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Still, there are creative solutions that could retain the green streetcars’ historic status without straining the city budget. Running the occasional red car on the St. Charles Avenue line is one possible solution that was raised during the last mayoral election. If issues with the ramps make that impractical, the city should consider regularly supplementing streetcar service on St. Charles (already the city’s busiest line) with buses. Even commuters who don’t use wheelchairs might appreciate an express bus on the crowded, stop-and-start St. Charles line, and an express bus could make exceptions to stop at other intersections if requested by a wheelchair rider. The RTA has made important strides under the Landrieu Administration,despite the narrowed scope of the city’s public transit system since Hurricane Katrina. Buses run on time more frequently, the

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Without wheelchair access, an impromptu trip to the grocery store or spontaneous afternoon out becomes impossible. city has a useful transit website for the first time, and there’s modern color-coded signage at stops all over the city. The City Council also has demonstrated a commitment to fairness by eliminating the odious, discriminatory wheelchair fees in the new “taxi passengers’ bill of rights” that will be coming before the council. Ensuring equal access for residents and visitors with limited mobility is more than a worthy goal. It should be a legacy for an administration that insists every New Orleanian matters. In the end, it’s not really up to the bureaucrats or government officials to bring New Orleans into the 21st century when it comes to transportation parity. It’s up to the citizens. New Orleanians would never accept a City Hall or other public building without access for all. We shouldn’t accept public transportation with less than the same.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 20 > 2011

s there a New Orleanian — or a visitor — who has never had the opportunity to take a ride on the beautiful, historic St. Charles Avenue streetcars? Yes, as it turns out: people in wheelchairs. When the classic green Perley Thomas streetcars were designed in 1923, access for the disabled wasn’t even considered. But, despite their historic significance and a community-wide commitment to preserve them, the iconic streetcars have changed with the times — most notably when signs segregating black from white passengers came down. In the 1970s, the streetcars got their first automated fare boxes. Sadly, nearly 100 years after the first green streetcars were introduced to New Orleans, one thing has not changed: they remain inaccessible to those in wheelchairs. It’s time for that to change, too. Many people mistakenly believed (as we did when we began this week’s cover story) that the streetcars couldn’t be modified because they are listed on the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP). The city’s website even states that the NRHP designation prohibits the cars from being modified. However, an NRHP spokesman tells Gambit that’s not necessarily true. The Cabildo, which has an even more stringently protected status as a National Historic Landmark, has added an elevator without losing its federal designation. And even if inclusion on the NRHP did prohibit alterations, that’s no excuse for excluding the disabled. San Francisco’s federally landmarked cable cars also have no wheelchair access, but Frisco offers fully accessible MUNI (bus) lines within a block of nearly every cable car stop. New Orleans offers no such regular alternative. Some don’t understand how a major urban transportation line can legally make no provision for the disabled. The truth is the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) requires no such provision. The ADA applies only to new vehicles. Nevertheless, it stipulates public transportation providers must provide paratransit (disabilityequipped) minivans or buses where they operate fixed-route bus or rail systems “unless it would result in an undue burden.” New Orleans has some paratransit vehicles, but they require prior administrative approval and advance reservations. For those dependent on a streetcar line without wheelchair access, an impromptu trip to the grocery store or spontaneous afternoon out becomes impossible. A better solution would be a system giving wheelchair users the same access as everyone else. That’s not as easy as retrofitting a few green streetcars. NHRP concerns aside, RTA officials note that the wheelchair ramps don’t have enough room to unfold at every stop, and the old streetcars’ interiors (unlike the newer red cars) aren’t spacious enough to accommodate wheelchairs.

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08

what you say?

Where we should be

e appreciate the opportunity to respond to the recent editorial about UNO athletics (“Keep UNO in Division I, Commentary, Sept. 6). First, let us state that, yes, the University of New Orleans would prefer to have remained Division I and avoided the financial circumstances we find ourselves in. But the reality is that, just like many American families right now, we can’t afford the most expensive model on the market. Fortunately, there is an alternative that is not only affordable but will allow us to succeed. While it is heartening to see such prominent people concerned with the future of UNO athletics, it’s unfortunate that the figures referenced in the editorial are factually incorrect. The idea that it would only cost only an additional $100,000 to remain Division I is simply wrong. From 2006 to 2009, the university gave direct subsidized support to athletics in an amount exceeding $1 million per year. Under the previous athletic director, the athletic department ran a deficit averaging nearly $1.5 million per year on top of the annual subsidy — even as UNO had five fewer sports than the minimum number required by the NCAA. The current accumulated debt the athletic department must still pay off is $5.5 million. Between the university subsidy and the debt, that is an annual gap of more than $2.5 million. It is also important to note that even as the department overspent, the UNO athletics budget was still in the lowest quarter of nonfootball Division I schools in the nation. Clearly this was unsustainable. These budgets are public record and anyone can review them. It is evident that in those years, the foundation was not laid to operate a successful Division I program in a post-Katrina environment. To ignore this fact and these verifiable numbers by stating that there is only a $100,000 difference is flagrantly misleading. In order for UNO to have a healthy athletic program, it needs fan and community support. Even in successful seasons in Division I, only several hundred fans, on average, attended baseball and basketball games. That kind of attendance cannot sustain a Division I program. There has also been a lack of significant fundraising support. In spite of considerable attention brought to the plight of UNO athletics, the only major donation to materialize in recent years was from the estate of Wick Cary. Lastly, in the spring of 2009, UNO students voted down a proposal to increase the student athletic fee. These factors have forced us to assess this situation with a strong sense of reality.

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Even in successful seasons in Division I, only several hundred fans, on average, attended baseball and basketball games. That kind of attendance cannot sustain a Division I program.

While the analysis mentioned in the editorial has not been shared with UNO administrators, multiple analyses have been done on this issue, including an entirely independent assessment by Collegiate Consultants in February. Each analysis has pointed to moving to Division II as key to future success. In the Division II Gulf South Conference, UNO athletics will be self-sustaining and no longer a financial burden to the university. Going Division II is also the way UNO will be able to add intercollegiate football, and the Division II scholarship structure will help improve the University’s bottom line because more student-athletes will be paying tuition. With winning teams, fundraising will strengthen, attendance will grow and sports can be added. This is the path to success that the University has chosen. We encourage UNO supporters around the region to demonstrate your commitment to the University and its athletic program. We need your help right now, and together we can all succeed. Joe M. King

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Brian glorioso

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Michael saper a

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scuttle Butt

QUOTES OF THE WEEK

“A 40-year-old Indian American with a glittering resume who’s equally adept at fundraising, policy and politics, Jindal is a coveted endorsement and will surely be on next year’s VP lists.” — Jonathan Martin, Politico, Aug. 11, 2011, one month before Gov. Bobby Jindal endorsed Texas Gov. Rick Perry for president. Jindal flew to Tampa, Fla., Sept. 12 to be in the audience for the CNN Tea Party Republican debate, which featured Perry and seven other presidential contenders. The next day, Jindal endorsed incumbent Buddy Caldwell for attorney general rather than the other GOP candidate in the race, former Rep. Anh “Joseph” Cao. Jindal, however, did not weigh in on the lieutenant governor’s race between incumbent Jay Dardenne and Plaquemines Parish president Billy Nungesser, both Republicans.

Civil Disagreements THE CITY’S VOW TO ‘CUT RED TAPE’ MEANS CHANGES FOR THE CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION. BY CHARLES MALDONADO

N

“No, I will not be V.P. I want to be governor of the great state of Louisiana.” — Gov. Bobby Jindal, talking to reporters after the debate. He added, “I don’t want a job from Rick (Perry). What I want Rick to do is create millions of jobs in our country for my fellow Americans.” The reporters did not ask Jindal if he had any ambitions to be part of a Perry administration cabinet.

is paramount to any true reform strategy: civil service rules, which guide procedures for hiring, firing, layoffs, discipline and promotions for the more than 5,500 City of New Orleans employees. “The city needs a comprehensive approach to civil service reform,” Howard says. Under its “Cut Red Tape” section, the PSG report makes nine recommendations for changing civil service rules and procedures, including simplifying job classifications, broadening pay grades, easing restrictions on hiring and firing, and aggressively recruiting from outside city government. “[Kopplin] touched on the subject,” Howard says. In very general terms, Kopplin said the city will push the rules changes through the Civil Service Commission, the five-member body that makes and amends civil service rules. But it was one of the last and shortest parts of his presentation. When a BGR member pressed the issue in the question-and-answer portion, Kopplin mentioned the new appointments of longtime New Orleans public library employees Joseph Clark and Loyola University President the Rev. Kevin Wildes to the commission.

“I am working aggressively with our congressional delegation and the Obama administration to fight to keep these 880 jobs in New Orleans. This processing and distribution center provides critical services to the residents and businesses of this region, including everyone with ZIP codes that begin with 700 or 701. It does not make sense to pull PAGE 11

c'est what? WWL-AM’S GARLAND ROBINETTE ADMITS HE TOOK A $250,000 LOAN FROM LANDFILL OWNER FRED HEEBE, BUT SAYS HE’S “DONE ABSOLUTELY NOTHING WRONG.” DO YOU BELIEVE HIM?

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Vote on “c’est what?” on bestofneworleans.com THIS WEEK’S QUESTION

When do you think the NBA dispute will be settled and basketball will resume?

PAGE 10

BoUQuets Nicholas Payton

THIS WEEK’S HEROES AND ZEROES

has been named jazz artist-in-residence at Tulane University for the 2011-2012 school year. The New Orleans native, a Grammy Award-winning trumpeter and graduate of the New Orleans Center for Creative Arts, will conduct master classes and lectures as part of his residency. The program is funded by the charity Music Rising, which was founded after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita to preserve New Orleans musical legacies.

John Goodman

has been announced as this year’s “Celluloid Hero” by the New Orleans Film Society, producers of the annual New Orleans Film Festival. Goodman has lived in the New Orleans area since the 1990s with his wife Annabeth and has appeared in many local productions, from Treme to The Big Uneasy, Harry Shearer’s documentary about the 2005 federal levee failures. Goodman also taped public service announcements for the region after the BP oil disaster.

Paul May,

who began working at New Orleans City Hall in 1971, retired Sept. 16 after 40 years of city service. May has twice served as director of safety and permits and worked in the Code Enforcement and City Planning Commission offices during his long career. In a Sept. 12 ceremony at City Hall, Mayor Mitch Landrieu praised May for his service to New Orleans and presented him with a key to the city.

Troy Andrews,

aka Trombone Shorty, presented students at KIPP McDonough 15 Middle School with new brass instruments during a visit Sept. 7. It’s part of Andrews’ new Horns for Schools initiative, which will deliver trumpets and trombones to New Orleans schoolchildren. Andrews’ new CD, For True, reached No. 1 on the iTunes music charts upon its release, a remarkable showing for a young jazz musician.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 20 > 2011

ew Orleans Deputy Mayor Andy Kopplin made an appearance in the D.H. Holmes Ballroom at the Chateau Bourbon Hotel on Monday, Sept. 12, to brief members of the Bureau of Governmental Research (BGR) of the Landrieu Administration’s progress in reforming city government. “Today is the 500th day in the Landrieu administration,” Kopplin said, a fact no one in the room seemed know but which lent the mostly dry policy speech an air of significance. “We have 960 days to go.” Kopplin reminded the audience of the mess the Nagin administration left Mayor Mitch Landrieu — blight, disorganization, a bad image, a reputation for corruption, budget problems and more. Then he listed the many new initiatives Landrieu and his staff have enacted to deal with some of those problems, particularly those started since last March, when consultant David Osborne of the Minnesota-based Public Strategies Group (PSG) called New Orleans government the most dysfunctional he’s seen in his more than two decades in public policy Osborne made that now-infamous comment as he presented PSG’s report City of New Orleans: A Transformation Plan for City Government. That document, a two-phase strategy that putatively seeks to remedy inefficiency, improve customer service and use public dollars more effectively, has been fully embraced and adopted by the administration as its blueprint. The audience, which included City Council President Jackie Clarkson and mostly BGR members (i.e. local business leaders with a heavy emphasis on finance and real estate development) ate up the report, or seemed to. BGR president Janet Howard says Kopplin and the city so far have failed to address one area she believes

09

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page 9

He predicted the two will work to adopt whatever recommendations come from City Hall. The commission is made up of five members, one chosen by city employees and four chosen by local universities — Dillard, Loyola, Tulane, the University of New Orleans, Southern University at New Orleans and Xavier University. Whenever there is a vacancy, each group will get to present three nominees to the council. Clark, who has indicated he favors civil service reform, was the employees’ third choice of three. Wildes, who replaced Chairman William Forrester Jr. and was nominated by Tulane University, is seen as friendly to the administration — Landrieu also nominated Wildes to his position on the New Orleans Public Belt Railroad’s Board of Commissioners — and hostile to labor. That’s what the Concerned Classified City Employees group argued when it attempted to file an injunction against Wildes’ appointment. According to documents in Orleans Parish Civil District Court, the group cited Wildes’ 2006 “Pathways” plan to make Loyola — then facing a $15 million deficit — solvent after Hurricane Katrina. The plan eliminated 14 majors and professors who were tenured or on a tenure track. Faculty in the university’s College of Humanities and Natural Sciences recorded a 61-19 vote of no confidence in Wildes, due in large part to his handling of the plan. In media reports attached to the injunction, professors said Wildes hadn’t followed proper protocol and had failed to consult faculty before making the changes. Wildes did not respond to Gambit’s request for comment. Wildes and Clark will be sworn in at commission meeting Sept. 19. Members of the Concerned Classified City Employees group are also scheduled to speak at the meeting. Many city workers believe both those appointments, along with the city’s first proposed change in layoff (or bumping) procedures, signal the beginning of an overhaul that could leave city workers in constant fear of losing their jobs or having their departments privatized, with few protections. “When the Civil Service Commission had a hearing on bumping, 200 city employees spoke,” says Helene O’Brien, president of Service Employees International Union Local 21, which represents 600 city employees. “Workers are scared.” In June, the administration presented the commission with proposed changes to civil service rule XII, known as the “bumping” rule, which governs layoff procedures. Under the current system, when positions are eliminated, veteran employees are placed in positions within or outside their department, “bumping” someone else. It

can cause a chain reaction. The administration’s position is that the bumping preference is based primarily on seniority rather than merit, which echoes both PSG and a 2004 report the BGR released on civil service. Still, the mayor wasn’t proposing an elimination of the current system, but rather a change to keep bumping within departments affected by layoffs rather than bumping employees from one department to another. O’Brien, on the other hand, says an employee’s rating in three-year performance evaluations are what determine an employee’s eligibility, a position backed by Lisa Hudson, city personnel director. Even if that’s the case, Howard argues, the evaluation system is flawed. Managers, aware that evaluation will determine layoff status, are often reluctant to be honest. “You can’t have a merit system without a proper review process,” she says. O’Brien and Howard both have criticisms of the PSG’s take on civil service reform. They both say it’s not detailed enough and that PSG did not do thorough research into real problems. “It’s almost anecdotal, the way the report is done,” O’Brien says. She notes that PSG interviewed only 60 people — city employees, politicians and residents — but doesn’t say who those people are. Hudson tells Gambit that personnel were involved in its development, but only minimally. “I think I remember meeting with them for about an hour,” Hudson says. “I don’t really see what the big deal with that report is. It’s mostly just ideas we’ve seen in earlier reports [such as the 2004 BGR report]. There aren’t a lot of original ideas in there.” In many cases the complaints cited in the report are not actually addressed by the recommendations, O’Brien says. “[Employees] believe in reform,” she says. “They just don’t believe civil service rule reform is the problem … I think you’ll find the real problem is not the rules. The real problem is the management. The workers are the victims of that bad management. And the workers are being blamed for that bad management.” She says management and private sector contractors who work for the government will see most of the benefits from the types of civil service rules reform that PSG, the BGR and the Landrieu administration want. Howard disagrees. “There’s resistance to change in general and there’s going to be tremendous resistance to civil service change in particular,” Howard says. “While some people may be opposed if they believe it will hurt them, reform will certainly be advantageous to a lot of people, especially those people who are doing a good job. The city cannot deliver service to the public unless it has a good work force.”

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page 9

“In some strange ways, it’s like it always was, just more extreme since the flood. The parts that are good are still good, the parts that are rundown are still in bad shape. Just worse. The poor folks is hurting there, still, and nothing much has changed that. Of course, yuppies are starting to move in and push out the natives. That ain’t nothing new.” — Musician Art Neville of the Funky Meters, explaining the current state of New Orleans to Patch.com. Of the current state of music, Neville said, “I’ve listened to Jay-Z and Beyonce recently. I don’t really get it. Not yet, anyway. It’s dance music, but it ain’t very funky.”

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perceives as pervasive racism against black residents by City Hall, Clark said New Orleanians “do not want another Arnie Fielkow.” Clarkson, who was frequently looking down and writing during Clark’s speech, received a sharp rebuke from Roseanne Licciardi, who said the council president had treated Clark disrespectfully. “Why is it that you weren’t listening to what Mr. Clark had to say?” Licciardi said, to which Clarkson replied testily that she always listens to what Clark, a fixture at council and school board meetings, has to say. The interim appointee’s term begins Oct. 1, when Fielkow is set to vacate his seat. Fielkow, who announced his resignation in late August, is moving to Chicago to take over as head of the National Basketball Retired Players Association. — Charles Maldonado

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 20 > 2011

The four members of the New Orleans City Council’s Governmental Affairs Committee have unanimously approved all 16 candidates vying for an appointment to an interim at-large seat on the council, among them former state Sen. Diana Bajoie. The full council is scheduled to pick an interim appointee for outgoing council Vice President Arnie Fielkow at its next meeting Thursday (Sept. 22). The committee — District A Councilwoman Susan Guidry, District B Councilwoman Stacy Head, District C Councilwoman Kristin Gisleson Palmer and Fielkow — were joined by Council President Jackie Clarkson and District D Councilwoman Cynthia Hedge-Morrell at the meeting, at which 13 of the 16 candidates appeared to introduce themselves and state their cases. Candidates Steve Barry, an attorney; John Penny, an assistant professor of criminal justice at Southern University at New Orleans; and Daniel Ring, a customer service representative for local art supply distributor SLS Arts, were not present. There were three major factions among the candidates, each with a common theme in their pitches for the seat. Bajoie and other politicians, including former District A Councilman Scott Shea and former District D interim Councilman David Payton, highlighted their political experience as a primary reason they should get the appointment. Others, like Tulane law professor Paul Barron and former PR consultant Sally Stevens, took the opposite approach, touting their lack of political experience, agenda or aspira-

tions in politics. The third group, particularly Eric Granderson, Fielkow’s chief of staff, and Thomas Milliner, a former deputy city attorney, split the difference: nonpoliticians with no political aspirations who nevertheless know how City Hall functions. The otherwise dry, straightforward meeting changed tone when two members of the public engaged in brief spats with Clarkson. When Albert “Chui” Clark, chairman of the group Neighborhood Unity, who had filled out a comment request card prior to the meeting, began to speak, Clarkson at first didn’t recognize him and continued talking. “You have to respect the public,” Clark said. “You cannot shut out the public.” In a five-minute statement where he criticized the city’s new public housing policies, economic development initiatives, charter school expansion and what he

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public jobs out of this booming corridor where we’re leveraging public investments in the streetcar to attract over $1 billion in private investments and development.” — Mayor Mitch Landrieu on Sept. 15, reacting to news the U.S. Postal Service would conduct a study regarding the shutdown of the New Orleans Processing and Distribution Center on Loyola Avenue.

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scuttlebutt

grow like weeds on neutral grounds every election season. But the newly enforced law also applies to concert posters, advertisements, yoga class flyers, and anything stapled or slapped on light poles and other public rights of way — parks, playgrounds, trees, light fixtures, street signs and parking meters. A nine-person task force consisting of city employees from the Department of Sanitation and Parks and Parkways and New Orleans Police Department Quality of Life officers looked for and removed signs for five days, ending Friday, Sept. 16. Those duties now are back in the hands of the 22 sanitation employees and 70 Parks and Parkways employees whose duties include litter and sign control. Bands and venues promoting their next big gig may want to stick strictly to coffee shop bulletin boards and Facebook. In an email to Gambit, Landrieu press secretary Ryan Berni said, “The individual(s) or business depicted on the sign or poster will be held responsible for the illegal sign. … The entities listed on the sign are responsible.” In other words, everyone on a typical concert bill (venue, artists, and promoter) can be targeted for fines. Aspiring politicos also should take note: The candidates represented on the signs — and their committees — also will be held responsible for possible fines, Berni said. Candidates, as always, have 48 hours before and after an election to remove their signs. The penalties are $25 per sign, or $50 per sign if attached to a tree; possible community service; fines of $150 to $5,000 (and possible community service or jail time) for littering or illegal dumping. Berni said artists with proper permitting for neighborhood artwork are in the clear. — Alex Woodward

Marsh Mellows

There was little consensus among New Orleanians last week as to whether the marsh fire in eastern New Orleans had in fact been completely snuffed out, despite a deluge from Tropical Storm Lee and repeated attempts to douse the flames via helicopter drops. Twitter (through #marshfire or #smokepocalypse hashtags) still spiked with reports of burning odors, presumably from the smoldering marsh. Attempts to let it burn itself out (or hopes the rain would put it out) followed “best practices,” according to Mayor Mitch Landrieu. But early last week Landrieu confirmed three hot spots had been extinguished by Sept. 10, via two Louisiana National Guardpiloted Blackhawk helicopters dropping

137 buckets and carrying more than 60,000 gallons of water. Landrieu announced the New Orleans Fire Department and Mosquito Control would survey the area three times a day throughout the week. But a reconnaissance flight on Thursday, Sept. 15 identified the same three small hot spots, which NOFD had hoped to fight from nearby canals but couldn’t. Landrieu requested helicopter support from the Governor’s Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness for additional water drops. Landrieu press secretary Ryan Berni said if more support is needed, it will be sent. Authorities believe lightning strikes on Aug. 24 ignited a fire that spread to an area of marsh grass and underbrush covering more than 1,500 acres. What followed were days of air quality alerts issued by the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality as changing winds brought stinging, burning smells across the metro area — and as far as Baton Rouge — until late Sunday, Sept. 11. “Particulate matter” from the smoke carried ash and soot particles, which are considered especially harmful to people with respiratory problems and allergies. Gov. Bobby Jindal authorized the Louisiana National Guard to drop more than 1 million gallons of water on the flames before Tropical Storm Lee’s rain bands moved inland. — Woodward

GaMBIT’s “40 UNDer 40” seeKING NoMINaTIoNs

The Nov. 1 issue of Gambit will be our annual “40 Under 40,” spotlighting New Orleanians under the age of 40 for their accomplishments. Nominations are now open through Oct. 4 at 5 p.m. Nominees must meet the following requirements: • Must be 39 years of age or younger • Live in the New Orleans metro area • Be worthy of distinction Elected officials are not eligible. To nominate someone for “40 Under 40,” send us a brief email, fax or letter (email preferred) telling us about his or her background, accomplishments and future plans. Include the person’s exact date of birth (it will be verified). Send your nomination to Gambit managing editor Kandace Graves: • Email: kandaceg@gambitweekly.com • Fax: (504) 483-3116 • Mail: Gambit, attn. Kandace Graves (40 Under 40), 3923 Bienville St., New Orleans, LA 70119 No phone calls, please. Only winners will be notified. All nominations must be received by the end of business day on Oct. 4.

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DEAR JOHN, The story of how Lenora Lafayette, a young woman from Baton Rouge, La., came to sing at Covent Garden is almost a fairy tale. She was 26 years old and living in Basel, Switzerland, performing leading roles in operas there as well as in Germany and France. At 1:15 p.m. on Jan. 28, 1953, Lafayette received a phone call asking her to come to London to perform the leading role in the 7 p.m. performance of Aida at the Covent Garden. Even without a rehearsal, Lafayette was a smashing success. She was applauded for overcoming the obstacle of substituting for the Dutch singer Gre Brouwenstijn — and, as an English critic wrote, “the exceptional beauty and vitality of her voice, the simple dignity of her stage presence, and the truthfulness of her acting.” L af aye t te’s musical career began at McKinley High School in Baton Rouge. After graduation, she received special training at Fisk University in Nashville, Tenn. She won the Marian Anderson Award (for using the arts for the betterment of society; Mia Farrow is the 2011 winner) in 1947 and a year later won a $2,000 Julius Rosenwald Fellowship and studied at Juilliard School of Music in New York. In 1950, Lafayette won the $3,000 John Hay Whitney Fellowship to study in Europe. A year later, in 1951, she starred in Aida at the Basel Opera House and so impressed everyone that she was signed for a full season. Health problems put her in the hospital, but Lafayette managed to enter and place second in a prestigious international musical competition in Geneva. With this win she received many offers to perform and was able to stay in Europe, where Sir John Barbirolli sought her out to star in Aida at Covent Garden. She

later returned there to play the lead in Puccini’s Madama Butterfly. Lenora Lafayette did not achieve the fame of contemporaries such as Leontyne Price, and segregation limited her stardom in America, but Lafayette’s international career lasted until right before the civil rights movement — and she made history as the first African-American to perform at the Royal Opera House — or any English opera house. She died of cancer in 1975.

13

clancy DUBOS

POLITICS Follow Clancy on Twitter @clancygambit.

Belts and Suspenders he New Orleans City Council is set to vote Thursday (Sept. 22) on an interim replacement for at-large Councilman Arnie Fielkow, who has announced his resignation effective Oct. 1 to head up the National Basketball Retired Players Association in Chicago. Fielkow announced his resignation on Aug. 22. Teams of lawyers immediately began researching state law and the City Charter to determine how and when Fielkow’s replacement should be selected. Not surprisingly, different lawyers came up with different answers. The confusion apparently stems from the fact that Fielkow resigned prospectively, rather than immediately — and the City Charter pegs the timetable for replacing him on the date the “vacancy” in his seat “occurs.” Fielkow still sits on the council, so it’s easy to argue that the vacancy has not yet occurred. Some, no doubt, take a different view. Consequently, in addition to all the political intrigue that now surrounds the interim appointment (and, for a time, that which accompanied the scheduling of the election to choose his permanent replacement), we

T

now have the legal conundrum of when Fielkow’s interim successor will be properly named — and, possibly, who will properly name him or her. All legal minds agree that the council gets the first shot at selecting Fielkow’s interim replacement; the law also bars that person from seeking the office in the ensuing election. Questions arise as to timing. If the council does not make the selection on a timely basis, Mayor Mitch Landrieu gets to weigh in. So the question is, when is the right time? The council takes the position that this Thursday is the correct date. It appears to be the last possible day under that interpretation of the law. But what if that interpretation is wrong, or challenged later? What may have to happen is a belt-andsuspenders approach. That is, the council may find it wise to pick someone on Thursday, and then subsequently ratify that selection later. It would help if Landrieu would issue an executive order naming the same person — hence the belt and suspenders reference. Landrieu no doubt favors this interpretation because it gives him some say-so in what has heretofore been strictly a council

prerogative. Overall, Hizzoner gets along fairly well with this council, although he and Fielkow have had several behindthe-scenes tussles, mostly concerning policy disagreements. Landrieu is thought to favor several among the 16 applicants for Fielkow’s seat; above all, he wants the interim appointee to be an African-American. That would begin to restore some racial parity to the

Fielkow is breaking with tradition and promising not to try to sway the selection.

council. Five of the council’s seven members are white; the city is more than 60 percent black. Council sources say both frontrunners for the interim appointment are AfricanAmerican: former state Sen. Diana Bajoie and Fielkow chief of staff Eric Granderson. All who applied appear qualified on some level — depending on whether your preference is for someone with governmental experience, or an “outsider,” or a lawyer, a business person, etc. One applicant, David Payton, has even served as an interim council member before — for former Councilman Marlin Gusman, who resigned in 2004 to become criminal sheriff. Payton previously served on Gusman’s council staff. If all this is not complicated enough, Fielkow is breaking with tradition and promising not to try to sway the selection. That’s a first. In the past, the resigning council member (with the glaring exception of Oliver Thomas, who resigned because he pleaded guilty to a federal bribery charge) typically nominated someone who was summarily appointed by his or her colleagues. These days, few things are done the old way. Time will tell if that’s a good thing in this case.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 20 > 2011

AUTHENTIC CUISINE PASSED DOWN FOR GENER ATIONS

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Creative Loafing

PIETY STREET MARKET returns to THE OLD IRONWORKS (612 Piety St., 908-4741) from noon to 5 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 24 for the first monthly installment of its fall season. More than 40 vendors offer arts and crafts, vintage goods and food. There will be live music by the Frenchmen String Quartet.

BY MARGUERITE LUCA S

n a city with no shortage of po-boys it can be difficult to differentiate one from the next, but Roz and Max Gruenig, owners of Koz’s (515 Harrison Avenue; 484-0841; 6215 Wilson St., Harahan, 737-3933; www.kozcooks.com), say their secret is the bread. “Really, our bread is different than [what] most people use,” Roz says of the soft, fluffy loaves from Gendusa Bakery that have been a staple at the Lakeview eatery since it opened two years ago. In addition to 20 different types of po-boys, including homecooked roast beef, fried oyster and meatball versions, Koz’s also whips up daily hot plates such as red beans and rice, grilled chicken and country-fried steak. And don’t forget about the 36 inches of po-boy goodness that gives Koz’s the slogan “Home of the Whole Loaf” and keeps the kitchen and servers busy on the weekends. “[The whole loaf] is good for parties, before football games,” Roz says. “A family of four can eat one (for) dinner.” While Koz’s is relatively new to New Orleans, the Gruenig family is a fixture in the po-boy business. Koz Gruenig, Max’s father, began working at the Po-boy Factory in Gentilly at age 12. He opened the first Koz’s restaurant in Harahan after Hurricane Katrina. “[My father] laid the groundwork,” Max says. “He’s a major part of everything. He still even cooks.” Seated in the cozy restaurant, where family photographs decorate sage green and mustard yellow walls, Roz and Max, who have been married for three years, greet customers by

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > SEPTEMBER 20 > 2011

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THRIFT CIT Y

STYLE LAB FOR MEN(3326 Magazine St., 3045072; www.stylelabformen.com) has received new fall shipments from Ben Sherman, J Brand, G-Star, Defend New Orleans and Joe’s Jeans, among other designer brands.

name as they enter, Max and Roz Gruenig preasking how their jobs pare to dig in to a roast beef are going, what their “whole loaf” po-boy. children are up to, and how they enjoyed their vacations. “Sitting with the customers and talking to people all day, it’s my favorite part [of Koz’s],” says Roz, balancing her 3-month-old daughter Sophie on her lap. “We met people two years ago and it feels like we’ve known them forever. … They’re like family.” “If I had a really good memory I’d get to know everyone’s name,” Max says. “I think that’s what really sets us apart — becoming friends with our customers. And a lot of it is due to my dad. He’s [just] short of 50 years in the business. That’s a long time to make sandwiches.”

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CRESCENT CITY AUCTION GALLERY (1015 Julia St., 529-5057; www.crescentcityauctiongallery.com) holds a multi-estate auction at 9 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 24, in its Julia Street gallery. Art, antique furniture, jewelry, silver and accessories will be for sale. Call Adam Lambert at the store or email him at adam@crescentcityauctiongallery.com for more information. WEDDING BELLES (3632 Magazine St., 8911005; www.weddingbellesneworleans.com) and STATIONER OF NEW ORLEANS (3632 Magazine St., 895-4868; www.stationernola. com) host a party with Champagne and dessert at their shared location from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 22 to honor Ella Rose, the winner of their window design contest.

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deNied The City of New Orleans has always maintained that the RTA can’t provide wheelchair access to the St. Charles streetcar line due to the streetcars’ status on the National Register of Historic Places.

But the National Register says that’s not true. By Charles Maldonado

page 18

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 20 > 2011

A StreetcAr NAmed

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cover story

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page 20

The city maintains there isn’t room to unfold motorized wheelchair ramps on the St. Charles Avenue neutral ground.

must take into account the effects of  their actions on historic properties. It  does  not  prevent  federal  properties  from  being  altered,”  Gabbert  says.  “Any  of  these  state  preservation  offices,  including  Louisiana,  should  be  able  to  cite  instances  where  historic  properties  have  been  altered  to accommodate ADA requirements.  So  there  are  ways  to  do  it.”  (The  elevator-equipped  Cabildo,  home  of  the  Lousiana  State  Museum,  is  one such instance, even though as a  National  Historic  Landmark  it’s  held  to an even higher standard for maintaining  historic  authenticity  than  a  property  that’s  merely  on  the  register, like the streetcars.)     Like  most  other  publicly  accessed  facilities,  including  privately  owned  ones like restaurants and office buildings,  NORTA  simply  isn’t  required  to  make the ADA improvements.      “Due  to  the  fact  that  the  line  has  this historic nature and due to its being  designated as the longest continuously  operating,  unchanged  rail  line  in  all  of the world, the RTA has a waiver for  the line specifically as well as the cars  themselves,” Mercadel says. He admits  that while NORTA isn’t strictly prohibited from making the necessary adjustments, the agency fears the line might  have to be altered so drastically that it  would lose its designation.      “I  know  that  we  have  done  some  research,”  Mercadel  says.  “We  have  found  many  challenges.  One  of  them  would be that — let’s just say we could  employ a handicap ramp on the vehicles 

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 20 > 2011

    The impediment to ADA accessibility improvements on the St. Charles  route  is  the  streetcar’s  designation  on  the  National  Register.  That’s  the  short  explanation,  at  least,  and  it’s  the  one  that,  as  of  this  writing,  NORTA  continues  to  present  to  the  public on its website:     “The  green  streetcars  that  travel  the  St.  Charles  Avenue  line  do  not  contain  accessibility  equipment. The green St. Charles Avenue  streetcars are considered a National  Historic Landmark. This federal status  protects  our  treasured,  historic  streetcar line, but it also means that  by  law  the  RTA  cannot  update  the  streetcars  with  the  modern  equipment needed to make them accessible to disabled riders. The red streetcars that travel on Canal Street and  on the Riverfront line are accessible  to disabled riders.”     There  are  at  least  two  things  wrong with that statement, says Jim  Gabbert,  historian  and  southeastern  regional  reviewer  for  the  NRHP.  The  first  is  that  the  streetcar  line  is  not  a  National  Historic  Landmark  (NHL),  which applies to only 2,500 properties  out of 80,000 in the NRHP. The NHL  is a much shorter, more exclusive list  (and one that includes another active  line-and-vehicle transit combination:  San Francisco’s cable cars).     The  other,  Gabbert  says,  is  that  NORTA can indeed update its streetcars  with  modern  equipment  while  maintaining its place on the NRHP.      “Under the NHPA, federal agencies 

23

cover story

… I know that we’ve done enough research to show that if we were to have a ramp of that size, scale and the acceptable safety compliance issues that exist for the federal regulations and for the right of way, we do not have the space in our right of way on that rail line to deploy that kind of ramp. If we were to deploy one of those ramps, the ramp would be deploying into the street.” Bascle doesn’t buy it. He believes all it would take is adding some of the newer ramp-equipped red cars to the line, putting in platforms and possibly widening

“The St. Charles Avenue Streetcar Line and the Perley Thomas Streetcars that service that line are both listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Prior to any modifications being made to the line or the streetcars, the Regional Transit Authority must seek authorization from governing bodies. The Regional Transit Authority has formed a committee to research the feasibility of moving toward accessibility on the St. Charles Avenue streetcar line. Members of the committee have discussed critical

RTA Board when it plans services for disabled riders; Provide technical assistance and advice about serving disabled ridership.” But Mercadel says the paratransit advisory committee is not the as-yet-unidentified one in charge of studying ADA compliance on the St. Charles Avenue Streetcar. Asked for the title of the appropriate committee, the names of any of its members, when it has met or whether any of its meetings have been publicly advertised, Mercadel emailed a statement to Gambit:

“Mayor Landrieu is committed to improving accessibility throughout our city. the rtA has rightly formed a committee to look into improving accessibility on the historic st. charles Avenue streetcar line. rtA already provides ADA paratransit services along the line and the rest of the entire rtA fleet is ADA compliant. ... We take ADA compliance very seriously.” — Mayor Mitch Landrieu’s administration

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According to Jacques Berry, spokesman for Lt. Gov. and Louisiana Department of Culture, Recreation and Tourism Commissioner Jay Dardenne, whose office oversees the Division of Historic Preservation, the city of New Orleans and NORTA can do whatever they want with the property and maintain its historic status — so long as they’re not trying to get federal funding for it. But with potential improvements along the 13-mile long track stretching most of the way across the city, plus a possible need for new red streetcars to supplement the active green ones, such a project would likely be prohibitively expensive and would require the city and NORTA to seek funds from the Federal Transit Administration, Mercadel and Berry say. Getting that process started while maintaining historic designation would require a state review (historic and engineering assessments along with a series of public hearings), then federal approval from NRHP. NORTA hasn’t taken the first step in that process. “We haven’t been contacted by the RTA,” Berry says. NORTA officials say they have formed a committee to determine whether the agency will make a formal inquiry, according to an emailed statement from Mercadel:

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 20 > 2011

some of the medians on St. Charles. “It would mostly be just cement and a curb cutout,” he says.

considerations including legality, operational capacity, safety concerns, and financial implications. All of these considerations are being explored fully prior to any formal action being taken. The RTA is committed to serving all members of the community and offers ADA paratransit services to qualifying riders. Additionally, all other RTA vehicles, with the exception of the St. Charles Avenue streetcar line, are fully accessible.” NORTA’s Board of Commissioners does have a committee with the specific mission of addressing disabled-rider issues. The 10-member paratransit advisory committee — its formal name is the Special Transit Services Committee — is overseen by NORTA ADA coordinator Karen Wilson-Sider. The paratransit advisory committee meets on the first Thursday of every other month. Its next meeting is 10 a.m. Oct. 6 in the boardroom of the RTA Building (2817 Canal St.). The committee’s four main objectives, according to the NORTA website, are to “Provide a forum for the concerns of disabled riders in the RTA’s service areas; Review current RTA policies, services, and procedures that affect the disabled community; Prepare comments and written recommendations for the RTA board about issues affecting disabled riders; Assist the

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“The statement provided constitutes the present position of the RTA as we move forward with exploring the feasibility of St. Charles Avenue Line accessibility.” Assuming the worst case — a hypothetical in which NORTA or the city started the formal process and the NPS decided any federally funded ADA improvements would result in a loss of historic status — it wouldn’t cost NORTA or the city anything, at least not anything financial. Being on the Register of Historic Places is good for tax benefits if the property is privately owned, which it’s not. The designation can be used to secure grants, but only if the money is going to be used for maintaining historic authenticity, not for improving service. As Bascle points out, the St. Charles line is not just an invaluable historic asset but a widely used public service. According to RTA ridership records, the St. Charles line provided 3.1 million rides in 2010. That accounts for 22 percent of total 2010 RTA ridership (13.8 million) and 53 percent of NORTA streetcar ridership (5.9 million). “The problem to me is that’s the main line to get to a lot of places in New Orleans,” Bascle says. “To not have (disabled) access to a line that’s ridden by the most people doesn’t seem right to me.”

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There is no bus service on St. Charles Avenue. NORTA’s suggested alternate bus lines are on Freret and Magazine streets — nine and seven blocks away for most of their routes — and the Leonidas line, which goes roughly in the same direction and takes a rider near the Uptown end of the St. Charles line but has little in common with it beyond that. Compare this to the San Francisco cable car system, which, like the St. Charles streetcar line, also fails to live up to ADA standards. That it’s a service intended mainly for visitors is clear just from its fare: $6 for children and adults, no transfers available. Then there’s the fact that almost all of the area covered by the cable cars is redundant to San Francisco’s regular bus and light rail services, which cost $2 for a single ride and are accessible. For Bascle, a comic who performs late at night in venues around the city, there’s yet another problem: time. The St. Charles line, only about a half-mile from his house, runs throughout the night, unlike any nearby bus line. “I was downtown last week [at the Howlin’ Wolf]. I was able to get the bus to that area earlier in the day, but I had to rush out of there to get home [on the Magazine bus line],” he says. “I think the latest one is still only 11:30 (p.m.).” Bascle’s Uptown house, where he lives with his parents and his brother Jesse, who also uses a wheelchair, is actually closer to the Freret Street bus line than the St. Charles streetcar. But the Freret bus stops running before 11 p.m. The next closest alternative, Magazine, stops at midnight inbound toward Canal Street and 11:39 p.m. outbound. Leonidas only goes until 7 p.m. and doesn’t run at all during the weekends. Bascle says getting a ride to places he needs to go can be difficult. His brother’s van has a wheelchair ramp but no hand controls for brakes and gas, so that requires a driver. So does getting a ride in a friend’s car. In both cases, Bascle is put in the uncomfortable position of depending on someone else to get home from his job — although the city has a municipal transit system. Mercadel defends NORTA’s overall commitment to providing service for disabled New Orleanians and says the agency complies with ADA rules on every other NORTA project, which accounted for 78 percent of last year’s total ridership. She says the percentage of rides taken in accessible vehicles could go even higher with the addition of new ADAcompliant streetcar service under construction. “We do have all of our other services compliant and fully accessible, whether you have a steel wheel that rolls on rails or whether you have a rubber wheel that runs on the streets in our city, everything else is fully accessible,” Mercadel says. “We are committed to moving forward to make certain that any of the new lines coming on are going to be compliant — the Loyola Avenue spur and the French Quarter spur. We find ourselves in a conundrum of having this amazing historic asset and trying to make certain that everything we do going forward ... addresses the needs of all the residents of this community.”

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School Technology keeps knocking on classroom doors, buT schools are careful abouT whaT They inviTe in. by k a ndace p ow er gr av e s

n today’s education parlance, going Old School refers to pre-laptop days when class time was spent taking notes with pen and paper while a teacher lectured at the front of the class. A new wave of learning techniques has students silently engaging with the teacher, asking questions and making comments through social media platforms that some educators say give voices to students who don’t normally raise their hands in class. The new paradigm has detractors, however, as teachers and school administrators try to harness the energy technology can bring to the classroom while balancing the need to keep students focused on schoolwork and protect them (and diminish the liability of schools) from the abundance of harmful materials available on the Internet. There’s no question classrooms need to adapt to students’ changing methods of cybercommunication — and many have done that — but the controversy comes in how to administer the new teaching methods and control the information students retrieve. “We have an academic discussion board, similar to what colleges use: Blackboard. We use Moodle,” says Philip Forchier, director of technology at Academy of the Sacred Heart. That program allows a closed circle of users to add content and comments, and students can hand in assignments over Moodle. “It allows teachers to post assignments, what went on in class that day, and students can comment back,” Forchier says. “The teacher has control over the conversation, and our students are the only ones with access. When a student logs on, they only have access to their teachers.” As for straight social media, Sydney Dubbin, dean of students at Sacred Heart’s upper school, says the policy is straightforward. “We do not allow our students to access Facebook or Myspace on campus,” she says. Shelly Raynal, director of public affairs at Holy Cross, says the all-boys school also

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 20 > 2011

I

has that rule. All Holy Cross students in fifth grade and up are issued laptops when school starts and every classroom has a smartboard (electronic interactive screens), she says. The school maintains an online community where students can check assignments, ask questions and keep abreast of what’s happening at the school. Computers first became commonplace in classrooms 30 years ago, after the National Commission on Excellence in Education issued A Nation at Risk in 1983, warning that education must keep pace with a world dominated by computers and jobs that require hightech expertise.

In response, the U.S. government in 1997 established the E-rate program to help schools and libraries build the infrastructure needed to connect to the Internet, thus bridging what then-Vice President Al Gore called “a gap between the information haves and the information have-nots.” Public schools in the U.S. had an average of 72 instructional computers in 1995, according to figures the U.S. Department of Education released in 2009, but by 2005, the number had risen to 154 computers per school — and 100 percent of the nation’s public schools were connected to the Internet. The Department of Education’s 2010 National Education Technology Plan ratchets up the need for tech

savviness with a policy that envisions students being online 24/7. What has changed over the years is the thought that connectedness for the less moneyed would be mainly through schools and libraries — and that it would be limited to a computer terminal. Today, students can go online from their smartphones or iPads, and family income no longer determines who has access to technology at home. The challenge for educators is to teach students how to capitalize on the positive things the cyber world can teach — new ideas, research, communication and technology skills — and minimize their exposure to the trash. Schools have enacted policies to page 28

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2011-12 Open Houses We invite you to visit our campuses to learn why you’ll love charter schools, too. Go to www.eastbankcollaborative.com to see video introductions to all our schools and direct links to their websites for downloadable student applications. Audubon Charter School

Lusher Charter

Lower School: (PK3-3)

428 Broadway St., New Orleans, LA 70118 • (504) 324-7100

Upper School: (4-8)

School visits by appointment only

719 S. Carrollton Ave., New Orleans, LA 70118 • (504) 324-7110 www.auduboncharter.com

Benjamin Franklin High School (9-12) 2001 Leon C. Simon Dr., New Orleans, LA 70122 (504) 286-2610 www.benfranklinhighschool.org

5100 Cannes St., New Orleans, LA 70129 (504) 324-7450 www.einsteincharter.org

3774 Gentilly, New Orleans, LA 70122 (504) 324-7160 www.hynesschool.org

1400 Camp St., New Orleans, LA 70130 • (504) 654-1088

Westbank Campus: 502 Olivier St., New Orleans, LA 70114 • (504) 274-4571 www.isl-edu.org

Lake Forest Elementary Charter

Middle/High School: (6-12)

Nov. 10 & Dec. 1 Oct. 22

Eastbank- 10 a.m.-noon Westbank- 1:00-3:00 p.m.

Morris Jeff Community School* (PK4-4) 2239 Poydras St., New Orleans, LA 70119 (504) 373-6258 www.morrisjeffschool.org

Moton Charter School* (PK-7) 6800 Chef Menteur Hwy., New Orleans, LA 70126 (504) 245-4400 www.eastbankcollaborative.com/moton.html

New Orleans Charter Science and Math High School (9-12) 5625 Loyola Ave., New Orleans, LA 70115 (504) 324-7061 www.noscihigh.com

Oct. 27

New Orleans Military and Maritime Academy (NOMMA) (9-10)

Oct. 11

Warren Easton Charter High School (9-12)

Eastbank- 6:00 p.m. Westbank- 6:00 p.m.

8:45 a.m.-10:30 a.m.

Henderson School, 1912 LB Landry Ave., New Orleans, LA 70112 (504) 227-3810 http://nomma.net

3019 Canal St., New Orleans, LA 70119 (504) 324-7400 www.warreneastoncharterhigh.org

8:20 a.m. Grades 2-5 Dec. 9 8:20 a.m. Grades 6-12 Nov. 10 6:00 p.m.

Oct. 17 6:00-7:30 p.m.

Please call school for details

Nov. 3 6:30-8:00 p.m.

Please call school for details

Dec. 1 5:00-7:00 p.m.

New ECCS unified student application and admissions dates for the 2012-13 school year* The timely application dates are as follows:

Application availability: Monday, October 10 Deadline for admissions application: Friday, January 13 Notification to parents - no later than: Friday, April 13 PLEASE NOTE: Only timely applications will be accepted for schools requiring a lottery. Not all ECCS schools will have a lottery and may accept applications year-round. Applications need to be delivered to each school individually. The applications will be available on each school’s website and supplemental information may be required. *Morris Jeff will not be using the unified student application or dates. Moton, a year-round school, will not be using the unified dates. Please call the schools for information.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 20 > 2011

Eastbank Campus:

12000 Hayne Blvd.. New Orleans, LA 70128 (504) 826-7140 www.lakeforestcharter.org

Sept. 22

9:00 a.m.

International School of Louisiana (K-8)

(Gifted PK, K-8)

Oct. 6

4:00-5:30 p.m.

Hynes Charter School (Gifted PK, K-8)

7315 Willow St., New Orleans, LA 70118 • (504) 862-5110 5624 Freret, New Orleans, LA 70115 • (504) 304-3960 www.lusherschool.org

6:00-8:00 p.m.

Einstein Elementary Charter (PK-8)

Lower School: (K-5)

Grades K-1

Nov. 11 & Dec. 2

27

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28

FEATURE

Someone will know the answer. You.

page 26

block or filter Internet access to pornography and other inappropriate materials in accordance with the Children’s Internet Protection Act. “At the heart of these various education technology policies are competing frames (policies developed based on the attitudes of those enforcing the new rules),” researchers wrote in Social Media Access in K-12 Schools: Intractable Policy Controversies in an Evolving World, which will be presented by University of Maryland researchers June Ahn, Lauren Bivona and Jeffrey DiScala during the American Society for Information Science & Technology annual meeting in New Orleans Oct. 9-12. “The narratives of economic competitiveness and digital divide compel education leaders to expand access to technology for students. However, fears about student safety on the Internet typically induce school organizations to dramatically restrict student use of new tools.” That study shows 95 percent of U.S. families own a cellphone, 93 percent own a home computer, and 94 percent have regular Internet users in the family. It also shows that young people have set up their own cyberspace networks, with nearly 75 percent of American teenagers using sites such as Facebook and Myspace. 2010’s Project Tomorrow reported that youngsters take on self-directed learning on the Internet, searching topics that interest them, finding videos, podcasts, blogs, websites and articles on their own. While it shows initiative, such explorations usually aren’t monitored by parents or school administrators. “Although young people have grown up surrounded by technology, researchers have found that youths exhibit large variability in skills such as online search or assessing the credibility of Internet sites,” the study concludes. “Furthermore, social media provides powerful opportunities for young people to participate in online communities, but these opportunities also introduce significant risks.” Those include cyberbullying, stalking and other activities. The conundrum becomes: How do schools promote media education so young people can learn to use new technologies safely and

ethically, but safeguard students against negative behaviors? “We have instruction on how to safely use all of these sites in our computer class,” Dubbin says, “and the archdiocese has films. We bring in outside speakers so [students] know about these social sites, but they are blocked on campus.” In the 2008 University of Minnesota study Educational Benefits of Social Networking Sites Uncovered, principal investigator Christine Greenhow, a learning technologies researcher in the school’s College of Education and Human Development, says, “What we found was that students using social networking sites are actually practicing the kinds of 21st century skills we want them to develop to be successful. Students are developing a positive attitude toward using technology systems, editing and customizing content and thinking about online design and layout. … The websites offer tremendous educational potential. “Now that we know what skills students are learning and what experiences they’re being exposed to, we can help foster and extend those skills … and build on that in our teaching.” Still another study, this one by researchers at Lock Haven University, South Dakota State University and Pennsylvania State University and published in the Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, suggests that using Twitter in class could lead to greater participation and higher grades. Of the first-year prehealth majors in the study, those who used Twitter in class typically averaged grades a half-point higher than the non-tweeters. The students reported richer discussions among students using Twitter and conversations that extended beyond the class hour. But can students in K-12 grades get as much out of using social technologies in the classroom as those college students? “Seeing students (in lower grades) use technology is amazing,” Raynal says. “They give it no thought. We have fifth-, sixthand seventh-graders … they have slide shows on our website and videos of science projects. It’s amazing what these fifth- and sixth-graders can do. They’re well-versed in technology, and they’re not afraid.”

MUSIC NEON INDIAN LIGHTS UP ONE EYED JACKS PAGE 35 FILM SHUT UP LITTLE MAN; DRIVE; BELLFLOWER; PAGE 42 CUISINE FOOD CARTS AND THE STREET FARE DERBY PAGE 57

TUCKER PUNCH 33

PAG E

CHRIS TUCKER AT THE UNO LAKEFRONT ARENA

>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << MUSIC FILM ART STAGE >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE YOU GO << <<<<<<<<<< << 35 42 46 49 >> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << THE >> >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>> << <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> > << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <THE HEAD AND THE HEART WITH THAO AND >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

THE GET DOWN STAY DOWN

Cutting Edge Music Business Conference & Events SEPT. 21-24 WWW.CUTTING EDGENOLA.COM

Stephanie Jordan will perform Friday at the NOLA Downtown Music & Arts Festival. PHOTO COURTESY OF CUTTING EDGE

Serious Business BY W IL L C OV IEL LO utting Edge Music Business Conference founder Eric Cager is not one to miss a good opportunity. The 18-year-old event is adding a new feature this year: a daytime free music festival in Lafayette Square. “We’ve always had a lot of great music (at the conference), but it has always taken place from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m.,” Cager says. “So we thought we should do a festival that’s an extension of the new music showcases during the daytime.” Called the NOLA Downtown Music & Arts Festival, it includes acts covering a wide range of ages and genres. Some of the more familiar performers include jazz vocalist Stephanie Jordan, funk bands Damon Batiste and the Batiste NOW and David Batiste and the Gladiators, the Brass-A-Holics brass band, the Gospel Soul Children and zydeco veterans Chubby Carrier and the Bayou Swamp Band. Newer bands include local rockers the Black Market Butchers. Since its inception in 1993, the festival primarily has combined showcases of new bands and singer/songwriters and seminars on legal issues. It added more seminars about the business side of the industry and opportunities like film tax credits. “Art is business,” Cager says. “It’s important for artists to realize that there are a lot of practical aspects. This is for artists, tour managers, booking agents and record labels.” There are a host of speakers presented in both

C

the Cutting Edge Music Business Conference and the Continuing Legal Education portions of conference. Keynote speakers include Jeffrey Brabec, a former vice president of ASCAP (American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers), record industry executives and Martin Atkins, a former member of Public Image Ltd., author of Tour:Smart and owner of both a record label and recording studio. Other elements of the conference include a film industry program, originally added in 2003 to address tax credits available for filmrelated projects, and the Roots Music Gathering, which highlights New Orleans Cultural Heritage. The NOLA Downtown festival presents music in Lafayette Square on Friday from 4:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. The conference’s Thursday night opening party at The Howlin’ Wolf is a fundraiser for the Roots of Music program, which provides music education to New Orleans school children. The entertainment lineup includes Marlon and Stephanie Jordan, LaTosha Brown, Tanya Boutte, George French and the Deja Vu Brass Band and others, and there is a tribute to legendary New Orleans composer Wardell Quezergue, who died on Sept. 6. From Thursday through Saturday, there are nighttime musical showcases for singer/songwriters, rock, hip-hop and R&B and gospel music at venues including 12 Bar, the Hard Rock Café, LeRoux and the Big Top Gallery. See the website for schedule and details.

52

CUISINE

57

SEPT

20

Singer/songwriters Thao Nguyen and Mirah Yom Tov Zeitlyn visited One Eyed Jacks last summer, almost a year before their blessed April union Thao & Mirah (Kill Rock Stars). Nguyen’s backing band this time is the Get Down Stay Down, with whom she’s recorded two crafty folk/rock records for KRS since 2008. The Devil Whale opens; The Head and the Heart, who opened for the Walkmen in April, headlines. Tickets $15. 10 p.m. Tuesday. One Eyed Jacks, 615 Toulouse St., 569-8361; www.oneeyedjacks.net

JACUZZI BOYS WITH THE DEAD PEOPLE

SEPT

CHRIS TUCKER

SEPT

PETER BJORN AND JOHN WITH DINOSAUR FEATHERS

SEPT

21

One of a growing number of bright Sunshine State prospects, Miami’s Jacuzzi Boys eschew the snotty pop of Jacksonville’s Black Kids and the sugared rock of West Palm Beach’s Surfer Blood, plunging into power-trio garage fuzz and Carter-era minimalist punk. Glazin’, the band’s second album and debut for Hardly Art, arrived in August. The Dead People opens. Call for ticket information. 10 p.m. Wednesday. Siberia, 2227 St. Claude Ave., 265-8855

23

Comedian Chris Tucker gained early notoriety on HBO’s Def Comedy Jam and picked up roles in comedies like House Party 3. But he’s best known for his work as a sideman to Hollywood’s most dangerous talents, Jackie Chan (Rush Hour and its two sequels) and Charlie Sheen (Money Talks). Tickets $54.40-$75 (includes fees). 8 p.m. Friday. UNO Lakefront Arena, 6801 Franklin Blvd., 280-7222; http://arena.uno.edu

26

Five years and two middling albums after their smash Writer’s Block (a titular jinx if there ever was one), Peter Moren, Bjorn Yttling and John Eriksson sound like they’re having fun making music again on Gimme Some (Columbia), the Swedish rockers’ sixth release. There’s no whistling world-beaters here, but there isn’t a sour note either. Dinosaur Feathers opens. Tickets $20. 10 p.m. Monday. One Eyed Jacks, 615 Toulouse St., 569-8361; www.oneeyedjacks.net

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 20 > 2011

THE CUTTING EDGE CONFERENCE INITIATES A DAYTIME FESTIVAL

EVENTS

33

LISTINGS

STICK THIS IN YOUR EAR

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

MUSIC Rolling Road Show, 5

LEGENDS BAR & GRILL — Tricks, 9

preview

THE MAISON — Jerry Jumonville & the Jump City Band, 6; Cat’s Pajamas Funk All Stars, 9

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Up Close & Personal feat. Cornell Williams & Big D Perkins, 10

MOJITO’S RUM BAR & GRILL — Fun in the Pocket feat. Mayumi Shara, 6; Lagniappe Brass Band, 9:30

All show times p.m. unless otherwise noted.

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Leslie Martin, noon

Tuesday 20

OLD FIREMEN’S HALL — Two Piece & a Biscuit feat. Brandon Foret, Allan Maxwell & Brian Melancon, 7:30

BANKS STREET BAR — Michael Matthews & Company, 10

OLD POINT BAR — Open Mic Night feat. Kim Cantwell, 6:30

BLUE NILE — WATIV CD release, 10

BMC — Spillway, 6; Royal Rounders, 8:30; Lagniappe Brass, 11 BULLETS SPORTS BAR — Kermit Ruffins, 6

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Domenic & Matt El DeOrazio, 7; Button Hoof & Eddy Price, 11 CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — Bart Ramsey, 6:30 COLUMNS HOTEL — John Rankin, 8

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Street Beat, 6 THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

FUNKY PIRATE — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30 HOWLIN’ WOLF NORTHSHORE — Gorilla Productions Battle of the Bands, 5

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Jason Marsalis, 8 JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Brint Anderson, 6 THE MAISON — Gregory Agid Quartet, 6; Magnitude, 9

MOJITO’S RUM BAR & GRILL — Carolyn Broussard, 6; ADO & Hot Lyrix, 9:30 OLD POINT BAR — Josh Garrett & the Bottom Line, 8

ONE EYED JACKS — The Head & the Heart, Thao & the Get Down Stay Down, The Devil Whale, 10

Kevin Barnes went batty during a winter sequestered in Scandinavia, but he came back with the most brutally honest and intricately inspired pop record of 2007, Of Montreal’s Hissing Fauna, Are You the Destroyer? Alan Palomo did the same this year and came back with Era Extrana (Mom + Pop), on which the New Yorker introduces a more mature, if less revolutionary, Neon Indian. That the September release neither hisses (aside from mixer Dave Fridmann’s exfoliating finish) nor destroys is no indictment of Palomo, a 23-year-old electronics whiz and bedroomrecording artist whose October 2009 debut Psychic Chasms — a mumbled recitation of half-remembered summertime highs made wavier through heat mirage — may have put him on the trail of something more tangible. (It also, by way of woozy single “Terminally Chill,” fomented the ignoble use of “glo-fi” and “chillwave” to describe his and others’ brand of laid-back, home-cooked electropop, two genre mongrels capable of driving any self-respecting artist off the continent in pursuit of reinvention.) On “Hex Girlfriend” and “Halogen (I Could Be a Shadow),” he strikes the perfect balance of ambition and nostalgia, swallowing his breathy, attractive melodies in a swarm of always-active analog synths and oscillating Doctor Who sound waves. Com Truise, aka New Jersey keyboard pornographer Seth Haley, opens. Tickets $14. — Noah Bonaparte Pais

SEPT

21

Neon Indian with Com Truise 10 p.m. Wednesday One Eyed Jacks, 615 Toulouse St., 569-8361; www.oneeyedjacks.net

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall-Stars feat. Shannon Powell, 8 RALPH’S ON THE PARK — Joe Krown, 5 SIBERIA — Viva City, Eli James, Evil Flying Chickens, 10 SPOTTED CAT — Ben Polcer, 4; Smokin’ Time Jazz Club, 6; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 10

Wednesday 21 12 BAR — Brass-A-Holics, 9

BANKS STREET BAR — Micah McKee’s Songwriters Showcase, 8; Major Bacon, 10 THE BEACH — Chicken on the Bone, Reverend Robert Rockefeller, 7:30 BIG AL’S SALOON — John Lisi & the Delta Funk, 8 BLUE NILE — United Postal Project, 8; Gravity A, 10:30 BMC — Bryce Eastwood, 6; Blues4Sale, 9:30

ONE EYED JACKS — Neon Indian, Com Truise, 10

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lars Edegran & Palm Court Jazz Band, 7 PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Band feat. Mark Braud, 8 RALPH’S ON THE PARK — Joe Krown, 5 RENDON INN BAR & GRILL — Marc Stone Band, 7 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Swing-a-Roux, 8:30 RUSTY NAIL — Jenn Howard, 8 SIBERIA — Jacuzzi Boys, Dead People, Jonesbirds, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Uptown Jazz Orchestra, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Ben Polcer, 4; Orleans 6, 6; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10 THREE MUSES — Mike Hood, 4:30; Bottoms Up Blues Gang, 7

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6

Thursday 22 12 BAR — Lucie Silvas, Riffs, Vaporats, 7:30

3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY — Cutting Edge Music Conference Gospel Night, 9

BANKS STREET BAR — Dave Jordan & the Neighborhood Improvement Association, 10 BAYOU PARK BAR — Jim Jones & the Koolaides, 9

CANDLELIGHT LOUNGE — Treme Brass Band, 9

FUNKY PIRATE — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30

CAROUSEL PIANO BAR & LOUNGE — Louis Prima Night feat. John Autin, Austin Clements & Tyler Clements, 8

HI-HO LOUNGE — DJ Bees Knees, Sinful Friends, 10

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Meschiya Lake, 8; Dayna Kurtz & Dave Torkanowsky, 10

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Hopetoun Collective, Gravy Flavored Kisses, 9

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — T-Bone Stone, 7; Nervous Duane, 11

HOUSE OF BLUES — Atmosphere, Evidence, Blueprint, 8; Atmosphere, Evidence, Blueprint, 8

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Street Beat, 6

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S I CLUB — Kristin Diable & Mia Borders, 8

DISH ON HAYNE — Kermit Ruffins, 6 D.B.A. — Walter “Wolfman” Washington & the Roadmasters, 10 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Bob Andrews, 9:30 EIFFEL SOCIETY — Vivaz!, 8

THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

THE BEACH — Chicken on the Bone, 7:30 BLUE NILE — Bottoms Up Blues Gang, 7

BMC — The Rambling Letters, 6; Troy Turner Band, 9:30 BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Tom McDermott & Aurora Nealand, 8 CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Domenic, 7; The Voodoo Fix, 11

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Smoking Time Jazz Club, 8

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KERRY IRISH PUB — Chip Wilson, 9

DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 5:30

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LAFAYETTE SQUARE — Harvest the Music feat. Paul Sanchez & the

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Loren Pickford, 9:30

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Sasha Masakowski, 5; Irvin Mayfield’s NOJO Jam, 8 JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Joe Bennett, 6

LACAVA’S SPORTS BAR — Crossfire, 9

CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — John Autin, 6:30

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Street Beat, 6

D.B.A. — Jon Cleary, 7

Bourbon St.

Live Entertainment Nightly

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 20 > 2011

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Rebirth Brass Band, 10

Neon Indian with Com Truise

35

LISTINGS

STICK THIS IN YOUR EAR

MUSIC

PAGE 35 THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

FUNKY PIRATE — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30 THE HANGAR — Pogo & That 1 Guy, 8

HOWLIN’ WOLF — Cutting Edge Music Conference Roots of Music Fundraiser, 6 THE INN ON BOURBON — Joe Ashlar, 6 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S I CLUB — Amanda Shaw, 8

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Roman Skakun, 5; Shamarr Allen, 8 KERRY IRISH PUB — Lynn Drury, 9

LAFITTE’S BLACKSMITH SHOP — Mike Hood, 9 LAFRENIERE PARK — Live at Lafreniere feat. Yat Pack, 6

THE MAISON — Those Peaches, 5; John Dobry, 7; Doombalaya, 10; Braindance (upstairs), 10

MAPLE LEAF BAR — The Trio, 10 MOJITO’S RUM BAR & GRILL — Andre Bouvier, 6; Smoky Greenwell’s Blues Jam, 9:30 NEW ORLEANS ARENA — Def Leppard, Heart, 7:30 OAK — Kristin Diable, 9

OLD POINT BAR — Blues Frenzy, 6:30 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Leroy Jones & Katja Toivola feat. Crescent City Joymakers, 7

PRESERVATION HALL — New Birth Brass Band feat. Tanio Hingle, 8 RAY’S — Bobby Love Band, 6

RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Arrivals, 8

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Leon Chavis, 8:30 ROYAL PALM — Philip Melancon Jr., 6:30

THE SALOON — Major Bacon, 5 SIBERIA — Holy Shit!, Your Pest Band, Die Rotzz, Roman Gabriel Todd/Bobby Sweatpants Duo, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Clarence Johnson III’s Tribute to John Coltrane, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Ben Polcer, 4; Miss Sophie Lee, 6; New Orleans Moonshiners, 10

TARPON JOE’S BAR AND GRILL — Minus Linus, 9:30 THREE MUSES — Tom McDermott, 4:30; Luke Winslow-King, 7:30

VAUGHAN’S — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 8:30

Friday 23 12 BAR — Tony Moore, Liz Lawrence, Alex Berger, Jill Jackson, 7:30

3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY — Friday Night Music Camp feat. Rue Fiya,

LEGENDS BAR & GRILL — Topcats, 10

THE MAISON — Those Peaches, 5; Kristina Morales, 7; Erika Flowers, 10; Free Spirits Brass Band, midnight MAPLE LEAF BAR — Mia Borders, 10

MOJITO’S RUM BAR & GRILL — Bryce Eastwood, 4; Eudora Evans & Deep Soul, 7; Fredy Omar con su Banda, 10:30; Mumbles, 12:30 a.m. OAK — Reed Alleman, 6; Jen Howard, 10

OLD POINT BAR — Thomas Johnson & the People, 9:30 ONE EYED JACKS — Garage A Trois, Vagabond Swing, 10

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Clive Wilson & Palm Court Jazz Band, 7 PELICAN CLUB — Sanford Hinderlie, 7

THE PERFECT FIT BAR & GRILL — Rechelle, Regeneration, 5:30 PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Masters feat. Leroy Jones, 8 REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — Jean-Eric, 10

RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Broken Heart Pharaohs, 9:30 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Dale Watson, Royal Southern Brotherhood feat. Devon Allman, Mike Zito & Cyril Neville, 8:30

SIBERIA — Katey Red Presents feat. Magnolia Rhome, Flyboy Keno, JC Styles, DJ Q, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Ellis Marsalis Trio, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Andy J. Forest, 4; Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 6:30; New Orleans Cotton Mouth Kings, 10 THREE MUSES — John Royen, 4; Gary Negbaur Trio, 6:30; Glen David Andrews, 10

Saturday 24 12 BAR — Christian Serpas & Ghost Town, 10

3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY — Cutting Edge Music Conference Showcase, 9

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4133 S. Carrollton ave ( @ T u l a n e ) 301-0938

S H a M r O C K Pa r T Y. C O M

Thursdays at Twilight Garden Concert Series

MON 9/19

Papa Grows Funk

Julio and Cesar

TUE 9/20

Rebirth Brass Band

SEPTEMBER 22

WED 9/21

Up Close & Personal

THIS WEEK’S PERFORMANCE

BABYLON LOUNGE — Fat Camp, Interior Decorating, Vuture, 10

THU The Trio featuring 9/22 Johnny V & Special Guests

BANKS STREET BAR — House of Surf, Green Demons, 10 BAYOU PARK BAR — Demonic Destruction, A Hanging, Ruiniverse, 10 BIG AL’S SALOON — New Orleans Quarter Notes, 8

BLUE NILE — Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 7; Kristin Diable (upstairs), 9

BMC — New Orleans Jazz Series, 3; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 6:30; Troy Turner Band, 9:30; Ashton & The Big Easy Brawlers Brass Band, 12:30 a.m. BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Jack Fine’s Foot Stompers, 8 PAGE 39

Showcasing Local Music

Adults: $8 / Children 5-12: $3 Children 4 & Under = FREE Mint Juleps and other refreshments available for purchase For more information call

(504) 483-9488

FRI 9/23

Mia Borders

SAT 9/24

Johnny Sketch & the Dirty Notes

TrioTrio w/ Walter SUN Joe JoeKrown Krown SUN “Wolfman” Washington feat. Russell Batiste & Walter 9/25 3/13 & Russell Batiste Wolfman Washington

New Orleans Best Every Night! 8316 Oak Street · New Orleans 70118

(504) 866-9359

www.themapleleafbar.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 20 > 2011

REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — Big Freedia, Mr. Ghetto, Nicky Da B, Monsta Wit Da Fade, Gotty Boi Chris, Rusty Lazer, 10

5; Cutting Edge Music Conference Gospel Night, 9 BANKS STREET BAR — Gravity A, 10 BAYOU PARK BAR — Revealers, 10 BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE LOUNGE — Frank Williams Jr. & Friends feat. Bobby Love, 8 BLUE NILE — Mykia Jovan & Jason Butler, 8; Bottoms Up Blues Gang (upstairs), 9; Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 11 BMC — Moonshine & Caroline, 7; Rue Fiya, 10; The Soulbillyswampboogie Band, 12:30 a.m. BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Royal Rounders feat. Adam Rogers, 8 CARROLLTON STATION — Tanglers, 9:30 CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Louisiana Hellbenders, 7; The Great In Between, 11 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Sweet Olive String Band, 5:30; Phil DeGruy & Michael Skinkus, 8; Grand Baton, 10 CLEVER WINE BAR — Scott Sanders Quartet feat. Olivier Bou, 8 THE CYPRESS — Roarshark, Hobobones, 7 DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 9 D.B.A. — Hot Club of New Orleans, 6; Happy Talk Band, 10 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Eric Traub Trio, 10 FUNKY PIRATE — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30 HARD ROCK CAFE — Jason & the Kruegers, 12:30; The New, 9; Green Demons, 9:45; Fire Bug, 11; Dem Sons of Bitches, 11:45 HERMES BAR — Brian Coogan & Friends, 9:30 & 11 HI-HO LOUNGE — Strange Roux & Friends HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Earphunk, Mississippi Rail Co., Coyotes, The Blue Party, Wooden Wings, 9 THE INN ON BOURBON — Joe Ashlar, 6 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S I CLUB — Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 8 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Joe Krown, 5; Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown, 8; Burlesque Ballroom feat. Meschiya Lake, midnight JUJU BAG CAFE AND BARBER SALON — Michaela Harrison, Todd Duke, 7:30 KERRY IRISH PUB — Damien Louviere, 5; Danny Burns, 9 KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LAFAYETTE SQUARE — Nola Downtown Festival feat. Brass-A-Holics, 4:30; Chubby Carrier & the Bayou Swamp Band, 5; Stephanie Jordan, 6; Damon Batiste & Batiste Now, 7 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Tom Worrell, 7

37

LUNCH SPECIALS

VIETNAMESE FRESH SPRING ROLLS $6.95

starting at $5.45

Daily soup or Salad with your lunch for only $1.95

FILM

Is the Summer too hot for you? Cool off with our Vietnamese fresh SPRING ROLLS & VERMICELLI SALAD to fill you up. Also, our CHINESE & VEGETARIAN dishes will cure that Summer time hunger.

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

NOW SHOWING APOLLO 18 (PG-13) — The found-footage-style horror depicts a failed mission to the moon. AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Hollywood 7, Grand

witnessing the murder of her parents as a child, a woman (Zoe Saldana) grows up to be a professional assassin with a goal of revenge. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14, Grand

3635 Prytania St.

(at Amelia)

CONTAGION (R) — A lethal

NOLA 70115

airborne virus rapidly spreads across the world in the drama starring Matt Damon, Gwyneth Paltrow, Jude Law, Kate Winslet and Laurence Fishburne. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies, Grand Hollywood 9, Prytania

(504)899-5129 For full Menu please visit our web site:

www.moonnola.com

THE DEBT (R) — Helen Mirren

IT’S HURRICANE SEASON. Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 20 > 2011

Is your property covered?

42

stars as a former Israeli Mossad agent who must confront her haunting past when a Nazi war criminal she believed to be dead resurfaces. AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 14

DON’T BE AFRAID OF THE DARK (R) — Katie Holmes and Guy

Pearce star in the horrorthriller about a family that moves into a mansion already occupied by hellish spirits. AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9

FINAL DESTINATION 5 (R) —

Survivors of a bridge collapse learn there’s no way to evade death in the latest installment of the horror franchise. AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20

THE FUTURE (R) — Miranda July

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preview Pearl Jam Twenty

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

COLOMBIANA (PG-13) — After

DINE IN • TAKE OUT CATERING • DELIVERY

A ROOM WITH A VIEW

directs and stars in the offbeat drama about a couple whose lives drastically change after adopting a cat. Canal Place THE GUARD (R) — An Irish cop with a subversive sense of humor is teamed up with an uptight FBI agent to investigate a drug ring. AMC Palace 20 THE HELP (PG-13) — In the

film adaptation of Kathryn Stockett’s hit novel, an aspiring journalist shakes up her conservative Southern town when she interviews the black maids of the city’s upper class. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 14

Pearl Jam emerged from Seattle’s burgeoning grunge scene in the early 1990s and climbed to and maintained super rock star status, selling more than 60 albums worldwide. Early on, members of the band befriended precocious Rolling Stone journalist Cameron Crowe, author of Fast Times at Ridgemont High, and writer/director of Jerry McGuire, Say Anything and the semiautobiographical Almost Famous. For this film commemorating the band’s 20 years together, Crowe filmed new interviews and culled rarely seen footage from the band’s career. Throughout its history, Pearl Jam maintained control of many aspects of its management and distribution and achieved a level of autonomy that also allowed it to maintain some privacy (or what’s possible for a famous rock band). That’s led to the buzz about this project, and the film debuted at the Toronto International Film Festival last week. It screens at select national theaters on Sept. 20 for one night only (two showings). Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center hosts the only screening in Louisiana, and Zeitgeist founder Rene Broussard reports that his theater is one of eight nationally that will be allowed to run the film for a week (Sept. 23-27). — Will Coviello

SEPT

2027

Pearl Jam Twenty 7:30 p.m. & 9:30 p.m. Tuesday Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

I DON’T KNOW HOW SHE DOES IT (PG-13) — Based on Allison

Pearson’s best-selling novel, Sarah Jessica Parker plays an ambitious career woman trying to have it all. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 14

LIONS 3-D: THE ROAR OF THE KALAHARI (G) — In Botswana’s

Kalahari Desert, a life-anddeath struggle between a real lion king and a fierce, young contender unfolds. Entergy IMAX

THE LION KING 3-D (G) — The

Disney classic gets a 3-D update in this re-release. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 PROJECT NIM (R) — James Marsh’s film documents the 1970s experiment that aimed to see if a chimpanzee could communicate like humans if raised as a human child. Canal Place RISE OF THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) — The origin

story of the cult classic takes place in modern-day San

Francisco, where a geneticist’s engineering begets intelligent apes. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 SHARK NIGHT 3-D (PG-13) —

While at a Louisiana lake house, a group of friends happens upon hundreds of flesh-eating sharks in the Shreveport-filmed horror. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand STRAW DOGS (R) — A Los Angeles-based couple moves back to the wife’s hometown in the South, where they face conflict with the locals that becomes increasingly violent. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 TRANSFORMERS: DARK OF THE MOON (PG-13) — A mysterious

event from the past threatens to bring war to Earth in the third installment of Michael Bay’s giant robot franchise. Entergy IMAX WARRIOR (R) — A man trains for a mixed martial arts PAGE 44

PETER TRAVERS

AND MOST VISCERALLY

EXCITING FILMS OF THE YEAR. BRAD PITT NAILS EVERY NUANCE. JONAH HILL SCORES A KNOCKOUT!

BRAD PITT SHOWS US ONCE AGAIN

KAREN DURBIN

‘MONEYBALL’ LEFT ME READY TO CHEER.” “‘MONEYBALL’ IS HILARIOUS. JUST HOW GOOD HE IS.” BRUCE HANDY

“ENTERTAINING

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 20 > 2011

DOLPHIN TALE (PG) — Harry Connick Jr. stars in the true story of the people who helped a dolphin struggling to survive after being caught in a crab trap. MONEYBALL (PG-13) — Brad Pitt plays Billy Beane, the general manager of the Oakland Athletics who employed the use of a computer-based analysis to draft players.

THE EDDY DUCHIN STORY (NR) — The 1956 film is a biopic of

BRAD PITT IS

44

OPENING FRIDAY

SPECIAL SCREENINGS

MONEYBALL’ CRUISES INTO THE HIGH GEAR OF THE SAVVIEST OLD HOLLYWOOD COMEDIES.

SENSATIONAL.”

YES MA’AM (R) — Gary L. Goldman’s 1982 documentary features interviews with black domestic laborers in New Orleans and the white families who employ them. Chalmette Movies

Statham, Clive Owen and Robert De Niro star in the action film about an exspecial ops agent who comes out of retirement when his mentor is taken captive.

ACHIEVEMENT.”

band leader and pianist Eddy Duchin. Tickets $5.50. Noon Wednesday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com

RICHARD CORLISS

A FILM BY BENNETT MILLER

FIGHT CLUB (R) — A discontent white-collar worker forms an underground “fight club” with an eccentric soap salesman in the 1999 film based on the Chuck Palahniuk novel. Tickets $8. Midnight FridaySaturday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com GHOSTBUSTERS (PG) — The

“MONEYBALL” COLUMBIA PICTURESEXECUTIVEPRESENTS A SCOTT RUDIN/MICHAEL DE LUCA/RACHAEL HOROVITZ PRODUCTION BASED ON THE PRODUCERS SCOTT RUDIN ANDREW KARSCH SIDNEY KIMMEL MARK BAKSHI MYCHAEL DANNASCREENPLAY BOOK BY MICHAEL LEWIS PRODUCED STAN CHERVIN BY STEVEN ZAILLIAN AND AARON SORKIN DIRECTED BY MICHAEL DE LUCA RACHAEL HOROVITZ BRAD PITT BY BENNETT MILLER

MUSIC BY STORY BY

STARTS fRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 23

CHECk LOCAL LISTINGS fOR THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES

A ROOM WITH A VIEW

PAGE 42

tournament and is forced to confront his estranged older brother, a former MMA fighter. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

KILLER ELITE (PG-13) — Jason

THIS FILM MARKS A SERIOUS AND

“‘

FILM

“‘MONEYBALL’ IS ONE OF THE BEST

LISTINGS

New Orleans Film Society hosts an outdoor screening of the 1984 comedy about a group of unemployed parapsychologists’ unique ghost removal services. There will be food and drink vendors on site. Free admission. 8 p.m. Friday, Coliseum Square Park, Coliseum and Euterpe Streets; www.coliseumsquare.org

LESSON BEFORE LOVE (NR) — Dui Jarrod’s New Orleans-

made film follows a group of unfulfilled singles in their journey toward love. There is a meet-and-greet with Jarrod before the screening, and a Q&A session after. Tickets $10. 7 p.m. Thursday, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

MOVIES IN THE PARK. The

New Orleans Recreation Development Commission hosts free outdoor screenings

review Shut Up Little Man

Fans of found object kitsch and pop cultural static may be familiar with the phrase “Shut up, little man.” It’s the signature line from the surreptitiously taped fights of chronically drunk and foul-mouthed San Francisco roommates Peter, who was gay, and Raymond, who was bitterly homophobic. The tapes were recorded in the late 1980s by Eddie Lee Sausage and Mitchel Deprey, who, fresh out of college, moved to the Bay Area and took the cheap apartment next door. They dubbed outtakes from the verbal wars onto cassette tapes they shared with friends, and those spread to other traders. Eventually, clips made it onto offbeat radio shows, comic artists started to chronicle their visions of Peter and Ray, and the new wave band Devo used some of the recordings as dubbed lyrics for a song, “Shut Up Little Man,” of course. Then there were puppet show dramatizations of the duo, a stage play and eventually competing film projects. Matthew Bates’ Shut Up Little Man: An Audio Misadventure starts at the beginning, following Mitch and Eddie from Wisconsin to San Francisco. They recount taking the apartment and why they started taping their neighbors and sharing the recordings. Bates cleverly dubs recorded rants over film of Hitler making an impassioned speech and stock footage of a 1950s married couple having a spat. Then he focuses on the various comic and dramatic projects that appropriated Peter and Ray’s dialogue, which Mitch and Eddie first disseminated explicitly labeled as free use. They tried to copyright the recordings in 1994. Bates’ film is best when playing the original tapes and recounting the projects they inspired. He then follows two threads. Eddie and Mitch try to discover the true nature of Peter and Ray’s relationship. And Bates follows the development of competing film projects, which asks some interesting questions about the nature of surreptitiously recorded conversations as intellectual property. Unfortunately, the film redacts many of the names of the studio people involved in the competition for rights, and it doesn’t really answer some of the questions. But the truly raw footage is outrageous and entertaining, and it’s an almost nostalgic look at underground culture and how things went viral just before the Internet. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students/ seniors, $5 Zeitgeist members. — Will Coviello

SEPT

2329

Shut Up Little Man: An Audio Misadventure 7:30 p.m. Fri.-Thu. Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 8275858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

of family movies on Fridays and Saturdays at greenspaces across the city. Visit www. nola.gov/Residents/NORD/ Movies-in-the-Park for the full schedule and other details. 7:45 p.m. Friday-Saturday

through Nov. 26. PRAY THE DEVIL BACK TO HELL (NR) — The film chronicles

the story of Liberian women whose silent protests brought about agreement amid a bloody civil war. The screen-

FILM

LISTINGS

A ROOM WITH A VIEW

review Drive and Bellflower

SEPT

2627

Drive Wide release Bellflower 7:30 p.m. Mon.-Tue., Sept. 26-27 Chalmette Movies, 8700 W. Judge Perez Drive, Chalmette, 304-9992; www.chalmettemovies.com

ing is part of Ashe, ITVS Community Cinema and the Charitable Film Network’s Community Fall Film Series. Free admission. 6 p.m. Friday, Ashe Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 5699070; www.ashecac.org SHOW BOAT (NR) — The 1951 movie-musical, adapted from Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein’s stage show, is about a daughter of a riverboat captain who falls for a charming gambler. Tickets $5.50. Noon Saturday-Sunday

and Sept. 28, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com AMC Palace 10 (Hammond), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 12 (Clearview), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 16 (Westbank), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 20 (Elmwood), (888) 262-4386; Canal Place, 363-1117; Chalmette Movies, 304-9992; Entergy IMAX, 581-IMAX; Grand (Slidell), (985) 641-1889; Hollywood 9 (Kenner), 464-0990; Hollywood 14 (Covington), (985) 893-3044; Kenner MegaDome, 468-7231;

Prytania, 891-2787; Solomon Victory Theater, National World War II Museum, 527-6012 Compiled by Lauren LaBorde Scan for movie times.

SCREEN GEMS PRESENTS A BATTLEPLANMUSICPRODUCTION “STRAW EXECUTIVE DOGS” DOMINIC PURCELL LAZ ALONSO WILLA BASED HOLLAND AND JAMES WOODS BY LARRY GROUPÉ PRODUCERS BEAU MARKS GILBERT DUMONTET BASED ON THE ABC MOTION ON THE NOVEL “THE SIEGE OF TRENCHER’S FARM” BY GORDON WILLIAMS PICTURE SCREENPLAY BY DAVID ZELAG GOODMAN AND SAM PECKINPAH DIRECTED PRODUCED SCREENPLAY BY ROD LURI E BY MARC FRYDMAN BY ROD LURI E check local listings for theaters and showtimes

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 20 > 2011

Both Drive and Bellflower take up the American cinematic love affair with cars, crime and violence, but from different ends of the film industry. Drive is a slick bigbudget project based on crime writer James Sallis’ novel (whose Lew Griffin private eye series is set in New Orleans). Bellflower is writer/director/star Evan Glodell’s personal hipster apocalypse, and is far more interesting if you can handle the self-importance of self-destructive, downwardly mobile slackers. In Drive, Ryan Gosling stars as a talented driver (movie stunts, race cars, getaway cars) who spends much of the film cruising or roaring through Los Angeles’ streets in the hazy night glow of street and city lights, to noirish effect. The parttime criminal moves into a new apartment after a heist gone wrong and meets attractive neighbor Irene (Carey Mulligan). Her husband is in jail, where he’s managed to pile up protection money debts that draw threats to her life. More heists go wrong, mobsters demand money or blood, and the driver goes from fleeing to being the source of the film’s sudden and brutal eruptions of violence. Gosling’s loner wheelman is stoic and steely although at times that seems to be indistinct from emotionless and dull. Albert Brooks’s mobster also at times offers odd moods for the task at hand. The film doesn’t have Quentin Tarantino’s stylized cool and sharp dialogue. But the tension is tight and the chase scenes are solid and original. What drives all the violence, other than the pulp fiction thrills, is not very deep, but the action grips the road and burns rubber. Perhaps the best conceit in Bellflower is that the two main characters, friends Aiden (Tyler Dawson) and Woodrow (Glodell), are gleefully pursing post-apocalypse readiness. The slacker tinkerers build their own flame thrower and refine their Mad Max-style muscle car (the Medusa). The women with whom they guzzle whiskey and beer find this cool, and Woodrow courts the far more brassy Milly (Jessie Wiseman) during a grizzled road trip. When a gargantuan roughneck slaps Milly’s ass, Woodrow demands an apology, threatens the guy and ends up unconscious. Milly would have preferred he won the fight, but the bravado is charming enough for her. Woodrow can’t live up to the swagger of his doom machines, and eventually Milly finds his puppy dog affections and lack of sexual machismo a problem. Whatever the couple lacks in relationship skills they overcompensate for with booze, cheating, brandishing guns and feats of both petty and reckless abandon. Their smoldering relationship unleashes rivalries among friends, violent confrontations and all around destruction. The young cast ably animates a bunch of inspired and gritty hipsters. The self-immolation is both hard to watch and and harder to stop watching. Woodrow doesn’t seem to understand the extent to which he is fighting for his mind and soul, and to him, putting out the flame just doesn’t seem cool. Bellflower screens two nights only and is sponsored by Chalmette Movies and the New Orleans Film Society. — Will Coviello

45

ART

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

GALLERIES 1022 GALLERY. 1022 Lowerline St., 301-0679; www.1022gallery. blogspot.com — Mixed media and ceramics by Dana Beuhler, Hannah Scheurich, Brandon Zeringue and Chris Scheurich, through Oct. 8. 3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY. 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com — “Greetings

from Louisiana: Graphic Grattitude,” screenprints and mixedmedia typography by Daniela Marx, through Saturday.

A GALLERY FOR FINE PHOTOGRAPHY. 241 Chartres St., 568-1313; www.agallery.com —

Exhibition of gallery artists featuring Louviere + Vanessa, Sebastiao Salgado, Joshua Mann Pailet and Herman Leonard, through September.

ACADEMY GALLERY. 5256 Magazine St., 899-8111 — Faculty

exhibition, through Saturday.

BERGERON STUDIO & GALLERY. 406 Magazine St., 522-7503; www.bergeronstudio.com — Photographs by Michael P. Smith, Jack Beech, Harriet Blum, Kevin Roberts and others, ongoing.

and jewelry by local artists Noel Rockmore, Michael Fedor, Xavier de Callatay, Charles Bazzell, Bambi deVille and Ritchie Fitzgerald, ongoing.

ARTICHOKE GALLERY. 912 Decatur St., 636-2004 — Artists work on

site in all media; watercolors and limited-edition prints by Peter Briant, ongoing.

BARRISTER’S GALLERY. 2331 St. Claude Ave., 525-2767; www.barristersgallery.com — “Precipice,”

FRAMIN’ PLACE & GALLERY. 3535 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-3311; www.nolaframing.com — Prints

by Tommy Thompson, Phillip Sage, James Michalopoulos and others, ongoing. FREDRICK GUESS STUDIO. 910 Royal St., 581-4596; www.fredrickguessstudio.com — Paintings by

Fredrick Guess, ongoing.

THE FRONT. 4100 St. Claude Ave.; www.nolafront.org — Works

by Clay Blancett, Tod Seelie, Megan Hildebrandt and Valorie Polmer, through Oct. 2.

Paintings and works on paper by Mark Bercier, ongoing.

CALICHE & PAO GALLERY. 312 Royal St., 588-2846 — Oil paintings by Caliche and Pao, ongoing.

CAROL ROBINSON GALLERY. 840 Napoleon Ave., 895-6130; www.carolrobinsongallery. com — “Blueprints: Reflections of Modern Design,” works on canvas by Nell Tilton, through Saturday.

ART GALLERY 818. 818 Royal St., 524-6918 — Paintings, sculpture

Coignard, Engel, Papart, Petra, Tobiasse, Schneuer and Yrondi, ongoing.

CAFE BABY. 237 Chartres St., 3104004; www.markbercier.com —

ANTIEAU GALLERY. 927 Royal St., 304-0849; www.antieaugallery. com — “Gambling for Souls,” works by Molly McGuire and Stephen Warde Anderson, through Oct. 10.

Welch and Dexter Brecht, jewelry by Don David, through September.

artists, ongoing.

ELLIOTT GALLERY. 540 Royal St., 523-3554; www.elliottgallery. com — Works by gallery artists

Conversations, Reflections, and Observations,” silkscreen prints by Brian Folley Kelly, through Oct. 4.

CARIBBEAN ARTS LTD. 720 Franklin Ave., 943-3858 — The gallery

ARIODANTE GALLERY. 535 Julia St., 524-3233 — Paintings by Martin

DUTCH ALLEY ARTIST’S CO-OP GALLERY. 912 N. Peters St., 4129220; www.dutchalleyonline. com — Works by New Orleans

BYRDIE’S GALLERY. 2422-A St. Claude Ave., www.byrdiesgallery.com — “Altered Spaces:

ANTENNA GALLERY. 3161 Burgundy St., 957-4255; www.pressstreet.com — “Ash Column,”

by Anton Haardt, Christopher Moses and others, ongoing.

Best Friend,” paintings by Jeremy Willis, through Nov. 5.

BRYANT GALLERIES. 316 Royal St., 525-5584; www.bryantgalleries.com — Paintings by Dean Mitchell, ongoing.

CARDINAL GALLERY. 541 Bourbon St., 522-3227 — Exhibition of Ital-

ANTON HAARDT FOLK GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www.antonart.com — Works

review

We Stand to Save Our Wetlands,” works by Nilo and Mina Lanzas; works by Clementine Hunter, Noel Rockmore and others; all ongoing.

ALL IN THE FRAME GALLERY. 2596 Front St., Slidell, (985) 2901395 — “Serene Waters, Clear

drawings by Angela Driscoll, through Oct. 2.

DU MOIS GALLERY. 4921 Freret St., 818-6032 — “Fear is a Man’s

BERTA’S AND MINA’S ANTIQUITIES GALLERY. 4138 Magazine St., 895-6201 — “Louisiana! United

CALLAN FINE ART. 240 Chartres St., 524-0025; www.callanfineart. com — Works by Eugene de

Horizons,” paintings by Annie Strack, ongoing.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 20 > 2011

paintings and constructions by Kathleen Loe, through Oct. 1.

AG WAGNER STUDIO & GALLERY. 813 Royal St., 561-7440 — Works

by gallery artists; 504 Toys, locally handcrafted toys; both ongoing.

46

WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET

Blass, Louis Valtat and other artists of the Barbizon, Impressionist and Post-Impressionist schools, ongoing.

ian artists featuring works by Bruno Paoli and Andrea Stella, ongoing.

showcases contemporary Haitian and Jamaican art.

CARROLL GALLERY. Newcomb Art Department, Woldenberg Art Center, 314-2228; www.tulane. edu/~art/carrollgallery — “Text/

Image,” a group exhibition featuring works that integrate text and and image. Closing reception 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Thursday. CASELL GALLERY. 818 Royal St., 524-0671; www.casellartgallery. com — Pastels by Joaquim

Casell; etchings by Sage; oils by Charles Ward; all ongoing.

COLE PRATT GALLERY. 3800 Magazine St., 891-6789; www. coleprattgallery.com — Paint-

ings by Andrew Bucci, David Rex Joyner and Stephan Hoffpauir, through Saturday.

COLLECTIVE WORLD ART COMMUNITY. Poydras Center, 650 Poydras St., 339-5237; www.collectiveworldartcommunity.com —

Paintings from the Blue Series

GALERIE D’ART FRANCAIS. 541 Royal St., 581-6925 — Works by

Todd White, ongoing.

Poloroids and Jazz

To casual observers, some of Thomas Roma’s photographs can be a little elusive at first. Like Lee Friedlander, whose jazz portraits appear in the next room, Roma’s approach can seem random, so it takes a minute to realize his views of Brooklyn and Sicily sometimes involve a compositional counterpoint as intricate as a Bach fugue. Like Friedlander, Roma incorporates incidentals that most photographers avoid, but here they result in an ambient sensibility that breaks the usual rules while communicating the haphazard intimacy of the Brooklyn landscape. His most compellingly human works have to be his Come Sunday photos of worshipers in black Brooklyn churches, some of which once were synagogues as is also occasionally the case in New Orleans’ Central City. Here the epiphanies of a very emotional form of religious experience are conveyed with great warmth and empathy, which makes for a striking contrast with Roma’s more detached Brooklyn and Sicilian vistas. One of the ironies of a town notorious for taking genius for granted was that it was left to two great photographers from elsewhere — Friedlander and Ralston Crawford — to document New Orleans’ traditional jazz musicians of the 1950s. In this series, the young Friedlander’s vision is at its most direct and unvarnished, yet his sly use of incidentals is apparent in works such as his 1958 Joe James portrait (pictured), where the intense pianist is framed by Falstaff beer graphics in the background. This stands in marked contrast to the nearby Pop Shots series of Andy Warhol’s Polaroid photos, yet the stylized glitz of the Peter Pan of Pop is localized in his series of portraits of former New Orleans Museum of Art photography curator Tina Freeman, interspersed with the likes of Pia Zadora and other bygone glitterati. In this show, many of the uncanny connections that link Brooklyn, New York, New Orleans and even Sicily are all on display under the same roof. — D. Eric Bookhardt

THRU OCT

09

Pictures For Books: Photographs by Thomas Roma Jazz People: New Orleans Jazz Photographs by Lee Friedlander Pop Shots: Polaroid portraits by Andy Warhol Tulane University, Newcomb Art Gallery, 865-5328; www.tulane.edu/~newcomb/artindex.html

by Joseph Pearson, ongoing. COLLECTIVE WORLD ART COMMUNITY. 2820 St. Claude Ave., 339-5237; www.collectiveworldartcommunity.com — Works by

members of Galerie Nothburga, featuring Elisabeth Melkonyan, Johanna Bair, Inge von Reusner, Anna-Maria Achatz and Gabriela Nepo Stieldorf, through September.

COUP D’OEIL ART CONSORTIUM. 2033 Magazine St., 722-0876; www.coupdoeilartconsortium. com — “And the Earth Begot

...” works by Michele Basta, through Oct. 8.

COURTYARD GALLERY. 1129 Decatur St., 330-0134; www. woodartandmarketing.com —

Hand-carved woodworks by Daniel Garcia, ongoing.

DIGEST. 723 Louisa St.; www. digest.723louisa.org — Mono-

types, watercolor, paintings and mixed media by Patch Somerville, Cayla Zeek and Mark Waguespack, through September.

D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., 524-3936 — “Jump ’N’ Jive,” oil paintings

by Perry Morgan III, through Sept. 29.

GALERIE PORCHE WEST. 3201 Burgundy St., 947-3880 — Pho-

tography by Christopher Porche West, ongoing.

GALLERIA BELLA. 319 Royal St., 581-5881 — Works by gallery artists, ongoing. GALLERY BIENVENU. 518 Julia St., 525-0518; www.gallerybienvenu. com — “Bending the Curve,” acrylic on panel by Michael Kessler, through Sunday. GALLERY VERIDITAS. 3822 Magazine St.; 267-5991 — “Cycles of Discovery,” photos by Thomas Kiefer and Stewart Harvey, through Oct. 9. GEORGE SCHMIDT GALLERY. 626 Julia St., 592-0206; www. georgeschmidt.com — Paintings by George Schmidt, ongoing. GRAPHITE GALLERIES. 936 Royal St., 565-3739 — “Sinners and

Saints,” works by Joe Hobbs; works by Christy Lee Rogers; both ongoing.

GUTHRIE CONTEMPORARY. 3815 Magazine St., 897-2688; www. guthriecontemporary.com — “Schemata,” works by Susan Dory, ongoing. GUY LYMAN FINE ART. 3645 Magazine St., 899-4687; www. guylymanfineart.com — Mixed media with mechanical light sculptures by Jimmy Block, ongoing. HAROUNI GALLERY. 829 Royal St., 299-8900 — Paintings by David

Harouni, ongoing.

HERIARD-CIMINO GALLERY. 440 Julia St., 525-7300; www.heriardcimino.com — “Perchance

to Dream,” box assemblages by Audra Kohout, through Saturday.

ISAAC DELGADO FINE ARTS GALLERY. Delgado Community Col-

ART

LISTINGS

& Sculptural Extravaganza,” culinary sculpture by Jean-Luc Albin of Maurice’s French Pastries, ice carving by Dawson, chocolate sculpture by Cloud Candi and 3-D designs by The Bikery, through September. NEWCOMB ART GALLERY. Woldenberg Art Center, Tulane University, 865-5328; www. newcombartgallery.tulane. edu — “Pictures for Books,”

photographs by Thomas Roma; “Jazz People: New Orleans Portraits,” photographs by Lee Friedlander; “Pop Shots,” Polaroid portraits by Andy Warhol; all through Oct. 9.

OCTAVIA ART GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www. octaviaartgallery.com — Mixed-

media paintings by Meredith Keith, through Saturday.

ONE SUN GALLERY. 616 Royal St., (800) 501-1151 — Works by local

and national artists, ongoing.

PEARL ART GALLERY. 4421 Magazine St., 228-5840 — Works

by Cindy and Drue Hardegree, Erica Dewey, John Womack, Sontina, Lorraine Jones and S. Lee, ongoing.

PHOTO WORKS NEW ORLEANS. 521 St. Ann St., 593-9090; www. photoworksneworleans.com —

Photography by Louis Sahuc, ongoing.

REINA GALLERY. 4132 Magazine St., 895-0022; www.reinaart. com — “Vintage New Orleans

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 20 > 2011

Artists,” watercolors, etchings and folk art; “Patron Saints,” works by Shelley Barberot; both ongoing.

REYNOLDS-RYAN ART GALLERY. Isidore Newman School, 5333 Danneel St., 896-6369; www. newmanschool.org — “Poetry &

Motion,” mixed media on panel and canvas by Demond Matsuo and Karoline Schleh, through Oct. 13. RHINO CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS GALLERY. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www.rhinocrafts.com — Works by Margo Manning,

Chris Menconi, Chip Tipton, Andrew Jackson Pollack and others, ongoing.

RIVERSTONE GALLERIES. 719 Royal St., 412-9882; 729 Royal St., 581-3688; Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 36, 566-0588; 733 Royal St., 525-9988; www. riverstonegalleries.net — Multi-

media works by Ricardo Lozano, Michael Flohr, Henry Ascencio, Jaline Pol and others, ongoing. RODRIGUE STUDIO. 721 Royal St., 581-4244; www.georgerodrigue.com — Works by George

Rodrigue, ongoing.

ROSETREE GLASS STUDIO & GALLERY. 446 Vallette St., Algiers Point, 366-3602; www.rosetreeglass.com — Hand-blown glass

works, ongoing.

RUSTY PELICAN ART. 4031 St. Claude Ave., 218-5727; www. rustypelicanart.com — Works by

Travis and Lexi Linde, ongoing.

48

SALONE DELL’ARTES ARTEMISIA. 3000 Royal St., 481-5113 — “I

Genti H2O,” works by Shmuela Padnos, ongoing.

SHEILA’S FINE ART STUDIO. 1427 N. Johnson St., 473-3363; www. sheilaart.com — Works by Sheila

Phipps, ongoing.

SLIDELL CULTURAL CENTER. 444 Erlanger St., (985) 646-4375 — Annual Artists of the Year

exhibit, through September.

SOREN CHRISTENSEN GALLERY. 400 Julia St., 569-9501; www. sorengallery.com — “Sportman’s

Paradise,” works by Ed Smith, through September.

STEVE MARTIN STUDIO. 624 Julia St., 566-1390; www.stevemartinfineart.com — Contemporary

sculpture and paintings by Steve Martin and other Louisiana artists, ongoing.

STUDIO BFG. 2627 Desoto St., 942-0200; www.studiobfg.com — “Peel Sessions: First Install-

ment,” works by Tina Stanley, ongoing.

STUDIO GALLERY. 338 Baronne St., Third Floor, 529-3306 — Works by YA/YA artists, ongoing. TAYLOR/BERCIER FINE ART. 233 Chartres St., 527-0072 — Works

by Maysey Craddock, Drew Galloway, Ruth Marten and Jamie Baldridge, through September. THOMAS MANN GALLERY I/O. 1812 Magazine St., 581-2113; www. thomasmann.com — “Where’s

the Money?” group exhibit interpreting the economy, ongoing.

TRIPOLO GALLERY. 401 N. Columbia St., (985) 893-1441 — Works

by Bill Binnings, Robert Cook, Donna Duffy, Scott Ewen, Juli Juneau, Kevin LeBlanc, Ingrid Moses, Gale Ruggiero, Robert Seago and Scott Upton, ongoing.

UNO-ST. CLAUDE GALLERY. 2429 St. Claude Ave. — “Small Heads/ Little Busts,” works by Alan Gerson, through Oct. 2. VENUSIAN GARDENS ART GALLERY. 2601 Chartres St., 943-7446; www.venusiangardens.com —

“Luminous Sculpture,” works by Eric Ehlenberger, ongoing.

VIEUX CARRE GALLERY. 507 St. Ann St., 522-2900; www.vieuxcarregallery.com — “Architectural

Treasures of New Orleans,” works by Marlena Stevenson; paintings by Sarah Stiehl; both through September.

WMSJR. 1061 Camp St., 299-9455; www.wmsjr.com — Paintings by Will Smith, ongoing. A WORK OF ART GALLERY. 8212 Oak St., 862-5244 — Glass works

by Juli Juneau; photographs from the New Orleans Photo Alliance; both ongoing.

gallery during the 2012 season. Email bob@press-street.com or visit www.press-street.com/ antenna for details. Application deadline is Oct. 1. CRESCENT CITY BLUES & BBQ FESTIVAL T-SHIRT. Creative Allies

hosts a contest to create the design for the festival’s official T-shirt. The winner also receives a $400 cash prize. Visit www. creativeallies.com/contests for details. Submissions deadline is Friday.

@PHONOGRAPHY. 3 Ring Circus’

Big Top Gallery hosts a show in December combining tweets and cell phone photos for PhotoNOLA, the citywide photography event. There is a $25 entry fee. Visit www.3rcp.com or email bigtop3ring@gmail. com for details. Submissions deadline is Oct. 29.

SPARE SPACES ALVAR LIBRARY. 913 Alvar St., 5962667 — “Youth,” sculpture by

Betty Petri; “The Solitary Chair,” sculpture by Michael Moreau; both ongoing. BACCHANAL. 600 Poland Ave., 948-9111; www.bacchanalwine. com — “Coming Home: 2005-

2009,” photographs by Lee Celano, ongoing.

ANTENNA GALLERY. Emerging

and established artists and curators can apply for an opportunity to exhibit in the Bywater

LIZANO’S GLASS HAUS. 3400 Cleary Ave., Suite B, Metairie, 4541144 — Fused-glass works by Paulette Lizano, ongoing. LOST LOVE LOUNGE. 2529 Dauphine St., 949-2009; www. lostlovelounge.com — “The Sur-

realist Life,” works by John Isiah Walton, through Oct. 1.

MCKEOWN’S BOOKS AND DIFFICULT MUSIC. 4737 Tchoupitoulas St., 895-1954 — “The Book

of Kells, Revisited,” encaustic paintings by Patricia Kaschalk, ongoing.

METAIRIE PARK COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL. 300 Park Road, Metairie, 837-5204; www.mpcds. com — “The Unconventional

Portrait,” works by Mark Bercier, David Halliday, Gina Phillips and Alexander Stolin, ongoing.

MOJO COFFEE HOUSE. 1500 Magazine St., 525-2244; www. myspace.com/mojoco — Photographs by Marc Pagani, ongoing. NEOPHOBIA. 2855 Magazine St., 899-2444; www.neophobianola.com — Works by Tanner,

ongoing.

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE. 5110 Danneel St., 8913381; www.neutralground.org —

BUD’S BROILER. 500 City Park Ave., 486-2559 — Works by

Work by local artists, ongoing.

CAMPBELL’S COFFEE & TEA. 516 S. Tyler St., Covington, (985) 2466992; www.campbellscoffee. com — Multimedia works by

Ustabes by Will Smith, ongoing.

Andrew Bascle, Evelyn Menge and others, ongoing.

Margaux Hymel, ongoing.

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR. 5535 Tchoupitoulas St., 891-8500; www.dosjefescigarbar.com —

Works by Mario Ortiz, ongoing.

DRISCOLL ANTIQUES. 8500 Oak St., 866-7795; www.driscollantiques.com — Works by Sandra

Horstman Roberts, ongoing.

HAZELNUT NEW ORLEANS. 5515 Magazine St., 891-2424; www. hazelnutneworleans.com — Photography by Roy Barloga, ongoing. HI-HO LOUNGE. 2239 St. Claude Ave., 945-4446; www.hiholounge.net — Works by Robin Durand, Brad Edelman, Tara Eden, Eden Gass and others, ongoing. INTERIORS AND IMPORTS. 813 Florida St., Mandeville, (985) 624-7903 — Paintings by Annie Strack, ongoing. INTERNATIONAL HOUSE. 221 Camp St., 553-9550; www.ihhotel. com — Paintings by YA/YA se-

nior guild and alumni, ongoing.

JAX BREWERY. 600 Decatur St., 299-7163 — Works by YA/YA

youth artists, ongoing.

CALL FOR ARTISTS

on canvas by YA/YA artists, ongoing.

JW MARRIOTT NEW ORLEANS. 614 Canal St., Suite 4, 525-6500; www.marriott.com — Works by

Charlene Insley, ongoing.

LIBERTY’S KITCHEN. 422 1/2 S. Broad St., 822-4011 — Paintings

NEW ORLEANS CAKE CAFE & BAKERY. 2440 Chartres St., 9430010 — Oil landscapes of the

PEACHES RECORDS. 408 N. Peters St., 282-3322 — “Gospel and

Blues,” photographs by Rita Posselt, ongoing.

ROYAL BLEND CAFE. 621 Royal St., 523-2716 — Black-and-white photographs by Jocelyn Marquis, through September. SOUND CAFE. 2700 Chartres St., 947-4477 — Mixed-media paint-

ings by YA/YA alumnus Gerard Caliste, ongoing.

SURREY’S CAFE & JUICE BAR. 1418 Magazine St., 524-3828; www. surreyscafeandjuicebar.com — Watercolor, pen and ink series of New Orleans landmarks by Will Smith, ongoing. THREE MUSES. 536 Frenchmen St., 298-8746; www.thethreemuses. com — Portraits by Zack

Smith, ongoing.

MUSEUMS AMERICAN-ITALIAN MUSEUM & RESEARCH LIBRARY. 537 S. Peters St., 522-7294 — Permanent

exhibits of jazz artists, a St. Joseph’s altar replica, the Louisiana Italian-American Sports Hall of Fame and a research library with genealogy records.

ASHE CULTURAL ARTS CENTER. 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org —

“Ashe in Retrospect: 19982008,” photographs by Morris Jones Jr., Eric Waters, Jeffrey Cook and others, ongoing.

BACKSTREET CULTURAL MUSEUM. 1116 St. Claude Ave.; www.backstreetmuseum.org —

Permanent exhibits of Mardi Gras Indian suits, jazz funeral memorabilia and social aid and pleasure club artifacts, ongoing.

CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER. 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www. cacno.org — “The Center Cannot Hold,” paintings and drawings by Brooke Pickett; “Drip: The Music of Water in New Orleans,” sound installation by John Kleinschmidt and Andy Sternad; “Patterns and Prototypes: Early Paintings by Tina Girouard and Robert Gordy,” curated by Dan Cameron; all through Sunday. “As We See It: Youth Vision Quilt,” studentcreated quilt with more than 400 patches, ongoing. GERMAN-AMERICAN CULTURAL CENTER. 519 Huey P. Long Ave., Gretna, 363-4202; www.gaccnola.com — Museum exhibits

depict the colonial experience, work, culture and religion of German immigrants.

HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION. 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www.hnoc.org — “The 18th Star:

Treasures From 200 Years of Louisiana Statehood,” through Jan. 29.

LONGUE VUE HOUSE AND GARDENS. 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue.com — “Magic

Spell of Memory: The Photography of Clarence John Laughlin,” through fall 2011.

LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM PRESBYTERE. 751 Chartres St., 568-6968; www.lsm.crt.state. la.us — “Living With Hurri-

canes: Katrina and Beyond,” an exhibition of stories, artifacts and science displays, through Sunday. “It’s Carnival Time in Louisiana,” Carnival artifacts, costumes, jewelry and others items, ongoing.

LOUISIANA SUPREME COURT MUSEUM. Louisiana Supreme Court, 400 Royal St., 310-2149; www.lasc.org — The Supreme

Court of Louisiana Historical Society sponsors the museum’s exhibitions of the people and institutions that have contributed to the development of Louisiana law for 300 years. MAIN LIBRARY. 219 Loyola Ave., 529-7323; www.nutrias. org — “Hidden from History: Unknown New Orleanians,” photographs of the city’s working poor, ongoing. MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN COCKTAIL. 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.museumoftheamericancocktail.org — “Absinthe Vi-

sions,” photographs by Damian Hevia, ongoing. NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM. 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum. org — “Roosevelt, Rockwell, and

the Four Freedoms: America’s Slow March from Isolation to Action,” original posters by Norman Rockwell and museum artifacts, through Nov. 13.

NEW ORLEANS AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM. 1418 Gov. Nicholls St., 566-1136; www.noaam.com — “Drapetomania: A Disease

Called Freedom,” 18th- and 19th-century documents and artifacts about slavery from the Derrick Beard Collection; “Restore the Oaks: Art Under the Overpass in Treme,” paintings by artists of the murals under the 1-10 overpass; both through Oct. 29.

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma. org — “Thalassa,” a 20-foot-tall

suspended sculpture by Swoon, through Sunday. “The Elegant Image,” figural bronzes from the Indian Subcontinent from the collection of Siddharth K. Bhansali, through Oct. 23. NEW ORLEANS PHARMACY MUSEUM. 514 Chartres St., 565-8027; www.pharmacymuseum.org — Exhibits about 19th-century

pharmacy, medicine and health care, all ongoing.

OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART. 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org —

“Mississippi Mud: The Potters of Mississippi”; “Looking to Learn,” works by New Orleans Center for Creative Arts visual art students, through September. “Whispering Pines,” photographs by Birtney Imes, through Oct. 16.

OLD U.S. MINT. 400 Esplanade Ave., 568-6990; lsm.crt.state. la.us/site/mintex.htm — “Race: Are We So Different?” an exhibit exploring the history, science and everyday experience of race, through Sunday. SOUTHERN FOOD & BEVERAGE MUSEUM. Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood. org — “Acadian to Cajun: Forced

Migration to Commercialization,” a multimedia exhibit; “Laissez Faire — Savoir Fare,” the cuisine of Louisiana and New Orleans; “Eating in the White House — America’s Food”; all ongoing. “Tout de Sweet,” an exhibit exploring all aspects of the sugar industry in the South; “Barbecue Nation”; both ongoing.

TANGIPAHOA AFRICAN-AMERICAN HERITAGE MUSEUM & BLACK VETERANS ARCHIVES. 1600 Phoenix Square, Hammond, (985) 542-4259; www.africanamericanheritagemuseum.com — The museum exhibits works

that preserve and tell the history of African-American ancestors in Louisiana; it also houses the country’s first memorial to black Vietnam War veterans, ongoing.

TULANE UNIVERSITY. Joseph Merrick Jones Hall, 6823 St. Charles Ave. — “Treme: People and Places,” maps, architectural drawings and photographs celebrating the bicentennial of Faubourg Treme, through November.

LISTINGS

GET IN ON THE ACT

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

STAGE

review

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

BONOBO

THEATER THE ADDAMS FAMILY. Mahalia Jackson Theater for the Performing Arts, 1419 Basin St., 525-1052; www. mahaliajacksontheater.com — The musical brings the macabre television family to the stage. Tickets start at $30. 8 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Saturday. CHICAGO. Rivertown Repertory

Theatre, 325 Minor St., Kenner, 4687221 — John Kander and Fred Ebb’s musical satire is set in Prohibitionera Chicago, where the justice system is corrupt and murderers have celebrity status. Tickets $35 general admission, $33 students and seniors, $17 children. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2:30 p.m. Sunday through Oct. 2.

FEEDING THE MOONFISH. Byrdie’s Gallery, 2422-A St. Claude Ave., www.byrdiesgallery.com — Four Humours Theater presents Barbara Wiechmann’s character study of two young people and the unlikely bond they form over the course of a night. Tickets $6, or two tickets for $10. 8:30 p.m. Friday and Monday. FOOTLIGHT FRENZY. Playmakers

THE FUTURE IS A FANCYLAND PLACE.

AllWays Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www.theallwayslounge.com — Andrew Vaught and Christopher Kaminstein’s play follows a group of Americans obsessed with apocalyptic prophecies. Call 264-1776 for reservations. Tickets $15. 8 p.m. Friday-Sunday through Oct. 2.

GOD OF CARNAGE. Southern Rep

Theater, The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 522-6545; www.southernrep.com — In Yasmina Reza’s comedy, a meeting of two sets of parents hoping to resolve a conflict between their sons becomes increasingly chaotic as the evening progresses. Tickets $29 Thursday and Sunday, $35 Friday and Saturday. 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday through Oct. 9.

JITNEY. Anthony Bean Community Theater, 1333 S. Carrollton Ave., 8627529; www.anthonybeantheater. com — August Wilson’s drama depicts the African-American experience in 1970s Pittsburg through his portrayal of men working as jitneys, or unlicensed taxi cab drivers. Tickets $20 general admission, $18 students and seniors. 8 p.m.

Jitney Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright August Wilson said he didn’t write political dramas, although there are obvious political aspects in his 10 plays chronicling the decades of the 20th century. Each installment reflects the African-American struggle against racial injustice, but Wilson focuses on his characters, who are fully realized individuals with particular faults and conflicts. Set in Pittsburgh in the late 1970s, Jitney presents intense personal and social conflicts. A jitney is a gypsy cab, and the entire play takes place in a “car station,” a garage for unlicensed cabs. Becker (Will Williams) runs the place, and his drivers play checkers, grumble, joke, gossip and get into fights while waiting for the phone to ring. There are quieter moments of humor and tenderness, but the play packs a wallop. Becker’s son Booster (Sam Malone) is being released following a 20-year jail term for killing a white woman. He was condemned to death, but the sentence was commuted. Becker never visited him and Booster comes to the car station to confront him. The sparks fly and Williams and Malone handle the explosive scene with poise. Booster despises his father for humbling himself to their landlord, which Becker says was necessary to keep a roof over the boy’s head. Becker calls his son a murderer and blames him for the death of his wife because of her heartbreak. Racism is a frequent subject but not the central one. Various subplots are portrayed well by Alfred Aubry, Donald Lewis, Harold X. Evans, Steven Burke, Desmond M. Ables, Coti Gayles and Samuel Johnson III. Jitney comes to a climax when the city moves to close and demolish the car station. Becker tells the cabbies to resist and keep driving their gypsy cabs until a bulldozer arrives. They are soon left to fight without him and the drivers look for answers and direction. Anthony Bean (assisted by Gwendolyne Foxworth) directs the play with a sure hand. John Grimsley designed the apt set. — Dalt Wonk

SEPT

25

Jitney Anthony Bean Community Theater, 1333 S. Carrollton Ave., 862-7529; www.anthonybeantheater.com Tickets $20 general admission, $18 students/seniors

MATTHEW DEAR

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 20 > 2011

Theater, 19106 Playmakers Road (off Lee Road), Covington, (985) 893-1671; www.playmakersinc.com — In the farce, a desperate PTA group produces an ambitious benefit play to try and save their bankrupt School for Unusual Children. Tickets $15 general admission, $10 students. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday.

49

STAGE

LISTINGS

Friday-Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday. THE MARVELOUS WONDERETTES. Cutting Edge Theater at

Attractions Salon, 747 Robert Blvd., Slidell, (985) 290-0760; www.cuttingedgeproductions. org — In Roger Bean’s jukebox musical, an all-girl quartet in the 1950s sings the hits of the era. Tickets $18.50. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday through Sept. 30.

SPEECH & DEBATE. Actor’s Theatre of New Orleans, WTIXFM Building, second floor, 4539 N. I-10 Service Road, Metairie, 456-4111 — Three high school outcasts are connected when a sex scandal comes to light in Stephen Karam’s dark comedy. Tickets $20 general admission, $18 students. 7:30 p.m Thursday-Saturday and 2:30 p.m. Sunday. THE WEIR. Deutsches Haus,

1023 Ridgewood St., 522-8014; www.deutscheshaus.org — In Conor McPherson’s play, drinkers at a pub in rural Ireland regal each other with ghost stories that get darker and more personal as the night progresses. Tickets $15 suggested donation. 7:30 p.m. Monday-Wednesday through Oct. 12.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 20 > 2011

BURLESQUE & CABARET

50

ELECTION PREVIEW

BURLESQUE BALLROOM. Irvin

October 18 Election Guide:

planade Ave.; www.myspace. com/dragonsdennola — The “gorelesque” revue features knife tricks, rock ’n’ roll, and homemade popsicles. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Saturday.

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Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse, 300 Bourbon St., 553-2270; www. sonesta.com — Trixie Minx stars in the weekly burlesque show featuring the music of Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown. Call 553-2331 for details. 11:50 p.m. Friday.

THE RAZOR BLADE WALTZ REVUE. Dragon’s Den, 435 Es-

FAMILY STAGE PETITE ROUGE. Jefferson

Performing Arts Center, 400 Phlox St., Metairie, 885-2000; www.jpas.org — The musical is the story of Little Red Riding Hood set in the Louisiana swamps and bayous. Tickets $20 general admission, $15 children 12 and under. 11 a.m. Saturday, 2 p.m. SaturdaySunday.

www.innonbourbon.com — Vocalists from the association perform. 7 p.m. Wednesday.

AUDITIONS CRESCENT CITY SOUND CHORUS. Delgado Community

College, City Park campus, Orleans Avenue, between City Park Avenue and Navarre Street; www.dcc.edu — The women’s chorus holds weekly auditions for new members. Call 453-0858 or visit www. crescentcitysound.com for details. 7 p.m. Monday.

COMEDY BROWN IMPROV COMEDY. 12 Bar, 608 Fulton St., 212-6476; www.12barnola.com — The improv comedy troupe performs. 8:30 p.m. Saturday. CHRIS TUCKER. UNO Lakefront Arena, 6801 Franklin Ave., 280-7171; www.arena.uno.edu — The actor and comedian performs. Tickets start at $43.50 (plus fees). 8 p.m. Friday. COMEDY CATASTROPHE. Lost

Love Lounge, 2529 Dauphine St., 949-2009; www. lostlovelounge.com — The bar hosts a free weekly stand-up comedy show. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

COMEDY GUMBEAUX. Howlin’ Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf.com — Local comedians perform, and amateurs take the stage in the open mic portion. 8 p.m. Thursday. COMEDY OPEN-MIC. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts a weekly open-mic comedy night. (Sign-up time is 10:45 p.m.) Free admission. 10 p.m. Friday. COMEDY SPORTZ NOLA. La

Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts a safe-for-all-ages team comedy competition. Tickets $10 ($5 with drink purchase). 7 p.m. Saturday.

FEAR & LOATHING IN NEW ORLEANS/GOD’S BEEN DRINKING. La Nuit Comedy Theater,

5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The sketch comedy show with vampires, zombies, relationship advice and other horrors is followed by the improvised comedy program. Admission $10 ($5 with drink purchase). 8:30 p.m. Friday. GROUND ZERO COMEDY.

OPERA NEW ORLEANS OPERA ASSOCIATION. The Inn on Bourbon,

541 Bourbon St., 524-7611;

The Maison, 508 Frenchmen St., 371-5543; www.maisonfrenchmen.com — The show features local stand-up comedians. Sign-up is 7:30 p.m.; show is 8 p.m. Friday.

IVAN’S OPEN MIC NIGHT. Rusty Nail, 1100 Constance St., 5255515; www.therustynail.org — The Rusty Nail hosts a weekly open-mic comedy and music night. 9 p.m. Tuesday. LA NUIT STAND-UP OPEN MIC.

La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts an open mic following the God’s Been Drinking show. 11 p.m. Friday.

LAUGH OUT LOUD. Bootleggers Bar and Grille, 209 Decatur St., 525-1087 — Simple Play presents a weekly comedy show. 10 p.m. Thursday. NATIONAL COMEDY COMPANY.

Yo Mama’s Bar & Grill, 727 St. Peter St., 522-1125 — The audience interactive comedy show features live local music. Call 523-7469 or visit www.nationalcomedycompany.com for tickets. Tickets $8 online, $15 at the door. 10 p.m. Saturday. OPEN MIC COMEDY SHOWCASE. 12 Bar, 608 Fulton St.,

212-6476; www.12barnola.com — Jackie Jenkins Jr. hosts the show. Free admission. 8 p.m. Tuesday. PERMANENT DAMAGE STANDUP COMEDY. Bullets Sports Bar,

2441 A.P. Tureaud Ave., 9484003 — Tony Frederick hosts the open mic comedy show. 8 p.m. Wednesday. SIDNEY’S STAND-UP OPEN MIC. Sidney’s, 1674 Barataria

Blvd., Marrero, 341-0103 — The show features professional, amateur and first-time comics. Free admission. Sign-up is 8 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Thursday. SNACK TIME WITH THE ANVIL COMPANY. La Nuit Comedy

Theater, 5039 Freret St., 6444300; www.nolacomedy. com — The improv and sketch comedy troupe performs. Tickets $10 ($5 with drink purchase). 8:30 p.m. Saturday.

SPOILER ALERTS. Blue Nile,

532 Frenchmen St., 948-2583; www.bluenilelive.com — The improv show that satirizes films features comedy troupe Awkward Headbutt. 8 p.m. Tuesday.

STUPID TIME MACHINE.

Howlin’ Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www. thehowlinwolf.com — The improv comedy troupe performs. Tickets $5. 8:30 p.m. Tuesday. THINK YOU’RE FUNNY? Carrollton Station, 8140 Willow St., 865-9190; www.carrolltonstation.com — The weekly open-mic comedy showcase is open to all comics. Sign-up is 8:30 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Wednesday.

EVENTS

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

FAMILY Tuesday 20 KINDER GARDEN: BACK TO SCHOOL IN THE GARDEN.

Longue Vue House and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 4885488; www.longuevue.com — Children and accompanying adults explore the world of insects through age-appropriate activities. Tickets $10 members, $12 nonmembers. Call 293-4722 or email lvaughn@ longuevue.com for details. 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. TODDLER TIME . Louisiana

Children’s Museum, 420 Julia St., 523-1357; www.lcm.org — The museum hosts special Tuesday and Thursday activities for children ages 3-under and their parents or caregivers. Admission $8, free for members. 10:30 a.m.

Thursday 22 ART ACTIVITIES DURING AFTER HOURS. Ogden Museum of

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 20 > 2011

Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — The Ogden offers art activities for kids during its weekly After Hours concerts. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

52

LITTLE MASTERS. Longue Vue

House and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www. longuevue.com — Children ages 2 and a half to 5 and their parents or caregivers paint, dance, sing and try yoga moves in the gardens. Pre-registration is required. Call 293-4721 or email jcohn@longuevue. com for details. Admission $12 members, $15 nonmembers (includes one adult and child). 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.

BE THERE DO THAT

Saturday 24 SATURDAY STUDIOS: YOUNG MASTERS. Ogden Museum of

Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — Children explore and interact with artworks in the museum’s collection and then create their own works in the museum’s studio. The program is for children in the second to fifth grades. Call 539-9608 or email ebalkin@ogdenmuseum. org for details. Admission $15 members, $18 nonmembers. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

pists, the Akula Foundation Grief Resource Center’s group is open to any family that has experienced a death or other significant loss. Space is limited; pre-registration is required. 6:15 p.m. to 7:15 p.m. NEW DOCENT TRAINING . Ogden

EVENTS

Museum of Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www. ogdenmuseum.org — The Ogden trains prospective docents, people who lead museum tours, in museum techniques and education strategies for engaging visitors. Call 539-9608 or email ebalkin@ogdenmuseum.org for details. 10 a.m.

Tuesday 20

TRINITY COUNSELING & TRAINING CENTER GALA . Private

BECOMING A WOMAN . East Jefferson General Hospital, 4200 Houma Blvd., Metairie, 454-4000; www.ejgh.org — Girls ages 9-12 learn about the changes that come with adolescence. Call 456-5000 for details. Admission $20. 6:308:30 p.m. COMPREHENSIVE ZONING ORDINANCE MEETINGS. The city

hosts public meetings at various locations where residents can view draft zoning text and maps, meet with city planners, and submit written comments. Call 658-7033 or visit www.nola. gov/RESIDENTS/City-Planning for the full schedule and other details. CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Tulane University

Square, 200 Broadway St. — The weekly market features fresh produce, kettle corn, Green Plate specials and flowers. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. DEPRESSION AND BIPOLAR SUPPORT ALLIANCE . Tulane-

Lakeside Hospital, 4700 South I-10 Service Road West, Metairie — The peer support group meets the first and third Tuesdays of every month. Visit www.dbsaneworleans.org for details. 7:30 p.m. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP. Grief

Resource Center, 1221 S. Clearview Pkwy., fourth floor, 723-3628 — Facilitated by licensed counselors and thera-

residence, 2523 Prytania St. — The gala honors Anne Heard and Cecile Tebo for their contributions to the New Orleans mental health community, and it also features specialty cocktails and food from local restaurants. Visit www.trinitynola.com/tctcgala for details. Admission $250 patron party, $125 gala. Patron party 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., general admission 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Wednesday 21 COVINGTON FARMERS MARKET. Covington City Hall, 609 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-1873 — The market offers fresh locally produced foods every week. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. FRENCH MARKET FARMERS MARKET. French Market, French

Market Place, between Decatur and N. Peters streets, 522-2621; www.frenchmarket.org — The weekly market offers seasonal produce, seafood, prepared foods, smoothies and more. 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP. East

Jefferson General Hospital, 4200 Houma Blvd., Metairie, 454-4000; www.ejgh.org — The American Cancer Society sponsors a group for people who have experienced the death of a loved one. Call 4565000 for details. 6:30 p.m. to

8 p.m. LGBT YOUNG ADULT PEER SUPPORT GROUP. LGBT

Community Center of New Orleans, 2114 Decatur St., www. lgbtccno.org — The group supports 18- to 24-year-olds dealing with the struggles of coming out, sexuality, family and relationships. 7 p.m. NONPAC MEETING . Seventh

District Station, 10555 Lake Forest Blvd. — The New Orleans Neighborhood Policing Anti-Crime Council holds its monthly meeting. 7 p.m.

WACNO GREAT DECISIONS DISCUSSION SERIES. Latter

Memorial Library, 5120 St. Charles Ave., 596-2625; www. nutrias.org — Katherine Fidler, assistant professor of history and African studies at Loyola University, discusses the Horn of Africa. Call 280-5591 or email director@wacno.org for details. Free admission. 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. WESTWEGO FARMERS & FISHERIES MARKET. 484 Sala

Ave., Sala Avenue at Fourth Street, Westwego — The market offers organic produce, baked goods, jewelry, art and more, with live music and pony rides. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

WOMEN & WINE ON WEDNESDAYS. Bacchanal, 600

Poland Ave., 948-9111; www. bacchanalwine.com — The women’s networking and social event features wine specials. Visit www.womenwinewednesday.com for details. 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

Thursday 22 CELEBRATE RECOVERY. Victory

Fellowship Church, 5708 Airline Drive, Metairie — The group addresses addictions and other emotional issues through a spiritual perspective. Call 7335005 for details. 6:30 p.m.

CHAMBER AFTER 5. Good Work Network Business Resource Center, 1824 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 309-2073; www. goodworknetwork.org — The New Orleans Chamber of

Commerce’s casual networking event features door prizes. Call 799-4260 or email rsvp@ neworleanschamber.org for details. Admission free for members, $10 nonmembers. 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. CHANGES. Hey! Cafe, 4332

Magazine St., 891-8682 — The weekly meetings teach focusing, a method of directing attention outside one’s body to affect change. Call 232-9787 for details. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

FRESH MARKET. Circle Food

Store, 1522 St. Bernard Ave. — The Downtown Neighborhood Market Consortium market features fresh produce, dairy, seafood, baked goods and more. EBT and WIC accepted. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

LIFE HURTS, GOD HEALS. Victory Fellowship Church, 5708 Airline Drive, Metairie — The support group focuses on teens and young adults with addictions, hang ups and emotional pain. Call 733-5005 for details. 7 p.m. OCHSNER HELLO HEALTH SEMINAR . Chateau Golf and

Country Club, 3600 Chateau Blvd., Kenner, 467-1351; www. chateaugc.com — OB/GYN Shontell Thomas discusses endometriosis and fibroids. Call (866) 624-7637 for details. Admission $15. Noon.

SISTAHS MAKING A CHANGE . Ashe Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — The group offers lessons in African dance and more, along with nutrition, health and wellness seminars. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday and Monday.

Friday 23 “BIRTH OF A MUSE” UNVEILING .

Coliseum Square, Corner of Prytania and Terpsichore streets — The Arts Council of New Orleans unveils the new public art sculpture by artist Kim Bernadas at the event featuring music, refreshments and dance. Visit www.artscouncilofneworleans.org for details. 5:20 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

BRAIN ANEURYSM SUPPORT

GROUP. West Jefferson Medical Center, 1101 Medical Center Blvd., Marrero, 347-5511; www. wjmc.org — The group for survivors of brain aneurysms, strokes or similar brain injuries meets in room 201 of the hospital’s North Tower. Email rebeccawinchell@gmail.com or visit www.brainsupportnola.com for details. Noon. THE EZRA OPEN. Rock ’N’

Bowl, 3016 S. Carrollton Ave., 861-1700; www.rocknbowl. com — The Better Than Ezra Foundation hosts the bowling tournament that features an open bar and food. The patron party at Harrah’s Theater (8 Canal St., 533-6600; www. harrahsneworleans.com) includes an open bar, food, live and silent auctions and a performance by Better Than Ezra and guests. Visit www. btefoundation.org for details. Tickets $150 patron party, $50 general admission (does not include bowling). 2 p.m. tournament, 7:30 p.m. to midnight patron party.

FRIDAY NIGHT MUSIC CAMP WITH RUE FIYA . 3 Ring Circus’

The Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp. com — The family happy hour event features live music, art projects and drinks for adults and children. Admission free for children and 3 Ring Circus members, $5 for nonmember adults. 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

GUIDED HIKE . Bayou Segnette State Park, 7777 Westbank Expwy., Westwego, 736-7140 — The park ranger leads a hike though all three park trails, and discusses park history, geology, wildlife and more along the way. 10 a.m. LOVE IN THE GARDEN . Sydney

and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden, New Orleans Museum of Art, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, City Park, 658-4100; www. noma.org — The event celebrates local artists with live music by Mixed Nuts, food and drinks from local restaurants, and gondola rides. Visit www. noma.org/lovetickets.html for details. Tickets start at $75. Patron party 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., PAGE 55

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A WINE, SPIRITS, FOOD & MUSIC EVENT benefiting The Big Easy Awards Foundation

Limited Availability CALL 483-3129 Purchase tickets online at

bestofneworleans.com MESCHIYA LAKE Big Easy Awards Best Female Entertainer 2011

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > SEPTEMBER 20 > 2011

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53

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com EVENTS PAGE 52

general admission 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. MARKETPLACE AT ARMSTRONG PARK . Armstrong Park, N.

Rampart and St. Ann streets — The weekly market features fresh produce, baked goods, Louisiana seafood, natural products, art, crafts and entertainment. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays.

STORMIN’ OF THE SAZERAC .

Sazerac Bar, The Roosevelt New Orleans, 123 Baronne St., 648-1200; www.therooseveltneworleans.com — The event commemorates the 62nd anniversary of women being admitted to the bar with a 1940s costume contest, hat modeling, giveaways, a special ladies-only lunch and more. Lunch at 1 p.m., event at 3 p.m. VINO ON THE BAYOU. Pitot

House, 1440 Moss St. — The Courtyard Kings perform at the event featuring wine from Cork & Bottle. Admission $5 Louisiana Landmarks Society members, $10 nonmembers. 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

WHERE Y’ART. New Orleans

Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma.org — The museum’s weekly event features music, performances, film screenings, family-friendly activities and more. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Saturday 24 100 YEARS OF SOCIAL CHANGE .

ABC’S OF BABYSITTING . East

Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 838-1190 — The program for children ages 11-13 imparts babysitting tips about infant and child choking, essentials of childcare, problem behavior, entertaining ideas and babysitting as a business. Call 4565000 for details. Admission $10. 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.

ART ON OAK . Symphony Book

Fair Warehouse, 8605 Oak St. — The Symphony Volunteers host a sale of affordable posters, paintings and prints by George Dureau, Ida Kohlmeyer and others to benefit the Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra. The event also includes refreshments. Free admissions. 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.

AWESOME LADIES OF DISTINCTION TRYOUTS.

Awesome Ladies of Distinction, 2100 Woodmere Blvd., Suite 100, 348-3992; www.awesomeladiesofdis-

CAN I EAT THAT?

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — The site ranger leads a hike focusing on edible plants that can be found along the nature trail. 10:30 a.m. CIVIL WAR DRUM DEMONSTRATION .

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — The program features the demonstration of Civil War drum cadences and calls in period costume using a Civil War-style snare drum. 2 p.m.

CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Magazine Street

Market, Magazine and Girod streets, 861-5898; www. marketumbrella.org — The weekly market features fresh produce, flowers and food. 8 a.m. to noon. EAGLE WATCH . Fontainebleau

State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — A park ranger leads a viewing of the park’s eagle nest. 3 p.m.

ERACE NEW ORLEANS MEETING . Christ Church

Cathedral, 2919 St. Charles Ave., 895-6602 — ERACE meets in the church’s Westfeldt Room for its weekly discussion group. Call 8661163 for details. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. GERMAN COAST FARMERS MARKET. Ormond Plantation,

13786 River Road, Destrehan — The market features a wide range of fresh vegetables, fruits, flowers and other items. Visit www.germancoastfarmersmarket.org for details. 8 a.m. to noon. GREEN-IT-YOURSELF WORKSHOP: INSULATION 101 . Global Green Holy Cross

Project, 409 Andry St.; www. globalgreen.org/neworleans — Experts discuss the process of choosing and installing energy-efficient insulation. Free admission. 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. GRETNA FARMERS MARKET.

Gretna Farmers Market, Huey P. Long Avenue, between Third and Fourth streets, Gretna, 362-8661 — The weekly rain-or-shine market features more than 30 vendors offering a wide range of fruits, vegetables, meats and flowers. Free admission. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

LOUISIANA ACTORS EXPO. Pan-

American Life Building, 601 Poydras St. — The conference brings together casting directors, talent agents, directors,

writers and other professionals in the Louisiana film industry and includes panel discussions, agent meetings and casting sessions. Visit www. louisianaactorsexpo.com for details. Admission $75. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

SEAFOOD community.arts + crafts ENTERTAINMENT market exhibitors . kid’s activities

MADISONVILLE BICENTENNIAL CELEBRATION . Fairview-

Riverside State Park, 119 Fairview Drive, Madisonville — The park’s Otis House is is featured with other historic Madisonville properties on the Pickets-N-Posts Home Tour, part of a day of events commemorating the town’s founding. 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.

The best kept secret in New Orleans

SATURDAYS 8AM to 1PM 409 Aycock St. • Arabi • 504.355.4442

Located at the Aycock Barn • www.visitstbernard.com

Plant sales & rentals 1135 PRESS ST. @ NEW ORLEANS

2900 ST. CLAUDE

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METROPOLITAN CENTER FOR WOMEN & CHILDREN GALA .

Harrah’s Hotel, 228 Poydras St., second floor ballroom, 533-6000; www.harrahs. com — In recognition of Domestic Violence Awareness Month, the battered women’s program hosts a “metro carnival” themed gala featuring a performance by Cyril Neville. Call 837-5400 for details. Admission $75 in advance, $100 at the door. 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. NATURE: A CLOSER LOOK .

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers lead a weekly nature hike. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

NEW ORLEANS LADIES ARM WRESTLING SUPER BRAWL .

Howlin’ Wolf, 907 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf.com — NOLAW’s championship brawl features entertainment by NOLA Hip-Hop, music by DJ Justin and prize giveaways. Proceeds benefit Common Ground Health Clinic. Visit www.nolaw.org for details. Admission is free, but donations are suggested. 8 p.m.

RENAISSANCE MARKETPLACE OF EASTERN NEW ORLEANS.

Renaissance Marketplace, 5700 Read Blvd. — The market offers cuisine from area restaurants, shopping, arts and crafts, children’s activities and more. 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. SANKOFA FARMERS MARKET. Holy Angels Complex, 3500 St. Claude Ave., 875-4268; www.sankofafarmersmarket. org — The weekly market offers fresh produce and seafood from local farmers and fishermen. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. SEWING BEE . Staple Goods, 1340 St. Roch Ave., 908-7331; www.postmedium.org/staplegoods — Stephanie McLeish and Bee Good host the event, where participants can bring their own projects or work on a quilt for Africa. The event is a part of Local Threads, a free arts festival in the St. Roch neighborhood. Noon to 5 p.m. SHAMPOOCH DOG WASH .

Whole Foods Market Arabella Station, 5600 Magazine St., 899-9119 — The store offers

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > SEPTEMBER 20 > 2011

St. Mark’s Community Center, 1130 N. Rampart St., 529-1681; www.seeaplay.org — St. Mark’s and the North Rampart Community Center commemorate their work in the areas of gender rights, civil rights and education with a program that includes artist Skylar Fein, author Ellen Blue and Community Center executive director Jefferey Parker. Free admission. 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.

tinction.org — The mentoring program for girls ages 2-17 promotes health and fitness education through dancing. Girls ages 2-4 are not required to audition. Pre-registration is required, and there is a $5 tryout fee. Call 348-3992 or email awesomeladies@aol.com for details.

fresh.produce

55

EVENTS

LISTINGS

dog washes for $10 to benefit the LA/SPCA. The event also includes veterinarians, animal behaviorists, groomers, raffles, games, a costume contest and more. Visit www.la-spca.org for details. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. SMITHSONIAN MUSEUM DAY.

Local museums open free of charge in the spirit of the free-admission policy of the Smithsonian Institution’s Washington, D.C., museums. Visit www.smithsonianmag. com/museumday for participating museums.

SOULSPEAK AFROBEAT PARTY.

Tekrema Center for Art and Culture, 5640 Burgundy St. — The nonprofit organization’s birthday tribute to saxophonist John W. Coltrane features a jazz poetry session, food and drink, a performance by Donald Harrison and more. Admission $7. 8 p.m.

ST. BERNARD SEAFOOD & FARMERS MARKET. Aycock Barn,

409 Aycock St., Arabi — The market showcases fresh seafood, local produce, jams and preserves, baked goods, crafts, live entertainment, children’s activities and more. Call 3554442 or visit www.visitstbernard.com for details. 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 20 > 2011

STREET FARE DERBY. Fair

Grounds Race Course & Slots, 1751 Gentilly Blvd., 943-1415; www.fairgroundsracecourse. com — Local food trucks set up shop at the inaugural event, which also features drinks and music from Kermit Ruffins and the Barbecue Swingers and Papa Grows Funk. Visit www. streetfarederby.com for details. Admission $10 in advance, $15 day of event, $40 VIP access. 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. VIP admission, 12:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. general admission.

SULA FOUNDATION FALL PIT BULL CLINIC . LA/ SPCA, 1700

Mardi Gras Blvd., 368-5191; www.la-spca.org — The clinic offers low-cost vaccinations, training demonstrations, photos, discounted rates on microchips and other services to leashed dogs. Call 613-7370 or email info@sulafoundation. org for more details.

Sunday 25 EXCELLENCE IN JOURNALISM CONFERENCE . Sheraton New

Orleans Hotel, 500 Canal St., 595-5511; www.sheratonneworleans.com — The Radio Television Digital News Association and Society of Professional Journalists’ convention features speakers including CNN anchor Soledad O’Brien, workshops, tours of local newsrooms, book signings, critique sessions and more. Visit www.excellenceinjournalism.org for the full schedule and other details. 8 a.m. Daily through Sept. 27. INTRODUCTION TO JUDAISM .

Temple Sinai, 6227 St. Charles

56

BE THERE DO THAT Ave. — Rabbi Edward Cohn leads a free class for those seeking information about Judaism or considering conversion. Reservations are recommended. 9 a.m. Sundays. Through Feb. 26. MARTIN PAYTON — REFLECTIONS: THE CLOSE OF A CHAPTER . Ashe Cultural Arts

Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www. ashecac.org — The steel sculptor presents a lecture and digital images of his works. Free admission. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. NO/AIDS WALK . Audubon Park,

6500 Magazine St. — The walk raises money for prevention, care and support services of the NO/AIDS Task Force and other Louisiana AIDS service organizations. Visit www.noaidswalk. com for details. Registration 8 a.m., 10 a.m. walk.

PRIMITIVE WOODWORKING .

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers host a weekly demonstration of woodworking techniques. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS LOUISIANA CULTURAL ECONOMY FOUNDATION ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY FUND GRANT.

The foundation awards grants to individual cultural workers, nonprofit cultural organizations and cultural economy businesses. Email lisa@culturaleconomy.org or visit www. culturaleconomy.org for details. Application deadline is Sept. 30.

CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY.

American Cancer Society, 2605 River Road, Westwego, 8334024 or (800) ACS-2345; www. cancer.org — The American Cancer Society needs volunteers for upcoming events and to facilitate patient service programs. Opportunities are available with Relay for Life, Look Good … Feel Better, Hope Lodge, Man to Man, Road to Recovery, Hope Gala and more. Call for information. ANOTHER LIFE FOUNDATION VOLUNTEERS. Another Life

Sunday 26

Foundation seeks volunteers recovering from mental illness to help mentor others battling depression and suicidal behaviors. Free training provided. For details, contact Stephanie Green at (888) 543-3480, anotherlifefoundation@hotmail.com or visit www.anotherlifefoundation.org.

MOUNT CARMEL ACADEMY GOLF CLASSIC . English Turn

BAYOU REBIRTH WETLANDS EDUCATION . Bayou Rebirth

WILLIAM FAULKNER BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION . Faulkner House

Books, 624 Pirate’s Alley, 5242940 — The Pirate’s Alley Faulkner Society celebrates the society’s namesake on his birthday. 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

Country Club, 3201 Rue Parc Fontaine, 392-6590 — The high school’s annual golf classic features food from local restaurants, prizes and cash giveaways. Call 288-7626 ext. 127 or visit www.mcacubs.org for details. 10:30 a.m. NEW ORLEANS NATIONAL COLLEGE FAIR . Ernest N. Morial

Convention Center, 900 Convention Center Blvd. — Students and parents can meet one-on-one with admissions representatives from national and international colleges and universities. Visit www.nacacnet.org for details. Free admission. 9 a.m. to noon and 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. TOASTMASTERS MEETING . Milton H. Latter Memorial Library, 5120 St. Charles Ave. — New Orleans Toastmasters Club hosts an open weekly meeting (except holidays) to hone the skills of speaking, listening and thinking. Call 2518600 or visit www.notoast234. freetoasthost.org for details. 6 p.m. UNITED NONPROFITS OF GREATER NEW ORLEANS.

Goodwill Training Center, 3400 Tulane Ave. — Nonprofit Central hosts a weekly meeting for all leaders of nonprofit groups. Email susan_unp@ yahoo.com for details. 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.

seeks volunteers for wetlands planting projects, nursery maintenance and other duties. Visit www.bayourebirth.org for details.

BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS VOLUNTEERS. Big Brothers Big

Sisters of Southeast Louisiana, 2626 Canal St., Suite 203, 3097304 or (877) 500-7304; www. bbbssela.org — Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southeast Louisiana needs volunteers to serve as mentors. A volunteer meets two to three times a month with his or her Little Brother or Sister. You can play games, watch movies, bake cookies, play sports or plan any other outings you both would enjoy. Call for information.

CASA NEW ORLEANS. The organization seeks volunteer court-appointed special advocates to represent abused and neglected children in New Orleans. The time commitment is a minimum of 10 hours per month. No special skills are required; thorough training and support is provided. Call Brian Opert at 522-1962 ext. 213 or email info@casaneworleans. org for details. CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. CCFM and marketum-

brella.org seek volunteers to field shopper questions, assist seniors, help with monthly children’s activities and more. Call 495-1459 or email latifia@mar-

ketumbrella.org for details. EDGAR DEGAS FOUNDATION .

The nonprofit seeks volunteers to contribute to the development of the foundation. Call 821-5009 or email info@ degashouse.com for details. GREATER NEW ORLEANS FAIR HOUSING ACTION CENTER .

The center seeks part-time civil rights investigators with excellent writing skills, reliable transportation and no criminal convictions to help expose housing discrimination in the New Orleans metro area. Call 717-4257 or email mmorgan@ gnofairhousing.org for information. HANDSON NEW ORLEANS. The volunteer center for the Greater New Orleans area invites prospective volunteers to learn about the various opportunities available, how to sign-up to attend service projects and general tips on how to be a good volunteer. Call 483-7041 ext. 107, email volunteer@ handsonneworleans.org or visit www.handsonneworleans.org for details. HOSPICE VOLUNTEERS.

Harmony Hospice, 519 Metairie Road, Metairie, 832-8111 — Harmony Hospice seeks volunteers to offer companionship to patients through reading, playing cards and other activities. Call Jo-Ann Moore at 832-8111 for details. JACKSON BARRACKS MUSEUM VOLUNTEERS. The museum

seeks volunteers to work one day a week for the Louisiana National Guard Museum. Volunteers prepare military aircraft, vehicles and equipment for display. Call David at 837-0175 or email daveharrell@ yahoo.com for details. JEFFERSON COMMUNITY SCHOOL . The charter school

that educates at-risk middle school students who have been expelled from Jefferson Parish’s public schools seeks adult mentors for its students. Call 8360808 for details.

LOUISIANA SPCA VOLUNTEERS.

Dorothy Dorsett Brown LA/ SPCA Campus, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd., Algiers, 368-5191; www. la-spca.org — The Louisiana SPCA seeks volunteers to work with the animals and help with special events, education and more. Volunteers must be at least 12 years old and complete a volunteer orientation to work directly with animals. Call or email Dionne Simoneaux at dionne@la-spca.org.

LOWERNINE.ORG VOLUNTEERS. Lowernine.org seeks volunteers to help renovate homes in the Lower 9th Ward. Visit www. lowernine.org or email lauren@ lowernine.org for details. MAKE A MOVE. Volunteers are

needed for the New Orleans Mission’s free, one-day event on Oct. 12 that will offer struggling individuals a variety of

services including medical check-ups, eye screenings, foot care, legal services, grooming, employment assistance, food, toiletries and more. Call 4514282, email signal@hero-farm. com or visit www.neworleansmission.org for details. MEAL DELIVERY VOLUNTEERS.

Jefferson Council on Aging seeks volunteers to deliver meals to homebound adults. Gas/mileage expenses will be reimbursed. Call Gail at 8885880 for details.

Orleans Police Department at its district stations. Email vocal@nola.gov for details.

WORDS BOOK LAUNCH PARTY. East

Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 838-1190 — The party celebrates new releases from June Shaw (Deadly Reunion) and Shannon Brinkman (Preservation Hall). 7 p.m. Tuesday.

MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY ASSOCIATION . The MDA seeks

DAVID GESSNER . Octavia Books,

NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM . National World War

PASS IT ON . George & Leah McKenna Museum of REXANNE BECNEL & JUNE SHAW. Garden District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The authors sign and discuss The Thief’s Only Child and Deadly Reunion, respectively. 1 p.m. Saturday.

volunteers ages 16 and older for its weeklong summer camps around the country. Call (800) 572-1717 or visit www.mda.org/ summercamp for details. II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — The museum accepts applications for volunteers to meet and greet visitors from around the world and familiarize them with its galleries, artifacts and expansion. Call 527-6012 ext. 243 or email katherine.alpert@nationalww2museum.org for details.

OPERATION REACH VOLUNTEERS. Operation REACH

and Gulfsouth Youth Action Corps seek college student volunteers from all over the country to assist in providing recreation and education opportunities for New Orleansarea inner-city youth and their families. For information, visit www.thegyac.org and www. operationreach.org. PUBLIC SCHOOL VOLUNTEERS.

New Orleans Outreach seeks volunteers to share their enthusiasm and expertise as part of the ARMS-Outreach afterschool program. Volunteers are needed in the arts, academics, technology, recreation and life skills. Email jenny@nooutreach. org or call 654-1060 for information.

SENIOR COMPANION VOLUNTEERS. New Orleans

Council on Aging, Annex Conference Room, 2475 Canal St., 821-4121; www.nocoa.org — The council seeks volunteers to assist with personal and other daily tasks to help seniors live independently. Call for details.

START THE ADVENTURE IN READING. The STAIR program

holds regular volunteer training sessions to work one-on-one with public school students on reading and language skills. Call 899-0820, email elizabeth@ scapc.org or visit www.stairnola.org for details. TEEN SUICIDE PREVENTION .

The Teen Suicide Prevention Program seeks volunteers to help teach middle- and upperschool New Orleans students. Call 831-8475 for details.

VOLUNTEERS CAN LEAD PROGRAM . The program allows

residents to assist the New

513 Octavia St., 899-7323 — The author signs and discusses The Tarball Chronicles: A Journey Beyond the Oiled Pelican and Into the Heart of the Gulf Oil Spill. 6 p.m. Tuesday.

ROBERT FRANEK . Maple Street

Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www.maplestreetbookshop.com — The author discusses The Best 376 Colleges. 6 p.m. Wednesday.

SHERRY “LEDDY” MILAM . Garden District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 8952266 — The author signs and discusses The Red Feather. Big Chief Kevin Goodman and the Flaming Arrows perform. 6 p.m. Saturday. YVONNE SPEAR PERRET. The Catholic Book Store, 3003 S. Carrolton Ave., 861-7504 ��� The author signs Yat Wit: Chicken Gumbo for the New Orleans Soul. 11 a.m. Saturday.

CALL FOR WRITERS BOB KAUFMAN BOOK PRIZE IN POETRY. Trembling Pillow

Press presents the contest. The winner will be published in 2012. Visit www.tremblingpillowpress.com for details. Submissions deadline is Nov. 15. POETIC SOUL CONTEST. 411 NOLA hosts the competition to honor the publication of the second edition of poet Asia Rainey’s book Soul Chant. There is a $5 entry fee per poem. Email contests@411nola.com or visit www.411nola.com for details. Submissions deadline is Nov. 2. WOMEN WRITING POETRY WORKSHOP SERIES. St.

Anna’s Episcopal Church, 1313 Esplanade Ave., 947-2121; www.stannanola.org — Delia Nakayama hosts a free poetry workshop series for women ages 15 and older on Thursdays starting Oct. 6. Space is limited; reservations are required. Call 289-9142 to register.

For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Email Ian McNulty at imcnulty@cox.net. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <DISTILLED DINING > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >A tour of the Old New Orleans Rum distillery typically involves a drink or two, but a special event there Friday, < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <PUTTING < < < < < < <EVERYTHING < < < < < < < < < <ON < < <THE < < < TABLE < < < < < < < < < < < < < <Sept. 23 also entails dinner. Martin Wine Cellar (714 Elmeer St., Metairie, 896-7300; www.martinwine.com) co-hosts the event, which begins at its Metairie location at 5:30 p.m. From there, vans shuttle guests to the distillery in Gentilly for cocktails, a facility tour and a rum tasting, followed by a trip back to Martin’s for rum dishes. The cost is $30 per person. Call Martin’s for reservations.

am

B

THINK SMALL STREET FARE DERBY

12:30 p.m. - 6 p.m. Saturday

Fair Grounds Race Course & Slots, 1751 Gentilly Blvd.; www. streetfarederby.com $10 in advance,$15 at the door, kids under 12 free

Sliders are the specialty at Nosh (219 Dauphine St., 581-6674; www.nolanosh.com), a French Quarter cafe with a full bar and some fun desserts. In addition to the standard burger, the slider list includes ground turkey, buffalo, seared fish, pulled pork, portobello mushroom and a BLT. Nosh also serves salads, hand-cut fries, homespun sweets and breakfast fare.

five 5 IN

FIVE ESCARGOT DISHES

CIRO’S COTE SUD

7918 MAPLE ST., 866-9551 www.cotesudrestaurant.com

Enjoy traditional escargot Bourgogne in a cozy, romantic setting.

DANTE’S KITCHEN

736 DANTE ST., 861-3121 www.danteskitchen.com

Order escargot prepared with house-made bacon, goat cheese, basil and vermouth.

Track Meet STREET FARE DERBY SHOWCASES A GROWING FOOD TRUCK SCENE

Andrew Gomila (window) and Henry Pulitzer (right) will bring their Geaux Plates truck to the Street Fare Derby. PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

EMERIL’S RESTAURANT

800 TCHOUPITOULAS ST., 528-9393 www.emerils.com

Dip escargot in potato fondue with chorizo, with crusty bread on the side.

B Y I A N M C N U LT Y

T

food scene can be a low-cost tool for urban development — by reclaiming vacant lots or dark street corners — and small-business growth, incubating future conventional restaurants. But in New Orleans, food truck operators and others often complain that murky regulations and licensing requirements from City Hall have stifled growth. “There are a lot of people who want to open trucks here but can’t figure out how to do it legally,” Caston says. “We get literally five requests a week through the website from people asking ‘How do we start a food truck in New Orleans?’ Right now, our answer is ‘Good luck.’” Caston hopes the Street Fare Derby will lead to greater advocacy for regulatory reform and demonstrate the street-food scene’s potential. That’s potential the event’s host, the Fair Grounds, has already experienced firsthand. Last year, the track invited local food trucks to participate in a series of evening races called Starlight Racing. Fair Grounds spokesman Jim Mulvihill says it was part of a marketing effort to draw a younger patrons to the historic racetrack. “Other tracks around the country have done this with food trucks and for the same reason,” he says. “Food trucks bring people out, and especially the people we’re trying to reach and introduce to racing.” Indeed, the Street Fare Derby coincides with the Fair Grounds’ biggest race day of the year for quarter horses, racehorses bred for short sprints. If the Derby is successful, perhaps more New Orleans street food will find itself on the fast track too.

MARTINIQUE BISTRO

5908 MAGAZINE ST., 891-8495 www.martiniquebistro.com

Discover escargot under a buttery, goldencrusted gratin with blue cheese.

ONE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE 8132 HAMPSON ST., 301-9061 www.one-sl.com

Escargot are served over fried green tomatoes with New Orleans-style bordelaise.

Questions? Email winediva1@earthlink.net.

2010 Jean Jean-Luc Colombo Cape Bleue Rose VIN DE PAYS DE MEDITERRANEE, FRANCE / $12-$17 Retail A blend of 40 percent Syrah, 40 percent Mourvedre and 20 percent Counoise was fermented in stainless steel vats. On the palate, taste watermelon rind, cherry, raspberry, herbs, citrus and a subtle minerality. Serve it well-chilled with smoked or cured salmon, fish, shrimp, fowl, ham curries and roasted beet salad. Buy it at: Elio’s Wine Warehouse, Joe’s French Quarter Wine Cellar, The Wine Seller, Cork & Bottle, Bacchanal and Schiro’s Deli and Bar. Drink it at: Herbsaint, Patois, Lilette, La Petite Grocery, The Grill Room at the Windsor Court, Le Pavillon Hotel and Chateau du Lac Bistro. — Brenda Maitland

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 20 > 2011

he roving spud masters known as the Fry Bar serve gourmet garlic-Parmesan-rosemary fries at local art markets. The Peace Love & Sno-balls trailer whirls out a rainbow of syrup-soaked shaved ice at Audubon Park on the weekends. A food truck called Geaux Plates parks outside Uptown bars with inventive banh mi-style sandwiches. And at second-line parades, Linda Green serves yakamein, the only-in-New Orleans, Asian-soul-hybrid soup. They’re examples of the deep traditions and budding trends in street food found across the city. This Saturday, however, their trucks and many others will finally all be in the same spot: the Street Fare Derby, an offbeat culinary event at the Fair Grounds Race Course. With more vendors from New Orleans, the Northshore and Baton Rouge signing up, this street food festival should be a grand tour of inventive, hand-held eats, complete with music from Kermit Ruffins and Papa Grows Funk and a day of live horse racing to boot. The event gives diners a chance to sample from the area’s wide and fast-growing range of street food in one place. For organizers, it’s a chance to showcase a street food scene they believe has more to offer than just a good quick meal. The Derby is the work of Lizzy Caston and Erica Normand, who last year launched the website NOLAFoodTrucks.com as a guide to local street food. Caston helped start a similar site and a similar street food festival in Portland, Ore., arguably the nation’s epicenter of street food with some 600 licensed vendors. Caston is a firm believer that a robust street

57

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 20 > 2011

CUISINE

s ay d s ne P M d e W 5:00

Scuttlebites ALL THE NEWS THATS FIT TO EAT.

La f S q ay e ua tte re

B Y I A N M C N U LT Y

BAKED IN BYWATER

There’s a new bakery in the Bywater that’s open on weekend days and, once a month, quite late at night. Local baker Dawn Snead started Shake Sugary (3600 St. Claude Ave., 355-9345; www.shakesugary.com) in a small storefront, which happens to be adjacent to the newly relocated Sankofa Farmers Market (3500 St. Claude Ave.; www.sankofafarmersmarket.org). Shake Sugary is normally open Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. During the “second Saturday” gallery nights organized by the St. Claude Arts District (or, delightfully, SCAD), the bakery reopens from 9 p.m. to midnight for people out gallery hopping. The line-up at Shake Sugary changes from week to week, but I’ve been relieved to find Snead’s excellent bacon and sweet potato biscuit consistently available. You also can find Shake Sugary baked goods down the street at St. Coffee (2709 St. Claude Ave., 872-9798), a hip little coffee shop with food from a host of downtown suppliers, including donuts from Alois J. Binder Bakery and empanadas from the food truck crew Empanada Intifada. — Ian McNulty

POURING IT ON

HEADING PHO MAGAZINE STREET

Whether you’re hungry for traditional Vietnamese noodle shop fare or interested in tasting something a little different from the Vietnamese cookbook, a pair of Uptown restaurants now under development may have you covered. Magasin Vietnamese Cafe is taking shape at 4201 Magazine St., and it will serve what its owner describes as a combination of “home-style family cooking” with French influences and a large array of made-to-order spring rolls. Meanwhile at 2005 Magazine St., a new eatery called Pho Noi Viet will serve a traditional Vietnamese noodle house menu, with staples like pho, banh mi sandwiches, bun noodle salads and, of course, more spring rolls. These are independent ventures, and each is tentatively slated to open sometime in October. Magasin, located in the former corner grocery, takes its name from the French word for “store.” It’s being developed by Kim Nguyen, a New Orleans native who runs a pair of traditional Vietnamese restaurants in Houston. For Magasin, which will be her restaurant debut in her hometown, she’s taking a different approach. “I’m stepping a little bit away from the traditional here and bringing in more French influences, though there will still be fundamental (dishes) that people want too,” Nguyen says. One particular specialty will be a roster of 15 spring rolls prepared to order in a sushi bar style of service. Renovation work is also underway at Pho Noi Viet, a family-run restaurant from Kim and Vinh Vu. Although this will be the couple’s first restaurant, Kim Vu’s cooking may be familiar to those who have sipped late-night pho in the Marigny. Last year, Vu was part of the team that opened Pho King, a Vietnamese restaurant inside the Lost Love Lounge (2529 Dauphine St., 949-2009; www.lostlovelounge.com). The owners of that bar later took over Pho King and now run it simply as “the Vietnamese Kitchen at the Lost Love Lounge.” Vinh Vu explains that the plan for Pho Noi Viet came about after he and his wife saw how popular Vietnamese food had become around New Orleans. “We want to have our own place and really show our cooking,” he said. — McNulty Got a tip for Scuttlebites? Contact Ian McNulty at imcnulty@cox.net.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 20 > 2011

A sprawling new sports bar and restaurant complex near the Louisiana Superdome opened last week, skidding across the finish line just in time for the Saints home opener against the Chicago Bears. Walk-On’s Bistreaux & Bar (1009 Poydras St., 309-6530; www.walk-ons.com) and Happy’s Irish Pub (1009 Poydras St., 304-9236; www.happysirishpub.com) are both expansions from the same Baton Rouge-based management group. Developed together, they took over the former address of a Smith & Wollensky steakhouse, which had been empty since Hurricane Katrina. Walk-On’s originated as a sports bar and grill practically within field goal range of Tiger Stadium at Louisiana State University. It has since grown into a chain with a second location in Baton Rouge and another in Lafayette. The dining room of the New Orleans location is covered with large, flat-screen TVs and has a large bar with booths equipped with self-serve beer taps. The restaurant’s menu covers familiar barand-grill territory and adds a sort of Louisiana/Tex-Mex theme with lots of tortillas, cheese, crawfish and fried seafood. Walk-On’s serves lunch and dinner daily and is open to all ages. Just next door, Happy’s is strictly a bar, and it’s one that seems in line with the “breastaurant” concept. Barmaids wear the classic Catholic-schoolgirl-gone-bad

uniform, with skimpy skirts and midriff tops. Happy’s has two rooms fitted with deep booths and more TVs, plus an open courtyard. — McNulty

59

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

>>>>>

YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>

<<<< <<< <<<<< >>>>>>>>> <<< >> <<

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Out > > >2 >Eat > >is>an > >index > > >of> Gambit > > > > >contract > > > > >advertisers. > > > > > > >Unless > > > >noted, > > > >addresses > > > > > >are > >for > >New > > >Orleans. >>>>>>>>> Dollar signs represent the average cost of a dinner entree: $ — under $10; $$ — $11 to $20; $$$ — $21 or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax 483-3116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

AMERICAN FAT HEN GRILL — 1821 Hickory

Ave., Harahan, 287-4581; 7457 St. Charles Ave., 266-2921; www. fathengrill.com — Fat Hen serves barbecue, burgers and breakfast. Pit-cooked barbecue options include St. Louis-style spare ribs. Burgers are made with all Black Angus beef ground in-house daily. Reservations accepted. St. Charles Avenue: breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Hickory Avenue: breakfast, lunch and dinner Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $$ O’HENRY’S FOOD & SPIRITS — 634

S. Carrollton Ave., 866-9741; 8859 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Kenner, 461-9840; www.ohenrys.com — Complimentary peanuts are the calling card of these casual, family friendly restaurants. The menu includes burgers, steaks, ribs, pasta, fried seafood, salads and more. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BAR & GRILL

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 20 > 2011

BAYOU BEER GARDEN — 326 N.

60

Jefferson Davis Pwky., 302-9357 — Head to Bayou Beer Garden for a 10-oz. Bayou burger served on a sesame bun. Disco fries are french fries topped with cheese and debris gravy. No reservations. Lunch and dinner, latenight Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

DINO’S BAR & GRILL — 1128

BEST PLACE TO BOARD YOUR PET

Tchoupitoulas St., 558-0900 — Dino’s kitchen serves burgers, chicken tenders, salads and wraps. Happy hour is from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards and checks. $

THE RIVERSHACK TAVERN — 3449

218-4098 4920 TCHOUPITOULAS ST. | WWW.CANINECONNECTIONNOLA.COM

River Road, 834-4938; www. therivershacktavern.com — This bar and music spot offers a menu of burgers, sandwiches overflowing with deli meats and changing lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ SHAMROCK BAR & GRILL — 4133

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S. Carrollton Ave., 301-0938 — Shamrock serves burgers, shrimp or roast beef po-boys, Reuben sandwiches, cheese sticks and fries with cheese or gravy. Other options include corned beef and cabbage, and fish and chips. No reservations. Dinner and late night daily. Credit cards. $

ZADDIE’S TAVERN — 1200 Jefferson Hwy., Jefferson, 832-0830 — Zaddie’s serves burgers, alligator sausage, boudin, tamales and meat or crawfish pies. Thrusday’s steak night special features a filet mignon, buttergarlic potatoes, salad, grilled French bread and a soft drink

for $15. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $

24-hour City Park location also offer shrimp and catfish po-boys. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $

BARBECUE ABITA BAR-B-Q — 69399 Hwy.

59, Abita Springs, (985) 892-0205 — Slow-cooked brisket and pork are specialties at this Northshore smokehouse. The half-slab rib plate contains six ribs served with a choice of two sides. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

BOO KOO BBQ — 3701 Banks

St., 202-4741; www.bookoobbq. com — The Boo Koo burger is a ground brisket patty topped with pepper Jack cheese, boudin and sweet chile aioli. The Cajun banh mi fills a Vietnamese roll with hogshead cheese, smoked pulled pork, boudin, fresh jalapeno, cilantro, cucumber, carrot, pickled radish and sriracha sweet chile aioli. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.Sat. Cash only. $

WALKER’S BAR-B-QUE — 10828 Hayne Blvd., 281-8227; www.cochondelaitpoboys.com — The makers of the Jazz Fest cochon de lait po-boy serve pork, ribs, chicken and more. The family feast includes a half-slab of ribs, half a chicken, half a pound of brisket, pork and sausage, two side orders, bread and sauce. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Saturday. Cash only. $

BREWPUB CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE —

527 Decatur St., 522-0571; www. crescentcitybrewhouse.com — Live jazz and German-style beers complement creative cooking at this brewpub. Grilled Brewhouse ribs are served with house-made barbecue sauce. Starters include Brewhouse hot wings, baked oysters and fried calamari with red pepper aioli. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BURGERS BEACHCORNER BAR & GRILL —

4905 Canal St., 488-7357; www. beachcornerbarandgrill.com — Top a 10-oz. Beach burger with cheddar, blue, Swiss or pepper Jack cheese, sauteed mushrooms or house-made hickory sauce. Other options include a grilled chicken sandwich. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ BUD’S BROILER — Citywide; www. budsbroiler.com — Bud’s Broiler is known for charcoal-broiled burgers topped with hickory-amoked sauce. The menus also includes hot dogs and chicken sandwiches. The Clearview Parkway and

CAFE CAFE FRERET — 7329 Freret St.,

861-7890; www.cafefreret. com — The cafe serves breakfast itemes like the Freret Egg Sandwich with scrambled eggs, cheese and bacon or sausage served on toasted white or wheat bread or an English muffin.Signature sandwiches include the Chef’s Voodoo Burger, muffuletta and Cuban po-boy. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Fri.-Wed., dinner Mon.Wed., Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

ECO CAFE & BISTRO — 3903 Canal St., 561-6585; www.ecocafeno.com — Eco Cafe serves sandwiches like the veggie club, layered with Swiss cheese, tomatoes, onions, cucumbers, spinach and baby pickles. There are fresh squeezed juices, and Friday and Saturday evenings feature tapas dining. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ GOTT GOURMET CAFE — 3100

Magazine St., 373-6579; www. gottgourmetcafe.com — This cafe serves a variety of gourmet salads, sandwiches, wraps, Chicago-style hot dogs, burgers and more. The cochon de lait panini includes slow-braised pork, baked ham, pickles, Swiss, ancho-honey slaw, honey mustard and chili mayo. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

LAKEVIEW BREW COFFEE CAFE —

5606 Canal Blvd., 483-7001 — This casual cafe offers gourmet coffees and a wide range of pastries and desserts baked in house, plus a menu of specialty sandwiches and salads. Breakfast is available all day on weekends. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PARKVIEW CAFE AT CITY PARK —

City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 483-9474 — Located in the old Casino Building, the cafe serves gourmet coffee, sandwiches, salads and ice cream till early evening. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

PRAVDA — 1113 Decatur St., 5811112; www.pravdaofnola.com — Pravda is known for its Soviet kitsch and selection of absinthes, and the kitchen offers pierogies, beef empanadas, curry shrimp salad and a petit steak served with truffle aioli. No reservations. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ RICCOBONO’S PANOLA STREET CAFE — 7801 Panola St., 314-1810

— Specialties include crabcakes

OUT2EAT Benedict — two crabcakes and poached eggs topped with hollandaise sauce and potatoes — and the Sausalito omelet with spinach, mushrooms, shallots and mozzarella. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily. Credit cards. $

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VINE & DINE — 141 Delaronde St., 361-1402; www.vine-dine.com — The cafe serves cheese boards and charcuterie plates with pate and cured meats. There also is a menu of sandwiches, quesadillas, bruschettas, salads and dips. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CHINESE CHINA ORCHID — 704 S. Carrollton

Ave., 865-1428; www.chinaorchidneworleans.com — This longtime Riverbend restaurant offers a wide array of Chinese dishes. Sizzling black pepper beef or chicken is prepared with onions, red and green peppers and brown sauce and served on a hot plate with steamed rice on the side. Other options include fried rice, noodle and egg foo young dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

CHINA ROSE — 3501 N. Arnoult Road., Metairie, 887-3295 — China Rose offers many Chinese seafood specialties. The Lomi Lomi combines jumbo shrimp, pineapple and water chestnuts wrapped in bacon, fries them golden brown and serves them on a bed of sautéed vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

FIVE HAPPINESS — 3511 S. Carroll-

ton Ave., 482-3935 — The large menu at Five Happiness offers a range of dishes from wonton soup to sizzling seafood combinations served on a hot plate to sizzling Go-Ba to lo mein dishes. Delivery and banquest facilities available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

JUNG’S GOLDEN DRAGON — 3009 Magazine St., 891-8280; www. jungsgoldendragon2.com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, Thai and Korean cuisine. Chinese specialties include Mandarin, Szechuan and Hunan dishes. Grand Marnier shrimp are lightly battered and served with Grand Marnier sauce, broccoli and pecans. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ TREY YUEN CUISINE OF CHINA — 600 N. Causeway Approach.,

Mandeville, (985) 626-4476; 2100 N. Morrison Blvd., Hammond, (985) 345-6789; www.tryyuen. com — House specialties include fried soft-shell crab topped with Tong Cho sauce, and Cantonese-style stir-fried alligator and mushrooms in oyster sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

COFFEE/ DESSERT ANTOINE’S ANNEX — 513 Royal

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Isabella’s Gallery Available at both Isabella’s Gallery locations:

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St., 581-4422; www.antoines.com — The Annex is a coffee shop serving pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. The Royal Street salad features baby spinach and mixed lettuces with carrots, red onion, red peppers, grapes, olives, walnuts and raspberry vinaigrette. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

KUPCAKE FACTORY — 800 Metai-

rie Road, Metairie, 267-4990; 819 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 4648884; 6233 S. Claiborne Ave., 2673328; www.thekupcakefactory. com — Choose from a large selection of gourmet cupcakes. The Fat Elvis is made with banana cake and topped with peanut butter frosting. The Strawberry Fields tops strawberry cake with strawberry buttercream frosting. Other options include white chocolate raspberry and a banana cupcake. No reservations. Hours vary by location. Credit cards. $

MAURICE FRENCH PASTRIES — 3501

Hessmer Ave., Metairie, 885-1526; 4949 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 455-0830; www.mauricefrenchpastries.com — Maurice French Pastries offers an array of continental and French baked goods as well as specialty cakes, cheesecakes and pies. No reservations. Hessmer Avenue: breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. West Napoleon: breakfast and lunch Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PINKBERRY — 300 Canal St.; 5601

Magazine St., 899-4260; www. pinkberry.com — Pinkberry offers frozen yogurt with an array of wet and dry topping choices including caramel, honey, fruit purees, various chocolates and nuts and more. There also are fresh fruit parfaits and green tea smoothies. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CONTEMPORARY 5 Fifty 5 — 555 Canal St., 553-5638;

www.555canal.com — New Orleans dishes and Americana favorites take an elegant turn in dishes such as the lobster mac and cheese, combining lobster meat, elbow macaroni and mascarpone, boursin and white cheddar cheeses. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

BAYONA — 430 Dauphine St., 5254455; www.bayona.com — House favorites on Chef Susan Spicer’s menu include sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce and the appetizer of grilled shrimp with black-bean cake and coriander sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$$ THE GREEN GODDESS — 307 Ex-

change Alley, 301-3347; www. greengoddessnola.com — Chef Chris DeBarr’s contemporary cooking combines classic techniques, exotic ingredients and culinary wit. At lunch, Big Cactus Chilaquiles feature poached eggs on homemade tortillas with salsa verde, queso fresca and nopalitos. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Thu.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ OAK — 8118 Oak St., 302-1485;

with roasted garlic and shiitake polenta cakes and a memorable cochon de lait. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CREOLE ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713 St.

Louis St., 581-4422; www.antoines. com — The city’s oldest restaurant offers a glimpse of what 19th century French Creole dining might have been like, with a labyrinthine series of dining rooms. Signature dishes include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ GUMBO SHOP — 640 St. Peter

St., 525-1486; www.gumboshop. com — Gumbo and New Orleans classics such as crawfish etouffee dominate the menu. Their spicy flavors meld into a dish that represents the city’s best and redefines comfort food. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

LE CITRON BISTRO — 1539 Religious St., 566-9051; www.le-citronbistro.com — Located in a historic building, the quaint bistro serves starters like chicken and andouille gumbo and fried frogs legs. Entrees include choices like fried chicken, Gulf fish and burgers. Reservations accepted. Dinner Wed.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000 N. Peters St., 524-4747 — This casual restaurant serves Creole favorites. The menu includes crawfish etouffee, boiled crawfish, red beans and rice and bread pudding for dessert. Outdoor seating is adjacent to Dutch Alley and the French Market. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

CUBAN/ CARIBBEAN MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — 437 Esplanade Ave., 252-4800; www. mojitosnola.com — Mojitos serves a mix of Caribbean, Cuban and Creole dishes. Caribbean mac and cheese pie is made with chunks of lobster, tomatoes, scallions, garlic and creamy cheese sauce and is served over a bed of spicy corn maque choux. Reservations accepted. Lunch, dinner and late-night Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

DELI CG’S CAFE AT THE RUSTY NAIL — 1100 Constance St., 722-3168;

www.oaknola.com — This wine bar offers small plates and live musical entertainment. Gulf shrimp fill tacos assembled in house-made corn tortillas with pickled vegetables, avocado and lime crema. The hanger steak bruschetta is topped with Point Reyes blue cheese and smoked red onion marmalade. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

www.therustynail.biz — Inside the Rusty Nail, CG’s offers a menu of sandwiches. The Piggly Wiggly features pulled pork on a sesame seed bun with coleslaw and pickle chips on the side. The Wild Turkey is layered with Granny Smith apple slices, provolone, bacon and garlic mayo. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $

8132 Hampson St., 301-9061; www.one-sl.com — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes like char-grilled oysters topped with Roquefort cheese and a red wine vinaigrette, seared scallops

Metairie, 888-2010; www.koshercajun.com — This New York-style deli specializes in sandwiches, including corned beef and pastrami that come straight from the Bronx. No reservations. Lunch

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Sun.-Thu., dinner Mon.-Thu. Credit cards. $

MARTIN WINE CELLAR — 714 El-

meer Ave., Metairie , 896-7350; www.martinwine.com — The wine emporium offers gourmet sandwiches and deli items. The Reuben combines corned beef, melted Swiss, sauerkraut and Russian dressing on rye bread. The Sena salad features chicken, golden raisins, blue cheese, toasted pecans and pepper jelly vinaigrette over field greens. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Fri., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GOURMET TO GO BREAUX MART — 315 E. Judge

Perez, Chalmette, 262-0750; 605 Lapalco Blvd., Gretna, 433-0333; 2904 Severn Ave., Metairie, 8855565; 9647 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 737-8146; www.breauxmart.com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux” as well as weekday specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

INDIAN DINER DAISY DUKES — 121 Chartres St., 561-5171; www.daisydukesrestaurant.com — Daisy Dukes is known for its seafood omelet and serves a wide variety of Cajun spiced Louisiana favorites, burgers, po-boys and seafood, including boiled crawfish and oysters on the half-shell. Breakfast is served all day. No reservations. Open 24 hours daily. Credit cards. $$

JULIE’S LITTLE INDIA KITCHEN AT SCHIRO’S — 2483 Royal St., 944-

6666; www.schiroscafe.com — The cafe offers homemade Indian dishes prepared with freshly ground herbs and spices. Selections include chicken, lamb or shrimp curry or vindaloo and vegetarian saag paneer. Schiro’s also serves New Orleans cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NIRVANA INDIAN CUISINE — 4308

FRENCH FLAMING TORCH — 737 Octavia

St., 895-0900; www.flamingtorchnola.com — Chef Nathan Gile’s menu includes pan-seared Maine diver scallops with chimichurri sauce and smoked bacon and corn hash. Coffee- and coriander-spiced rack of lamb is oven roasted and served with buerre rouge and chevre mashed potatoes. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

MARTINIQUE BISTRO — 5908

Magazine St., 891-8495; www. martiniquebistro.com — This French bistro has both a cozy dining room and a pretty courtyard. Try dishes such as Steen’s-cured duck breast with satsuma and ginger demi-glace and stoneground goat cheese grits. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sat.-

Magazine St., 894-9797 — Serving mostly northern Indian cuisine, the restaurant’s extensive menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TAJ MAHAL INDIAN CUISINE —

923-C Metairie Road, Metairie, 836-6859 — The traditional menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways, including curries and tandoori. Vegetarian options are available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.Sun. Credit cards. $$

ITALIAN ANDREA’S RESTAURANT — 3100

N. 19th St., Metairie 834-8583; www.andreasrestaurant.com — Chef/owner Andrea Apuzzo’s specialties include speckled trout

Diners enjoy lunch at Emeril’s (800 Tchoupitoulas St., 528-9393; www.emerils.com). PhOTO By CheRyL GeRBeR

royale which is topped with lump crabmeat and lemon-cream sauce. Capelli D’Andrea combines house-made angel hair pasta and smoked salmon in light cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

CAFE GIOVANNI — 117 Decatur St., 529-2154; www.cafegiovanni. com — Chef Duke LoCicero serves inventive Italian cuisine and Italian accented contemporary Louisiana cooking. Shrimp Dukie features Louisiana shrimp and a duck breast marinated in Cajun spices served with tassomushroom sauce. Belli Baci is the restaurant’s cocktail lounge. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

MOSCA’S — 4137 Hwy. 90 W.,

Westwego, 436-8950; www. moscasrestaurant.com — This family-style eatery has changed little since opening in 1946. Popular dishes include shrimp Mosca, chicken a la grande and baked oysters Mosca, made with breadcrumps and Italian seasonings. Reservations accepted. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $$$

RICCOBONO’S PEPPERMILL RESTAURANT — 3524 Severn Ave.,

Metairie, 455-2266 — This Italianstyle eatery serves New Orleans favorites like stuffed crabs with jumbo lump crabmeat with spaghetti bordelaise and trout meuniere with brabant potatoes. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ VINCENT’S ITALIAN CUISINE — 4411

Chastant St., Metairie, 885-2984; 7839 St. Charles Ave., 866-9313;

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 20 > 2011

To find out how to get your business listed on Forkfly, call your Gambit Account Executive or 504-483-3126

65

Creole, Italian, seafood, & specialty Dishes

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OUT2EAT www.vincentsitaliancuisine.com — Try house specialties like vealand spinach-stuffed canneloni. Bracialoni is baked veal stuffed with artichoke hearts, bacon, garlic and Parmesan cheese and topped with red sauce. Reservations accepted. Chastant Street: lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.Sat. St. Charles Avenue: lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

JAPANESE KYOTO — 4920 Prytania St., 891-

3644 — Kyoto’s sushi chefs prepare rolls, sashimi and salads. “Box” sushi is a favorite, with more than 25 rolls. Reservations recommended for parties of six or more. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$

MIKIMOTO — 3301 S. Carrollton

Ave., 488-1881; www.mikimotosushi.com — Sushi choices include new and old favorites, both raw and cooked. The South Carrollton roll includes tuna tataki, avocado and snow crab. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Delivery available. Credit cards. $$

MIYAKO JAPANESE SEAFOOD & STEAKHOUSE — 1403 St. Charles

Ave., 410-9997; www.japanesebistro.com — Miyako offers a full range of Japanese cuisine, with specialties from the sushi or hibachi menus, chicken, beef or seafood teriyaki, and tempura. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

Now open 7 days a week in Mandeville LUNCH : Mon - Fri 11-2pm DiNNER: Mon -Thu 5-930pm Fri & Sat 5-10pm · Sun 1130a - 930p 600 N. Causeway, Mandeville 2100 N. Morrison, Hammond

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 20 > 2011

985/626-4476

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MEXICAN & CUBAN FOOD

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581-7253; www.rocknsake.com — Rock-n-Sake serves traditional Japanese cuisine with some creative twists. There’s a wide selection of sushi, sashimi and rolls or spicy gyoza soup, panfried soba noodles with chicken or seafood and teriyaki dishes. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.Sun. Credit cards. $$

WASABI SUSHI — 900 Frenchmen St., 943-9433; 8550 Pontchartrain Blvd., 267-3263; www.wasabinola.com — Wasabi serves a wide array of Japanese dishes. Wasabi honey shrimp are served with cream sauce. The Assassin roll bundles tuna, snow crab and avocado in seaweed and tops it with barbecued eel, tuna, eel sauce and wasabi tobiko. No reservations. Frenchmen Street: Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner daily. Pontchartrain Boulevard: lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

LOUISIANA CONTEMPORARY BOMBAY CLUB — 830 Conti St., 586-0972; www.thebombayclub. com — Mull the menu at this French Quarter hideaway while sipping a well made martini. The duck duet pairs confit leg with pepper-seared breast with black currant reduction. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ BOUCHE — 840 Tchoupitoulas St., 267-7485; www.bouchenola. com — This wine bar and restaurant serves creative dishes like tasso truffle mac and cheese with three cheeses and Mornay sauce, baby spinach salad with Maytag blue cheese and bacon lardons, and crispy duck breast

with Grand Marnier sweet potatoes and vanilla-balsamic extract. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

This wallet-friendly restaurant offers new takes on Mexican-inspired cooking. It’s known for its meal-and-a-half-size signature burritos. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

301-9570 — Veal Oscar features lightly breaded veal topped with lump crabmeat and hollandaise, served with garlic red potatoes and grilled asparagus. The alligator pear and crabmeat salad combines avocado and crabmeat over tomatoes, red onions and greens in balsamic glaze. Reservations accepted. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $$

NACHO MAMA’S MEXICAN GRILL — 3242 Magazine St., 899-0031;

MIA’S — 1622 St. Charles Ave.,

MILA — 817 Common St., 412-

2580; www.milaneworleans.com — MiLA takes a fresh approach to Southern and New Orleans cooking, focusing on local produce and refined techniques. Try New Orleans barbecue lobster with lemon confit and fresh thyme. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri. dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

RALPH’S ON THE PARK — 900 City

Park Ave., 488-1000; www.ralphsonthepark.com — Popular dishes include baked oysters Ralph, turtle soup and the Niman Ranch New York strip. There also are brunch specials. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

REDEMPTION — 3835 Iberville

St., 309-3570 — Redemption offers contemporary Louisiana cooking. Chambord duckling is served with cherry vinaigrette. Seared foie gras is complemented by vanilla parsnip puree. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

TOMMY’S WINE BAR — 752

Tchoupitoulas St., 525-4790 — Tommy’s Wine Bar offers cheese and charcuterie plates as well as a menu of appetizers and salads from the neighboring kitchen of Tommy’s Cuisine. No reservations. Lite dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ MEDITERRANEAN/ MIDDLE EASTERN ATTIKI BAR & GRILL — 230 Decatur

St., 587-3756; www.attikineworleans.com — Attiki features a range of Mediterranean cuisine including entrees of beef kebabs and chicken shawarma. Reservations recommended. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $$

PYRAMIDS CAFE — 3151 Calhoun St., 861-9602 — Diners will find authentic, healthy and fresh Mediterranean cuisine featuring such favorites as sharwarma prepared on a rotisserie. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEXICAN & SOUTHWESTERN COUNTRY FLAME — 620 Iberville

St., 522-1138 — Country Flame serves a mix of popular Mexican and Cuban dishes. Come in for fajitas, pressed Cuban sandwiches made with hickorysmoked pork and char-broiled steaks or pork chops. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ JUAN’S FLYING BURRITO — 2018

Magazine St., 569-0000; 4724 S.Carrollton Ave. 486-9950; www.juansflyingburrito.com —

1000 S. Clearview Pkwy., Harahan, 736-1188; www.nachomamasmexicangrill.com — These taquerias serve Mexican favorites such as portobello mushroom fajitas and chile rellenos. There are happy hour margaritas on weekdays and daily drink specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SANTA FE — 3201 Esplanade Ave.,

948-0077 — This casual cafe serves creative takes on Southwestern cuisine. Bolinos de Bacalau are Portuguese-style fish cakes made with dried, salted codfish, mashed potatoes, cilantro, lemon juice, green onions and egg and served with smoked paprika aioli. Outdoor seating is available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TOMASITO’S MEXICAN CUISINE —

755 Tchoupitoulas St., 527-0942 — Tomasito’s is an upscale cantina with a patio for outdoor dining. The carnitas platter features marinated and slow-cooked pork served with Mexican rice, refried beans and a choice of salsa verde, smoky chipotle or a traditional Mexican sauce. No reservations. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MUSIC AND FOOD GAZEBO CAFE — 1018 Decatur St.,

525-8899; www.gazebocafenola. com — The Gazebo features a mix of Cajun and Creole dishes and ice cream daquiris. The New Orleans sampler rounds up jambalaya, red beans and rice and gumbo. Other options include salads, seafood po-boys and burgers. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

HOUSE OF BLUES — 225 Decatur

St., 310-4999; www.hob.com/neworleans — Try the pan-seared Voodoo Shrimp with rosemary cornbread. The buffet-style gospel brunch features local and regional groups. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

THE MARKET CAFE — 1000 Deca-

tur St., 527-5000; www.marketcafenola.com — Dine indoors or out on seafood either fried for platters or po-boys or highlighted in dishes such as crawfish pie, crawfish etouffee or shrimp Creole. Sandwich options include muffulettas, Philly steaks on po-boy bread and gyros in pita bread. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SIBERIA — 2227 St. Claude Ave., 265-8855 — This music clubs serves dishes like fish and chips, spicy hot wings, tacos and more. There are weekly specials and vegetarian and vegan options. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO —

626 Frenchmen St., 949-0696; www.snugjazz.com — Traditional Creole and Cajun fare pepper the menu along with newer creations such as the fish Mari-

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598-1200; www.redfishgrill.com — Seafood creations by executive chef Brian Katz dominate a menu peppered with favorites like hickory-grilled redfish, pecan-crusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ VILLAGE INN — 9201 Jefferson

Hwy., 737-4610 — Check into Village Inn for seasonal boiled seafood or raw oysters. Other options include fried seafood platters, po-boys, pasta and pizza. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

SOUL FOOD BIG MOMMA’S CHICKEN AND

WAFFLES — 5741 Crowder Blvd., 241-2548; www.bigmommaschickenandwaffles.com — Big Mamma’s serves hearty combinations like the six-piece which includes a waffle and six fried wings served crispy or dipped in sauce. Breakfast is served all day. All items are cooked to order. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.Sun., Lunch daily, dinner Sun. Credit cards. $

STEAKHOUSE CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS —

322 Magazine St., 522-7902; www. centraarchy.com — This traditional steakhouse serves USDA prime beef, and a section of super-sized cuts includes a 40-oz. Porterhouse for two. The menu also features seafood options and a la carte side items. Reservations recommended. Diner daily. Credit cards. $$$ CRESCENT CITY STEAKS — 1001

N. Broad St., 821-3271; www. crescentcitysteaks.com — Order USDA prime beef dry-aged and hand-cut in house. There are porterhouse steaks large enough for two or three diners to share. Bread pudding with raisins and peaches is topped with brandy sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri. and Sun., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE —

Harrah’s Hotel, 525 Fulton St., 587-7099; 3633 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 888-3600; www.ruthschris.com — Ruth’s top-quality steaks are broiled in 1,800-degree ovens and arrive at the table sizzling. Reservations recommended. Fulton Street: Lunch and dinner daily. Veterans Memorial Boulevard: Lunch Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

TAPAS/SPANISH MIMI’S IN THE MARIGNY —

2601 Royal St., 872-9868 — The decadant Mushroom Manchego Toast is a favorite here. Or enjoy hot and cold tapas dishes ranging from grilled marinated artichokes to calamari. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ SANTA FE TAPAS — 1327 St. Charles Ave., 304-9915 — The menu includes both tapas dishes and entrees. Seared jumbo scallops are served with mango and green tomato pico de gallo. Gambas al ajillo are jumbo shrimp with garlic, shallots, chilis and cognac. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ VEGA TAPAS CAFE — 2051 Metarie Road, 836-2007; www.vegatapascafe.com — Vega’s mix of hot and cold tapas dishes includes a salad of lump crabmeat on arugula with blood orange vinaigrette, seared tuna with avocado and tomato relish, braised pork empanadillos, steamed mussels and shrimp with tomatoes and garlic in caper-basil cream. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

VIETNAMESE AUGUST MOON — 3635 Prytania St., 899-5129; www.moonnola. com — August Moon serves a mix of Vietnamese and Chinese cuisine. There are spring

Grab lunch at Terrazu (201 St. Charles Ave., 287-0877) inside the Place St. Charles in the CBD. PHOTO BY CHeRYL GeRBeR

rolls and pho soup as well as many popular Chinese dishes and vegetarian options. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

DOSON NOODLE HOUSE — 135 N. Carrollton Ave., 309-7283 — Noodles abound at this Mid-City eatery, which excels at vinegary chicken salad over shredded cabbage, as well as bowls of steaming pho. Vegetable-laden wonton soup and thick spring rolls make a refreshing, satisfying meal. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards and checks. $$

PHO HOA RESTAURANT — 1308

Manhattan Blvd., 302-2094 — Pho Hoa serves staple Vietnamese dishes including beef broth soups, vermicelli bowls, rice dishes and banh mi sandwiches. Bo kho is a popular beef stew. Appetizers include fried egg rols, crab rangoons and rice paper spring rolls. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

PHO NOLA — 3320 Transcontinental Drive, Metairie, 941-7690; www.pho-nola.com — Pho NOLA serves spring rolls and egg rolls, noodle soups, rice and vermicelli dishes and po-boys. Beverages include boba teas, milk teas, coffee drinks and smoothies. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PHO TAU BAY RESTAURANT — 113 Westbank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, 368-9846 — You’ll find classic Vietnamese beef broth and noodle soups, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, shrimp spring rolls with peanut sauce and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Wed. & Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

CLASSIFIEDS Caffe

Adorable male 12 wk old Bobtail kitten Very sweet and playful ,tested vacs neutered 504 462-1968

AUTOMOTIVE

483-3100 • Fax: 483-3153 3923 Bienville St. New Orleans, LA 70119

DOMESTIC AUTOS

CHATTY CAT

IMPORTED AUTOS

DSH, Gray/Brown/Black Tabby white chest, chin, feet. Appx. 1years, Neut. Vacs/Vet Ck/litter trained/Rescue. Small, Precious, Talkative & Super gentle! Would be great pet for child or Senior. Wt. 7 lbs. (504) 460-0136

classadv@gambitweekly.com

‘06 LEXUS IS 350

Elijah

CASH, CHECK OR MAJOR CREDIT CARD

‘07 INFINITI M35

Mon.-Fri. 8:30 a.m.- 5:30 p.m.

Online: When you place an ad in Gambit’s Classifieds it also appears on our website, www.bestofneworleans.com Free Ads: Private party ads for

merchandise for sale valued under $100 (price must be in ad) or ads for pets found/lost. No phone calls. Please fax or email.

Deadlines:

• For all Line Ads - Thurs. @ 5 p.m. • For all Display Ads - Wed. @ 5 p.m. Note: Ad cancellations and changes for all display ads must be made by Wednesday at 5 pm prior to the next issue date. Ad cancellations and changes for all line ads must be made by Thursday at 5 pm prior to the next issue date. Please proof your first ad insertion to make sure it is correct. Gambit only takes responsibility for the first incorrect insertion.

‘10 CHEVROLET HHR $11,995 504-368-5640

5 yr old gorgeous solid white Angora male cat super smart and sweet.Shots ,neuter ,rescue 504 462-1968

$19,995 504-368-5640

Kit Kit

$22,995 504-368-5640

Muted Gray Tabby DSH , appx. 1 y.o, VetCk/Vacs/Spayed/ Litter Trained/ Super Sweet/ Rescue (504) 460-0136

‘’09 NISSAN SENTRA $10,995 504-368-5640

‘’09 TOYOTA YARUS $11,995 504-368-5640

‘10 HONDA CIVIC

$15,995 Several to Choose From! 504-368-5640

‘10 Mitsubishi Galant $12,995 504-368-5640

‘10 VOLVO S40 $19,995 504-368-5640

‘11 HYUNDAI SONATA $17,995 504-368-5640

SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES ‘09 SUBARU FORESTER AWD $16,995 Call 504-368-5640

WANTED TO PURCHASE CASH FOR CARS

Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com

ART/POSTERS VINTAGE N.O. JAZZFEST POSTERS

Dating back to 1980, Still in protective tubes, Will sell as collection or by year. 704-681-4914.

FURNITURE/ACCESSORIES $125 Full/Double Size Mattress Set, still in original plastic, unopened. We can deliver. (504) 846-5122 $295 Brand New Iron Queen Bed with mattress set, all new. Can deliver. (504) 952-8403 King Pillowtop Mattress, NEW!!! ONLY $199. Can deliver. (504) 846-5122 NEW Pub Height Table Set all wood, still boxed. Delivery available. $325 (504) 846-5122 Queen Mattress Set $149 Still in wrapper. Will deliver. (504) 846-5122

MISC. FOR SALE STEP LADDER 12’

Fiberglass, Green Bull. heavy duty. Cost $250. Sell for $125. Call 782-8418

MERCHANDISE WANTED

MISHKA

Beautiful long hair Russian Blue mix 5 yr old sweetie ,spayed vacs ,504 462-1968

Nina-female boxer

sweet, friendly, loves belly rubs, kids & to be near you Traci- tbkestler@cox.net 504-975-5971

Princess Leila

solid white 6yr old female cat , very loving and talkative spayed ,shots ,rescue 504 462-1968

Sugar-rodesian ridgebace/ hound mix

6mth big loving eyes, affectionate, enjoys playing w/ oth dogs, in obed training. call Ann Marie zmom8699@yahoo.com

ANNOUNCEMENTS

ADOPTIONS ADOPT: Loving couple promises your baby, endless love, Christine & Tom 888-316-5136 exp pd. PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293

ASK ABOUT OUR SPECIAL RATES FOR

Real Estate Rentals &

Employment

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT

A BODY BLISS MASSAGE

Jeannie LMT #3783-01. Flexible appointments. Uptown Studio or Hotel out calls. 504.894.8856 (uptown)

BYWATER BODYWORKS

Advertise in

NOLA

MARKETPLACE

Swedish, deep tissue, therapeutic. Flex appts, in/out calls, OHP/student discounts, gift cert. $65/hr, $75/ 1 1/2hr. LA Lic# 1763 Mark. 259-7278

MASSAGE EXTRAORDINAIRE

24 yrs exp to give you the ultimate in relaxation. Call Matteo. LA 0022, for your next appt. Metairie area. 504-8320945. No Outcalls

MERCHANDISE APPLIANCES KENMORE CHEST FREEZER

Gambit’s weekly guide to Services, Events, Merchandise, Announcements, and more for as little as $60

7.2 CUBIC FT. LIKE NEW, HARDLY USED, GARAGE KEPT, KEY LOCK AND BOOK. $100.00. YOU PICK UP NORTHSHORE ABITA SPRINGS. 504-615-8884. To Advertise in

EMPLOYMENT Call (504) 483-3100

SERVICES

HOME SERVICES Affordable Fast Gutters LLC

Local Family Owned & Operated. All work guaranteed. Fully insured. 6” Seamless Gutters; Half -round 6” Seamless Gutters; Facia; Soffit, Patio Covers & Carports. Free Est. 504-838-9885

Don’t Replace Your Tub REGLAZE IT

Chip/Spot Repair - Colors Available Clawfoot tubs for sale Southern Refinishing LLC Certified Fiberglass Technician Family Owned & Operated 504-348-1770 southernrefinishing.com

RELIABLE DISPOSAL CO

Now Offering Portable Toilet Service. Container Trash Removal Free Quotes; Same Day Service Keeping our Water & Environment Clean One Job at A time Since 1969 504-835-1696

AIR COND/HEATING MERVYNS Heating & A/C Service

Residential Service All Makes & Models Service - Installation- Repairs Free Estimates on Replacements & New Installations 504-701-3605 - jcollins51@cox.net

PETS

NOTICE

Massage therapists are required to be licensed with the State of Louisiana and must include the license number in their ads.

No Selling! Give away our free RX card. Help others, including pets. Save up to 75% off prescriptions at 56,000 pharmacies. all 866-612-3733 visit nulegacyrxcard.com/ddw

Weekly Tails

German, Japanese, U.S. Helmets, Daggers, Swords, Flags, Guns, Civil War. ALL MEMORABILIA. Call 985-722-7051

LICENSED MASSAGE

MAKE MONEY EACH TIME SOMEONE FILLS A PRESCRIPTION

LOST/FOUND PETS

Billy Bob is a 7-year-old, neutered,

REWARD- LOST

red Min. Pin. He loves to sit on laps, is good on a leash and will need TLC during his heartworm treatment. To meet Billy Bob or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191.

(Mid City but could be anywhere by now),Ozzie, male, brown/black stripe (brindle), pit mix, sweet, call him & he will come, hold him &call me asap, Traci 504-975-5971.

PET ADOPTIONS ALLEY CAT

DSH White with Gray Tabby Markings, de-clawed, appx 1 year old, Vet Ck/ Vacs/Neut./Litter Trained/ Super Sweet/ Rescue Wt. 9 lbs.. (504) 460-0136

BILLY BOB Kennel #A10375091

Blk. Cocker Spaniel ,sweet & loving Maggie- sweet & loving dog. She is blind, but gets around very well by hearing & excel scenes of smell Loretta 504-715-0674

6wk sweet m kitten striped cat Archie is fun & full of gusto. If interested Please contact Traci-tbkestler@ cox.net 504-975-5971

Alexa

Purrfect 14 wk old adorable, beautiful & sweet kitten silver tabby ,vacs & spayed . rescue 504 462 -1968

Itty Bitty Inky

Very cute sweet petite kitty, 3yrs old , only 6 lbs, white/black spayed,shots 504 462-1968

SCOOTER Kennel #A13797185

Scooter is a 4-month-old, neutered, orange/white tabby DSH. He’s got a bright orange coat and a sunny disposition to match and is quite mellow for a young kitten. To meet Scooter or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. To look for a lost pet come to the Louisiana SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), Mon-Sat. 9-5, Sun. 12-5 or call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 20 > 2011

WANTED: WAR SOUVENIERS

ANNOUNCEMENTS HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-800-532-6546 Ext. 97 http:// www.continentalacademy.com

71

reaL esTaTe

SHOWCaSe FRENCH QUARTER

RIVER RIDGE 9012 Rosecrest Lane Newly renovated brick home, 1420 sq. ft., 2 bedroom, 2 bath, hardwood floors through out, appliances included, covered carport, large 62x120 lot w/open backyard & additional shed. 5 min. from Mathews & St. Rita.

Call (504) 915-3220

Reduced! Asking $169,000

922-24 Dauphine St. $900K Four 1 bedroom apartments. Parking for 5+ cars.

938 Royal St. A $216K Great location for this condo. Perfect for your weekend getaways! Quaint & comfortable. 1 br, great kit & bath.

835 Royal St. $365K Great location, secluded hideaway! Spac 2 br, 2 marble tile baths. Small rear balc overlooking garden.

Paula Bowler • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 • www.frenchquarterrealty.com

CLASSIFIEDS GENTILLY

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

2500 GENTILLY BLVD. 2BR/2BA, Lr, dr, den, kit w/granite, fp, hdwd flrs, inground pool. Call (504) 669-7263.

OLD METAIRIE METAIRIE TOWERS 401 Metairie Rd

1 bedroom, 1.5 bath, renovated with new appliances and AC’s. $118,000. Call 504-275-5700

EAST NEW ORLEANS LOOK NO FURTHER! $175,000

7516 Ebbtide Dr. 3/2, Mstr w/jac tub & dbl vanities, wbfp, hdwd flrs, ss appl, vltd ceils, granite, custom closets, fnced yd, 2 car garage, tiled patio, auto sprinkler 504-421-4841.

FRENCH QUARTER/ FAUBOURG MARIGNY 514 DUMAINE , Units 3 & 6. Charming ground & 2nd fl courtyard/ balcony. Awesomely located. Each unit $105,000 www.JudyFisher.net; Judy Fisher, Inc, 504-388-3023 301 Decatur St. Rare corner. Zoning allows live entertainment. 9,000 sq ft (Approx 3,000 sq ft ea. floor). Beautiful light filled loft style spaces. Possible owner financing. $1,650,000. Judy Fisher Inc. 504-388-3023. www. JudyFisher.net

LAKEVIEW/LAKESHORE 1161 ROBERT E. LEE BLVD

Luxury home in Lake Vista near the lakefront. Over 4000 sq ft. 4 BR, 4.5 BA. Custom kit Lovely pool. $775,000. G.L. Schroeder Realtor, Contractor. 504.241.1000. Cell 504.722.2928. schroederbuild@yahoo.com

2320 - 2322 LOWERLINE

Spacious raised basement duplex. Craftmen windows, built-ins, large balconies. Wd flrs up & down. Lg basement. Off st. pkg. $359,000. Jennifer Pearl, Realtor. Cell 504-258-5724, Ofc 488-0950. www.jennifervpearl.com

CONDO FOR SALE

1 Blk off St. Charles. 2/2, wd flrs, appls & w/d incl., grnite cntrtps & ss appl. OS pkng. REDUCED PRICE! $148,000. Darlene, Hera Realty 504-914-6352

ABITA SPRINGS LOWER GARDEN DIST./ IRISH CHANNEL MAKE ME BEAUTIFUL AGAIN!

Irish Channel did not flood Katrina damaged house w/2 & 1/3 L-shaped lots. 2 lots each 30x120’ = 60’x120’ & rear portion of corner lot 35’x25’, dble driveway in front w/a single tin garage & single driveway on side street. $8,567 roof, 7 rms & 3 bathrooms. 4th sewer line in rear, 2 lg walk in closets. Large walk in pantry. Huge, red brick floor to ceiling dble sided fireplace. Could house 1 family or owner occupied + 1 rental, or 2 rentals, or could build single/double on second lot. Much space to add on. Huge yd for in-ground pool. Many options for house & land. Paved front patio w/ 2 lg. red brick planters. $195,000, 504-832-1901.

THE FERNANDEZ HOUSE

HISTORIC ABITA SPRINGS

Steps to Tammany Trace & Abita fairs & festivals. 5 br, 3 ba cottage w/ porches. Less than a year old. $255K. Suzy McDaniel 985-640-1836 or 504944-3605. DB Sotheby’s Int’l Realty

COVINGTON COVINGTON COTTAGE

Charming 3 or 4 br, 3.5 ba, 2500 sf. Close to park. Lush landscaping, oversized lot, pool. $359K. Suzy McDaniel 985-640-1836 or 504-944-3605. D. B. Sotheby’s Int’l Realty.

ELEGANT COUNTRY LIVING

Min. from downtown Covington. Custom European estate on Bogue Falaya River. Main house 3500 sf ft 3 br, 3.5 ba. Guest house 2 br, 1 ba. On 4.66 acres. $1,099,000. By Appt. 985-5022882. CovingtonRiverEstate.com.

927 DAUPHINE STREET $1,895,000 An excellent example of an early creole cottage set in a serene compound. Beautiful courtyard with mature plantings in a classic partere garden. Property consists of the main house, 4 income producing apartments and a large bonus space-- office, workshop, gym, etc. Parking for multiple cars. Great location.

Paula Bowler • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 www.frenchquarterrealty.com

TCHEFUNCTA COUNTRY CLUB New remod 4 or 5 br, 3.5 ba, gour kit w/gran & Italian tile. Toto whirlpool & spa. It tile shwr in mstr. Designer fixtures. 4700+ total sf. $595K. Suzy McDaniel 985-640-1836/504-9443605. DB Sotheby’s Int’l Realty

FOLSOM

LUSH FOLSOM ACREAGE

40 rolling acres w/2500sf cottage & 4000sf barn. Pecan & walnut grove, blueberry orchard, live oaks, friuit trees, pond. $625K. Suzy McDaniel 985-640-1836 or 504-944-3605. DB Sotheby’s Int’l Realtors

STUNNING OAKLAWN/ LACOMBE

Beau pool w/wtrfall/jacuzzi,1400sf putting gym, home theat, gamerm, library, fab mst ste w/sep ofc/gym, chandlrs, 10,500 sf tot. $1,250,000. Suzy McDaniel, 985-640-1836, 504944-3605. DB Sotheby’s Int’l Realty.

LACOMBE

50175 SAGE RD, FOLSOM $249,000

LACOMBE OAKLAWN AVE

Adorable Acadian Cottage on 5 cres. 3BR/2BA w/new kitchen, all new appl & updated baths. Only 40 min from NOLA. Country living close to the city! Delery Comarda Realtors, 504-8753555 www.NOLAHomefinder.com

Classic, well kept on acre. 4 or 5 br, 3 ba, gamerm,bonusrm, scr porch. 3000sf liv. Close to La. Heart Hosp. $369K. Suzy McDaniel 985-640-1836 or 504-944-3605. DB Sotheby’s INt’l Realtors.

MANDEVILLE 2102 RIDGE COURT FOREST BROOK SUBDIVISION

4BR/2BA has it all. split flrplan. Cypress cabinets, corner fp, wood pergola & inground pool. Karin Lorenz Crosby, Coldwell Banker TEC Realtors. Off: 985-845-2001 x175, or cell: 985630-2514

Ann de Montluzin Farmer

broker

1016 NAPOLEON AVE • $350,000

3 br, 2.5 bA, 2088 Sq Ft. Spacious 1st floor w/ wrap around pvt brick patio. Separate dining room and living room with built in bookshelves. Wood burning fireplace in den with French doors opening onto the patio. Located at rear of complex so very private. Assigned parking space. Located on parade route and close to Magazine Street and many amenities. Must see!

(504) 895-1493 (504) 430-8737 farmeran@gmail.com www.demontluzinrealtors.com Licensed in Louisiana for 32 years, building on a real estate heritage since 1905

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 20 > 2011

FRENCH QUARTER STUDIOS

PRIME FQ COMMERCIAL

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT

$174,900

REAL ESTATE

73

CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATE OLD METAIRIE 1/2 OFF FIRST MONTH OLD METAIRIE SECRET

1 or 2 BR, Sparkling Pool, Bike Path, 12’ x 24’ Liv.Rm, Sep Din, King Master, No Pets, No Sect 8, $699 & $799 . 504-236-5776

METAIRIE TOWERS

1BR, 1-1/2 BA, pool. Elec & cable included, parking. 24 hr Concierge Service, $970/mo 914-882-1212.

WEST BANK TERRYTOWN

434 Bruce Ave, 3 BR, 1.5 BA, patio, util rm, carport, lg liv/din, kit w/oven, refrig, cabinets, cooktop. Lg yd. Lse $1000/mo. No smoke. 451-0913.

ALGIERS POINT HISTORIC ALGIERS POINT

High end 1-4BR. Near ferry, clean, many x-tras, hrdwd flrs, cen a/h, no dogs, no sec 8, some O/S prkng $750$1200/mo. 504-362-7487

BROADMOOR 1819 S. LOPEZ ST.

Broadmoor 1/2 Shotgun dbl 2BR/1.5BA. Hrdwd flr. Cen. A/H, w/d. $1100/mo. 1 yr lse req. + sec. dep. Avail. 10/1. 504-577-0938. edgeglow@yahoo.com.

CARROLLTON 8216 FIG

Good landlord looking for good tenant! 1 blk off Carrollton. 2br/1ba, 1/2 dble, hdwd flrs, CA&H. $850/mo Call Chuck at 504-236-3609

CITY PARK/BAYOU ST. JOHN

MID CITY SMALL OFFICE SPACE

MID CITY - Offstreet parking for one vehicle. Separate entrance. Available 10/1. Contact Jane, (504) 482-5292

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT 1006 WASHINGTON AVE

1 BR, 1200 sf, furn, cen a/h, hdwd flrs, d/w, w/d, gated parking, pool, no pets, $750/mo. Lse. 504-458-6509.

1205 ST CHARLES/$1050

Fully Furn’d studio/effy/secure bldg/ gtd pkg/pool/gym/wifi/laundry. Avail 10/1. 985-871-4324, 504-442-0573.

1510 CARONDELET 1 block to St. Charles

2 Eff apts. Lower $650 tenant pays elec. Upper $700 incl util, w/d on site 1-888-239-6566 or mballier@yahoo.com

GARDEN DISTRICT

1, 2, 3 & 4 ROOM OFFICES STARTING AT $695 INCLUDING UTILITIES

CALL 899-RENT

1510 CARONDELET

Lg 1 BR Apt, 1 blk St. Charles. open floor plan, remodeled kit & bath, laundry facilities on site. $800.1-888-239-6566 or mballier@yahoo.com

1508 CARONDELET ST- 2 APTS Studio, newly remodeled kit & ba, hdwd flrs. $800/mo. Util incl. Huge 2 BR Apt. Bright, spacious,, high ceilings, hdwd flrs, $1100 Both have Cent a/h, laundry facility avail 24 hrs. Walk 1 blk to St. Charles St Car, easy access to I-10, CBD & FQ. No pets/No smokers. 1-888-2396566. mballier@yahoo.com

1750 ST CHARLES #424

1 br + study, total renov, SS appls, wd flrs, gar pkg. Mardi Gras parade rt. $1700. Debbie w/L&B, 952-09591

215 MILLAUDON

Great landlord looking for great tenants! Near Tulane Univ., 1 br, 1 bath, CA & H, equip’d kit, fenced in yard. $695 Call Chuck, 504-236-3609.

3921 CONSTANCE

1/2 double, living room, bedroom, kitchen, bath, a/c unit. $675/mo. Call 895-6394 or 289-9977.

4917 S MIRO ST

2 BR, 1 BA, pool, cen a/h. $885 mo, water incl. Furn kit, w/d. Safe neighborhood. Call 452-2319 or 821-5567 Complete w/fridge, w&d, mw, stove, sec sys, CA&H, os pkng. On srtcr & Busline. Quiet n’bhood. $1,100 mo + sec dep. No pets/smokers. Call (504) 866-2250

2 BR, Newly renov shotgun style $895/mo Also: Rms by week, private bath. $175/wk all util incl. 504-2020381, 738-2492.

HOWARD SCHMALZ & ASSOCIATES REAL ESTATE Call Bert: 504-581-2804 6608 Marshall Foch 3br/2ba "Lakeview Duplex" $1400 87 Egret 2br/2ba "Sanctuary Living" $1275 248 Cherokee #19 "University Area Condo" $1200

1/2 Dble 2 Sty, 2Bd, 1Ba, A/C, Refig, Stove, W/D, Garage. $1275/mo, 1-yr Lse Sec Dep., No Pets. Call 225-8026554/ email dicklea@cox.net

Living room, 1 BR, kitchen, tile bath. No pets. $500/mo. Call 504-494-0970.

ESPLANADE RIDGE 1208 N. GAYOSO

Upper 2 BR, LR, DR, 1 BA, KIT, wood/ ceramic flrs, high ceilings, cen a/h, w/d hkups, no pets. $1100 mo. 432-7955.

LAKEFRONT LARGE ATTRACTIVE APARTMENT

2BR, 2BA w/ appls, beautiful courtyard setting w/swimming pool, quiet neighborhood. $900/mo. 504-495-6044 or 504-756-7347

Advertise in

EMPLOYMENT Call 483-3100

FRENCH COUNTRY BRICK HOME FOR LEASE

4 br, 3 ba, Jacuzzi & full shower, 9 ft ceil, antique pine flrs, porches, 2 car gar, sep workshop. Loc on 6 acres 10 min N of I-12 off Turnpike Rd. 50275 Huckleberry Ln. $1950/mo. 985-7969130. lapolofarms.com

RENTALS TO SHARE ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Findyour roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com.

ROOMS FOR RENT CANAL ST - 1 ROOM

Very, very clean. Great n’hood, 6 mo rent agreement. $140/wk, incl wtr & elec. 282-7296. NO CALLS AFT 7PM

French Quarter Realty Wayne • Nicole • Sam • Jennifer • Brett • Robert • George • Baxter • Kaysie • Billy

504-949-5400 222 London(Metairie) 2/1.5 pool, parking, 960 sq ft

$850

1112 Dauphine

2/1 hdwd flrs,hi ceils,storage,lots of light $1350

1125 Rampart #3

1/1 Exclocation,lotsnatlight,fresh/tidy $750

318 Royal #2

1/1 lrg pvt gallery, huge dbl parlor

$2350

5519 Rosemary Pl

2/2 nice flrpln, front porch

718 Barracks #5

1/1 lotsofstorage,gatedent,comcrtyrd$900

$1100

835 St Louis “F”

studio 3rd Flr. Cent AC, Hi Ceil Wd Flr Balc $950

1005 Josephine A

2/1.5 newly renov, rftp deck, gated ent $1400

1005 Josephine B

3/2 newly renov, rftp deck, gated ent $1500

931 Bienville 633 St Peter

parking remote entry, well lit

$175

1/2 fullyfurn,balc,completelyremodeled $1175

CONDOS FOR SALE

DORIAN M. BENNETT • 504-236-7688 dorian.bennett@sothebysrealty.com

3141 Ponce de Leon #7 1/1 812 Esplanade #2 1/1 1233 Decatur #8 1/1 1809 Burgundy 1/1 919 St philip #6 1/1 1014 Esplanade #4 1/1 856 Carondelet #4 1/1.5 712 Deerfeild Road 3/2

RESIDENTIAL RENTALS 824 Royal - Retail/Gallery ................... $4300 830 St. Philip - 1 bd/ 1ba pkg ............. $2500

shotgun style, wd flrs, fab loc $149,5k grnd flr w/ pool! 481 sq ft $170k 3rd fl , tons of charm 608 sq ft $199k spectacular, needs facelift $238k spacious, nice floorplann, crtyd $224k Tonsofnaturallight,wdfls. 2crtyds! $249k elev, parking, crtyds and terrace! $ 375k Ranch-StyleTerrytown! updated,gar.$165k

We have qualified tenants for your rentals. Call us!

718 Frenchmen - 1 bd/ 1ba pkg ............. $750 CALL FOR MORE LISTINGS!

2340 Dauphine Street • New Orleans, LA 70117 (504) 944-3605

readers need

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To advertise in Gambit Classifieds’ “Real Estate” Section call 504.483.3100.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 20 > 2011

1329 FRENCHMAN ST.

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FURN 2BDRM/1BA HOUSE

4228 ORLEANS AVE.

DOWNTOWN

WAREHOUSE DISTRICT CBD CONDO WITH BALC

75

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 20 > 2011

CHOOSE YOUR (DE)VICE

76

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 20 > 2011

483-3153

77

PUZZLE PAGE CLASSIFIEDS EXCELLENT VALUE UPTOWN SALE PENDING

• 3222 Coliseum • 4941 St. Charles • 2721 St. Charles • 5528 Hurst • 1750 St. Charles • 1750 St. Charles • 20 Anjou • 1544 Camp • 3915 St. Charles • 1544 Camp • 1544 Camp • 1224 St. Charles

(New Price!) $2,495,000 Grand Mansion $2,300,000 (3 bdrm/3.5ba w/pkg) $1,579,000 TOO LATE! $1,300,000 TOO LATE! $429,000 Commercial $399,000 (4 bdrm/2 ba w/pkg) $220,000 (2 bdrm/2ba w/pkg) $239,000 (1bdrm/1ba w/pkg) $315,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $159,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $149,000 starting at $79,000

YOUR PROPERTY COULD BE LISTED HERE!!!

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 20 > 2011

ANSWERS FOR LAST WEEK ON PAGE 75

78

John Schaff crs CELL

504.343.6683

office

GREAT INVESTMENT NEW LISTING

4517 ANNUNCIATION

1208/1210 S. GENOIS

RENOVATED VICTORIAN GEM! 3br, 2ba charming Uptown cottage. Open floor plan, bright airy great room. Spacious eat-in kitchen with stainless appliances. High ceilings, crown molding, hardwood floors. Large private backyard, great for gardening and entertaining. $225,000

IMMEDIATE CASH FLOW. Property is currently getting $1800 rent, potentially more. Gutted after Katrina, renovations completed in 2006 include new roof, dry wall, and wiring, 2 new central heaters installed since 2006. Long term tenants, excellent return on investment. Close to the Blue Plate Mayonnaise Building. $125,000

504.895.4663 (504) 895-4663


Gambit: September 20, 2011