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STEPHEN

DEAR STEPHEN, Imagine City Park without Interstate 610. Even with the train track intruding, it’s lovely. Until the early 1970s there was no highway or traffic ripping through this beautiful landscape. The picnic tables on Zachary Taylor Drive were welcomed by those of us who enjoyed al fresco dining. Those tables predate the interstate by many years. And near the picnic tables were golf courses. In 1938, a new clubhouse had been built on Zachary Taylor Drive. This facility served the golfers until May 1967. In 1963 the City Park Board learned the Louisiana State Highway Department intended to acquire a 200-foot right of way through the park. In 1958, the country embarked on an ambitious plan to build highways after the National Defense Highway Act provided for the creation of an extensive interstate highway system across America. Unfortunately, parts of our city were destroyed by the construction of Interstate 10 and the I-610 bypass. Remember Claiborne Avenue before the interstate was built? It was clear that the new I-610 bypass would have a big impact on the park. In particular, it would go right through the golf clubhouse, and an entire golf course would become unusable. A battle began between the City Park Board and the State Highway Department (now the Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development). Two years later, on December 24, 1965, the newspapers carried the story: The park would receive $1.24 million to build a new clubhouse and golf course to replace the ones that would have to be abandoned. Environmentalists filed suit in federal court in 1972, but their suit was dismissed. HEY BLAKE, MY MOTHER TOLD ME MY YOUNGER BROTHER AND I WERE BORN AT THE “OLD” MERCY HOSPITAL. WHAT CAN YOU TELL ME ABOUT IT? DANIEL CHUN

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HEY BLAKE, COULD YOU TELL ME WHY THERE ARE CEMENT PICNIC TABLES UNDER THE OVERPASS IN CITY PARK?

DEAR DANIEL, The first Sisters of Mercy arrived in New Orleans in 1869. Six of them had journeyed from St. Louis to teach Irish

students at St. Alphonsus School. The sisters developed a health care ministry, a day care for working mothers, an orphanage and a shelter for elderly women and those looking for work. They opened the first Mercy Hospital, also known as the Soniat Memorial Hospital, on March 19, 1924, with a reception and a blessing by Archbishop John W. Shaw. The hospital was located at 1321 Annunciation St.

This photo of the old Mercy Hospital was taken in 1951, the same year the institution moved to the corner of South Jefferson Davis Parkway and Bienville Street in Mid-City. PHOTO BY ALEXANDER ALLISON/ COURTESY LOUISIANA DIVISION, NEW ORLEANS PUBLIC LIBRARY

The previous fall, Leona Saulet Soniat purchased the building for $100,000 and gave it to the sisters in memory of her husband, Leonce. The sisters, with the aid of their supporters, added $20,000 worth of improvements. A landmark in New Orleans, the building — the old Saulet Plantation home — was erected in 1816 on land that once was part of the Jesuit plantation and had been purchased in 1763 by Soniat’s great-grandfather, Thomas Saulet. In 1860, the building was taken over by the Sisters of Charity. For more than half a century, it housed St. Simeon’s Select Seminary for Girls and Young Ladies. Many prominent women in Louisiana were educated there. Prior to Soniat’s purchase, it was Dr. B. F. Gallant’s mental hospital. More than 100,000 patients were treated at the first Mercy Hospital. In 1928, the first class of nurses completed their training at the Mercy School of Nursing. By the time the hospital moved, 342 young women had graduated. In 1951, the “new” Mercy Hospital opened on North Jefferson Davis Parkway and Bienville Street. The original hospital was abandoned, and the old Saulet Plantation home was demolished in 1959 to make way for a Schwegmann’s supermarket.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> CLANCY DUBOS MORE SCUTTLEBUTT < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < KNOWLEDGE < < < < < < < < < < <IS < <POWER <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< 17 15 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

scuttle Butt

QUOTES OF THE WEEK

“The Democrats have the candidates. They’re now deciding which ones will come forth and offer their talents.” — Buddy Leach, head of the Louisiana Democratic Party, at the Baton Rouge Press Club June 27. Leach mentioned a list of possible Democratic candidates, including New Orleans-area figures like state Senate President Joel Chaisson, Caroline Fayard, John Georges and Sen. Karen Carter Peterson, but offered no specifics as to who might be running for which office. “Gov. Bobby Jindal gets endorsement from senator he refused to endorse last year” — Sen. David Vitter on his Twitter account (@DavidVitter), pointedly retweeting a headline about his endorsement of Jindal for re-election. In the 2010 Senate election, Jindal kept his distance from his fellow Republican, saying he thought voters were “smart enough to make up their own minds.”

REWARDING THE STAFF

Bullies PREPARE TO BE OVERRUN BY RED AND WHITE COSTUMES, MUSTACHES, SANGRIA AND ROLLER DERBY GIRLS — IT’S THE FIFTH ANNUAL SAN FERMIN IN NUEVA ORLEANS FESTIVAL BY ALE X WOODWARD

T

an eight-day festival honoring St. Fermin. West Bank-raised Mickey Hanning made Running with the Bulls one of his top three goals (along with skydiving and marathon running) — and he liked it so much he led a group of friends to recreate the event in New Orleans five years ago. “On Mardi Gras (in 2006), a buddy was dressed up in white clothes with the sash and bandanna. ‘Why don’t we just do something silly like that here?’” Hanning remembers asking himself. “I just assumed it would be people I knew, family and friends — just kind of have our own little fun thing, maybe top it at 100 people.” PAGE 13

BoUQuets Bo Dollis,

PAGE 15

PHOTO BY JARED HOWERTON

c'est what? DO YOU THINK JUSTICE WILL ULTIMATELY BE SERVED IN THE DANZIGER BRIDGE TRIAL?

35% yes

36% no

29% partially

Vote on “c’est what?” on bestofneworleans.com THIS WEEK’S QUESTION

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THIS WEEK’S HEROES AND ZEROES

chief of the Wild Magnolias Mardi Gras Indian tribe since 1964, received a National Heritage Fellowship and a $25,000 award from the National Endowment for the Arts for taking New Orleans traditions “from community gatherings to festivals and concert halls in cities all over the world.” Dollis will receive his awards in September at a Washington, D.C., banquet at the Library of Congress.

Syrena Johnson

received the inaugural scholarship from Chefs Move!, a division of the John Besh Foundation, which offers culinary students a yearlong full scholarship to the French Culinary Institute in New York City, along with housing, travel, job placement assistance and a mentorship with Besh. Johnson, 21, worked in construction after Hurricane Katrina and has been training at Liberty’s Kitchen in Mid-City.

220 librarians

from across America took part in “Libraries Build Communities,” a day of service held June 24 during the American Library Association (ALA) convention in New Orleans. The volunteers fanned out to public and school libraries, assisting with everything from landscaping and construction to cataloging and organizing books. The ALA was the first national organization to hold a conference in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina.

Joe Stagni,

a Kenner City Council member, had his own “Anthony Weiner” moment last week when it was revealed that he sent a photo of himself in his underwear to a woman with whom he said he had “an inappropriate but consensual relationship.” The photo was discovered on a city government computer system. Stagni, who is married, apologized to his family and asked God for “mercy and forgiveness.”

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 05 > 2011

he annual encierro in Pamplona, Spain, has seen more than a dozen deaths and thousands of injuries — bulls unleashed from corrals wend their way through the cobblestone streets of the village toward a bullfighting arena. A txupinazo (or bottle rocket) signals the start of the half-mile run, and in the bulls’ path are thousands of runners clad in white with red scarves and sashes. It’s a centuries-old practice, originating from Pamplona’s residents helping herd the bulls, and it later attracted hundreds then thousands of visitors soaked in sangria and wine over

Members of women’s roller derby groups, wielding toy baseball bats, fill in as the bulls and chase thousands of runners at the Running of the Bulls, held during the San Fermin de Neuva Orleans festival in downtown New Orleans.

Congressman Steve Scalise, R-Metairie, has positioned himself as one of the biggest Washington foes of government spending, particularly spending by Democrats. In 2009, he said, “When you look across the country you see families tightening their belts to live within their means, and states are tightening their belts to balance their budgets. Washington is the only place that is going on a wild spending spree during these tough economic times.” In February, Scalise authored an amendment to a federal spending bill that would block funding for many of President Barack Obama’s aides and advisers (e.g., the much-loathed “czars”).

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    That 2007 event attracted more than  200  people,  and  in  2010,  more  than  8,000  runners  crowded  the  French  Quarter  and  CBD.  Members  of  the  Big  Easy Rollergirls assume the role of bulls,  brandishing toy baseball bats and wearing  horned  helmets.  In  its  first  year,  only  14  rollergirls  hit  the  streets.  This  year, more than 400 roller derby women  from 27 teams from across the U.S. and  Canada will chase runners along a 1-mile  gauntlet  from  the  Ernest  N.  Morial  Convention  Center,  through  the  French  Quarter  and  back  into  the  CBD,  ending  at Ernst Cafe on South Peters Street.     In  as  little  as  five  years  and  with  virtually  no  advertising,  the  organizers,  a  group of six friends, have inadvertently  launched  a  summertime  goof  into  an 

annual  festival  that  has  captured  the  imagination  of  thousands  and  attracts  national and international crowds to an  event that starts at 7 a.m. on a Saturday.     “People  in  New  Orleans  are  looking  for  something  fun  in  the  summer  —  any reason to get dressed up,” Hanning  says.  “In  the  middle  of  the  year  we’ll  start  talking  about  (plans),  and  someone eventually will say, ‘This is so stupid.  This is crazy that these people come to  this  city  and  do  this,  this  early  in  the  morning.’ It’s truly bizarre.” THE  FIRST  RUNNING  OF  THE  BULLS  IN  New  Orleans  in  2007  was  missing  one key ingredient.     “We  were  at  a  loss  [as  to]  what  or  who to use for bulls,” co-organizer Dylan  O’Donnell  says.  “We  had  some  strange  ideas. Mickey’s wife (Beth) was going to 

“WE RUN ON STELLA ARTOIS, ABSINTHE,  Gatorade,  water,  coffee,  very  little  sleep,  sangria  —  we  squeeze  in  food here and there,” O’Donnell says.  “It’s  exhausting,  but  the  adrenaline  we  get  through  the  weekend  keeps  us going.”     The main event, El Encierro, lasts only  15  to  20  minutes  —  but  the  festival  stretches across four days. On Thursday,  July  7,  the  group  hosts  a  Marques  de  Caceres  wine  dinner  at  Rambla.  On  Friday, July 8, El Txupinazo features food  from  Vega  Tapas  Cafe,  with  an  open  bar,  music  by  Ven  Pa’  Ca  and  flamenco  dancing. Following that, 12 Bar opens its  doors for a 12-hour fiesta that lasts until 

2011 San Fermin in Nueva Orleans www.nolabulls.com Thursday, July 7 SFNO Wine Dinner 2011

Rambla, 217 Camp St. The  five-course  Marques  de  Caceres  dinner  includes  pairings  with wines and sangria. Tickets $100. 6:30 p.m.

Friday, July 8 El Txupinazo

The Chicory, 610 S. Peters St. The  pre-party  features  food  from  Vega  Tapas  Cafe,  flamenco  dancing,  live  music  and  an  open  bar.  Tickets $75. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Twelve-Hour Countdown

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12 Bar on Fulton, 608 Fulton St. 12  Bar  will  be  open  from  8  p.m.Friday  to  8  a.m.  Saturday,  before the Running of the Bulls. 8 p.m. to 8 a.m.

saTurday, July 9 El Encierro

Ernst Cafe, 600 S. Peters St. The main event: hundreds of roller  girls  chase  thousands  of  people  through  the  streets  of  downtown New Orleans. An after-party  features  live  music,  food  and  a  mechanical bull. 8 a.m.

La Fiesta de Pantalones

12 Bar, 608 Fulton St. The  post-run  party  features  live  music and food. Admission $5. 8 p.m.

sunday, July 10

Julie’s Little India Kitchen at

El Pobre de Mi

Ernst Cafe, 600 S. Peters St. The  event  features  a  brunch  from  Vegas  Tapas  Cafe  and  the  third  annual  Ernest  Hemingway  Talent Contest co-hosted by NOLA  Fugees. Free admission. Noon

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > JULY 05 > 2011

“We run on Stella  Artois, absinthe,  Gatorade, water,  coffee, very little  sleep, sangria  — we squeeze  in food here  and there.” — C0-organizer Dylan O’Donnell

chase  us  with  a  papier-mache  thing  on  her  head.  She’s  not  a  very  intimidating  person.  (The  Big  Easy  Rollergirls)  were  happy to oblige chasing us in the streets  and beating us.”     Without  a  txupinazo  to  signal  the  beginning of the run, the crew has used  air horns (blown by O’Donnell’s dad) —  or has simply yelled, “Run!”     Spectators  and  runners  dress  in  traditional  white  outfits,  with  a  red  scarf  around  the  neck  and  red  sash  tied  around the waist. Other costumes range  from  matadors,  Frida  Kahlo  impersonators, flamenco dresses, gigantes y cabezudos (giant papier-mache heads used  in  San  Fermin  parades),  to  the  not-soSpanish  Mexican wrestlers  (luchadores)  and sombreros.     Before El Encierro, the costaleros carry  the  statue  of  St.  Fermin  in  a  morning  procession, followed by a drum procession (el tambores) and trumpatistos, performing  a  Spanish  fanfare  on  trumpet.  Following  the  run,  roller  girls  compete  in  two  contests:  Best  Dressed  Bull  and  Horniest — to determine who wore the  best pair of horns.      Hanning  stresses  that  the  event  requires  a  lot  of  time  —  and  a  good  bit  of  money.  The  group  pays  for  the  events  though  donations,  ticket  sales  and merchandise; Hanning and his wife  Beth  screenprint  and  stitch  the  event’s  merchandise, including T-shirts and the  signature  red  scarves.  The  sales  not  only help fund the events but also raise  money for charities the group supports.  This  year,  sales  and  donations  (including  those  for  a  by-donation  mechanical  bull  ride)  support  Animal  Rescue  New Orleans and the Louisiana Multiple  Sclerosis Society.     Also  joining  the  festivities  this  year  are  30  members  of  Atlanta’s  Cocktail  Tour,  who  will  take  part  in  the  procession  and  carry  the  ashes  of  Donald  Robert  Hanemann,  one  of  the  Atlanta  groups’  members  who  died  recently.  One  of  Hanemann’s  wishes  was  to  run  with the bulls in New Orleans.

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RUNNING WITH THE BULLS:

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Wear red and white all weekend. Hint: Hit up uniform shops and www.nolabulls.com If you’re running, arrive by 7 a.m. by the latest. Take a siesta later that day, and come back for the La Fiesta de Pantalones Hydrate Leading up to the Running of the Bulls, el tambores (drummers) lead the procession of St. Fermin during the San Fermin de Nueva Orleans festival. Photo by Jared howerton

The City of New Orleans, too, has embraced the festival. City Council Vice President Arnie Fielkow, donning a mustache, attended last year’s run. For the first time, the Joan of Arc statue on Decatur Street waved the Spanish, not French, flag, in honor of both the event and the city’s Spanish legacy. “It’s like a Holy Trinity here: Getting up early, drinking and costuming,” O’Donnell says. “Those three elements in New Orleans, people will react in hordes.”

during the same time period by members of Louisiana’s House delegation was $200,578. More embarrassing for the GOP: the state’s most frugal congressman was Cedric Richmond, Louisiana’s only Democratic representative. Richmond’s staff took home a meager $147,342 — 61 percent of what Scalise spent on his office. Also near the bottom was another House freshman, Republican Rep. Jeff Landry, who spent $163,386. (Both Richmond and Landry took office Jan. 3, while the other representatives’ payroll ran Jan. 1-March 31.)

Asked about the disparity, Stephen Bell, Scalise’s communications director, wrote in an email to Gambit, “Last year, Congressman Scalise returned $104,575 from his annual budget to the taxpayers, for a total of more than $375,000 returned since being elected in 2008, and earlier this year he helped pass a 5 percent cut in the budget of all House members.” (According to the report, Bell himself pulled down $12,999 in the first quarter of 2011.) The totals for the Louisiana delegation: Scalise (1st District), $241,804; Rep.

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MORE ScUTTLEBUTT Scalise, however, has no problem paying his own aides and advisers handsomely. Recently, the nonpartisan public information website LegiStorm published the details of salaries and bonuses paid to congressional staffers in the first quarter of 2011. Scalise was Louisiana’s most generous House member when it came to doling out salaries and bonuses to his staff. According to LegiStorm, Scalise spent $241,804 on salaries and bonuses in the first quarter of 2010. The average cumulative salaries and bonuses paid

Page 16

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 05 > 2011

8 a.m., when El Encierro begins. Following the run, food vendors, live music and a mechanical bull fill the streets, followed by La Fiesta de Pantalones (“The Pants Party”) at 12 Bar. In his 1926 novel The Sun Also Rises, Ernest Hemingway introduced the Running of the Bulls to the world outside Pamplona. Concluding the fourday San Fermin in Nueva Orleans festival is El Pobre de Mi (or “Poor Me”), which in Pamplona is the “last hurrah and get-together — sing, drink and lament the fest is over,” Hanning says. In New Orleans, the event — co-hosted by NOLA Fugees at Ernst Cafe on Sunday, July 10 — includes an Ernest

Hemingway lookalike contest (and catwalk-style Hemingway fashion show) and Hemingway skit contest — though the skits are assigned after participants get there. “It could be from a book, a story from his life, you have no clue what you’re getting into,” Hanning says. “Costuming is part of life here. It’s fun to see some of the creative things people come up with.” The group (dubbed el pastores, named after the guys running behind the bulls with long sticks to keep them in line) and the festival received Pamplona’s blessing following the first year’s event, which was featured in Diario de Navarra newspaper. (“Over there, they think it’s funny,” Hanning says.) Organizers of Pamplona’s San Fermin event met the New Orleans crew on Ash Wednesday in 2009, and for the following year’s event, the San Fermin organizers sent the event’s mascot costume — “a big blue bull with big blue something elses,” as O’Donnell describes it — named “Mr. Testes.”

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15

scuttlebutt

page 15

Charles Boustany (7th District), $235,426; Rep. Rodney Alexander, (5th District), $223,011; Rep. Bill Cassidy (6th District), $203,406; Rep. John C. Fleming (4th District), $189,669; Landry (3rd District), $163,386; and Richmond (2nd District), $147,342. — Kevin Allman

eWe tube

It’s probably no surprise that former Gov. Edwin Edwards — less than six months out of federal prison — is already ready to tie the knot for a third time. The bride this time is Trina Grimes Scott, an Alexandria woman about five decades his junior. What may be surprising is EWE’s sudden embrace of Facebook. The 83-yearold Edwards bypassed the traditional media and shared his engagement on the social media site, where he’s also dropped other tidbits about his post-prison life (he likes American Idol and thinks Tea Partiers are “sincere and good people, but do not represent the average American citizen”). EWE also used Facebook to announce a potential new business deal: a reality show tracking his engagement. The producer is SSS Entertainment, a company owned by Alexandria filmmaker Shaun

Sanghani, whose other Louisiana-focused projects include a proposed TV show called The Wank: “This hilarious reality program follows the party-fueled lives of young guys and girls living on the West Bank of New Orleans, where every weekend is Mardi Gras.” Meanwhile, it’s full steam ahead on plans for EWE’s 84th birthday party/roast, which is scheduled next month at the Hotel Monteleone in the French Quarter. The party was announced last January, and a hotel spokesperson confirmed to Gambit it’s still on for July 30, when 450 of Edwards’ closest friends are scheduled to show up and poke fun at him. No word yet as to whether the gala will now be an engagement party as well — or whether there will be reality-TV cameras documenting the bash. — Allman

Audit CleArs serpAs, Finds some errors

Last year, Nashville, Tenn., Mayor Karl Dean ordered an audit of the Metropolitan Nashville Police Department’s (MNPD) crime-reporting statistics to check the crime-reporting system from 2007 through 2009 — a time when New

Orleans Police Chief Ronal Serpas was top cop in Nashville. Last week, the audit report found thousands of errors but, according to the report, the numbers weren’t intentionally fudged. The audit stated that the statistics under Serpas “were reasonably stated and met Tennessee standards.” Auditors found that 3.6 percent (or more than 11,000) of the 316,739 crime reports submitted had incorrect information, mostly from human or computer errors. They concluded the variance was “within the range acceptable” to the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation (TBI) and “sufficient to satisfy state standards.” MNPD officials said the errors had no effect on how the cases were handled; a recordsmanagement system was addressing those errors, according to MNPD. Because of the computer errors, most of the 11,000 reports weren’t sent to TBI as required. Serpas has claimed crime was down in Nashville for six consecutive years. The FBI and TBI said some crimes — notably rape, assaults and burglaries — were up. Investigations by Nashville CBS affiliate News Channel 5 and The Tennessean alleged underreported rape and sexual

assault cases, in contrast to MNPD’s claims that those crimes decreased. In 2009, more than 30 percent of sexual assault cases were submitted as a “matter of record” and thus not entered into crime statistics. MNPD officials insist those cases still were followed through. Serpas served as police chief in Nashville from January 2004 to May 2010, after which he accepted the same position at NOPD. (Serpas served with NOPD previously, joining the ranks in 1980 and serving as deputy chief under former NOPD Superintendent Richard Pennington in the 1990s and early 2000s.) MNPD was audited four times from 2004 to 2009, three times by the TBI, and once by the FBI in 2007. In June 2010, Serpas told Gambit he was “glad Mayor Dean called for it because it will be the fifth audit in five years.” Last week, Serpas said in a statement, “Just like the four other routine audits conducted by state and federal officials during the years I worked for the people of Nashville, I was confident that this review would show that the department took crime-reporting seriously.” — Alex Woodward

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 05 > 2011

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POLITICS Follow Clancy on Twitter @clancygambit.

How Many Council Districts? group of community leaders is suggesting the New Orleans City Council change the way its members are elected — from five members elected from districts and two elected atlarge to seven members all elected from districts. Supporters of the idea raise some valid and interesting arguments. The proposal emerged from a series of neighborhood meetings held by the council in recent weeks to discuss various redistricting plans in the wake of the 2010 Census. By law, the council (like state legislatures and Congress) must redraw district boundaries to conform to constitutional “one man, one vote” requirements. Proponents of the seven-district idea say more districts will mean fewer constituents for each council member, thereby bringing city government closer to the people. It also would allow voters to “elect candidates of choice,” which is the new code word for minority candidates. The reality is that voters already can elect candidates of choice if they turn out in large enough numbers, which African-American voters in New Orleans have not done very often since Hurricane Katrina. At the same

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time, smaller districts automatically mean that every vote counts more, which means all voters can elect candidates of choice, whatever those choices may be. In recent elections, smaller black voter turnout has combined with an increase in crossover voting to produce white majorities on the City Council, the Orleans Parish School Board and in the city’s legislative delegation despite the fact that almost two-thirds of the city’s residents are African-American. Critics of the seven-district idea point out that the districts already are smaller because the city’s population tumbled after Katrina. After the 2000 Census, each council district contained an average of roughly 97,000 people; after redistricting and Katrina they will have approximately 69,000 each. A seven-district plan would give each council district about 49,000 people. Changing the number of council districts requires a change in the City Charter, which takes time. The charter currently requires the council to adopt a new five-district plan by early August, which means council members are likely to adopt a new districting plan (with the two at-large seats) at their

July 21 meeting. The plan then will be submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice for review under the Voting Rights Act. However, that does not preclude going forward with an alternative plan. The next round of citywide elections is not until February 2014, which leaves plenty of time to amend the City Charter. The seven-district concept already has generated considerable discussion among council members. “I am intrigued by the idea,” says at-large

Smaller council districts automatically mean that every vote counts more.

Councilman Arnie Fielkow, who is term limited in his present seat. “I would like to see more dialogue on that concept.” Fielkow adds that changing from the current plan to a seven-district plan “is not something we can do in the next few weeks. However, it could be done any time between now and 2014.” Here’s another wrinkle: Why not combine the two plans? That is, increase the council from seven members to nine — with seven elected from districts and two at-large. That way, at least two members will still look at all issues through a citywide prism — and the others will serve more geographically and socio-economically compact districts. Why not also eliminate the “weird math” in vote counting that results from making all at-large candidates run against each other? Instead, have candidates run for one at-large seat or the other, as is done in Jefferson Parish. That way, each at-large council member would need a majority to get elected, as opposed to the current 25 percent-plus-one. There is plenty of time to weigh these and other ideas before the next citywide election.

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > JULY 05 > 2011

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(504)522-9715 | www.facebook.com/cosimosbar

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BY K EVI N A L L M A N , WI L L COVI E LLO, L AU R E N L AB O R DE , I AN M C N U LT Y, MI S SY WI LK I NSON AN D ALEX WO ODWAR D P H OTO S BY C H E RY L G E R B E R

Right Time,

Right Place NEW ORLEANS’ BARS OFFER SPECIAL DRINKS, MUSIC AND MORE

At a growing number of bars and restaurants around town, mixologists have taken the approach of an artist or alchemist in crafting cocktail menus. In revivals of retro drinks, interpretations of classics or in original creations, these clever craft cocktails often incorporate offbeat and, in many cases, house-made bitters, syrups and other mixers. Here are some bars with notable offerings.

Many of the inventive drinks at this tony cocktail lounge contain house-made bitters, syrups and shrubs, mixers produced with an old method of preserving fruit using vinegar. For a tomatoless twist on the bloody Mary, the Red Medicine features a Tabasco shrub with demerara sugar, honey, Pimm’s and lemonade. 4905 Freret St., 302-2357; www.curenola.com

BAR TONIQUE

FRENCH 75 AT ARNAUD’S

BOUCHERIE

IRIS

This friendly but refined bar on the edge of the French Quarter is stocked with house-made tonic, ginger beer, a variety of syrups and fresh-squeezed juices, plus many rare liquors and mixers. The menu offers original creations and reboots of classics. A summertime “temperance” menu features a selection of nonalcoholic — but nonetheless complex — cocktails that are free for designated drivers. 820 N. Rampart St., 324-6045; www.bartonique.com Co-owner James Denio and bartender Mike Seaman design the cocktails to match the restaurant’s seasonal menu of refined Southern cuisine. House-made bitters and infusions are incorporated into cocktails like the Good Medicine, a summery digestif made with Italian herbal liqueur, vermouth, orange pekoe iced tea and a sprig of mint. 8115 Jeannette St., 862-5514; www.boucherie-nola.com

CLEVER

The Lost Love Lounge is a Marigny hub for drinks, bingo, trivia games, comedy and Vietnamese food.

CURE

At this low-key Mid-City wine bar, Tony DiMunno and a small staff of bartenders make cocktails using house-made syrups. Jalapeno syrup adds a kick to the spicy pear kamikaze with Merlet Creme de Poire liquor and a cinnamon-sugar rim. A classic mai tai using the old Trader Vic’s recipe features housemade orgeat syrup. 3700 Orleans Ave., 483-6360; www.cleverwines.com

Renowned mixologist Chris Hannah’s cocktail menu showcases original creations and classic drinks revived from bygone eras. A Paloma tequila highball with house-made grapefruit syrup is an alternative to a margarita, and a “summer Sazerac” features Genever gin, orange bitters, orange peel and Chartreuse. House-made orgeat and falernum syrups are used in the bar’s tiki drinks. 813 Bienville St., 523-5433; www.arnaudsrestaurant.com/french-75 Sharon Floyd, the mixologist behind the bar at Ian Schnoebelen’s innovative contemporary American restaurant, draws seasonal inspiration for her fresh cocktails. Her melon-heavy summer cocktails include the Thai Melon, featuring house-infused kaffir lime vodka, coconut Ciroc, cantaloupe juice and house-made pandan leaf syrup. The Mexicoinspired Stems and Stalks combines lemongrassinfused mescal with St. Germain, fresh celery juice and rosewater, citrus syrup and Herbsaint. 321 N. Peters St., 299-3944; www.irisneworleans.com

LOA

Bartender Alan Walter built his reputation as New Orleans’ cocktail chemist during his stint at the restaurant Iris. Now cocktail enthusiasts can find him at the bar inside the International House Hotel. His cocktails feature homemade bitters, syrups and freshPAGE 21

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 05 > 2011

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here’s a time and place for everything — especially if you want to enjoy a drink in New Orleans. Gambit checked out the local bar scene and what follows are our findings on everything from craft cocktail menus to draft picks, places to meet and greet and stages to belt out karaoke tunes, sunny courtyards and shady places for the wee hours. There are bars with food, music, comedy, games and more.

CHEMISTRY SET

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®

For one week, the best bartenders don’t work in bars. One time a year the international cocktail community converges on New Orleans for Tales of the Cocktail®. That time is finally here again. See the world’s best bartenders in action at the United States Bartender’s Guild Piña Colada Competition, Spirited Dinner® Series and countless other events during Tales of the Cocktail® 2011.

Tickets are still available to several spirited events.

To get your tickets visit www.TalesoftheCocktail.com.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > JULY 05 > 2011

patio pounders

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Check Out Nightly The Gambit’s MUSIC SCHEDULE – Top 50 Bars – HOURS

on Facebook & MySpace 2008, 2009 & 2010

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unning With Scissors is the local stage troupe that’s brought New Orleans original entertainments like The Really Desperate Housewives of Stepford Parish and The Titanic Adventures of the Love Boat Poseidon — the kind of shows that go down best with an audience that’s had a couple of drinks ... if not something stronger. We asked the Scissors sisters (and brothers) where they like to drink when they’re not busy committing theater. Brad Caldwell, actor: “Hands down, my favorite bar is Napoleon’s Itch. The drinks, location and decor are great, but my favorite part is that it’s completely non-smoking. Not that I have anything against smokers per se, but my clothes and hair sure do.”

Jack Long, actor: “When asked about my favorite bar, I usually say, ‘Whichever bar is closest.’ Then I follow up with, ‘ ... and is still gracious enough to allow me through the doors after the last time.’ Interesting fact: The only proper reply when you are asked to leave an establishment is ‘It was a lovely party. Thank you for having me.’ Any other response can only involve bruising and possible police intervention. But to the question: Flanagan’s Pub on St. Philip provides the two most important qualities I look for in a bar. The clientele is just boisterous enough that it is unlikely that anybody could remember sufficient detail about you should they be subpoenaed, and the bartenders are discreet enough to forget when they last saw you, should your significant other inquire.” Elizabeth Pearce, actor, culinary historian and cocktail tour guide at the Hermann Grima House: “Some might label the Lost Love Lounge as ‘hipster,’ but to me, it just feels

Lisa Picone, singer/actor: “My favorite neighborhood hang-out spot is Vaughan’s in the Bywater. It’s a block away from my house. The drinks are cheap and they have a decent beer selection — I usually get a ‘girlie’ Woodchuck pear. It’s a great place to watch Saints games and there is even free food every once in a while. I was there for the (Saints) championship and the Super Bowl and I wouldn’t have had it any other way. My favorite fancy place is the Carousel Bar in the Hotel Monteleone. The revolving bar is elegant. It’s a great place for Champagne on New Year’s Eve or a refreshing Pimm’s Cup on a hot summer night.” Todd Perley, video editor: “I pride myself on being a connoisseur of neighborhood dive bars. (Everyone has to have a hobby, right?) I’ve put in long hours researching New Orleans’ many watering holes, and I have to say that The Saint is one of the friendliest in town. They’ll make you feel right at home — even if your home isn’t the Lower Garden District.” Richard Read, writer/director/impresario: “I tend to judge a bar by how fast and friendly the service is at the worst possible times (but then, I’m kind of a pessimist). On that count alone, One Eyed Jacks ranks at the top of my list. Whether I’m at a crowded show or out for a leisurely cocktail-hour beverage, the bartenders are quick and to the point. They’re even speedy on Fat Tuesday, which is an accomplishment on par with reciting Shakespeare during an earthquake or zipping down Magazine Street on a Saturday afternoon. As for decor: If there’s anyone who doesn’t enjoy naked ladies painted on velvet, I probably don’t want to know ’em.” Liz Zibilich, “props dominatrix”: “Molly’s at the Market is my favorite local hangout. You can sit in the window sipping a frozen Irish coffee watching the world go by. The bartenders offer good conversation and quick, delicious cocktails. There’s a back bar, too, which is great for cool nights. A cat that just hangs around ... a photo booth ... and where else can you drink with the dead?!? (Ask to see Irving!)”

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 05 > 2011

John “Jonno” d’Addario, “photographer, art historian, and bon vivant”: “Of the several bars which ring the rosy perimeter of the part of the French Quarter fondly known as the Fruit Loop, my favorite is probably Cafe Lafitte in Exile, known simply as ‘Lafitte’s’ to most of its regulars (not to be confused with Lafitte’s Blacksmith Shop down the street) or ‘Fifi’s’ when said regulars are in a particularly festive mood. “The drinks are fairly priced, the bartenders are friendly, and there’s always the chance of being entertained by half-naked hotties dancing on top of the bar or wrestling in a giant wading pool of Spaghetti-O’s when you venture upstairs. You’ll also find one of the best balconies in New Orleans, complete with a postcard-perfect view of the half-faded Uneeda Biscuit sign on the corner of Dumaine, impromptu screenings of Xanadu on the outside wall of the Clover Grill across the street, and a view down Bourbon Street that makes you fall in love with New Orleans all over again (especially after a few cocktails). “And if you’re really lucky you’ll be there for one of the epic mass napkin tosses when the DJ starts playing ‘Love Is In The Air’ ... but I’ll let you experience that for yourself.”

like my neighborhood. Both the Marigny (and Bywater) are pretty welcoming to all kinds of folks, and the Lost Love Lounge is as well. The bartenders are always superfriendly, as is the owner, who is often perched on a barstool chatting with customers at the door or at the bar. The lending library may seem incongruous in a locale that specializes in turning your vision slightly blurry, but perusing the titles always leads to interesting discussions with whoever you are sitting next to. The lighting is just right for a date: moody without being seedy, and I enjoy the tikiish decor evoked by the Sailor Jerry posters that pepper the walls. Also, having late night Vietnamese food served from the back is a welcome alternative to french fries. A great neighborhood bar.”

BAR:

7 Days 4pm-til

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Carrollton Ave., 301-0938; www. shamrockparty.com

PUB GRUB Local bars offer a wide array of dining options, from small plates to full-fledged gastropubs. Here are some places with gourmet dining options and the relaxed atmosphere of a bar.

AMERICAN SECTOR

Patrons enjoy refined drinks and small plates at chef John Harris’ Bouligny Tavern.

bars provide opportunities for fun activities beyond pool, darts and Erotic Photo Hunt.

and weekly spelling bees. The Pinewood Derby should return in the fall, and the spelling bee is on indefinite hiatus, but until then there’s bingo on Sundays beginning around 10 p.m. (after a Treme screening). There’s also heavy metal trivia in between rounds. 2529 Dauphine St., 949-2009; www.lostlovelounge.com

BLUE NILE

OZ

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The selection of house-brewed beers typically includes a pilsner, the Vienna-style Red Stallion, a Munichstyle dark beer, a weiss (wheat) beer and a seasonal brew. There’s also an oyster bar and full menu from the kitchen. 527 Decatur St., 522-0571; www.crescentcitybrewhouse.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 05 > 2011

D.B.A.

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Not unlike its neighbors on Frenchmen Street, this bar offers nightly music on its intimate stage — but its other star is its beer altar, featuring dozens of international microbrews and craft beers. Bring cash for the cover charge for the bands (there are typically two shows a night). 618 Frenchmen St., 942-7371; www.dbabars.com/dbano

GORDON BIERSCH

The chain brewery features rotating seasonal brews and several regulars, like a hefeweizen, a Czech-style pilsner, and a Schwarzbier, a dark German “black beer” with a roasted coffee finish, all brewed in-house. The spacious bar also serves an eclectic selection of bar food. 200 Poydras St., 522-2739; www.gordonbiersch.com

LET THE GAMES BEGIN The pub quiz trend has spread to many local bars, and for those who are out of knowledge or tired of studying, there are new options. For anyone seeking an active drinking experience, these

Artist Will Smith hosts his “Drink ’n’ Draw” nights at the Blue Nile every third Sunday of the month from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. The event is usually at the Circle Bar, which currently is undergoing renovation. A live model will be present, and struggling artists can receive instruction upon request. 532 Frenchmen St., 948-2583; www.blue-nilelive.com

HI-HO LOUNGE

For those still into bar trivia but seeking some specialization, the Bywater music store Euclid Records hosts a music trivia night on Tuesdays at the Hi-Ho. Lefty Parker and music writer (and former Gambit contributor) Alison Fensterstock come up with the questions, which range from “very easy” to “super challenging.” Prizes include bar tabs, Euclid gift certificates, music memorabilia and more. The bar usually screens a music-related movie at 6 p.m., and trivia starts around 8 p.m. 2239 St. Claude Ave., 945-4446

LOST LOVE LOUNGE

This Bywater dive has proved to be the home for grown-up Boy Scouts and elementary school nerds. In the past it has hosted an authentic Pinewood Derby

This isn’t your grandmother’s church hall bingo: The legendary French Quarter gay dance club hosts drag bingo twice a week. On Fridays and Saturdays from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., sassy drag queens host the game that awards prizes including free cover for the weekend and other schwag. The bar usually has happy hour drink specials during the games. 800 Bourbon St., 593-9491; www.ozneworleans.com

It’s found inside the museum that’s dedicated to the crowning achievement of the “greatest generation” but the bar at John Besh’s spiffy, 1940’s-inspired restaurant draws representatives of all generations. They hoist retro cocktails, tiki drinks and custom-brewed draft beers while grazing through snacks like rabbit pate and crab pies or towering sandwiches served on butcher blocks. National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 528-1940; www.american-sector.com

THE BOMBAY CLUB

With its deep booths, leather armchairs and dark wood paneling, there’s an urbane air inside the Bombay Club. Membership is not required to make a night of it at this club, where chef Ricky Cheramie prepares modern Creole cuisine and cocktail book author Cheryl Charming presides over the bar. Check out her themed cocktail specials on Mad Men Mondays or James Bond Tuesdays, while live jazz continues on weekends. 830 Conti St., 586-0972; www.thebombayclub.com

BOULIGNY TAVERN

Hidden under the highway at the edge of downtown, the Rusty Nail usually hosts bingo at 8 p.m. on Thursdays. The next bingo night is scheduled for July 14. Prizes include free food and drinks, T-shirts and other items. 1100 Constance St., 525-5515; www.therustynail.biz

Chef John Harris made his name — and earned plenty of culinary accolades — at his restaurant Lilette. So it’s no surprise that the drinks at the bar he opened just next door share the spotlight with dishes like duck confit, gouda beignets and charcuterie. The sleek decor is an unabashed tribute to mid-century American design, and on any given night the well-dressed crowd is equally stylish. 3641 Magazine St., 891-1810; www.boulignytavern.com

SHAMROCK

CAPDEVILLE

THE RUSTY NAIL

The Shamrock might be New Orleans’ exclusively-for-grown-ups Dave & Buster’s. The proprietors have filled the old Rock ’N’ Bowl space with a whopping 23 pool tables, 5 ping-pong cages, foosball tables, shuffleboard, skee-ball machines, air hockey and many more amusements. The bar hosts ping-pong and foosball tournaments on Tuesdays, and pool tourneys on Wednesdays. 4133 S.

Anthems and guitar ballads dominate the jukebox, and whiskey bottles line the rafters at a Warehouse District tavern that wears its rock ’n’ roll allegiance as proudly as a concert T-shirt. Whiskey is also prominent on the list of cocktails, which the after-work crowd knocks back while rolling up sleeves for burgers topped with fried eggs, duck confit club sandwiches and bowls of poutine,

the Quebecois-style cheese fries. 520 Capdeville St., 371-5161; www.capdevillenola.com

MIMI’S IN THE MARIGNY

This two-story watering hole has long been an outpost for late-night eats in the Marigny, serving its traditional Spanish tapas menu well into the wee hours. Eclectic local roots bands perform upstairs, where sofas and table lamps lend the feel of a bohemian living room. Each Saturday, the vibe shifts to highenergy house party as DJ Soul Sister gets behind the turntables and everyone starts dancing. 2601 Royal St., 872-9868

MONDO

Chef Susan Spicer opened Mondo as a family-friendly restaurant in Lakeview, but it turns out that the roomy front bar became the neighborhood’s favored perch for creative cocktails and inventive nibbles. While the kid’s menu remains popular in the main dining room, the bar fills with people sampling wine and snacks like Thai meatballs, deviled eggs or wood-oven pizzas. 900 Harrison Ave., 224-2633; www.mondoneworleans.com

RENDON INN

It’s been around since 1933, but this backstreet Broadmoor joint isn’t your grandfather’s Rendon Inn. Thoroughly remodeled after Hurricane Katrina, it’s now a tavern with a wide selection of local craft beers on tap and a full menu by J’Anita’s. Check out the pulled pork and brisket, the redfish sandwiches, fresh guacamole and bacon-wrapped apricots stuffed with blue cheese. 4501 Eve St., 826-5605

SYLVAIN

This beautifully renovated old French Quarter address is now a place to get gourmet burgers and market salads, while the bar serves both craft cocktails and cans of Schlitz beer. The main dining room and bar have an antique feel, with mellow lighting and simple decor, while a narrow courtyard leads to a brick-lined cove and a few tables that seem seductively tucked away. 625 Chartres St., 265-8123; www. sylvainnola.com

THE THREE MUSES

People come to Frenchmen Street for food, music and drinks, and the Three Muses puts them all under one rather petite roof. PAGE 28

Kajun’s Pub is a popular spot with karaoke singers.

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While jazz singers or roots acts perform on the tiny stage, people nosh through a creative, international tapas menu from chef Dan Esses at small tables or along the bustling bar, where bartenders mix original cocktails like the orange blossom Sazerac or the spaghetti western. 536 Frenchmen St., 298-8746; www.thethreemuses.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 05 > 2011

TOMMY’S WINE BAR

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Tommy’s Wine Bar is an elegant and spacious lounge offering more than 150 bottles of wine, with 20 available by the glass. It’s a sibling to neighboring Tommy’s Cuisine, a clubby bastion of seafood-heavy Italian-Creole dining. Wine bar patrons can enjoy the best of both. The bar offers cheese plates as well as appetizers and desserts from the restaurant menu. 746 Tchoupitoulas St., 581-1103; www.tommysneworleans.com

KARAOKE Whether you need a little liquid courage or just can’t wait to sing for the crowd, these bars are ready to hand you the mic and a drink.

THE BEACH HOUSE

In the karaoke hierarchy, home karaoke machines rank at the bottom, professional systems are the standard, and live music is the Holy Grail. Aspiring singers can sing to a live karaoke band from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. on Tuesdays. As far as song selection goes, band members say they can figure out how to play just about anything. 2401 N. Woodlawn Ave., Metairie, 456-7470

BUDDHA BELLY

Cheap drinks and plentiful song selections are hallmarks of good karaoke bars. With nearly 9,000 songs, drink specials (including $2 draft beers and two-for-one well drinks after midnight), Buddha Belly’s Tuesday and Saturday karaoke nights meet the criteria — and raise the entertainment factor with a stripper pole. 4437 Magazine St., 891-6105

KAJUN’S PUB

Thanks to a library of 50,000 songs, Kajun’s Pub is a behemoth among karaoke bars, cutting across age, gender and race barriers with promises of cheap booze and public humiliation. Dollar shots and $5.50 pitchers make the smoky, 24-hour dive a prime blackout spot. Don’t get too rowdy — the bartenders are armed with pepper spray and they’re not afraid to use it. 2256 St. Claude Ave., 947-3735; www.kajunpub.com

LITTLE TOKYO SMALL PLATES & NOODLE BAR

Spend $40 on food and drink at Little Tokyo’s South Carrollton location and receive an hour in a private karaoke room suitable for gatherings ranging from mild (birthday fetes) to wild (bachelor parties). Songbirds who prefer a less intimate venue can serenade diners in the main restaurant nightly starting at 8 p.m. 1340 S. Carrollton Ave., 861-6088; www.littletokyonola.com

THE SAINT BAR & LOUNGE

Lower Garden District hipster mecca The Saint Bar & Lounge

Winston’s Pub and Patio is a popular watering hole in Old Metairie. features tikioki (a neologism of tiki drinks and karaoke) at 9 p.m. Tuesdays. Mai tais and fog cutters sweeten a limited song selection, but the loyal crowd and enthusiastic host are upbeat and supportive. The bar attracts a late-night bunch — go before 11 p.m. and you may as well sing to yourself. 961 St. Mary St., 523-0050; www. thesaintneworleans.com

METAIRIE ROAD TRIP Here are the best places in Metairie and thereabouts to find yourself with a pint in your hand and a designated driver at your side.

GENNARO’S BAR AND RESTAURANT

Wedged beneath the Causeway overpass on Metairie Road, Gennaro’s bills itself as the oldest bar in Jeff Parish. Take out the flat-screen TVs and you could be back in 1962 — the broken-in vibe here features low ceilings, terrazzo floors, cheesecake pictures on the walls, WTIX on the radio and, on some nights, karaoke. Beer is cheap, the regulars are friendly, and — lagniappe — you can get Bear’s excellent po-boys right next door. 3206 Metairie Road, Metairie, 833-9226

LAGER’S INTERNATIONAL ALE HOUSE

If you get Bulldog deja vu in this draft pub across from Lakeside Shopping Center, no wonder: The bars share the same owners (and much of the same menu). Dozens

of draft taps, King Henry VIII-sized comfy booths, and a smoking patio overlooking scenic Severn Avenue are among the charms. On Wednesdays, order a pint and keep the glass; on Thursdays, it’s $2 off pitchers of microbrew. Besides, where else do framed photos of Benjamin Franklin and Fonzie share wall space? 3501 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 887-9923; lagersmetairie.draftfreak.com

OSCAR’S RESTAURANT & BAR

New Orleans has legendary burger bars like Port of Call and Yo’ Mama’s Bar & Grill. Old Metry has Oscar’s, where the bar menu includes wraps and salmon but everybody goes for the hamburgers with a baked potato on the side. A pleasantly dark space along one of Metairie Road’s retail rows just off Bonnabel Boulevard, Oscar’s seems to cater to a strong crowd of regulars. Nothing fancy here (unless you count the mass-produced Marilyn Monroe art on the walls, and we don’t), just stiff drinks, sweet servers and oh, that burger. 2027 Metairie Road, Metairie, 831-9540

RIVERSHACK TAVERN

If you see a faded shack on the side of the road … it’s Jefferson’s Rivershack Tavern, a roadhouse without Patrick Swayze but with tons of quirky memorabilia on the paneled walls (Elvis and Alfred E. Neuman over the jukebox, what’s said to be Louis Armstrong’s first trumpet) along with the famous “tacky ashtrays” on the bar. The Rivershack can get loud when it’s crowded

(bands play several nights a week), but you can always sit outside at a picnic bench under a spray mister and watch people ride horses on the levee across the street. 3449 River Road, Jefferson, 834-4938; www.therivershacktavern.com

WINSTON’S PUB & PATIO

Next to the Metairie Road railroad crossing is this cozy cottagestyle English pub: dark wood, couches, a good beer selection and a kitchen that makes a mean order of fish and chips. By the way, that’s Winston as in Mr. Churchill, which means stogies are not only allowed, but there’s a cigar vending machine. Out back is a deck with umbrellas and tables, a nice place to sit and visit when it cools off at night. Beware: this small hideaway can get quite crowded as the evening progresses. 531 Metairie Road, Metairie, 831-8705

EIGHT DAYS A WEEK Check into these watering holes for notable weekly gigs by local bands.

BJ’S LOUNGE

Forget that Sunday’s over, and forget that the weekend melted into a Monday. This neighborhood dive postpones Monday’s hangover blues with King James & the Special Men, tucked into a stool-less corner and ripping through forgotten rock ’n’ roll. Jimmy Horn (King James) leads a crew of Frenchmen Street regulars digging into sets of simmering New Orleans R&B and PAGE 30

Voted

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S e r lect e e B io st

New Orleans

AUTHENTIC CUISINE PASSED DOWN FOR GENER ATIONS

4Y

ears

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Free Appetizer WITH PURCHASE OF 2 ENTREES

by Gambit Readers

36

N

HAPPY HOUR

N

Mon - Fri 2pm - 7pm

7PM - CLOSE

SPECIALS

• 50¢ off pints • $1 off pitchers • 1/2 priced house wines • Double Mixed Drinks for Single Prices

WEEKLY

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 05 > 2011

AND VOTED ONE OF THE BEST BAR PATIOS IN NEW ORLEANS

Monday

Happy Hour MONDAY - FRIDAY OPEN FOR

breakfast, lunch & dinner MONDAY-THUR SDAY & SUNDAY 8AM-10PM FR IDAY & SATUR DAY 8AM-11PM

•••••••••••••$2 off select pitchers

Tuesday •••••••••••••••••••••$1 off Local pints Wednesdays ••••PINT NIGHT! keep the glass

Thursdays •••$2 off micro-brew pitchers

Uptown

3236 Magazine Street • (504) 891-1516 Mid-City

5135 Canal Boulevard • (504) 488-4191

135 DECATUR STREET • FRENCH QUARTER 504.529.8600

www.Draftfreak.com

WWW.HUCKFINNSCAFE.COM

BAYOU

BEER GARDEN

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MID-CITY’S BEST KEPT SECERT... NOT SUCH A SECRET ANYMORE

• 3-6pm DAiLY •

happY hoUr $1.50 pBr pintS $2 gaMe rentalS $3 iMportS

BEAUTIFUL PATIO

504.302.9357

326 N. JEFFERSON DAVIS PKWY

2 MondaYS

$

game rentals • PBr Pints JaMeSon ShotS

TUESDAYS • 8pm

ping pong &

FooSBall toUrneY

Twelve Mile Limit is a relatively new bar in Mid-City. drinks as the bar top and barstools slowly spin around them. There also is ample stationary seating around the lounge, and live piano music offers more sophisticated entertainment most nights. 214 Royal St., 523-3341; www.hotelmonteleone.com

THE COLUMNS

With its grand view of St. Charles Avenue, the veranda at the Columns offers a picturesque and breezy perch to enjoy a drink. Inside the ornately decorated Victorian-era hotel, the barroom offers more clubby ambience, with its dark wood and plush banquettes. 3811 St. Charles Ave., 899-9308; www.thecolumns.com

DAVENPORT LOUNGE AT THE RITZ-CARLTON

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE

Grammy-winning trumpeter Irvin Mayfield’s club brought contemporary live jazz back to Bourbon Street, and there’s no cover charge. The lineup of local favorites includes Shamarr Allen, Jason Marsalis, Bill Summers, Germaine Bazzle and George French. On Friday nights, the Burlesque Ballroom recalls another variety and era of Bourbon Street entertainment. 300 Bourbon St., 553-2299; www.sonesta.com

SWIZZLE STICK BAR AT THE LOEWS HOTEL

Cocktailian Lu Brow helped get New Orleans’ cocktail revival going, and she rotates in new concoctions every few weeks at this airy lounge situated between the lobby of the Loews Hotel

THE GREAT OUTDOORS As unforgiving as the summer heat can be in New Orleans, there are plenty of courtyards, patios and balconies in which to cool off.

BACCHANAL

This super-casual Bywater wine shop has a spacious backyard cluttered with mismatched patio furniture and chairs. It’s a popular destination for live music and food offered by the in-house chef or visiting chefs on weekends. Pay for wine, bottled beer and a selection of cheeses and salumi in the front of the shop and then head out back to find a seat. 600 Poland Ave., 948-9111; www.bacchanalwine.com

BALCONY BAR & CAFE

Many revelers don’t get past this bar’s ground-floor pool tables and large array of taps, but the second floor offers one of Uptown’s largest balcony drinking destinations. There’s plenty of seating on the wraparound balcony, and the upstairs kitchen offers casual fare to fuel a late night. 3201 Magazine St., 894-8888

1100 Constance St. NOLA • 525-5515

WEDNESDAYS • 8pm

8 Ball toUrneY THURSDAYS • 9pm-miDNighT Parking Availablepe Enter/Exit on Callio

ther ustynail.biz

tropical isle® HOME OF THE Hand Grenade® -Sold Only At-

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FRiDAY • 7/8 • 9pm

poCket aCeS BraSS Band

435, 600, 610, 721, 727

SATURDAY • 7/9 • 10pm

New Orleans’ Most Powerful Drink!

EVERY SUNDAY • 8pm-2Am

Bourbon St.

Live Entertainment Nightly

dJ kodiak

free!

karaoke

30 BeerS on tap

Mini-BOwling

ShUFFleBoard Skee Ball • Beer Pong

23 pool taBleS 7 DarT BOarDS

HOUSE OF BLUES

The Voodoo Garden at this music hall on Decatur Street is typically open for special events and dining only — but on Fridays, the patio opens during its happy hour from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m., or as long as the band performing there keeps playing. Sip $2 domestics and $3 imports, and $3 house wines and cocktail creations in the brick patio trimmed with the venue’s folk art decor and lush palm greenery. 225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www.hob.com

ladieS night

FirSt drink Free & Free Jello Shot w/ everY drink thereaFter

partieS and large groUpS welCoMe 1/2 lB TurBO Burger w/ frieS $6 200 Pelican Ave., Algiers Point 504-227-1007 · www.crownanchorpub.com

Mon-Fri 4pm-till · Sat-Sun 1am-till Find us on facebook

4133 S. Carrollton ave ( @ T u l a n e ) 301-0938

S H a M r O C K Pa r T Y. C O M

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 05 > 2011

Trumpeter and crooner Jeremy Davenport is in residence three nights at week at his namesake lounge off the third-floor lobby of the Ritz-Carlton. Catch him after work on Thursday evenings and later on Friday and Saturday nights. 921 Canal St., third floor, 524-1331; www.ritzcarlton.com

and Cafe Adelaide. One recent addition is the Zen Garden, a mix of organic vodka, ginger liqueur and muddled cilantro in a cayenne-and-sugar-rimmed glass. There’s a $5 cocktail special offered every day. 300 Poydras St., 595-3305; www.cafeadelaide.com

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sHTo P aLK

BY BYLINDSEY KAT STROMQUIST DARNELL

Royal Jewels ocated on one of the most recognized streets in the Vieux Carre, Wellington & Company Fine Jewelry (505 Royal St., 525-4855; www.wcjewelry.com) provides quality antique, estate and modern jewelry to shoppers from New Orleans and around the world. “We have a huge variety,” says owner Tom Whisnant. “There’s something for everyone who walks in the door.” As a graduate gemologist and third-generation store owner, Whisnant is a knowledgeable resource about fine and antique jewelry. “My family had been, and actually still is, in the antique business,” Whisnant says. “My wife and I both have a passion for jewelry, and our business has really grown.” The store carries a premium selection of antique, estate and contemporary jewelry, including antique engagement rings, estate watches from Cartier and Rolex, South Sea pearls and precious stones. It also offers a range of prices from $25 to $150,000 to accommodate its diverse clientele. “We work really hard to bring the right products with the best prices, and pass that along to our customers,” Whisnant says. “People are always amazed by our selection.” Wellington & Company is an exclusive retailer of Thistle & Bee, a sophisticated collection of sterling silver and 18-karat gold jewelry, and Blu, an enchanting collection by Betty Lou Moscot, an award-winning designer whose pieces were featured in Sex and the City 2. “We look for designers that are different, that haven’t been in the market before and that will reach a range of customers,” Whisnant says. In addition to showcasing selected designers, the company produces many of its own custom designs. “We do a lot of manufacturing ourselves, and most of our modern jewelry is our design,” he says. Orders for engagement rings dominate the shop’s custom work, and turnaround time is generally 10 days to two weeks. “People go for the modern ring that has an antique feel, and today, with technology, you can make it look identical to anything you want,” Whisnant says. “It’s really amazing.” Whisnant and his wife/business partner Brandy are enthusiastic about their work. “I think for us, it’s the customers and being part of special moments,” Whisnant says. “It’s also just a great business where you meet people from all over the world and you get to see some amazing pieces (of jewelry).”

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 05 > 2011

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SHOPPING NEWS BY EMILY JENSEN VERNON (2049 Magazine St., 3095929; www.vernonclothing.com), a new clothing boutique by Chris Galliano, provides a luxury shopping experience with designer fashion lines, custom wedding gowns from the local Ottilie Brodmann label, wardrobe consultations and an espresso bar for shoppers. At 1 p.m. Saturday, July 9, LE JOUET (1700 Airline Drive, Metairie, 837-0533; www.lejouet.com) hosts children’s musician Johnette Downing for an afternoon of singing, reading, book signing and crafts. JARED THE GALLERIA OF JEWELRY (3400 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 885-2221; www.jared.com) will present a special jewelry event from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday, July 7. A large collection of Le Vian chocolate diamonds will be on display, and refreshments will be served. DEGAS HOUSE (2306 Esplanade Ave., 821-5009; www.degashouse.com) offers a special summer package through Sept. 30: Book a double occupancy room for two nights for $385 and receive free perks, including a Creole breakfast, cocktails, a tour of Degas House, New Orleans Museum of Art tickets, a $50 Degas House gift card and other treats.

>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << MUSIC >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE YOU GO << <<<<<<<<<< << 44 >> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << THE >> >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>> << <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> > << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< < >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

JULY 7-9 8 P.M. THU.-SAT. LE CHAT NOIR, 715 ST. CHARLES AVE., 5815812; WWW.CABARETLECHATNOIR.COM TICKETS $35-$45 (INCLUDES $5 DRINK CREDIT)

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TWELFTH NIGHT

Le Chat's Nine Lives LE CHAT NOIR PRESENTS A FINAL BLOWOUT WEEKEND OF CABARET BY WILL COVIELLO

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Mayronne productions. The final evening presents local cabaret performers, many of whom presented their first cabaret-style shows at Le Chat. Jefferson Turner, Amy Alvarez, Lisa Picone and Anais St. John all studied at the Yale Cabaret Conference, many with the encouragement of Motley. “(Learning cabaret) was a huge adjustment for me,” Picone says. “I am known as a comedic actress. I always performed in a persona. In cabaret, you aren’t playing a character anymore, you’re you.” When Picone left for Yale, Motley told her she wanted her to come back and do a show. Picone chose to sing the music of Peggy Lee, and the show won the 2011 Big Easy Award for Best Cabaret. Dorian Rush won the 2010 Big Easy for Cabaret for her show about Janis Joplin. “I never would have done it without Barbara,” Rush says. “She approached me and told me she wanted me to do something fresh and new about Janis Joplin.” Motley always believed she could build a home for cabaret in New Orleans. “I loved New York cabaret shows,” she says. “I was wowed by the glamour and the intimacy. … I thought ‘There’s retro music, glamorous singers draped over pianos, and cocktails.’ It seemed like a no-brainer for New Orleans.” Since opening in 1999, Le Chat has featured a mix of cabaret, musical comedy and theater. This final weekend showcase revives some of the many highlights. “This is my present to myself and the city,” Motley says. “I would love to have had it go on for six weeks and have everyone back.”

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Wiz Khalifa hails from Pittsburgh, but his reefer-madness raps come from the same clouded realm as New Orleans’ own stoner Curren$y. Khalifa’s “Black and Yellow,” off his Atlantic debut Rolling Papers, is to the Steelers what “Halftime (Stand Up and Get Crunk)” is to the Saints. Tickets $41 (includes fees). 7:30 p.m. Thursday. UNO Lakefront Arena, 6801 Franklin Ave., 280-7222; www.arena.uno.edu

WAITING AROUND

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Not every New Orleans performer moonlights in the service industry, but this musical offers a picture of restaurants from the server’s point of view. Waiting Around is a renamed reprise of Harry Mayronne and Ricky Graham’s The Black & White Blues, which ran at Le Chat Noir for three years before an off Broadway run in New York. Tickets $20 Fri.-Sun., $15 Mon. 8 p.m. Fri.-Mon. AllWays Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www.waitingaroundthemusical.com

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OpenHouse Music begins its booking tenure at the swanky Eiffel Society with an appropriately sexy gig: Big History, New Orleans’ clubbiest synth-pop outfit, debuting new material and performing with “surprise guests.” 8 p.m. Saturday. Eiffel Society, 2040 St. Charles Ave., 525-2951; www.eiffelsociety.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 05 > 2011

e Chat Noir presents three blockbuster nights of cabaret and musical performances Thursday through Saturday, after which the venue’s future is unclear. Proprietor Barbara Motley has put the building up for sale, and any new programming likely will have to be worked out with new ownership. But the three separate programs now on the boards show how far cabaret performance has come locally and how big a part Le Chat has played in developing the local theater scene. “Before Le Chat happened, I did cabaret in other cities,” says Jeffery Roberson, aka Varla Jean Merman. “I thought I’d never be able to do my shows in New Orleans. I had done drag in gay bars, but that’s not an audience that’s listening to a show.” Roberson presented many solo shows at Le Chat, performed often in small-cast musical productions (Scrooge in Rouge, The Mystery of Irma Vep), and he also rehearsed and created new productions in Le Chat’s space. “Before that, I used to go to Hartford (Conn.) to workshop new shows,” he says. “It was great to be able to shoot film at Le Chat and work with Su (Gonczy) and (costume designer) Cecile Casey Covert.” Thursday evening’s showcase features national cabaret performers who have visited Le Chat in between bouncing back and forth from New York to Los Angeles. They include Andrea Marcovicci, Anna Bergman, Jason Graae, Shelly Markham, Alex Rybeck and Todd Murray. On Friday, a variety show reprises songs and scenes from musical theater productions, ranging from A Cocktail Party in the Ladies Lounge to Running with Scissors’ salacious parodies and Ricky Graham and Harry

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With siblings lost at sea, lovesick aristocrats, cross-dressing, mistaken identity and misguided affections, Twelfth Night is one of Shakespeare’s more rambunctious comedies, highlighted by the unfortunate servant Malvolio (Ricky Graham), who is tricked into believing the noble woman he serves has fallen in love with him. Tickets $15-$40. 7:30 p.m. Thu.-Sat., 1:30 p.m. Sun. (Previews Thu.-Fri., opening night Saturday) Through July 23. Tulane University, Dixon Hall, 865-5106; www.neworleansshakespeare.com

WIZ KHALIFA Anna Bergman is one of seven national cabaret stars performing this week at Le Chat Noir.

CUISINE

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MUSIC

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

STICK THIS IN YOUR EAR

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Smokin’ Time Jazz Club, 6; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 10

Wednesday 6 All show times p.m. unless otherwise noted.

Tuesday 5 ALLWAYS LOUNGE — James Justin Burke & Company, 10 BACCHANAL — Mark Weliky, 7:30 BANKS STREET BAR — NOLA Treblemakers, 9; Micah Mckee’s Songwriters Showcase, 11 BISTREAUX — Aaron LopezBarrantes, 6

BLUE NILE — Dennis Formento & Ed Barrett, 10 BMC — Peter Novelli, 6; Royal Rounders, 8:30; Lagniappe Brass Band, 11

CAFE NEGRIL — John Lisi & Delta Funk, 9 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Grayson Capps, 8

COLUMNS HOTEL — John Rankin & Friends, 8

D.B.A. — New Orleans Suspects, 10 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Joe Krown, 9:30 THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

FUNKY PIRATE — Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 05 > 2011

GENNARO’S — Harvey Jesus & Fire, 8

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Jason Marsalis, 8 JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Ched Reeves, 3; Brint Anderson, 6; Truman Holland, 9 LAFITTE’S BLACKSMITH SHOP — Mike Hood, 9 THE MAISON — Gregory Agid Quartet, 6; Magnitude, 9

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Rebirth Brass Band, 10 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Willie Bonham, 4; John Michael Bradford, 6; Lil Red & Big Bad, 9:30

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Gina Forsyth, 9; Luana Cote, 10 OLD OPERA HOUSE — Charlie Cuccia & Old No. 7 Band, 7

OLD POINT BAR — Josh Garrett & the Bottom Line, 8 PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall-Stars feat. Greg Stafford, 8 RALPH’S ON THE PARK — Joe Krown, 5 SIBERIA — Eeries, Dives, SS

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BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Amasa Miller & Holley Bendtsen, 8

Boombox, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — John Autin Quartet, 8 & 10

12 BAR — Brass-A-Holics, 8:30 BACCHANAL — Jazz Lab feat. Jesse Morrow, 7:30 BANKS STREET BAR — Major Bacon, 10

BIG AL’S SALOON — Jumpin’ Johnny Sansone Blues Party, 7

BISTREAUX — Paul Longstreth, 7

BLUE NILE — United Postal Project, 8; Jason Songe Presents (upstairs), 10; Gravity A, 11 BMC — David Mahoney Quartet, 6; Blues4Sale, 9:30 CANDLELIGHT LOUNGE — Treme Brass Band, 9

CAROUSEL PIANO BAR & LOUNGE — Louis Prima Night feat. John Autin, Austin Clements & Tyler Clements, 8 COLUMNS HOTEL — Ricardo Crespo, 8 D.B.A. — Alex McMurray, 7; Walter “Wolfman” Washington & the Roadmasters, 10

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Bob Andrews, 9:30 EIFFEL SOCIETY — Vivaz!, 8

THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

FUNKY PIRATE — Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30 HI-HO LOUNGE — Midnight Snax, DJ Beesknees, 10

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Hope Toun, Gravy Flavored Kisses, 9 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Sasha Masakowski, 5; Irvin Mayfield’s NOJO Jam, 8

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Lisa Lynn, 3; Joe Bennett, 6; Andy J. Forest, 9

KERRY IRISH PUB — Chip Wilson, 9 KRAZY KORNER — Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LACAVA’S SPORTS BAR — Crossfire, 9

THE MAISON — Jerry Jumonville & the Jump City Band, 6; The Cat’s Pajamas Funk All Stars, 9

MAPLE LEAF BAR — New Orleans Suspects, 10 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Willie Bonham, 4; Andrea Gomez, 6; La Esencia del Jazz, 9:30

MOJO STATION — Ed Wills, Blues for Sale, 8 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Stoop Collective, 7; Pat Flory, 9 OAK — Amanda Walker, 7

OLD FIREMEN’S HALL — Two

preview

COLUMNS HOTEL — Alex Bosworth, 8

Call Waiting “I am really interested in what seems like it could be real but isn’t,” Khaela Maricich told Seattle paper The Stranger earlier this year. “Or what seems hard to believe but actually is true.” As the girlish voice and creative force behind The Blow, Maricich has made a career out of subverting expectations: She’s an early K Records eccentric who teamed with YACHT’s Jona Bechtolt to release 2006’s most startlingly fresh electropop LP Paper Television; a visual artist whose music is a psychosexual opendiary reading — a little awkward, a lot hot — and whose live show often consists of her onstage alone, spilling alternately desirous and humorous prose, all while writhing like she’s in front of her bedroom mirror using a hairbrush as a microphone. On her pop template and first sort-of hit, “Hey Boy” (off 2004’s Poor Aim: Love Songs), over an adorable arrangement of handclaps and toy-robot bass, she wonders aloud why a gentleman never called: “A, you’re gay/ B, you’ve got a girlfriend/ C, you kind of thought I came on too strong/ or D, I just wasn’t your thing/ No ring.” Since Paper Television’s seeming breakthrough, she’s retreated, surfacing in 2010 after years of silence with a new partner (conceptual artist Melissa Dyne) and new unreleased songs, written as fodder for a pseudo-imaginary pop star (spoiler: it’s Lindsay Lohan) and unveiled in a series of site-specific concert installations in rock clubs, music halls and museums. Try not to fall too hard; you’ll only break her heart. Love Inks opens. Tickets $10. — Noah Bonaparte Pais

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The Blow 10 p.m. Wednesday One Eyed Jacks, 615 Toulouse St., 569-8361; www.oneeyedjacks.net

Piece & a Biscuit feat. Brandon Foret, Allan Maxwell & Brian Melancon, 7:30

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Vibe, 8:30 ONE EYED JACKS — The Blow, Love Inks, 9

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lars Edegran & Topsy Chapman feat. Palm Court Jazz Band, 7

MUSEUM — Victory Belles, noon

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6

Thursday 7 12 BAR — Nothing Solid, Enharmonics, 9

PRESERVATION HALL — Kid Simmons’ New Orleans Jazz Band, 8

BACCHANAL — Courtyard Kings, 7; Vincent Marini, 9:30

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Jerry Embree, 8:30

BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Armand St. Martin, 7

RALPH’S ON THE PARK — Joe Krown, 5

SIBERIA — Severed Faith, Shadow of Creation, Ruiniverse, Chaos Aeon, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Delfeayo Marsalis & the Uptown Jazz Orchestra, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Orleans 6, 6; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10 STAGE DOOR CANTEEN AT THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II

BANKS STREET BAR — Dave Jordan & the Neighborhood Improvement Association, 10

BAYOU PARK BAR — Pocket Aces Brass Band, 9 THE BEACH — Chicken on the Bone, 7:30

BISTREAUX — Paul Longstreth, 7

BMC — The Ramblin’ Letters, 6; Charley & the SoulaBillySwampBoogie Band, 9:30 BOOMTOWN CASINO — Harvey Jesus, 8

DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 5:30 D.B.A. — Colin Lake Band, 10

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Los Tres Amigos, 9:30 THE EMBERS “ORIGINAL” BOURBON HOUSE — Curtis Binder, 6

THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

FUNKY PIRATE — Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30

HI-HO LOUNGE — Stooges Brass Band, 10 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Shamarr Allen, 8

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Beth Patterson, 3; Colin Lake, 6; Captain Leo, 9 KERRY IRISH PUB — Truman Holland, 9 KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & the Zydeco Hellraisers, 4; Death by Orgasm, 8:30

LAFITTE’S BLACKSMITH SHOP — Mike Hood, 9 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — BrassA-Holics, 11

THE MAISON — Those Peaches, 6; Doombalaya, 10 MAPLE LEAF BAR — The Trio, 10 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Willie Bonham, 4; Andre Bouvier’s Royal Bohemians, 6; Smoky Greenwell’s Blues Jam, 9:30

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Broadmoor Pol, 8; Mark Fernandez, 9; Clyde Albert, 10 OAK — Brian Coogan, 8

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 4; Vibe, 8:30 OLD POINT BAR — Blue Frenzy, 6:30; The Parishioners, 9

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Leroy Jones & Katja Toivola feat. Crescent City Joymakers, 7

PAVILION OF THE TWO SISTERS — Thursdays at Twilight feat. New Orleans Banjoes Plus 2, 6

PRESERVATION HALL — Survivors Brass Band feat. Jeffrey Hills, 8 PRIME EXAMPLE — Jason Marsalis, 8 & 10

RALPH’S ON THE PARK — Joe Krown, 5 RAY’S — Bobby Love Band, 6

RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Jumpin’ Johnny, 7 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Li’l Nathan & the Big Tymers, 8:30 SATURN BAR — Alex McMurray, 10

SIBERIA — NASA Space Universe, Interior Decorating, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — The Bridge Trio feat. Joe Dyson, Max Moran & Conan Pappas, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Jayna Morgan, 6; New Orleans Moonshiners, 10 THREE MUSES — Luke WinslowKing, 7:30 UNO LAKEFRONT ARENA — Wiz Khalifa, Big Sean, 7:30

VAUGHAN’S — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 8:30 WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6

Friday 8 12 BAR — Local Skank, 10

ALLWAYS LOUNGE — DJ Q & Nola Fam, 10

AUSTIN’S RESTAURANT — Scott Kyser, 6:30 BANKS STREET BAR — Space Heaters, 10

BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Armand St. Martin, 7; Philip Melancon, 8 BAYOU PARK BAR — Jeremy Reneau, 10

BISTREAUX — Paul Longstreth, 7 BLUE NILE — Mykia Jovan & Jason Butler, 8; Brass-AHolics, 11

BMC — Moonshine & Caroline, 7; Soul Project, 10; Lagniappe Brass Band, 12:30 a.m.

BOOMTOWN CASINO — Topcats, 9 BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Dead Pelican Society, 8

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Rotten Cores, 10 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Sweet Olive String Band, 5:30; Alex McMurray, 8

COLUMNS HOTEL — Alex Bachari Trio, 5 DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 9 D.B.A. — Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 6; John Mooney, 10

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Eric Traub Trio, 10 THE EMBERS “ORIGINAL” BOURBON HOUSE — Curtis Binder, 6 EMERIL’S DELMONICO — Bob Andrews, 7 FELIPE’S TAQUERIA — Fredy Omar con su Banda, 10

FUNKY PIRATE — Mark & the Pentones, 4; Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30

GREEN ROOM — NOLA County, 10 THE HANGAR — Appetite for Destruction, 10 HI-HO LOUNGE — The Kid Carsons, 10

HOWLIN’ WOLF — Gorilla Productions Battle of the Bands Finals, 5

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Puro Instinct, John Maus, Geneva Jacuzzi, 10

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — David Reis, 5; Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown, 8

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Joe Krown, 7; Country Fried, 11

THE MAISON — Those Peaches, 5; Kristina Morales, 7; Young Fellaz Brass Band, 10; The Blues Less Traveled, midnight MAPLE LEAF BAR — 101 Runners, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Alex Bosworth, 4; Eudora Evans & Deep Soul, 7; Javier Olondo & Asheson, 10:30; The Mumbles, 12:30 a.m. OAK — Reed Alleman, 6; Jenn Howard, 10

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1; Vibe, 8:30 OLD POINT BAR — Blue Frenzy CD release, 9:30

ONE EYED JACKS — The Civil Wars, Rowland Baxter, Grant Watts & the Old Family, 9 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Wendell Brunious & Palm Court Jazz Band, 7 PELICAN CLUB — Sanford Hinderlie, 7

THE PERFECT FIT BAR & GRILL — Rechelle, Regeneration, 5:30 PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Masters feat. Leroy Jones, 8

RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Broken Heart Pharaohs, 9:30 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — The Wise Guys, 9:30

SIBERIA — Kromosom, Night Fever, Eating Disorder, The Foot, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Ellis Marsalis Quartet, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 6:30; New Orleans Cotton Mouth Kings, 10

TARPON JOE’S BAR AND GRILL — Burger ’N’ Fries, 10

THREE MUSES — Romy Kaye, 7; Gypsy Swing Trio, 10 TIPITINA’S — Good Enough for Good Times, 10 TOMMY’S WINE BAR — Tommy’s Latin Jazz Band feat. Matthew Shilling, 9

VOILA — Mario Abney Quartet, 5 WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6; Anais St. John, 9 ZADDIE’S TAVERN — Cold

APPLE BARREL — Peter Orr, 7

ATCHAFALAYA — Atchafalaya All Stars, 11 a.m.

AUSTIN’S RESTAURANT — Scott Kyser, 6:30 BACCHANAL — Gypsy Swing Club, 7 BANKS STREET BAR — Grant Watts, 10

BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Armand St. Martin, 7; Philip Melancon, 8

BISTREAUX — Paul Longstreth, 7 BJ’S LOUNGE — The Lushingtons, 9

BLUE NILE — Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 7; Hot 8 Brass Band, 11

BMC — The Lushingtons, 3; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 6:30; The Revealers, 9:30; Ashton & the Big Easy Brawlers Brass Band, 12:30 a.m. BOOMTOWN CASINO — Hott Tickets, 9 BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Hawaii 504, 8 CARROLLTON STATION — Ponchartrain Wrecks, A Fragile Tomorrow, 9:30

CLEVER WINE BAR — Scott Sanders Quartet feat. Gregory Agid, 8 COLUMNS HOTEL — Andy Rogers & guest, 9

DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 9 D.B.A. — Wendell Brunious Quartet, 7; Little Freddie King, 11

DECKBAR & GRILLE — Miche & MixMavens, 8

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Wendell Brunious, 10 THE EMBERS “ORIGINAL” BOURBON HOUSE — Curtis Binder, 6 EMERIL’S DELMONICO — Bob Andrews, 7

FUNKY PIRATE — Mark & the Pentones, 4; Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30

GREEN ROOM — Poltern Kinder, 10 HARRAH’S CASINO (HARRAH’S THEATRE) — Marc Broussard, 8 HI-HO LOUNGE — Black Pistol Fire, 10 HOWLIN’ WOLF — Future Leaders of the World, Oceans of the Addict, The Scoreseses, 10

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Soundclash Beat Battle, 10

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Bill Summers, 8; Brass-A-Holics, midnight

KERRY IRISH PUB — Speed the Mule, 5; Invisible Cowboy Band, 9

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30

VOTED

-No Cover

LAFITTE’S BLACKSMITH SHOP — Mike Hood, 9

THE MAISON — Magnitude, 7; Deep Fried 5, 10; Yojimbo, midnight

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Khris Royal & Dark Matter, 10 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Kristina Morales, 4; Kipori “Baby Wolf” Woods, 7:30; Charley & the SoulaBillySwampBoogie Band, 11

MULATE’S CAJUN RESTAURANT — Bayou DeVille, 7 NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM — Bayou Community Band, 3

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — John & Tanya, 8; Miranda Day, 9 OAK — Andrew Duhon, 9

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1; Vibe, 8:30

MUSIC LINE-UP

Zagat Rated

LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Moonshine & Caroline, 10:30 LOUISIANA MUSIC FACTORY — Olga, 2; Scott Schmidt, 3

A True Mid-City Neighborhood MusiC bAr

Live Music Nightly

05

WALTER “WOLFMAN” WASHINGTON

TUES 7/05

HONKY TONK OPEN MIC w/ JASON BISHOP WED 7/06 CHIP WILSON THUR 7/07 TRUMAN HOLLAND & FRIENDS FRI 7/08 DANNY BURNS CRESCENT CITY CELTIC BAND SAT 7/09 SPEED THE MULE INVISIBLE COWBOY SUN 7/10 MARK HESSLER MON 7/11

SCHATZY & FRIENDS

9PM 9PM

JUL

POCKET ACES

9PM 5PM 9PM 5PM 9PM 8PM 8PM

JUL

9PM

07 BRASS BAND

10PM

JUL

10PM

JUL

CONVERTS & THE BI LLS 10PM W/ RED MOUTH PUNK SHOW

08 JEREMY RENEAU 09

HAPPY HOUR DAILY TIL 8PM

331 Decatur St. • 527-5954

POOL TABLES BIG SCREEN TV

www.kerryirishpub.com

542 S. JEFF DAVIS PKWY

OLD POINT BAR — Dana Abbott, 9:30

ONE EYED JACKS — Alexis Marceaux, The Sour Notes, Native America, Elaine Greer, 9

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lionel Ferbos & Palm Court Jazz Band, 7 PELICAN CLUB — Sandford Hinderlie, 7 PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Swing Kings, 8

REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — The Glitch Mob, 10 RITZ-CARLTON — Catherine Anderson, 1

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Cajun Fais Do-Do feat. T’Canaille, 2; Amanda Shaw, 9:30

SATURN BAR — The Valparaiso Men’s Chorus, 11 SIBERIA — Die Rotzz, Wild Emotions, Dead People, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Leah Chase, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Luke WinslowKing, 3; Panorama Jazz Band, 6; Jazz Vipers, 10

THREE MUSES — Young Spodie & the Hot Shots, 7; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10 TIPITINA’S — Young Fellaz Brass Band, Free Spirit Brass Band, 10

TOMMY’S WINE BAR — Julio & Caesar, 10

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6; PAGE 46

Always a party at Tarpon Joe's! Happy Hour 4-7 THURSDAYS- STEAK DAY 12 oz Ribeye or Strip w/ Sides - $9.95

FULL MENU THURSDAY- Live Music/Open Mic Night FRIDAY - Live Bands SATURDAY - Karaoke Joe NO COVER 5 TVs for watching your favorite sports Pool Tables, Dart Boards, VIdeo Poker

2205 David Drive METAIRIE, LA • 887-9944 www.facebook.com/ pages/Tarpon-Joes-Bar

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 05 > 2011

REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — G-Eazy, 11:30

ALLWAYS LOUNGE — Black Jet Radio, 10

TUE

KERRY IRISH PUB — Danny Burns, 5; Crescent City Celtic Band, 9

12 BAR — Los Po-Boy-Citos, 8

THU

JUJU BAG CAFE AND BARBER SALON — Michaela Harrison, Todd Duke, 7:30

Saturday 9

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Joe Bennett, 3; Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 6 & 9

FRI

JOEY K’S RESTAURANT — Maryflynn’s Prohibition Jazz & Blues, 5

Turkey, 10

SAT

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Colin Lake, 3; Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 6 & 9

MUSIC

45

MUSIC

CHARCOAL BROILED HAMBURGERS

LISTINGS

PAGE 45 Anais St. John, 9

Sunday 10

Crescent City Pendant & Earrings

CHERRY, APPLE & PEACH ALSO SERVING SHRIMP & CATFISH PO-BOYS â&#x20AC;˘ GRILLED CHICKEN

500 CITY PARK AVE â&#x20AC;˘ 486-2559 2008 CLEARVIEW PKWY â&#x20AC;˘ 889-2837

{Aroun d t he b loc k from M a rga ritav ille} w w w . s t erlings ilv ia . c om

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04 05 WED 06 THU 07 FRI 08 SAT 09 SUN 10

CHARMAINE NEVILLE BAND JOHN AUTIN QUARTET

BUFFAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LOUNGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Some Like it Hot, 11 a.m; Alex McMurray & Bill Malchow, 8

DELFEAYO MARSALIS & UPTOWN JAZZ ORCH. THE BRIDGE TRIO ELLIS MARSALIS QUARTET LEAH CHASE THAIS CLARK & The Decatur Street Allstars

-"7/ -\ nĂ&#x160;EĂ&#x160;£äĂ&#x160;*

  Ă&#x160;,"Ă&#x160;x*

â&#x20AC;˘4â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘

BLUE NILE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; John Dobry Band, 7:30; To Be Continued Brass Band, 10

BOOMTOWN CASINO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Captain â&#x20AC;&#x153;Chiggy Chiggyâ&#x20AC;? Charles, 7

7Ă&#x160;",  -½Ă&#x160;*,  ,Ă&#x160;<<Ă&#x160; 1

TUE

BISTREAUX â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Aaron LopezBarrantes, 6

BMC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Charley & the SoulaBillySwampBoogie Band, 1; Gypsy Elise & the Royal Blues, 7; Jack Cole & Friends, 9:30

â&#x20AC;˘nug â&#x20AC;˘arbor MON

ATCHAFALAYA â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sam & Boone, 11 a.m.

BANKS STREET BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tony Italiano, 9

41 FRENCH MARKET PLACE 299-9225 GAMBLING PROBLEMS? CALL 1-800-522-4700

ARNAUDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Gumbo Trio, 10:30 a.m. & 6:30

BREAKFAST LUNCH & DINNER

5606 Canal Blvd. â&#x20AC;˘ 504-483-7001 www.lakeviewbrew.com

CAFE RANI â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Courtyard Kings, 11 a.m. COLUMNS HOTEL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Chip Wilson, 11 a.m.

COURT OF TWO SISTERS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mary Flynn, 9:30 a.m.

D.B.A. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Palmetto Bug Stompers, 6; Mas Mamones, 10 DRAGONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S DEN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Rus, Ribbz, Sour.D, Partymonster, Unicorn Fukr, 9 THE EMBERS â&#x20AC;&#x153;ORIGINALâ&#x20AC;? BOURBON HOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Curtis Binder, 6

FINNEGANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S EASY â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Robin Clabby, Chris Alford, Erik Golson & Nick Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Gara, 12:30 FRENCH QUARTER PIZZERIA â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Nervous Duane, 8

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 05 > 2011

One of the best places to eat Po-Boys -Brett Anderson

3939 Veterans â&#x20AC;˘ 885-3416

(between Cleary Ave & Clearview) Mon-Tues 11-3 â&#x20AC;˘ Wed-Thurs 11-7:30 Fri 11-8:30 â&#x20AC;˘ Sat 11-8:00 www.parranspoboys.com

VISIT OUR WEBSITE

www.originaldungeon.com

Green Parrot Nursery 201 NASHVILLE AVE. NASHVILLE & THE RIVAH

(504) 894-1100

Try Our Homemade Sausage & Boudin, Dry-Aged Beef, Ribeye Steaks, Ground Ribeye For Great Burgers, Boneless Stuffed Chickens, Smoked Chicken, Brisket, Ribs & More 5618 JEFFERSON HWY ¡ HARAHAN, LA 70123 Located near Jefferson and Edwards

Monday - Saturday 9am-6pm [504] 733-0901 â&#x20AC;˘ w w w.emmettsmeats.com

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tom McDermott & Kevin Clark, 11 a.m; Julio & Caesar, 4:30; Javier Olondo & Asheson, 8

MULATEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CAJUN RESTAURANT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Bayou DeVille, 7 NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sunday Swing feat. Swingaroux, 2

OLD OPERA HOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Bonoffs, 1

OLD POINT BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jesse Moore, 3:30 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tom Fischer & Sunday Night Swingsters, 7

THE PERFECT FIT BAR & GRILL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brass-A-Holics, 8 THE PRECINCT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Funk Express, 7:30 PRESERVATION HALL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; St. Peter Street All-Stars feat. Lars Edegran, 8

RALPHâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ON THE PARK â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Joe Krown, 11:30 a.m.

RITZ-CARLTON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Armand St. Martin, 10:30 a.m; Catherine Anderson, 2 ROOSEVELT HOTEL (BLUE ROOM) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; James Rivers Movement, 11 a.m.

THE SAINT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ringo Deathstarr, In Elevators, Kindest Lines, 8 SIBERIA â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Nuclear Aminals, Firebrand, Opposable Thumbs, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Thais Clark & the Decatur Street Allstars, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Rights of Swing, 3; Ben Polcer & friends, 6; Pat Casey, 10

HOMEDALE INN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sunday Night Live Jam Session feat. Homedale Boys, 7

THREE MUSES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; New Orleans Moonshiners, 4:30

HOUSE OF BLUES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sunday Gospel Brunch, 10 a.m.

HOWLINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; WOLF (THE DEN) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Hot 8 Brass Band, 9

IRVIN MAYFIELDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Germaine Bazzle & Paul Longstreth, 7 JIMMY BUFFETTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Irving Bannisterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s All-Stars, 3; Cindy Chen, 6; Ched Reeves, 9

www.greenparrotnursery.com

46

3 full bars â&#x20AC;˘ 10:30-til 738 Toulouse St. â&#x20AC;˘ 523-5530

Quintet, 10

MAPLE LEAF BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Joe Krown Trio feat. Russell Batiste & Walter â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wolfmanâ&#x20AC;? Washington, 10

FUNKY PIRATE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mark & the Pentones, 4 HI-HO LOUNGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Skin â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Bones Gang, 6

Home of the Original Seafood Muffuletta

STICK THIS IN YOUR EAR

KERRY IRISH PUB â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mark Hessler, 8

KRAZY KORNER â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LE BON TEMPS ROULE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Chapter: SOUL, 9

LE PAVILLON HOTEL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Philip Melancon, 8:30 a.m. MADIGANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Anderson/ Easley Project, 9

THE MAISON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Dave Easley Trio, 5; Bx4, 7; Low Stress

ST. CHARLES TAVERN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mary Flynn Thomas & Prohibition Blues, 10 a.m.

TIPITINAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sunday Music Workshop feat. Tony Dagradi, Roland Guerin & Johnny Vidacovich, 1

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mario Abney Quartet, 6

Monday 11 APPLE BARREL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sam Cammarata, 8

ATCHAFALAYA â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Burke Ingraffia, Dr. Danny Acosta, 7 BACCHANAL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jonathan Freilich, 7:30

BANKS STREET BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;awlins Johnnys, 9

BISTREAUX â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Aaron LopezBarrantes, 6

BJâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LOUNGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; King James & the Special Men, 10 BLUE NILE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Big Pearl & the Fugitives of Funk, 9

BMC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Fun in the Pocket feat.

Mayumi Shara, 5; Smoky Greenwellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Monday Blues Jam, 9:30

COLUMNS HOTEL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; David Doucet, 8

D.B.A. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Paul Sanchez, 6; Glen David Andrews, 9 DONNAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BAR & GRILL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Les Getrex & the Blues All-Star Band, 9

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Craig Paddock, 9:30 THE FAMOUS DOOR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

FOUR POINTS BY SHERATON (M!X ULTRALOUNGE) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tim Sullivan Jazz Trio, 7

FUNKY PIRATE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Willie Lockett & All Purpose Blues Band, 8:30 GREEN ROOM â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sean Imel, 10 HI-HO LOUNGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Blue Grass Pickinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Party, 8

HOUSE OF BLUES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Steve Earle & the Dukes feat. Alison Moore, 8 IRVIN MAYFIELDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Bob French & the Original Tuxedo Band, 8 JIMMY BUFFETTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Truman Holland, 3; Brint Anderson, 6; Ched Reeves, 9

KERRY IRISH PUB â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Greg Schatz & Friends, 8

THE MAISON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 7; Rue Fiya, 10 MAPLE LEAF BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Papa Grows Funk, 10 MAT & NADDIEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S RESTAURANT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Courtyard Kings, 7

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Uke Joint, 7; Miles Kirkpatrick, 10 OLD POINT BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brent Walsh Jazz Trio feat. Romy Kaye, 7

PRESERVATION HALL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; St. Peter Street Playboys feat. Maynard Chatters, 8 RIVERSHACK TAVERN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Dave Jordan, 7

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Charmaine Neville, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brett Richardson, 4; Dominic Grillo & the Frenchmen Street AllStars, 6; Jazz Vipers, 10

ST. ROCH TAVERN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Washboard Lissa Orchestra, 7

classical/ concerts DUTCH ALLEY â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Near French

Market, on North Peters Street â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sun: Summer Twilight Romance Series presents Harmoniemusik, 7

TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

1329 Jackson Ave., 522-0276; www.trinitynola.com â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tue: Organ & Labyrinth, 6; Tue: Trinity Wall Street Choir, 7:30; Thu: Evensong Choir, 6:30; Sun: David & Roselyn, 5; Mon: Taize, 6

FILM

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

A ROOM WITH A VIEW

preview

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

NOW SHOWING BAD TEACHER (R) — Cameron Diaz plays a foul-mouthed, golddigging seventh-grade teacher.

AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

BEYOND ALL BOUNDARIES (NR) — The museum screens a 4-D

film, bringing audiences into battle using archival footage and special effects. National World War II Museum Solomon Victory Theater

BRIDESMAIDS (R) — A comical-

ly struggling woman (Kristen Wiig) tries to get her life in order while also serving as her best friend’s maid of honor. AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Hollywood 14

CARS 2 (PG-13) — The Pixar

sequel finds its characters competing in an international race. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 05 > 2011

DEEP SEA (NR) — Audiences experience the depths of the ocean. Entergy IMAX

COLUMBIA PICTURES AND METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER PICTURES PRESENT A BROKEN ROAD/HEY EDDIE/HAPPY MADISON PRODUCTION MUSIC MUSIC KEVI N JAMES “ Z OOKEEPER” ROSARI O DAWSON SUPERVISION BY MICHAEL DILBECK BY RUPERT GREGSON-WILLIAMS EXECUTIVE PRODUCED PRODUCERS BARRY BERNARDI JEFF SUSSMAN CHARLES NEWIRTH JENNIFER EATZ BY TODD GARNER KEVIN JAMES ADAM SANDLER JACK GIARRAPUTO WALT BECKER STORY SCREENPLAY DIRECTED BY JAY SCHERICK & DAVID RONN BY NICK BAKAY & ROCK REUBEN & KEVIN JAMES AND JAY SCHERICK & DAVID RONN BY FRANK CORACI A FILM BY FRANK CORACI

check local listings for theaters and showtimes

SWEET STUFF

OFFERING THE FOLLOWING CLASSES:

ICY HOT CHOCOLATE

CHILDREN ANDYOUNG ADULT ACTING

Now Serving

MECHANICAL MODELING · MODELING MAKE-UP 101 · FASHION / MODA

THE HANGOVER PART II (R) —

After the infamous bachelor party in Las Vegas, Stu (Ed Helms) tries to play it safe for his wedding in Thailand — but things once again go awry. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 14

HURRICANE ON THE BAYOU (NR) — The film tells the story

of Hurricane Katrina and the impact that Louisiana’s disappearing wetlands has on hurricane protection. Entergy IMAX

KUNG FU PANDA 2 (PG) — The

animated sequel stars Jack Black as the voice of the titular warrior. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

LARRY CROWNE (PG-13) —

5707 Magazine St. · 504.269.5707 www.BlueFrogChocolates.com

48

ADULT SCENE STUDY

GREEN LANTERN (PG-13) — In the DC Comics adaptation that was filmed in New Orleans, a hot-shot test pilot must maintain peace in the universe using a mystical green ring. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14, Prytania

Cast a vote for BFC under “Best Sweet Shop”

5 0 4 . 32 4 . 37 8 2 • 1 . 8 7 7. 9 9 7. 56 8 8 de lc o r ra la nd a sso c @ m sn. c o m w w w. d e l c o r r a l m o d e l . c o m

After being downsized from the hot-shot position at his job, the affable Larry Crowne

French Connection

The French Film Festival screens an array of films, from a biopic about Yves Saint Laurent (L’Amour Fou) to a murder thriller (Crime D’Amour) to the Jean-Luc Godard film Socialisme. There also are a couple of classic films. An American in Paris (1951) starring Gene Kelly is the only film in English, all others are in French and subtitled in English. L’Amour Fou is about the life of St. Laurent, featuring extensive interviews with his longtime partner Pierre Berge (pictured together). It begins with St. Laurent’s death in 2008 and focuses on the auction of their vast art collection. Berge is somber but also very frank about St. Laurent and his outlook and troubles. Just into his 20s, St. Laurent became the successor to Christian Dior’s fashion empire before he decided to form his own company with Berge a few years later. The documentary includes an interview in which St. Laurent expresses regrets about not having lived a more carefree younger life. In the mid-1970s, he plunged into drugs and alcohol and indulged in a lifestyle of excess that he didn’t escape until 1990. But throughout his life, he suffered a sense of alienation and depression. The intensity surrounding the releases of new collections were the few moments of joy that offered him reprieve. The account of the prolific and highly influential designer and fashion mogul is intriguing, but like his life, the spectacles of his new designs and shows and the excesses of his partying account for the most vibrant and compelling parts. Other films include Gainsbourg: A Heroic Life about singer/songwriter Serge Gainsbourg. Rapt is a dramatization of the 1978 kidnapping of a millionaire playboy and his humiliation at the hands of his captors. In The Names of Love, a young hippie woman sets out to seduce elder conservatives into a new worldview but inadvertently falls in love. Mozart’s Sister is about Wolfgang Mozarts’ older sister who also was a musical prodigy but constrained by the gender roles of her times. Tickets $9 general admission, $7 New Orleans Film Society members. — Will Coviello

JUL

8-13

FRENCH FILM FESTIVAL Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.neworleansfilmsociety.org

FILM

LISTINGS

Nick (Jason Bateman), Kurt (Jason Sudeikis) and Dale (Charlie Day) consult a hitman (Jamie Foxx) about how to kill their employers in Horrible Bosses. (C) 2011 WARNER BROS. PICTURES

(Tom Hanks) decides to go back to college. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

crash in J.J. Abrams’ sci-fi drama. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies, Grand

ate in Paris in the 1951 classic. Tickets $5.50. Noon SaturdaySunday and July 13, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 8912787; www.theprytania.com

MIDNIGHT IN PARIS (PG-13) — In the Woody Allen film,

TRANSFORMERS: DARK OF THE MOON (PG-13) — A mysterious

BRIT WIT — The Big Top

a screenwriter and aspiring novelist (Owen Wilson) finds himself travelling back in time to the Jazz Age while touring Paris at night. AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 05 > 2011

MONTE CARLO (PG) — Selena

50

Gomez stars in the summertime tween comedy about a case of mistaken identity during a trip to Monte Carlo. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

MR. POPPER’S PENGUINS (PG) — Jim Carrey plays Mr.

LAKE R E B M I T N I T S U J CHER” TOM WOLFE A E T D A B “ Z A I D ON MUNSICBY MANISH RAVAL UPNITSKY R E M A C N O I T C U D O A MOSAIC PR D JASON SEGEL SUPERVISIO LEE EISENBERG IRGECETENDE ST ASDAN S T N E ES R P S E K D R N COLUMBIA PUINCTCUH JOHN MICHEXAECEULTIVHEIGGIONRSGIAA KACANDES JAKE KASDDAANVID HOUSEHOLTER BY JAKE LSICUCY P ANDREWS PRODUCERS GE PRODUCEDBY JIMMY MILLER MU M I C H A E L ERG B N E S I E BY E E L & Y K S WRITTENY GENE STUPNIT B check local listings for theaters and showtimes

Popper, a business man whose world is turned upside down when six penguins turn his swanky New York apartment into a snowy winter wonderland. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES (PG-13) — In the latest installment

of the franchise, Captain Jack Sparrow’s (Johnny Depp) past comes back to haunt him when he encounters Angelica (Penélope Cruz), a pirate he once loved. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Entergy IMAX, Grand, Hollywood 14

SUPER 8 (PG-13) — A group

of friends in 1979 start to witness strange occurrences after a catastrophic train

event from the past threatens to bring war to Earth in the third installment of Michael Bay’s giant robot franchise. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 THE TREE OF LIFE (PG-13) —

Terrence Malick’s film, Palme d’Or winner at the 2011 Cannes Film Festival, follows a man through his innocent childhood to his disillusioned adult years. Canal Place UNDER THE SEA 3-D (G) — Jim Carrey narrates the documentary exploring the Great Barrier Reef. Entergy IMAX X-MEN: FIRST CLASS (PG-13) —

The prequel tells the origin story of the Marvel Comics supergroup. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

OPENING FRIDAY HORRIBLE BOSSES (PG-13) — A

group of friends devise a convoluted plan to get rid of their intolerable bosses.

SPECIAL SCREENINGS AN AMERICAN IN PARIS (NR) — Gene Kelly stars as an

exuberant American expatri-

screens British comedies every week. 7 p.m. Tuesday, 3 Ring Circus’ The Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com

CONAN O’BRIEN CAN’T STOP (NR)— Rodman Flender‘s film

documents the comedian and TV host’s 32-city music and comedy show following his much publicized departure from NBC’s Tonight Show. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 7:30 p.m. Friday, Sunday and nightly through July 14, 5:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Zeitgeist MultiDisciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 8275858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

DR. STRANGELOVE OR: HOW I LEARNED TO STOP WORRYING AND LOVE THE BOMB (NR) —

The cafe screens the 1964 black comedy satirizing the nuclear scare. Free admission. 7:30 p.m. Monday, La Divina Gelateria, 621 St. Peter St., 3022692; www.ladivinagelateria. com

PURPLE RAIN (R) — DJ Soul Sister presents the screening of Prince’s 1984 musical. Tickets $8. Midnight FridaySaturday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com TRIGUN (NR)— The film is a

big-screen adaptation of the acclaimed manga series by Yasuhiro Nightow. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5

FILM

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

review Stood Up

JUL

8-14

AMBER

HEARD

MAMIE

GUMMER

DANIELLE

PANABAKER

JARED

HARRIS

CONAN O'BRIEN CAN'T STOP 7:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. Friday-Thursday (5:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. July 9) Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

members. 9:30 p.m. Saturday and 5:30 p.m. Sunday, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net THE WIZARD OF OZ (NR) —

Judy Garland plays Dorothy, a girl swept away in a tornado to a magical land, in the 1939 classic. Tickets $5.50. Noon Tuesday-Thursday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 8912787; www.theprytania.com

FILM FESTIVALS NEW ORLEANS FRENCH FILM FESTIVAL — The New

Orleans Film Society and The Consulate General of

France in New Orleans’ festival includes screenings of Gainsbourg: A Heroic Life, L’Amour Fou, Love Crime and six other films. Visit www. neworleansfilmsociety.org for the full schedule and other details. Friday-Monday, then daily through July 14, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 8912787; www.theprytania.com AMC Palace 10 (Hammond), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 12 (Clearview), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 16 (Westbank), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 20 (Elmwood), (888) 2624386; Canal Place, 363-1117; Chalmette Movies, 304-9992; Entergy IMAX, 581-IMAX; Grand (Slidell), (985) 641-

1889; Hollywood 9 (Kenner), 464-0990; Hollywood 14 (Covington), (985) 893-3044; Kenner MegaDome, 468-7231; Prytania, 891-2787; Solomon Victory Theater, National World War II Museum, 527-6012 Compiled by Lauren LaBorde

JOHN CARPENTER’S

THEWARD July 8, 2011

at Scan for movie times.

6047 MAGAZINE ST. • 899-4223

©2010 CHAMBERLAIN FILMS, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

LIMITED ENGAGEMENT

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 05 > 2011

Would you take a $32 million severance payment from your current employer and agree not to work for a competitor for at least the next seven months? Conan O’Brien did (estimates of the undisclosed package run higher), but he wasn’t happy about it. The amount of the fee isn’t mentioned in Rodman Flender’s documentary Conan O’Brien Can’t Stop, and maybe that’s a telling omission. The film is very funny, or at least viewers likely will find it as funny as they found O’Brien’s late-night show and brand of humor (which they can now watch on TBS). But behind the behind-the-scenes documentary, there is an amusing look at celebrity. O’Brien has to face something he finds insufferable: being denied a place on TV. So victimized that he’d compare himself to Anne Frank? Well, yes, even if he knows that’s an outrageous joke. NBC canceled O’Brien’s show in 2010 after some failed program changes that involved Jay Leno, who stayed on the air. O’Brien wasn’t happy about the whole deal, so he did what anyone in his entertainment world shoes would do — he assembled a large team of writers, producers and musicians, including sexy backup singers, and scheduled a 32-city tour. The film follows the tour and features stand-up bits, characters lifted from the show (the masturbating bear remade as the self-pleasuring panda), a host of celebrity guests (Jim Carrey, Stephen Colbert, Pearl Jam) and something people may not know about O’Brien, his musical side. He’s a talented guitarist, and the film is loaded with songs, from O’Brien singing “Poke Salad Annie” to “Seven Nation Army” and he jams with Jack White on other tunes. O’Brien is very comfortable in front of a camera, which makes many of the backstage antics both candid and funny, but he also always seems to be performing. Much of his running commentary seems tailored for the film audience. It starts with an endless stream of jokes about being jilted by NBC, but by the end of the film, he’s offering an ongoing testimonial about how much he loves his fans and how hard he works to please them. Perhaps he protests too much. In the bubble of celebrity, however, this all seems to be part of the lifestyle. But he’s likable and funny enough for you to finally plunk down a few dollars and pay to watch him perform. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 seniors/students, $5 Zeitgeist members. — Will Coviello

PALACE 20 - ELMWOOD

1200 Elmwood Park Blvd., Harahan LA 70123

51

LISTINGS

WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

OPENING ANTENNA GALLERY. 3161 Burgundy

St., 957-4255; www.press-street. com — “What Can We Do?” prints, drawings and installations by six artists, through July. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. June 9. THE FRONT. 4100 St. Claude Ave.; www.nolafront.org — Painting and

sculpture by Clark Derbes; video and collage by Kelly Boehmer and Chuck Carbia; photography, performance and installations by Brandon Ballengee, Andrew Pasco, Andy Sternad and John Kleinschmidt; all through Aug. 7. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. PIECE’A WORK. 3436 Magazine St.; www.pieceawork.com — The Mag-

nolia School benefit art exhibition, through July. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Wednesday.

ST. TAMMANY ART ASSOCIATION. 320 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-8650; www.sttammanyart.org — Summer Show, an annual exhibition and competition, through Aug. 13. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. TROUSER HOUSE. 4105 St. Claude Ave. — “Eat Me, Drink Me,” an in-

teractive exhibit featuring culinary artists and mixologists, through July. Interactive elements 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday.

A GALLERY FOR FINE PHOTOGRAPHY. 241 Chartres St., 568-1313; www. agallery.com — Exhibition of gal-

lery artists featuring Louviere + Vanessa, Sebastiao Salgado, Joshua Mann Pailet and Herman Leonard, through September.

ACADEMY GALLERY. 5256 Magazine St., 899-8111 — Annual student

exhibition, through July 23.

AG WAGNER STUDIO & GALLERY. 813 Royal St., 561-7440 — Works by

gallery artists; 504 Toys, locally handcrafted toys; both ongoing.

ALL IN THE FRAME GALLERY. 2596 Front St., Slidell, (985) 290-1395 — “Serene Waters, Clear Horizons,” paintings by Annie Strack, ongoing.

puy, Susan Landry, Ro Mayer, Myra Williamson Wirtz, Alicia Windham and Maria Etkind, through July 30.

Again,” exhibition of work by gallery artists from the past year, through Aug. 4.

ART GALLERY 818. 818 Royal St., 524-6918 — Paintings, sculpture

DU MOIS GALLERY. 4921 Freret St., 818-6032 — “Cold Drink” printmak-

and jewelry by local artists Noel Rockmore, Michael Fedor, Xavier de Callatay, Charles Bazzell, Bambi deVille and Ritchie Fitzgerald, ongoing.

ARTICHOKE GALLERY. 912 Decatur St., 636-2004 — Artists work on

site in all media; watercolors and limited-edition prints by Peter Briant, ongoing. BARRISTER’S GALLERY. 2331 St. Claude Ave., 525-2767; www.barristersgallery. com — “The New Orleans Big Deal

Show,” paintings, mixed media and music by Silke Thoss and Bob Tooke, through Saturday.

BERGERON STUDIO & GALLERY. 406 Magazine St., 522-7503; www. bergeronstudio.com — Photographs by Michael P. Smith, Jack Beech, Harriet Blum, Kevin Roberts and others, ongoing. BERTA’S AND MINA’S ANTIQUITIES GALLERY. 4138 Magazine St., 895-6201 — “Louisiana! United We Stand

to Save Our Wetlands,” works by Nilo and Mina Lanzas; works by Clementine Hunter, Noel Rockmore and others; all ongoing.

BRYANT GALLERIES. 316 Royal St., 525-5584; www.bryantgalleries. com — Paintings by Dean Mitchell,

ongoing.

CALICHE & PAO GALLERY. 312 Royal St., 588-2846 — Oil paintings by

Caliche and Pao, ongoing.

CALLAN FINE ART. 240 Chartres St., 524-0025; www.callanfineart. com — Works by Eugene de Blass,

Louis Valtat and other artists of the Barbizon, Impressionist and PostImpressionist schools, ongoing.

CARDINAL GALLERY. 541 Bourbon St., 522-3227 — Exhibition of Italian art-

ists featuring works by Bruno Paoli and Andrea Stella, ongoing.

CARIBBEAN ARTS LTD. 720 Franklin Ave., 943-3858 — The gallery show-

cases contemporary Haitian and Jamaican art.

CASELL GALLERY. 818 Royal St., 5240671; www.casellartgallery.com —

Pastels by Joaquim Casell; etchings by Sage; oils by Charles Ward; all ongoing.

COLE PRATT GALLERY. 3800 Magazine St., 891-6789; www.coleprattgallery.com — Monotypes by Marie

Bukowski and plein air paintings by Phil Sandusky, through July 30.

DUTCH ALLEY ARTIST’S CO-OP GALLERY. 912 N. Peters St., 412-9220; www.dutchalleyonline.com —

ISABELLA’S GALLERY. 3331 Severn Ave., Suite 105, Metairie, 779-3202; www. isabellasgallery.com — Hand-blown glass works by Marc Rosenbaum; raku by Kate Tonguis and John Davis; all ongoing.

ELLIOTT GALLERY. 540 Royal St., 523-3554; www.elliottgallery.com —

JAMIE HAYES GALLERY. 621 Chartres St., 592-4080; www.jamiehayes.com — New Orleans-style art by Jamie Hayes, ongoing.

ing invitational, through Aug. 6.

Works by New Orleans artists, ongoing.

Works by gallery artists Coignard, Engel, Papart, Petra, Tobiasse, Schneuer and Yrondi, ongoing.

FAIR FOLKS & A GOAT. 2116 Chartres St., 872-9260; www.fairfolksandagoat.com — “An American Memory,” a group exhibition curated by Michael Martin, through July 15. “Good Wood,” furniture and sculpture by Michael Robinson, through Aug. 1. “Foot-a-Night,” installation by Hannah Chalew, ongoing. FIELDING GALLERY. 525 E. Boston St., Covington, (985) 377-2212 — Metal

sculpture by Keith Villere, through July 13. FRAMIN’ PLACE & GALLERY. 3535 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-3311; www.nolaframing.com — Prints by

Tommy Thompson, Phillip Sage, James Michalopoulos and others, ongoing.

FREDRICK GUESS STUDIO. 910 Royal St., 581-4596; www.fredrickguessstudio.com — Paintings by Fredrick

Guess, ongoing.

GALERIE D’ART FRANCAIS. 541 Royal St., 581-6925 — Works by Todd

White, ongoing.

GALERIE PORCHE WEST. 3201 Burgundy St., 947-3880 — Photog-

raphy by Christopher Porche West, ongoing.

GALLERIA BELLA. 319 Royal St., 5815881 — Works by gallery artists, ongoing. GALLERY BIENVENU. 518 Julia St., 525-0518; www.gallerybienvenu.com — “My Pinocchio Syndrome for

Abigail ... Ten Years Later. This Ain’t Disney Jeff,” mixed media by Blake Boyd, through July 23.

GEORGE SCHMIDT GALLERY. 626 Julia St., 592-0206; www. georgeschmidt.com — Paintings by George Schmidt, ongoing. GRAPHITE GALLERIES. 936 Royal St., 565-3739 — “Sinners and Saints,”

works by Joe Hobbs; works by Christy Lee Rogers; both ongoing.

COLLECTIVE WORLD ART COMMUNITY. Poydras Center, 650 Poydras St., 339-5237; www.collectiveworldartcommunity.com — Paintings from

through Aug. 8.

the Blue Series by Joseph Pearson, ongoing.

GUTHRIE CONTEMPORARY. 3815 Magazine St., 897-2688; www.guthriecontemporary.com — “Impact,” works by Bernd Haussmann, ongoing. “Schemata,” works by Susan Dory; both ongoing.

ANTON HAARDT FOLK GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www. antonart.com — Works by Anton

COUP D’OEIL ART CONSORTIUM. 2033 Magazine St., 722-0876; www. coupdoeilartconsortium.com —

GUY LYMAN FINE ART. 3645 Magazine St., 899-4687; www.guylymanfineart.com — Mixed media with mechanical light sculptures by Jimmy Block, ongoing.

ANGELA KING GALLERY. 241 Royal St., 524-8211; www.angelakinggallery.com — Works by Peter Mars,

Haardt, Christopher Moses and others, ongoing.

ARIODANTE GALLERY. 535 Julia St., 524-3233 — Group exhibition fea-

turing Cheri Ben-Iesau, Isabelle Du-

“Prospect.1.75, Blake Boyd: The Batman Years,” mixed-media works by Blake Boyd, through July 23.

D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., 524-3936 — “So Much Art, So Little Time,

HERIARD-CIMINO GALLERY. 440 Julia St., 525-7300; www.heriardcimino. com — Group exhibition featuring works by nine gallery artists, through Saturday.

HAROUNI GALLERY. 829 Royal St., 299-8900 — Paintings by David

Harouni, ongoing.

JON SCHOOLER GALLERY. 8526 Oak St., 865-7032; www.jonschooler.com — “Subliminal WOWs,” paintings by Jon Schooler, ongoing. JULIE NEILL DESIGNS. 3908 Magazine St., 899-4201; www.julieneill.com —

Wilkerson Row Handcrafted furniture By Shaun Wilkerson

3137 Magazine St. 504-899-3311 www.shaunwilkerson.com

“Facade,” photographs by Lesley Wells, ongoing.

KAKO GALLERY. 536 Royal St., 565-5445; www.kakogallery.com —

Paintings by Don Picou and Stan Fontaine; “Raku” by Joy Gauss; 3-D wood sculpture by Joe Derr; all ongoing.

KURT E. SCHON. 510-520 St. Louis St., 524-5462 — The gallery specializes

in 18th and 19th century European oil paintings by artists from the French Salon and Royal Academy as well as French Impressionists. L9 CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 539 Caffin Ave., 948-0056 — “Faces of Treme,”

works by Chandra McCormick and Keith Calhoun, ongoing.

LE PETIT SALON DE NEW ORLEANS. 906 Royal St., 524-5700 — Paintings

fresh. Feminine. fun.

by Holly Sarre, ongoing.

LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia St., 522-5988; www.lemieuxgalleries. com — “Breaking Muse!” ceramic

assemblages by Shannon Landis Hansen; textile constructions by Christine Sauer, through July 30.

LIVE ART STUDIO. 4207 Dumaine St., 484-7245 — “New Orleans is Alive,”

acrylics by Marlena Stevenson, through July.

LOUISIANA CRAFTS GUILD. 608 Julia St., 558-6198; www.louisianacrafts. org — Group show featuring works from guild members, ongoing. MALLORY PAGE STUDIO. 614 Julia St.; www.mallorypage.com — Paintings by Mallory Page, ongoing. MARTINE CHAISSON GALLERY. 727 Camp St., 304-7942; www.martinechaissongallery.com — “Embers of a Floating World,” works by Caroline Wright, through Saturday. MICHALOPOULOS GALLERY. 617 Bienville St., 558-0505; www.michalopoulos.com — Paintings by James Michalopoulos, ongoing. MICHELLE Y WILLIAMS GALLERY. 835 Julia St., 585-1945; www.michelleywilliams.com — Works by Michelle

Y. Williams, ongoing.

NEW ORLEANS ARTWORKS. 727 Magazine St., 529-7279 — Illuminated glass sculpture by Curt Brock; enameled copper jewelry by Cathy PAGE 55

CLOTHING JEWELRY ACCESSORIES GIFTS 622 S. CARROLLTON · NOLA, LA 70118 504.301.9410 MON-SAT 10AM-6PM · SUN 10AM-3PM

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 05 > 2011

GALLERIES

ART

53

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

ART

PAGE 53

DeYoung; hand-pulled prints by Dominique Begnaud; both through July 30. OCTAVIA ART GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www. octaviaartgallery.com — Summer Group Show, featuring works by gallery artists, through July 30. ONE SUN GALLERY. 616 Royal St., (800) 501-1151 — Works by local and national artists, ongoing. PARSE GALLERY. 134 Carondelet St. — “Worn, Torn, Wet &

Wild,” works by Jessica Langley and Christi Birchfield, through July 25.

PEARL ART GALLERY. 4421 Magazine St., 228-5840 — Works

by Cindy and Drue Hardegree, Erica Dewey, John Womack, Sontina, Lorraine Jones and S. Lee, ongoing.

PHOTO WORKS NEW ORLEANS. 521 St. Ann St., 593-9090; www.photoworksneworleans. com — Photography by Louis

Sahuc, ongoing.

REINA GALLERY. 4132 Magazine St., 895-0022; www.reinaart. com — “Vintage New Orleans

Artists,” watercolors, etchings and folk art; “Patron Saints,” works by Shelley Barberot; both ongoing.

RHINO CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS COMPANY. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www.rhinocrafts. com — Priscilla Busch, Natalie

Nichols, Andrew Jackson Pollack, Barbara Roberds and others, ongoing.

Ricardo Lozano, Michael Flohr, Henry Ascencio, Jaline Pol and others, ongoing. RODRIGUE STUDIO. 721 Royal St., 581-4244; www.georgerodrigue.com — Works by George Rodrigue, ongoing. ROSETREE GLASS STUDIO & GALLERY. 446 Vallette St., Algiers Point, 366-3602; www.rosetreeglass.com — Hand-blown glass

works, ongoing.

RUSTY PELICAN ART. 4031 St. Claude Ave., 218-5727; www. rustypelicanart.com — Works by

Travis and Lexi Linde, ongoing.

SALONE DELL’ARTES ARTEMISIA. 3000 Royal St., 481-5113 — “I

Genti H2O,” works by Shmuela Padnos, ongoing.

SHEILA’S FINE ART STUDIO. 1427 N. Johnson St., 473-3363; www. sheilaart.com — Works by

Sheila Phipps, ongoing.

STELLA JONES GALLERY. Place St. Charles, 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 132, 568-9050 — “Street

Children,” a group exhibition of works by Zambian youth,

STEVE MARTIN STUDIO. 624 Julia St., 566-1390; www.stevemartinfineart.com — Contemporary

sculpture and paintings by Steve Martin and other Louisiana artists, ongoing.

STUDIO BFG. 2627 Desoto St., 942-0200; www.studiobfg.com — “Peel Sessions: First Install-

ment,” works by Tina Stanley, ongoing.

STUDIO GALLERY. 338 Baronne St., Third Floor, 529-3306 — Works by YA/YA artists,

ongoing.

THOMAS MANN GALLERY I/O. 1812 Magazine St., 581-2113; www. thomasmann.com — “Where’s the Money?” group exhibit interpreting the economy, ongoing. TRIPOLO GALLERY. 401 N. Columbia St., (985) 893-1441 — Works

by Bill Binnings, Robert Cook, Donna Duffy, Scott Ewen, Juli Juneau, Kevin LeBlanc, Ingrid Moses, Gale Ruggiero, Robert Seago and Scott Upton, ongoing. UNO-ST. CLAUDE GALLERY. 2429 St. Claude Ave. — “Mara/

Thalassa/Kai: The Sea,” works by Anastasia Pelias, Rian Kerrane and Melissa Borman, through July. VENUSIAN GARDENS ART GALLERY. 2601 Chartres St., 943-7446; www.venusiangardens.com —

“Luminous Sculpture,” works by Eric Ehlenberger, ongoing.

VIEUX CARRE GALLERY. 507 St. Ann St., 522-2900; www. vieuxcarregallery.com — Works

by Sarah Stiehl and Brock Swanson, through July 15. WMSJR. 1061 Camp St., 299-9455; www.wmsjr.com — Paintings by Will Smith, ongoing. A WORK OF ART GALLERY. 8212 Oak St., 862-5244 — Glass works

SPARE SPACES ALVAR LIBRARY. 913 Alvar St., 596-2667 — “Youth,” sculpture

by Betty Petri; “The Solitary Chair,” sculpture by Michael Moreau; both ongoing.

BACCHANAL. 600 Poland Ave., 948-9111; www.bacchanalwine. com — “Coming Home: 2005-

2009,” photographs by Lee Celano, ongoing.

BUD’S BROILER. 500 City Park Ave., 486-2559 — Works by

Andrew Bascle, Evelyn Menge and others, ongoing.

CAFE ROSE NICAUD. 632 Frenchmen St., 949-3300 — Paintings

by Clarke Peters, through June. CAMPBELL’S COFFEE & TEA. 516 S. Tyler St., Covington, (985) 2466992; www.campbellscoffee. com — Multimedia works by

Margaux Hymel, ongoing.

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR. 5535 Tchoupitoulas St., 891-8500; www.dosjefescigarbar.com — Works by Mario Ortiz, ongoing. DRISCOLL ANTIQUES. 8500 Oak St., 866-7795; www.driscollantiques.com — Works by Sandra

Horstman Roberts, ongoing.

HAZELNUT NEW ORLEANS. 5515 Magazine St., 891-2424; www.hazelnutneworleans.com — Photography by Roy Barloga,

ongoing.

HI-HO LOUNGE. 2239 St. Claude Ave., 945-4446; www.hiholounge.net — Works by Robin

Durand, Brad Edelman, Tara Eden, Eden Gass and others, ongoing.

INTERIORS AND IMPORTS. 813 Florida St., Mandeville, (985) 624-7903 — Paintings by Annie

Strack, ongoing.

INTERNATIONAL HOUSE. 221 Camp St., 553-9550; www.ihhotel. com — Paintings by YA/YA se-

nior guild and alumni, ongoing.

by Juli Juneau; photographs from the New Orleans Photo Alliance; both ongoing.

JAX BREWERY. 600 Decatur St., 299-7163 — Works by YA/YA

CALL FOR ARTISTS

JW MARRIOTT NEW ORLEANS. 614 Canal St., Suite 4, 525-6500; www.marriott.com — Works by

MONUMENTAL. Antenna Gallery, 3161 Burgundy St., 957-4255; www.antennagallery.org —

Antenna seeks proposals for imaginative reinterpretations of 19th- and early 20th-century New Orleans monuments for a show in February 2012. Submissions deadline is Nov. 15, and there is a $15 entry fee. Email courtney@courtneyegan.net for details. NOLA NOW! The Contemporary

Arts Center seeks submissions for an exhibit featuring works produced in the last two years by artists currently living and working in the greater New Orleans area. The exhibition opens Oct. 1. Call 528-3805 or visit www.cacno.org for details. Submissions deadline is Friday.

youth artists, ongoing.

Charlene Insley, ongoing.

LIBERTY’S KITCHEN. 422 1/2 S. Broad St., 822-4011 — Paintings

on canvas by YA/YA artists, ongoing.

LIZANO’S GLASS HAUS. 3400 Cleary Ave., Suite B, Metairie, 4541144 — Fused-glass works by Paulette Lizano, ongoing. MARIGNY PHO. 2483 Burgundy St., 267-5869 — Selections from

“B Movie Double Feature,” photographs and ceramic collectors’ plates by Heather Weathers, through July.

MCKEOWN’S BOOKS AND DIFFICULT MUSIC. 4737 Tchoupitoulas St., 895-1954 — “The Book

of Kells, Revisited,” encaustic paintings by Patricia Kaschalk, ongoing.

METAIRIE PARK COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL. 300 Park Road, Metairie, 837-5204; www.mpcds.com — “The Unconventional Por-

GERMAN-AMERICAN CULTURAL CENTER. 519 Huey P. Long Ave., Gretna, 363-4202; www.gaccnola.com — Museum exhibits

MOJO COFFEE HOUSE. 1500 Magazine St., 525-2244; www. myspace.com/mojoco — Photographs by Marc Pagani, ongoing.

GREAT AMERICAN ALLIGATOR MUSEUM. 2051 Magazine St., 5235525 — The museum features

trait,” works by Mark Bercier, David Halliday, Gina Phillips and Alexander Stolin, ongoing.

NEOPHOBIA. 2855 Magazine St., 899-2444; www.neophobianola.com — Works by Tanner, ongoing. NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE. 5110 Danneel St., 891-3381; www.neutralground. org — Work by local artists,

ongoing.

NEW ORLEANS CAKE CAFE & BAKERY. 2440 Chartres St., 9430010 — Oil landscapes of the

Ustabes by Will Smith, ongoing.

PEACHES RECORDS. 408 N. Peters St., 282-3322 — “Gospel and

Blues,” photographs by Rita Posselt, ongoing.

ROYAL BLEND CAFE. 621 Royal St., 523-2716 — Black-and-white photographs by Jocelyn Marquis, through September. SOUND CAFE. 2700 Chartres St., 947-4477 — Mixed-media paint-

ings by YA/YA alumnus Gerard Caliste, ongoing.

SURREY’S CAFE & JUICE BAR. 1418 Magazine St., 524-3828; www. surreyscafeandjuicebar.com —

Watercolor, pen and ink series of New Orleans landmarks by Will Smith, ongoing.

THREE MUSES. 536 Frenchmen St., 298-8746; www.thethreemuses.com — Portraits by Zack

Smith, ongoing.

MUSEUMS AMERICAN-ITALIAN MUSEUM & RESEARCH LIBRARY. 537 S. Peters St., 522-7294 — Permanent

exhibits of jazz artists, a St. Joseph’s altar replica, the Louisiana Italian-American Sports Hall of Fame and a research library with genealogy records.

ASHE CULTURAL ARTS CENTER. 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — “Ashe in Retrospect: 19982008,” photographs by Morris Jones Jr., Eric Waters, Jeffrey Cook and others, ongoing. BACKSTREET CULTURAL MUSEUM. 1116 St. Claude Ave.; www.backstreetmuseum.org —

Permanent exhibits of Mardi Gras Indian suits, jazz funeral memorabilia and social aid and pleasure club artifacts, ongoing.

CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER. 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www. cacno.org — “As We See It: Youth Vision Quilt,” studentcreated quilt with more than 400 patches, ongoing.

depict the colonial experience, work, culture and religion of German immigrants.

fossils, taxidermy, folk art, kitsch, Americana and more.

HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION. 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www.hnoc.org — “The Threads

of Memory: Spain and the United States,” a traveling exhibition of rare materials from the Archive of the Indies in Seville, Spain, through Sunday. “The Golden Legend in the New World: Art of the Spanish Colonial Viceroyalties,” paintings from the New Orleans Museum of Art collection, through Aug. 14.

LONGUE VUE HOUSE AND GARDENS. 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue.com — “Magic Spell of Memory: The

Photography of Clarence John Laughlin,” through fall 2011.

LOUISIANA FILM MUSEUM. Montrel’s Bistro, 1000 N. Peters St., 524-4747; www.louisianafilmmuseum.org — The museum

features props, costumes, video clips, still photographs, posters and other exhibits from major films produced in Louisiana.

LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM PRESBYTERE. 751 Chartres St., 568-6968; www.lsm.crt.state. la.us — “Before During After,”

photographs illustrating the impact of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, through August. “Holding Out and Hanging On: Surviving Hurricane Katrina,” photographs by Thomas Neff, through Sept. 12. “Living With Hurricanes: Katrina and Beyond,” an exhibition of stories, artifacts and science displays, through Sept. 25. “It’s Carnival Time in Louisiana,” Carnival artifacts, ongoing.

LOUISIANA SUPREME COURT MUSEUM. Louisiana Supreme Court, 400 Royal St., 310-2149; www.lasc.org — The Supreme

Court of Louisiana Historical Society sponsors the museum’s exhibitions of the people and institutions that have contributed to the development of Louisiana law for 300 years. MAIN LIBRARY. 219 Loyola Ave., 529-7323; www.nutrias. org — “Hidden from History: Unknown New Orleanians,” photographs of the city’s working poor, ongoing. MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN COCKTAIL. 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www. museumoftheamericancocktail. org — “Absinthe Visions,”

photographs by Damian Hevia, ongoing. NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle,

658-4100; www.noma.org — “Ancestors of Congo Square: African Art in the New Orleans Museum of Art,” through July 17. “Read My Pins: The Madeleine Albright Collection,” more than 200 pins from Albright’s personal collection, through Aug. 14. “Thalassa,” a 20-foottall suspended sculpture by Swoon, through Sept. 25. “Peter Carl Faberge and Other Russian Masters,” permanent collection of Faberge objects; “Six Shooters,” photographs from the New Orleans Photo Alliance; both ongoing. NEW ORLEANS PHARMACY MUSEUM. 514 Chartres St., 565-8027; www.pharmacymuseum.org — Exhibits about 19th-century

pharmacy, medicine and health care, all ongoing.

OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART. 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org —

Works created by child and adult students in Mahalia Jackson Early Childhood and Family Learning Center art workshops, through July 17. “Art & Jazz: Preservation Hall at 50”; “New Orleans Craft & Design,” through July 24. “One World, Two Artists,” works by John Alexander and Walter Anderson; “Juke Joint,” photographs by Birney Imes, through July 24.

OLD U.S. MINT. 400 Esplanade Ave., 568-6990; lsm.crt.state. la.us/site/mintex.htm — “Race: Are We So Different?” an exhibit exploring the history, science and everyday experience of race, through March 31. SOUTHERN FOOD & BEVERAGE MUSEUM. Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood. org — “Acadian to Cajun:

Forced Migration to Commercialization,” a multimedia exhibit; “Laissez Faire — Savoir Fare,” the cuisine of Louisiana and New Orleans; “Eating in the White House — America’s Food”; all ongoing. “Tout de Sweet,” an exhibit exploring all aspects of the sugar industry in the South; “Barbecue Nation”; both ongoing. TANGIPAHOA AFRICAN-AMERICAN HERITAGE MUSEUM & BLACK VETERANS ARCHIVES. 1600 Phoenix Square, Hammond, (985) 542-4259; www.africanamericanheritagemuseum. com — The museum exhibits

works that preserve and tell the history of African-American ancestors in Louisiana; it also houses the country’s first memorial to black Vietnam War veterans, ongoing.

TULANE UNIVERSITY. Joseph Merrick Jones Hall, 6823 St. Charles Ave. — “Treme: People and Places,” maps, architectural drawings and photographs celebrating the bicentennial of Faubourg Treme, through November.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 05 > 2011

RIVERSTONE GALLERIES. 719 Royal St., 412-9882; 729 Royal St., 581-3688; Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 36, 566-0588; 733 Royal St., 5259988; www.riverstonegalleries. net — Multimedia works by

through Aug. 1.

55

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Outdoor Dining Eclectic Wine, Beer, & Cocktail Lists Small Plates Local Artwork Open Late Open for Brunch on Saturday & Sunday Private Dining Room Available

1 6 2 2 S T C H A R L E S AV E • 3 0 1 - 9 5 7 0 MON - THURS 11AM- MIDNIGHT • FRI 11AM - 2AM SAT 10AM-2AM • SUN 10AM- MIDNIGHT

THE 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEE. Cutting

Edge Theater at Attractions Salon, 747 Robert Blvd., Slidell, (985) 290-0760; www. cuttingedgeproductions.org — The Tony Award-winning one-act musical comedy centers around a middle school spelling bee officiated by three quirky adults. Tickets $18.50. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday through July 29.

BROADWAY: TAKE NOTES. Le Chat Noir, 715 St. Charles Ave., 581-5812; www.cabaretlechatnoir.com — Casts from shows originating from Le Chat Noir — including Waiting Around: The Restaurant Musical, The Music of Running With Scissors, The Best of Varla Jean Merman, A Cocktail Party in the Ladies Lounge and My O My — perform. Tickets $35 (includes $5 drink credit). 8 p.m. Fri., July 8. BROTHER. Elm Theatre, 220 Ju-

lia St., 218-0055; www.elmtheatre.org — In Lisa Ebersole’s play, race and class tensions arise after a stranger crashes a boozy, late-night birthday celebration. Tickets $15. 8 p.m. Thursday and Saturday, then Thursday-Saturday through Aug. 6.

DISNEY’S CAMP ROCK: THE MUSICAL. NORD’s Ty Tracy

Theater, Gallier Hall, 545 St. Charles Ave., 598-3800; www. crescentcitylights.org — Young singers and actors from the NORDC/Crescent City Lights Youth Theater perform the pop musical. Tickets $15. 7:30 p.m. Friday and July 14, 1 p.m. Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday through July 17. IN HERE, LIFE IS BEAUTIFUL AND CABARET IS FAMILY. Le Chat

Noir, 715 St. Charles Ave., 5815812; www.cabaretlechatnoir. com — The show features locally based artists who have premiered cabaret shows at Le Chat Noir, including Banu Gibson, Amy Alvarez, Jefferson Turner, Anais St. John, Dorian Rush, Leslie Castay, Lisa Picone and Rich Look. Tickets $35 (includes $5 drink credit). 8 p.m. Saturday.

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GET IN ON THE ACT

Door Canteen at The National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 528-1944 — The tribute show seeks to recapture the music, style and comedy of Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin and Sammy Davis Jr. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 11 a.m. Sunday.

TWELFTH NIGHT. Lupin Theatre,

Running With Scissors’ Mildred Dearest is, of course, all about Joan Crawford and her lust for attention. As Crawford, Brian Peterson’s makeup announced that like a billboard right from the beginning. A rim of bright red lipstick as thick as a white-wall tire surrounded his lips, and a precipitously tall and imposing pompadour-meetsring-curl-bangs wig (like a hairdo Crawford wore in Mildred Pierce) towered over sharply drawn eyebrows. It was a portrait of vanity on steroids. Scissors’ staged biopic began with a tantalizingly racy film introduction and included extended, sometimes overworked, news radio interludes. Some of the best moments in the show centered on Crawford’s self-absorption. Peterson somehow mustered a progression of at least eight nuanced expressions of perplexed anxiety as Crawford waited to hear if she had won the Oscar for her 1941 film Mildred Pierce. Of course, she did, and that made her all the more unbearable after years of declining interest at the box office. The Mildred Dearest story could have been a bit more involved. At times, other characters were not so much victims of Crawford’s ego but expected to set up easy punchlines for her. The serial neglect and torment Crawford directed at her adopted children Christina (Dorian Rush) and Christopher (Brad Caldwell), however, was funny. The best confrontation came as young Christina inappropriately flirted with one of Crawford’s suitors. The strange three-way dynamic of Crawford abusing Christina while courting men and film roles is the unseemly core of the controversy stirred by the original film Mommie Dearest. The overt competition in Mildred Dearest was at times deliciously funny. There also were some fun unexpected surprises. Rush sang a strangely creepy version of Shirley Temple’s “Animal Crackers in My Soup.” And one clever moment came early on as a studio executive (Jack Long) whipped out a wire hanger, getting a jump on the audience’s expectations. Unfortunately, Long also played a few of Crawford’s paramours (she had four husbands) and that got a bit muddled. In the past, Peterson excelled as Elizabeth Taylor and the film divas she played, including Angela Vickers in A Place in the Sun and Maggie in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. Casting him as Crawford was sure to delight Scissors fans, and he did a great job balancing her glamour and fame with her ruthless ambition and narcissism. But given the previously proven talents of the other players, Mildred Dearest would have been a stronger drama if the story wasn’t all about Crawford. — Will Coviello Tulane University, 865-5106; www.tulane.edu — Shakespeare’s comedy weaves together the stories of siblings lost at sea, a local count in love with a woman who has sworn off men, and group of buffoons out to exact revenge on an egotistical butler. The play is part of the New

Orleans Shakespeare Festival at Tulane. Call the box office or email box@tulane.edu for reservations. Tickets $15 preview performances (ThursdayFriday), $40 opening night gala (Saturday), minimum $5 donation for “pay what you will” performance (July 17), $30 general admission. 7:30 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 1:30

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com STAGE p.m. Sunday through July 23. WAITING AROUND: THE RESTAURANT MUSICAL. AllWays

Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www.theallwayslounge.com — Ricky Graham’s musical comedy that once had an off-Broadway run centers around the food business, from the servers’ point of view. Tickets $20 Friday-Sunday, $15 Monday. Tickets available at www.waitingaroundthemusical.com or at the theater’s box office before the performance. 8 p.m. Friday-Monday through July 25.

BURLE SQUE & CABARET BURLESQUE BALLROOM. Irvin

Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse, 300 Bourbon St., 553-2270; www. sonesta.com — Trixie Minx stars in the weekly burlesque show featuring the music of Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown. Call 553-2331 for details. 11:50 p.m. Friday.

BUSTOUT BURLESQUE. House of Blues, 225 Decatur St., 3104999; www.hob.com — The burlesque troupe performs. Tickets $22 (plus fees). 8 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. Saturday. CURTAIN CALL AT LE CHAT NOIR: A MARQUEE OF MEMORIES. Le

Chat Noir, 715 St. Charles Ave., 581-5812; www.cabaretlechatnoir.com — Cabaret artists who have done shows at Le Chat Noir in the past including Andrea Marcovicci, Anna Bergman, Jason Graae and Todd Murray perform. Tickets $45 (includes $5 drink credit). 8 p.m. Thursday.

TODD MURRAY. Le Chat Noir,

AUDITIONS CRESCENT CITY SOUND CHORUS. Delgado Community

College, City Park campus, Orleans Avenue, between City Park Avenue and Navarre Street; www.dcc.edu — The women’s chorus holds weekly auditions for new members. Call 453-0858 or visit www. crescentcitysound.com for details. 7 p.m. Monday.

FOOTLIGHT FRENZY. Playmak-

ers Theater, 19106 Playmakers Road (off Lee Road), Covington, (985) 893-1671; www.playmakersinc.com — The theater seeks actors for the September production of the play. 7 p.m. Monday and July 12.

CALL FOR

APPLICATIONS BROADWAY THEATRE CONNECTION. BTC offers 12 scholar-

COMEDY A.S.S.TRONOTS. La Nuit Comedy

Theater, 5039 Freret St., 6444300; www.nolacomedy.com — Four “androids” improvise a space voyage based on audience suggestions. Tickets $6. 8:30 p.m. Thursday.

BASED ON REAL LIFE. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — The weekly long-form improv comedy show features some guys, a girl and someone named John Stewart. Tickets $6. 8:30 p.m. Saturday. BROWN HQ. Pip’s Bar, 5252 Vet-

erans Blvd., 456-9234 — Audience members can participate in the show performed by select cast members of the improv comedy troupe. Visit www.brownimprovcomedy. com/BrownHQ for details. Tickets are free for performers, $5 general admission. 8 p.m. Tuesday.

BROWN IMPROV FAN APPRECIATION SHOW. 12 Bar, 608 Fulton

St., 212-6476; www.12barnola. com — The improv comedy troupe performs. The show is free for those who “like” the group on Facebook. Visit www. facebook.com/brownimprov for details. 8:30 p.m. Friday.

COMEDY CATASTROPHE. Lost

Love Lounge, 2529 Dauphine St., 949-2009; www. lostlovelounge.com — The bar hosts a free weekly stand-up comedy show. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

COMEDY GUMBEAUX. Howlin’ Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf. com — Local comedians perform, and amateurs take the stage in the open mic portion. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Thursday. COMEDY OPEN-MIC. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — The theater hosts a weekly open-mic comedy night. (Sign-up time is 10:45 p.m.) Tickets $8. 11 p.m. Friday. COMEDY SPORTZ NOLA. La Nuit

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — The theater hosts a safe-for-all-ages team comedy competition. Tickets $10. 7 p.m. Friday-Saturday.

FEAR & LOATHING IN NEW ORLEANS. La Nuit Comedy Theater,

5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The sketch comedy show boasts vampires, zombies, relationship advice and other horrors. 8:30 p.m. Friday.

FRIDAY NIGHT LAUGHS. La Nuit

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St.,

644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — Jackie Jenkins Jr. hosts the open-mic comedy show. Free admission. 11 p.m. Friday.

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Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — Actors improvise a comedy based on audience suggestions. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Friday.

GROUND ZERO COMEDY.

The Maison, 508 Frenchmen St., 371-5543; www.maisonfrenchmen.com — The show features local stand-up comedians. Sign-up is 7:30 p.m.; show is 8 p.m. Friday. IVAN’S OPEN MIC NIGHT. Rusty Nail, 1100 Constance St., 5255515; www.therustynail.org — The Rusty Nail hosts a weekly open-mic comedy and music night. 9 p.m. Tuesday. LA NUIT STAND-UP OPEN MIC.

La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts an open mic following the God’s Been Drinking show. 11 p.m. Friday.

LAUGH OUT LOUD. Bootleggers Bar and Grille, 209 Decatur St., 525-1087 — Simple Play presents a weekly comedy show. 10 p.m. Thursday. NATIONAL COMEDY COMPANY.

Yo Mama’s Bar & Grill, 727 St. Peter St., 522-1125 — The interactive improv comedy show features B97 radio personality Stevie G, Lynae LeBlanc, Jay Tombstone, Richard Mayer and others. Call 523-7469 or visit www.nationalcomedycompany.com for tickets. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Saturday. PERMANENT DAMAGE STANDUP COMEDY. Bullets Sports Bar,

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Blvd., Marrero, 341-0103 — The show features professional, amateur and first-time comics. Free admission. Sign-up is 8 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Thursday. STUPID TIME MACHINE.

Howlin’ Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www. thehowlinwolf.com — The improv comedy troupe performs. Admission $5. 8:30 p.m. Tuesday.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 05 > 2011

715 St. Charles Ave., 581-5812; www.cabaretlechatnoir. com — The Mystic Krewe of Satyricon presents the cabaret singer’s performance as a benefit for the organization. Call 525-4498 for reservations. Tickets $30. 6 p.m. Sunday.

ships for their four-day musical theater workshop for students ages 10 to 20 years old to be held August 1-4 at NOCCA. Ten of the scholarships will be need-based, and two will be talent-based. Application deadline is Monday. Email info@ broadwaytheatreconnection. com for details.

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EVENTS

LISTINGS

EAGLE WATCH . Fontainebleau

PAGE 58

for details. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

preview

DRINKING LIBERALLY NEW ORLEANS. Pravda, 1113 Decatur

Zimet Benefit

St., 581-1112; www.pravdaofnola.com — Progressives meet to share ideas and drink. 7 p.m.

PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

When news broke in May that Nathanial Zimet (pictured), the chef/ owner of Boucherie, was shot during a robbery, his friends and admirers in the restaurant business wasted no time organizing benefits to help his recovery. The biggest to date is Sunday’s Beasts & Brass (“beast” is an affectionate reference to Zimet’s work ethic) at the Howlin’ Wolf. It begins with a patron party from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. with brass bands, an open bar and food from a host of new-guard New Orleans restaurants, including La Petite Grocery, The Three Muses, Iris, Patois, Crescent Pie & Sausage Co., Martinique Bistro, Rambla, Lilette, St. James Cheese Co., Cure, Dante’s Kitchen, La Boca and Sucre, plus Boucherie itself and local caterer Joel’s Grand Cuisine. A general admission party with a cash bar and more bands begins at 9 p.m., when Zimet’s food truck, Que Crawl, will serve barbecue outside. Tickets $20, patron party $85 in advance, $100 at the door. — Ian McNulty

FRESH MARKET. Circle Food

Store, 1522 St. Bernard Ave. — The Downtown Neighborhood Market Consortium market features fresh produce, dairy, seafood, baked goods and more. EBT and WIC accepted. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

JOHN ALEXANDER . Ogden

Museum of Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www. ogdenmuseum.org — Artist John Alexander gives a tour of his portion of the museum’s One World, Two Artists: John Alexander and Walter Anderson exhibition and signs copies of the book that accompanies the exhibition. Free for museum members, $10 nonmembers. 5:30 p.m.

SISTAHS MAKING A CHANGE . Ashe Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — The group offers lessons in African dance and more, along with nutrition, health and wellness seminars. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday and Monday. WORLD WAR II DISCUSSION GROUP. East Bank Regional

Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 838-1190 — John Guignard, a British expatriate living in New Orleans, discusses his experiences as a child living through the Battle of Britain. 7 p.m.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 05 > 2011

Friday 8

60

ADULT CHILDREN OF ALCOHOLIC/DYSFUNCTIONAL FAMILIES. Fair Grinds

Coffeehouse, 3133 Ponce de Leon Ave., 913-9073; www. fairgrinds.com — The weekly support group meets at 6:15 p.m. Fridays. Visit www.adultchildren.org for details.

DAVID BINKLEY. New Orleans

JUL

10

BEASTS & BRASS 5 p.m.-until, Sunday The Howlin’ Wolf, 907 S. Peters St., 529-5844; www.benefit4nathanial.eventbrite.com

Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma.org — Binkley discusses “Kuba Art and Loyola University’s Frère JosephAurélien Cornet Archives.” The lecture is in conjunction with the museum’s Ancestors of Congo Square: African Art in the New Orleans Museum of Art exhibition. 6 p.m. MARKETPLACE AT ARMSTRONG PARK . Armstrong Park, North

Rampart and St. Ann streets —

The weekly market features fresh produce, baked goods, Louisiana seafood, natural products, art, crafts and entertainment. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays.

to 8 p.m. Fridays.

WHERE Y’ART. New Orleans

Beverage Museum, Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood.org — The food historian discusses Bastille Day and demonstrates how to make authentic savory and sweet crepes. Free with museum admission. 2 p.m.

Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 6584100; www.noma.org — The museum’s weekly event features music, performances, film screenings, family-friendly activities and more. 5:30 p.m.

Saturday 9 BASTILLE DAY WITH NORA WETZEL . Southern Food &

BROAD STREET BAZAAR . 300 N. Broad St., corner of Bienville Street — The monthly market features health screenings, jewelry, food vendors and more. Call 561-7495 or visit www. broadcommunityconnections. org for details. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Magazine Street

Market, Magazine and Girod streets, 861-5898; www.marketumbrella.org — The weekly market features fresh produce, flowers and food. 8 a.m. to noon.

State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — A park ranger leads a viewing of the park’s eagle nest. 3 p.m.

ERACE NEW ORLEANS MEETING .

Christ Church Cathedral, 2919 St. Charles Ave., 895-6602 — ERACE meets in the church’s Westfeldt Room for its weekly discussion group. Call 866-1163 for details. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

GERMAN COAST FARMERS MARKET. Ormond Plantation,

13786 River Road, Destrehan — The market features a wide range of fresh vegetables, fruits, flowers and other items. Visit www.germancoastfarmersmarket.org for details. 8 a.m. to noon. GRETNA FARMERS MARKET.

Gretna Farmers Market, Huey P. Long Avenue, between Third and Fourth streets, Gretna, 362-8661 — The weekly rainor-shine market features more than 30 vendors offering a wide range of fruits, vegetables, meats and flowers. Free admission. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

GUIDED CANOE TOUR . Bayou

Segnette State Park, 7777 Westbank Expwy., Westwego — The park staff leads a guided canoe trip around the park’s waterways to learn about its history and ecology. 10 a.m. Sat., July 9 and Sat., July 23.

NATURE: A CLOSER LOOK .

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers lead a weekly nature hike. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

OUTDOOR COOKING . Bogue Chitto Park, 17049 State Park Blvd., Franklinton, (888) 6777312 — The Interpretive Ranger leads the session about outdoor cooking and the use of a Dutch oven over an open fire. 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. SANKOFA FARMERS MARKET. Sankofa Farmers Market, 5500 St. Claude Ave., 975-5168; www. sankofafarmersmarket.org — The weekly market offers fresh PAGE 62

TRAFFIC TICKETS • EXPUNGEMENTS

ALCOHOL-RELATED OFFENSES

ANN R. BAEHR

EVENTS

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PAGE 60

produce and seafood from local farmers and fishermen. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays.

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Barn, 409 Aycock St., Arabi — The weekly market features produce, seafood, baked goods, arts and crafts and live entertainment. Call 278-4242 for details. 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.

WRITING WORKSHOP. United

Teachers of New Orleans, 4718 Paris Ave., 304-2160; www. utno.org — Students at the Center, Andover Bread Loaf Writing Workshop and United Teachers of New Orleans offer a free monthly writing workshop for New Orleans public school teachers. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Sunday 10 DIMENSIONS OF LIFE DIALOGUE . New Orleans

Lyceum, 618 City Park Ave., 460-9049; www.lyceumproject.com — The nonreligious, holistic discussion group focuses on human behavior with the goal of finding fulfillment and enlightenment. Call 368-9770 for details. Free. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. NEEDLE JUNKIES. 3 Ring Circus’

The Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com — The knitting group meets every Sunday. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

PRIMITIVE WOODWORKING . Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers host a weekly demonstration of woodworking techniques. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Antiques & Interiors

wholesale to the public. Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 05 > 2011

over 12,000 square feet of european antiques.

62

SUNDAY SWING WITH SWINGAROUX . National

World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — Professional swing dancers provide coaching for dancers of all levels while local musicians play World War II era hits. Call 528-1944 ext. 359 for details. 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. dance lessons, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. live music. Free admission.

& decorators alike 300 Jefferson Hwy.(A cr oss fr om Lowe’s) New Orleans 504.231.3397 www.dopantiques.com

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Monday 11 TOASTMASTERS MEETING . Milton H. Latter Memorial Library, 5120 St. Charles Ave. — New Orleans Toastmasters Club hosts an open weekly meeting (except holidays) to hone the skills of speaking, listening and thinking. Call 251-8600 or visit www. notoast234.freetoasthost.org for details. 6 p.m. UNITED NONPROFITS OF GREATER NEW ORLEANS.

Goodwill Training Center, 3400 Tulane Ave. — Nonprofit Central hosts a weekly meeting for all leaders of nonprofit groups. Email

susan_unp@yahoo.com for details. 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.

SPORTS NEW ORLEANS ZEPHYRS. Zephyr Field, 6000 Airline Drive, Metairie, 734-5155; www.zephyrsbaseball.com — The Zephyrs play the Omaha Storm Chasers 7 p.m. Tuesday and 11:30 a.m. Wednesday. They play the Iowa Cubs 7 p.m. Thursday-Friday, 6 p.m. Saturday and 1 p.m. Sunday. NEW ORLEANS JESTERS. Pan American Stadium, City Park, 1 Zachary Taylor Drive — The Jesters play the Baton Rouge Capitals. Visit www.nolajesters.com for details. 7 p.m. Wednesday.

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS PROJECT HOMECOMING . The

faith-based nonprofit seeks homes to rebuild that suffered damage of 50 percent or more from Hurricane Katrina. Call 942-0444, ext. 244 for details.

CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY.

American Cancer Society, 2605 River Road, Westwego, 833-4024 or (800) ACS-2345; www.cancer.org — The American Cancer Society needs volunteers for upcoming events and to facilitate patient service programs. Opportunities are available with Relay for Life, Look Good … Feel Better, Hope Lodge, Man to Man, Road to Recovery, Hope Gala and more. Call for information. ANOTHER LIFE FOUNDATION VOLUNTEERS. Another Life

Foundation seeks volunteers recovering from mental illness to help mentor others battling depression and suicidal behaviors. Free training provided. For details, contact Stephanie Green at (888) 5433480, anotherlifefoundation@ hotmail.com or visit www. anotherlifefoundation.org. BAYOU REBIRTH WETLANDS EDUCATION . Bayou Rebirth

seeks volunteers for wetlands planting projects, nursery maintenance and other duties. Visit www.bayourebirth.org for details.

BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS VOLUNTEERS. Big Brothers Big

Sisters of Southeast Louisiana, 2626 Canal St., Suite 203, 3097304 or (877) 500-7304; www. bbbssela.org — Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southeast Louisiana needs volunteers to serve as mentors. A volunteer meets two to three times a month with his or her Little Brother or Sister. You can play games, watch movies, bake cookies, play sports or plan any other out-

ings you both would enjoy. Call for information. CASA NEW ORLEANS. The organization seeks volunteer Court Appointed Special Advocates to represent abused and neglected children in New Orleans. Thorough training and support is provided. Call Mike Madej at 522-1962 ext. 213 or email mmadej@casaneworleans.org for details. CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. CCFM and marke-

tumbrella.org seek volunteers to field shopper questions, assist seniors, help with monthly children’s activities and more. Call 495-1459 or email latifia@marketumbrella. org for details.

EDGAR DEGAS FOUNDATION . The nonprofit seeks volunteers to contribute to the development of the foundation. Call 821-5009 or email info@degashouse.com for details. GREATER NEW ORLEANS FAIR HOUSING ACTION CENTER .

The center seeks part-time civil rights investigators with excellent writing skills, reliable transportation and no criminal convictions to help expose housing discrimination in the New Orleans metro area. Call 717-4257 or email mmorgan@ gnofairhousing.org for information. HANDSON NEW ORLEANS.

The volunteer center for the Greater New Orleans area invites prospective volunteers to learn about the various opportunities available, how to sign up to attend service projects and general tips on how to be a good volunteer. Call 483-7041 ext. 107, email nkennebrew@ handsonneworleans.com or visit www.handsonneworleans.org for details. HOSPICE VOLUNTEERS.

Harmony Hospice, 519 Metairie Road, Metairie, 832-8111 — Harmony Hospice seeks volunteers to offer companionship to patients through reading, playing cards and other activities. Call Jo-Ann Moore at 832-8111 for details. JACKSON BARRACKS MUSEUM VOLUNTEERS. The museum

seeks volunteers to work one day a week for the Louisiana National Guard Museum. Volunteers prepare military aircraft, vehicles and equipment for display. Call David at 837-0175 or email daveharrell@yahoo.com for details. JEFFERSON COMMUNITY SCHOOL . The charter school

that educates at-risk middle school students who have been expelled from Jefferson Parish’s public schools seeks adult mentors for its students. Call 836-0808 for details.

LOUISIANA SPCA VOLUNTEERS.

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SPCA Campus, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd., Algiers, 368-5191; www.la-spca.org — The Louisiana SPCA seeks volunteers to work with the animals and help with special events, education and more. Volunteers must be at least 12 years old and complete a volunteer orientation to work directly with animals. Call or email Dionne Simoneaux at dionne@la-spca.org. LOWERNINE.ORG VOLUNTEERS.

Lowernine.org seeks volunteers to help renovate homes in the Lower 9th Ward. Visit www. lowernine.org or email lauren@ lowernine.org for details. MEAL DELIVERY VOLUNTEERS. Jefferson Council on Aging seeks volunteers to deliver meals to homebound adults. Gas/mileage expenses will be reimbursed. Call Gail at 8885880 for details. MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY ASSOCIATION . The MDA seeks

volunteers ages 16 and older for its weeklong summer camps around the country. Call (800) 572-1717 or visit www.mda.org/summercamp for details.

NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM . National World War

II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — The museum accepts applications for volunteers to meet and greet visitors from around the world and familiarize them with its galleries, artifacts and expansion. Call 527-6012 ext. 243 or email katherine. alpert@nationalww2museum.org for details.

OPERATION REACH VOLUNTEERS. Operation

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REACH and Gulfsouth Youth Action Corps seek college student volunteers from all over the country to assist in providing recreation and education opportunities for New Orleans-area inner-city youth and their families. For information, visit www.thegyac.org and www.operationreach.org. PUBLIC SCHOOL VOLUNTEERS.

New Orleans Outreach seeks volunteers to share their enthusiasm and expertise as part of the ARMS-Outreach after-school program. Volunteers are needed in the arts, academics, technology, recreation and life skills. Email jenny@nooutreach.org or call 654-1060 for information.

SENIOR COMPANION VOLUNTEERS. New Orleans

Council on Aging, Annex Conference Room, 2475 Canal St., 821-4121; www.nocoa.org — The council seeks volunteers to assist with personal and other daily tasks to help seniors live independently. Call for details.

START THE ADVENTURE IN READING. The STAIR program

holds regular volunteer training sessions to work one-on-one with public school students on reading and language skills. Call 899-0820, email elizabeth@ scapc.org or visit www.stairnola.org for details. TEEN SUICIDE PREVENTION .

The Teen Suicide Prevention Program seeks volunteers to help teach middle- and upperschool New Orleans students. Call 831-8475 for details.

TOURO VOLUNTEER SERVICES. Touro Volunteer Services, 1401 Foucher St., 897-8107; www. touro.com/content/careercamp — The infirmary seeks adult volunteers to assist with the Family Surgery Lounge, patient information desk, book and goody cart, hospital tours and health screenings. Call volunteer services at 8978107 for information.

WORDS BARNES & NOBLE JR . Barnes

& Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 455-5135 — The bookstore regularly hosts free reading events for kids. Call for schedule information. COOKBOOKS & COCKTAILS SERIES. Kitchen Witch

Cookbooks Shop, 631 Toulouse St., 528-8382 — The group meets weekly to discuss classic New Orleans cookbooks. 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Friday.

DINKY TAO POETRY. Molly’s at

the Market, 1107 Decatur St., 525-5169; www.mollysatthemarket.net — The bar hosts a free weekly poetry reading with open mic. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

FAIR GRINDS POETRY EVENT.

Fair Grinds Coffeehouse, 3133 Ponce de Leon Ave., 913-9073; www.fairgrinds.com — Jenna Mae hosts poets and spokenword readers on the second, fourth and fifth Sunday of each month. 8 p.m.

FIRST TUESDAY BOOK CLUB.

Maple Street Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www. maplestreetbookshop.com — The group discusses Wendy Burden’s Dead End Gene Pool. 6 p.m. Tuesday.

FRIENDS OF THE NEW ORLEANS PUBLIC LIBRARY BOOK SALE .

Latter Library Carriage House, 5120 St. Charles Ave., 596-2625; www.nutrias.org — The group hosts twice-weekly sales of books, DVDs, books on tape, LPs and more. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

JENNIFER SHAW. Octavia Books,

513 Octavia St., 899-7323 — The author signs Hurricane Story. 6 p.m. Thursday.

LOCAL WRITERS’ GROUP.

Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 455-5135 — The weekly group discusses and critiques fellow members’ writing. All genres welcome. 7:30 p.m. Monday.

MAPLE LEAF READING SERIES. Maple Leaf Bar, 8316 Oak St., 866-9359; www.mapleleafbar.com — The weekly reading series presents featured writers followed by an open mic. Free admission. 3 p.m. Sunday. NEW AUTHORS EVENT. East

Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 8381190 — Kenyan Smith, author of Growing Pains: Kendra’s Diaries; Randy Elstrott, author of Watchmaker Society; and Maxine Marks Goodman, author The Good Son sign and read from their books. 7 p.m. Tuesday.

NOMA BOOK CLUB. New

Orleans Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma. org — The group discusses V. S. Naipaul’s The Masque of Africa: Glimpses of African Belief with African art curator Bill Fagaly. Noon Thursday.

PASS IT ON . George & Leah McKenna Museum of African American Art, 2003 Carondelet St., 586-7432; www.themckennamuseum.com — Poet Gian “G-Persepect” Smith and Alphonse “Bobby” Smith host a weekly spoken-word and music event. Admission $6. 9 p.m. Saturday. POETRY MEETING . New Orleans Poetry Forum, 257 Bonnabel Blvd., Metairie, 835-8472 — The forum holds workshops every Wednesday. 8 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. RICHARD D. WHITE JR. Maple

Street Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www. maplestreetbookshop.com — The author signs and discusses Will Rogers: A Political Life. 1 p.m. Saturday.

SCIENCE FICITION BOOK CLUB. Octavia Books, 513

Octavia St., 899-7323 — The group discusses Catherynne Valente’s Palimpsest. 10:30 a.m. Saturday. SPOKEN WORD. Ebony Square, 4215 Magazine St. — The center hosts a weekly spokenword, music and open-mic event. Tickets $7 general admission, $5 students. 11 p.m. Friday. TAO POETRY. Neutral Ground Coffeehouse, 5110 Danneel St., 891-3381; www.neutralground.org — The coffeehouse hosts a weekly poetry reading. 9 p.m. Wednesday. UNIVERSES. Craige Cultural Center, 1800 Newton St., Algiers — The center hosts a weekly spoken-word, music and open-mic event. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Sunday. WOMEN’S POETRY CIRCLE . St. Anna’s Episcopal Church, 1313 Esplanade Ave., 947-2121; www.stannanola.org — The group meets at 2 p.m. Mondays. Call 289-9142 or email poetryprocess@gmail. com for details.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Email Ian McNulty at imcnulty@cox.net. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <VIN HOOREBEEK > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >Patrick Van Hoorebeek, founder of the wine-themed marching group the Krewe of Cork (www.kreweofcork.com) and a < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <PUTTING < < < < < < <EVERYTHING < < < < < < < < < <ON < < <THE < < < TABLE < < < < < < < < < < < < < <maitre d’ at a succession of local restaurants, opened a new wine bar in the French Quarter. Patrick’s Bar Vin (730 Bienville St., 581-7300; www.patricksbarvin.com) is inside the St. Louis Hotel and opens onto a lush courtyard. The bar offers an extensive wine list and many Belgian beers. A menu of small plates is coming soon.

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B

PRESSING MATTERS

Those who remember the long-gone Mid-City Cuban restaurant Garce’s may recall how its array of pressed sandwiches went beyond the traditional Cuban. There’s a similar menu and a similar feel at the new Mid-City Cuban lunch place Restaurant Mambi (320 S. Broad St., 827-5838). In addition to the Cuban sandwich, Mambi serves its “Uruguayan sandwich” with steak and ham and also makes pressed chicken sandwiches. The rest of the menu lists traditional dishes like yellow rice with chicken, fried pork with congri and steak with plantains.

five 5 IN

Five Places for Blackened Flavor

Monique Hodges started a business for her home-baked cupcakes. PHOTO BY IAN MCNULTY

Cooking Up Companies A BUSINESS INCUBATOR TAKES COOKS FROM HOMEMADE TO RETAIL. BY IAN MCNULTY

D

416 Chartres St., 596-2530 www.chefpaul.com

The kitchen that launched the redfish craze now makes great blackened drum.

HARBOR SEAFOOD & OYSTER BAR

3203 Williams Blvd., Kenner, 443-6454 Skip the batter and get gator or calamari blackened.

BOUCHERIE

8115 Jeannette St., 862-5514 www.boucherie-nola.com

The blackened shrimp on grit cakes is an indispensible appetizer.

BRIGTSEN’S RESTAURANT 723 Dante St., 861-7610 www.brigtsens.com

The blackened tuna with smoked corn sauce is a modern classic.

TWO TONY’S RESTAURANT

8536 Pontchartrain Blvd., 282-0801 www.two-tonys.com

There’s a new location, but it serves the same platter of blackened seafood.

Questions? Email winediva1@earthlink.net.

2009 Dona Paula Los Cardos Malbec MENDOZA, ARGENTINA / $10 RETAIL

Los Cardos, Dona Paula’s second label, presents an outstanding value in the burgeoning Malbec category. This elegant yet approachable wine reflects the varietal’s slow maturation and distinctive regional character. Complex aromas of raspberry, blackberry, cassis and hints of black pepper are followed on the palate by vibrant flavors of ripe plum, cherry and chocolate with a balanced acidity on the finish. Open an hour before serving. Enjoy it with tapas, grilled meats and vegetables, roast chicken, burgers, firm cheeses and hummus. Buy it at: Dorignac’s. Drink it at: Antoine’s and Impastato’s Restaurant. — Brenda Maitland

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 05 > 2011

inner guests at Stacey Greco’s home in Hahnville were forever saying her remoulade sauce was so good she should sell it. Don Militello heard much the same thing from fellow tailgaters outside Tiger Stadium in Baton Rouge whenever he broke out his olive salad-style “olive mix.” So did Gentilly resident Monique Hodges when she started bringing her cupcakes to family parties. “So good you should sell it” turns out to be fairly common praise for homemade treats, but in each of the cases mentioned here the cooks took the encouragement to heart and brought their recipes to market. Each also made the leap from home cook to food entrepreneur with the help of a unique food business incubator called Edible Enterprises (917 Third St., Norco, 985-764-1504; www.edibleenterprises.org). A nonprofit started in 2009 by Goodwill Industries and supported by other local groups, Edible Enterprises is located in a nondescript metal building in Norco, a town 10 miles upriver from Kenner, perhaps best known for its refinery. Here, more than a dozen small start-up food companies prepare their products in a licensed, regulator-approved facility where they rent a professionally equipped kitchen and storage space. Some of these tenants function as caterers, like Hodges’ dessert company Cake N’ Cups (232-6592; www.cakencups.webstarts.com). Many other foods produced here, like the Creole remoulade from Greco’s company, Omi’s Gourmet Foods (985-783-6921; www.omisgourmetfoods.com), and the olive mix from Militello Gourmet Specialties (225-413-3146; www.-

militellogourmetspecialties.com), are now found on supermarket shelves around the region. The 12,000-square-foot facility has three commercial kitchens, and tenants share specialized equipment that might be too expensive for them to buy on their own. These budding entrepreneurs also can count on help from Edible Enterprises staffers, who might give marketing advice for building a brand or provide technical assistance to turn household recipes into commercial formulas. “A lot of them try out their recipes at farmers markets, and when they come here we give them the tools to reach new customers,” says chef Gaye Sandoz, tenant services director at Edible Enterprises. “They might come in with one recipe, say, and from there we help them grow that into a business with other related products.” Case in point is Fromage Circa 1965 (www.fromagecirca1965.com), a company siblings Carmen and Charles Sherrouse named for the year their mother Mattie Sue first made a seasoned cheese ball that became a fixture at family gatherings. Working at Edible Enterprises, the Sherrouses developed a packaged version and currently are refining a creamy cheese dip and a vermouth-based marinade. “This just started out in mom’s kitchen and now it’s an enterprise for us to try to bring to the marketplace,” Charles says. The entrepreneurial impulse also inspired Kyshun Webster, director of the New Orleans youth development nonprofit Operation Reach. In February, he started Cupcakes & Co. (410-5898; www.cupcakesandcompany.net) selling his treats from a food truck and baking them at Edible Enterprises. “It lowered the barrier of entry into the business, and for me it really has been an incubator,” Webster says. “I’ve had the chance to develop the business and prove that there’s a market for it.” That gave him the confidence to invest in a standalone shop for Cupcakes & Co., which he hopes to open on Poydras Street this summer.

K-PAUL’S LOUISIANA KITCHEN

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>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<

YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT >>>>>>>>>

>>>> specialties. The Lomi Lomi com< < < < < < <bines < jumbo shrimp, pineapple > > > > > > > >and > water chestnuts wrapped in bacon, fries them golden brown <<< and serves them on a bed of sau>> téed vegetables. Reservations Lunch and dinner daily. <accepted. < Credit cards. $

FIVE HAPPINESS — 3511 S. Carrollton

< < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <Ave., < 482-3935 — The large menu > > > > > > > > > > > > > Out > > >2 >Eat > >is>an > >index > > >of> Gambit > > > > >contract > > > > >advertisers. > > > > > > >Unless > > > >noted, > > > >addresses > > > > > >are > >for > >New > > >Orleans. > > > > > > > at > >Five Happiness offers a range Dollar signs represent the average cost of a dinner entree: $ — under $10; $$ — $11 to $20; $$$ — $21 or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax 483-3116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

AMERICAN FAT HEN GRILL — 1821 Hickory Ave.,

Harahan, 287-4581; www.fathengrill.com — Fat Hen serves barbecue, burgers and breakfast. Pitcooked barbecue options include St. Louis-style spare ribs. Burgers are made with all Black Angus beef ground in-house daily. There is a full bar. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

O’HENRY’S FOOD & SPIRITS — 634

S. Carrollton Ave., 866-9741; 8859 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Kenner, 461-9840; www.ohenrys.com — Complimentary peanuts are the calling card of these casual, family friendly restaurants. The menu includes burgers, steaks, ribs, pasta, fried seafood, salads and more. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BAR & GRILL DINO’S BAR & GRILL — 1128 Tchoupi-

toulas St., 558-0900 — Dino’s kitchen serves burgers, chicken tenders, salads and wraps. Happy hour is from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards and checks. $

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 05 > 2011

THE RIVERSHACK TAVERN — 3449

66

River Road, 834-4938; www.therivershacktavern.com — This bar and music spot offers a menu of burgers, sandwiches overflowing with deli meats and changing lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SHAMROCK BAR & GRILL — 4133

S. Carrollton Ave., 301-0938 — Shamrock serves burgers, shrimp or roast beef po-boys, Reuben sandwiches, cheese sticks and fries with cheese or gravy. Other options include corned beef and cabbage, and fish and chips. No reservations. Dinner and late night daily. Credit cards. $

WALKER’S BAR-B-QUE — 10828

Hayne Blvd., 281-8227; www.cochondelaitpoboys.com — The makers of the Jazz Fest cochon de lait po-boy serve pork, ribs, chicken and more. The family feast includes a half-slab of ribs, half a chicken, half a pound of brisket, pork and sausage, two side orders, bread and sauce. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Saturday. Cash only. $

ABITA BAR-B-Q — 69399 Hwy.

59, Abita Springs, (985) 892-0205 — Slow-cooked brisket and pork are specialties at this Northshore smokehouse. The half-slab rib plate contains six ribs served with a choice of two sides. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Tue.Sat. Credit cards. $

BOO KOO BBQ — 3701 Banks St., 2024741; www.bookoobbq.com — The Boo Koo burger is a ground brisket patty topped with pepper Jack cheese, boudin and sweet chile aioli. The Cajun banh mi fills a Vietnamese roll with hogshead cheese, smoked pulled pork, boudin, fresh jalapeno, cilantro, cucumber, carrot, pickled radish and sriracha sweet chile aioli. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., latenight Fri.-Sat. Cash only. $

azine St., 373-6579; www.gottgourmetcafe.com — This cafe serves a variety of gourmet salads, sandwiches, wraps, Chicago-style hot dogs, burgers and more. The cochon de lait panini includes slowbraised pork, baked ham, pickles, Swiss, ancho-honey slaw, honey mustard and chili mayo. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

LAKEVIEW BREW COFFEE CAFE —

BREWPUB CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE —

527 Decatur St., 522-0571; www. crescentcitybrewhouse.com — Live jazz and German-style beers complement creative cooking at this brewpub. Pan-seared redfish St. Louis is topped with fried oysters and barbecue sauce. Starters include Brewhouse hot wings, baked oysters and fried calamari with spicy marinara. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BURGERS BEACHCORNER BAR & GRILL — 4905

Canal St., 488-7357; www.beachcornerbarandgrill.com — Top a 10-oz. Beach burger with cheddar, blue, Swiss or pepper Jack cheese, sauteed mushrooms or housemade hickory sauce. Other options include a grilled chicken sandwich. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ BUD’S BROILER — Citywide; www. budsbroiler.com — Bud’s Broiler is known for charcoal-broiled burgers topped with hickory-amoked sauce. The menus also includes hot dogs and chicken sandwiches. The Clearview Parkway and 24-hour City Park location also offer shrimp and catfish po-boys. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $

CAFE BARBECUE

GOTT GOURMET CAFE — 3100 Mag-

CAFE FRERET — 7329 Freret St., 861-

7890; www.cafefreret.com — The cafe serves breakfast itemes like the Freret Egg Sandwich with scrambled eggs, cheese and bacon or sausage served on toasted white or wheat bread or an English muffin.Signature sandwiches include the Chef’s Voodoo Burger, muffuletta and Cuban po-boy. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Fri.-Wed., dinner Mon.-Wed., Fri.Sat. Credit cards. $$

ECO CAFE & BISTRO — 3903 Canal St., 561-6585; www.ecocafeno.com — Eco Cafe serves sandwiches like the veggie club, layered with Swiss cheese, tomatoes, onions, cucumbers, spinach and baby pickles. There are fresh squeezed juices, and Friday and Saturday evenings feature tapas dining. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

5606 Canal Blvd., 483-7001 — This casual cafe offers gourmet coffees and a wide range of pastries and desserts baked in house, plus a menu of specialty sandwiches and salads. Breakfast is available all day on weekends. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PARKVIEW CAFE AT CITY PARK —

City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 483-9474 — Located in the old Casino Building, the cafe serves gourmet coffee, sandwiches, salads and ice cream till early evening. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $ PRAVDA — 1113 Decatur St., 581-1112;

www.pravdaofnola.com — Pravda is known for its Soviet kitsch and selection of absinthes, and the kitchen offers pierogies, beef empanadas, curry shrimp salad and a petit steak served with truffle aioli. No reservations. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ RICCOBONO’S PANOLA STREET CAFE — 7801 Panola St., 314-1810

— Specialties include crabcakes Benedict — two crabcakes and poached eggs topped with hollandaise sauce and potatoes — and the Sausalito omelet with spinach, mushrooms, shallots and mozzarella. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily. Credit cards. $

VINE & DINE — 141 Delaronde St., 361-1402; www.vine-dine.com — The cafe serves cheese boards and charcuterie plates with pate and cured meats. There also is a menu of sandwiches, quesadillas, bruschettas, salads and dips. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CHINESE CHINA ORCHID — 704 S. Carrollton Ave., 865-1428; www.chinaorchidneworleans.com — This longtime Riverbend restaurant offers a wide array of Chinese dishes. Sizzling black pepper beef or chicken is prepared with onions, red and green peppers and brown sauce and served on a hot plate with steamed rice on the side. Other options include fried rice, noodle and egg foo young dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ CHINA ROSE — 3501 N. Arnoult Road., Metairie, 887-3295 — China Rose offers many Chinese seafood

of dishes from wonton soup to sizzling seafood combinations served on a hot plate to sizzling Go-Ba to lo mein dishes. Delivery and banquest facilities available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

JUNG’S GOLDEN DRAGON — 3009

Magazine St., 891-8280; www. jungsgoldendragon2.com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, Thai and Korean cuisine. Chinese specialties include Mandarin, Szechuan and Hunan dishes. Grand Marnier shrimp are lightly battered and served with Grand Marnier sauce, broccoli and pecans. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

TREY YUEN CUISINE OF CHINA — 600 N. Causeway Approach.,

Mandeville, (985) 626-4476; 2100 N. Morrison Blvd., Hammond, (985) 345-6789; www.tryyuen.com — House specialties include fried soft-shell crab topped with Tong Cho sauce, and Cantonese-style stir-fried alligator and mushrooms in oyster sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

COFFEE/ DESSERT ANTOINE’S ANNEX — 513 Royal St., 581-4422; www.antoines.com — The Annex is a coffee shop serving pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. The Royal Street salad features baby spinach and mixed lettuces with carrots, red onion, red peppers, grapes, olives, walnuts and raspberry vinaigrette. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

KUPCAKE FACTORY — 800 Metairie Road, Metairie, 267-4990; 819 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 464-8884; 6233 S. Claiborne Ave., 267-3328; www.thekupcakefactory.com — Choose from a large selection of gourmet cupcakes. The Fat Elvis is made with banana cake and topped with peanut butter frosting. The Strawberry Fields tops strawberry cake with strawberry buttercream frosting. Other options include white chocolate raspberry and a banana cupcake. No reservations. Hours vary by location. Credit cards. $ MAURICE FRENCH PASTRIES — 3501

Hessmer Ave., Metairie, 885-1526; 4949 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 455-0830; www.mauricefrenchpastries.com — Maurice French Pastries offers an array of continental and French baked goods as well as specialty cakes, cheesecakes and pies. No reservations. Hessmer Avenue: breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. West Napoleon: breakfast and lunch Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PINKBERRY — 300 Canal St.; 5601

Magazine St., 899-4260; www. pinkberry.com — Pinkberry offers frozen yogurt with an array of wet and dry topping choices including caramel, honey, fruit purees, various chocolates and nuts and more. There also are fresh fruit parfaits and green tea smoothies.

No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CONTEMPORARY 5 Fifty 5 — 555 Canal St., 553-5638;

www.555canal.com — New Orleans dishes and Americana favorites take an elegant turn in dishes such as the lobster mac and cheese, combining lobster meat, elbow macaroni and mascarpone, boursin and white cheddar cheeses. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

BAYONA — 430 Dauphine St., 525-

4455; www.bayona.com — House favorites on Chef Susan Spicer’s menu include sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce and the appetizer of grilled shrimp with black-bean cake and coriander sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$$ FEAST NEW ORLEANS — 200 Julia

St., 304-6318; www.feastneworleans.com — Feast serves rustic European dishes in a casual setting. Cock-a-Leekie is a dish of braised chicken with cream, bacon, plums, leeks and red potatoes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ THE GREEN GODDESS — 307 Ex-

change Alley, 301-3347; www.greengoddessnola.com — Chef Chris DeBarr’s contemporary cooking combines classic techniques, exotic ingredients and culinary wit. At lunch, Big Cactus Chilaquiles feature poached eggs on homemade tortillas with salsa verde, queso fresca and nopalitos. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Thu.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

OAK — 8118 Oak St., 302-1485; www. oaknola.com — This wine bar offers small plates and live musical entertainment. Gulf shrimp fill tacos assembled in house-made corn tortillas with pickled vegetables, avocado and lime crema. The hanger steak bruschetta is topped with Point Reyes blue cheese and smoked red onion marmalade. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

ONE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE — 8132 Hampson St., 301-9061; www. one-sl.com — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes like char-grilled oysters topped with Roquefort cheese and a red wine vinaigrette, seared scallops with roasted garlic and shiitake polenta cakes and a memorable cochon de lait. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CREOLE ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713 St.

Louis St., 581-4422; www.antoines. com — The city’s oldest restaurant offers a glimpse of what 19th century French Creole dining might have been like, with a labyrinthine series of dining rooms. Signature dishes include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ GUMBO SHOP — 640 St. Peter St., 525-1486; www.gumboshop.com — Gumbo and New Orleans classics such as crawfish etouffee dominate the menu. Their spicy flavors meld into a dish that represents the city’s best and redefines comfort food. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

LE CITRON BISTRO — 1539 Religious

St., 566-9051; www.le-citronbistro. com — Located in a historic building, the quaint bistro serves starters like chicken and andouille gumbo and fried frogs legs. Entrees include choices like fried chicken, Gulf fish and burgers. Reservations accepted. Dinner Wed.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000 N.

Peters St., 524-4747 — This casual restaurant serves Creole favorites. The menu includes crawfish etouffee, boiled crawfish, red beans and rice and bread pudding for dessert. Outdoor seating is adjacent to Dutch Alley and the French Market. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

CUBAN/ CARIBBEAN MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — 437

Esplanade Ave., 252-4800; www. mojitosnola.com — Mojitos serves a mix of Caribbean, Cuban and Creole dishes. Caribbean mac and cheese pie is made with chunks of lobster, tomatoes, scallions, garlic and creamy cheese sauce and is served over a bed of spicy corn maque choux. Reservations accepted. Lunch, dinner and latenight Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

DELI CG’S CAFE AT THE RUSTY NAIL —

1100 Constance St., 722-3168; www. therustynail.biz — Inside the Rusty Nail, CG’s offers a menu of sandwiches. The Piggly Wiggly features pulled pork on a sesame seed bun with coleslaw and pickle chips on the side. The Wild Turkey is layered with Granny Smith apple slices, provolone, bacon and garlic mayo. No reservations. Dinner and latenight Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $ KOSHER CAJUN NEW YORK DELI & GROCERY — 3519 Severn Ave., Me-

tairie, 888-2010; www.koshercajun. com — This New York-style deli specializes in sandwiches, including corned beef and pastrami that come straight from the Bronx. No reservations. Lunch Sun.-Thu., dinner Mon.-Thu. Credit cards. $

MARTIN WINE CELLAR — 714 Elmeer Ave., Metairie , 896-7350; www. martinwine.com — Sandwiches piled high with cold cuts, salads, hot sandwiches, soups and lunch specials are available at the deli counter. The Cedric features chicken breast, spinach, Swiss, tomatoes and red onions on seven-grain bread. No reservations. Lunch daily. Credit cards. $

DINER DAISY DUKES — 121 Chartres St., 561-

5171; www.daisydukesrestaurant. com — Daisy Dukes is known for its seafood omelet and serves a wide variety of Cajun spiced Louisiana favorites, burgers, po-boys and seafood, including boiled crawfish and oysters on the halfshell. Breakfast is served all day. No reservations. Open 24 hours daily. Credit cards. $$

FRENCH FLAMING TORCH — 737 Octavia St.,

895-0900; www.flamingtorchnola. com — Chef Nathan Gile’s menu includes pan-seared Maine diver scallops with chimichurri sauce PAGE 68

OUT2EAT page 66 and smoked bacon and corn hash. Coffee- and coriander-spiced rack of lamb is oven roasted and served with buerre rouge and chevre mashed potatoes. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

5908 Magazine St., 891-8495; www.martiniquebistro.com — This French bistro has both a cozy dining room and a pretty courtyard. Try dishes such as Steen’s-cured duck breast with satsuma and ginger demi-glace and stone-ground goat cheese grits. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$ MARTINIQUE

BISTRO

GOURMET TO GO BREAUX MART — 315 E. Judge Perez, Chalmette, 262-0750; 605 Lapalco Blvd., Gretna, 433-0333; 2904 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-5565; 9647 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 737-8146; www.breauxmart.com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux” as well as weekday specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

www.tonymandinas.com — Tony Mandina’s serves Italian and Creole cuisine. Dishes include pasta, veal parmigiana, veal Bordelasie and specialties like shrimp Mandina and battered eggplant topped with shrimp and crabmeat in cream sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

VINCENT’S ITALIAN CUISINE — 4411 Chastant St., Metairie, 885-2984; 7839 St. Charles Ave., 866-9313; www.vincentsitaliancuisine.com — Try house specialties like veal- and spinach-stuffed canneloni. Bracialoni is baked veal stuffed with artichoke hearts, bacon, garlic and Parmesan cheese and topped with red sauce. Reservations accepted. Chastant Street: lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. St. Charles Avenue: lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

JAPANESE

JULIE’S LITTLE INDIA KITCHEN AT SCHIRO’S — 2483 Royal St., 944-

KYOTO — 4920 Prytania St., 891-

NIRVANA INDIAN CUISINE — 4308

Magazine St., 894-9797 — Serving mostly northern Indian cuisine, the restaurant’s extensive menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 05 > 2011

TONY MANDINA’S RESTAURANT — 1915 Pratt St., Gretna, 362-2010;

INDIAN 6666; www.schiroscafe.com — The cafe offers homemade Indian dishes prepared with freshly ground herbs and spices. Selections include chicken, lamb or shrimp curry or vindaloo and vegetarian saag paneer. Schiro’s also serves New Orleans cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $

TAJ MAHAL INDIAN CUISINE — 923-

C Metairie Road, Metairie, 836-6859 — The traditional menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways, including curries and tandoori. Vegetarian options are available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

ITALIAN ANDREA’S RESTAURANT — 3100 N. 19th St., Metairie 834-8583; www. andreasrestaurant.com — Chef/ owner Andrea Apuzzo’s specialties include speckled trout royale which is topped with lump crabmeat and lemon-cream sauce. Capelli D’Andrea combines housemade angel hair pasta and smoked salmon in light cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ CAFE GIOVANNI — 117 Decatur St.,

529-2154; www.cafegiovanni.com — Chef Duke LoCicero serves inventive Italian cuisine and Italian accented contemporary Louisiana cooking. Shrimp Dukie features Louisiana shrimp and a duck breast marinated in Cajun spices served with tasso-mushroom sauce. Belli Baci is the restaurant’s cocktail lounge. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ RICCOBONO’S PEPPERMILL RES-

68

TAURANT — 3524 Severn Ave., Metairie, 455-2266 — This Italian-style eatery serves New Orleans favorites like stuffed crabs with jumbo lump crabmeat with spaghetti bordelaise and trout meuniere with brabant potatoes. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

3644 — Kyoto’s sushi chefs prepare rolls, sashimi and salads. “Box” sushi is a favorite, with more than 25 rolls. Reservations recommended for parties of six or more. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

MIKIMOTO — 3301 S. Carrollton Ave., 488-1881; www.mikimotosushi.com — Sushi choices include new and old favorites, both raw and cooked. The South Carrollton roll includes tuna tataki, avocado and snow crab. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Delivery available. Credit cards. $$

MIYAKO JAPANESE SEAFOOD & STEAKHOUSE — 1403 St. Charles Ave.,

410-9997; www.japanesebistro. com — Miyako offers a full range of Japanese cuisine, with specialties from the sushi or hibachi menus, chicken, beef or seafood teriyaki, and tempura. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

ROCK-N-SAKE — 823 Fulton St., 581-

7253; www.rocknsake.com — Rockn-Sake serves traditional Japanese cuisine with some creative twists. There’s a wide selection of sushi, sashimi and rolls or spicy gyoza soup, pan-fried soba noodles with chicken or seafood and teriyaki dishes. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.Sun. Credit cards. $$

WASABI SUSHI — 900 Frenchmen St., 943-9433; 8550 Pontchartrain Blvd., 267-3263; www.wasabinola.com — Wasabi serves a wide array of Japanese dishes. Wasabi honey shrimp are served with cream sauce. The Assassin roll bundles tuna, snow crab and avocado in seaweed and tops it with barbecued eel, tuna, eel sauce and wasabi tobiko. No reservations. Frenchmen Street: Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner daily. Pontchartrain Boulevard: lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

LOUISIANA CONTEMPORARY BOMBAY CLUB — 830 Conti St., 586-

0972;

www.thebombayclub.com

— Mull the menu at this French Quarter hideaway while sipping a well made martini. The duck duet pairs confit leg with pepper-seared breast with black currant reduction. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ BOUCHE — 840 Tchoupitoulas St., 267-7485; www.bouchenola.com — This wine bar and restaurant serves creative dishes like tasso truffle mac and cheese with three cheeses. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

MIA’S — 1622 St. Charles Ave., 3019570 — Veal Oscar features lightly breaded veal topped with lump crabmeat and hollandaise, served with garlic red potatoes and grilled asparagus. Reservations accepted. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $$

MILA — 817 Common St., 412-2580; www.milaneworleans.com — MiLA takes a fresh approach to Southern and New Orleans cooking, focusing on local produce and refined techniques. Try New Orleans barbecue lobster with lemon confit and fresh thyme. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri. dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ RALPH’S ON THE PARK — 900 City

Park Ave., 488-1000; www.ralphsonthepark.com — Popular dishes include baked oysters Ralph, turtle soup and the Niman Ranch New York strip. There also are brunch specials. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

REDEMPTION — 3835 Iberville St.,

309-3570 — Redemption offers contemporary Louisiana cooking. Chambord duckling is served with cherry vinaigrette. Seared foie gras is complemented by vanilla parsnip puree. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ TOMMY’S WINE BAR — 752 Tchoupi-

toulas St., 525-4790 — Tommy’s Wine Bar offers cheese and charcuterie plates as well as a menu of appetizers and salads from the neighboring kitchen of Tommy’s Cuisine. No reservations. Lite dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEDITERRANEAN/ MIDDLE EASTERN ATTIKI BAR & GRILL — 230 Decatur

St., 587-3756; www.attikineworleans.com — Attiki features a range of Mediterranean cuisine including entrees of beef kebabs and chicken shawarma. Reservations recommended. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $$

PYRAMIDS CAFE — 3151 Calhoun St., 861-9602 — Diners will find authentic, healthy and fresh Mediterranean cuisine featuring such favorites as sharwarma prepared on a rotisserie. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEXICAN & SOUTHWESTERN COUNTRY FLAME — 620 Iberville St.,

522-1138 — Country Flame serves a mix of popular Mexican and Cuban dishes. Come in for fajitas, pressed Cuban sandwiches made with hickory-smoked pork and char-broiled steaks or pork chops. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

JUAN’S FLYING BURRITO — 2018

Magazine St., 569-0000; 4724

S.Carrollton Ave. 486-9950; www. juansflyingburrito.com — This wallet-friendly restaurant offers new takes on Mexican-inspired cooking. It’s known for its mealand-a-half-size signature burritos. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ NACHO MAMA’S MEXICAN GRILL —

3242 Magazine St., 899-0031; 1000 S. Clearview Pkwy., Harahan, 7361188; www.nachomamasmexicangrill.com — These taquerias serve Mexican favorites such as portobello mushroom fajitas and chile rellenos. There are happy hour margaritas on weekdays and daily drink specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SANTA FE — 3201 Esplanade Ave., 948-0077 — This casual cafe serves creative takes on Southwestern cuisine. Bolinos de Bacalau are Portuguese-style fish cakes made with dried, salted codfish, mashed potatoes, cilantro, lemon juice, green onions and egg and served with smoked paprika aioli. Outdoor seating is available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ TOMASITO’S MEXICAN CUISINE — 755 Tchoupitoulas St., 527-0942

— Tomasito’s is an upscale cantina with a patio for outdoor dining. The carnitas platter features marinated and slow-cooked pork served with Mexican rice, refried beans and a choice of salsa verde, smoky chipotle or a traditional Mexican sauce. No reservations. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MUSIC AND FOOD GAZEBO CAFE — 1018 Decatur St.,

525-8899; www.gazebocafenola. com — The Gazebo features a mix of Cajun and Creole dishes and ice cream daquiris. The New Orleans sampler rounds up jambalaya, red beans and rice and gumbo. Other options include salads, seafood poboys and burgers. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

HOUSE OF BLUES — 225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www.hob.com/neworleans — Try the pan-seared Voodoo Shrimp with rosemary cornbread. The buffet-style gospel brunch features local and regional groups. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat.,

brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

THE MARKET CAFE — 1000 Decatur

St., 527-5000; www.marketcafenola.com — Dine indoors or out on seafood either fried for platters or po-boys or highlighted in dishes such as crawfish pie, crawfish etouffee or shrimp Creole. Sandwich options include muffulettas, Philly steaks on po-boy bread and gyros in pita bread. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SIBERIA — 2227 St. Claude Ave., 265-

8855 — This music clubs serves dishes like fish and chips, spicy hot wings, tacos and more. There are weekly specials and vegetarian and vegan options. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — 626 Frenchmen St., 949-0696; www. snugjazz.com — Traditional Creole and Cajun fare pepper the menu along with newer creations such as the fish Marigny, topped with Gulf shrimp in a Creole cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

NEIGHBORHOOD BRAXTON’S RESTAURANT — 636

Franklin Ave., Gretna, 301-3166; www.braxtonsnola.com — Braxton’s serves a mix of salads, poboys, deli sandwiches and entrees. Start a meal with oysters Louise, featuring fried oysters on a bed of spinach and cheese. The seafood platter includes fried shrimp, oysters, catfish strips, french fries, potato salad and vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

KATIE’S RESTAURANT — 3701 Iberville St., 488-6582; www.katiesinmidcity.com — Favorites at this Mid-City restaurant include the Cajun Cuban with roasted pork, grilled ham, cheese and pickles pressed on buttered bread. The Boudreaux pizza is topped with cochon de lait, spinach, red onions, roasted garlic, scallions and olive oil. There also are salads, burgers and Italian dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, Dinner Tue.Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ KOZ’S — 515 Harrison Ave., 4840841; 6215 Wilson St., Harahan, 7373933; www.kozcooks.com — Louisiana favorites such as seafood

Diners enjoy Creole favorites at Camellia Cafe (69455 Hwy. 59, Abita Springs, 985-8096313; www.thecamelliacafe.com). PHOTO BY CHeRYL GeRBeR

platters, muffulettas and more than 15 types of po-boys, ranging from hot sausage to cheeseburger, are available at Koz’s. The Will’s Chamber of Horrors sandwich features roast beef, ham, turkey, Swiss and American cheese, Italian dressing and hot mustard. . No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $ OLIVE BRANCH CAFE — 1995 Barataria Blvd., Marrero, 348-2008; 3700 Orleans Ave., 302-1220; 5145 Gen. de Gaulle Drive, 393-1107; www.olivebranchcafe.com — These cafes serve soups, salads, sandwiches, wraps and entrees. Chicken and artichoke pasta is tossed with penne in garlic and olive oil. Shrimp Carnival features smoked sausage, shrimp, onion and peppers in roasted garlic cream sauce over pasta. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$ RAJUN CAJUN CAFE — 5209 W.

Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 883-5513; www.rajuncajuncafe.com — The cafe serves soups, salads, po-boys, muffulettas, seafood plates and a few entree platters. Daily specials include items such as breaded pork chops on Wednesdays and seafood options on Friday. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

PIZZA ITALIAN PIE — Citywide; www.

italianpie.com — Italian Pie offers an array of pizzas, calzones, sandwiches, wraps and salads. The Mediterranean pie is topped with artichoke hearts, kalamata olives, red onion, tomatoes, herbed ricotta, mozzarella and pesto sauce. The spinach and artichoke pie includes mushrooms, onion, feta, mozzarella and garlic sauce. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ page 70

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 05 > 2011

BE ST SCHOOL WEBSITE ST. MARY 'S DOMINICAN

69

Thursdays at Twilight Garden Concert Series

CHOOSE YOUR (DE)VICE

THIS WEEK’S PERFORMANCE MONTY WILLIAMS ON THE HORNETS PAGE 9

New Orleans Banjos +2

KING BRITT-ISH INVASION PAGE 91

BEST

OF NEW ORLEANS

.COM

OUT2EAT page 68 MARKS TWAIN’S PIZZA LANDING — 2035 Metairie Road, Metairie,

832-8032; www.marktwainspizza.com — Disembark at Mark Twain’s for salads, po-boys and a range of pizza pies. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ NONNA MIA CAFE & PIZZERIA

— 3125 Esplanade Ave., 948-1717 — Nonna Mia uses homemade dough for pizza served by the slice or whole pie and offers salads, pasta dishes and panini. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

G A M B I T > V O L U M E 3 2 > N U M B E R 4 > J A N U A R Y 2 5 > 2 011

Old favorites from the 1920’s

JULY 7

REGINELLI’S — 741 State St., 8991414; 817 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 712-6868; 874 Harrison Ave., 488-0133; 3244 Magazine St. 8957272; 5608 Citrus Blvd., Harahan, 818-0111; www.reginellis.com — This New Orleans original offers a range of pizzas, sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

Adults: $8 / Children 5-12: $3 Children 4 & Under = FREE

R&O’S RESTAURANT — 216 Old

Mint Juleps and other refreshments available for purchase For more information call

Hammond Hwy., 831-1248 — R&O’s menu includes a mix of pizza and Creole and Italian seafood dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $

(504) 483-9488

SLICE PIZZERIA — 1513 St. Charles Ave., 525-7437; 5538 Magazine St., 897-4800 — You can buy pizza by the slice and add or subtract toppings as you choose. There are also a full coffee bar and more. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ THEO’S NEIGHBORHOOD PIZZA — 4218 Magazine St., 894-8554;

4024 Canal St., 302-1133; www. theospizza.com — There is a wide variety of specialty pies or build your own from the selection of more than two-dozen toppings. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

“Since 1969”

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 05 > 2011

WIT’S INN — 141 N. Carrollton Ave., 486-1600 — This bar and restaurant features pizzas, calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

70

COUPON

all orchid plants

25

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OFF

EXPIRES 8/5/11

DENTAL CLEANING SPECIAL

CASH & CARRY ONLY NOT VALID W/ ANY OTHER COUPONS. COUPON MUST BE PRESENT AT TIME OF PURCHASE.

SANDWICHES & PO-BOYS DRESS IT — 535 Gravier St., 571-

7561 — Get gourmet burgers and sandwiches dressed to order. For dessert, try a chocolate chip cookie served with ice cream and chocolate sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

MAGAZINE PO-BOY SHOP — 2368 Magazine St., 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of po-boys or go for breakfast burritos or daily lunch specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Cash only. $ MAHONY’S PO-BOY SHOP — 3454

METAIRIE 750 MARTIN BEHRMAN AVE (504) 833-3716

89

$

*

(reg. $132)

COVINGTON 1027 VILLAGE WALK (985) 809-9101 VISIT US ON

WWW.VILLERESFLORIST.COM

includes comprehensive exam (#0150), x-rays (#274), cleaning (#1110) or panorex (#330) *NEW PATIENTS ONLY — EXPIRES 07/17/11

DR. GLENN SCHMIDT DR. STEPHEN DELAHOUSSAYE FAMILY DENTISTRY Call For An Appointment

UPTOWN KENNER

Now available at 2 locations!

8025 Maple St. @ Carrollton · 861-9044 www.uptownsmiles.com 1942 Williams Blvd., Suite 8 · 469-9648 www.kennersmiles.com

Magazine St., 899-3374; www.mahonyspoboys.com — The Peacemaker is filled with fried oysters, bacon and cheddar cheese. There are other po-boys and daily lunch specials as well. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PARKWAY BAKERY AND TAVERN

— 538 N. Hagen Ave., 482-3047 — Parkway serves juicy roast beef po-boys, hot sausage po-boys, fried seafood and more. No reservations. Kitchen open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $

PARRAN’S PO-BOYS — 3939 Vet-

erans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 885-3416; www.parranspoboy. com — Parran’s offers a long list of po-boys plus muffulettas, club sandwiches, pizzas, burgers, salads, fried seafood plates and Creole-Italian entrees. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Thu.-Sat. Credit cards. $

TRACEY’S — 2604 Magazine St.,

899-2054; www.traceysnola.com — The roast beef po-boy dripping with garlicky gravy is the highlight of a menu transplanted from the former Parasol’s to this Uptown bar. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Cash only. $

SEAFOOD GRAND ISLE RESTAURANT — 575 Convention Center Blvd., 5208530; www.grandislerestaurant. com — Grand Isle offers seafood options from raw oysters to lobster St. Malo with combines Maine lobster, shrimp and mussels in seafood broth. Baked Gulf fish are served with compound chili butter, potatoes and a vegetable. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ JACK DEMPSEY’S — 738 Poland Ave., 943-9914 — The Jack Dempsey seafood platter serves a training-table feast of gumbo, shrimp, oysters, catfish, redfish and crawfish pies, plus two side items. Other dishes include broiled redfish and fried softshell crab. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat. and dinner Wed.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ LA COTE BRASSERIE — 700 Tchoupitoulas St., 613-2350; www. lacotebrasserie.com — This stylish restaurant in the Renaissance New Orleans Arts Hotel serves an array of raw and cooked seafood. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ RED FISH GRILL — 115 Bourbon St.,

598-1200; www.redfishgrill.com — Seafood creations dominate a menu peppered with favorites like hickory-grilled redfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

VILLAGE INN — 9201 Jefferson

Hwy., 737-4610 — Check into Village Inn for seasonal boiled seafood or raw oysters. Other options include fried seafood platters, poboys, pasta and pizza. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

SOUL FOOD BIG MOMMA’S CHICKEN AND WAFFLES — 5741 Crowder Blvd., 241-2548;

www.bigmommaschickenandwaffles.com — Big Mamma’s serves hearty combinations like the sixpiece, which includes a waffle and six fried wings served crispy or dipped in sauce. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., Lunch daily, dinner Sun. Credit cards. $

STEAKHOUSE CRESCENT CITY STEAKS — 1001

N. Broad St., 821-3271; www. crescentcitysteaks.com — Order USDA prime beef dry-aged and hand-cut in house. There are porterhouse steaks large enough for two or three diners to share. Res-

ervations accepted. Lunch Tue.Fri. and Sun., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$ RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE —

Harrah’s Hotel, 525 Fulton St., 587-7099; 3633 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 888-3600; www.ruthschris.com — Ruth’s top-quality steaks are broiled in 1,800-degree ovens and arrive at the table sizzling. Reservations recommended. Fulton Street: Lunch and dinner daily. Veterans Memorial Boulevard: Lunch Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

TAPAS/SPANISH MIMI’S IN THE MARIGNY — 2601

Royal St., 872-9868 — Enjoy hot and cold tapas dishes ranging from grilled marinated artichokes to calamari. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

SANTA FE TAPAS — 1327 St. Charles

Ave., 304-9915 — The menu includes both tapas dishes and entrees. Seared jumbo scallops are served with mango and green tomato pico de gallo. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

VEGA TAPAS CAFE — 2051 Metarie

Road, 836-2007; www.vegatapascafe.com — Vega’s mix of hot and cold tapas dishes includes a salad of lump crabmeat on arugula with blood orange vinaigrette. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

VIETNAMESE AUGUST MOON — 3635 Prytania

St., 899-5129; www.moonnola. com — August Moon serves a mix of Chinese and Vietnamese cuisine, including spring rolls and vegetarian options. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

DOSON NOODLE HOUSE — 135 N. Carrollton Ave., 309-7283 — This Mid-City eatery excels at vinegary chicken salad over shredded cabbage, bowls of steaming pho and thick spring rolls. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards and checks. $$ PHO HOA RESTAURANT — 1308

Manhattan Blvd., 302-2094 — Pho Hoa serves staple Vietnamese dishes including beef broth soups, vermicelli bowls, rice dishes and banh mi sandwiches. Bo kho is a popular beef stew. Appetizers include fried egg rols, crab rangoons and rice paper spring rolls. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

PHO NOLA — 3320 Transcontinental Drive, Metairie, 941-7690; www.pho-nola.com — Pho NOLA serves spring rolls and egg rolls, noodle soups, rice and vermicelli dishes and po-boys. Beverages include boba teas, milk teas, coffee drinks and smoothies. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PHO TAU BAY RESTAURANT — 113 Westbank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, 368-9846 — You’ll find classic Vietnamese beef broth and noodle soups, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, shrimp spring rolls with peanut sauce and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Wed. & Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

CLASSIFIEDS AUTOMOTIVE DOMESTIC AUTOS ‘09 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER $10,995 504-368-5640

‘10 CHEVROLET HHR

BACK IN THE LOOP!

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT

Thanks for your patience & well wishes. All is well and once again doing Body Work & Massage Therapy. Call Matteo. LA 0022, for your next appointment. Metairie area. 504-8320945. No Outcalls.

LICENSED MASSAGE NOTICE

Massage therapists are required to be licensed with the State of Louisiana and must include the license number in their ads.

MERCHANDISE

$12,995 504-368-5640

BLDG. MATERIALS

IMPORTED AUTOS

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Huge Savings/Factory Deals 38x50, 50x96, 63x120, 78x135 Misc. Sizes and material avail. www.sunwardsteel.com Source:10P 37-513-4334

‘09 SCION XD $12,995 504-368-5640

‘09 SUBARU IMPREZA i $12,995 504-368-5640

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massage & body work

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‘10 KIA SOUL $14,995 504-368-5640

‘2011 TOYOTA CAMRY LE Power seat. Several to choose from $17,995 504-368-5640

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Relax Today Introductory price 1 hr

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90 min. avail • Swedish & Deep Tissue

5 min from Elmwood

Hours: 10am-7:30pm Mon - Sat

$9,995 504-368-5640

Alicia

‘09 SUBARU FORESTER

LA Lic# 520

AWD $18,995 Call 504-368-5640

16 yrs exp. Non-Sexual call

504-317-4142

pain management & relaxation • Lomi Lomi - 90 minutes • Deep Tissue • Swedish • Waxing Services Available evening appts avail. 6 -10pm weekdays. 10am-7pm on weekends.

504-258-3389

2209 LaPalco Blvd

www.atouchofaloha.massageplanet.com La Lic #2983 • Member of BBB Providing Therapeutic Massage/Non Sexual

FURNITURE/ACCESSORIES $125 Full/Double Size Mattress Set, still in original plastic, unopened. We can deliver. (504) 846-5122 $295 Brand New Iron Queen Bed with mattress set, all new. Can deliver. (504) 952-8403 King Pillowtop Mattress, NEW!!! ONLY $199. Can deliver. (504) 846-5122 NEW Pub Height Table Set all wood, still boxed. Delivery available. $325 (504) 846-5122 Queen Mattress Set $149 Still in wrapper. Will deliver. (504) 846-5122

A BODY BLISS MASSAGE

Jeannie LMT #3783-01. Flexible appointments. Uptown Studio or Hotel out calls. 504.894.8856 (uptown)

BYWATER BODYWORKS

Swedish, deep tissue, therapeutic. Flex appts, in/out calls, OHP/student discounts, gift cert. $65/hr, $75/ 1 1/2hr. LA Lic# 1763 Mark. 259-7278

LOST/FOUND PETS 20 YEAR OLD YORKIE

Female. Deaf, losing eyesight. Blonde coat. Long skinny tail. Carondelet at Washington. Call Kena, 504-615-4943

PET ADOPTIONS

KOJAK

large cuddly orange Morris the cat look a like. Neutered ,shots rescue 504 462-1968

PETS ALLEY CAT

DSH White with Gray Tabby Markings, de-clawed, appx 1 year old, Vet Ck/ Vacs/Neut./Litter Trained/ Super Sweet/Rescue Wt. 9 lbs.. (504) 460-0136

Lab Mix

Animal Helper Adoptions

Lab Mix

Toto deserves a loving homeb est in a home w/ no kids housebroken &obeys commands. good watch dog contact Traci- tbkestler@cox.net 504-975-5971

Boris, a 10 year old retired NOPD Belgian malinois, deserves a wonderful place to live out his retirement. Meet Boris and other wonderful Animal Helper rescues at the Kenner PETCO, 3500 Williams Blvd. on Saturday, July 16th between 11 AM and 2 PM. Photo courtesy of Zoeica Images.

BASHFUL

DSH/MAIN COON MX. Gray/Black Tabby w/ white chest, feet. Appx. 1year old, Vet Ck/Neut./litter trained/ Rescue. Very sweet and gentle but a little shy (504) 460-0136. Wt. 11 lbs.

CHATTY CAT

3 yr/ M, Neuterd, House Broken, Up to date on vaccines, Playful & Sweet Brenda 504-838-0736 bmigaud@ cox.net

Princess Leila

solid white 4yr old female cat , very loving and talkative spayed ,shots ,rescue 504 462-1968 SFS Cat Adoptions has a large variety of sweet beautiful rescues that need good indoor homes-Siamese , Russian blues, etc all cats are spayed /neutered and vacs. 504 462-1968

Shepherd mx pup

Merlin (approx 15 wks) very friendly w/ ppl & other animals. housebroken. contact Tracy tscannatella@gmail.com 504-874-0598

DSH, Gray/Brown/Black Tabby white chest, chin, feet. Appx. 1years, Neut. Vacs/Vet Ck/litter trained/Rescue. Small, Precious, Talkative & Super gentle! Would be great pet for child or Senior. Wt. 7 lbs. (504) 460-0136

Tigger

Elijah

Very sweet male 2 yr pld golden brown tabby. shots ,tested ,neutered. 504 462-1968

Itty Bitty Inky

ADOPT

5 yr old gorgeous solid white Angora male cat super smart and sweet.Shots ,neuter ,rescue 504 462-1968 Very cute sweet petite kitty, 3yrs old , only 6 lbs, white/black spayed,shots 504 462-1968

Kirin

Gorgeous 7 yr old male Siamese extremely sweet and loving ,neutered shots ,rescue 504 462-1968

Kit Kit

Muted Gray Tabby DSH , appx. 1 year old, VetCk/Vacs/Spayed/ Litter Trained/Super Sweet/ Rescue (504) 460-0136

ADOPTIONS Adoring couple longs to adopt your newborn. Secure life. Endless love awaits. Mary & Mike, 1-800-693-1904. Expenses paid.

ANNOUNCEMENTS TROPIC FILMS, INC. has completed production of NOTM “Unzip”. Creditors must contact us at (305) 395-0470

reaL esTaTe

SHOWCaSe GENTILLY

GENTILLY

OLD METAIRIE

BILOXI, MS

RIVER RIDGE

4336 St Anthony $99,000

Charming renovated 2 bedroom/1 bath/ Cen a/h/Off street Parking/ Ceramic Tile/Corner lot/ Near Universities. Southern Spirit Realty Keisha Washington 504-319-2693

5542 Charlotte Dr. $99,500 Slab Ranch - 3 BR, 2 BA Partially renov + Guest Cottage 504-568-1359

324 Metairie Rd - $1,950,000 Desirable Met Rd prop. Comm retail under non-conforming use. Inc 16,090 sq. ft. of land w/ exc. frontage on Met Rd & Vincent Ave. Loading dock & 7 parking spaces. Exc. redevel opp. for commercial/townhomes/single-family. Contact Josh Gertler, Basis Brokerage 504.261.8048 josh@basis-development.com

Only Beachfront Resort in Biloxi/Gulfport - Bank Owned 3 bedroom/3 bath, 2161 sf. Amenities, covered parking Call Janine 228-313-1352 FIDELIS REALTY Please ask me about other foreclosures

Reduced! $184,000

Call (504) 915-3220

FRENCH QUARTER

WESTBANK FOR SALE WESTBANK EXPRESS CAR WASH 2515MANHATTAN BLVD HARVEY, LA

922-24 Dauphine St. $900K Four 1 bedroom apartments. Parking for 5+ cars.

938 Royal St. A $228K Great location for this condo. Perfect for your weekend getaways! Quaint & comfortable. 1 br, great kit & bath.

835 Royal St. 374.5K Great location, secluded hideaway! Spac 2 br, 2 marble tile baths. Small rear balc overlooking garden.

Paula Bowler • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 • www.frenchquarterrealty.com

CAR WASH NEXT TO WALGREENS • 120 FOOT TUNNELS • 13 FREE VACUUM BAYS • 45,000 SQ. FT. OF LAND • 120 FOOT TUNNELS • 13 FREE VACUUM BAYS • 45,000 SQ, FT. OF LAND TRAFFIC COUNT - 50,000+ CARS PER DAY MAGNER REALTY SONNY MAGNER (504) 390-3024

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 05 > 2011

9012 Rosecrest Lane Newly renovated brick home, 1420 sq. ft., 2 bedroom, 2 bath, hardwood floors through out, appliances included, covered carport, large 62x120 lot w/open backyard & additional shed. 5 min. from Mathews & St. Rita.

73

CLASSIFIEDS MANDEVILLE Stunning Sanctuary Elegance

90 Cardinal Lane. Upgrades Galore. 5305 / 7106 sq ft. Approx 1 acre lot . Reduced to $999,000. Call Marlene Zahn 504-236-8262 or Cindy Saia 504-577-5713. Latter & Blum Realtors, 985-246-3505. mzahn@latterblum.com

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

CORPORATE RENTALS 1103 ROYAL UNIT A

1 bedroom, 1 bath, cen a/h, Jacuzzi tub, w/d, water incl. Furnished or unfurnished. $1500/mo. Avail June 1. Call for appt, 504-952-3131.

NEW ORLEANS RIVERFRONT 2 BR, 2.5 BA. Furnished, healthclub, pool, parking. All util incl, wifi. Min 1 mth. $125/day. 781-608-6115.

New Orleans Area 10 Min to Downtown

1 & 2 Br Apts, 1 Ba, furn. Qn bed, WiFi, Cbl. Pkg.Util Incl. Lndry Fac. Sec Cameras From $1200/mth. 1 mth min. 2200 Pasadena, Met. 504491-1591.

1/2 OFF FIRST MONTH OLD METAIRIE SECRET

1023 PIETY ST

1 or 2 BR, Sparkling Pool, Bike Path, 12’ x 24’ Liv.Rm, Sep Din, King Master, No Pets, No Sect 8, $699 & $799 . 504-236-5776

METAIRIE TOWERS

Rent $970/mo 1BR, 1-1/2 BA, pool. Elec & cable incld, prkg. 24 hr Concierge Service- 914-882-1212.

ALGIERS POINT HISTORIC ALGIERS POINT

High end 1-4BR. Near ferry, clean, many x-tras, hrdwd flrs, cen a/h, no dogs, no sec 8, some O/S prkng $750$1200/mo. 504-362-7487

BROADMOOR 3626 Upperline

Upr dplx, 3 br, 1.5 ba, wd flrs, cei fans, furn kit, w/d, off st pkg. Nice area. $1200/mo. Louis, 874-3195.

BYWATER

Victorian Building in Lower Garden District. Fridays Only. Call 670-2575 for information

JEFFERSON HOUSE - NEAR OCHSER

511 LaBarre Rd. 3 BR, 2 BA, cent a/h, water pd, fenced yd. $1300. Lse & dep. 504-913-6999, 259-6999

METAIRIE 2805 Wytchwood Dr.

1Bd/1Ba Lafreniere Pk. CA/H. D/W. Crpt/wd flr. Frig&Stv. W/D hkups. Ref. Please. $625/mo+dep. 504-250-2151

4608 FAIRFIELD ST.

4228 ORLEANS AVE.

1/2 Dble 2 Sty, 2Bd, 1Ba, A/C, Refig, Stove, W/D, Garage. $1275/mo, 1-yr Lse Sec Dep, No Pets.. Call 225-8026554/ email dicklea@cox.net

DOWNTOWN Living room, 1 BR, kitchen, tile bath. No pets. $500/mo. Call 504-494-0970.

1103 ROYAL UNIT A

1 bedroom, 1 bath, cen a/h, Jacuzzi tub, w/d, water incl. Furnished or unfurnished. $1500/mo. Avail June 1. Call for appt, 504-952-3131.

IRISH CHANNEL 1/2 BLOCK TO MAGAZINE

1 BR $695/mo. 2 BR, $900/mo (2 BR includes utilities), hardwood/carpet floors. . 504-202-0381, 738-2492.

Completely renov, 1/2 dbl, 1BR, 1BA, hdwd flrs, new appls, ceil fans, wtr pd. $650/mo+dep. Call 504-899-5544

3234-B Banks St.

1b/1b Upper Rr apt. Renov. Ceil fans/ new carp. all new appl. balcony, cen a/h. Util Incl. $890/m+ dep. 504908-7334

4322 HAMILTON

2BR/1BA lower, 1000 + sf, hdwd flrs, furn kit, w/d, porch, fen yd, off st pkg, no smokers, pet negot. $900/mo + dep. 488-2969 1 efficiency $800; One 1 bdrm. $850. On red streetcar line. Both include water. Call 504-782-6564

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT RAISED COTTAGE UPPER

Deluxe furn 2 Br, w/10x12 luxury ba, cent. air, wd & tile floors, ceil fans, mini blinds, yd, screen prch, w/d, 5300 Freret at Valmont. $1200$1400/mo incl. gas/wtr 504-8993668

1 BLK TO AUDUBON PARK

6230 Annunciation, 3 BR, 2 BA, furn kit, cen a/h, w/d, off st prkg, $1950, lease. Call 621-7795

1 Blk to St. Charles

1711 2nd St. Lrg 1b/1b, dish washer, w/d onsite, cent AC, marble mantels, patio $850/mo 895-4726 or 261-7611

1205 ST CHARLES/$1075

Fully Furn’d studio/effy/secure bldg/ gtd pkg/pool/gym/wifi/laundry. 985871-4324, 504-442-0573.

1, 2 & 3

BEDROOMS AVAILABLE CALL

899-RENT

St. Andrew - O/S, gtd pkng, pool, laun, $775/mo & up 2833 MAGAZINE 1BR/1BA Mod kit, o/s pkng, pool, coin op laun, $800/mo 891-2420

FURN 2BDRM/1BA HOUSE

Complete w/fridge, w&d, mw, stove, sec sys, CA&H, os pkng. On srtcr & Busline. Quiet n’bhood. $1,100 mo + sec dep. No pets/smokers. Call (504) 866-2250

GARDEN DISTRICT CONDO

Adorable gated condo. 1 bd/1ba. O/S pkng, stainless appliances & granite. Garden District Patrol. $900 including utilities. Call (504) 432-1034.

8401 WILLOW ST

1510 CARONDELET 1 block to St. Charles

1300sf, 2 or 3br, 1ba, furn kit, laun, c-a/h, hdwd flrs, ceil fans, Offst pkg. $1200 • wtr pd. 504-865-9964

1729 1/2 ROBERT ST

5419 STORY ST. 3 br, 2 ba duplex. Cen a/h, unfurn w/all appl inc m’wave & w/d. Close to univ & hosp. On bus line. Lg fncd bkyd. Safe n’hood, sec sys. $1350/mo. 289-5110.

2 Eff apts. Lower $625 tenant pays elec. Upper $700 incl util, w/d on site 1-888-239-6566 or mballier@ yahoo.com Studio apt, 2 rms, tile ba, effc kit, patio, wd flrs, fpl, bkcse, a/c unit/heat, security. $700/mo. 866-8118

2105 FERN ST

2 br, 1 ba, cen a/h, w/d, d/w, wd flrs, hi ceil, sec sys, patio. No dogs. Great n’hood. $950. 985-246-0012.

579 S CARROLLTON

By St. Charles, Large Studio. $850/ mo utilities paid. 504-913-6999, 504259-6999

4129 VENDOME PLACE

Beautifully renovated spacious home. 3/4 br, 3 BA, kit w/ ss appl. w/d, cen a/h, lg yard, small gar. $2500/mo. $1500 dep. 504-621-9337

AWESOME UPT DPLX UNIT

NEAR SACRED HEART

Fantastic neighborhood, 3 br, 2.5 baths, fenced in yard. Lovely details and amenities. Ready 6/17/11 $1,800/mo. 4620 Carondelet St. 723-4472 or 872-9365

RENTALS TO SHARE ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Findyour roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com.

4830 1/2 CHESTNUT

1 bdrm, furn kit, cen a/h, wd flrs, hi ceil, w/d hkps, ceil fans, balc. $750/ mo. ASC Real Estate. Call between 10am & 4pm. 504-439-2481.

GRT LOCATIONS!

LOWER GARDEN DISTRICT

HOWARD SCHMALZ & ASSOCIATES REAL ESTATE Call Bert: 504-581-2804

$1000

1726 St. Charles 1br/1ba Apartment Over Pralines $800

1BR, 1-1/2 BA, pool. Elec & cable included, parking. 24 hr Concierge Service, $970/mo 914-882-1212.

3122 PALMYRA STREET

4511 CANAL ST

1327 FRENCHMAN ST.

628 Julia 1br/1ba "Arts District Apartment"

OLD METAIRIE METAIRIE TOWERS

CITY PARK/BAYOU ST. JOHN

FRENCH QUARTER/ FAUBOURG MARIGNY

2 apts available, one mid-July and one mid-August. Located between Chartres and Royal, furnished including linens, kitchen ware, tv, cable, wi-fi, bottled water...the works - $850/ mo, 900 for short term, free laundry on premises. Call Gloria 504-948-0323

2 story, 3 BR upstairs, 2 half BA, 1 full BA. Formal dining. Washer, dryer, backyard. $1200. 504-301-7239

UPTOWN/ GARDEN DISTRICT

1207 Jackson 1br/1ba "Aquatic Garden Apt"

$750

1514 Euterpe

$600

THE FERNANDEZ HOUSE

"Efficiency Off St. Charles"

927 DAUPHINE STREET $1,895,000 An excellent example of an early creole cottage set in a serene compound. Beautiful courtyard with mature plantings in a classic partere garden. Property consists of the main house, 4 income producing apartments and a large bonus space-- office, workshop, gym, etc. Parking for multiple cars. Great location.

Paula Bowler • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 www.frenchquarterrealty.com

Properties For Lease and For Sale

Full Service Property Management Over 30 years of selling properties & filling vacancies!

504-736-0544

www . mauriceguillot . com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 05 > 2011

3 Br, 2.5 Ba. Approx 1800 sq ft. Lg fenced yard. Small pet OK $1200/mo plus deposits.. 504-442-0618

Newly renovated 1850’s bldg on CBD st car line. 600-1000 sq ft. $1200-$2000/mo. 18 Units. Catalyst Development L.L.C. Owner/Agent. . 504-648-7899

Upper 2 BR, LR, DR, 1 BA, KIT, wood/ ceramic flrs, high ceilings, cen a/h, w/d hkups, $1150/mo. 432-7955.

BYWATER STUDIOS

LAKEVIEW/LAKESHORE TOWNHSE- 6604 BELLAIRE

MID CITY

1208 N. GAYOSO

3020 VETERANS BLVD

THERAPIST OFFICE SPACE

CBD 339 CARONDELET LUXURY 1 BDRM APTS

ESPLANADE RIDGE

COMMERCIAL RENTALS 3000 sg ft for lease off Causeway Blvd. 1 story in small strip mall. A/C, Heat and Water included in lease. Call Rick, 504-486-8951. Kirschman Realty, LLC.

2 br, 2 full ba, w/d hkps, cen a/h, cfans, fncd yd, avail now. $875. 888239-6566 or mballier@yahoo.com

REAL ESTATE

75

PUZZLE PAGE CLASSIFIEDS UPTOWN HOME

BETWEEN UPTOWN & OCHSNER

SALE PENDING

• 3222 Coliseum • 4941 St. Charles • 2721 St. Charles • 5528 Hurst • 1750 St. Charles • 1750 St. Charles • 20 Anjou • 1544 Camp • 3915 St. Charles • 1544 Camp • 1544 Camp • 1224 St. Charles

(New Price!) $2,495,000 Grand Mansion $2,300,000 (3 bdrm/3.5ba w/pkg) $1,579,000 TOO LATE! $1,300,000 TOO LATE! $429,000 Commercial $399,000 (4 bdrm/2 ba w/pkg) $220,000 (2 bdrm/2ba w/pkg) $239,000 (1bdrm/1ba w/pkg) $315,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $159,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $149,000 starting at $79,000

YOUR PROPERTY COULD BE LISTED HERE!!!

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 05 > 2011

ANSWERS FOR LAST WEEK ON PAGE 75

78

John Schaff crs CELL

504.343.6683

3506 ANNUNCIATION CHARMING VICTORIAN. Well maintained Historic cottage. Beautiful hardwood floors. 12’ ceilings, plenty of closet/ storage space. Central A/C, & Huge backyard. Excellent location & a great value! $269,000

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504.895.4663 (504) 895-4663

131 BROOKLYN AVE. CLASSIC SHOTGUN. Excellent location, minutes from Uptown. High ceilings. Hardwood & slate flooring. Furnished kitchen. Whirlpool. New central A/C.Well maintained home w/large backyard & off street parking. Right near levee. Great for bike riding & dog walking! Owner/Agent $110,000


Gambit's 2011 Top Bars Issue