 in Siren. For more information on this program in Polk County, contact Shirley Schoenberger at 715-338-9393 or 715-485-1221.

Shaw of St. Croix Regional Medical Center, and Sinclear Todd. “We are in the infant stage of this process and could use volunteers and monetary donations,” Sinclear Todd said. “Much of the food is purchased from Second Harvest and for every dollar spent there, $7 is donated by them, so we will be purchasing the food for backpacks from there.” This backpack program at St. Croix Falls will serve students in all grades. The cost per backpack is about $7 to $9 not including a milk coupon. The items go home with a student in a nondescript backpack on Fridays. The number of students enrolled in free/reduced lunches at St. Croix Falls is 39.5 percent districtwide. Of that, 40 percent of elementary students receive free or reduced lunches, or 100 students. Students who qualify for free and reduced lunches also can eat breakfast, but there are students who are still hungry or concerned about what they are going to eat over a weekend or school break and this is where sending a backpack home can help. “It just breaks your heart,” said Christenson. “It’s nice to know there is something we can do.” People who are interested in donating a place to store food, help pack food or contribute monetarily can contact the school district by calling 715-483-9823 and ask for Gjovig or Sinclear Todd. Monetary donations can be sent to the Salvation Army and should include St. Croix Falls Backpack written in the memo to make sure their donation goes to St. Croix Falls. Checks can also be sent, with Backpacks

for Kids written in the memo in care of the Backpack Program at St. Croix Falls, to Denise Sinclear Todd or Maria Gjovig at the school address: P.O. Box 130, St. Croix Falls, WI 54024. There is a meeting scheduled for persons who want to help or join the backpack committee, on Tuesday, May 10, at 8 a.m. in the St. Croix Falls Elementary School conference room. Once the program gets under way in October of the 2011-2012 school year, the committee will be working on an annual fundraiser to help fund the program and sustain it to keep the backpacks going to kids who need them.

Backpacks for Kids to start at SCF schools

by Tammi Milberg Leader staff writer ST. CROIX FALLS – If you worked at a school and heard students say they were hungry or their family was low on food with a weekend or school break coming up, what would you do? Staff at St. Croix Falls schools who have heard this decided to get in on a worthwhile program to help kids eat on weekends. The program is called Backpacks for Kids, a program through the Salvation Army. The program is currently running in Frederic, Amery, Unity, Head Start and Osceola. Osceola runs their program independently through a fundraiser, but the other districts are assisted by the Salvation Army to run the program. Frederic currently sends out an estimated 35 backpacks, Amery, 70; Unity, 100; Head Start, 70; and soon to be added to the list, St. Croix Falls. The backpacks are distributed to families whose children receive free or reduced lunches and one backpack is sent home per family. “When I hear a kid say they are hungry and they come to my office, truthfully I give them whatever food I may have in my room to send home with them,” said Denise Sinclear Todd, middle school guidance counselor at St. Croix Falls. “When I heard of the backpack program I thought, this is such a worthwhile program that we need to have it here at St. Croix Falls.” The start-up cost to get the program off the ground is $2,000, with an estimated $7,000 to keep it funded for one school year based on the free/reduced lunch estimated numbers for the district in the

2011-2012 school year when the program will start. The backpacks include a breakfast item, cans of fruit and vegetables, macaroni and cheese, canned spaghetti, boxed hamburger meal kits, a pasta dish and a milk coupon. The Salvation Army helps provide backpacks and milk coupons. Last year, $60,000 was spent on milk vouchers for the backpack project. The Red Kettle Campaigns during the holiday season help to pay for the milk coupons, as well as individual donations sent to the program, but school districts that want to participate in the program must do the fundraising for the food items. “We need funding as well as volunteers to help pack backpacks on Thursday nights, and a place to keep the food items and pack backpacks,” said Maria Gjovig, St. Croix Falls elementary guidance counselor. “In addition to funds, we need a location to store food, on a pallet, maybe have a table for packing the backpacks, and preferably a location close to school grounds,” stated Tawny Christenson, staff member at St. Croix Falls Schools. The whole process began when Gjovig and elementary Principal Jeff Benoy visited the Serenity Home and Community Referral Agency before the Christmas holiday season. They had a meeting with Duana Bremer, Salvation Army director for Polk and Burnett counties. Gjovig and Benoy met again with Bremer along with other interested persons including Christenson, Rebecca Berg, employee of Edward Jones and Rotary member, Sarah

St. Croix Falls hires new middle school principal

ST. CROIX FALLS – The school board for St. Croix Falls approved the hiring of Joe Connor as middle school principal last week following closed session of the regular school board meeting. Connor is from Crosby, Minn. He has accepted the position and will replace Kathleen Willow who retires at the end of the 2010-2011 school year. A feature on Connor will be forthcoming in the Leader. –Tammi Milberg with information from St. Croix Falls Schools

Donation to CRA

Celebrate Earth Day – stop Gov. Walker’s regressive environmental agenda

With Earth Day approaching, I ask you to join me in asking Gov. Walker and the legislative leadership to stop giveaways to polluters and special interests and to restore Wisconsin’s long bipartisan tradition of protecting our land, water and air resources. We all want cleaner lakes, air and jobs, but Walker protects special interests rather than protecting our environment and good jobs. Walker’s efforts threaten outdoor recreation, fishing, hunting and tourism jobs that bring more than $12 billion into our state. One of the governor’s first acts after being elected was to give federal train money to other states. He gave away $810 million in train money and 5,500 jobs to Illinois and other states. This action appears to be payback to the oil, coal and gas industries that contributed $127,693 to Walker, according to the Wisconsin Democracy Campaign, www.wisdc.org. Walker then proposed the most restrictive rules in the nation for wind energy. Wisconsin should be open to clean-energy businesses like wind energy. The governor has already killed two projects and threatened 1,000 jobs. In his budget bill, the governor attempted to sell state power plants with no bid contracts, and canceled a biomass power plant that would have created jobs and helped wean us off fossil fuels. It makes no sense to sell these power plants and stop biomass when Wisconsin imports $16 billion a year in oil, gas and coal each year, costing us over 300,000 jobs. The greatest potential to economic recovery in Wisconsin is through the creation of clean-energy jobs which will stop the bleeding of billions of dollars in energy costs to other states and countries. We need leadership on this issue, not regression. Walker’s worst threats are in the proposed budget which makes serious cuts to our clean water, recycling, farm and land conservation efforts. His budget rolls back a bipartisan compromise that would clean up phosphorus pollution from our lakes and help our farmers to implement conservation practices. Wisconsinites might have to go to the EPA in Chicago to get water permits be-

Gerry Potvin, representing the Siren Covenant Church Men’s Ministry, is presenting a $400 check to Community Referral Agency Burnett County Outreach for their wish list of gas cards and maintenance items. Receiving the donation are Jenny Wallenburg, sexual assault victim’s advocate, Renee Nanez, Burnett County Outreach coordinator and Venessa Viebrock, children’s advocate. - Photo submitted

Second OWI for Milltown man

CLAM FALLS - Joshua Jonet, 24, Milltown, was arrested and charged with OWI, second offense, on Friday, April 15. That night police were called to CTH I in Clam Falls for a report of a blond women walking in the street. The officer met a vehicle on the 330th Avenue portion of CTH I, saw it slow and pull over briefly. The hazard lights came on briefly and then went off. The officer stopped and approached the other vehicle. A male in the driver’s seat, later identified as Jonet, asked if the officer knew where Milltown was. The officer could hear a woman crying hysterically. The officer said he thought at that point Jonet realized he was a deputy, as he said something like, “I’m in trouble.” The officer noted the woman in the passenger’s seat had a bloody nose and her clothing were in disorder. She appeared to be wet, and Jonet appeared to have blood on the sleeve and chest of his shirt. Jonet denied drinking, but the officer stated it was obvious he had been. Field sobriety tests were given. A Breathalyzer registered .14 and he was arrested. — with information from the Polk County Sheriff’s Dept.

Amery man hits light pole, gets second OWI

AMERY - Jeffrey Kobs, 28, Amery, was arrested and charged with OWI, second offense, and operating with a prohibited blood alcohol content on Friday, April 15. A police officer was alerted to a possible intoxicated driver by another motorist who was driving behind a blue flatbed truck that was reportedly “all over the road and in oncoming lanes of traffic.” They were driving on CTH F coming in to Amery. The officer found the vehicle parked on Apple Avenue with no driver present, but the officer recognized it as belonging to Kobs. The officer then got a call about a vehicle that had struck a light pole on Broadway Street, and he went there, took photos and found pieces of a truck mirror bracket there. He then returned to the blue truck and found damage to it consistent with hitting a pole, including a missing passenger side mirror bracket. Another Polk County deputy located Kobs in another apartment. Another party told the police that Kobs had arrived moments before, stumbled in, could barely walk and stated “I don’t know what happened,” before passing out on the couch. The officer woke Kobs and questioned him. Kobs said he just came from Clear Lake and admitted he had been drinking. He didn’t remember hitting a light pole. The officer brought Kobs outside and he couldn’t walk without assistance. They had to keep him from falling. Field sobriety tests were given. His PBT registered .15 and he was arrested. — with information from the Polk County Sheriff’s Dept.

Long Lake recycling site open for the summer

LONG LAKE — The Long Lake recycling drop-off site is now open at its summer location – one-half mile east of Long Lake Dam on CTH D. The site is open on Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. throughout the summer months. The compost site will also be open for yard waste. The site will continue to accept leaves, grass clippings and brush less than 2 inches in diameter from Long Lake property owners only. The recycling dropbox is open for residents in either Burnett or Washburn counties, not businesses, and includes the following items: newspaper, glass containers, No. 1 and No. 2 plastics — no lids or caps, tin and aluminum cans, phonebooks, magazines, office paper — all colors — and cardboard. Please break down all cardboard boxes. Please refrain from dropping off recycling items during closed hours in order to keep this site as clean and litter free as possible. Do not leave items of any kind outside of gate. Report any illegal dumping to RCC by calling the office at 715-635-2197 with the license plate of the illegal dumpers. RCC will exercise the right to fine those who dump items illegally at any of RCC’s recycling or yard waste sites throughout the two-county service area. Illegal dumping at recycling sites is punishable by law. Please note that the Long Lake recycling site does not accept garbage of any kind including twine, string, plastic bags or any other items that RCC does not accept. If you would like further information on this or other recycling sites in Washburn or Burnett county, or if you have other items to dispose of, please call Jen at 715-6352197, or e-mail her at jbarton@nwrpc.com. — from RCC

Am bulance Service 133 Eider St., Milltown, WI 54858

715-825-4444

Milroy

73rd District Assembly

cause Walker’s plan violates the federal Clean Water Act. This Act has not only cleaned up our waterways, it has revitalized the economies of industrial waterfront communities from the Fox Valley to the Twin Ports. Walker’s rolling back of clean water policies will hurt sustainable economic development in our communities. Walker would also divert the recycling fee from our recycling program, one of the best in the nation. This means we may have to build more landfills, at the same time eliminating recycling jobs. The governor’s budget also threatens the popular bipartisan Stewardship Fund by cutting payments in lieu of taxes to local governments for conservation lands. This takes away the ability of local governments to control property taxes and conserve the last of our wild places. The governor does away with measures such as the Wisconsin Purchase of Agricultural Conservation Easement, or PACE, program that helps farmers stay in business and protects the heritage of Wisconsin’s family farms from sprawling development. This program has been popular and successful across the state. We need to restore Wisconsin’s proud tradition of clean government and protecting our environment. We need to: put professionals in charge of environmental programs, not political cronies; implement, rather than gut, measures to clean up our lakes, streams and beaches; keep recycling fees going to fund our recycling program to keep those good jobs and limit new landfills; and restore the Stewardship Fund and farmland protection programs. If we take these steps, Wisconsin families can have cleaner jobs, air, water, land and government. I encourage you to contact Walker and ask that he terminate his regressive environmental agenda and work toward maintaining and improving the pristine beauty of Wisconsin. You can contact him by calling 608-266-1212 or by e-mailing him at governor@wisconsin.gov. Together we can continue Wisconsin’s long and proud conservation tradition. - from the office of Rep. Milroy

5TH-ANNUAL PIG ROAST

• E-edition • Go to www.the-leader.net

5TH-ANNUAL PIG ROAST

The entire paper online.

Unity Area

Rep. Nick

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Siren board reorganizes after recent election

PAGE 12 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - APRIL 20, 2011

by Nancy Jappe Leader staff reporter SIREN - The Siren Village Board held a special reorganization meeting Tuesday afternoon, April 19. The first item on the agenda was installation of newly elected board members Peggy Moore, Tom Anderson and Dave Alden, along with village President Janet Hunter. Board committee members were approved as follows: Vice President - Dave Alden. Buildings, grounds and parks - Phylllis Kopecky chair, Rudy Mothes and Peggy Moore. Personnel and finance - Janet Hunter chair, Dave Doty Sr. and Dave Alden. Police and public safety - Dave

Doty Sr. chair, Tom Anderson and Phyllis Kopecky. Roads, streets and utilities - Dave Alden chair, Janet Hunter and Rudy Mothes. Upcoming meetings were scheduled for: Buildings, grounds and parks - Monday, May 2, 2 p.m. Personnel and finance - Tuesday, April 26, 9 a.m. Public safety - on hold. Roads, streets and utilities - Thursday, April 28, 9 a.m. Board of appeals - Wednesday, April 27, 10 a.m. Board of review - May 31, 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. No plan commission meeting was scheduled. The following appointments were approved: Dave Doty Sr. to the plan commission. Jack Hedlund - citizen

appointment to the plan commission. Bob Lee - alternate citizen appointment to board of appeals to fill in when there is lack of a quorum. Tom Anderson - board representative to the ballpark committee. Peggy Moore - appointment as weed commissioner. Martin Shutt - Siren member on the Burnett County Development Association. In other action at this meeting, U. S. Bank, Bremer Bank, Community Bank and the Local Government Investment Pool were designated as official depositories for village funds, and the Inter-County Leader will continue as the board’s official newspaper.

Luck trustees take oath of office RIGHT: Luck Village Clerk Kathy Hanson (right) administered the oath of office to (L to R) Trustee Bob Determan, village President Peter Demydowich and Trustee Kristine King. The three were sworn in Tuesday evening, April 19. — Photos by Mary Stirrat

Music students advance to state competition John Wilcoxon took the oath of office as a trustee for the village of Luck. Village clerk Kathy Hanson administered the oath last Wednesday, April 13, at the end of the regular board meeting.

Free puppet show and Easter egg hunt

Burnett Community Library Main Street

Webster

HAPPY EASTER & THANK YOU

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To all the people who sent me cards, prayers, flowers, etc., to my family who loved me and cared, to St. Croix Hospital, Regions in St. Paul and Rice Lake Convalescent Center, who took such wonderful care of me I always want you to remember there is no one else like you. You have gifts that only you can give the world. You have blessings others can only receive through you. You are special, you are loved, you are you – the world is blessed to have you in it. 534326 35Lp

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I want to thank all the people that sent cards, gifts, food and were concerned in any way during the time I was in the hospital with pneumonia. Thanks to the 3 hospital staffs and all of their “Angels.” May God bless you all, we love you. Chuck & Izzy Magnison and Family

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Sixty students from the Grantsburg High School music department, along with one middle school student, will participate in the Wisconsin State Music Contest. Grantsburg is participating in a total of 21 events at the state level competition which will be held on Saturday, May 7, on the UW-Eau Claire campus. Large ensembles include handbells, percussion ensemble, brass ensemble, woodwind ensemble, Travelers, vocal jazz, ladies swing choir, an SATB ensemble, and an SSAA ensemble. Vocal soloists are Paul Lewis, Joe Dumas and Lily Benge Briggs. Cherissa Vollendorf, Stephanie Miklya, Carissa Skifstad, Lily Benge Briggs and Paul Lewis will be performing musical theater solos. Instrumental soloists are Grace Corbin and Scott Morley, along with eighth-grader Carter Lee. Julia Siqi Gao will be playing a piano solo. Siqi Gao and Lee also have the added distinction of being awarded the Best in Site award at the district level competition. – Photo submitted

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TAYLORS FALLS, Minn. – Kids of all ages and their parents are invited to a fun, free puppet show called “Some Kind of Happenin’s Happenin’ in Jerusalem.” It is performed by the Holy Hand Puppeteers at 2 p.m., on Saturday, April 23, at Taylors Falls United Methodist Church located at 290 W. Government St., next to the historic Folsom House Museum. An Easter egg hunt will follow the performance on the Folsom House lawn. - submitted

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Polk County Recycling Center gives tours for Earth Day

APRIL 20, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 13

Students from local schools toured the Polk County Recycling Center on Hwy. 8 in St. Croix Falls on Friday, April 15. The recycling center celebrated Earth Day with guided tours. This exhibit is a water table that shows students how what we put on the soil pollutes our groundwater and rivers and streams. These are St. Croix Falls fifth-graders at the exhibit.

Billie Jo Webb, St. Croix Falls, takes a ride on the energy bicycle. She is pedaling to light up lightbulbs that are traditional and fluorescent to see how much force and effort is used to light each bulb type. The fluorescent bulb takes less energy to light. Photos by Tammi Milberg

Students look at a clump of grass that has grown in the area of a cow pie to see how the cycle of animals eating and helping fertilize grass takes place on farm pastures.

RIGHT: These students from St. Croix Falls pretend to be cows grazing on grass as they learn about how cows recycle the grass they eat.

LEFT: These students learn how oil is recycled and see an oil filter compressed in the recycling center. During difficult time, it’s easy to feel like things are out of your control. So it’s essential to consider every financial decision carefully, especially when it comes to your retirement savings.

LEFT: Students learn about how plastic pop bottles can be recycled and their materials spun into a fiber that makes hats and T-shirts.

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Burnett supervisors hear updates on Forts, ADRC

PAGE 14 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - APRIL 20, 2011

by Nancy Jappe Leader staff writer SIREN - Laura Neve, Burnett County director of the Aging and Disability Resource Center, provided an update on the Aging and Disability Resource Center during the Burnett County Board of Supervisors meeting Tuesday, April 19. Neve assured the board that no county levy dollars are involved in funding the agency. Support comes just from federal and state dollars. ADRC Centers are the first places for people to go to get accurate, unbiased information related to aging or living with a disability. The ADRC office in Burnett County is located at the Government Center. In Polk County it is on the lower level of the Polk County Government Center. According to Neve, the agency is trying to work more closely with the St. Croix Tribe. Barbara Engelhart is the only full-time employee working in this capacity, and the agency is looking at adding another person. The local ADRC has been chosen, along with ADRCs in Brown and Osakis counties, to pilot a national grant for the Administration on Aging. Burnett County has reached its goal of eliminating people from the waiting list for services within the first two years. There are now new people on the list who are waiting for service slots (seven elderly, 11 with physical disabilities and two with development disabilities), and the agency is working to integrate the Burnett and Polk counties into one waiting list. ADRC is sponsoring an open house at the Burnett County Government Center Thursday, April 28, from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Members of the Polk County staff will be on hand for the open house. Director Steve Wierschem was at the meeting to update board members on activities at Forts Folle Avoine Historical Park. “We have something here (people) can’t find anywhere else,” Wierschem said, referring to this being the only place in the country where two fur trading companies located so near to one another - back in 1802-1804. The county provides support for the Forts, and Wierschem told board members that the goal is to have the Forts open all year round. Board member Chris Sybers, head of the Burnett Towns Association, provided an update on the association, describing several achievements since he took over as head of the group, one being establishment of a committee to work on an ambulance agreement. He reported that all of the townships have signed a contract with the sole bidder, North Ambulance, and that the committee meets quarterly and will report to the county board. The goal of providing ambulance service within 12-15 minutes is being maintained in most instances. The Towns Association is working to get all stop signs up to federal standards by 2015, as required. Sybers contacted a number of companies and found a source where stop signs can be ordered, at a group price, saving a lot of money for the townships. He is also looking into group buying of radios and cell phones for maintenance trucks. Another achievement is that the three villages in the county are now represented on the Towns Association. In actions taken at this meeting, the board approved the 2010-2015 Burnett County Land Information Plan and a resolution creating a revised zoning district map to change the zoning of a parcel of land in the town of Grantsburg from RR-3 to A-2 (agriculture).

Christine Moeller (R), president of the Burnett County Historical Society, introduced Forts Folle Avoine Historical Park Director Steve Wierschem after which Wierschem brought county board members up to date on Forts activities. “We have something here (people) can’t find anywhere else,” Wierschem told the board, meaning a site where two fur trading companies located beside one another, the only place in the country where this happened. - Photos by Nancy Jappe

Marilyn Kooiker, UW-Extension family living agent, was recognized during the April 19 Burnett County Board of Supervisors meeting for receiving the Epsilon Sigma Phi National Honorary Society (for all extension programs) Mid-Career Award. County board Ssupervisor Larry Main is shown as he was describing the criteria for Kooiker’s receiving the award.

Allan Benson (L), employee of the Burnett County Highway Department for the past 15 years, was honored by the county board on his retirement. Board member Charles Awe read a letter from Benson’s supervisor, Burnett County Highway Commissioner Bob Morehouse, describing the value of Benson’s work as a highway department employee.

Burnett County clerk Wanda Hinrichs showed a plat from the Burnett County plat book from the 1840s to members of the county board during their meeting Tuesday, April 19. Clayton Jorgensen, Grantsburg, brought the plat book to the board meeting, and he talked about the 1843 Territorial Road, “the granddaddy of all Burnett County roads,” the road that brought the first settlers and freight into the county.

RIGHT: Local artist Jim Springett (L) is allowing one of his oil paintings to go on display at the Burnett County Government Center in Siren for the next month. The artwork is the fourth and final in a series of Burnett County historical scenes. Springett made the presentation during the monthly meeting of county supervisors, Tuesday, April 19. Shown with Springett is local historian Clayton Jorgenson. - Photo by Priscilla Bauer

State budget plan could help St. Croix River bridge project

by Rich Kremer Wisconsin Public Radio STILLWATER, Minn. - A provision in Gov. Scott Walker’s budget proposal could make it easier for Wisconsin to fund a bridge project across the federally protected St. Croix River. Proponents of the project want to build a new four-lane bridge linking Holton and Stillwater, Minn. It would replace a deteriorating, two-lane lift bridge built in 1931. But the bridge project has faced many obstacles over the past decades. In 1972, the St. Croix was designated as a Wild and Scenic River meaning no new construction. Now a bill co-sponsored by U.S. Congressman Ron Kind is seeking an exemption from the federal protec-

tions. Then there’s the issue of funding. The new bridge is expected to run in the $600 million range, but Wisconsin Department of Transportation Secretary Mark Gotlieb says Wisconsin’s half of that is in the bank. “We have bonding authority already for $225 million, and we’re confident that if the regulatory obstacles can be overcome, that we can certainly fund the Wisconsin share of the project.” Gottlieb says Gov. Scott Walker’s biennial budget proposal would end one of those obstacles. “We had a statutory provision that had been put in a previous budget that would have required us to get a $75 million federal earmark in order to release the bonding

that we have already authorized for the project, and the governor has proposed to remove that provision.” But the St. Croix River Crossing project has also faced two lawsuits from environmental groups including the Sierra Club. State Sen. Sheila Harsdorf says it’s time for the stalling to stop. “The reality is this bridge is an essential component of our infrastructure system for the region on both sides of the river,” says Harsdorf. “It’s important for commerce for safety.” Harsdorf is hopeful that Congress will grant the exemption for the bridge project by September because of time limits on Minnesota’s bonding for the crossing.

SPRING SPORTS

APRIL 20, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 15

INTER COUNTY LEADER • INTER COUNTY LEADER • INTER COUNTY LEADER

F R E D E R I C • G R A N T S B U R G • L U C K • S T. C R O I X F A L L S • S I R E N • U N I T Y • W E B S T E R BASEBALL • BOYS GOLF • SOFTBALL • TRACK & FIELD

West Lakeland has plenty of new faces and stars for 2011

by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer GRANTSBURG – The Pirates girls softball team will once again be the team most other squads are gunning for. Behind head coach Don Bjelland, and assistant Steve Johnson, the Pirates have two seasoned leaders with a combined 30 years of experience between them. While they graduated six starting seniors in 2010, you might expect them to be looking at a down year, which Bjelland was quick to erase. “This team will surprise some, if the chemistry and leadership jells,” he said. “Midseason will give a better picture as to how good we might be.” What’s new for this year? According to Johnson and Bjelland, the past practice of having one main starting ace on the mound may move more toward a “pitch by committee” approach. “This year you will see a number of faces in the circle,” Bjelland said. After a stellar, 20-1 overall record last season, with that one, lone loss coming in a second round, 11-inning 3-2 sectional heartbreaker to Arcadia, the Pirates came very close to state again. Can anyone knock them off their victorious habits? Bjelland is giving little away, but said they have several key opponents. “Frederic will probably have low numbers, but are well coached and always ready to play,” he said. “Luck and St. Croix Falls always are competitive.” Grantsburg has a bevy of returning talent, including Tiff Meyer, Kylie Pewe, Emily Cole and Gab Witzany, all of whom started and made an impact on the 2010 squad. They play a multitude of positions, and any one of them can hit competitively. “I look for us to hit well and play good defense,” Bjelland stated. “If we have any (weaknesses) it may be pitching, simply from lack of varsity playing time. There are at least four pitchers ready to prove me wrong.” Grantsburg continues to have strong athletic seasons in numerous sports, including softball, and that winning is contagious, as both Bjelland and Johnson know from experience. “Tradition is huge,” Bjelland said. “This group is ready to leave their mark on Grantsburg fast pitch.”

Webster/Siren softball The growing Webster/Siren Tigons girls softball squad has a few familiar faces back, but did lose a gaggle of talent to graduation, including their entire infield. Head coach Scott Hoefs is in his sixth year as the top dog, and has a full decade in with the program. He has former Luck head coach Ashley Close as a new assistant, along with assistants Tina Rudiger and Dan Thill. But they have lots of new faces and unknown talent to process and groom, and Hoefs admits there will be some experimentation this season. “We’ll have some growing pains early, as we are replacing five starters, including the whole infield,” he said. “Ten of our 22 players are either freshmen or first-time players.” The Tigons had some solid moments last season, and have a great respect for the talent in the West Lakeland Conference. “Everyone in our conference is a key

Extra Points

Unity’s Brittany Thomfohrda eyes a pop-up during an Eagles win over St. Croix Falls on Monday, April 18. The Eagles could be one of the dark horses in the Lakeland Conference this spring. – Photo by Marty Seeger

opponent,” Hoefs said. “Other than Grantsburg and possibly Frederic, the rest of the conference will be able to beat anyone on a given night.” Hoefs is thankful for some of the returning talent they have to work with, and said the success this season will be keyed by some of those familiar faces. “It starts with your seniors, and we have five seniors that we are counting on to lead the younger players: Siiri Larsen, Samantha Kopecky, Kayla Duclon, Bryana Andren and Billie Ingalls.” The Webster/Siren squad has almost two dozen players to play with, but as Hoefs admits, finding an opposing school with a JV squad means fewer games than they’d like to have. “We have good numbers (22) the problem is finding other schools that have JV teams so we can get experience for our players,” he said, noting that the lack of playing time is a real issue for the squad to gain game-time experience.

Frederic softball The Frederic Vikings return with head coach of five years, Erin Hansford, and six-year assistant Brad Schmidt. They are routinely mentioned as one team that might be able to give the mighty Grantsburg squad a run, and but Hansford admits they have plenty of work to do this season. “I’m not sure what to expect,” she said, “only position remaining the same from last year, is pitcher Cori Schmidt. We’re looking to train in new talent. We have a young infield and an inexperienced outfield.” She noted that the Vikes have “many new, young players,” and they also have two foreign exchange students, from Germany and

See Softball/ Page 22

••• CONOVER, N.C. – Former Saints athlete Brenna Martens ended her collegiate golf career with Lenoir-Rhyne University on a high note. Martens shot a 230 (plus 17) to win the Food Lion South Atlantic Conference Golf Championship. She led all three rounds and defeated Ashley Denton of Wingate by just one stroke, and also helped lead Lenoir-Rhyne to a Brenna Martens fifth-place team finish. She is currently working through college as a nursing student and plans to graduate next spring, 2012. – Marty Seeger with information from www.lrbears.com ••• WEBSTER – Webster senior, Jack Taylor will be a Tiger for a different team during the fall of 2011. On the recommendation from Division 1 Oklahoma University, Taylor is attending Cowley College, a two-year institution affiliated with the NJCAA in Arkansas City, Kan. The Cowley Tigers men’s and women’s cross-country teams are coming off their first-ever national championship titles. Cowley’s top boys runner, Josh Garcia, recently signed on to run for the University of Oklahoma, making the addition of Taylor at Cowley College an important aspect of the future success of their team. – submitted ••• WINONA, Minn., – The Winona State Warriors softball team suffered two losses against No. 6 Minnesota State in Mankato, Minn., on Monday, April 18. Despite the two losses, it’s been a busy week for former Grantsburg athletes Mollie Bjelland and Michelle Lund. Last Tuesday, Bjelland became one of only 10 players in history with over 200 hits, and became the only player in school history to compile 200 hits, 150 runs, 45 doubles, 10 triples, 35 home runs and 165 career RBIs. Lund, a freshman with the Warriors logged two innings in relief and gave up only one hit. – Marty Seeger with information from winonastatewarriors.com ••• The Wisconsin Baseball Association announced the four playoff sites for the August State Semifinals, which include Osseo, Hayward, Osceola and Rib Lake. Area town baseball teams affected by the change include the Osceola Braves, St. Croix River Bandits and Grantsburg Honkers. ••• LEADER LAND – The Monday, April 25, Unity at St. Croix Falls baseball game can be heard on 104.9 FM beginning at 5 p.m. ••• LEADER LAND – Local sports tidbits to share? Please contact the Leader by 4:30 p.m. on Mondays to go in Extra Points. – Marty Seeger ••• LEADER LAND – Leader Sports strives to follow the college careers of area athletes. If you know of an athlete who will be playing collegiate sports in 2011 and hasn’t been mentioned, send us an e-mail or call and we’ll take it from there. – Marty Seeger

SPORTS RESULTS DEADLINES: WEDNESDAY - MONDAY: 1 p.m. the following business day. TUESDAY: 7 a.m. on Wednesday. Missed deadlines mean no coverage that week! S P O R T S N E W S O R S C O R E S T O R E P O R T ? • P H O N E : 7 1 5 - 3 2 7 - 4 2 3 6 • FA X : 7 1 5 - 3 2 7 - 4 1 1 7 • E - M A I L : m s e e g e r @ c e n t u r y t e l . n e t

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Sneak peek into the 2011 spring track season

Area could see several state qualifiers this spring

by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer LEADER LAND – After a bit of a slow start the area track season is starting to get under way, and as usual, teams are itching to get going. While there have been a handful of meets in the area, some have been limited to running or throwing. Some field events such as pole vault have yet to break outdoors, but the competition is coming soon. Of the seven area track teams, Frederic has been a steady presence near the top of the standings, especially the girls. In his 15th year of coaching, Frederic girls track coach Jeff Larcom again sees good things with his team. “I am very excited for the season this year. I feel we are the team to beat, being we have won conference and regionals for the last three years,” Larcom said. The Vikings have several athletes that will be able to score points in each event, and several of the athletes are eyeing another shot at state. Larcom said returning athletes to watch for include Sage Karl, Calla Karl, Tanesha Carlson, Alli Anderson, Amanda Blok, Samantha Nelson, Sarah Knauber, Leah Engebretson and Paige Burton. Larcom believes Unity, Webster and St. Croix Falls should be bringing very competitive teams to the mix this season, yet feels he has a very experienced crew. “I feel we have a strong senior influence this year,” Larcom noted. The Vikings will be without senior leader Jade Johnson this season after a basketball injury, so he hopes some of the younger athletes can fill the void. One thing the Vikings aren’t short of, however, is competitive spirit. “I always want to get athletes to state and I feel we can do that. I know that there will be some upset girls on my team if they don’t make it back to state this year. They have the work ethic and drive to make it happen,” Larcom said. The Frederic boys could have several contenders for state this season, including Tony Peterson who earned a spot in the

ing a bit of experience in the field events. Lone sophomore Colton Tretsven is expected to be dominant in the throwing events, however, after displaying a strong work ethic in the off-season. The Pirates are also welcoming foreign exchange student Jin Jeon who is currently the fastest athlete on the team. The South Korea native is actually a very talented soccer player, but has decided to give track a try this season.

Tony Peterson of Frederic skims a hurdle in one of the area track teams first meets of the season in Spooner on Thursday, April 14. – Photo by Larry Samson

110-meter hurdles. “We have strong relay teams and a strong shot and discus team,” said firstyear head coach Gaelynn Sears. In total, the Vikings have 19 athletes, with many of them being seniors, which include Peterson, Ben Ackerley, Josiah Lund, Robert Kirk, John Chelmo, Jesse Sanchez, Aane Nakashima and Ben Saengthaweep. “The weather has been the biggest factor determining success on the track and field. The only consolation to the cold spring is that everyone else has been faced with the same conditions,” Sears added.

Grantsburg track With some area track teams producing an average of about 40 athletes, the Grantsburg track program is fielding roughly 20 kids this spring. It may not allow them to score points in every event, but they do have strength in the events

they participate in. The Pirates don’t have a major track program at the middle school level, so for some athletes, they’ll be seeing their first track meets of their careers. There is, however, a handful of experienced athletes that have a shot at entering a spot at state this season, including senior Angela Gaffney, who is always consistent in the distance events. Gaffney earned a spot at sectionals last year, but fell short of state. The lone Pirate to make state last season was Kortney Morrin in the high jump, but a knee injury during the basketball season has sidelined her for the rest of the year. One of the strengths for the team could be in their distance running, especially for the boys, who have three runners that competed at the state cross-country meet last season. “We have no one who wants to do the 100. It’s a problem I’ve never had in coaching track,” said first-year coach Lisa Danielson, who says they should be very strong in the 400 events, but could be lack-

Luck track Al Tomlinson is stepping in as the head Luck track coach this season, but has been coaching track for four years as an assistant in Luck. The Cardinals have just two girls on the track team this year, but both Leah LeMay and Hannah Karl are getting faster and stronger by the day, according to Tomlinson, and should be competitive in distance running, and LeMay is a solid sprinter, long jumper and vaulter. The boys return three state qualifiers from last year who competed in the pole vault, (A.J. Walsh-Brenizer), long jump (Landen Strilzuk) and discus (Roger Steen). Tomlinson believes that the field events will be one of the team’s biggest strengths, but he sees the boys doing very well in the sprints, all the way up to the 400 events. There’s also room for competition in the 1600 and 3200, which the Cardinals haven’t had in recent years. Tomlinson also sees some younger athletes stepping up this season. “Some new and returning athletes will definitely see some improvement over last year in regards to times and distances in the field events. We have some freshman beginners that are very athletic and show some great promise for the future,” Tomlinson said. Other key returning athletes include Ben Kufalk in sprints and relays, and Brady Klatt, who just missed state in the high jump. One of the team’s few weaknesses will be in the mid-distance events, such as the 800. “It has been an exciting preseason so far. The athletes have been working very hard on getting in shape, and working on various techniques of their particular event. We competed in an early track meet at Menomonie and ended up seventh out of

See Track preview/ next page

Grantsburg Pirates fast-pitch team goes to college

GRANTSBURG – Coach Don Bjelland and his Grantsburg fast-pitch team took a road trip Wednesday, April 13, but there was no game scheduled and not even a practice. In fact, the team did not even bring their equipment. They were going for a crash course of college fast-pitch 101. The Winona State Warriors rolled into Concordia University Wednesday afternoon for a collegiate doubleheader and saw its 13-game win streak come to an end. With them were two of Grantsburg’s favorite daughters, Mollie Bjelland and Michelle Lund. Winona State had a great playoff run last year with a few All-Americans on the roster, one of which was senior Bjelland, starting center fielder and No. 3 batter hitting .393. The long, lean lefty was one of the driving forces in the NCAA Division 3 playoff push and is making a few waves again this year. Bjelland was tabbed as NSIC Preseason Offensive Player of the Year in a vote of conference coaches. Bjelland was named to the 2010 Louisville Slugger/NFCA Division II All-America first team a season ago, and was also a firstteam all-region selection. She helped lead the Warriors to the NCAA Division II Central Region tournament with a 38-14 overall record. She finished the 2010 season with a .371 batting average while belting 12 home runs and 51 RBI. She scored 36

The Grantsburg Pirates fast-pitch team took a moment to visit with former teammates and talk to coaches from the Winona State fast-pitch team. – Photos submitted

runs to go with 17 doubles, four triples and a .755 slugging percentage. Following in her wake is another Pirate pitcher, freshman Michelle Lund, with a record of 5-0. She has been a great contributor to the Warriors pitching staff, a real credit for a walk-on freshman. Lund sports a 2.70 ERA in the 36 innings pitched but leads all Winona State pitchers with a

batting average of .306. Playing for Winona State is just one of several things these two players have in common. Both have won state championships pitching for Grantsburg as juniors in high school. Both were voted first team all-state. Both also played in the high school All-Star classic. Winona State Warriors head coach Greg Jones took a few minutes to talk with

Mollie Bjelland scores a run at Concordia University on Wednesday, April 13.

the Grantsburg team after the game “ I want to thank you for coming down to support us today. I know it’s tough to take a day off from practice in the season.” Winona bounced back in the second game with a 7-0 shutout victory in the nightcap. Bjelland had a pair of hits. Winona State is now 25-4 overall and 9-1 in their conference this season. – submitted

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14 teams with only six athletes. We might not have the numbers that some of the other teams have, but we will have some very good quality in many events,” Tomlinson said. Former head coach Jeff Brenizer and football coach Don Kendzior are assisting Tomlinson this season. “The coaches have implemented a precise program to keep the athletes’ interest high. We have also instilled an accountability to the program and their fellow athletes that the athletes are really responding to,” Tomlinson said.

Siren track The Siren Dragons track team has a great group of athletes coming back this season, and should have a very good shot at having some kids representing them at state in La Crosse this season. For the girls, senior Ashley Guevara is back again and will almost certainly look for another return to state in the throwing events. She won the sectional championship last season in the discus and eventually took third at state, which was a personal best finish. Another thrower, senior Daphne Hubbell, could be eyeing a shot at state in the shot put after falling just short in the sectional meet at Colfax last year. Senior Seth Stoner could represent Siren again at state if last year’s performance is any indication. Stoner also earned a spot at state last season in the discus and will have experience on his side. In the long jump, senior Isaac Wegner just missed a shot at state but will get another shot at it this season. The Siren 4X200 relay team also made a sectional appearance in Colfax last year, and four of the five that made up that team from last season are back again this year, including Coty Reh, Jeremy Wikstrom, Mike Wampfler and Reuben Mixsooke. St. Croix Falls track In year two of his coaching career, Saints boys track coach Jacob Meyer will have a lot to choose from in terms of the sheer number of athletes this season. “We have almost twice as many boys out for track this year then we did last year, which it is really nice to have the numbers,” Meyer said, adding that several of his boys are back from last year with a bit more experience. The boys team had a few representing the team at state last season, including Ryan Larson, who has since graduated, but Jace Marek, Garrett Radinzel, Alex Bertram and Auney Seifert are back again this season after qualifying at state in the

Good things are in store for the Frederic girls track team this season, and Sam Nelson is one of many talented athletes eyeing another trip to state. – Photo by Larry Samson 4x200 relay. Other key returning runners include Cody Zelinski, Ryan Nussbaum, Reshaud Kelash, Alex Frey and Marshall Dillman. “Our sprinter depth is our biggest strength this year. We have a lot of fast sprinters which makes practice more competitive, which in turn will hopefully make us a better team,” Meyer said. Steph Belisle is back for her third season with coaching the Saints girls team. She says this year’s team consists of several freshmen and sophomore athletes, which shows a bit of inexperience. “However, they are working hard and their talent is beginning to show. I am optimistic about the number of athletes we have out for track this spring. We have about 25 girls out this year and numbers are an important piece of scoring points in meets,” Belisle said. Two seniors Ashley Bollig and Bailey Bergmann return this season, and Bergmann has represented the cross-country team as an individual. Both will be distance runners. “Ashley is a hard worker who is willing to run anything if it benefits the team. Bailey has proven to be a competitive miler for us in the past,” Belisle said. The Saints girls will be without two key athletes this season to ACL injuries including Sarah Petznick, who was a fierce competitor in the hurdles, and Matti Gerlach, who continue to help the track team any way they can, despite not being able to compete. “The conference looks strong. We will

The Unity boys track team has several athletes that have state potential this spring. – Photo by Becky Amundson

The Webster boys track team is known for lots of success in their distance and other running events, but the field events could be an added bonus for the Tigers this season. – Photo by Becky Amundson have our work cut out for us, but I am ex- and coming freshman with Oliver Raboin, cited to see how our young team does as who could do well in the throwing events we move into the outdoor season. We as well as Zach Cardot. have a group of young ladies who should see success, if they continue to work and Webster track dedicate themselves to improvement as The Webster track team seems to conthey have so far!” Belisle said. tinue to grow, and dominate year after year, and it would be no surprise to say Unity track they’ll be near the top again this season, Unity girls track coach Mike Bielemeier especially with loads of experienced talhas been around the coaching scene since ent that participated at state last season. 1984, and the Eagles have had numerous Last season the boys earned a conference, successes over the years, and this year regional and sectional championships to looks no different. Once again Unity has a go along with a runner-up recognition in strong participation record in both girls Division 3 at state. and boys, and Bielemeier is “glad to have State qualifier Mason Kriegel is back the good numbers,” but there are several this season as a pole vaulter, and Jack Tayyounger athletes, with 12 total freshmen. lor and Devin Greene competed in the The field events look like another strong 2x800 relay at state. Taylor is a phenomepoint for the Eagles, but they could be nal distance runner lacking in distance runners. Hayla Bader who also competed in could be a big strength in the team’s hurthe 1600- and 3200dles and jumping events, and Bryana Pemeter events. tersin in the sprints. Ashley Johnson and “(Jim) Muus is alJenna Christensen are another pair of athways able to send some letes that could be a key in the team’s distance kids to state jumping events. and (Jeff) Postler seems The Unity boys will look to compete for to get a thrower to state a conference title and send more than just as well. We’re also going to be competitive one to state this spring. For starters, they’ll in the jumps,” said Webster coach Roy have senior Joe Swanson competing for Ward, who will also get coaching help another shot at state in the throwing from co-coach Sarah Pickering, and sevevents. Swanson took fifth last year at eral other assistant coaches, which has state in the discus, and if he makes an- been huge part of building such a successother trip he could have company with ful track program. Xavier Foeller, who is dominant in the The girls team should also be competihurdles, and Dylan Hendricks, who com- tive this season after returning four girls peted in sectionals last spring. Unity has who competed at the state track meet last a strong relay team this season as well. In year. Shaina Pardun continues to improve the 4x200 Rush Hickethier, Hendricks, in the pole vault and Mary Johnson has Justin Runberg and been a fierce competitor in the shot put Tyler Christensen could after her bid to state last year. Two of the make some noise. girls 4x200 relay team are back again this Christensen is also a season after a solid performance at state, talented sprinter and which ended up breaking the school Hickethier could do record. Melissa Gustavson and Angel well in the long jump. Christenson are the two back to compete The Eagles have an up again this year.

Area tracksters made it look easy in Spooner, Thursday, April 14, during one of the first track meets of the season. Many teams look to be in great form already. – Photo by Larry Samson

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Frederic girls explode in extra frames over Saints

Frederic 18, St. Croix Falls 12 (nine inn.)

by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer ST. CROIX FALLS – It took almost three hours to decide a winner, and the lead changed hands several times near the end, but Frederic emerged as the victors, 18-12, in extra innings on Tuesday, April 19, after the Vikings exploded for eight runs in the top of the ninth inning. Viking starter Cori Schmidt pitched a complete, extra inning game for the win, and also helped her own cause at the plate, going 5-for-5 and scoring six runs in the high-scoring affair. She had help from catcher Vanessa Neumann, who was 4for-6 with six RBI, and had several sharp extra base hits. St. Croix Falls trailed early, playing catch-up much of the night and only held the lead for half an inning, but they never gave up, and weren’t about to give up without a fight. They scored two runs in six different innings, including in the bottom of the sixth, when they briefly held that aforementioned lead and forced the Vikings to score to stay alive. St. Croix Falls starter Alexis Erickson was solid, but handed off relief duties to Natalie Sempf in the third frame, who was also sharp. The Saints bats were strong at times, with catcher Alicia Chelberg going 4-for-6, and knocking several balls quite hard. Designated hitter Brenna Loen tallied three RBIs, and Sempf went 2-for-5 with a solid triple. Erickson also hit the ball hard, going 2-for-4 and scoring twice, but she was also stranded four times. Both squads had their fielding troubles at times, possibly due, in part, to the cold temps, and the Vikings registered a total

St. Croix Falls designated hitter Brenna Loen knocked in a run with this swing, and ended up with three RBI in her squads' extra inning, 18-12 loss Tuesday to Frederic.

more runs in the bottom of the third, one run in the fourth and another two runs in the fifth. Cole, Schweiger and Finch each had two hits apiece, and Hanson and Jessica Hoffman both went 1 for 3 with two RBIs. Pewe, Tiffany Meyer, Schweiger and McKenzie Ryan each knocked in an RBI apiece, with the backing of another solid night of pitching from the Pirates. Hansen and Hoffman pitched just over two innings apiece, giving up five of the Eagles hits and compiling five strikeouts. Grace Corbin finished out the game for the Pirates with one strikeout. – Marty Seeger

Grantsburg 11, New Richmond 1 GRANTSBURG – Following a nice conference win over Unity, the Pirates softball team continued to roll through with another win over New Richmond the following afternoon on Friday, April 15. After a seven-run inning in the second, and adding another four runs in the fourth inning, the Pirates managed to end the game in five innings. Sam Schweiger pitched four innings and allowed just two hits with three strikeouts. Jessica Hoffman pitched one inning and allowed one hit, one run and had a strikeout. The Pirates scattered four hits, with Kylie Pewe going 2 for 2. Nicole McKen-

See softball roundup/ Page 22

It was just out of reach for both Lexi (left) and Lauren Domagala on a bloop single to short right field by the Saints on Tuesday. – Photos by Greg Marsten

of nine errors, to the Saints’ 4 miscues. The game went into extra innings after a 10-10 tie at the end of regulation, and the Vikings cut lose with a giant, eight-run ninth inning, aided by having seven straight batters get on base before the Saints were able to wrangle in an out. Cori Schmidt even scored twice in the inning, and Neumann had two separate RBI atbats in the same runaway frame. But the Saints did not roll over and scored a pair of runs in the bottom of the ninth, trying to stay in the game, which was quickly running out of daylight, before the Vikes were able to shut down the hosting Saints and declare victory, 18-12. Frederic improves to 3-1 overall, and 21 in conference play. St. Croix Falls evens up their record at 2-2 in both conference and nonconference play.

Grantsburg 11, Unity 1 GRANTSBURG – After a scoreless first inning, the Grantsburg Pirates softball team opened up their offense with five runs in the second inning while tacking on another six to beat the Eagles in five innings on Thursday, April 14. Nicole McKenzie got things going for the Pirates in the second inning with a leadoff walk and Emily Cole and Sam Schweiger each singled. Lauren Finch then drew a one-out walk, and Macy Hansen doubled along with Kylie Pewe to help get the baserunners the Pirates needed and the five-run inning. Unity picked up one run in the top of the third when Marisa Hacker singled, and Brittany Thomfohrda hit an RBI single. It was the only run Unity would get however, as the Pirates picked up three

Luck catcher Avery Steen gets ready to lay a tag on Frederic freshman, Brandi Bahr.

Eagles softball team off to a good start

Pick up second conference win Monday Unity 9, St. Croix Falls 6

by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer ST. CROIX FALLS – After taking care of business against Frederic and falling to a very sharp Pirates team, the Eagles managed to pull themselves out of a big hole against St. Croix Falls on Monday, April 18, for another conference win. First-year coach Chad Stenberg was more than pleased with his team’s effort as they rallied back from a six-run inning by the Saints in the top of the first. The Saints had home-field advantage but because the game had been moved from Unity to St. Croix Falls, Unity started the game in the bottom of the first, and answered the Saints six runs with three of their own. The Saints six runs came with the help

Saints second baseman Jessica Larcom puts a tag on Unity’s Brittany Thomfohrda and turns a sharp double play to first. Both teams displayed solid defense on Monday, April 18, but the Eagles held on for the win. – Photo by Marty Seeger

of five walks issued by Unity’s Hailey Olson, as well as singles from Heather Gilbert, Alexis Erickson and Tess Hedrick, along with a double by Brenna Loen. Unity answered with three runs of their own in the bottom of the first, as Shauna Jorgenson hit a leadoff single, and was brought home by an RBI double by Crystal Donahue. Olson then belted a deep fly ball to center and legged out a triple, and Jessica Kutina doubled to bring Olson home. The Eagles retired the Saints 1-2-3 in the top of the second, and retook a 7-6 lead with four runs in the bottom of the second inning. Jorgenson again singled with one out to get things started, and Shay Nelson drew a walk before Donahue blasted her second RBI double of the game. Olson followed up with a two-RBI single. Kutina also singled in the inning, which came on two outs. Olson pitched a solid game to keep the Saints from scoring any more runs, and the Eagles defense made some quality plays in the win.

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SCF boys fend off the Vikes at home

St. Croix Falls 5, Frederic 3

by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer ST. CROIX FALLS – The Frederic Viking boys kept picking away at the hosting Saints’ early lead on Tuesday, April 19, on the road, but just couldn’t get finish the deal, stranding several runners, and falling by a 5-3 final score in a very close contest. The Saints capitalized on baserunning and fielding issues to score two early runs, and then added another score on a Taylor Woller RBI double in the second inning to gain a 3-0 lead. They then relied on starting pitcher Marcus Campbell’s prowess to keep the Vikes in check. But Frederic kept picking away at the Saints lead, with Joe Draxler using good base running and a Trae Gehl sac fly to make it 3-1 in the third inning. The Saints responded in kind later that inning, using a deep Blake Klopfer double and a followup Zach Christenson double to stretch their lead to 4-1. Viking starter Raif Poirier made sure the Saints never got too far ahead, and showed solid control throughout the contest. He had some help at the plate, especially from Draxler, who singled in the fifth, and later scored on a fielder’s choice to narrow the lead. But the Vikes had a tough time with stranded runners once again, and couldn’t finish the deal. Once again the Frederic bats responded, this time off reliever Zach Christenson, who gave up a run in the sixth inning, but was able to keep the Vikes from scoring any more, again stranding runners in scoring position, maintaining a 4-3 Saints lead. St. Croix Falls DH Joe Thayer stretched the count and walked, and later scored an insurance run on a Nick Johnson sacrifice for the final score, giving Campbell the win and the Saints a 5-3 conference victory.

ball team continues to cruise at the start of the season with another victory on Monday, April 18, with a big nonconference test against Hayward. The Pirates won in dramatic fashion as they held a 4-2 lead in the top of the seventh inning, when Hayward belted a tworun homer to tie the game at four. Then in the bottom of the seventh, with one out, Russ Thoreen drove home the game-winning run on a deep fly ball that sailed over the center fielder. – Marty Seeger with information from www.gk12.net

Grantsburg 6, Unity 2 GRANTSBURG – The Pirate boys baseball team continued their winning ways with a hard-fought victory over Unity on Friday, April 15, during another cold and

See Baseball/ next page

Frederic's Joe Draxler collided with Saints catcher Taylor Woller in a play at the plate. Draxler was ruled safe in the play, as Woller did not have possession of the ball. – Photo by Greg Marsten

While the Vikings had trouble bringing runners home in the clutch, they showed they can play with anyone, and were just a few well placed sacrifice flies away from a victory. They move to a record of 1-3 overall and are 0-2 in West Lakeland play. The Saints move to 3-2 overall, and 2-1 in conference play. They are rich in batting talent and again showed they are going to be a tough squad, especially with Camp-

bell on the mound.

St. Croix Central 20, Luck 2 LUCK – The Cardinal boys baseball team was shelled against St. Croix Central on Tuesday, April 19. No game stats were available at press time. Grantsburg 5, Hayward 4 GRANTSBURG – The Grantsburg base-

The Pirates pulled out an exciting win over Hayward on Monday, April 18. – Photo by Priscilla Bauer

Eagles come down to the wire with win over Luck boys Unity 6, Luck 5

by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer LUCK – It was a back-and-forth, well fought contest Monday, April 18 at Luck between the rival Unity Eagles and hosting Cardinals boys, with Unity scoring three runs in the top of the seventh inning to come from behind for the win, 6-5. The Eagles had jumped to an early lead on unforced errors in the first inning, and Luck slowly pecked away at the deficit, scoring a run in the third inning, and two more in the fifth to tie the contest at 3-3, and did most of their damage with two outs. Luck scored again in the sixth inning to briefly take the lead, but that big seventh for Unity was too much to overcome. Luck did make a valiant attempt at the end, and scored once to get within a run, but they ran out of inning and lost, 6-5. Unity senior Brady Flaherty started and pitched five strong innings, but Luke Nelson came on in relief and got the win. Logan Hacker started for Luck and added plenty with his bat, as well. Also helping

Unity senior Jason Vlasnik beats a throw home and a tag by Luck catcher Brady Klatt to score the tying run in the top of the seventh inning.

Unity's Derek Campbell tries to beat out an infield grounder as Luck’s Conn Johnson takes the throw at first. – Photos by Greg Marsten

out was Cardinal third baseman Tony Aguado, who had a key base hit to short right in the sixth inning, keeping the Cards in the contest. All in all, it was an evenly matched game all the way, and showed how tight the West Lakeland Conference will likely be all season long, now that the fields are somewhat playable.

Extra credit The game had added elements of rivalry not usually seen in high school as the squads were coached by the Brothers Humpal: Ryan for Luck and Matt for Unity. As if that wasn’t enough, the two umpires were also brothers, with Paul Ausman behind the plate and Larry Ausman in the field.

Luck athletic director and high school Principal Mark Gobler added another element to the rivalry, noting that he not only coached both Humpals as a head coach in baseball at Amery, but that he also played alongside the Ausmans in high school, as well. “It’s a small world!” Paul Ausman joked.

Luck 7, Frederic 4 FREDERIC – It was an arguably cold day for baseball, but neither team showed it, as the Luck Cardinals and Frederic Vikings played to a close contest on Thursday, April 14, at Frederic, with the Cards emerging victorious, 7-4. “It was cold!” exclaimed Luck head coach Ryan Humpal, who along with the

It was a close play at first for Luck runner Dylan LeMay, as Viking first baseman Michael Tesch hauls in a throw. crowd, was slowed by the strong winds and cold temps. “We had 10 hits and eight stolen bases, but did not have the timely hitting to extend our lead. Overall, we fought through the elements and won.” Starting Cardinal hurler Conn Johnson pitched four innings and got the win, with Logan Hacker coming in for the save. The duo combined for seven innings, striking out nine and giving up four runs. Luck managed to garner 10 hits off Frederic starter Raif Poirier, who generally kept the Cards in check. Frederic kept in the game through out, scoring in four different innings, and managing nine hits off Hacker and Johnson, and all of their runs were earned. But the Vikes also had a tough time with strikeouts and gave up 11 K’s in the contest. Luck hung on for the 7-4 victory, as both squads hope for warmer weather.

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New faces leading teams into spring

Area track, baseball and softball teams see coaching changes

by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer FREDERIC – It’s been a tough spring so far for our area sports teams, mostly because they’ve been struggling to find dry fields and good weather to compete in. The good news is, that finer weather is coming, and everyone will welcome that change with open arms. Along with the inevitable change in weather, this spring, also ushers in the inevitable changes in the area coaching staffs. Starting with Frederic, fans will see at least one new coaching change this spring in boys track, as Gaelyn Sears takes over the helm

Frederic boys track Sears isn’t unfamiliar with the track program in Frederic. She’s a fifth-grade teacher at Frederic Elementary and has been the middle school boys and girls track coach for the previous six years. She is taking over the head boys track coaching position, replacing Troy Wink. “Our kids will put out their best effort during meets and that is all you can ask of any athlete,” Sears said. Grantsburg boys golf Tom Hullander is a familiar face in the halls of Grantsburg High School, as he’s been employed there for the past four years in special education. Hullander resides in Cumberland and took over the coaching du-

Tom Hullander

A R E A At Hacker’s Lanes

Monday Afternoon Senior Mixed Standings: The Bears 43, Vultures 41, Eagles 38, Swans 31.5, Badgers 30, Cardinals 26, Nite Hawks 23.5, Zebras 23. Women’s games: Ruth Sorenson (S) 254, Barb Austad (B) & Bernice Moyer (S) 245, Liz Johnson (Z) 243. Women’s series: Barb Austad (B) 699, Bernice Moyer (S) 673, Marge Traun (TB) 638. Men’s games: Dave Bannie (Z) 272, Bob Eischens (V) 256, Tony Deiss (S) 251. Men’s series: Bob Eischens (V) 721, Dave Bannie (Z) 691, Dick Coen (NH) 651. Team games: Zebras 937, Vultures 889, The Bears 876. Team series: Vultures 2604, Swans 2523, The Bears 2498. Monday Night Ladies Standings: Hog Wild Gals 75.5, Mane Attractions 68, House of Wood 64.5, The Bottle Shop 63, Hacker’s Lanes 49, Bye 15. Individual games: Robin Lindvall (BS) 193, Susie Houston (MA) 187, Lori Larson (HWG) 182. Individual series: Robin Lindvall (BS) 515, Linda Giller (HWG) 495, Barb Morgan (HWG) 488. Team games: Hacker’s Lanes 646, Hog Wild Gals 641, The Bottle Shop 617. Team series: Hog Wild Gals 1841, The

Baseball continued

ties of former boys golf coach Bruce Teigen. Hullander is looking forward to the season and has been golfing for over 30 years. He’ll have a lot of raw talent to work with as the new coach, with eight newcomers, but is looking forward to showcasing his experience with the athletes and trying to get his team on a path to state.

Grantsburg girls track Lisa Danielson is a former track and cross-country athlete from Amery, and will bring a lot of experience to Grantsburg this season as the new girls track coach, along with current boys track coach Bill Morrin. Danielson went to state during her high school career on two occasions, in both crosscountry and as a distance runner in track. Lisa Danielson She attended UW-Superior, and ran cross-country before a sprained ankle shortened her career there, but stuck with her love of the sport through coaching. She coached track at Baldwin-Woodville for two years and last season she helped coach middle school track in Siren. This is Danielson’s first year of teaching at Grantsburg, and so far, she’s excited with her new coaching opportunity. Danielson is taking the place of former girls track coach, Heidi Jensen. Luck baseball and softball Ryan Humpal is taking over the head coaching duties this season with the Luck Cardinals baseball team, which Wayne Dickinson coached last season. Dickinson is still coaching, however, with the Luck softball team. Humpal is the brother of Matt Humpal,

Unity softball Unity alumnus Chad Stenberg will be handling the head coaching duties this spring for the Unity softball team. He’s got experience with the players and the softball program as a volunteer assistant youth coach the previous six seasons. Stenberg believes that Chad Stenberg

B O W L I N G

Bottle Shop 1800, Hacker’s Lanes 1727. Wednesday Night Early Mens Standings: Cummings Lumber 40, Larsen Auto Center 34, Skol Bar 33, Pioneer Bar 27.5, Lewis Silo 26.5, A-1 Machine 19. Individual games: Mark Bohn (SB) 238, Chuck Kruse (CL) 237 & 229. Individual series: Chuck Kruse (CL) 643, Chris Rowell (PB) 618, Mark Bohn (SB) 615. Team games: Skol Bar 919, Cummings Lumber 919, Lewis Silo 894. Team series: Skol Bar 2671, Cummings Lumber 2658, Lewis Silo 2577. Thursday Early Standings: Fab Four 52, Wikstrom Construction 52, American Family Siren 48, Hell Raisers 46.5, Frontier Trails 45, Red Iron Studios 43, Grindell Law Offices 41, Daeffler’s Quality Meats 36.5. Individual games: Bruce Wikstrom (WC) 257, Bryce Daeffler (DGM) 254, Blake Douglas (GLO) 251. Individual series: Curtis Renfroe (RIS) 623, Lydell Larson (FT) 613, Brian McBroom (AFS) 611. Team games: Wikstrom Construction 608, Fab Four & American Family Siren 601. Team series: Fab Four 1701, American Family Siren 1695, Frontier Trails 1688. Games 50 or more above average: Bryce Daeffler 254 (+68); Blake Douglas 251 (+59); Lydell Larson 233 (+55); Curtis Renfroe 238 (+52); Bruce Wikstrom

The Pirates scored right away in the first inning when Russ Thoreen reached on a fielder’s choice and Nolan Hanson drove him home on an RBI single. Grantsburg then scored three more runs in the bottom of the second inning when Joe Engelhart led the inning off with a double, Gavin Meyer walked and sophomore Lucas Willis drove in two runs on a triple. Biorn picked up his first RBI of the game on a single and the Pirates took a 4-0 lead heading into the third inning. The Eagles picked up a run in the top of the third when Zac Baxter took a walk and Jason Vlasnik reached first on an error.

who is currently the head coach for the Unity baseball team. The new Luck baseball skipper isn’t unfamiliar with the Cardinals program, or the athletes, as he coached the JV baseball team last season. Humpal not only Ryan Humpal brings baseball experience, but a competitive attitude. Some might be surprised to know that Humpal not only loves the game of baseball, but is actually more of a hockey person. He helps coach Amery hockey, where he went to high school. “It passes the winter by very quickly,” Humpal said. Along with his love of hockey, Humpal ran track for UM-Duluth, and loves being involved with football. He was also a student athlete for current Luck athletic director, Mark Gobler, who was the head baseball coach in Amery at the time. Humpal was coached by Gobler during his freshman through junior season. As for Luck baseball, Humpal sees a lot of potential, and a lot of athleticism. “We’ve got good athletes. If our baseball skills can catch up to our athleticism we’ll be decent,” Humpal said.

257 (+87). Splits converted: 2-10: Curtis Renfroe. 3-10: Dave Grindell. 5-10: Laryn Larson. Thursday Late Standings: Stotz & Company 34, Fisk Trucking 29.5, Hog Wild BBQ & Grill 28.5, Hansen Farms Inc. 27, Johnson Upholstery 26. Women’s games: Rita Frandsen 158, Heather Wynn 135, Judy Bainbridge 130. Women’s series: Rita Frandsen 464, Heather Wynn 390, Judy Bainbridge 324. Men’s games: Dale Johnson 246, Richard Coen 204, Eugene Wynn Sr. 200. Men’s series: Dale Johnson 655, Eugene Wynn Jr. 559, Richard Coen 534. Team games: Johnson Upholstery 896, Fisk Trucking 824, Hog Wild BBQ & Grill

With one out, Brady Flaherty loaded the bases on a single, and Luke Nelson was credited for the RBI when he flied out to the first baseman. It was all the Eagles would get in terms of runs until the top of the sixth inning when Unity produced three hits and scored one run. Trevor Thompson picked up the win for the Pirates with eight strikeouts. Nelson pitched for the Eagles allowing nine hits in six innings of work, with seven strikeouts, two walks and four earned runs. Willis led the Pirates with two hits and three RBIs, and Biorn had two hits with an RBI and Thoreen had a pair of hits as well. Hanson went 1 for 3 with an RBI. – Marty Seeger

along with the help of new assistant coach, Deb Grams, the Eagles will be a fierce opponent this season. They’ve already pulled out a nice 9-5 conference victory over Frederic this season, and a come-from-behind win over the Saints more recently.

Deb Grams

Siren/Webster baseball The Webster/Siren baseball team will compete this season under new head coach Matt Ramlet a Tomah High School graduate who competed in football, basketball and baseball. He was a pitcher for UW-Oshkosh, as well as an assistant coach for the team after graduation. Last season, Ramlet was also an assistant baseball coach for the Neenah Rockets varsity boys. “As whenever there is a new coach there are many things that change. Most of all we are really taking an approach to things at a simpler point of view,” Ramlet said. It should be a fresh start for Ramlet with the boys, as he’s working with a good mix of new, and younger athMatt Ramlet letes. “We are all just really excited about this season. I am looking forward to beginning my first year as a head coach and am sure there will be a few struggles along the way. Our schedule for the month of May is packed full of games so hopefully we can grind it out and come out with some wins and put ourselves in a good position come postseason play,” Ramlet said.

R E S U LT S

806. Team series: Johnson Upholstery 2549, Hog Wild BBQ & Grill 2342, Fisk Trucking 2325. Friday Night Ladies Standings: Frederic Design 68, The Leader 68, The Dozers 64, The Pin Heads 57, Meyer’s Plus 53, Junque Art 50, Pioneer Bar 46. Individual games: Gail Linke 206, Karen Carlson 187, Pat Bresina 186. Individual series: Gail Linke 560, Margie Traun 487, Paula Denn 480. Team games: The Pin Heads 667, The Dozers 628, Junque Art 612. Team series: The Pin Heads 1850, The Dozers 1796, Junque Art 1725. Games 50 or more above average: Pat Bresina; Denise Strait. Splits converted: 9-6-10: Pat Traun. 3-67-10: Gail Linke.

McKenzie Lanes

Tuesday Night Men’s Standings: The Dugout 96.5, Steve’s Appliance 85.5, The Cobbler Shop 79, Dream Lawn 77, Nel-Lo-Hill Farm 63, Centurview Park 60, Hack’s Pub 49.5, McKenzie Lanes 49.5. Individual games: Mark Kamish 279, Ryan Wiemer 269, Jim Shannon 268. Individual series: Rick Fox 692, Mark Kamish 678, Ryan Wiemer 671. Team games (Handicap): Nel-Lo-Hill Farm 1282. Team series (Handicap): The Dugout

Spooner 24, Siren/Webster 4 SPOONER – The Spooner Rails baseball team was on track against Siren/Webster on Friday, April 15, shelling out 14 runs in the first inning and never looking back. Siren/Webster did manage to pick up four runs, with two coming in the second inning with singles from Lincoln Spafford, Mycal Larson and Shay Johnson. Walks contributed to Siren/Webster’s two runs in the fifth – Marty Seeger

St. Croix Falls 19, Siren/Webster 2 WEBSTER – The St. Croix Falls Saints had little trouble dispatching the Siren/Webster boys on Thursday, April 14, coming away in the freezing cold with

3463.

Wednesday Night Men’s Standings: Tiger Express 34, Harvest Moon 34, Davy’s Construction 33, McKenzie Lanes 32, Dalles Electrical 29, Hanjo Farms 28, Reed’s Marina 18, Edina Realty 16. Individual games: Gene Braund 268, Rick Antonson 267, Cookie Nelson 253. Individual series: Cookie Nelson 673, zJason Loney 642, Rick Antonson 629. Team games (Handicap): Harvest Moon 1052, McKenzie Lanes 1031. Team series (Handicap): Harvest Moon 3004, Tiger Express 2968. Saturday Night Mixed Standings: Roller Coasters 62, Pin Busters 60, Happy Campers 59.5, Eureka Bombers 55.5, Fisk Trucking 49, Ten Pin Titans 43, Melonbergers 41, The In-Laws 38. Women’s games: Toni Sloper 192, Brenda Lehmann 185, Bev Warner & Justine Melin 177. Women’s series: Toni Sloper 518, Jan Lehmann 473, Brenda Lehmann 459. Men’s games: Steve Loney 229, Erv Lehmann 226, Tim Katzmark 217. Men’s series: Steve Loney 596, Erv Lehmann 571, Doug Fisk 533. Team games (Handicap): Ten Pin Titans 890, Eureka Bombers 888, Happy Campers 877. Team series (Handicap): Eureka Bombers 2598, Happy Campers 2541, Pin Busters 2486.

a strong, 19-2 win on a 10-run rule. Saints catcher Taylor Woller had a big night at the plate, knocking in six runs on 4-for-4 batting. He helped pitcher Ben Clausen get the win, as did Marcus campbell, who added three RBIs to the cause. Siren/Webster starter Evan Oachs was tagged for the loss, but went 2-for-4 in his own defense. "All of our kids got an opportunity to play," stated Saints head coach Paul Randolph. "We are proud of the way the kids performed, considering how cold it was. They were consistent in their fundamentals, in spite of the score." – Greg Marsten

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Track teams compete at Siren, Spooner

by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer SIREN – Despite less than ideal conditions on Thursday, April 14, several area track team braved wind and cold in Siren and at Spooner. In Siren, St. Croix Falls, Clayton/Turtle Lake, Clear Lake and Luck competed, with the Saints boys and girls both coming out on top with 101.50 and 89.67 points respectively. Starting with the girls events, Amber Moore of Siren dominated in the 100, 200, 400-meter dash, taking first place in all three events with times of 13.20, 27.70 and 1:05.6 respectively. In the 800-meter run, Erica Bergmann of St. Croix Falls finished first with a time of 2:38, and Allie Holmdahl and Bailey Bergmann of St. Croix Falls took second and third overall with times of 6:21.40 and 6:27.50 respectively. Savannah Stone of St. Croix Falls placed second in the 3200-meter run with a time of 14:14. The St. Croix Falls girls 4x100meter relay team took first with a finish of 58.20, and they took second in the 4x200 with a time of 2:01.20. In the girls high jump, Kierstyn Campbell took first place honors with a mark of 4 feet, 6 inches, and Autumn Erickson took second with a leap of 4-4. The girls long jump was won by Daphne Hubbell of Siren with a mark of 14-6.75, and Kristen Sexton of Siren placed second in the triple jump with a mark of 25-09. Ashley Guevara was first in the shot put with a throw of 32-06.25, and Hubbell came in second with a throw of 31-06.75. Vuevara also took first in the discus with a mark of 97-10 and Hubbell took second with a 91-03. Bella Nelson of Luck threw a 77-10 for third place. For the boys events, Garrett Radinzel placed first in the 200-meter dash with a time of 23.30. Landen Strilzuk of Luck took first in the 400-meter dash with a time of 56.90. In the 800-meter run Ryan Nussbaum of St. Croix Falls finished first with a time of 2:16.90, and in the boys 1600-meter run, Alex Frey, Nussbaum and Chris Eisen took first, second and third with times of 5:08.70, 5:19.00 and 5:33.00 respectively. Austin Baker of Luck took second overall in the 3200 meter run with a time of 12:25.20. Garrett Kerkow of St. Croix Falls placed second in the 110-meter hurdles with a time of 18:90. The St. Croix Falls 4x100-meter relay team took first with a time of 47.30, and they also took first in the 4x200 and 4x400 with times of 1:38.40 and 3:07.00 respectively. Jace Marek of St. Croix Falls was first in the long jump with a mark of 19-05, and Roger Steen came first in the shot put with a throw of 47-00.25. Seth Stoner of Siren was second with a throw of 44-01.50 and

Despite the crummy weather several area teams were able to compete in Spooner on Thursday, April 14. – Photos by Becky Amundson A.J Walsh-Brenizer took third with a throw of 39-09.25. Steen also took first in the discus with a throw of 134-11. Stoner threw a 128-01 in the discus and Will Haines of Siren hit a mark of 121-11.

Spooner Invitational SPOONER – Among eight different schools it was Webster that topped the boys standings with 132 points, and the Unity boys came in a close second with 130 points, followed by Spooner, Cumberland, Frederic, Barron, Shell Lake, Drummond and Cameron. The girls teams show Spooner at the top with 145.50 points and the Frederic girls taking second with 143 points, followed by Webster, Unity, Drummond, Shell Lake, Cameron, Cumberland and Barron. Top finishers in each boys event included Webster’s Mason Kriegel in third place overall in the 100-meter dash with a time of 11.85. Kriegel took second in the

Klatt playing club ball with UW

Tanesha Carlson gets the baton from Allison Anderson during the Frederic girls 4x100-meter relay.

200-meter dash with a time of 24.41. Frederic’s Josiah Lund placed first overall in the 400-meter dash with a time of 56.52, and place second in the 800-meter run with a time of 2:08.38. Jack Taylor and Joey Erickson took honors in the 1600, with Taylor taking first with a time of 4:44.95, and Erickson finishing with 4:59.70. Taylor took first in the 3200 as well, with a time of 10:10.16, and Erickson placed second with a 10:57.89. The 110-meter hurdles were won by Tony Peterson of Frederic’s with a time of 16:00 in the finals, followed by Unity’s Xavier Foeller with a time of 16:23. Peterson also placed first in the 300-meter hurdles with a time of 43.35, followed by Foeller with a time of 44.12. Rush Hickethier, Justin Runberg, Dylan Hendricks and Tyler Christensen took first in the 4x200 meter relay with a time of

Golfers get on the links in Webster

First invite of the season sees Eagles at the top

Former Luck athlete Mitchell Klatt is still wearing red, but for a different team again this season. Klatt is on the University of Wisconsin Badgers Club Baseball team. He suffered a setback due to a MRSA staph infection in his hand recently, and was hospitalized for four days over spring break, missing the team trip to Florida. However, the team traveled to Minneapolis last weekend to play Saturday and Sunday against the Minnesota Gophers Club team in sub-40-degree weather. The Badgers won Saturday 8-4. Klatt was a designated hitter batting fourth and was 1 for 3. Wisconsin played Sunday in a doubleheader and Minnesota won 1-0 and 6-1. Klatt also DH’d in one game and went 1 for 3 with a double in the fourth batting slot. He is batting .333 for the year. – Photo submitted

1:39.45. Frederic won the 4x400-meter relay with a time of 3:53.54 with the help of Ben Ackerley, Robert Kirk, Lund and Peterson. Webster won the 4x800-meter relay with Taylor, Devin Greene, Cody Isaacson and Erickson competing. They finished with a time of 9:11.19. In the high jump, Steven Krueger of Unity took first with a mark of 5-10.00, followed by Taylor Heinz of Webster with a 5-08.00. The pole vault was won by Kriegel with a mark of 11-00, followed by Dylan Hendricks of Unity with a 10-06. Unity’s Hickethier finished second in the long jump with a 18-10.00, and Oliver Raboin of Unity placed first in the shot put with a throw of 44-09.25. Joe Swanson of Unity was second in the discus with a mark of 144-08. For the girls events, Sage Karl came in second in the 100-meter dash with a time of 13.59, and Alison Becvar of Webster took third with a time of 13:69.00. Karl placed first in the 200-meter dash with a 27.62, and Calla Karl of Frederic was first in the 800-meter run with a 2:36.37. Sam Nelson of Frederic came in second in the 1600-meter run with a time of 5:51.45, and not far behind were Webster’s Kally Schiller and Emma Kelby with times of 5:52.22 and 5:57.12. Schiller did take first in the 3200-meter run with a time of 12:45.29. The Frederic 4x100-meter relay team took second overall with a time of 55.82. Team members included Allison Anderson, Amanda Blok, Tanesha Carlson and Sage Karl. The Frederic girls 4x400-meter relay team also placed second, which included a time of 5:11.18 from Leah Engebretson, Karry Simpson, Sarah Underwood and Shabana Mishler. The Vikings 4x800-meter relay team dominated as well, with Nelson, Calla Karl, Sarah Knauber and Engebretson with a time of 10:53.82. Blok also took second in the high jump with distance of 4-08.00, Hayla Bader of Unity was first in the pole vault with a mark of 8-00, and Shaina Pardun was second with a 7-06. Nelson of Frederic was not only dominant in relays and distance running, but also took first in the triple jump with a 31-01, followed by Michelle Gibbs of Webster with a 29-09. Webster’s Mary Johnson was first overall in the shot put with a 33-03.75, and Emily Gross of Unity was second with a 31-11.25. Johnson was also first in the discus with a throw of 91-01.

by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer WEBSTER – Area golfers got their first real taste of competition at the Fox Run Golf Course in Webster on Tuesday, April 19. The Eagles seemed to keep right on pace with all the success they had last season as they came out on top with a total team score of 156 for first place. Reed Sorenson was the overall medal winner with a 37, followed by a 38 by Brandon Stencil, 40 by Kyle Sorenson, 41 from Jake Bengston and 48 from Evan Lunda. The second place spot could be a battle this

season as St. Croix Falls came through with a 190, followed by a 196 from Grantsburg, 200 from Siren and 230 from Frederic. With only three of the four golfers needed to make up a team, Luck finished with a total of 90, and Webster scored a team Reed Sorenson total of 303. The Saints shot consistently in the 40s, with Taylor Sempf leading the team with a 46. Jake Langevin shot a 43 for Grantsburg, Luke Bollant shot a 42 for the Dragons, Dayton Rivera penciled in a 50 and Webster’s Ben Weis shot a 73. For Cardinals, it was Roger Steen who led with a 42.

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P R I N G

Softball roundup /from Page 18

zie went 1 for 3 with three RBIs and Lauren Finch went 1 for 2 with two RBIs. Cole, Hoffman, Schweiger and K Casey each had one hit apiece. – Marty Seeger

St. Croix Falls 6, Webster/Siren 3 SIREN – The Saints softball team used a five-run second inning to defeat the hosting Tigons of Webster/Siren on Thursday, April 14, with the Saints staying ahead for a 6-3 conference win. The win was the first of the season for the Saints, who were coming off a big loss to Grantsburg two nights earlier. St. Croix Falls tagged Tigon starter Abby Mitchell for six runs in the contest, but were kept in check for the rest of the game by reliever Siiri Larsen, who struck out six Saints in relief. The Tigon batters managed just four hits off Saints' hurlers Alexis Erickson and Natalie Sempf, who pitched 3 and 4 innings respectively. The Saints had a huge night at the plate by first baseman Stephanie Melin and sec-

Softball from page 15

Turkey, so they will be working on the basics and the fundamentals more than in years past. But Hansford knows the conference is pretty evenly matched, meaning nobody can slide through a game. “We won’t overlook anyone,” she said. The Vikings have several key returning players, including pitcher Cori Schmidt. She’ll be tossing to Vanessa Neumann this season, instead of Alex Lonetti, and Krysta Laqua takes over for an injured Maria Miller at first base. But they have several returning players in Frankie Knuf and outfielders Lauren Domagala and Tara Anderson. Frederic rolled up a strong 14-4 overall record last season, which included an 8-2 mark in conference play. Hansford thinks their strengths will continue to be on the mound, with Schmidt and her supporting cast. “One of our biggest strengths this year should be pitching,” Hansford said, adding that she was “hoping to hit well. We’re working to have a winning season.”

Unity softball The Eagles have a new head coach in Unity alum Chad Stenberg, who has nonetheless been a longtime volunteer youth coach. Stenberg and new assistant coach Deb Grams are hoping the Eagles can be more aggressive at the plate, as well as on the base paths. “I would like us to improve every week and become fundamentally sound,” he said, “so we can make a run in the tournament at the end of the season.” Stenberg thinks everyone they play is a key opponent this year, “We can’t look past one team,” he stressed. “We have to continue to get better every week and look past no one.” The Eagles have four key returning players in seniors Marisa Hacker, Jessica Kutina, Kathryn Zahler and Crystal Donahue. “We have some real good athletes on this team,” he said. “It’s my job to make them good ballplayers. If we come together as a team and do the little things right, I think we will be tough to beat.” Stenberg believes that 90 percent of the game is mental, and he thinks that if the squad can gain the confidence in themselves, they should have no problem competing. “The girls have to believe in the team and themselves,” he said. “Without both, we will struggle. If we get over that hurdle we could be pretty good.” The Eagles finished 4-11 overall last season, and 4-6 in West Lakeland Conference play, and Stenberg admits it remains a tough conference, but like most other coaches, he realizes there are no sure things. “Anyone can be beaten on any given night,” he said. “That’s why they

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ond baseman Jessica Larcom, who each tallied three hits. They also played strong defense and were able to keep the hosting Tigons from tying the contest in the fifth inning, when they scored two runs, but also stranded three players on the third out. St. Croix Falls was able to keep their opponents in check to hold on for the victory, 6-3. – Greg Marsten

Frederic 18, Luck 4 FREDERIC – The Frederic Viking girls took advantage of walks and ran up a big conference win over the rivals Luck Cardinals on Thursday, April 14, winning by an 18-4 margin after a sloppy first few innings for the Cards. While the Cards had their moments, the Vikings had quite a few, and strung them together to lead the whole way. Cori Schmidt earned the victory for the Vikings, and gave up just five hits and two earned runs. She was helped by some stellar field play at times, and the score was aided by a rough couple of innings for the Luck girls to start.

play the game! I think it will be an exciting year for the Unity girls and the coaching staff.” St. Croix Falls softball Now starting her third year as head coach, St. Croix Falls' Stacie Hoff and assistants Anna Parsons and Jen Ellefson are concentrating heavily on their pitching rotation, trying to help their defense by keeping their opponents looking. "Our pitching has been one of our main components," Hoff said. "We've been working very hard on it this spring." Losing eight seniors to graduation definitely is a struggle, but Hoff thinks it's not as bad as it sounds, "I do have four returning starters this year," she said. Hoff and crew are relying heavily on the battery of Natalie Sempf and veteran catcher Alicia Chelberg, who is not only solid behind the plate but a clutch hitter. They are also banking on the glove skills of Jessica Larcom, who she said is "one of our better defensive players." Coming off a 7-14 overall record, with a 4-6 West Lakeland Conference tally, the Saints are hoping to improve and make their mark in the late season, especially with so many early weather postponements. "It's really just exciting to be able to play actual outdoor softball!" Hoff joked, noting how her team was not alone in having very little actual field time before their first games, saying you can only learn so much in the gym. Hoff is happy to get some of her other returning players back, such as Alexis Erickson, who she thinks may be a real break out player. "But really, we lost a lot of players - eight out of our 19 from last year. We'll need to work hard." She thinks the conference will be Grantsburg's to lose and said a surprise squad this year might be Unity, who she said was impressive and "doing very well with their new coach. They're cruising early ... But really, between us, Frederic, and Unity, I think we're going to be pretty evenly matched," she said.

Luck softball New Cardinal head coach Wayne Dickinson moves from three years as the Cards baseball coach to a first year softball coaching. He replaces Ashley Close, who now works at the Webster School District and is an assistant for the combined Webster/Siren program. "We'll try some different things, see what works," Dickinson said, noting that he is not afraid to try some new positions for players, and give more of the squad a chance to play. The Cardinals are coming off a 3-14 overall record last year, with a 3-7 mark in the West

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Frederic’s Lauren Domagala made an amazing catch in right field on an otherwise surefire extra base hit by Luck’s Camille Marsten. – Photo by Greg Marsten

Frederic scored eight runs in the first inning, four more in the second and another 5 runs in the third, while the Cards managed all of their runs in the second inning.

Vikings Lexi Domagala and Kendra Mossey each had two hits, and scored five runs between them in the win.

Lakeland. While they have quite a few returning players, they also have a gaggle of young talent to groom, including several young pitchers to assist ace Maia Lehmann. Luck has only a few upperclassmen this season: Jade Schrock, Morgan Denny and Gena Pearson, the latter two can also expect some innings on the mound. Their roster is full of freshman and sophomores, including ace catcher Avery Steen, who can make an impact with both her glove and her bat. Expect the Cards to work hard on fundamentals and to try several pitchers, including sophomore Jaimee Buck and rookie freshmen hurlers Jillian Klatt and

hard-throwing Abbie Otlo. Like all local teams that don't have a domed stadium, the Cards were hampered by early season Mother Nature cancellations, postponements and the subsequent heavy makeup schedule to follow, a schedule that allows for little down time for injuries or recoveries, which is where having so many pitching arms may be an advantage. But being young, they can also expect to be plagued by walks and a lack of playing time without a true JV program. And this season will go down as the last for the Cards as a stand alone squad, with the program combining with Frederic in 2012.

LEADER SPORTS SCOREBOARD BASEBALL

West Lakeland Standings Team Conf. Overall 2-0 4-0 Grantsburg Pirates St. Croix Falls Saints 2-1 3-2 2-1 1-2 Luck Cardinals Unity Eagles 1-1 2-3 0-2 1-3 Frederic Vikings Siren / Webster 0-2 0-3 Scores Thursday, April 14 Grantsburg 6, Unity 2 Luck 7, Frederic 4 St. Croix Falls 20, Siren/Webster 2 Friday, April 15 Washburn at Luck (postponed) Spooner 24, Siren/Webster 4 St. Croix Central at St. Croix Falls (postponed) Monday, April 18 Unity 6, Luck 5 Grantsburg 5, Hayward 4 Tuesday, April 19 St. Croix Central 20, Luck 2 Unity 10, Shell Lake 5 St. Croix Falls 4, Frederic 3 Upcoming - (Subject to change) Thursday, April 21 5 p.m. Frederic at Grantsburg Luck at St. Croix Falls Monday, April 25 3:30 p.m. Luck at Grantsburg (doubleheader) Unity at St. Croix Falls Tuesday, April 26 4:30 p.m. Grantsburg at Pine City Frederic at Webster Thursday, April 28 5 p.m. Unity at Cameron Webster at Frederic Grantsburg at Northwood Shell Lake at St. Croix Falls

TRACK & FIELD

Upcoming - (Subject to change) Thursday, April 21 4:15 p.m. Meet at Somerset (Luck) Tuesday, April 26 4:30 p.m. Meet at Frederic High School (Frederic, Grantsburg, Luck, Siren, St. Croix Falls, Unity, Webster) Thursday, April 28 4:15 p.m. Meet at St. Croix Falls (St. Croix Falls, Unity, Webster, Siren, Luck)

GOLF

Upcoming - (Subject to change) Tuesday, April 26 4 p.m. Meet at St. Croix Valley Golf Course

(Frederic, Grantsburg, Luck, St. Croix Falls, Siren, Unity, Webster)

Wednesday, April 27 9 a.m. Meet at Barron (Grantsburg and Luck) Thursday, April 28 4 p.m. Meet at Frederic

(Frederic, Grantsburg, Luck, St. Croix Falls, Siren, Unity, Webster)

SOFTBALL

West Lakeland Standings Team Conf. Overall Grantsburg Pirates 2-0 4-0 Unity Eagles 3-1 3-1 Frederic Vikings 2-1 3-1 St. Croix Falls Saints 1-3 1-3 Luck Cardinals 1-2 1-4 Webster / Siren 0-2 0-3 Scores Thursday, April 14 Grantsburg 11, Unity 1 Frederic 18, Luck 4 St. Croix Falls 6, Webster/Siren 3 Friday, April 15 Grantsburg 11, New Richmond 1 Saturday, April 16 Unity at Osceola (postponed) Hayward at Grantsburg (postponed) Monday, April 18 Turtle Lake/Clayton 12, Luck 6 Unity 9, St. Croix Falls 6 Tuesday, April 19 Frederic 18, St. Croix Falls 12 Unity 23, Luck 2 Upcoming - (Subject to change) Thursday, April 21 5 p.m. Frederic at Grantsburg Luck at St. Croix Falls Monday, April 25 3:30 p.m. Grantsburg at Luck (doubleheader) Tuesday, April 26 4:30 p.m. Grantsburg at Pine City 5 p.m. Bruce at Luck Unity at St. Croix Falls Frederic at Webster Thursday, April 28 5 p.m. Webster/Siren at Frederic Grantsburg at Northwood Shell Lake at St. Croix Falls 5:30 p.m Cameron at Luck

Visit

www.wissports.net

for local scores and stats

O UTDOOR S

APRIL 20, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 23

I N T E R C O U N T Y L E A D E R

ATVs • BIRDING • BOATING • CAMPING • FISHING • HIKING • HUNTING • RECREATIONAL VEHICLES

by Diane Dryden Special to the Leader SPOONER - There is a song that was very popular in 1932 when it was first released and played by the BBC in England, titled “Teddy Bears Picnic.” Amazingly it’s still popular around the world today. The lyrics are simple: “If you go down to the woods today, You’re sure of a big surprise, If you go down to the woods today, you’d better go in disguise. For ev’ry bear that ever there was would gather there for certain, because today’s the day the teddy bears have their picnic.”

Mike Bartz, DNR conservation warden for 25 years, is the face you’ll see if you have a nuisance bear problem.

Teddy bears picnic

If you live in northern Wisconsin, you are already fully aware that the local black bears emerge from their dens sometime around mid-April and go on the search for their own picnic, which is usually held in the backyards of residents everywhere. According to the Shell Lake bear trapper, or in more technical terms, wildlife specialist, Mike Bartz, “When bears emerge from their dens in spring, they are hungry and smart. The sows either have their newborn cubs or their yearlings along, so not only does mom have to forage for her own food, but she needs to supply food for her young and they are all hungry.” Bartz works for Wildlife Services, which is an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture and part of their service is assisting people with wildlife conflicts. He advises that bird feeders should be taken down at the beginning of April and not put back up until the end of summer because, “Even though the spring diet of a bear is grass and forbs, sunflower seeds are also some of the bears’ favorite foods, especially if they’ve already established where the feeders were last year.” He also cautions that decks are a huge temptation for bears because that’s usually where all the goodies are like barbecue grills still smelling of meat and grease no matter when they were last used, bowls of dog food–another favorite treat–and bird feeders filled to capacity or chunks of suet. “Garbage cans are another favorite of bears. You might think it as waste but they think of it as their next meal,” Bartz said. “What is so important to remember is to

A bear like this might soon be on your property and eating at your bird feeders because they’re hungry after their long winter’s nap. – Photos by Diane Dryden make your property uninviting to bears. This might be harder if you live in an area where there are multiple houses and your neighbors don’t police their yards properly. It stands to reason that if the temptation is removed they’ll move on.” Bartz spent 25 years as a DNR conservation warden in Barronett, Bayfield, Door and Washburn counties fulfilling a lifelong dream of his since the age of 11. After high school graduation from Frederic High School, he spent four years in

the military and college at the University of Minnesota - Duluth before he joined the DNR where he retired three years ago and began his part-time career as an official bear trapper for Washburn, Burnett, Polk and part of Rusk and Sawyer counties.

Population differs “The bear population differs every year, often depending on the dry or wet spring weather, but starting around mid-April and going until October, we get bear complaint calls. These calls are made to our office at 800-228-1368 and the calls are usually in two categories, agricultural damage and homeowners personal space. Complaints that cannot be handled with advice or technical assistance are then referred to the field for follow-up. Ag-related calls usually come in later in the year when bears are attracted to corn, wheat or sunflower fields. “At the beginning of August when corn is in its milk stage and is irresistible to bears, they can damage several acres of corn in a short period by knocking the stalks down to access the ears,” Bartz said. “We also get calls from orchard owners and bee keepers for the same reason. If these bears aren’t relocated, not only will they come back year after year, but they will continue to introduce their young to the taste of ripe apples, corn and honey.” Complaints involving beehives are easily resolved using electric fences.

See Bears/ next page

Wolves, crossbows dominate discussion at spring hearings

by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer BALSAM LAKE – It certainly wasn’t the longest hearing on record, but at roughly 2-1/2 hours, there was plenty to talk about during Monday’s annual spring fish and wildlife hearings in Balsam Lake. The April 11 meetings were held statewide in every county in Wisconsin and attendance was up a bit statewide from 2010, from 4,360 to 5,575. At the spring hearings in Balsam Lake, over 65 citizens showed up to cast their votes on a variety of topics from questions on fishing, to how wolves are being managed in the state. Wolves seemed to dominate much of the evening discussion, with most comments centered on the belief that the state has too many wolves and the DNR estimate of the wolf population was considerably skewed. DNR estimates, according to Polk County wildlife biologist, Michelle Carlisle, showed 626 wolves in the state in 2009, and as many as 690 wolves statewide in 2010. “When are they going to come up with a real number on the real number of these wolves?” one man asked, while another replied “There’s no way that number is even close, and there’s no way it can be.” Carlisle was merely on hand to present the DNR wolf population estimates available to her, and noted that the DNR is currently in the process of developing a new wolf-management plan. Right now the DNR has their hands tied with implementing any sort of management plan until the wolf is removed from the federal endangered species list, and hands the power back over to the state. While those at the Polk County hearings seemed unconvinced of the DNR wolf population estimates, some felt that the estimates were accurate. Unity High School biology teacher Brian Collins was in approval of a wolf management plan in Wisconsin, but

felt that the old DNR management goal of 350 wolves statewide was a bit too low. One of the four questions asked was whether or not you favored a wolf-management goal of 350 or less in the next revision of the wolf plan. “I had a very good bow-hunting season last year, and I hunt where the Wolf Creek, Trade River pack is and I enjoy their company. I’ve had the privilege of seeing them twice since 2007, and I bow hunt a lot of hours down there,” Collins said. “They’re an emotional animal, they get us very excited, but I think that we have to recognize that there is some value in this animal.” All four wolf questions received overwhelming support statewide, in favor of

either a goal of 350 or fewer wolves, implementing meaningful population control or delisting. On implementing a goal of 350 or fewer wolves, 58 Polk County citizens voted yes, while eight were opposed. Statewide, 3,989 voted yes, while only 827 voted no. Another topic that seemed to draw interest was question No. 48, asking if you favored legalizing crossbows for all ages during the regular archery season. Currently, only disabled hunters or those age 65 or older can use crossbows, and comments at the Polk County hearings seemed split down the middle. Statewide, 1,969 said yes to using crossbows, but 3,017 voted no.

David Morris of Dresser brought down this big tom not long after daybreak on Sunday, April 17, on the last day of the first turkey-hunting period.

Al Tomlinson of Luck and his son-in-law Craig Lien had success on Friday, April 15, when Lien shot this huge gobbler near Dresser. The bird weighed 30.5 pounds, had an 11-inch beard and 1-1/2-inch spurs. – Photos submitted

“The modernization of archery has already gone too far,” said one concerned citizen who was against the use of crossbows during the archery season. “I think anything we can do to get more people to hunt, and feel more comfortable hunting with a crossbow, we should let them hunt with a crossbow,” said another voter who was for the use of crossbows. Another person asked that if people were so against going away from traditional methods for hunting, then why wasn’t everyone hunting with a recurve or a longbow. Comments were then made

See hearings/ next page

Jarett Dowd, 13, of Polk County took his first-ever turkey on Sunday, April 10, during the two-day youth hunt.

PAGE 24 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - APRIL 20, 2011

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Report black bear and bobcat sightings

MADISON – People can help state wildlife officials monitor and document the expanding distribution of black bears and bobcats in the state by reporting observations through an online reporting form. “As spring arrives and wildlife become more active and people get out of doors more, we encourage hunters, hikers and others enjoying the outdoors to report when they see black bears and bobcats,” says Becky Roth, DNR biologist at Spring Green. Black bears and bobcats are commonly found in the northern and central forest regions of Wisconsin and much of their populations still live in these forested counties. However, recent range expansion by both species has led to more frequent sightings in southern counties, Roth said. Biologists have been tracking evidence of bears in the southern third of the state, an area that is outside of their normal range as shown in this bear distribution map. The public is encouraged to report these bear sightings, tracks, scat, claw marks or hair through the online site or call their local wildlife management office. Past efforts by the public have allowed the DNR to produce a map of black bear sightings in southern Wisconsin. June is the breeding season for bears in Wisconsin and “most bear sightings we receive in southern counties occur during late May and June when subadult bears, mostly young males, are forced out of breeding territories up north and disperse

Bears continued

Unique pattern Sows have a unique breeding pattern. The males do their daddy duty in July, but mom has a special pouch that holds the semen until the fall when she is ready to produce eggs. Babies are then born while mom is in the den half asleep and in the spring, every other spring, she emerges with newborns. The alternate springs she emerges with her yearlings, which will be abandoned later that year by mom and left on their own to retrace their steps from last year to the feeding spots. “And that’s why it’s so important to remove anything a bear would like to eat. They might wander through your yard looking for food, but if they don’t find any, they will leave.” Waiting game And it’s important to remove that food before the bears emerge. Bears that get comfortable feeding on bird seeds every night may cause damage if the seeds or the dog food or the suet is gone. At first

long distances in search of new habitat. But we have already been receiving reports this month,” Roth says. The wooded hills, coulees, creeks and river bottoms in southwestern Wisconsin’s Driftless area provide abundant food and cover for bears as well as potential winter den sites, so it’s possible that wandering bears will find it to their liking and some may decide to stay. “Although we’ve had a few instances in past years when bears have stayed around southern counties through the summer, most leave the area and presumably return north as the breeding season ends,” she says. Last year, however, we were getting reports of sows with cubs and sows with yearlings which resulted in continued bear sightings throughout the summer. This is because female bears with their young cubs or yearlings are less likely to move long distances over a short time period. The DNR is also looking for help in collecting evidence of bobcats. The public is encouraged to report all bobcat observations, tracks, or scat from all parts of Wisconsin. As of September 2010, Wisconsinites reported more than 100 bobcats via the online bear and bobcat observation site. Using information from wildlife managers, personal correspondence and the online reporting form, a map of bobcat sightings has been produced. “Citizen monitoring has proven to be a valuable tool in resource management

they are usually scared off with a loud chorus that is beaten out loudly by pots and pans, but if they show no fear you have the beginning of a different scenario. It becomes a waiting game, you waiting for the bear to leave and the bear waiting for his usual food. Most bears will abandon a site after several days if they don’t gain access to food. On rare occasions bears get aggressive by popping their jaws or swinging their heads, woofing or even by making false charges. Sometimes bears will even break through windows and doors to get into the house. These are certainly bears that qualify for the relocating program.

Trapping Bartz has access to a number of bear traps that are metal tubes about 7 feet long. They’re 30 inches in diameter and the tube rests on skids. If warranted, the traps are placed close to the areas the bears frequent using fluid scents like liquid smoke, apple, cherry or anise and the object is to attract the bear with the scent in order to have them go into the tube and

and an opportunity for interested citizens to contribute to our knowledge of wildlife and habitat trends,” said Brian Dhuey, DNR’s wildlife surveys coordinator. The DNR also asks people to e-mail any photos taken of the black bear or bobcat to wildlife management; this can be done directly from the reporting form. “Trail cameras that have been placed in the woods as scouting tools are oftentimes a good source of photo evidence. This is especially valuable for bobcats, as they are secretive animals and tracking their distri-

S

bution is oftentimes difficult,” Dhuey says. Previous photos can be viewed on the DNR’s trail camera gallery. Other endangered or rare animal sightings can be reported using the DNR Bureau of Endangered Resources Rare Mammal Observation form. Use this form to report sightings of wolf, moose, cougar, lynx, wolverine, marten or Franklin’s ground squirrel. – from the DNR

Catchable-size trout delivered to dozens of waters statewide

MADISON - Catchable-size trout are being delivered to dozens of waters before the May 7 opening day of the regular inland season to provide trout fishing where it wouldn’t otherwise exist. The trout are stocked in waters where the habitat is marginal and there is no natural reproduction. They are a small subset of the state’s overall trout treasury — more than 10,000 miles of classified trout water and trout populations that have generally increased statewide over the last 60 years. “We’ll hope to complete most of the put ‘n’ take stocking by the opener or shortly thereafter, depending on condi-

pull down on the bait that’s on the far end. It’s usually something sweet and once the bait is pulled down it triggers the gate to close. Mature bears are usually calm, but the young ones are almost always agitated. These young ones can weigh from 60 to 150 pounds but they are both loaded the same way, using a double-wide snowmobile trailer pulled by a truck. “If we have to capture a sow and cubs, we will only move them if the entire family is captured. We relocate these animals on large tracts of public land that’s at least 200 miles away so they can settle in before winter hibernation. Last year we took over 16 bears out of one farmer’s corn fields and several yearlings out of the Shell Lake city shop’s dumpster.” Due to the fact that many resorts and campgrounds are using better fish-gut storage or removal, bear calls to those locations have been reduced.

Relocation Last year alone there were 102 bears relocated from Bartz’s area, of which only

tions,” says David Giehtbrock, statewide fish production manager. If the lake is frozen, they’ll need to wait. The fish were raised at Lakewood State Fish Hatchery, Nevin State Fish Hatchery, Osceola State Fish Hatchery and St. Croix Falls State Fish Hatchery. Additional fish were raised and stocked through cooperative rearing agreements with fishing clubs, and about 70,000 fish were stocked in urban fishing waters, small lakes and ponds cooperatively managed with the local municipality and used as a place for fishing clinics and kids fishing. – from the DNR two were euthanized. If Bartz has one recommendation for residents, starting in April and running through October, it would be to remove any food temptation from your yard and deck to help these hungry bears move on to more natural locations like the woods to nibble on the willow and aspen trees and eat the berries and grubs and not your dog’s food, or in some cases, your dog. For additional information on wildlife damage issues and nuisance bear information, go to: http://dnr.wi.gov/org/land/wildlife/da mage/urbsub.htm and if you’d like to get up close and personal with Lily the black bear, simply go to bear.org. This site that emanates from Ely, Minn., takes you into the den to see not only Lily, but her yearling and her two newborns, a male and a female. The site also covers everything you ever wanted to know about bears and it’s always interesting to see what’s going on with the new family.

Hearings continued

to the effect that hunting wasn’t just about killing, and he felt that anyone who could just buy a weapon, spend only a short time practicing and kill a deer, was ruining the tradition of hunting. He said that practicing, getting your bow sighted in and spending time and just preparing yourself for the hunt was a big part of the fun of hunting. “We’re losing our hunting heritage by using all of this modern-day equipment,” he said. Polk County voted against the use of crossbows for all ages, with 44 voting no, and 25 voting yes. On question 41, people seemed more in favor of lowering the age requirement to use a crossbow from 65 to 55. In Polk County, there were 37 votes for yes, and 31 for no. Statewide, 2,806 said yes, while 2,198 voted no. Considerable discussion was held as well on bears and hunting with bear hounds. A question asking if you favored bear hunting with hounds statewide, 1,989 voted yes, while 2,300 voted no. But on another bear question, it seem much of the state was in favor of dividing up bear management Zone C, with 2,870 voting yes, and 1,158 votes for no. It was noted

Conservation Congress delegates, conservation wardens, and fisheries and wildlife biologists were on hand to answer questions from a good-sized crowd during the spring Conservation Congress hearings on Monday, April 11. – Photo by Marty Seeger

that splitting up Zone C, might open up more opportunity for bear hunters with hounds to hunt in that zone, which is currently limited to hunters who sit over bait. By splitting up the zone, bears could also be managed more effectively. Comments were also heard on the topic of extending the spring turkey hunting periods an extra two days, instead of the current time periods which run five days, from Wednesday through Sunday. One voiced his opinion on opening up

the entire season. “Buy a tag over the counter and let them hunt,” he said, adding, “What if it rains those five to seven days? And I’m a farmer, so I’d just as soon shoot em’ all!” Conservation warden Jesse Ashton commented that opening up the spring turkey season was something that had been discussed before, but most people favored the current method because it protected the quality of the hunt. Ashton said it could potentially open the door to more

hunting accidents as well. Statewide, 3,024 voted yes to extending the turkey-hunting periods two days, while 1,974 opposed it. In neighboring Burnett County, fewer than 20 people attended the hearings on Monday. Results for those questions, as well as the results state and countywide, can be found on the DNR Web site at www.dnr.state.wi.us.

County prepares for life after the Budget Repair Bill

APRIL 20, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 25

Transition committee set up to make necessary changes

by Mary Stirrat Leader staff writer BALSAM LAKE —Gov. Scott Walker’s Budget Repair Bill will require counties and other public employers to change and create a variety of personnel policies, and Polk County is preparing for the changes. Tuesday evening, April 19, the Polk County Board of Supervisors formed a five-person transition committee, charged with the responsibility of developing the new grievance process and other personnel policies that will be necessary. Appointed to the committee were supervisors Patricia Schmidt of the personnel committee, Brian Masters of the finance committee, and Kristine KremerHartung, Jay Luke, and Herschel Brown as members at large. The idea, said Supervisor Russell Arcand, chairman of the personnel committee, was to have a member of the personnel committee, a member of the finance committee, then three other supervisors from three different committees. With no two members coming from the same governing committee, he said, there will be no possibility of any committee having a quorum present when the transition committee meets. Schmidt and Masters were nominated by their respective committees, but the other three were nominated and elected by the board of supervisors. During discussion before the committee was appointed, Supervisor Larry Voelker questioned whether the timing was right. The particulars of the Budget Repair Bill and its impact are unknown, he said, leaving the county “in a state of limbo.” He asked whether it made any sense to establish the committee at this time, before any details of the Budget Repair Bill are ironed out. The committee doesn’t have to meet if there is no need, responded Arcand, but it will be in place and ready to go if the need arises.

Polk County board Chairman William Johnson IV, left, with county clerk Carole Wondra and county Administrator Dana Frey. — Photos by Mary Stirrat

In addition, Wisconsin County Mutual Insurance Company is offering a seminar next Wednesday, April 27, in Stevens Point and committee members can take advantage of expertise provided there. On the agenda for the seminar are grievance policy and procedures, employee policies and work rules, fringe benefits, performance-based wage systems and claims avoidance.

Grants and loans Action by the board of supervisors will allow companies coming into Osceola and Dresser to tap into federal money to help generate 200 jobs within five years. Federal money available through the Wisconsin Community Development Block Grant for Economic Development program will be used to provide KAPCO Inc., with $3.04 million to employ 152 people, and another $450,000 to Engineered Plastic Components to employ another 50. Polk County needed to authorize application for the funds, which will be administered by West Central Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission. KAPCO, located out of Grafton, bought the stamping portion of Polaris, and with the grant funding commits to employ 152 people within two years. If these employees are maintained for five years the grant will be forgiven and no repayment will be

Offi ficcially school board members

Roni Schuler and Patricia Mitchell (L to R) were sworn in Tuesday, April 19, as official school board members of the St. Croix Falls school district. They are pictured taking their oaths of office. Both are incumbents who were elected April 5. – Photo by Tammi Milberg

necessary. KAPCO currently has four operations in the Upper Midwest, and is a government subcontractor. According to board chairman William Johnson IV, KAPCO is planning to use the Osceola location to move into the Twin Cities market. Engineered Plastic Components is taking over operations at UFE in Dresser, and has committed to hire 50 people within two years. Again, if these employees are hired within the required time frame and retained for five years, the grant will be forgiven and no repayment will be necessary.

Health report Gretchen Sampson, director of the Polk County Public Health Department, presented Polk County’s community health improvement plan. Titled Healthiest Polk County 2015, the plan is “a call to action” to address issues of physical activity, nutrition, tobacco use and mental health. These areas, said Sampson, were identified through a community health needs assessment as four top issues in the county. The plan includes strategies to address the issues and ways to track progress with the overall goal of helping people enjoy longer and healthier lives. According to the 2011 County Health Rankings report, released by the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Polk County ranked 31 of 72 in health outcomes, which are measures of how long people live and how well they live. Measures studied for the rankings include things such as rate of smoking, income, air pollution levels, car accidents, teen birth and obesity. These measures and their results, which led to the identification of the four top health needs in Polk County as listed above, can be found at www.countyhealthrankings.org. Among statistics included in the plan is that 43 percent of adults in Polk County report they do not meet recommended levels of physical activity, which means 30 minutes per day of moderate activity at least five times a week, or vigorous activity for 20 minutes a day at least three days aweek. About 18 percent of children between the ages of 3 and 5 who participate in the WIC program watch more than two hours of television per day. Just over 36 percent of Polk County adults are overweight, and nearly 23 percent are obese, while 15 percent do not have a secure food supply and suffer

Sixteen inducted into Frederic High School’s National Honor Society

Frederic High School’s National Honor Society Banquet was held on Tuesday, April 5. Sixteen new members were inducted based on their character, scholarship, leadership and service. The new senior member is Jesse Chouinard. New junior members are Jayce den Hoed, April Halverson, Allison Martin, Shabana Mishler and Autumn Schmidt. New sophomore members are Paige Burton, McKenna Cook, Kourtni Douglas, Ian Lexen, Kendra Mossey, Vincent Nelson, Julia Owens, Natalie Phernetton, McKenna Rognrud and Emily Wells. Inductees shown are (L to R) back row: Emily Wells, Autumn Schmidt, Vince Nelson, Ian Lexen, McKenna Rognrud, Julia Owens, Kourtni Douglas, Paige Burton and Jayce den Hoed. Front row (L to R): Allison Martin, April Halverson, McKenna Cook, Natalie Phernetton, Kendra Mossey, Shabana Mishler and Jesse Chouinard. - Photo submitted

Supervisor Ken Sample questioned the process of tabling a resolution.

hunger due to limited budgets. The report shows that approximately 60 Polk County residents die each year due to tobacco-related illness. Nearly 21 percent of pregnant women in the county are smokers. In 2007 an estimated $22 million in health care costs were paid in Polk County as a result of diseases caused by smoking, and in 2008 residents of Polk County spent more than $10 million on 2.5 million packs of cigarettes. Using statistics from 2007 to 2008, according to the report, studies show that Polk County’s teen suicide rate was double the statewide average.

Controversial resolution Circumstances surrounding the tabling of a resolution last month that led to the resignation of Supervisor Ken Sample, who later rescinded his resignation, were briefly discussed by the board. “I’m not looking to be combative, and I’m not looking to be right,” Sample said Tuesday night. He added, however, that he believes the tabling of the resolution did not appropriately follow Robert’s Rules of Order. Corporation counsel Jeff Fuge used several pages from Robert’s Rules of Order to give support to the way the resolution was tabled, but Sample said that the materials did not include all pertinent information. “I think there was a good faith effort to follow Robert’s Rules of Order,” said board Chairman William Johnson IV. Supervisors later had the opportunity to again discuss the resolution itself, which stated support for the rights of Polk County workers. No supervisor took action to bring the resolution up for discussion.

Other business • County Administrator Dana Frey presented some preliminary 2010 year-end budget figures, noting that general fund expenses were about $2 million less than budget. About $1.6 million was added to the fund balance. • Supervisor Jay Luke, chairman of the public protection committee, said that Polk County dispatcher received about 20,000 calls during the first three months of 2011. • Supervisor Patricia Schmidt, chair of the public health committee, said the committee is looking at the way unused medications are disposed of in Polk County. The medications are showing up in trace amounts in groundwater, she said. A free drop box for unused medication can be found at the Polk County Justice Center. • Supervisor Herschel Brown of the organizational committee said that the committee will meet April 26 to begin looking at redistricting maps. He also said that the committee has identified more than 54 auxiliary and subcommittees of the county, in addition to its regular governing committees. • The highway department was authorized to proceed with nearly $2.4 million in budgeted highway projects. Projects include a portion of CTH I ($1.007 million), CTH M ($498,200), CTH Y ($357,500), CTH F ($198,500), CTH E ($305,800), and Hwy. 65/CTH K intersection ($25,000). Funds are included in the 2011 budget.

PAGE 26 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - APRIL 20, 2011

Balsam Lake, Wis.,

Thurs. & Fri., April 21 & 22 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Tiller; 2 JD mowers; 10’ stepladder; tools; drill; 12 cords hardwood; misc.

is having an

Contact Mary at 715-405-3584

534327

Saturday, June 4, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

533666 24-25a,dp 34-35Lp

ART & CRAFT SALE

FOR RENT

Denny Ash Residence 1391 140th Ave. Balsam Lake

Yourchuck’s True Value Siren Apply In Person

One-BR Apartment, Downtown Centuria

325

534296 35-36L 25-26a

$

per mo. Available May 1! Water, sewer & garbage incl. Background check. First Month’s Rent And Damage Deposit

612-280-7581

533418 23-24a,d 34-35L

Our Lady of the Lakes Church

NOW HIRING

NOTICE Town of Lorain Cemetery Cleanup Sat., April 30, 2011, At 9 a.m.

Bring rakes, shovels. All invited to help. Susan E. Hughes, Clerk 534299 35L 25a

FOR RENT Clayton, WI All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians; pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-6699777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1800-927-9275. 445101 8a-etfcp 19Ltfc

2-BR Split-Level House Air conditioning, 2-car garage, no pets. $

885/mo. rent + utilities

$885 Security Deposit Will do background check.

Call 715-263-3577 Or 715-948-2560 534337 35r,Lp 25a-ep

FOR RENT 1-BR Apartment In Balsam Lake

Clean, quiet, manager on site. Water, sewer & garbage included. Garage available. No pets, no smoking. $

375/month

PARKWAY APTS. 715-485-3402 Cell: 715-554-0780 534382 35-36Lp 25-26a,dp

awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. Date: April 18, 2011 SCHELBLE LAW FIRM, S.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff By: Jeffrey E. Schelble, State Bar No. 1014739 P.O. Address: 622 N. Water Street, Suite 400 Milwaukee, WI 53202 Phone: 414-270-1930

534394 WNAXLP

MOVING SALE

VENDORS WANTED!

Saree L. Reindahl, nonregistration of vehicle, $263.50. Troy L. Riley, Clear Lake, operate snowmobile-fail/comply signs, $175.30. Cody T. Schillinger, Amery, fail/register deer in unit of kill, $243.00. Mary A. Schmidt, Webster, operating while suspended, $280.50. Sadie Jo M. Simonsen, Luck, fail to stop/improper stop at stop sign, $175.30. Colleen R. Skeie-Norenberg, Grantsburg, speeding, $175.30. Charles F. Snyder, Everett, Pa., speeding, $183.30; interstate record of duty status, $263.50. Autumn L. Sonnenberg, Cumberland, speeding, $175.30. Chad T. Sparish, Cumberland, inattentive driving, $187.90. Mariea L. Stone, St. Paul, Minn., operating motor vehicle w/o proof of insurance, $10.00. Cassandra J. Strugul, Milltown, speeding, $175.30. Andrew T. Sund, Luck speeding, $175.30. Adam J. Taylor, Crown Point, Ind., speeding, $175.30. Andrew G. Thorud, Amery, hunt without license, $202.70. Michael J. Trumble, Amery, speeding, $175.30. Erik D. Videen, Chisago City, Minn., underage drinking-possess, not guilty plea. William R. Webber, New Richmond, speeding, $175.30. Christopher J. Wojtowicz, Grantsburg, speeding, $175.30. Michael J. Wood, Amery, apply for bear preference point while DNR privileges were revoked, $243.00. Emily C. Worrell, St. Croix Falls, failure to keep vehicle under control, $213.70. Matthew P. Wright, speeding, $250.90; fail/yield to stop for emergency vehicle, $326.50; operting motor vehicle w/o proof of insurance, $10.00. Casey L. Wylie, Frederic, speeding, $175.30. Scotty D. Yeazle, Rice Lake, speeding, $175.30. Gregory L. Zinn, Amery, speeding, $200.50.

POLK COUNTY - Connie Prose, 55, Webster, was arrested and charged with OWI, third offense, on Saturday, April 17, after being involved in a one-vehicle crash. Prose told a police officer at the scene that she had been having trouble driving because of her medication. A witness said she had been “all over the road” before going in the ditch. She thought she may have dozed off, causing the accident. Prose’s speech was slightly slurred and her eyes were glassy. She didn’t appear to have an injuries due to the accident, and field sobriety tests were given. She failed the tests and was given a Breathalyzer, which registered .23, and she was arrested. • Michael Stener, 64, Amery, was arrested, charged with OWI, (April 20, 27, May 4) second offense, on Friday, April STATE OF WISCONSIN 15. A police officer who was drivCIRCUIT COURT ing in the city of Amery on Keller POLK COUNTY Avenue South in the inside lane. A car coming from the other di- FORD MOTOR CREDIT rection on Keller in the inside COMPANY LLC Plaintiff, lane crossed the centerline into vs. the officer’s lane in front of him. He turned and pursued the vehi- RYAN M. FISHER Defendant(s) cle, and according to the report, saw it “almost bounce off the SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION curb, cross the center lane and Case No. 11-CV-198 ride on the centerline.” The car Money Judgment: 30301 stopped at Griffin, and the driver THE STATE OF WISCONSIN: identified himself as Michael Stener. Field sobriety tests were To the person named above as a given, but Stener was unable to Defendant: RYAN M. FISHER follow directions and was unable 305 2nd Ave. SW #3 to blow adequately to get a PBT Milltown, WI 54858-9074 reading. He said he had had seven cans of beer. He was taken You are hereby notified that in for an evidentiary blood test at the plaintiff named above has Amery Regional Medical Center. filed a lawsuit or other legal • Shawn Phetteplace, 36, Wey- action against you. Within 40 days after April 25, erhaeuser, was charged with OWI, first offense on Saturday, 2011, you must respond with a April 16. That day, a police officer written demand for a copy of the was sent to Hwy. 8 to watch for a complaint. The demand must be silver Nissan that was reportedly sent or delivered to the court, speeding and driving recklessly. whose address is 1005 W. Main St., #300, Balsam Lake, WI The officer watched the vehicle 54810, and to Schelble Law for several miles and then Firm, S.C. whose address is 622 stopped it at the Super America N. Water Street, Suite 400, on Hwy. 8. The officer spoke with Milwaukee, WI 53202. You may Phetteplace, smelled a strong have an attorney help you. odor of intoxicants and adminisIf you do not demand a copy tered field sobriety tests. He per- of the complaint within 40 days, formed poorly. A Breathalyzer the court may grant judgment registered .12. A review of his against you for the award of driving record showed he Phet- money or other legal action teplace didn’t have a valid dri- requested in the complaint. A ver’s license. — with information judgment may be enforced as from the Polk County Sheriff’s Dept. provided by law. A judgment

(April 20) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF John Albert Marklevits Notice to Creditors for Summary Assignment (Formal Administration) Case No. 11 PR 13 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE: 1. A petition for summary assignment was filed. 2. The decedent, with date of birth 04-03-1936, and date of death 12-29-2009, was domiciled in Polk County, State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address of 100 Lake Ave. S. #104, Frederic, WI 54837. 3. The right of a creditor to bring an action terminates three months after the date of public action of this order. Creditors may bring an action by: A. Filing a claim in the Polk County Circuit Court before the property is assigned. B. Bringing a suite against the assignee(s) after the property is assigned. 4. The poperty may be assigned to the creditors and interested persons after 30 days have elapsed following the publication of this notice. BY THE COURT: Hon. Molly E. GaleWyrick Circuit Court Judge 600 Judicial Ctr. 1005 W. Main St. Balsam Lake, WI 54810 715-485-9241 March 29, 2011 Robert L. Loberg 359 W. Main St. Ellsworth, WI 54011 715-273-5072 Bar #1017505 533968 WNAXLP

view, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Olivia J. Krueger, Amery, inattentive driving, $147.90. Shannon R. Landers, North Branch, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Travid D. Lee, Star Prairie, operate w/o carrying license, $150.10. Christina N. Lehmann, Cumberland, speeding, $175.30. Ashley D. Lowe, Turtle Lake, OWI, $817.50; open intox., $263.50. Christopher J. Manka, Neshkoro, truck following too closely, not guilty plea. Thomas P. Manthey, Chisago City, Minn., underage drinkingpossession, $263.50. Kristina M. Marlowe, Clayton, dog at large, not guilty plea. Justin S. Martinson, Amery, fail/stop at stop sign, $175.30. Calvin K. McQuay, Grantsburg, operate snowmobilefail/comply signs, $175.30. John R. Metzger, St. Paul, Minn., possession of illegal-sized fish, $137.50. Lynette A. Mintz, Woodbury, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Nina M. Northquest, Grantsburg, operating while suspended, $200.50. Nathan U. Oehrlein, Hastings, Minn., inattentive driving, $187.90. Chad Ogilvie, Luck, operate w/o proof of insurance, $10.00. Nathan J. Olin, Siren, nonregistration of auto, $175.30. Patricia L. Olson, Osceola, operating while suspended, $200.50; nonregistration of other vehicle, $263.50. Todd T. Palmberg, Balsam Lake, operate snowmobilefail/comply signs, $175.30. Indouangdy Panthaphim, Minneapolis, Minn., speeing, $175.30. James E. Pettis Jr., Frederic, speedometer violations, not guilty plea. Anton V. Pshon, St. Paul, Minn., speeding, $175.30.

35Lp

Joseph Harriman, Balsam Lake, place mobile home on property without obtaining land use permit, $438.00. John W. Hawes, Centuria, operating left of centerline, $213.10; operating a motor vehicle w/o insurance, $200.50. Eugene P. Hayes, Norway, Mich., speeding, not guilty plea. Deanna R. Helgeson, Clayton, speeding, $175.30, twice. Barry J. Henschke, Milltown, speeding, $175.30. Willie J. Hochstetler, Amery, unreasonable and imprudent speed, $213.10. Austin J. Holdt, Luck, operate snowmobile-fail/comply signs, not guilty plea. Charles J. Howard, River Falls, speeding, $175.30. Brandon A. Hughes, Osceola, operating motor vehicle w/o proof of insurance, $10.00. Andrew B. Hulquist, Eau Claire, operate after rev./susp. of registration, $175.30. Didi Ionascu, Chicago, Ill., interstate record of duty status, $263.50. Barbara L. Jarchow, Balsam Lake, speeding, $175.30. Ryan C. Jenquin, Hudson, speeding, $175.30. Andrew R. Johnson, Centuria, seat belt violation, $10.00. Timothy J. Johnson, Maplewood, Minn., hunt without license, $206.70. Marc W. Johnvin, Mountain, interstate record of duty status, $263.50. Grigoriy V. Katargin, St. Louis Park, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Ralph L. Katuin, Dresser, seat belt violation, $10.00. Terry L. Kelly, Amery, fail/register deer in unit of kill, $243.00. Robert E. Knutson, Radium Springs, N.M., fish > 3 hooks/lines/baits, $182.70. Matthew A. Krech, River Falls, speeding, $175.30. John S. Kripotos, Shore-

One-vehicle crash results in third OWI arrest

533474 34-35L 24a

Dorothy J. Blakeborough, Amery, operating motor vehicle w/o proof of insurance, $10.00. Angela J. Boettcher, Luck, hunt without license, $206.70. Brian K. Bonkoski, Springbrook, speeding, $175.30. James C. Boyer, Woodbury, Minn., speeding, $200.50. Kris J. Budke, Amery, speeding, $175.30. Kelly L. Butterfield, St. Croix Falls, operating a motor vehicle w/o insurance, $200.50. Kevin J. Bystrom, Luck, speeding, $200.50. Deanna R. Campbell, Hayward, operate w/o valid license, $200.50. Dale E. Campeau, Comstock, operating motor vehicle w/o proof of insurance, $263.50; nonregistration of vehicle, $10.00. Debra J. Clarke, White Bear Lake, Minn., speeding, $175.30. James M. Colalillo, Centuria, operate w/o valid license, $200.50; operating motor vehicle w/o insurance, $200.50. Joseph A. Cox, Rapid City, S.D., speeding, $200.50. Allison M. Curry, Rice Lake, passing in no-passing zone, not guilty plea. Erica A. Doriott, Luck, operating a motor vehicle w/o insurance, $200.50. Edward J. Ferguson, Clayton, operating a motor vehicle w/o insurance, $200.50. Brian W. Gano, Gleason, interstate record of duty status, $200.50. Blake S. Gaudette, Clear Lake, seat belt violation, $10.00. Sally V. Goossen, Somerset, speeding, $175.30. Taylor T. Grunow, Dresser, driving too fast for conditions, $213.10. Michael H. Haaf, Frederic, speeding, intake. Jerrold D. Haensel, Montrose, S.D., interstate record of duty status; speeding; not guilty pleas.

Polk County circuit court

Siren Police report

APRIL 20, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 27

532622 WNAXLP

NOTICE SIREN POLICE DEPARTMENT in now taking bids for a:

1993 BLACK GMC TRUCK 2500 VIN #: 1GTGK24K9RE507835 Body in good condition, sale of vehicle will be as is. This is an abandoned motor vehicle that is legally owned by Davin Tyler who has not wished to claim the vehicle. Vehicle may be seen at Siren Village Public Works Department. Sealed bids will be accepted until 4 p.m. May 2, 2011. Please mail sealed bids to: SIREN POLICE DEPARTMENT, Attn: Chief Chris Sybers. P.O. Box 23, Siren, WI 54872 Please contact SIREN POLICE DEPARTMENT at 715-349-7181 with any 534350 35-36L questions.

(April 6, 13, 20) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF Kyle W. Johnson DOD 2-1-2010 Order and Notice for Hearing on Petition for Summary Settlement (Formal Administration) Case No. 10 PR 20 A petition for the summary settlement was filed. THE COURT FINDS: The decedent, with date of birth Dec. 30, 1965, and date of death, Feb. 1, 2010, was domiciled in Polk County, State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address of 497 State Hwy. 48, Cumberland, WI 54829. THE COURT ORDERS: The petition be heard at the Polk County Courthouse, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin, Room Br. 1, before Hon. Molly E. GaleWyrick, Court Official, on May 6, 2011, at 3 p.m. If you require reasonable accommodations due to a disability to participate in the court process, please call 715-4859299 at least 10 working days prior to the scheduled court date. Please note that the court does not provide transportation. BY THE COURT: Molly E. GaleWyrick Circuit Court Judge March 31, 2011 Arnold R. Koehler Koehler & Meese Law Office LLC P.O. Box 430 Rice Lake, WI 54868 715-234-2128 Bar No. 1000384

VOLUNTEER ROADSIDE SPRING CLEANUP (Town roads only)

Sun., April 24 to Sat., April 30 Bags will be furnished by the town. Pick up bags at the Luck Town Shop. When filled leave at the roadside for town employee to pick up. Lloyd Nelson, 534130 Clerk 24a 35L (Apr. 13, 20, 27, May 4, 11, 18) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY THE RIVERBANK, Plaintiff vs. JOSEPH E. BARG, and DAN JASPERSON and SUSAN A. JASPERSON, Defendants. Case No. 10 CV 692 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE By virtue of and pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-entitled action on November 22, 2010, in the amount of $110,488.13, I will sell the described premises at public auction at the Main Front Entrance of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, in the Village of Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin, on: Thursday, May 26, 2011, at 10:00 o’clock a.m. TERMS OF SALE: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeiture of deposit plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. DESCRIPTION: Lot One Hundred Four (104) of the Assessor’s Plat of the Village of Dresser, according to the Official Plat thereof on file and of record in the office of the Register of Deeds in Polk County, Wisconsin, being a part of the Northeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter (NE 1/4 of NE1/4), of Section Eighteen (18), Township Thirtythree (33) North of Range Eighteen (18) West, Village of Dresser, Polk County, Wis. PIN: 116-00417-0000. STREET ADDRESS: 138 State Street, Dresser, WI 54009. Dated at Balsam Lake, Wis., this 28th day of March, 2011. Peter M. Johnson, Sheriff Polk County, Wisconsin Steven J. Swanson / #1003029 Attorney at Law P.O. Box 609 105 South Washington Street St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 715-483-3787 533982 WNAXLP

NOTICE FOR BIDS TOWN OF BLAINE Accepting bids for hot mix and pulverizing for approximately 7/10 mile (20 feet wide x 2 inches thick) on Lee Road, Town of Blaine, Burnett County, State of Wisconsin. Bids must be in by May 10, 2011. Bids will be opened at 7 p.m. at the monthly town board meeting. For information or mailing of bids: Dan Dyson 3240 Big McGraw Road Danbury, WI 54830 715-244-3722 Right to refuse any or all bids. Attention of bidders is particularly called to the requirements as to conditions of employment to be observed and minimum wage rates to be paid under contract, Section 3, Segregated Facility, Section 109 and E.O. 11246. Stare prevailing wage rates are applicable to this project. Engineer certification is required prior to final payment. Portion of project will be paid by local road improvement plan (LRIP). 534313 35L WNAXLP

WNAXLP

TOWN OF LUCK

(Mar. 23, 30, Apr. 6, 13, 20, 27) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY BRANCH 2 Profinium Financial, Inc., Plaintiff, vs. WALKER PROPERTIES OF WOODBURY II, LLC, AND WALKER PROPERTIES OF WOODBURY IV, LLC, Defendants. Case No.: 09-CV-992 Classification: 30301 Money Judgment 30404 Mortgage Foreclosure NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE By virtue of and pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-entitled matter on October 25, 2010, I will sell at public auction at the Polk County Courthouse, 1005 West Main St., Balsam Lake, Wisconsin, 54810, Polk County, on May 4, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 a.m. of that date, the following-described mortgaged premises, by offering for sale as a whole and not by separate parcel, to wit: Lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, Section 28, Township 32 North, Range 19 West, Arbor View, Farmington, Polk County, Wisconsin. Tax Parcel Numbers: 02201209-0100, 022-01209-0200, 022-01209-0300, 022-012090400, 022-01209-0500. Terms of Sale: Ten percent (10%) of successful bid must be paid to Sheriff at sale in cash or by certified or cashier’s check. Balance must be paid within ten (10) days after confirmation by the Court. The mortgaged premises shall be sold as a whole. Successful bidder shall pay the transfer fee. Dated at Balsam Lake, Wis., this 23rd day of March, 2011. /s/ Peter Johnson Sheriff of Polk County, Wis. Document Drafted By: Daniel J. McGarry WHYTE HIRSCHBOECK DUDEK, S.C. 33 East Main Street, Suite 300 Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (608) 255-4440

NOTICE TOWN OF LAKETOWN Monthly Board Meeting Will Be Held Tuesday, April 26, 2011, At 7:30 p.m. Cushing Community Center Agenda: Call to order; clerk’s report; treasurer’s report; open forum; discuss proposed ATV route; road report; pay bills; closed session and 534446 35L adjournment. Patsy Gustafson, Town Clerk

(April 20, 27, May 4, 11, 18, 25) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP Plaintiff, vs. DAVID FOUKS; SHELLY FOUKS A/K/A SHELLY L. SWANSON; Defendants. NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Case No. 10 CV 312 Case Code No. 30404 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on September 29, 2010, in the amount of $194,069.18, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: June 15, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax from the proceeds of the sale. PLACE: Lobby of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, Balsam Lake, WI 54810. PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Lot 3 of Certified Survey Map No. 5460 filed July 23, 2007, in Vol. 24 C.S.M., Pg. 145, as Doc. No. 734549, being Lots 3 and 4 of Certified Survey Map No. 5336 filed December 28, 2006, in Vol. 24 of C.S.M., Pg. 21, as Doc. No. 726610, located in the NE 1/4 of the NW 1/4 of Section 24, Township 32 North, Range 19 West, Town of Farmington, Polk County, Wisconsin. Together with and subject to a driveway agreement/easement recorded in Vol. 1007 of Rec., Pg. 649, as Doc. No. 735962. TAX KEY NO.: 022-00576-0300 PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2464 30th Avenue, Osceola, Wisconsin 54020. Gunar J. Blumberg State Bar No. 1028987 Attorney for Plaintiff 230 W. Monroe, Ste. 1125 Chicago, IL 60606 Phone: 312-541-9710 Johnson, Blumberg & Associates, LLC, is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose.

NOTICE OF HEARING

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(April 13, 20, 27) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT BURNETT COUNTY In the matter of the name change of: Ryan K. Mueller By (Petitioner) Ryan K. Mueller Notice and Order for Name Change Hearing Case No. 11-CV-88 NOTICE IS GIVEN: A petition was filed asking to change the name of the person listed above: From: Ryan K. Mueller To: Ryan K. Tagawa Birth Certificate: Ryan K. Mueller IT IS ORDERED: This petition will be heard in the Circuit Court of Burnett County, State of Wisconsin: Judge James Erickson, Burnett Co. Circuit Court, 7410 Co. Rd. K #115, Siren, WI 54872. April 27, 2011,11:30 a.m. If you require reasonable accommodations due to a disability to participate in the court process, please call 715-349-2147 at least ten (10) working days prior to the scheduled court date. Please note that the court does not provide transportation. BY THE COURT: /s/Hon. Kenneth L. Kutz Circuit Court Judge April 6, 2011

533234

Bethanie B. Rice, city of Madison, and Daniel J. Letch, town of Bone Lake, issued April 14, 2011.

(April 6, 13, 20) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT BURNETT COUNTY In The Matter Of The Name Change Of JANET KAY DOMASICA By: JANET KAY DOMASICA Notice and Order for Name Change Hearing Case No. 11-CV-82 NOTICE IS GIVEN THAT: A petition has been filed asking to change the name of the person listed above: From: JANET KAY DOMASICA To: JANET KAY HARTER IT IS ORDERED: This petition will be heard in the Circuit Court of Burnett County, State of Wisconsin: Hon. Kenneth L. Kutz, Burnett County Government Center, 7410 County Road K, #715, Siren, WI 54872, April 25, 2011, 4:15 p.m. If you need help in this matter because of a disability, please call: 715-349-2147. BY THE COURT: Hon. Kenneth L. Kutz Circuit Court Judge March 30, 2011

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Polk Co. marriage licenses

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March 29: Benjamin G. Anderson, 24, Frederic, was cited for operating after revocation during a traffic stop on Hwy. 70 at its south junction with Hwy. 35 at 6:58 p.m. April 3: At 2:42 a.m., the officer on duty was dispatched to provide mutual aid at the scene of a reported fight at Midtown Tavern. Christine L. Erickson, 50, Shoreview, Minn., was cited for speeding on Hwy. 35/70 and Park Street at 2:20 p.m. Daniel R. Matrious, 53, Blaine, Minn., was cited for speeding on Hwy. 35/70 and Elizabeth Street at 2:41 p.m. April 8: Bert M. Hess III, 30, Webster, was cited for operating after revocation during a stop on Hwy. 35/70 and Works Progress Street at 5:08 p.m. Deborah L. Hubbell, 41, Webster, was cited for operating without vehicle insurance during a stop on Hwy. 70 and Nyberg at 11:58 p.m. April 12: Eric A. Pavlicek, 39, Siren, received five citations during a traffic stop on Fourth Avenue and Main Street at 6:10 p.m. Pavlicek was cited with: operating after revocation. operating with a prohibited alcohol concentration, third offense; driving with an open intoxicant in the vehicle; operating while intoxicated, third offense; and failure to stop at a stop sign. April 15: Joshua J. Peters, 28, Grantsburg, was cited for OWI; operating with a prohibited alcohol concentration, first offense; and nonregistration of a vehicle during a stop on Hwy. 70 and Ellis Avenue at 10:13 p.m. April 16: Cody J. Maslow, 18, Siren, was cited for failing to stop at the stop sign on South Shore Drive and Fourth Avenue at 12:25 a.m. Kayla W. Bubendorf, 21, Luck, was cited for operating after suspension, second offense, at 12:57 a.m. on Hwy. 35 and Tower Road. Travis R. Pyke, 23, Frederic, was cited for OWI at 2:45 a.m. on Hwy. 35 and Olson Street. Amanda S. Tadych, 29, Crystal, Minn., was cited for speeding on Hwy. 70 at Hanson Street at 2:10 p.m. Lester J. Merrill, 34, Luck, was cited for OAR on Ellis Avenue and Main Street at 2:46 p.m. April 17: Jennifer D. Gorne, 20, Balsam Lake, was cited for speeding on CTH B and Third Avenue at 6:46 p.m. (March 30, April 6, 13, 20, 27, May 4) STATE OF WISCONSIN Sign up for CIRCUIT COURT e-mails of local POLK COUNTY breaking ROCK N’ ROLL TO GO PLUS!, INC., news at Plaintiff, www.the-leader.net vs. BRIDGET A. SORENSON, Defendant (Apr. 13, 20, 27, May 4, 11, 18) CASE NO. 2010TJ000017 STATE OF WISCONSIN NOTICE OF SALE CIRCUIT COURT Public notice is here given that POLK COUNTY by virtue of an Execution issued THE RIVERBANK, under the seal of the Circuit Plaintiff Court for Eau Claire County, vs. Wisconsin, upon a Judgment DAN JASPERSON and entered in the Court on October SUSAN A. JASPERSON, 20, 2009, in favor of Rock N’ and Roll To Go Plus!, Inc., Plaintiff, STATE of WISCONSIN, and against Bridget A. SorenDefendants. son, Defendant, in the sum of Case No. 10 CV 693 $389,577.39, damages and NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE costs, I have levied upon all By virtue of and pursuant to a right, title and interest of BridJudgment of Foreclosure en- get A. Sorenson in and to the tered in the above-entitled ac- following real estate: tion on November 22, 2010, in Lot 27 County Plat of Magic the amount of $143,610.82, I Lake, along with 1/5 interest will sell the described premises Outlot 2 as recorded in Volat public auction at the Main ume 956 on Page 88 as DocuFront Entrance of the Polk ment #683110, Section 32, County Justice Center, 1005 Township 32 North, Range 17 West Main Street, in the Village West, Town of Alden, Polk of Balsam Lake, Polk County, County, Wisconsin. Wisconsin, on: Lot 28 County Plat of Magic Thursday, May 26, 2011, Lake, along with 1/5 interest at 10:00 o’clock a.m. Outlot 2 as recorded in VolTERMS OF SALE: ume 956 on Page 88 as Docu1. 10% down in cash or cerment #683110, Section 32, tified funds at the time of Township 32 North, Range 17 sale; balance due within 10 West, Town of Alden, Polk days of confirmation of sale; County, Wisconsin. failure to pay balance due Parcel ID: 002-02267-2700, will result in forfeiture of 002-02267-2800, 002-02267deposit plaintiff. 0102. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to Property Address: 7th Avenue, all legal liens and encumTown of Alden, Star Prairie, WI brances. 54026. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate I will sell this property at pubTransfer Tax. lic auction to the highest bidder, DESCRIPTION: Lot 4, Plat of for cash, at 900 Polk County Trollview Estates, Township of Judicial Center, 1005 West Main Osceola, Polk County, Wis. Street, in Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin, at 10 a.m., PIN: 042-01314-0400. STREET ADDRESS: 982 South on May 11, 2011, to satisfy the View Lane, Dresser, WI 54009. execution, together with interest and costs. Dated at Balsam Lake, Wis., Dated this 22nd day of March, this 28th day of March, 2011. 2011. Peter M. Johnson, Sheriff /s/ Peter M. Johnson, Sheriff Polk County, Wisconsin Herrick & Hart, S.C. Steven J. Swanson / #1003029 Terry L. Moore Attorney at Law 116 West Grand Avenue P.O. Box 609 P.O. Box 167 105 South Washington Street Eau Claire, WI 54702-0167 St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 715-483-3787 533980 WNAXLP (715) 832-3491

The Polk County Board of Adjustment will hold a public hearing at 10:30 a.m. on Tuesday, May 10, 2011, at the Government Center in Balsam Lake, Wisconsin. The Board will call the public hearing to order at 8:30 a.m., recess at 8:45 a.m. to view each site and will reconvene at 10:30 a.m. at the Government Center in Balsam Lake, Wisconsin. At that time each applicant will inform the board of their request. (THE APPLICANT MUST APPEAR AT 10:30 A.M. WHEN THE BOARD RECONVENES AT THE GOVERNMENT CENTER.) THOMAS A SCHAFFER requests a Special Exception from Article 8D1(a) of the Polk County Shoreland Protection Zoning Ordinance to operate a Tourist Rooming House. Property affected is: 2190 W Pipe Lake Ct, Lot 6, Char Mar Estates, Vol 571/Pg 807, Sec 15/T35N/R15W, Town of Johnstown, Pipe Lake (Class 1). JOHN & CAROLINE DAVIS request a variance to Article 11F2b(2)+(1) of the Polk County Shoreland Protection Zoning Ordinance to construct a porch to side of dwelling and exceed an 1,100sq.-ft. footprint. Property affected is: 1792 120th St., Lot 5, CSM #5722, Vol 25/Pg 199, in Gov’t Lot 2, Sec 6/T34N/R16W, Town of Apple River, Balsam Lake (Class 1). 534401 35-36L 25a,d WNAXLP

Notices/Employment Opportunities

PAGE 28 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - APRIL 20, 2011

Quarterly & Annual Meeting Wed., April 27 - 7 p.m. At the Luck Senior Center

Industrial Tool & Plastics, leader in custom injection molding for the past 45 years, presently has the following positions open:

MATERIAL HANDLER/BACKUP FOREMAN

ITP is accepting applications for a Material Handler/Backup Foreman on our 3rd shift. Plastic injection molding experience is necessary.

MAINTENANCE PERSON/SETUP & CYCLE TECH

533846 24a,d,e 35L

We are also accepting applications for a Maintenance Person/Setup & Cycle Tech position on 1st shift. Applicant must have electrical and hydraulic experience, along with plastic injection mold setup and cycling experience. Wages will be based on experience. ITP offers a competitive wage and benefits such as group health, dental, life insurance, 401(k) and vacation.

Apply at:

Plaintiff vs. DAVID H. RAILSBACK II ARLA J. RAILSBACK LAMPERT YARDS, INC. ANTCZAK CONSTRUCTION, INC. STATE OF WISCONSINDEPARTMENT OF REVENUE JOHN DOE #1 AND JOHN DOE #2 the unknown tenants of the premises located at W8389 Carlton Road Spooner, WI 54801, JOHN DOE #3 AND JOHN DOE #4 the unknown tenants of the premises located at N5126 Greenfield Road Spooner, WI 54801, Defendants Case No.: 10CV822 Case Code: 30404 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE By virtue of a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above-entitled action on November 4, 2010, the undersigned Sheriff of Polk County, Wisconsin, will sell at public auction at the front entrance of the Polk County Justice Center in the City of Balsam Lake, in said county, on the 25th day of May, 2011, at 10 a.m., the real estate and mortgaged premises directed by the Judgment to be sold, therein described as follows: Lot 6, Plat of Big Island, except the NW 1/2 thereof, located in Government Lot 2, Section 2-34-17, Polk County, Wisconsin. Said property is also described as the SE 1/2 of Lot 6, of Government Lot 2 of Big Island, Balsam Lake, Section 2-34-17, Polk County, Wisconsin. TERM OF SALE: Cash. DOWN PAYMENT: A deposit of 10% of sale price to be deposited in cash or by certified check with the Sheriff at the time of sale; balance to be paid by cash or certified check within ten days after confirmation of sale. Dated this 1st day of April, 2011. /s/ Peter M. Johnson Polk County Sheriff Donald R. Marjala, Lawyer Spangler, Nodolf, Bruder & Klinkhammer, LLC P.O. Box 1165 Eau Claire, WI 54702-1165 (715) 830-9771 Attorneys for Plaintiff

529 Blanding Woods Rd., St. Croix Falls, WI 715-483-3086, Fax: 715-483-1623, amy@itpmolding.com

(April 13, 20, 27) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY THE RIVERBANK, Plaintiff, vs. DANIEL F. FOUST and KAREN M. FOUST, Defendants Case No. 10 CV 811 NOTICE OF ADJOURNED SHERIFF’S SALE Sheriff’s Sale in this action was scheduled for Thursday, April 7, 2011, at 10:00 o’clock a.m., which has been adjourned as set forth herein. By virtue of and pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-entitled action on January 4, 2011, in the amount of $111,661.05, I will sell the described premises at public auction at the Main Front Entrance of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, in the Village of Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin on: Thursday, May 5, 2011, at 10:00 o’clock a.m. TERMS OF SALE: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeiture of deposit plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. DESCRIPTION: Lot Fourteen (14) of Certified Survey Map No. 5261 recorded in Volume 23 of Certified Survey Maps on page 168 as Document No. 721541, said map being Lot 14 of Certified Survey Map No. 214 recorded in Volume 1 of Certified Survey Maps on page 217, as Document No. 359866, located in the Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (NW1/4 of the NW1/4), Section Twenty-five (25), Township Thirty-five (35) North, Range Fifteen (15) West and part of the Southwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (SW1/4 of the NW1/4), Section Twenty-five (25), Township Thirty-five (35) North, Range Fifteen (15) West, Town of Johnstown, Polk County, Wisconsin. PIN: 028-00625-0000 STREET ADDRESS: 1983 Long Lake Lane, Comstock, WI 54826. Dated at Balsam Lake, Wisconsin, this 4th day of April, 2011. Peter M. Johnson, Sheriff Polk County, Wisconsin Steven J. Swanson No. 1003029 Attorney at Law P.O. Box 609 105 South Washington Street St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 715-483-3787

Community Referral Agency, Inc., a domestic violence and sexual assault shelter and agency in Northwestern Wisconsin, is seeking a

FULL-TIME EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

The Executive Director is responsible for the management of grant activities, overseeing all employee relations, oversight of the shelter and outreach office, and serving as a media and community liaison. The ideal candidate would possess supervisory and grant administration experience/knowledge, experience working in a nonprofit, and knowledge of the dynamics of domestic violence and sexual assault. Resumes and references will be accepted until April 29, 2011. Salary based on qualifications. Qualified candidates should send materials to: Community Referral Agency, Inc. Executive Director Position P.O. Box 365 Milltown, WI 54858 No telephone calls, please.

(Mar. 16, 23, 30, April 6, 13, 20) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY The RiverBank 304 Cascade Street P.O. Box 188 Osceola, Wisconsin 54020 Plaintiff, vs. Rivertown Construction, LLC 916 248th Street Osceola, WI 54020-4208 Douglas A. Neidermire 916 248th Street Osceola, WI 54020-4208 Lori A. Neidermire 916 248th Street Osceola, WI 54020-4208 Richard E. Funk 2274 60th Avenue Osceola, WI 54020-4509 Joleen R. Funk 2274 60th Avenue Osceola, WI 54020-4509 FMF Capital, LLC 8040 Excelsior Drive Suite 200 Madison, WI 53717 Mortgagelt, Inc. 8040 Excelsior Drive Suite 200 Madison, WI 53717 and National City Bank 50 West Broad Street Suite 1800 Columbus, OH 43215 Defendants. Case Code: 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage/ Contract Court File No. 10-CV-423 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on October 29, 2010, in the amount of $149,521.65 against Richard E. Funk and Joleen R. Funk, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: May 4, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: Pursuant to said judgment, 10% of the successful bid must be paid to the sheriff at the sale in cash, cashier’s check or certified funds, payable to the clerk of courts (personal checks cannot and will not be accepted). The balance of the successful bid must be paid to the clerk of courts in cash, cashier’s check or certified funds no later than ten days after the court’s confirmation of the sale or else the 10% down payment is forfeited to the plaintiff. The property is sold “as is” and subject to all liens and encumbrances. PLACE: In the foyer area of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, in the City of Balsam Lake, Polk County. DESCRIPTION: That part of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (SW1/4 of the SW1/4) of Section 32, Township 33 North, Range 18 West described as follows: Lot 2 of Certified Survey Map No. 3231 recorded in Volume 14 of Certified Survey Maps on Page 253 as Document No. 604680, Polk County, Wisconsin, together with a 30-foot wide access easement as described in Volume 829, Page 739 of Deeds. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2274 60th Ave., Osceola, WI 54020. Peter Johnson Polk County Sheriff MURNANE BRANDT Attorneys for Plaintiff 30 E. 7th Street, Suite 3200 St. Paul, MN 55101-4919 Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (15 U.S.C. Section 1692), we are required to state that we are attempting to collect a debt on our client’s behalf and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose.

TOWN OF MILLTOWN Plan Committee Meeting

Tues., May 3, 2011, 7 p.m. Milltown Fire Hall Virgil Hansen, Clerk

533974 35L

ANCHORBANK, FSB Assignee of S & C BANK

Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (15 U.S.C. Section 1692), we are required to state that we are attempting to collect a debt on our client’s behalf and any information we obtained will be used for that purpose. 533271 WNAXLP

Industrial Tool & Plastics Inc.

Industrial Tool & Plastics,

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT BRANCH 2 ST. CROIX COUNTY

532093 WNAXLP

NORTHLAND MUNICIPAL AMBULANCE SERVICE

(April 6, 13, 20, 27, May 4, 11)

533892 WNAXLP

Case Classification No. 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage TO: Nelce C. Sluka P.O. Box 323 St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 THE STATE OF WISCONSIN TO THE ABOVE-NAMED DEFENDANT: YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that the Plaintiff named above has filed a lawsuit or other legal action against you. Within forty (40) days after April 20, 2011, you must respond with a written demand for a copy of the complaint. The demand must be sent or delivered to the court whose address is: Clerk of Circuit Court Polk County Justice Center 1005 West Main Street, Suite 300 Balsam Lake, WI 54810 and to plaintiff’s attorney whose address is: Steven J. Swanson 105 Washington Street South P.O. Box 609 St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 You may have an attorney help or represent you. If you do not provide a proper Answer within forty (40) days after April 20, 2011, the Court may grant Judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the Complaint and you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the Complaint. A Judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A Judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. Dated the 15th day of April, 2011. Steven J. Swanson Bar No. 1003029 Attorney for Plaintiff 105 Washington Street South P.O. Box 609 St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 715-483-3787 534397 WNAXLP

FOLLOW THE LEADER

533888 34-35L 24-25a,d

(April 20, 27, May 4) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY THE RIVERBANK, Plaintiff, vs. NELCE C. SLUKA, Defendant. SUMMONS (By Publication) Case No. 11 CV 186

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(Mar. 23, 30, April 6, 13, 20, 27) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY ONEWEST BANK, FSB Plaintiff vs. JOSEPH J. HARRINGTON, et al. Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Case Number: 10 CV 566 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on November 4, 2010, in the amount of $159,927.44, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: May 10, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: Lot Two (2) of Certified Survey Map No. 4012 Recorded In Volume 18 of Certified Survey Maps on Page 42 as Document No. 651777, being located in part of the the fractional Northwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (FR NW1/4 OF SW1/4) of Section Nineteen (19), Township Thirty-Three (33) North, Range Eighteen (18) West, Town of Osceola, including part of Lot One (1) of Certified Survey Map No. 3097 recorded in the Register of Deeds Office for Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 838 240th St., Osceola, WI 54020. TAX KEY NO.: 042-00398-0200. Dated this 25th day of February, 2011 Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County Russell J. Karnes State Bar #1054982 Blommer Peterman, S.C. 165 Bishops Way Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. 266528

(Mar. 16, 23, 30, April 6, 13, 20) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY The RiverBank 304 Cascade Street P.O. Box 188 Osceola, WI 54020 Plaintiff, vs. Upland Homes, LLC 308 SW 15th Street, Suite 25 Forest Lake, MN 55025 and Joel A. Rivard 28007 Nathan Lane Lindstrom, MN 55045 Defendants Case Code: 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage/ Contract Court File No. 10-CV-685 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on October 28, 2010, in the amount of $132,531.52, against Upland Homes, LLC, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: May 4, 2011, at 10 a.m. TERMS: Pursuant to said judgment, 10% of the successful bid must be paid to the sheriff at the sale in cash, cashier’s check or certified funds, payable to the clerk of courts (personal checks cannot and will not be accepted). The balance of the successful bid must be paid to the clerk of courts in cash, cashier’s check or certified funds no later than ten days after the court’s confirmation of the sale or else the 10% down payment is forfeited to the plaintiff. The properties are sold “as is” and subject to all liens and encumbrances. PLACE: In the foyer area of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, in the City of Balsam Lake, Polk County. DESCRIPTION: Lot EightyThree (83) and Lot Eighty-Four (84) of Gateway Meadows, said Plat being a Subdivision of part of the Northeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (NE1/4 of the SE1/4), the Southeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (SE1/4 of the SE1/4), the Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (NW1/4 of the SE1/4) and the Southwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (SW1/4 of the SE1/4), Section TwentySix (26), Township ThirtyThree (33) North of Range Nineteen (19) West; also being a part of Outlots 169 and 170 of the Osceola Outlot Plat, Village of Osceola, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1221 Corey Court and 1231 Corey Court, Osceola, WI 54020 Peter Johnson Polk County Sheriff MURNANE BRANDT Attorneys for Plaintiff 30 E. 7th Street, Suite 3200 St. Paul, MN 55101-4919 Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (15 U.S.C. Section 1692), we are required to state that we are attempting to collect a debt on our client’s behalf and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose. 1107876 532094 WNAXLP

Notices/Employment Opportunities

APRIL 20, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 29

Communications Officer Sheriff’s Department Limited Part Time up to 1,020/hrs. Deadline to apply: May 2, 2011

$19.07/hr.

$13.75/hr.

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Communications Officer Sheriff’s Department Recruitment for Full Time Deadline to apply: May 2, 2011

YOU MUST COMPLETE OUR POLK COUNTY EMPLOYMENT APPLICATION TO BE ELIGIBLE. For applications, complete job description & qualifications, please visit our Web site at www.co.polk.wi.us, employee Opportunities, or in person at 100 Polk County Plaza, #229, Balsam Lake, WI, 715-485-9176. AA/EEOC

(Mar. 30, Apr. 6, 13, 20, 27, May 4) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY AnchorBank, fsb f/k/a S&C Bank, Plaintiff, vs. Daniel R. Johnson, Individual and Sole Proprietor, d/b/a Swedes Masonry, Defendant. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Case No: 09 CV 929 Case Code: 30404 Judge: Molly E. GaleWyrick PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered April 26, 2010, in the amount of $181,175.54, the Polk County Sheriff will sell the described property at public auction as follows: DATE/TIME: May 17, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 10% of successful bid must be paid to the Sheriff at sale in cash or by certified check. Balance due within 10 days of court approval. Purchaser is responsible for payment of all transfer taxes and recording fees. Sale is AS IS in all respects and subject to all liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Foyer Area, Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main St., Suite 900, Balsam Lake, WI 54810. DESCRIPTION: Parcel 1: A parcel of land in the SE 1/4 of SW 1/4, Section 28, Township 35 North, Range 18 West, Town of Eureka, Polk County, Wis., described as follows: Commencing at the Southeast corner of SE 1/4 of SW 1/4, thence North along the Forty line 300 feet; thence West parallel to the South line of said Forty, 500 feet; thence South parallel to the east line of said Forty to the South line of said Forty; thence East to the place of beginning. Parcel 2: The SE 1/4 of SW 1/4, Section 28, Township 35 North, Range 18 West, Town of Eureka, Polk County, Wisconsin, except a parcel described as follows: Commencing at the Southeast corner of SE 1/4 of SW 1/4, thence North along the Forty line 300 feet; thence West parallel to the South line of said Forty, 500 feet; thence South parallel to the East line of said Forty to the South line of said Forty, thence East to the place of beginning. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2155 190th Avenue, Centuria, WI 54824. Peter M. Johnson Polk County Sheriff ECKBERG, LAMMERS, BRIGGS, WOLFF & VIERLING, P.L.L.P. Nicholas J. Vivian (#1047165) 430 2nd Street Hudson, WI 54016 (715) 386-3733 Attorneys for Plaintiff Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (15 U.S.C. Section 1692), we are required to state that we are attempting to collect a debt on our client’s behalf and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose. If you are currently in bankruptcy or have been discharged in bankruptcy, this letter is not an attempt to collect the debt from you personally. This letter serves only as notice of the commencement of a legal proceeding as required by the loan documents, state law, and/ or federal law. 532796 WNAXLP

NOTICE OF REAL ESTATE FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that, by virtue of a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-entitled action on November 5, 2010, in the amount of $257,121.09, the undersigned Sheriff will sell at public auction in the Lobby of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 W. Main St., Balsam Lake, WI 54810, on May 10, 2011, at 10:00 a.m., the following real estate and mortgaged premises directed by said Judgment to be sold, to-wit: Legal description: The Southeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 13, Township 36 North, Range 15 West, in the Town of McKinley, Polk County, Wisconsin. (TAX KEY NO. 038-00292-0000 and 03800293-0000). ADDRESS OF PROPERTY: 2753 Polk Barron St., Cumberland, WI 54829 TERMS OF SALE: 10% down in cash or certified funds (no personal checks) at sale, the balance due within 10 days of confirmation. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax from the proceeds of the sale upon confirmation of the Court. Said real estate is sold as is and subject to all liens and encumbrances. Peter M. Johnson Polk County Sheriff STUPAR, SCHUSTER & COOPER, S.C. By: Jeffrey S. Schuster Attorneys for Plaintiff 633 West Wisconsin Avenue Suite 1800 Milwaukee, WI 53203 414-271-8833

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(March 30, April 6, 13, 20, 27, May 4) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, as Trustee for Ameriquest Mortgage Securities Inc., Asset-Backed Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2003-1 by American Home Mortgage Servicing Inc., its attorney-in-fact Plaintiff, vs. STEVEN A. GAUSTAD; and BENEFICIAL FINANCIAL I INC. successor to Beneficial Wisconsin, Inc.; and CAPITAL ONE BANK USA N.A.; and MIDLAND FUNDING LLC; and CURRAHEE FINANCIAL, LLC; and THE CUMBERLAND MEMORIAL HOSPITAL AND EXTENDED CARE UNIT, INC.; and THE CUMBERLAND CLINIC, S.C., Defendants Case No. 10-CV-726 Code No. 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage Dollar Amount Greater Than $5,000 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on November 18, 2010, in the amount of $60,638.43, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: May 19, 2011, at 10 o’clock a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center located at 1005 West Main St., Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: A parcel of land in Outlot 93 of the Village of Clayton, described as follows: Commencing at the East 1/4 corner of Section 24-33-15, thence West along the EastWest quarter line a distance of 2,289.75 feet, which is the point of beginning of parcel being described; thence due North 200 feet; thence due West 100 feet; thence due South 200 feet; thence East 100 feet to the point of beginning; Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 241 Clayton Avenue East, Village of Clayton. TAX KEY NO.: 112-00257-0000. Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County, WI O’DESS AND ASSOCIATES, S.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff 1414 Underwood Avenue Suite 403 Wauwatosa, WI 53213 (414) 727-1591 O’Dess and Associates, S.C., is attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If you have previously received a Chapter 7 Discharge in Bankruptcy, this correspondence should not be construed as an attempt to collect a debt.

Everyone Welcome

Case No. 10-CV-608 Branch No. 2 Foreclosure of mortgage/30404

NOTICE OF SPRING CLEANUP Danbury and Swiss Cemeteries The Town of Swiss will be conducting its spring cleanup of both the Danbury and Swiss Cemeteries on or about the 1st of May, 2011. We will be removing faded/ dried-up decorations as to prepare for Memorial Day Weekend. Should you desire to save items, please have decorations removed by the above date. Swiss Town Board 533805 34-35L

Are You A Licensed

Physical Therapist or Physical Therapist Assistant? ADORAY Home Health & Hospice is looking for you! *0 - 20 hours a week *Flexible scheduling ADORAY services patients in St. Croix, Pierce, Southern Polk and Western Dunn Counties. Send resume or access application at

www.adoray.org and mail to: 2231 Hwy. 12, Suite 201 • Baldwin, WI 54002 715-684-5020/1-800-359-0174

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Mon., May 2, 2011 6:30 p.m. Located in Trade Lake

(Mar. 30, Apr. 6, 13, 20, 27, May 4) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY ANCHORBANK, FSB Plaintiff vs. DAVID M. SWENSON, et al. Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Case Number: 10 CV 128 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on May 5, 2010, in the amount of $54,637.19, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: May 18, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin. DESCRIPTION: The Northeast One-quarter of the Southeast One-quarter, Section 9, Township 35 North, Range 15 West, in the Town of Johnstown, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2237 Pipe Lake Road, Comstock, WI 54826. TAX KEY NO.: 028-00168-0000. Dated this 25th day of March, 2011. Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County Marie M. Flannery State Bar #1045309 Blommer Peterman, S.C. 165 Bishops Way Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. 268116

NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR THE FOLLOWING DEPARTMENTS & POSITIONS

• Bussers/Dining Room Hosts • Hotel Housekeeping • Valet Staff • EVS Staff

HWYS. 35 & 77 • DANBURY, WI

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POLK COUNTY POSITIONS ANNOUNCEMENT

Patsy Gustafson Town Clerk

Annual Meeting

531806 WNAXLP

NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Case No. 10 CV 89 Case Code No. 30404 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on May 18, 2010, in the amount of $102,593.09, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: Time: May 18, 2011, at 10 a.m. Terms: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of slae; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax from the proceeds of the sale. Place: Lobby of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, Balsam Lake, WI 54810. Property Description: Commencing 480 feet north of the east 1/8 post in the South line of Section 15, Township 32 North of Range 19 West, thence North on said 1/8 line 95 feet; thence West at right angles with said 1/8 line 150 feet; thence South parallel with said 1/8 line 95 feet; thence East 150 feet to the place of beginning said described piece of parcel of land being a part of the Southwest quarter of the Southeast quarter of Section 15, Township 32 North of Range 19 West, Polk County, Wisconsin. Tax Key No.: 022-00362-0000. Property Address: 307 State Road 35, Osceola, WI 54020. Gunar J. Blumberg State Bar No. 1028987 Attorney for Plaintiff 230 W. Monroe, Ste. 1125 Chicago, IL 60606 Phone: 312-541-9710 Johnson, Blumberg & Associates, LLC is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. 532976 WNAXLP

No burning is allowed from midnight until 6 p.m. from April 1 through June 1, 2011.

533857 34-36L

(Mar. 30, Apr. 6, 13, 20, 27, May 4) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION The Bank of New York Mellon f/k/a the Bank of New York, as trustee for the certificate holders CWALT , Inc., Alternative Loan Trust 2006-OC1, Mortgage pass-through Certificates, series 2006-OC1 Plaintiff vs. Steve M. Preisler; Julie A. Preisler; Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, acting solely as nominee for Intervale Mortgage Corporation; Defendants

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BURNING RESTRICTION

533962

(March 30, April 6, 13, 20, 27, May 4) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY HSBC MORTGAGE SERVICES, INC. Plaintiff, vs. ARDELL K. STRENKE and SHELLEY A. STRENKE, husband and wife, Defendants. Case No. 10-CV-137 Code No. 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage Dollar Amount Greater Than $5,000.00 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on May 11, 2010, in the amount of $148,211.27, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: May 12, 2011, at 10:00 o’clock a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center located at 1005 West Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin. DESCRIPTION: SE 1/4 of NE 1/4 of one acre in the NE 1/4 of SE 1/4, described as follows: Beginning at the Northwest Corner of NE 1/4 of SE 1/4, run thence East along the North boundary line of said description 22 Rods, then South at right angles 11 Rods, then Northwesterly to a point on the West boundary line of said description 3 Rods South of place of beginning, then North 3 Rods to beginning, all in Section 29-37-17, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1619 315th Avenue, Town of West Sweden. TAX KEY NO.: 048-00667-0000 Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County, WI O’DESS AND ASSOCIATES, S.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff 1424 Underwood Avenue Suite 403 Wauwatosa, WI 53213 414-727-1591 O’Dess and Associates, S.C., is attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If you have previously received a Chapter 7 Discharge in Bankruptcy, this correspondence should not be construed as an attempt to collect a debt.

TRADE LAKE SWEDISH MISSION CHURCH 35Lp

www.the-leader.net

TOWN OF LAKETOWN

(Mar. 16, 23, 30, April 6, 13, 20) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION BANK MUTUAL, Plaintiff, vs. DAVID C. HANSON a/k/a DAVE C. HANSON, Defendant.

Apply in person at HR, M - F, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. or online http://danbury.stcroixcasino.com/employment/

Notices/Employment Opportunities

PAGE 30 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - APRIL 20, 2011

534308 35-36L 25-26a,d

• Strong volunteer management skills, able to manage 5-15 volunteers at one time. • Strong knowledge of Habitat for Humanity philosophy and ministry (or willingness to learn) • Strong residential construction background and knowledge • Organized • Excellent communication skills (phone, fax, e-mail) and commitment to work as a member of a team • Requires 2-3 days per week (including most Saturdays) • Willing to teach unskilled volunteers how to perform tasks, ensure they learn and have a positive experience • Knowledge of ICF (Insulated Concrete Forms) construction, energyefficient construction and air sealing • Willingness to lead devotions and safety training • Ability to work independently • Ability to manage professional trade partners • Able to lift minimum of 50 Lbs. Volunteer management skills for this position are essential. If this job is for you, please submit your resume and income requirements to Wild Rivers Habitat for Humanity via e-mail to:eric@wildrivershabitat.org. This job is part time for the length of the project (approximately 4 months) and does not carry any benefits.9 We may hire one person for the 2 Habitat builds or hire one person for each build. Deadline for resumes is Friday, May 6, 2011.

NOTICE OF OPEN BOOK FOR THE TOWN OF MEENON

Notice is hereby given that Open Book for the Town of Meenon will be held on Monday, May 2, 2011, from 6 - 8 p.m. at the Meenon Town Hall. This session gives the property owner an opportunity to meet with the assessor, ask questions of the assessor and look over their property assessments.

NOTICE OF THE BOARD OF REVIEW FOR THE TOWN OF MEENON Notice is hereby given that the Board of Review for the Town of Meenon, Burnett County, will be held on Monday, May 16, 2011, from 6 - 8 p.m. at the Meenon Town Hall. Please be advised of the following requirements to appear before the Board of Review and procedural requirements if appearing before the Board: No person shall be allowed to appear before the Board of Review, to testify to the Board by telephone or to contest the amount of any assessment of real or personal property if the person has refused a reasonable written request by certified mail of the Assessor to view such property. After the first meeting of the Board of Review and before the Board’s final adjournment, no person who is scheduled to appear before the Board of Review may contact, or provide information to a member of the Board about the person’s objection except at a session of the Board. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or contest the amount of assessment unless, at least 48 hours before the first meeting of the Board or at least 48 hours before the objection is heard if the objection is allowed because the person has been granted a waiver of the 48-hour notice of an intent to fill a written objection of appearing before the Board during the first two hours of the meeting and showing good cause for failure to meet the 48-hour notice requirement and file a written objection, that the person provides to the Clerk of the Board of Review notice as to whether the person will ask for removal of any Board member and, if so, which member will be removed and the person’s reasonable estimate of the length of time that the hearing will take. When appearing before the Board, the person shall specify, in writing, the person’s estimate of the value of the land and of the improvements that are subject of the person’s objection and specify the information that the person used to arrive at that estimate. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or subject or object to a valuation; if that valuation was made by the Assessor or the objector using the income method; unless the person supplies the Assessor all of the information about income and expenses, as specified in the manual under Sec. 73.03(2a), that the Assessor requests. The municipality or county shall provide by ordinance for the confidentiality of information about income and expenses that is provided to the Assessor under this paragraph and shall provide exceptions for persons using the information in the discharge of duties imposed by law or of the duties of their office by the order of a court. The information that is provided under this paragraph, unless a court determined that it is inaccurate, is not subject to the right of inspection and copying under Sec. 19.35(1) of Wis. Statutes. The Board shall hear upon oath, by telephone, all ill or disabled persons who present to the Board a letter from a physician, surgeon or osteopath that confirms their illness or disability. No other persons may testify by the telephone. Respectfully Submitted, 533893 Suzanna M. Eytcheson 34-35L 24-25a WNAXLP Meenon Town Clerk

Croix Falls, died April 1, 2011. Jeannine M. Keen, 81, Osceola, died April 3, 2011. Gertrude J. Klas, 99, Luck, died April 3, 2011. Ardell E. Liberty, 65, Lincoln

REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL LARGE DAM STUDY AND PERMIT APPLICATION The Town of Bone Lake in Polk County will be accepting proposals from qualified engineering firms to conduct a dam study and prepare a permit application for the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources to build a properly permitted large dam in section 34 of Bone Lake Town, T36N - R16W for the purpose of maintaining the current water level and characteristics of the Straight River north of 250th Avenue. The study shall be performed in accordance with NR 333-04 of the Wisconsin Administrative Code. For more detailed specifications, firms can contact Ray Schaefbauer, 612-940-1417. Proposals should be received by May 11 at the Town Clerk’s residence: Darrell Frandsen, Bone Lake Town Clerk, 954 280th Ave., Frederic, WI 54837. Proposals shall be submitted in a sealed envelope and marked Straight River Dam Engineering Proposal. Proposals will be opened at the Town Board meeting on May 12. Selected firms may be requested to attend a town meeting for further consideration. Bids may be considered for up to 60 days after opening date. The Town of Bone Lake reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids and to select the bid proposal deemed most advantageous to the Town 534301 35-36L WNAXLP of Bone Lake.

The following full-time position is available in the Shell Lake School District:

7 - 12 ENGLISH AND SOCIAL STUDIES/ HISTORY INSTRUCTOR This position will provide English, Social Studies and History instruction in grades 7 - 12 in the Shell Lake High School. D.P.I. licenses, 21 Grades 6 - 12 300 English, 221 Grades 612, 701 Social Studies or 750 History will be required. Applicants with multiple certifications and D.P.I. licenses are preferred. To apply: Applicants must send the following: • Letter of application • Resume • Current D.P.I. license(s) • Three letters of recommendation • Copy of official transcripts Successful applicant must pass a criminal background check, drug screen and required medical exam. Application deadline: May 15, 2011. Submit application materials to: Mr. Donald Peterson School District of Shell Lake 271 Hwy. 63 S. Shell Lake, WI 54871 The Shell Lake School District does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex or disability.

Township, died April 3, 2011. Mary Jane Jensen, 86, St. Croix Falls, died April 5, 2011. Roy V. Belisle, 72, McKinley Township, died April 7, 2011. Marion V. Larson, 86, Amery,

died April 7, 2011. Trevor C. Jorgenson, 90, Amery, died April 8, 2011. Curtis R. Maloney, 89, Amery, died April 8, 2011.

NOTICE VILLAGE OF WEBSTER RESIDENTS MUNICIPAL BRUSH DUMP The Village of Webster will open the Brush Dump on Saturday, April 23, 2011, from 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. The spring dates and hours of operation are as follows: Saturday, April 23, 2011 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. Saturday, April 30, 2011 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. Saturday, May 7, 2011 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. Saturday, May 14, 2011 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. ***Please take note that when you come to the dump to dump your leaves, clippings and brush you will need to show proof of residency to the attendee. The most likely forms of identification would be a copy of your water/sewer bill, utility billing with your residence address or a driver’s license with your residence address. You will not be allowed to dump your debris without this information at the time of disposal. If you have any questions, feel free to call the Village of Webster Office at: 715-866-4211 534193 Monday - Friday 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 35L

NOTICE OF EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY GRANTSBURG SCHOOL DISTRICT April 17, 2011

Job Title: K-6 General Music Teacher Job Description: 1.0 FTE Qualifications: Candidates must have or be eligible for WI DPI certification in general music (#515). Choral music certification (#511) isn’t required but is beneficial. Requirements: Elementary music teaching experience preferred. The ability to motivate and challenge students in the variety of musical areas is a must. Being able to work on a team that will help meet the music needs of the district is important. Having solid piano skills is a requirement. How to Apply: Send letter of application, resume, credentials (three current letters of recommendation and transcripts) and a copy of license by May 9, 2011. Contact: Katie Coppenbarger, Principal Grantsburg Elementary School 480 East James Ave. Grantsburg, WI 54840 715-463-2320

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Wild Rivers Habitat for Humanity (WRHFH) Is Seeking A Motivated Individual To Lead Construction Of Our Home(S) Being Built This Summer In Amery And Luck, Wisconsin

Jean M. Swanson, 84, Oakland Township, died March 31, 2011. Denis Bayle, 53, St. Croix Falls, died April 1, 2011. Margaret E. Frey, 90, St.

Polk County death notices

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Public notice is hereby given to all persons in the Village of Siren, Wisconsin, that a public hearing will be held on Wednesday April 27, at 10 a.m., at the Village Hall, 24049 First Avenue, Village of Siren, Wisconsin, relative to an application for a Variance to the Village of Siren Land Use Ordinance as follows: A variance to allow reduced lot sizes of 13,500 square feet for Lot #1 and 12,200 square feet for Lot #2; from the minimum lot size of 15,000 square feet for an R-1 lot. The lots are located at 23975 and 23967 First Avenue and 7731 State Road 70. (PIDS: 07-181-2-38-16-17-2 02-000-018000; 07-181-2-38-16-17-5 15604-012000 & 07-181-2-38-16-17-5 15-604-013000). All persons interested are invited to attend said hearing and be heard. Information on the proposal is available at the Village Office at 24049 First Avenue. Martin Shutt Administrator 533972 35L WNAXLP

The School District of Grantsburg is an Equal Opportunity Employer and does not discriminate on the basis of age, race, color, national origin, sex, religion or handicap.

SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGIST/ SPECIAL EDUCATION DIRECTOR POSTING

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VILLAGE OF SIREN NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

Join a progressive school district, dedicated to excellence in education for all students, located in the beautiful St. Croix Valley of Western Wisconsin. The St. Croix Falls School District is a 4K - 12 district with approximately 1,120 students taught by a quality staff of dedicated teachers committed to the education and development of the whole child. Seeking an individual with a strong background in special education and assessment, that will be a strong advocate for all students with special needs, will demonstrate a commitment to academic excellence, will provide strong educational and instructional leadership, will promote a positive, caring and nurturing environment, will help each staff member in identifying and developing the unique talents and potential of all students with special needs and has a good understanding of students’ individual learning styles. Applicants should have a certification in school psychology, a license as a special education director or a willingness to pursue one, a strong knowledge of curriculum, instruction and assessment in addressing the needs of special-needs students, the ability to build strong relationships with students, staff, parents and the community, the ability to be flexible, creative and collaborative when addressing issues and concerns when providing leadership in special education, and to work with the administrative team with our current RTI and co-teaching initiative. Interested applicants can fill out a district application located at www.scf.k12.wi.us, and submit along with your cover letter and resume, 3 letters of reference, transcripts and copy of current license to: Glenn Martin, 740 Maple Drive, St. Croix Falls, Wisconsin 54024. Deadline for applications is May 6, 534400 35-36L 2011.

Men of Tomorrow luncheon

APRIL 20, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 31

DNR wildlife management officer Kyle Anderson talked with Grantsburg 11th-grade students Matt Swenson, Lucas Hennemanand Ben Dorff during the students’ tour of the Crex Wildlife and Education Center.

Dr. Blaise Vitale, a family practice physician at Burnett Medical Center, talked with Grantsburg 11th-grade students about careers in the field of medicine at the Men of Tomorrow luncheon at the Crex Convention Center on Wednesday, April 13.

Photos by Priscilla Bauer

Glimpses of spring

All indications are that it is spring, despite Mother Nature dragging her feet with the warmer temperatures that usually arrive in late April. Highs in the low 50s and lows near freezing are creating spring anxiety for some of us but these photos are proof that signs of spring do exist. - Photos by John Reed

The keynote speaker at the Men of Tomorrow Luncheon was Don Erickson. “Every employer is looking for the all-American boy,” said Erickson, who then went on to give his presentation focusing on how to get a job and interview tips.

Grantsburg

Students today prepare to be Men of Tomorrow

by Priscilla Bauer Leader staff writer GRANTSBURG – When Grantsburg High School 11th-grade boys sat down for a luncheon Wednesday, April 13, at Crex Convention Center the place settings weren’t about to intimidate them. The students were ready to show off their manners and etiquette after a day of workshops at WITC-Rice Lake where they learned the skills needed for them to be comfortable in social situations. The students were also treated to new hairstyles and hand care during their WITC day. Previous to the luncheon, the students had each identified a career of interest and during their meal were seated at tables with invited community members successful in those careers, giving them a unique opportunity to ask questions about the various career paths they could choose. The luncheon’s keynote speaker was Don Erickson, a 1965 Grantsburg graduate, who served as vice president of McNally Industries in 1991, senior vice president of marketing and sales in 2003 and senior vice president and general manager in 2007. “It is good to be among businesspeople and young men who will someday be businesspeople,” Erickson told those attending the Men of Tomorrow luncheon. “Every employer is looking for the all-American boy,” said Erickson, who then went on to give his presentation focusing on how to get a job and interview tips. “Employers are looking for people who come to work to do the best job they can and who are not looking at the clock.” Erickson said education, whether formal or through experience, is important as are people skills. “Do what you can to add experiences to your resume,” commented Erickson. “Be someone who brings value to your employer and then when times get tough you will be kept on. Constantly be recreating yourself,” advised Erickson. “Continue to prepare for the next opportunity, be ready for it with a skill set.” After the luncheon, one group of students visited Alion and McNally Industries, learning about careers in technology while a second group visited the Crex Wildlife and Education Center for a presentation on Crex Meadows and careers in wildlife management.

Suitable for framing

Sharon Jensen benefit

PAGE 32 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - APRIL 20, 2011

Siren L E F T: T h e r e was a long line coming into Northwoods Crossing Center, Event Siren, Sunday, April 17, as wellwishers stopped to greet and hug Sharon Jensen, a Clam Falls woman who beat the odds to overcome a quick-acting deadly disease, losing her left arm at the shoulder as well as her shoulder blade and collarbone to the disease. – Photos by Nancy Jappe

ABOVE: The parking lot at the Northwoods Crossing Event Center and nearby Siren Senior Center was full Sunday afternoon, April 17, with cars spilling out onto First Avenue. The occasion - a benefit to help with medical and other expenses for Sharon Jensen, who overcame the odds and survived two types of Group A strep infections, known as necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. Only about 500 cases a year are diagnosed in the U.S. The community came out in full force to show their support to Sharon and her husband, Earl, both lifelong residents of the area. LEFT: Jessica Tollander shows a gun that was offered for raffle during the Sharon Jensen benefit in Siren Sunday, April 17.

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ABOVE: Earl Jensen (R), Sharon Jensen’s husband, was all smiles as he greeted folks who came to support him and his wife with medical and other expenses following Sharon’s sudden bout with a deadly disease. BELOW: Gift certificates from area merchants were among the items offered during the Sharon Jensen benefit in Siren Sunday, April 17.

Prices shown do not included $5 handling fee.

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Currents

WED., APRIL 20, 2011 • INTER-COUNTY LEADER NORTHERN CURRENTS • SECTION B

THE-LEADER.NET

An award-winning newspaper serving NW Wisconsin

The anchor of Bone Lake

After 43 years, Wayne Shirley retires from town board ... and more

symbols, marks and highlighted addresses with three colors, all noting something special at each location in the town. "One color is pie, one color is cookies, one color means you get the Holy Grail of treats: Pie and ice cream!" LaFond said with a laugh. "But really, nobody in government projects professionalism, honesty and integrity like Wayne Shirley. Nobody." Shirley let a little grin slip out when his secret was revealed. He added later, in private, that he also "knew every home where he could get coffee ... but treats were another matter."

by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer TOWN OF BONE LAKE – With a total of 43 years of service to the Town of Bone Lake, longtime Chairman Wayne Shirley was honored in grand fashion on Saturday, April 9, in a special ceremony at Bone Lake Lutheran Church. Well over 100 people attended to honor, celebrate - and to some degree, roast - the well-known local man who has been instrumental in more than just local government, but also has played an important role in many local lives, agencies and organizations. Shirley wasn't just noted for his service to the town, as he has also served on numerous local volunteer and leadership roles, from the local telephone company, to the Towns Association, Bone Lake Lutheran Church Council, United Pioneer Home Board, Polk County Board of Supervisors, Luck Rural Fire Association and more. Shirley has literally spent a lifetime serving the community. After nearly half a century of public service, the large crowd showed up to wish him well, tell their "Wayne stories," honor him and yes, even poke him a little bit, since he's the kind of guy who cannot only take it, but give it pretty well.

The anchor gets hooked "He's been like an anchor," stated neighbor Linda Glenn, who vividly recalled Shirley having fun with her when she called to request help, cleanup or assistance for some town matter. "He'd hear it was me on the phone and would say, 'What now, troublemaker?' Then he'd laugh." Shirley dipped his toes into local government for the first time as an assessor in the late 1950s and said he "felt totally, completely lost" at first. "I was a 22-year-old dummy!" he joked, while recalling how a prominent, local resident "went into orbit" when he saw the tax assessment numbers Shirley had given to his property. "I learned real fast, that's for sure." The last time Shirley wasn't involved with, elected to, cleaning up, fixing or helping run the Town of Bone Lake, TVs were black and white, fire engines were always red and going to the moon was just a fantasy. "Public servants like Wayne Shirley don't come around very often," stated Polk County Land Information Department Interim Director Sarah McCurdy, who noted that he was quick to assist with mapping projects, grant applications or whatever was asked of him, "He always, always said yes to whatever we'd asked."

Wayne Shirley was given a "secret map" created over the years by a local assessor, showing locations and homes in the Town of Bone Lake where they were always welcomed to have coffee, pie, cookies or the ultimate, pie and ice cream. - Photos by Greg Marsten

The whole secret map issue finally gets daylight You can easily say that Shirley's hand has been in just about every local role ... sometimes for very unique reasons, as longtime friend and assessor Greg LaFond noted. LaFond said that anyone in his assessment office "always wanted to be the assessor for Wayne's town," that they always liked working with him, since he knew everyone, and their concerns. Or so it seemed. As it turns out, they also had a little secret, which was revealed later when a specially marked map of the Town of Bone Lake was revealed. On the map were strange

Wayne Shirley (right) received several awards and plaques, including from his fellow Town of Bone Lake board members Dan Beal (left, planning commission) and town clerk Dennis Frandsen (middle.)

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Ghosts of Bone Lake past "The Town of Bone Lake was created in April of 1889," current Town of Bone Lake clerk Darrell Frandsen said. "While Wayne's terms of service didn't go quite that far back ..." Frandsen's joke was only halfhearted, as he later gave evidence of Shirley's longevity and dedication by reading off a list of names he served with since he was first on the board in 1965: Chairs Harvey Dueholm, Abel Jenssen and Harry Johnson; former Supervisors Pete Hostrup, Elmer Hedlund, Ellis Richter, Irvin Hermstad, Harry Johnson, Darwin Sorenson, Keith Nelson, Bill Schilling and Roger Neumann. His list of past treasurers includes Mickey Vilstrup, Roy Nelson, Janice Bystrom, Leonard Sorenson, Theresa Nelson and Rhonda Bazey. Town clerks include Neil Martin, Glenn Benson, Darwin Sorenson, Janice Bystrom, Jane Bubendorf, Gwynne Jenson and Frandsen, himself, for 22 years. Frandsen noted that Shirley is "easily the longest-serving town board member in Bone Lake," and he called him "a wealth of knowledge and history to Bone Lake for all of us." "His friendship and help to me has been invaluable," Frandsen said. "Whether we are comparing assessment rolls together, conducting meetings or walking through a foot of snow locating a grave in the cemetery ... he's always been there." The fire loan Shirley was also known for his frugality, and as a town’s representative on the Luck Fire Association, he also spread that penny-pinching into other arenas, as Ron Hanson of the Luck Rural Fire Association noted. Hanson spoke of the difficult time Shirley had when the fire department wanted to borrow "big money," $100,000, years ago for a new fire hall and departmental improvements. "He made sure we paid off that fire department loan early," Hanson said. "I learned a lot from Wayne and wouldn't dare increase a budget, much less a levy!" Hanson said that Shirley always had the firefighters in mind and tried to make sure they had full support from the fire association and his town. Hanson called him "a patient, caring man," and referred to him as the "patron saint of firefighters."

Even the assessors get applause, sometimes In an age where it has become fashionable to portray politicians and government officials as "the enemy," Shirley is known for his tenor of being disarming, approachable and fair. That air of realism is contagious, as longtime friend, accountant and former state Assemblyman Bob Dueholm joked. "I never thought I'd hear Wayne described as 'patient,'" Dueholm joked. "And it's nice to be in a crowd where assessors are applauded!" Dueholm also concurred with others that Shirley has been "an anchor for the town" for decades, and the kind of person "you had to know" if you wanted to get something done. He noted Shirley’s involvement with the United Pioneer Home, Polk County tourism, local planning commissions and even his mentoring of other people who took on the roles beside him.

See Wayne Shirley, page 2

Wayne Shirley/from page 1

PAGE 34 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - APRIL 20, 2011

"He's also been a good friend and a tremendous help to many people," Dueholm said. "But again, I don't know about patient!"

Lines of communication Shirley has also been involved in the local communications advances in numerous ways over the last half century. Lakeland Communications CEO John Klatt also opined about Shirley's long-running role in the Luck Telephone Company and how he was "the man most responsible for getting me here in 1989." Klatt joked about times with Shirley at job sites, in meetings or during often difficult, decision-making junctures, where the industry jumped leaps and bounds while he served on the telephone company board "for an amazing 42 years, as well." "Wayne often said that if other government agencies operated the way towns did, they’d be very efficient," Klatt said, joking that he also got a "heavy dose" of Shirley's politics over the years. "I usually heard the Democrats' side in those discussions!" "But he also said something that I'll never forget: he said you can never raise up your own organization by tearing down another organization," Klatt said. "And I think that stuck ... and really, 43 years of town service is quite a feat, almost incomprehensible."

Those late-night calls Shirley admits his memory isn't quite as sharp as it was, but he also likes to give credit where it's due, noting how his wife, Patsy, has not only endured his years of public service, but helped him in many ways along the road, literally. "It wasn't always just me, you know," he stated. "She was often there, right beside me at 2:30 in the morning, taking those calls about trees across the road. I was firing up that chain saw, and she would be right beside me helping to clear that road and load the wood." Those late night calls were often actual emergencies or a combination of his duties in both fire protection and as a local official, neighbor and friend. That reality was revealed by another neighbor, Ruth Sorenson. She spoke passionately about how Wayne and Patsy Shirley were the first to respond when they had a chimney fire years ago, helping them to save their home. "They were right there for us, always right there," she said, putting her hand on their shoulders. "You could always count on them as neighbors." Chairman Wayne Shirley was not on the April 5 election ballot and his service officially ended with the recent swearing-in of the new board, which he noted as being both a relief and a bit sad, although he said he "won't miss those late-night phone calls." "No, it really has been fun, working on the town board," he reminisced. "But it is getting to the point where I figured I better quit while I was ahead, so people didn't say, 'Well, that dummy should've quit two years ago!"

Patsy and Wayne Shirley.

Sarah McCurdy of the Polk County Land Information Department gave glowing remarks about Wayne Shirley, and his help in numerous areas of local government.

Wayne Shirley received a special honor from the Wisconsin Towns Association for his diligence and attention to local government over the decades.

Wayne Shirley is seen here at the Morris Blomgren auction in 2010, looking over a rare, 1928 Dodge Bros. sedan that ended up selling for over $5,000. Shirley said that after he saw how much the items were going for, it made him wish he'd saved some of his “old heaps." - Photos by Greg Marsten

Town of Bone Lake Planning Commission member Dan Beal (left) was the emcee of the event honoring Wayne Shirley for over four decades of service to the town.

A lesson in life cycles

Last week, Ms. Nancy Christiansen’s first- and second-grade classes at Luck Elementary School came to class and had an exciting discovery - the eggs they had in an incubator for the past three weeks were hatching. The class had been studying and learning about life cycles throughout the year, and hatching chicken eggs was one real-life example they were able to observe right in Ms. Christiansen's classroom. The eggs were collected from the farms of Kate Hauer and Beth Petersen, and by Wednesday, April 13, a dozen chicks had hatched. The project is ongoing and quite popular with the kids and other students, who have been following the chicks' progress. Photo at left: Gavyn and Nathan watch as a black chick breaks out of its egg. Middle photo: Alexis and Cameron had fun watching the first two chicks to hatch early last week. Photo at right: By the next day, the chick population had skyrocketed! - Photos submitted, photo at right by Greg Marsten

ACS Rags to Riches this Saturday

LUCK — The annual Rags to Riches sale sponsored by Luck Medical Clinic to support the American Cancer Society’s Finish Line Walk/Run will be this Saturday, April 23, from 9 a.m. to noon. This year’s sale has a new location. It will be held at Lucky Dollar Store in the strip mall on Hwy. 35 in Luck. All proceeds from the sale go to the American Cancer Society. Another event to support the ACS and the walk/run will be held Saturday, April 30, from 2 – 10 p.m. at Sundown Saloon in Lewis. The second-annual Party for a Lifetime will include Bingo from 2 – 6 p.m., music by DJ Wilson Spinning Discs from 6-10 p.m., and an exclusive Elvis appearance at 8 p.m. There will also be door prizes, food, raffles and a silent auction. “We want to give friends and family the chance to Live a Lifetime,” organizers said. “Together we can make a difference.” – submitted

HSBC fundraiser April 30

BURNETT COUNTY - The fourth-annual Humane Society of Burnett County spaghetti dinner fundraiser will be held Saturday, April 30, from 4:30-7 p.m., at the Loyal Order Moose Lodge in Siren. Dinner prices are $8 for adults and $6 for kids (15 and under). This year the accompanying silent auction has more items to bid on, including a Green Bay Packers signed football. Raffle tickets, which are currently for sale at the shelter, will also be for sale at the dinner. The drawings will take place at 6:30 p.m. (need not be present to win). This year’s grand prize will be two American Airlines gift cards worth $1,200 total. Tickets are $3 each, or $15 for a book of six tickets. For more information please call the shelter at 715-866-4096. - submitted

Know Your Antiques Show is Tuesday

BALSAM LAKE - The Polk County Historical Society’s 11th-annual Know Your Antiques Show will be held Tuesday, April 26, at 7 p.m. at the Justice Center community room in Balsam Lake. The public is invited. Persons are asked to limit their articles to two items. Appraisers Larry Phillipson and Mark Cellotti have been in the business of antiques more than 50 years. Refreshments will be served and a door prize of four tickets to the Northfield Historical Society will be given out that night. This is an opportunity for area residents to experience a local version of “Antiques Roadshow.” The original “Antiques Roadshow” series began as a 1977 British Broadcasting Corporation documentary about a London auction house. The pilot road show was recorded in Hereford, England, on May 17, 1977. The American broadcast PBS created a similar show in 1997. The American version of “Antiques Roadshow” is produced by WGBH, a broadcast station in Boston, Mass. The shows brought local people in with their possessions to be evaluated for authenticity and interest and an approximate valuation given. Often the professional evaluator gives a rather in-depth historical, craft or artistic context to the antique. - with submitted information

An open door policy

Today I am fortunate to be able

Cold Turkey

to drive reasonably reliable cars and trucks but it wasn’t always the case. I have had several vehicles in John W. Ingalls the past that have attempted to shorten my life. Despite regular maintenance and reasonable care these vehicles had within them a well-developed sense of revenge and a couple of them even attempted mutiny. Most recently, on a trip to Canada I had the frightful experience of having a deer jump out from the side of the road in front of the truck. Not an uncommon occurrence up north, I quickly hit the brakes only to find out there were no brakes. At 60 mph, while towing a boat, the lack of brakes can cause a sudden tightening in the chest and throat. After numerous gradual rolling stops, 250 miles and two quarts of brake fluid, I was able to get the rusted and ruptured brake lines fixed. I am sure I lost at least three months off of my life during that day. Another old truck served me well but did nothing for the local air quality. Every other day I would fill it up with oil and check the gas. It was rusted out on the bottom so I bolted and wired a two-by-four under the driver’s side door and glued down some carpet samples to keep the sand from drifting into the cab when driving on dirt roads. When it was cold in the mornings it would not go in reverse so I had to plan my parking arrangement each night after work. The scariest part was the shift handle on the steering column. It

APRIL 20, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 35

It’s spring, and you know

Letters from

Home

what that means. I had a nice time at the annual book club retreat, a couple of weeks ago, which was not surprising. The only real surprise of Carrie Classon the weekend was learning that I was hosting the next meeting. Now, this was only fair. The group meets once a month. I had been a member for more than a year and had yet to host a meeting. But I was a little taken aback nevertheless because I hadn’t invited any of these book club women to my little farm house before. Now, I love my house. But the truth is that my house is a lot smaller than any of their houses. It is also quite a bit older and considerably more decrepit. So I figured it had better be clean—very clean. Looking around my house through my book club members’ eyes, I decided they had just done me an enormous favor because the time for spring cleaning had arrived. It was shocking, once I really looked around me, how much cleaning there was to do. I attacked the baseboards with zeal. I lay on my stomach and scrubbed all-but-inaccessible places. I dusted every inch of wall and ceiling. At some point during the previous winter I had declared an armistice with cobwebs. The truce was abruptly broken. I shampooed the living room rug and it came so clean I couldn’t bear to walk on it, so I walked around the edges of the room until I discovered my cat Lucy had vomited right in the middle of it. Then I cleaned that up. Say what you will, I found that there was something intensely satisfying about being on my hands and knees making vigorous use of various Scotch Brite products. While I was fairly certain the book club members wouldn’t be looking underneath my

microwave for unsightly collections of dust, I was disturbed that the collection had reached its current size. As I cleaned, I realized how little instruction I had been given in cleaning. Exactly how clean is clean enough? I remember, years ago, my former mother-in-law told me that if she couldn’t see the dust, she was under no obligation to remove it. I thought this was very sensible advice and I adopted it as my rule of thumb for housekeeping. It dawned on me only recently that my former mother-in-law is a very short woman with failing eyesight. When I informed Daniel that I would be dedicating the next couple days to spring cleaning, he suggested that I use 409, which is not surprising as he recommends 409 for cleaning every imaginable thing (and a few things you probably haven’t imagined). So I went through a lot of 409 and an enormous pile of rags and I spent a lot of time on my knees. I cleaned places I knew my former mother-in-law wouldn’t likely be able to see— nor would anyone else. And I realized that whether or not anyone looked under my refrigerator, on top of the china cabinet, or beneath the stove burners was entirely beside the point. I was having a wonderful time cleaning. I was cleaning for the same reason I would go to confession or meditate or any number of other things: It was my dirt and I wanted to deal with it. The house is a lot cleaner. The book club came and went and, much to my disappointment, no on inspected the underside of my refrigerator. But that’s OK. It’s spring and I have dealt with my dirt. Till next time, —Carrie

Co-op members donated $11,000 to worthy causes

CENTURIA – Polk-Burnett’s Operation Round-Up awarded $11,000 to 19 community organizations at its spring 2011 quarterly meeting. Funding for Operation Round-Up is donated by members of Polk-Burnett Electric Cooperative who round their monthly electric bill up to the next even dollar amount. Grants are awarded quarterly by a committee of co-op members to organizations that improve local quality of life, according to cooperative principles. Grant recipients for spring 2011 are: 1. $300 to Burnett County Head Injury Support Group to fund monthly activities and postage 2. $800 to Community Homestead to help purchase a bakery oven 3. $100 to Osceola School District Family Challenge Program to buy incentives for participation 4. $500 to Polk County Area Literacy Council to offer tutoring to children and adults 5. $500 to Compassionate Friends Northwoods Chapter to buy books for families after the loss of a child 6. $1,000 to Clear Lake Park Board to help build a handicap-accessible bath house at Clear Lake’s main park 7. $500 to River’s Run and Ride Rally to serve monthly meals at Faith’s Lodge for families after the loss of a child 8. $1,000 to Polk County 4-H Horse Project to purchase portable horse stalls

MD

was held in place with a large spike. Each time I shifted into gear I feared a traumatic disruption to our future family plans. At $500 I worried that I had overpaid but after driving it all one summer I was able to resell it for a profit. It helped that I had thrown in a few extra quarts

of oil. One of my favorites was an Opel, a small, red twodoor, standard car that never wanted to start when I wanted it to start. I couldn’t afford a new battery and the old one never held a charge for more than a few days. We would push it to the edge of the hill near our mobile home and as it started to gain speed going down the hill I would jump in the driver’s seat and slip it into gear. Nine times out of 10 it would start. On the 10th time I would pull out the battery and carry it to our landlord’s home a half mile away, hook up the battery to his charger and walk home until it was charged and then repeat my steps. It would have been much easier to just walk the six miles to work every day. After our first child was born we made a reasonable effort to buy a reliable car. Money was always a concern, especially to a young couple with a new baby and limited income. We finally bought a light-blue two-door Dodge Reliant K-car. I don’t know what the K represented but Reliant usually meant reliable. It wasn’t new but it was well-maintained, modestly priced and met our needs. I was starting college at the time and had some long commutes. Driving from

w w w. t h e - l e a d e r. n e t

9. $100 to Luck High School to host a post-prom party 10. $100 to Luck National Honor Society to help with expenses for community talent show 11. $1,000 to Shell Lake Band-Aides to offer marching band camp 12. $500 to Polk County Amateur Radio Association to help train and prepare for emergency communications 13. $500 to Frederic Public Library to purchase Wii games for teens and senior citizens 14. $1,000 to Siren Chamber of Commerce to offer 2011 Music in the Park programming 15. $900 to Polk County Kinship to offer mentoring activities for youth 16. $100 to Frederic Area ACS Walk/Run to help purchase T-shirts and cover event expenses 17. $1,000 to St. Croix Falls Public Library to improve children’s section for summer reading program 18. $1,000 to Endeavors Adult Development Center to build a wheelchair-accessible retail counter for the greenhouse 19. $100 to Unity Leos Club to host a post-prom party Nonprofit organizations interested in applying for a grant or co-op members who’d like to round their bill up in support of Operation Round-Up may call 800-4210283 or visit www.PolkBurnett.com. The next application deadline is June 1. – from Polk-Burnett

Grantsburg to the University of Minnesota on a daily basis was hard on the vehicle and the driver. One day when returning from Minneapolis, the car started jerking and making small grinding noises. The noises grew and the jerking stopped. Actually, everything stopped, just as I crossed the St. Croix River bridge into Wisconsin. In the days before cell phones I had no choice but to start walking until a gracious passer-by picked me up. Bob Anderson in Falun later towed me home and installed a new transmission into the car. Despite the cost I was comfortable knowing we now had a more reliable car than before. By the end of the month I had to replace the head gasket. I thought a head gasket was something mechanics wore on their heads. I found out that they wear very expensive headgear. Our nearly new car was now more reliable than ever. Tammy would place Leah, our firstborn, into the cheap plastic car seats that were available then and go to the local grocery store. Packing the bags into the trunk and strapping Leah into the car seat, she started home. With the transmission working perfectly and the engine purring like a kitten she pulled out onto the highway. A sudden gust of wind blew her hair and caught her attention. The passenger side door had suddenly become unhinged and literally fell off the car onto the highway. It didn’t just swing open but was actually lying on the road. Someone came to her assistance that day and helped carry the door off the road. Sadly, we found out that our insurance would only cover accidents and acts of God. We didn’t have an open door policy.

PAGE 36 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - APRIL 20, 2011

River Road

Meetings

I went to the town of Sterling annual meeting last week. These town meetings are where the local folks get together to review the budget, talk about road improvements and bring up problems. Sadly, they are not very well attended. Issue: People trying to get a cell phone signal are parking on the top of the hills overlooking the sand barrens on Evergreen and 250th Avenue, creating unsafe conditions. Cell phone service is almost unavailable west of the River Road in Sterling. On Evergreen, this is the hill where Ione and Bruce Muehlhauser live. This hill rises sharply on both the east and west sides so cars speeding over the hill don’t see cars parked on the narrow blacktop road on top. Two years ago, a neighbor was killed there. The worst times are probably spring and fall when the sun rises and sets directly in the east or west, forcing you to drive directly into the sun. The discussion of possible solutions included; no-parking signs (an ordinance would be needed), danger or speed limit signs, putting a wide shoulder for parking, cutting down the hill, warning folks to be careful, getting a cell tower placed to cover West Sterling, and asking the nearby neighbors if they thought it was a problem and had any suggestions. In the meantime, we all had better drive carefully over those hills as our neighbors might be parked there trying to get their phone messages. I think it is unsafe to drive over 45 miles per hour on the rural roads and any time you are going over a hill, you really need to slow down for fear of a school bus, farm tractor, parked car, etc. The road project for the coming year is to improve the River Road north of Wolf Creek (the city). A hill north of the cemetery is to be leveled so folks coming out of driveways, the cemetery and church can be seen from a distance. Problems show up when folks drive these narrow, hilly, rural roads too fast. I like to take the River Road from my place south to St. Croix Falls or north to Grantsburg, and generally drive about 40-45 mph. There are many drivers who zoom by me running 55-65, dodging around me on curves and hills, probably mumbling about old geezers on the road. Another road project is to finish the work on Purgatory Road just east of Hwy. 87 by cutting the north bank, cutting the hill itself and possibly filling the area to the west of the hill. The clay from the south bank, done last summer, is stockpiled at the gravel pit to be mixed with the gravel to be crushed this summer. George Sornson, landowner to the south, donated the clay to the township. George’s grandfather was a Sterling and Polk County board member for many years in the ‘30s through ‘50s, and is recognized on a plaque at Evergreen and River Road for his efforts in getting Sterling’s town forest under way. Sterling earned $30,000 from leases for hunting cabin site rentals in the town forest. Sterling earned about $36,000 from timber sales off the forest. The town owns about 4,000 acres of land west of the River Road. Back in the 1930s, during the Great Depression, the sandy land in West Sterling was reverting to Polk County for unpaid property taxes. Dr. J. A. Riegel, St. Croix Falls, had sold a plan to Polk County to take over most of West Sterling and zone it to keep people out and make it a forest and wildlife reserve. He thought the sandy land was unfit for farming. Sterling residents, in an effort to thwart the takeover, voted to buy land in each section so the county would never own complete blocks of land to zone. Through the ‘40s and ‘50s the 4,000 acres were purchased, mostly for paying off the back taxes to the county—often no more than a few dollars per acre. A couple of times since the purchase, efforts have been made to sell parts of the forest, but each time, at an annual meeting, residents have chosen to keep the land. The income has

FREDERIC PAINTBALL NOW OPEN!

Collected by Russ Hanson

Dan Beal, rural Luck, receives an award given to him by Dick Ugland on behalf of the Polk Men’s Group in appreciation for 12 years of sponsoring and chairing the group. “The group was founded to discuss politics and religion,” commented Beal, “However, when fistfights became too prevalent the range of topics was broadened.” – Photo by the Rambler been very helpful for the town. The mill rate for the Cushing Fire department was set at 0.7 if I remember correctly, to match Laketown’s rate. The fire department was started by the Sterling Town Board and local volunteers in 1963, with the first fire the North Bar in early 1964. The fiftieth birthday is coming up in 2013. It has been wonderfully successful, and our fathers and grandfather’s who created the whole thing surely deserve some credit and celebration for their efforts. Are any of the original fire department people still out there so we can get a story or two about the start-up? The Cushing Community Center has the Spring Bash coming up on April 30. It is a meeting of all the neighbors; a fun community event with the goal of raising money to keep the old school in good condition to use for our Laketown and Sterling events. Until the 1990s the center was the Cushing School, part of the St. Croix Falls district. Although we all miss having the school, the building has functioned well in its new life, thanks to Laketown and Sterling townships and the community center volunteers, especially Betty Wilson! Laketown and Sterling townships and the Cushing Community Center group have just shared the cost of replacing the massive old inefficient boilers with three new efficient small furnaces, the big project for the year. Over the past few years, the old gym was refurbished with a new floor, as well as a ramp built to make the town board room handicapped accessible. The Sterling, Eureka and Laketown Historical Society will have its first meeting of the season on Thursday night at the museum in the community center (back— NE entrance to the building) May 19, 7 p.m. We will talk about what we are going to do this year. We like to pick a veteran to honor at the Wolf Creek Cemetery for Memorial Day—this year I think we have Charles Nick, a Civil War veteran, lined up as the honoree. This year starts the remembrance of 150 years since the Civil War started, so most history societies are focusing on that. On the Sunday after Father’s Day, June 26, is the 74th-annual Sterling Old Settlers potluck picnic at the community center. We help sponsor that. SELHS has sponsored cemetery walks over the past 10 years. We haven’t done one recently. Two projects we might help with are the 2012 75th Old Settlers Picnic and the 2013 Fire Department 50th. Margo and I were over to Earl Nelson’s visitation last week at Frederic, a meeting of the neighbors, relatives and friends of the family to say goodbye to the grandson of an original settler. Earl’s wife Lavonne

715-205-9775

passed away Dec. 31, and he followed her just three months later. Earl lived all his life on the farm his grandfather homesteaded almost 150 years ago just north of Atlas. The neighborhood changed, the neighbors changed. Earl and Lavonne were the old-timers; those who remembered everything: Atlas and Trade Lake as thriving mill and creamery towns; the old schools and churches, and all the people who came and went over the 84 years Earl lived there; extended by remembering what parents and grandparents passed along. Earl and Lavonne were the spark plugs behind the SELHS cemetery walk at the Union cemetery some years ago, when I got to know them. The cemetery is about 6 acres of land donated by Earl’s grandfather from the homestead. Earl and his father and grandfather had been the cemetery caretakers since the cemetery was started some 140 years ago until just a few years ago when health problems forced Earl to give it up. At the cemetery walk, we honored three Civil War veterans who, although they were staunch Unionists living in Alabama, were drafted into the Southern armies to fight against the North. After the war, they chose to leave Alabama and come north leaving the postwar South where, although slaves were freed, the bitterness and hate continued. The three had been buried without veterans honors and their plots had been flagless for 100 years, their staunch Union support not letting relatives place a Confederate flag, and the local Unionists uncertain how to recognize rebels. An American flag is what they would have wanted, relatives told us, and that is what they have now! Lavonne had collected the stories of the Alabama folks and much more local and family history. Earl told us of his father finding Dr. Bell dying in his rolled-over car just up the road in 1911, and of diphtheria coming through the community in the 1880s killing so many children that all the lumber his grandfather had sawed for the new house was used for coffins. Earl carefully preserved the original log barn his grandfather built and part of the original house from homestead days in the 1870s. Sure, Margo and I will miss the sure cup of coffee, cookies and sandwiches we always got when we visited, but what we will really miss is the mix of old and new things we talked about with the Nelsons. Earl and Lavonne are buried in the Union Cemetery on the large plot they bought many years ago along the north fence. They gave one lot on their own site to an old neighbor, John Birch, who died without money for a grave. He lies next to them just north. Sharing their final rest-

FREDERIC PUBLIC LIBRARY Main Street

Frederic, WI 54837

ing place with a poor neighbor is the kind of people they were. At the end of March, I volunteered to be on the Strategic Planning Committee for the St. Croix Falls School District. The goal is for us to identify some trends in education, research them and make some recommendations for the whole district. At the first meeting, almost 50 people volunteered; a mix of parents, teachers, staff, board members and community folks. We were given instructions and told what we do matters and told to get to work! We broke up into four groups. The group I chose broke into four subgroups. I am on the technology sub-subgroup with a student, teacher and technical staff person. The whole process is to be finished by the end of May, so everything is moving along quickly. We are trying to have our meetings using the Internet and e-mail rather than in person. We put information on a blog, a private Internet place, where others can read it and comment on it. It is quite interesting to see the different points of view, and to try to narrow our focus to a few trends. I am interested in the use of technology and the Internet in education, and come to the group as a former worker in the highly technical medical field. At work, we wanted graduates who were comfortable with technology and who could and would learn on their own, didn’t need a boss nearby to stay on task, embraced change, and could work and communicate with others. What they knew was less important then their ability to find the information they needed and to learn and to keep up with change. Find one of those and we had a rare and valuable person. I wonder if schools spend too much time on what you know rather than on how to learn. About all that is sure nowadays is that learning is a lifelong effort, and the better you are equipped to keep on learning, the easier life will be. Many of my friends are those educated in the ‘40s-‘60s. Some view a current education through the rearview mirror of their own education. This is like comparing a Model T Ford with a new Ford Focus by measuring the gas mileage (not much different), yet the two cars are vastly different. Going back to something is rarely a solution that will work anymore in anything. I had a meeting with a gas pump the other day. I stuck in my debit card and a pleasant voice said “Welcome Mr. Hanson. My camera has detected you have your Ford truck with the two gas tanks, and it has been two weeks since you filled them. Your bank account is rather low right now, not enough to fill both with gas at $3.90 per gallon. Would you like to transfer money from your savings account so you can fill it up? You are qualified for an immediate personal loan sufficient to fill both tanks too. Please press 1 for a transfer from savings, 2 for a loan, or just go ahead and start filling and I will cut you off when you empty the account. By the way, Margo’s account has almost $1,000 in it. If you would like to take it from her account press 3. Press 4 and I will disguise the withdrawal as several smaller withdrawals at places she normally shops.” Pretty slick, that modern technology! Don’t forget the Thursday, April 28, 7 p.m., free meeting on farm toy collecting at the Luck Museum. Bring your own farm toy for valuation by Leaning Tree Farm experts Bruce and Patsy Gustafson, and hear Ken Java admit how much he has spent on toy farm machinery as he shows us his extensive collection.

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Meditation in a bulletin

The following meditations were written by a former pastor of our Lewis and Siren United Methodist churches, Mike Ascher. Hosanna to the very top! “The crowds that went ahead of him and that followed were shouting, ‘Hosanna to the son of David! Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord! Hosanna in the highest heaven!” Matthew 21:9 Jesus’ entry into Jerusalem was the final leg of his journey to Calvary. Upon this rugged hill he would win salvation through the sacrifice of his own life for our sins. The crowds shouted the ancient psalm, “Hosanna in the highest heaven!” Hosanna is the Hebrew word for “The Lord saves!” Hosanna is shouted from mortals on the dusty road leading into Jerusalem. Hosanna is heard in the highest heaven where angels listen for news from planet Earth. Hosanna echoes back to Earth in greater decibels than it left. “Hosanna in the highest heaven!” Many Jews of Jesus’ day equated “highest heaven” with the seventh tier of heaven. Although there is little biblical data to support the “seven-story theory” of heaven, there is extrabiblical reference to seven layers of heaven (cf. Talmud). Paul speaks of being caught up to the third heaven in a rapturous vision (2 Corinthians 12:2). Whether the third heaven or seventh, to the very top, resounds salvation’s cry, “Hosanna in the highest heaven!”

A Vain Tomb “If Christ has not been raised, our proclamation has been in vain and your faith has been in vain.” 1 Corinthians 15:14 Either the tomb is vain or your faith is. Vain means “empty” and that is exactly how the Bible says that the disciples found Jesus’ tomb early on Sunday morning. This was not “vain-imagining” for the first ones at the tomb fully expected to find it occupied and anything but empty. Their souls might have been emptied by grief, but they believed the burial crypt to be full. They were there to put the final, sad touches on the embalming process. They expected to leave, even more empty than when they had arrived – Surprise! The tomb was empty, i.e., vain! The disciples left full! It says of John, “He saw and believed.” That is fullness. Had the tomb, however, been full, instead of empty, the disciples would have left empty instead of full. It cannot be both ways. You cannot have a full tomb and a full faith. You cannot have an empty tomb and an empty faith. Neither of these are reasonable options. If the tomb is full, your faith is empty. If the tomb is vain then your faith is not. Believe! Come empty; leave full. Alleluia! He is risen!

My personal comments In former years a different local pastor was invited to write a short devotion for each issue of the InterCounty Leader during Lent. We appreciated the variety of interpretations of Holy Scripture and personal touches. In a way we got acquainted with area ministers and priests. In former days we observed Maundy Thursday with services. Stores were closed all day on Good Friday. In later years, stores and businesses were closed from noon until 3 p.m. different area churches were responsible for half-hour segments of the three-hour service. Each segment included a short message by the pastor of that particular church, a choir number, scripture and prayers and meditation. If we had to leave before 3 p.m. we were asked to select a natural break in time and leave when one segment ended, before a new one began.

APRIL 20, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 37

Behind the

Signpost

Bernice Abrahamzon The message often focused on the last words of Christ. It was all very solemn and deeply meaningful. In still later years, employees at various businesses in Frederic were given permission to attend a onehour service. So customs change with the years. Ways continue to change in 2011, as various pastors chose not to circulate this year for Wednesday night Lenten services. The pastors preferred conducting the Wednesday night service each week in their own churches in their own two- or three-church charge. Actually, they made it harder for themselves as they had to write and deliver a new message every Wednesday. In previous years they wrote one sermon or message and delivered the same one in a different church every week. It meant a nice variety and as a congregation, we enjoyed meeting so many different area pastors. The series was usually based on a study book (i.e. The eyes of Jesus, the ears of Jesus, the hands of Jesus, etc.) This is not a criticism of the way it was done this year, just a memory of other ways it was observed in other years. Perhaps the soaring price of gasoline for any travel was a deciding factor. We are learning to limit our driving if possible, shopping for basic food less often, making lists before we shop. It’s been a long time since we’ve pulled into a gas station and decided to fill it up. What is the cost of that? The trouble is it has a domino effect. With higher gas prices, it costs more for deliveries to grocery stores, food prices also go up. Ditto for fast food places. Five or 10 dollars worth of gas is very little. I think sometimes our vehicles are running on fumes or vapors. Newscasters seem to report rising costs in a gleeful way, like the most important news of the day, ahead of floods, war casualties and tornadoes.

More good thoughts From Focus on Oconomowoc in the Oconomowoc Enterprise (my hometown newspaper). “There are three kinds of people, those who can count and those who can’t.” “Change is inevitable, except from a vending machine.” “Consciousness is that annoying time between naps.” “Always remember, you’re unique, just like everyone else.” Albert Einstein: “Before God we are all equally wise and equally foolish.” Until next week, Happy Easter! Bernice

Kooiker receives ESP Mid-Career Service Award

BURNETT COUNTY – Marilyn Kooiker, Burnett County Family Living agent, was honored at the Wisconsin Joint Council of Extension Professionals 2011 annual session on April 6 in Stevens Point. Kooiker was presented with the Mid-Career Service Award by Paul Roback, president of Epsilon Sigma Phi, and Rick Klemme, dean of University of Wisconsin-Cooperative Extension. This award is designed to recognize an experienced Extension professional with 10-20 years of Pictured (L to R): Rick Klemme, dean and director of Cooperative Extension, Marilyn Kooiker service who has exhibited and Paul Roback, president of ESP. – Photo submitted continuing leadership and excellence in state Extension program planning, delivery and evaluation in pro- silon Sigma Phi, the nation’s honorary and educational fraternity for Extension professionals. - submitted gram and/or administration. The Mid-Career Service Award is presented by Ep-

Do you remember? Compiled by Bernice Abrahamzon

50 Years Ago

Whitie’s Standard Service purchased the Siren school buses.-A choir concert was set for Palm Sunday on March 26 at Zion Lutheran Church, Trade Lake, at 8 p.m.-Stop and Swap, Taylors Falls, had a big appliance sale, dining room sets, hutches, china closets, desks, etc., as “Harold was away.”-Spring dresses were on sale at Hagberg’s in Frederic for Easter from $5.98 - $12.98; also rain and shine coats from $9.98 - $19.98, also hats for the Easter parade at $2.98.-The movie “The Hoodlum Priest” was playing at the Frederic Theatre and also fight films between Patterson and Johansson.-The Farmers Union Co-op in Frederic had a dollar a minute oil sale.-The film “Cry for Happy” was playing at the Auditorium Theatre at SCF, explaining “Four U.S. sailors take over geisha house.”-Coffee and fresh-baked cakes were served at Anderson’s Clover Farm Store, Frederic, March 24-25.-A spring Holstein sale was held at Balsam Lake on April 8.-A Soo-Line hearing at Superior was called a dismal failure.-“Butch” Oeffler died on a fox hunt.-Monday’s moisture on one day totaled 1.85 inches.-A Trees for Tomorrow scholarship was available for a Polk County teacher.Many places of business were closed on Good Friday, March 31, including Farmers State Bank, Frederic.

40 Years Ago

A Fine Arts Festival was coming May 11 at the Frederic High School.-Specials at Route’s Market, Frederic, included Armour’s ham at 53¢ lb., center cut ham slices at 79¢ lb., pork steak at 49¢ lb., Finest pork and beans at 4 cans for 49¢, Wisconsin Longhorn cheese at 79¢ lb., and bunches of radishes and green onions at 7¢ bunch.-Olsen & Son, Frederic, advertised film processing.-The film “Gone With the Wind” was playing at the D’Lux Theatre, Luck.-The Village Inn, Danbury, had a pancake supper every Friday night from 5-10 p.m., including sausage and coffee, at $1 per serving.-There were many break-ins in Polk County.-Five Polk youths went to state 4-H music groups.-A large ad said, “Alarmed about rising taxes? Where does all the money go? Can you help to lower taxes?” An informational meeting was set for May 6 at 8 p.m. at the Luck Village Hall.Arrow Building Center in seven different towns had a shingle sale at $3.49 per bundle to end May 12.Specials at the Frederic Co-op Store included flower seeds at 25¢ and up, Cheer at 78¢ large box, strawberries at 3 pints for 89¢, Banquet dinners at 37¢, and young tom turkeys at 39¢ lb.-The Siren Home Bakery was open under John and Charlotte Fink.

20 Years Ago

The presentation at the Grantsburg Area Historical Program was The Home Front, the Way We Were1940-1941, held on March 21, at the Grantsburg Senior Citizen Center.-The Siren Auto Supply offered radiator service including boil outs, flushing, repairs and recore.-The Leader specified it did not want color photographs.-Families for Life sponsored a program at the Grantsburg Baptist Church on the abortion controversy disputing statements that it’s not a baby, it won’t hurt and the procedure is safe, inexpensive and will take care of a woman’s problem.-Linda Lou’s Bakery at Siren was holding a Girl Scout cookie sale on March 16. Lou Jappe also baked wonderful items to serve with coffee.-Personal care worker training was planned April 22, 23, 24, 29, 30 from 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. at the government center in Siren.-The Luck board set goals to improve water quality.-A fire simulator honed fire department skills.-Wis. Congressman Dave Obey was on a trip to Kuwait, Saudi Arabia and Israel.-The Leader was selling cardboard boxes at 10¢ apiece.-The Milltown VFW sponsored a fish fry March 22 at a charge of $4.50 adults, $2.50 children, from 4:30 – 7 p.m. with second helpings available.-The River Valley Medical Center ran a column on silent angina.

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TOWN TALK/COUNTRY CHATTER

PAGE 38 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - APRIL 20, 2011

Holden is a 4-year-old white toy poodle with apricot highlights. He has a soft, dense, curly coat. Holden is a confident adventurer. He likes people and kids, tolerates cats and loves being involved in a good treasure hunt. Holden says, “What could be better than tracking rabbit in the morning and a long nap in the afternoon, only to awake just in time for my afternoon meal?” The good news is that spring has finally come, even if we are still receiving some of the white stuff now and again. The bad news is that with those warmer temperatures come the ticks. Protecting your dog or cat from fleas and ticks has always been an important part of responsible pet care. The threat of tick-borne Lyme disease has made this responsibility even more important in recent years. It is a good practice to comb your pet regularly with a flea comb or brush. Since it can take 24 to 48 hours for an attached tick to transmit an infection to its host, it’s important to remove them promptly. A once-over daily check is always a good plan of action. Run your hands over your dog’s entire body. If you feel a bump or swollen area, check to see if a tick has burrowed there. Don’t limit your search to your dog’s torso; check between his toes, under his armpits, inside his ears and around his face and chin. There are many brands of flea and tick products available at a variety of locations, from supermarkets to pet supply stores to online retailers and veterinarians. It is critical to read their labels before using any of these products on your companion. Each year, millions of Americans purchase flea and tick products believing that they couldn’t be sold unless they were proven safe. But the EPA did not begin to review pet products for safety until 1996. At

Await

Arnell Humane Society of Polk County

Holden

least 1,600 pet deaths related to spot-on treatments with pyrethroids were reported to the EPA over the last five years. The EPA has assigned a risk level to permethrins as “likely to be carcinogenic to humans.” Pyrethroid-based flea and tick treatments are approved for sale by the EPA. They can be found in powders, shampoos, dips, spray and spoton treatments. Besides pyrethroid-based products, ingredients to be wary of are: tetrachlorvinphos, an organophosphate insecticide, carbaryl and propoxur. As of September 2010, carbaryl can no longer be used in new pet products. However, existing stock of flea/tick products containing carbaryl can still be sold. Symptoms of poisoning by flea/tick treatments may include salivating, dilated pupils, tremors, vomiting, shivering and skin irritation. If you suspect your pet may be suffering negative effects as a result of a flea/tick treatment, consult your

Frederic Senior Center

Hi to everyone. I do believe in the saying, the older we get the faster time seems to go. I only get about half the things done that I have on my Monday list of things to do each week. It seems to me the faster I go the behinder I get. I guess I will have to hire a housekeeper. Then maybe I can keep up. I sure hope everything starts to go better for all of us. The Spade winners this last week were, first place, Arvid Pearson; second place, Joyce Thompson; third place, Lillian Murphy; fourth place, Ellis Erickson.

715-349-2964

Bernie Boelter

Mark your calendars for the annual meeting which will be on Tuesday, June 21, at 1 p.m., when election of officers will be held. Nominations for officers can be made at the May 17 meeting and also at the June meeting by any member. Only those members who have paid dues will be eligible to vote in June, however, any member can be nominated for office without being a voting member. There will be no more Euchre on Thursdays until fall. The warm weather brings on golf fever and many of the card players are suffering from that malady. We wish them good luck and look forward to seeing them back in the fall. If anyone is interested for the fall, please call me. Remember “over the hill” only means you are much wiser for having climbed the hill. See you at the center.

Siren

Woke up Saturday morning to about half inch of that awful white stuff all over the deck and lawn, seems good ‘ol Mother Nature just can’t seem to make up her mind this year and let spring come sailing in or just let Old Man Winter keep hanging around. It was a sorry sight to see all my beautiful colored crocuses in the garden looking cold and surprised. Haven’t seen hide nor hair of that big black critter that did all the damage in my bird yard. Hubby seems to think just maybe he got the chicken wire caught in his teeth when he tried to eat the suet. If that is so, bet he doesn’t make a return trip to the bird yard any too soon. The annual Regional Hospice Spring Fling is coming on Saturday, April 30, at the Northwoods Crossing Event Center in Siren starting at 5 p.m. Tickets for this event are $30 per person. A dinner, silent auction, board raffles and more are planned, plus entertainment – Sonny Winberg and the Power of Twang. This event is sponsored by the Taylor Funeral Homes of Siren, Webster and Spooner. For more info or to purchase tickets for this event call hospice at 715-635-9077. Bruce and Judy Roe on Big Wood Lake had a bear on their deck that Bruce swears can challenge the weight of Goliath and Samson in bear country. Sympathy to the family of Donna Martin who

Hazel Hoffman

The 500 cards winners this past Thursday evening were first place, Phyliss Peterson; second place, Bill Ihrig; third place, Willis Williams; and fourth place, Mildred Ihrig. Good luck to all cardplayers this week. There has been no date set for Shirley Sandquist’s funeral at this time. As soon as I hear I will post it on the blackboard at our senior center. Take care and stay happy and healthy. Happy Easter everyone!

Webster Senior Center

This week marked the end of Wii bowling, with a break for the summer. Earl Boelter had high single game with a 223 and The Strikers had high team game with a 786. This season has been a lot of fun and we are hoping that next year will be just as exciting. Thanks to all who participated. We can add one more team if anyone is interested. Our tournament will be held on Saturday, April 30, at 1 p.m. Twenty Dime Bingo players enjoyed the cake furnished by donations. We will continue Dime Bingo through the summer, every Wednesday at 12:30 p.m. No need to call, just bring your dimes and come on in. It was nice to see Nancy O’Brien out to play cards Thursday evening. She is doing very well. Welcome back! Our thoughts and prayers go out to the family of Georgia Lalor who passed away this last week.

Engagement

Happy Tails

Bev Beckmark

passed away April 4. Sympathy to the family of Rhonda M. Benedickt who passed away April 19. Sympathy to the family of Elaine Johnson who passed away April 12. Don’t forget to partake of the best Good Friday breakfast in the area at the Siren Senior Center. Breakfast starts at 7 a.m. and goes until 11 a.m. Price is just $6 for adults and $3 for kids under 12. See you there. The Burnett County Moose Lodge north of Siren will once again hold their annual Easter egg hunt for kids up to 12 years old on Saturday, April 23, starting at 2 p.m. Kids can enjoy hot dogs, chips, beverages and candy. This year’s event will have a bike giveaway for one lucky boy and girl. The bikes were donated by the Community Bank. Mark your calendars for April’s Food and Friends Community Dinner held at the Webster United Methodist Church on Tuesday, April 26. Dinner is from 5 to 6 p.m. A freewill offering is appreciated but not necessary. Congratulations to elementary student Sampson Richter, middle schooler Haylee Doriott and high schooler Stephanie Taylor for being chosen Siren Schools students of the week. Great job guys.

veterinarian immediately. Luckily there are newer flea and tick treatments for pets such as Frontline, Advantix and Revolution which contain safer insecticides. These topical treatment products are designed to have fewer toxic effects on your pet’s nervous system. Imidacloprid, fipronil and selamectin are safe and effective topical ingredients. While these ingredients are considered safe for your pet, you will still want to watch your pet for signs of distress as each pet has an individual threshold for these chemicals. Always follow the instructions on the package of the flea and tick product. Follow these simple steps to help prevent problems: Never use dog treatments on cats, and vice versa. Always be certain of your pet’s weight before purchase to ensure proper dosage. Don’t split one “large dog” dose in half for two small dogs or combine two “small dog” doses for one large dog. Do not use them on very young, elderly, pregnant or sick animals unless directed to do so by a veterinarian. Each year, we hear stories from potential adopters looking to replace a loved pet they have lost to Lyme disease. Informed and careful prevention is the answer to tick season. Arnell Memorial Humane Society, 185 Griffin Street East, Amery, 715-268-7387 or online: arnellhumane.org.

Denotter/Suskin

Michele Denotter and Darryl Suskin are announcing their engagement. Michele is the daughter of Donnie and Melba Denotter of Frederic. She graduated from the University of Minnesota with a Bachelor of Music degree in piano performance and the University of Wisconsin – Superior with a Bachelor of Science degree in mass communication. She is employed by Feld Entertainment in Chicago. Darryl is the son of Arlys Shikora and Ken and Dianne Suskin. He graduated from the University of Illinois with a Bachelor of Science degree in food science and human nutrition. He is employed by Custom Culinary in Lombard, Ill. A Sept. 4 wedding at Cable is planned. The couple will reside in Niles, Ill. – Photo submitted

Dewey - LaFollette

Karen Mangelsen

Donna and Gerry Hines went to Circle Pines, Minn., Thursday and had lunch with Nick and Esther Mangelsen. From there they went to Maple Grove, Minn. That evening they attended a play in which granddaughter Jennifer Hines was one of the characters. They stayed overnight with Brian and Jane Hines and, before they came home Friday morning, they visited Jan Myers. Randy, Tara and Henry Mangelsen called on Hank and Karen Mangelsen Friday afternoon. Gerry and Donna Hines were Friday evening visitors of Lida and Don Nordquist. Karen and Hank Mangelsen went to Siren Saturday morning to watch granddaughters Hannah Mangelsen and Mandy and Patty Close play in a volleyball tournament at the school. Chris Harrison was a weekend guest of Nina and

Lawrence Hines. Visitors of Ronda and Maynard Mangelsen over the weekend were Dylan Longhenry, Chris Harrison Daya Lawrence and Jean and Bryce Williamson. Hank and Karen Mangelsen were supper guests at the home of Jake and Holly Mangelsen and family Saturday, Others there were April and Dave Close and family, and Randy, Tara and Henry Mangelsen. April and Dave’s anniversary was celebrated. Mary Dunn, Ruth Rydberg, Marlene Swearingen, Lorri McQuade, Karen Mangelsen and Donna and Nina Hines were Tuesday afternoon guests of Lida Nordquist. They enjoyed a time of visiting and playing cards. Several from this area attended the benefit for Sharon Jensen at Rumors in Siren Sunday afternoon.

Born at Osceola Medical Center:

••• A boy, Victor David Hess, born April 15, 2011, to Andrew and Tearran Hess, Grantsburg. Victor weighed 7 lbs., 7 oz. and was 19-1/2 inches long.Victor has one sibling, Asher. Grandparents are Bill and Cathy, Grantsburg, and Lori and Carson, Grantsburg. •••

Births

A boy, Jayson John Nichols, born April 10, 2011, to Ashley and Patrick Nichols, Amery. Jayson weighed 6 lbs., .08 oz. ••• A boy, Bentley Michael Noreen, born April 10, 2011, to Danielle Gadbois, Osceola, and John Noreen Jr., Stillwater, Minn. Bentley weighed 8 lbs., ••• A boy, Samuel David Parent, born April 12, 2011, to Molly and Richard Parent, Osceola. Samuel weighed 8 lbs., 8 oz. •••

Born at Burnett Medical Center:

A boy, Thomas Lee Roy McPheeters, born April 12, 2011, to Andrew and Billie Jo McPheeters, St. Croix Falls. Thomas weighed 6 lbs., 5 oz. and was 19 inches long. Thomas has a sister named Samantha. ••• A boy, Andreas Aaron Olson Jr., born April 15, 2011, to Catherine and Andreas Olson, Danbury. Andreas weighed 6 lbs., 13 oz. and was 20-1/2 inches long. Andreas has one sibling, Grace. Grandparents are Connie Larson, Danbury, and Bonnie (LaVonne) Olson, Webster. Great-grandmother is Rita Larson, Danbury.

Born at St. Croix Regional Medical Center:

A boy, Noah James Enslin, born April 5, 2011, to Sarah and Paul Enslin, Balsam Lake. Noah weighed 6 lbs., 15 oz. ••• A girl, Emily Grace Freundschun, born April 7, 2011, to Renee and Anthony Freundschun, Shafer, Minn. Emily weighed 6 lbs., 12 oz. ••• A boy, Zane Harlan Schackman, born April 9, 2011, to Kristine Heinicke and Jared Schackman, Taylors Falls, Minn. Zane weighed 8 lbs., 5 oz. ••• A boy, Jace James Nelson, born April 10, 2011, to Polly and Aaron Nelson, St. Croix Falls. Jace weighed 8 lbs., 3 oz. •••

Lewis

A bridal shower was held Saturday afternoon at the Lewis Memorial United Methodist Church for Ann Nelson. She is the daughter of Marlene and Scott Nelson of Lewis. She and Josh Nelson have set their wedding date in late June at the Lewis church. Wonderful leftovers from Saturday’s bridal shower were served Sunday morning after church services. Everyone enjoyed it very much. The food was prepared and served by the United Methodist Women. The parents of the bride to be provided the cake for the shower. Jessie Ford planned the program. Palm Sunday was observed Sunday at Lewis with the distribution of palm leaves and appropriate hymns for the occasion. Worshippers are encouraged to use the special

Bernice Abrahamzon

Easter envelopes next Sunday at church. How grateful are we for the sacrifice Jesus made on the cross on Good Friday (also called Long Friday). In reading old-time bound newspapers, we note that business places and stores were closed all day in the early years. Later, stores were closed from noon till 3 p.m. when they opened for business. Now they are open all day for business. How times change through the years. Glad to report that Mary Jane Johnson is now home after a short stay at the Frederic Care Center. Wishing her good health and a happy Easter. Maundy Thursday services will be held at 1 p.m. at the Lewis church and at the Siren United Methodist Church in the evening. Welcome.

TOWN TALK/COUNTRY CHATTER

APRIL 20, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 39

Borderline news

Bob Brewster

Don and Marlene Mishler’s grandson Brandon visited, with great-granddaughter, Isabelle, along with him. Their daughter Diana and her friend, Mike, also visited. On Sunday, they shopped in Duluth, Minn., and then went to Pam Ellwein’s 50th birthday party. Fifteen people from Cloverton and Markville attended the Seven County Senior Convention in Aitkin, Minn. Special guest was 3-year-old Benny Carlin, who accompanied grandma, Bev. Fran Levings was elected president, with Patrice Winfield being elected second vice president. Prize winners from the area were Cheryl Wickham, Darlene Merimonti, Beverly Carlin, Gordy Peschong and Fran Levings. Don Schirmer is busy getting tires on his skid loader in preparation of the dirt work that is still needed around his new house. Ed Carlin saw a large timber wolf near his cows, but managed to chase it away. Viki and Todd Elliott returned from a six-day trip to Branson, Mo. They had a wonderful time taking in such events as a Marty Robbins tribute, a Dixie Stampede dinner show, and a Civil War Cave. Dave Baker took his son Nic to lunch at the Seward Cafe in Minneapolis recently. The Cloverton Cemetery cleanup will be on May 13, at 1 p.m. Refreshments will follow at 2:30 p.m., at the town hall. Mother Nature is just playing with us here in Dairyland. First we have nice warm weather, and then we are back to wearing our winter clothes again. Josh Baer, son of Karl and Tammy Baer, was chosen as student of the week for the Webster High School this past week. He is a junior there. On Wednesday,

April 13, the Dairyland Homemakers met for their monthly meeting. They raffled off a quilt at noon and the winning ticket belonged to Katie Carrel, a 9-yearold girl. Lucky girl! Tuesday, April 26, the Ladies of the Wesleyan Church are having their monthly ladies day out. They will be meeting at Emily’s Luncheon in Webster at 12:30 p.m. Any ladies in the community that would like to join them are welcome to do so. If you have any questions, or need more information, call Bernie Gustafson at 715-244-3161. There will be a combined Good Friday service on April 22, at 7 p.m., at the Woodland Wesleyan Church in Blaine, with the Markville Zion Lutherans joining in. Sharon Proffit spent five days last week in Elk Mound taking care of the Kinblom children who had the flu, and a nasty flu it is reported to be. Sharon returned home on Friday. Markville Cemetery cleanup day is at 9 a.m., on May 14. The Borderline frost boils are worse than in recent years. I went out to get the mail the other day and I saw this hat sitting in the middle of the road. As I stopped to pick it up, I saw a strap of leather also lying in the mud. I pulled on the strap, harder and harder, and pretty soon this guy came up out of the road holding onto a pair of reins. He gave the reins a tug, and out came a team of horses and a buckboard. He wiped his brow and turned to me and said, “Thanks there, buddy. Once you get in a pair of tracks, they kind of suck you in.” Last week’s answer and this week’s question: The Markville Post Office closed in April of 1987. When did the Cloverton Post Office close?

Top Teen books of 2010

Reading program meets after school Tuesdays and Thursdays to give children additional reading help as part of the after-school program. For more information contact your child’s teacher.

Grantsburg Public Library

Come in and check out one of the top-10 books of 2010. These books were named by the American Library Association and voted on by teen book clubs through the nation. Helen Anderson’s paintings are on display at the library. Stop in and see the beautiful oil paintings that Helen has graciously allowed the library to display.

National Library Week was lots of fun

We had treats and coffee on Tuesday, an Egg Hunt and Candy Chess on Wednesday. Thank you to everyone for coming out and helping us celebrate.

Weekly events

Preschool story hour shakes things up every Wednesday at 10:30 a.m. Join us each week for books, activities and fun. Come out next week and see what great things are in store. Youth Chess Club joins for play every Wednesday from 3:45-5:15 p.m., games and learning. All youth ages 10 and up are welcome to stop by and join us for a game.

Upcoming events

Read with Me bags are now available. Thanks to a grant from Wal-Mart we have been able to purchase fun books, activities, and more for each internationally themed bag. These bags are for library use only and for adults and children to use together. We hope to encourage families to read and use the library together. Stop in and check out the bags that are available. Saturday Chess Fun hosted by the chess club. Stop in from 9:30-11 a.m., for a casual game of chess. Treats and coffee will be served. New Books are listed on the Web page: http://grantsburg.wislib.org, phone 715-463-2244. Hours are Monday noon – 6 p.m., Tuesday noon – 6 p.m., Wednesday 10:30 a.m. – 6 p.m., Thursday noon – 6 p.m., Friday 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. – noon.

St. Croix Senior Center

Numerous studies show that even a 15-minute stroll can boost your mood better than prescription medications. And, you don’t have to brave the frigid temps to reap the benefits, just head to the nearest mall or Wal-Mart, Menards or along the scenic St. Croix River and start window shopping or enjoying the nice, spring scenery. Our recent weeks have been a bit scarce for news. Possibly the biggest news at the St. Croix Center is we now have a resident cookie baker on Thursday mornings. Greg, from the Shafer area, has joined our club and has offered to bake for us on those mornings. So, when you are downtown and need a warm refreshment with some fresh cookies, just stop by and visit and enjoy his contribution to the center. Thanks, Greg, for making this new contribu-

Marian Edler

tion to our town and center. Tuesday 500 card winners were Larry Anderson, Roger Greenly, Laurie Lambert, Ron Flostrand and Kathy Larson. Domino winners were Jean McIntyre, Ione Meixner and Delores Benson. Hand and Foot winners were a tie with Russ Adams and Charlie Ziegler. Thursday evening card winners were Charlie Mevissen, Elroy Petzel, Chuck Magnison and Roger Greenly tied. Several of our members have been under the weather recently. Izzy Magnison and Ione White have been enjoying a good rest at the local hospitals. We do miss everyone when they do not come to the center, but hope you will be up and kicking your heels real soon.

Hey folks, what happened to our nice warm spring weather? I even woke up Friday morning with some snow on the ground and it’s been chilly outside ever since although this afternoon did turn sunny and warmed up a bit. Mom took Eli and I for a walk through the woods, which was fun. We got lots of exercise, including our noses from all the smells out there. When we came home, we flaked out in the sun and had a nice nap. Poor Mom was a little tired today so she was kind of slow. Last night Dad woke her up around 2 a.m. to see a bear drinking from the birdbath outside their bedroom window. Dad of course went back to sleep but Mom didn’t! Fortunately she’s not too cranky. Things are still kind of quiet at the shelter and Lucas has taken a couple of much-deserved days off of work. I know my friends at the shelter will miss him while he’s gone, and I’m sure he’ll miss us too. Brad, the black-and-white kitty, was adopted this week and went home with a great family. Their kids were very excited to have a new pet and seemed like they couldn’t wait to get him home. Caleb, the last puppy, was supposed to go home on Saturday, but his new mom and dad couldn’t make it because of the weather where they live in Michigan. We talked to his new mom and she was very disappointed as she had his new bed ready with new toys to play with but he should be leaving us by Friday. Dolly’s been adopted and is supposed to go home on Tuesday. Poor Lucas has to go pick up four new dogs, all strays, and bring them back to the shelter. Ron the beagle’s owner came and collected him, which was good, but we haven’t heard anything from the other owners yet. Sue and Sully came in together from the Grantsburg vets where they had been treated for porcupine quills – ouch! Silly Sue was afraid of the camera, it was very funny to watch Mom trying to take her picture. Polly is a young brindle-colored hound who loves to play tag. All their pics are on our Web site and if you know anyone that is missing these dogs, please let them know where they can pick them up! Picture in today’s article is Sully. We also have a new kitty in, a little ginger female that’s been named Morisette. She seems very nice for a cat. Other felines waiting for a home are Jennifer, Finn, Shadow, Sasha and Teddy. My poor friend Duchess is still waiting for

Shelter

YAPpenings Sadie

her forever home as are Tony, Madeline, Halley and Ernie the old guy! Thank you to the girls from Northwest Passage for stopping by to spend time with the animals and take my friends for a walk. There is a great halfmile trail behind the shelter which makes for a nice outing. We have a number of volunteers that enjoy walking the dogs just as much as the dogs enjoy their company. Raffle tickets have sold so well that we had to order another $500, isn’t that wonderful? Hopefully some of the money from this can go toward the sidewalk that they really need at the shelter. A sidewalk would make the shelter accessible for everyone to visit and spend time with all my fourfooted friends. Items for the silent auction continue to come in as well, with some great things to bid on. Well guess that’s about it for now, I want to get back out into that sunshine while it lasts. Sending you all licks and tailwags! The Humane Society of Burnett County is saving lives, one at a time. www.hsburnettcty.org. 715-866-4096. We’re on Facebook too!

Siren Senior Center

Reminder, our Good Friday breakfast will be held this coming Friday beginning at 7 a.m. until 11 p.m. We will be serving scrambled eggs, sausage, biscuits and gravy, cheesy potatoes, cinnamon rolls. The price is right, $6 for adults and $3 for children 12 and under. Next week on Saturday, April 30, we are sponsoring our second-annual 500 card party. We had a great turnout last year and are hoping for an even greater crowd this year. The cost for this is only $3, with a chance to win a great door prize and a freewill-offering lunch following. We also have two tables set up with the silent auction items that anyone may bid on. You do not have to participate in the card party to make bids on these, as the highest bidder on each item will be notified by telephone if you are not in attendance at cards. Stop in anytime to make your bids. Our craft room has had many donations these past weeks thanks to CeCe’s nephew from Rochester who gave a large basket full of his Beanie Babies to us. Also our bonanza of books that came in last week had a sizeable amount of children’s classic books that we have marked very reasonably and that we know your grandchildren would treasure.

We only had three Wii bowlers show up on Monday to try their skill at our new addition to the center. Abby and Don Brand had taken the week off for their yearly jaunt to Branson, Mo., to enjoy the shows so that might have been the reason for the low turnout. Anyone interested in playing the game, just show up on Monday morning and join the fun. Our other three activities, Dime Bingo, 500 and Spade cards, had a nice attendance with our snowbirds joining us again. Winners at 500 this week were Sue Newberger, Neil Olson, Butch Connor, Mary Ellen Vorwald and Dwaine Bentley. Spade winners were Sue Hughes, Darleen Groves, Mary Sicard, Marlyce Borchert and Marie Bentley. Treats for the cardplayers were furnished by Anke Olesen, Nona Severson, Marie Bentley and Barb Munger. We will not be playing Spades on Friday, April 22, due to our breakfast and also we will be serving the nutrition dinner on Wednesday, April 20, to compensate for the Friday breakfast. The center is open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday and all of our card activities begin at 1 p.m. promptly. Have a great Easter.

THANK YOU

Bea & Jim Wallace

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Thank you to all the staff and friends at the Frederic Nursing & Rehab. for all your special care.

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We all love you Mom & Dad! From All The Kids

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Happy Anniversary Wed., April 20

Barb Munger

Mary Jane Johnson

TOWN TALK/COUNTRY CHATTER

PAGE 40 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - APRIL 20, 2011

Fran Krause

Orange

The Webster School District is having their spring break this week although the weather isn’t very “spring.” The senior high band and choir left for Florida Saturday, April 16, and is returning Friday night, April 22.

They will be performing at the Magic Kingdom on Monday, April 18. The trip is a fun way to reward the dedicated band and choir members. Deanna and Brad Krause drove to Ely, Minn., last Friday to check out

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the college there. Dave and Teresa Childers and family spent the weekend at their cabin. Friday night Jack and LaVonne O’Brien joined them at the Pour House for dinner. John and Reeny Neinstadt spent Tuesday through Friday with the Lemar Johnson family. They took Jared to the FBLA state meeting at Appleton and Wisconsin Dells. The following couples were guests of Steve and Cheri Ammond at their Florida home on the Gulf side this week: Pam and Brad Peterson, Randy and Annette Hedrick, Mark and Deanna Krause and Rusty and Peg Helland.

$1,000 each: Grantsburg grads benefit from Dollars for Scholars

GRANTSBURG - The board of directors for Grantsburg Dollars for Scholars voted last month to award each and every graduating Grantsburg High School senior who is bound for any kind of postsecondary school a $1,000 scholarship. This past week the annual Dollars for Scholars fundraising newsletter was mailed to every resident of the Grantsburg school district as well as to supporters and alumni who live across the country. An envelope is included for mailing back a gift to the fund. Additional envelopes are available at the high school, local banks and the public library. Donations can also be made online at grantsburgdollarsforscholars.com. Education is a legacy that Grantsburg Dollars for Scholars and the entire community is committed to. It embraces more than just the hopeful graduates who are sent off each year from their little town in northwestern Wisconsin. It involves a network of people who feel a tie to Grantsburg, to the high school, or perhaps just have a connection to the community through a parent or grandparent. In the 16 years since the organization’s inception, over $250,000 has been awarded to graduating seniors. Each year over $30,000 is raised through the spring fund drive and several other community events. The Dollars for Scholars board of directors, which includes nearly 20 community members from all walks of life, encourages you to consider making a donation to the scholarship fund. - from Grantsburg Dollars for Scholars

Ice Age Trail news and events It’s the Glaciers!

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STATEWIDE – The Ice Age Trail Alliance’s business is the preservation and enjoyment of the glacial gifts by way of a footpath following the edges of the last glacier in Wisconsin. The IATA held its membership meeting two weeks ago in Wausau. Some meeting highlights John Helling, who owns a cabin along the Ice Age Trail outside of Luck, was elected as president of the board and Luck’s Dean Dversdal was recognized for 4,000 hours of volunteer service. Back in Polk County the Indianhead chapter met to plan another full year of work and enjoyment on the trail. They’ll start as soon as the spring flowers appear and with them the birds and the ticks. The completion of the IAT through Straight Lake State Park may become the crowning achievement of the year 2011. Again the IATA mobile skills crew will come to SLP. They will supply a host of volunteers with tools and expert trained leadership, June 2 through 5. Visit iceagetrail.org to sign up. Every Saturday from now to June 2, members will work with Scouts, school groups, community service volunteers and anyone else who wants to come, to prepare the trail corridor for final construction. Of course the ongoing maintenance work grows with the miles of trail completed. A well-kept trail involves keeping the trail clear by mowing, brushing, removing obstacles, placing and replacing blazes and signs, building and maintaining bridges, fixing trouble spots etc. As for enjoyment, flower, bird and butterfly hikes with knowledgeable leaders are on the schedule. Events on the Ice Age Trail Saturday, May 7, 7 a.m.: Bird hike with John Menge and Laura Sandstrom, SLP parking lot 270 and 120 (GG). Saturday, May 14, 9 a.m.: Spring flora hike with Barb Delaney, plant ecologist, Lions Park, Hwy. 87, St. Croix Falls. May, dates dependent on weather: Butterfly tour with Dean Hansen. Friday, May 13: St. Croix Falls, School Service Day. Thursday-Sunday, June 2-5: Straight Lake Park, MSC trail-building event. For more information, contact 715-472-2248. - submitted

Springing right along

It probably surprises some, but historical knowledge can be pretty elusive, even for gnomes (although we live several hundred years at a crack, thus stretching our memories, if not our knowledge). This is particularly true with various aspects of the fur trade, of which Forts Folle Avoine is a good example. Take, for instance, the role of women in the fur trade. Many people have notions of the voyageurs dashing about in their canoes—trekking across vast stretches of watery wilderness each year in pursuit of furs. Furs were hunted by the men of various tribes and bought with a variety of trade goods (axes, guns, kettles, cloth, woolens, etc.). Few, however, have an accurate notion of how native and mixed-blood women were crucial to any year’s fur trading efforts. This comes to mind when one peruses the journal of fur trader Michel Curot, kept during his sojourn on the Yellow River in the winter of 1803-04. Spring was the time when fur traders were planning their outward trips back to Lake Superior (up the St. Croix, then down the Brule River to the lake, then around to Grand Portage on the northwest shore). The trading crew’s birchbark canoes were in need of patching material—usually in the form of spruce or pine gum, a commodity obtained from Indian women, as we learn from Curot’s journal entry for April 7: “This The basaltic rock that shapes the spectacular scenery of our valley is also the basis of the local traprock industry that blasts it out of the earth and crushes it into various usable sizes, to be trucked wherever it is needed for road building, railroad beds, bank and erosion stabilization, landscaping, and even as particulate on roofing shingles. The local plant, at the south edge of Dresser Village, was built in 1914 by John Wunder. A German immigrant, he by then owned Gopher Sand and Gravel Co. in Minneapolis, in conjunction with his concrete-building construction business. Wunder had that same year bought out a financially struggling local corporation attempting to establish a traprock quarry in Taylors Falls, Minn. John Larson, whose father-in-law, Jule Larson, was superintendent of the Dresser plant from 1930 to 1959, says Wunder became interested in traprock after discovering that the crushed rock considerably strengthened his concrete buildings. Traprock is hardened lava that flowed over this region from fissures in the earth some 1,100 million years ago, creating ledges and outcroppings. It is one of the hardest, most indestructible rocks in the world. Its name comes from the geologic term for “any of various fine-grained, dark-colored igneous rocks having a more or less columnar structure, especially basalt.” In the Dalles of the St. Croix River can be seen the columns, or steps, formed as the rock has split and broken. Taylors Falls historian Jack Liljenberg tells us that the fledgling company there folded even before the rock crusher, purchased in New York, could be installed. “The dynamite blasts on the hillside above the town – and flying rock debris – got the people up in arms, and their

The unique building under construction.

APRIL 20, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 41

Folle Avoine Chronicles Woodswhimsy the gnome

morning I sent Savoyard (one of his voyageurs) to the Indian lodges to get some gum and maple sugar (another necessary commodity supplied by Indian women). I gave him two brasses (a measurement) of cloth to pay for them. He came back this afternoon with two young Indians who told him that Mr. Sayer [Curot’s trading rival] in passing had also sent to the lodges, and that he had got the gum as well as furs from them. I sent him back with the two Indians, and another brasse of cloth to engage the women to make some gum, which I absolutely must have, not being able to use any canoe that did not at once fill with water.” A few days later, on April 15, Curot records this exchange: “... I paid La Petitte Riviere for dressing the three deer skins two pairs of cloth leggings. She is to make some gum for another pair.” Besides gum, one also notes in the entry above the purchase of maple sugar from the women, and the dress-

ing of animal pelts. In addition, the women sewed moccasins, netted snowshoes, fished, interpreted, and performed other key functions at many trading posts. Many of the traders and voyageurs were married to native women—white women from the traders homes in eastern Canada did not venture into the western lands until later in the 1800s. And while we tend to think of the canoes as being paddled by crews of male voyageurs, there are many hints in fur traders diaries that Indian women would sometimes be traveling along, that they weren’t just along for the ride, but supplied paddle power as well. Those with special knowledge of a particular route might also function as guides. Although there were never many women in any one canoe or brigade, a woman or two in the canoe was nothing remarkable. While this time of year saw the fur trade crews of 1804 readying their departure, spring at the modern Forts Folle Avoine takes on another flavor entirely—that of preparing for the main visitors season ahead. And, speaking of flavors, a series of classes involving the site’s outdoor bread oven will get under way in a few weeks. The first of these will be held on Saturday, May 14 (15 in case of rain), starting at 8 a.m. Registrants for the class (limited to 12) will help Al Johnson, the site’s resident bread-making guru, construct a new beehive clay oven. Class participants will learn the particulars of not only building a unique, functional outdoor oven, but will actually be able to use the

present one and learn all the ins and outs of the process. Registrants will only need to bring a pair of sturdy rubber gloves, and a beverage if desired. Pizza (fixings provided) will be made in the oven for lunch. Cost is $30 and, as mentioned, limited to 12—registration and more info can be obtained by calling the Fort office at 715-866-8890. As those who’ve taken these classes before have discovered, Mr. Johnson’s approach is fun and down-to-earth. Hmm ... could he also be, perchance, another gnome? Signed, Woodswhimsy

Al Johnson, breadmaker, will offer a class about building and using old-fashioned outdoor clay ovens on Saturday, May 14, at Forts Folle Avoine Historical Park. For more info, call 715-866-8890. – Photo submitted

A St. Croix Tale Rosemarie Vezina Braatz

protests brought an end to those operations even before the site was prepared.” Evidence of the proposed plant can be made out in what is now still referred to as Rock Crusher Woods, southwest of the Angel Hill neighborhood, now part of the Minnesota Interstate Park. (Ironically, the looming exploitation of the traprock landscape spurred local citizens to support the establishment of the park.) Even as early as the 1880s, the attraction of crushed traprock as an inexpensive road surfacing material was threatening the intrinsic beauty of the craggy bluffs above Taylors Falls. (Dalles traprock was used in surfacing the old

John Wunder founded Dresser Trap Rock Inc.

The steam shovel filling the "dinky cars."

Fort Road that became West Seventh Street in St. Paul.) The Taylors Falls and Lake Superior branch of the St. Paul and Duluth (later Northern Pacific) Railroad, completed in 1880, would have offered transportation of the heavy material. John Wunder’s son, Harvey, had moved to Taylors Falls in 1920 to take charge of operations there, which apparently were confined to excavation of sand and gravel from the company’s other properties, identified by Liljenberg as mainly along Basil Street to the north and east in the village. Harvey bought and moved into what was known as the Walker House at 213 Basil St. on Angel Hill (later the Lucius and Florence Tangen residence, now the Randy Pearson home). He eventually took over management of the Dresser traprock plant. Harvey Wunder had met his future wife, Martha Cecilia Ostrom, who was living with an aunt in St. Croix Falls, while doing preliminary work on the Taylors Falls project before entering the armed forces during World War I. A daughter, Marjorie Lois, and two sons, John Harvey and William Henry, were born to them. Both sons died serving as pilots in World War II. After Martha’s death in 1925, Harvey married Claudia Hansen, and they had one child, Rolf Martin. An engineer, Harvey Wunder had worked on the 1914 construction of the traprock plant at Dresser. That was a huge project, employing at least 100 men at a time (including, according to some reports, imported Italian laborers such as had worked a decade earlier on construction of the hydropower plant at St. Croix Falls). There was rock to blast, track to lay, and fill to dig and haul for the “high line” railroad that would carry the rock to the top of the crusher plant. Some 5,300 yards of concrete were placed for the foundation. Four carloads of timber posts went

into the framework of the main building. Two long buildings, a cookhouse and a bunkhouse, were built for the workers, and a farmhouse remaining on the land was used for storage. The plant was located on land that had been the farms of Thomas Michelson and William Dresser. Wunder grasped the opportunity to purchase the rocky land cheaply through a real estate agent who, apparently, led the owners to believe it was worthless except as “a sheep ranch.” And, finally, there were the gargantuan machines to install. The primary crusher was believed to be “the largest open jaw crusher” in the world. It weighed 220 tons, with a 40-ton swinging jaw. As reported in the Osceola Sun, it “will crush rock that is 6 x 7 feet into pieces as small as 12 inches and from there the rock is conveyed in iron bucket conveyors to a smaller crusher which weighs 70 tons.” That “smaller” crusher could break the rock up as coarse as 3 inches or “as fine as dust.” Two steam shovels were brought in to load the rock chunks into quarry cars that were hauled to the crushing mill by steam locomotives called “dinkys.” John Larson tells us that the steam shovels – two-man Osgood shovels – and the dinkys had been used in building the Panama Canal, which had just been completed. Three steel tanks 44 feet in diameter and 40 feet high could each hold 1,800 yards of gravel or crushed rock; other concrete tanks had a capacity of 6,000 yards of crushed rock each. Altogether, the tanks could hold the equivalent of 1,185 carloads of rock. The broken rock was conveyed to the tanks and sorted according to size by a large screen shaker. The company began operations with a contract to supply 65,000 yards of rock, probably for railroad track ballast. To be continued next week

LIBRARY NEWS

PAGE 42 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - APRIL 20, 2011

Frederic Public Library

Holiday hours The library will be closed Saturday, April 23.

Book group meets April 21 The Thursday morning book group will meet at the library April 21, at 10 a.m., to discuss “Until They Bring the Streetcars Back,” by Stanley Gordon West. This is historical fiction with a dark side set in St. Paul in 1949. If you’re interested in what the book groups have been reading, you can find out by picking up new brochures at the library or go to fredericlibrary.org, mouse over the Book Groups tab and click on Adult. Your food shelf donations double in April The local food shelf has partnered with the Feinstein Foundation, a group that will match dollars for money raised and items donated to participating food shelves in the area. The drive will end April 30 for this special match program, so be sure to bring your grocery items to the library for the food shelf. You can also choose to make a financial contribution. Movie event May 12 Frederic Library in partnership with Frederic Arts will host a Thursday, May 12, screening and discussion of “Ana’s Playground,” a film about the impact of war and violence on children. Short-

listed for a 2011 Academy Award nomination, the film (which was shot in Minneapolis) avoids political or regional stereotypes as it follows a rag-tag group of children at play in a war-torn neighborhood when danger strikes in the form of a sniper. This free program begins at 7 p.m. with the film, followed by a time for discussion and refreshments. For more information, go to anasplayground.com.

We value your Friendship If you are interested in donating some of your time and talents to the library, consider joining the Friends of the Frederic Library group. The Friends help the library with willing hands and energy and fundraising events to support the materials and program budgets. To find the latest Friends brochure and 2010 review, click on the Friends of the Library tab on the library Web site at www.fredericlibrary.org.

Learn more about library events Frederic Public Library, 127 Oak St. West. 715-327-4979, e-mail fredericpl@ifls.lib.wi.us. Regular open hours are Monday through Friday 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.; and Saturday 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Story time for preschoolers is held every Wednesday at 10:30 a.m. Web site: www.fredericlibrary.org. Facebook: Frederic Public Library.

Milltown Public Library

Pajama story time Story time has moved to the evenings at Milltown Public Library. Jump into your pajamas, grab a guardian (you’ll need them for the ride anyway), and join us for a half hour of fun, stories and a small craft every Tuesday evening at 6 p.m. Pack in some fun before your day is done. Sunday State Journal With so much happening in our state and so few places that distribute the Wisconsin state newspapers, the Milltown Public Library recently subscribed to the Sunday edition of the Madison State Journal. Stop in to review this new addition to our magazine and newspaper collection.

Computer basics lab The Milltown Public Library offers computer basic lab time every Wednesday at 1, 2 and 6 p.m. During this time, we help novice users create an e-mail account, draft and edit documents like holiday greeting letters and help with the general comfort and navigation of this sometimes intimidating technology. Space

is limited, so call in advance to reserve a spot.

St. Croix Falls Public Library

Community anchors Our library is featured in the 2011 Library Design Showcase under renovations and reclamations March/April issue of American libraries magazine. Check it out. We also are being recognized by the Illuminating Engineering Society for our lighting design. Check it out on the Web site. April is Turn Off the TV Month at the library Don’t be bored. Board games are here through April 26. Ask about them at the front desk. Kids and Family Game Night is Thursday, April 21, from 5-8 p.m. Preregister with a librarian.

Seventh-annual Teen Poetry Contest Teens in sixth-12th grades submitted poems until April 15. Osceola Public Library will host open mike night on Thursday, April 28, from 5-7 p.m. The winners will be announced then and invited to read their winning poems. Contact any Polk County library for more information or to register. Second-annual Library Gala will be held on Saturday, June 11. Save the date.

Community meeting room is available for your organization Reserve the meeting room with our online form. www.stcroixfallslibrary.org.

School’s out at SCFPL Homework help and cool programs for youth are available for kids in grades five through eight Wednesdays 3:30-5 p.m.

Did you know? Besides the myriad of books in all genres and reading levels, the library also has oodles of movies, books on audio, and even eBooks and eAudiobooks. Check out our wares anytime at www.more.lib.wi.us or stop in and browse the collections.

Sa

Tangen Drug

Easter Sunday, April 24

All You Can Eat $14.95 One Trip $10.95 Kids 6-10 $6.95 • Children 5 & under Free Call 715-327-8777 for reservations.

534218 35Lp

Buffet

11 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. Carving Station - Lamb & Ham Shrimp Scampi Station • Breakfast Foods Salads & Fruit Platter Mini Appetizer Bites • Dessert Table Cupcakes & Sundaes • Easter Eggs

Regular hours begin Wednesday, April 27, 4 p.m.

Enjoy our first Fish Fry and Seafood Boil, Friday, April 29.

124 Washington St. N. • St. Croix Falls, Wis.

715-483-3271

534362 35L

SIREN DENTAL CLINIC Your Health

When? April 25-28, 2011, 7-9 a.m. Where? The New Lobby (entrance located off of Hwy. 70) Cost? $25 (cash or check only, please) What’s Included? Fasting Glucose, Total Cholesterol, Triglycerides, HDL (good) and LDL (bad) cholesterol, cardiac risk factor and added new this year an ALT and AST (liver tests for lipid medication users) Please come fasting – no food for at least 12 hours and no alcoholic beverages for 48 hours prior to testing.

To schedule an appointment, call weekdays between 8 a.m. and 3 p.m., 715-463-7308 or 533647 800-293-5353, ext. 7308. 34-35L

Sheldon A. Olesen, DDS Jon E. Cruz, DDS 24164 State Road 35, Siren, Wis.

DOCTOR IS IN ON FRIDAYS!

NEW PATIENTS WELCOME 529877 25Ltfc

Spring Spring Opening! Opening!

Hours The library is open from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. 715-483-1777. E-mail: scflibrary@ifls.lib.wi.us. Online: www.stcroixfallslibrary.org.

4, 201 1 2 1 2 l i r p A Sale runs

It’s Time For Burnett Medical Center’s Annual Cholesterol Screening Event

Please join us for our

Technology Free wireless and eight public computers are available at the library. Plus, seven laptops are available for use in the library, but you must have a valid MORE library card in good standing.

F F O O % % 0 0 2ale runs April 21-24, 2011 2

Hours and information – www.milltownpubliclibrary.org, 715-8252313. Monday through Thursday 10 a.m. - 7 p.m., Friday 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. or e-mail milltownpl@milltownpubliclibrary.org

1 mile north of Frederic, WI on State Road 35 715-327-8777

Check out our Web site It has up-to-date information on what’s happening at the library and other useful library tools you can use at home. www.stcroixfallslibrary.org. Look for us on Facebook.

E L A S T F I G S P R I NG F F

Fresh coffee and fast Wi-Fi are served up every day.

COOKHOUSE

Story hour with Cole Listen to stories, create art and have fun with other kids and parents every Wednesday, 10:30 a.m.

www.the-leader.net

Closings The library will be closed on Saturday, April 23. Please have a safe holiday weekend.

AASPEN SPEN L LEAF EAF Here’s To

Homework help, quiet study, snacks, oldschool games, eco arts, computer access and a chance to help build more and better youth programs at SCFPL. Students need a note from a parent to catch bus No. 9 down to the library. Students in grades two through four are welcome to attend with a parent or guardian present at all times. For more information or to volunteer to be a tutor, contact Cole, the youth services librarian, at czrostlik@stcroixfallslibrary.org or at 715-4831777.

S. A. OLESEN, DDS JON E. CRUZ, DDS

* Preventative Care * * Crowns, Bridges, Cosmetic Dentistry * * Dentures, Partials, Relines * * Fillings, Root Canals and Extractions * GENTLE DENTAL CARE FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY

715-349-2297

Want A Brighter Smile?

Receive a FREE Crest Professional Whitestrips Kit! New Patients Welcome! Crowns • Bridges Partials • Dentures Fillings • Extractions Root Canals

New adult patients, at their new patient appointment which includes: • Examination • Cleaning • X-Rays , will receive a free Crest Professional Whitestrips kit.

We now haveDIGITAL X-RAYS (very low exposure to X-Ray & no waiting for developing) Emergency patients call before

Open Mondays ‘til 8 p.m. 10 a.m. for same day appointment

Gary Kaefer, D.D.S. Family Dentistry Webster Office

715-866-4204

507637 21a,btfc 32Ltfc

Grantsburg Office

715-463-2882

APRIL 20, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 43

A honor roll Fifth grade Alexis Symond, Simeon Wilson, Troy Woodman, Skyler Winkler, Taylor Howe, Jazmine Mangelsen, Rachel Sperry, Caleb Pardun, Mikayla Walker, Brianna Bray, Riley Richison, Mason Schaaf, Emily Stewart, Molly Turchi, Sydney Raschke, Brett Johnson, Dustin Kern, Ian Magnuson and Austin Spafford. Sixth grade David Greiff, Emma Rachner, Synclare Stubbe, Sunny Cone, Sadie Koelz, Tailor Larson, Victoria Tyndall, Andrew Ruiz, Sophie Phernetton, Alex Strang, Carolina Calixto Rosas, Savannah Varner, Jenna Curtis, Emily Sabatka and Darbi Young.

Seventh grade Tate Fohrenkamm, Nicole Hursh, Alec Ralph, Cassidy Formanek, Lydia Wilson, Maggie O’Malley, Daniel Okes, Grant Preston, Annika Hendrickson, Max Norman, Samantha Culver, Darrick Nelson, Elizabeth Freymiller and Emma Olsen.

Eighth grade William Cooper, Zachary Koelz, Marissa Elmblad, Nathanael Gatten, Ellora Schaaf, Mallory Daniels, Ciarra Lechman, Madison Main, Alexandra Spears, Daniel Formanek, Ashley Davis, Andrew Schrooten, Alec Gustafson, Sean Martinez, Mary Wilson, Carrie Rosenthal and Steven McCain.

Webster Honor Roll

Freshmen Kristine Watral, Megan Hophan, Amysue Greiff, Jack Ralph, Mikayla Hatfield, Logan Rutledge and Ashley Starks.

Sophomores Amber Davis, Darren Deal, Kaleiah Schiller, Brianna Phernetton, Danielle Formanek, Chelsey McIntyre, Samantha Perius, Gabriella Schiller, Molly Brown, Matthew Smith, Emma Kelby, Charles Mahlen, Jacob Hunter, Angel Christianson, Tessa Schiller and Nikkita Emberson. Juniors Mary Arnold, Olivia Kopecky, Chelsea Larson, Audrey Mulliner, Austin Bork, Matthew Hophan, Danielle Dyson, Mackenzie Koelz, Shauna Rein, Miranda Burger, Melissa Gustavson, Garrett Eichman and Matthew Elmgren.

Seniors Callan Brown, Mason Kriegel, Breeanna Watral, Siiri Larsen, Connor Pierce, Greg McIntyre, Michelle Gibbs, Samantha Kopecky, Devin Greene, Michael Thielke, Jenna Anderson, Alyssa Main and Nicholas Smith. B honor roll Fifth grade Andrew Moritz, Joseph Formanek, Cody Peterson, Summer Varner, Emily Flatten, Callie Nyren, Taylor Loomer and Crystal Breeden.

Sixth grade Jameson Matrious, Allison Mulroy, Bradley Brown, Logan Grey, Paige Bird, Andrew Pavlicek, Destiny Inkman and Elissa Hendrickson.

Seventh grade Paul Sargent, Taylor Espeseth, Jonathan Rein, Terry Curtis Jr., Nicole Moretter, Kaela Lundeen, Tyler Grey, Connor Raschke, Raelyn Phelps, Julia Summer, Jacob Smith and Kayla Vantassel. Eighth grade Ryan Curtis, Dade McCarthy, Nicholas Robinson, Christina Weis, Brett Richison, Raelyn Tretsven, Brandon Johnson, Madeline Snow, Diana Jennings and Tristan Kingbird. Freshmen Sarah Thielke, Janie Waltzing, Paige Young, Marissa Elliott, Aleah Heinz, Erik Larson, Cullan Hopkins, Tamera Quatmann, Evon Maxwell,

Kelsey Sheffler, Lance Preston, Jalicia Larson and Harley Berthiaume.

Sophomores Amber Friel, Brenna Nutt, Savana Arcand, Brooke Bird, Merissa Kern, Alyxandria Hatfield, Nathan Puttbrese, Mark Packard, Carl Rachner, Danielle Curtis, Megan Hughes and Colton “Cody” Kruse-Hilt. Juniors Robert Buehler, Leslea Wiggins, Joshua Baer, Katlyn Payson, Brittany Maxwell, Joseph Erickson, Aaron Clay, Sarah Nyberg, Bradley Krause, Alyce Deblase and Alicia Snorek.

Seniors Bryana Andren, Rachel Salas, Kayce Rachner, Cody Dreier, Allison Rydel, Croix Swanson, Jack Taylor, Billie Ingalls, James Wethern, Austin Elliott and Elise Windbiel.

Frederic State Music Festival qualifiers

Wound Healing Center receives national recognition

AMERY – National Healing Corporation, an industry leader accounting for approximately 30 percent of the nation’s managed and outsourced wound healing centers, has recognized the Wound Healing Center in Amery with its Front Runner Award. The center was recognized for maximizing its resources to meet the growing needs of its community. Case manager Beth Jackson, program director Linda Shurden, and medical director Dr. Anders Ulland accepted the award at a three-day clinical symposium in Orlando, Fla., where nearly 450 wound care experts from around the nation were briefed by internationally recognized specialists on new

treatment options and promising research in the field. The Wound Healing Center offers highly specialized wound care to patients suffering from diabetic ulcers, pressure ulcers, infections and other chronic wounds which have not healed in 30 days or more. Advanced treatments included hyperbaric oxygen therapy, negative pressure wound therapy, bio-engineered skin substitutes, biological and biosynthetic dressings and growth factor therapies. The Wound Healing Center, a division of Amery Regional Medical Center, is located at 230 Deronda St. in Amery. For more information, call 715-268-0175. – with submitted information

The following Frederic students have received a starred first rating at the Solo and Ensemble Music Festival recently and have qualified for the State Music Festival in Eau Claire on May 7. Shown (L to R): Chris Hopp, Cori Schmidt, Joe Draxler, Isabel Lexen, Michael Tesch, Alli Anderson, Erik Stoner, Lauren Domagala, Calla Karl, Sam Nelson, April Halverson, Ben Kurkowski, Tylyn O’Brien, Rachael Poirier, Abby Brightbill, Emily Wells, McKenna Cook, Kendra Mossey, Ian Lexen, McKenna Rognrud, Natalie Phernetton, Abbey Pickard, Bradley Knauber, Josiah Lund, Dan Halverson, Ashley Bergeron, Daniel Larson, Brittani Hughes, Allison Martin, Zane Matz, Emily Amundson, Sarah Wells, Zach Williamson, Zach Schmidt, Mark Olson. Olivia Schauls, Mya Rivera, Lara Harlander, Kinzie Matz and Nicole Nelson. – Photo submitted

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CHURCH NEWS OBITUARIES

APRIL 20, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 45

Eternal

Perspectives Sally Bair

The open curtain

When the curtain goes up, it means the play is about

to begin. We will now be able to see the much-anticipated actors and action. Hopefully, the closed curtain will rise and we will get our money’s worth—a good performance. In the days of Moses, the Israelites dealt with a closed curtain. God instructed them to construct a curtain, or veil, for their portable tabernacle. The curtain in God’s dwelling place, in the Holy of Holies room, separated him from the people. Once they settled in Jerusalem, they built a temple, complete with a new curtain made for God’s new dwelling. Their perpetually closed curtain was meant to keep the sight of God separated from the people because they could not look upon his awesome glory and holiness and yet live. It also obstructed sinful man’s approach to a perfect God who would not tolerate sin. There was no direct entry to God in the Holy of Holies behind the veil except by the high priest who, once a year, was allowed to enter the sacred room. And even he could not enter without presenting a blood sacrifice and a cleansing of his body. It is said that everything in the Old Testament conceals what the New Testament reveals. When Jesus died on the cross, by virtue of his own blood shed for our sins, it brought a glorious end to the need for any separation between God and man. The curtain’s purpose ended on a sudden, dramatically supernatural note when God’s mighty hand tore it from top to bottom at the very instant that Jesus said, “It is finished.” No longer would sinful man have to stand afar off from God. Jesus forever removed the obstacle to fellowship with God for anyone who would approach him through faith and in spiritual worship. The writer of Hebrews 10:19-22 clearly explains this wonderful truth. “Therefore, brethren, having boldness to enter the holiest by the blood of Jesus, by a new and living way which he consecrated for us, through the veil, that is, his flesh, and having a high priest over the house of God, let us draw near with a true heart in full assurance of faith, having our hearts sprinkled from an evil conscience and our bodies washed with pure water.” Lord, we thank you for removing the veil so we can approach you through faith. Thank you for giving us victory over sin and death through your Son, Jesus, who is our Overcomer. Amen. Mrs. Bair may be reached at sallybair@gmail.com

News from the Pews

FREDERIC – This past Sunday was Palm Sunday and the children entered the sanctuary joyously waving their palm branches as the people did many years ago when Jesus made his triumphant entrance into Jerusalem. The children sang the song “Jesus Rode on a Colt” and it was so dear with their sweet angelic voices. During worship the choir, small but mighty, under the direction of Joshua Rau sang a beautiful song titled “Savior, To Your Passion Go” which was written in 1867. Also during worship Great Adventure Bibles were presented to Tessa Domagala and Adam Menke by Jackie and she encouraged members of the congregation to share their favorite Bible verses with the students. Holy Week and Easter are the greatest days of the year for Christians, and you are invited to worship with us at special services at Pilgrim this week - On Wednesday, April 20, at 5:30 p.m., a potluck supper will be served; from 6 to 7 p.m., the confirmation students will meet; from 6 to 7 p.m., the students pre-K through sixth grade will get together to talk about the tradition of May baskets which they will make and on Sunday, May 1, they will distribute them to the residents at Comforts of Home. Thursday, April 21, 7 p.m. the Maundy Thursday service will observe the Last Supper with Holy Communion. Immediately following worship the youth, sixth- to eighth-graders, will have a lock-in centered on Bible studies, games and various activities along with making plans for serving a light breakfast at 6:30 a.m. before the Good Friday early-morning worship service. Easter Sunday, April 24, from 8:30 to 9:15 a.m., an Easter breakfast will be served in the fellowship hall of the church with worship at 10 a.m. The congregation is in its final two weeks of collecting food and money for Family Pathways – also known as the Frederic Food Shelf. The Feinstein Foundation will match dollars for money raised and items donated to Family Pathways as they have done in previous years. Pilgrim will again be having a team that will participate in the Frederic Area American Cancer Society Walk/Run Event on Saturday, May 7. Registration is from 8 to 9 a.m., at Birch Street Elementary School and the walk begins at 9:15 a.m. Pilgrim invites everyone to join them for Sunday morning worship, which begins at 10 a.m. At 9:15 a.m., there is a Playgroup that meets for toddlers and parents. The children and parents sing songs as well as learn children’s Bible stories. For more information about the church or coming events, please call the church office at 715-327-8012 or go to their Web site www.pilgrimlutheranfrederic.org. - submitted

RIGHT: Shown front row (L to R): Cade Engen, Tessa Domagala, Adam Menke, Sydney Domagala and McKenna Engen. Standing in back are brothers Noah and Brennan Koball. – Photo submitted

Jean M. Swanson

Jean M. Swanson, 84, resident of Webster and formerly of Siren, died March 31, 2011, at Good Samaritan Center in St. Croix Falls. Jean had lived independently in her home until she was hospitalized on March 19 at Indianhead Medical Center in Shell Lake. She was then transferred to Good Samaritan Center on March 31. Jean was born Aug. 23, 1926, in Lake Crystal, Minn., to Marius and Janna Thorsbakken. She was a 1944 graduate of Centuria High School. On Aug. 25, 1945, Jean married Kenneth in Way Cross, Ga. Jean worked at Anderson’s Store in Siren for over 10 years. She was later employed for over 15 years by Capeside Cove Good Samaritan Center in Siren, where she worked as a dietary aide and in the housekeeping department. Jean was a member of Bethany Lutheran Church for 60 years in Siren. She was an active member, serving as a Sunday school teacher and involved with the ladies aid. Jean enjoyed Bridge and was a Bridge club member for over 50 years. She also enjoyed crossword puzzles, liked reading, watching game shows and was an avid Badger and Packer fan. Jean was preceded in death by her husband, Kenneth; son, Bobby; brother, Elmer; and sister, Agnes. She is survived by her son, Larry (Jean) Swanson; daughter, Linda (Doug) Plath; grandchildren, Trevor, Torrey, Deanna, Dana and Eric; great-grandchildren, Alyvia, Jacob and Rylee Jean; along with other relatives and friends. Memorial services were held Monday, April 11, at Bethany Lutheran Church in Siren with Pastor Keith Rediske officiating. Music was provided by Myrna Gardin and Pat Taylor. Interment followed at the Lakeview Cemetery in Siren. Online condolences can be made at www.swedberg-taylor.com The Swedberg-Taylor Family Funeral Home, Siren, was entrusted with arrangements.

Kenneth E. Stoner

Kenneth E. Stoner, 83, resident of rural Siren, died Saturday, April 2, 2011, at his home. Ken was born March 21, 1928, to Lloyd and Violet Stoner of Morrill, Kan. The family moved to Spokane, Wash., and then to Fall City, Neb., where Ken attended school and then entered the Navy. Ken served for 11-1/2 years aboard four different ships and sailed to ports in many countries around the world. His travels included attending the 1956 Olympics held in Australia. In 1950, Seaman Stoner received a Commendation Medal for outstanding courage and devotion to duty. While in Oakland, Calif., he met and married Karoline Alora (Kolander) Stoner, his wife of 59 years, after a whirlwind courtship of 10 days. They eventually made their permanent home on the family farm in Daniels Township of Burnett County where they dairy farmed, and Ken butchered for the Frederic Locker Plant until he retired due to failing health. Four children were born to Kay and Ken’s union. Kenneth served as a volunteer emergency fire warden for over 50 years with Burnett County. He enjoyed meeting many local residents as they came to his home for burning permits. He belonged to the local American Legion and was an active member of Immanuel Lutheran Church. He enjoyed deer hunting and fishing with family and friends on the home place. He and his wife enjoyed trips to many different states with his sister-in-law and brother-in-law and family gatherings at home. Ken is survived by his wife, Karoline; children, Jane Winkler of Norman, Okla., Nancy (Bryan) Anderson of Frederic, Keith (Debbie) Stoner of Siren and Steven (Terri) Stoner of Frederic; grandchildren, Kristin (Artie) Edwards, Alison (Cody) Goodnight, Katie Anderson, Joel Anderson, Jeremy Stoner, Holly Stoner and Erik Stoner; great-grandson, Noah Goodnight. He was preceded in death by his parents, Lloyd and Violet Stoner; brother, James Stoner; and sisters, Geraldine Connally and Lila Louise Brackhahn. Funeral services were held Friday, April 8, at Immanuel Lutheran Church, Frederic, with Pastor Jody Walter officiating. Julie Dahling served as organist and family members provided the music. Interment followed at the Siren Lakeview Cemetery. Casket bearers were Jeremy Stoner, Erik Stoner, Joel Anderson, James Kolander, Jack Sexton and Warren Hable. Honorary casket bearers were Milton Daeffler, Merlin Place, Laverne Scheider, Don Nordquist and Lloyd Talmadge. Online condolences can be made at www.swedberg-taylor.com. The Swedberg-Taylor Family Funeral Home, Siren, was entrusted with the arrangements.

Late obituaries on page 3 of Section A

Holy Week services

Balsam Lake – Faith Lutheran Church has scheduled the following for Holy Week: Maundy Thursday worship service on April 21, at 7 p.m. Easter Sunday sunrise service with communion is scheduled at 7 a.m., breakfast at 8 a.m. and a regular worship service to follow at 9:30 a.m. East Balsam Baptist Church will hold its Good Friday and Prayer service at 7 p.m. on Friday, April 22. Bone Lake – Bone Lake Lutheran Church has scheduled the following for Holy Week: Maundy Thursday and Good Friday worship services on April 21 and 22 are at 6:30 p.m. Easter Sunday services are at 7 and 10:30 a.m., with a pancake breakfast at 8 to 9:30 a.m. Danbury – Trinity Lutheran Church will have their Easter service at 8 a.m. Dresser – Peace Lutheran Church will have Good Friday services at noon, including a children’s service. Franconia/Shafer, Minn. – St. Francis Xavier, Franconia/Shafer, Minn., has scheduled the following for Holy Week: Holy Thursday Mass, April 21, 7 p.m. Adoration following until 10 p.m.; Good Friday service, April 22, 7 p.m.; Easter Vigil Mass, Saturday, April 23, 9 p.m.; and Easter Sunday Mass, April 24, 9 a.m. Frederic – Immanuel Lutheran Church has scheduled the following for Holy Week: Maundy Thursday, April 21, service at 7 p.m.; Good Friday, April 22, service at 1 p.m.; and Easter service at 10:30 a.m. Crosswalk Community Church, Frederic, will hold Maundy Thursday service with communion at 7 p.m., Thursday, April 21. Easter Sunday, April 24, includes a pancake breakfast from 8-9:30 a.m., followed by the worship service at 10:15 a.m. Grantsburg – Maundy Thursday joint service with Bethany Lutheran Church will be at 7 p.m. at Faith Lutheran Church. Good Friday there will be a joint worship service with Faith at Bethany at 7 p.m. Easter sunrise service will be held at Bethany at 7:30 a.m., with brunch to follow. Calvary Covenant Church, Grantsburg, will show “The Story of Jesus for Children” on Easter Sunday at 9:15 a.m., with a worship service at 10:30 a.m. Luck – The Easter Sunday service at West Denmark is changed to 8 a.m. and a breakfast to follow. Regular schedule will resume the next Sunday. Milltown – Milltown Lutheran Church has scheduled the following for Holy Week: Maundy Thursday, April 21, 7 p.m. service; Good Friday, April 22, services at 4 and 7 p.m. with Passion on the Main at 6 p.m.; and Easter, April 24 sunrise service at 6:30 a.m., followed by breakfast and worship service at 10 a.m. No Sunday school. Siren – Bethany Lutheran Church, has scheduled the following for Holy Week: Maundy Thursday, April 21, Passover/Seder re-enactment will be at 7 p.m.; Good Friday, April 22, Service of Darkness will be at 7 p.m.; and Easter, April 24, services at 7 and 9:30 a.m. with the brass quartet playing. Easter breakfast will be served at 8 a.m. Taylors Falls, Minn. – St. Joseph’s Catholic Church, Taylors Falls, Minn., has scheduled the following for Holy Week: Holy Thursday, April 21, Mass at 7 p.m., Adoration until midnight; Good Friday service April 22, 3 p.m.; Easter Vigil Saturday Mass, April 23, 9 p.m.; Easter Sunday Mass, April 24, at 7:30 and 10:30 a.m.; and Divine Mercy Sunday, May 1, at 7:30 and 10:30 a.m., Adoration, Confessions 1-3 p.m. and Chaplet sung at 3 p.m. Webster – Our Redeemer Lutheran Church, Webster, has scheduled the following for Holy Week: April 21, Maundy Thursday service at 7 p.m.; April 22, Good Friday service at 7 p.m.; and Easter Sunday, 10:30 a.m. Yellow Lake – Yellow Lake Lutheran Church has scheduled the following for Holy Week: Friday, April 22, Good Friday service at 1:30 p.m.; Sunday, April 24, Easter worship services are 7:30 and 9:30 a.m., with a continental breakfast at 8:30 a.m. between services.

COME CELEBRATE THE DEATH AND RESURRECTION OF JESUS CHRIST WITH US At

Calvary Covenant Church, 11530 State Rd. 70, Grantsburg, WI. Join us at 9:15 a.m. on Easter Sunday, April 24, as we watch the movie “The Story of Jesus for Children,” to remind us of the path Jesus walked that led to the cross and the world-changing resurrection. After viewing the film we will celebrate the wonder of this event in our 10:30 a.m. worship service and thank God for all He has done for us. 534151 35L

OBITUARIES

PAGE 46 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - APRIL 20, 2011

Arthur John Cardinal

Arthur John Cardinal, 84, died on Sunday morning, April 17, 2011. Art was born on Sept. 30, 1926, in Beaver Township, Polk County. He was the son of John and Maye (Belisle) Cardinal. Art grew up, went to school and farmed in Range. He was drafted into in the United States Army in December of 1945, serving in France and Germany in World War II. Art served until being discharged in July of 1947. He returned to Polk County where he farmed. On May 21, 1949, he was united in marriage to Lois Johnson and together they raised five children. During his time farming he drove a milk route and also spent time working at the feed mill to help care for his family. In 1977 he sold his milk herd, but still had some animals on his farm. In retirement from farming he spent time working for Byron Byrd Plumbing and also for the Apple River Township in road maintenance. When time allowed, Art enjoyed going fishing and hunting. Also, time spent camping with family was something he enjoyed. As his health declined and he lost his eyesight, he moved to Golden Age Manor where he has lived the past nine months. Preceding him in death were his parents; wife, Lois; sisters, Ruby Roberts, Albertha Roberts and Gladys Alt; and one brother, Charles Cardinal. Surviving family members are his children, Guy (Jackie) Cardinal; Allan (Yvonne) Cardinal, Cindi Cardinal, Debbie (Ralph) Olson and Mona (Todd) Schock; nine grandchildren; seven great-grandchildren; brother, Eli Cardinal; sister, Donnamae Fortmeyer; sisters-in-law, Carole Cardinal and Irene Finholdt; and other relatives and friends. Mass of Christian Burial was held on Wednesday, April 20, at St. Ann’s Catholic Church in Turtle Lake, with Father William Murphy officiating. Kathy Turba accompanied the St. Ann’s choir. Interment was at the St. Ann’s Cemetery. The Williamson – White Funeral Home and Cremation Services in Amery was entrusted with arrangements. Friends may sign an online guest book and view a photo tribute by visiting www.williamsonwhite.com. Lowell L. Carlson, 99, Grantsburg, died peacefully at his home in Grantsburg. He was born to Oscar and Emma Carlson on Jan. 26, 1912, at the family homestead in Marine, Minn. Lowell grew up in Marine, but left home at the age of 14 to live with his sister’s family in Osceola, so that he could attend high school. He graduated from Osceola High School in 1929, just at the brink of the Great Depression. He was lucky enough to find a job as a clerk in St. Croix Falls working at Northern States Power, now Xcel Energy. He spent his career with NSP eventually becoming controller. At that time, he was one of the only corporate officers at the company without a college degree. In 1935, Lowell married Ruth Eleanor Peterson in Scandia, Minn., and together they raised three children in Spring Lake Park and Fridley, Minn. Lowell and Ruth retired in 1972 to their home on Big Wood Lake near Grantsburg, where they spent many years until Ruth’s death in 1995. Lowell was a fiercely independent man, who was living alone in his home at the time of his death. He remained actively engaged with life until the very end, reading, watching sports, driving to his son’s home for weekend visits, and until recently, enjoying an occasional martini. He loved woods and water and was an avid fisherman and hunter throughout his life. He was a longtime member of Bethany Lutheran Church in rural Grantsburg. Lowell is survived by his three children, Judy (Igor) Golovscenko of Dayton, Ohio, Lawrence (Janice) Carlson of Marine, Minn., Jack (Kathleen) Carlson of Washburn; grandchildren, Mark, Natalia, Andrey, Scott, Jeff, Neil, Drewe and Kelly; five great-grandsons; and many nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his wife, Ruth; and all 10 of his siblings. Funeral services were held at Bethany Lutheran Church, Grantsburg, on April 16, 2011. The Edling Funeral Home, Grantsburg, was entrusted with arrangements.

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Georgia May (Brethorst) Lalor, 77, Webster, died April 14, 2011, surrounded by her family at the Indianhead Medical Center in Shell Lake following a lengthy battle with congestive heart failure. Georgia had also fought Crohn’s disease for 30 years. Georgia had spent the last few months of her life at the Terraceview Living Center in Shell Lake. Georgia was born Oct. 8, 1933, in Frederic to Josephine (Stoklasa) and George Brethorst. She married William “Bill” Lalor on April 24, 1965. Georgia liked reading and watching wildlife. When her health allowed, she liked picking wild berries and mushrooms, as well as deer hunting with her family. She also enjoyed playing card and dice games, for hours on end, with her children, many sisters and nieces and nephews. She took great joy in her grandchildren and loved lots of hugs. When she was physically able, she volunteered many hours helping out friends and relatives in their times of need. Georgia is survived by her husband, Bill; children, Sheila (Peter) Berklund, Kim Lalor, Lee (Kim) Griffin and Chad La Lor; sisters, Gladys Benson and Emma Jensen, both of Frederic; seven grandchildren and four greatgrandchildren. She was preceded in death by her parents; and siblings, Emil Svoboda, Bill Svoboda, Jerry Svoboda, Chuck Svoboda, Frank Svoboda, Violet (Brethorst) Marek and Bud Brethorst; and infant grandson, Crex Bistram. A memorial service will be held Friday, April 22, at 11 a.m., with visitation from 10 – 11 a.m., at Swedberg-Taylor Family Funeral Home, Webster, with Pastor Cindy Glocke officiating. The Swedberg-Taylor Family Funeral Home, Webster, was entrusted with arrangements.

Elaine C. Johnson

Elaine C. Johnson, 90, died peacefully on April 13, 2011, at the Frederic Nursing and Rehabilitation Community. She had been a resident there since December 2010. Elaine was born to Sam and Annie Lindquist of rural Trade Lake on April 2, 1921. She was the second of five children. She attended school in Frederic and graduated from there in 1939. In 1940, Elaine married Raymond L. Johnson. They had three children, two boys and a girl. She was a homemaker until she was employed by the Frederic School system as a cook. Later, she worked for the Farmers State Bank in Frederic as a teller. In 1964, she became a widow when Raymond died. Elaine married Emil L. Johnson of Clam Falls in 1975. They did some farming, lots of gardening and were devoted to their families and the Clam Falls Lutheran Church. Elaine was preceded in death by her parents; her husbands, Raymond and Emil; son, Ronald; stepdaughter, Marilyn Mangelsen; stepson, Eugene Johnson; greatgrandson, Dean Johnson; and brother, Carmond Lindquist. She is survived by her daughter, Sandra (Byron) Teske of Clear Lake; son, Rodney (Cindy) Johnson of Siren; daughter-in-law, Betty Johnson of Dresser; stepson, Benny (Pat) Johnson of Grantsburg; stepdaughters, Karen (Owen) Olson of Amery and Diana (John) Mangelsen of Frederic; sisters, Delores Peterson of Marysville, Wash., Leona Cummings and Gloriann Jones of Frederic; 16 grandchildren; and 21 great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held at the Rowe Funeral Home in Frederic on Monday, April 18, with the Rev. Gary Rokenbrodt officiating. Vocalist was Milton Johnson. Burial took place at Maple Grove Cemetery in Frederic following the service. Pallbearers assisting were Craig Johnson, Jason Teske, Bobby Mangelsen, Chad Olson, Larry Olson and Tom Thorsheim. Online condolences may be left at www.rowefh.com. Please continue to check the Web site for updated information or call Bruce Rowe at 715-327-4475. Rowe Funeral Home of Frederic was entrusted with funeral arrangements.

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Ruth Elaine Coen Hansen

Ruth Elaine Coen Hansen, 83, Milltown, died peacefully with her family by her side on Tuesday, April 12, 2011, at the Good Samaritan Home in St. Croix Falls. Ruth was born on April 14, 1927, in Luck, to Alvin and Ella Coen. She married Floyd Hansen on April 3, 1948, and four children were born to this union, Kenneth, Judy, Marie and Debby. Ruth was preceded in death by her parents; sister, Myrtle; brother, Edward; great-granddaughter, Ava Hutton. She leaves behind her husband, Floyd of Milltown; children, Kenneth of Red Wing, Minn., Judy (Tom) Bainbridge of Milltown, Marie (Byron) Freer of Milltown, Debby (John) Bartz of Red Wing, Minn.; six grandchildren, Ann (Mark) Petersen, Bryan Bainbridge, Paul (Jobie) Bainbridge, Nina Allison (Mike Hutton), Allan (Leah) Freer, Jason Hansen; 10 great-grandchildren; sisters, her twin, Ruby Hansen of Balsam Lake, Orra Holin of Balsam Lake, Iva Johnson of St. Paul, Minn., and Alice (Lloyd) Dau of Luck; brothers, Larry (Kitty) Coen of Amery and Robert (Rose) Coen of Baraga, Mich.; many nieces and nephews. Memorial services were held at Milltown Lutheran Church in Milltown, on Friday, April 15, with Rev. Mel Rau officiating. Music was provided by Cheryl Peper. Interment will be at Milltown Cemetery in the future. Rowe Funeral Home of Luck, www.rowefh.com, and the Northwest Wisconsin Cremation Center in Milltown, www.wicremationcenter.com, were entrusted with the arrangements.

Jayme L. Bottolfson

Jayme L. Bottolfson, 22, Star Prairie, died on Saturday, April 16, 2011, near Amery from injuries sustained in an automobile accident. Jayme was born Dec. 7, 1988, at the Osceola Medical Center in Osceola. She was raised in the Star Prairie area and graduated from Osceola High School in 2007. She was currently completing a computer programming course at the Minneapolis Business College, where she would have graduated in June. Jayme had worked part time at Andersen Windows, Bealka Casting and most recently at Carly Foundry in Blaine, Minn. She loved snowboarding, snowmobiles, four-wheeling, motorcycle racing and country music. She was known as a “free spirit” and “lived on the edge.” She is survived by her mother, Colleen (Greg) Cook of Star Prairie; father, Terry of Star Prairie; sister, Nicki (Andrew) Anderson of Star Prairie; brother, Branden Bottolfson of Star Prairie; grandparents, Dee (Ron) Campeau of Grantsburg, Leland (Myra) Johnson of Star Prairie, Ilene Bottolfson of Star Prairie, Orlo Bottolfson of Star Prairie, Ted (Sue) Cook of Amery and Kay Larson of Osceola; great-grandparents, Irene Johnson of Dresser and Thelma and Frank Standart of New Richmond; special nephews, Jacob and Jaxson Anderson; aunt, Tammy (Ron) Running of Star Prairie, Denae (Chad) Tolzsman of Clear Lake; uncles, Dennis (Barb) Johnson of Star Prairie, Scott (Stacey) of Osceola, Steven (Sandy) Bottolfson of New Richmond, Scott Bottolfson of Star Prairie, Kelly (Jeri) Cook of Amery and Bryan (Kim) Cook of Amery Darren (Judy) Johnson of Deer Park; as well as many other aunts, uncles, cousins and friends. Jayme was preceded in death by her infant brother, Travis; and great-grandparents, Vi and Si Hanson and Oscar Bottolfson and Lloyd Johnson. Funeral services were held Wednesday, April 20, at West Immanuel Lutheran Church near Osceola with the Rev. Rex Brandt officiating. Music was provided by Dana Hanson and Debbie Hanson. Interment was at West Immanuel Lutheran Church Cemetery. Serving as casket bearers were Jared Padgett, Matt Bottolfson, James Larson, Tony Blair, Mike Hanson, Bryan Cook, Scott Johnson and Andrew Anderson. Condolences maybe left at www.grandstrandfh.com. The Grandstrand Funeral Home in Osceola was entrusted with arrangements.

Everett Lough

Everett Lough, 76, Grantsburg, died April 12, 2011, at his home. Everett was the owner of Everett’s Upholstery in Grantsburg. He is survived by his wife, Cornelia (Cookie); and his children, David Lough, Robert Lough and Natashia Domeier. A celebration of Everett’s life was held Friday, April 15, at the Edling Funeral Home, Grantsburg. The Edling Funeral Home, Grantsburg, was entrusted with arrangements.

OBITUARIES

APRIL 20, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 47

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Patricia L. Peters, former resident of Georgetown Township, died Sunday, April 17, 2011, at Thomas Landing in Rice Lake. She is survived by her children, Audrey (Steve) Yeager, Melissa (Troy) Moe, Jennifer (Chris) Kohler; grandchildren, Mariah and Kyle Yeager, Kaytlyn, Alex and Evan Moe, Kaspar and Karma Kohler; brothers, Bill (Claudia) Brau, Maynard (Barb) Brau; sister, Lucy (Elwood) Steele. Funeral services will be held at Bone Lake Lutheran Church, Luck, on Thursday, April 21, with visitation beginning at noon, followed by the service at 1 p.m. Online condolences may be left at www.rowefh.com. Refer to this Web site for updated information or call Bruce Rowe at 715-472-2444. The Rowe Funeral Home of Luck was entrusted with arrangements.

Jeffery S. Pomerleau

Jeffery S. Pomerleau, 35, resident of Luck, died Saturday, April 16, 2011. He is survived by his parents, Steve and Marcia Pomerleau; siblings, Allen Pomerleau, Kari (Adam) Broten; niece and nephews, Ben, Kylie and Owen Broten; aunts and uncles. Funeral services will be held at the First Baptist Church in Milltown, on Friday, April 22, at 11 a.m. Visitation will be held at the Rowe Funeral Home in Luck on Thursday, April 21, from 4-7 p.m. and one hour prior to the service at the church on Friday. Online condolences may be left at www.rowefh.com. Refer to this Web site for updated information or call Bruce Rowe at 715-472-2444. Rowe Funeral Home of Luck, has been entrusted with funeral arrangements.

David L. Kent

David L. Kent, 64, Frederic, died Tuesday, April 12, 2011, at his residence. He is survived by his son, Traverse Kent; stepmother, Marian Kent; stepdaughter, Elizabeth Madsen; brother, John Kent; sisters, Myra Oredson, Wanda Wildin, Debra Kent and Mary Lou Wright. Private services are being planned. Online condolences may be left at rowefh.com or wicremationcenter.com. Please continue to check the Web sites for updated information or call Bruce Rowe at 715-327-4475. Rowe Funeral Home of Frederic and the Northwest Wisconsin Cremation Center in Milltown have been entrusted with funeral arrangements.

Anthony Eugene “Gene” Omernik Longtime Resident And Businessman

MONTROSE - Gene Omernik (Anthony Eugene) died at Montrose Memorial Hospital on April 9, 2011. His life was celebrated Saturday, April 16. Visitation was held from 5 to 7 p.m. Friday, April 15, at Crippin Funeral Home. The son of Anton and Ella (Heurth) Omernik, born in Grantsburg, Wis., Gene grew up in Spooner, Wis., and graduated high school in 1946. He and Kay enjoyed returning home to northern Wisconsin to attend all of their high school reunions and visit family. Gene served two years in the United States Army then graduated from University of Minnesota in 1952 with a degree in business. Gene Omernik and Kay (Helen Kay) Spafford of Shell Lake, Wis., married on June 23, 1951, in Shell Lake and raised six children together: Marc of Reno, Sue of Durango, Mary (Steve Mathis) and Tom (Marian Brooks) of Montrose, David of Lakewood and Stephen (Jeri Mattics) of Montrose. They have 14 grandchildren and 15 great-grandchildren. Gene is survived by his wife of 59 years and by a brother, Jerome of Robbinsdale, Minn. His parents and two sisters, Ellen and Arlene, preceded him in death. In 1972, Gene realized his lifelong dream of running his own business and living in Colorado. He bought a home on a piece of property large enough to keep horses on, moved his family from Potomac, Md., to Montrose, and opened Jeans Westerner, a sporting goods and clothing store. In 1977, he opened a second Jeans Westerner in Delta, and five years after that, opened The Work Horse in Montrose. Most of his children and grandchildren worked at the stores during the past 39 years. Mary, Tom and Stephen continue to operate the business today. Gene served on many committees, boards and was a proud Rotarian. He spent his free time hunting and fishing and raising a family. Gene’s greatest joy in life was his loving wife and offspring. He leaves an extended family in Colorado and beyond. Gene Omernik lived a life that mattered. He contributed much to his community, to his family, and to all of his business and social associates. He was a man of integrity, humor, compassion, courage and sacrifice. He enriched and empowered in ways others hope to emulate. Many of us will feel the lasting loss of his passing, but it is not the number of us mourning our loss that is important, rather the value of his being in all our lives. Living a life that matters isn’t an accident. It is a matter of choice. Gene made uncountable good choices that provided for his family and strengthened his community. A gathering to celebrate his amazing life was held with a visitation on Friday, April 15, 2011, at Crippin Funeral Home. On Saturday, April 16, 2011, on his 83rd birthday, the life of Gene Omernik was celebrated with a Catholic Mass at St. Mary’s followed by light luncheon/fond remembrances at Ted Nelson’s Steakhouse, 697 Cobble Drive. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Montrose Community Foundation or to Western Colorado Hospice and Palliative Care. Arrangements are under the direction of Crippin Funeral Home, 802 E. Main St., Montrose, CO 81401 (970) 249-2121. 534146 35r,Lp

Ida Packer

Ida Packer, 87, St. Croix Falls, died Monday, April 18, 2011, at the United Pioneer Home in Luck. Ida was born July 20, 1923, in Eureka Township to John and Hanna Moltzer. She graduated from Balsam Lake High School in 1941. On March 20, 1943, she married Melvin “Pat” Packer. She was a homemaker. In her free time Ida enjoyed baking, especially pies which she loved to give away, sewing, raising violets and other flowers, and Sunday drives with the family. Ida was preceded in death by her parents; husband, Pat; siblings, Erick, Johnny, Elvira and Helen; and grandsonin-law, Jason Whittier. She is survived by her children, Charlotte (Stuart) Swenson of Amery, Colleen Nelson of St. Croix Falls, Dorothy Anderson of St. Croix Falls, Lester Packer of St. Croix Falls, Lloyd (Karen) Packer of Cumberland, Lee Packer of St. Croix Falls, Dawn (Kris) Tracy of Osceola and Darlene (Rick) Meuller of Milltown; 11 grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren. Private funeral services were held at the Grandstrand Funeral Home in Osceola. Condolences may be left at www.grandstrandfh.com. The Grandgrand Funeral Home, Osceola, was entrusted with arrangements.

Louis Matrious Jr.

Louis Matrious Jr., 62, Shell Lake, died April 10, 2011 at Indianhead Medical Center. Louis was born Sept. 2, 1948, in Siren on the shores of Clam Lake to Louis and Annie Matrious Sr. Louis was preceded in death by his parents; sisters, Vivian Hemming, Irene Matrious and Thelma Ess; along with nieces and nephews. Louis is survived by his wife of 38 years, Teresa Henseler; his daughters, Sandy Matrious, Nichole (Thomas Smith); and Marla (Michael J. Decorah); his grandchildren, Brandon, Payton, Cameron and Tala Chante; sister, Marion Benjamin; along with his nieces, nephews, great-nieces and nephews and cousins. Funeral service was held Thursday, April 14, at Lake Lena (Aazhoo-mog) Community Center with Lee Staples officiating. Interment followed at the Lake Lena Cemetery. Casket bearers were Randy Phernetton, Bubba Reynolds, Pete LaBlanc, Charles Mitchell, Thomas Smith, Anthony Pike and Tyler Morrow. Honorary casket bearers were Rick Benjamin, Sam Garbow, Lawrence Matrious, Tim Matrious, Jim Matrious, Marvin Hemming and Cordell Benjamin. Online condolences can be made at www.swedberg-taylor.com. The Swedberg-Taylor Funeral Home, Webster, was entrusted with arrangements.

Heartfelt Thank-You

When we had to say goodbye to someone we loved, someone so close to our heart, it is very comforting knowing that we could not have done this without the love and support of our family and friends. A very special thank-you to Edling Funeral Home; Pastor Carolyn; American Legion, 40-8 Division 236; the wonderful lunch provided by the Auxiliary and church ladies and the beautiful music provided by organist Linda, choir and Joe Lener. Please know that from our heart we want to thank everyone for all you have done and continue to do for us. Arvid’s love is still around us as it has been from the start. So even though we will miss him, his memory will be with us wherever we go. With much love and appreciation

The family of Arvid Fossum

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John Henry Barthman Sr., 70, Reeve, died on Tuesday, April 12, 2011, at the Willow Ridge Care Center, Amery, after a courageous six-year battle with cancer. John was born on Feb. 9, 1941, in Clear Lake, the son of Henry and Bernice (Larson) Barthman. He grew up in the Reeve area, attended Meadowbrook School and graduated from Clear Lake High School in 1959. John was married to Rebekah Hettinger on Aug. 1, 1964, and together they had two sons, Thomas Scott and John Jr. It was also during 1964 that he was inducted into the U.S. Army and served for two years, being honorably discharged in 1966. After discharge from the service, John worked with his brother, Virgil, in carpentry and construction while helping with the family farm. John began driving truck and retired from Buhr Brothers Transport in Clear Lake, after 23 years. He and Rebekah divorced in 1977, and he married Connie Carlson at the Reeve church on June 21, 1980. He continued to be a resident of the Reeve area until the time of his death. In his spare time, John enjoyed hunting, fishing, camping, gardening, farming, four-wheeling and taking trips to Lake Superior. He was a member of the Reeve Evangelical Free Church and was very active in the Clear Lake American Legion and Clear Lake Area All-Veterans Honor Guard. He is preceded in death by his parents, Henry and Bernice Barthman. He is survived by his wife, Connie Barthman; sons, Thomas Barthman of Hudson, John (Melissa) Barthman Jr. of Turtle Lake; grandchildren, Matthew (Sondra) Barthman of St. Croix Falls, Kevin (Ashley) Londroche of Seattle, Wash., Ashlee Barthman of Osceola, Alex Barthman of Centuria, Collin Christenson of Turtle Lake, Makaylin Christenson of Turtle Lake; sister, Nancy (Art) Bergmann of Clear Lake; brothers, Virgil (Karen) Barthman of Reeve and Wallace (Kathy) Barthman of Cody, Wyo.; and other relatives and friends. Funeral service was held on Saturday, April 16, at the Reeve Evangelical Free Church in Reeve, with Pastor Todd Groat officiating. Music was provided by Nancy Bergmann and Thomas Scott Barthman. Casket bearers were Alex Barthman, Matt Barthman, Nicholas Barthman, Ralph Buhr, Larry Bergmann and Kevin Londroche. Interment was at Reeve Cemetery, Vance Creek Township. Military honors were provided by the Clear Lake Area All-Veterans Honor Guard. The Scheuermann-Hammer Funeral Home of Clear Lake was entrusted with the arrangements.

Patricia L. Peters

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John Henry Barthman

CHURCH NEWS

PAGE 48 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - APRIL 20, 2011

Children’s independence comes when parents learn to let go

Question: There’s so much on the news about child abductions, murders, etc. that I often find myself in a panic when it comes to my tween girls. How can I overcome the urge to just lock them in their rooms until they reach adulthood? Jim: We hear so much bad news today that we often feel like there’s danger lurking everywhere. A survey by the Mayo Clinic revealed that these are the five things parents are most worried about: 1 - kidnapping; 2 - school snipers; 3 - terrorists; 4 - dangerous strangers; and drugs. Those things certainly are scary. But now consider the five things that, in reality, are the most likely to cause death to children under the age of 18, according to the Centers for Disease Control: 1 - car accidents; 2 – homicide, usually at the hands of someone they know; 3 - child abuse; 4 - suicide; and 5 - drowning. These are frightening, too, but they probably aren’t the first things that come to mind when you worry about your girls. As The New York Times has observed, there’s a disconnect going on here. In the age of 24-hour news, we hear

Focus on the Family

horrible stories of abductions and school shooters, but the fact is that in the grand scheme of things, those things are rare, they are the worst-case scenarios. Thank goodness! Statistically, the least-safe thing we can do with our kids is drive them somewhere. And yet most of us do that every day. According to Christie Barnes, author of “The Paranoid Parents Guide,” moms and dads are worrying more at a time when statistics for homicide, kidnapping and even traffic deaths are actually going down. Certainly, there are dangers out there. And even if some of them are rare, we don’t want our kids to be that one exception to the rule. We need to take the appropriate measures to protect them. But we also need to be careful not to be overly fearful for their safety. That can be paralyzing. It’s all about finding the proper balance. ••• Question: Our daughter is 14 and wants to do group dates. Is that appro-

priate for a 14-year-old, and when would you recommend single or group dating? Juli: As you wrestle through decisions regarding your daughter and dating, I’d encourage you to consider a few questions. First, what do you mean by “group dating”? There’s a big difference between a group of 14-year-olds going to Denny’s for pancakes after the school play and teens hanging out in someone’s basement unsupervised. In my opinion, any mixed-gender interaction among 14year-olds should be supervised by adults. Even the most levelheaded 14year-old is not mature enough to handle the emotional and physical pressures that come with an exclusive dating relationship or with unsupervised contact with the opposite sex. Every parent will have a different opinion about the magic age when his or her daughter is ready to date, whether alone or in a group. Wise parents might even have a different answer for different children, as some mature more quickly than others. Whatever age you decide to let your daughter date, prepare her for it. Think about it this way: Many states require 50 or more supervised hours behind the wheel, plus a written and driving test before issuing a driver’s license to a teenager. Why don’t we have a similar approach to dating? Observe your daughter in mixed-gender situations.

quences; implementing restorative consequences; and holding children responsible. The program will go from 6:30 to 8 p.m. in the Siren School auditorium. This is a free program under the sponsorship of the Siren School District. Kronenberg is a parent, teacher, author

and highly sought-after expert and speaker in the areas of self-concept and discipline. He presents his topic with enthusiasm, drama, humor and discipline. The audience will laugh as they learn some practical techniques for teaching responsibility to children. The presentation is designed to make the job of parenting

Jim Daly

Juli Slattery

How does she behave with the opposite sex? Have you talked to her about what to do if she gets into a compromising situation? Has she shared with you why she wants to date and what her standards are? Have you considered your role in helping her screen potential boyfriends and in supervising dating relationships? Dating can be a wonderful aspect of teen life, but it is also fraught with serious dangers. Treat it that way! ••• Jim Daly is president of Focus on the Family, host of the Focus on the Family radio program, and a husband and father of two. Dr. Juli Slattery is a licensed psychologist, cohost of Focus on the Family, author of several books, and a wife and mother of three. Submit your questions to: FocusOnTheFamily.com. Copyright 2010 Focus on the Family, Colorado Springs, CO 80995. International copyright secured. All rights reserved. Distributed by Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut St. Kansas City, MO 64106; 816-581-7500. This feature may not be reproduced or distributed electronically, in print or otherwise, without written permission of Focus on the Family.

Brought to you by:

Faith Fellowship Luck

Nationally known speaker to present ways to teach children responsibility

SIREN - Nationally known speaker Corwin Kronenberg is coming to Siren Thursday, April 28, bringing his entertaining style and usefulness of information for a program on teaching children to be responsible. Topics to be covered include disciplining with unconditional love; making rules and delivering conse-

just a little easier, and prepare the audience to leave the school feeling empowered and ready to use some proven parenting strategies. - information submitted

Church listings sponsored by the following area businesses: BREMER BANK, N.A. Full-Service Banking Member FDIC Frederic - Danbury - Siren

DAEFFLER’S QUALITY MEATS, INC. Wholesale & Retail Meats Custom Butchering & Processing Phone 715-327-4456

INTER-COUNTY CO-OP PUBLISHING ASSOCIATION

NORTHWESTERN WISCONSIN ELECTRIC CO. “Your Electric Servant” Serving Polk & Burnett Counties “Use Energy Wisely”

CARLSON-ROWE FUNERAL HOME Frederic, Wis. 715-327-4475 Duane Lindh

HAULING • Gravel • Sand • Rock • Top Soil • Trackhoe 715-472-2717 Mobile 715-491-1861 1065 290th Ave. Frederic, Wis.

Printers & Publishers Office Supplies

LUCK

Frederic, Wis. - 715-327-4236 Shell Lake, Wis. - 715-468-2314 Siren, Wis. - 715-349-2560 St. Croix Falls, Wis. - 715-483-9008

VAN METER’S MEATS

STATE FARM INSURANCE COMPANIES Corey T. Arnold, Agent Frederic, Wis. Phone 715-327-8076

BEAN’S COUNTRY GRIDDLE Hwys. 35 & 48 Downtown Frederic Phone 715-327-5513

Government Inspected Slaughtering and Processing, Sausage making • Ham & Bacon Cured & Smoked Sides and Quarters of Beef and Pork Available Old-fashioned Fresh Meat Counter Tim Van Meter and Ross Anderson, Owners Luck, WI 54853 Plant 715-472-2141

WEBSTER

ALPHA

SIREN

CASHCO BUILDING SUPPLIES

BASS LAKE LUMBER

OLSEN & SON

• Complete Line of Building Supplies & Lumber • Cabot’s Stains Grantsburg, Wis. 715-488-2471 or 715-327-8766

Your Full-Service Drugstore Siren, Wis. Phone 715-349-2221

BURNETT DAIRY CO-OP

10022 Elbow Lake Road Siren, Wis. 54872 715-689-2539

Complete Lumber & Building Supplies Phone 715-866-4238 Hwy. 35 N. Webster, Wis. Tom & Becky O’Brien, Owners

HOPKINS SAND & GRAVEL, INC. Sand, Gravel, Ready-Mix, Concrete, Black Dirt, Dozer Work, Landscaping & Septic Tanks Installed Hwy. 35 North Webster, Wis. Phone 715-866-4157 M.P.R.S. #03059

1988 World Champion Cheesemaker Earl Wilson, Cheese Plant Mgr. Clif Gipp, Ag. Supply Mgr. for Feed, Propane & Fertilizer Alpha, Wis. 715-689-2468 • 715-689-2467

D & L FINANCIAL SERVICES

CUSHING CUSHING COOPERATIVE SOCIETY Feed Mill - Grain Dept. Cushing, Wis. 715-648-5215

SWEDBERG-TAYLOR FUNERAL HOME Webster, Wis. Phone 715-866-7131

BRUCE’S AUTO REPAIR & TOWING Wrecker - Flatbed Air Conditioning & Computerized Car Service - Cold Weather Starts Webster, Wis. 715-866-4100 Days 715-866-8364 Eves.

Any area business wishing to help sponsor the church listings should contact the Leader at 715-327-4236.

Churches 4/11

FREDERIC

New day care owner takes over Siren business

APRIL 20, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 49

by Nancy Jappe Leader staff writer SIREN - Christina Phernetton, owner of Kid Country, a day care in Webster for the past seven years, took over ownership of the day-care building at 24178 North First Ave., Siren, Monday, April 11. That building is now known as Kid City Childcare and Preschool. Knowing that she was full to capacity in Webster and that good-quality child care was needed in Siren, and hearing about the availability of the Siren business, Phernetton was quick to sign a purchase agreement. She is grateful that many of the existing staff were willing to stay on, making the transfer of ownership a lot easier and saying a lot for the quality of the staff. Child care workers need to either be licensed child care teachers or be willing to take classes. Classes are offered online by WITC and amount to approximately 60 hours of training. Phernetton will pay for the training with the understanding that the trainee will stay on the job for at least one year. If the trainee leaves before a year is up, the cost of the training is deducted from their last paycheck. One big advantage the new Kid City has is its hours of operation. Knowing that many parents work a second shift, Phernetton is keeping the building open from 5:30 a.m. until 12:30 a.m. Cots and blankets are provided and, at bedtime, the children get into their pajamas and hop into bed to sleep until their parents/caregivers come to pick them up. Phernetton has been in child care for the past 11 years, going back to the time when her second daughter was born and needed day care. She took the training and is now working on a two-year associate degree. “Not that I need it; I’m choosing to do so,” she said.

Kid City Childcare and Preschool at 24178 North First Ave., Siren, is licensed by the state to care for children from 2 weeks to 12 years old. Kid City provides an educational curriculum along with nutritious meals and snacks (using the same formulas as the public schools). Children are cared for from 5:30 a.m. to 12:30 a.m., seven days a week. During the summer, a camplike program is provided for school-age children. The day care provides a six-hour educational curriculum and is on the same food program as are the public schools. The children are served their food family style and learn table manners and the need to take proper portions of food. They eat meat loaf, lasagna and other foods prepared by a cook who works out of each facility. When asked what was the motivating force for going into child care, Phernetton answered by saying: “When I was looking for day care for my first child, I visited somewhere that made me cry. That was not where I wanted my child to be. My motivation is to provide quality care for kids that is safe and fun. I was also look-

ing for night care as I worked at a casino. Nobody did night care. It brought me to tears when I thought that I didn’t want to leave my baby there. I don’t want people to feel like that.” Besides the evening care that is offered at Kid City in Siren, Phernetton and her staff offer summer care for school-age children. This will be a set up like at a school camp with fun things provided for the children to do. One other point that Phernetton stressed is that children at the day care go outside for play every day, several times a day, to exercise their muscles, give them a change of pace and good fresh air. She wishes the facility had more room to ex-

Native American Week Four drum groups were on hand for the powwow at Siren School last Friday, April 15. This group, Niiwogiizhik, under the leadership of Patrick LeGarde, came to Siren from Minneapoiis, Minn. The other groups were: The Cumberland Singers, Pipestone and the Siren School Drum led by Mike Taylor.

Christina Phernetton, the new owner of the day care facility at 24178 North First Ave., Siren, has been in the child-care business for the past 11 years. She took over the facility as of Monday, April 11. This is her second day care; the first, Kid Country, is located in Webster. Kid City is licensed for 35 children. “There’s plenty of room for more kids,” Phernetton said. “We’re enrolling now.” – Photos by Nancy Jappe

pand into, but is content now to work with what she has. Kid City is featured on Facebook, offering parents the opportunity to watch their children at play. Parents looking for day care can also check out the site. “We have openings. We are enrolling now,” Phernetton said. For more information, give her a call at 715-349-8262, 715-733-0071 or by e-mail at kidcityabc123@yahoo.com.

Siren

Photos by Nancy Jappe

Dancers in the powwow at Siren School Friday afternoon, April 15, signed the attendance forms located at the entrance to the school’s big gym. The powwow was held at the conclusion of Native American Week.

Feathers formed a large part of this dancer’s outfit.

This little dancer seemed intent on watching the older powwow dancers, maybe hoping one day to be out there doing her own steps, twists and turns.

ABOVE: Traditional and group dancing spotlighted many colorfully dressed dancers.

RIGHT: Students at Siren School and their teachers were invited out on the gym floor to be a part of the dancing during the powwow Friday, April 15.

Last Comic Standing

PAGE 50 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - APRIL 20, 2011

Grantsburg

Audience falls for Last Comic Standing

by Priscilla Bauer Leader staff writer GRANTSBURG – When Josh Blue took the stage to entertain over 300 fans coming to T-Dawgs in Grantsburg for his Friday, April 15, show, he had them, as the saying goes, at "Hello." The comic, who gained national attention after winning NBC’s television’s “Last Comic Standing,” certainly lived up his bio's description of the comedian who puts the cerebral in cerebral palsy. With hilarious, and thought-provoking stories and actions about his disability, Blue gave an engaging performance from start to finish. Totally in his element, Blue had the crowd laughing to the point of tears with his superb improvisations and dead-on comic timing. Blue is part of a continuing series of headliner comedians presented by T-Dawgs in Grantsburg. Look for another familiar comedic face coming back to Grantsburg this summer when Louie Anderson returns to the TDawgs stage in July.

Over 300 fans found Josh Blue’s unique brand of humor, much of which is derived from his experiences with a disability, hilarious. Blue performed two shows at T-Dawgs in Grantsburg on Friday, April 15.

Photos by Priscilla Josh Blue’s bio states he is the comedian who puts cerebral in cerebral palsy, and Bauer the comic certainly lived up to that description Friday evening, April 15, with hilarious, and thought-provoking stories and actions about his disability.

Professor Numbers

Comedian Josh Blue had the audience laughing to the point of tears with his superb improvisations and dead-on comic timing.

Grantsburg Schools

Nelson School Little Pirates Marcus Michel and Jordan Java stood ready to help Professor Numbers with Professor Numbers showed surprised Nelson kindergartener Owen Rathje he did get the cor- one of the many fun and entertaining magic tricks he rect answer in a mind-reading mathemagic trick. showed students during his Mathemagic Show.

Mathemagic Show is entertaining math education

by Priscilla Bauer Leader staff writer GRANTSBURG – The eyes of Grantsburg’s Nelson Primary, Elementary and Middle School students grew bigger and bigger in amazement as Professor Numbers presented his Mathmagic Show and math workshops at the schools on Wednesday and Thursday, April 13 and 14. Little did the students know, Professor Numbers’ biggest trick was getting kids interested in math with his unique method of incorporating magic into solving mathematical problems. Professor Numbers’ high-energy, fun-filled blend of math, humor and magic show was a great way to end the Math Week celebration at both the elementary Grantsburg fourth grader Linda Harmon got a high-five from and middle schools. Professor Numbers after she solved a number puzzle using conEducator and author Ray Blum, aka Professor Numbers, thoroughly enter- secutive numbers. tained the students as he showed them the magical, fun side of mathematics RIGHT: Brittany Bloom gave Professor Numbers a hug after with his mathemagic and arithmetricks. the math workshop he presented for Grantsburg Middle School students during his visit to the school last week. Photos by Priscilla Bauer

Unity Variety Show

APRIL 20, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 51

A duet accompanied by dancing chickens, cows and other critters was a highlight of the Unity High School Variety Show, held Saturday, April 16. The singers shown are Carol and Henry Kline.

Do-wop was front and center in the program, as these background singers illustrated. Shown (L to R) are Kelsy Johnson, Anna Luepke and Becca Garvey.

Balsam Lake

Cows, milk and gumballs, oh my! Performing a skit at the Unity Variety Show are Brandi Larson and Tara Voss.

Several Unity-based bands made their marks on the show. Shown above are Justin Mooney on drums (far left) Megan Jones (singing), Ross MacTaggert on tambourine and Brandon Mooney on guitar.

Photos by Greg Marsten

RIGHT: It was a band experiment that ran awry, but smelled curiously of fresh cinnamon rolls. Shown (L to R) are Mickey Muller, Scott Bever, Ashley Johnson, Jessica Kutina, Neil Kline and Jenelle Larsen.

An a cappella group performed at the Unity High School Variety Show, April 16. Shown (L to R) are Justin Mooney, Brandon Mooney, Josh Kreft, Ross MacTaggert, Oliver Raboin, Coleman Thill, Luke Nelson, Brady Flaherty and Xavier Foeller.

Faculty Follies

PAGE 52 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - APRIL 13, 2011

Dana Morrin cringed as she showed her answer to the question, “What would you like your husband to stop doing?” during the Oldie versus Newlywed Game portion of the Faculty Follies. And by the look on his face, it was not the answer her husband, Bill, expected.

Faculty Follies played to packed auditorium

Grantsburg

The looks on contestants faces, like those of Jason and Anna Hedrix, Leon and Karen Miller, and Matt and Allissa Koenen, showed there were plenty of wrong, but humorous, answers to questions asked of the married couples to see how well they really knew each other during the Faculty Follies version of the Oldie versus Newlywed Game.

by Priscilla Bauer Leader staff writer GRANTSBURG – It was standing room only for the firstannual Grantsburg Faculty Follies last Saturday evening, April 16. And while there may have been a shortage of chairs, there was no shortage in entertainment with many talented members of the Grantsburg School District staff presenting a show packed with fun and variety. The performances ranged from the campy to the classical, from the uproarious to the reverent, and from the silly to the spirited. Before Elvis appeared to the delight of swooning women, the Koenens gave the audience quiet time to reflect with their harp and sax selections. Former Grantsburg math teacher Russ Erickson changed the subject with his rendition of the song, “I Love Geography.” The staff band, some of whom it was rumored hadn’t picked up their instruments in many a moon, played more than one fine-sounding Disney tune. And no one wanted to say, “Na, Na, Hey, Hey Goodbye” to the acappella ensemble with their perfect harmonies of that tune and several other favorites. But by far the funniest moments came during the Oldie versus Newlywed Game when couples married only a few years competed against couples married 20-40 years. A fitting finale to the Follies was the Community Choir’s spirited performance of “Be True to Your School.”

Linda Halacy, Patty Meyer and Elna Doornink showed their dance moves as part of the Evolution Dance Troop. Middle school Principal Brad Jones rocked the auditorium as the King with his performance of “Heartbreak Hotel.”

Photos by Priscilla Bauer

A fitting finale to the Follies was the Community Choir’s spirited performance of “Be True to Your School.”

Heather Jensen and Anna Hedrix performed, “Alone” by Heart accompanied by the 1980 Rockin’ Band.

Members of the Grantsburg School District staff started off the show performing “Tonight’s Gonna Be a Good Night” dressed for the part as the Black Eyed Peas and Company.

CHURCH ChurchDIRECTORY Directory

APRIL 20, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 53

ADVENTIST

SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST - FREDERIC 609 Benson Road; Pastor Curtis Denney Sat. Worship 11 a.m.; Sabbath Schl. 9:30 a.m. ALLIANCE

ALLIANCE

ALLIANCE CHURCH OF THE VALLEY Senior Pastor Bob Morton 1259 Hwy. 35 S., St. Croix Falls Sunday Worship: 9 & 11 a.m.

BIBLE FELLOWSHIP

BIBLE FELLOWSHIP

WORD OF LIFE CHURCH

Meeting in homes. Elders: Cliff Bjork, Jon Zens, 715-483-1357 and 715-755-3048 Sun. Fellowship - 10 a.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. LUTHERAN

LUTHERAN

BALSAM LUTHERAN CHURCH 1115 Mains Crossing, 1/2 Mile South Hwy. 8 On 110th St.; Sun. Worship 9 a.m.; Sun. School 10:15 a.m. Wed. Bible Study 8:30 a.m.; Wed. LOGOS 3:20 p.m.

BEAUTIFUL SAVIOR LUTHERAN (WELS) Gene E. Jahnke, Pastor, 715-635-7672, Hm. 715-354-7787, Hwy. 70 at 53, Spooner Sun. Wor. - 9:30 a.m.; Sun. School & Bible Classes For All - 10:45 a.m.

BETHANY LUTHERAN - BRANSTAD Pastor Jay Ticknor, 715-463-5746 3 miles So. of Grantsburg on Hwy. 87 Sun. Schl. - 9:30 a.m.; Worship - 11 a.m.

BETHANY LUTHERAN - SIREN Hwy. 35, 1/2 blk. N. Main St. Interim Pastor Keith Radiske Pastoral Serv. 715-349-5280 Sun. School 8:15 a.m.; Sun. Worship - 9:30 a.m.

BETHESDA LUTHERAN - DRESSER (LCMC) www.bethesdalutheran.ws Pastor Roger Kastelle 715-755-2562 1947 110th Ave., Dresser Contemporary Serv. 8:30 a.m.; Adult Ed & Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Traditional Service 10:45 a.m.;

BONE LAKE LUTHERAN bllc@lakeland.ws Pastor Mary Ann Bowman, 5 mi. E. of Luck on Hwy. 48, 1/2 mi. S. on I; Office - 715-472-2535 Pastor - 715-472-8153, Exploring Prayer 8:45 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 3 - adult 9 a.m.; Wor. 10:30 a.m.; Fellowship 11:30 a.m. Holy Communion 1st & 3rd Sundays

CHRIST LUTHERAN (LCMS) Pipe Lake CTH G & T, 715-822-3096 Pastor Steve Miller Sun. Serv. 10:45 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9:15 a.m. during schl. yr.; Holy Communion 1st & 3rd Sun. www.christlutheranpipelake.com

CLAM FALLS LUTHERAN (AALC) Pastor Gary Rokenbrodt - 715-653-2630 Communion 1st Sun.; Wor. 9 a.m.; Sun. School 9 a.m.

FAITH LUTHERAN - BALSAM LAKE faithlutheran@lakeland.ws Pastor Diane Norstad 715-485-3800; CTH I & Mill Street Worship 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 10:40 a.m.; Holy Communion 1st & last Sundays

MILLTOWN LUTHERAN

113 W. Main St.. W., Phone 715-825-2453 Pastor Danny G. Wheeler 9:15 a.m. Worship ; 10 a.m. Sunday School

NEW HOPE LUTHERAN CHURCH Pastor Emory Johnson, 715-463-5700 685 W. State Road 70, Grantsburg Sun. Wor. Serv. 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 11 a.m.

NORTH VALLEY LUTHERAN

Pastor Carolyn Saunders, 715-463-2624 Sunday School - 11 a.m.; Worship - 11 a.m.

Pastor Carolyn Saunders, 715-463-2624 Worship - 9 a.m.; Sunday School - 10:30 a.m.

DANBURY UNITED METHODIST

ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC

Cindy Glocke, Pastor, 715-866-8646 Sunday Worship - 10:30 a.m.

Pastor Gerald Heinecke Church Phone 715-866-7191 Sun. Schl. - 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Wor. - 10:30 a.m. Communion 1st & 3rd Sundays

HOLY TRINITY UNITED METHODIST

ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC

Holytrinity@wisconsinumc.org 1606 165th Ave., CTH I, Centuria Pastor Freddie Kirk, 715-485-3363 Pastor Tammy Clausen Sunday Worship - 8:30 a.m.

Rev. Thomas E. Thompson, 715-294-2243 255 E. 10th Ave., Osceola Masses: Sun. 10:30 a.m., Tues. 5 p.m. Thurs. at 10 a.m. at Osc. Nursing Home

PEACE LUTHERAN - DRESSER (ELCA) 2355 Clark Road, Dresser, WI, 715-755-2515 Web site: plcdresser.org Pastor Wayne Deloach, Intern Courtney Young Sun. Wor. 8:30 & 11 a.m., Sun. Schl. 9:35 a.m.

GRACE UNITED - WEBSTER

LAKEVIEW UNITED - HERTEL

ASSEMBLY

PILGRIM LUTHERAN - FREDERIC (ELCA)

LEWIS MEMORIAL UNITED METHODIST

Interim Pastor Andrew Hinwood 507 Wisconsin Ave. N., 715-327-8012 Sun. Parents & Toddlers 9:15 a.m.; Sun. Worship - 10 a.m. Holy Communion 1st & 2nd Sundays www.pilgrimlutheranfrederic.org

Tom Cook, Pastor Worship 8:45 a.m.; Sunday Schl. 10 a.m.

Pastor Don Wiltshire, 715-640-6400 Centuria - Phone 715-646-2172 Sunday Service: 10 a.m.

REDEEMER EV. LUTHERAN

OSCEOLA UNITED METHODIST

(Wisconsin Synod) Pastor Gene DeVries 200 N. Adams St., St. Croix Falls Sun. Wor. - 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - 8:30 a.m.

McKINLEY UNITED METHODIST Pastor Annie Tricker Sun. Worship 11 a.m.; Sun. School 11 a.m. Potluck dinner 1st Sunday

Rev. Mike Weaver Sunday Worship Service - 10 a.m. Sunday School is at 9 a.m., Nursery available

APPLE RIVER COMMUNITY (EFCA)

SHEPHERD OF THE VALLEY LUTHERAN

Pastor Arveda “Freddie” Kirk, 715-327-4436 Pastor Tammy Clausen Sunday Worship 10:30 a.m.

TRINITY LUTHERAN LCMS, DANBURY Pastor Gerald Heinecke Home 715-327-8608; Church 715-866-7191 Sunday Worship Service - 8 a.m. Holy Communion 1st & 3rd Sundays

TRINITY LUTHERAN - FALUN

(Missouri Synod) Pastor Jody R. Walter, 715-327-8608 Sun. Schl. - 8:45 a.m.; Service - 10:30 a.m. Communion - 1st, 3rd & 5th Sun.

LAKESIDE COMMUNITY LUTH. - ELCA CTH H, 1/2 mi. N. of CTH A & H on H Church Off. 715-635-7791 Roger Pittman, Pastor Worship Serv. 10 a.m.; Sun. School. 9 a.m.

LAKETOWN LUTHERAN - CUSHING

WOLF CREEK UNITED METHODIST Rev. Mike Weaver Sunday Worship - 8:15 a.m. COVENANT

COVENANT

CALVARY COVENANT - ALPHA

SIREN COVENANT

UNITED COVENANT - CLEAR LAKE Pastor Gary Tonn Sunday School 9:00 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m. CATHOLIC

CATHOLIC

ASSUMPTION OF THE BLESSED VIRGIN MARY

Pastor Dorothy Sandahl Sun. Wor. 10:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 10:30 a.m.

LUCK LUTHERAN 510 Foster Ave. E. Office 715-472-2605; Home 715-472-8424 Sun. Wor. Serv. 10:30 a.m.; Mon. Wor. Serv. 6:30 p.m.

ZION LUTHERAN - BONE LAKE (AALC)

Danbury - 7586 St. Rd. 77, 715-866-7321 Pastor - Father Michael J. Tupa Mass - Sat. 4 p.m., Fri. 9 a.m. (Sept.-May). Reconciliation as per bulletin & by appt.

OUR LADY OF PERPETUAL HELP

OUR LADY OF THE LAKES

Pastor Martin Weigand - 715-294-3489 Sun. Schl. 9 a.m.; Adult Bible Class 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m.

Balsam Lake - Rev. John A. Drummy, Pastor - 405-2253 Mass: Sat. eves. 6 p.m.; Sun. 8:30 a.m.; Tues. 5:30 p.m.; Fri. 9 a.m.Sacrament of Reconciliation 7:30 a.m. Sun. or by appt.

ZION LUTHERAN - MARKVILLE

SACRED HEARTS OF JESUS & MARY

PRESBYTERIAN

PRESBYTERIAN

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN

Rev. Bruce Brooks - 715-483-3550 719 Nevada St. , (between Simonson & Tower Roads) , St. Croix Falls Worship - 10 a.m. (Nursery provided) Sun. Schl. - Child.- 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - Adults 8:45 a.m.; Communion 1st Sunday

Pastor Andrew Bollant Sun. Schl. - 9:15 a.m.; Morn. Serv. - 10:15 a.m.; Supervised Nursery; Wed. Evening - Worship Serv. 6:30 p.m.

231 Bluff Drive, 715-247-2435 Services are Sundays at 10:30 a.m. CHRISTIAN CENTER

EVANGELICAL

Pastor Bruce Tanner, 715-268-2176 942 U.S. Hwy. 8, Amery Sun. Schl. 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible study 7 p.m.

CROSSWALK COMMUNITY CHURCH

HOPE FELLOWSHIP OF SOMERSET

CHRISTIAN CENTER

EL SALEM/TWIN FALLS CHRISTIAN CENTER

1751 100th Ave., Dresser Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship 10:30 a.m. Evening Services Sun. 6 p.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. Call Pastor Darryl Olson at 715-755-3133 for information and directions

523 1st St., Clayton, 715-948-2493 Fr. Christopher Wojcik, Pastor Saturday Vespers - 5 p.m.; Sunday Liturgy - 9:30 a.m.

Pastor - Father Daniel Bodin 490 Bench St., Taylors Falls, 651-465-7345 Sat. Vigil 5:30 p.m.; Sun. 7:30 & 10:30 a.m. Tues. - Thurs. 7:30 a.m.

Interim Pastor Julie Brenden 715-327-8384, 715-327-8090 Fellowship - 10:30 a.m., Sun. Schl. 9:45 a.m.; Worship 11 a.m., Communion - 1st & 2nd Sundays

Pastor Dan Slaikeu 4 mi. SE of Grantsburg on Williams Rd. Worship 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:30 a.m.

HOLY TRINITY ORTHODOX

1/2 mi. W. of Hwy. 35 on U, 715-866-8281, Pastors Douglas Olson, Roger Kampstra and Myron Carlson Services begin at 9:30 a.m.; Communion 1st & 3rd Sunday

ZION LUTHERAN - TRADE LAKE

FULL GOSPEL

Pastor Dale VanDeusen, 715-488-2296 or 715-488-2653 20296 Hwy. 87, Grantsburg Morning Wor. - 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - 10:45 a.m.; Nursery provided for all services

CHURCH OF ST. JOSEPH

Pastor Tim Faust Worship - 11 a.m.; Sun. School - 10 a.m. Holy Communion - 1st & 3rd Sunday

Dairyland - Rev. Andrea Wittwer 715-244-3649 Sunday School - 10 a.m.; Worship - 11 a.m.

TRADE RIVER EVAN. FREE

290 W. Government Street, 715-294-4436 Reverend Dr. Rolland Robinson Sunday Service - 10 a.m. with nursery Sunday School - Sept. - May at 10 a.m.

Pastor Dave Guertin 7686 Lofty Pines Drive, Siren, 715-349-5601 Worship 10 a.m.; Sunday School 9 a.m.

ZION LUTHERAN - EAST FARMINGTON (WELS )

WOODLAND WESLEYAN

TAYLORS FALLS UNITED METHODIST

TRINITY EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN OSCEOLA

Pastor Gary Rokenbrodt - 715-653-2630 5 mi. E. of Frederic on W, 2 mi. south on I; Sun. School 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m. Communion - 1st Sunday

WESLEYAN

CHRISTIAN ORTHODOX

Pastor Scott Sagle, 715-689-2541 Sun. School 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Worship 10:30 p.m.; Elevator provided, welcome

WEST IMMANUEL LUTHERAN - ELCA

WESLEYAN

Tom Cook, Pastor Sunday School 9 a.m. Worship - 10:15 a.m. (Nursery available)

Hwy. 70 East, 715-689-2271, Pastor: Carl Heidel Worship 9 a.m.; Sunday School 10:15 a.m. Communion -Every Sunday

Pastors Mike & Linda Rozumalski 1 mi. west of Luck on N, 2478 170th St., Luck Sunday Wor. 10 a.m.; Sunday Schl. 9 a.m. Fellowship 11 a.m.

Minister Garret Derouin, 715-866-7157 Musky & Birch St., Avail. in office 9 a.m. - noon, Tues.-Fri.; Sun. Bible Study 9:30 a.m. Worship 10:30 a.m.

Pastor Greg Lund, 715-327-8767 700 Churchwood Lane; 505 Old CTH W, Frederic Sun. Schl. - 9 a.m.; Morn. Worship - 10:15 a.m.; Nursery provided for all services Sat. Worship - 6 p.m., Luck Senior Center

SIREN UNITED METHODIST

YELLOW LAKE LUTHERAN

IMMANUEL LUTHERAN - FREDERIC

SIREN ASSEMBLY OF GOD

1614 CTH B, North Luck, Pastor Rob Lubben Sunday Worship - 9 a.m. Contact Leslie Valentine, 715-646-2390; E-mail: leslie56@centurytel.net

10 mi. W. of Cumberland on Hwy. 48 (McKinley) - Pastor Neal Weltzin GT Office 715-857-5580, Parsonage 715-822-3001, TR Office - 715-822-3001 Wor. Serv. - 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - 10:15 a.m. Holy Communion - 1st Sunday

CHURCH OF CHRIST - WEBSTER

WOOD RIVER CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP

EVANGELICAL

TRINITY LUTHERAN - ELCA

CHURCH OF CHRIST

CHURCH OF CHRIST

FULL GOSPEL

ST. CROIX FALLS UNITED METHODIST

(Missouri Synod) 140 Madison St. South, St. Croix Falls Pastor Mark K. Schoen Sun. Service - 9 a.m.; Sun.School - 10:30 a.m.

Pastor Andy McDaniel, 715-327-8402 Sun. Schl. - 9:15 a.m.; Wor. Serv. - 10:15 a.m.; Nursery provided.; www.tradelakebaptistchurch.org

Pastor Larry Mederich, 715-294-4332 www.occconnect.org Mtg. @ St. Croix Art Barn; Sun. Serv. - 9 a.m. Nursery and children church

ST. PETER’S LUTHERAN - LCMC

ST. LUKE UNITED - FREDERIC

TRADE LAKE BAPTIST

OSCEOLA COMMUNITY CHURCH

350 Michigan Ave., Centuria Sun. Worship - 10:45 a.m.; Sun. School - 10 a.m.

ST. JOHN’S EV. LUTHERAN (Wis. Synod)

FRISTAD LUTHERAN - CENTURIA

Phone 715-327-4340, 715-327-8384, 715-327-8090 Interim Pastor Julie Brenden Worship 9:15 a.m.; Sun. School 10:30 a.m. Communion - 1st & 2nd Sundays

CENTURIA ASSEMBLY OF GOD

oumc@centurytel.net 306 River Street, Osceola, 715-755-2275 Pastor Mark Gilbert Adult Class - 8:30 a.m.; Sunday School 10 a.m. Sunday Worship - 10 a.m.; Holy Communion 1st Sunday

Rev. Thomas E. Thompson, 715-247-3310 255 St. Hwy. 35, East Farmington Mass Friday 9 a.m.; Sacrament of Penance Sat. 3:30 p.m.

GRACE LUTHERAN - WEST SWEDEN

ASSEMBLY

Pastor Jack Starr Wor. - 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - during worship hour

Rev. Rexford D. Brandt 447 180th St., Osceola, 715-294-2936 Sunday Worship 9 a.m. Communion 1st & 3rd Sunday of the month

Rt. 1, Balsam Lake, WI (Fox Creek) Pastor Neal Weltzen; GT Office - 715-857-5580, Parsonage - 715-822-3001, TR Office - 715-822-3001 Wors. Serv. 10:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9:15 a.m.; Holy Communion - 1st Sun. of each month

ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST Pastor Father Michael J. Tupa, 715-866-7321 Cedar & Muskey Ave. - Webster Mass Sun 10 a.m., Wed. 5:30 p.m. (Sept-May), Fri. 9 a.m. (Summer)

CENTRAL UNITED METHODIST GRANTSBURG

Pastor Dorothy Sandahl, 715-648-5323 or 715-648-5324 Sun. Wor. 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9 a.m.

GEORGETOWN LUTHERAN - ELCA

Pastor Doug McConnell Youth Pastor Chris Radtke At Grantsburg High School, 715-463-5794 Sun. Serv. 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 11 a.m.

OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN, (LCMS) WEBSTER

WEST DENMARK LUTHERAN

ELCA - 501 Hwy. 35, 715-646-2357, Mel Rau, Pastor Sun. Wor. & Holy Communion - 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - 10:40 a.m.

LIVING HOPE CHURCH

Pastor Father Daniel Bodin, 651-465-7345 25293 Redwing Ave., Shafer, MN Sunday 9 a.m.

1050 North Keller Ave., Amery 715-268-7717 Father John Drummy, Pastor Sat. Mass 4 p.m., Sun. Mass 8 a.m. Mass Wed. & Thurs. 9 a.m.

FIRST EVAN. LUTHERAN

FIRST LUTHERAN - CUSHING

ATLAS UNITED METHODIST

ST. FRANCIS XAVIER

Cindy Glocke, Pastor, 715-866-8646 Sunday Worship - 9 a.m.

300 Seminole Ave. (CTH M) Mark Kock, Pastor, 715-294-2828 Sunday Worship 8 a.m. & 10:30 a.m.; Summer, 9 a.m.

5561 Chestnut St., Taylors Falls, MN 651-465-5265 Traditional Worship 8:30 a.m.; Sunday School & Youth 9:45 a.m.; Adult Learning 10 a.m.; Contemp. Wor. 11 a.m.

METHODIST

Pastor Maggie Isaacson, 715-825-3559 3 mi. W. of Milltown on “G” Sunday Worship - 9:15 a.m. Holy Communion 1st & 3rd Sundays

Pastor Victor St. George, 715-463-5388 Worship 9:30 a.m.; Sun. School 10:45 a.m.

FAITH LUTHERAN - GRANTSBURG

METHODIST

Pastor Father Michael J. Tupa CTHs A & H - 715-866-7321 Crescent Lake Voyager Village area. Mass Sun. 8 a.m., Thurs. 9:30 a.m. Reconciliation as per bulletin and by appt.

ST. DOMINIC - FREDERIC & IMMACULATE CONCEPTION - GRANTSBURG CATHOLIC MASS SCHEDULE Pastor: Rev. Dennis M. Mullen, 715-327-8119 St. Dominic: Sat. 4:30 p.m.; Sun. 10:30 a.m. Immaculate Conception: Sat. 6:30 p.m.; Sun. 8:30 a.m. Call the office for daily & holy day Mass times

ST. ANNE PARISH Rev. Thomas E. Thompson, 715-247-3310 139 Church Hill Rd., Somerset Mass Sun. 8:30 a.m.; Wed. 9 a.m. Sacrament of Penance Sun. 8 a.m.

BAPTIST

BAPTIST

EAST BALSAM BAPTIST - BALSAM LK. 715-857-5411 Worship Service - 9 a.m.; Sunday School-10:15 a.m.

EUREKA BAPTIST 2393 210th Ave., St. Croix Falls Pastor Willis Christenson, 715-483-9464 Sunday School - 10 a.m.; Worship Service - 11 a.m.

FAITH FELLOWSHIP Hwy. 35 and CTH N., Luck Bill McEachern Pastor, 715-485-3973 Sun. Bible study - 9 a.m.; Sun. Wor. - 10 a.m.

FIRST BAPTIST - AMERY 131 Broadway St., 715-268-2223; www.fbcamery.org; E-mail: churchoffice@fbcamery.org Pastor Charlie Butt, Lead Pastor; Nick Buda, Assoc. Pastor of Family Ministries Sunday Service: 9 a.m.; All ages Sunday School 10:30 - 11:30 a.m. Nursery available

FIRST BAPTIST - FALUN Pastor Kevin Miller Associate Pastor Steve Ward Sunday School - (all ages) - 9:30 a.m. Church Serv. - 10:45 a.m.

FIRST BAPTIST - MILLTOWN Pastor Marlon Mielke, 715-825-3186 Sunday Schl. 9:45 a.m.; Worship 11 a.m., 7 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST - TAYLORS FALLS, MN Located across from elemen. school on West St., Pastor, Dr. Kevin Schumann; 651-465-7171 Sun. Morn. - Sun. School for all ages - 9 a.m. Morn. Worship - 10:15 a.m.; Nursery provided.

FIRST BAPTIST - WEBSTER Church Phone 715-866-4111; Interim Pastor Ken Hyatt; Youth Pastor Jerry Scheumann Sun. School - 9:30 a.m.; Wor. - 10:45 a.m (Nursery Provided)

GRACE CHURCH OF OSCEOLA “The Cure for the Common Church”

ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN

HOLY CROSS ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN Meeting at Zion Lutheran Church, 28005 Old Towne Rd., Chisago Lakes, MN hcomm.org Sunday Worship Service 9:30 a.m. NAZARENE

NAZARENE

CALVARY CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 510 S. Vincent, St. Croix Falls Pastor Tom Reaume, 715-483-3696 Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:45 a.m. & Wed. 6:30 p.m.

FAITH COMMUNITY 7535 Peet St., Danbury, 715-656-4010 Adult Bible Service 9 a.m.; Services: Sun. 10 a.m.; Sunday School during church service.

NONDENOMINATIONAL

NONDENOMINATIONAL

CENTERPOINT CHURCH “Come as you are”

Pastor Dick Enerson, www.centerpointstcroix.com, 715-294-1833, Meeting at SCF High Schl. - Main entrance 740 Maple Drive, St. Croix Falls Sunday Worship 10 - 11:15 a.m.

NEW LIFE COMMUNITY - AMERY Interim Pastor Craig Jorgenson Sunday Worship 10 a.m.; Children’s Church: K to 6th Grade

NEW LIFE CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY Meets at Dresser Elem. School, Dresser Pastor Tony Minell 715-417-1982 Sunday Worship 9:45 a.m.; Sunday School 9:45 a.m.

NEW WINE CHURCH - CENTURIA 309 5th Street, , 715-338-2751 Pastors Randy and Pam Stone Sunday 10 a.m.; Wednesday 7 p.m.

NORTHERN PINES FRIENDS WORSHIP GROUP 715-733-0481 or 715-733-0480 for time of meeting.

INTERDENOMINATIONAL

INTERDENOMINATIONAL

RIVER VALLEY CHRISTIAN

722 Seminole Ave., Osceola Pastor Dr. Kent Haralson; 715-294-4222 or 715-755-3454; info@gracechurchosceola.com Sun.: Praise & Worship Serv. 9 am., Adult Bible Study 10:45 a.m., Children’s Sun. School 10:45 a.m.

1289 160th St. (Hwy. 65), St. Croix Falls, 715-483-5378 Senior Pastors Paul and Sonja Hanson Sunday Adult Bible Class 9 a.m. (No child care available) Worship and Children’s Sunday Schl. 10 a.m.

GRACE BAPTIST - GRANTSBURG

ST. PETER’S COMMUNITY CHURCH

716 S. Robert St., Grantsburg, 715-463-5699 Sr. Pastor Brad Moore David Ahlquist, Assoc. Pastor Sun. Worship 9:30 a.m.; Sun. School 11 a.m.

“Faith on Purpose” (Love God, Love People...period) faithonpurpose.org CTH F, Dresser, 715-483-2911 Pastor’s res./office Sunday Worship 10 a.m.

church directory

ADVENTIST

PAGE 54 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - APRIL 20, 2011

PLEASE NOTE...IMPORTANT NOTICE YOU WILL LOSE TITLE TO YOUR PROPERTY IF THESE TAXES ARE NOT PAID ON OR BEFORE JUNE 13, 2011 TAKE NOTICE that all persons having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in or lien upon the real property described in the list of tax liens, No. 2011-1 on file in the Office of the Clerk of Circuit Court of Polk County, dated April 6, 2011, and herein set forth, are hereby notified that the filing of such list of tax liens in the Office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Polk County constitutes the commencement by said Polk County of a special proceedings in the Circuit Court for Polk County to foreclose the tax liens therein described by foreclosure proceeding In Rem and that a notice of the pendency of such proceeding against each piece or parcel of land therein described was filed in the Office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court on April 6, 2011. Such proceeding is brought against the real property herein described only and is to foreclose the tax liens described in such list. No personal judgment will be entered herein for such taxes, assessments or other legal charges or any part thereof. TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that all persons having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in or lien upon the real property described in said list of tax liens are hereby notified that a certified copy of such list of tax

liens has been posted in the Office of the County Treasurer of Polk County and will remain posted for public inspection up to and including June 13, 2011, which date is hereby fixed as the last day of redemption. TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that any person having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in or lien upon any such parcel may, on or before said June 13, 2011, redeem such delinquent tax liens by paying to the County Treasurer of Polk County, the amount of all such unpaid tax liens and in addition thereto, all interest and penalties which have accrued on said unpaid tax liens, computed to and including the date of redemption, plus the reasonable costs that the County incurred to initiate the proceedings plus the person’s share of the reasonable costs of publication under sub. (6). POLK COUNTY By Amanda Nissen Polk County Treasurer

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY In the Matter of the Foreclosure of Tax Liens under Section 75.521 Wis. Statutes by Polk County: 2011-1 PETITION FOR JUDGMENT VESTING TITLE TO POLK COUNTY Now comes the County of Polk, by Carole T. Wondra, Polk County Clerk, and alleges and states as follows: 1. The Polk County Treasurer, Amanda Nissen, has prepared a List of Tax Liens of Polk County being foreclosed by proceeding In Rem, a verified copy of which is attached and incorporated herein by reference. 2. The foreclosure of the tax liens through In Rem proceedings is governed by Section 75.521 Wisconsin Statutes and the requirements therein have been fulfilled. 3. The time periods after the date of the tax certificates, as stated, is set forth in Section 75.521 (3) Stat., have lapsed for the properties included and described in said list. 4. Notice of this proceeding shall be given to all parties specified in Section 75.521 (3) c Stat. by the County Treasurer sending a copy of this petition, and a copy of the List of Tax Liens of Polk County by registered or certified mail, return receipt requested. WHEREFORE, the Petitioner requests that the court grant judgment in favor of Polk County vesting title to the parcels of land described in the attached “List of Tax Liens” in Polk County, thereby, barring any and all claims whatsoever of the former owners or any persons claiming through and under the former owners since the date of filing the list of tax liens in the office of the Clerk of Circuit Court. Dated this 6th day of April, 2011. Carole T. Wondra, Polk County Clerk Polk County Government Center 100 Polk County Plaza, Suite 110, Balsam Lake, WI 54810

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY In the Matter of the Foreclosure of Tax Liens under Section 75.521 Wis. Statutes by Polk County; list of Tax Liens for 2011-1 AFFIDAVIT I, Amanda Nissen, being first duly sworn under oath, depose and state as follows: 1. I am the Treasurer for the County of Polk. 2. I prepared the attached List of Tax Liens of Polk County which are being foreclosed by proceeding In Rem 2011-1 in the Circuit Court of Polk County. 3. I verify that the information contained in the listed tax liens is true and correct and that said information is based upon the files and records contained in the Polk County Treasurer’s Office. Amanda Nissen Polk County Treasurer 715-485-9255 Subscribed and sworn to before me this 6th day of April, 2011. Carole T. Wondra Notary Public, Polk County, Wis.

LIST OF TAX LIENS OF POLK COUNTY BEING FORECLOSED BY PROCEEDING IN REM 2011-1 STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE FORECLOSURE OF TAX LIENS UNDER SECTION 75.521 WISCONSIN STATUTES BY POLK COUNTY, LIST OF TAX LIENS FOR YEARS INDICATED. NO. DESCRIPTION

OWNER/MORTGAGE CO. LIEN/JUDGMENT HOLDER

YEAR TAX

AMT. TAX CERT.#

INT. RATE

001 Town of Alden 002-01106-0200 Sec 9 T32 R18 Lot 2 CSM 5273

Owner: Robert J. Kehl Lien/Judgment Holders: Polk County Land Surveying Co. Wisconsin Dept. of Revenue Dept. of Treasury/ Internal Revenue Service

2007 SC 2007

745.74 165.00

78

12% Annually

002 Town of Alden 002-01106-0600 Sec 9 T32 R18 Lot 6 CSM 5272

Owner: Robert J. Kehl Lien/Judgment Holders: Polk County Land Surveying Co. Wisconsin Dept. of Revenue Dept. of Treasury/ Internal Revenue Service

2007 SC 2007

969.46 165.00

81

12% Annually

003 Town of Alden 002-01329-0000 Sec 14 T32 R18 Pt SE SE

Owner: Dale K. Goulett Mortgage Holder: Cherokee State Bank

2007 SC 2007

004 Town of Alden 002-01333-0000 Sec 15 T32 R18 Pt NE NE

Owner: Kenneth R. Carlson 2007 Mortgage Holders: SC 2007 Centennial Mortgage & Funding Inc. Central Bank

79.44 165.00

005 Town of Alden 002-01731-0000 Sec 27 T32 R18 Pt SW SW

Owner: Mitchell R. Erickson Land Contract Holders: Donald H. & Harriet Schroepfer Rural American Bank Luck Lien/Judgment Holders: WI Dept. of Rev.

2007 SC 2007

787.23 165.00

006 Town of Alden 002-01805-0000 Sec 34 T32 R18 Lot 8 CSM 2342

Owners: Dale E. & Pamela J. Prax Lien/Judgment Holder: WI Dept. of Revenue

2007 SC 2007

76.55 165.00

118

007 Town of Alden Owner: Glen Johnson 002-02111-0000 Construction Inc. Sec 23 T32 R18 Mortgage Holder: The RiverBank Lot 1 CSM 106 being pt Lot 8 Warren Park

2007 SC 2007

1,789.77 165.00

127

008 Town of Alden 002-02266-1200 Sec 28 T32 R17 Lot 12 Plat of Canterbury Hills

Owner: Biermann Homes Inc. Mortgage Holder: Bridgewater Bank

2007 SC 2007

009 Town of Alden 002-02266-1400 Sec 28 T32 R17 Lot 14 Plat of Canterbury Hills

Owner: Biermann Homes Inc. Mortgage Holder: Bridgewater Bank

2007 SC 2007

3,147.02 165.00

640.89 165.00

726.34 165.00

89

90

115

134

135

NO. DESCRIPTION

OWNER/MORTGAGE CO. LIEN/JUDGMENT HOLDER

YEAR TAX

AMT. TAX CERT.#

INT. RATE

010 Town of Alden 002-02266-1500 Sec 28 T32 R17 Lot 15 Plat of Canterbury Hills

Owner: Biermann Homes Inc. Mortgage Holder: Bridgewater Bank

2007 SC 2007

726.34 165.00

136

12% Annually

011 Town of Apple River 004-00024-0100 Sec 1 T34 R16 Lot 1 CSM 4169

Owner: Troy J. Hanson Mortgage Holder: S & C Bank Lien/Judgment Holder: WESTconsin Credit Union

2007 SC 2007

795.24 165.00

162

12% Annually

Owners: James M. Jr. & Lori A. Duncan LE James M. & JoAnn Duncan Mortgage Holder: S & C Bank

2007 SC 2007

431.28 165.00

164

12% Annually

12% Annually

012 Town of Apple River 004-00056-0000 Sec 2 T34 R16 Pt SW SW

Owners: James M. Jr. & Lori A. Duncan LE James M. & JoAnn D. Duncan Mortgage Holder: S & C Bank

2007 SC 2007

1,718.40 165.00

165

12% Annually

12% Annually

013 Town of Apple River 004-00057-0000 Sec 2 T34 R16 NE SW SW 014 Town of Apple River 004-00398-0000 Sec 12 T34 R16 Pt SE NE & NE SE AKA Parcel 1 per PD-820

Owner: Laurie Sabata Mortgage Holders: Polk County Bremer Bank NA

2007 SC 2007

1,400.31 165.00

184

12% Annually

015 Town of Apple River 004-00694-0100 Sec 25 T34 R16 Lot 1 CSM 2106

Owner: Erenia C. Benitez Mortgage Holder: Earl Goodwin

2007 SC 2007

1,625.46 165.00

212

12% Annually

016 Town of Apple River 004-00804-0000 Sec 29 T34 R16 Gov Lot 3

Owner: Susan J. Peterson 2007 Lien/Judgment Holders: SC 2007 State of WI Dept. of Health Services Hill Top Excavating Cottonwood Financial Wisconsin

624.12 165.00

234

12% Annually

017 Town of Apple River 004-00808-000 Sec 29 T34 R16 Pt SE SW

Owner: Susan J. Peterson 2007 Lien/Judgment Holders: SC 2007 State of WI Dept. of Health Services Hill Top Excavating Cottonwood Financial Wisconsin

341.69 165.00

238

12% Annually

018 Town of Apple River 004-00807-0200 Sec 29 T34 R16 Lot 2 CSM 1772

Owners: Wayne T. & Louise M. Giampaolo Mortgage Holders: U.S. Bank NA RBMG Inc. M & I Bank FSB

96.45 165.00

237

12% Annually

12% Annually

12% Annually

12% Annually

12% Annually

12% Annually

533707 34-36L 25a,d WNAXLP

2007 SC 2007

Continued On Next Page

APRIL 20, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 55

Seniors Karie Bartlett, Stacie Buck, Morgan Denny, David Franzel, Karissa Giller, Logan Hacker, Kyle James, Brady Klatt, Nicholas Leal, Neal Mellon, Megan Moore, Alec Mortel, Maxwell Musial, Kasey Ouellette, Genavieve Pearson, Ashley Petersen, Tabitha Pilz, Sammie Schallenberger, Jade Schrock, Lindsey Stapel, Roger Steen, Landen Strilzuk, AJ Walsh-Brenizer, Mikayla Washington, Alexandria Wilkinson and Kristine Wortman. Juniors Anthony Aguado, Taylar Anderson, Tyler Ander-

Luck Honor Roll

son, Julie Franzel, Shardae Garcia, Taylor Hacker, Michael Jenssen, Summer Johnson, Laurie Jorgenson, Benjamin Kufalk, Caitlin Ledin, Maia Lehmann, Morgyn McGinnity, Krystal Ouellette, Morgan Pullin and Jacob Schrock.

Sophomores Sonja Anton, Evan Armour, Jordan Bazey, Eric Blaser, Jaimee Buck, John Denny, Ashley Dexter, Katelyn Dinnies, Cole Engstrand, Brendan Fenning, Gabriel Hendrickson, Austin Holdt, Kyle Hunter, Taylor Joy, Hannah Karl, Brodie Kunze, Dylan LeMay, Leah LeMay, Geoffrey Maiden Mueller, Jillian Peterson, Logan Potvin, Kylie Rich,

Alexander Richey, Jan Rozumalski, Avery Steen and Matthew Thompson. Freshmen Megan Bartylla, Tessa Clemenson, Haley Dikkers, Casey Ekholm, Cody Engstrand, Samantha Harvey, Jillian Klatt, Camille Marsten, Connor McGinnity, Travis Muller, Noah Musial, Isabella Nelson, Darian Ogilvie, Abbie Otlo, Karsten Petersen, Whitney Petersen, Brianna Schaar, Dylan Skow and Alicia Sund.

Eighth grade Hailey Foeller, Reilly Giller, Angela Gore, Jordan Hendrickson, Jenni Holdt, Derek Hutton,

Kalley Lunsmann, Samuel Nelson, Tanner Nielsen, Jes Pedersen, Katelyn Pfaff, Emily Warren, Farrah Welch, Victoria Wood and Krystal Zuniga.

Seventh grade Anna Christensen, Maxwell Dehmer, John Dikkers, Brittany Donald, Kerrigan Ekholm, Devyn Ellefson, Jordan Erickson, Taylor Hawkins, Steven Holdt, Jared Hunter, Jordan Jones, Madeline Joy, Alaura Lemieux, Nick Mattson, Noah Mortel, Emma Pedersen, Christopher Pouliot, Derek Rennicke, William Rovney, Sarah Schaar, Parker Steen and Luke Woltz.

LIST OF TAX LIENS OF POLK COUNTY BEING FORECLOSED BY PROCEEDING IN REM 2011-1 (cont’d.) NO. DESCRIPTION

OWNER/MORTGAGE CO. LIEN/JUDGMENT HOLDER

YEAR TAX

AMT. TAX CERT.#

INT. RATE

NO. DESCRIPTION

OWNER/MORTGAGE CO. LIEN/JUDGMENT HOLDER

YEAR TAX

AMT. TAX CERT.#

INT. RATE

019 Town of Apple River 004-00822-0000 Sec 30 T34 R16 Pt Gov Lot 3

Owners: Charles L. & Janet R. Cran 2007 Mortgage Holder: Bremer Bank NA SC 2007

39.51 165.00

245

12% Annually

032 Town of Beaver 008-00707-0000 Sec 26 T34 R15 Pt SE SE

Owner: Zachary Russell Mortgage Holder: EquiFirst Corporation

2007 SC 2007

362.10 165.00

477

12% Annually

020 Town of Apple River 004-00899-0040 Sec 33 T34 R16 Pt Lot 4 CSM 1740

Owner: Joshua Beauvais

2007 SC 2007

288.36 165.00

254

12% Annually

033 Town of Beaver 008-00885-0001 Sec 34 T34 R15 Lot 1 CSM 1565

2007 SC 2007

259.93 165.00

488

12% Annually

021 Town of Apple River 004-01000-0000 Sec 6 T34 R16 Unit 7 East Balsam Resort Condo

Owner: Mark G. Mann Mortgage Holder: Associated Bank NA

2007 SC 2007

690.37 165.00

262

12% Annually

Owners: Gene R. & Dawn L. Kittelson Mortgage Holder: WESTconsin Credit Union Lien/Judgment Holders: Cumberland Memorial Hospital Wisconsin Dept. of Revenue Diagnostic Radiology Associates

034 Town of Beaver 008-01021-0000 Sec 14 T34 R15 Lot 8 Morning Side Park

Owners: Joan M. Rourke; Kristin M. Rourke; Christopher J. Werle William C. Brakeman Mortgage Holder: Bell America Mortgage LLC

2007 SC 2007

11.65 165.00

493

12% Annually

035 Town of Beaver 008-01022-0000 Sec 14 T34 R15 Lot 9 Morning Side Park

Owners: Joan M. Rourke; Kristin M. Rourke; Christopher J. Werle William C. Brakeman Mortgage Holder: Bell America Mortgage LLC

2007 SC 2007

50.81 165.00

494

12% Annually

Owners: Joan M. Rourke; Kristin M. Rourke; Christopher J. Werle William C. Brakeman Mortgage Holder: Bell America Mortgage LLC

2007 SC 2007

23.39 165.00

495

12% Annually

12% Annually

036 Town of Beaver 008-01023-0000 Sec 14 T34 R15 Lot 10 Morning Side Park

Owners: Charles E. & 2007 Wanda Stuntz SC 2007 Mortgage Holder: Bremer Bank NA Lien/Judgment Holders: Wisconsin Dept. of Revenue Amery Regional Medical Center Cemstone Products Co.

420.69 165.00

505

12% Annually

12% Annually

037 Town of Black Brook 010-00185-0000 Sec 8 T32 R16 Pt NE NE

038 Town of Black Brook 010-00188-0000 Sec 8 T32 R16 Pt NE NE

Owners: Charles E. & 2007 Wanda Stuntz SC 2007 Mortgage Holder: Bremer Bank NA Lien/Judgment Holders: Wisconsin Dept. of Revenue Amery Regional Medical Center Cemstone Products Co.

3,637.78 165.00

506

12% Annually

039 Town of Black Brook 010-00194-0000 Sec 8 T32 R16 Pt SE NE

Owners: Charles E. & Wanda Stuntz Lien/Judgment Holders: Wisconsin Dept. of Revenue Amery Regional Medical Center

2007 SC 2007

231.91 165.00

507

12% Annually

040 Town of Black Brook 010-00459-0000 Sec 18 T32 R16 Pt NE NE

Owner: Robert L. Moore

2007 SC 2007

77.30 165.00

521

12% Annually

041 Town of Black Brook 010-00464-0000 Sec 18 T32 R16 Pt SE NE

Owner: Robert L. Moore

2007 SC 2007

165.01 165.00

522

12% Annually

042 Town of Black Brook 010-00606-0000 Sec 24 T32 R16 PT SE NE

Owners: Carol J. & Catherine Donovan Lien/Judgment Holders: CACH Jeff J. Bohn RMB Funding Polk County (Sheriff) Polk County (Zoning)

2007 SC 2007

1,825.18 165.00

527

12% Annually

022 Town of Apple River Owner: Diane R. Connors 004-01043-0000 Sec 2 T34 R16 Lot 6 Plat of Cherrywood

2007 SC 2007

361.59 165.00

264

12% Annually

023 Town of Apple River Owners: Vernon J. & 004-01189-0000 Lucille M. Kelly Sec 36 T34 R16 Pt Lot 7 & 12 Assessor’s Plat (Range)

2007 SC 2007

1,765.70 165.00

274

12% Annually

024 Town of Balsam Lake 006-00488-0100 Sec 17 T34 R17 Lot 1 CSM 4779

Owner: Jenice D. McKenzie Mortgage Holder: Sterling Trust Company FBO Richard A. Strohbusch

2007 SC 2007

1,156.10 165.00

318

12% Annually

025 Town of Balsam Lake 006-00734-0000 Sec 26 T34 R17 Lot 1 CSM 606

Owner: Randy White Lien/Judgment Holders: Amery Regional Medical Center Joe’s Heating & Air Conditioning Milwaukee Child Support Agency

2007

417.92

339

026 Town of Balsam Lake 006-01005-0000 Sec 33 T34 R17 Lot 13 CSM 593

Owner: Scott R. Wallis Mortgage Holder: Countrywide Home Loans Inc. Lien/Judgment Holder: Rock County Child Support Agency

2007 SC 2007

Owner: Steven A. Swager Mortgage Holders: Schanon Mortgage Inc. Bremer Bank NA Lien/Judgment Holders: WESTconsin Credit Union Mark Robert Young

2007 SC 2007

Owners: Jeffrey D. Hulett; Carolyn A. Michels; Michael G. Tibbetts Mortgage Holders: J.P. Morgan Chase Bank NA Security State Bank of Marine

2007 SC 2007

029 Town of Beaver 008-00274-0000 Sec 12 T34 R15 Pt Gov Lot 3

Owners: Timothy A. & Sharon K. Wold Mortgage Holder: The Bank of New York Mellon Lien/Judgment Holder: Dept. of Treasury-Internal Revenue Service

2007 SC 2007

030 Town of Beaver 008-00613-0400 Sec 23 T34 R15 Lot 4 CSM 4123

Owner: Ernesto Benitez Mortgage Holders: Schanon Mortgage Bremer Bank NA

2007 SC 2007

3,550.49 165.00

438

12% Annually

031 Town of Beaver 008-00617-1000 Sec 23 T34 R15 Lot 10 CSM 3561

Owners: Rene Benitez & Carlos Benitez Mortgage Holders: Schanon Mortgage Inc. Bremer Bank NA Lien/Judgment Holders: Midland Funding LLC Nu Island Partners LLC

2007 SC 2007

243.24 165.00

440

12% Annually

027 Town of Balsam Lake 006-01078-0000 Sec 35 T34 R17 Pt SW SE

028 Town of Balsam Lake 006-01079-0001 Sec 35 T34 R17 Outlot 1 CSM 4438

105.45 165.00

845.07 165.00

133.09 165.00

182.83 165.00

366

383

384

420

12% Annually

12% Annually

12% Annually

533709 34-36L 25a,d WNAXLP

PAGE 56 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - APRIL 20, 2011

PLEASE NOTE...IMPORTANT NOTICE YOU WILL LOSE TITLE TO YOUR PROPERTY IF THESE TAXES ARE NOT PAID ON OR BEFORE JUNE 13, 2011 TAKE NOTICE that all persons having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in or lien upon the real property described in the list of tax liens, No. 2011-2 on file in the Office of the Clerk of Circuit Court of Polk County, dated April 6, 2011, and herein set forth, are hereby notified that the filing of such list of tax liens in the Office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Polk County constitutes the commencement by said Polk County of a special proceedings in the Circuit Court for Polk County to foreclose the tax liens therein described by foreclosure proceeding In Rem and that a notice of the pendency of such proceeding against each piece or parcel of land therein described was filed in the Office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court on April 6, 2011. Such proceeding is brought against the real property herein described only and is to foreclose the tax liens described in such list. No personal judgment will be entered herein for such taxes, assessments or other legal charges or any part thereof. TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that all persons having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in or lien upon the real property described in said list of tax liens are hereby notified that a certified copy of such list of tax

liens has been posted in the Office of the County Treasurer of Polk County and will remain posted for public inspection up to and including June 13, 2011, which date is hereby fixed as the last day of redemption. TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that any person having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in or lien upon any such parcel may, on or before said June 13, 2011, redeem such delinquent tax liens by paying to the County Treasurer of Polk County, the amount of all such unpaid tax liens and in addition thereto, all interest and penalties which have accrued on said unpaid tax liens, computed to and including the date of redemption, plus the reasonable costs that the County incurred to initiate the proceedings plus the person’s share of the reasonable costs of publication under sub. (6). POLK COUNTY By Amanda Nissen Polk County Treasurer

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY In the Matter of the Foreclosure of Tax Liens under Section 75.521 Wis. Statutes by Polk County: 2011-2 PETITION FOR JUDGMENT VESTING TITLE TO POLK COUNTY Now comes the County of Polk, by Carole T. Wondra, Polk County Clerk, and alleges and states as follows: 1. The Polk County Treasurer, Amanda Nissen, has prepared a List of Tax Liens of Polk County being foreclosed by proceeding In Rem, a verified copy of which is attached and incorporated herein by reference. 2. The foreclosure of the tax liens through In Rem proceedings is governed by Section 75.521 Wisconsin Statutes and the requirements therein have been fulfilled. 3. The time periods after the date of the tax certificates, as stated, is set forth in Section 75.521 (3) Stat., have lapsed for the properties included and described in said list. 4. Notice of this proceeding shall be given to all parties specified in Section 75.521 (3) c Stat. by the County Treasurer sending a copy of this petition, and a copy of the List of Tax Liens of Polk County by registered or certified mail, return receipt requested. WHEREFORE, the Petitioner requests that the court grant judgment in favor of Polk County vesting title to the parcels of land described in the attached “List of Tax Liens” in Polk County, thereby, barring any and all claims whatsoever of the former owners or any persons claiming through and under the former owners since the date of filing the list of tax liens in the office of the Clerk of Circuit Court. Dated this 6th day of April, 2011. Carole T. Wondra, Polk County Clerk Polk County Government Center 100 Polk County Plaza, Suite 110, Balsam Lake, WI 54810

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY In the Matter of the Foreclosure of Tax Liens under Section 75.521 Wis. Statutes by Polk County; list of Tax Liens for 2011-2 AFFIDAVIT I, Amanda Nissen, being first duly sworn under oath, depose and state as follows: 1. I am the Treasurer for the County of Polk. 2. I prepared the attached List of Tax Liens of Polk County which are being foreclosed by proceeding In Rem 2011-2 in the Circuit Court of Polk County. 3. I verify that the information contained in the listed tax liens is true and correct and that said information is based upon the files and records contained in the Polk County Treasurer’s Office. Amanda Nissen Polk County Treasurer 715-485-9255 Subscribed and sworn to before me this 6th day of April, 2011. Carole T. Wondra Notary Public, Polk County, Wis.

LIST OF TAX LIENS OF POLK COUNTY BEING FORECLOSED BY PROCEEDING IN REM 2011-2 STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE FORECLOSURE OF TAX LIENS UNDER SECTION 75.521 WISCONSIN STATUTES BY POLK COUNTY, LIST OF TAX LIENS FOR YEARS INDICATED. NO. DESCRIPTION

OWNER/MORTGAGE CO. LIEN/JUDGMENT HOLDER

001 Town of Bone Lake 012-00253-0000 Sec 13 T36 R16 Pt SW SW

Owners: Dustin L. & Audry J. Donald Mortgage Holder: Rural American Bank Luck

2007 SC 2007

1,198.71 165.00

567 12% Annually

002 Town of Bone Lake 012-00729-0000 Sec 29 T36 R16 Lot 1 CSM 4278

Owner: Danny E. Hoffman Lien/Judgment Holder: Wisconsin Dept. of Revenue

2007 SC 2007

2,209.36 165.00

593 12% Annually

003 Town of Clam Falls 014-00199-0200 Sec 8 T37 R16 Lot 2 CSM 4174

Owner: David D. Graf Mortgage Holder: U.S. Bank NA Lien/Judgment Holders: Progrowth Bank Bankfirst Violet C. Nahkala

2007 SC 2007

1,238.24 165.00

630 12% Annually

004 Town of Clam Falls 014-00202-0100 Sec 8 T37 R16 Pt NW SE

Owner: David D. Graf Mortgage Holders: Kenneth Nahkala & Violet C. Nahkala U.S. Bank NA Lien/Judgment Holders: Progrowth Bank Bankfirst Violet C. Nahkala

2007 SC 2007

005 Town of Clam Falls 014-00370-2000 Sec 17 T37 R16 Lot 2 CSM 4648 & Interest In common area

YEAR TAX

AMT. TAX CERT.#

2,365.51 165.00

INT. RATE

NO. DESCRIPTION

10,200.79 165.00

006 Town of Clam Falls 014-00561-0000 Sec 27 T37 R16 Lot 1 V4 CSM pg 30

Owners: Mark P. & 2007 Margaret F. Jordan SC 2007 Lien/Judgment Holder: Milwaukee Child Support Agency

1,724.16 165.00

686 12% Annually

007 Town of Clam Falls 014-00589-0100 Sec 28 T37 R16 Lot 1 CSM 2241

Owners: Robert & Irene King 2007 Lien/Judgment Holders: SC 2007 Discover Bank Fond du Lac, Milwaukee, Winnebago & Rock Child Support Agencies Mineral Claim: State of WI Board of Commissioners of Public Lands

341.91 165.00

688 12% Annually

YEAR TAX

AMT. TAX CERT.#

INT. RATE

008 Town of Clam Falls 014-00612-0000 Sec 29 T37 R16 Pt NE SE

Owners: Robert Dale King, 2007 Christopher King Jr., Shawn P. SC 2007 King, Jason King & Pamela King Lien/Judgment Holders: Milwaukee, La Crosse, Manitowoc, Langlade, Winnebago, Douglas, Brown, Outagamie, Portgage & Waupaca Child Support Agencies Arrow Financial Services Mineral Claim: State of WI Board of Commissioners of Public Lands

1,490.84 165.00

689 12% Annually

009 Town of Clam Falls 014-00614-0000 Sec 29 T37 R16 NE SE

Owners: Robert Dale King, 2007 Christopher King Jr., Shawn P. SC 2007 King, Jason King & Pamela A. King Lien/Judgment Holders: Milwaukee, La Crosse, Manitowoc, Langlade, Winnebago, Douglas, Brown, Outagamie, Portgage & Waupaca Child Support Agencies Arrow Financial Services Mineral Claim: State of WI Board of Commissioners of Public Lands

13.12 165.00

690 12% Annually

010 Town of Clam Falls 014-00615-0000 Sec 29 T37 R16 NW SE

Owners: Robert Dale King, 2007 Christopher King Jr., Shawn P. SC 2007 King, Jason King & Pamela A. King Lien/Judgment Holders: Milwaukee, La Crosse, Manitowoc, Langlade, Winnebago, Douglas, Brown, Outagamie, Portgage & Waupaca Child Support Agencies Arrow Financial Services Mineral Claim: State of WI Board of Commissioners of Public Lands

1,422.08 165.00

691 12% Annually

011 Town of Clam Falls 014-00616-0000 Sec 29 T37 R16 SW SE

Owners: Robert Dale King, 2007 Christopher King Jr., Shawn P. SC 2007 King, Jason King & Pamela A. King Lien/Judgment Holders: Milwaukee, La Crosse, Manitowoc, Langlade, Winnebago, Douglas, Brown, Outagamie, Portgage & Waupaca Child Support Agencies Arrow Financial Services Mineral Claim: State of WI Board of Commissioners of Public Land

1,335.36 165.00

692 12% Annually

631 12% Annually

Owner: Seven Pines LLC 2007 Land Contract Holder: SC 2007 Leland Gohlike Mortgage Holder: Glenn R. Mortenson Lien/Judgment Holders: Wisconsin Dept. of Workforce Dev. Lakes Gas Company Ryan Benson Wisconsin Dept. of Revenue Department of Treasury-Internal Revenue Service

OWNER/MORTGAGE CO. LIEN/JUDGMENT HOLDER

669 12% Annually

533712 34-36L 25a,d WNAXLP

Continued On Next Page

APRIL 20, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 57

LIST OF TAX LIENS OF POLK COUNTY BEING FORECLOSED BY PROCEEDING IN REM 2011-2 (cont’d.) NO. DESCRIPTION 012 Town of Clam Falls 014-00617-0000 Sec 29 T37 R16 Pt SE SE

OWNER/MORTGAGE CO. LIEN/JUDGMENT HOLDER

YEAR TAX

AMT. TAX CERT.#

INT. RATE

693 12% Annually

NO. DESCRIPTION

OWNER/MORTGAGE CO. LIEN/JUDGMENT HOLDER

029 Town of Eureka 020-01059-0000 Sec 10 T35 R19 Pt SE SE

Owners: Tom & Lori M. Curtis 2007 Lien/Judgment Holders: SC 2007 Wisconsin Dept. of Revenue Dept. of Treasury-Internal Rev. Service

264.45 165.00

896 12% Annually

030 Town of Eureka 020-01274-0000 Sec 25 T35 R19 Pt SW NW

Owner: Charles Edward Mevissen 2007 Lien/Judgment Holder: SC 2007 Webster Concrete

8.58 165.00

909 12% Annually

031 Town of Farmington 022-00671-1000 Sec 28 T32 R19 Pt SW SE

Owner: Walker Properties of 2007 Woodbury IV LLC SC 2007 Mortgage Holder: Profinium Financial Lien/Judgment Holder: Milwaukee Child Support Agency

189.10 165.00

962 12% Annually

032 Town of Farmington 022-01209-0100 Sec 28 T32 R19 Lot 1 Plat of Arbor View

Owner: Walker Properties of 2007 Woodbury IV LLC SC 2007 Mortgage Holder: Profinium Financial Milwaukee Child Support Agency

486.95 165.00

992 12% Annually

Owner: Walker Properties of 2007 Woodbury IV LLC SC 2007 Mortgage Holder: Profinium Financial Lien/Judgment Holder: Milwaukee Child Support Agency

486.95 165.00

993 12% Annually

YEAR TAX

AMT. TAX CERT.#

INT. RATE

Owners: Robert Dale King, 2007 Christopher King Jr., Shawn P. SC 2007 King, Jason King & Pamela A. King Lien/Judgment Holders: Milwaukee, La Crosse, Manitowoc, Langlade, Winnebago, Douglas, Brown, Outagamie, Portgage & Waupaca Child Support Agencies Arrow Financial Services Mineral Claim: State of WI Board of Commissioners of Public Land

1,133.51 165.00

013 Town of Clayton 016-00316-0000 Sec 14 T33 R15 Pt NW SE

Owners: Dean V. & 2007 Sherri J. Munkelwitz SC 2007 Mortgage Holder: Bremer Bank NA

3,468.95 165.00

735 12% Annually

014 Town of Clayton 016-00339-0000 Sec 15 T33 R15 Pt NE SE

Owner: Bertha A. Anderson

2007 SC 2007

252.24 165.00

737 12% Annually

015 Town of Clayton 016-00567-0000 Sec 23 T33 R15 Pt SE NW

Owners: Geoffrey S. & Nancy K. Timm Mortgage Holder: Bank Mutual

2007 SC 2007

1,587.79 165.00

749 12% Annually

016 Town of Clayton 016-00762-0100 Sec 31 T33 R15 Lot 1 CSM 4380

Owners: Arthur W. Renander 2007 Zara Renander, Sonja V. Renander SC 2007 Mortgage Holders: Schanon Mortgage Inc. Michael D. & Cynthia A. Jensen Gwin Family Trust

345.77 165.00

756 12% Annually

033 Town of Farmington 022-01209-0200 Sec 28 T32 R19 Lot 2 Plat of Arbor View

994 12% Annually

Owners: Arthur W. Renander 2007 Zara Renander, Sonja V. Renander SC 2007 Mortgage Holders: Schanon Mortgage Inc. Michael D. & Cynthia A. Jensen Gwin Family Trust

339.74 165.00

757 12% Annually

Owner: Walker Properties of 2007 Woodbury IV LLC SC 2007 Mortgage Holder: Profinium Financial Lien/Judgment Holder: Milwaukee Child Support Agency

502.70 165.00

017 Town of Clayton 016-00762-0200 Sec 31 T33 R15 Lot 2 CSM 4380

034 Town of Farmington 022-01209-0300 Sec 28 T32 R19 Lot 3 Plat of Arbor View

995 12% Annually

Owners: Arthur W. Renander 2007 Zara Renander, Sonja V. Renander SC 2007 Mortgage Holders: Schanon Mortgage Inc. Michael D. & Cynthia A. Jensen Gwin Family Trust

462.36 165.00

758 12% Annually

Owner: Walker Properties of 2007 Woodbury IV LLC SC 2007 Mortgage Holder: Profinium Financial Lien/Judgment Holder: Milwaukee Child Support Agency

491.67 165.00

018 Town of Clayton 016-00762-0300 Sec 31 T33 R15 Lot 3 CSM 4380

035 Town of Farmington 022-01209-0400 Sec 28 T32 R19 Lot 4 Plat of Arbor View

996 12% Annually

Owner: Jeff C. Brandt 2007 Mortgage Holder: SC 2007 Green Tree Finan. Servicing Corp. Lien/Judgment Holders: Household Auto Finance Amery Regional Medical Center Capital One Bank USA

1,597.02 165.00

772 12% Annually

Owner: Walker Properties of 2007 Woodbury IV LLC SC 2007 Mortgage Holder: Profinium Financial Lien/Judgment Holder: Milwaukee Child Support Agency

532.65 165.00

019 Town of Clear Lake 018-00116-0600 Sec 6 T32 R15 Lot 6 CSM 2709

036 Town of Farmington 022-01209-0500 Sec 28 T32 R19 Lot 5 Plat of Arbor View 037 Town of Farmington 022-00977-1900 Sec 29 T32 R18 Lot 19 CSM 3762

2007 SC 2007

806.85 165.00

978 12% Annually

020 Town of Clear Lake 018-00523-0000 Sec 26 T32 R15 NW SE

Owners: John R. & Susan M. White 2007 Lien/Judgment Holder: SC 2007 Milwaukee Child Support Agency

1,095.10 165.00

Owner: Larry J. Kolve Lien/Judgment Holders: David Cook Croix Management Company Mark Lange St. Croix Falls Family Housing Unifund Coorporation Owner: Troy D. Gillenwater

2007 SC 2007

581.89 165.00

979 12% Annually

021 Town of Clear Lake 018-00524-0000 Sec 26 T32 R15 SW SE

Owners: John R. & Susan M. White 2007 Lien/Judgment Holder: SC 2007 Milwaukee Child Support Agency

038 Town of Farmington 022-01003-0100 Sec 30 T32 R18 Lot 1 Plat of Andrea Acres

Owner: Adam L. Ritterpusch Mortgage Holder: Wisconsin Housing & Economic Development Authority

039 Town of Farmington 022-01216-0200 Sec 22 T32 R19 Lot 2 Cattail Coulee Plat

197.76 165.00

023 Town of Eureka 020-00197-0100 Sec 8 T35 R18 Lot 1 CSM 4767

Owner: The Collova’s LLC 2007 Power of Attorney: Marcy M. Hesse SC 2007 Mortgage Holders: Contractors Capital Corporation M & I Marshall and Ilsley Bank Liza A Knutson Heywood, Cari & Anderson SC Lien/Judgment Holders: Gerald J. Smith Gerald & Jennifer L. LaVenture The RiverBank Builders Resource Group Inc.

1011 12% Annually

022 Town of Clear Lake 018-00567-0000 Sec 28 T32 R15 Pt SE SE

2007 SC 2007

197.76 165.00

1012 12% Annually

835 12% Annually

040 Town of Farmington 022-01216-0400 Sec 22 T32 R19 Lot 4 Cattail Coulee Plat

2007 SC 2007

199.35 165.00

1013 12% Annually

836 12% Annually

041 Town of Farmington 022-01216-0500 Sec 22 T32 R19 Lot 5 Cattail Coulee Plat

2007 SC 2007

196.98 165.00

1014 12% Annually

837 12% Annually

042 Town of Farmington 022-01216-0600 Sec 22 T32 R19 Lot 6 Cattail Coulee Plat

2007 SC 2007

196.98 165.00

1015 12% Annually

885 12% Annually

043 Town of Farmington 022-01216-0700 Sec 22 T32 R19 Lot 7 Cattail Coulee Plat 044 Town of Farmington 022-01216-0800 Sec 22 T32 R19 Lot 8 Cattail Coulee Plat

2007 SC 2007

196.98 165.00

1016 12% Annually

796 12% Annually

1,095.10 165.00

797 12% Annually

2007 SC 2007

237.50 165.00

803 12% Annually

Owner: Max Roemhild Mortgage Holder: First State Bank of Wyoming

2007 SC 2007

435.96 165.00

833 12% Annually

024 Town of Eureka 020-00197-0200 Sec 8 T35 R18 Lot 2 CSM 4767

Owner: Max Roemhild Mortgage Holder: First State Bank of Wyoming

2007 SC 2007

435.96 165.00

834 12% Annually

025 Town of Eureka 020-00197-0300 Sec 8 T35 R18 Lot 3 CSM 4767

Owner: Max Roemhild Mortgage Holder: First State Bank of Wyoming

2007 SC 2007

026 Town of Eureka 020-00197-0400 Sec 8 T35 R18 Lot 4 CSM 4768

Owner: Max Roemhild Mortgage Holder: First State Bank of Wyoming

2007 SC 2007

027 Town of Eureka 020-00197-0700 Sec 8 T35 R18 Lot 7 CSM 4768

Owner: Max Roemhild Mortgage Holder: First State Bank of Wyoming

2007 SC 2007

028 Town of Eureka 020-00745-0000 Sec 29 T35 R18 Pt NW SE

Owner: Retreat Rocky Hills Silent 2007 Lien/Judgment Holder: SC 2007 Ladd Memorial Hospital

383.64 165.00

435.96 165.00

516.16 165.00

3,508.64 165.00

533714 34-36L 25a,d WNAXLP

Continued On Next Page

Artistic talent rewarded

PAGE 58 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - APRIL 20, 2011

LUCK - Each year, the Wisconsin Art Education Association hosts the Visual Arts Classic – an art competition for high school students. The students compete in a variety of areas including an individual long-term project, an individual on-site project, team critical thinking, and a team Art History Quiz Bowl. The team with the most points at the regional competition advances to the state competition at UWMadison. In addition, students can advance individually if they receive a first

All about collecting farm toys at the April LAHS meeting

place in their category. This is Luck High School’s second year competing at the Visual Arts Classic. They did well at the regional competition at UW-Stout. Five of the eight students that attended regionals advanced as individuals to state competition. A special congratulation is in order for foreign exchange student Sonja Anton for receiving a gold medal for her long-term project in the area of personal adornment. She is the first student representing Luck to do so. Lind-

Kyle James at state VAC working on his onsite painting.

Visual Arts Classic participants – Kneeling (L to R): Matt Pennington and Haley Dikkers. Standing: Bryce Amlee, Kyle James, Shardae Garcia, Lindsey Stapel, Sonja Anton and Samantha Gore. – Photos submitted

sey Stapel was awarded a silver medal for her long-term personal adornment project. Bryce Amlee, Kyle James and Haley Dikkers all received bronze medals for their individual projects. If you have any questions or would like information for your school to participate in the Visual Arts Classic, please feel free to contact Mr. Kyle Clemins, the art teacher for the Luck School District. - submitted

LUCK — For the past three months, the Luck Museum has displayed an extensive collection of farm toys and model farm equipment on loan from Ken Java. As a conclusion to this exhibit, Java and Bruce Gustafson from Leaning Pine Farm Toys will be at the April meeting of the Luck Historical Society to discuss collectible farm toys and where to find them. Gustafson will give free appraisals for any items brought to the meeting. Come and bring those farm toys from your attic or basement; they may be worth more than you think. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. Thursday, April 28, in the Luck Museum. Everyone is welcome and admission is always free. Please mark your calendars for these upcoming spring events: On Friday, May 6, the Luck High School art classes will open their 2011 art show at the museum. Detailed information will follow soon. On May 26, the Luck Historical Society, the Polk County Genealogical Society and the Luck Library will jointly sponsor a Civil War presentation by Mike Martin on this 150th anniversary of that historic and tragic part of our country’s past. Emphasis will be placed on Wisconsin’s role in the war. — submitted

LIST OF TAX LIENS OF POLK COUNTY BEING FORECLOSED BY PROCEEDING IN REM 2011-2 (cont’d.) NO. DESCRIPTION

OWNER/MORTGAGE CO. LIEN/JUDGMENT HOLDER

YEAR TAX

AMT. TAX CERT.#

INT. RATE

NO. DESCRIPTION

OWNER/MORTGAGE CO. LIEN/JUDGMENT HOLDER

YEAR TAX

AMT. TAX CERT.#

INT. RATE

045 Town of Farmington 022-01216-0900 Sec 23 T32 R19 Lot 9 Cattail Coulee Plat

2007 SC 2007

196.98 165.00

1017 12% Annually

056 Town of Farmington 022-01216-2300 Sec 23 T32 R19 Lot 23 Cattail Coulee Plat

2007 SC 2007

197.76 165.00

1028 12% Annually

046 Town of Farmington 022-01216-1000 Sec 22 T32 R19 Lot 10 Cattail Coulee Plat

2007 SC 2007

196.98 165.00

1018 12% Annually

057 Town of Farmington 022-01216-2400 Sec 23 T32 R19 Lot 24 Cattail Coulee Plat

2007 SC 2007

197.76 165.00

1029 12% Annually

047 Town of Farmington 022-01216-1100 Sec 22 T32 R19 Lot 11 Cattail Coulee Plat

2007 SC 2007

196.98 165.00

1019 12% Annually

058 Town of Farmington 022-01216-2500 Sec 23 T32 R19 Lot 25 Cattail Coulee Plat

2007 SC 2007

205.66 165.00

1030 12% Annually

048 Town of Farmington 022-01216-1400 Sec 22 T32 R19 Lot 14 Cattail Coulee Plat

2007 SC 2007

196.98 165.00

1020 12% Annually

059 Town of Farmington 022-01216-2600 Sec 23 T32 R19 Lot 26 Cattail Coulee Plat

2007 SC 2007

201.71 165.00

1031 12% Annually

049 Town of Farmington 022-01216-1500 Sec 22 T32 R19 Lot 15 Cattail Coulee Plat

2007 SC 2007

196.98 165.00

1021 12% Annually

060 Town of Farmington 022-01216-2700 Sec 23 T32 R19 Lot 27 Cattail Coulee Plat

2007 SC 2007

198.56 165.00

1032 12% Annually

050 Town of Farmington 022-01216-1600 Sec 22 & 23 T32 R19 Lot 16 Cattail Coulee Plat

2007 SC 2007

198.56 165.00

1022 12% Annually

061 Town of Farmington 022-01216-2800 Sec 22 & 23 T32 R19 Lot 28 Cattail Coulee Plat

2007 SC 2007

196.98 165.00

1033 12% Annually

051 Town of Farmington 022-01216-1700 Sec 23 T32 R19 Lot 17 Cattail Coulee Plat

2007 SC 2007

198.56 165.00

1023 12% Annually

062 Town of Farmington 022-01216-2900 Sec 22 T32 R19 Lot 29 Cattail Coulee Plat

2007 SC 2007

196.98 165.00

1034 12% Annually

052 Town of Farmington 022-01216-1800 Sec 23 T32 R19 Lot 18 Cattail Coulee Plat

2007 SC 2007

196.98 165.00

1024 12% Annually

063 Town of Farmington 022-01216-3000 Sec 22 & 23 T32 R19 Lot 30 Cattail Coulee Plat

2007 SC 2007

196.98 165.00

1035 12% Annually

053 Town of Farmington 022-01216-2000 Sec 23 T32 R19 Lot 20 Cattail Coulee Plat

2007 SC 2007

196.98 165.00

1025 12% Annually

064 Town of Farmington 022-01216-3100 Sec 22 & 23 T32 R19 Lot 31 Cattail Coulee Plat

2007 SC 2007

197.76 165.00

1036 12% Annually

054 Town of Farmington 022-01216-2100 Sec 23 T32 R19 Lot 21 Cattail Coulee Plat

2007 SC 2007

198.56 165.00

1026 12% Annually

065 Town of Farmington 022-01216-3300 Sec 23 T32 R19 Lot 33 Cattail Coulee Plat

2007 SC 2007

205.66 165.00

1037 12% Annually

055 Town of Farmington 022-01216-2200 Sec 23 T32 R19 Lot 22 Cattail Coulee Plat

2007 SC 2007

197.76 165.00

1027 12% Annually

066 Town of Farmington 022-01216-3400 Sec 23 T32 R19 Lot 34 Cattail Coulee Plat

2007 SC 2007

224.56 165.00

1038 12% Annually

533716 34-36L 25a,d WNAXLP

APRIL 20, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 59

PLEASE NOTE...IMPORTANT NOTICE YOU WILL LOSE TITLE TO YOUR PROPERTY IF THESE TAXES ARE NOT PAID ON OR BEFORE JUNE 13, 2011 TAKE NOTICE that all persons having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in or lien upon the real property described in the list of tax liens, No. 2011-3 on file in the Office of the Clerk of Circuit Court of Polk County, dated April 6, 2011, and herein set forth, are hereby notified that the filing of such list of tax liens in the Office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Polk County constitutes the commencement by said Polk County of a special proceedings in the Circuit Court for Polk County to foreclose the tax liens therein described by foreclosure proceeding In Rem and that a notice of the pendency of such proceeding against each piece or parcel of land therein described was filed in the Office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court on April 6, 2011. Such proceeding is brought against the real property herein described only and is to foreclose the tax liens described in such list. No personal judgment will be entered herein for such taxes, assessments or other legal charges or any part thereof. TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that all persons having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in or lien upon the real property described in said list of tax liens are hereby notified that a certified copy of such list of tax

liens has been posted in the Office of the County Treasurer of Polk County and will remain posted for public inspection up to and including June 13, 2011, which date is hereby fixed as the last day of redemption. TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that any person having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in or lien upon any such parcel may, on or before said June 13, 2011, redeem such delinquent tax liens by paying to the County Treasurer of Polk County, the amount of all such unpaid tax liens and in addition thereto, all interest and penalties which have accrued on said unpaid tax liens, computed to and including the date of redemption, plus the reasonable costs that the County incurred to initiate the proceedings plus the person’s share of the reasonable costs of publication under sub. (6). POLK COUNTY By Amanda Nissen Polk County Treasurer

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY In the Matter of the Foreclosure of Tax Liens under Section 75.521 Wis. Statutes by Polk County: 2011-3 PETITION FOR JUDGMENT VESTING TITLE TO POLK COUNTY Now comes the County of Polk, by Carole T. Wondra, Polk County Clerk, and alleges and states as follows: 1. The Polk County Treasurer, Amanda Nissen, has prepared a List of Tax Liens of Polk County being foreclosed by proceeding In Rem, a verified copy of which is attached and incorporated herein by reference. 2. The foreclosure of the tax liens through In Rem proceedings is governed by Section 75.521 Wisconsin Statutes and the requirements therein have been fulfilled. 3. The time periods after the date of the tax certificates, as stated, is set forth in Section 75.521 (3) Stat., have lapsed for the properties included and described in said list. 4. Notice of this proceeding shall be given to all parties specified in Section 75.521 (3) c Stat. by the County Treasurer sending a copy of this petition, and a copy of the List of Tax Liens of Polk County by registered or certified mail, return receipt requested. WHEREFORE, the Petitioner requests that the court grant judgment in favor of Polk County vesting title to the parcels of land described in the attached “List of Tax Liens” in Polk County, thereby, barring any and all claims whatsoever of the former owners or any persons claiming through and under the former owners since the date of filing the list of tax liens in the office of the Clerk of Circuit Court. Dated this 6th day of April, 2011. Carole T. Wondra, Polk County Clerk Polk County Government Center 100 Polk County Plaza, Suite 110, Balsam Lake, WI 54810

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY In the Matter of the Foreclosure of Tax Liens under Section 75.521 Wis. Statutes by Polk County; list of Tax Liens for 2011-3 AFFIDAVIT I, Amanda Nissen, being first duly sworn under oath, depose and state as follows: 1. I am the Treasurer for the County of Polk. 2. I prepared the attached List of Tax Liens of Polk County which are being foreclosed by proceeding In Rem 2011-3 in the Circuit Court of Polk County. 3. I verify that the information contained in the listed tax liens is true and correct and that said information is based upon the files and records contained in the Polk County Treasurer’s Office. Amanda Nissen Polk County Treasurer 715-485-9255 Subscribed and sworn to before me this 6th day of April, 2011. Carole T. Wondra Notary Public, Polk County, Wis.

LIST OF TAX LIENS OF POLK COUNTY BEING FORECLOSED BY PROCEEDING IN REM 2011-3 STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE FORECLOSURE OF TAX LIENS UNDER SECTION 75.521 WISCONSIN STATUTES BY POLK COUNTY, LIST OF TAX LIENS FOR YEARS INDICATED. OWNER/MORTGAGE CO. LIEN/JUDGMENT HOLDER

YEAR TAX

001 Town of Garfield 024-00822-0000 Sec 13 T33 R18 Pt NE NE

Owner: Dennis P. Peterson Mortgage Holder: Kathleen M. Gionis

2007 SC 2007 SC 2007

1,975.45 11.00 165.00

1070 1070

12% Annually 12% Annually

002 Town of Garfield 024-00823-0000 Sec 13 T33 R18 Pt NW NE

Owner: Dennis P. Peterson Mortgage Holder: Kathleen M. Gionis

2007 SC 2007 SC 2007

26.84 11.00 165.00

1071 1071

12% Annually 12% Annually

003 Town of Garfield 024-00824-0000 Sec 13 T33 R18 Pt SW NE

Owner: Dennis P. Peterson Mortgage Holder: Kathleen M. Gionis

2007 SC 2007 SC 2007

75.12 11.00 165.00

1072 1072

004 Town of Garfield 024-00825-0000 Sec 13 T33 R18 Pt SE NE

Owner: Dennis P. Peterson Mortgage Holder: Kathleen M. Gionis

2007 SC 2007 SC 2007

125.19 11.00 165.00

1073 1073

005 Town of Georgetown 026-00487-0100 Sec 13 T35 R16 Lot 1 CSM 3044

Owner: Lonny Douglas Canfield Lien/Judgment Holder: State of Wisconsin

2007 SC 2007

103.80 165.00

1149

006 Town of Georgetown 026-01263-0600 Sec 31 T35 R16 Lot 6 CSM 3173

Owners: Grant K. & Tobie J. Miller Mortgage Holders: Bank of America NA J.P. Morgan Chase Bank NA

2007 SC 2007

007 Town of Johnstown 028-00849-0800 Sec 33 T35 R15 Lot 8 CSM 2013

Owner: James J. Claffey

2007 SC 2007

008 Town of Laketown 030-00004-0000 Sec 1 T36 R18 Pt frl NE NE

Owners: John J. Kurkowski & Troy Kurkowski Lien/Judgment Holder: Polk County

2007 SC 2007

891.84 165.00

1275

12% Annually

009 Town of Laketown 030-00116-0000 Sec 4 T36 R18 Pt NW SE

Owners: William J. & Kathleen A. Rivard

2007 SC 2007

1,536.20 165.00

1286

12% Annually

010 Town of Laketown 030-00609-0000 Sec 25 T36 R18 Pt NE SE

Owners: Clyde O. & 2007 Lillian J. Christensen SC 2007 Lien/Judgment Holder: WI Dept. of Health & Family Services

2,669.97 165.00

1328

12% Annually

NO. DESCRIPTION

AMT. TAX CERT.#

2,245.10 165.00

439.32 165.00

1181

1267

INT. RATE

12% Annually 12% Annually

12% Annually 12% Annually

12% Annually

12% Annually

12% Annually

533718 34-36L 25a,d WNAXLP

NO. DESCRIPTION

OWNER/MORTGAGE CO. LIEN/JUDGMENT HOLDER

YEAR TAX

AMT. TAX CERT.#

INT. RATE

011 Town of Laketown 030-00701-0000 Sec 29 T36 R18 Pt NW NW

Owner: James M. Tollefson Land Contract Holders: James & Audrey Roush Lien/Judgment Holders: WI Dept. of Revenue RBS Citizens NA

2007 SC 2007

40.97 165.00

1333

12% Annually

012 Town of Laketown 030-00863-0000 Sec 34 T36 R18 Pt S1/2 SW

Owner: Tony Lee Jenson Mortgage Holder: U.S. Bank NA ND

2007 SC 2007

1,019.86 165.00

1347

12% Annually

013 Town of Laketown 030-00864-0000 Sec 34 T36 R18 Pt SE SW

Owner: Tony Lee Jenson Mortgage Holder: U.S. Bank NA ND

2007 SC 2007

15.26 165.00

1348

12% Annually

014 Town of Laketown Owner: Calvin N. Jacobson 030-00928-0000 Lien/Judgment Holder: Sec 4 T36 R18 Bank One NA Lot 8 Plat of Peterson & Nelson Shores

2007 SC 2007

1,113.44 165.00

1353

12% Annually

015 Town of Laketown 030-00974-2000 Sec 9 T36 R18 Lot 2 Sunset Cove E

Owner: Christopher Lee Sullivan

2007 SC 2007

168.79 165.00

1355

12% Annually

016 Town of Lincoln 032-00339-0200 Sec 15 T33 R16 Pt NE NW

Owners: Suzan (Luebke) Sauers, Amy Sauers & John Robert Sauers

2007 SC 2007

572.19 165.00

1388 12% Annually

017 Town of Lincoln 032-00533-0000 Sec 21 T33 R16 Pt NW NE

Owners: Daniel A. & Jeanine J. Vadnais Lien/Judgment Holders: Wisconsin Dept. of Revenue Capital One Bank Country Comfort Dental Arts U.S. Bank NA Dept. of TreasuryInternal Revenue Service

2006 2007 SC 2007

284.86 855.73 165.00

1113 1412

12% Annually 12% Annually

018 Town of Lincoln 032-00797-0000 Sec 28 T33 R16 Pt NE SE

Owner: Semple Building Movers Inc. Mortgage Holder: First Federal Capital Bank

2007 SC 2007

96.80 165.00

1440

12% Annually

Continued On Next Page

PAGE 60 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - APRIL 20, 2011

LIST OF TAX LIENS OF POLK COUNTY BEING FORECLOSED BY PROCEEDING IN REM 2011-3 (cont’d.) NO. DESCRIPTION 019 Town of Lincoln 032-01106-0200 Sec 12 T33 R17 Lot 2 CSM 3451

OWNER/MORTGAGE CO. LIEN/JUDGMENT HOLDER

YEAR TAX

AMT. TAX CERT.# 225.20 165.00

Owner: Donald H. Bottolfson Mortgage Holder: WESTconsin Credit Union Lien/Judgment Holders: Coleman & Hartman SC Dept. of TreasuryInternal Revenue Service

2007 SC 2007

020 Town of Lincoln 032-01106-0360 Sec 12 T33 R17 Lot 6 CSM 5283

Owner: Donald H. Bottolfson Mortgage Holder: WESTconsin Credit Union Lien/Judgment Holders: Coleman & Hartman SC Dept. of TreasuryInternal Revenue Service

2007 SC 2007

021 Town of Lincoln 032-01643-0000 Sec 36 T33 R17 Lot 6 Blk 6 Olaf Haukom Add To Deronda

Owner: Kay L. Hoverman Mortgage Holders: Eagle Valley Bank NA Barbara L. Johnson Lien/Judgment Holder: Asset Acceptance

2007 SC 2007

1,067.81 165.00

1487

022 Town of Lorain 034-00185-0000 Sec 10 T37 R15 Pt SW NE

Owner: Dorothy L. Chenal Lien/Judgment Holders: LE Proffit & Sons Capital One Bank State of Wisconsin WI Dept. of Revenue

2007 SC 2007

696.06 165.00

1497

12% Annually

023 Town of Luck 036-00082-0000 Sec 4 T36 R17 Pt SE NE

Owner: Jason Richard Richter Mortgage Holder: BAC Home Loans Servicing

2007 SC 2007

89.93 165.00

1525

12% Annually

024 Town of Luck 036-00237-0100 Sec 10 T36 R17 Lot 1 CSM 4551

Owners: Alan P. Raths & Mary Ellen White Mortgage Holders: MERS as Nominee for Advisor’s Mortgage LLC Bremer Bank NA Lien/Judgment Holders: Capital One Bank USA Midland Funding

2007 SC 2007

56.19 165.00

1533

12% Annually

025 Town of Luck 036-00260-0000 Sec 11 T36 R17 Pt NW SW

Owner: Patsy L. Peppenger

2007 SC 2007

509.45 165.00

1534

12% Annually

026 Town of Luck 036-00643-0000 Sec 29 T36 R17 Lot 1 CSM 5102

Owners: Roger D. Nelson & Ralph A. Johansen Mortgage Holders: Gordon & Vida Meland Lien/Judgment Holders: Livingston Financial Currahee Financial LLC AnchorBank Asset Acceptance

2007 SC 2007

225.28 165.00

1570

12% Annually

027 Town of Luck 036-00858-0100 Sec 34 T36 R17 Lot 1 CSM 4014

Owner: AnchorBank fsb

2007 SC 2007

2,308.31 165.00

1589

12% Annually

028 Town of Luck 036-00912-0000 Sec 31 T36 R17 Lot 2 CSM 4792

Owner: John R. Marsh Mortgage Holder: First Federal Capital Bank Lien/Judgment Holders: Dept. of TreasuryInternal Revenue Service MRC Receivables Corp. WI Dept. of Revenue Associated Bank NA

2007 SC 2007

229.37 165.00

1590

12% Annually

029 Town of McKinley 038-00818-0000 Sec 35 T36 R15 Lot 3 CSM 3541

Owner: Melanie S. Baumgartner Mortgage Holder: Bremer Bank NA Discover Bank

2007 SC 2007

1,571.88 165.00

1630

12% Annually

030 Town of McKinley 038-00857-0000 Sec 10 T36 R15 Lot 2 Sunrise Roost

Owners: Donald C. & Rebecca J. Seaquist

2007 SC 2007

711.93 165.00

1632

12% Annually

031 Town of Milltown 040-00278-0100 Sec 11 T35 R17 Pt SE SW

Owner: Peter J. Linder

2007 SC 2007

229.43 165.00

1660

12% Annually

032 Town of Milltown 040-00354-0000 Sec 12 T35 R17 Pt SE SE

Owner: Theodore L. Hughes Lien/Judgment Holder: Dept. of TreasuryInternal Revenue Service

2007 SC 2007

1,455.07 165.00

1669

12% Annually

033 Town of Milltown 040-00399-0000 Sec 14 T35 R17 SE SW

Owners: Michael A. & Janis G. Larson Mortgage Holder: Rural American Bank Luck

2007 SC 2007

1,202.54 165.00

1674

2,068.04 165.00

1460

INT. RATE

1461

12% Annually

12% Annually

NO. DESCRIPTION

OWNER/MORTGAGE CO. LIEN/JUDGMENT HOLDER

034 Town of Milltown 040-00400-0000 Sec 14 T35 R17 Pt SE SW

Owners: Michael A. & Janis G. Larson Mortgage Holder: Rural American Bank Luck

2007 SC 2007

1,516.92 165.00

1675

12% Annually

035 Town of Milltown 040-00619-0000 Sec 23 T35 R17 Pt NE NW

Owners: Michael A. & Janis G. Larson Mortgage Holder: Rural American Bank Luck

2007 SC 2007

71.92 165.00

1691

12% Annually

036 Town of Milltown 040-00447-0000 Sec 16 T35 R17 Lot 2 CSM 2193

Owner: Lon M. Scheele Mortgage Holder: S & C Bank Shared Driveway Agreement: Duane Gurtner Lien/Judgment Holders: WI Dept. of Revenue

2007 SC 2007

2,190.75 165.00

1682

12% Annually

037 Village of Milltown 151-00079-0000 Sec 8 T35 R17 Lot 7 Blk C 1st Addn

Owner: Lon M. Scheele Land Contract Holder: Polk County Bank Lien/Judgment Holder: WI Dept. of Revenue

2007

177.05

2340

12% Annually

038 Town of Milltown 040-00974-0000 Sec 29 T35 R17 Pt NW NW

Owner: Cheryl Petersen Mortgage Holder: MERS as Nominee for Countrywide Home Loans

2007 SC 2007

93.27 165.00

1705

12% Annually

039 Town of Milltown 040-01068-0100 Sec 32 T35 R17 Pt NE SE

Owner: Allen A. Metcalf III Mortgage Holder: The RiverBank

2007 SC 2007

3,660.11 165.00

1707

12% Annually

040 Town of Milltown 040-01447-0000 Sec 25 T35 R17 Lot 1 CSM 5091

Owner: Virginia J. Wahlquist Trust

2007 SC 2007

1,588.76 165.00

1726

12% Annually

041 Town of Osceola 042-00290-0000 Sec 16 T33 R18 Pt SE NE

Owners: Irene C. Dombrock (LE) James D. & Susan I. Carney Robert A. & Melinda S. Wells Lien/Judgment Holder: Dane Child Support Agency

2007 SC 2007

2,438.59 165.00

1741

12% Annually

042 Town of Osceola 042-00290-0100 Sec 16 T33 R18 Lot 1 CSM 4865

Owners: Irene C. Dombrock (LE) James D. & Susan I. Carney Robert A. & Melinda S. Wells Lien/Judgment Holder: Dane Child Support Agency

2007 SC 2007

554.91 165.00

1742

12% Annually

043 Town of Osceola 042-00661-0100 Sec 28 T33 R18 Lot 1 CSM 3107

Owners: David & Shannon Keith Mortgage Holder: Eagle Valley Bank Lien/Judgment Holders: Capital One Bank USA NA Milwaukee Child Support Agency

2007 SC 2007

2,627.24 165.00

1767

12% Annually

044 Town of Osceola 042-00782-0200 Sec 31 T33 R18 Lot 2 CSM 3732

Owner: Elton E. Babbitt

2007 SC 2007

3,180.12 165.00

1773

12% Annually

045 Town of Osceola 042-00782-0800 Sec 31 T33 R18 Lot 8 CSM 3874

Owner: Cole J. Gile

2007 SC 2007

372.94 165.00

1774

12% Annually

046 Town of St. Croix Falls Owner: Wells Fargo Bank NA 044-00397-0200 Sec 17 T34 R18 Lot 2 CSM 4025

2007 SC 2007

8.68 165.00

1826

12% Annually

047 Town of St. Croix Falls 044-00795-0000 Sec 28 T34 R18 Pt SE SE

Owner: Richard H. Hansen Mortgage Holder: First State Bank of Wyoming Lien/Judgment Holders: Wisconsin Dept. of Revenue St. Croix Valley Good Samaritan Ctr. Durand Blanding Milwaukee County Child Support Agency

2007 SC 2007

2,877.63 165.00

1853

12% Annually

048 Town of St. Croix Falls 044-00891-1200 Sec 33 T34 R18 Lot 12 CSM 3996

Owner: Ficek Investment Company LLC Mortgage Holders: The RiverBank Lake Area Bank

2007 SC 2007

480.31 165.00

1854

12% Annually

049 City of St. Croix Falls 281-01397-0000 Sec 33 T34 R18 Pt SE NE

Owner: Ficek Investment Company LLC Mortgage Holders: The RiverBank Lake Area Bank

2007 SA 2007 SC 2007

5,692.55 63,406.25 165.00

2904 2904

12% Annually 12% Annually

050 City of St. Croix Falls 281-01397-0001 Sec 33 T34 R18 Outlot 1 CSM 4960

Owner: Ficek Investment Company LLC Mortgage Holders: The RiverBank Lake Area Bank

2007 SC 2007

359.29 165.00

2905

12% Annually

12% Annually

12% Annually

YEAR TAX

AMT. TAX CERT.#

INT. RATE

533720 34-36L 25a,d WNAXLP Continued On Next Page

APRIL 20, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 61

PLEASE NOTE...IMPORTANT NOTICE YOU WILL LOSE TITLE TO YOUR PROPERTY IF THESE TAXES ARE NOT PAID ON OR BEFORE JUNE 13, 2011 TAKE NOTICE that all persons having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in or lien upon the real property described in the list of tax liens, No. 2011-4 on file in the Office of the Clerk of Circuit Court of Polk County, dated April 6, 2011, and herein set forth, are hereby notified that the filing of such list of tax liens in the Office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Polk County constitutes the commencement by said Polk County of a special proceedings in the Circuit Court for Polk County to foreclose the tax liens therein described by foreclosure proceeding In Rem and that a notice of the pendency of such proceeding against each piece or parcel of land therein described was filed in the Office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court on April 6, 2011. Such proceeding is brought against the real property herein described only and is to foreclose the tax liens described in such list. No personal judgment will be entered herein for such taxes, assessments or other legal charges or any part thereof. TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that all persons having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in or lien upon the real property described in said list of tax liens are hereby notified that a certified copy of such list of tax

liens has been posted in the Office of the County Treasurer of Polk County and will remain posted for public inspection up to and including June 13, 2011, which date is hereby fixed as the last day of redemption. TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that any person having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in or lien upon any such parcel may, on or before said June 13, 2011, redeem such delinquent tax liens by paying to the County Treasurer of Polk County, the amount of all such unpaid tax liens and in addition thereto, all interest and penalties which have accrued on said unpaid tax liens, computed to and including the date of redemption, plus the reasonable costs that the County incurred to initiate the proceedings plus the person’s share of the reasonable costs of publication under sub. (6). POLK COUNTY By Amanda Nissen Polk County Treasurer

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY In the Matter of the Foreclosure of Tax Liens under Section 75.521 Wis. Statutes by Polk County: 2011-4 PETITION FOR JUDGMENT VESTING TITLE TO POLK COUNTY Now comes the County of Polk, by Carole T. Wondra, Polk County Clerk, and alleges and states as follows: 1. The Polk County Treasurer, Amanda Nissen, has prepared a List of Tax Liens of Polk County being foreclosed by proceeding In Rem, a verified copy of which is attached and incorporated herein by reference. 2. The foreclosure of the tax liens through In Rem proceedings is governed by Section 75.521 Wisconsin Statutes and the requirements therein have been fulfilled. 3. The time periods after the date of the tax certificates, as stated, is set forth in Section 75.521 (3) Stat., have lapsed for the properties included and described in said list. 4. Notice of this proceeding shall be given to all parties specified in Section 75.521 (3) c Stat. by the County Treasurer sending a copy of this petition, and a copy of the List of Tax Liens of Polk County by registered or certified mail, return receipt requested. WHEREFORE, the Petitioner requests that the court grant judgment in favor of Polk County vesting title to the parcels of land described in the attached “List of Tax Liens” in Polk County, thereby, barring any and all claims whatsoever of the former owners or any persons claiming through and under the former owners since the date of filing the list of tax liens in the office of the Clerk of Circuit Court. Dated this 6th day of April, 2011. Carole T. Wondra, Polk County Clerk Polk County Government Center 100 Polk County Plaza, Suite 110, Balsam Lake, WI 54810

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY In the Matter of the Foreclosure of Tax Liens under Section 75.521 Wis. Statutes by Polk County; list of Tax Liens for 2011-4 AFFIDAVIT I, Amanda Nissen, being first duly sworn under oath, depose and state as follows: 1. I am the Treasurer for the County of Polk. 2. I prepared the attached List of Tax Liens of Polk County which are being foreclosed by proceeding In Rem 2011-4 in the Circuit Court of Polk County. 3. I verify that the information contained in the listed tax liens is true and correct and that said information is based upon the files and records contained in the Polk County Treasurer’s Office. Amanda Nissen Polk County Treasurer 715-485-9255 Subscribed and sworn to before me this 6th day of April, 2011. Carole T. Wondra Notary Public, Polk County, Wis.

LIST OF TAX LIENS OF POLK COUNTY BEING FORECLOSED BY PROCEEDING IN REM 2011-4 STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE FORECLOSURE OF TAX LIENS UNDER SECTION 75.521 WISCONSIN STATUTES BY POLK COUNTY, LIST OF TAX LIENS FOR YEARS INDICATED. NO. DESCRIPTION

OWNER/MORTGAGE CO. LIEN/JUDGMENT HOLDER

YEAR TAX

AMT. TAX CERT.#

INT. RATE

001 Town of Sterling 046-00094-0300 Sec 4 T36 R19 Pt NW SE & SE NW SE

Owner: Valerie C. Jensen Lien/Judgment Holders: Riverside Finance Inc. Scott W. & Kathy Willis State of Wisconsin

2007 SC 2007

331.85 165.00

1890

12% Annually

002 Town of Sterling 046-00095-0200 Sec 4 T36 R19 Pt NE SW SE

Owner: Valerie C. Jensen Lien/Judgment Holders: Riverside Finance Inc. Scott W. & Kathy Willis State of Wisconsin

2007 SC 2007

111.18 165.00

1891

12% Annually

003 Town of Sterling 046-00161-0000 Sec 8 T36 R19 Pt SE NW

Owners: Donald R. Patterson & Kathleen L. Theisen Land Contract Holders: Thomas F., James T. & Janet E. Anderson

2007 SC 2007

597.32 165.00

1899

12% Annually

004 Town of Sterling 046-00162-0000 Sec 8 T36 R19 Pt SE NW

Owners: Donald R. Patterson & Kathleen L. Theisen Land Contract Holders: Thomas F., James T. & Janet E. Anderson

2007 SC 2007

574.09 165.00

1900

12% Annually

005 Town of Sterling 046-00454-0000 Sec 20 T36 R19 Pt SW NE

Owners: Terrance Gerald Owen & Kimberly S. Hederman-Owen Mortgage Holder: Rural American Bank Luck

2007 SC 2007

1,164.70 165.00

1924

12% Annually

006 Town of Sterling 046-00491-0200 Sec 21 T36 R19 Lot 2 CSM 4464

Owners: David & Carol Parsons 2007 Land Contract Holders SC 2007 Louis D’Jock & Daniel D’Jock Lien/Judgment Holder: Rock County Child Support Agency

197.15 165.00

1928

12% Annually

007 Town of Sterling 046-00493-0000 Sec 21 T36 R19 Pt SW NW

Owner: Amy M. Eibs

2007 SC 2007

5.62 165.00

1931

12% Annually

008 Town of Sterling 046-00667-0000 Sec 27 T36 R19 NW SW

Owner: Teresa M. Johnson Lien/Judgment Holder: Milwaukee Child Support Agency

2007 MF 2007 SC 2007

108.60 21.58 165.00

1939 1939

12% Annually 12% Annually

009 Town of Sterling 046-00668-0000 Sec 27 T36 R19 Pt SW SW

Owner: Teresa M. Johnson Lien/Judgment Holder: Milwaukee Child Support Agency

2007 SC 2007

42.60 165.00

1940

12% Annually

533722 34-36L 25a,d WNAXLP

NO. DESCRIPTION

OWNER/MORTGAGE CO. LIEN/JUDGMENT HOLDER

YEAR TAX

AMT. TAX CERT.#

INT. RATE

010 Town of West Sweden 048-00043-0000 Sec 3 T37 R17 NE Frl NE

Owner: David Maurice Chenal 2007 Mortgage Holders: SC 2007 Chalres & Eunice Tollander Trust MERS as Nominee for Finance America LLC Lien/Judgment Holders: Estate of Elizabeth Coen GCI Capital Inc. Wisconsin Dept. of Revenue Dept. of Treasury-Internal Rev. Service

541.38 165.00

1972

12% Annually

011 Town of West Sweden 048-00053-0000 Sec 3 T37 R17 SW NE

Owner: David Maurice Chenal 2007 Mortgage Holders: SC 2007 Charles & Eunice Tollander Trust MERS as Nominee for Finance America LLC Lien/Judgment Holders: Estate of Elizabeth Coen GCI Capital Inc. Wisconsin Dept. of Revenue Dept. of Treasury-Internal Rev. Service

1,281.89 165.00

1973

12% Annually

012 Town of West Sweden 048-00054-0000 Sec 3 T37 R17 SE NE

Owner: David Maurice Chenal 2007 Mortgage Holders: SC 2007 Charles & Eunice Tollander Trust MERS as Nominee for Finance America LLC Lien/Judgment Holders: Estate of Elizabeth Coen GCI Capital Inc. Wisconsin Dept. of Revenue Dept. of Treasury-Internal Rev. Service

1,357.12 165.00

1974

12% Annually

013 Town of West Sweden 048-00056-0000 Sec 3 T37 R17 Pt Gov Lot 2

Owner: David Maurice Chenal 2007 Mortgage Holders: SC 2007 Charles & Eunice Tollander Trust MERS as Nominee for Finance America LLC Lien/Judgment Holders: Estate of Elizabeth Coen GCI Capital Inc. Wisconsin Dept. of Revenue Dept. of Treasury-Internal Rev. Service

309.77 165.00

1975

12% Annually

014 Town of West Sweden 048-00058-0000 Sec 3 T37 R17 Island 6 & 7 in NW

Owner: David M. Chenal 2007 95.88 1977 12% Annually Mortgage Holders: SC 2007 165.00 Charles & Eunice Tollander Trust MERS as Nominee for Finance America LLC Lien/Judgment Holders: Estate of Elizabeth Coen GCI Capital Inc. Wisconsin Dept. of Revenue Dept. of Treasury-Internal Rev. Service Continued On Next Page

PAGE 62 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - APRIL 20, 2011

LIST OF TAX LIENS OF POLK COUNTY BEING FORECLOSED BY PROCEEDING IN REM 2011-4 (cont’d.) NO. DESCRIPTION 015 Town of West Sweden 048-00944-0000 Sec 27 T37 R17 Pt Lot 10 Wm J Starrs Subdiv

OWNER/MORTGAGE CO. LIEN/JUDGMENT HOLDER

YEAR TAX

AMT. TAX CERT.#

Owner: David M. Chenal 2006 Mortgage Holders: 2007 Charles & Eunice Tollander Trust SC 2007 MERS as Nominee for Finance America LLC Lien/Judgment Holders: Estate of Elizabeth Coen GCI Capital Inc. Wisconsin Dept. of Revenue Dept. of Treasury-Internal Rev. Service

18.44 101.78 165.00

Owner: Thomas F. Nordmeyer

2007 SC 2007

520.73 165.00

1979

017 Town of West Sweden Owner: Thomas F. Nordmeyer 048-00905-0000 Sec 27 T37 R17 Lot 17 Blk 2 Setzers Add To NW NW

2007 SC 2007

1,187.49 165.00

018 Town of West Sweden Owner: Thomas F. Nordmeyer 048-00906-0000 Sec 27 T37 R17 Lot 18 Blk 2 Setzers Add To NW NW

2007 SC 2007

019 Town of West Sweden Owner: Thomas F. Nordmeyer 048-00907-0000 Sec 27 T37 R17 Lot 19 Blk 2 Setzers Add To NW NW 020 Town of West Sweden 048-00646-0000 Sec 28 T37 R17 Pt SE NW

OWNER/MORTGAGE CO. LIEN/JUDGMENT HOLDER

YEAR TAX

AMT. TAX CERT.#

INT. RATE

Owner: Joy M. Randall Mortgage Holders: Gay M. Ersfeld Bank of America NA

2007 SC 2007

199.95 165.00

2056

12% Annually

031 Village of Balsam Lake 106-00459-0000 Sec 3 T34 R17 Pt Gov Lot 5

Owners: Herbert M. & Mary H. Richardson Mortgage Holder: PNC Bank NA

2007 DC 2007 SC 2007

1,834.51 340.36 165.00

2063 2063

12% Annually 12% Annually

12% Annually

032 Village of Balsam Lake 106-00494-0000 Sec 3 T34 R17 Pt Gov Lot 7

Owner: Kevin R. Jenderny Mortgage Holder: MERS as Nominee for Intervale Mortgage Corporation

2007 SC 2007

55.85 165.00

2066

12% Annually

2023

12% Annually

033 Village of Centuria 111-00165-0000 Sec 12 T34 R18 Pt Lot 92 Assessors Plat

Owners: Dennis W. & Tara L. Swanson Mortgage Holder: The Bank of New York Mellon Lien/Judgment Holder: St. Croix Regional Medical Center

2007 SC 2007

103.43 165.00

2098

12% Annually

39.84 165.00

2024

12% Annually 034 Village of Centuria 111-00175-0000 Sec 11 T34 R18 Lots 3 & 4 Blk 15 First Addn

Owner: Steven G. Holecek Mortgage Holders: Rural American Bank Glen C. & Darlene M. Holecek

2007 SC 2007

810.24 165.00

2100

12% Annually

2007 SC 2007

39.84 165.00

2025

035 Village of Centuria 111-00186-0000 Sec 11 T34 R18 Lots 1 & 2 Blk 17 First Addn

Owner: Homes By Croix Creek Inc. 2007 Mortgage Holder: SC 2007 Community Bank Cameron DC 2007 Grantsburg SC 2007

194.77 11.00 273.64 165.00

2102 2102 2102

12% Annually 12% Annually 12% Annually

Owner: Sandra L. Hoff Mortgage Holder: U.S. Bank NA ND Lien/Judgment Holders: CenturyTel St. Croix Regional Medical Center Country Comfort

2007 SC 2007

264.04 165.00

2005

036 Village of Clayton 112-00081-0000 Sec 24 T33 R15 Lots 1-10 Blk 3; Lots 1-10 Blk 4; Lots 13-24 Blk 5 First Addn

416.15 165.00

2131

12% Annually

021 Town of West Sweden 048-00649-0000 Sec 28 T37 R17 Pt NE SW

Owner: Sandra L. Hoff Mortgage Holder: U.S. Bank NA ND Lien/Judgment Holders: CenturyTel St. Croix Regional Medical Center Country Comfort

2007 SC 2007

1,240.49 165.00

2006

12% Annually

Owner: Curtis Ventures LLC 2007 Land Contract Holders: SC 2007 James T. & Lois J. Simons Citizens State Bank Lien/Judgment Holders: Bull Dozin Inc. U.S. Foodservice Sysco Food Services of MN Troy Capital LLC Citibank South Dakota NA Resurgence Financial LLC WI Dept. Workforce Development Discover Bank Polk County Child Support Agency Milwaukee Child Support Agency

022 Town of West Sweden 048-00951-0000 Sec 28 T37 R17 Lot 4 Wm J Starrs Subdiv

Owner: Sandra L. Hoff Mortgage Holder: U.S. Bank NA ND Lien/Judgment Holders: CenturyTel St. Croix Regional Medical Center Country Comfort

2007 SC 2007

38.34 165.00

2031

12% Annually

023 Town of West Sweden 048-00952-0000 Sec 28 T37 R17 Lot 5 Wm J Starrs Subdiv

Owner: Sandra L. Hoff Mortgage Holder: U.S. Bank NA ND Lien/Judgment Holders: CenturyTel St. Croix Regional Medical Center Country Comfort

2007 SC 2007

024 Town of West Sweden 048-00696-0000 Sec 29 T37 R17 Pt NW SE

Owner: Luther N. & Mary L. Hall Mortgage Holder: Eagle Valley Bank NA

2007 SC 2007

2,225.98 165.00

2010

025 Town of West Sweden 048-00728-0000 Sec 31 T37 R17 Pt NE NW

Owners: Thomas Enterprises; Randall & Lawrence L. Thomas Mortgage Holder: Reading Land Company

2007 SC 2007

72.78 165.00

2012

026 Town of West Sweden 048-00939-0000 Sec 27 T37 R17 Lot 7 Wm J Starrs Subdiv

Owner: Charles T. Sahr Jr. 2007 Mortgage Holder: SC 2007 Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. for Suntrust Mortgage Inc. Lien/Judgment Holders: St. Croix Regional Medical Center Burnett Medical Center

11.79 165.00

96.62 165.00

2032

2028

027 Village of Balsam Lake Owner: Thomas F. Bombenger 106-00160-0100 Sec 2 T34 R17 Lot 1 CSM 3217

2007 SC 2007

7.69 165.00

2043

028 Village of Balsam Lake Owner: Thomas F. Bombenger 106-00160-0200 Sec 2 T34 R17 Lot 2 CSM 3217

2007 SC 2007

8.58 165.00

2044

029 Village of Balsam Lake 106-00223-0000 Sec 10 T34 R17 Lots 1-4 Blk 11 Original Plat

Owner: Jason Marshal Duncan 2007 Mortgage Holders: SC 2007 S & C Bank Household Finance Corporation III Lien/Judgment Holders: Ford Motor Credit Company Wisconsin Electric Power Company

24.78 165.00

2047

12% Annually 12% Annually

NO. DESCRIPTION 030 Village of Balsam Lake 106-00290-0000 Sec 10 T34 R17 Lot 17-20 Blk 20 Original Plat

\016 Town of West Sweden 048-00079-0100 Sec 4 T37 R17 Pt Gov Lot 3

1587 2030

INT. RATE

12% Annually

12% Annually

12% Annually

037 Village of Clayton Owner: Wilshire Developments 112-00215-0000 Sec 24 T33 R15 Pt Outlot 67 Assessor’s Plat

2007 SC 2007

247.54 165.00

2140

12% Annually

038 Village of Clayton Owner: Wilshire Developments 112-00216-0000 Sec 24 T33 R15 Pt Outlot 68 Assessor’s Plat

2007 SC 2007

390.55 165.00

2141

12% Annually

039 Village of Clayton Owner: Wilshire Developments 112-00370-1000 Sec 24 T33 R15 Lot 10 First Addn to Oak Meadows Plat

2007 SC 2007

2.14 165.00

2154

12% Annually

040 Village of Clayton Owner: Wilshire Developments 112-00370-1100 Sec 24 T33 R15 Lot 11 First Addn to Oak Meadows Plat

2007 SC 2007

2.14 165.00

2155

12% Annually

041 Village of Clayton Owner: Wilshire Developments 112-00370-1200 Sec 24 T33 R15 Lot 12 First Addn to Oak Meadows Plat

2007 SC 2007

2.14 165.00

2156

12% Annually

042 Village of Clayton Owner: Wilshire Developments 112-00370-1300 Sec 24 T33 R15 Lot 13 First Addn to Oak Meadows Plat

2007 SC 2007

2.14 165.00

2157

12% Annually

043 Village of Clayton Owner: Wilshire Developments 112-00370-1400 Sec 24 T33 R15 Lot 14 First Addn to Oak Meadows Plat

2007 SC 2007

2.14 165.00

2158

12% Annually

044 Village of Clayton Owner: Wilshire Developments 112-00370-1500 Sec 24 T33 R15 Lot 15 First Addn to Oak Meadows Plat

2007 SC 2007

4.27 165.00

2159

12% Annually

045 Village of Clayton 112-00228-0000 Sec 24 T33 R15 Outlot 78 Assessor’s Plat

2007 DC 2007 SC 2007

1,677.77 314.14 165.00

2142 2142

12% Annually 12% Annually

12% Annually

12% Annually

12% Annually

12% Annually

12% Annually

12% Annually

533724 34-36L 25a,d WNAXLP

Owner: Kerri L. Schoel Mortgage Holder: Beneficial Wisconsin Inc. Lien/Judgment Holder: GMAC

Continued On Next Page

Pinewood Derby

APRIL 20, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 63

SIREN/WEBSTER – On Saturday, March 26, Cub Scout Pack 564 of Siren and Webster competed in their annual Pinewood Derby. Thirty boys competed with the wooden cars they designed, shaped and decorated themselves. The Cub Scouts watched anxiously as the cars were loaded on the shiny derby track in heats of four. Scouts, along with parents, siblings, family and friends cheered for their favorites. Race after race, the boys kept on cheering. Some cars were so fast they flew off the end of the track, while others needed a push from Scoutmaster Bill Lindberg to cross the finish line. The high-tech electronic finish line made posting immediate results possible and kept everyone’s attention as many races finished in a near tie. The Cub Scout motto is "Do your best," and every boy put so much work into his car that they could each walk away feeling like a winner. Awards were given at each age level to the top three fastest cars. Additional trophies were given to the top three cars for fastest speed overall, best

Siren/Webster

The Cub Scouts of Pack 564 pose for a group photo at the end of race day. – Photos submitted

design and most original design. Winners from the pack level were eligible to compete on Saturday,

April 16, at the District Pinewood Derby at the Webster Elementary School.- submitted

During intermission, the Webelos sold lunch, beverages and snacks to raise money for camp.

Results

Wolves First: Logan Hansen Second: Gavyn Johnson Third: Dillon Buskirk Bears First: McCoy Maslow Second: Vincent Belland Third: Mathias Ojeda Webelos First: Jordan Webster Second: Breck Mangen Third: North Hinze Overall Speed First: Jordan Webster Second: Breck Mangen Third: North Hinze Overall Design First: Kerik Stubbe Second: Wyatt Schaaf Third: Hunter Schaaf Overall Originality First: Devan Rand Second: Gage Holmes Third: Vincent Belland

Older Cub Scouts led a flag ceremony at the beginning and end of the Pinewood Derby.

Between races, the boys enjoy time together.

The boys look on as the cars race down the track.

LIST OF TAX LIENS OF POLK COUNTY BEING FORECLOSED BY PROCEEDING IN REM 2011-4 (cont’d.) NO. DESCRIPTION

OWNER/MORTGAGE CO. LIEN/JUDGMENT HOLDER

YEAR TAX

AMT. TAX CERT.#

INT. RATE

NO. DESCRIPTION

OWNER/MORTGAGE CO. LIEN/JUDGMENT HOLDER

YEAR TAX

AMT. TAX CERT.#

INT. RATE

046 Village of Clear Lake 113-00227-0200 Sec 18 T32 R15 Unit B Plat of Jewel Town Condo 1

Owner: Marvin L. Burton Mortgage Holder: Dairy State Bank

2007 SC 2007

1,031.03 165.00

2176

12% Annually

049 Village of Clear Lake Owner: Marvin L. Burton 113-00227-0500 Mortgage Holder: Sec 18 T32 R15 Dairy State Bank Unit E Plat of Jewel Town Condo 111

2007 SC 2007

1,031.03 165.00

2179

12% Annually

047 Village of Clear Lake 113-00227-0300 Sec 18 T32 R15 Unit C Plat of Jewel Town Condo 11

Owner: Marvin L. Burton Mortgage Holder: Dairy State Bank

2007 SC 2007

1,031.03 165.00

2177

12% Annually

050 Village of Clear Lake 113-00293-0000 Sec 19 T32 R15 Outlot 74 Assessors Plat

2007 SC 2007

193.48 165.00

2187

12% Annually

048 Village of Clear Lake 113-00227-0400 Sec 18 T32 R15 Unit D Plat of Jewel Town Condo 11

Owner: Marvin L. Burton Mortgage Holder: Dairy State Bank

2007 SC 2007

1,031.03 165.00

2178

12% Annually

Owner: Tabitha F. Lawrimore Mortgage Holder: Bank of America NA

533726 34-36L 25a,d WNAXLP

PAGE 64 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - APRIL 20, 2011

PLEASE NOTE...IMPORTANT NOTICE YOU WILL LOSE TITLE TO YOUR PROPERTY IF THESE TAXES ARE NOT PAID ON OR BEFORE JUNE 13, 2011 TAKE NOTICE that all persons having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in or lien upon the real property described in the list of tax liens, No. 2011-5 on file in the Office of the Clerk of Circuit Court of Polk County, dated April 6, 2011, and herein set forth, are hereby notified that the filing of such list of tax liens in the Office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Polk County constitutes the commencement by said Polk County of a special proceedings in the Circuit Court for Polk County to foreclose the tax liens therein described by foreclosure proceeding In Rem and that a notice of the pendency of such proceeding against each piece or parcel of land therein described was filed in the Office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court on April 6, 2011. Such proceeding is brought against the real property herein described only and is to foreclose the tax liens described in such list. No personal judgment will be entered herein for such taxes, assessments or other legal charges or any part thereof. TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that all persons having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in or lien upon the real property described in said list of tax liens are hereby notified that a certified copy of such list of tax

liens has been posted in the Office of the County Treasurer of Polk County and will remain posted for public inspection up to and including June 13, 2011, which date is hereby fixed as the last day of redemption. TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that any person having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in or lien upon any such parcel may, on or before said June 13, 2011, redeem such delinquent tax liens by paying to the County Treasurer of Polk County, the amount of all such unpaid tax liens and in addition thereto, all interest and penalties which have accrued on said unpaid tax liens, computed to and including the date of redemption, plus the reasonable costs that the County incurred to initiate the proceedings plus the person’s share of the reasonable costs of publication under sub. (6). POLK COUNTY By Amanda Nissen Polk County Treasurer

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY In the Matter of the Foreclosure of Tax Liens under Section 75.521 Wis. Statutes by Polk County: 2011-5 PETITION FOR JUDGMENT VESTING TITLE TO POLK COUNTY Now comes the County of Polk, by Carole T. Wondra, Polk County Clerk, and alleges and states as follows: 1. The Polk County Treasurer, Amanda Nissen, has prepared a List of Tax Liens of Polk County being foreclosed by proceeding In Rem, a verified copy of which is attached and incorporated herein by reference. 2. The foreclosure of the tax liens through In Rem proceedings is governed by Section 75.521 Wisconsin Statutes and the requirements therein have been fulfilled. 3. The time periods after the date of the tax certificates, as stated, is set forth in Section 75.521 (3) Stat., have lapsed for the properties included and described in said list. 4. Notice of this proceeding shall be given to all parties specified in Section 75.521 (3) c Stat. by the County Treasurer sending a copy of this petition, and a copy of the List of Tax Liens of Polk County by registered or certified mail, return receipt requested. WHEREFORE, the Petitioner requests that the court grant judgment in favor of Polk County vesting title to the parcels of land described in the attached “List of Tax Liens” in Polk County, thereby, barring any and all claims whatsoever of the former owners or any persons claiming through and under the former owners since the date of filing the list of tax liens in the office of the Clerk of Circuit Court. Dated this 6th day of April, 2011. Carole T. Wondra, Polk County Clerk Polk County Government Center 100 Polk County Plaza, Suite 110, Balsam Lake, WI 54810

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY In the Matter of the Foreclosure of Tax Liens under Section 75.521 Wis. Statutes by Polk County; list of Tax Liens for 2011-5 AFFIDAVIT I, Amanda Nissen, being first duly sworn under oath, depose and state as follows: 1. I am the Treasurer for the County of Polk. 2. I prepared the attached List of Tax Liens of Polk County which are being foreclosed by proceeding In Rem 2011-5 in the Circuit Court of Polk County. 3. I verify that the information contained in the listed tax liens is true and correct and that said information is based upon the files and records contained in the Polk County Treasurer’s Office. Amanda Nissen Polk County Treasurer 715-485-9255 Subscribed and sworn to before me this 6th day of April, 2011. Carole T. Wondra Notary Public, Polk County, Wis.

LIST OF TAX LIENS OF POLK COUNTY BEING FORECLOSED BY PROCEEDING IN REM 2011-5 STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE FORECLOSURE OF TAX LIENS UNDER SECTION 75.521 WISCONSIN STATUTES BY POLK COUNTY, LIST OF TAX LIENS FOR YEARS INDICATED. NO. DESCRIPTION

OWNER/MORTGAGE CO. LIEN/JUDGMENT HOLDER

001 Village of Dresser 116-00050-0000 Sec 7 T33 R18 Lots 11 & 12 Blk 3 Original Plat

Owners: Daniel A. & Kristine E. Shelby Mortgage Holders: U.S. Bank Beneficial Wisconsin Inc.

2007 SC 2007

117.48 165.00

2210 12% Annually

010 Village of Luck 146-00453-0000 Sec 27 T36 R17 Lot 3 V1 CSM Pg 105

Owners: John M. & Judy L. Harri Land Contract Holder: Eldore R. Trulson Ingress & Egress Easement: Big Butternut Lake Prot. Assn.

2007 SC 2007

2,410.73 165.00

2318 12% Annually

002 Village of Dresser 116-00051-0000 Sec 7 T33 R18 E 1/2 Lot 13 Blk 3 Original Plat

Owners: Daniel A. & Kristine E. Shelby Mortgage Holders: U.S. Bank Beneficial Wisconsin Inc.

2007 SC 2007

59.17 165.00

2211 12% Annually

011 Village of Milltown 151-00057-0000 Sec 17 T35 R17 Lots 1 & 2 Bank’s Plat

2007 SC 2007

404.48 165.00

2336 12% Annually

003 Village of Dresser 116-00158-0000 Sec 7 T33 R18 Lot 3 Second Addn

Owners: Michael & Carol M. Murphy Sr. Lien/Judgment Holders: Walworth Child Support Agency Ozaukee Child Support Agency Washington Child Support Agency Racine Child Support Agency

2007

1,863.43

2214 12% Annually

Owner: Raymond R. Arellano Mortgage Holder: Linda Berg Lien/Judgment Holders: Wisconsin Dept. of Revenue Polk County Clerk of Court Cincinnati Insurance Company

012 Village of Milltown 151-00101-0000 Sec 8 T35 R17 Lot 7 & Pt Lot 6 Blk G First Addn

Owners: Luck Northern Bar Inc. Tyrone A. & Irvin R. Shafer Mortgage Holder: S & C Bank Lien/Judgment Holder: Wisconsin Dept. of Revenue

2007 SC 2007

1,228.78 165.00

2345 12% Annually

004 Village of Frederic 126-00031-0000 Sec 27 T37 R17 Pt Lot 10 & 11 Blk 3 Original Plat

Owner: Ruby E. Jones Land Contract Holder: Richard D. Jones Mortgage Holder: Village of Frederic

2007 DC 2007 SC 2007

826.27 99.69 165.00

2239 12% Annually 2239 12% Annually

013 Village of Milltown 151-00334-0000 Sec 17 T35 R17 Pt NW NW

Owner: Chase Home Finance LLC

2007 SC 2007

9.23 165.00

2371 12% Annually

005 Village of Frederic 126-00458-0000 Sec 28 T37 R17 Lot 4 CSM V1 Pg 197

Owner: Russell E. Niles Mortgage Holders: MERS as Nominee for U.S. Bank NA U.S. Bank NA ND

2007 SC 2007

46.58 165.00

2277 12% Annually

014 Village of Milltown 151-00437-0000 Sec 8 T35 R17 Lot 45 Pixie Ac Mobile Home Second Addn

Owners: Phillip S. & Vicky L. Wheeler Mortgage Holder: AVCO Financial Services

2007 SC 2007

704.49 165.00

2385 12% Annually

006 Village of Frederic 126-00482-0000 Sec 28 T37 R17 Pt SE NE

Owner: Frederic Farmers Union Cooperative

2007 SC 2007

348.18 165.00

2281 12% Annually

015 Village of Osceola 165-00108-0000 Sec 27 T33 R19 Pt Lot 3 Blk 18 Original Plat

2,662.83 590.05 1,790.02 165.00

2390 12% Annually 2390 12% Annually 2390 12% Annually

007 Village of Frederic 126-00440-0400 Sec 28 T37 R17 Lot 4 CSM 3733

Owner: Steven L. Harrison

2007 SC 2007

1,642.93 165.00

2275 12% Annually

Owners: John W. O’Shaughnessy 2007 & Thomas O’Shaughnessy SA 2007 Land Contract Holders: DC 2007 Thomas D. & Margaret A. Rogers SC 2007 Lien/Judgment Holders: Larry Lengyel Wisconsin Dept. of Revenue

48.11 165.00

2395 12% Annually

Owner: Steven L. Harrison

2007 SC 2007

154.43 165.00

2285 12% Annually

Owner: Linda F. Stipe Mortgage Holder: MERS as Nominee for Countrywide Home Loans

2007 SC 2007

008 Village of Frederic 126-00537-0100 Sec 34 T37 R17 Lot 1 CSM 4140

016 Village of Osceola 165-00151-0000 Sec 22 T33 R19 Lot 18 Christopherson Subdiv

009 Village of Frederic 126-00540-0000 Sec 34 T37 R17 Lot 4 CSM 1503

Owner: Steven L. Harrison

2007 SC 2007

2,939.32 165.00

2286 12% Annually

017 Village of Osceola 165-00234-0000 Sec 27 T33 R19 Lot 15 Viebrocks Addn

Owner: Jane M. Haas 2007 Mortgage Holder: SA 2007 Deutsche Bank National Trust Co. DC 2007 for Morgan Stanley SC 2007 ABS Capital Inc.

2,244.68 114.37 886.39 165.00

2403 12% Annually 2403 12% Annually 2403 12% Annually

YEAR TAX

AMT. TAX CERT.#

INT. RATE

533728 34-36L 25a,d WNAXLP

NO. DESCRIPTION

OWNER/MORTGAGE CO. LIEN/JUDGMENT HOLDER

YEAR TAX

AMT. TAX CERT.#

INT. RATE

Continued On Next Page

APRIL 20, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 65

Why support the Frederic Area American Cancer Society Walk/Run?

FREDERIC – There are many reasons to take up the fight against cancer. Cancer strikes one out of two men and one out of three women. You or someone you know or love will fight cancer in their lifetime. The American Cancer Society Walk/Run provides funds for research, education, advocacy and services in the fight against cancer. The walk is being held in Frederic on Saturday, May 7. There is still time to register as an individual, form a team, make a contribution to a walker or purchase a tribute flag in honor or memory of someone who has had cancer. Money raised by the walk is carefully spent. Funds raised are used for cancer research, education, advocacy and services. Since 1946 the ACS has invested $3.4 billion in cancer research. The research

has improved treatment and survival rates. Sixty-six percent of cancer patients survive this disease as opposed to one in five in 1939 and one in four in 1949. An estimated 11.7 million-plus Americans alive today have a history of cancer. This is encouraging news. ACS-funded researchers have developed many methods of detecting cancer such as Pap and PSA tests and mammography to screen for breast cancer. Numerous techniques for treating cancer were discovered by ACS researchers. Researchers funded by ACS have won 42 Nobel Prizes. An important cancer drug called Gleevec has been a tremendous breakthrough treatment for people with chronic myloid leukemia. Gleevec was developed through ACS cancer research grants.

The Hope Lodge in Marshfield has been open for eight years and is available to cancer-treatment patients who must travel for treatment in Marshfield. The Hope Lodge is a short-term residential facility designed to offer no-cost housing, emotional and practical support and referral services free to any cancer patient receiving outpatient oncology treatment. There is also Hope Lodge near the University of Minnesota hospitals and in Rochester, Minn., that may be used by cancer patient families from our area. The ACS is working to educate Americans about the importance of living healthy lifestyles in order to lower the risk of certain cancers. Proper diet, maintaining a normal weight, exercising on a regular basis, not using tobacco products, staying out of the sun, using sunscreens,

not using tanning beds, having regular checkups and screening tests are some of the ways we can reduce our risk for cancer. The ACS is dedicated to continuing the fight until cancer is no longer a health problem. Join in this fight by participating in the Frederic Walk/Run on Saturday, May 7. Registration can be made online at: http://main.acsevents.org/site/TR?pg=e ntry&fr_id=35016 Paper registration and tribute flag forms are available at U.S. and Bremer banks, the Medicine Shoppe and Larsen Auto Center. For more information on how to form a team, be an individual walker or make a contribution, call Elvira Schmidt at Frederic, 715-653-2684. - submitted

Frederic Arts Inc. receives $500 Creativity Grant from ArtWeb

FREDERIC - Frederic Arts will expand on its Art Medley project for 2011 with the help of the Creativity Grant from ArtWeb. The medley, in its second year, will involve the creative work of over 100 people. Six-inch by six-inch frames are the starting points for the art work of contributors young and old, amateur and professional. The results will be assembled in a medley display that will travel throughout Polk County. The first display and its opening event will be held at the Art Center, 310 Lake St. S., in Frederic on Family Days weekend, June 17-19. Frederic Arts is seeking participants to contribute their works of art to the medley. Frame blanks can be picked up at the Frederic Library until mid-May and at the Art Center (old Legion Hall across from

Coon Lake Park) on Friday and Saturday, May 6 and 7, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. each day, during the Earth Arts Spring Art Tour. The ArtWeb Visual Artists Guild is a group of artists from Polk, Barron and St. Croix counties. Its aim is to encourage artistic freedom, awareness and appreciation of the visual arts through providing scholarships and grants for local arts programs, while it provides creative support and inspiration for its members. - submitted

Presenting the ArtWeb Creativity Grant are members Bonnie Hagen of Amery, Judy Hostvet/Paulson of New Richmond and Julie Adams of Amery. Accepting the check are Mark Buley and Jack Route of Frederic Arts. from Frederic Arts

LIST OF TAX LIENS OF POLK COUNTY BEING FORECLOSED BY PROCEEDING IN REM 2011-5 (cont’d.) NO. DESCRIPTION

OWNER/MORTGAGE CO. LIEN/JUDGMENT HOLDER

YEAR TAX

AMT. TAX CERT.#

INT. RATE

018 Village of Osceola 165-00582-0000 Sec 27 T33 R19 Pt Outlot 162 Assessor’s Plat

Owner: Marcel Eibensteiner Mortgage Holders: Builders Development & Finance U.S. Bank NA

2007 SA 2007 SC 2007

3,033.66 15,032.46 165.00

2425 12% Annually 2425 12% Annually

019 Village of Osceola 165-00612-0000 Sec 27 T33 R19 Outlot 176 Assessor’s Plat

Owner: Marcel Eibensteiner Mortgage Holders: Builders Development & Finance U.S. Bank NA

2007 SA 2007 SC 2007

224.85 35,516.29 165.00

2433 12% Annually 2433 12% Annually

020 Village of Osceola 165-00613-0000 Sec 27 T33 R19 Outlot 177 Assessor’s Plat

Owner: Marcel Eibensteiner Mortgage Holders: Builders Development & Finance U.S. Bank NA

2007 SA 2007 SC 2007

130.18 35,506.24 165.00

2434 12% Annually 2434 12% Annually

021 Village of Osceola 165-00844-0040 Sec 26 T33 R19 Lot 40 Plat of Gateway Meadows

Owner: Jason Pierre Land Contract Holder: Mikbrico of Wisconsin LLC Mortgage Holder: The RiverBank

2007 SA 2007 DC 2007 SC 2007

1,775.21 90.45 176.02 165.00

2487 12% Annually 2487 12% Annually 2487 12% Annually

022 Village of Osceola 165-00844-0091 Sec 26 T33 R19 Lot 91 Plat of Gateway Meadows

Owner: Mikbrico of Wisconsin LLC 2007 Mortgage Holder: SC 2007 The RiverBank

1,407.34 165.00

2525 12% Annually

023 Village of Osceola 165-00844-0121 Sec 26 T33 R19 Lot 121 Plat of Gateway Meadows

Owner: Mikbrico of Wisconsin LLC 2007 Mortgage Holder: SC 2007 The RiverBank

1,342.26 165.00

2555 12% Annually

024 Village of Osceola 165-00844-0229 Sec 26 T33 R19 Outlot 1 Plat of Gateway Meadows

Owner: Mikbrico of Wisconsin LLC 2007 Mortgage Holder: SC 2007 The RiverBank

229.79 165.00

2630 12% Annually

025 Village of Osceola 165-00844-0230 Sec 26 T33 R19 Outlot 2 Plat of Gateway Meadows

Owner: Mikbrico of Wisconsin LLC 2007 Mortgage Holder: SC 2007 The RiverBank

229.79 165.00

2631 12% Annually

026 Village of Osceola 165-00844-0231 Sec 26 T33 R19 Outlot 3 Plat of Gateway Meadows

Owner: Mikbrico of Wisconsin LLC 2007 Mortgage Holder: SC 2007 The RiverBank

214.01 165.00

2632 12% Annually

NO. DESCRIPTION

OWNER/MORTGAGE CO. LIEN/JUDGMENT HOLDER

YEAR TAX

AMT. TAX CERT.#

INT. RATE

027 Village of Osceola 165-00844-0232 Sec 26 T33 R19 Outlot 4 Plat of Gateway Meadows & Pt NW SE

Owner: Mikbrico of Wisconsin LLC 2007 Mortgage Holder: SC 2007 The RiverBank

110.46 165.00

2633 12% Annually

028 Village of Osceola 165-00844-0185 Sec 26 T33 R19 Lot 185 Plat of Gateway Meadows

Owner: Equity Homes Inc. Mortgage Holders: The RiverBank Patriot Bank MN

2007 SC 2007

124.26 165.00

2618 12% Annually

029 Village of Osceola 165-00844-0186 Sec 26 T33 R19 Lot 186 Plat of Gateway Meadows

Owner: Equity Homes Inc. Mortgage Holders: The RiverBank Patriot Bank MN

2007 SC 2007

97.63 165.00

2619 12% Annually

030 Village of Osceola 165-00844-0187 Sec 26 T33 R19 Lot 187 Plat of Gateway Meadows

Owner: Equity Homes Inc. Mortgage Holders: The RiverBank Patriot Bank MN

2007 SC 2007

97.63 165.00

2620 12% Annually

031 Village of Osceola 165-00844-0188 Sec 26 T33 R19 Lot 188 Plat of Gateway Meadows

Owner: Equity Homes Inc. Mortgage Holders: The RiverBank Patriot Bank MN

2007 SC 2007

145.96 165.00

2621 12% Annually

032 City of Amery 201-00262-0000 Sec 28 T33 R16 Pt Lots 9 & 10 Blk 2 C H Johnson Addn

Owners: Rene & Shay L. Benitez Mortgage Holder: Bremer Bank NA Lien/Judgment Holders: Midland Funding LLC Nu Island Partners LLC

2007 SC 2007

245.88 165.00

2646 12% Annually

033 City of St. Croix Falls 281-01396-0000 Sec 33 T34 R18 Pt SW NE

Owner: The RiverBank

2007 SA 2007 SC 2007

1,871.33 63,134.60 165.00

2903 12% Annually 2903 12% Annually

034 City of St. Croix Falls 281-01399-0000 Sec 33 T34 R18 Pt SE NW

Owner: The RiverBank

2007 SA 2007 SC 2007

1,770.27 51,397.30 165.00

2907 12% Annually 2907 12% Annually

533730 34-36L 25a,d WNAXLP Continued On Next Page

PAGE 66 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - APRIL 20, 2011

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HELP WANTED – SKILLS TRADED

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“Distinctive Funeral Service”

HOP

Rated PG, 95 Minutes. Fri.-Sun.: 1:00, 3:00, 5:00, 7:00 & 9:00 p.m. Mon.: 1:00, 3:00, 5:00 & 7:00 p.m. Tues.-Thurs.: 5:00 & 7:00 p.m.

All shows and show times before 6 p.m. $5.00. Shows and show times subject to change. Visit us on our Web site: www.timberstheatres.com

www.theleader.net

Breakfast Buffet

8:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. Adults - $7.99 Children 12 & Under $5.99 3 & Under Free ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT - Pancakes - French Toast - Biscuits & Gravy - Scrambled Eggs - Plain or Denver - Blueberry & Bran Muffins - Fresh Fruit - Strudel - Bacon - Sausage Links

Season Opener - This Saturday! Opening

weekends only beginning on Saturday, April 23. Spring season hours: Fridays 4 - 9 p.m., Saturdays 10 a.m. - 9 p.m., Sundays 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Easter Sunday Special: Celebrate this special day with Moose Mulligan! After you complete your 18 holes, see Moose for a free “Moose Pass” good for a free round of mini golf anytime during the 2011 season! Buy a Season Pass and Save: No better time to purchase a Season Pass from Moose Mulligan’s – one-time low fee, good for the whole season!

“Like Us” on Facebook – You will be glad you did! 534334 35L

Easter Day

Sunday, April 24, 2011

Chisago House Taylors Falls, MN 651-465-5245

Sunday Buffet

11:30 a.m. - 7 p.m. Adults - $9.99 Children 12 & Under $7.99 3 & Under Free ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT - Baked Chicken - Carved Ham - Meatballs - Full Salad Bar - Mashed Potatoes & Gravy - Vegetable - Bread Pudding & Custard Sauce - Baked Beans - German Potato Salad

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www.riversrally.org

AUSTIN LAKE GREENHOUSE & FLOWER SHOP • WEDDING BOUQUETS • FUNERAL DESIGNS • CUT FLOWERS • GIFTS • BALLOONS • BEDDING PLANTS • POTTED PLANTS • TUXEDO RENTAL BY SAVVI • ANTLER KING PRODUCTS

Eye health exams, glaucoma checks, foreign body removal, full line of street wear, safety and sport wear, contact lenses

Webster, Wisconsin

Rated R, 102 Minutes. Fri.-Sun.: 1:15, 3:30, 6:00 & 8:45 p.m. Mon.: 1:15, 3:30 & 6:00 p.m. Tues.-Thurs.: 5:00 & 7:10 p.m.

Call 1-800-919-1195 or 715-825-2335 & 715-646-2777 445914 eves. 9a,dtfc 20Ltfc

Siren, Wisconsin

Call, stop in or e-mail for a FREE brochure.

Phone (715) 472-2121

Swedberg-Taylor Funeral Home

Rated R, 112 Minutes. Fri.-Sun.: 1:00, 3:30, 6:00 & 8:45 p.m. Mon.: 1:00, 3:30 & 6:00 p.m. Tues.-Thurs.: 5:00 & 7:10 p.m.

$ 10x10.............. $ 10x16.............. $ 10x20.............. $ 10x24.............. $ 10x40..............

Adventure-Style Miniature Golf

We are also available for wedding dances w/o a full reception.

Hours: Tues., Thurs., Fri. 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

Daily: 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

SCREAM 4

Fresh food, great service and the most reasonable prices in the area!

304 1st St. So., Luck, Wis.

Phone 715-268-2004

RIO

Rated G, 99 Minutes. Fri.-Sun.: 1:00, 3:00, 5:00, 7:00 & 9:00 p.m. Mon.: 1:00, 3:00, 5:00 & 7:00 p.m. Tues.-Thurs.: 5:00 & 7:00 p.m.

Frederic, WI 715-327-9969 or 715-327-4125 E-mail: 10pin@centurytel.net

Family Eye Clinic

OPTOMETRIST 119 Arlington Drive Amery, Wis.

SHOW TIMES FOR FRI., APRIL 22 THRU THURS., APRIL 28

YOUR HIGHNESS

25.00 35.00 40.00 45.00 50.00 90.00

$

5x10................

24226 1st Ave. No. Siren, WI Local Movie Line 715-349-8888 Timbers1@starwire.net

HACKER’S LANES BANQUET HALL

Dr. Daniel C. Satterlund

Dr. T.L. Christopherson

Milltown, WI

AT THE LODGE

534229 35L 25a

AUTOMOBILE DONATION

C & J MINI STORAGE

HELP WANTED TRUCK DRIVER

534395 35-36L 25-26a

ADOPTION

PREGNANT? Fun, happy couple looking to adopt. We would cherish the chance to show your child a lifetime of love! Call 888-915-2525 License 012998 LCFS (CNOW)

MOOSE MULLIGAN’S

Hwy. 35 & “FF,” Webster Flowers Phoned Anywhere

Robert L. Nelson New York Life Insurance Company Box 313 Luck, Wis. 54853 Phone

715-472-2502

NEW YORK LIFE

Call 715-866-7261

Let’s Thrive.®

Cris A. Moore, FICF, FIC Senior Financial Consultant

Joel L. Morgan, FIC Assistant Financial Associate

Matt P. Bobick Financial Associate 201 Main St. S. • Luck, WI 54853

715-472-8107 office 800-500-2936 toll-free 22854A N1-07

200700115

• Commercial Printing • Office Supplies • Daily UPS Pickup • Fax & Copy Service See us for all your printing needs.

INTER-COUNTY COOPERATIVE PUBLISHING ASSOCIATION • Frederic, 715-327-4236 • Shell Lake, 715-468-2314 • Siren, 715-349-2560 • St. Croix Falls 715-483-9008

Visit The Leader’s Web Site: www.the-leader.net

4/11

Raising funds for: Faith’s Lodge, The Compassionate Friends & River’s Uplift 533978 35-36Lp

APRIL 20, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 67

Students of the Week GRANTSBURG

FREDERIC

Jewel Gavin has been chosen Frederic Elementary School’s student of the week. She is in sixth grade and the daughter of Missy Warner and Eric Gavin. Jewel’s favorite food is egg rolls, favorite movie is “Twilight,” favorite book is “Snow Treasure” and favorite subject is math. She enjoys basketball and volleyball. Jewel has two sisters, Farrah and Kaitlin. She has three pets, a dog, a cat and a fish. Jewel wants to be a marine biologist when she grows up.

Brett McClay has been chosen Frederic Middle School’s student of the week. He is in eighth grade and the son of Brenda McClay and Shawn McClay. Brett is very pleasant to work with, always cooperative and makes teaching an enjoyable experience. He enjoys riding bike, fishing and hunting. Brett’s future plans are to get a job. The greatest influences in his life have been his teachers.

Kali Otte has been chosen Frederic High School’s student of the week. She is the daughter of Luann and Tim Otte. Kali is extremely conscientious, polite, respectful and a superb citizen and individual. She is involved in choir, youth group, NHS, track and baby-sits and works at United Pioneer Home. Kali enjoys movies, music and hanging out with family and friends. She plans to go to college to study occupational therapy or early education.

Micah VanRavenswaay has been chosen Grantsburg Elementary School’s student of the week. He is in second grade and the son of Tim and Gail VanRavenswaay. Micah is very kind, has a great sense of humor and works hard in the classroom. Micah moved to Grantsburg from Illinois. He enjoys recess, music, gym and art. Micah loves sports, especially baseball, basketball and soccer. He played T-ball and liked that a lot. Micah has two brothers.

LUCK

Breanna White has been chosen Luck Elementary School’s student of the week. She is the daughter of Chad and Melissa White. Breanna is open and honest with her teachers and peers. She has a bubbly and happy personality which is very contagious. Breanna does her work to the best of her ability and is eager to help others.

Keith Vollendorf has been chosen Grantsburg High School’s student of the week. He is a freshman and the son of David and Valerie Vollendorf. Keith is an excellent math student who is a hard worker and excellent problem solver. He enjoys soccer, band, and youth group. Keith enjoys being outside, sports and relaxing. His future plans are to go to a four-year college.

ST. CROIX FALLS

Samantha Lindberg has been chosen Luck Middle School’s student of the week. She is in seventh grade and the daughter of Amy and John Lindberg. Samantha has a very enjoyable, quiet sense of humor. She is involved in volleyball. Samantha enjoys reading, riding bike and mudding. The most influencial person in life is her mom.

Kyle Hunter has been chosen Luck High School’s student of the week. He is a sophomore and the son of Scott and Nancy Hunter. Kyle is a leader among his peers and was a member of the team that attended the Lakeland Conference Leadership Seminar. He is involved in youth bowling, football, basketball and baseball. Kyle enjoys spending time with friends and family, stock car racing, ice fishing and hunting.

Brittany Tucker has been chosen St. Croix Falls Elementary School’s student of the week. She is in fourth grade. Brittany enjoys reading and helping in the library. She also likes to play outside during recess. Brittany enjoys playing with her Wii and spending time with her family. She has two cats, a guinea pig, bunnies, chickens, an African gray parrot that talks, a dog and fish. In the future Brittany wants to be an artist and author of children’s books.

Sophie Gutzmer has been choMiddle sen St. Croix Falls School’s student of the week. She is in sixth grade and the daughter of Danielle Foeller and Jeff Gutzmer. Sophie enjoys softball and hanging out with friends. Her favorite subject is recess. Sophie is an awesome student who works hard and does super work. She has a fun personality and is a great friend to all of her classmates. Sophie has two sisters, Paige and Noelle.

Nolan O’Brien has been chosen St. Croix Falls High School’s student of the week. He is a junior and the son of Craig O’Brien and Rosemary Slaughter. He likes horseback riding, playing Texas Hold’em, Canadian go-carting and hanging out with Mr. Clark. Nolan is involved in wrestling, football, golf and FFA. He has an older sister, Erin, and an older brother, Paddy.

WEBSTER

SIREN

Stephanie Gerhardson has been chosen Siren Elementary School’s student of the week. She is in first grade. Stephanie is hardworking, cooperative and is always eager to help. She is a joy to have in class and is well-liked and trusted by her fellow classmates. Stephanie enjoys reading and writing in our classroom. She would like to be a professional basketball or football player. The most influential person in her life is her dad.

Drew McNally has been chosen Grantsburg Middle School’s student of the week. She is in seventh grade and the daughter of Faith and Steve McNally. Drew is a great student who is pleasant and has a ready smile for everyone. Her favorite classes are math and science. She also plays flute in the band. Drew is active in many sports including volleyball and gymnastics. She also enjoys participating with church activities.

Elizabeth Stanford has been chosen Siren Middle School’s student of the week. She is the daughter of Travis and Caryn Stanford. Lizzie has a positive and respectful attitude, is very attentive to class discussions and is a positive role model among her peers. Her favorite color is blue, her favorite animal is a dog, her favorite number is 22 and her favorite place is going to a friend’s house. Her current future plans include going to college to become a veterinarian.

Kristen Sexton has been chosen Siren High School’s student of the week. She is a senior and the daughter of Jerry and Rose Sexton. Kristen is an active member of the choir and band. She is involved in track. Kristen will be performing in the upcoming production of “Little Women” being presented by Theatre in the Woods in Shell Lake. She values her friendships and is a trustworthy student and friend. Kristen will be attending UW-Superior next fall.

Keep up the hard work!

Taylor Howe has been chosen Webster Middle School’s student of the week. She is in fifth grade and the daughter of Kim Flodin and Mike Howe. Taylor is an excellent student and overall neat person to have in class. She has a strong work ethic, her skills are top-notch and she is always prepared. Taylor has a great sense of humor, an unusual amount of patience and is positive. She enjoys playing volleyball and basketball.

Jayme Mitchell has been chosen Webster High School’s student of the week. She is a senior and the daughter of John and Rose Howe and Greg Mitchell and Julia Cooper. Jayme is a take-charge kind of person. She is a good student who makes good decisions. She is responsible and dedicated. Jayme is involved in band and basketball. She enjoys sports and family and friends.

Ali Kreft has been chosen Unity Middle School’s student of the week. She is in seventh grade and the daughter of Bobbie Jo and Matt Babcock and Joe Kreft. Ali is a breath of fresh air in the classroom. She has a positive attitude and a great smile. Ali works hard and shows kindness to everyone.

Josie Owen has been chosen Unity High School’s student of the week. She is a freshman and the daughter of Sharon and Gary Owen. Josie enjoys being active as evidenced by her participation in track, volleyball, clogging and dance. She has been extremely hardworking and willing to help others. After high school, Josie plans on becoming a cosmetologist. She resides in Centuria.

UNITY

Proudly Supporting Our Students Stop In or Call Us Today

Electricity • Propane 1-800-421-0283 www.polkburnett.com

Supporting our area students and their accomplishments. INTER-COUNTY

Serving Northwest Wisconsin

2547 State Road 35, Luck, Wis. (in the Evergreen Plaza) 715-472-4088

www.sterlingbank.ws

If You Would Like To Be A Sponsor Of

STUDENT OF THE WEEK Please Call 715-327-4236

Isaah Holden has been chosen Unity Elementary School’s student of the week. He is in first grade and the son of Tiffany and Stephen Holden. Isaah does an exceptional job in all areas, both behaviorally and academically. He puts forth great effort each and every day. Isaah is a great friend to others and is also a great role model.

Coming

events

PAGE 68 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - APRIL 20, 2011

Happenings in the Upper St. Croix Valley communities Luck

APRIL

• Farm toy collectors discussion at the historical society meeting at the museum/library, 7 p.m.

Barron

• Open mike/poetry contest night for Teen Poetry Contest at the library, 5-7 p.m., 715-294-2310 or 715-4858680.

THURSDAY/21

Osceola

• Rep. Rivard town hall meeting at the courthouse, 3-5 p.m., 888-534-0075.

Siren • Ruby’s Pantry at 24534 Hwy. 35/70. Open 4:30 p.m. Distribution 5-6:30 p.m. • Corwin Kronenberg to speak on teaching children responsibility at the school auditorium, 6:30-8 p.m.

Centuria • Clean Sweep Recycle Day for Polk-Burnett customers at their office, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., 800-421-0283.

Frederic

Trade Lake

• Lioness Club meeting at Sunrise Apartments, 7 p.m., 715-327-4892.

• Beef cow-calf meeting at Beaver Creek Cattle Ranch. RSVP by Monday, April 25. 5 p.m. tour/dinner, 6 p.m. program, 800-528-1914.

Luck

FRI. & SAT./29 & 30

• American Legion & Auxiliary 255 meeting at the village hall, 7 p.m.

Osceola

Trade Lake

• Rep. Severson’s town hall meeting at village hall, 5:30-6:30 p.m., 888-529-0028.

• Rummage and bake sale at the Baptist church. Fri. noon-6 p.m., Sat. 8 a.m.-1 p.m.

FRIDAY/29

Rice Lake • Rep. Rivard’s town hall meeting at UW-Barron County Fine Arts Theater, 7-8 p.m., 888-534-0075.

Webster

Siren • Informational program and public recognition for Restorative Justice Program at the government center, Room 165, 5 p.m. • American Legion Post 132 meets at the village office building, 7 p.m.

Spooner • Rep. Rivard town hall meeting at Northwest Sports Complex, 8-10 a.m., 888-534-0075.

St. Croix Falls • Diabetes support group at the medical center, 6-8 p.m., 715-483-0431. • Rep. Severson’s town hall meeting at city hall, 4-5 p.m., 888-529-0028.

• Powwow at the high school. • José Cole Circus at the high school, 7 p.m.

This loon seemed pretty content considering the violent easterly winds on Balsam Lake on Friday, April 15. The high winds actually helped break up the remaining ice cover on the lakes opening the door for even more spring wildlife to return. – Photo by Marty Seeger

Dresser • Easter egg hunt at the park, 10 a.m.

Indian Creek • Easter egg hunt at Indian Creek Tavern, 12:30 p.m., 715653-2671.

Luck

Turtle Lake • Rep. Rivard town hall meeting at the library, noon-2 p.m., 888-534-0075.

FRI. & SAT./22 & 23

• Rags to Riches ACS sale at the former Lucky Dollar Store, 9 a.m.-noon.

Siren • Easter egg hunt at the Moose Lodge, 2 p.m.

Grantsburg

Taylors Falls, Minn.

• Earth Day events: “Green Fire,” 6, 7:15 & 8:30 p.m. Fri.; Birding tour 8-10 a.m. & wildflower hike 1-3 p.m. Sat. at Crex Meadows, www.crexmeadows.org, 715-463-2739.

• Puppet show & Easter egg hunt at the United Methodist Church, 2 p.m.

Dresser

• Arnell Humane Society annual meeting at the shelter, 6:30 p.m., 715-268-7387.

FRIDAY/22

MONDAY/25 Amery

• Minicamp for children to learn about Good Friday at Peace Lutheran Church, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m., 715-755-2515.

Siren

Balsam Lake

• Good Friday Breakfast at the senior center, 7-11 a.m.

• Adoption support group, Unity High School band room, 7:15 p.m.

Amery

• Shred-it Party at Frandsen Bank & Trust, 4-6 p.m., 715472-2161.

SATURDAY/23

Luck

• Community Clean Sweep at the medical center’s maintenance garage, 9 a.m.-1 p.m.

Danbury

TUESDAY/26 Balsam Lake

• Kids Easter egg hunt at Cozy Corner Inn, 1 p.m., 715244-3041.

• Know Your Antiques Show at the Justice Center community room, 2-item limit, 7 p.m.

Siren

SATURDAY/30 Amery

• Ruby’s Pantry at Congregational Church. Register 7-9:15 a.m. Distribution 9 a.m., 715-268-7390.

Balsam Lake • Spring writers conference at Our Lady of the Lakes Catholic Church, 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m. RSVP by April 15, 715483-9738.

• Burnett County Republican Party will meet at 7 p.m. in Room 162 in the government center.

St. Croix Falls • Alzheimer’s support group at the medical center, 1-3 p.m., 715-483-0431. • Open Arms hosted by Alliance Church of the Valley. Meal and fellowship, 5-6:30 p.m., 715-483-1100. • “Amphibians and Reptiles of the St. Croix River Valley” at Interstate Park. Children’s program 6-6:30 p.m., refreshments, speaker 7:30 p.m.

Webster • Food and Friends at Grace United Methodist Church. Dinner 5-6 p.m.

WEDNESDAY/27

• Ramblin’ Red Hat Ladies meet at The Nuthouse, noon, 715-689-2776.

THURSDAY/28

• Lyme disease education and support at Our Savior’s Lutheran Church, 7 p.m., 715-268-2856, 715-268-2035.

Dresser • Dresser & St. Croix Falls area VFW Post 4186 & Ladies Auxiliary All-You-Can-Eat Spaghetti at the VFW Hall, 4:30-7 p.m.

Tim Nelson and Kat Hillier are shown with just some of the exercise equipment featured at Every Body Fitness. – Photos by Tammi Milberg

Every Monday Indianhead Barbershop Chorus meets at the Balsam Lake Government Center, 7:30 p.m., 715-483-9202. Baby and Me class - Amery Medical Center, 1-2 p.m. Grief Share support group at Centennial Hall, Amery, 715-268-2176 or 715-268-8360. Bingo - Burnett County Moose Lodge, Siren, 6 p.m. Survivors of domestic violence & sexual assault support group, Polk Co., 800-261-7233, 6-7:30 p.m. Anger management group at Amery Regional Medical Center, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 715-268-4094.

Every Thursday

Amery

by Tammi Milberg Leader staff writer ST. CROIX FALLS – There is a new business in the North Country Mall on Hwy. 8 that opened this February called Every Body Fitness. It is a 24-hour fitness center that features cardio machines, circuit weight trainers and free weights. The fitness center is leased by co-owners Kat Hillier and Tim Nelson. They are new to the business, but are excited to be open and have just under 100 club members. The center also features showering facilities and tanning. The club offers individual, joint and family memberships. Cardio equipment includes treadmills, exercise bikes, arc trainers and stair steppers. Circuit trainers are weightlifting machines targeting specific muscles in the body such as chest or leg presses.

Divorce care support group at Apple River Community Church, 715-268-8360, 715-268-2176.

Every Tuesday

Siren

Every Body Fitness opens on Hwy. 8 • Polk County Alzheimer’s support group at social services building, 715-483-3133.

ONGOING

Every Day, AA &/or AlAnon, Polk & Burnett counties, 715-931-8262 for time/location. Amery, 715-268-8431.

Breastfeeding support group at the St. Croix Regional Medical Center, 2-3:30 p.m., 715-483-0431. Narcotics Anonymous meets at the Serenity House (old jail), Balsam Lake, 7 p.m., 612-205-2321.

Every Friday Moms In Touch International, First Baptist, Amery, 8:15 a.m., 715-268-5408.

The business is staffed from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday, and noon to 5 p.m. on Friday, Saturday and Sunday by appointment only. The business is featuring a sign-up special through the month of May. Every Body Fitness also offers core conditioning classes. For more information or to join, call 715-483-3853.

LEFT: Every Body Fitness is located in the North Country Mall on Hwy. 8 in St. Croix Falls.

In Memory

Zoe B. Emerson Aug. 2, 1938 April 20, 2010

Granny, Because of you, we have memories to last a lifetime. You are in our mind and always in our heart! We love you and miss you so dearly.

Zoey & Clay Stacy, Sarah & Andrew

534335 35Lp


Inter County Leader April 20