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garden tripod A Redbubble Country Gardens come grow with us Group Members Magazine

Cover Image Parrot Tulips by Barbara Wyeth

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All The Materials Contained May Not Be Reproduced, Copied, Edited, Published, Transmitted Or Uploaded In Any Way Without the artist/ photographers Permission. These Images/writings Do Not Belong To The Public Domain. All images and information within the Garden Tripod magazine are the responsibility of the owner/artist/writer/photographer & not the country garden come grow with us group, redbubble or the Garden Tripod magazine 2012-2013

GARDEN TRIPOD A Redbubble Country Gardens come grow with us Group Members Magazine Issue

11 May 2013 Garden Tripod Web Site www.gardentripod.com

Editor TheAgency Cover image Parrot Tulips by Barbara Wyeth   News Hound Arum beauty by Maree Clarkson Spring on the Fence by Ruth Lambert Feature Botanica An Interview with Barbara Wyeth Welcome New Members

Ruth Lambert yanshee Barbara Wyeth Steve Randall Clare Colins DriftingAudrey Liam Cox CADavis goddarb Lynn Gedeon Brian Haslam Arvind Singh Mike Pesseackey aka crimsontideguy Chris Randall

Contributors: Revel in Red Challenge catalogue Lets have some Spring TULIPS !!! by AnnDixon Memories of summer by vigor Roses and gazebo by Celeste Mookherjee Red Roses For You! by Sandra Foster Affairs Of The Heart by naturelover Our World Is Bleeding... by Vicki Spindler (VHS Photography) FALLBERRIES by ctheworld A Burst of Red by rosaliemcm Autumn Dahlia ~ Shades of Red! by SummerJade Soaked in Red by KatiesCorner Bright Red Dahlia by lynn carter Red Rose macro by baneling Shades Of Red by Debbie Oppermann Spotlight artisandelimage Ramblings from the Office Temp AWAL Micropropagation Part 4 Richard Fenwick Animal Vegetable Mineral Unbreakable Bond by Peter Williams Rhino by Adelina84 Izu 4 by Heather Lara Guarding the Future - cheetahs by Heather Ward Greyhound by Redbarron Hare Today, Gone Tomorrow by Sami Thorpe Artichokes & Garlic by Rachel Slepekis Tomatoes and Beans by Clare Colins Good For You by PhotoKismet It's In The Bag by trueblvr Fresh Corn on the Cob by AnnDixon Tates... New Potatoes In A Paper Bag by charliefoxtrott a bunch of tomatoes by Michel Meijer 17th century carrots by Darren Bailey LRPS Flawless (Rosella Opalite) by Stephanie Bateman-Graham

Red Lily by SKNickel Unfolding Family Layers by Sherry Hallemeier We Three Leaves Of Burning Bush Are by paintingsheep Red for love by Ana Belaj Red Hibiscus by WildestArt Gate to Paradise by Nancy Richard Poppy posy by Jacki Stokes Hardy Hybiscus by Mary Campbell Especially for you, with love, tulips. by elphonline Pointsettia by phil decocco Staghorn Sumac by cclaude Zinniafire by Eileen McVey Red Red Red Dahlias by Barbara Wyeth Red Beauty by Geoff Carpenter Juicy Red by trueblvr Beauty on Majuba Mountain... by Qnita Ruby by Jeanette Varcoe Red sea of tulips by Arie Koene Radiant. by Bette Devine

Ghosts (Amazonite) by Stephanie Bateman-Graham Porthole (Agatized Jasper) by Stephanie Bateman-Graham Star Bridge by Stephanie Bateman-Graham Sticks & Stones Career.... by Bob Daalder Callanish Stone by kalaryder Towering Sticks by CADavis Callanish Standing Stones by Justin Foulkes Sticks II by Donna Rondeau Rock stack by Morag Anderson Sticks by yanshee Avebury neolithic stone circle by Martyn Franklin Spiral by Sarah Horsman Stonehenge Rocks by Steve Randall Pentre Ifan 2 by Neill Parker ADVERTISEMENT Exhibitions Without Walls “Flowers In Art: Contemporary International Artist” Angel On Call Dog Rescue, Inc

Welcome to the Garden Tripod Magazine and the Country Gardens Come Grow With Us group in RedBubble

Ruth Lambert

yanshee

Barbara Wyeth

Steve Randall

Clare Colins

DriftingAudrey

Liam Cox

CADavis

Lynn Gedeon

Brian Haslam

Mike Pesseackey aka crimsontideguy

goddarb

Arvind Singh

Chris Randall

27

Spotlight Real Yellow Challenge Winner

45

67

Animal Vegetable Mineral

Sticks & Stones

108

Revel in Red Catalogue

11

Barbara Wyeth

Scanner Art

51

garden tripod A Redbubble Country Gardens come grow with us Group Members Magazine Welcome to our 11th edition of the Garden Tripod. We have a wonderful collection of images to show you from around the web. Continuing from last month we are still showing text in the raw, as it has been written, rather than trimming and tidying. We felt we was loosing contact with the person. So spelling mistakes and grammatical errors are now included for free, and we meet the real people, unpolished, unaltered. Some of the awesome selection of images for you this month are including Revel in Red, and the spotlight of last months Real Yellow challenge. A very small collection of scanner art and an interview with its maker,  Barbara Wyeth. A little look around the bubble at fabulous drawings of Animals, Photography of vegetables and close up images of Minerals. So how best to follow that than having a section on Sticks and Stones. The office temp is off exploring out side the office, so no ramblings this month, but she will be back in time for the bumper birthday edition of Garden Tripod next month. We will be one year old in June ... and the office news hound was a year old on the 5th May.. gosh how time can fly and with it comes experience. I hope all our readers are still enjoying the individual look and layout of this publication.

Stay Safe agen

A little word from our Office News Hound Hi Folks .. I am officially the office dog for the Garden Tripod Magazine. This month I am all grown up, on the 5th of May I was one year old.. there was a party and everything. I was not allowed to eat the cake, but tried to blow out the candle on it anyway. I got presents and a fancy dog biscuit. Silly really as I was up half the night worrying about what was going to happen, and it was a wonderful day. I have to go and play with my new birthday toys now, so hope you enjoy the two images I have chosen Stay Safe Princess Summer

Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 8

Spring on the Fence by Ruth Lambert

Garden Tripod 11 9

W&N watercolour on Bockingford 300gsm Arum lilies in my garden (Tarlton, Gauteng, South Africa) What could be more beautiful than a creamy white arum lily – whether in your garden, a pot, or the wild? Arum lilies (Zantedeschia) are native to southern Africa from South Africa north to Malawi and grow well in full sun near water, but prefer a semi-shaded environment when there’s no permanent water nearby.

Arum beauty by Maree Clarkson

The faintly scented flowers attract a multitude of crawling insects and bees, which pollinate the flowers in exchange for food, each one in its own way. The white crab spider, for instance, visits the flower to eat the insects. It does not spin webs, but makes good use of its paleness as an effective camouflage in the spathe. Porcupines are crazy about the large rhizomes and will savagely destroy whole colonies of arum lilies. The good thing is that thanks to this brutal pruning, the plants regenerate fresher than ever with the most amazing flowers. It’s worth the massacre!

Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 10

Revel in Red

32 Entries 109 Votes 1 Winner

Garden Tripod 11 11

Revel In Red Lets have some Spring TULIPS !!! by AnnDixon

Roses and gazebo by Celeste Mookherjee

Memories of summer

Red Roses For You!

by vigor

by Sandra Foster

Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 12

Catalogue

Affairs Of The Heart by naturelover

Our World Is Bleeding... by Vicki Spindler (VHS Photography)

FALLBERRIES by ctheworld

Revel In Red

Autumn Dahlia ~ Shades of Red! A Burst of Red by rosaliemcm

by SummerJade

Soaked in Red by KatiesCorner

Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 14

Catalogue

Bright Red Dahlia by lynn carter

Shades Of Red by Debbie Oppermann

Red Rose macro by baneling

Revel In Red

Red Lily by SKNickel

Unfolding Family Layers by Sherry Hallemeier

Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 16

We Three Leaves Of Burning Bush Are by paintingsheep

Catalogue

Red for love by Ana Belaj

Gate to Paradise by Nancy Richard

Red Hibiscus by WildestArt

Revel In Red

Hardy Hybiscus by Mary Campbell

Poppy posy by Jacki Stokes

Lets have some Spring TULIPS !!! Especially for you, with love, tulips. by elphonline

Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 18

by AnnDixon

Catalogue

Ruby by Jeanette Varcoe

Pointsettia by phil decocco

Red sea of tulips by Arie Koene

Revel In Red

Staghorn Sumac by cclaude

Red Red Red Dahlias Zinniafire by Eileen McVey

Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 20

by Barbara Wyeth

Catalogue

Radiant. by Bette Devine

Red Beauty by Geoff Carpenter

Beauty on Majuba Mountain... Juicy Red by trueblvr

by Qnita

Revel in Red

32 Entries 109 Votes

1 Winner Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 22

10 votes & Winner

Radiant. by Bette Devine

8 votes Poppy posy

by Jacki Stokes

7 votes Bright Red Dahlia by lynn carter

Zinniafire by Eileen McVey

6 votes each

Red Red Red Dahlias by Barbara Wyeth Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 24

Lets have some Spring TULIPS !!! by AnnDixon

We Three Leaves Of Burning Bush Are by paintingsheep

Staghorn Sumac by cclaude

5 votes each

Shades Of Red by Debbie Oppermann

Beauty on Majuba Mountain... by Qnita

4 votes each

Congratulations

These past and present challenge winners you are now a Featured Member in Country Gardens come grow with us Group

11 RED issue

Bette Devine

10 YELLOW issue

artisandelimage

BlueShift

9 GREEN issue

Celeste Mookherjee

Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 26

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Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 28

Spotlight Real Yellow Challenge Winner artisandelimage Rebirth GreyHawk Landing, Bradenton, Florida, USA

Please don’t use or copy any image without permission first!

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Black With A Hint Of Botanical Element ~ Part Two Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 30

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The World Is A Colorful Wonder ~ Part Forty-Three Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 32

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Pumpkin Extravaganza ~ Part Three Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 34

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Forgotten Beauty Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 36

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Botanical Abstraction ~ Part One Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 38

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And They Pretend That I Can't Feel... Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 40

Le Petit Oiseau De Toutes Les Couleurs

More Products are available @ http://www.redbubble.com/people/artisandelimage

Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 42

Ramblings from the Office Temp ~ Sorry the office temp is away on a ramble and will be back in time for next months issue

Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 44

Micropropagation

Part 4-

Hello In this issue I would like to discuss my favourite topic. It’s a subject that I specialized in when I was at college and the one technique which I feel is much undervalued. Issue 8 – Advantages, Disadvantages, Nutrient gel Issue 9 – Plant initiation/New start, Problems Issue 10 – Multiplication, Rooting

Issue 11 – Weaning, Aftercare

We have a competition to win a Plant culture Kit at the end of this article, to enter email your answer the Garden Tripod Magazine at gardentripod@yahoo.com Winners are selected at random and will be announced in issue 12

Please Note: Views, comments are my own and any products discussed in this article are not endorsed by myself or Garden Tripod Magazine. Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 46

Micropropagation

Part 4 –

Weaning and Aftercare Once your culture has achieved a rooting percentage of 80%+ it’s time for weaning/hardening off. It’s important to remember ·

Cultures can be many years old, have been growing in 90% to 100% humidity and have lost the ability to open and close their stomata.

·

The leaves have abnormally high number of stomata per leaf and little to no cuticle.

·

In some cases, plants have thinner roots, stems, leaves and less chlorophyll in the leaf. Without this important weaning stage any micropropagated plants left in the open would be dead in approx 20 minutes as water escapes through all pores in the leaves.

To help this process While the plants are still in culture the following can be used to help the weaning process ·

Add calcium or reduce sugar content in multiplication/rooting mix this can shorten weaning time and reduce fatalities.

·

Small bags of silica gel can be hung in the jars to lower the humidity however the culture must not be allowed to dry out.

·

In the growing room or a clean room, jar lids can be loosened to allow more water vapour to escape.

·

Increase agar content to reduce available moisture [= a firmer gel] however this will make it more difficult to separate roots from agar.

Micropropagation

Part 4 –

Once the plants are removed from the jar – ·

Wash off all traces of agar, this will reduce moulds, yeast's bacteria formation and the need to use fungicides.

·

Transfer plantlets to compost and store in a fog or mist tunnel/bench for 2 - 4 weeks reducing the mist gradually.

·

Monitor and if required us fungicides, this can increase the survival rate. A fully weaned plant is free from pest/diseases, is often stronger and has better root system compared to normal propagation techniques. E.g. Soft or semi-ripe cutting. At this stage the plant is able to open and close the stomata according to turgidity.

The future of Micropropagation – Within the next 10 years ·

Increased number of Micropropagation labs, based at large commercial Nurseries but networking with surrounding small nurseries/garden centers making it more cost effective.

·

Robotics to increase production and reduce labour costs.

·

Development of UV rooms [with an automotive robotic workforce] to eliminate contamination to between 80 100%.

·

Replacing the scalpel blade with laser cutting beam in an automated device. This reduces cross contamination/damage to neighboring cells and has been found to break bud dormancy of in woody plants. E.g. Avocado [Persea americana] Strawberry Tree [Arbutus unedo]

·

Carbohydrate/Sucrose free cultures reducing bacterial contamination to workable conditions. This could allow cultures to be grown outside under sunlight with or without CO² enrichment.

In issue 12 we will look at Equipment required for home tissue culture

Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 48

Micropropagation Part 4-

Competition 2 lucky readers could win a Plantlet Culture Kit (Great gift for budding gardeners over 7 yrs old) Just answer this simple question – Where can you find the stomata? Winners are selected at random and will be announced in issue 12 Good luck

Plantlet Culture Kit for Tomato, Potato and Sweet Peas

To enter email your answer the Garden Tripod Magazine at

gardentripod@yahoo.com Winners are selected at random and will be announced in issue 10

Next month Equipment required for home tissue culture

Please Note: Views, comments are my own and any products discussed in this article are not endorsed by myself or Garden Tripod Magazine.

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Botanica An Interview with  Barbara Wyeth

Barbara Wyeth SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES

Can you remember the very first thing that you scanned as an art work, and how long ago was that

What type of scanner do you use

What scanner settings do you use and are they varied from subject to subject

As a photographer, I am delighted and amazed at the detail I can get by scanning objects directly. For a while now, I’ve been working with flowers and plants from the garden behind my building on Russian Hill, and with beautiful specimens from the flower shop where I work. My background is in traditional photography and hand-tinting, but I admit to the thrill of seeing these wonders of nature so lovingly rendered on my iMac screen! I also like to break away from the computer screen and sketch, usually flowers and natural materials, always humbled by the unmatchable beauty and intricacy of nature. In the 70s I was excited by Color Xerox and did a lot of work on the copier machine. A fellow-artist and I had a art postcard shop, the Postcard Palace, in North Beach, San Francisco and sold a lot of cards made with color-copy art. We merged with a copyart studio and then had a Color Xerox on premises and did lots of experimental work so the scanner was not a leap for me. I’ve long been fascinated with the immediacy of getting an image so quickly and with the brilliant color. Oddly enough, all along I was also shooting in black and white and handtinting my images but the convenience and my growing interest in digital imagery got me going on the scanner. I use some photoshop but really only know some basic stuff so I don’t alter my images very much – mostly I just “clean-up”, like the old days of spotting photographs. I use an Epson Perfection 4490.

I use pretty basic settings when scanning. I try to frame on the scanner, like framing an image in a camera’s view finder. When I’m working with these lovely flowers and growing things, I want to capture their “naturalness” – they are so beautiful on their own and that beauty is what I’m trying to show. I think of these images as botanical art and like to render my subjects in a straightforward manner.

Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 52

In your profile you say you work in a florist, do you have a favorite flower

I work at a lovely florist in San Francisco and have access to beautiful flowers. I also garden so I have a bounty of material to work with! I love so many flowers, my favorite seems to vary with the seasons. Some are definitely easier to work with, since depth of field is somewhat limited on the scanner.

Have you put items on the scanner, that were not organic.

I’ve put many things on the scanner – a favorite series is “Things Found In the Garden”. I love the wonderful textures and colors on some of these objects that I find while working in the dirt.

Do you use photoshop to clean your images in, and do you ever just like them left natural

I do clean-up my images and use a few adjustments in photoshop but try to keep them “pure”.

If you could give a new artist one piece of advice, what would that be.

My only advise to new artists is just to jump in and do it! Don’t think about perfect time, perfect conditions, or whether you’re doing it “right”. The beauty of computers and all this technology is that you can experiment and play. And you can do it in the comfort of home – and in your ’jammies!

Who is/was your inspiration to create scanner art images

My mother was a "garden clubber " and great lover of growing things. I attribute my love of nature and flowers to her and her influence!

Coral-Colored Dahlia Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 54

Single Coral Peony

 Barbara Wyeth

Red Shirley Poppies Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 56

Hawthorn

Nepeta Bunch Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 58

Borage

Mock Orange Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 60

Summer!

Golden Nasturtium Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 62

Graham Thomas Roses

 Barbara Wyeth

Dandelion Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 64

Vegetables

On the Vine

Deux Radis

Spring Onions

"Cabbage" Rose

Animal Vegetable Mineral

Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 68

Peter Williams is an entirely self taught UK artist, working out of his studio on the Suffolk coast where he lives with his long term partner Jenny. With a strong online presence and multiple solo exhibitions each year, he has developed a large following of collectors and enthusiasts from all continents, new work being sought after as demand outstrips productivity. Short listed for the David Shepherd Wildlife Artist Of The Year award 2010 and 2011 his paintings have also been published in some of Dorling K i n d e r s l e y ’s w a t e r c o l o u r workshop books and featured in many UK publications.

Unbreakable Bond by Peter Williams http://mightyfineartprints.com

Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 70

Rhino ESSEX, UNITED KINGDOM

by Adelina84

I’m a wildlife artist living in Southern California. Currently I’m focussing on scratchboard but I love to dabble in everything I can get my hands on. There is nothing in the natural world that doesn’t hold beauty of some kind and I enjoy finding new ways to look at things. I’m always looking for input from other artists, the good, the bad and the ugly – I think it’s the only way to keep growing as an artist, so your comments and suggestions are always welcome!

Izu 4 by Heather Lara

Since I was young, the goal of my drawings has been to be as realistic as possible. As a scientifically-oriented person, I value accuracy and detail. But at the same time, I don’t want a drawing to be flat, lifeless. I want to capture a moment in time. Ever since I can remember, the subject of my drawings has mostly been animals. I feel like I have a deep connection with the natural world, and I want to show it through my art. I am a self-taught artist, and after several years of trying different media, I have settled on two that I really connect with: charcoal and pyrography. I love seeing a drawing come to life, and these media do that for me.

cheetahs

Guarding the Future

by Heather Ward http://www.heatherwardwildlifeart.com

Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 76

I am a full time artist with a good track record of hundreds of commissions over the past 15 years, mainly portraits, pet portraits and wildlife. Having moved to Shetland in 2007, my surroundings are now starting to influence my work with more seascapes, landscapes and wildlife coming to the fore. Commissions are available in any medium, any subject m a t t e r, b e a r i n g i n m i n d copyright laws, and I just need a good photograph to work from (with permission from the photographer if it is not your own photograph). Commissions are also available for design work, book illustrations and in a cartoon or caricature style, examples of which can be seen on my website, as well as examples of more detailed classical portraits of people and animals:

Greyhound by Redbarron

Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 78

My natural artist ability has been nurtured since childhood and with a faithful four legged friend never far from my side I needn’t look far for inspiration. In my early twenties, drawing portraits of people and pets blossomed from a hobby into my profession and has continued to grow from strength to strength ever since proving extremely popular throughout the UK and beyond. In 2006 I decided to compliment the original portrait commissions that I produce by venturing into the world of animal prints and greetings cards. These are also proving to be a fantastic success. Dogs, cats, horses, farm animals and wildlife, each captured in charming, lovable detail.

Hare Today, Gone Tomorrow by Sami Thorpe http://www.samithorpe.co.uk

Animal Vegetable Mineral

Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 82

I am a self taught photographer and artist. At a young age I developed a love for drawing and painting; however, as I grew older my abilities did not match what I saw in the world or in peoples faces. Therefore due to an increasing desire for capturing light and people’s emotions, I turned to photography. I truly believe that everyone is beautiful and eagerly pursue the chance to show just that.

Artichokes & Garlic by Rachel Slepekis www.rachelellice.com

Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 84

I live and photograph on the Dorrigo Plateau, Mid North Coast NSW. Nowhere is more beautiful, nor more open to photographic enjoyment than this area. Majestic panoramas from the many outlooks. Microscopic macro opportunities in the rainforests. Beautiful gardens and parks that change colour seasonally.

Tomatoes and Beans by Clare Colins

www.photography-dorrigo.com.au

Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 86

I once classified myself as an amateur but, recently, I met a photographer who noted there are no amateurs, just photographers at different points in their careers. So instead of amateur, I will describe myself as a photographer who is on the road to learning as much as possible with a passion and zeal for the craft.

Good For You by PhotoKismet www.photokismet.blogspot.com

Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 88

Hello, and thank-you for being interested in my work. I am a 64 yr. old (as of 2012) who got into photography late in life. I have always been interested in photography, but never seemed to do anything about it until May of 2007, when I confiscated my husband Georges’s Kodak EasyShare. I now have a Canon PowerShot SX10 IS. and am thoroughly enjoying it. I am one of those people that see’s something worth remembering ( to me anyway) in just about everything I see, and that is what I take pictures of.I hope you enjoy them,

It's In The Bag by trueblvr

Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 90

Retired, Grandmother of 7 (4 girls, 3 boys) and Great Grandmother to three boys, a new Great Granddaughter due May 2013, and a beautiful Cavalier Spaniel called Charlie Girl, I love photography, I love to travel and to meet people, I also enjoy seeing the world through the eyes of others too

Fresh Corn on the Cob by AnnDixon

Born in Leeds, Moved around a bit as a kid, Settled in Sleaford Lincolnshire as a paramedic, remained in that job for a number of years, had an accident in work and was forced to retire, moved to Northumberland. Northumberland is a beautiful place well worth a visit, the wildlife and coastline are a favourite, you can often see me at Hauxley, Alnwick and Druridge, along with Otterburn as my family descended from that area and Durham. Photography is a hobby of mine my camera is a Sony A750 with a few macro and G lenses here and there.

Tates... New Potatoes In A Paper Bag by charliefoxtrott

Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 94

What does something look like in a certain time, in a certain place and in certain circumstances? This question I ask myself when I’m photographing. The reason to make photographs is to show that ‘something’ other people. Phot o g r a p h y i s a g o o d manner to register: it can be a relatively quick and simple way to give a detailed picture, it gives the whole picture the equal amount of attention (the light-sensitive layer gets practical the same amount of light almost at the same time) and shows that an object exists or existed. But what value can you give that picture? Photography acts as a filter and the operation of the filter is determined by the creator of the picture.

a bunch of tomatoes by Michel Meijer

Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 96

This image was inspired by the works of Sanchez Cotan who was a 17th century painter who painted many still life constructions. In this time period fruit and veg was hung up in the pantry to stop it from going bad so quickly so many still life paintings of this period would have hanging vegetables and fruit in them. Image taken with a Nikon D90 using a 35-70 Nikkor lens the lighting was a single Bowens studio light with a black background I also used a 09 ND filter to further blacken the background area. D&D Photography LTD

17th century carrots by Darren Bailey LRPS www.danddphotography.co.uk

Animal Vegetable Mineral

Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 100

Technically speaking this is mineral microscopy; I prefer to call it Microgeophotography: I use a low-powered microscope and capture software to take very close up pictures of mostly unpolished slices of rock. In the trade these are called slabs.

Flawless (Rosella Opalite) by Stephanie Bateman-Graham www.prettyrockdesigns.com

Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 102

It’s amazing what you find under the microscope: rich and complex blends of colours seem to emerge from nowhere; shapes, faces, landscapes, deep space, animals, and plants all find their way into the picture. Some of my favorites are pure abstract art to be enjoyed entirely for their own sake.

Ghosts (Amazonite) by Stephanie Bateman-Graham www.prettyrockdesigns.com

Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 104

For technical purposes I’ll adjust brightness/contrast/ saturation to bring out certain features, but all the patterns and colours are provided by nature, and I try to process images as little as possible. Nature is very clever.

Porthole (Agatized Jasper) by Stephanie Bateman-Graham www.prettyrockdesigns.com

Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 106

More recently I’ve started using image stacking software to compensate for some of the limitations of the microscope optics, but I keep everything as natural as possible.

Star Bridge by Stephanie Bateman-Graham www.prettyrockdesigns.com

Sticks & Stones

Towering Sticks by CADavis

Taken North of Idaho City, Idaho

Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 110

Callanish Standing Stones Callanish (Calanais) Standing Stones, Isle of Lewis, Outer Hebrides, Scotland.

by Justin Foulkes www.bananapancake.com.

Sticks II by Donna Rondeau Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 112

On the Tasmanian east coast, with its typical orange lichen and blue, blue water. The Freycinet Peninsula is in the background.

Rock stack by Morag Anderson

Chest out… a new beginning develops into a more realistic approach and finally ends up… tired and defeated.

Career.... by Bob Daalder

Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 114

One of the stones at the spectacular circle of Callanai I on the Isle of Lewis, which is off the coast of Scotland

Callanish Stone by kalaryder

http://kalaryderphotography.weebly.com

Sticks Little sticks in the snow.

by yanshee Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 116

Mystical stone henge, Avebury in Wiltshire, UK which dwarfs Stone henge in size.

Avebury neolithic stone circle by Martyn Franklin www.negaro.co.uk

Spiral by Sarah Horsman

Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 118

The dolmen dates from approximately 3,500 B.C. and, possibly, was used as a communal burial. The existing stones form the portal and main chamber of the tomb, which would originally have been covered with a large stone mound about 36.6 m long and 17 m wide. Some of the stones have been scattered, but at least seven are in their original position. The capstone is 5.1 m in length, and is estimated to weigh 16 tonnes, and rises 2.4 m above the ground. It is delicately supported by the narrow tips of three uprights. The facade surrounding the portal was built with carefully constructed dry stone walling. Archaeological excavations have taken place in 1936 – 1937 and 1958 – 1959, both led by William Francis Grimes. The dolmen is owned and maintained by Cadw, the Welsh Historic Monuments Agency. The site is well-kept and entrance is free. It is located about 6 km by road from Newport and 17 km from Cardigan.

Pentre Ifan 2 by Neill Parker

Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 120

Capture of Stonehenge. Stonehenge is a prehistoric monument in the English county of Wiltshire, about 2 miles (3.2 km) west of Amesbury and 8 miles (13 km) north of Salisbury. One of the most famous sites in the world, Stonehenge is the remains of a ring of standing stones set within earthworks. It is in the middle of the most dense complex of Neolithic and Bronze Age monuments in England, including several hundred burial mounds.1 Archaeologists believe it was built anywhere from 3000 BC to 2000 BC, as described in the chronology below. Radiocarbon dating in 2008 suggested that the first stones were raised between 2400 and 2200 BC,2 whilst another theory suggests that bluestones may have been raised at the site as early as 3000 BC (see phase 1 below). The surrounding circular earth bank and ditch, which constitute the earliest phase of the monument, have been dated to about 3100 BC. The site and its surroundings were added to the UNESCO’s list of World Heritage Sites in 1986 in a co-listing with Avebury Henge. It is a national legally protected Scheduled Ancient Monument. Stonehenge is owned by the Crown and managed by English Heritage, while the surrounding land is owned by the National Trust.34 Archaeological evidence found by the Stonehenge Riverside Project in 2008 indicates that Stonehenge could have been a burial ground from its earliest beginnings. 5 The dating of cremated remains found on the site indicate that deposits contain human bone from as early as 3000 BC, when the ditch and bank were first dug. Such deposits continued at Stonehenge for at least another 500 years. 6 The site is a place of religious significance and pilgrimage in Neo-Druidry.

Stonehenge Rocks by Steve Randall

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Submit images that show off the dog. The dog must be the main focus of the image. UNTIL ONE HAS LOVED AN ANIMAL, PART OF THEIR SOUL REMAINS UNWAKENED. GIVE BACK THE LOVE THEY GIVE YOU. This Group Accepts: Photographs, Acrylics, Oils, Water Colors, and Drawings.

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This is a group for sharing photos of all kinds of sighthounds – including greyhounds, deerhounds, whippets, salukis, galgos, wolfhounds, borzois, afghans and a l l l u rc h e r s a n d s i g h t h o u n d crossbreeds. If you own a sighthound or even just love sighthounds in general then you’re welcome to join us here!

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Garden Tripod 11