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MARCH 22, 2011 · VOLUME 32 · NUMBER 12

> > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > NEWS > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >ADMINISTRATIVE > > > > > > > > DIRECTOR > > > > > >MARK > > >KARCHER > <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< The Pet Issue >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Gambit > > > > >readers’ > > > > >pet > >photos > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >19 > > > > > >EDITORIAL >FAX: > > 483-3116 > > > > |>response@gambitweekly.com >>>>>>>>>> < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < Shelter < < < < <stories < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <26 <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< EDITOR KEVIN ALLMAN > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Animal > > > > >resources > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >33 > > > > > >MANAGING > > > > > >EDITOR > > > >KANDACE > POWER GRAVES

Commentary

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Blake Pontchartrain

8

News

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Bouquets & Brickbats

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C’est What?

9

POLITICAL EDITOR CLANCY DUBOS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR WILL COVIELLO SPECIAL SECTIONS EDITOR MISSY WILKINSON STAFF WRITER ALEX WOODWARD EDITORIAL ASSISTANT LAUREN LABORDE listingsedit@gambitweekly.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS JEREMY ALFORD, D. ERIC BOOKHARDT, BIG RED COTTON, ALEJANDRO DE LOS RIOS, MEG FARRIS, BRENDA MAITLAND, IAN McNULTY, NOAH BONAPARTE PAIS, DALT WONK CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER CHERYL GERBER INTERNS CARRIE MARKS, MARGUERITE LUCAS, MARTA JEWSON

Scuttlebutt

9

PRODUCTION DIRECTOR

The State of the State / Jeremy Alford

15

The Department of Justice report on the NOPD New Orleans know-it-all

How an Uptown couple is delivering news to their neighborhood This week’s heroes and zeroes Gambit’s Web poll

26

From their lips to your ears

The Louisiana Family Forum wants to draw the state’s new redistricting maps

Politics / Clancy DuBos

17

Shoptalk

37

Merger most foul

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A&E News

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Gambit Picks

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Big Easy Theater Awards / Profile

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Noah Bonaparte Pais / On the Record

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David Kunian / CD Reviews

45

Cuisine

65

The Puzzle Page

78

Armistead Maupin and the annual Tennessee Williams/ New Orleans Literary Festival Best bets for your busy week

vietnamese restaurant The Best Beef Noodle Soup in Town

Ximone Rose is on her way

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Floating Action, floating into town

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 22 > 2011

Panorama Jazz Band and Carl LeBlanc

04

Ian McNulty on Little Chinatown 5 in Five: Five spots for mussel men Brenda Maitland’s Wine of the Week Banh Mi • Beef Stew • Rice

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CHAIRMAN CLANCY DUBOS PRESIDENT & CEO MARGO DUBOS Gambit (ISSN 1089-3520) is published weekly by Gambit Communications, Inc., 3923 Bienville St., New Orleans, LA 70119. We cannot be held responsible for the return of unsolicited manuscripts even if accompanied by a SASE. All material published in Gambit is copyrighted: Copyright 2011 Gambit Communications, Inc. All rights reserved.

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commeNtary

thinking out loud if you’re a ditzy girl...

Draining the Swamp

N

17.” In 2009, the report said, the arrest rate of black youths versus white youths was a staggering 16 to 1 — a disparity that was “so severe and so divergent from nationally reported data it cannot plausibly be attributed entirely to the underlying rates at which these youth commit crimes.” Asked after the meeting if he had a personal message for black New Orleanians who have long been fearful of local cops, Landrieu said, “They were right.” The report is bound to cause widespread discussion and concern. The important thing for all citizens to bear in mind going forward is the underlying purpose — and ultimate utility — of the report. It must lay the groundwork for curative action by the mayor, the City Council and the police chief — all under DOJ supervision. It’s equally important for citizens to recall that Landrieu invited the feds to look at NOPD; he knew

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The report should serve as the first meaningful step toward long-term, systemic reform at NOPD.

NOPD had major problems and he wanted an independent assessment from top to bottom. Now he has it, warts and all. The next big step for Landrieu, Serpas and the feds will be drafting a consent decree, which is a binding federal judgment against the city setting forth specific steps — including deadlines and benchmarks — that the NOPD must take to correct the problems cited in the report. Overall, the report should serve as the first meaningful step toward long-term, systemic reform at the NOPD. Many of the report’s conclusions are familiar refrains. What’s different now is the presence of a mayor and a police chief who are committed not only to reforming the NOPD but also to institutionalizing those reforms. We wish the feds and city officials well in their attempts to drain this decades-old swamp. With federal oversight, we hope the NOPD, in the words of Assistant AG Perez, “earns the trust of the public it is charged with protecting.” As the report clearly showed, NOPD has a long, long way to go.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 22 > 2011

o one expected the U.S. Department of Justice’s (DOJ) 10-month investigation of the New Orleans Police Department (NOPD) to turn up anything pretty, but certainly no one could have imagined just how damning it would be. In its summary of the report, the DOJ found reasonable cause to believe local cops engaged in multiple violations of federal law and unconstitutional conduct in a variety of areas. Those violations included use of excessive force; unconstitutional stops, searches and arrests; “biased policing,” particularly toward African-Americans, gays, lesbians and especially transsexuals; a systemic failure to provide services for non-English speakers; and a systemic failure to investigate sexual assaults and domestic abuse. “For far too long, the New Orleans Police Department failed to adequately protect the citizens of the city,” Deputy Attorney General James Cole told the group gathered at Gallier Hall on March 17. “This was a result of its failure to ensure respect for and adherence to the Constitution.” Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights Thomas Perez said the NOPD’s failings were “wide ranging, systemic and deeply rooted in the culture of the department” — encompassing policies, recruitment, training, supervision, paid details, performance evaluations, interrogation practices and more. The 115-page report (www.justice.gov/crt/about/spl/nopd_report.pdf), which had been requested by Mayor Mitch Landrieu and NOPD Chief Ronal Serpas, was shocking even for a department known for its dysfunction. Among its conclusions: • Mishandling of officer-involved shooting investigations “was so blatant and egregious it appeared intentional.” • A “significant” number of arrests had “apparent constitutional violations.” • Officers often use unnecessary force that’s “deliberately retaliatory.” • Sexual assault investigations were “systematically misclassified,” resulting in a “sweeping failure.” • NOPD has “virtually no capacity to provide meaningful access to police services” for non-English speakers. (To his credit, Serpas began working on that problem before the report was issued.) And for African-Americans, many of whom have long said the NOPD unfairly targets blacks, the report confirmed their worst fears. Of the 27 instances between January 2009 and May 2010 in which officers intentionally discharged their firearms at people, all 27 of those people were black. “Despite the clear policy violations we observed, NOPD has not found an officerinvolved shooting violated policy in at least six years,” the report stated. The report also noted “racial disparities in arrests … in virtually all categories, with particularly dramatic disparity for African-American youth under

07

IT’S

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YES! A CA KE

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Sugar pines, the tallest pines in the world, have very long cones and are among the most valuable softwoods. They typically movie New Orleans in Eddie DeLange wrote “Do thrive at elevations You Know What It Means 1947 and was perforto Miss New Orleans?” for between 3,000 and med by Armstrong and the 1949 film New Orleans, 7,500 feet, and are Billie Holiday. in which it was performed found mostly in the DeLange died in 1949 by Louis Armstrong and mountain regions of at age 45. He was la-ter Billie Holiday. the far Western Uniinducted into the Nated States — but not tional Academy of Popin Louisiana. In the Bayou State we have ular Music’s Songwriters Hall of Fame. loblolly pines, longleaf pines, shortleaf pines, slash pines and spruce pines — but HEY BLAKE, no sugar pines. Armstrong also sings the phrase “miss IS THERE IS A PORTRAIT IN NEW them moss-covered vines.” Well, just ORLEANS OF ABDIL DAILY CROSSabout everybody in Louisiana knows MAN, WHO WAS MAYOR BETWEEN that moss grows only on trees, not on 1846 AND 1854? vines, telephone poles or fences. Spanish ANNETTE PECK moss (also called Florida moss) is not a true moss. It is an epiphytic plant, which DEAR ANNETTE, grows on another plant, but does not rely on the host plant for nutrients. It most There isn’t a portrait of Crossman commonly adopts oak or cypress trees as hanging any where, but you can see a hosts but may be found on other species. picture of him and get more informaIt’s pretty clear the man who wrote tion at the New Orleans Public Library’s the lyrics to one of our favorite songs website (http://www.nutrias.org/exhibwasn’t worried about botanical accu- its/charter/crossman.htm). Crossman racy. It’s also possible songwriter Eddie was the 12th mayor of New Orleans and DeLange had never been to New Orleans. served three consecutive terms. He was He was born on Long Island, N.Y. in 1904. born in Maine in 1803, the same year as After graduating from the University of the Louisiana Purchase. He received little Pennsylvania in 1926, he spent five years formal education but learned his father’s in Hollywood, acting and working as a trade and became a hatter. stuntman in both silent and talking films. Arriving in New Orleans in 1829 with In 1932 he returned to New York and only $5 to his name, Crossman opened a began his career as a lyricist — and a very hat shop on Canal Street. He soon earned successful one at that. During the 1930s a good reputation and ran for various DeLange had his own orchestra, which offices. By 1844 he was elected to the performed in clubs and on the radio. Louisiana Legislature. On the Municipal It had many top hits. Along with Louis Council, Crossman showed his talent for Alter, who wrote the music, DeLange administration, which led to his nominapenned one of the most popular songs tion for mayor. He had a successful public about our city. It was written for the career before he died in 1859.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > JEREMY ALFORD CLANCY DUBOS < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < KNOWLEDGE < < < < < < < < < < <IS < <POWER <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< 15 17 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

scuttle Butt

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

Your (Hyper)local News UPTOWN MESSENGER, AN ONLINE NEWSPAPER, IS BRINGING PROFESSIONALLY SOURCED NEWS TO A HIGHLY TARGETED AUDIENCE. “MICRONEWS” WEBSITES, TAILORED TO READERS BY NEIGHBORHOOD, ARE A HOT TREND IN JOURNALISM ... EVEN IF THE LONG-TERM FINANCIAL PICTURE IS UNCLEAR. BY KEVIN ALLMAN

R

It’s obviously a great Robert Morris and public service, particuSabree Hill publish larly in a world where a Uptown Messenger, a lot of unemployed jourwebsite/online newsnalists are contemplatpaper with an intensely ing going into business local focus and flavor. for themselves. Morris PHOTO BY and Hill — the parents CHERYL GERBER of twin 3-year-olds — fit that description. But is micronews a financially viable new model for journalism? BACK IN JURASSIC-JOURNALISM DAYS (TRANSLATION: before internet and CNN), newspapers were a one-stop print source for international, national and local news. Cable networks now cover the first two with more effi-

JINDAL OFF AND RUNNING — AND EXAGGERATING

Gov. Bobby Jindal unofficially kicked off his re-election campaign last week by launching a statewide media buy for a TV ad touting his anti-tax and job-creation credentials. Jindal has no declared opponent, but he does have more than $9 million in cash on hand in his campaign account. Most observers admit he may as well spend some of his campaign money before voters get a dose of bad news in the upcoming legislative session, during which the governor and lawmakers will announce budget cuts. Jindal’s ads also reinforce his no-taxes position to lawmakers, some of whom are grumbling that Louisiana should look beyond budget cuts and one-time monies to balance the next fiscal year’s budget. In his proposed budget, which was released almost a week before the ads began running, Jindal uses a combination of higher tuitions and fees to keep higher education whole and a combination of one-time funds and cuts to plug the rest of what was once seen as a $1.6 billion revenue shortfall. “Our economy has certainly done better than the region and the country’s economy, but we are impacted by this national recession,” Jindal says in the ad. “We can’t get complacent. We can’t be satisfied with the progress we’ve made.” That message echoes what Jindal is telling crowds as he travels the state. On March 15, the governor appeared at the Jefferson Parish Pachyderm Club’s annual cochon de lait at the PAGE 13

c'est what? GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS SAY THAT — DESPITE THE BP OIL DISASTER — GULF SEAFOOD IS SAFE TO EAT. DO YOU AGREE?

52% YES

THIS WEEK’S

PAGE 11

Norman Robinson

NO

24%

NOT SURE

Vote on “c’est what?” on bestofneworleans.com

QUESTION

BoUQuets

24%

Does the nuclear disaster in Japan make you concerned for the safety of Louisiana’s nuclear power plants?

THIS WEEK’S HEROES AND ZEROES

received the 2011 Golden Mike Award at the Louisiana Association of Broadcasters’ annual Prestige Awards in Baton Rouge Mar. 15. The Golden Mike is the organization’s highest award. Robinson, whose broadcasting career began in 1972, has been at WDSU-TV for 20 years and is currently the station’s lead anchor and host of its public affairs show Hot Seat.

Frank A. France,

founder of Kehoe-France School and an alumnus of Loyola University, was presented with Loyola’s Integritas Vitae Award for high moral character and selfless service March 17 at the Roosevelt Hotel. France and his late wife, Patricia Kehoe, founded their namesake school in 1949. It moved to its present Metairie location in 1958 and opened a Northshore location in 1996.

Richard Cotton

will be joining the nation’s best high school debaters at the National Catholic Forensic League Grand National Tournament in Washington, D.C. at the end of May. Cotton, a junior at New Orleans Charter Science and Math High School, qualified for the spot at a regional debate held in February at De La Salle High School, where he delivered an eight-minutelong original narrative.

Rep. John LaBruzzo,

R-Metairie, is back for the fourth year in a row with his plan to drug-test state welfare recipients — this time at random. Similar bills have been quashed in federal courts, and LaBruzzo’s bill fails every year — but not before embarrassing Louisiana in the process. If we’re going to drug test every group of people who get Uncle Sam handouts, let’s start with the biggest offenders: Wall Street and politicians.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 22 > 2011

obert Morris and Sabree Hill are trained professional journalists who cover Uptown — anything and everything Uptown, from violent crime and robberies to street festivals and the ongoing brouhaha over the proposed new Walgreens on Magazine Street. That item last month about the guy whose gold tooth stopped a bullet? Morris broke that first, in a story headlined “Bang-Proof Bling.” But Morris and Hill don’t publish daily, or even weekly: They publish only when there’s news, and they do so on their website, Uptown Messenger (www.uptownmessenger.com) — one of a growing number of neighborhood-focused websites designed to supplant, if not replace, the daily and weekly newspapers in major cities. Push-button publishing is as old as blogging, zines and the mimeograph machine, but Uptown Messenger and sites like it — “hyperlocal journalism” or “micronews” — are a new paradigm: news websites with an intense geographic focus, often staffed by trained journalists and relying on traditional reporting techniques and photojournalism. “Riverbend Business-Burglary Spree Abates, But Still No Arrest,” read a recent headline on Uptown Messenger, topping a story about a robber who had broken into more than a dozen businesses around Maple and Oak streets. Morris reported the story (including quotes from officers of the New Orleans Police Department’s 2nd District), and Hill supplied photos. The result? A well-sourced story perhaps of little interest to New Orleans at large, but of great interest to one particular neighborhood — and the sort of crime story that might have slipped past editors confronting ever-smaller page counts.

“The pimp store.” — Dr. John’s reply to a reporter who asked him where he got his shoes at his Rock ’n’ Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony in New York City March 14. The New Orleans music legend accessorized his footwear with a suit of K&B purple.

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FOR THe FIRST TIMe IN HISTORY, MORe Americans are getting their news from the Internet than from traditional newspapers. That was one of the findings issued last week in the “State of the Media,” an annual report by the Project for excellence in Journalism. “In a media world where consumers decide what news they want to get and how they want to get it, the future will belong to those who understand the public’s changing behavior and can target content and advertising to snugly fit the interests of each user.” In other words: micronews. Then, of course, there’s the collapse of the traditional newspaper industry. Ann Arbor, Mich. — home to the University of Michigan — has a population on par with Orleans Parish, with about 350,000 people living in the Ann Arbor metro area. It’s also the first American city of its size not to have a daily newspaper. In 2009, the 174-yearold Ann Arbor News was closed by its owner, Advance Publications (publisher of, among other papers, The TimesPicayune). Declining ad revenue was cited

as the cause. In its place arose AnnArbor. com, a news website that prints a companion newspaper twice a week: a sort of macro-micronews site. Micronews sites are flourishing around the country, says Jessica Durkin, who studies hyperlocal news operations as a Knight media policy fellow with the New America Foundation. Durkin was a reporter for the Scranton (Pa.) Times-Tribune until she was laid off in 2009. “I was one reporter covering five towns, which wasn’t unusual,” she says. “You can’t be everywhere, and so much gets lost.” Durkin thought about setting up her own local news website, but the more she read other micronews websites from around the country, the more interested she became in the phenomenon itself. Her interest led to her own site, In Other News (www.inothernews.us), an online directory of micronews websites — what she says is “a website tracking a compilation of online, independent journalistic start-ups in the wake of legacy media layoffs and industry shrinkage.” Durkin has found dozens of them across the country, many staffed by former journalists who left “legacy media” due to either layoffs or general disgust. That describes both Morris and Hill. He worked at various papers around the country, doing a variety of editorial jobs, before landing at the Houma Courier after Hurricane Katrina. Hill, whose background is photojournalism, arrived at the Houma paper around the same time. But both felt drawn to New Orleans, and they hatched a plan for a website that would cover just one neighborhood as rigorously as they’d covered anything else. Uptown Messenger debuted in November 2009. Like Gambit and many other newspapers, Morris and Hill adhere to the ethics standards set forth by the Society of Professional Journalists, but neither is a member of the Louisiana Press Association or New Orleans Press Club. “We’d rather pour the money back into the site,” Morris says. Hill also sells ads for Uptown Messenger, which is a no-no in the traditional newspaper world but a fact of life at most hyperlocals. Hill says the ads she sells serve a community-service purpose as well as a financial one; when she had tried in the past to market her own wedding-photography business with banner ads on traditional newspaper websites, she found it cost-prohibitive. On Uptown Messenger, it costs a business $100 to have an ad featured for a month. Durkin says it’s not an ideal situation to have journalists selling ads, but nothing in journalism is as clear-cut as it used to be. “There are discussions among the publishers (of these sites),” she says. “But page 12

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ciency and immediacy than newspapers, while big-city dailies, weeklies and local TV stations cover the local stuff. But none of them have the ability (or, these days, the staff) to pinpoint individual neighborhoods well. That’s where hyperlocal news comes in — on the theory that a car prowl on your block, the opening of a new restaurant down the street, or a charity car wash at your nearby synagogue is both news you can use and news you’re not going to get anywhere else. That’s what Morris and Hill strive to provide their readers. “School board meetings, things like that, aren’t going to be of interest to everybody in the city,” Hill says. “But for parents with children at that school, it’s very important.” Recent stories on Uptown Messenger include an account of the city cleaning vacant lots Uptown, controversy over a corner store seeking an alcohol-sale permit and photo galleries of St. Charles Avenue Mardi Gras parades. On Mar. 17, the site printed a story of vital interest to Uptowners: a sharp spike in the number of rape cases reported to the police in the 2nd District, which covers much of Uptown. “I think the core of what we want to do is just sort of public life — public safety is very important, particularly in New Orleans,” Morris says. “We don’t have guidelines,” Hill says. “We’re able to publish as much as we want. What I love that we’ve been able to do is report on the emotional side of things — how a murder is affecting a family. Stuff like that.”

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most of these people either come from a journalism background and respect journalism ethics or understand the need to keep it separate. “What’s the alternative? No reporting at all?” she asks rhetorically. “They’re adding to the information ecosystem, which is vital.”

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NoT surprisiNgly, some bigger swimmers are testing the micronews waters. The online Huffington post, founded by Arianna Huffington, now has four local editions (Chicago, New york, Denver and los Angeles), setups with a local contact and a string of mostly unpaid freelancers and bloggers. in 2009, Aol spent millions to acquire patch, a two-year-old network of more than 600 hyperlocal news sites in 18 states and the District of Columbia. last month, Aol spent more than $300 million to acquire the Huffington post, and the combined companies are expected to expand their hyperlocal operations aggressively over the next year. There have been failures, some of them high-profile. The san Diego (Calif.) News Network (sDNN) (www. sdnn.com) launched in march 2009 with a roster of 50 reporters, editors and stringers. it entered the market boasting news partnerships with local community papers as well as a TV station, and quickly opened satellite offices to cover neighboring orange and riverside counties. one year later, the orange County office laid off its entire staff and sDNN announced it was searching for a buyer. by July 2010 — 16 months after its splashy launch — sDNN was defunct. And earlier this month, AnnArbor. com, considered a pioneering model for online city journalism, laid off 14 people — nearly half its newsroom. morris and Hill say their small size keeps them nimble and their costs low. (morris also has taken a part-time job at Tulane university and has recused himself from covering the university.) There’s already a good number of advertisers on uptown messenger, including uptown restaurants, real estate agents, artisans and a church, nestled next to a thorough community calendar listing meetings from both City Council and a cookbook club. Durkin says these are good signs for uptown messenger’s long-term viability. “The most successful (hyperlocals) share three characteristics,” she says. “Not trying to compete against traditional media, a focus on a narrow geographical area — they become the eyes and ears within their boundaries — and extreme dedication. people who do this partway, it’s not going to take off.” page 13

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Harahan Lions Club. Jindal told a packed audience of GOP faithful and elected officials that he will not budge on his opposition to taxes — not even on cigarette taxes, which many people favor as a way to reduce smoking. He also touted his ethics reform credentials, which caused some in the crowd (including a few lawmakers) to roll their eyes. “We are rated No. 1 in the country for legislative ethics laws,” Jindal crowed, ignoring the fact that his own office ranks near the bottom among America’s governors on the issue of transparency. Jindal made the most recent “Worst Governors” list issued annually by Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW). CREW’s stated criteria were “whether governors had violated ethics, campaign finance and personal financial disclosure rules as well as whether they had complied with state transparency laws.” Jindal was in the bottom 11 of the list. CREW noted that Jindal “prevented the public release of government records and has fought legislation to make government more transparent,” “weakened the authority of the state ethics board” and “rewarded campaign donors with government jobs and contracts” (see Gambit’s March 23, 2009 cover story, “Jindal’s List”). — Clancy DuBos

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Morris and Hill say they’re in it for the long haul, and have registered a second domain called NOLA Messenger (www. nolamessenger.com). If their Uptown model works, it’s not hard to imagine a geographically focused Messenger for other neighborhoods in the city. Right now, though, Morris says, they’d rather concentrate on expanding Uptown Messenger by continuing to follow previously reported stories and perhaps explore some investigative reporting. And, of course, they want more readers. Currently Morris and Hill offer a daily email digest for subscribers, and they’re active on Facebook and Twitter. The social media playing field is an equal one, whether you’re The New York Times or a

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neighborhood website — and a look at Uptown Messenger’s Twitter feed shows their news tweets are being read in nearly every TV newsroom in town, as well as by Gambit, The Times-Picayune and other local publications. But how can a couple of independent reporters compete against a juggernaut like AOL’s Patch? Very well, according to Durkin. “It’s cookie-cutter,” she says of Patch and the Huffington Post city sites. “It’s a big weakness of traditional media as well. What’s very refreshing is that these startup sites have their own personality, down to the design of the page.” In other words: Arianna and Patch, watch out.

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > MARCH 22 > 2011

Before leading the Downtown Irish Club’s St. Patrick’s Day parade as the club’s Man of the Year, Plaquemines Parish President Billy Nungesser was pressing the flesh with GOP stalwarts at the Jefferson Parish Pachyderm Club’s cochon de lait March 15, leading many to speculate he will run for lieutenant governor in the fall against fellow Republican Jay Dardenne. Nungesser seemed to be picking a fight

with Dardenne on March 9 when he publicly groused about Dardenne’s distribution of the first tourism payout from BP — $5 million of an eventual $30 million boodle to be spread across all 64 parishes. Plaquemines Parish will see $2.2 million of that money, as will five other parishes most seriously affected by the oil disaster. Orleans will get $6 million, and the remaining $11.8 million will be divided among the state’s other 57 parishes. Dardenne pointed out, correctly, that the deal had been made before he took office in November 2010, and he was just distributing the funds; his office, which handles statewide tourism strategies, will be receiving $6.5 million. (Scott Angelle, the acting lieutenant governor when the deal was struck, issued a statement defending the payouts, saying the oil disaster gave the entire Louisiana tourism industry “a perception problem.”) Nungesser garnered regional and national attention during the BP oil disaster by criticizing both the company’s and the Obama administration’s response to the disaster. He passed on the opportunity to run for lieutenant governor in a special election last fall — right after the gusher was sealed but while oil continued to wash ashore in his parish. Instead, he won re-election handily in parish contests held on the same ballot. Furthering speculation about a lieutenant governor bid, Nungesser has been telling friends he would soon have “a new website.” Qualifying for statewide and legislative offices is Sept. 6-8. — DuBos & Kevin Allman

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jeremy ALFORD

THE STATE OF THE STATE

Mapping Morality THE LOUISIANA FAMILY FORUM WANTS TO DECIDE THE NEW STATE SENATE DISTRICTS FOR THE NEXT 10 YEARS. GOOD LUCK WITH THAT. olitical livelihoods are officially on the line. Lawmakers begin a special session this week to tackle redistricting, a decennial policy extravaganza at which the lines demarcating one elected office from another are redrawn, shifted or entirely abolished — based on the latest U.S. Census numbers.

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Whether it’s called the “Demographic Equity Plan” or the “Guillory Plan,” the new redistricting map proposed by the Louisiana Family Forum and state Sen. Elbert Guillory — an African-American Democrat from Opelousas — strengthens evangelical Christian power statewide, while potentially diluting black political power in Orleans Parish. Americans and the new powers that exist.” Who or what is the new power base? According to a statewide poll released last week by Louisiana State University’s Public Policy Research Lab, approximately 58 percent of respondents identified themselves as “evangelical or born again.” That segment of the electorate helped Gov. Bobby Jindal achieve his historic win in 2007 — and was a key element of former President George W. Bush’s winning coalition. And what does this new power base want? For starters, the LFF plan reverses the political fault line along the eastern I-10/I-12 corridor. Right now, there are 10 Senate districts in metro New Orleans and seven in the region from Baton Rouge to Slidell. The LFF plan upends those counts, adding a new white district to Baton Rouge proper and another to New Orleans. In fact, LFF proposes its most significant changes in New Orleans. Instead of five minority districts for the city proper, the proposal calls for three minority districts and one white district. Then again, while LFF’s new map would pit state Sen. J.P. Morrell against new state Sen. Cynthia Willard-Lewis, both Dems, just about any plan with a chance of clearing the Senate would do likewise. Elsewhere in south Louisiana, Terrebonne and Lafourche parishes would have their own Senate seats and Jefferson Parish

would have a stronger hold on the area near southern St. Charles Parish, which is currently Chaisson’s district and home base of support. There’s obviously a lot of moving pieces to the LFF plan, and some of those with skin in the game are quite skeptical of the plan and its sponsors. “People like Mr. Guillory and the Family Forum, they have agendas,” Chaisson says. Guillory laughs at the suggestion, insisting he’ll be a Democrat for life. Still, his agenda is no secret. “The rest of Louisiana can no longer be a junior partner to New Orleans in governing the state,” he says. As for his own district, Guillory gets what he wants out of the LFF plan — more precincts in and around his St. Landry Parish base and enough black voters to keep his district in the “minority” column. Mills acknowledges his plan reflects the LFF agenda, but he also avers, “This plan has merit. “There’s a passivity in the Senate that’s shocking to me,” Mills adds. “We want more public input. That’s why we’re putting out this plan. And we admit too that this plan could change another 20 times. Nothing is set in stone.” On that last point they can all agree.

Jeremy Alford can be reached at jeremy@ jeremyalford.com.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 22 > 2011

Congressional seats will be dramatically altered this go-around, starting with one that must be eliminated. Louisiana’s population grew by only 1.4 percent from 2000 to 2010, one of the smallest increases in the nation. The impact will trickle down across the state, from the Louisiana Public Service Commission to local judicial districts. First, however, legislators will have to reconstitute their own House and Senate districts. With 105 members, the House presents a tall order. The Senate has but 39 members, but the debate in both chambers promises to be spirited and eminently watchable. Despite the high stakes and the imminence of the special session, the only thing coming out of the Senate in recent weeks was an eerie silence. That, of course, doesn’t mean there wasn’t a lot of jockeying going on behind the scenes. “I was handed a map by the Senate leadership not long ago and was told this was the plan,” says one lawmaker. “I was under the impression we were supposed to be doing this in public.” Actually, the Senate for decades has been known for taking care of its internal business quietly, out of the public view. With far fewer members than the (at times) unruly House, it’s easier to get things done behind the scenes. Still, a sense that all is not well in the marbled halls of power is fueling something called the “Demographic Equity Plan,” a redistricting model being pushed by a most unlikely team — the Louisiana Family Forum (LFF), an influential Christian lobby that leans heavily Republican, and state Sen. Elbert Guillory, an AfricanAmerican Democrat from Opelousas. Guillory is one of the few Dems who is sometimes referred to as a “DINO” — Democrat In Name Only. Until a few years ago, he was a registered Republican. “We may not be a traditional pairing,” Guillory says, sitting beneath a taxidermied deer head on the wall of LFF’s Baton Rouge offices. “But it’s a good marriage. We agree on the principles.” Interestingly, Guillory calls the plan the “Demographic Equity Plan,” while LFF brass calls it the “Guillory Plan.” The latest version of the proposed Senate remap was given to Gambit just days before the special session convened. Among the principles, or rather perceptions, on which Guillory and LFF agree is that

there’s a “secret plan” being tossed around the Senate. Like the other lawmaker interviewed for this story, Guillory says he too was handed a map showing proposed lines. “I was told the Senate president is taking care of the Senate plan,” he says. “I also suspect the public will never see this plan until the last minute. These are the kinds of plans put together by politicians wholly to protect their fiefdoms.” While that description applies at any level of local, state or national politics, Senate President Joel Chaisson, a Democrat from Destrehan, is term-limited and barred from seeking re-election. That, ostensibly, makes him an ideal sponsor of the new Senate plan. Moreover, Chaisson says he’ll “absolutely” make sure every plan receives a full hearing. He admits that a plan has been floating around, but he describes it as “a starting point.” Interviewed last week, Chaisson said he was still working on his own Senate plan, which was to be filed last Friday (March 18), just two days before the session’s opening gavel on Sunday. LFF president Gene Mills, an ordained minister and part-time motivational speaker, says Chaisson’s status as a term-limited lawmaker is among the reasons his group and Guillory are able to propose such dramatic changes. “That’s really the only reason we can do this,” Mills says. “Term limits are taking people out.” In fact, both Chaisson’s plan and the LFF plan seek to obliterate the district of state Sen. Rob Marionneaux, a term-limited Livonia Democrat who chairs the tax-writing Revenue and Fiscal Affairs Committee. But things aren’t always as simple as they appear. For example, Marionneaux also sits on the Senate and Governmental Affairs Committee, which must first approve any redistricting effort in the upper chamber. Four other members of the Senate are likewise term-limited: Sens. Butch Gautreaux, D-Morgan City; Joe McPherson, D-Woodworth; Mike Michot, R-Lafayette; and Willie Mount, D-Lake Charles. While the new LFF plan does little to change north Louisiana, it portends all kinds of drama for south Louisiana. It dilutes the power base long held by New Orleans by redistributing African-American districts away from the Crescent City (which may be inevitable on some level, given population shifts after Hurricane Katrina). And, at least on paper, the LFF plan makes it difficult for Democrats, particularly white Democrats, to win in most areas. When asked about the impact on his own party, Guillory just shrugs. “It very possibly does,” he says. “But we in the black community need to decide who should truly represent us. There needs to be new relationships between African-

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POLITICS Follow Clancy on Twitter @clancygambit.

Merger Most Foul? ov. Bobby Jindal’s push to “merge” the University of New Orleans (UNO) and Southern University at New Orleans (SUNO) has generated a lot more heat than light, and that’s too bad. A study the governor requested by a national higher education consultant came back with some interesting conclusions for improving both schools — including that they not be merged after all. Instead, the consultant recommended two alternatives for consolidating administrations and better coordinating curricula at UNO, SUNO and Delgado so metro area students can be better served. Imagine that: a consultant’s report that actually makes sensible recommendations rather than just parrots what the client-inchief wants to hear. Jindal immediately announced his support of the second alternative, even before the Board of Regents had a chance to formally review the document. That alternative calls for an administrative consolidation and relocation of SUNO onto UNO’s campus. Unfortunately, the governor continues to refer to the plan as a merger, which is

G

not what the consultant has recommended. Jindal further muddied the waters by saying the plan will be refined in the legislative process, which leaves people wondering exactly what he is promoting. If Jindal were truly embracing the consultant’s report, he would not be talking about a merger at all. Of course, that would require that he be intellectually honest about his intentions, which currently are more political than educational. Meanwhile, SUNO supporters are up in arms against the plan, even though SUNO’s future would be a lot brighter — and its federal designation as a Historically Black College and University (HBCU) preserved — if the recommendations of the report were adopted. This, too, plays into Jindal’s hands politically. Truth is, the only people with something to lose under the plan are SUNO administrators, who arguably should be held accountable for the university’s woefully low graduation rate. Under the consultant’s plan, admission standards at both UNO and SUNO would increase significantly, which can only improve their respective graduation rates. Most important, both universities would

survive as separate institutions under the consultant’s plan. SUNO would continue to be an HBCU, albeit on UNO’s campus, and UNO would finally get its independence from the LSU system by moving into the University of Louisiana system. So why all the fuss? Two reasons. First, SUNO administrators probably see this as the beginning of the end for their fiefdom. Second, Jindal is playing a political (read: re-election) game. It’s an old story in Louisiana: A governor

Jindal could defuse a lot of the opposition by simply admitting that his plan is not a merger.

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who is slipping in the polls at election time picks on New Orleans to remind the bubbas that he’s one of them. It plays even better if the governor can pick on blacks in New Orleans. Jindal could defuse a lot of the opposition by simply admitting his plan is not a merger, but “merger” plays too well outside New Orleans for that to happen. When Jindal embraced the merger concept in January — without even consulting his allies beforehand — he polarized blacks and whites across the state. That’s a despicable thing for a governor to do, but it suits Jindal’s political purposes in this election year. The governor asked the Board of Regents, which was already studying the idea, to prepare a report on the merger concept. He then announced his support of the consultant’s “consolidation” alternative the day before the Regents were to vote on the report — thereby pre-empting their independent assessment as well. It remains to be seen if Jindal truly embraces the consolidation proposal. If he continues to call it a merger, we’ll know that he doesn’t really care whether the idea succeeds — as long as it plays well for him politically.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 22 > 2011

TAPAS

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Æ *U P G U F O I B Q Q F O T U I B U

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— Henry DaviD THoreau

convention 1

Each spring, Gambit puts out the call for photos of our readers’ pets — and each year you send in your best shots of Fluffy or Fideaux. (No snakes, bunnies, birds or guinea pigs out there? We didn’t get photos of anything but dogs and cats in this year’s batch.) Over the next few pages, you’ll see a fine-looking group of furry creatures. Enjoy. — The Gambit staff

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Archie (left) and Raleigh (right) take a break from the sunshine to chill under a tree. Casey Lapin

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Toulouse looks fabulous in pink shades — even while napping. MiChaeL Laird

3 When Jack Russell mix Gambit got home

from the shelter, owners Patrick and Brenda Delbasty looked to a certain weekly newspaper on the coffee table to name the new pup. patriCk & Brenda deLBa s t y

and Sophie nap in concert. 4 Jezebel pat ti sMith Oatmeal asks, “What are you looking at?” 5 Baby rene Guita r t paGe 21

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 22 > 2011

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Libby, this week’s Gambit cover girl, pokes out her pink tongue. RENE GUITA R T

PAGE 22

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Quazi-Meaux-Deaux is a rescued pup with an underbite and two front feet pointing backwards. “God assembled him from leftover parts,” his owners say. GLY NN BR O W N

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Muggan plays peek-a-boo. M O L LY SHEF F IEL D

Skylar the dog doesn’t look too sure about his feline companion Sha. TRICIA BERNARD

Beauregard and Beignet make themselves comfortable on a soft throne. JENNY MCKIBBEN

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 22 > 2011

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Visit our new STATE OF THE ART DENTAL SUITE for all your pet’s oral care!

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four legged { FRIEND REQUESTS } WHERE YOUR NEXT PET SHOULD COME FROM. BY A L E X WO O DWA R D

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 22 > 2011

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26

he U.S. Humane Society estimates four million cats and dogs are put down every year in shelters across the country. According to the Humane Society of Louisiana, more than half of the communities in the state are without animal shelters or pet rescue programs. But shelters and foster family homes in New Orleans and its surrounding parishes house hundreds, if not thousands, of dogs, cats and other animals available and eager for adoption. Here’s a roundup of shelters in the metro area and St. Tammany, St. Bernard and Plaquemines parishes — all of which are looking for volunteers.

ANIMAL RESCUE NEW ORLEANS (ARNO)

271 Plauche St., Harahan, 571-1900; www.animalrescueneworleans.org Adoption hours: 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. daily (including holidays)

THE SCOOP: Adoption fees are $100 for cats and

Pups clamor for attention at the LA/SPCA.

PHOTOS BY CHERYL GERBER

$150 for dogs and include all spaying and neutering, all shots, microchipping, combo testing for cats, and heartworm treatment if necessary. THE POOP: The shelter at Elmwood houses about 65 dogs and 75 cats, with dozens of other pets in ARNO foster care. Foster “parents” are screened, as are adoption candidates. More than 5,500 animals have found homes through its adoption programs, while thousands of others have been reunited with their human families. Volunteer opportunities are available 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. daily, and ARNO offers community service hours for students and those in the court system. The shelter offers a wide range of programs, including a pet retention program serving up to 60 indigent families each year, though this year 63 families are in the program. When families are faced with relinquishing their pets because of financial hardship, the program helps keep them together. ARNO also assists communities with humane trapping and trap-neuterrelease (TNR) efforts. PAGE 28

LA/SPCA volunteer Sue Swanson and Petina, a shorthair cat, share a moment.

Among dogs held at JPAS are a stray terrier (left) and Miko, a pet whose owner no longer could care for him.

cover story Dali, an Abyssinian-tabby mix, waits to be adopted at ARNO.

PAGE 26

ARNO is one of only two shelters in the U.S. offering feral dog rehabilitation, which provides up to 10 wild puppies and dogs with long-term care. “Each dog is different. Some are hard-wired and it may take up to a year to rehab them, which is why most shelters put down feral dogs,” says ARNO executive director Charlotte Bass Lily. “But we got used to tracking and trapping feral dogs after Katrina because the pets went feral, so we thought, why don’t we just continue that.” ARNO also offers veterinary care and outreach programs — last week, ARNO’s animals visited Tulane University’s campus to give students some stress relief during exams.

JEFFERSON PARISH ANIMAL SHELTER, EAST BANK

1 Humane Way, Harahan, 736-6111, jpas.petfinder.com

JEFFERSON PARISH ANIMAL SHELTER, WEST BANK 1869 Ames Blvd., Marrero, 349-5111, jpas.petfinder.com Adoption hours: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mon.-Wed. and Fri.; 9 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Thu.; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sat.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 22 > 2011

Diane Guichard, director of the Jefferson Parish Animal Shelter (JPAS), holds a puppy ready for adoption.

28

THE SCOOP: Adoption fee is $67 and includes spaying and neutering, rabies, distemper and parvo vaccinations, microchipping and lice treatments.

Sarah Fanning, a Colorado State University student volunteering at ARNO for spring break, poses with Billy, a beagle puppy.

THE POOP: Jefferson Parish’s East Bank shelter in Jefferson houses 80 cats and 40 dogs; about half of each are available for adoption. At the West Bank facility in Marrero, there are 72 cats and 97 dogs, and 20 cats and 30 dogs are adoptable. A list of the shelters’ adoptable pets can be found on its Petfinder.com website. In 2010, the shelters combined took in more than 12,000 animals. Volunteer opportunities include walking, bathing and grooming dogs, socializing and grooming cats, dog training, assisting with offsite adoption events, transporting animals, and photographing the pets for Petfinder. Fostering opportunities also are available. Volunteer-run nonprofit groups Friends of the Jefferson Animal Shelter (www.fjas.petfinder.com) and the Jefferson SPCA (www.jeffersonspca.org) also offer volunteer opportunities with the shelters. The shelters offer rabies vaccinations (Tuesdays on the West Bank and Wednesdays on the East Bank) and microchipping daily. Upcoming adoption events are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Jefferson Feed (4421 Jefferson Hwy., Jefferson) April 2 and April 16.

LOUISIANA SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION OF CRUELTY TO ANIMALS (LA/SPCA)

1700 Mardi Gras Blvd., 368-5191; www.la-spca.org Adoption hours: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mon.-Sat; noon to 4 p.m. Sun. THE SCOOP: Adoption fees for dogs weighing fewer than 20 pounds or younger than 6 months are $150. Fees for cats, kittens and dogs more than 20 pounds and older than 6 months are $80. Rabbits and other small pets are $80. All animals are spayed

and neutered, and fees include microchipping, heartworm and flea medications, all vaccines and tags and licenses for Orleans Parish residents. THE POOP: The LA/SPCA has served as New Orleans’ animal control provider for more than 60 years. Its Dorothy Dorsett Brown campus in Algiers holds 350 animals, with approximately 100 available for adoption daily. Animals may be relinquished to the shelter 24 hours a day. It’s an open-admission shelter and won’t turn away any unwanted or homeless animals; however, LA/SPCA staff euthanize sick and injured animals once all opportunities are exhausted, if there is no room at the shelter or the animal is considered dangerous. “We do consider the animal’s quality of life and the health of the herd when euthanasia decisions are made for sick or injured animals,” says LA/SPCA communications director Katherine LeBlanc. “No animal will be turned away from the LA/SPCA, and all adoptable animals will have an opportunity at adoption. We are proud that the number of adoptable animals euthanized is below the national average, but these decisions are the most difficult part of our work.” Volunteer opportunities are available for people ages 18 years or older, and youth opportunities also are available for teens ages 15 and older. The LA/SPCA also employs an Animal Cruelty Investigations Team and offers education outreach programs, a TNR program, wellness clinics, annual checkups with a veterinary care team, disaster preparedness and hosts other public events throughout the year.

PLAQUEMINES ANIMAL WELFARE SOCIETY (PAWS)

9596 Hwy. 23, Belle Chasse, 392-1601; www.paws4life.org Adoption hours: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mon.-Sat.; 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sun.

THE SCOOP: Adoption fees for dogs are $100 and $25 for cats. All pets are fully vaccinated and microchipped, and cats are tested for leukemia and feline immunodeficiency virus. THE POOP: The Plaquemines nonprofit, no-kill shelter is home to more than 70 cats and 45 dogs and will soon move into a new state-of-the-art green facility shared with Plaquemines Parish Animal Control. “It’s unique — a nonprofit moving into a Plaquemines Parish building,” says shelter director Jacob Stroman. “It’s unusual, but we’re going to make it happen.” Volunteer opportunities are available daily. “We’ll take any help we can get,” Stroman says. Volunteer duties include dog walking, socialization, grooming, and assisting with adoption events and the shelter’s social networking websites. PAWS also accepts donations — check the shelter’s “wish list” on its website to find other ways to help. While PAWS is transitioning to its new home, which broke ground in April 2010, it will continue to offer low-cost spaying and neutering and offsite adoption events. PAGE 30

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PAGE 28

cover story

ST. BERNARD PARISH ANIMAL CONTROL SHELTER 5455 Judge Perez Drive, Violet, 278-1534 Adoption hours: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mon.-Fri.

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THE POOP: St. Bernard’s new state-of-the-art shelter opened earlier this year and houses 70 dogs and 50 cats. At any time, 30 dogs and 40 cats are available for adoption. The shelter is open-admission and does euthanize in cases of aggression. “We could always use volunteers, at the shelter or offsite,” says shelter director Beth Brewster. Volunteers can do “whatever they want to do,” Brewster says, and duties include cleaning kennels, socializing the animals, helping with adoption events or walking dogs. Volunteers must be 16 or older to participate, or no younger than 12 if assisted by an adult. The shelter also provides St. Bernard Parish with a feral cat TNR program and a low-cost spay-neuter clinic.

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THE SCOOP: Adoption fees for dogs and puppies weighing fewer than 25 pounds are $90, and adult dogs more than 25 pounds are $50. Adult cats are $15 and kittens are $35. Fees include spaying and neutering, one month’s worth of flea medication and heartworm prevention and all shots recommended for the animal’s stage of development.

20384 Harrison Ave., Covington, (985) 892-7387; www.sttammanyhumanesociety.org Adoption hours: 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday THE SCOOP: Adoption fees are $50-$150 for dogs and $25-$75 for cats. Fees include spaying and neutering, vaccinations, microchipping, six months of heartworm prevention, and one month of flea/tick prevention. All adoptable cats have tested negative for feline leukemia and feline immunodeficiency virus. PAGE 33

The LA/SPCA’s Marisa Collins and her feline friend Orpheus.

Mischief, a feral dog, peers out of his temporary home at ARNO.

Jazzy, a Catahoula hound mix, gazes wistfully out of his cage at the LA/SPCA.

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THE POOP: Louisiana’s largest no-kill shelter is the St. Tammany Humane Society’s Covington facility, which houses 100 dogs and 40 cats, all of which are available for adoption. The shelter doesn’t turn away any animals, though dogs and cats may face a waiting list. Director Vaughn Maurice says finding enough homes for the animals is the biggest challenge to operating as a no-kill shelter. Once a month, the shelter moves 20 pets to homes in the northeast U.S. Volunteer opportunities include walking dogs, socializing with cats, cleaning kennels, assisting clinic veterinarians and helping with fundraisers. “We’re totally dependent on the community for our budget of $1.5 million,” Maurice says. “We have to go out and raise (money). We receive no government funding, so it takes an army of volunteers to raise that kind of money every year.” Maurice says the shelter also accepts donations ranging from toys to pet food; a list of needed items can be found on the website. Volunteers under age 16 (and no younger than 12) must be accompanied by an adult. The shelter also offers a full-service, low-cost veterinary clinic, low-cost spaying and neutering, and a Second Chance fund which provides greatly reduced (or free) veterinary care for pets of indigent owners. Maurice says the Humane Society’s TNR program handles about 1,000 feral cats every year.

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THE POOP: The Slidell facility houses between 100 and 125 dogs and cats, with more than 40 available for adoption throughout the year. The shelter is open-admission and doesn’t turn away any animals, but division supervisor Damian Anti says his staff must euthanize animals with poor behavior or health issues. Volunteer opportunities are available for people ages 18 and older. The shelter also offers low-cost spaying and neutering vouchers and frequently works with other rescue groups like the Feral Cat Consortium and the shelter’s nonprofit group, the Animal Assistance League, which provides food, medicine, medical care and comfort for shelter animals. The group also assists with pet adoptions, veterinary clinics and humane education outreach programs. Find volunteer and other information on the group’s website.

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Pets Where to go for your petâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s health, boarding, day care and more.

Algiers Animal Clinic 3807 Gen. DeGaulle Drive, 364-1566; www.algiersanimalclinic.com Ark Animal Hospital 4025 Jefferson Hwy., Jefferson, 834-0906; www.arkanimal.net Audubon Veterinary Hospital 731 Nashville Ave., 891-0685; www.audubonvet.com Belladoggie 815 Washington Ave., 309-9510; www.belladoggie.com Camp Bow Wow 2731 Tchoupitoulas St., 891-3647; www.campbowwow.com/us/la/ neworleans Canal Street Veterinary Hospital 4022 Canal St., 200-2784; www.canalstreetvet.com Canine Connection 4920 Tchoupitoulas St., 218-4098; www.canineconnectionnola.com

Crescent City Veterinary Hospital 524 Jefferson Ave., 894-0752; www.crescentcityvet.com

Lakeside Pets Lakeside Shopping Center, 3301 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 837-7281; www.lakeside-pets.com Lakeview Veterinary Hospital 6245 Memphis St., 482-2173; www.lakeviewvet.vetsuite.com Magazine Street Animal Clinic 3458 Magazine St., 891-4115; www. magazinestreetanimalclinic.com Metairie Small Animal Hospital 101 Metairie Road, Metairie, 835-4266; 5040 W. Esplanade Ave., Metairie, 455-2345; 4041 Williams Blvd., Kenner, 443-4400; 734 Robert E. Lee Blvd., 830-4080; www.msah.com NOLA Animal Clinic 4554 Downman Road, 241-6462; www.nolaanimalclinic.com NOLA Furry Friends 617 S. Claiborne Ave., 324-3644; www.nolafurryfriends.com Petcetera 3205 Magazine St., 269-8711; www.petceteraneworleans.com

Dog Day Afternoon 4734 Magazine St., 899-1850; www.dogdaynola.com

Pet Care Center 2212 David Drive, Metairie, 887-2999; www.petcarecenterinc.com

Double M Feed Garden & Pet Supply 1124 Gause Blvd., Slidell, 646-0290; 3212 W. Esplanade Ave., Metairie, 835-9800; 8400 Jefferson Hwy., Harahan, 738-5007; www.doublemfeed.com

Pet Emporium 2315 Metairie Road, Metairie, 8285004; www.petemporium.net

Garden District Pet Hospital 1116 Louisiana Ave., 891-8618; www.gardendistrictpethospital.com Jefferson Feed Pet & Garden Center 4421 Jefferson Hwy., 733-8572; www.jefffeed.com

Prytania Veterinary Hospital 4907 Prytania St., 899-2828; www.prytaniavet.com Southeast Veterinary Specialists 3409 Division St., Metairie, 2190444; www.svsvets.com Zeusâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Place 4601 Freret St., 304-4718; www.zeusplace.com

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > MARCH 22 > 2011

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sHTo P aLK

BY LEE CUTRONE

SHOPPING NEWS BY CARRIE MARKS

Garden Variety raditionally, the term beer garden (from the German biergarten) refers to an open-air establishment that serves brew, drinks and local culinary specialties. With 80 beers, an enlarged deck and a soon-to-be introduced menu of pub-style food, Bayou Beer Garden (326 N. Jefferson Davis Pkwy., 302-9357; www.bayoubeergarden.com) lives up to its name. Housed in an early 20th-century Arts and Crafts-style structure, this Mid-City bar features a porch and outside tables where patrons can enjoy libations and the scenery. “There are seats out front, but the hidden gem is out back,” says New Orleans Fire Department District Chief Dean DiSalvo, who coowns Bayou Beer Garden with bartender Fiona Delargy. At the venue’s rear, a sprawling shaded deck and patio provide more than 2,000 square feet of space. Flowering plants and tropical greenery surround the deck and a back bar. During warmer months, patrons use the deck to watch football games and hold Bartender Kelly Lafleur serves business meetings. Within the next month there will be live music on Sunday Bayou Beer Garden’s selection of afternoons. When burgers, Buffalo wings and sandwiches become available this more than 150 liquors month, DiSalvo expects lunchtime crowds to keep the bar buzzing. Bayou Beer Garden’s private parking lot is a rare perk for a neighborhood watering hole. “The overwhelming response I get is that (the bar) is comfortable and friendly,” Delargy says. When DiSalvo and Delargy bought the former coffeehouse two years ago, they planned a laid-back environment that would give their diverse clientele plenty of ways to unwind. Inside, crimson walls, wooden tables, a glossy oak bar, a pool table and darts offer a pub-style alternative to the deck. House-made sangria is a popular choice when the temperature rises, and more than 150 liquors and daily bucket specials give patrons an array of drink options. “We’re known for a good drink at a reasonable price,” Delargy says.

T

LOVEJOY DAY SPA (200 Metairie Road, Metairie, 828-1997; www.lovejoyspa.com) offers Free Manicure Tuesdays through April 26. Book a pedicure appointment for Tuesday and receive a free manicure. All books, CDs and DVDs are 50 percent off during a special event to celebrate the FRIENDS OF THE NEW ORLEANS PUBLIC LIBRARY’s fifth anniversary of its twice-weekly book sales. The event runs from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, March 23, at the LATTER LIBRARY CARRIAGE HOUSE (5120 St. Charles Ave., 596-2625; www.nutrias.org). ESTHETIQUE FACIAL SPA (5702 Magazine St., 896-1006; www.efacialspa.com) hosts a microdermabrasion party from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, March 26. Treatments cost $40 and minimize fine lines, improve pores and relieve other minor skin problems. Call or email efacialspa@gmail.com for appointments. A number of private Uptown and St. Charles Avenue gardens are open for viewing during the 2011 SECRET GARDENS TOURS from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday, March 25, and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, March 26. Tickets for Friday tours, which are led by landscape professionals, cost $60, and tickets for Saturday’s self-guided tours are $25. Call 838-3098 or visit www.secretgardenstour.org to buy tickets, which benefit the BRAIN INJURY ALLIANCE OF LOUISIANA and programs that serve brain injury survivors.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 22 > 2011

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MUSIC: FLOATING ACTION PAGE 44 FILM: FOUND FOOTAGE FESTIVAL PAGE 51 CUISINE: A KENNER CHINATOWN PAGE 65

MADAME 41

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EXENE CERVENKA AT ONE EYED JACKS

>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << MUSIC >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE YOU GO << <<<<<<<<<< << 44 >> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << THE >> >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>> << <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> > << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

The Tennessee Williams/New Orleans Liter— ary Festival MARCH 23-27 WWW.TENNESSEEWILLIAMS.NET

Amistead Maupin will read from Tennesse Williams’ and his own work at the festival. PHOTO BY JOHN BARROIS

Joint Celebrations THE TENNESSEE WILLIAMS/NEW ORLEANS LITERARY FESTIVAL CELEBRATES ITS 25TH ANNIVERSARY AND THE CENTENNIAL OF THE PLAYWRIGHT’S BIRTH. BY WILL COVIELLO

M

In tribute to Williams’ birthday and his career, actors and writers will read from his work. Maupin will leave dramatic scenes to actors and present an essay titled “Too Personal,” which Williams used as an introduction to Small Craft Warnings. In it, he addressed the divide between writing fiction and autobiography. Critics and fans often pick apart his plays, trying to match real people to fictional characters, and Williams protested that his plays exhibited his talent, not his diary. Maupin defends the art of writing fiction, but protests less strenuously about the connection. “Artists draw from their own lives,” Maupin says. “Almost all of my characters are autobiographical to one degree or another.” The distinction stirred debate when he released Michael Tolliver Lives! At first Maupin said it was distinct from Tales of the City, and it was different in that it was a first-person novel and not about a swirling array of characters like previous books in the series. But Maupin later dropped his defense and said the novel is an extension of the series about one of its central characters, and parts of it are similar to his own life, particularly the manner in which Tolliver comes out as a gay man in a letter to his parents. “I like the disguise of fiction, but I draw on cultural realities,” Maupin says. Maupin was born in Washington D.C. and grew up in Raleigh, N.C. He served in the Navy during the Vietnam War and became a reporter afterward. In the PAGE 43

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EVENTS

CUISINE

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MAR

22 RYAN BINGHAM & THE DEAD HORSES

Ryan Bingham’s entry into country’s big time came before Crazy Heart’s 2010 award tour — it was the roughhewn singer’s smooth integration on T-Bone Burnett’s soundtrack alongside old lions like the Louvin Brothers, Waylon Jennings and Townes Van Zandt. Produced by Burnett, Junky Star (Lost Highway), Bingham’s third album, signals both quid pro quo and cinder-smoke confirmation. Silent Comedy and Liam Gerner open. Tickets $18 in advance, $20 at the door. 8:30 p.m. Tuesday. Tipitina’s, 501 Napoleon Ave., 895-8477; www.tipitinas.com

MAR

26 MOOD INDIGO: BIG BAND REVISITED

PHOTO BY MICHAEL WILSON

Reprising a 1996 project titled Mood Indigo, the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Foundation and Contemporary Arts Center present an all-star big band concert featuring Germaine Bazzle, Nicholas Payton (pictured), Tony Dagradi, Jason Mingledorff, Roland Guerin, Victor Atkins, Herlin Riley and others. Tickets $25 in advance, $35 at the door, $20/$30 CAC members, Fans of the Fest. 8 p.m. Saturday. CAC, 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www.cacno.org

MAR

BIG EASY THEATRE AWARDS

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The Big Easy Foundation recognizes top performances from 2010 and bestows special awards for lifetime achievement and arts education. Bryan Batt emcees the event and there are performances by nominated actors. Call 483-3129 for reservations. Tickets $125. 7 p.m.-10 p.m. Monday. Harrah’s New Orleans Casino, 8 Canal St., 533-6000; www.bestofneworleans.com

MAR

28

EXENE CERVENKA AND KEVIN SECONDS

PHOTO BY MAGGIE ST. THOMAS

SoCal and NoCal ’70s punk sages in their teens and early 20s, Exene Cervenka (pictured) and Kevin Seconds today have as much traction for their visual art as their music. On a joint tour, the ex-X phoenix and 7 Seconds founder are going acoustic — Cervenka to support March release The Excitement of Maybe (Bloodshot), her second country-bred solo outing in 18 months. Tickets $10 in advance, $12 at the door. 10 p.m. Monday. One Eyed Jacks, 615 Toulouse St., 569-8361; www.oneeyedjacks.net

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 22 > 2011

ore than Tennessee Williams, author Armistead Maupin is inextricably associated with a place. Creator of the Tales of the City series, he chronicled bohemian and bustling life in San Francisco from the mid-1970s onward. He also met Williams in San Francisco, though they didn’t discuss writing. Maupin attended an art gallery opening in the South of Market district in the mid-1970s. Williams was inside, attracting attention and being hounded for photos. After escaping the throng of fans, Williams spotted Maupin in the parking lot. Surmising Maupin wasn’t smoking a regular cigarette, Williams approached him. “I can’t exactly call it the passing of the torch from one writer to another,” Maupin says, laughing. “We just sat on the hood of a car, smoked a joint and had a discussion about the moon.” At the Tennessee Williams/New Orleans Literary Festival, Maupin will read from Williams’ work and discuss his own writing. The festival celebrates both its 25th anniversary and the centennial of Williams’ birth, and the schedule of events includes readings and discussions by authors, actors who starred in famous productions of Williams’ work, literary agents, journalists and others. Theatrical productions include The Glass Menagerie and world premieres of recently discovered one-act plays by Williams. There also are parties, walking tours and the popular Stanley and Stella Shouting Contest on Sunday in Jackson Square.

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WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE YOU GO

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early 1970s, he moved to San Francisco, where he worked for the Associated Press. The beginning of his Tales series were short stories he published in the San Francisco Chronicle. The latest installment, Mary Ann in Autumn, was released in 2010. Maupin adopted San Francisco as his new home almost instantly, in part because some elements reminded him of living in the South. “It was a tolerant and vibrant city with the qualities of a small town,” he says. “It had a respect for tradition that was in perfect keeping with my Southern experiences.” THEATRICAL PRODUCTIONS AT THE FESTIVAL OFFER INSIGHT INTO THE development of characters and ideas in Williams’ work. Southern Rep premieres three one-act plays that were discovered recently: The Pretty Trap, The Magic Tower and Every Twenty Minutes. The Pretty Trap is a precursor to The Glass Menagerie, but it’s a comedy and covers the basic story in 20 pages. Director Aimee Hayes points out that the play is very different from Menagerie. It focuses on Amanda Wingfield, Tom isn’t depressed and Laura doesn’t limp, Hayes says. “Everyone knows these roles,” she adds. But she told the actors, “We have to think about this as a Saturday Night Live sketch and take it from there.” One of the reasons it has not been professionally performed before may have to do with Williams’ feelings about it: He hated it. “Williams wrote in his notes that he didn’t like it,” Hayes says. “But for our purposes, it’s delightful. We see him working toward the full play.” She also sees elements in the other two works that preview more fully realized themes in the plays Cat on a Hot Tin Roof and Sweet Bird of Youth. Fans can compare The Pretty Trap with a full production of The Glass Menagerie by the UNO Department of Film, Theatre and Communications Arts at Le Petit Theatre du Vieux Carre, starring Janet Shea as Amanda. Both Maupin and Hayes note that Williams was a dedicated writer who awoke early every morning to work. He wrote many short stories and

Rebecca Taliancich and Lucy Faust star in Southern Rep’s premiere of The Pretty Trap. PHOTO BY JOHN BARROIS

short plays, and characters in them were plucked for greater roles in his better known works. Hayes says he pushed himself hard to improve his products. “He could have written for TV, he could have been a sitcom writer,” she says. “If he wasn’t ruthless about his own work, he wouldn’t have gone on to create characters like Blanche.” With the inclusion of the one-acts, the festival’s participants and productions celebrate every facet of Williams’ legacy. And, of course, locals can channel their own inner Stellas and Stanleys, comic or dramatic, at the annual Shouting Contest in Jackson Square. For a full schedule of events, visit www.tennesseewilliams.net.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 22 > 2011

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Desert Flower FLOATING ACTIONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S DESERT ETIQUETTE mid South By Southwestâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hectic schedule of nonstop showcasing and on-the-hour concerts, keeping your wits means staying grounded. Even if itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on a rooftop. This year, on the Austin, Texas, music, film and technology conferenceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kickoff Wednesday â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the annual on-ramp to a weeklong musical Autobahn â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Floating Action brought the oftenflighty festival back to earth with a dusky, downshifted 7:15 p.m. set atop the Cheers Shot Bar on Sixth Street. The sentiment was reciprocal. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nice to spend the sunset with you here,â&#x20AC;? frontman Seth Kauffman told the crowd, strumming the opening chords of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Well Hidden,â&#x20AC;? the first track on February release Desert Etiquette (Park the Van). The North Carolina bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s live incarnation is a quartet, Kauffmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s crawling drawl backed by bassist Michael Libramento, guitarist Brian Landrum and drummer Josh Carpenter, a former guitarist whose natural rock instincts, Kauffman says, bring a â&#x20AC;&#x153;hard-hitting, in-your-faceâ&#x20AC;? aspect to the groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s laid-back, slow sound. On recordings, however, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all Kauffman. As on 2007â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Research (released under Kauffmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name) and 2009â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s self-titled debut, he plays almost every note on Desert Etiquette, from the ambling drumbeats and bass lines to the wobbling keys and guitars, knocked off-kilter by various phaser and reverb effects for a hazy, flashback feel. That clock-stopping aesthetic, molded on the self-titled album around vintage Caribbean soul, got a stopwatch workout on the new LP, which Kauffman wrote and recorded at his Black Mountain, N.C., home studio on a self-imposed 48-hour deadline. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d always kind of done them the same way: take your time, let it make itself,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re just trying to press the boundaries and challenge yourself. You can churn out a bunch of crap in a couple days. I wanted to not be careful.â&#x20AC;? Oddly, the result is Kauffmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s calmest record, one that emphasizes negative space and moves along at a beach-stroll pace. On centerpieces â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Balanceâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rincon,â&#x20AC;? two of five Desert Etiquette

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tracks played at SXSW, guitars flap and sitars sway in a rhythmic breeze while cymbals crash in the distance like lapping waves. Kauffmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recording techniques are palpable, even if he canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t exactly describe them. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot of itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s me not really knowing what Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m doing,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You just kind of try random things until youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re

feeling someSeth Kauffman is thing. A lot of the sole source of it, in the studio Floating Actionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recording efforts. world, is not correct. Some of the stuff people would never let you get away with in a real studio.â&#x20AC;? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one reason he chooses to record by himself. But Kauffmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attempts at a recording sprint have altered his production work for others, most recently with former bandmate Tyler Ramsey (Band of Horses). â&#x20AC;&#x153;That was after Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d recorded Desert Etiquette,â&#x20AC;? he says of Ramseyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s forthcoming second album. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my new approach, just forcing somebody to do it really fast and trust yourself that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be good.â&#x20AC;? The Floating Action sound, however, begins and ends with Kauffman. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think people whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve asked me to produce their albums did it because theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d heard what I did, and kind of wanted that,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s funny, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll do some weird, crazy things that people just arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t on board with. I guess thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s another thing I like about doing it yourself: When youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re working in the studio with other people, ideas will get shot down or voted out. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nobody to do that.â&#x20AC;?

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REVIEWS

STICK THIS IN YOUR EAR

MUSIC

CD Reviews PANORAMA JAZZ BAND 17 Days

(Threadhead) ike the city on whose streets it marches and dances throughout the year — particularly during the busiest days of Carnival (Krewe du Vieux through Fat Tuesday) referred to in the title of its new album — the Panorama Jazz Band brings together many strains of music. On this album, all are presented as joyous dance music in songs ranging from the rock-steady rhythms of “Mun-Dun-Gu” to the bright African melodies and happy momentum of “Good News.” The band puts a propelling beat in its cover of the dirge “Lonely Woman” by avant-garde pioneer Ornette Coleman (who spent some formative time here in the 1940s). Energetic rhythms are driven by powerhouses Jon Gross on sousaphone, the unrelenting Boyanna Trayanova on snare drum, Gregg Mervine on bass drum, and the band’s secret weapon: Dan Oestreicher on baritone saxophone. Panorama mixes it up by including the terrific Eastern European tracks “Goldenshteyn Hora” and “Happy Nign” among the marching and second-line songs. One great achievement of this collection is how Panorama Jazz Band shows the similarities between genres that, on the surface, seem very different. When the band segues from the Serbian “Nikolic Cocek” into Sidney Bechet’s “Ti Ralph,” it seems obvious the two composers, although living worlds apart, drew from very similar wells. Panorama makes sure differences don’t get in the way, and it exemplifies how New Orleans culture melds diverse elements in a wild street shuffle. — David Kunian

L

CARL LEBLANC (Self-released)

arl LeBlanc’s Tribute to Justin Adams: Jus-tin Case is a fine piece of work that is simple but swinging. It was recorded in 1994 but not released until 2010. Justin Adams (19231991) was one of the most versatile and influential guitar players in New Orleans’ history. He played in the J&M studio band and alongside Fats Domino, Little Richard, Charles Brown and the Adams Brothers Band. On this album, LeBlanc honors Adams’ versatility by showcasing his own. LeBlanc plays great, clean jazz lines on “Plarine Days” and pretty melodies interspersed with chords on Duke Ellington’s “I Let A Song Go Out of My Heart.” He turns Sidney Bechet’s “Petit Fleur” into a mysterious habanera lament in the style of “St. Louis Blues.” His voice has a wonderful downto-earth vibe and his singing is heartfelt. He does an expository blues tune about music that led to his appreciation of Adams. LeBlanc’s band is tight but not uptight. It includes well-known musicians like Nicholas Payton and George French as well as unsung players Chris Severin and the late Fred Kemp and Bernard “Bunchy” Johnson. Wardell Quezerque’s horn arrangements are punchy or languid in just the right places. This recording is a good example of music a listener might hear at a jazz club in New Orleans on any given night, and a fine tribute to an almost-forgotten New Orleans music treasure. — Kunian

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 22 > 2011

A Tribute to Justin Adams: Justin Case

TUE OPEN MIC

45

MUSIC

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

STICK THIS IN YOUR EAR Frank Fairbanks, 5; Damien Louviere, 9

TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Two Fools on Stools, 1; Butch Fields Band, 5; Mojo Trio, 9

Wednesday 23 12 BAR — Brass-a-holics, 9

All show times p.m. unless otherwise noted.

Tuesday 22 12 BAR — Bat Masterson, 9:30

3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY — Xylos, Simon Lott, Justin Peake’s Beautiful Bells, 8 BANKS STREET BAR — NOLA Treblemakers, 10

BAYOU PARK BAR — Parishioners, 9 BMC — Dana Abbott Band, 6; Royal Rounders, 8:30; Lagniappe Brass Band, 11

CAFE NEGRIL — John Lisi & Delta Funk, 9

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Nervous Duane, 7; Bad Reeds, 11 CHICKIE WAH WAH — New Orleans Nightcrawlers, 8 D.B.A. — New Orleans Cottonmouth Kings, 9

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Tom Hook, 9:30 HOSTEL NEW ORLEANS — Soul School feat. Elliot Luv & the Abney Effect, 8

HOUSE OF BLUES — Rebelution, Giant Panda Guerilla Dub Squad, Kris Royal, 8

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 22 > 2011

HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — Omar Rodriguez Lopez Group, 9:30 HOWLIN’ WOLF — Aloud, Mahayla, Kahotec, 10

LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Marc Stone, 4:30; Jay B Elston, 9

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Rebirth Brass Band, 10 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Tony Memmel, 7; Michael Liuzza, 8; B-List Allstars, 9; Jamie Kent & the Options, 10 NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Bruce Barnes & Matt Hampsey, 3 OAK — Kristina Morales, 7

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Charlie Cuccia & Old No. 7 Band, 7 ONE EYED JACKS — Eddie Spaghetti, 9

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall-Stars feat. Shannon Powell, 8

REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — Peter Murphy, Bauhaus, Livan, 8:30 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — L.Y.L.A., 8:30

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Smokin’ Time Jazz Club, 6; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 10 TIPITINA’S — Ryan Bingham & the Dead Horses, Liam Gerner, 9 TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON —

46

BACCHANAL — Jazz Lab feat. Jesse Morrow, 7:30 BANKS STREET BAR — Major Bacon, 10

BEACH HOUSE — Poppa Stoppa Oldies Band, 8

BIG AL’S SALOON — Jumpin’ Johnny Sansone Blues Party, 7 BLUE NILE — United Postal Project, 8; Khris Royal & Dark Matter, 10

BMC — Jameson Family Band, 6; Suzaune Yee Mckamey, 8:30; Blues4Sale, 11 CANDLELIGHT LOUNGE — Treme Brass Band, 9 CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Bat Masterson, 5:30; T-Bone Stone, 7; Bottoms Up Blues Gang, 11 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Sweet Olive String Band, 5; Tom McDermott & Meschiya Lake, 8

CIRCLE BAR — Jim O. & the No Shows feat. Mama Go-Go, 6 D.B.A. — Leeroy Stagger, 7; Walter “Wolfman” Washington & the Roadmasters, 10

Showcase, 9

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Roman Skakun, 5; Shamarr Allen, 8

preview Lonely Boi

Together, the Atlanta duo OutKast is to rap what Jimi Hendrix was to the guitar. Big Boi alone — as he performs and records since Andre 3000 decided to withhold his considerable musical talents from the world — is still more skilled and creative than most in mainstream or underground rap. It’s a wonder he doesn’t carry a chip on his shoulder, given Andre’s retreat from the spotlight and label troubles that kept his long-awaited solo album Sir Lucious Left Foot … The Son of Chico Dusty (Island Def Jam) in limbo for years. In the end, Big Boi switched labels to release it, but he was legally barred from sharing any tracks created with Andre, with whom he had worked since high school. Nonetheless, while solo Big Boi often builds songs around catchy choruses that have little do with the verses, his verses meet the high standard set by the Grammy-winning Speakerboxxx/The Love Below (La Face), and five other official OutKast albums. Big Boi made two surprise local appearances last summer, both times performing a stripped-down show with a DJ and a dancer. But Big Boi doesn’t need much more than his patented super-fast but easily discernible flow. He also distinguishes himself by addressing subjects well beyond the genre’s overworked focus on materialism and violence. Tickets $41.35 (includes fees). — Michael Patrick Welch

EIFFEL SOCIETY — Vivaz!, 8 HI-HO LOUNGE — Buskers Ballroom, 10

HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — Surfer Blood, Holiday Shores, Dewars, 9 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Sasha Masakowski, 5; Irvin Mayfield’s NOJO Jam, 8

KRAZY KORNER — Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LACAVA’S SPORTS BAR — Crossfire, 9

LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Frank Fairbanks, 4:30 & 9

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Khris Royal & Dark Matter, 10

MOJO STATION — Ed Wills, Blues for Sale, 8 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Devil Whale, 7; Sally Spring, 9; Gina Forsyth, 10 NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Meghan Swartz, 12

OLD FIREMEN’S HALL — Two Piece & a Biscuit feat. Brandon Foret, Allan Maxwell & Brian Melancon, 7:30 PRESERVATION HALL — Joint Chiefs of Jazz feat. Frank Oxley, 8

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Johnny Angel & the Swingin’ Demons, 8:30 SHAMROCK BAR — Beth Patterson, 9

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO

MAR

25

Big Boi 10 p.m. Friday Harrah’s New Orleans Casino, 8 Canal St., (800) 745-3000; www.harrahsneworleans.com

— Delfeayo Marsalis & the Uptown Jazz Orchestra, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Orleans 6, 6; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10 TROPICAL ISLE BAYOU CLUB — T’Canaille, 9 TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Damien Louviere, 5 & 9

TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Mark Penton, 1; Debbie & Deacons, 5; Late as Usual, 9 YUKI IZAKAYA — By and By, 8

ZADDIE’S TAVERN — Cindy Chen & Mike Sklar, 8

Thursday 24 12 BAR — L’il Red & Big Bad, 10 ALLWAYS LOUNGE — Bat Masterson, Horns of Happiness, 10

BACCHANAL — Courtyard Kings, 7; Vincent Marini, 9:30 BANKS STREET BAR — Dave Jordan & the Neighborhood Improvement Association, 10 BAYOU PARK BAR — Ron Hotstream & the F-Holes, 9

BEACH HOUSE — Beach House All-Stars, 8 THE BEACH — Chicken on the Bone, 7 BIG AL’S SALOON — Major Bacon, 8 BLUE NILE — Gravity A, 10

BMC — Ramblin’ Letters, 6; David Mahoney Quartet, 8:30; Low-Stress Quintet, 10 BOMBAY CLUB — Marlon Jordan Jazz Trio, 8 CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Domenic, 7; Rotten Cores, 11

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Smoking Time Jazz Club, 8

CIRCLE BAR — Sam and Boone, 6 D.B.A. — Debauche, 10

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Loren Pickford, 9:30

HI-HO LOUNGE — Stooges Brass Band, 10 HOUSE OF BLUES — Apocalyptica, We are the Fallen, 8

HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — Murs, Tabi Bonney, Jermaine Quiz & Simon Lott, 9:30 HOWLIN’ WOLF — Lyricon

KERRY IRISH PUB — Dave James & Tim Robertson, 9 KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & the Zydeco Hellraisers, 4; Death by Orgasm, 8:30

LAFITTE’S BLACKSMITH SHOP — Mike Hood, 9 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Soul Rebels Brass Band, 11

LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Al Hebert, 4:30; Frank Fairbanks Duo, 9

THE MAISON — Doombalaya, 10 MAPLE LEAF BAR — The Trio, 10

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Richard Bienvenu, 8; Clyde Albert, 9; Kimm Beggs, 10; Emma Hill, 11 OAK — Honey Island Swamp Trio, 8

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 4; Vibe, 8:30

OLD POINT BAR — Blues Frenzy, 6:30; Lynn Drury, 9 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Tim Laughlin & Crescent City Joymakers, 8 PRESERVATION HALL — Paulin Brothers Brass Band feat. Dwayne Paulin, 8 PRIME EXAMPLE — Delfeayo Marsalis, 8 & 10

RAY’S — Bobby Love Band, 6 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Gena Delafose, 8:30

SATURN BAR — Alex McMurray, 9 SIBERIA — Bare Wires, Dead People, Spooks, Far Out Fangtooth, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Sachal Vasandani, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Miss Sophie Lee, 6; New Orleans Moonshiners, 10

TROPICAL ISLE BAYOU CLUB — T’Canaille, 9

TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Mark Barrett, 5; Debbie & the Deacons, 9

TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Mark Penton, 1; Butch Fields Band, 5; Late as Usual, 9 VAUGHAN’S — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 8:30

Friday 25 12 BAR — Renard Poche Band, 10

3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY — Friday Night Music Camp feat. Susan Cowsill, 5; Seguenon Kone & Friend, Kossa Diomande, Martin D. Zagbo, Bruce Sunpie, Boubacar Cissoko, 9 ALLWAYS LOUNGE — Shane Shane & DJ Rusty Lazer, 10 BANKS STREET BAR — Ritmo Calypso, 9

BIG AL’S SALOON — Burger ’N Fries, 8

BMC — Moonshine & Caroline,

7; Mark Pentone & Smoky Greenwell Trio, 9; Rue Fiya, 10; One Mind Brass Band, 1 a.m.

BOMBAY CLUB — Monty Banks, 6; Judy Spellman Quintet, 9:30 CARROLLTON STATION — Ben Labat & the Happy Devil, Super Water Sympathy, 71s, 9:30

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Hellbenders, 7; Mike Darby’s House of Cards, 11

CHICKIE WAH WAH — By & By String Band, 5:30; Paul Sanchez, 8; Bob Livingston, 10 CIRCLE BAR — Jim O. & Sporadic Fanatics, 6 CLUB 7140 — Michael Ward, 8

D.B.A. — Linnzi Zaorski, 6; Lightning Malcolm Band, 10

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Eric Traub Trio, 10

EUCLID RECORDS — Father Abraham, Era Zona, Murdoc, 5

FRENCH MARKET — Honey Island Swamp Band, members of Bonerama, Walter “Wolfman” Washington & the Roadmasters, 4 FUNKY PIRATE — Mark Penton, 4:30; Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30 HERMES BAR — Luke WinslowKing, 9:30 & 11 HI-HO LOUNGE — Impulss & DJ Bazooka Joe CD release, Skratchmo, 10

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Fresh Millions, White Colla Crimes, We Were Wolves, 9

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Joe Krown, 5; Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown, 8; Burlesque Ballroom feat. Linnzi Zaorski, midnight

JUJU BAG CAFE AND BARBER SALON — Micheala Harrison, Todd Duke, 7:30 KERRY IRISH PUB — Mike Ryan, 5; Damien Louviere CD release, 9

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Mike Dillon’s Go-Go Jungle, 11

THE MAISON — Tuba Skinny, 7; Honey Pots, 10; Pinettes Brass Band, 11:30; Local Skank, 1 a.m. MAPLE LEAF BAR — Radiators, 10 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Fredy Omar, 10

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Daniel Black, 7; Dan Rivers, 8; Devil Killing Moth, 9; Mike True, 10; Todd Lemoine, 11 OAK — Kristina Perez, 6; Mike Kobrin Trio, 10

OLD POINT BAR — Lil’ Red & Big Bad, 9:30 ONE EYED JACKS — Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 9

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Duke Heitger & Palm Court Jazz Band, 8 PELICAN CLUB — Sanford Hinderlie, 7 PAGE 48

MUSIC

LISTINGS F-Holes, 9

PAGE 46

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BOMBAY CLUB — Monty Banks, 7

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Bluerunners feat. Creole String Beans, 9

CHAMPIONS SPORTS PUB & GRILL — Sam Cammarata, 8

SHAMROCK BAR — The Tangle, 9

CIRCLE BAR — Micah McKee & Loren Murrell, 7

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Ellis Marsalis Quartet, 8 & 10

D.B.A. — Palmetto Bug Stompers, 6; Margie Perez, 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 6:30; New Orleans Cottonmouth Kings, 10

DONNA’S BAR & GRILL — Jesse McBride & the Next Generation Jazz Band, 9

ST. ROCH TAVERN — The Way, 9

TIPITINA’S — Soul Rebels Brass Band, Naughty Professor, 10

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TOMMY’S WINE BAR — Tommy’s Latin Jazz Band feat. Matthew Shilling, 9 TOOLOULA’S — Savage Fate, 10 TROPICAL ISLE BAYOU CLUB — T’Canaille, 9

TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Captain Leo, 1; Mojo Trio, 5; Debbie & the Deacons, 9 YELLOW MOON BAR — Michael James & His Lonesome, 9

Saturday 26 12 BAR — Iguanas, 10

ALLWAYS LOUNGE — Nasimiyu CD release, 10 BANKS STREET BAR — PYMP, 10

BIG AL’S SALOON — Irving “Skip” Bishop Benefit, 3

BLUE NILE — Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 7

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 22 > 2011

BMC — New Orleans Jazz Series, 3; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 6:30; Deja Vu Brass Band, 9:30; Ashton & the Big Easy Brawlers Brass Band, 12:30 a.m.

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BOMBAY CLUB — Monty Banks, 6; Leroy Jones Quartet, 9:30

BOURBON COWBOY TOO — Chicken on the Bone, 11 CAFE NEGRIL — Smoky Greenwell & the Blues Gnus, 10

CARROLLTON STATION — Jimmy Robinson feat. House of Clements, 9:30 CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Dread, Anijarim, Parabellum, 8

CHICKIE WAH WAH — WTUL’s 6th Annual Hootenanny, 8

CIRCLE BAR — Jazzholes, 6

D.B.A. — John Boutte, 8; OTRA, 11

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Wendell Brunious, 10 DRAGON’S DEN — Ghostwood, Robinsons, Hons, 6

HERMES BAR — Paul Sanchez, 9:30 & 11 HI-HO LOUNGE — Russian Mafia Band, Debauche feat. Slow Burn Burlesque, 11

KERRY IRISH PUB — Speed the Mule, 5; Hurricane Refugees, 9 KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30

LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Los Po-BoyCitos, 11 LOUISIANA MUSIC FACTORY — J.C.

Deer Tracks

With the defunct Bloomington, Ind., bands Impossible Shapes and John Wilkes Booze, multi-instrumentalist Aaron Deer made unfettered psychedelic pop and silly-in-nameonly soul rock, respectively. That his side project, The Horns of Happiness, outlived both parent groups reflects the timeless aspects of Deer’s song craft, a Humpty Dumptied Faberge egg offered up in shards but alive with sounds that evoke the natural world. It’s also somewhat misleading: The Horns today bear little resemblance to the group that produced the quietly startling A Sea as a Shore in 2004. That album is a wide-eyed wander through the musical wilderness, its fractured track list scattered among 15 alluring pieces: acoustic guitars rendered as sunshine filtering through a forest canopy, organs diffracted into spinning color-wheel spectrums and perfect melodies that veer off path midthought. The 2007 EP What Spills Like Thread is the opposite: two tracks closer to 10 minutes apiece, droning rockers hoisted up a flagpole by repeated bass and electric guitar mantras. Now a trio based in Oakland, Calif., the Horns reintroduced themselves in March 2010 with an eponymous digital single, free on the Secretly Canadian website. It’s not underground-shaking stuff like their debut, but Deer and Shelley Harrison’s slaloming chants give the rotating material downhill movement. Wee Giant opens. Tickets $5. — Noah Bonaparte Pais

MAR

24

The Horns of Happiness 9 p.m. Thursday AllWays Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www.theallwayslounge.com

& Company, 2; Davis, 3; Bob Livingston, 4

THE MAISON — Ramblin’ Letters, 7; Jeremy Phipps & the Outsiders, 10; Yojimbo, midnight MAPLE LEAF BAR — Jake Eckert, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Kevin Clark, 10 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Badura, 9; Linda McRae, 10; A Fragile Tomorrow, 11

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — New Orleans Women in Music Showcase, 2 OAK — Mia Borders, 8

SIBERIA — Omean, Hollow Leg, Shroud Eater, Bhang Khang, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Deacon John & the Ivories, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Luke WinslowKing, 3; Panorama Jazz Band, 6; Dominick Grillo & the Frenchmen St. All Stars, 10 STARBUCKS — Abiea, 7:30

TIPITINA’S — Davis Rogan CD release, 10

TOMMY’S WINE BAR — Julio & Caesar, 10

TOOLOULA’S — Backflow, 10

OLD POINT BAR — Ozzy Cash feat. Kim Carson, 9:30

TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Captain Leo, 1; Mark Barrett, 5; Debbie & the Deacons, 9

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lionel Ferbos & Palm Court Jazz Band, 8

ZADDIE’S TAVERN — Karen & David Noble, 9

ONE EYED JACKS — Dax Riggs, Unnaturals, 9

PELICAN CLUB — Sandford Hinderlie, 7 PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Swing Kings feat. Lucien Barbarin, 8 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Rockin’ Dopsie Jr., 9:30

WHEREHOUSE BAR & GRILL — Savin’ Face, 9:30

Sunday 27 ALLWAYS LOUNGE — Magnetic Ear, 10

BANKS STREET BAR — Bob Livingston, Ron Hotstream & the

FINNEGAN’S EASY — Robin Clabby, Erik Golson & Nick O’Gara Trio, 3 GENERATIONS HALL — Fete de la Musique Lycee Francais Benefit feat. Ellis Marsalis, Thelonious Monk Institute members, Bonerama and others, 5

HOUSE OF BLUES — Sunday Gospel Brunch, 10 a.m.; Whigs, Johnny Corndawg, 8

HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — EOTO, 9 HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Hot 8 Brass Band, 9 KERRY IRISH PUB — Steve Keith, 8

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Brass Sunday, 9

LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Jason Bishop, 4:30; Lacy Blackledge, 9 MADIGAN’S — Anderson/Easley Project, 9

THE MAISON — Lionel Ferbos & the Palm Court Jazz Band, 4; Cristina Perez, 7; Chegadao, 10 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Joe Krown Trio feat. Russell Batiste & Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 10

OLD POINT BAR — Jesse Moore, 3:30 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lucien Barbarin & Sunday Night Swingsters, 8 THE PERFECT FIT BAR & GRILL — Brass-a-holics, 8

THE PRECINCT — Funk Express, 7:30

PRESERVATION HALL — Tommy Sancton’s New Orleans Jazz Band, 8

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — James Singleton’s Illuminasti Quartet, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Rights of Swing, 3; Ben Polcer & Friends, 6; Pat Casey & the New Sound, 10 ST. CHARLES TAVERN — Maryflynn Thomas, 10 a.m.

TIPITINA’S — Cajun Fais Do Do feat. Bruce Daigrepont, 5:30 TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Butch Fields Band, 1; Rhythm & Rain, 5; Late as Usual, 9 ZADDIE’S TAVERN — Wardell Williams, 5

Monday 28 BACCHANAL — Jonathan Freilich, 7:30 BANKS STREET BAR — Spillway, 9

BJ’S LOUNGE — King James & the Special Men, 10 PAGE 50

MUSIC

LISTINGS

PAGE 48 BLUE NILE — Big Pearl & the Fugitives of Funk, 9

BMC — Fun in the Pocket feat. Mayumi Shara, 5; Smoky Greenwell’s Monday Night Blues Jam, 9:30 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Jon Cleary, 8

D.B.A. — By & By String Band, 6; Panorama Jazz Band, 9 DONNA’S BAR & GRILL — Les Getrex & the Blues All-Star Band, 9

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — John Fohl, 9:30 HI-HO LOUNGE — Blue Grass Pickin Party, 8; Old Tire Swingers, 11

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Bob French & the Original Tuxedo Jazz Band, 8 KERRY IRISH PUB — Lynn Drury, 9

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Papa Grows Funk, 10

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Dave Easley, 8; Dave Maleckar, 9 OLD POINT BAR — Brent Walsh Trio, 6:30

ONE EYED JACKS — Exene Cervenka & Kevin Seconds, 9 PRESERVATION HALL — St. Peter Street Playboys feat. Maynard Chatters, 8

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Dominic Grillo & the Frenchmen Street All-Stars, 6; Jazz Vipers, 10 ST. ROCH TAVERN — Washboard Lissa Orchestra, 7

TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Captain Leo, 5; Can’t Hardly Play Boys, 9

TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Damien Louviere, 1; Big Feets, 5; Rhythm & Rain, 9

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Charles Ave., 865-7430; www.hnjchurch. org — Sun: Symphony Chorus of New Orleans & musicians from the Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra, 3:30

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 22 > 2011

MAHALIA JACKSON THEATER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS — 1419 Basin St., 525-

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1052; www.mahaliajacksontheater.com — Sat: Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra presents Sir James Galway, 7:15 MANDEVILLE TRAILHEAD — 675 Lafitte St., Mandeville, (985) 624-3147; www.mandevilletrailhead.com — Fri: Mandeville Live! presents Sgt. Pepper Beatles Tribute, Kristin Diable, 6:30

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Moreau Center, 4123 Woodland Drive, (800) 259-7744 — Thu: Gregg Kallor, 5:30 ROGERS MEMORIAL CHAPEL — Tulane University, 862-3214 — Wed: Gregg Kallor, 5:30 ST. JOSEPH ABBEY CHURCH — 75376 River Road, St. Benedict, (985) 892-1800; www. sjasc.edu — Sun: Musica da Camera, 3 TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH — 1329 Jackson Ave., 522-0276; www.trinitynola.com — Tue: Organ & Labyrinth, 6; Thu: Evensong Choir, 6:30; Sun: Members of the Louisiana Symphony Orchestra, 5; Mon: Taize, 6 VICTORY FELLOWSHIP CHURCH — 5708 Airline Drive, Metairie — Fri: Yesterday’s Tomorrow Reunion Concert, 7 XAVIER UNIVERSITY — Musical Building Recital Hall, 1 Drexel Drive, 486-7411; www.xula.edu — Wed: Nick Ciraldo, 7 More listings at www.bestofneworleans.com.

FILM

LISTINGS

A ROOM WITH A VIEW

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

NOW SHOWING THE ADJUSTMENT BUREAU (PG-13) — A politician poised

BATTLE: LOS ANGELES (PG-13) — After Earth is attacked by

unknown forces, Los Angeles becomes the last stand for mankind as the world’s cities crumble. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

BEASTLY (PG-13) — The

modern-day Beauty and the Beast follows a New York teen transformed into a monster to find true love. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 14

BEYOND ALL BOUNDARIES (NR) — The museum screens a 4-D

film, bringing audiences into battle using archival footage and special effects. National World War II Museum Solomon Victory Theater

BIG MOMMAS: LIKE FATHER LIKE SON (PG-13) — Martin

Caught on Tape

CEDAR RAPIDS (R) — A shel-

tered insurance agent (Ed Helms) has his boundaries pushed while representing his company on a convention. Canal Place DEEP SEA (NR) — Audiences experience the depths of the ocean. Entergy IMAX DINOSAURS ALIVE! (NR) —

David Clark helms a CGI jaunt in a Jurassic park. Entergy IMAX, Kenner MegaDome GNOMEO & JULIET (G) — The

animated film is a spin on the Shakespeare tale with feuding gardeners and their lawn gnomes and flamingos. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 14 GRAND CANYON: RIVER AT RISK (NR) — Robert Redford

narrates a 15-day river-rafting trip that highlights the beauty of the Colorado River. Entergy IMAX

HALL PASS (R) — Two women

sensing their husbands’ restlessness decide to grant

Heavy Metal Parking Lot is the best film ever made about headbanging rock, big hair and teens guzzling Jack-andCokes. There’s no narration, and it’s really not much more than two guys with a videocamera, a microphone and a mission to let Judas Priest fans be heard. They edited it down to 16 minutes of tape recorded in the parking lot outside a Priest concert (Dokken opened) at the Capital Centre in Largo, Md. in 1986. There’s plenty of shirtless guys drinking beer and smoking dope, some animal-print spandex and at least one admitted 13-year-old girl on a date with a 20-year-old guy. The crowd doesn’t like punk music much, but they love Priest, Iron Maiden, Scorpions and getting wasted. It almost turns epic/tragic when one group describes how they got backstage passes by writing the band manager about a friend who died in a car accident. For years, it was a popular bootlegged video, but on its 25th anniversary, Heavy Metal Parking Lot is the main attraction in a fantastic collection of bizarre video in The Found Footage Festival. New York Comedy writers Nick Prueher and Joe Pickett have worked for The Onion and The Late Show With David Letterman, and since 1991, they have collected oddball videotapes, many culled from thrift stores, plus some training videos pilfered from former employers. The clips in the festival include montages from workout tapes and a synthesis of self-hypnosis training videos (on how to stop smoking, be a better lover and improve your tennis game). In segments from the cable access show Petpourri, a nerdy host tries to simultaneously talk and keep track of a table full of battling puppies, turtles, hamsters and parrots. One collection compiles the results of industrial toilet bowl flush tests using faux turds made from miso paste. And then there’s the instructional video on how to get revenge, hosted by Linda Blair from The Exorcist. Prueher and Pickett host the event. Tickets $10. — Will Coviello

MAR

27

The Found Footage Festival 7 p.m. Sunday Chalmette Movies, 8700 W. Judge Perez Drive, Chalmette, 304-9992; www.chalmettemovies.com

them one week of freedom to do whatever they want. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 14 I AM NUMBER FOUR (PG-13) — A teen who hides a secret

identity and extraordinary abilities must elude an enemy who seeks to destroy him. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 14

JUST GO WITH IT (PG-13) —

Adam Sandler and Jennifer Aniston star in the romantic comedy about a plastic surgeon who enlists the

help of his assistant and her kids to woo a much younger schoolteacher. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 JUSTIN BIEBER: NEVER SAY NEVER (G) — The documen-

tary on the 16-year-old pop sensation features concert footage and screaming teenagers. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Hollywood 14

THE KING’S SPEECH (R) — Colin Firth stars as King George VI, who unexpectedly becomes king when his brother Edward

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 22 > 2011

Lawrence reprises his role as FBI agent Malcolm Turner who disguises himself as an old woman. AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9

SERVING ALL-U-CAN EAT

Y

to win a Senate seat falls for a beautiful ballet dancer, but mysterious men want to keep the two apart. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14, Prytania

TILL FRIDAYS

review

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

DON’T WAIT

51

Hirschfeld and the Theater of Tennessee Williams” exhibit. A discussion and Q&A with Paulsen follows the screening. Free admission. 6:30 p.m. Tuesday.

FILM

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

SPECTACULAR

Intense and absolutely rIvetIng!”

preview

Tom Snyder, MOVIEGUIDE®

FOUND FOOTAGE FESTIVAL — The festival features

clips from found VHS tapes curated by comedians Joe Pickett (The Onion) and Nick Prueher (Late Show with David Letterman). Visit www.foundfootagefest.com for details. Tickets $10. 7 p.m. Sunday, Chalmette Movies, 8700 West Judge Perez Drive, 304-9992

GIANT (NR) — The 1956 film starring Elizabeth Taylor, Rock Hudson and James Dean depicts the life of a Texas cattle rancher and his family over two generations. Tickets $5.50. Noon Saturday-Sunday and March 30. Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 8912787; www.theprytania.com KING KONG (NR) — The New Orleans Film Society hosts an outdoor screening of the 1933 movie for the museum’s weekly Where Y’Art program. Free admission. The screening begins at dusk. Friday, Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden, New Orleans Museum of Art, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, City Park, 658-4100; www. noma.org

PRAY THE DEVIL BACK TO HELL — The film chronicles

the story of the thousands of Liberian women whose silent protests were critical in bringing about agreement amid a bloody civil war. The screening is part of the Newcomb Feminist Film Series. Free admission. 7 p.m. Friday, Tulane University, Woldenberg Art Center, Freeman Auditorium, 314-2200; www. tulane.edu

RED STATE (NR) — Kevin Smith’s independent horror film starring John Goodman and Melissa Leo depicts characters inspired by Westboro Baptist Church members and their ilk. A Q&A with Smith follows. Tickets $60. 8 p.m. Saturday, Tulane University, McAlister Auditorium, 5293000; www.tulane.edu THE ROYAL TENENBAUMS (R) —

An estranged family of former child geniuses reunite in Wes Anderson’s absurdist comedy. Tickets $8. Midnight FridaySaturday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com

Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center presents a seven-night series of short films from Eurochannel. Each night features a different theme and films from across Europe. Friday opens with stories about childhood, including the Irish film Frankie (pictured) in which a young boy dedicates himself to being a good father. Subsequent showcases include comedies on Saturday and Eastern European films on Sunday. Tickets $7 general admisson, $6 students/seniors, $5 Zeitgeist members. — Will Coviello European Short Films M A R 7:30 p.m. Friday-Thursday 25-31 Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

Thursdays at Twilight Garden Concert Series

THIS WEEK’S PERFORMANCE SECOND EUROCHANNEL SHORT FILMS TOUR — The

center hosts a week of seven originally curated, thematic programs of award-winning short films that pay tribute to a changing Europe. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, free for members. 7:30 p.m. FridayMonday, then March 28-31, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net SOUNDTRACK FOR A REVOLUTION (NR) — The docu-

mentary recounts the struggles of the American Civil Rights Movement through its powerful music, performed by John Legend, Joss Stone, Wyclef Jean, The Roots and others. Free admission. 6 p.m. Wednesday, Ashe Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www. ashecac.org YOUSSOU N’DOUR: RETURN TO GOREE (NR) — Pierre-Yves

Borgeaud’s documentary

follows Senegalese singer N’Dour on his journey to perform a concert in Gorée, an island that today symbolizes the West African slave trade. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 Zeitgeist members. 9:30 p.m. Tuesday-Wednesday, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc. net AMC Palace 10 (Hammond), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 12 (Clearview), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 16 (Westbank), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 20 (Elmwood), (888) 262-4386; Canal Place, 363-1117; Chalmette Movies, 304-9992 ; Entergy IMAX, 581-IMAX; Grand (Slidell), (985) 641-1889; Hollywood 9 (Kenner), 464-0990; Hollywood 14 (Covington), (985) 893-3044; Kenner MegaDome, 468-7231; Prytania, 891-2787; Solomon Victory Theater, National World War II Museum, 527-6012 Compiled by Lauren LaBorde

Tom McDermott & Evan Christopher Traditional Jazz

HANDMADE 10M. STERLING AUSTRIAN SWAROVSKY

CRYSTAL DOUBLE CAPPED ROSARY

MARCH 24

Adults: $8 / Children 5-12: $3 Children 4 & Under = FREE Mint Juleps and other refreshments available for purchase For more information call

(504) 483-9488

“WHERE THE UNUSUAL IS COMMONPLACE.” 5101 W. ESPLANADE AVE. METAIRIE, LA 70006 504-885-4956 • 800-222-4956

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 22 > 2011

MAKING THE BOYS (NR) — The documentary explores the making and legacy of The Boys in the Band, which is considered the first major play and film to revolve around gay characters. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 Zeitgeist members. 7:30 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

Euro Visions

53

LISTINGS

WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

ART ARTICHOKE GALLERY. 912 Decatur St., 636-2004 — Artists work on site in all media; watercolors and limited-edition prints by Peter Briant, ongoing.

Library, 6363 St. Charles Ave., fourth floor, 861-5456 — “In the Blink of an Eye,” photographs by Harold Baquet, through Thursday.

BARRISTER’S GALLERY. 2331 St. Claude Ave., 525-2767; www. barristersgallery.com — “Read

D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., 524-3936 — “Surroundings,” mixedmedia sculpture by Allen Wynn, through March.

My Lips,” paintings by Terrence Sanders, through April 4.

OPENING FAIR GROUNDS RACE COURSE & SLOTS. 1751 Gentilly Blvd., 943-1415; www.fairgroundsracecourse.com — “Letters from

the Backside,” an exhibition of letters from the Neighborhood Story Project with photographs by Aubrey Edwards, through Sunday. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesday.

GALLERIES 1022 GALLERY. 1022 Lowerline St., 301-0679; www.1022gallery. blogspot.com — Paintings by Tim Trapolin, through April 18. 3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY. 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com — “Mwwwaha-

hahhhaaa!” mixed media by Ryan Ballard, through March 30.

811 GALLERY. 811 Howard Ave., 524-3872; www.francoalessandrini.net — Photographs by Ric-

cardo Lorenzi, through April 10.

A GALLERY FOR FINE PHOTOGRAPHY. 241 Chartres St., 568-1313; www.agallery.com — Photo-

graphs by Michael Kenna; photographs by Sebastiao Salgado, through April.

ACADEMY GALLERY. 5256 Magazine St., 899-8111 — “A Fresh

AG WAGNER STUDIO & GALLERY. 813 Royal St., 561-7440 — Works

by gallery artists; 504 Toys, locally handcrafted toys; both ongoing.

ALL IN THE FRAME GALLERY. 2596 Front St., Slidell, (985) 2901395 — “Serene Waters, Clear Horizons,” paintings by Annie Strack, ongoing. ANTENNA GALLERY. 3161 Burgundy St., 957-4255; www. antennagallery.org — “Order

of Effects/Accomodating the Mess,” a group exhibition, through April 3. ANTON HAARDT FOLK GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www.antonart.com — Works

by Anton Haardt, Christopher Moses and others, ongoing. ARIODANTE GALLERY. 535 Julia St., 524-3233 — Works by Elsie

Semmes, Abe Geasland, Kiki Huston and Phillip Spence, through March.

ART GALLERY 818. 818 Royal St., 524-6918 — Paintings, sculpture

and jewelry by local artists Noel Rockmore, Michael Fedor, Xavier de Callatay, Charles Bazzell, Bambi deVille and Ritchie Fitzgerald, ongoing.

Photographs by Michael P. Smith, Jack Beech, Harriet Blum, Kevin Roberts and others, ongoing. BERTA’S AND MINA’S ANTIQUITIES GALLERY. 4138 Magazine St., 895-6201 — “Louisiana! United

We Stand to Save Our Wetlands,” works by Nilo and Mina Lanzas; works by Clementine Hunter, Noel Rockmore and others; all ongoing.

BRYANT GALLERIES. 316 Royal St., 525-5584; www.bryantgalleries.com — Paintings by Dean Mitchell, ongoing. BYRDIE’S GALLERY. 2422-A St. Claude Ave., www.byrdiesgallery.com — “Byrdie’s Landing,”

carved wood sculpture installation by Swamp Deville, through April 6.

CALICHE & PAO GALLERY. 312 Royal St., 588-2846 — Oil paintings by Caliche and Pao, ongoing. CALLAN FINE ART. 240 Chartres St., 524-0025; www.callanfineart. com — Works by Eugene de

Blass, Louis Valtat and other artists of the Barbizon, Impressionist and Post-Impressionist schools, ongoing.

CARDINAL GALLERY. 541 Bourbon St., 522-3227 — Exhibition of Ital-

ian artists featuring works by Bruno Paoli and Andrea Stella, ongoing.

CARIBBEAN ARTS LTD. 720 Franklin Ave., 943-3858 — The gallery

showcases contemporary Haitian and Jamaican art.

CASELL GALLERY. 818 Royal St., 524-0671; www.casellartgallery. com — Pastels by Joaquim

Casell; etchings by Sage; oils by Charles Ward; all ongoing.

COLE PRATT GALLERY. 3800 Magazine St., 891-6789; www. coleprattgallery.com — “Spring

Buzz,” oil on canvas by Carolyn Evans; “Walk About,” monotypes by Barbara Brainard; both through April.

COLLECTIVE WORLD ART COMMUNITY. Poydras Center, 650 Poydras St., 339-5237; www. collectiveworldartcommunity. com — Paintings from the Blue

Series by Joseph Pearson, ongoing.

COLLECTIVE WORLD ART COMMUNITY. 2820 St. Claude Ave., 339-5237; www.collectiveworldartcommunity.com — “An

Artist’s Rage: Crimes Against Humanity,” paintings and installations by Gustavo Duque, through April 20. COLLINS C. DIBOLL ART GALLERY. Loyola University, Monroe

DU MOIS GALLERY. 4921 Freret St., 818-6032 — “Emit,” works by

William DePauw, Sean Friloux and Cory Knott, through April 3. DUTCH ALLEY ARTIST’S CO-OP GALLERY. 912 N. Peters St., 4129220; www.dutchalleyonline. com — Works by New Orleans

artists, ongoing.

ELLIOTT GALLERY. 540 Royal St., 523-3554; www.elliottgallery. com — Works by gallery artists

Coignard, Engel, Papart, Petra, Tobiasse, Schneuer and Yrondi, ongoing.

FAIR FOLKS & A GOAT. 2116 Chartres St., 872-9260; www.fairfolksandagoat.com — “Permanence,” paintings by Timothy Cavnar, through April 3. FRAMIN’ PLACE & GALLERY. 3535 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-3311; www.nolaframing.com — Prints

by Tommy Thompson, Phillip Sage, James Michalopoulos and others, ongoing. FREDRICK GUESS STUDIO. 910 Royal St., 581-4596; www.fredrickguessstudio.com — Paintings by

Fredrick Guess, ongoing.

THE FRONT. 4100 St. Claude Ave.; www.nolafront.org — Works

by Lee Deigaard, Alex Podesta, Tippy Tippens and Dave Greber, through April 3.

GALERIE D’ART FRANCAIS. 541 Royal St., 581-6925 — Works by

Todd White, ongoing.

GALERIE PORCHE WEST. 3201 Burgundy St., 947-3880 — Pho-

tography by Christopher Porche West, ongoing.

GALLERIA BELLA. 319 Royal St., 581-5881 — Works by gallery artists, ongoing. GALLERY 421. 421 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 898-5858 — More than 500 pieces of art by more than 50 artists, ongoing. GALLERY BIENVENU. 518 Julia St., 525-0518; www.gallerybienvenu. com — Sculpture by David Borgerding, through Monday. THE GARDEN DISTRICT GALLERY. 1332 Washington Ave., 891-3032; www.gardendistrictgallery. com — “The River,” a group

invitational exhibit featuring local and regional artists, through April.

GEORGE SCHMIDT GALLERY. 626 Julia St., 592-0206; www. georgeschmidt.com — Paintings by George Schmidt, ongoing. GRAPHITE GALLERIES. 936 Royal St., 565-3739 — “Sinners and

Saints,” works by Joe Hobbs, ongoing.

GUTHRIE CONTEMPORARY. 3815 Magazine St., 897-2688; www. guthriecontemporary.com —

“Schemata,” works by Susan

review Call of the Wild Side Herman Mhire produced more than 200 exhibitions by the time he retired in 2005 from his post as director of the art museum at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. He was a distinguished professor of visual arts and a founder of the Festival International de Louisiane. In 2004, France named him a Chevalier of the Order of Arts and Letters. So one might wonder, when viewing his large photographic portraits at Martine Chaisson Gallery, how he got so over the top. He does not deny these portraits of well-known Acadian artists resemble the art of the insane, but he tells us he took up Photoshop a few years ago after a series of unsettling events caused him to immerse himself in something new. Formerly an exponent of a kind of ethereal photographic classicism, his new approach is like a classical pianist suddenly switching to death metal. So Kelly 2 becomes a horned demon with a goatee; Ralph 3 (pictured) is a human hedgehog with swirling vortexes for facial features; Lynda 2 is a Rorschach blot wearing lipstick, and in Francis 3, Francis Pavy resembles a glowing psychedelic avocado. A surprisingly effective outburst of digital Dadaism, this is what can happen when an elegant eye takes a walk on the wild side. Stefan Szczesny started out in Germany’s Junge Wilde or “Wild Youth” movement of the 1970s, which evolved into Neoexpressionism, but today the Bavarian native lives in St. Tropez, France after following a wanderlust that took him to the Caribbean and other exotic places. These lush and breezy Earthly Paradise tableaux recall the French periods of Matisse in Nice or Paul Ninas in Martinique. They can be seductive for the way they capture the feminine allure of those balmy climes where sea breezes caress the senses and even danger is cloaked in a lulling aesthetic. Needless to say, they look right at home in New Orleans. — D. Eric Bookhardt

THRU APR

23 THRU MAR

26

Altered States: New Work by Herman Mhire Martine Chaisson Gallery, 727 Camp St., 3047942; www.martinechaissongallery.com An Earthly Paradise: New Work by Stefan Szczesny Octavia Art Gallery, 4532 Magazine St., 3094249; www.octaviaartgallery.com

Dory, ongoing. HAROUNI GALLERY. 829 Royal St., 299-8900 — Paintings by David

Harouni, ongoing.

HIGHWATER GALLERY. 7800 Oak St., 309-5535 — “The Shamrock

Shimmy,” prints, paintings, handmade jewelry and oil paintings by Serene Bacigalupi, Forrest Bacigalupi, Luiny Ripera and Brian Poirier.

ISABELLA’S GALLERY. 3331 Severn Ave., Suite 105, Metairie, 779-3202; www.isabellasgallery. com — Hand-blown glass works

by Marc Rosenbaum; raku by Kate Tonguis and John Davis; all ongoing.

JAMIE HAYES GALLERY. 621 Chartres St., 592-4080; www.jamiehayes.com — New Orleans-style art by Jamie Hayes, ongoing. JAZZ & HERITAGE GALLERY. 1205 N. Rampart St., 558-6100; www. jazzandheritage.org — “Femme Fest,” an exhibition of female artists curated by the Women’s Caucus for Art of Louisiana, through April 15. JEAN BRAGG GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART. 600 Julia St., 895-7375; www.jeanbragg.com —

“A Toast to Louisiana Seafood,” a group exhibition of oil and acrylic works, through March. JON SCHOOLER GALLERY. 8526 Oak St., 865-7032; www.

JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY. 400A Julia St., 522-5471; www. jonathanferraragallery.com — “Wrapped,” sculpture by

Sidonie Villere, through April 9. “The Theatre of Cultural Strata: A Visual Journey of Urban Archeology and Cultural Veneer,” a multimedia exhibition by Krista Jusrisich, through May 2. JULIE NEILL DESIGNS. 3908 Magazine St., 899-4201; www. julieneill.com — “Facade,” photographs by Lesley Wells, ongoing. KAKO GALLERY. 536 Royal St., 565-5445; www.kakogallery.com — Paintings by Don Picou and Stan Fontaine; “Raku” by Joy Gauss; 3-D wood sculpture by Joe Derr; all ongoing. KKPROJECTS. 2448 N. Villere St., 415-9880; www.kkprojects.org — “Knead,” works by Kristian

Hansen, Tora Lopez, John Oles and William Murphy, ongoing. KURT E. SCHON. 510-520 St. Louis St., 524-5462 — The gallery specializes in 18th and 19th century European oil paintings by artists from the French Salon and Royal Academy as well as French Impressionists. L9 CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 539 Caffin Ave., 948-0056 — “Faces

of Treme,” works by Chandra McCormick and Keith Calhoun, ongoing.

LE DESIGNS LLC. 3512 Magazine St., 373-6413 — Jewelry by Vicki,

paintings by Peter Drasutis and furniture by Whilite Design, through March. LE PETIT SALON DE NEW ORLEANS. 906 Royal St., 524-5700 — Paintings by Holly Sarre,

ongoing.

LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia St., 522-5988; www.lemieuxgalleries.com — “Confluence,” works

by Kathryn Hunter, through April 16.

LOUISIANA CRAFTS GUILD. 608 Julia St., 558-6198; www.louisianacrafts.org — Group show featuring works from guild members, ongoing. MARTINE CHAISSON GALLERY. 727 Camp St., 304-7942; www. martinechaissongallery.com —

“Altered States,” works by Herman Mhire, through April 23.

MICHALOPOULOS GALLERY. 617 Bienville St., 558-0505; www. michalopoulos.com — Paint-

ings by James Michalopoulos, ongoing.

MICHELLE Y WILLIAMS GALLERY. 835 Julia St., 585-1945; www. michelleywilliams.com — Works by Michelle Y. Williams, ongoing. NEW ORLEANS ARTWORKS. 727 Magazine St., 529-7279 — “The

Saints Go Green,” works by Chad Ridgeway, Teri Walker, Carol Rivers, Tish Douzart and Pamela Conway Caruso, through March 30.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 22 > 2011

Look at the Flower,” paintings, ceramics and photographs by gallery artists, through Saturday.

BERGERON STUDIO & GALLERY. 406 Magazine St., 522-7503; www.bergeronstudio.com —

jonschooler.com — “Subliminal WOWs,” paintings by Jon Schooler, ongoing.

55

ART

LISTINGS

NEWCOMB ART GALLERY. Woldenberg Art Center, Tulane University, 865-5328; www. newcombartgallery.tulane. edu — “Reflections on Water in American Painting,” through April 24. OAK STREET GALLERY. 111 N. Oak St., Hammond, (985) 345-0521 — “Cuba on my Mind,” photographs by Katie Wainwright and Denise Tullier-Holly, through April. OCTAVIA ART GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www. octaviaartgallery.com — “An Earthly Paradise,” works by Stefan Szczesny, through Saturday. ONE SUN GALLERY. 616 Royal St., (800) 501-1151 — Works by local

and national artists, ongoing.

PEARL ART GALLERY. 4421 Magazine St., 228-5840 — Works by Cindy and Drue Hardegree, Erica Dewey, John Womack, Sontina, Lorraine Jones and S. Lee, ongoing. PHOTO WORKS NEW ORLEANS. 521 St. Ann St., 593-9090; www. photoworksneworleans.com — Photography by Louis Sahuc, ongoing. REINA GALLERY. 4132 Magazine St., 895-0022; www.reinaart. com — “Vintage New Orleans

Artists,” watercolors, etchings and folk art; “Patron Saints,” works by Shelley Barberot; both ongoing.

RHINO CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS COMPANY. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www.rhinocrafts.com — Kathleen Grumich, Vitrice

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 22 > 2011

McMurry, Deborah Morrissey, Cathy DeYoung and others, ongoing.

56

RIVERSTONE GALLERIES. 719 Royal St., 412-9882; 729 Royal St., 581-3688; Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 36, 566-0588; 733 Royal St., 525-9988; www. riverstonegalleries.net — Multi-

media works by Ricardo Lozano, Michael Flohr, Henry Ascencio, Jaline Pol and others, ongoing. RODRIGUE STUDIO. 721 Royal St., 581-4244; www.georgerodrigue.com — Works by George

Rodrigue, ongoing.

san O’Brien, through March 30.

Moreau; both ongoing.

ST. TAMMANY ART ASSOCIATION. 320 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-8650; www.sttammanyart.org — Pho-

BACCHANAL. 600 Poland Ave., 948-9111; www.bacchanalwine. com — “Coming Home: 2005-

tographs by Robert Dutruch, through April 9.

STELLA JONES GALLERY. Place St. Charles, 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 132, 568-9050 — “Losing My

Religion, Choosing My Confessions,” mixed media by Charly Palmer, through March.

STEVE MARTIN STUDIO. 624 Julia St., 566-1390; www.stevemartinfineart.com — Contemporary sculpture and paintings by Steve Martin and other Louisiana artists, ongoing. STUDIO BFG. 2627 Desoto St., 942-0200; www.studiobfg.com — “Peel Sessions: First Install-

ment,” works by Tina Stanley, ongoing.

STUDIO GALLERY. 338 Baronne St., Third Floor, 529-3306 — Works

by YA/YA artists, ongoing.

THOMAS MANN GALLERY I/O. 1812 Magazine St., 581-2113; www. thomasmann.com — “Where’s

the Money?” group exhibit interpreting the economy, ongoing.

TRIPOLO GALLERY. 401 N. Columbia St., (985) 893-1441 — Works

by Bill Binnings, Robert Cook, Donna Duffy, Scott Ewen, Juli Juneau, Kevin LeBlanc, Ingrid Moses, Gale Ruggiero, Robert Seago and Scott Upton, ongoing.

UNO-ST. CLAUDE GALLERY. 2429 St. Claude Ave. — “Dual Tense,”

works by Robyn Denny; “Functional for your Purpose,” works by Jason Derouin; both through April 3. VENUSIAN GARDENS ART GALLERY. 2601 Chartres St., 943-7446; www.venusiangardens.com —

“Luminous Sculpture,” works by Eric Ehlenberger, ongoing.

VIEUX CARRE GALLERY. 507 St. Ann St., 522-2900; www.vieuxcarregallery.com — Works by Sarah

Stiehl, through May 15.

VINCENT MANN GALLERY. 305 Royal St., 523-2342; www.vincentmanngallery.com — Paintings by Jacob Manguno and Luc Didier, through May 7.

2009,” photographs by Lee Celano, ongoing.

BELLA NOLA. 4236 Magazine St., 897-9499; www.bellanola. net — Paintings by Mario Ortiz,

ongoing.

BUD’S BROILER. 500 City Park Ave., 486-2559 — Works by

Andrew Bascle, Evelyn Menge and others, ongoing.

CAMPBELL’S COFFEE & TEA. 516 S. Tyler St., Covington, (985) 2466992; www.campbellscoffee. com — Multimedia works by

Margaux Hymel, ongoing.

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR. 5535 Tchoupitoulas St., 891-8500; www.dosjefescigarbar.com — Works by Mario Ortiz, ongoing. DRISCOLL ANTIQUES. 8500 Oak St., 866-7795; www.driscollantiques.com — Works by Sandra

Horstman Roberts, ongoing.

FUEL. 4807 Magazine St., 8955757; www.fuelcoffeehouse. net — Watercolors laminated

onto wood by William Smith, ongoing.

HAZELNUT NEW ORLEANS. 5515 Magazine St., 891-2424; www. hazelnutneworleans.com —

Photography by Roy Barloga, ongoing.

HI-HO LOUNGE. 2239 St. Claude Ave., 945-4446; www.hiholounge.net — Works by Robin Durand, Brad Edelman, Tara Eden, Eden Gass and others, ongoing. INTERIORS AND IMPORTS. 813 Florida St., Mandeville, (985) 624-7903 — Paintings by Annie

Strack, ongoing.

INTERNATIONAL HOUSE. 221 Camp St., 553-9550; www.ihhotel. com — Paintings by YA/YA se-

nior guild and alumni, ongoing.

JAX BREWERY. 600 Decatur St., 299-7163 — Works by YA/YA

youth artists, ongoing.

JW MARRIOTT NEW ORLEANS. 614 Canal St., Suite 4, 525-6500; www.marriott.com — Works by

Charlene Insley, ongoing.

work, ongoing.

WMSJR. 1061 Camp St., 299-9455; www.wmsjr.com — Paintings by

Will Smith, ongoing.

LIBERTY’S KITCHEN. 422 1/2 S. Broad St., 822-4011 — Paintings on canvas by YA/YA artists, ongoing.

RUSTY PELICAN ART. 4031 St. Claude Ave., 218-5727; www. rustypelicanart.com — Works by

A WORK OF ART GALLERY. 8212 Oak St., 862-5244 — Glass works

LIZANO’S GLASS HAUS. 3400 Cleary Ave., Suite B, Metairie, 4541144 — Fused-glass works by

ROSETREE GLASS STUDIO & GALLERY. 446 Vallette St., Algiers Point, 366-3602; www.rosetreeglass.com — Hand-blown glass

Travis and Lexi Linde, ongoing.

SALONE DELL’ARTES ARTEMISIA. 3000 Royal St., 481-5113 — “I

Genti H2O,” works by Shmuela Padnos, ongoing.

SHEILA’S FINE ART STUDIO. 1427 N. Johnson St., 473-3363; www. sheilaart.com — Works by Sheila

Phipps, ongoing.

SOREN CHRISTENSEN GALLERY. 400 Julia St., 569-9501; www. sorengallery.com — “Ms. Informed: An Homage to Women Who Have Changed History,” ceramic work by Su-

by Juli Juneau; photographs from the New Orleans Photo Alliance; both ongoing.

ZEITGEIST MULTI-DISCIPLINARY ARTS CENTER. 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net — “Analog Fron-

tiers,” a collection of steampunk art curated by Theodora Eliezer, through March.

SPARE SPACES ALVAR LIBRARY. 913 Alvar St., 596-2667 — “Youth,” sculpture

by Betty Petri; “The Solitary Chair,” sculpture by Michael

Paulette Lizano, ongoing.

LOST LOVE LOUNGE. 2529 Dauphine St., 949-2009; www. lostlovelounge.com — New

Orleans Community Printshop exhibition, through March.

MCKEOWN’S BOOKS AND DIFFICULT MUSIC. 4737 Tchoupitoulas St., 895-1954 — “The Book

of Kells, Revisited,” encaustic paintings by Patricia Kaschalk, ongoing.

METAIRIE PARK COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL. 300 Park Road, Metairie, 837-5204; www.mpcds. com — “The Unconventional

Portrait,” works by Mark Bercier, David Halliday, Gina Phillips and Alexander Stolin, ongoing. MOJO COFFEE HOUSE. 1500 Magazine St., 525-2244; www. myspace.com/mojoco — Photographs by Marc Pagani, ongoing. NEOPHOBIA. 2855 Magazine St., 899-2444; www.neophobianola.com — Works by Tanner,

ongoing.

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE. 5110 Danneel St., 8913381; www.neutralground.org —

Work by local artists, ongoing. NEW ORLEANS CAKE CAFE & BAKERY. 2440 Chartres St., 9430010 — Oil landscapes of the

Ustabes by Will Smith, ongoing.

PEACHES RECORDS. 408 N. Peters St., 282-3322 — “Gospel and

Blues,” photographs by Rita Posselt, ongoing.

SOUND CAFE. 2700 Chartres St., 947-4477 — Mixed-media paint-

ings by YA/YA alumnus Gerard Caliste, ongoing.

pleasure club artifacts, ongoing. CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER. 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www. cacno.org — “As We See It:

Youth Vision Quilt,” studentcreated quilt with more than 400 patches, ongoing.

GERMAN-AMERICAN CULTURAL CENTER. 519 Huey P. Long Ave., Gretna, 363-4202; www.gaccnola.com — Museum exhibits

depict the colonial experience, work, culture and religion of German immigrants.

GREAT AMERICAN ALLIGATOR MUSEUM. 2051 Magazine St., 5235525 — The museum features

fossils, taxidermy, folk art, kitsch, Americana and more.

HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION. 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www.hnoc.org — “Drawn to

Life: Al Hirschfeld and the Theater of Tennessee Williams,” drawings by Hirschfeld, through April 2. “In Search of Julien Hudson: Free Artist of Color in Pre-Civil War New Orleans,” through April 20.

SURREY’S CAFE & JUICE BAR. 1418 Magazine St., 524-3828; www. surreyscafeandjuicebar.com — Watercolor, pen and ink series of New Orleans landmarks by Will Smith, ongoing.

LONGUE VUE HOUSE AND GARDENS. 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue.com — “All

THREE MUSES. 536 Frenchmen St., 298-8746; www.thethreemuses. com — Portraits by Zack Smith,

LOUISIANA FILM MUSEUM. Montrel’s Bistro, 1000 N. Peters St., 524-4747; www.louisianafilmmuseum.org — The museum

ongoing.

CALL FOR ARTISTS ANTENNA GALLERY. The gallery seeks work that uses, recreates or interprets meaning from the artist’s childhood artwork for a May exhibition. Email nataliemclaurin@gmail.com for details. Submission deadline is April 20. COLD DRINK PRINTMAKING INVITATIONAL. Du Mois Gallery,

4921 Freret St., 818-6032 — The gallery accepts submissions for the exhibition juried by New Orleans Museum of Art modern and contemporary art curator Miranda Lash. Email dumoisgallery@gmail.com for details. Submission deadline is March.

MUSEUMS AMERICAN-ITALIAN MUSEUM & RESEARCH LIBRARY. 537 S. Peters St., 522-7294 — Permanent

exhibits of jazz artists, a St. Joseph’s altar replica, the Louisiana Italian-American Sports Hall of Fame and a research library with genealogy records.

ASHE CULTURAL ARTS CENTER. 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — “Ashe in Retrospect: 19982008,” photographs by Morris Jones Jr., Eric Waters, Jeffrey Cook and others, ongoing. BACKSTREET CULTURAL MUSEUM. 1116 St. Claude Ave.; www.backstreetmuseum.org —

Permanent exhibits of Mardi Gras Indian suits, jazz funeral memorabilia and social aid and

That Glitters,” an exhibition of Carnival jewelry, through April 12.

features props, costumes, video clips, still photographs, posters and other exhibits from major films produced in Louisiana.

LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM PRESBYTERE. 751 Chartres St., 568-6968; www.lsm.crt.state. la.us — “Before During After,”

photographs illustrating the impact of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, through August. “Living With Hurricanes: Katrina and Beyond,” an exhibition of stories, artifacts and science displays; “It’s Carnival Time in Louisiana,” Carnival artifacts, costumes, jewelry and others items; both ongoing.

LOUISIANA SUPREME COURT MUSEUM. Louisiana Supreme Court, 400 Royal St., 310-2149; www.lasc.org — The Supreme

Court of Louisiana Historical Society sponsors the museum’s exhibitions of the people and institutions that have contributed to the development of Louisiana law for 300 years. MAIN LIBRARY. 219 Loyola Ave., 529-7323; www.nutrias. org — “Hidden from History: Unknown New Orleanians,” photographs of the city’s working poor, ongoing. MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN COCKTAIL. 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.museumoftheamericancocktail. org — “Absinthe Visions,”

photographs by Damian Hevia, ongoing. NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM. 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — “Ours To Fight For: American

Jews in the Second World War,” an exhibit on loan from the Museum of Jewish Heritage, through April 24. NEW ORLEANS AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM. 1418 Gov. Nicholls St., 566-1136; www.noaam.com — “The American Dream,” the

National Conference of Artists’ Martin Luther King Jr. art exhibition honoring Dr. Margaret Burroughs, through Saturday. “Photography as a Healing Art,” photographs by Jim Belfon, through April 2. “Drapetomania: A Disease Called Freedom,” 18th- and 19th-century documents and artifacts about slavery from the Derrick Beard Collection, through May 28.

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma. org — “Residents and Visitors:

20th Century Photographs of Louisiana,” a collaboration with the Historic New Orleans Collection, through Sunday. “The Sound of One Hand: Painting and Calligraphy by Zen Monk Hakuin,” through April 17. “Lofty Ideals: Selections of Nineteenth-Century French Sculpture from the Permanent Collection,” through April 24. “Different Strokes for Different Folks: Glass Works from Harter, Jastremski and Sawyer Gifts,” through May 15. “Peter Carl Faberge and Other Russian Masters,” permanent collection of Faberge objects; “Six Shooters,” photographs from the New Orleans Photo Alliance; both ongoing. NEW ORLEANS PHARMACY MUSEUM. 514 Chartres St., 5658027; www.pharmacymuseum. org — Exhibits on 19th-century

pharmacy, medicine and health care, all ongoing. OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART. 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — “Big-

Hearted Pots,” ceramic pots by Mark Hewitt; “North Carolina Craft Now,” an exhibition by the Center for Southern Craft and Design, through April 10. “A Life in Glass,” glass vessels by Richard Ritter; “Selections from ‘Partial to Home,’” photographs by Birney Imes, through April 15.

SOUTHERN FOOD & BEVERAGE MUSEUM. Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood. org — “Acadian to Cajun: Forced

Migration to Commercialization,” a multimedia exhibit; “Laissez Faire — Savoir Fare,” the cuisine of Louisiana and New Orleans; “Eating in the White House — America’s Food”; “Tout de Sweet,” an exhibit exploring all aspects of the sugar industry in the South; all ongoing.

TULANE UNIVERSITY. Joseph Merrick Jones Hall, 6823 St. Charles Ave. — “Treme: People and Places,” maps, architectural drawings and photographs celebrating the bicentennial of Faubourg Treme, through Nov. 30.

LISTINGS

GET IN ON THE ACT

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

THEATER 6X6. Le Chat Noir, 715 St.

Charles Ave., 581-5812; www. cabaretlechatnoir.com — Six playwrights get a topic and one week to write a 10-minutelong play. Tickets $10. 7:30 p.m. Wednesday.

ALIENS, IMMIGRANTS AND OTHER EVILDOERS. Xavier Uni-

versity, University Center Auditorium, 1 Drexel Drive, 486-7411; www.xula.edu — Jose TorresTama’s bilingual “sci-fi Latino noir” depicts the struggles of immigrants by satirizing their status as “aliens.” Free admission. 7:30 p.m. Thursday. CLOSER. AllWays Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www. marignytheatre.org — The lives and relationships of four strangers intertwine in Patrick Marber’s Tony Award-winning portrait of modern love and betrayal. Tickets $15 general admission, $10 students/seniors. 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 6 p.m. Sunday through March 27. A DIFFERENT WOMAN: A TRUE STORY OF A TEXAS CHILDHOOD.

DR. HORRIBLE’S SING-ALONG BLOG. Tulane University, McWil-

liams Hall, 6823 St. Charles Ave., 865-5105 ext. 2; www.neworleansshakespeare.com — Joss Whedon’s musical tragicomedy tells the story of Dr. Horrible, an aspiring supervillain; Captain Hammer, his nemesis; and Penny, their mutual love interest. Free admission. 8 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Saturday.

FANTASTIC MISTER FOX. Con-

temporary Arts Center, 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www. cacno.org — Roald Dahl’s adventure comes to life with twisting cardboard tunnels, allowing audiences to crawl through the multi-media production’s sets. Tickets $20. Runs through April 3. Days and times vary; visit the CAC website for details.

GYPSY. Cutting Edge Theater at

Attractions Salon, 747 Robert Blvd., Slidell, (985) 290-0760; www.cuttingedgeproductions. org — The musical based on

the memoirs of burlesque dancer Gypsy Rose Lee focuses on her and her sister’s childhood with their overbearing stage mother. Tickets $18.50. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday through April 9. HEDWIG AND THE ANGRY INCH.

Backyard Ballroom, 3519 St. Claude Ave., 945-9936; www. frontmanshow.com — The musical tells the story of an East German rock ’n’ roll star who was the victim of a botched sex-change operation. Email skinhorsetheater@gmail.com or visit www.skinhorsetheater. org for details. Tickets $10. 8 p.m. Thursday-Friday, midnight Saturday through April 9. MAMA DRAMA. Actor’s Theatre of New Orleans, WTIX-FM Building, second floor, 4539 N. I-10 Service Road, Metairie, 4564111 — The show is a collection of vignettes about the joys, trials and tribulations of being a mother. Tickets $20 general admission, $18 students and seniors. 7:30 p.m. ThursdaySaturday, 2:30 p.m. Sunday through April 2. MARRERO ACTION. Anthony

Bean Community Theater, 1333 S. Carrollton Ave., 862-7529; www.anthonybeantheater. com — Hal Clark’s play follows a man whose father’s stroke prompts him to return to New Orleans for the first time in 12 years. Tickets $20 general admission, $18 students and seniors. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday. MARRIAGE CAN BE MURDER.

Le Cafe De Bon Temps, 40261 Hwy. 190 East, Slidell — The comedic murder-mystery takes place at a wedding and reception, which turns sour after someone kills a mother-in-law. Reservations are required. Tickets $50 (includes dinner). 6 p.m. Sunday. ON THE AIR. Stage Door Canteen at The National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 528-1944 — Bob Edes Jr., Gary Rucker and others star in the stage musical that pays tribute to the heyday of radio broadcasts. Call 528-1943 or visit www.stagedoorcanteen.org for details. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 11 a.m. Sunday through June 26. SECONDARY CAUSE OF DEATH.

Rivertown Repertory Theatre, 325 Minor St., Kenner, 468-7221 — The play is Peter Gordon’s sequel to the comedic murdermystery Murdered to Death, a satirical whodunit set in England. Tickets $30 general admission, $28 seniors and students, $15 children. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2:30 p.m. Sunday through April 3. THE SECRET GARDEN.

NOCCA|Riverfront Lupin Hall, 2800 Chartres St., 940-2787; www.nocca.com — NOCCA students perform the play, based on Frances Hodgson Burnett’s novel about a girl who creates an imaginary

world of her own after her parents die of cholera. Tickets $15. 7 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Saturday. THE SOUND OF MUSIC. Jefferson

Performing Arts Center, 400 Phlox St., Metairie, 885-2000; www.jpas.org — A nun leaves the convent to serve as governess for the children of a strict widower in Rodgers and Hammerstein’s musical. Tickets $15-$35. 7:30 p.m. Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday through April 3.

THREE ONE-ACT PLAYS BY TENNESSEE WILLIAMS. Southern

Rep Theater, The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 522-6545; www.southernrep. com — The theater hosts world premieres of Tennessee Williams’ one-acts The Pretty Trap, The Magic Tower and Every Twenty Minutes. Tickets $25. A performance 8 p.m. Wednesday benefits the Tennessee Williams/New Orleans Literary Festival, and tickets are $100. Visit www.tennesseewilliams.net for tickets for that show only. 8 p.m. Thursday and Saturday-Sunday, then 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday through April 3.

YOU CAN’T TAKE IT WITH YOU.

Playmakers Theater, 19106 Playmakers Road (off Lee Road), Covington, (985) 893-1671; www.playmakersinc.com — George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart’s Pulitzer Prize-winning play follows two star-crossed lovers during the Depression. Tickets $15 general admission, $10 students. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday through April 3.

BURLESQUE & CABARET BURLESQUE BALLROOM. Irvin

Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse, 300 Bourbon St., 553-2270; www. sonesta.com — Trixie Minx stars in the weekly burlesque show featuring the music of Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown. Call 553-2331 for details. 11:50 p.m. Friday.

9070 or 239-0126 for details. 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Friday.

review Enema of the People New Orleans entertainer Varla Jean Merman (the concoction of singer/comedian Jeffery Roberson) made a three-night stop at Le Chat Noir last week with her new show The Loose Chanteuse. “Loose” it was — much of the monologue between songs was improvised as she chatted with the audience — but there was plenty of “chanteuse” as well (Roberson is a classically trained singer whose next project is an off-Broadway musical). Merman pushed the usual drag-queen humor in a few interesting directions, one of the best of which was a true story about how she, while sleepwalking, promised to buy a neighbor’s Marigny house … a story which segued into “Ambien,” a clever rewrite of Elvis Costello’s “Alison.” And her act nearly approached performance art when she sang a mashup of Mozart’s The Magic Flute with Lady Gaga and Beyonce’s “Telephone” while accompanying herself on an ocarina iPhone app. There were occasional missteps — a little less conversation would have been good, and it was hard to make out many of the lyrics from a gangsta-rap rewrite of “My Favorite Things” — but overall this was a nicely twisted oneman show. The Loose Chanteuse was underwritten by a personal-hygiene company (yes, really), which inspired not only a song about inner freshness but gave Merman the chance to play Oprah. “And you get an enema … and you get an enema!” she squealed, as assistants came from backstage to distribute a box of enemas to each lucky audience member. (The gift gave new meaning to “loose chanteuse.”) After the show, Merman stood at the door to sign each box, providing one of the best sights of the night: Uptown matrons toddling down St. Charles Avenue to the parking lot, each clutching an autographed enema. — Kevin Allman

OFF OFF BROADZWAY. Shadow-

box Theatre, 2400 St. Claude Ave., 523-7469; www.theshadowboxtheatre.com — The Chicago-based parody burlesque troupe performs their sketch comedy revue “Kinda Big and Really Easy.” Tickets $12. 11 p.m. Friday-Saturday.

RICK GRAHAM’S 2011 RENEW REVUE. Le Chat Noir, 715 St. Charles

Ave., 581-5812; www.cabaretlechatnoir.com — The annual cabaret show celebrating life in New Orleans features Yvette Hargis, Amanda Zirkenbach, Matthew Mickal and Jefferson Turner. Tickets $32 (includes $5 drink credit). Mystic Krewe of Satyricon performance 8 p.m. March 18 (call 525-4498 for that performance only; tickets are $30). 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 6 p.m. Sunday through April 3.

AUDITIONS

www.crescentcitysound.com for details. 7 p.m. Monday.

BARBERSHOP HARMONY SOCIETY. Christ the King Lutheran

NEW ORLEANS BURLESQUE FESTIVAL. Burlesque dancers

Church, 1001 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 469-4740; www.ctknola.org — The Greater New Orleans Chapter holds new member auditions for its Mardi Gras Chorus. Call 363-9001 or visit www.mardigraschorus.org for details. 7:15 p.m. Tuesday.

CRESCENT CITY SOUND CHORUS.

Delgado Community College, City Park campus, Orleans Avenue, between City Park Avenue and Navarre Street; www.dcc. edu — The women’s chorus holds weekly auditions for new members. Call 453-0858 or visit

(men and women), singers, comics, magicians, contortionists, duos, troupes, novelty and other variety acts are sought for the September festival. Email neworleansburlesque@ yahoo.com or visit www. neworleansburlesquefest. com for details. There is a $15 application fee. Application deadline is April 25.

THE VAGINA MONOLOGUES.

Ashe Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 5699070; www.ashecac.org — The center seeks women to perform in the April 16 production of Eve Ensler play. Call 569-

COMEDY A.S.S.TRONOTS. La Nuit Comedy

Theater, 5039 Freret St., 6444300; www.nolacomedy.com — Four androids improvise a space voyage based on audience suggestions. Tickets $6. 8:30 p.m. Thursday.

BASED ON REAL LIFE. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — The weekly long-form improv comedy show features some guys, a girl and someone named John Stewart. Tickets $6. 8:30 p.m. Saturday. BROWN! IMPROV COMEDY.

City Bar, 3515 Hessmer Ave., 309-5325; www.citybarnola. com — The comedy troupe stars Johnathan Christiansen, Gant Laborde, Ken Lafrance, Bob Murrell and Kelli Rosher. Visit www.brownimprovcomedy.com for details. 8:30 p.m. Saturday.

COMEDY CATASTROPHE. Lost Love Lounge, 2529 Dauphine St., 949-2009; www. lostlovelounge.com — The bar hosts a free weekly stand-up comedy show. 9 p.m. Tuesday. COMEDY GUMBEAUX. Howlin’ Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf. com — Local comedians perform, and amateurs take the stage in the open mic portion. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Thursday. COMEDY OPEN-MIC. La Nuit

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts a weekly open-mic comedy night. (Sign-up time is 10:45 p.m.) Tickets $8. 11 p.m. Friday.

COMEDY SPORTZ NOLA. La Nuit

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — The theater hosts a safe-for-all-ages team comedy competition. Tickets $10. 7 p.m. Friday-Saturday.

DYKES OF HAZARD. Rubyfruit Jungle, 1135 Decatur St., 5711863; www.myspace.com/ rubyfruitjunglenola — Kristen Becker hosts a weekly comedy show with live music, sketch comedy, burlesque and more. Admission $5. 9 p.m. Friday. FEAR & LOATHING IN NEW ORLEANS. La Nuit Comedy Theater,

5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The sketch comedy show boasts vampires, zombies, relationship advice and other horrors. 8:30 p.m. Fridays.

FRIDAY NIGHT LAUGHS. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — Jackie Jenkins Jr. hosts the open-mic comedy show. Free admission. 11 p.m. Friday. GOD’S BEEN DRINKING. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — Actors improvise a comedy based on audience

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 22 > 2011

Shadowbox Theatre, 2400 St. Claude Ave., 523-7469; www. theshadowboxtheatre.com — The play is an adaptation of schoolteacher Gertrude Beasley’s controversial 1925 autobiography, which is an unflinching look at her life in a cycle of abuse and poverty. Tickets $15. 8 p.m. Thursday and Saturday-Sunday.

STAGE

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LISTINGS

suggestions. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Friday. GROUND ZERO COMEDY.

The Maison, 508 Frenchmen St., 371-5543; www.maisonfrenchmen.com — The show features local stand-up comedians. Sign-up is 7:30 p.m; show is 8 p.m. Friday. IVAN’S OPEN MIC NIGHT. Rusty

Nail, 1100 Constance St., 5255515; www.therustynail.org — The Rusty Nail hosts a weekly open-mic comedy and music night. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

LA NUIT STAND-UP OPEN MIC.

La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts an open mic following the God’s Been Drinking show. 11 p.m. Friday. LAUGH OUT LOUD. Bootleggers Bar and Grille, 209 Decatur St., 525-1087 — Simple Play presents a weekly comedy show. 10 p.m. Thursday. NATIONAL COMEDY COMPANY.

Yo Mama’s Bar & Grill, 727 St. Peter St., 522-1125 — The interactive improv comedy show features B97 radio personality Stevie G, Lynae LeBlanc, Jay Tombstone, Richard Mayer and others. Call 523-7469 or visit www.nationalcomedycompany.com for tickets. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Saturday.

PERMANENT DAMAGE STANDUP COMEDY. Bullets Sports Bar,

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 22 > 2011

2441 A.P. Tureaud Ave., 9484003 — Tony Frederick hosts the open mic comedy show. 8 p.m. Wednesday.

RAHN RAMEY & ALDO. Boomtown Casino, Boomers Saloon, 4132 Peters Road, Harvey, 3667711; www.boomtownneworleans.com — The stand-up comedians perform. Free admission. 8 p.m. Wednesday.

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ROUNDHOUSE. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — Comedians perform a barefoot, long-form improvisation show. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Friday.

Sidney’s, 1674 Barataria Blvd., Marrero, 341-0103 — The show features professional, amateur and first-time comics. Free admission. Sign-up is 8 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Thursday.

STUPID TIME MACHINE. The Factory, 8314 Oak St. — The improv group performs a weekly comedy show. Audiences are asked to bring their own chairs. Tickets $1-$6. 8:30 p.m. Tuesday. THINK YOU’RE FUNNY? Carrollton Station, 8140 Willow St., 865-9190; www.carrolltonstation.com — The weekly open-mic comedy showcase is open to all comics. Sign-up is 8:30 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Wednesday.

review Documented Immigration Illegal aliens and Sesame Street? What’s the connection? Carlo Alban explains in his one-man show Intringulis. His family came to the United States from Ecuador when he was 7 years old. The parents and two of their children entered on a tourist visa and stayed, which began Carlo’s life as an outlaw — and an undocumented worker who nonetheless appeared on Sesame Street and other shows. Dressed casually in jeans and a black T-shirt, Alban appears on a nearly empty stage. There are two guitars, some steps and a large framed glass window. A projection screen in the rear features Alban family photos and song translations during the performance. Alban played guitar and sang with spirit, and the songs had a way of highlighting his struggle to fit in. Part of the struggle was financial, and at one point, using the window like a chalkboard, he presented a calculation of the amount his family spent over more than a dozen years to become full citizens. Money went to applications, fees, bureaucrats and even a bribe. Furthermore, undocumented immigrants pay taxes but they don’t get credit for contributing to Social Security because their numbers are false. Throughout the piece there was a sense of irony. At one point, Alban was terrified because his papers were not in order, but the projector that was supposed to display them was broken, so he squeaked by. He offered an amusing anecdote about a demonstration at the equator: Supposedly a basin placed directly over the equator drains water straight down. If the bowl is moved 2 feet to the north, the water swirls clockwise. If it’s moved two feet south of the equator, the water swirls counterclockwise. Amazing! Except, as Alban tells us, this is all a scam to sell tickets to tourists. In reality, the tour director secretly tilts the sink one way or other. There are much more ominous themes. A brother who stayed in Ecuador comes to visit. Carlo realizes he and his brother have become estranged over time and distance. Whether or not he’s legal, his new home has changed his point of view. The show was aptly directed by David Anzuelo. Robert Kaplowitz handled sound design. — Dalt Wonk

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EVENTS

LISTINGS

plus food and drinks from the restaurant. Admission starts at $100. Visit www.kidstherapyzone.org for details. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. AN EDIBLE EVENING. Samuel

J. Green Charter School, 2319 Valence St., 896-4086 — The Edible School Yard New Orleans’ fundraising event is a garden party at ESY’s flagship school site, and it features food from local restaurants, drinks and a silent auction. Tickets start at $45. Call 267-9053 or visit www.esynola.org for details. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

IRON RAIL LADIES’ NIGHT. The

Iron Rail, 511 Marigny St., 9480963; www.ironrail.org — Iron Rail offers a weekly creative space for women. Email ladiesnight.ironrail@gmail.com for details. 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.

LE CLUB DE LECTURE POUR TOUS.

St. Tammany Parish Library, Covington Branch, 310 W. 21st Ave., Covington, (985) 893-6280; www.sttammany.lib.la.us/ covington.html — The group for those who speak and read French provides a language immersion experience through reading and discussing books. 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

LOUISIANA CRAWFISH & REDFISH CUP FESTIVAL . Sidney

D. Torres Memorial Park, Jean Lafitte Parkway, Chalmette — The event features food, music, rides and more. Call 329-6411 for details. Thursday-Sunday.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 22 > 2011

SISTAHS MAKING A CHANGE .

64

Ashe Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 5699070; www.ashecac.org — The group offers lessons in African dance and more, along with nutrition, health and wellness seminars. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday and Monday.

Friday 25 FISH FRYDAYS. Our Lady of the

Rosary Church, 1322 Moss St., 488-2659 — The church hosts weekly fish fry events during Lent. Visit www.fsjna.org for details. 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.

IN EXCHANGE ETHICAL FASHION SHOW. Republic New Orleans,

828 S. Peters St., 528-8282; www.republicnola.com — IN Exchange, the nonprofit store at Tulane University, hosts a fashion show featuring the store’s fair-trade apparel. Big History and Royal Teeth perform, and the event features free drinks from 9 p.m. to 10 p.m. Call (860) 966-6363 or email erica.trani@gmail.com for details. Admission $8 in advance, $10 at the door. 9 p.m. NEW ORLEANS ROADFOOD FESTIVAL. Cooks from Louisiana

and across the country will line Royal Street at the weekendlong event also featuring a kickoff party, a beignet-eating contest and more. Visit www. neworleansroadfoodfestival.com for details. Kickoff party Friday at the Southern

Food and Beverage Museum (1 Poydras St., 569-0405), street festival 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday, beignet-eating contest 1 p.m. Sunday. NEW ORLEANS SPRING FIESTA .

New Orleans Spring Fiesta Association, 826 St. Ann St., 581-1367; www.springfiesta. com — The New Orleans Spring Fiesta Association’s event features home and walking tours, a presentation of the Spring Fiesta queen and her court, a brunch at Commander’s Palace and other activities. Home tour admission $22 in advance, $25 day of event; walking tour admission $12 in advance, $15 day of event. Call 581-1367 or visit www.springfiesta.com for the schedule and other details. Friday-Sunday and April 2-3. PARANORMAL RESEARCH SOCIETY FIELD TRIP. Holiday Inn,

2261 N. Causeway, Metairie — The three-day event showcasing New Orleans’ paranormal history features the cast of A&E’s Paranormal State and authors Michelle Belanger and Nathan Robert Brown. Visit www.parafieldtrip.com for details. Tickets $50-$500. 12:30 p.m. Friday-Sunday.

SECRET GARDENS TOUR . The fundraiser benefiting brain injury recovery resources allows guests access to a variety of private gardens in the Uptown area. The event also features a boutique and live music. Call 838-3098 or visit www.secretgardenstour.org for details. Admission $60 guided tour, $25 self-guided tour. Guided tour 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday, self-guided tour 9 a.m. to 4 p.m Saturday. SMALL BUSINESS HELP SESSIONS.

City Hall, Conference Room 8E010, 421 Loyola Ave., 6589800; www.nola.gov — Assessor Erroll G. Williams hosts two free, one-hour question and answer sessions to help business owners fill out the LAT Personal Property self-reporting tax forms. Visit www.nolaassessor.com for details. 11 a.m. Friday and Monday. VINO ON THE BAYOU. Pitot

House, 1440 Moss St. — The event features wines from Cork & Bottle and a book signing by R. Stephanie Bruno. Tickets $5 Louisiana Landmarks Society Members, $10 general admission. 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

WHERE Y’ART. New Orleans

Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 6584100; www.noma.org — The museum’s weekly event features music, performances, film screenings, family-friendly activities and more. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Fridays.

Saturday 26 ABITA SPRINGS WHOLE TOWN GARAGE SALE & FLEA MARKET.

Abita Springs, Level Street —

Vendors feature everything from antiques, collectables, crafts, furniture, garden tools, food and more at the event. Call (985) 326-5437 or visit www.abitaboosterclub.com for details. 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. ACT PRACTICE TEST. West

Bank Regional Library, 2751 Manhattan Blvd., Harvey, 364-2660; www.jefferson.lib. la.us — Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions hosts a free ACT practice test session, at which students will receive their scores and detailed feedback. Call 1-800-KAP-TEST or visit www.kaptest.com/college for details. 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

DARWIN DAY. University of New Orleans, Homer L. Hitt Alumni Center, 2000 Lakeshore Drive — The annual celebration features several speakers discussing Darwinian topics. Free admission. 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. EAGLE WATCH. Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — A park ranger leads a viewing of the park’s eagle nest. 3 p.m. GREEN-IT-YOURSELF WORKSHOP.

Global Green Holy Cross Project, 409 Andry St.; www. globalgreen.org/neworleans — Demetria Christo of EcoUrban LLC discusses “Landscaping for the Rainy Season.” Call 525-2121 or email www.globalgreen.org/ bibg for details. Free admission. 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. LA GALERIE D’ABSINTHE OPENING PARTY. Southern Food

& Beverage Museum, Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www. southernfood.org — The party celebrates the opening of the museum’s collection of absinthe artifacts and ephemera with tastings of the formerly illegal spirit. Free with museum admission. 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. LE VERT TOUR . Young Leadership

Council, 840 Euterpe St., 585-1500; www.youngleadershipcouncil.org — The Young Leadership Council’s self-guided tour features 11 eco-friendly homes and local green organizations. Visit www.youngleadershipcouncil.org/site103.php for details. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

LOUISIANA DERBY DAY. Fair Grounds Race Course & Slots, 1751 Gentilly Blvd., 943-1415; www.fairgroundsracecourse. com — The Fair Grounds hosts a full day of happenings to celebrate the biggest horse-racing event in the state, including a trackside party, a free seminar and book signings. Admission $10 clubhouse, $5 grandstand. 9 a.m. LOUISIANA OYSTER JUBILEE . 300

block of Bourbon Street, French Quarter — The highlight of the event is the “Longest Oyster Po-Boy,” a po-boy stuffed with 5,500 Louisiana-harvested oysters. The event also includes a best oyster po-boy contest. Visit www.oysterjubilee.com for details. 10 a.m.

NATURE: A CLOSER LOOK .

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers lead a weekly nature hike. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION HOUSE PARTY.

First NBC Bank, 201 Baronne St. — The event features a Caribbean vacation giveaway and music by 4 by 4 Connection and ELS. Call 488-0155 or visit www.ndf-neworleans.org for details. Admission $80 patron party (6:30 p.m.), $60 gala (7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.)

NINTH WARD COMMUNITY GARDEN GRAND OPENING.

Ninth Ward Community Garden, 1301 Desire St., 390-7337; www.nolagreenroots.com — NOLA Green Roots presents the opening of its newest community garden at the event that features membership sign-ups and food. Reservations are recommended. 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.

OCHSNER FUN RUN AND RHYTHM & SOLE AFTER-PARTY.

Ochsner Medical Center, 1514 Jefferson Hwy., 842-3000; www.ochsner.org — Proceeds from the race, which starts at the Mississippi River levee behind the medical center, benefit Ochsner Pediatrics, the Nursing Educational Grant Fund and Competitive Sports Teams at Elmwood Fitness Center. The after-party features live music by the Top Cats, food and children’s activities. Visit www.ochsner. org/philanthropy for details. Admission $20. A TASTE OF NEW ORLEANS SILENT AUCTION. Cathedral

Montessori School, 9 Fortress Road, 606-1288; www. cathedralmontessori.com — The Parent’s Association of Cathedral Montessori School’s fundraiser for the school features a silent auction, food, drinks and live music. Admission $15 in advance, $20 at the door. 6 p.m.

TASTE OF THE LAKE. Lakeview Grocery, 801 Harrison Ave., 2931201; www.lakeviewgrocery.com — The event supporting recovery and beautification efforts in Lakeview features wine, beer, food from more than 30 restaurants and live music. Admission $40 in advance, $50 at the event. Visit www.lakeviewcivic. org, www.wgno.com or www. wnol.com for tickets. 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.

Sunday 27 CELEBRATION OF DISCOVERY: OH, THE PLACES YOU’LL GEAUX! .

Castine Center, Pelican Park, 63350 Pelican Drive, Mandeville, (985) 626-7997 — The fundraiser for the Children’s Museum of St. Tammany features live and silent auctions, food and drink from more than 40 restaurants, live entertainment and more. Admission $100. Email celebrationtickets@bellsouth.net for

details. 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. DOG DAY AFTERNOON. City

Park, 1 Palm Drive — The LA/ SPCA’s event is a dog walk-athon featuring music, food and specialty drinks from local restaurants, animal vendors and artists, dog obedience demos, contests and prizes. Call 7623307 or visit www.la-spca.org/ dogdayafternoon for details. 10:30 a.m.

JESUIT HIGH SCHOOL BLUE JAY BAZAAR . Jesuit High School,

4133 Banks St., 483-3816 — The bazaar features live entertainment, games, food booths and jewelry, liquor and cash raffles. Call 483-3947 for details. Free admission. 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. ONCE UPON A VINE . Pavilion of the Two Sisters, City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 482-4888 — Martin Wine Cellar’s annual event features more than 150 wines, a selection of cheeses, pates and charcuterie and live music. Call 899-7411, 896-7300 or visit www.martinwine.com for details. Admission $60. 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. PRIMITIVE WOODWORKING.

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers host a weekly demonstration of woodworking techniques. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

SPRING STAINED GLASS TOUR .

Center of Jesus the Lord, 1236 N. Rampart St. — The tour highlights architecture and stained glass art of four historic French Quarter churches. A reception follows the tour. Call 581-7032 or email aoberhelman@prcno. org for details. Admission $15 Preservation Resource Center members, $18 non-members, $20 day of tour. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Monday 28 MARTIN CHALFIE. Metairie Park Country Day School, 300 Park Road, Metairie, 837-5204; www.mpcds.com — The Nobel Laureate in Chemistry speaks as part of the Leah GoldmanKarp Lecture series. Call 8493113 or email calais_coulon@ mpcds.com for details. 7 p.m.

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS ARTS COUNCIL OF NEW ORLEANS GRANTS. The council awards

grants to support arts activities in Orleans, Jefferson and Plaquemines Parishes. Visit www.artscouncilofneworleans. org for details. Application deadline is April 27. NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM STUDENT ESSAY CONTEST. The museum seeks

essays on the topic “Why should we remember Pearl Harbor?” for the contest that awards a cash prize. The entry divisions are middle school (grades 5-8) and high school (grades 9-12). Essays are accepted online only. Visit

www.nationalww2museum. org/essaycontests for details. Submission deadline is March 31.

WORDS ANDRE PERRY. Maple Street

Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 8664916; www.maplestreetbookshop.com — The author signs and discusses The Garden Path: The Miseducation of a City. 6 p.m. Thursday.

BRIANNE GOULD. Angelo Brocato, 214 N. Carrollton Ave., 486-0078; www.angelobrocatoicecream.com — The author and actress signs her books. 3:30 p.m. Saturday. “DAYS OF OUR LIVES 45 YEARS: A CELEBRATION IN PHOTOS.”

Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 455-5135 — Cast members from the soap opera sign the book. 7 p.m. Thursday.

DOUGLAS BRINKLEY. Garden

District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The author discusses and signs The Quiet World : Saving Alaska’s Wilderness Kingdom, 1879-1960. 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Wednesday.

ED HASLAM . Barnes & Noble

Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 455-5135 — The author signs and discusses Me and Lee. 2 p.m. Sunday. The author also appears at Barnes & Noble Booksellers in Mandeville (3414 Hwy. 190, Suite 10, 985-6268884). 5 p.m. Monday.

LYNN BRYANT. Garden District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The author discusses and signs Catfish Alley. 1 p.m. Monday. MARK CHILDRESS. Garden District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The author discusses and signs Georgia Bottoms. 1 p.m. Saturday. PAMELA LEIGH STARR . CC’s

Coffeehouse, 2800 Esplanade Ave. — The author discusses Misconceptions. 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Saturday.

PASS IT ON . George & Leah McKenna Museum of African American Art, 2003 Carondelet St., 586-7432; www.themckennamuseum.com — Poet Gian “G-Persepect” Smith and Alphonse “Bobby” Smith host a weekly spoken-word and music event. Admission $6. 9 p.m. Saturday. VICTORIA COSNER LOVE & LORELEI SHANNON . Garden

District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The authors discuss and sign Mad Madame Lalaurie. 5:30 p.m. Thursday.

More listings: www.bestofneworleans.com.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Email Ian McNulty at imcnulty@cox.net. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> DIVERSIFIED MARKET <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Saturday, March 26, the Gretna Farmers Market hosts the > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >annual Gretna Jubilee, a culinary event benefiting four West < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <PUTTING < < < < < < <EVERYTHING < < < < < < < < < <ON < < <THE < < < TABLE < < < < < < < < < < < < < <Bank magnet schools. The event is a showcase for the diverse flavors of the West Bank with food provided by more than 30 local restaurants, including Pupuseria Divino Corazon, Pho Tau Bay, Gattuso’s and O’Brien’s Grille. Tickets include an open bar and entertainment by Kristin Diable and Bonerama perform. WHAT For details visit www.gretnajubilee.com. Little Chinatown

am

B

WHERE

3800 Williams Blvd., Kenner, 305-0580 WHEN

Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner daily HOW MUCH

Inexpensive

RESERVATIONS

Accepted

WHAT WORKS

FIVE SLURP-WORTHY MUSSEL DISHES 733 TOULOUSE ST., 528-9206 www.bistromaisondeville.com

Poached with a broth boasting alligator sausage and saffron.

CHECK, PLEASE

BOUCHERIE

Manager Judy Xhuo presents an array of Cantonese dishes at Little Chinatown.

8115 JEANNETTE ST., 862-5514 www.boucherie-nola.com

Hammy potlikker transforms the traditional dish.

CAFE DEGAS

3127 ESPLANADE AVE., 945-5635 www.cafedegas.com

A bistro classic with herbs and plenty of fennel.

PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

Dishes described as “salt toasted” turn out to be fried and practically tiled with minced garlic, green onions and jalapenos, and this also is true of the “salt and pepper” dishes. This robust seasoning mix is good when applied to large, shell-on shrimp or chicken wings, but better on squid and softshell crab, and it’s superlative on crisp quail, hacked into chunks and drizzled with lemon. In the same vein, dishes described as “blackened” aren’t cooked Cajun-style, but they are liberally flecked with black pepper, as in the case of a hot pot of beef short ribs in thick gravy sown with garlic. Soups are another specialty, and most are large enough to ladle out around the table. Roasted duck, tender pork dumplings, springy egg noodles, greens and a rich golden broth make up one particularly good example. Goat stew is full of flavor but also pretty crowded with bones and cartilage. One light vegetarian soup was served with puffed rice crackers, which are floated on top but fall apart in the broth as they get soggy. The menu is large and varied, and vegetarians will find a section all for themselves. Look at the specials board and you may also get the singular experience of sucking tiny, bean-sized snails from their shells — dozens and dozens to a plate — or twirling watercress from a salty pork broth. Non-Chinese guests sometimes have to ask for chopsticks here, but it would be hard to ask for a more satisfying spin through Cantonese cooking this close to home.

CLEMENTINE’S BELGIAN BISTRO

2505 WHITNEY AVE., GRETNA, 366-3995 www.bistrogallerie.com

Lobster bisque replaces broth for a decadent version.

IRIS

321 N. PETERS ST., 299-3944 www.irisneworleans.com

Smoked tomato and onion broth is heady and ambrosial.

Questions? Email winediva1@earthlink.net.

2008 Clean Coast Pinot Noir SONOMA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA $11-$14 RETAIL

Boutique winemaker Susie Selby hand-crafted this Pinot Noir from Sonoma County fruit. It offers red berry fruit aromas with floral and spice notes. On the palate, soft red cherry, raspberry and cranberry flavors dominate with hints of cassis and savory herbs leading to an acid-balanced finish. Drink it with salmon, tuna, oysters en brochette, mushroom dishes, roasted vegetables, roast fowl, game and light meats, and cheeses. A portion of sales is donated to the Greater New Orleans Foundation. Buy it at: Elio’s Wine Warehouse, Dorignac’s and Langenstein’s in Metairie. Drink it at: Bayona and Bouche. — Brenda Maitland

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 22 > 2011

T

IN

WHAT DOESN'T

BY IAN MCNULTY here’s no mistaking that Little Chinatown’s building along Williams Boulevard was once a Pizza Hut. The distinctively boxy roof design makes its franchise precursor plain enough, despite the new name and Chinese lantern decor around the doors. It’s just as obvious, however, that Little Chinatown is something quite different from your everyday Chinese restaurant. A banner outside proclaims “We Believe in Authentic Taste,” and upon entering, this promise is endorsed by a specials board marked by Chinese characters and brief but arresting translations like “snails with black beans” and “salt and pepper frog legs.” Then there are the steaming clay pots making the rounds at large tables populated by Chinese families and the steady stream of young people arriving after 9 p.m., even on weeknights, who banter in Chinese with the waiters and slurp endless strands of noodles between glugs of beer. Little Chinatown is the inverse of restaurants where a few authentic dishes lurk amid the standard Americanized fare. Here, it’s the sweet and sour pork and crab Rangoon that seem out of place, and they’re greatly outnumbered by dishes like whole steamed fish lashed with ginger or bowls of congee, a soupy rice porridge bolstered by bits of duck and pickled egg. The Cheng family, transplants from Hong Kong by way of New York City, opened Little Chinatown late in 2010 to showcase traditional Cantonese cooking. It’s fun to explore the menu, but it does require some decoding.

five 5

BISTRO AT THE MAISON DE VILLE

A Kenner newcomer serving compelling Cantonese cuisine

FINDING AUTHENTIC CANTONESE COOKING IN KENNER.

Chef Matt Murphy has left M Bistro (921 Canal St., 670-2828; www.ritzcarlton.com/neworleans), the flagship restaurant at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel which opened last year and was named in his honor. As executive chef, Murphy was in change of the hotel’s overall culinary operations. Murphy says he plans to “begin my own project and a new career path.” The hotel has not yet named his replacement. M Bistro continues to serve breakfast, lunch and dinner daily.

Soups, “salt toasted” dishes, seafood Scant menu descriptions spur guessing games

Hong Kong Calling

M WITHOUT THE MURPHY

65

>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<

YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT >>>>>>>>>

>>>> House specialties include fried < < < < < < <soft-shell < crab topped with Tong > > > > > > > >Cho > sauce, and Cantonese-style stir-fried alligator and mushrooms <<< in oyster sauce. Reservations ac>> cepted for large parties. Lunch and <dinner < daily. Credit cards. $$

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > > > > > > > > > > Out > > >2 >Eat > >is>an > >index > > >of> Gambit > > > > >contract > > > > >advertisers. > > > > > > >Unless > > > >noted, > > > >addresses > > > > > >are > >for > >New > > >Orleans. >>>>>>>>> Dollar signs represent the average cost of a dinner entree: $ — under $10; $$ — $11 to $20; $$$ — $21 or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax 483-3116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

AMERICAN FAT HEN GRILL — 1821 Hickory Ave.,

Harahan, 287-4581; www.fathengrill.com — Fat Hen serves barbecue, burgers and breakfast. Pitcooked barbecue options include St. Louis-style spare ribs. Burgers are made with all Black Angus beef ground in-house daily. There is a full bar. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BAR & GRILL DINO’S BAR & GRILL — 1128 Tchoupitoulas St., 558-0900 — Dino’s kitchen serves burgers, chicken tenders, salads and wraps. Happy hour is from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards and checks. $ THE RIVERSHACK TAVERN — 3449

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 22 > 2011

River Road, 834-4938; www.therivershacktavern.com — This bar and music spot offers a menu of burgers, sandwiches overflowing with deli meats and changing lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

66

SHAMROCK BAR & GRILL — 4133 S. Carrollton Ave., 301-0938 — Shamrock serves burgers, shrimp or roast beef po-boys, Reuben sandwiches, cheese sticks and fries with cheese or gravy. Other options include corned beef and cabbage, and fish and chips. No reservations. Dinner and late night daily. Credit cards. $

baked oysters and fried calamari with spicy marinara. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BURGERS

BUD’S BROILER — Citywide; www. budsbroiler.com — Bud’s Broiler is known for charcoal-broiled burgers topped with hickory-amoked sauce. The menus also includes hot dogs and chicken sandwiches. The Clearview Parkway and 24-hour City Park location also offer shrimp and catfish po-boys. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CAFE

CAFE FRERET — 7329 Freret St.,

861-7890; www.cafefreret.com — The cafe serves breakfast itemes like the Freret Egg Sandwich with scrambled eggs, cheese and bacon or sausage served on toasted white or wheat bread or an English muffin.Signature sandwiches include the Chef’s Voodoo Burger, muffuletta and Cuban po-boy. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Fri.-Wed., dinner Mon.-Wed., Fri.Sat. Credit cards. $$ LAKEVIEW BREW COFFEE CAFE —

5606 Canal Blvd., 483-7001 — This casual cafe offers gourmet coffees and a wide range of pastries and desserts baked in house, plus a menu of specialty sandwiches and salads. Breakfast is available all day on weekends. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PARKVIEW CAFE AT CITY PARK —

BARBECUE ABITA BAR-B-Q — 69399 Hwy. 59, Abita Springs, (985) 892-0205 — Slow-cooked brisket and pork are specialties at this Northshore smokehouse. The half-slab rib plate contains six ribs served with a choice of two sides. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Tue.Sat. Credit cards. $ WALKER’S BAR-B-QUE — 10828

Hayne Blvd., 281-8227; www.cochondelaitpoboys.com — The makers of the Jazz Fest cochon de lait po-boy serve pork, ribs, chicken and more. The family feast includes a half-slab of ribs, half a chicken, half a pound of brisket, pork and sausage, two side orders, bread and sauce. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Saturday. Cash only. $

BREWPUB

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE —

527 Decatur St., 522-0571; www. crescentcitybrewhouse.com — Live jazz and German-style beers complement creative cooking at this brewpub. Pan-seared redfish St. Louis is topped with fried oysters and barbecue sauce. Starters include Brewhouse hot wings,

City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 483-9474 — Located in the old Casino Building, the cafe serves gourmet coffee, sandwiches, salads and ice cream till early evening. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $ PRAVDA — 1113 Decatur St., 581-1112;

www.pravdaofnola.com — Pravda is known for its Soviet kitsch and selection of absinthes, and the kitchen offers pierogies, beef empanadas, curry shrimp salad and a petit steak served with truffle aioli. No reservations. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ RICCOBONO’S PANOLA STREET CAFE — 7801 Panola St., 314-1810

— Specialties include crabcakes Benedict — two crabcakes and poached eggs topped with hollandaise sauce and potatoes — and the Sausalito omelet with spinach, mushrooms, shallots and mozzarella. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily. Credit cards. $

TERRAZU — 201 St. Charles Ave., 287-

0877; www.terrazu.net — Located in the lobby of Place St. Charles, Terrazu serves sandwiches like the Brie cheese press with turkey, Brie, spinach and sweet and spicy raspberry coulis in pita bread. The Terrazu shrimp salad combines boiled shrimp, hearts of palm, tomato

and avocado with tarragon vinaigrette. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $

VINE & DINE — 141 Delaronde St., 361-1402; www.vine-dine.com — The cafe serves cheese boards and charcuterie plates with pate and cured meats. There also is a menu of sandwiches, quesadillas, bruschettas, salads and dips. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CHINESE CHINA ORCHID — 704 S. Carrollton

Ave., 865-1428; www.chinaorchidneworleans.com — This longtime Riverbend restaurant offers a wide array of Chinese dishes. Sizzling black pepper beef or chicken is prepared with onions, red and green peppers and brown sauce and served on a hot plate with steamed rice on the side. Other options include fried rice, noodle and egg foo young dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ CHINA ROSE — 3501 N. Arnoult Road., Metairie, 887-3295 — China Rose offers many Chinese seafood specialties. The Lomi Lomi combines jumbo shrimp, pineapple and water chestnuts wrapped in bacon, fries them golden brown and serves them on a bed of sautéed vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ FIVE HAPPINESS — 3511 S. Carrollton

Ave., 482-3935 — The large menu at Five Happiness offers a range of dishes from wonton soup to sizzling seafood combinations served on a hot plate to sizzling Go-Ba to lo mein dishes. Delivery and banquest facilities available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

JUNG’S GOLDEN DRAGON — 3009

Magazine St., 891-8280; www. jungsgoldendragon2.com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, Thai and Korean cuisine. Chinese specialties include Mandarin, Szechuan and Hunan dishes. Grand Marnier shrimp are lightly battered and served with Grand Marnier sauce, broccoli and pecans. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

THREE HAPPINESS — 1900 Lafayette

St., Suite 4, Gretna, 368-1355; www. threehappiness.com — Three Happiness serves Chinese and Vietnames dishes and dim sum specials on weekends. Westlake duck features tender duck with snow peas, corn, straw mushrooms and napa cabbage. Vietnamese crepes are served with pork and shrimp. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TREY YUEN CUISINE OF CHINA —

600 N. Causeway Approach., Mandeville, (985) 626-4476; 2100 N. Morrison Blvd., Hammond, (985) 345-6789; www.tryyuen.com —

COFFEE/ DESSERT

ANTOINE’S ANNEX — 513 Royal St.,

581-4422; www.antoines.com — The Annex is a coffee shop serving pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. The Royal Street salad features baby spinach and mixed lettuces with carrots, red onion, red peppers, grapes, olives, walnuts and raspberry vinaigrette. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

BEN ’N JERRY’S — 3500 Veterans

Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 887-5656 — Ben ’n Jerry’s offers rich ice creams in signature flavors, ice cream cakes, frozen drinks, fruit smoothies and sundaes. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

MAURICE FRENCH PASTRIES — 3501 Hessmer Ave., Metairie, 885-1526; 4949 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 455-0830; www.mauricefrenchpastries.com — Maurice French Pastries offers an array of continental and French baked goods as well as specialty cakes, cheesecakes and pies. No reservations. Hessmer Avenue: breakfast and lunch Mon.Sat. West Napoleon: breakfast and lunch Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PINKBERRY — 300 Canal St.; 5601

Magazine St., 899-4260; www. pinkberry.com — Pinkberry offers frozen yogurt with an array of wet and dry topping choices including caramel, honey, fruit purees, various chocolates and nuts and more. There also are fresh fruit parfaits and green tea smoothies. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

fresca and nopalitos. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Thu.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

ONE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE — 8132 Hampson St., 301-9061; www. one-sl.com — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes like char-grilled oysters topped with Roquefort cheese and a red wine vinaigrette, seared scallops with roasted garlic and shiitake polenta cakes and a memorable cochon de lait. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CREOLE ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713 St.

Louis St., 581-4422; www.antoines. com — Signature dishes at the city’s oldest restaurant include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GUMBO SHOP — 640 St. Peter St., 525-1486; www.gumboshop.com — Gumbo and New Orleans classics such as crawfish etouffee dominate the menu. Their spicy flavors meld into a dish that represents the city’s best and redefines comfort food. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

LE CITRON BISTRO — 1539 Religious

St., 566-9051; www.le-citronbistro. com — Located in a historic building, the quaint bistro serves starters like chicken and andouille gumbo and fried frogs legs. Entrees include choices like fried chicken, Gulf fish and burgers. Reservations accepted. Dinner Wed.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000 N.

Peters St., 524-4747 — This casual restaurant serves Creole favorites. The menu includes crawfish etouffee, boiled crawfish, red beans and rice and bread pudding for dessert. Outdoor seating is adjacent to Dutch Alley and the French Market. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

DELI KOSHER CAJUN NEW YORK DELI & GROCERY — 3519 Severn Ave., Me-

tairie, 888-2010; www.koshercajun. com — This New York-style deli specializes in sandwiches, including corned beef and pastrami that come straight from the Bronx. No reservations. Lunch Sun.-Thu., dinner Mon.-Thu. Credit cards. $

MARTIN WINE CELLAR — 714 Elmeer Ave., Metairie , 896-7350; www. martinwine.com — Sandwiches, salads, soups and lunch specials are available at the deli counter, including the Cedric, which features chicken breast, spinach, Swiss, tomatoes and red onions on seven-grain bread. No reservations. Lunch daily. Credit cards. $

DINER DAISY DUKES — 121 Chartres St.,

561-5171; www.daisydukesrestaurant.com — Daisy Dukes is known for its seafood omelet and serves a wide variety of Cajun-spiced Louisiana dishes, burgers, po-boys and seafood. Breakfast is served all day. No reservations. Open 24 hours daily. Credit cards. $$

STEVE’S DINER — 201 St. Charles Ave., 522-8198 — Steve’s serves hot breakfasts until 10 a.m. Lunch features sandwiches, salads and hot

CONTEMPORARY 5 Fifty 5 — 555 Canal St., 553-5638;

www.555canal.com — New Orleans dishes and Americana favorites take an elegant turn in dishes such as the lobster mac and cheese, combining lobster meat, elbow macaroni and mascarpone, boursin and white cheddar cheeses. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

BAYONA — 430 Dauphine St., 5254455; www.bayona.com — House favorites on Chef Susan Spicer’s menu include sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce and the appetizer of grilled shrimp with black-bean cake and coriander sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$$

FEAST NEW ORLEANS — 200 Julia

St., 304-6318; www.feastneworleans.com — Feast serves rustic European dishes in a casual setting. Cock-a-Leekie is a dish of braised chicken with cream, bacon, plums, leeks and red potatoes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ THE GREEN GODDESS — 307 Ex-

change Alley, 301-3347; www.greengoddessnola.com — Chef Chris DeBarr’s contemporary cooking combines classic techniques, exotic ingredients and culinary wit. At lunch, Big Cactus Chilaquiles feature poached eggs on homemade tortillas with salsa verde, queso

Frieda Wilkerson presents a platter of ribs at Abita Bar-B-Q (69399 Hwy. 59, Abita Springs, 985-892-0205). PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

Out2Eat page 67 nesebistro.com — Miyako offers a full range of Japanese cuisine, with specialties from the sushi or hibachi menus. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ ROCK-N-SAKE — 823 Fulton St., 581-7253; www.rocknsake.com — There’s a wide selection of sushi, sashimi and rolls or spicy gyoza soup, pan-fried soba noodles with chicken or seafood and teriyaki dishes. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

LOuISIaNa CONtEMPORaRY BOMBAY CLUB — 830 Conti St.,

586-0972; www.thebombayclub. com — The duck duet pairs confit leg with pepper-seared breast with black currant reduction. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ BOUCHE — 840 Tchoupitoulas St.,

267-7485; www.bouchenola.com — This wine bar and restaurant serves creative dishes like tasso truffle mac and cheese with three cheeses and Mornay sauce. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

MILA — 817 Common St., 412-2580; www.milaneworleans.com — Try New Orleans barbecue lobster with lemon confit and fresh thyme. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri. dinner Mon.Sat. $$$ RALPH’S ON THE PARK — 900 City

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 22 > 2011

Park Ave., 488-1000; www.ralphsonthepark.com — Popular dishes include baked oysters Ralph, turtle soup and the Niman Ranch New York strip. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

TOMMY’S WINE BAR — 752 Tchoupi-

toulas St., 525-4790 — Tommy’s Wine Bar offers cheese and charcuterie plates as well as a menu of appetizers and salads. No reservations. Lite dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEDItERRa— NEaN/MIDDLE EaStERN

let-friendly restaurant offers new takes on Mexican-inspired cooking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ NACHO MAMA’S MEXICAN GRILL —

3242 Magazine St., 899-0031; 1000 S. Clearview Pkwy., Harahan, 7361188; www.nachomamasmexicangrill.com — These taquerias serve Mexican favorites such as portobello mushroom fajitas and chile rellenos. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SANTA FE — 3201 Esplanade Ave., 948-0077 — Fried green tomatoes are topped with grilled jumbo shrimp and roasted chili remoulade and capers. Outdoor seating is available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

ATTIKI BAR & GRILL — 230 Decatur

St., 587-3756; www.attikineworleans.com — Attiki features a range of Mediterranean cuisine including entrees of beef kebabs and chicken shawarma. Reservations recommended. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $$

PYRAMIDS CAFE — 3151 Calhoun St.,

861-9602 — Diners will find authentic, healthy and fresh Mediterranean cuisine featuring such favorites as sharwarma prepared on a rotisserie. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEXICaN & SOutHWEStERN COUNTRY FLAME — 620 Iberville

St., 522-1138 — Come in for fajitas, pressed Cuban sandwiches made with hickory-smoked pork and char-broiled steaks or pork chops. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

JUAN’S FLYING BURRITO — 2018

Magazine St., 569-0000; 4724 S.Carrollton Ave. 486-9950; www. juansflyingburrito.com — This wal-

MuSIC aND FOOD GAZEBO CAFE — 1018 Decatur St.,

525-8899; www.gazebocafenola. com — The New Orleans sampler rounds up jambalaya, red beans and rice and gumbo. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

HOUSE OF BLUES — 225 Decatur

St., 310-4999; www.hob.com/neworleans — Try the pan-seared Voodoo Shrimp with rosemary cornbread. The buffet-style gospel brunch features local and regional groups. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

2035 Metairie Road, Metairie, 8328032; www.marktwainspizza.com — Disembark at Mark Twain’s for salads, po-boys and pies like the Italian pizza with salami, tomato, artichoke, sausage and basil. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NONNA MIA CAFE & PIZZERIA — 3125 Esplanade Ave., 948-1717 — Nonna Mia uses homemade dough for pizza served by the slice or whole pie and offers salads, pasta dishes and panini. Gourmet pies are topped with ingredients like pancetta, roasted eggplant, portobello mushrooms and prosciutto. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ REGINELLI’S — 741 State St., 899-

1414; 817 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 712-6868; 874 Harrison Ave., 488-0133; 3244 Magazine St. 8957272; 5608 Citrus Blvd., Harahan, 818-0111; www.reginellis.com — This New Orleans original offers a range of pizzas, sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

R&O’S RESTAURANT — 216 Old Hammond Hwy., 831-1248 — R&O’s offers a mix of pizza and Creole and Italian seafood dishes. There’s everything from seafood gumbo and stuffed artichokes to po-boys and muffulettas. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, dinner Wed.Sun. Credit cards. $

SLICE PIZZERIA — 1513 St. Charles Ave., 525-7437; 5538 Magazine St., 897-4800 — Neapolitan-style pizza rules, but you can buy pizza by the slice and add or subtract toppings as you choose. There are also a full coffee bar, Italian sodas and organic teas. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

NEIGHBORHOOD

4218 Magazine St., 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., 302-1133; www.theospizza.com — There is a wide variety of specialty pies or build your own from the selection of more than two-dozen toppings. Also serving salads and sandwiches. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — 626 Frenchmen St., 949-0696; www. snugjazz.com — The fish Marigny is topped with Gulf shrimp in a Creole cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

ville St., 488-6582; www.katiesinmidcity.com — Favorites here include the Cajun Cuban with roasted pork, grilled ham, cheese and pickles pressed on buttered bread. There also are pizzas, salads, burgers and Italian dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, Dinner Tue.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ KOZ’S — 515 Harrison Ave., 4840841; 6215 Wilson St., Harahan, 7373933; www.kozcooks.com — Louisiana favorites such as seafood platters, muffulettas and more than 15 types of po-boys, ranging from hot sausage to cheeseburger, are available at Koz’s. The Will’s Chamber of Horrors sandwich features roast beef, ham, turkey, Swiss and American cheese, Italian dressing and hot mustard. . No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $ RAJUN CAJUN CAFE — 5209 W.

Cafe Rani (2917 Magazine St., 895-2500; www.caferanimagazine.com) serves salads and much more.

PIZZa MARKS TWAIN’S PIZZA LANDING —

St., 527-5000; www.marketcafenola.com — Dine indoors or out on seafood fried for platters and poboys or highlighted in dishes such as crawfish pie, crawfish etouffee or shrimp Creole. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

THE MARKET CAFE — 1000 Decatur

KATIE’S RESTAURANT — 3701 Iber-

PHOTO BY CHerYl GerBer

68

REDEMPTION — 3835 Iberville St., 309-3570 — Chambord duckling is served with cherry vinaigrette. Seared foie gras is complemented by vanilla parsnip puree. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 883-5513; www.rajuncajuncafe.com — The cafe serves soups, salads, po-boys, muffulettas, seafood plates and a few entree platters. Daily specials include items such as breaded pork chops on Wednesdays and seafood options on Friday. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

THEO’S NEIGHBORHOOD PIZZA —

WIT’S INN — 141 N. Carrollton Ave., 486-1600 — This Mid-City bar and restaurant features pizzas, calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers for snacking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SaNDWICHES & PO-BOYS

po-boys, hot sausage po-boys, fried seafood and more. No reservations. Kitchen open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $

TRACEY’S — 2604 Magazine St., 899-2054; www.traceysnola.com — The roast beef po-boy dripping with garlicky gravy is the highlight of a menu transplanted from the former Parasol’s to this Uptown bar. Other options include fried seafood and bar noshing items. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Cash only. $

SEaFOOD GRAND ISLE RESTAURANT — 575

Convention Center Blvd., 520-8530; www.grandislerestaurant.com — Grand Isle offers seafood options from raw oysters to lobster St. Malo with combines Maine lobster, shrimp and mussels in seafood broth. Baked Gulf fish are served with compound chili butter, potatoes and a vegetable. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

JACK DEMPSEY’S — 738 Poland

Ave., 943-9914 — The Jack Dempsey seafood platter serves a training-table feast of gumbo, shrimp, oysters, catfish, redfish and crawfish pies, plus two side items. Other dishes include broiled redfish and fried soft-shell crab. No reservations. Lunch Tue.Sat. and dinner Wed.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ LA COTE BRASSERIE — 700

Tchoupitoulas St., 613-2350; www. lacotebrasserie.com — This stylish restaurant in the Renaissance New Orleans Arts Hotel serves an array of raw and cooked seafood. Tabasco and Steen’s Cane Syrup glazed salmon is served with shrimp mirliton ragout. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

MAHONY’S PO-BOY SHOP — 3454 Magazine St., 899-3374; www. mahonyspoboys.com — Mahoney’s serves traditional favorites and original po-boys like the Peacemaker, which is filled with fried oysters, bacon and cheddar cheese. There are daily lunch specials as well. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PARKWAY BAKERY AND TAVERN — 538 N. Hagen Ave., 482-3047 —

Parkway serves juicy roast beef

taPaS/SPaNISH MIMI’S

IN

THE

MARIGNY

2601 Royal St., 872-9868 — The decadant Mushroom Manchego Toast is a favorite here. Or enjoy hot and cold tapas dishes ranging from grilled marinated artichokes to calamari. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner and latenight Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ SANTA FE TAPAS — 1327 St. Charles Ave., 304-9915 — The menu includes both tapas dishes and entrees. Seared jumbo scallops are served with mango and green tomato pico de gallo. Gambas al ajillo are jumbo shrimp with garlic, shallots, chilis and cognac. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ VEGA TAPAS CAFE — 2051 Metarie Road, 836-2007; www.vegatapascafe.com — Vega’s mix of hot and cold tapas dishes includes a salad of lump crabmeat on arugula with blood orange vinaigrette, seared tuna with avocado and tomato relish, braised pork empanadillos, steamed mussels and shrimp with tomatoes and garlic in caper-basil cream. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

VIEtNaMESE AUGUST MOON — 3635 Prytania

St., 899-5129; www.moonnola.com — August Moon serves a mix of Vietnamese and Chinese cuisine. There are spring rolls and pho soup as well as many popular Chinese dishes and vegetarian options. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

RED FISH GRILL — 115 Bourbon St., 598-1200; www.redfishgrill. com — Seafood creations by executive chef Brian Katz dominate a menu peppered with favorites like hickory-grilled redfish, pecancrusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

DOSON NOODLE HOUSE — 135 N.

737-4610 — Check into Village Inn for seasonal boiled seafood or raw oysters. Other options include fried seafood platters, po-boys, pasta and pizza. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

PHO HOA RESTAURANT — 1308 Manhattan Blvd., 302-2094 — Pho Hoa serves staple Vietnamese dishes including beef broth soups, vermicelli bowls, rice dishes and banh mi sandwiches. Bo kho is a popular beef stew. Appetizers include fried egg rols, crab rangoons and rice paper spring rolls. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

VILLAGE INN — 9201 Jefferson Hwy.,

MAGAZINE PO-BOY SHOP — 2368

Magazine St., 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of po-boys filled with everything from fried seafood to corned beef to hot sausage to veal. There are breakfast burritos in the morning and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Cash only. $

gree ovens and arrive at the table sizzling. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

SOuL FOOD BIG MOMMA’S CHICKEN AND WAFFLES — 5741 Crowder Blvd., 241-2548;

www.bigmommaschickenandwaffles.com — Big Mamma’s serves hearty combinations like the six-piece which includes a waffle and six fried wings served crispy or dipped in sauce. Breakfast is served all day. All items are cooked to order. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., Lunch daily, dinner Sun. Credit cards. $

StEaKHOuSE RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE —

Harrah’s Hotel, 525 Fulton St., 5877099; 3633 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 888-3600; www. ruthschris.com — Ruth’s top-quality steaks are broiled in 1,800-de-

Carrollton Ave., 309-7283 — Noodles abound at this Mid-City eatery, which excels at vinegary chicken salad over shredded cabbage, as well as bowls of steaming pho. Vegetable-laden wonton soup and thick spring rolls make a refreshing, satisfying meal. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards and checks. $$

PHO NOLA — 3320 Transcontinental

Drive, Metairie, 941-7690; www. pho-nola.com — Pho NOLA serves spring rolls and egg rolls, noodle soups, rice and vermicelli dishes and po-boys. Beverages include boba teas, milk teas, coffee drinks and smoothies. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PHO TAU BAY RESTAURANT — 113 Westbank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, 368-9846 — You’ll find classic Vietnamese beef broth and noodle soups, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, shrimp spring rolls with peanut sauce and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Wed. & Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

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LUKE

MARIAM

NOELLE

PATCHES

PIXIE

SpayMart 601-749-0268

LA SPCA 504-368-5191

P.A.W.S. 504-392-1601

LA SPCA 504-368-5191

Sponsored By:

Sponsored By:

Metairie Small Animal Hospital Please help me find a loving home!

Sponsored By:

# A11454960

Sponsored By:

Metairie Small Animal Hospital Please help me find a loving home!

Sponsored By:

JCM’s Luxury Boarding & Dog Obedience School

PRECIOUS

Lynette BiJou

#12243577

# 11989509

LA SPCA 504-368-5191

Sponsored By:

Sponsored By:

Metairie Small Animal Hospital

Metairie Small Animal Hospital

Please help me find a loving home!

Please help me find a loving home!

PAWS DOWN

Southern Refinishing is the BEST DOGGONE Reglazer Around! Humane Society of Louisiana 888-6-HUMANE Sponsored By: Angela Castellon, Tinkerbell & Pear

#12270245

LA SPCA 504-368-5191 Sponsored By:

Metairie Small Animal Hospital Please help me find a loving home!

Robin Roussel

Diane Rosenbach

Prudential Gardner Realtors

Prudential Gardner Realtors

504-417-8787

Our Mission:

504-388-1739

“Saving, Caring, Sheltering Loveable Pets to Adopt”

- Chip/Spot Repair - Colors available - Clawfoot tubs & hardware FOR SALE

Golf Fundraiser “In The Ruff” • Saturday, May 21st, TPC Club www.StFrancisAnimalSanctuary.org Helping Families Find Homes – Placing Abandoned Pets In A Home

Contact: Robin and Diane - Specializing in YOU.

348-1770

Southernrefinishing.com

708 BARATARIA BLVD.

SOUTHERN REFINISHING LLC

Certified Fiberglass Technician Family Owned & Operated

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 22 > 2011

# A12290603

ITTY BITTY & MR. JONES

71

Pet Adopt-A-Thon QUINN

RIBBON

P.A.W.S. 504-392-1601

LA SPCA 504-368-5191

# A12384980

Sponsored By: Christopher Lege

SCOUT

Sponsored By:

ROOSEVELT

RUBY

SADIE

SARENA

SpayMart 601-749-0268

P.A.W.S. 504-392-1601

P.A.W.S. 504-392-1601

SpayMart 601-749-0268

Sponsored By:

Metairie Small Animal Hospital

Sponsored By:

Metairie Small Animal Hospital

SEBASTIAN

SMILEY

SPADE

SPARKY

Humane Society of Louisiana 888-6-HUMANE

P.A.W.S. 504-392-1601

LA SPCA 504-368-5191

P.A.W.S. 504-392-1601

Sandy Miller HHS Latter & Blum Inc. Realtors

Sponsored By:

Sponsored By: Rhett Sassard

VELVET

# 11341793

LA SPCA 504-368-5191

Sponsored By: Rhett Sassard

Metairie Small Animal Hospital

Sponsored By:

Please help me find a fantastic home!

Please help me find a loving home!

Sponsored By: Maurice Olivier & Angel

TOM & LEON

TULIP

TWINKLE

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 22 > 2011

72

We make great friends

P.A.W.S. 504-392-1601 Sponsored By:

Southern Refinishing

P.A.W.S. 504-392-1601 Sponsored By:

Sponsored By:

Metairie Small Animal Hospital I am a great friend!

Rose McKenna is a 2 1/2-monthold, spayed, Lab mix who LOVES to fetch. She gets along well with other dogs and cats and likes to celebrate St. Paddy’s Day year ‘round. To meet Rose or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191.

LA SPCA 504-368-5191 Metairie Small Animal Hospital Please help me find a loving home!

rose McKenna Kennel #A12355893

WITH SECOND LOOK, WE FIND IF ANYTHING GOT LEFT BEHIND.

3501 Severn Ave • Metairie, LA 70002 Phone: 504-455-3095 • Mon-Fri 9:00 am to 8:00 pm Sat and Sun 9 am - 5 pm

¶Error rates are for tax season 2010. Fees apply for Second Look® reviews or if you have us prepare a corrected or amended return.¨ If H&R Block makes an error on your return, we’ll pay resulting penalties and interest. If you are audited, we’ll explain your audit notice and the documentation you should provide to the auditor. ©2011 HRB Tax Group, Inc.

I would love to be your pet!

Weekly Tails

Sponsored By:

Muriel’s Jackson Square

I am very playful!

# 11779188

# A12384624

Sponsored By:

SUGAR

I would love to be your pet!

# A10383822

Metairie Small Animal Hospital

Metairie Small Animal Hospital

Please help me find a loving home!

LA SPCA 504-368-5191

SpayMart 601-749-0268

Sponsored By:

Sponsored By:

JCM’s Luxury Boarding & Dog Obedience School

Metairie Small Animal Hospital

Precious Kennel #A12270245

Precious is a 10-year-old, spayed, DSH, with tabby markings and pale green eyes. She’s an affectionate, laid-back, gal who likes to play with toys and would do best in an adult household. To meet Precious or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. To look for a lost pet come to the Louisiana SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), Mon-Sat. 9-5, Sun. 12-5 or call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org.

CLASSIFIEDS EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT

BEAUTY SALONS/SPAS

$$$HELP WANTED$$$ Earn Extra income assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! CALL OUR LIVE OPERATORS NOW! 1-800-405-7619 ext. 2450 http:// www.easywork-greatpay.com Paid In Advance! Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net

DOMESTIC AUTOS

in search of talented HAIRSTYLIST COLORIST APPRENTICE

MODELING/ACTING PHONE ACTRESSES FROM HOME. BEST PAY OUTS, BUSY SYSTEM, BILINGUAL/SP A+. Weekends a must! Land Line / Good Voice 1-800-4037772. LIPSERVICE.NET

Apply in person @ 1514 St Charles Ave.

568.0050

for interview

TEACHERS/INSTRUCTORS Biology Teacher

Pelican Educational Foundation, Abramson Science & Technology Charter School in New Orleans, LA seeks Biology Teacher. Requires Bach degree in Sci. Educ., Biol. Educ., Biology or related + 1 yr in job or teaching biology or science courses to middle or high school students. Please mail resumes to Pelican Educational Foundation, 5552 Read Blvd., New Orleans LA 70127, Attn: Mr. Eski. Refer to Ad #GD.

VOLUNTEER

Offers Volunteer Opportunities. Make a difference in the lives of the terminally ill & their families. Services include: friendly visits to patients & their families, provide rest time to caretaker, bereavement & office assistance. School service hours avail. Call Volunteer Coordinator @ 504-818-2723 #3016

ELEVEN 79 Restaurant

Seeks Exp Pantry/Line Cook. Call 504-299-1179 & provide resume for interview.

THE BEACH HOUSE

Metairie Restaurant seeks Experienced GRILL/FRY COOK Call Lynn 456-7470 for interview

RETAIL COOKING SCHOOL/STORE

is looking to fill 2 positions: Sales, a Prep/Serve/Clean helper, Must be able to work weekends. Call Crescent City Cooks!, Riverwalk 529-1600

Pelican Educational Foundation, Abramson Science & Technology Charter School in New Orleans, LA seeks Computer Teacher. Requires Bach degree in Comp. Educ., Comp. Sci, Comp Engnrg. or related + 1 yr in job or teaching computer courses to middle or high school students. Please mail resumes to Pelican Educational Foundation, 5552 Read Blvd., New Orleans LA 70127, Attn: Mr. Eski. Refer to Ad #HT.

MATH TEACHER:

Pelican Educational Foundation, Abramson Science & Technology Charter School in New Orleans, LA seeks Math Teacher. Requires Bach degree in Educ, Math, Engnrg. or related + 1 yr in job or as Math Teacher at middle or high school level. Please mail resumes to Pelican Educational Foundation, 5552 Read Blvd., New Orleans LA 70127, Attn: Mr. Eski. Refer to Ad #AS.

Apply in person @ 1514 St Charles Ave.

504-523-7027

LOOK WHAT’S COOKING ...

WE ARE CURRENTLY RECRUITING FOR:

ASSISTANT FRONT DESK MANAGER

We offer an excellent benefits package, including: Competitive Salaries, Medical, Dental, Life Insurance, 401(K), Paid Holidays, and much more! Applications accepted Monday - Friday, 9am –4pm 401 Natchez Alley, New Orleans, LA, 70130 Fax resume: (504) 596-4722 • Job line: (504) 596-4657 Phone: (504) 962-4925 • www.windsorcourthotel.com EOE, M/F/D/V

IMPORTED AUTOS ‘03 MERCEDES BENZ E320 $11,995 504-368-5640

‘06 ACURA TL $16,995 504-368-5640

‘06 INFINITY G35 COUPE $16,995 504-368-5640

‘08 HONDA ACCORD LXP 33K Miles, $14,995 504-368-5640

‘09 ACCORD COUPE EXL V6, LOW LOW MILES $21,900 504-368-5640

‘09 HONDA CIVIC

Ralph Brennan’s newest property at

2700 Metairie Road Opening Soon

NOW HIRING

EXPERIENCED COOKS EXPERIENCED SERVERS VALETS Competitive salary & great benefits! Apply online rbmet@neworleans-food.com or fax resume 504-581-9795 Drug free workplace

Alicia Whittington

Hands With A Heart Swedish & Deep Tissue

SPECIAL

1 HOUR

$55

60/90/120 Minutes Available Appts

9am-9pm • M - Sa

DX, 4 door $11,995 504-368-5640

River Ridge Location LA Lic# 520

‘09 NISSAN CUBE

call

$11,995 504-368-5640

601.303.7979

TRUCKS ‘08 FORD 150 XL Crew Cab $18,995 504-368-5640

SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES ‘07 HONDA PILOT LX Low miles $17,995 Call 504-368-5640

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT NOTICE

Massage therapists are required to be licensed with the State of Louisiana and must include the license number in their ads.

LICENSED MASSAGE A BODY BLISS MASSAGE

Jeannie LMT #3783-01. Flexible appointments. Uptown Studio or Hotel out calls. 504.894.8856 (uptown)

BYWATER BODYWORKS

Swedish, deep tissue, therapeutic. Flex appts, in/out calls, OHP/student discounts, gift cert. $65/hr, $75/ 1 1/2hr. LA Lic# 1763 Mark. 259-7278

A Touch of

Aloha La Lic #2983

MERCHANDISE APPLIANCES 18 Cubic Ft Fridge

Almond Color. $65. Call 943-7699.

ELECTRIC RANGE

Hotpoint Almond Color 30in, Good working Condition. $65. Call 943-7699

FURNITURE/ACCESSORIES $125 Full/Double Size Mattress Set, still in original plastic, unopened. We can deliver. (504) 846-5122 $295 Brand New Iron Queen Bed with mattress set, all new. Can deliver. (504) 952-8403 King Pillowtop Mattress, NEW!!! ONLY $199. Can deliver. (504) 846-5122

LARGE HUTCH

Approx 8’ H x 8’L x 3’D (from front to back of cabinet section. Features 6 doors w/ 2 inside adjustable shelves & top section holds 6 adjustable shelves. Solid cypress by Boesch Cabinetmakers, finished by Littleton & Pruit. $700. E-mail bcieditor@cox.net NEW Pub Height Table Set all wood, still boxed. Delivery available. $325 (504) 846-5122 Queen Mattress Set $149 Still in wrapper. Will deliver. (504) 846-5122

massage & body work

pain management & relaxation • Lomi Lomi - 90 minutes • Deep Tissue • Swedish evening appts avail. 6 -10pm weekdays. 10am-7pm on weekends.

504-258-3389

2209 LaPalco Blvd

www.atouchofaloha.massageplanet.com Member of BBB Providing Therapeutic Massage/Non Sexual

ANNOUNCEMENTS

ADOPTIONS ADOPT

Adoring couple longs to adopt newborn. secure, endless love awaits. Christine & Paul, 1-800-774-0854. Expenses paid.

ANNOUNCEMENTS PORTRAITS

By Artist Alexander Samuel Schwartz Private & Public collections. Appt. only, 775-354-4464

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 22 > 2011

Experience preferred.

Hail Queen Fergie and King Banjo

Only $3995 Call 504-365-1655

Computer Teacher

FT or PT Tailor is needed for ladies clothing store.

Home of Barkus XIX Ball

05 FORD TAURUS

504-523-7027

Please Call

(Metairie, LA) 40hrs/wk: Assist on Rd improvement, water/wastewater & drainage projects. Prep reports/ Rd levee dsgn/qty estimates. Prep site plans & construction docs for water lines, sanitary sewer, storm lines, lift stations plans for govt agency. Use AutoCad, Microstation, Civil3D, MSWord & Excel. Req Masters degree in Civil Engg & 24 mnths relevant work exper. Mail resumes to AIMS Group Inc. 4421 Zenith St. Metairie, La 70001

seeks articulate, personable guide. Bilingual a plus. PT/FT. Call 9-5, Laura Plantation 225-265-7690.

Excellent opportunity for long term employment. Retail sales preferred. Salary+commision. We will train.

in the Warehouse District

ENGINEERING

LA’S TOP TOUR ATTRACTION

AUTOMOTIVE

SALES/BRIDAL

STAFF ENGINEER

GUIDES/TOURS

RESTAURANT/HOTEL/BAR

CLASSIFIEDS

73

reaL esTaTe

BROADMOOR

SHOWCaSe METAIRIE

Big Beautiful Bargain

GENTILLY

WAGGAMAN

FRENCH QUARTER

RIVER RIDGE

2-3 BR, 2 full ba, lg upper, furn kit, wd/cer flrs, cf. CH, grt flrplc. Lotsa closets & o/s pkg. Pets ok. $1100/mo. 874-3195

BYWATER 1023 PIETY ST

Great 1 Bdrm Condo for Rent in Metairie! Gated Community, ground floor unit, reserved parking outside your door! Fitness Ctr & Pool! Granite & SS appliances. Washer/Dryer. Conv. to Hosp, I10, Shopping! $950/mo. Donna Chandler • Re/Max Affiliates O: 504-838-7649 or C: 504-669-4677

5542 Charlotte Dr. $99,500 Slab Ranch - 3 BR, 2 BA Partially renov + Guest Cottage 504-568-1359

Freshly remodeled 2 br, 2 full ba, w/d hkps, cen a/h, c-fans, fncd yd, avail now. $875. 888-239-6566 or mballier@yahoo.com

55 Richelle Street 3BD/2BA Additional Large Lot $135,000 Prudential Gardner Kathy Hunter 985-688-5873

FRENCH QUARTER CONDOS 929 Dumaine

ONLY 4 UNITS LEFT. STARTING AT 93,500

Jennifer Shelnutt French Quarter Realty 388-9383

9012 Rosecrest Lane 1,420 sqft, lot 62x120 Newly renov 2 bdrm, 2 bth, original hw floors, appl. inclu. Covered carport and additional shed in bkyd. Great River Ridge nbrhd. $189K. Call (504) 915-3220

CARROLLTON 8131 PLUM - LG 1 BR

Beau upr apt, lg lr/dr comb, frplce w/ mantel, cen a/h, wd flrs, blt-in kit, wd on premises, off st pkg. $850/mo, lse/dep. 909-5541 or 865-1091.

8131 PLUM ST

REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

LOTS/ACREAGE ARIZONA LAND LIQUIDATION, $99/mo., 1 & 2 1/2-Acre ranch lots. 1 hour from Tucson Int’l Airport. NO CREDIT CHECK! Guaranteed Financing, Money Back Guarantee. (800) 631-8164 Code 4054 www. sunsiteslandrush.com

OLD METAIRIE VACANT LOT - METAIRIE HEIGHTS

50 x 120. Ready to build $120,000 (504) 451-8118

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT CONDO FOR SALE

1 Blk off St. Charles. 2/2, wd flrs, appls & w/d incl., grnite cntrtps & ss appl. OS pkng. $169,900 Darlene, Hera Realty 504-914-6352

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 22 > 2011

OWN 20 ACRES, Only $129/mo. $13,900 near growing El Paso, Texas (safest city in America!) Low down, no credit checks, owner financing. Free map/pictures. 866-257-4555 www. sunsetranches.com

74

Lg studio, wk in closet, stcar line. Lg eat-in kit, wd flrs, hi ceil, cen a/h, w/d on site, off st pkg. $800 dep/lse. 9095541 or 865-1091.

CLASSIFIEDS MAKE ME BEAUTIFUL AGAIN!

Irish Channel did not flood Katrina damaged house with 2 & 1/3 L-shaped lots. 2 lots each 30x120’ = 60’ x 120’ & rear portion of corner lot 35’ x 25’, double driveway in front with also a single tin garage & a single driveway on side street. $8,567 roof, 7 rooms & 3 bathrooms. Fourth sewer line in rear, 2 large walk in closets. Large walk in pantry. Huge, red brick floor to ceiling double sided fireplace. Could house 1 family or owner occupied plus 1 rental, or 2 rentals, or could build single or double on second lot. Much space to add on Huge yard for in-ground pool. Many options for house and land. Paved front patio with 2 large red brick planters. $210,000, 504-832-1901.

APARTMENTS with

METAIRIE

FURN 2BDRM/1BA HOUSE

Complete w/fridge, w&d, mw, stove, sec sys, CA&H, os pkng. On srtcr & Busline. Quiet n’bhood. $1,100 mo + sec dep. No pets/smokers. Call (504) 866-2250

1/2 OFF FIRST MONTH OLD METAIRIE SECRET

4320-C Annunciation St. $650/Month + One Month Deposit. No Smokers. Available April 15th Furnished Kitchen. Washer / Dryer provided. (no quarters needed!!!) Water Paid. On 3 Bus Lines! On Parade Route! NEAR EVERYTHING!!! Walk to Tipitina’s, Grocery, Eateries, Shops along Magazine. Rear 1st-floor apartment No dogs. Cats are OK. Please don’t call after 9 pm. 504-288-3264

227 CODIFER BLVD

LARGE 2 BR, 1 BA APT

LUXURY APTS

3 BR, 2 full baths, LR, DR, kit, w&d hkups, faux fireplace, fans, blinds. No pets. $850/mo. 504-443-2280

OLD METAIRIE

COVINGTON 227 S. ORCHARD LANE

Garden Home, gated, 3br, 2 ba wd flrs, 10’ ceil, granite. 1634 sq ft liv, 2250 total. $249K. 985-892-5533

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

CORPORATE RENTALS New Orleans Area 10 Min to Downtown

1Br, 1 Ba, Nwly Remod, furn. Qn bed, WiFi, Cbl. Pkg.Util Incl. Lndry Fac. Sec Cameras $1200/mth. 1 mth min. 2325 Pasadena, Met. 504-491-1591.

COMMERCIAL RENTALS 3 SMALL OFFICES - CBD

From 135 - 220 sq ft. Can be subdivided. $500 each. Parking available. Call 561-1216 for info.

BIG OFFICE SPACE ON CANAL 4220 Canal Street - Ground Floor On Streetcar Line 1,800 Sq. Ft. Large Central Room, three Separate Offices, Great for Group Practice or Studio $1,575/Mo + Utilities peggy.leblanc@ live.com, 488-6401

1 or 2 BR, Sparkling Pool, Bike Path, 12’ x 24’ Liv.Rm, Sep Din, King Master, No Pets, No Sect 8, $699 & $799 . 504-236-5776 Old Met 2 br lower duplex. Lg fenced yd, off st pkg, small pet OK. Walk to everything! $1100. 504-908-6751 $1250/mo. 1 BR/1 1/2BA. Hot tub & Pool, pkng. New kit. Util & TV incld., 24 hr desk service. 504-628-4996

ALGIERS POINT 605 VALLETTE ST

3br 2ba house. Updated kit & ba, wd fls, high ceil, cent a/h, w/d hkup, walk to ferry, parks, $1500. 713-204-5342

HISTORIC ALGIERS POINT

High end 1-4BR. Near ferry, clean, many x-tras, hrdwd flrs, cen a/h, no dogs, no sec 8, some O/S prkng $750-$1200/mo. 504-362-7487

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

Suites at Exchange Centre

935 Gravier Street, Suite 600 • New Orleans, LA 70112

Where Innovation and Opportunity Connect

Features vary by community.

Executive suites at an incredible value with a unique array of services and a unique approach to pricing – offering one very reasonable price that includes everything! Exterior and interior offices available ranging from $425-$900. ALL INCLUSIVE HIGHLIGHTS • Fully furnished and equipped suites available at affordable, all inclusive rate • Unique amenities including fitness room, media centre, and training room all included in pricing.

Melissa Pittman 985.630.7769

Melissa.pittman@transwestern.net

Louis Vergona 504.799.3122

GENTILLY Newly renov, new appls, cen a/h, w/d, alarm, fncd yd, off st prkg, priv entrance, $875+util. 504-283-8450.

METAIRIE TOWERS

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

Washers and Dryers • Gated • Home Office Spaces Pet Friendly • 24/7 Emergency Maintenance 24/7 Online Resident Services

Annunciation St. @ Napoleon

IRISH CHANNEL 1/2 BLOCK TO MAGAZINE

Furn Rms, Prefer Nght wrkrs. 1&2 BDRM, hardwd/crpt floors. $175/ wk to 900/mo +dep. 504-202-0381, 738-2492.

LAKEVIEW/LAKESHORE BOATHOUSE

Nice loft, full kit w/great view, 40 ft cov’d slip. $1700/mo. Jennifer 504250-9930. HGI Realty 504-207-7575.

CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATE LAKEFRONT

COMPLETELY REMODELED

LRG ATTRACTIVE APT

2BR, 2BA w/ appls, beaut crtyd setting w/swimming pool, quiet nb’hood. $875/mo. 504-495-6044 or 504756-7347

4340 S. Carrollton 1 BR,1 BA, new appl, w/water $825. 3222 Napoleon 2 Rms Avail, $600 w/utils. No Pets + Deposit • 504-376-4676

TREME

FRENCH QUARTER/ FAUBOURG MARIGNY

1137 TREME

2 blks to Fr Qtr, lg 1 BR apt, furn kitchen, 2nd flr with balcony, prkg, $700. 504/525-6520, 390-4362.

FRENCH QTR LOFT

1220 Chartres. 2 bdrm apt. w/balc. Carpet, pool, laundry room, security gate. No pets. $1500/mo. Mike, 9194583.

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT

FRENCH QUARTER

1 bedroom, 1 bath, balcony with view of Mississippi & Fr Qtr. $1000/mo w/ dep. Call 504-909-2104.

1510 CARONDELET 1 block to St. Charles

7722 HICKORY ST.

NEAR UNIV•GARDEN DIST

1 BR balc apt, $750 . Studio lg rm, kitc, full bath, $650 w/d on site 1-888-239-6566 or mballier@yahoo.com

Close to univer. 2/1 furn kit w/stove, mw, fridge w/ice, dw & w&d. Hdwd flrs, ceil fans, CA & H. Water paid by owner. Nice shared backyd. $975/mo. + same dep. (504) 282-1346

2 UPTOWN APARTMENTS

815 PINE ST

NEAR UNIVERSITIES

2 BR & 3 BR. hdwd floors, cent a/c, Lusher School District, University area. $950 - $1300. Chris - 861-7528

816A STATE ST

UPTOWN/ GARDEN DISTRICT

1, 2 & 3

1 BEDROOM APT

2511 S Carrollton Ave. Furn kit, cen a/h, off st pkg. $700/mo, wtr pd. Background ck required. 504-4507450.

1 Blk to St. Charles

1711 2nd St. Lrg 1b/1b, dish washer, w/d onsite, cent AC, marble mantels, patio $850/mo 895-4726 or 261-7611

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call 483-3100 1014 WASHINGTON AVE

Completely renov 2 br, 2 ba, cen a/h, wood flrs, w/d hkps, new appls, lg rear yard. $1395/mo. O/A, 891-3180.

1205 ST CHARLES/$1075

Fully Furn’d studio/effy/secure bldg/ gtd pkg/pool/gym/wifi/laundry. 985871-4324, 504-442-0573. Avail May 1

1750 ST. CHARLES APT

1 LARGE BR, large walk-in closet, new renov, new appliances, security, parking space. $1550. Call 899-0607

1 BR unfurnished apt, 3 blocks to universities, $700/mo, utilities incl. No pets. 504-865-8437 for appt. 2br upr,balcony, granite cntrtps, hi ceil, wd flrs, c-a/h, off st prkg, w/d, no dogs. $1400 • 504/258-2441

801 HENRY CLAY AVE #108

Henry Clay Condos, newly renov, luxury 1 bdrm, furn kit, pool. 1 blk to Aud Pk. $800+dep. 504/258-2441

BEDROOMS AVAILABLE CALL

Studios, 1 & 2 bd + loft. 1.5 - 2 baths apts. some uitl pd. Hdwd flrs, hi ceil, cen a/h, furn kit with d/w, lndry. $600 - $1200/mo. 388-7426. 3/1.5 Dublin near streetcar. Lv, furn kit, w/d hkp, hdwd flrs, ceil fans, scrn porch. $1050 + deposit. Owner/Agent, 442-2813.

S. FRONT - NR. CHILDREN’S HOSP Newly renov cottage. 1BR, lr, kit, w/d hkups. $750 + dep. No sec 8, no pets. New Owner Special: $100 off 1st mo. rent. 504-891-1889, 473-0821

RENTALS TO SHARE ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Findyour roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com.

HOWARD SCHMALZ & ASSOCIATES REAL ESTATE Call Bert: 504-581-2804

1406 Magazine 2br/1ba "Lower Garden District" 248 Cherokee 2br/2ba "University Area Condo" 7522 Benjamin 1br/1ba "Cool Pool Condo" 912 Harding Dr. 1br/1ba "Bayou Efficiency"

899-RENT

$1050 $1200 $700 $600

2368 CHIPPEWA

1BR/1BA, tile flr, side entrance, pets negotiable. $600/mo + deposit. Owner on premises. Avail April 1. 228-8687

4322 LAUREL STREET

AT Napoleon 1 br half dbl, furn kit, w/d, porch, large yard. Great location on parade rt! $650/mo. 905-4372.

6317 S. PRIEUR

Near Tulane 2 bedroom, living room, dining room, furn kit, tile bath. No pets. $800/mo, Call 504-283-7569

7522 BENJAMIN - NR UNIV

1 br condo w/ pool, prkg, laundry, gated community. $675/mo w/wtr pd. No pets. (504) 858-2162.

800 sq/ft., wd flrs, 2 firepl mantels, ceil fans, LR, DR, kit, bath w/clawfoot, hall closet, BR w/closet. Cent a/h, DW, fridge w/ice & wtr, Stackable W&D, small front yd, EZ on st pkg. Walk to Rouses, bars & restaurants. Pets OK w/fee. Avail April 1. $780/lse. (504) 908-5210 for appt.

Ann de Montluzin Farmer

broker

Historic House and Luxury Home Specialist Residential /Commercial Sales and Leasing, Appraisals.

(504) 895-1493 (504) 430-8737

farmeran@gmail.com Licensed in Louisiana for 32 years, building on a real estate heritage since 1905

5400 block of STORY ST. 3 br, 2 ba duplex. Cen a/h, unfurn w/all appl inc m’wave & w/d. Close to univ & hosp. On bus line. Lg fncd bkyd. Safe n’hood, sec sys all units. $1350/mo. 289-5110.

GRT LOCATIONS!

MAGAZINE ST O/S gtd pkng, pool, lndry $775/mo LOWER GARDEN DISTRICT St. Andrew- O/S, gtd pkng, pool, laun, $775/mo & up NAPOLEON 1 BR, pool, lndry, os pkng, $700/mo 891-2420

CK E H C E S PLEA ! YOUR ADt to

r every effo We make ments. advertise in r o r r avoid e e first our ad th y k c e h c Please cannot since we , s r a e p p ct ads day it a r incorre fo le ib s n cation. be respo y of publi a d t s ir f r, call after the d an erro If you fin ent Departm d ie if s s the Cla tely at immedia will be 100 & it .3 3 8 4 ) 4 (50 sible. on as pos o s s a d e correct

4328 BANCROFT DRIVE $625,000 A LARGE WATERFRONT HOME ON PRESTIGIOUS STREET. 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, Elevator, Master with large walk-in closet, bonus room over garage, office and situated on beautiful Bayou St. John. Great location near City Park and just 3 miles to the French Quarter.

Michael L. Baker, ABR/M, CRB, HHS President Realty Resources, Inc. 504-523-5555 • cell 504-606-6226 Licensed by the Louisiana Real Estate Commission for more than 28 years with offices in New Orleans, LA 70130

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 22 > 2011

MID CITY 217 N. SCOTT ST.

AWESOME UPT DPLX UNIT

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