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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

Alumnus of the Year

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Mike McGlone ’68 Homecoming Mass & Jazz Brunch Reception Sunday, October 9, 2011 – Mass at 10 a.m. – Chapel of the North American Martyrs All Jesuit alumni are invited to honor Mr. McGlone and recognize Blue Jays from the Golden Anniversary Class of 1961 and the Silver Anniversary Class of 1986.

commentary

thinking out loud

page 5

A m e n dm e n t 3 :

FOR

The Patients Compensation Fund was established nearly four decades ago to provide a stable source of revenue to pay medical malpractice claims. The money that goes into the fund is statutorily decreed to be “private” and therefore beyond the reach of governors and lawmakers during tough fiscal times. Amendment 3 makes that “private” label part of the constitution and therefore permanent. We recommend voting FOR Amendment 3. A m e n dm e n t 4 :

FOR

Louisiana has a savings account. It is officially called the Budget Stabilization Fund but is commonly known as the “rainy

feedback

day” fund. The fund has many regulations governing how and when it can be tapped — and how it must be replenished. Amendment 4 provides that when the fund is tapped, excess mineral revenues that generally replenish it need not go back into the fund until the following fiscal year. This makes sense. Moreover, the constitution already contains protections against excessive raiding of the fund. We recommend voting FOR Amendment 4. A m e n dm e n t 5 :

FOR

Amendment 5 applies only to New Orleans. It clarifies, but does not change, current policy as regards the public auction of properties for which the owners are delinquent in paying taxes. We recommend voting FOR Amendment 5.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

am writing in response to “Streetcar Denied” (cover story, Sept. 20). First, I would like to thank Jonah Bascle for all his work on the [issue of St. Charles Avenue streetcars being inaccessible to people in wheelchairs]. As a woman who has cerebral palsy and has been all over the United States, I would have to say that NOLA is one of, if not the most, inaccessible major city I have been to within the United States. This makes me sad — as a person who loves New Orleans and has lived in the New Orleans area all of my life. I want people with disabilities from all over the world to come visit New Orleans just to see all the magic and treasures this city has to offer. However, when speaking with friends of mine around the country, many refuse to visit due to how difficult it can be to manage in this city. I speak not only of transportation issues, but of sidewalk and curb-cut issues, and problems getting into buildings such as shops and restuarants. Opponents of making the city accessible often state that the historic preservation of the city needs to be protected. However, there are many simple solutions, such as removable ramps and platforms. One issue that was brought up in the article is that the green streetcars don’t have enough room at some stops to deploy a ramp. Jonah’s solution was more cement and curb cuts and/or adding red streetcars to the St. Charles line. These are excellent ideas. Other cities make access to public transit work with platform ramps and other mechanisms. Beyond the transportation issue, this is more about equal access and access to all. Every person matters and should be [afforded] the same opportunities. This article was great in showing New Orleans that we (people in wheelchairs) exist, we have lives and we want rights just like everyone else. Let’s make noise my New Orleans disabled community. Let’s not back down!

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

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DEAR ALLEN, The $500,000 Ford Assembly Plant, located at Friscoville Avenue and the Mississippi River in Arabi, opened for business in April 1923 and began turning out 150 cars and 20 trucks a day almost immediately. The output included every model of Ford cars, and they were assembled entirely from parts made in Ford’s factory in Detroit. The plant in Arabi (which most records list as Ford’s New Orleans plant) held an open house with guided tours on April 23, 1923, and the tours were so popular the company continued them for many years. Construction of the plant began in August 1922, and the finished building measured 400 feet by 400 feet, with a two-story section in front. Initially, it employed between 400 and 500 men. The New Orleans plant was one of 35 similar facilities located in the larger cities of America. Ford cars were very popular, and records show they accounted for 47 percent of all passenger cars sold in Louisiana in July 1932. The Great Depression took a toll on sales, however, and the plant closed in January 1933, leaving 700 men without jobs. HEY BLAKE, WHEN I TOLD MY GRANDSON THAT I WAS BORN AT HOTEL DIEU, HE EXCLAIMED, “YOU WERE BORN IN A HOTEL?” COULD YOU TELL ME ABOUT THE HISTORIC HOSPITAL THAT STOOD ON TULANE AVENUE? ALAN LEONHARD

DEAR ALAN, It’s been said that you can tell you’re a New Orleans native if you know better than to try to rent a room at Hotel Dieu. The Daughters of Charity established Hotel Dieu (French for “house of God”) in 1858 with only five patients in their care, but during the Civil War, it was the only private hospital in operation. After the war, seamen sought treatment there. The Daughters of Charity have a long history of providing health care in New Orleans, starting with Charity Hospital in 1834. The first nuns, known as “God’s Geese,” decorated their hospital with a golden crucifix and two golden candlesticks, which stood before bandaged patients as they worshiped with their anxious families. It wasn’t until 1895, however, that the first registered nurses arrived from Boston.

This photograph of the original Hotel Dieu is part of the U.S. Sanitary Commission records from 1861-1872. The Daughters of Charity sold the hospital, which has been rebuilt and renovated several times, to the state in 1992, and it was renamed University Hospital. PHOTO COURTESY NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY

The first Hotel Dieu building was replaced in 1924 and that one was replaced in 1972. The Daughters of Charity sold the hospital to the state of Louisiana in 1992, and the institution was renamed University Hospital. Just hours before Hotel Dieu was to be turned over to the state, the original crucifix and candlesticks were carried to the altar in the hospital’s chapel, where a special Mass was celebrated to bid farewell to the House of God in New Orleans.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < KNOWLEDGE < < < < < < < < < < <IS < <POWER <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < QUOTE OF THE WEEK > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > “New Orleans has lost one of its greatest leaders in our <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< < < < < < < < nearly > > > > >300-year > > > > > > history. > > > > > >A>World > > > > War > > > >II>veteran, > > > > > >he > >assumed > >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> the role of archbishop during one of our city’s most difficult < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < periods, just on the heels of Hurricane Betsy. A builder in the

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truest form and a man dedicated to education, from his earliest days he led the rebuilding of badly damaged churches and schools and drove the creation of a strong Catholic school system throughout the Archdiocese. Archbishop Hannan was also a firm believer in caring for the community’s seniors and the poor, leading important housing and social justice programs. Archbishop Hannan was a devoted man to his family, his church, and this community. He consistently stood for a vibrant, God-fearing community, and he truly was a spiritual shepherd to his flock.” — Mayor Mitch Landrieu on the death of former Archbishop Philip Hannan, who served from 1965 to 1988 as the head of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New Orleans. Hannan died Sept. 29 at the age of 98.

Big Spender STATE REP. JOHN LABRUZZO BRANDS HIMSELF AS AN ARCHCONSERVATIVE, BUT HE SPENDS LIBERALLY FROM HIS CAMPAIGN ACCOUNT — ON MEALS AND WHEELS. BY CLANCY DUBOS

A CHARTER DEBATE

E

Candidates for the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education (BESE) will debate at Dillard University Wednesday, Oct. 5. The BESE elections — normally low-key affairs — have drawn increased attention this year because of the nascent and controversial charter school movement championed by leaders of the statewide Recovery School District (RSD). Proponents of charters cite increased parental choice and higher test scores; detractors have decried the “privatization” elements of charters and what some see as a push to get special-needs students out of the system. BESE candidates this year have generally been lumped into either the pro- or anti-charter category. Brian Beabout, an assistant professor of educational leadership at the University of New Orleans, says the races are so heated because the current BESE board is nearly evenly PAGE 15

From Jan. 1, 2009 through Sept. 22, 2011, Rep. John LaBruzzo charged more than $49,000 in automobile- and food-related expenses to his campaign account — despite not having to run against an opponent since 2005. “I am a higherrevving engine, campaign-wise, and I have the work to back it up,” LaBruzzo told Gambit. tion cycle, I’m campaigning all the time.” Louisiana’s campaign finance laws do not require politicians to provide many details on their reports, but the law does require them to keep detailed records and to produce them if their reports are questioned by the state Ethics Board, which oversees campaign finance

c'est what? WITH THE REPEAL OF “DON’T ASK, DON’T TELL,” GAY SERVICEMEMBERS CAN NOW SERVE OPENLY IN THE MILITARY. WHAT KIND OF AN ADJUSTMENT WILL IT MAKE TO THE ARMED SERVICES?

15% major

38% minor

47% none

Vote on “c’est what?” on bestofneworleans.com THIS WEEK’S QUESTION

How would you rate Gov. Bobby Jindal’s term in office?

PAGE 10

BoUQuets Team Gleason,

THIS WEEK’S HEROES AND ZEROES

founded by former New Orleans Saints safety Steve Gleason, aims to help patients with ALS, or Lou Gehrig’s disease, and their families. Gleason recently announced he was diagnosed with ALS in January. On Sept. 25, 2006, Gleason famously blocked an Atlanta Falcons punt that was returned for a touchdown in the opening minutes of the first game inside the restored Louisiana Superdome after Hurricane Katrina — a play quarterback Drew Brees called the most significant in the team’s history.

Joseph A. Craig Elementary

was awarded a $30,000 grant by Energizer and the VH1 Save the Music Foundation to benefit the Treme school’s arts and music programs. Energizer’s “now that’s positivenergy” program gave $250,000 to Save the Music to help struggling music programs in eight schools around the country. Since 1997, Save the Music has provided $48 million in new musical instruments to 1,800 public schools in more than 100 cities.

Henry and Karen Coaxum

are recipients of the 2011 Alexis de Tocqueville Award, the highest honor awarded by United Way of the Greater New Orleans Area for community activism, philanthropy and volunteerism. Coaxum Enterprises runs seven McDonald’s restaurants, and its training and resource center trains hundreds of employees each year. The Coaxums also serve on several boards for economic development, historic preservation and the arts.

Warren LeBeauf Jr. and Tamara Scott-Landry,

a married couple in St. Charles Parish, were sentenced in federal court last month to 87 months and 30 months, respectively, for collecting more than $800,000 from fraudulent tax returns. LeBeauf, a deputy with the St. Charles Parish Sheriff’s office, collected thousands of pages of prison inmates’ personal information, which Scott-Landry, an accountant, used to file fraudulent tax returns over 10 months in 2005 and 2006.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

ven critics of Louisiana’s lax campaign finance laws concede that the disclosures they require of public officials make it easier for voters to see where candidates get their money — and how they spend it. Knowing that, one would expect politicians to be wary of charging excessive food, automotive and other potentially personal expenses to their campaign accounts. But “wary” is not a word generally associated with state Rep. John LaBruzzo, R-Metairie. LaBruzzo first gained notoriety in 2008 for his lobbying efforts in the state Senate on behalf of the controversial legislative pay raise — senators say he trolled the aisles showing photos of his family and begging them to pass the pay hike — and then for his eugenics proposal. In the wake of the pay raise debacle, he floated the idea of paying poor women $1,000 to be permanently sterilized (that’s beyond even what David Duke, one of his predecessors, had suggested) and filed successive — but unsuccessful — bills requiring welfare recipients to be drug tested at state expense. When it comes to spending campaign money on food and vehicles, LaBruzzo is equally unabashed. Records the lawmaker filed with the state Ethics Administration show he spent more than $18,000 on meals and more than $31,000 on vehicles and fuel between January 2009 and September 2011. LaBruzzo says all of his expenditures are legal and vetted by the local accounting firm LaPorte. “I walk my district every other year,” he told Gambit. “I have expenses that relate to that. Even if it’s not in an elec-

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Robert Scott, president of the Baton Rouge-based Public Affairs Research Council of Louisiana (PAR), says LaBruzzo’s spending raises a “red flag.” Scott says using campaign funds for gas and meals isn’t uncommon, but “it is unusual to see hundreds of them.” and wheels during that same period. Similarly, Tucker reported spending a total of $30.52 on fuel during the last three years and about $9,500 on meals, or barely half what LaBruzzo spent on meals. Tucker is House Speaker and currently is running for secretary of state, a statewide office. He and LaBruzzo, though both Republicans, are at odds politically. Tucker says he removed LaBruzzo from the powerful House Appropriations Committee after Tucker received complaints from LaBruzzo’s committee colleagues that LaBruzzo repeatedly signed up to receive his per diem pay, then left committee meetings early. LaBruzzo says Tucker removed him for purely political reasons. When asked why he spent so much on fuel, LaBruzzo said, “I have a campaign truck that doesn’t get good gas mileage.” When asked how he could gas up a vehicle twice on the same day — or use two “campaign” vehicles — LaBruzzo said, “If you are a higher-revving engine, obviously you’re going to burn more fuel.” In response to questions about specific dates in January 2010 on which he gassed up twice in the same day, LaBruzzo searched his records and said he made day trips out of town on official business on those days and had to fill up page 13

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

Lawmakers were not in session then. On several other occasions, he claimed a “constituent meal” at the steak house. He likewise claimed a “meal” at Lucy’s Retired Surfers Bar on March 17 — St. Patrick’s Day — 2010, for $38.54. On Nov. 21, 2010, he claimed $22 in “concessions” at the New Orleans Arena. On that date the New Orleans Saints beat the Seattle Seahawks in the Superdome. LaBruzzo suggested Gambit look at other lawmakers’ campaign reports, in particular those of state Sen. John Alario, R-Westwego; state Rep. Jim Tucker, R-Terrytown; Rep. Nick Lorusso, R-Lakeview (LaBruzzo’s opponent in this fall’s election); and state Sen. Ed Murray, D-New Orleans. We did. Tucker, Murray and Lorusso’s food and vehicle expenses came nowhere near those of LaBruzzo. Only Alario, who is the dean of the Legislature, an authority on the state budget and actively campaigning to be Senate president, rivaled LaBruzzo’s total expenses for food, fuel and vehicle use. Alario’s dining expenses, however, were far fewer in number. They show a high-powered senator lavishly entertaining colleagues during legislative sessions and committee meetings — mostly in Baton Rouge — whereas LaBruzzo’s meal tabs were year-round and smaller in scale. For example, on Feb. 25, 2010, a full 21 months before the Oct. 22 primary, LaBruzzo charged $10.86 at Honey Baked Ham in Metairie to his campaign account, describing it as a “campaign meal.” Meanwhile, Murray reported nothing for gas and less than $4,900 on meals from 2009 through 2011 — far less than LaBruzzo’s more than $49,000 on meals

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

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Legislative critic C.B. Forgotston blames lawmakers for passing a vague campaign finance law. “I can’t say that it’s illegal,” Forgotston says of LaBruzzo’s expense reports.

So what, exactly, are the standards for campaign spending? Political veterans

agree they are ill-defined. “The way the law is written, you’re not allowed to use it for personal expenses,” says Robert Scott, president of the Public Affairs Research Council of Louisiana (PAR), “but you can use money from your campaign funds for activities related to holding office as well as the campaign — and that’s a pretty broad range of activities that could be included. It’s hard to separate the two.” Frequent legislative critic C.B. Forgotston blames the Legislature for passing a vague law. “I can’t say that it’s illegal,” says Forgotston of LaBruzzo’s expense reports, “but it’s certainly an abuse of the system to use campaign funds for things not directly related to a campaign. The law is very general and very vague.” Turning his attention to LaBruzzo’s meals, Forgotston said, “I don’t think this is going to sit well with his constituents, frankly. I don’t think that’s what they expect. I think a lot of them are going to wonder, ‘How come he hasn’t taken me to lunch?’” Forgotston lives in Hammond, but for more than two decades he resided in what is now LaBruzzo’s district. “I would like to know who the constituents were,” he said. “It’s easy to just put words on a paper. It’s another thing to back them up.” Ethics Board administrator Kathleen

mine information from the reports, the Internet — and a requirement that most candidates file electronically — has made that task easier, says PAR’s Scott. “The public has the ability to look at a lot of the activities and to make a judgment themselves as to whether these activities are appropriate, whether they are excessive, whether there are conflicts that are created — that’s what so important about the disclosure laws,” Scott says. “The public can see and make judgments themselves. It isn’t just about having a police force enforcing the laws.” Scott noted it’s not unusual to see receipts for gas and meals. “It is unusual to see hundreds of them,” he said of LaBruzzo’s reports. “I don’t think there’s any question that there’s a red flag here. This definitely deserves more scrutiny, and it definitely deserves more scrutiny from the public.”

Meals & Wheels rom Jan. 1, 2009 through Sept. 22, 2011, Rep. John LaBruzzo charged more than $31,000 in gas and vehicle expenses and more than $18,000 in “constituent meals” and other dining expenses to his campaign account.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

his car twice each time. LaBruzzo also suggested that Gambit look closely at the ethics and campaign finance records of his opponent in House District 94, Republican Lorusso. During the same 2009-11 period, Lorusso spent less than $8,000 on meals, most of them during legislative sessions. Lorusso spent only $560 on gas during that time — all of it during legislative sessions — and nothing on vehicle payments or repairs. LaBruzzo added Lorusso has “multiple ethics violations” whereas he has none. Ethics records show Lorusso was fined on two occasions for filing his campaign finance reports late four years ago — once on a Monday instead of the previous Thursday, and once for a postmark that was a day past deadline. Lorusso scoffed at LaBruzzo’s insinuation and noted that none of his own expenditures has ever raised red flags. Lorusso also said he wrote a letter to his constituents explaining the deadline snafus and that he was subsequently elected twice by large margins. “We’ll see what the voters think of Mr. LaBruzzo’s lavish campaign spending, compared to me not trying to live out of my campaign account,” he said.

Allen would not comment specifically on LaBruzzo’s reports, but she said candidates are required to keep detailed records beyond the minimal information that’s contained in the reports. “If there was ever a question by our office, we would expect someone to be able to provide their records to support that,” Allen said. “A candidate is required to keep their records for a period of two years following the last report for the election.” Allen noted that the ethics staff is overwhelmed by the more than 15,000 reports that they receive in a typical election year. The Ethics Board has only two staff members assigned to review the reports, and they usually are able to perform only cursory examinations — and no random audits. While the shortage of manpower and the vagueness of the law has put more of a burden on ordinary citizens to

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

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Double Bill A HANO resideNt gOt bills fOr twO differeNt reNt AmOuNts. wHile tryiNg tO fiNd ANswers, sHe pAid NeitHer. NOw sHe’s beeN evicted. by cHArles mAldONAdO

n Sept. 29, Lorraine McCalebb lost her home. She lived in one of the Housing Authority of New Orleans’ (HANO) “scattered site” (nondevelopment) buildings in Algiers and was officially ordered out of her house, where she lived with her daughter and grandchild, following an eviction hearing on Sept. 27 in Judge Mary “K.K.” Norman’s court in New Orleans Second City Court. “I don’t know where I’m going to go,” McCalebb said after leaving the hearing. McCalebb, who has appeared at HANO and City Council meetings to protest her eviction, had several witnesses at her side to dispute the eviction, which Norman dismissed at a hearing in August after HANO’s attorney didn’t appear on time, according to courtroom statements from Norman and HANO lawyer Tammie Jackson. McCalebb and Eloise Williams, a community activist who came to court on McCalebb’s behalf, say HANO has mishandled the eviction, citing apparent inconsistencies between McCalebb’s August and September court summonses. McCalebb also says the agency refused to give her additional time to vacate her home in retaliation for speaking publicly about her eviction. HANO officials deny both allegations. McCalebb had been living in her current home and a nearby scattered site building since 2007 at a rental rate of $50 per month. When her daughter got a job last March, McCalebb didn’t report the new income to the agency until June, when McCalebb signed a new lease at a rate of $329 per month, retroactively payable from April. Soon after signing the lease, though, McCalebb says she discovered an error. She says HANO was counting as income $131 per month she receives from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) utility payment reimbursements. She says the error is why she did not pay her rent. An eviction notice she received in August from HANO used the $329 rate for a total of $1,341 due for April through July (an average of $335 per month, presumably including penalties). McCalebb’s court date was Aug. 16, but Norman dismissed it when HANO attorney Tammie Jackson failed to appear. In September HANO appears to have admitted its error, albeit in the form of another eviction notice instead of an offer to work out a payment plan at the new, correct

O

rent. The notice was amended to $198 (which is $329 minus $131, the amount of McCalebb’s utility reimbursement) for April through August, a total of $1,433 (an average of $286 per month, presumably including penalties). Asked why HANO was demanding another immediate eviction when its own court filing appeared to demonstrate that HANO had realized its mistake, agency spokeswoman Lesley Eugene said Judge Norman didn’t see it that way. “We can’t discuss anything in this case because she has a confidentiality clause in her contract with HANO,” Eugene told Gambit. “This is the same thing as any rental contract between any tenant and any private landlord,” Eugene added. “Ms. McCalebb had a responsibility to pay her rent and properly report her income. She did not do that.” She also didn’t accept the agency’s help, Eugene said. After McCalebb attended HANO Board of Commissioners meetings in August and September, looking for help, HANO Administrative Receiver David Gilmore advised her to meet with a member of the agency’s senior staff to discuss her problem and seek legal representation. “It’s my understanding she did neither,” Eugene said. During the hearing, Jackson initially wanted to give McCalebb 24 hours to vacate, even as one of McCalebb’s witnesses, Ivan Williams, offered to pay the delinquent amount (more than $1,600) if she could be allowed to remain in her home a few more weeks. Jackson refused, saying “Ms. McCalebb has shown up at board meetings and seriously misrepresented me and HANO.” Speaking on Jackson’s behalf, Eugene denied the statement was given as a justification for HANO’s actions. After the court order, McCalebb contacted U.S. Attorney Jim Letten, who referred her put to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Office of Inspector General (HUD OIG), which investigates allegations of fraud and mismanagement in HUD as well as local housing agencies, like HANO, that HUD oversees. Bobby Anderson, special agent-incharge of the New Orleans HUD OIG, said HUD is looking at McCalebb’s complaint, but added the HUD OIG’s interview with McCalebb didn’t appear to turn up any red flags. Anderson said his office will review the case with both HANO and the Second City Court. “It’s not a dead issue,” he said. Meanwhile, on the day of the eviction, a U-Haul stood in front of McCalebb’s nowformer house. As she smoothed out a dress and hung it for the move, McCalebb said she didn’t know where she would be staying that night. ”Right now I’m just trying to get this all out of here so I can get it into storage,” she said. As of Sept. 30, McCalebb was staying with another family member, waiting to hear her fate.

The

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New OrleaNs

New Orleans chief economist Jerome Lomba says the city is on track for exceeding its $488,370,665 revenue target for the 2011 fiscal year. Speaking Sept. 28 at a monthly revenue update before Deputy Mayor Andy Kopplin, District E Councilman Jon Johnson, Director of Finance Norman S.J. Foster, Tulane University director of research Peter Ricchiuti and newly appointed interim Councilman Eric Granderson, Lomba said the city is projected to take in $488,452,373 — $81,708 above the target — by the end of the year.

Feel the noIse

In last week’s “Bouquets and Brickbats” (Sept. 27), the wrong symbol was inserted before an item about Sugar Bowl officials making illegal campaign contributions to then-Gov. Kathleen Blanco. The symbol should have been a brick. Gambit regrets the error — and Bowl officials deserved the brick.

In response to a working draft issued by District C City Councilwoman Kristin Gisleson Palmer, the Bourbon Street Alliance (BSA) has drafted an ordinance to combat noise in the French Quarter. Palmer’s office said another draft may be ready later this month, pending review of

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more than 100 pages of public comments submitted since the draft was posted earlier this year. The BSA sent Palmer’s office its draft ordinance proposing regulations for the placement of speakers in businesses. (The French Quarter Business Association also is submitting comment.) Nicole Webre, Palmer’s legislative director, told Gambit there is no primary target or “biggest offender” in Palmer’s draft ordinance, though she says “T-shirt shops and nonentertainment business establishments” that direct music to the street are a problem in both the French Quarter and Faubourg Marigny. The trick, Webre says, is balancing entertainment within mixeduse neighborhoods — not unplugging music in neighborhoods like the French Quarter that also are residential. “Some people have an incorrect notion that amending the current noise ordinance will shut down businesses and silence music,” Webre says. “This could not be further from the truth. This is an opportunity to improve the current legislation.” Webre said the proposed maximum decibel levels allowed are the same — or higher — than what is now in place. Current U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration standards allow for a maximum of 85 decibels over eight hours. There are no distinctions in the draft, however, between canned music and live music, on or off the street. Last year, New Orleans Police Department 8th District Maj. Commander Edwin Hosli told Gambit he received consistent complaints from residents in his district about loud and live music. The TBC Brass Band, a staple at the corner of Bourbon and Canal streets, was also told last year to clear the street by 8 p.m., though the rule has since been relaxed. “The current draft sound ordinance is still a work in progress and no one expects it to be perfect as a working draft,” Webre says. “We needed to start with something and then expand on that, so a draft was created and proposed to get the discussion going. This whole process has been long and arduous but exciting and even empowering for many people and organizations who have felt they haven’t had a voice or they haven’t been able to weigh in on a legislative process.” — Alex Woodward

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That good news comes despite Lomba’s estimates that the city will not meet its goals on fines, property taxes and penalties and interest. The surplus derives primarily from $5.5 million in nonrecurring funds from a number of sources, including FEMA reimbursements, which, Lomba told the group, came as something of a pleasant surprise. “That was not anticipated money in this year’s budget,” Lomba said. “It’s fortunate we have it.” The recurring revenues for this year are only projected to come to $482 million. But Lomba says he has figured new revenues into next year’s projected revenues. He anticipates an increase of $1.8 million in sales taxes because the city will host the Bowl Championship Series and the NCAA men’s basketball Final Four. Another $4 million-plus will come from Orleans Parish Sheriff sales of seized homes. Combined, Lomba said the city’s 2012 revenue should be about $18 above this year’s. As The Times-Picayune first reported last week, the gain could be even larger. According to Lomba’s projections, higher property assessments would push next year’s property tax revenues up $4.1 million but only if the City Council votes to maintain, or “roll forward,” current tax rates. Mayor Mitch Landrieu will deliver his 2012 budget to the public in mid-October, though mayoral spokesman Ryan Berni told Gambit the city has not yet scheduled a date or location for the budget address. City Council hearings on the budget should begin in early November, Berni said. While expressing some concern that a zero percent increase could be problematic if the city loses state or federal money or if it’s required to spend additional funds on litigation or employee wage increases, members of the revenue update committee pointed out that if you subtract the $5.5 million in nonrecurring funds from this year’s projections, true revenue growth in 2012 should be between 1 percent and 2 percent. That’s modest, but it bucks a national trend for cities, Ricchiuti said. “I was talking to an economist, and he said that one of the great things about New Orleans, as opposed to many other cities, is here ‘growth’ isn’t in parentheses,” which in budget documents means negative growth, or a loss, Ricchiuti said. — Charles Maldonado

• Gala at the Galvez • Prelude by the River (kora, sax, drums) | 6pm • Molto, led by Jean Montes | 7pm • Meal & Tributes • Jesse McBride Presents the Next Generation 9:30 pm • Screening: Draw Yourself! | 10 am • Children’s Workshop • Lower 9th Ward Village Charmaine Neville 7pm • Screening: Shirley Adams: Portrait of a Mother (So Africa) 8pm • Screening: Africa United (UK) 10am • New Orleans African American Museum Screening: Murder on a Sunday Morning (France/USA) 1pm • Fredy Omar con su banda | 7pm • Screening: Central Station (Brazil) | 8pm • Caesar Bros Funk Box 6:30 pm • Screening: Black Venus (France/Tunisia) 7:30 pm Festival pass: $20; $5 each screening. info/purchase: www.neworleansafrikanfilmfest.org or noafest@neworleansafrikanfilmfest.org

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

split. “The balance of power is pretty close. It’s an 11-member board, and most significant decisions have gone 6-5 — with (Gov. Bobby) Jindal getting what he wants and the RSD getting what they want.” The BESE districts were redrawn during this year’s legislative session in Baton Rouge. The new District 1, which covers most of the Northshore and some of Orleans Parish along the Lakefront, is currently represented by Metairie attorney Jim Garvey, who supports charters. His challengers are Lee Barrios, a retired educator from St. Tammany Parish, and Sharon Hewitt, an engineering manager for Shell Oil and longtime St. Tammany School System volunteer. Garvey and Hewitt are Republicans; Barrios is affiliated with no party. District 2, which encompasses most of Orleans Parish as well as some of Jefferson, St. Charles, St. John the Baptist, St. James and Assumption Parishes, will be a faceoff between eight-year incumbent Louella Givens and challenger Kira Orange Jones, both Democrats. (Also on the ballot are Ferdinand Wallace Jr., a Democrat from Reserve, and Pam Matus of Laplace, who listed no party affiliation.) Jones, a charter proponent, is the executive director of the New Orleans region of Teach For America, and has received a wide variety of endorsements, from Sen. Mary Landrieu to Jefferson Parish president John Young. Givens, a lawyer who is the current board’s strongest voice against the charter school movement, has been roiled in recent weeks by reports in The Times-Picayune about a DWI arrest earlier this year and a $1.3 million IRS tax lien against her house. Givens told the paper both situations are misunderstandings. She has not returned repeated calls from Gambit. The debate is open to the public and begins at 6:30 p.m. in Dillard’s Professional Schools Building (enter through the university’s St. Anthony Street gate). The fall primary election is Oct. 22, with the general election and any runoffs Nov. 19. — Kevin Allman

afrikan Film & arts FesTival Project

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

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proles has been a one-man highlight machine since the season began, but no moment encompasses what Sproles means to the Saints more than one of his first — or, rather, how Saints fans reacted to it. In the opening game against the Green Bay Packers, Sproles returned a punt for 72 yards for a touchdown and, either out of habit or confusion, a packed crowd at the Irish Channel bar Tracey’s began chanting “Reg-gie! Reg-gie!” On the NFL Network, Michael Irvin said what everyone is thinking: “[Sproles] is playing Reggie Bush’s role bet-

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

SPROLES

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

Jefferson teachers believe that all children deserve a high-quality education. But we can’t do it alone.

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On the nFL netwOrk, MichaeL irvin said

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Saints quarterback Drew Brees hands the ball to rookie running back Darren Sproles in the Saints’ 30-13 win against the Chicago Bears.

ter — like Reggie has never played before in his life.” Irvin wasn’t exaggerating. Sproles seems to change the Saints’ fortunes for the better every time he gets the ball. Against the Houston Texans, he ignited what had been a stagnant offense with a 30-yard rushing touchdown in the second quarter, putting the Houston defense on its heels for the rest of the game. Despite being projected to be a third-down running back, Sproles has been on the field for snaps more often than fellow backs Mark Ingram and Pierre Thomas. Sproles also has shown his versatility by catching 21 passes for 165 yards in his first two games — something Bush hadn’t done since 2008. Something else Bush hasn’t been able to do since 2008? Stay healthy. Sproles hasn’t missed a game since 2007. The only thing Sproles seems to lack is his own chant when he steps up to receive a punt. Our personal preference is the theme from Mighty Mouse (“Here he comes to save the day!”) but we think “Da-rren, Da-rren” will do.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

DJ CAPTAIN CHARLES

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s coveted as the Heisman Trophy is in college football, it hasn’t exactly been a consistent indicator of future NFL success. Saints fans know this all too well (see “Bush, Reggie”). Unfortunately for rookie Mark Ingram, he has the pressure of being the Saints’ second Heisman Trophy-winning running back drafted and he has to play in New Orleans’ pass-heavy offense. Ingram has averaged just over 12 rushing attempts in the team’s first three games and is averaging 3.6 yards per carry. The limited amount of carries puts a microscope on every one of them. So far, Ingram’s most memorable

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

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s coveted as the Heisman Trophy is in college football, it hasn’t exactly been a consistent indicator of future NFL success. Saints fans know this all too well (see “Bush, Reggie”). Unfortunately for rookie Mark Ingram, he has the pressure of being the Saints’ second Heisman Trophy-winning running back drafted and he has to play in New Orleans’ pass-heavy offense. Ingram has averaged just over 12 rushing attempts in the team’s first three games and is averaging 3.6 yards per carry. The limited amount of carries puts a microscope on every one of them. So far, Ingram’s most memorable

TOTes And Tees For Breast Cancer Awareness.

Get a Breast Cancer Awareness Tote Bag or T-shirt when you earn 25 base Reward Credits®. For each guest that picks up a tote or tee, Harrah’s New Orleans will donate $1 to a Breast Cancer Awareness organization. Monday, October 10, 12pm – 8pm Winners Cove Totes and tees limited to the first 2,000 guests.

Harrah’s reserves the right to change, cancel or amend these events at any time. Must be 21 or older to enter casino and to gamble. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® ©2011, Caesars License Company, LLC.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

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Saints running back Mark Ingram (No. 28) sprints past the Houston Texans on a 13-yard rush that gave Ingram his first NFL touchdown.

plays are a mixed bag. His steamrolling of safety Roman Harper spawned headlines and expectations that Ingram would treat opposing defenders the same way, but we have yet to see that power translate into the regular season. Ingram was stuffed at the goal line on the Saints’ final play in their loss to the Green Bay Packers, in a game where the Saints struggled in short-yardage situations. In week two, he fumbled in the fourth quarter against the Chicago Bears, a play that may have given Chicago new life had the Saints not managed to sack Bears quarterback Jay Cutler on the very next play. Against Houston, Ingram had just four carries for 38 yards, but one of those was a punishing 17-yard fourth quarter rushing touchdown that sealed the game for the Saints. The good news is that Ingram has played just three games as an NFL running back and has shown plenty of potential. Right now, Saints coach Sean Payton says he’s still juggling his three running backs in the backfield, but it shouldn’t take long for him to find the best way to use the powerful Ingram. More good news: Even though Ingram didn’t score on that final goal line play against the Packers, the touchdown against the Texans might be a greater indicator of how he will serve the Saints in that area. As Payton said after the Green Bay game, “I think that’s a play we’re going to see him score on a number of times as the season progresses.” page 26

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

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$85.00 ven though the Saints have one of the deepest rosters in the NFL, there were, and are, loads of questions to be answered on the team’s defensive line. Who can forget how the Seattle Seahawks ran roughshod over the Saints in the playoffs last year, or how Packers QB Aaron Rodgers seemingly went untouched in this year’s season opener? After a lackluster first game, defensive coordinator Gregg Williams shuffled the line and saw marked improvement against Chicago and Houston’s high-octane offense. Sorry about grouping all the defensive line players here, but with so many new faces, it can be hard to keep track … Aubrayo Franklin and Shaun Rogers are first-year Saints playing defensive tackle and they’re both playing a significant role in this new-look line. Against Chicago, it was the double teams the tackles commanded that freed up the Saints’ defensive ends and linebackers to tee off on Cutler. Against the Texans, the line was more inconsistent but stepped up at many crucial moments, pressuring Texans quarterback Matt Schaub into crucial fourth-quarter mistakes which gave the Saints the victory. Newcomers Junior Galette and Turk McBride got to reap the rewards of the tackles’ hard work, combining for three of the Saints’ six sacks on Cutler and one of the two on Schaub. The only real disappointment on the line so far is first-round pick Cameron Jordan. Jordan has seen limited action with the Saints defense this season, notching just four tackles. Jordan has said transitioning to the speed and skill of the NFL has been his biggest challenge. But while seeing a first-round pick standing idly on the sidelines may seem a waste, the upside is that he’s not playing because the Saints have better players ahead of him on the depth chart. That New Orleans has the luxury of keeping a talented rookie on the sidelines while he adjusts to the NFL is cause for optimism. PAGE 28

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

STERLING FLEUR DE LIS RING

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hile Ingram and Sproles will get most of the attention as newcomers to the Saints offense, free agent-signee Olin Kreutz is in a pivotal role. No one may be more important when it comes to the Saints’ effectiveness in moving the ball. The center-quarterback dynamic is the most important relationship on a football team. They are the only two offensive players to touch the ball on every snap and it’s their combined ability to read defenses and adjust for oncoming blitzes that can be the difference between a sack and a big gain. Exhibit A: Look at Kreutz’s former team, the Bears, which allowed 14 sacks in the first three games of the season. The offensive line situation in Chicago is so bad that Bears general manager Jerry Angelo has had to defend his offseason moves to angry fans (among those moves: letting Kreutz go to New Orleans). Kreutz started the season in New Orleans without missing a beat. Saints quarterback Drew Brees is among the least-hit QBs in the league and New Orleans has given up just six sacks through three games. Kreutz had a rough outing against Houston, though. It started on the first offensive play of the game for the Saints when he stepped on Brees after the snap and caused the quarterback to fall for a three-yard loss. Kreutz committed a facemask penalty and finished the game on the sidelines with a left knee injury. He’s since missed practice, but Kreutz’s work ethic should have him back on the field in no time. Kreutz’s passion was clear from the beginning, according to an anecdote shared by Payton before the team played the Bears. Apparently, as Kreutz’s agent was hammering out a deal with Saints general manager Mickey Loomis, the center was supposed to be getting on a plane to leave New Orleans. But when a deal was made at the eleventh hour, it was revealed that Kreutz never got on his flight and had instead stayed at an airport hotel. “He had purposely not gotten on the flight, stayed there,” Payton said. “Two hours later, he was at practice at center.”

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SHOPPING NEWS BY MISSY WILKINSON

Flame to Please ucked away on Iberville Street in the shadows of looming hotels, Country Flame (620 Iberville St., 522-1138) is the kind of quaint hole-in-the-wall restaurant that often lands in tourists’ blind spots. Many bar and hotel workers habitually stop by to fortify themselves before long shifts spent catering to French Quarter crowds. “Mainly, (our customers) are people who work around here,” says Loukia Christakis, who co-owns the restaurant with her husband Michael. “We have some tourists, but only on the weekends.” Vivid murals depicting scarlet macaws and men in sombreros decorate the 1,200-square-foot restaurant, where salsa music, the Spanish banter of employees and the mechanical hum of upright freezers create a comfortable din. “We have no storage space, so you see all the equipment here. The restaurant is tiny,” says Christakis, gesturing toward a long, narrow kitchen where three women hold court. “We only have ladies (cooking) in the kitchen. Because every time we have men, the kitchen is so small, we have some kind of friction. They can’t take the pressure,” she says, laughing. Country Flame serves Spanish, Mexican and Cuban cuisine, with the occasional Louisiana staple (po-boys, seafood platters) thrown in for good measure. She shops daily for the meat and produce to ensure the menu of house-made dishes (which includes tamales, pork chops and vegetarian fajitas) meets her specifications. “Everything is made from scratch. The fresher the products, the better the food,” Christakis says. “That is the secret to Mexican food: Keep it as fresh as possible.” Natives of Greece, Christakis and her husband opened their

Maisin du Soleil has been revamped and renamed. Now called FINI (6250 Gen. Diaz St., 304-0633), the Lakeview beauty boutique offers airbrush tanning, jewelry, Stila cosmetics and clothing.

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restaurant in 1993. Some Loukia Christakis has co-owned of the original employCountry Flame since 1993. ees still work at Country Flame, but some — like Christakis’ two sons, now surgeons, and her daughter, a biomedical engineer — have moved on. “(My children) all worked here; they all bussed tables; they all worked the bar, especially during Mardi Gras season,” she says. “It was a family business in those days.” Christakis prices most entrees at less than $10 and offers frequent drink specials to accommodate her regulars. “We always try to keep our prices low so people around here are able to eat,” she says. “Every day we have specials.” Though Christakis admits working in the French Quarter can be crazy, she says she wouldn’t trade the experience for anything. “I’ve been other places, and there is nothing like being in the French Quarter,” she says. “There’s never a dull moment.”

PAINTING WITH A TWIST (2132 E. Gause Blvd., Slidell, 985-6416433; www.paintingwithatwist. com/slidell) holds Painting with a Purpose from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 6. Participants create their own paintings during the two-hour art class, which costs $35, and a portion of proceeds benefits the SLIDELL MEMORIAL HOSPITAL CANCER CENTER. PIPPEN LANE (2929 Magazine St., 269-0106; www.pippenlane.com) hosts “Style Your Sole,” a party in conjunction with philanthropic shoe company TOMS, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 8. There will be balloons, face-painting, live zydeco music by Papillion and snacks from La Divina Gelateria and Sucre.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

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>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << MUSIC >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE YOU GO << <<<<<<<<<< << 34 >> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << THE >> >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>> << <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> > << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

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< Louis C.K.

Watts Up at Delgado DELGADO LAUNCHES A RADIO STATION. BY MICHAEL PATRICK WELCH

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director Jude Matthews has ripped 5,000 records onto the server so far. “Jude’s musical tastes run from Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons to what sounds like explosions inside a grain silo,” Dunn says. That’s how Dunn wants it. “Delgado has the largest enrollment in New Orleans and the second largest in Louisiana,” he says. “We want the music to reflect that and be as diverse as the Delgado campus itself. We have a huge amount of international students, so we will be playing music from around the world. And since our school is largely urban, there will be an emphasis on hip-hop, in particular a lunchtime hip-hop show.” The Dolphin’s tiny AM signal is not governed by the same Federal Communications Commission (FCC) rules as larger local independent stations, so staff DJs can choose from a wide variety of music. “The word ‘bitch’ I will let slide,” Dunn says. “But we will stop short of ‘motherf—ker,’ or anything violent.” Dunn describes his ideal as, “Tony Bennett followed by Led Zeppelin followed by Lil Wayne.” “We also have a great music department with a recording studio,” Dunn says. “We hope to feature the work of Delgado musicians recorded here on campus.” The Dolphin also plans to broadcast live performances. “We will have a sportscaster,” Dunn adds. “And many students from the theater department have shown great interest in performing old-school radio plays. It will be a truly unique station for this city.” The Dolphin’s signal reaches up to a three-mile radius, but anyone can listen to the Internet stream on www.live365.com/stations/dolphinradio.

OCT

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The NOLA Project reprises its fun and rambunctious production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream at the Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden. Tickets $16 general admission, $8 students. 7 p.m. Thu.-Fri. & Sun. New Orleans Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins C. Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www. noma.org

Gretna Heritage Festival Grand Funk Railroad, Molly Hatchet, Sara Evans, Galactic, Amanda Shaw & the Cute Guys, The Kyle Turley Band and others headline a festival featuring everything from oldies and classic rock to country, Latin and brass band music. The festival also includes food, arts and crafts, and rides and games. Tickets $12.50 in advance, $15 at the gate, weekend pass $35/$40. Downtown Gretna, 361-7748; www.gretnafest.com

Friendly Fires

OCT

616

OCT

7-9

OCT

9

Tipitina’s starts Sunday with its weekly free music workshop (1 p.m.) and then tosses the keys to bigbudget, twinkle-toed British dance-rockers Friendly Fires. Brooklyn MC Theophilus London opens. Tickets $18 in advance, $21 at the door (includes fees). 10 p.m. Sunday. Tipitina’s, 501 Napoleon Ave., 8958477; www.tipitinas.com

OCT

Janelle Monae 10 R&B spark plug Janelle

Monae, last seen at the New Orleans Arena firing up Katy Perry’s California Dreams tour, returns and plays a more intimate venue as part of the green-friendly Campus Consciousness Tour. Fun opens. Tickets $15 general admission, $10 students. 8 p.m. Monday. Tulane University, McAlister Auditorium, 6823 St. Charles Ave.; www.tucp.net

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

unning a small community radio station is a hands-on affair. Recently, at Delgado Community College’s new radio station “The Dolphin” (1610-AM), Bob Dunn multitasked in the back office of its two-room studio, soldering a small transmitter while ripping reggae CDs onto a server. Delgado journalism professor Susan Hague came up with the plan for a college radio station 10 years ago, and The Dolphin is now up and running (as of September) thanks to Dunn and a host of volunteers. Dunn is a veteran of WWL-TV, but after Hurricane Katrina he took a job at Delgado teaching courses on TV and radio production. Recently, he took on the title of station manager and worked with students in electronics and technology programs to construct The Dolphin’s studio in a hallway in the Student Life Center. Grants helped pay for some equipment, other gear is on loan, and Delgado’s TV department donated an old audio console. The Dolphin’s signal is generated by a 10-watt transmitter (WWOZ broadcasts at 4,000 watts) with a 9-foot antenna. It isn’t glamorous, but it works. “It was kind of like the old Mickey Rooney quote,” Dunn says with a laugh. “‘We’ve got an old barn out back and a few costumes, let’s put on a show!’” Dunn, Hague and The Dolphin’s current staff of seven students have pooled their music libraries to fill the computer currently serving as DJ. The station has featured a few guest shows by student DJs, and Dunn hopes to entirely replace the computer-generated programming with DJs within the next month. So far the station has received roughly 70 applications. Musical

PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

59

Louis C.K. is a stand-up comedy monster, and he also writes, edits, directs and produces Louie, the surreal, darkly funny and critically acclaimed FX series. Tickets $32.75-$45.75 plus fees. 8 p.m. Thursday. Mahalia Jackson Theater, 1419 Basin St., 287-0351; www.mahaliajacksontheater.com

A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Professor Bob Dunn (left), Jude Matthews and Tony LeCompte broadcast from The Dolphin’s studio at Delgado Community College.

CUISINE

51

33

MUSIC

DARTS • POOL • DARTS • POOL • DARTS • POOL • DARTS • POOL

OCT 7

NO COVER

9PM

HAPPY HOUR • MON-FRI • 3-7PM

MON: FREE POOL 6-10pm

WED: Blues Jam Night 8-11pm THURS: Steak Night 6pm-till

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

All show times p.m. unless otherwise noted.

SUN: Happy Hour ALL DAY

Tuesday 4 12 BAR — Lotus Crush, 8:30

BANKS STREET BAR — Michael Matthews & Banks Funk, 10

BAYOU PARK BAR — Jim Jones & the Kool-Aids, 9 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Camile Baudoin & the Living Rumors CD release, 8

COLUMNS HOTEL — John Rankin, 8 D.B.A. — New Orleans Nightcrawlers, 9

TUE COMEDY NIGHT

IS BACK!! 8PM

10/4

Live Music Nightly

VOTED

-No Cover

Zagat Rated

WED BRASS-A-HOLICS 9PM

10/5 BECOMING A NEW ORLEANS TRADITION

THU

NEW ORLEANS’ ROCK SPOT 9PM

10/6 GRENADE MAN & THE PARISHIONERS

FRI

WINE AROUND THE WORLD 4-7PM $20 ENDLESS GLASS OF WINE & COMPLIMENTARY HORS D’OEUVRES

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

10/7 BROWN IMPROV COMEDY 8:30PM ENHARMONIC SOULS 10:30PM

34

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9PM 5PM 9PM

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Mitch Woods, 9:30

DRAGON’S DEN — The Real Deal, Stone Leek, Joystick, Vapo-Rats, Reagabomb, 9 THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3 FUHRMANN AUDITORIUM — Louis Prima Jr. feat. Sarah Spiegel, 7:30

FUNKY PIRATE — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30

HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — Murs, Tabi Bonney, Ski Beatz & the Senseis, McKenzie Eddy, Sean O’Connell, Da$h, 8

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Jason Marsalis, 8

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Brint Anderson, 6 MAHALIA JACKSON THEATER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS — The Script, Hot Chelle Rae, 8 THE MAISON — Gregory Agid Quartet, 6; Magnitude, 9

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OLD POINT BAR — Josh Garrett & the Bottom Line, 8 ONE EYED JACKS — Dam-Funk, Master Blazter, 10 PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall-Stars feat. Shannon Powell, 8 RALPH’S ON THE PARK — Joe Krown, 5

SIBERIA — Enharmonic Souls, Fight the Quiet, Liquid Peace Revolution, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Hector Gallardo Quartet, 8

PHOTO BY BRYAN BUSH

To the Foburg Music Festival, Chaz Bundick is the one that got away. It was considered a minor coup when the fledgling festival announced it had booked the much-buzzed Toro Y Moi — the musical pseudonym for the 24-yearold South Carolinian’s nebulous home recordings — to headline the second-year downtown concert cluster in March. The official notice appeared on Foburg’s website Feb. 22, coinciding with the release of Toro Y Moi’s second album Underneath the Pine (Carpark), which clarified the drowsy, downtempo bedroom pop of his atmospheric 2010 debut Causers of This into a composed platter of wide-awake, thrillingly rhythmic electro funk. But hours before the Saturn Bar show, Bundick backed out, choosing to save his hoarse voice for South by Southwest (which he also missed). Laryngitis is about the only thing that has managed to slow Bundick’s ascent over the past two years, during which time he’s transmuted his and others’ music over and over: cutting two great but barely related long players, fashioning numerous remixes (of likeminded artists Neon Indian, Washed Out and Cut Copy) and releasing a steady trickle of EPs, most recently the glitzy September soul fetish Freaking Out. Unknown Mortal Orchestra and Bass Drum of Death open. Tickets $12. — Noah Bonaparte Pais

OCT

10

Toro Y Moi 10 p.m. Monday One Eyed Jacks, 615 Toulouse St., 569-8361; www.oneeyedjacks.net

& 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Smokin’ Time Jazz Club, 6; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 10 TIPITINA’S — Iration, Tomorrow’s Bad Seeds, Through the Roots, 8 WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Kirk Branch, 6

Wednesday 5 12 BAR — Brass-A-Holics, 9

ALLWAYS LOUNGE — Ivan Milev, Bulgarika, 9 BANKS STREET BAR — Major Bacon, 10

CANDLELIGHT LOUNGE — Treme Brass Band, 9

CAROUSEL PIANO BAR & LOUNGE — Louis Prima Night feat. John Autin, Austin Clements & Tyler Clements, 8 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Meschiya Lake & Tom McDermott, 8 COLUMNS HOTEL — Ricardo Crespo, 8 COVINGTON TRAILHEAD — Rockin’ the Rails feat.

Terrance Simien & the Zydeco Experience, 5

D.B.A. — Paul Sanchez, Alex Mcmurray & Washboard Chaz, 7; Walter “Wolfman” Washington & the Roadmasters, 10

DECKBAR & GRILLE — Oscar & the Blues Cats, 8

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Bob Andrews, 9:30 EIFFEL SOCIETY — Vivaz!, 8

THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

FUNKY PIRATE — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30

GREEN ROOM — Andrew Rice, 9 HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — Silent Disco feat. Michal Menert, Supervision, Party Monster, High Top Kicks, 10 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S I CLUB — Kristin Diable, 8

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — James Westfall, 5; Irvin Mayfield’s NOJO Jam, 8 JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Joe Bennett, 6 LACAVA’S SPORTS BAR — Crossfire, 9

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

LAFAYETTE SQUARE — Harvest the Music feat. Irma Thomas & the Professionals, Soul Project, 5

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & the Zydeco Hellraisers, 4

THE MAISON — Jerry Jumonville & the Jump City Band, 6; Cat’s Pajamas Funk Allstars, 9

MAPLE LEAF BAR — The Trio, 10

LEGENDS BAR & GRILL — Topcats, 9

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Charlie Wooten Project, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Alexey Marti Band, 6; J the Savage, 9:30 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Pat Flory, 9 NEW ORLEANS ARENA — Taylor Swift, 7

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Joe Krown, 12

OLD FIREMEN’S HALL — Two Piece & a Biscuit feat. Brandon Foret, Allan Maxwell & Brian Melancon, 7:30 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lars Edegran & Topsy Chapman feat. Palm Court Jazz Band, 7

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Band feat. Mark Braud, 8

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Mitch Woods & His Rocket 88s, 8:30 SIBERIA — Half Hearts, Roarshark, Gravy Flavored Kisses, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Delfeayo Marsalis & the Uptown Jazz Orchestra, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Orleans 6, 6; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10

STAGE DOOR CANTEEN AT THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM — Victory Belles, 12

THE MAISON — Those Peaches, 5; Natalie Mae, 7; Magnetic Ear, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Andre Bouvier, 6; Smoky Greenwell & the Blues Gnus, 9

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Jimmy Dasher, 8; Mark Fernandez, 9; Proverbial, 10 OAK — Cristina Perez, 9

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 4

OLD POINT BAR — Blues Frenzy, 6:30; Kim Carson, 9

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Leroy Jones & Katja Toivola feat. Crescent City Joymakers, 7 PAVILION OF THE TWO SISTERS — Thursdays at Twilight feat. M.I. Scoggin, 6

PRESERVATION HALL — Tornado Brass Band feat. Darryl Adams, 8

RALPH’S ON THE PARK — Joe Krown, 5 RAY’S — Bobby Love Band, 6

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Geno Delafose, 8:30 ROYAL PALM — Philip Melancon Jr., 6:30

SATURN BAR — Alex McMurray & Julia Haltigan, 10 SIBERIA — Lantern, Jonesbirds, Dummy Dumpster, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Mitch Woods & His Rocket 88s, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Miss Sophie Lee, 6; New Orleans Moonshiners, 10

THREE MUSES — Mike Hood, 4:30; Hot Club, 7

THREE MUSES — Tom McDermott, 4:30; Luke Winslow-King, 7:30

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Larry Sieberth, 6

VAUGHAN’S — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 8:30

TIPITINA’S — Lagniappe Brass Band, Dana Abbott Band, 9

12 BAR — Grenade Man & the Parishoners, 9

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Larry Sieberth, 6

Friday 7

BABYLON LOUNGE — D15, 10

12 BAR — Enharrmonic Souls, 10:30

CARROLLTON STATION — Plus 1 Songwriter Night, 9

BANKS STREET BAR — Bills, Tuxedos, Luxuero Lovers, Velvet Tension, 10

BANKS STREET BAR — Dave Jordan & Lynn Drury, 10

3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY — WATIV, 9:30

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Kristin Diable & the City, 9

BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Philip Melancon, 8

DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 5:30

BAYOU PARK BAR — Revealers, 10

COLUMNS HOTEL — Fredy Omar, 8

D.B.A. — Justyna Kelley, 7; Colin Lake CD release, 10 DER RATHSKELLER — Jazz at the Rat feat. Vincente Archer, 7

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Los Tres Amigos, 9:30

THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3 FUNKY PIRATE — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30 THE HOOKAH — Bonobo, 9

THE INN ON BOURBON — Joe Ashlar, 6 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S I CLUB — Amanda Shaw, 8

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Roman Skakun, 5; James Andrews, 8

BAYOU BEER GARDEN — Lynn Drury, 9:30

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE LOUNGE — Frank Williams Jr. & Friends feat. Bobby Love, 8

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Proverbial, 11 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Sweet Olive String Band, 5:30; Paul Sanchez & Alex McMurray, 8 CLEVER WINE BAR — Scott Sanders Quartet feat. Olivier Bou, 8

COLUMNS HOTEL — Alex Bachari Trio, 5 THE CYPRESS — Marias Noir, Dropkik, Necrotic Priapism, From Shore to Shore, 7 DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 9

D.B.A. — Hot Club of New Orleans, 6; Shamarr Allen & the Underdawgs,

DOWNTOWN GRETNA — Gretna Heritage Festival feat. Galactic, Grand Funk Railroad, New Orleans Bingo! Show and others, 4

EMERIL’S DELMONICO — Bob Andrews, 7 FUNKY PIRATE — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30 GALVEZ RESTAURANT — Campbell Perkinson, 6:30

GREEN ROOM — Jay Weber, 7; Eternal Absence, Riffer Madness, 10 HI-HO LOUNGE — Soul Track Mind, Nasimiyu & the Many Moons, Magnetic Ear, 10 HOUSE OF BLUES — Who’s Bad, 9 HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Crizmatik, 10

THE INN ON BOURBON — Joe Ashlar, 6

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S I CLUB — Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 8

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Joe Krown, 5; Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown, 8

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 6:30; New Orleans Cotton Mouth Kings, 10 THREE MUSES — Debbie Davis, 4; Aurora Nealand, 6:30; Glen David Andrews, 10 TIPITINA’S — North Mississippi Allstars, Alvin Youngblood Hart’s Muscle Theory, 10

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Larry Sieberth, 6; Anais St. John, 9 ZADDIE’S TAVERN — Cold Turkey, 9

Saturday 8

BANKS STREET BAR — Lushingtons, LIfe Without Elvis, 10

BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Philip Melancon, 8 BAYOU PARK BAR — Sebastian & the Funky Existence, DJ Resin, 10 BLUE NILE — Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 7

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1

THE CYPRESS — Dodging Cathrine, Night Came Quickly, The Citing Method, Define Our Pride, 7

COLUMNS HOTEL — Andy Rogers, 9

LAFAYETTE SQUARE — Lafayette Square Conservancy’s Anniversary Celebration feat. Ian Cunningham Band, 30x90 Blueswomen, Remedy, 4

DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 9

LEGENDS BAR & GRILL — LA Lightning, 10

DOWNTOWN GRETNA — Gretna Heritage Festival feat. Lynyrd Skynrd, Ingram Hill, Cowboy Mouth and others, 2

LOUISIANA MUSIC FACTORY — North Mississippi Allstars, 4 THE MAISON — Those Peaches, 5; Some Like it Hot!, 7; Latin Dance Party (upstairs), 10; AsheSon, 10 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Last Waltz Esemble, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Bryce Eastwood, 4; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 7; Fredy Omar con su Banda, 10:30 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Agent 86, 8 OAK — Jen Howard, 9

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1

OLD POINT BAR — Rick Trolsen, 5; Space Heaters, 9:30 ONE EYED JACKS — Sun Hotel CD release, 10

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Clive Wilson & Palm Court Jazz Band, 7 PELICAN CLUB — Sanford Hinderlie, 7 THE PERFECT FIT BAR & GRILL — Rechelle, Regeneration, 5:30

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Masters feat. Leroy Jones, 8 REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — TheSeKondElement, 10

RIVERSHACK TAVERN — John Lisi, 9:30 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Karma, 9:30

SIBERIA — Honky, Suplecs, Mountain of Wizard, Sunrise/Sunset, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Dr. Michael White & the Original Liberty Jazz Band, 8 & 10

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ATCHAFALAYA — Atchafalaya All Stars, 11 a.m.

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Eric Brace & Peter Cooper, 9

LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Tom Worrell, 7

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12 BAR — April Dawn, 6

JOEY K’S RESTAURANT — Maryflynn’s Prohibition Jazz & Blues, 5

JUJU BAG CAFE AND BARBER SALON — Michaela Harrison, Todd Duke, 7:30

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D.B.A. — John Boutte, 8; Little Freddie King, 11

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Sunpie & the Louisiana Sunspots, 10

EMERIL’S DELMONICO — Bob Andrews, 7 FUNKY PIRATE — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30 GALVEZ RESTAURANT — Campbell Perkinson, 6:30

GREEN ROOM — Northshore Epicfest Metalcorenicopia, 5 HOUSE OF BLUES — NOLA Underground Hip Hop Awards, 7 HOWLIN’ WOLF — Silent Disco, 10

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Robots Anonymous, 10

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THE INN ON BOURBON — Joe Ashlar, 6 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S I CLUB — Los Hombres Calientes feat. Irvin Mayfield & Bill Summers, 8

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Shannon Powell, 8; Brass-A-Holics, midnight JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Joe Bennett, 3; Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 6 & 9

K’GEE’S RESTAURANT — Gerard Delafose & the Zydeco Gators, 8:30 a.m.

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LOUISIANA MUSIC FACTORY — Gypsy Elise, 3; Colin Lake, 4 THE MAISON — Courtyard Kings, 7; PAGE 37

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

Thursday 6

TIPITINA’S — Solid Fuzz, Mega Dynasty, Zach Lund Band, 8:30

10

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — George French Band, 10

MUSIC

35

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com PAGE 35

Soul Project, 10

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Zydefunk, 10

FINNEGAN’S EASY — Robin Clabby, Chris Alford, Erik Golson & Nick O’Gara, 12:30

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Mumbles, 1; Kristina Morales, 4; Eudora Evans & Deep Soul, 7:30; Alexey Marti Band, 11

FUNKY PIRATE — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Lilli Lewis, 9

HOUSE OF BLUES — Sunday Gospel Brunch, 10 a.m.; Black Label Society, Texas Hippie Coalition, 7:30

MULATE’S CAJUN RESTAURANT — Bayou DeVille, 7

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Leslie Martin Quartet, 2 OAK — Coco Robichaux, 9

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1 OLD POINT BAR — Thomas Johnson & the People, 9:30

ONE EYED JACKS — Tapes ’n Tapes, Howler, Leslie Sisson, 10 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lionel Ferbos & Palm Court Jazz Band, 7 PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Band feat. Mark Braud, 8 RITZ-CARLTON — Catherine Anderson, 1

RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Gal Holiday & the Honky Tonk Revue, 10

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Amanda Shaw & Kristin Diable, 9:30 SIBERIA — Weedeater, Saviours, Bison BC, Fight Amp, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Herlin Riley Quintet, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Christina Perez, 3; Panorama Jazz Band, 6; Jazz Vipers, 10

THREE MUSES — Jeremy Lyons & the Deltabilly Boys, 6:30; Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10

TOMMY’S WINE BAR — Julio & Caesar, 10

WASHINGTON SQUARE PARK — Silence the Violence Talent Show & Concert, noon

Sunday 9 3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY — Mike Dillon Orchestra, 8

ALLWAYS LOUNGE — Dark Dark Dark, Pillars & Tongues, A Hawk & A Hacksaw, 10

ATCHAFALAYA — Sam & Boone, 11 a.m.

BABYLON LOUNGE — Sci Fi Zeros, Anna Kefer, 10 BANKS STREET BAR — Smashing Blonde, 9

BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Some Like it Hot, 11 a.m. D.B.A. — Palmetto Bug Stompers, 6

DOWNTOWN GRETNA — Gretna Heritage Festival feat. Hunter Hayes, Tracy Lawrence, Sara Evans, 2 DRAGON’S DEN — Carmine P. Filthy, Aric Wilde, Steeza, Mr. Cool Bad Guy, Unicorn Fukr, 9

HOMEDALE INN — Sunday Night Live Jam Session feat. Homedale Boys, 7

HOWLIN’ WOLF — Marsh Fest feat. Lost Bayou Ramblers, Terrance Simien & the Zydeco Experience, Brint Anderson and others, 3:30

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Hot 8 Brass Band, 9 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Germaine Bazzle & Paul Longstreth, 7

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 3; Cindy Chen, 6; Ched Reeves, 9 KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1

MADIGAN’S — Anderson/Easley Project, 9 THE MAISON — Norbet Susemihl’s New Orleans All Stars, 4; Cindy Scott, 7; Low Stress Quintet, 10

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Joe Krown Trio feat. Russell Batiste & Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Tom McDermott & Kevin Clark, 11 a.m.; Ricardo Crespo, 4:30; Javier Olondo & AsheSon, 8 MULATE’S CAJUN RESTAURANT — Bayou DeVille, 7 NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Jim Hession, 2

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1 OLD POINT BAR — Jesse Moore, 3:30

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lucien Barbarin & Sunday Night Swingsters, 7 THE PERFECT FIT BAR & GRILL — Brass-A-Holics, 8

PRESERVATION HALL — St. Peter Street All-Stars feat. Lars Edegran, 8 RALPH’S ON THE PARK — Joe Krown, 11:30 a.m.

SATURN BAR — Jason Knox, 9:30; Tin Types, 10; Eddy Burke, John Curry & Friends, 11 SIBERIA — I, Octopus, Emily Peal, Self Help Tapes, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Christian Winther CD release, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Rights of Swing, 3; Ben Polcer & the Grinders, 6; Pat Casey, 10 ST. CHARLES TAVERN — Maryflynn’s Prohibition Jazz & Blues, 10 a.m. THREE MUSES — Norbert Susemihl, Erika Lewis, Shaye Cohn, 7 TIPITINA’S — Friendly Fires,

Theophilus London, 10

Monday 10 APPLE BARREL — Sam Cammarata, 8

BANKS STREET BAR — N’awlins Johnnys, 9 BMC — Fun in the Pocket feat. Mayumi Shara, 5; Smoky Greenwell’s Blues Jam, 9

D.B.A. — Glen David Andrews, 9 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Burke Ingraffia CD release, 10 THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

GREEN ROOM — Todd Lemoine, 10 THE HANGAR — Warbringer, Lazarus A.D., Landmine Marathon, Diamond Plate, 7

HOUSE OF BLUES — Never Shout Never, 5:45

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Original Tuxedo Jazz Band feat. Gerald French, 8 THE MAISON — Royal Roses, 7; New Orleans Super Jam, 10

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Papa Grows Funk, 10

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Uke Joint, 7 OLD POINT BAR — Brent Walsh Jazz Trio feat. Romy Kaye, 7 ONE EYED JACKS — Toro y Moi, Unknown Mortal Orchestra, Bass Drum of Death, 10

PRESERVATION HALL — St. Peter Street Playboys feat. Mark Braud, 8 RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Dave Jordan, 7

SIBERIA — Creamers, Superdestroyers, Selma Oxor, Alexico, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Charmaine Neville, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Dominic Grillo & the Frenchmen Street All-Stars, 6; Jazz Vipers, 10 THREE MUSES — Bart Ramsey, 4:30; Mario Abney, 7

TULANE UNIVERSITY (MCALISTER AUDITORIUM) — Janelle Monae, fun., 7

classical/ concerts MANDEVILLE LAKEFRONT —

corner of Lakeshore Drive and Coffee Street, 523-6530 ext. 108; www.lpomusic. com — Sun: Sunset Symphony feat. Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra & Greater New Orleans Youth Orchestra, 4 ST. LOUIS CATHEDRAL — Jackson Square — Sun: Miguel Bernal Ripoll, 6 TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH —

1329 Jackson Ave., 522-0276; www.trinitynola.com — Tue: Organ & Labyrinth Organ Recital feat. Albinas Prizgintas, 6; Sun: Carlow Choir of Louisiana, 5

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

TIPITINA’S — Billy Iuso & Restless Natives feat. Golden Comanches War Chief Juan Pardo, 10

GREEN ROOM — Bobby Blaze, 9

MUSIC

37

FILM

LISTINGS

A ROOM WITH A VIEW

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

NOW SHOWING 50/50 (R) — The dramedy

follows a 25-year-old (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) as he deals with a cancer diagnosis. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

ABDUCTION (PG-13) — Taylor

Lautner is a man running for his life while trying to find out about his family. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 CONTAGION (R) — A lethal

airborne virus rapidly spreads across the world. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14, Prytania

THE DEVIL’S DOUBLE (R) — The

movie paints a portrait of Saddam Hussein through the story of a man who had to serve as a body double for his son. Canal Place

DRIVE (R) — Ryan Gosling

plays a Hollywood stunt driver by day and a getaway driver for heist operations by night. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 14

THE HELP (PG-13) — In the

film adaptation of Kathryn Stockett’s hit novel, an aspiring journalist shakes up her conservative Southern town when she interviews the black maids of the city’s upper class. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 14

KILLER ELITE (PG-13) — Jason

Statham, Clive Owen and Robert De Niro star in the action film about an exspecial ops agent who comes out of retirement when his mentor is taken captive. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

KING OF THE STRIPPERS (NR) —

The locally produced actioncomedy follows a man trying to get out of the crime game who keeps getting sucked

MIDNIGHT IN PARIS (PG) — In

the Woody Allen film, a dissatisfied screenwriter and aspiring novelist finds himself traveling back in time to the Jazz Age. Canal Place MONEYBALL (PG-13) — Brad Pitt plays the general manager of the Oakland Athletics who used a computer-based analysis to draft players. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 SARAH’S KEY (PG-13) — While

in France pursuing a story on the Vel’ d’Hiv Roundup in 1942, an American journalist’s life intertwines with that of one of her subjects. Prytania

STRAW DOGS (R) — A Los Angeles-based couple moves back to the wife’s hometown in the South, where they face conflict with the locals that becomes increasingly violent. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 14 WARRIOR (R) — A man trains for a mixed martial arts tournament and is forced to confront his estranged older brother, a former MMA fighter. AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20 YES MA’AM (R) — Gary L.

Goldman’s 1982 documentary features interviews with black domestic laborers in New Orleans and the white families who employ them. Chalmette Movies

OPENING FRIDAY REAL STEEL (PG-13) — In the near future, where giant robots have replaced humans in the sport of boxing, a washed-up former fighter (Hugh Jackman) teams up with his estranged son to build and train their own high-tech fighter.

SPECIAL SCREENINGS ANGELS DIE SLOWLY DVD RELEASE PARTY & SCREENING — The center screens New

Orleans filmmaker Charlie Brown’s locally produced film about a pair of French Quarter goth predators. An after-party featuring DJ Butterfoot follows. 8 p.m. Saturday, 3 Ring Circus’ The Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 5692700; www.3rcp.com

BEWARE THE GONZO (NR) —

After an outsider gets kicked off his school’s newspaper, he starts his own underground publication. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 7:30 p.m. Saturday-Monday, then nightly through Oct. 12,

Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net FORBIDDEN ZONE (R) —

Richard Elfman’s 1982 musical comedy attempts to capture the essence of the performance group the Mystic Knights of the Oingo Boingo. The screening is part of Antenna Gallery’s Scumbag Cinema Film Series. Free admission. 9 p.m. Wednesday, Antenna Gallery, 3161 Burgundy St., 957-4255; www. press-street.com

a pulse-racing thriller.

ryan gosling is terrific. george clooney is exceptional.” – Peter Travers “gripping

prOVOcatiVe” – Owen Gleiberman

HOBO WITH A SHOTGUN (NR)— A homeless man

One Of the year’s tOp casts at the tOp Of” their game

finds himself in a lawless metropolis and begins a bloody campaign for justice. Tickets $8. Midnight FridaySaturday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com

MOVIES IN THE PARK. The

New Orleans Recreation Development Commission hosts free outdoor screenings on Fridays and Saturdays. Visit www.nola.gov/Residents/ NORD/Movies-in-the-Park for a schedule and locations. 7:45 p.m. Friday-Saturday.

ONE BOOK ONE NEW ORLEANS FILM SCREENING— The group

screens Mr. Okra, a short film about the New Orleans personality, followed by From the Mouthpiece On Back, a documentary about the To Be Continued Brass Band. Admission is free, but a donation of one paperback book for incarcerated prisoners is suggested. 7 p.m. Wednesday, Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden, New Orleans Museum of Art, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, City Park, 658-4100; www.noma.org

anD

– Lou Lumenick

a film stuffeD with

saVVy wOrk by Veteran players ”

– Richard Corliss

PEARL JAM TWENTY (NR) — To

commemorate Pearl Jam’s 20th anniversary, Cameron Crowe’s documentary includes rare footage of the band and interviews. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 9:30 p.m. TuesdayThursday, Zeitgeist MultiDisciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 8275858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

A PLACE IN THE SUN (NR) —

Montgomery Clift, Elizabeth Taylor and Shelley Winters star in the 1951 drama. Tickets $5.50. Noon Saturday-Sunday and Oct. 12, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com

SAVE OUR SOULS — Director Mike Sanchez screens his documentary about New Orleans’ Slow Burn Burlesque troupe. Tickets $10. 7 p.m. Thursday, Republic NOLA, 524 S. Peters St.; www.thatburlesquemovie.com TALES OF URBAN FASCINATION — Visiting filmmaker Mark

Street presents seven of his films. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and PAGE 42

COLUMBIA PICTURES AND CROSS CREEK PICTURES PRESENT IN ASSOCIATION WITH EXCLUSIVE MEDIA GROUP AND CRYSTAL CITY ENTERTAINMENT A SMOKEHOUSE/APPIAN WAY PRODUCTION RYAN GOSLING GEORGE CLOONEY PHILIP SEYMOUR HOFFMAN “TEXECUTIHE IVDE ES OF MARCH” PAUL GIAMATTI MARISA TOMEI JEFFREY WRIGHT AND EVAN RACHEL WOOD SUPERVISORMUSIC LINDA COHEN MUSICBY ALEXANDRE DESPLAT PRODUCERS LEONARDO DiCAPRIO STEPHEN PEVNER NIGEL SINCLAIR GUY EAST TODD THOMPSON NINA WOLARSKY JENNIFER KILLORAN BARBARA A. HALL BASED ON THE PLAY SCREENPLAY PRODUCED “FARRAGUT NORTH” BY BEAU WILLIMON BY GEORGE CLOONEY & GRANT HESLOV AND BEAU WILLIMON BY GRANT HESLOV GEORGE CLOONEY BRIAN OLIVER DIRECTED BY GEORGE CLOONEY check lOcal listings fOr starts friDay, OctOber 7 theaters anD shOwtimes

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

DOLPHIN TALE (PG) — Harry Connick Jr. stars in the true story of people who helped a dolphin struggling to survive after being caught in a crab trap. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

back into it. Chalmette Movies

39

FILM

JOE MORGENSTERN

“‘MONEYBALL’ RENEWS YOUR BELIEF IN MICHAEL PHILLIPS

HHHH HHHH

REX REED

“A GREAT AMERICAN MOVIE

ROGER EBERT

THE POWER OF MOVIES.”

THAT WILL LEAVE YOU CHEERING.

POSITIVELY THRILLING.

MANOHLA DARGIS

“...YOU CAN HAVE A BLAST

AT ‘MONEYBALL’...”

MONEYBALL’ CRUISES INTO THE HIGH GEAR “‘OF THE SAVVIEST OLD HOLLYWOOD COMEDIES.

BRAD PITT IS SENSATIONAL.”

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

RICHARD CORLISS

42

A FILM BY BENNETT MILLER

LISTINGS PAGE 39

preview Mississippi River 9th Ward Film and Arts Festival

The Mississippi River 9th Ward Film and Arts Festival presents an array of films, panel discussions and events. One unique event is a visit by Gilles Porte, a French director who has undertaken an overwhelmingly cute project to film children drawing themselves. His ongoing work is documented in the film Dessine Toi (pictured), and New Orleans children will be the first American children to participate in the project. While Dessine Toi is irrepressibly upbeat, some of the other films are more lurid and serious. Venus Noire (Black Venus) is a French/Tunisian film about the South African woman who is known as Hottentot Venus. Born Saartjie Baartman in 1770s, she was taken to Paris and London and shamefully paraded as a sort of freak, and her treatment and characterization have been studied for their combined racism, sexism and fetishism. Shirley Adams: Portrait of a Mother is a sensitive drama about a South African woman who cares for a son crippled in a gang shootout. Also screening are Central do Brasil and Africa United, a familyfriendly film about Rwandan children trekking across the continent to attend the 2010 World Cup in South Africa. In Dessine Toi, Porte traveled the globe to film children drawing self portraits. He chose to work mostly with children not yet able to read or write. As they drew themselves, he surreptitiously filmed them from the other side of the two-way glass pane, capturing their joy, frustration and curiosity as they attempted to draw themselves. The filmmakers also turned some of the illustrations into animations, adding more whimsical scenes to the film. The story of Hottentot Venus is one of outrageous inhumanity, and director Abdellatif Kechiche’s dramatization captures both the lurid voyeurism and Baartman’s silent vigil to survive her treatment. She was lured to Europe with a promise of riches, but she was not a performer or sideshow freak, so much as a woman objectified for her protruding hips and buttocks and pendulous labia. Later she became a prostitute. Europeans gawked at her body, projecting a vision of savage otherness onto her, and scientists and doctors made all sorts of bogus claims about race from their similarly prurient observations. (Her remains were on display in France until 1976.) Cuban-born actress Yahima Torres has been lauded for her portrayal of Baartman. The film is in French with English subtitles. In a more somber and sensitive film, Shirley Adams is a black South African woman whose son has been crippled by a gunshot. Left a quadripelegic, he is angry and barely has the will to live. His father abandons the family, and Shirley cannot afford medication or food. When a white medical volunteer arrives to help, even that has its indignities, but Shirley’s devotion to caring for her son guides her. The festival is presented by the New Orleans Afrikan Film and Arts Festival. For a schedule and list of panel discussions, visit www.neworleansafrikanfilmfest.org. — Will Coviello

OCT

6-9

Mississippi River 9th Ward Film and Arts Festival www.neworleansafrikanfilmfest.org

seniors, $5 members. 7:30 p.m. Friday, Zeitgeist MultiDisciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 8275858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

“MONEYBALL” COLUMBIA PICTURESEXECUTIVEPRESENTS A SCOTT RUDIN/MICHAEL DE LUCA/RACHAEL HOROVITZ PRODUCTION MUSIC BASED ON THE BY MYCHAEL DANNA PRODUCERS SCOTT RUDIN ANDREW KARSCH SIDNEY KIMMEL MARK BAKSHI BOOK BY MICHAEL LEWIS STORY SCREENPLAY PRODUCED BY STAN CHERVIN BY STEVEN ZAILLIAN AND AARON SORKIN BY MICHAEL DE LUCA RACHAEL HOROVITZ BRAD PITT DIRECTED BY BENNETT MILLER check local listings for theaters and showtimes

TO CATCH A THIEF (NR) — Cary Grant and Grace Kelly star in Alfred Hitchcock’s 1955 mystery romance. Tickets $5.50. Noon Wednesday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 8912787; www.theprytania.com TUCKER & DALE VS. EVIL (R) — In the Canadian horror-

comedy, a pair of hillbillies on vacation encounter rowdy college kids and murder ensues. The film is screened with the short The Legend of Beaver Dam. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students

and seniors, $5 members. 7:30 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.

AMC Palace 10 (Hammond), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 12 (Clearview), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 16 (Westbank), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 20 (Elmwood), (888) 2624386; Canal Place, 363-1117; Chalmette Movies, 304-9992; Entergy IMAX, 581-IMAX; Grand (Slidell), (985) 6411889; Hollywood 9 (Kenner),

464-0990; Hollywood 14 (Covington), (985) 893-3044; Kenner MegaDome, 468-7231; Prytania, 891-2787; Solomon Victory Theater, National World War II Museum, 5276012 Compiled by Lauren LaBorde

Scan for movie times.

ART

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

OPENING ANTENNA GALLERY. 3161 Burgundy St., 957-4255; www. press-street.com — “Instruc-

tions,” a group show featuring gallery members writing and responding to written instructions, through Dec. 4. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

BARRISTER’S GALLERY. 2331 St. Claude Ave., 525-2767; www. barristersgallery.com — “Ret-

rospectacle,” paintings by Scott Guion, through Dec. 3. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

CARROLL GALLERY. Newcomb Art Department, Woldenberg Art Center, 314-2228; www. tulane.edu/~art/carrollgallery — “10 Years and 47 Artists,” a

retrospective exhibition celebrating A Studio in the Woods’ 10th anniversary, through Oct. 28. Opening reception 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Friday.

DU MOIS GALLERY. 4921 Freret St., 818-6032 — “Objects of

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

Adornment: An Art Show for Fashion,” an exhibit featuring Louisiana clothing and accessory designers curated by Slow Southern Style, through Nov. 5. Opening reception 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday.

44

THE FRONT. 4100 St. Claude Ave.; www.nolafront.org —

“General Hospital,” a multimedia installation by Stephanie Patton, through Nov. 6. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday.

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma. org — “Light to Dark/Dark to

Light,” paintings by Wayne Gonzales, through Feb. 26. Opening reception 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday.

OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART. 925 Camp St., 5399600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — “Art of the Cup: Functional

Comfort,” cups by more than 50 artists presented by the Center for Southern Craft and Design, through Dec. 18. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday.

TROUSER HOUSE. 4105 St. Claude Ave. — “Visual Vitriol,” a presentation of more than 300 punk posters curated by David Ensminger. Reception 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday.

WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET Hannah Scheurich, Brandon Zeringue and Chris Scheurich, through Saturday.

com — Paintings from the Blue Series by Joseph Pearson, ongoing.

review

3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY. 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com — “Direct Sun-

COUP D’OEIL ART CONSORTIUM. 2033 Magazine St., 722-0876; www.coupdoeilartconsortium. com — “And the Earth Begot

light,” photographic collage and sculpture by Sara Essex Bradley and Joe Kight, through Oct. 29.

...” works by Michele Basta, through Saturday.

9TH STREET STUDIO. 1029 9th St., 899-6686; www.9thstreet-studio.com — “One: A Collaboration Between Paint & Metal,” works by Alexis Walter and Rachael Adamiak, through Dec. 30.

COURTYARD GALLERY. 1129 Decatur St., 330-0134; www. woodartandmarketing.com —

Hand-carved woodworks by Daniel Garcia, ongoing.

D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., 524-3936 — “Small Creatures and Smaller Worlds,” graphite on paper illustrations by Lacey Stinson, through Nov. 3.

A GALLERY FOR FINE PHOTOGRAPHY. 241 Chartres St., 568-1313; www.agallery.com — Photo-

gravures by Josephine Sacabo, through December.

DU MOIS GALLERY. 4921 Freret St., 818-6032 — “Fear is a Man’s

Best Friend,” paintings by Jeremy Willis, through Nov. 5.

ACADEMY GALLERY. 5256 Magazine St., 899-8111 — “For Better

or For Worse,” works by Brent Barnidge; “Swamp Dance” by Katalin Gergo; both through Oct. 29.

AG WAGNER STUDIO & GALLERY. 813 Royal St., 561-7440 — Works

by gallery artists; 504 Toys, locally handcrafted toys; both ongoing.

ALL IN THE FRAME GALLERY. 2596 Front St., Slidell, (985) 2901395 — “Serene Waters, Clear

Horizons,” paintings by Annie Strack, ongoing.

ANGELA KING GALLERY. 241 Royal St., 524-8211; www.angelakinggallery.com — Sculpture by M.L.

Snowden, through October.

ANTIEAU GALLERY. 927 Royal St., 304-0849; www.antieaugallery. com — “Gambling for Souls,”

works by Molly McGuire and Stephen Warde Anderson, through Monday.

ANTON HAARDT GALLERY. 2858 Magazine St., 309-4249; www. antonart.com — Works by An-

ton Haardt, Christopher Moses and others, ongoing. ARIODANTE GALLERY. 535 Julia St., 524-3233 — Paintings by Isabelle

Dupuy; jewelry by Debbie Villa; works by Amy Archinal, through Oct. 30.

ART GALLERY 818. 818 Royal St., 524-6918 — Paintings, sculpture

and jewelry by local artists Noel Rockmore, Michael Fedor, Xavier de Callatay, Charles Bazzell, Bambi deVille and Ritchie Fitzgerald, ongoing.

ARTHUR ROGER GALLERY. 432 Julia St., 522-1999; www.arthurrogergallery.com — “Catholic

Sin,” photographs and sculpture by John Waters; paintings by Richard Baker; “Red Drawings and White Cut-Outs,” mixed media by James Drake; “Peekaboo,” video installation by Dave Greber; all through Oct. 29.

Paintings by Iva Gueorguieva

Sometimes you don’t know where you’ve been until you see it receding in a rearview mirror. When the 21st century began, the usual postmodern tropes of the previous century still applied. A decade later, “postmodern” is a word that is seldom heard in reference to art or architecture. There even seems to be an unheralded revival of classical modernism, with new building designs that look positively 1965 (like the new University Medical Center), and in visual art there has been a quiet reprise of abstraction that evokes 1950s action painting, even as the best examples look relatively fresh today. Iva Gueorguieva’s new paintings are darkly passionate in ways that recall the existentialist intensity of America’s mid-20th century painters, poets and musicians — at first glance you can almost hear Charlie Parker, John Coltrane or even Allen Ginsberg reciting riffs from Howl: “I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness, starving hysterical naked ...” in a miasma of espresso, pot and cigarette smoke. But that was then, so who is this woman? Bulgarian-born and Philadelphia-educated, Gueorguieva lived in New Orleans for three years and, seemingly on a whim, moved to Los Angeles a month before Katrina struck. The works in this show are based on her New Orleans memories, and the best of them display similarly perfect timing expressed as prismatic cul-de-sacs and gestural slashes. Clinamen (pictured) is a masterpiece of swirling vortexes and painterly mini-tornadoes with controlled explosions like fireworks in a labyrinth. The name refers to the tendency of atoms to swerve, as predicted by the classical Greek philosopher Epicurus in an eerie anticipation of Einstein and Heisenberg. Auto Extraction is a lyrical example of visionary abstraction that harks to the portentous point in the 1940s when the surrealism of Arshile Gorky and Roberto Matta morphed seemingly full-blown into abstract expressionism. Matta called it “morphologies,” landscapes of the inner world, things felt more than seen. The look may be related, but Gueorguieva makes it lyrically her own. — D. Eric Bookhardt

THRU OCT

29

DUTCH ALLEY ARTIST’S CO-OP GALLERY. 912 N. Peters St., 4129220; www.dutchalleyonline. com — Works by New Orleans

artists, ongoing.

ELLIOTT GALLERY. 540 Royal St., 523-3554; www.elliottgallery. com — Works by gallery artists

Coignard, Engel, Papart, Petra, Tobiasse, Schneuer and Yrondi, ongoing.

FRAMIN’ PLACE & GALLERY. 3535 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-3311; www.nolaframing.com — Prints

by Tommy Thompson, Phillip Sage, James Michalopoulos and others, ongoing. FREDRICK GUESS STUDIO. 910 Royal St., 581-4596; www.fredrickguessstudio.com — Paintings by

Fredrick Guess, ongoing.

GALERIE D’ART FRANCAIS. 541 Royal St., 581-6925 — Works by

Todd White, ongoing.

GALERIE PORCHE WEST. 3201 Burgundy St., 947-3880 — Pho-

tography by Christopher Porche West, ongoing.

GALERIE ROYALE. 3648 Magazine St., 894-1588; www.galerieroyale. com — Works on metal by Mike

Klung, through October.

Prefiguration: New paintings by Iva Gueorguieva Heriard-Cimino Gallery, 440 Julia St., 525-7300; www.heriard-cimino.com

Smith, Jack Beech, Harriet Blum, Kevin Roberts and others, ongoing.

CALICHE & PAO GALLERY. 312 Royal St., 588-2846 — Oil paintings by Caliche and Pao, ongoing.

BERTA’S AND MINA’S ANTIQUITIES GALLERY. 4138 Magazine St., 895-6201 — “Louisiana! United

CALLAN FINE ART. 240 Chartres St., 524-0025; www.callanfineart. com — Works by Eugene de

We Stand to Save Our Wetlands,” works by Nilo and Mina Lanzas; works by Clementine Hunter, Noel Rockmore and others; all ongoing.

GALLERIES

ARTICHOKE GALLERY. 912 Decatur St., 636-2004 — Artists work on site in all media; watercolors and limited-edition prints by Peter Briant, ongoing.

BRYANT GALLERIES. 316 Royal St., 525-5584; www.bryantgalleries.com — Paintings by Dean Mitchell, ongoing.

1022 GALLERY. 1022 Lowerline St., 301-0679; www.1022gallery. blogspot.com — Mixed media and ceramics by Dana Beuhler,

BERGERON STUDIO & GALLERY. 406 Magazine St., 522-7503; www.bergeronstudio.com — Photographs by Michael P.

Paintings and works on paper by Mark Bercier, ongoing.

CAFE BABY. 237 Chartres St., 3104004; www.markbercier.com —

Blass, Louis Valtat and other artists of the Barbizon, Impressionist and Post-Impressionist schools, ongoing.

CARDINAL GALLERY. 541 Bourbon St., 522-3227 — Exhibition of Ital-

ian artists featuring works by Bruno Paoli and Andrea Stella, ongoing.

CARIBBEAN ARTS LTD. 720 Franklin Ave., 943-3858 — The gallery showcases contemporary Haitian and Jamaican art.

CAROL ROBINSON GALLERY. 840 Napoleon Ave., 895-6130; www. carolrobinsongallery.com — “Unfinished Stories,” paintings by Jere Allen, through Oct. 29. CASELL GALLERY. 818 Royal St., 524-0671; www.casellartgallery. com — Pastels by Joaquim

Casell; etchings by Sage; oils by Charles Ward; all ongoing.

COLE PRATT GALLERY. 3800 Magazine St., 891-6789; www. coleprattgallery.com — “Around

& About,” watercolors by Christine Cozic, through Oct. 29.

COLLECTIVE WORLD ART COMMUNITY. Poydras Center, 650 Poydras St., 339-5237; www. collectiveworldartcommunity.

GALLERIA BELLA. 319 Royal St., 581-5881 — Works by gallery

artists, ongoing.

GALLERY BIENVENU. 518 Julia St., 525-0518; www.gallerybienvenu. com — “Boundary,” sculptures by Eva Hild, through Nov. 26. GALLERY VERIDITAS. 3822 Magazine St.; 267-5991 — “Cycles of Discovery,” photos by Thomas Kiefer and Stewart Harvey, through Sunday. “The Out of Towners,” paintings by Aaron Butler and Anna Kipervaser, sculpture by Donald Tully, through Nov. 6. GEORGE SCHMIDT GALLERY. 626 Julia St., 592-0206; www. georgeschmidt.com — Paintings by George Schmidt, ongoing. THE GEORGES GALLERY. Metairie Park Country Day School, 300 Park Road, Metairie, 837-5204; www.mpcds.com — “Life in Bal-

ance,” works by Connie Kittok, Pio Lyons, Ruth Owens and Max Ryan, through Oct. 28.

bestofneworleans.com ART GRAPHITE GALLERIES. 936 Royal St., 5653739 — “Sinners and Saints,” works by Joe

Treat Every Day Like It’s Friday!

Hobbs; works by Christy Lee Rogers; both ongoing.

GUTHRIE CONTEMPORARY. 3815 Magazine St., 897-2688; www.guthriecontemporary. com — “The Space in Between,” paintings by Bernd Haussmann; glass sculpture by Kazuo Kadonaga, through November. “Impact,” works by Bernd Haussmann, ongoing, First Tuesday-Saturday of every month. “Schemata,” works by Susan Dory, ongoing. GUY LYMAN FINE ART. 3645 Magazine St., 899-4687; www.guylymanfineart.com — Mixed media with mechanical light sculptures by Jimmy Block, ongoing. HAROUNI GALLERY. 829 Royal St., 299-8900 — Paintings by David Harouni, ongoing. HERIARD-CIMINO GALLERY. 440 Julia St., 525-7300; www.heriardcimino.com — “Preconfiguration,” paintings by Iva Gueorguieva, through Oct. 29. “4 Works: 1968-2010,” neon light sculpture by Keith Sonnier, through Nov. 25.

$ PICK 2 FOR 10 1 ENTRÉE + 1 STARTER OR 1 DESSERT

ISABELLA’S GALLERY. 3331 Severn Ave., Suite 105, Metairie, 779-3202; www.isabellasgallery.com — Hand-blown glass works by Marc Rosenbaum; raku by Kate Tonguis and John Davis; all ongoing.

Entrées

JACK GALLERY. 900 Royal St., 588-1777 — Paintings, lithographs and other works by Tom Everhart, Gordon Parks, Al Hirschfeld, Stanley Mouse, Anja, Patrick McDonnell and other artists, ongoing. JAMIE HAYES GALLERY. 621 Chartres St., 592-4080; www.jamiehayes.com — New Orleans-style art by Jamie Hayes, ongoing.

CRISPY GREEN BEAN FRIES

Starters

JEAN BRAGG GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART. 600 Julia St., 895-7375; www.jeanbragg.com — “La Vie en Roses,” oil paintings by Scott

Spinach Florentine Flatbread Savory Soup of Your Choice Fried Mozzarella Pan-Seared Pot Stickers Crispy Green Bean Fries Classic Wedge Salad

Howard, through October.

JON SCHOOLER GALLERY. 8526 Oak St., 8657032; www.jonschooler.com — “Sublimi-

nal WOWs,” paintings by Jon Schooler, ongoing.

Fein, through Nov. 19.

photographs by Lesley Wells, ongoing.

KAKO GALLERY. 536 Royal St., 565-5445; www.kakogallery.com — Paintings by Don

PARMESAN-CRUSTED CHICKEN

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Picou and Stan Fontaine; “Raku” by Joy Gauss; 3-D wood sculpture by Joe Derr; all ongoing.

KURT E. SCHON. 510-520 St. Louis St., 5245462 — The gallery specializes in 18th and 19th century European oil paintings by artists from the French Salon and Royal Academy as well as French Impressionists. L9 CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 539 Caffin Ave., 948-0056 — “Faces of Treme,” works by

Chandra McCormick and Keith Calhoun, ongoing.

LE PETIT SALON DE NEW ORLEANS. 906 Royal St., 524-5700 — Paintings by Holly

90 YEARS ON OAK STREET. #1 IN YOUR HEART.

Sarre, ongoing.

LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia St., 522-5988; www.lemieuxgalleries.com — “Hot Greens

bring a SAINT to your next party

and Cold Reds: The Silent Language of Color,” works by Kate Trepagnier, through Oct. 29.

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Group show featuring works from guild members, ongoing. PAGE 46

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

Desserts

JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY. 400A Julia St., 522-5471; www.jonathanferraragallery. com — “Junk Shot,” mixed media by Skylar JULIE NEILL DESIGNS. 3908 Magazine St., 899-4201; www.julieneill.com — “Facade,”

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PAGE 45 MALLORY PAGE STUDIO. 614 Julia St.; www.mallorypage.com — Paintings by Mallory Page, Mondays-Fridays.

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MARTINE CHAISSON GALLERY. 727 Camp St., 304-7942; www. martinechaissongallery.com — “Close Your Eyes,” works by Norman Mooney, through November.

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LISTINGS

6215 WILSON ST.

HARAHAN • 737-3933

515 HARRISON AVE.

LAKEVIEW • 484-0841

MICHALOPOULOS GALLERY. 617 Bienville St., 558-0505; www. michalopoulos.com — Paint-

ings by James Michalopoulos, ongoing.

MICHELLE Y WILLIAMS GALLERY. 835 Julia St., 585-1945; www. michelleywilliams.com —

Works by Michelle Y. Williams, ongoing. NEW ORLEANS ARTWORKS. 727 Magazine St., 529-7279 — “Glass Pumpkin Patch,” glass pumpkins by Dan Schreiber and Andy Katz; works by Pamela Conway Caruso, Melissa Clark, Scott Johnson and Yuka Petz, through Oct. 29.

NEWCOMB ART GALLERY. Woldenberg Art Center, Tulane University, 865-5328; www. newcombartgallery.tulane.edu — “Pictures for Books,” photographs by Thomas Roma; “Jazz People: New Orleans Portraits,” photographs by Lee Friedlander; “Pop Shots,” Polaroid portraits by Andy Warhol; all through Sunday.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

OCTAVIA ART GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www. octaviaartgallery.com — “Southern Gardens,” mixed media and giclee prints by Nall, through Oct. 29. ONE SUN GALLERY. 616 Royal St., (800) 501-1151 — Works by local

and national artists, ongoing.

PEARL ART GALLERY. 4421 Magazine St., 228-5840 — Works by Cindy and Drue Hardegree, Erica Dewey, John Womack, Sontina, Lorraine Jones and S. Lee, ongoing. PETER O’NEILL STUDIOS. 721 Royal St., 527-0703; www. oneillgallery.com — Works by Peter O’Neill, ongoing.

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POETS GALLERY AND CUSTOM FRAMING. 3113 Magazine St., 899-4100 — “Carnival of

Saints and Souls II,” a group exhibition featuring dolls and photography, through November.

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PHOTO WORKS NEW ORLEANS. 521 St. Ann St., 593-9090; www. photoworksneworleans.com — Photography by Louis Sahuc, ongoing.

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REINA GALLERY. 4132 Magazine St., 895-0022; www.reinaart. com — “Vintage New Orleans

Artists,” watercolors, etchings and folk art; “Patron Saints,” works by Shelley Barberot; both ongoing.

REYNOLDS-RYAN ART GALLERY. Isidore Newman School, 5333 Danneel St., 896-6369; www. newmanschool.org — “Poetry

& Motion,” mixed media on panel and canvas by Demond Matsuo and Karoline Schleh, through Oct. 13. RHINO CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS GALLERY. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www.rhinocrafts.com — “Art in the Fall,

Fall Into Art,” ceramic works on the theme of fall leaves by Nellrea Simpson, through October. Works by Margo Manning, Chris Menconi, Chip Tipton, Andrew Jackson Pollack and others, ongoing.

RIVERSTONE GALLERIES. 719 Royal St., 412-9882; 729 Royal St., 581-3688; Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 36, 566-0588; 733 Royal St., 5259988; www.riverstonegalleries. net — Multimedia works by

Ricardo Lozano, Michael Flohr, Henry Ascencio, Jaline Pol and others, ongoing.

RODRIGUE STUDIO. 721 Royal St., 581-4244; www.georgerodrigue. com — Works by George Rodrigue, ongoing. ROSETREE GLASS STUDIO & GALLERY. 446 Vallette St., Algiers Point, 366-3602; www. rosetreeglass.com — Hand-

blown glass works, ongoing.

RUSTY PELICAN ART. 4031 St. Claude Ave., 218-5727; www.rustypelicanart.com — Works by

Travis and Lexi Linde, ongoing. SALONE DELL’ARTES ARTEMISIA. 3000 Royal St., 481-5113 — “I

Genti H2O,” works by Shmuela Padnos, ongoing.

SCOTT EDWARDS PHOTOGRAPHY GALLERY. 2109 Decatur St., 610-0581 — “Burlesque Ex-

posed,” a group photography exhibition, through Nov. 11.

SHEILA’S FINE ART STUDIO. 1427 N. Johnson St., 473-3363; www. sheilaart.com — Works by

Sheila Phipps, ongoing.

SIBLEY GALLERY. 3427 Magazine St., 899-8182 — “Repentance,”

Works by YA/YA artists, ongoing. THOMAS MANN GALLERY I/O. 1812 Magazine St., 581-2113; www.thomasmann.com — “Food for Thought,” a group exhibition of wearable art and functional sculpture, through Nov. 13. “Where’s the Money?” group exhibit interpreting the economy, ongoing. TRIPOLO GALLERY. 401 N. Columbia St., (985) 893-1441 — Works by Bill Binnings,

Robert Cook, Donna Duffy, Scott Ewen, Juli Juneau, Kevin LeBlanc, Ingrid Moses, Gale Ruggiero, Robert Seago and Scott Upton, ongoing.

VENUSIAN GARDENS ART GALLERY. 2601 Chartres St., 9437446; www.venusiangardens. com — “Luminous Sculpture,”

works by Eric Ehlenberger, ongoing.

WMSJR. 1061 Camp St., 2999455; www.wmsjr.com — Paintings by Will Smith, ongoing. A WORK OF ART GALLERY. 8212 Oak St., 862-5244 — Glass

works by Juli Juneau; photographs from the New Orleans Photo Alliance; both ongoing.

CALL FOR ARTISTS @PHONOGRAPHY. 3 Ring Circus’ Big Top Gallery hosts a show in December combining tweets and cell phone photos for PhotoNOLA, the citywide photography event. There is a $25 entry fee. Visit www.3rcp. com or email bigtop3ring@ gmail.com for details. Submissions deadline is Oct. 29. WEST BANK ART GUILD. The guild seeks artists 18 and older for its juried art show and sale Oct. 29. Call 606-4731 or email juneholwell@cox.net for details.

mixed media and sculpture by Stefan Daiberl, through October.

SPARE SPACES

SOREN CHRISTENSEN GALLERY. 400 Julia St., 569-9501; www. sorengallery.com — “Beacons,” oil paintings by Libby Johnson, through Oct. 29.

by Betty Petri; “The Solitary Chair,” sculpture by Michael Moreau; both ongoing.

STELLA JONES GALLERY. Place St. Charles, 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 132, 568-9050 — “Maha-

lia: Queen of Gospel Music,” a group exhibition of works inspired by Mahalia Jackson, through Jan. 6.

STEVE MARTIN STUDIO. 624 Julia St., 566-1390; www. stevemartinfineart.com — Contemporary sculpture and paintings by Steve Martin and other Louisiana artists, ongoing.

ALVAR LIBRARY. 913 Alvar St., 596-2667 — “Youth,” sculpture

BACCHANAL. 600 Poland Ave., 948-9111; www.bacchanalwine. com — “Coming Home: 2005-

2009,” photographs by Lee Celano, ongoing.

BUD’S BROILER. 500 City Park Ave., 486-2559 — Works by

Andrew Bascle, Evelyn Menge and others, ongoing.

CAMPBELL’S COFFEE & TEA. 516 S. Tyler St., Covington, (985) 2466992; www.campbellscoffee. com — Multimedia works by

Margaux Hymel, ongoing.

STUDIO BFG. 2627 Desoto St., 942-0200; www.studiobfg. com — “Peel Sessions: First

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR. 5535 Tchoupitoulas St., 8918500; www.dosjefescigarbar. com — Works by Mario Ortiz,

STUDIO GALLERY. 338 Baronne St., Third Floor, 529-3306 —

DRISCOLL ANTIQUES. 8500 Oak St., 866-7795; www.driscollan-

Installment,” works by Tina Stanley, ongoing.

ongoing.

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

tiques.com — Works by Sandra Horstman Roberts, ongoing. HAZELNUT NEW ORLEANS. 5515 Magazine St., 891-2424; www. hazelnutneworleans.com — Photography by Roy Barloga, ongoing. HI-HO LOUNGE. 2239 St. Claude Ave., 945-4446; www.hiholounge.net — Works by Robin Durand, Brad Edelman, Tara Eden, Eden Gass and others, ongoing. INTERIORS AND IMPORTS. 813 Florida St., Mandeville, (985) 624-7903 — Paintings by Annie Strack, ongoing. INTERNATIONAL HOUSE. 221 Camp St., 553-9550; www.ihhotel.com — Paintings by YA/

YA senior guild and alumni, ongoing.

JAX BREWERY. 600 Decatur St., 299-7163 — Works by YA/YA

youth artists, ongoing.

JW MARRIOTT NEW ORLEANS. 614 Canal St., Suite 4, 525-6500; www.marriott.com — Works

by Charlene Insley, ongoing.

LIBERTY’S KITCHEN. 422 1/2 S. Broad St., 822-4011 — Paintings on canvas by YA/YA artists, ongoing. LIZANO’S GLASS HAUS. 3400 Cleary Ave., Suite B, Metairie, 454-1144 — Fused-glass works

by Paulette Lizano, ongoing.

MCKEOWN’S BOOKS AND DIFFICULT MUSIC. 4737 Tchoupitoulas St., 895-1954 — “The Book

of Kells, Revisited,” encaustic paintings by Patricia Kaschalk, ongoing.

MOJO COFFEE HOUSE. 1500 Magazine St., 525-2244; www. myspace.com/mojoco —

NEOPHOBIA. 2855 Magazine St., 899-2444; www.neophobianola.com — Works by Tanner,

ongoing.

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE. 5110 Danneel St., 891-3381; www.neutralground. org — Work by local artists,

ongoing.

NEW ORLEANS CAKE CAFE & BAKERY. 2440 Chartres St., 943-0010 — Oil landscapes

of the Ustabes by Will Smith, ongoing.

PEACHES RECORDS. 408 N. Peters St., 282-3322 — “Gospel

and Blues,” photographs by Rita Posselt, ongoing.

SOUND CAFE. 2700 Chartres St., 947-4477 — Mixed-media

paintings by YA/YA alumnus Gerard Caliste, ongoing. SURREY’S CAFE & JUICE BAR. 1418 Magazine St., 524-3828; www.surreyscafeandjuicebar. com — Watercolor, pen and ink series of New Orleans landmarks by Will Smith, ongoing.

THREE MUSES. 536 Frenchmen St., 298-8746; www.thethreemuses.com — Portraits by

Zack Smith, ongoing.

AMERICAN-ITALIAN MUSEUM & RESEARCH LIBRARY. 537 S. Peters St., 522-7294 — Permanent

exhibits of jazz artists, a St. Joseph’s altar replica, the Louisiana Italian-American Sports Hall of Fame and a research library with genealogy records.

ASHE CULTURAL ARTS CENTER. 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — “Ashe in Retrospect: 19982008,” photographs by Morris Jones Jr., Eric Waters, Jeffrey Cook and others, ongoing. BACKSTREET CULTURAL MUSEUM. 1116 St. Claude Ave.; www.backstreetmuseum.org —

Permanent exhibits of Mardi Gras Indian suits, jazz funeral memorabilia and social aid and pleasure club artifacts, ongoing.

CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER. 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www. cacno.org — “NOLA Now Part I: Swagger for a Lost Magnificence,” through Jan. 29. “As We See It: Youth Vision Quilt,” student-created quilt with more than 400 patches, ongoing. GERMAN-AMERICAN CULTURAL CENTER. 519 Huey P. Long Ave., Gretna, 363-4202; www.gaccnola.com — Museum exhibits

depict the colonial experience, work, culture and religion of German immigrants.

HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION. 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www.hnoc.org — “The 18th

Star: Treasures From 200 Years of Louisiana Statehood,” through Jan. 29.

LONGUE VUE HOUSE AND GARDENS. 7 Bamboo Road, 4885488; www.longuevue.com —

“Magic Spell of Memory: The Photography of Clarence John Laughlin,” through fall 2011. LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM PRESBYTERE. 751 Chartres St., 568-6968; www.lsm.crt.state. la.us — “It’s Carnival Time in

Louisiana,” Carnival artifacts, costumes, jewelry and others items, ongoing.

LOUISIANA SUPREME COURT MUSEUM. Louisiana Supreme Court, 400 Royal St., 3102149; www.lasc.org — The

Supreme Court of Louisiana Historical Society sponsors the museum’s exhibitions of the people and institutions that have contributed to the development of Louisiana law for 300 years.

MAIN LIBRARY. 219 Loyola Ave., 529-7323; www.nutrias. org — “Hidden from History: Unknown New Orleanians,” photographs of the city’s working poor, ongoing. MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN COCKTAIL. 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www. museumoftheamericancocktail. org — “Absinthe Visions,”

photographs by Damian Hevia, ongoing.

NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM. 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — “Roosevelt,

• 3-6pm DAiLY •

Rockwell, and the Four Freedoms: America’s Slow March from Isolation to Action,” original posters by Norman Rockwell and museum artifacts, through Nov. 13.

HaPPy Hour $1.50 PBr Pints $2 Game rentalS $3 imPorts

NEW ORLEANS AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM. 1418 Gov. Nicholls St., 566-1136; www. noaam.com — “Drapetomania:

2 mondaYS

$

A Disease Called Freedom,” 18th- and 19th-century documents and artifacts about slavery from the Derrick Beard Collection; “Restore the Oaks: Art Under the Overpass in Treme,” paintings by artists of the murals under the 1-10 overpass; both through Oct. 29.

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma. org — “The Elegant Image,”

figural bronzes from the Indian Subcontinent from the collection of Siddharth K. Bhansali, through Oct. 23. NEW ORLEANS PHARMACY MUSEUM. 514 Chartres St., 5658027; www.pharmacymuseum. org — Exhibits about 19th-

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Forced Migration to Commercialization,” a multimedia exhibit; “Laissez Faire — Savoir Fare,” the cuisine of Louisiana and New Orleans; “Eating in the White House — America’s Food”; “Tout de Sweet,” an exhibit exploring all aspects of the sugar industry in the South; “Barbecue Nation”; all ongoing. TANGIPAHOA AFRICAN-AMERICAN HERITAGE MUSEUM & BLACK VETERANS ARCHIVES. 1600 Phoenix Square, Hammond, (985) 542-4259; www.africanamericanheritagemuseum. com — The museum exhibits

works that preserve and tell the history of African-American ancestors in Louisiana; it also houses the country’s first memorial to black Vietnam War veterans, ongoing.

TULANE UNIVERSITY. Joseph Merrick Jones Hall, 6823 St. Charles Ave. — “Treme: People and Places,” maps, architectural drawings and photographs celebrating the bicentennial of Faubourg Treme, through November.

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OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART. 925 Camp St., 5399600; www.ogdenmuseum. org — “Whispering Pines,”

SOUTHERN FOOD & BEVERAGE MUSEUM. Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood. org — “Acadian to Cajun:

FRiDAY • 10/7 • 9pm SAtURDAY • 10/8 • 10pm

century pharmacy, medicine and health care, all ongoing.

photographs by Birtney Imes, through Oct. 16. Works by George Valentine Dureau, through Jan. 3. “Ersy: Architect of Dreams”; “Oyeme Con Los Ojos,” photographs by Josephine Sacabo; both through Jan. 8.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

Photographs by Marc Pagani, ongoing.

MUSEUMS

ART

47

STAGE

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly. com; FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

THEATER AMAZING ACRO-CATS.

Shadowbox Theatre, 2400 St. Claude Ave., 523-7469; www. theshadowboxtheatre.com — Cats play music and perform various feats of agility in the Halloween-themed show. Tickets $15. 7 p.m. WednesdaySunday, 10 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 4 p.m. Saturday-Sunday through Oct. 16. THE DROWSY CHAPERONE. Jefferson Performing Arts Center, 400 Phlox St., Metairie, 8852000; www.jpas.org — While listening to a recording of a fictional musical comedy in his dingy apartment, an agoraphobic Broadway fan — played by Ricky Graham — is transported into the glitzy production with a cast of colorful characters. Tickets $30 general admission, $27 seniors, $20 students, $15 children. 7:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday through Oct. 16.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

GOD OF CARNAGE. Southern

48

Rep Theater, The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 522-6545; www.southernrep. com — In Yasmina Reza’s comedy, a meeting of two sets of parents hoping to resolve a conflict between their sons becomes increasingly chaotic as the evening progresses. Tickets $29 Thursday and Sunday, $35 Friday and Saturday. 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday.

IN THE BLOOD. Lower Depths

Theater, Loyola University New Orleans, 6363 St. Charles Ave., 865-2074; www.montage.loyno. edu — Suzan-Lori Parks’ drama is a modern story of the protagonist of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter, who is a single mother of five children living in poverty. Tickets $13 general admission, $8 students, seniors and Loyola employees. 8 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday.

A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM.

Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden, New Orleans Museum of Art, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, City Park, 658-4100; www.noma.org — The NOLA Project presents an outdoor production of the Shakespeare comedy. Call 658-4100 or visit www.noma.org/nolaproject for reservations. 7 p.m. ThursdayFriday and Sunday through Oct. 16.

PERFORMANCE POTLUCK.

AllWays Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www.theallwayslounge.com — The event features new short works by local playwrights and performers including Meghann McCracken,

GET IN ON THE ACT 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 3 p.m Sunday.

review

THE WEIR. Deutsches Haus, 1023

The Future is a Fancyland Place

Remember Jonestown? The bizarre 1970s cult led by tyrannical psychopath Jim Jones had its apocalyptic end there. He ordered his 900 followers to commit “revolutionary suicide” by drinking arsenic-laced juice, and most did. What does Jonestown have to do with The Future is a Fancyland Place, recently on the boards at the AllWays Lounge? Nothing in terms of revolutionary suicide, but everything in the sense that truth can be stranger than fiction. Even this fiction. Andrew Vaught (of Cripple Creek Theatre) and Chris Kaminstein (of Goat in the Road Productions) wrote Fancyland. Phil Cramer designed the evocative set that traversed the theater, with audience seated on both sides. A bare ranch house kitchen with a porch is flanked by a pasture and a desiccated front yard. All the characters speak in country accents and diction — all the characters except the cows. This is where a Jonestown-like malevolent surrealism sets in. Under the sure-handed direction of Kaminstein, the cast gave themselves over to the confused narrative with utter conviction. This helped but did not entirely compensate for two hours of drama. Half the length would have been twice as good. There are 27 scenes, each given a Biblical name such as “The Promised Land,” “A Pillar of Salt” and “Theology.” The play deals with eschatology and science run amok. A lab set up in an abandoned beer cannery emitted some sort of frequency in the hope of creating “the apocalyptic cow.” What such a creature would be is unclear. The cows are infuriated by the frequencies and trample the entire town. The only house spared is Jarville’s (Ian Hoch). Soon, however, a herd of cows comes into his pasture as well. These cows are represented by simple puppets with abstract heads connected by chains to abstract bodies. They are manipulated effectively in choreography by Rachel Carrico. The cows have inherited the ability to emit ear-splitting high frequency static, and such abstract noise seems to be one of the signs of the Last Days. Randy (Matt Standley), Slim (Dave Davis), Hudie (Ross Britz), Sheila (Emilie Whelan), Juniper (Francesca McKenzie), Beulah (Cecile Monteyne), Ovit (Vaught) and Britt (Shannon Flaherty) are a contentious clan searching for the magical cow who will bring about the end of the world. There are abundant and bizarre complications — some opaque but comical, some just opaque. Randy and Slim, cowhands with an ongoing physical routine, could easily be the two fools who adopt Caliban in The Tempest. Their absurd shenanigans shouldn’t work, but they do. Finally, the clan locates Esther, the fatal bovine (also played by Monteyne). An end-of-the-world machine covering an entire wall is activated, but blows a fuse. So, our shabby collection of Walmarts and Fuddruckers is left intact. — Dalt Wonk

Taryn Vinet, Rebecca Gernon, Jon Broder, Bradley Troll, Kerry Cahill and others. Tickets $10, or free with a covered dish to share. 7 p.m. potluck, 8 p.m. show. Saturday. RITUAL MURDER. Ashe Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle

Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www. ashecac.org — Tom Dent’s 1968 play discusses black-on-black violence through a story of a seemingly senseless murder. Each performance is followed by story circles and sessions with social workers. Tickets $5.

Ridgewood St., 522-8014; www. deutscheshaus.org — In Conor McPherson’s play, drinkers at a pub in rural Ireland regal each other with ghost stories that get darker and more personal as the night progresses. Tickets $15 suggested donation. 7:30 p.m. Monday-Wednesday through Oct. 12.

BURLESQUE & CABARET BURLESQUE BALLROOM. Irvin

Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse, 300 Bourbon St., 553-2270; www. sonesta.com — Trixie Minx stars in the weekly burlesque show featuring the music of Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown. Call 553-2331 for details. 11:50 p.m. Friday.

CHERRY BROWN BURLESQUE.

Eiffel Society, 2040 St. Charles Ave., 525-2951; www.eiffelsociety.com — The rock ’n’ roll burlesque performance features live music by Knockbox. Tickets $10 general admission, $20 VIP seating. Email cherryberrybrown@yahoo.com for reservations. 9 p.m. Wednesday. FLEUR DE TEASE. One Eyed Jacks, 615 Toulouse St., 569-8361; www.oneeyedjacks.net — The burlesque troupe presents its Halloween revue. Tickets $15 general admission, $20 reserved seating. 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. Sunday. RICKY GRAHAM & FRIENDS.

Mid-City Arts Theater, 3540 Toulouse St. — Graham, along with Jefferson Turner, Mandy Zirkenbach and Matthew Mickal, perform in the cabaret show. Call 488-1460 or email info@midcitytheatre.com for reservations. 8 p.m. Thursday.

OPERA OPERA ON TAP. Rusty Nail, 1100

Constance St., 525-5515; www. therustynail.org — OperaCreole performs. Free admission. 7 p.m. Wednesday.

AUDITIONS POSSIBLE SIDE EFFECTS. Male actors are needed for the play, which will be performed during the New Orleans Fringe Festival. Auditions are by appointment only. Email possiblesideeffectstheplay@gmail. com for details. SPRING AWAKENING. Encore

Dance Studio, 1999 Hickory Ave., Suite 102, 737-5977 — Director Gary Rucker seeks actors at least 16 years old who are capable of passing for high school students for Theater 13’s production of the musical. Auditioners must prepare two samples of a Beatles song. Auditions are by appointment only. Email theatre13nola@ gmail.com or visit www.

preview The Amazing Acro-Cats

The Amazing Acro-Cats wowed local audiences during a March visit — at least for consenting to perform tricks if not purrfect execution. Ringmaster Samantha White returns with her circus of talented and sometimes fickle felines. They ride skateboards, leap from great heights, traipse across tightropes and more. The troupe is touring its Halloween-themed show, and the cat rock band will play some spooky songs. White formerly trained rats for film and TV scenes, but she switched to rescuing cats from shelters and training them for showbiz. Tickets $15. — Will Coviello

OCT

517

The Amazing Acro-Cats 7 p.m. Wed.-Sun.; 10 p.m. Fri.-Sat.; 4 p.m. Sat.-Sun. The Shadowbox Theatre, 2400 St. Claude Ave., 298-8676; www.shadowboxtheatre.com

theatre-13.com for details. 12:30 p.m. Saturday and 6 p.m. Sunday.

COMEDY COMEDY GUMBEAUX. Howlin’ Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf.com — Local comedians perform, and amateurs take the stage in the open mic portion. 8 p.m. Thursday. COMEDY SPORTZ NOLA. La Nuit

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — The theater hosts a safe-for-all-ages team comedy competition. Tickets $10 ($5 with drink purchase). 7 p.m. Saturday.

FEAR & LOATHING IN NEW ORLEANS/GOD’S BEEN DRINKING.

La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The sketch comedy show with vampires, zombies, relationship advice and more is followed by the improvised comedy program. Admission $10 ($5 with drink purchase). 8:30 p.m. Friday. GROUND ZERO COMEDY. The Maison, 508 Frenchmen St., 3715543; www.maisonfrenchmen. com — The show features local stand-up comedians. Sign-up is 7:30 p.m.; show is 8 p.m. Friday. IVAN’S OPEN MIC NIGHT. Rusty

Nail, 1100 Constance St., 525-5515; www.therustynail.org — The Rusty Nail hosts a weekly openmic comedy and music night. 9 p.m. Tuesday. LAUGH OUT LOUD. Bootleggers Bar and Grille, 209 Decatur St., 525-1087 — Simple Play presents a weekly comedy show. 10 p.m. Thursday. LOUIS C.K. Mahalia Jackson

Theater for the Performing Arts, 1419 Basin St., 525-1052; www.mahaliajacksontheater. com — The comedian and actor performs. Tickets $32.75-$45.75 (plus fees). 8 p.m. Thursday. NATIONAL COMEDY COMPANY.

Yo Mama’s Bar & Grill, 727 St. Peter St., 522-1125 — The interactive comedy show features live music. Visit www.nationalcomedycompany.com for tickets. Tickets $8 online, $15 at the door. 10 p.m. Saturday. RON WHITE. Mahalia Jackson

Theater for the Performing Arts, 1419 Basin St., 525-1052; www. mahaliajacksontheater.com — The comedian of Blue Collar Comedy fame performs. Tickets $49.75 and $75 (plus fees). 8 p.m. Friday.

SIDNEY’S STAND-UP OPEN MIC.

Sidney’s, 1674 Barataria Blvd., Marrero, 341-0103 — The show features professional, amateur and first-time comics. Free admission. Sign-up is 8 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Thursday.

SNACK TIME WITH THE ANVIL COMPANY. La Nuit Comedy The-

ater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The improv and sketch comedy troupe performs. Tickets $10 ($5 with drink purchase). 8:30 p.m. Saturday.

STUPID TIME MACHINE. Howlin’ Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf. com — The improv troupe performs. Tickets $5. 8:30 p.m. Tuesday. THINK YOU’RE FUNNY? Carrollton Station, 8140 Willow St., 8659190; www.carrolltonstation. com — The open-mic comedy showcase is open to all comics. Sign-up is 8:30 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Wednesday.

Invites YOU to a night of Irish Entertainment and Food at GALLIER HALL

525 Saint Charles Ave

Thursday, November 10th 2011 6:30-9:30pm BE PART OF THE GROWING IRISH NETWORK IN NEW ORLEANS Members only Party so .... Join the Irish Network today at

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

Proudly sponsored by Finn McCool’s Irish Pub and Aidan Gill

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LISTINGS

BE THERE DO THAT EVENTS YOUNG HISTORIANS TOUR.

FAMILY

National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — A museum staff member leads a tour of a special exhibit for familes with children ages 7-12. A craft activity relating to the exhibit follows the tour. Call 528-1944 ext. 229 for details. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

Tuesday 4

EVENTS

KINDER GARDEN: BACK TO SCHOOL IN THE GARDEN.

Tuesday 4

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

Longue Vue House and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue. com — Children and accompanying adults explore the world of insects through ageappropriate activities. Tickets $10 members, $12 nonmembers. Call 293-4722 or email lvaughn@longuevue.com for details. 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. TODDLER TIME . Louisiana

Children’s Museum, 420 Julia St., 523-1357; www.lcm. org — The museum hosts special Tuesday and Thursday activities for children ages 3-under and their parents or caregivers. Admission $8, free for members. 10:30 a.m.

Thursday 6 ART ACTIVITIES DURING AFTER HOURS. Ogden Museum of

LITTLE MASTERS. Longue Vue House and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue.com — Children ages 2 and a half to 5 and their parents or caregivers paint, dance, sing and try yoga moves in the gardens. Pre-registration is required. Call 293-4721 or email jcohn@ longuevue.com for details. Admission $12 members, $15 nonmembers (includes one adult and child). 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.

Saturday 8 CHILDREN’S ART WORKSHOP. Rhino Contemporary Crafts Gallery, The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www.rhinocrafts. com — Metalsmith Deborah Morrissey and other gallery artists lead children in making fall-themed hanging lanterns. The workshop is for children 10 and older. Reservations are suggested. Email artboxrhino@gmail.com for details. Admission $5. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. .

4229 Dauphine St., 947-5562 — The Greater New Orleans Fair Housing Action Center hosts a series of non-partisan, candid conversations with local candidates to discuss housing related issues in New Orleans. J.P. Morrell, Cynthia Willard-Lewis, Wesley T. Bishop and Samuel Cowart speak. Call 596-2100 for details. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Tulane University

Square, 200 Broadway St. — The weekly market features fresh produce, kettle corn, Green Plate specials and flowers. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

DEPRESSION AND BIPOLAR SUPPORT ALLIANCE. Tulane-

Lakeside Hospital, 4700 South I-10 Service Road West, Metairie — The peer support group meets the first and third Tuesdays of every month. Visit www.dbsaneworleans.org for details. 7:30 p.m.

DOWNTOWN LUNCHTIME SPIRITUALITY SERIES.

Immaculate Conception Jesuit Church, 130 Baronne St., 5291477; www.jesuitchurch.net — Leah Chase of Dooky Chase Restaurant speaks at the event. Visit www.loyno.edu/ lplc/downtown for details. Free admission. 12:30 p.m. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP.

Grief Resource Center, 1221 S. Clearview Pkwy., fourth floor, 723-3628 — Facilitated by licensed counselors and therapists, the Akula Foundation Grief Resource Center’s group is open to any family that has experienced a death or other significant loss. Space is limited; pre-registration is required. 6:15 p.m. to 7:15 p.m. IDENTITY THEFT DISCUSSION.

East Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 838-1190 — Two special agents from the New Orleans division of the FBI discuss identity theft and other cyber crimes. Free admission. 7 p.m.

Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — The Ogden trains prospective docents, people who lead museum tours, in museum techniques and education strategies for engaging visitors. Call 539-9608 or email ebalkin@ogdenmuseum.org for details. 10 a.m. RUTH FADEN. Tulane

University, Dixon Hall, 8655105 ext. 2; www.tulane.edu — The executive director of the Berman Bioethics Institute at Johns Hopkins University presents the lecture. Call 865-5422 or email cheaney@ tulane.edu for details. 7 p.m.

TEA ON TUESDAY: POPPY TOOKER. Longue Vue House

and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue. com — The food activist and WWNO 89.9 FM radio host discusses the food of Louisiana. A traditional tea service follows. Reservations are required. Call 293-4722 or email lvaughn@longuevue. com for details. Admission $25 members, $30 nonmembers. 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Wednesday 5 COMMUNITY CONVERSATIONS WITH CANDIDATES. Bridge

Lounge, 1201 Magazine St., 299-1888; www.bridgeloungenola.com — The Greater New Orleans Fair Housing Action Center hosts a series of non-partisan, candid conversations with local candidates to discuss housing related issues in New Orleans. Regina Bartholomew, Ellen Hazeur, Nakisha Ervin-Knott, Clare Jupiter and Kris Kiefer speak. Call 596-2100 for details. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. COVINGTON FARMERS MARKET. Covington City

Hall, 609 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-1873 — The market offers fresh locally produced foods every week. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday.

FRENCH MARKET FARMERS MARKET. French Market,

French Market Place, between Decatur and N. Peters streets, 522-2621; www.frenchmarket. org — The weekly market offers seasonal produce, seafood, prepared foods, smoothies and more. 3 p.m. to 7 p.m.

GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP. East

Jefferson General Hospital, 4200 Houma Blvd., Metairie, 454-4000; www.ejgh.org — The American Cancer Society sponsors a group for people who have experienced the death of a loved one. Call 4565000 for details. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. PAGE 53

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — The Ogden offers art activities for kids during its weekly After Hours concerts. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

COMMUNITY CONVERSATIONS WITH CANDIDATES. Vaughan’s,

NEW DOCENT TRAINING.

51

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com EVENTS PAGE 51 LUNCHBOX LECTURE. National

World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — The semi-monthly lecture series focuses on an array of World War II-related topics. Call 528-1944 ext. 229 for details. Noon.

NEW ORLEANS ROSE SOCIETY MEETING. Whitney Bank

Training Room, 1441 Metairie Road, Metairie, 838-6364; www.whitneybank.com — The topic of the meeting is preparing blooms for a show. Call 368-6885 for details. 7:30 p.m.

PLANTERS LUNCH. Founders Center, LaFreniere Park, 3000 Downs Blvd., Metairie — Friends of Jefferson the Beautiful host the event with lectures and lunch. Call 8338733 for details. Noon. TERRORISM: PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE. East Bank

Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 8381190 — Lou Reese, adjunct professor in the Homeland Security Studies program at Tulane University, presents the program. Free admission. 7 p.m.

WESTWEGO FARMERS & FISHERIES MARKET. 484 Sala

Ave., Sala Avenue at Fourth Street, Westwego — The market offers organic produce, baked goods, jewelry, art and more, with live music and pony rides. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 838-1190 — Nathan Huegen from National World War II Museum’s education department discusses the impact of the 1936 Olympic Games. 7 p.m.

Thursday 6 CELEBRATE RECOVERY. Victory

Fellowship Church, 5708 Airline Drive, Metairie — The group addresses addictions and other emotional issues through a spiritual perspective. Call 733-5005 for details. 6:30 p.m.

FESTIGALS. Hotel Monteleone,

214 Royal St., 523-3341; www. hotelmonteleone.com — The weekend event for women of all ages features home tours, spa and shopping experiences, speakers including Soledad O’Brien, dining specials, a block party with Rockin’ Dopsie, seminars and more. The event supports Women for Women International and Dress for Success. Visit www.festigals. org for the full schedule and other details. Admission $25$100. Thursday-Saturday.

FIRST THURSDAYS WARGAMES.

National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — The museum hosts WWII board and miniatures gaming for players at all levels. Pre-registration is required; a minimum number of gamers must register for the meeting to be held. Call 528-1944 ext. 333 for details. 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. FRESH MARKET. Circle Food Store, 1522 St. Bernard Ave. — The Downtown Neighborhood Market Consortium market features fresh produce, dairy, seafood, baked goods and more. EBT and WIC accepted. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. LIFE HURTS, GOD HEALS.

Victory Fellowship Church, 5708 Airline Drive, Metairie — The support group focuses on teens and young adults with addictions, hang ups and emotional pain. Call 733-5005 for details. 7 p.m. PITCHNOLA. Tulane University, Woldenberg Art Center, Freeman Auditorium, 3142200; www.tulane.edu — Teams and individuals present short “elevator pitches” relating to social problems in New Orleans in the competition. A reception with refreshments follows. Visit www.seno-nola. org for details. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. SISTAHS MAKING A CHANGE.

Studios holds a juried art market for professional artists on the first Friday of each month. Artists pay a $15 application fee and, if accepted, a $20 booth fee. 5:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. FRIENDS OF THE SLIDELL LIBRARY USED BOOK SALE.

St. Tammany Parish Library, Slidell Branch, 555 Robert Blvd., Slidell, (985) 893-6280; www.stpl.us — The sale features a variety of magazines and paperback, hardcover and children’s books. Email fsl70458@yahoo.com for details. Members-only sale 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Friday, general admission 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday.

NASHVILLE & THE RIVAH

(504) 894-1100 www.greenparrotnursery.com

Downtown Gretna, Huey P. Long Avenue between Fourth and Fifth streets — The annual festival features seven stages of live music, food, arts and crafts, carnival rides, a German beer garden, children’s entertainment and more. Visit www.gretnafest. com for details. Admission $12.50 online, $15 at the door. 4 p.m. to 11 p.m. Friday, 2 p.m. to 11 p.m. Saturday, 2 p.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday.

LAFAYETTE SQUARE CONSERVANCY ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION. Lafayette

Square, 601 S. Maestri Place; www.lafayette-square.org — The event features artists tents, food and drink, and live music by the Ian Cunningham Band, 30x90 Blueswomen and Remedy. 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. MARKETPLACE AT ARMSTRONG PARK. Armstrong Park, N.

Rampart and St. Ann streets — The weekly market features fresh produce, baked goods, Louisiana seafood, natural products, art, crafts and entertainment. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays.

II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — The filmmaker signs his DVD series The War, as well as the series’ companion books. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

WHERE Y’ART. New Orleans

Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma.org — The museum’s weekly event features music, performances, film screenings, family-friendly activities and more. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Fridays.

COMMUNITY CONVERSATIONS WITH CANDIDATES. Ralph’s on

Friday 7

Saturday 8

EASTSIDE ART MARKET.

BIG EASY ROLLERGIRLS TRYOUTS. Westbank Skate

Country, 1100 Terry Parkway, Gretna, 392-2227; www.

2nd Saturday Each Month 10am - 4pm Local Art and Artists

Saturday

October 8th

on the Riverfront in Madisonville

madisonvilleartmarket.com

MEET THE FILMMAKER: KEN BURNS. National World War

Ashe Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — The group offers lessons in African dance and more, along with nutrition, health and wellness seminars. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday and Monday.

Eastside Studios, 107 S. Orange St., Hammond, (985) 542-7113 or (985) 543-0403 — Eastside

201 NASHVILLE AVE.

GRETNA HERITAGE FESTIVAL.

CHANGES. Hey! Cafe, 4332 Magazine St., 891-8682 — The weekly meetings teach focusing, a method of directing attention outside one’s body to affect change. Call 232-9787 for details. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

the Park, 900 City Park Ave., 488-1000; www.ralphsonthepark.com — The Greater New Orleans Fair Housing Action Center hosts a series of non-partisan, candid conver-

Green Parrot Nursery

DAMAGED ART WORK?

The best kept secret in New Orleans

Paintings • Prints • Frames • Mirrors Photos • Sculpture • Glass • Ceramic Professionally Restored

The New Orleans Conservation Guild, Inc. 13 years in New Orleans 3620 Royal St • In Bywater 10-4pm • Mon-Fri [504] 944-7900 www.art-restoration.com

Plant sales & rentals 1135 PRESS ST. @ NEW ORLEANS

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > OCTOBER 04 > 2011

WORLD WAR II DISCUSSION GROUP. East Bank Regional

sations with local candidates to discuss housing related issues in New Orleans. Josie Haas, John Labruzzo and Nick Lorusso speak. Call 596-2100 for details. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

2900 ST. CLAUDE

(504) 947-7554

53

Attiki

EVENTS

bar & grill

skatecountrywb.com — The roller derby league holds tryouts for its seventh season. Visit www.bigeasyrollergirls. blogspot.com for details. There is a $10 try-out fee. 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.

experience the mediterranean

BELLY DANCER

Every Fri & Sat Night

FOOD SERVED TIL 1AM

Worldly Wine/ Martinis

BROAD STREET BAZAAR. 300 N. Broad St., corner of Bienville Street — The monthly market features health screenings, jewelry, food vendors and more. Call 561-7495 or visit www.broadcommunityconnections.org for details. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

HOOKAH 230 DECATUR

11AM-4AM DAILY

www.attikineworleans.com 504-587-3756

Showcasing Local Music MON 10/3

Papa Grows Funk

TUE 10/4

Rebirth Brass Band

WED 10/5

Charlie Wooten Project

Thursdays at Twilight Garden Concert Series

THIS WEEK’S PERFORMANCE

M.I. Scoggin " An Evening with Edith Piaf"

OCTOBER 6

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

54

Last Waltz Ensemble

SAT 10/8

Zydefunk

Adults: $8 / Children 5-12: $3 Children 4 & Under = FREE Mint Juleps and other refreshments available for purchase For more information call

(504) 483-9488

(504) 866-9359

www.themapleleafbar.com

DENTAL CLEANING SPECIAL

3-6PM on gamedays

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MON.11AM-3PM • TUES-THURS.11AM-9PM FRI-SAT.11AM-10PM • SUN BRUNCH. 9AM-3PM

Market, Magazine and Girod streets, 861-5898; www. marketumbrella.org — The weekly market features fresh produce, flowers and food. 8 a.m. to noon.

ERACE NEW ORLEANS MEETING. Christ Church

Cathedral, 2919 St. Charles Ave., 895-6602 — ERACE meets in the church’s Westfeldt Room for its weekly discussion group. Call 8661163 for details. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

13786 River Road, Destrehan — The market features a wide range of fresh vegetables, fruits, flowers and other items. Visit www.germancoastfarmersmarket.org for details. 8 a.m. to noon.

8316 Oak Street · New Orleans 70118

3701 IBERVILLE STREET • NOLA 70119 504.488.6582 • KATIESINMIDCITY.COM

CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Magazine Street

GERMAN COAST FARMERS MARKET. Ormond Plantation,

New Orleans Best Every Night!

OPEN AT 9AM TUES-SAT FOR BRUNCH

Southern Food & Beverage Museum, Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www. southernfood.org — Liz Williams leads that details the basics of cheese making with a hands-on demonstration. Admission $20 (includes cheese-making kit). 2 p.m.

State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — A park ranger leads a viewing of the park’s eagle nest. 3 p.m.

TrioTrio w/ Walter SUN Joe JoeKrown Krown SUN “Wolfman” Washington feat. Russell Batiste & Walter 10/9 3/13 & Russell Batiste Wolfman Washington

happy hour

CHEESE-MAKING CLASS.

EAGLE WATCH. Fontainebleau

THU The Trio featuring 10/6 Johnny V & Special Guests FRI 10/7

LISTINGS

includes comprehensive exam (#0150), x-rays (#274), cleaning (#1110) or panorex (#330) *NEW PATIENTS ONLY — EXPIRES 10/16/11

DR. GLENN SCHMIDT DR. STEPHEN DELAHOUSSAYE FAMILY DENTISTRY Call For An Appointment

UPTOWN KENNER

Now available at 2 locations!

8025 Maple St. @ Carrollton · 861-9044 www.uptownsmiles.com 1942 Williams Blvd., Suite 8 · 469-9648 www.kennersmiles.com

GRETNA FARMERS MARKET.

Gretna Farmers Market, Huey P. Long Avenue, between Third and Fourth streets, Gretna, 362-8661 — The weekly rain-or-shine market features more than 30 vendors offering a wide range of fruits, vegetables, meats and flowers. Free admission. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. MALCOM C. WEBB SYMPOSIUM: THE MAKING OF THE KING JAMES BIBLE . The

Chapel of the Holy Comforter, 2220 Lakeshore Drive — History and religion scholars present lectures. Call 288-3863 or email carolbillings3@cox. net for details. Free admission. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

NAMI WALK . Audubon Park, Shelter 10, 6500 Magazine St. — The 1.8-mile walk is held to to raise awareness about mental illness and the services available in New Orleans for persons with mental illness and their families. Visit www. namineworleans.org for details. 9 a.m.

Temple Sinai, 6227 St. Charles Ave. — Rabbi Edward Cohn leads a free class for those seeking information about Judaism or considering conversion. Reservations are recommended. 9 a.m. Sundays. Through Feb. 26.

NATURE: A CLOSER LOOK .

Orleans Avenue — The kayak scavenger hunt benefits the Faubourg St. John Neighborhood Association’s Re-Bridge project, which seeks to rehabilitate the the Dumaine and Magnolia Bridges. Visit www.kayakitiyat.com or www.rebridge.org for details. Admission $25. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers lead a weekly nature hike. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

NEW ORLEANS IRISH SET DANCERS CEILI . Irish House,

1432 Saint Charles Ave., 5956755; www.theirishhouseneworleans.com — The dance group hosts the Irish music and dance party, which features beginners dance instruction. Free admission. 8 p.m.

NOLA UNDERGROUND HIP HOP AWARDS. House of Blues, 225

Decatur St., 310-4999; www. hob.com — The event honors New Orleans’ hip-hop artists, past and present. Visit www. nolahiphopawards.com for details. Tickets $16-$31. 7 p.m.

PARTY IN PINK ZUMBATHON .

Camp Hope, 1914 Aycock St., Arabi, 682-5235 — The Zumbathon, which also features a raffle, raises money for breast cancer awareness. Email jennrupp@gmail.com for details. Admission $20. Noon to 3 p.m.

SANKOFA FARMERS MARKET. Holy Angels Complex, 3500 St. Claude Ave., 875-4268; www.sankofafarmersmarket. org — The weekly market offers fresh produce and seafood from local farmers and fishermen. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. SILENCE THE VIOLENCE TALENT SHOW & CONCERT.

Washington Square Park, 700 Elysian Fields Ave. — The American Idol-style talent competition features celebrity judges including the Smokey Greenwell Blues Band, Luther Kent, Charmaine Nevelle and others; guest performers, food, drinks and more. Call 943-0026 or email houseoffaithnon@yahoo.com for details. Noon to 5 p.m. ST. BERNARD SEAFOOD & FARMERS MARKET. Aycock

Barn, 409 Aycock St., Arabi — The market showcases fresh seafood, local produce, jams and preserves, baked goods, crafts, live entertainment, children’s activities and more. Call 355-4442 or visit www. visitstbernard.com for details. 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays.

Sunday 9 INTRODUCTION TO JUDAISM .

KAYAK-ITI-YAT SAVENGER HUNT. Bayou St. John, at

MARSH FEST. Howlin’ Wolf,

907 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf.com — The concert benefits the Louisiana charter boat captains affected by the BP oil disaster and features performances by Lost Bayou Ramblers, Shamarr Allen and the Underdawgs, Terrance Simien and the Zydeco Experience and others, plus an appearance from Swamp People cast members. Tickets $15 general admission, $25 VIP. 2:30 p.m VIP admission, 3:30 p.m. general admission.

OPERA ORIENTATION & ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION .

New Orleans Opera Association’s Women Guild Home, 2504 Prytania St., 899-1945 — The program discusses the opera Turandot in anticipation of the New Orleans Opera Association’s upcoming production and features guests from the production and light refreshments. Call 529-2278 ext. 227 for details. Admission $25 Women’s Guild Members, $15 Junior Committee members, $30 nonmembers. 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.

PRIMITIVE WOODWORKING . Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers host a weekly demonstration of woodworking techniques. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. SIERRA CLUB PROGRAM .

Audubon Zoo, Dominion Auditorium, 6500 Magazine St. — Haigler Pate of the National Park Service discusses “Challenges and Opportunities at the Barataria Preserve.” Call 307-0187 for details. Free admission. 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Monday 10 TOASTMASTERS MEETING . Milton H. Latter Memorial Library, 5120 St. Charles Ave. — New Orleans Toastmasters Club hosts an open weekly meeting (except holidays)

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com EVENTS

to hone the skills of speaking, listening and thinking. Call 2518600 or visit www.notoast234. freetoasthost.org for details. 6 p.m. UNITED NONPROFITS OF GREATER NEW ORLEANS.

Goodwill Training Center, 3400 Tulane Ave. — Nonprofit Central hosts a weekly meeting for all leaders of nonprofit groups. Email susan_unp@ yahoo.com for details. 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.

CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY.

American Cancer Society, 2605 River Road, Westwego, 8334024 or (800) ACS-2345; www. cancer.org — The American Cancer Society needs volunteers for upcoming events and to facilitate patient service programs. Opportunities are available with Relay for Life, Look Good … Feel Better, Hope Lodge, Man to Man, Road to Recovery, Hope Gala and more. Call for information. ANOTHER LIFE FOUNDATION VOLUNTEERS. Another Life

Foundation seeks volunteers recovering from mental illness to help mentor others battling depression and suicidal behaviors. Free training provided. For details, contact Stephanie Green at (888) 543-3480, anotherlifefoundation@hotmail.com or visit www.anotherlifefoundation.org.

seeks volunteers for wetlands planting projects, nursery maintenance and other duties. Visit www.bayourebirth.org for details.

BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS VOLUNTEERS. Big Brothers Big

Sisters of Southeast Louisiana, 2626 Canal St., Suite 203, 3097304 or (877) 500-7304; www. bbbssela.org — Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southeast Louisiana needs volunteers to serve as mentors. A volunteer meets two to three times a month with his or her Little Brother or Sister. You can play games, watch movies, bake cookies, play sports or plan any other outings you both would enjoy. Call for information.

CASA NEW ORLEANS. The

organization seeks volunteer court-appointed special advocates to represent abused and neglected children in New Orleans. The time commitment is a minimum of 10 hours per month. No special skills are required; thorough training and support is provided. Call Brian Opert at 522-1962 ext. 213 or email info@casaneworleans. org for details.

brella.org seek volunteers to field shopper questions, assist seniors, help with monthly children’s activities and more. Call 495-1459 or email latifia@marketumbrella.org for details.

EDGAR DEGAS FOUNDATION .

The nonprofit seeks volunteers to contribute to the development of the foundation. Call 821-5009 or email info@ degashouse.com for details. GREATER NEW ORLEANS FAIR HOUSING ACTION CENTER .

The center seeks part-time civil rights investigators with excellent writing skills, reliable transportation and no criminal convictions to help expose housing discrimination in the New Orleans metro area. Call 717-4257 or email mmorgan@ gnofairhousing.org for information. HANDSON NEW ORLEANS. The volunteer center for the Greater New Orleans area invites prospective volunteers to learn about the various opportunities available, how to sign-up to attend service projects and general tips on how to be a good volunteer. Call 483-7041 ext. 107, email volunteer@ handsonneworleans.org or visit www.handsonneworleans.org for details.

LOWERNINE.ORG VOLUNTEERS. Lowernine.org seeks volunteers to help renovate homes in the Lower 9th Ward. Visit www. lowernine.org or email lauren@ lowernine.org for details. MAKE A MOVE. Volunteers are

needed for the New Orleans Mission’s free, one-day event on Saturday Oct. 12 that will offer struggling individuals a variety of services including medical check-ups, eye screenings, foot care, legal services, grooming, employment assistance, food, toiletries and more. Call 451-4282, email signal@ hero-farm.com or visit www. neworleansmission.org for details.

MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY ASSOCIATION . The MDA seeks

volunteers ages 16 and older for its weeklong summer camps around the country. Call (800) 572-1717 or visit www.mda.org/ summercamp for details.

residents to assist the New Orleans Police Department at its district stations. Email vocal@nola.gov for details.

NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM . National World War

WORDS

OPERATION REACH VOLUNTEERS. Operation REACH

that educates at-risk middle school students who have been expelled from Jefferson Parish’s public schools seeks adult mentors for its students. Call 8360808 for details.

LOUISIANA SPCA VOLUNTEERS.

Dorothy Dorsett Brown LA/ SPCA Campus, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd., Algiers, 368-5191; www. la-spca.org — The Louisiana SPCA seeks volunteers to work with the animals and help with special events, education and more. Volunteers must be at least 12 years old and complete a volunteer orientation to work directly with animals. Call or email Dionne Simoneaux at dionne@la-spca.org.

The Teen Suicide Prevention Program seeks volunteers to help teach middle- and upperschool New Orleans students. Call 831-8475 for details.

VOLUNTEERS CAN LEAD PROGRAM . The program allows

JACKSON BARRACKS MUSEUM VOLUNTEERS. The museum

JEFFERSON COMMUNITY SCHOOL . The charter school

TEEN SUICIDE PREVENTION .

MEAL DELIVERY VOLUNTEERS. Jefferson Council on Aging seeks volunteers to deliver meals to homebound adults. Gas/mileage expenses will be reimbursed. Call Gail at 8885880 for details.

Harmony Hospice, 519 Metairie Road, Metairie, 832-8111 — Harmony Hospice seeks volunteers to offer companionship to patients through reading, playing cards and other activities. Call Jo-Ann Moore at 832-8111 for details.

seeks volunteers to work one day a week for the Louisiana National Guard Museum. Volunteers prepare military aircraft, vehicles and equipment for display. Call David at 837-0175 or email daveharrell@ yahoo.com for details.

holds regular volunteer training sessions to work one-on-one with public school students on reading and language skills. Call 899-0820, email elizabeth@ scapc.org or visit www.stairnola.org for details.

TOURO VOLUNTEER SERVICES. Touro Volunteer Services, 1401 Foucher St., 897-8107; www. touro.com/content/careercamp — The infirmary seeks adult volunteers to assist with the Family Surgery Lounge, patient information desk, book and goody cart, hospital tours and health screenings. Call volunteer services at 897-8107 for information.

II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — The museum accepts applications for volunteers to meet and greet visitors from around the world and familiarize them with its galleries, artifacts and expansion. Call 527-6012 ext. 243 or email katherine.alpert@nationalww2museum.org for details.

HOSPICE VOLUNTEERS.

START THE ADVENTURE IN READING. The STAIR program

and Gulfsouth Youth Action Corps seek college student volunteers from all over the country to assist in providing recreation and education opportunities for New Orleansarea inner-city youth and their families. For information, visit www.thegyac.org and www. operationreach.org. PUBLIC SCHOOL VOLUNTEERS.

New Orleans Outreach seeks volunteers to share their enthusiasm and expertise as part of the ARMS-Outreach afterschool program. Volunteers are needed in the arts, academics, technology, recreation and life skills. Email jenny@nooutreach. org or call 654-1060 for information.

SENIOR COMPANION VOLUNTEERS. New Orleans

Council on Aging, Annex Conference Room, 2475 Canal St., 821-4121; www.nocoa.org — The council seeks volunteers to assist with personal and other daily tasks to help seniors live independently. Call for details.

ANN MCCUTCHAN . Maple Street

Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www.maplestreetbookshop.com — The author discusses River Music: An Atchafalaya Story. 6 p.m. Wednesday.

BARNES & NOBLE JR . Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 455-5135 — The bookstore regularly hosts free reading events for kids. Call for schedule information. CATHARINE SAVAGE BROSSMAN .

Octavia Books, 513 Octavia St., 899-7323 — The poet reads from Under the Pergola. 6 p.m. Thursday.

with open mic. 9 p.m. Tuesday. FAIR GRINDS POETRY EVENT.

Fair Grinds Coffeehouse, 3133 Ponce de Leon Ave., 913-9073; www.fairgrinds.com — Jenna Mae hosts poets and spokenword readers on the second, fourth and fifth Sunday of each month. 8 p.m. FIRST TUESDAY BOOK CLUB.

Maple Street Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www. maplestreetbookshop.com — The group discusses Chris Bohjalian’s Double Bind. 6 p.m. Tuesday. FR. JEROME LEDOUX. New

Orleans Healing Center, 2372 St. Claude Ave., 948-9961; www. neworleanshealingcenter. org — The author signs War of the Pews: A Personal Account of St. Augustine Church in New Orleans. 5 p.m. Wednesday.

FRIENDS OF THE NEW ORLEANS PUBLIC LIBRARY BOOK SALE .

Latter Library Carriage House, 5120 St. Charles Ave., 596-2625; www.nutrias.org — The group hosts twice-weekly sales of books, DVDs, books on tape, LPs and more. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

JACQUES SOULAS. The Catholic Book Store, 3003 S. Carrolton Ave., 861-7504 — The author signs Cafe Degas Cookbook. 11 a.m. Saturday. LOCAL WRITERS’ GROUP.

Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 455-5135 — The weekly group discusses and critiques fellow members’ writing. All genres welcome. 7:30 p.m. Monday.

MAPLE LEAF READING SERIES.

Maple Leaf Bar, 8316 Oak St., 866-9359; www.mapleleafbar. com — The weekly reading series presents featured writers followed by an open mic. Free admission. 3 p.m. Sunday. PASS IT ON . George & Leah

COOKBOOK CLUB. Garden

McKenna Museum of African American Art, 2003 Carondelet St., 586-7432; www.themckennamuseum.com — Poet Gian “G-Persepect” Smith and Alphonse “Bobby” Smith host a weekly spoken-word and music event. Admission $6. 9 p.m. Saturdays.

COOKBOOKS & COCKTAILS SERIES. Kitchen Witch

POEMS & PINK RIBBONS. New

District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — Molly Birnbaum discusses and signs Season to Taste: How I Lost My Sense of Smell and Found My Way. Bringing food is encouraged but not required. 6 p.m. Monday.

Cookbooks Shop, 631 Toulouse St., 528-8382 — The group meets weekly to discuss classic New Orleans cookbooks. 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Friday.

DINKY TAO POETRY. Molly’s at

the Market, 1107 Decatur St., 525-5169; www.mollysatthemarket.net — The bar hosts a free weekly poetry reading

Orleans Healing Center, 2372 St. Claude Ave., 948-9961; www. neworleanshealingcenter.org — The Literary Lab hosts a free creative writing workshop for breast cancer patients, survivors and their friends and family that culminates in a reading that is open to the public. Call 952-2773 or email literarylabnola@gmail.com for details. 10 a.m. to noon.

POETRY MEETING . New Orleans Poetry Forum, 257 Bonnabel Blvd., Metairie, 835-8472 — The forum holds workshops every Wednesday. 8 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. SPOKEN WORD. Ebony Square, 4215 Magazine St. — The center hosts a weekly spoken-word, music and open-mic event. Tickets $7 general admission, $5 students. 11 p.m. Friday. TAO POETRY. Neutral Ground Coffeehouse, 5110 Danneel St., 891-3381; www.neutralground. org — The coffeehouse hosts a weekly poetry reading. 9 p.m. Wednesday. UNIVERSES. Craige Cultural Center, 1800 Newton St., Algiers — The center hosts a weekly spoken-word, music and open-mic event. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Sunday. THE WELL: A WOMEN’S POETRY CIRCLE . St. Anna’s Episcopal

Church, 1313 Esplanade Ave., 947-2121; www.stannanola. org — The group meets at 2 p.m. Mondays. Call 289-9142 or email poetryprocess@gmail. com for details.

YVONNE PERRET. Maple Street Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 8664916; www.maplestreetbookshop.com — The author reads from and discusses Yat Wit: Chicken Gumbo for the New Orleans Soul. 6 p.m. Thursday.

CALL FOR WRITERS BOB KAUFMAN BOOK PRIZE IN POETRY. Trembling Pillow

Press presents the contest. The winner will be published in 2012. Visit www.tremblingpillowpress.com for details. Submissions deadline is Nov. 15. POETIC SOUL CONTEST. 411 NOLA hosts the competition to honor the publication of the second edition of poet Asia Rainey’s book Soul Chant. There is a $5 entry fee per poem. Email contests@411nola.com or visit www.411nola.com for details. Submissions deadline is Nov. 2. “TENTH LIFE” ESSAY CONTEST.

One Book One New Orleans holds an essay contest based on this year’s selection, Dan Baum’s Nine Lives. Essays should detail “the mystery and magic in the life of a person you know,” and should be no longer than 1,500 words. Submissions may be poetry or prose. Email tenthlifenola@gmail.com for details. Submission deadline is Wednesday.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

BAYOU REBIRTH WETLANDS EDUCATION . Bayou Rebirth

CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. CCFM and marketum-

55

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

To find out how to get your business listed on Forkfly, call your Gambit Account Executive or 504-483-3126

57

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Email Ian McNulty at imcnulty@cox.net. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <SPEAKEASY NIGHT AT ARNAUD’S > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >When Arnaud’s Restaurant (813 Bienville St., 523-5433; www. arnaudsrestaurant.com) opened in 1918, Prohibition was fast < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <PUTTING < < < < < < <EVERYTHING < < < < < < < < < <ON < < <THE < < < TABLE < < < < < < < < < < < < < <on its heels. According to Arnaud’s lore, the restaurant and its patrons dodged enforcement and the good times rolled. Arnaud’s pays tribute to that time Oct. 12 with a “Speakeasy Dinner.” The evening includes a four-course meal of WHAT Prohibition-era dishes, and guests are encouraged to dress in Saffron NOLA appropriate period style. Get the “secret knock” for entrance (and a reservation) at sales@arnauds.com.

am

B

WHERE

505 Gretna Blvd., Gretna, 363-2174; www.saffronnola.com WHEN

Dinner Fri. HOW MUCH

Moderate

RESERVATIONS

Recommended

WHAT WORKS

Curries elevate the main ingredient instead of hiding it

WHAT DOESN'T

Limited hours mean limited access

CHECK, PLEASE

A contemporary, inventive approach to Indian cuisine

Currying Favor A ONCE-A-WEEK RESTAURANT DOES ONE-OF-A-KIND INDIAN CUISINE. B Y I A N M C N U LT Y

Y

PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

— these touchstone flavors of Indian cooking come through in abundance here, but they add zest to dishes that otherwise would be at home on any upscale bistro menu. So a Malabar-style curry is the sauce for amberjack paneed in lentil flour and scallops, caked with ginger and chiles, set high above a mild, creamy, distinctive, mango-flavored curry. Curry goes in seafood gumbo, and ginger-tomato sauce laces a spread of fried shrimp. Though this restaurant is fairly well hidden in a strip mall, the interior is stylishly decorated and very welcoming. There is a full bar with a respectable wine list, and the Vilkhus’ daughter and her college friends comprise most of the service staff. They’re warm, knowledgeable and easygoing. It’s possible to assemble a more familiar Indian meal here. The chicken tikka, the yogurt-marinated goat and the chicken curry attest to that. But it is much more interesting to see how the kitchen works Indian flavor into other types of dishes. The idea of ordering a pulled pork sandwich at a restaurant like this might seem odd, but this sandwich is no joke. The falling-apart tangle of pork is painted with spicy vindaloo, cut through with sauteed spinach and softened by its buttery brioche bun. Resist the impulse to wolf it all down, because the flavors of each bite build slowly in your mouth, a hallmark of deft Indian cooking in any context. The one-day-a-week window to catch this cooking is narrow. But with nowhere else to find food quite like this, finding a Friday night to experience it is the easy part.

Pink is the new black at restaurants participating in the inaugural NOLA Goes Pink dining benefit. Throughout October, chefs at 31 area restaurants will wear pink and serve special three-course $31 menus to support the local affiliate of Susan G. Komen for the Cure. Find participating restaurants and details at www.komenneworleans.org.

five 5 IN

FIVE OKTOBERFEST OPPORTUNITIES DEUTSCHES HAUS

www.deutscheshaus.org

Truncated and relocated to Kenner’s Rivertown (415 Williams Blvd.), the festival takes place Oct. 14-16, 21-23.

GERMANIA HALL

4415 BIENVILLE ST., 444-2682 www.germania46.org

This Mid-City Masonic Lodge hosts German Fest Oct. 29, from 6:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.

GRETNA HERITAGE FEST

DOWNTOWN GRETNA, 361-7748 www.gretnafest.com

The German-American Cultural Center hosts a German beer garden within the festival, Oct. 7-9.

HEINER BRAU

226 E. LOCKWOOD ST., COVINGTON, (985) 893-2884 www.heinerbrau.com

The German microbrewery hosts its annual festival Oct. 14-15.

MIDDENDORF’S RESTAURANT

30160 Hwy. 51, Akers, (985) 386-6666 www.middendorfsrestaurant.com

The menu includes German dishes each Wednesday and Thursday through Nov. 10.

Questions? Email winediva1@earthlink.net.

2010 Penalolen Sauvignon Blanc CASABLANCA VALLEY, CHILE / $13-$15 RETAIL

This bottling comes from a family-owned boutique winery situated in the cool climate of Casablanca Valley. In the glass, it offers aromas of lime zest, tangerine and lemongrass with hints of fresh herbs. On the palate, taste tangy citrus, grapefruit, melon, green pepper notes and a mineral component with a balanced finish. Enjoy it with tapas, mussels and other shellfish, vegetarian dishes and spicy Asian and Cajun cuisines. Buy it at: Rouses in Uptown, Swirl Wines and Bacchanal. Drink it at: RioMar and Salu Small Plates and Wine Bar. — Brenda Maitland

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

ou’ve had crab cakes and New Orleans-style barbecue shrimp before, but probably not the way they are made at Saffron NOLA. These crab cakes are pancakes made of soft, nuttytasting lentil batter and thick seams of lump meat. And the sauce over the shrimp tastes buttery, but it’s also jammy with a sweet-and-sour tamarind tang. Just as you would with barbecue shrimp, you’ll want to mop the plate with bread, though here that bread is chewy, blistered naan. The flavors at Saffron NOLA are unmistakably Indian, yet this place ranges far from the usual curryhouse script, embracing local seafood and a worldly, contemporary cooking style. Countless restaurants have taken that approach with the influences and traditions of Italy or France. But by drawing from the robustly flavorful fundamentals of Indian cuisine, Saffron NOLA is charting a different path, and at this unconventional restaurant, it’s as delicious and polished as it is inventive. The catch is that Saffron NOLA serves dinner just one night a week, and that’s because its owners are quite busy already. The restaurant is the offshoot of Saffron Caterers, a company the Vilkhus have run for some 20 years, and that business is a sideline itself. By day, Arvinder runs the Pickwick Club, one of the city’s private old-line clubs, and his wife Pardeep is a psychologist. When she retired from that field last year, the family decided to expand Saffron as a restaurant, though they didn’t want to open just another Indian eatery. Tumeric, chiles, ginger, garlic and coriander seed

Arvinder Vilkhu and chef Pardeep Vilkhu expanded their catering business into a creative Indian restaurant.

GOING PINK FOR A PURPOSE

59

Become a Counselor

CUISINE

Scuttlebites ALL THE NEWS THAT’S FIT TO EAT. BY IAN MCNULTY

MAUREPAS FOODS COMING TO BYWATER

FRESH AND KOSHER AT HILLEL’S KITCHEN

During Jewish holidays, people by the hundreds turn up Tulane University’s Mintz Center for Jewish Life. But throughout the year, traditional Jewish fare and a great deal more are served at Hillel’s Kitchen (912 Broadway St., 9099919; www.hknola.com), a kosher restaurant inside the Jewish student center near Tulane’s Uptown campus. It’s open to the public, and it’s exceptionally friendly to vegetarians and vegans. There’s also house-cured pastrami, salmon burgers, chicken salad and chili dogs, so this is far from a meatless kitchen. But there is a clear focus on fresh, health-conscious meals here. That’s the hand of chef Harveen Khera, who opened Hillel’s Kitchen earlier this year in the new, 10,000-square-foot Mintz Center. Originally from London, Khera built a culinary career in San Francisco, where she ran the French-Indian fusion restaurant Tallula in that city’s Castro district. She moved to New Orleans to help design a kitchen for the Mintz Center

PINTS & POBOYS

Choose a 3-inch Poboy & a Pint of Beer • $8

plus tax

Every Night • 7-10pm Choices include: Fried Green Tomato & Remoulade, Overstuffed Shrimp, Root Beer & Glazed Ham & Cheese, Pattons Hot Sausage, Certified Angus Roast Beef, or French Fry, Roast Beef & Cheddar Poboy

Come Try Our Weekly Throwback Cocktail! EXTENDED HOURS!

Mon-Sat 11am-10pm

3454 Magazine St. NOLA 504-899-3374

IN MEMORIUM: ANGEL MIRANDA

Angel Miranda, the founder and owner of Lola’s Restaurant (3312 Esplanade Ave., 488-6946; www.lolasneworleans.com) in Faubourg St. John, died from cancer late in September at age 57. A native of Seville, Spain, Miranda opened his first New Orleans restaurant, Altamira, in the Warehouse District in the 1980s. That folded a few years later, but he found lasting success with his following venture, Lola’s, which he opened in 1994 and named for his mother. Lola’s is a tiny place that has developed a huge following, and Miranda provided many New Orleanians with their first tastes of authentic Spanish cuisine. Even as the number of Spanish restaurants in New Orleans has grown, Lola’s has remained popular as both a neighborhood cafe and a cross-town destination. “When he opened, there was nothing even remotely like it in New Orleans,” says Xavier Laurentino, a close friend and owner of the Riverbend restaurant Barcelona Tapas. “You see Lola’s today and it’s a successful restaurant, but to make that happen he had to work incredibly hard.” Lola’s remains open, serving dinner nightly.

“Since 1969”

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

A restaurant in the Bywater that’s been in the works for more than a year is nearing completion. Chef Michael Doyle hopes to open Maurepas Foods (3200 Burgundy St., phone n.a.) in October and begin serving a wide-ranging menu he describes as country food with refinements and updates. “It’ll be what somebody’s grandmother is cooking somewhere in the world,” Doyle says. He and his crew are nearing the completion of an extensive renovation of a vintage property at the corner of Burgundy and Louisa streets, in a part of town with few restaurants. Maurepas Foods will serve lunch and dinner and possibly stay open for late-night service. “We’re planning to roll to midnight and see if people go for it,” Doyle says. For the past seven years, Doyle had been sous chef at Dante’s Kitchen, a Riverbend restaurant with an exceptionally well-developed network of local suppliers. He says he plans to use relationships he built there with farmers and fishermen to supply his own venture. The kitchen also will produce many of its own staples, from pickles to sausage, he says. Maurepas Foods will be open continually throughout the day, and Doyle says his menu will be designed to accommodate customers looking for full meals or just bar snacks.

and that work evolved into planning this public restaurant for the center. Her menu is inexpensive and loaded with locally sourced and house-made items. “Coming to New Orleans, my highest ambition was having people get as close to good food as possible, and when you strip away all the bells and whistles, more people can do that,” she says. Her list of specials recently included a lamb bacon BLT, for instance, and Vietnamese-style roast duck po-boys are on the menu. The kitchen mixes up traditional Jewish deli specialties (bagels with lox and latkes), all-American comfort food (meatloaf sandwiches) and international flavors (the Indian puffed rice salad bhel puri and the French socca chickpea pancakes). In-house preparation, from the pickles to the breads to the smoked salmon, is a uniting feature, along with kosher Rabbinic supervision. Hillel’s Kitchen is open from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday to Thursday, and from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday. Each Friday evening, the Mintz Center serves a free Shabbat dinner in its dining room. For details, visit www.tulanehillel.org.

61

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OuT2EAT page 62 PARKVIEW CAFE AT CITY PARK —

City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 483-9474 — Located in the old Casino Building, the cafe serves gourmet coffee, sandwiches, salads and ice cream till early evening. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

IT’S

YEKSE!

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276-9095 www.flourpowernola.com

MARK’S

MUFFLER SHOP since 1984

AUTHORIZED FLOWMASTER DEALER 3700 Orleans Ave.

in the Shops at the American Can Company

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5229 St. Claude Ave. New Orleans 504-944-7733 w ww.mar k smu f f ler sh op .com

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

BLACK & GOLD party?

64

PRAVDA — 1113 Decatur St., 5811112; www.pravdaofnola.com — Pravda is known for its Soviet kitsch and selection of absinthes, and the kitchen offers pierogies, beef empanadas, curry shrimp salad and a petit steak served with truffle aioli. No reservations. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ RICCOBONO’S PANOLA STREET CAFE — 7801 Panola St., 314-1810

— Specialties include crabcakes Benedict — two crabcakes and poached eggs topped with hollandaise sauce and potatoes — and the Sausalito omelet with spinach, mushrooms, shallots and mozzarella. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily. Credit cards. $

VINE & DINE — 141 Delaronde St., 361-1402; www.vine-dine.com — The cafe serves cheese boards and charcuterie plates with pate and cured meats. There also is a menu of sandwiches, quesadillas, bruschettas, salads and dips. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CHINESE CHINA ORCHID — 704 S. Carrollton

Ave., 865-1428; www.chinaorchidneworleans.com — This longtime Riverbend restaurant offers a wide array of Chinese dishes. Sizzling black pepper beef or chicken is prepared with onions, red and green peppers and brown sauce and served on a hot plate with steamed rice on the side. Other options include fried rice, noodle and egg foo young dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

CHINA ROSE — 3501 N. Arnoult Road., Metairie, 887-3295 — China Rose offers many Chinese seafood specialties. The Lomi Lomi combines jumbo shrimp, pineapple and water chestnuts wrapped in bacon, fries them golden brown and serves them on a bed of sautéed vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SCORE A TOUCHDOWN WITH YOUR GUESTS ARRANGEMENTS $ STARTING AT

40

FIVE HAPPINESS — 3511 S. Carroll-

ton Ave., 482-3935 — The large menu at Five Happiness offers a range of dishes from wonton soup to sizzling seafood combinations served on a hot plate to sizzling Go-Ba to lo mein dishes. Delivery and banquest facilities available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

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837-6400

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504.444.5640 7611 MAPLE STREET NEW ORLEANS

JUNG’S GOLDEN DRAGON — 3009 Magazine St., 891-8280; www. jungsgoldendragon2.com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, Thai and Korean cuisine. Chinese specialties include Mandarin, Szechuan and Hunan dishes. Grand Marnier shrimp are lightly battered and served with Grand Marnier sauce, broccoli and pecans. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ TREY YUEN CUISINE OF CHINA — 600 N. Causeway Approach.,

Mandeville, (985) 626-4476; 2100 N. Morrison Blvd., Hammond, (985) 345-6789; www.tryyuen. com — House specialties include fried soft-shell crab topped with Tong Cho sauce, and Cantonese-style stir-fried alligator and

mushrooms in oyster sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

COFFEE/ DESSERT ANTOINE’S ANNEX — 513 Royal

St., 581-4422; www.antoines.com — The Annex is a coffee shop serving pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. The Royal Street salad features baby spinach and mixed lettuces with carrots, red onion, red peppers, grapes, olives, walnuts and raspberry vinaigrette. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

KUPCAKE FACTORY — 800 Metai-

rie Road, Metairie, 267-4990; 819 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 4648884; 6233 S. Claiborne Ave., 2673328; www.thekupcakefactory. com — Choose from a large selection of gourmet cupcakes. The Fat Elvis is made with banana cake and topped with peanut butter frosting. The Strawberry Fields tops strawberry cake with strawberry buttercream frosting. Other options include white chocolate raspberry and a banana cupcake. No reservations. Hours vary by location. Credit cards. $

MAURICE FRENCH PASTRIES — 3501

Hessmer Ave., Metairie, 885-1526; 4949 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 455-0830; www.mauricefrenchpastries.com — Maurice French Pastries offers an array of continental and French baked goods as well as specialty cakes, cheesecakes and pies. No reservations. Hessmer Avenue: breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. West Napoleon: breakfast and lunch Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PINKBERRY — 300 Canal St.; 5601

Magazine St., 899-4260; www. pinkberry.com — Pinkberry offers frozen yogurt with an array of wet and dry topping choices

Chef Anthony Spizale serves modern Creole cuisine at Upperline Restaurant (1413 Upperline St., 891-9822; www. upperline.com). PHOTO By CHERyL GERBER

including caramel, honey, fruit purees, various chocolates and nuts and more. There also are fresh fruit parfaits and green tea smoothies. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CONTEMPORARY 5 Fifty 5 — 555 Canal St., 553-5638;

www.555canal.com — New Orleans dishes and Americana favorites take an elegant turn in dishes such as the lobster mac and cheese, combining lobster meat, elbow macaroni and mascarpone, boursin and white cheddar cheeses. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

BAYONA — 430 Dauphine St., 5254455; www.bayona.com — House favorites on Chef Susan Spicer’s menu include sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce and the appetizer of grilled shrimp with black-bean cake and coriander sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$$ THE GREEN GODDESS — 307 Ex-

change Alley, 301-3347; www. greengoddessnola.com — Chef Chris DeBarr’s contemporary cooking combines classic techniques, exotic ingredients and culinary wit. At lunch, Big Cactus Chilaquiles feature poached eggs on homemade tortillas with salsa verde, queso fresca and nopali-

bestofneworleans.com

tos. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Thu.Sun. Credit cards. $$ OAK — 8118 Oak St., 302-1485; www.oaknola.

com — This wine bar offers small plates and live musical entertainment. Gulf shrimp fill tacos assembled in house-made corn tortillas with pickled vegetables, avocado and lime crema. The hanger steak bruschetta is topped with Point Reyes blue cheese and smoked red onion marmalade. No reservations. Dinner and latenight Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

ONE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE — 8132 Hampson St., 301-9061; www.one-sl.com — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes like chargrilled oysters topped with Roquefort cheese and a red wine vinaigrette, seared scallops with roasted garlic and shiitake polenta cakes and a memorable cochon de lait. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CREOLE ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713 St. Louis St.,

581-4422; www.antoines.com — The city’s oldest restaurant offers a glimpse of what 19th century French Creole dining might have been like, with a labyrinthine series of dining rooms. Signature dishes include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GUMBO SHOP — 640 St. Peter St., 525-1486;

www.gumboshop.com — Gumbo and New Orleans classics such as crawfish etouffee dominate the menu. Their spicy flavors meld into a dish that represents the city’s best and redefines comfort food. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

LE CITRON BISTRO — 1539 Religious St., 566-9051; www.le-citronbistro.com — Located in a historic building, the quaint bistro serves starters like chicken and andouille gumbo and fried frogs legs. Entrees include choices like fried chicken, Gulf fish and burgers. Reservations accepted. Dinner Wed.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000 N. Peters St., 524-

4747 — This casual restaurant serves Creole favorites. The menu includes crawfish etouffee, boiled crawfish, red beans and rice and bread pudding for dessert. Outdoor seating is adjacent to Dutch Alley and the French Market. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — 437 Esplanade Ave.,

252-4800; www.mojitosnola.com — Mojitos serves a mix of Caribbean, Cuban and Creole dishes. Caribbean mac and cheese pie is made with chunks of lobster, tomatoes, scallions, garlic and creamy cheese sauce and is served over a bed of spicy corn maque choux. Reservations accepted. Lunch, dinner and late-night Tue.Sun. Credit cards. $$

DELI CG’S CAFE AT THE RUSTY NAIL — 1100 Constance

St., 722-3168; www.therustynail.biz — Inside the Rusty Nail, CG’s offers a menu of sandwiches. The Piggly Wiggly features pulled pork on a sesame seed bun with coleslaw and pickle chips on the side. The Wild Turkey is layered with Granny Smith apple slices, provolone, bacon and garlic mayo. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $

KOSHER CAJUN NEW YORK DELI & GROCERY — 3519 Severn Ave., Metairie, 888-2010; www.

koshercajun.com — This New York-style deli specializes in sandwiches, including corned beef and pastrami that come straight from the Bronx. No reservations. Lunch Sun.-Thu., dinner Mon.-Thu. Credit cards. $

MARTIN WINE CELLAR — 714 Elmeer Ave., Metairie

, 896-7350; www.martinwine.com — The wine emporium offers gourmet sandwiches and deli items. The Reuben combines corned beef, melted Swiss, sauerkraut and Russian dressing on rye bread. The Sena salad features chicken, golden raisins, blue cheese, toasted pecans and

Laid back fun since 1934 OPEN DAILY - HAPPY HOUR UNTIL 7PM 1201 BURGUNDY ST

(CORNER OF GOV NICHOLLS)

(504)522-9715

WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/COSIMOSBAR

l unch

Tues-Fri 11am-2pm

Riverbend

dinner

Mon-Sat 5pm-10pm

8 13 2 H A M P S O N S T R E E T 301.9061

www.one-Sl.coM

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

CUBAN/ CARIBBEAN

65

OUT2EAT pepper jelly vinaigrette over field greens. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Fri., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GOURMET TO GO

DINER DAISY DUKES — 121 Chartres St., 561-

5171; www.daisydukesrestaurant. com — Daisy Dukes is known for its seafood omelet and serves a wide variety of Cajun spiced Louisiana favorites, burgers, po-boys and seafood, including boiled crawfish and oysters on the halfshell. Breakfast is served all day. No reservations. Open 24 hours daily. Credit cards. $$

BREAUX MART — 315 E. Judge Perez, Chalmette, 262-0750; 605 Lapalco Blvd., Gretna, 433-0333; 2904 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-5565; 9647 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 737-8146; www.breauxmart.com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux” as well as weekday specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

INDIAN FRENCH FLAMING TORCH — 737 Octavia St.,

895-0900; www.flamingtorchnola. com — Chef Nathan Gile’s menu includes pan-seared Maine diver scallops with chimichurri sauce and smoked bacon and corn hash. Coffee- and coriander-spiced rack of lamb is oven roasted and served with buerre rouge and chevre mashed potatoes. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

5908 Magazine St., 891-8495; www.martiniquebistro.com — This French bistro has both a cozy dining room and a pretty courtyard. Try dishes such as Steen’s-cured duck breast with satsuma and ginger demi-glace and stone-ground goat cheese grits. Reservations

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

MARTINIQUE

66

BISTRO

JULIE’S LITTLE INDIA KITCHEN AT SCHIRO’S — 2483 Royal St., 944-

6666; www.schiroscafe.com — The cafe offers homemade Indian dishes prepared with freshly ground herbs and spices. Selections include chicken, lamb or shrimp curry or vindaloo and vegetarian saag paneer. Schiro’s also serves New Orleans cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NIRVANA INDIAN CUISINE — 4308

Magazine St., 894-9797 — Serving mostly northern Indian cuisine, the restaurant’s extensive menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TAJ MAHAL INDIAN CUISINE — 923-

C Metairie Road, Metairie, 836-6859

— The traditional menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways, including curries and tandoori. Vegetarian options are available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

ITALIAN ANDREA’S RESTAURANT — 3100 N.

19th St., Metairie 834-8583; www. andreasrestaurant.com — Chef/ owner Andrea Apuzzo’s specialties include speckled trout royale which is topped with lump crabmeat and lemon-cream sauce. Capelli D’Andrea combines housemade angel hair pasta and smoked salmon in light cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ CAFE GIOVANNI — 117 Decatur St., 529-2154; www.cafegiovanni.com — Chef Duke LoCicero serves inventive Italian cuisine and Italian accented contemporary Louisiana cooking. Shrimp Dukie features Louisiana shrimp and a duck breast marinated in Cajun spices served with tasso-mushroom sauce. Belli Baci is the restaurant’s cocktail lounge. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ MOSCA’S — 4137 Hwy. 90 W., Westwego, 436-8950; www.moscasrestaurant.com — This family-style eatery has changed little since opening in 1946. Popular dishes include shrimp Mosca, chicken a la grande and baked oysters Mosca, made with breadcrumps and Ital-

ian seasonings. Reservations accepted. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $$$

RED GRAVY — 125 Camp St., 561-

8844; www.redgravycafe.com — The cafe serves breakfast items including pancakes, waffles and pastries. At lunch, try meatballs, lasagna and other Italian specialties, panini, wraps, soups and salads. Open Sundays before New Orleans Saints home games. Reservations accepted for large parties. Breakfast and lunch Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $

RICCOBONO’S PEPPERMILL RESTAURANT — 3524 Severn Ave.,

Metairie, 455-2266 — This Italianstyle eatery serves New Orleans favorites like stuffed crabs with jumbo lump crabmeat with spaghetti bordelaise and trout meuniere with brabant potatoes. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ VINCENT’S ITALIAN CUISINE — 4411

Chastant St., Metairie, 885-2984; 7839 St. Charles Ave., 866-9313; www.vincentsitaliancuisine.com — Bracialoni is baked veal stuffed with artichoke hearts, bacon, garlic and Parmesan cheese and topped with red sauce. Reservations accepted. Chastant Street: lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. St. Charles Avenue: lunch Tue.Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

JAPANESE KYOTO — 4920 Prytania St.,

891-3644 — Kyoto’s sushi chefs

prepare rolls, sashimi and salads. “Box” sushi is a favorite, with more than 25 rolls. Reservations recommended for parties of six or more. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

MIKIMOTO — 3301 S. Carrollton Ave., 488-1881; www.mikimotosushi.com — Sushi choices include new and old favorites, both raw and cooked. The South Carrollton roll includes tuna tataki, avocado and snow crab. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Delivery available. Credit cards. $$ MIYAKO JAPANESE SEAFOOD &

STEAKHOUSE — 1403 St. Charles Ave., 410-9997; www.japanesebistro.com — Miyako offers a full range of Japanese cuisine, with specialties from the sushi or hibachi menus, chicken, beef or seafood teriyaki, and tempura. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

ROCK-N-SAKE — 823 Fulton St., 5817253; www.rocknsake.com — Rockn-Sake serves traditional Japanese cuisine with some creative twists. There’s a wide selection of sushi, sashimi and rolls or spicy gyoza soup, pan-fried soba noodles with chicken or seafood and teriyaki dishes. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

WASABI SUSHI — 900 Frenchmen St., 943-9433; 8550 Pontchartrain Blvd., 267-3263; www.wasabinola. com — Wasabi serves a wide array of Japanese dishes. Wasabi honey shrimp are served with

cream sauce. The Assassin roll bundles tuna, snow crab and avocado in seaweed and tops it with barbecued eel, tuna, eel sauce and wasabi tobiko. No reservations. Frenchmen Street: Lunch Mon.Sat., dinner daily. Pontchartrain Boulevard: lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$

LOUISIANA CONTEMPORARY BOMBAY CLUB — 830 Conti St., 586-

0972; www.thebombayclub.com — Mull the menu at this French Quarter hideaway while sipping a well made martini. The duck duet pairs confit leg with pepper-seared breast with black currant reduction. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

BOUCHE — 840 Tchoupitoulas St., 267-7485; www.bouchenola.com — This wine bar and restaurant serves creative dishes like tasso truffle mac and cheese with three cheeses and Mornay sauce, baby spinach salad with Maytag blue cheese and bacon lardons, and crispy duck breast with Grand Marnier sweet potatoes and vanilla-balsamic extract. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat., latenight Fri.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

MIA’S — 1622 St. Charles Ave., 3019570 — Veal Oscar features lightly breaded veal topped with lump crabmeat and hollandaise, served with garlic red potatoes and grilled asparagus. The alligator pear

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

and crabmeat salad combines avocado and crabmeat over tomatoes, red onions and greens in balsamic glaze. Reservations accepted. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $$

MILA — 817 Common St., 412-2580; www.milaneworleans.com — MiLA takes a fresh approach to Southern and New Orleans cooking, focusing on local produce and refined techniques. Try New Orleans barbecue lobster with lemon confit and fresh thyme. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri. dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ RALPH’S ON THE PARK — 900

City Park Ave., 488-1000; www. ralphsonthepark.com — Popular dishes include baked oysters Ralph, turtle soup and the Niman Ranch New York strip. There also are brunch specials. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

REDEMPTION — 3835 Iberville St.,

309-3570 — Redemption offers contemporary Louisiana cooking. Chambord duckling is served with cherry vinaigrette. Seared foie gras is complemented by vanilla parsnip puree. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ 752 Tchoupitoulas St., 525-4790 — Tommy’s Wine Bar offers cheese and charcuterie plates as well as a menu of appetizers and salads from the neighboring kitchen of

TOMMY’S WINE BAR —

Tommy’s Cuisine. No reservations. Lite dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEDITERRANEAN/ MIDDLE EASTERN ATTIKI BAR & GRILL — 230 Decatur

St., 587-3756; www.attikineworleans.com — Attiki features a range of Mediterranean cuisine including entrees of beef kebabs and chicken shawarma. Reservations recommended. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $$

PYRAMIDS CAFE — 3151 Calhoun St., 861-9602 — Diners will find authentic, healthy and fresh Mediterranean cuisine featuring such favorites as sharwarma prepared on a rotisserie. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEXICAN & SOUTHWESTERN COUNTRY FLAME — 620 Iberville St.,

522-1138 — Country Flame serves a mix of popular Mexican and Cuban dishes. Come in for fajitas, pressed Cuban sandwiches made with hickory-smoked pork and char-broiled steaks or pork chops. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

JUAN’S FLYING BURRITO — 2018

Magazine St., 569-0000; 4724 S.Carrollton Ave. 486-9950; www. juansflyingburrito.com — This wallet-friendly restaurant offers new takes on Mexican-inspired cooking. It’s known for its meal-and-a-

half-size signature burritos. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ NACHO MAMA’S MEXICAN GRILL — 3242 Magazine St., 899-0031;

1000 S. Clearview Pkwy., Harahan, 736-1188; www.nachomamasmexicangrill.com — These taquerias serve Mexican favorites such as portobello mushroom fajitas and chile rellenos. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SANTA FE — 3201 Esplanade Ave., 948-0077 — This casual cafe serves creative takes on Southwestern cuisine. Bolinos de Bacalau are Portuguese-style fish cakes made with dried, salted codfish, mashed potatoes, cilantro, lemon juice, green onions and egg and served with smoked paprika aioli. Outdoor seating is available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.Sun. Credit cards. $$ TOMASITO’S MEXICAN CUISINE —

755 Tchoupitoulas St., 527-0942 — Tomasito’s is an upscale cantina with a patio for outdoor dining. The carnitas platter features marinated and slow-cooked pork served with Mexican rice, refried beans and a choice of salsa verde, smoky chipotle or a traditional Mexican sauce. No reservations. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MUSIC AND FOOD GAZEBO CAFE — 1018 Decatur St., 525-8899; www.gazebocafenola. com — The Gazebo features a mix of Cajun and Creole dishes and ice

cream daquiris. The New Orleans sampler rounds up jambalaya, red beans and rice and gumbo. Other options include salads, seafood poboys and burgers. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

HOUSE OF BLUES — 225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www.hob.com/neworleans — Try the pan-seared Voodoo Shrimp with rosemary cornbread. The buffet-style gospel brunch features local and regional groups. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ THE MARKET CAFE — 1000 Decatur

St., 527-5000; www.marketcafenola.com — Dine indoors or out on seafood either fried for platters or po-boys or highlighted in dishes such as crawfish pie, crawfish etouffee or shrimp Creole. Sandwich options include muffulettas, Philly steaks on po-boy bread and gyros in pita bread. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SIBERIA — 2227 St. Claude Ave., 265-

8855 — This music clubs serves dishes like fish and chips, spicy hot wings, tacos and more. There are weekly specials and vegetarian and vegan options. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — 626 Frenchmen St., 949-0696; www. snugjazz.com — Traditional Creole and Cajun fare pepper the menu along with newer creations such as the fish Marigny, topped with Gulf shrimp in a Creole cream

sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

NEIGHBORHOOD ARTZ BAGELZ — 3138 Magzine St.,

309-7557; www.artzbagelz.com — Artz bakes its bagels in house and options include onion, garlic, honey whole wheat, cinnamonraisin, salt and others. Get one with a schmear or as a sandwich. Salads also are available. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

BRAXTON’S RESTAURANT — 636 Franklin Ave., Gretna, 301-3166; www.braxtonsnola.com — Braxton’s serves a mix of salads, poboys, deli sandwiches and entrees. Start a meal with oysters Louise, featuring fried oysters on a bed of spinach and cheese. The seafood platter includes fried shrimp, oysters, catfish strips, french fries, potato salad and vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

KATIE’S RESTAURANT — 3701 Iberville St., 488-6582; www.katiesinmidcity.com — Favorites at this Mid-City restaurant include the Cajun Cuban with roasted pork, grilled ham, cheese and pickles pressed on buttered bread. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, Dinner Tue.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ KOZ’S — 515 Harrison Ave., 4840841; 6215 Wilson St., Harahan, 7373933; www.kozcooks.com — Louisiana favorites such as seafood

platters, muffulettas and more than 15 types of po-boys, ranging from hot sausage to cheeseburger, are available at Koz’s. The Will’s Chamber of Horrors sandwich features roast beef, ham, turkey, Swiss and American cheese, Italian dressing and hot mustard. . No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $

OLIVE BRANCH CAFE — 1995 Barataria Blvd., Marrero, 348-2008; 3700 Orleans Ave., 302-1220; 5145 Gen. de Gaulle Drive, 393-1107; www.olivebranchcafe.com — These cafes serve soups, salads, sandwiches, wraps and entrees. Chicken and artichoke pasta is tossed with penne in garlic and olive oil. Shrimp Carnival features smoked sausage, shrimp, onion and peppers in roasted garlic cream sauce over pasta. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$ RAJUN CAJUN CAFE — 5209 W.

Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 883-5513; www.rajuncajuncafe.com — The cafe serves soups, salads, po-boys, muffulettas, seafood plates and a few entree platters. Daily specials include items such as breaded pork chops on Wednesdays and seafood options on Friday. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

PIZZA ITALIAN PIE — Citywide; www.

italianpie.com — Italian Pie offers an array of pizzas, calzones, sandwiches, wraps and salads. The Mediterranean pie is topped

MAGIC IN THE MOONLIGHT FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2011 • 6:30 P.M. ON THE MAIN AXIS OF THE BOTANICAL GARDEN

Menu by Chef Aaron Burgau of Patois and Chef Justin Devillier of La Petite Grocery

Fabulous auction items including: • Stunning Enrique Alferez “Reclining Nude with Grapes” bas relief • Sensational vacation packages to Alys Beach, Watercolor, and Montana • Bronze sculpture by internationally renowned artist Mario Villa • Decorative accent pieces by beloved metal artist Luis Colmenares • A divine lions head wall fountain from French Fountains

Al Fresco Dinner starts at $150

Pay online at garden.neworleanscitypark.com CLICK ON SPECIAL EVENTS

In the event of inclement weather, the dinner will be held in the Pavilion of the Two Sisters. New Orleans Botanical Garden Foundation is recognized as a 501(c)(3) organization by the Internal Revenue Service and is eligible to receive tax-deductible contributions.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

An Al Fresco Dinner Fête

67

Bringing you quality, consistency and value since 1971.

OUT2EAT with artichoke hearts, kalamata olives, red onion, tomatoes, herbed ricotta, mozzarella and pesto sauce. The spinach and artichoke pie includes mushrooms, onion, feta, mozzarella and garlic sauce. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ MARKS TWAIN’S PIZZA LANDING —

Now open 7 days a week in Mandeville LUNCH : Mon - Fri 11-2pm DiNNER: Mon -Thu 5-930pm Fri & Sat 5-10pm · Sun 1130a - 930p 600 N. Causeway, Mandeville 2100 N. Morrison, Hammond

985/626-4476

985/345-6789

2035 Metairie Road, Metairie, 832-8032; www.marktwainspizza.com — Disembark at Mark Twain’s for salads, poboys and pies like the Italian pizza with salami, tomato, artichoke, sausage and basil. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NONNA MIA CAFE & PIZZERIA — 3125

Esplanade Ave., 948-1717 — Nonna Mia uses homemade dough for pizza served by the slice or whole pie and offers salads, pasta dishes and panini. Gourmet pies are topped with ingredients like pancetta, roasted eggplant, portobello mushrooms and prosciutto. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

REGINELLI’S — 741 State St., 899-1414; 817

W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 712-6868; 874 Harrison Ave., 488-0133; 3244 Magazine St. 895-7272; 5608 Citrus Blvd., Harahan, 818-0111; www.reginellis.com — This New Orleans original offers a range of pizzas, sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

R&O’S RESTAURANT — 216 Old Ham-

mond Hwy., 831-1248 — R&O’s offers a mix of pizza and Creole and Italian seafood dishes. There’s everything from seafood gumbo and stuffed artichokes to po-boys and muffulettas. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $

SLICE PIZZERIA — 1513 St. Charles Ave.,

525-7437; 5538 Magazine St., 897-4800 — Neapolitan-style pizza rules, but you can buy pizza by the slice and add or subtract toppings as you choose. There are also a full coffee bar, Italian sodas and organic teas. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

THEO’S NEIGHBORHOOD PIZZA — 4218

68

Magazine St., 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., 302-1133; www.theospizza.com — There is a wide variety of specialty pies or build your own from the selection of more than two-dozen toppings. Also serving salads and sandwiches. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

WIT’S INN — 141 N. Carrollton Ave., 8884004 — This Mid-City bar and restaurant features pizzas, calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers for snacking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SANDWICHES & PO-BOYS DRESS IT — 535 Gravier St., 571-7561 — Get gourmet burgers and sandwiches dressed to order. Original topping choices include everything from sprouts to black bean and corn salsa to peanut butter. For dessert, try a chocolate chip cookie served with ice cream and chocolate sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ MAGAZINE PO-BOY SHOP — 2368 Maga-

zine St., 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of po-boys filled with everything from fried seafood to corned beef to hot sausage to veal. There are breakfast burritos in the morning and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Cash only. $ MAHONY’S PO-BOY SHOP — 3454 Mag-

azine St., 899-3374; www.mahonyspoboys.com — Mahoney’s serves traditional favorites and original po-boys like the Peacemaker, which is filled with fried oysters, bacon and cheddar cheese. There are daily lunch specials as well. No reservations. Lunch and

dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PARKWAY BAKERY AND TAVERN — 538

N. Hagen Ave., 482-3047 — Parkway serves juicy roast beef po-boys, hot sausage po-boys, fried seafood and more. No reservations. Kitchen open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $

PARRAN’S PO-BOYS — 3939 Veterans

Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 885-3416; www.parranspoboy.com — Parran’s offers po-boys, muffulettas, pizzas, burgers, salads, seafood plates and Creole-Italian entrees. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Thu.-Sat. Credit cards. $

TRACEY’S — 2604 Magazine St., 899-

2054; www.traceysnola.com — The roast beef po-boy dripping with garlicky gravy is the highlight of a menu transplanted from the former Parasol’s to this Uptown bar. Other options include fried seafood and bar noshing items. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Cash only. $

SEAFOOD GRAND ISLE RESTAURANT — 575 Conven-

tion Center Blvd., 520-8530; www.grandislerestaurant.com — Grand Isle offers seafood options from raw oysters to lobster St. Malo with combines Maine lobster, shrimp and mussels in seafood broth. Baked Gulf fish are served with compound chili butter, potatoes and a vegetable. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

JACK DEMPSEY’S — 738 Poland Ave., 943-9914 — The Jack Dempsey seafood platter serves a training-table feast of gumbo, shrimp, oysters, catfish, redfish and crawfish pies, plus two side items. Other dishes include broiled redfish and fried soft-shell crab. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat. and dinner Wed.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ LA COTE BRASSERIE — 700 Tchoupitoulas

St., 613-2350; www.lacotebrasserie.com — Tabasco and Steen’s Cane Syrup glazed salmon is served with shrimp mirliton ragout. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

RED FISH GRILL — 115 Bourbon St., 598-

1200; www.redfishgrill.com — Seafood creations by executive chef Brian Katz dominate a menu peppered with favorites like hickory-grilled redfish, pecan-crusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

VILLAGE INN — 9201 Jefferson Hwy.,

737-4610 — Check into Village Inn for seasonal boiled seafood or raw oysters. Other options include fried seafood

platters, po-boys, pasta and pizza. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

SOUL FOOD BIG MOMMA’S CHICKEN AND WAFFLES — 5741 Crowder Blvd., 241-2548; www.

bigmommaschickenandwaffles.com — Big Mamma’s serves hearty combinations like the six-piece: a waffle and six fried wings served crispy or dipped in sauce. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.Sun., Lunch daily, dinner Sun. Credit cards. $

STEAKHOUSE CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — 322 Mag-

azine St., 522-7902; www.centraarchy. com — This traditional steakhouse serves USDA prime beef, and a section of super-sized cuts includes a 40-oz. Porterhouse for two. The menu also features seafood options and a la carte side items. Reservations recommended. Diner daily. Credit cards. $$$ CRESCENT CITY STEAKS — 1001 N. Broad

St., 821-3271; www.crescentcitysteaks. com — Order USDA prime beef dryaged and hand-cut in house. There are porterhouse steaks large enough for two or three diners to share. Bread pudding with raisins and peaches is topped with brandy sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri. and Sun., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE — Harrah’s Hotel, 525 Fulton St., 587-7099; 3633 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 888-3600; www.ruthschris.com — Ruth’s top-quality steaks are broiled in 1,800-degree ovens and arrive at the table sizzling. Reservations recommended. Fulton Street: Lunch and dinner daily. Veterans Memorial Boulevard: Lunch Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

TAPAS/SPANISH MIMI’S IN THE MARIGNY — 2601 Royal

St., 872-9868 — The decadant Mushroom Manchego Toast is a favorite here. Or enjoy hot and cold tapas dishes ranging from grilled marinated artichokes to calamari. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

SANTA FE TAPAS — 1327 St. Charles Ave., 304-9915 — The menu includes both tapas dishes and entrees. Seared jumbo scallops are served with mango and green tomato pico de gallo. Gambas al ajillo are jumbo shrimp with garlic, shallots, chilis and cognac. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sun., brunch Sat.Sun. Credit cards. $$

Grab a sandwich at Short Stop Po-Boys (119 Transcontinental Drive, Metairie, 885-4572). PHOTO By CHeRyL GeRBeR VEGA TAPAS CAFE — 2051 Metarie Road,

836-2007; www.vegatapascafe.com — Vega’s mix of hot and cold tapas dishes includes a salad of lump crabmeat on arugula with blood orange vinaigrette, seared tuna with avocado and tomato relish, braised pork empanadillos, steamed mussels and shrimp with tomatoes and garlic in caper-basil cream. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$$

VIETNAMESE AUGUST MOON — 3635 Prytania St.,

899-5129; www.moonnola.com — August Moon serves a mix of Vietnamese and Chinese cuisine. There are spring rolls and pho soup as well as many popular Chinese dishes. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

DOSON NOODLE HOUSE — 135 N. Carroll-

ton Ave., 309-7283 — Noodles abound at this Mid-City eatery, which excels at vinegary chicken salad over shredded cabbage, as well as bowls of steaming pho. Vegetable-laden wonton soup and thick spring rolls make a refreshing, satisfying meal. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards and checks. $$

PHO HOA RESTAURANT — 1308 Manhat-

tan Blvd., 302-2094 — Pho Hoa serves Vietnamese dishes like soups, vermicelli bowls, rice dishes and banh mi sandwiches. Appetizers include fried egg rols, crab rangoons and rice paper spring rolls. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

PHO NOLA — 3320 Transcontinental

Drive, Metairie, 941-7690; www.phonola.com — Pho NOLA serves spring rolls and egg rolls, noodle soups, rice and vermicelli dishes and po-boys. Beverages include boba teas, milk teas, coffee drinks and smoothies. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.Sat. Credit cards. $

PHO TAU BAY RESTAURANT — 113 Westbank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, 368-9846 — There’s Vietnamese beef broth and noodle soups, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, spring rolls with peanut sauce and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Wed. & Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

CLASSIFIEDS AUTOMOTIVE DOMESTIC AUTOS ‘10 CHEVROLET HHR $11,995 504-368-5640

2009 FORD MUSTANG

V-6 Coupe, white, 50,000 miles, Leather, power seats, tinting all around, MP3, IPOD, DVD player, bluetooth. Call 985-210-5601

‘09 PT CRUISER $10,990 504-368-5640

FURNITURE/ACCESSORIES

Weekly Tails

$125 Full/Double Size Mattress Set, still in original plastic, unopened. We can deliver. (504) 846-5122 $295 Brand New Iron Queen Bed with mattress set, all new. Can deliver. (504) 952-8403 King Pillowtop Mattress, NEW!!! ONLY $199. Can deliver. (504) 846-5122 NEW Pub Height Table Set all wood, still boxed. Delivery available. $325 (504) 846-5122 Queen Mattress Set $149 Still in wrapper. Will deliver. (504) 846-5122

Chase is a 9-month-old, neutered, Treeing Walker Coonhound mix. Goofy, curious, “nose to the ground,” Chase also knows how to sit and shake. To meet Chase or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191.

‘10 CHEVY COBALT LT $10,995 504-368-5640

‘10 CHRYSLER SEBRING CONVERT. $15,995 504-368-5640

IMPORTED AUTOS ‘06 LEXUS IS 350 $19,995 504-368-5640

MISC. FOR SALE HALLOWEEN WITCH

6’ Animated. Stirring Bubbling Cauldron (Pot). Perfect for Halloween. $130. Call (504) 782-8418.

MERCHANDISE WANTED WANT TO PURCHASE

King Crowns & Scepters & other Mardi Gras items. Call (504) 473-3260.

‘10 HONDA CIVIC

$15,995 Several to Choose From! 504-368-5640

PETS

‘10 Mitsubishi Galant $12,995 504-368-5640

‘10 VOLVO S40 $19,995 504-368-5640

‘11 HYUNDAI SONATA $17,995 504-368-5640

SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES ‘09 SUBARU FORESTER

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

AWD $15,995 Call 504-368-5640

70

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT LICENSED MASSAGE NOTICE

LOST/FOUND PETS LOST DOG

Lost in Harahan on 9/24, cream collored young lab.app.1yr old.Just neutred still has stitches in that need to come out.Had on collar and tag.If you have seen him or have him please call 601-799-3045 or 504-427-3023 (Mid City but could be anywhere by now),Ozzie, male, brown/black stripe (brindle), pit mix, sweet, call him & he will come, hold him &call me asap, Traci 504-975-5971.

PET ADOPTIONS Alexa

Purrfect 14 wk old adorable, beautiful & sweet kitten silver tabby ,vacs & spayed . rescue 504 462 -1968

ALLEY CAT

DSH White with Gray Tabby Markings, de-clawed, appx 1 year old, Vet Ck/ Vacs/Neut./Litter Trained/ Super Sweet/Rescue Wt. 9 lbs.. (504) 460-0136

A BODY BLISS MASSAGE

Caffe

BYWATER BODYWORKS

Swedish, deep tissue, therapeutic. Flex appts, in/out calls, OHP/student discounts, gift cert. $65/hr, $75/ 1 1/2hr. LA Lic# 1763 Mark. 259-7278

BYWATER BODYWORKS

Swedish, deep tissue, therapeutic. Flex appts, in/out calls, OHP/student discounts, gift cert. $65/hr, $75/ 1 1/2hr. LA Lic# 1763 Mark. 259-7278

MASSAGE EXTRAORDINAIRE

24 yrs exp to give you the ultimate in relaxation. Call Matteo. LA 0022, for your next appt. Metairie area. 504-8320945. No Outcalls

MERCHANDISE ART/POSTERS VINTAGE N.O. JAZZFEST POSTERS

Dating back to 1980, Still in protective tubes, Will sell as collection or by year. 704-681-4914.

Beautiful long hair Russian Blue mix 5 yr old sweetie ,spayed vacs ,504 462-1968

Princess Leila

CHASE Kennel #A13707429

solid white 6yr old female cat , very loving and talkative spayed ,shots ,rescue 504 462-1968

Sweet KITTENS

Ashley & Rocker- really sweet & gentle. bright green eyes. They are Love bug material! Traci- tbkestler@cox.net 504-975-5971

White Poodle Mix

Pigwidgeon , male, fun personality. great w/ dogs, cats and kids. Tracitbkestler@cox.net 504-975-5971 ANNOUNCEMENTS

LEGAL NOTICES

DAHLIA Kennel #A12350149

Dahlia is a 1 1/2-year-old, spayed, solid black DSH with mellow yellow eyes just like her. All of her babies already found a new home, but Dahlia is still dreaming of hers. To meet Dahlia or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. To look for a lost pet come to the Louisiana SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), Mon-Sat. 9-5, Sun. 12-5 or call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org

REWARD- LOST

Massage therapists are required to be licensed with the State of Louisiana and must include the license number in their ads. Jeannie LMT #3783-01. Flexible appointments. Uptown Studio or Hotel out calls. 504.894.8856 (uptown)

MISHKA

Adorable male 16 wk old Bobtail kitten Very sweet and playful ,tested vacs neutered 504 462-1968

CHATTY CAT

DSH, Gray/Brown/Black Tabby white chest, chin, feet. Appx. 1years, Neut. Vacs/Vet Ck/litter trained/Rescue. Small, Precious, Talkative & Super gentle! Would be great pet for child or Senior. Wt. 7 lbs. (504) 460-0136

Elijah

5 yr old gorgeous solid white Angora male cat super smart and sweet.Shots ,neuter ,rescue 504 462-1968

Katrina rescue PUGLE great family dog, URGENT

Buddy 40ld male good w/ everyon, kids & dogs, loves attention. neutered & up to date on all shots.Traci- tbkestler@cox.net 504-975-5971

Kit Kit

Muted Gray Tabby DSH , appx. 1 year old, VetCk/Vacs/Spayed/ Litter Trained/Super Sweet/ Rescue (504) 460-0136

LAP KITTENS

The sweetest! lounge on your lap & playful. great for a kid, good w/othr kitten, and dogs too! Traci- tbkestler@ cox.net 504-975-5971

NEW ORLEANS CITY COUNCIL REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS

Electric and Natural Gas Regulatory services THE NEW ORLEANS CITY COUNCIL IS SOLICITING STATEMENTS OF QUALIFICATIONS FOR PROFESSIONAL ELECTRIC AND NATURAL GAS REGULATORY CONSULTANTS FIRMS TO PROVIDE CONSULTING SERVICES AND ADVICE TO THE CITY COUNCIL AND ITS UTILITY COMMITTEE REGARDING MATTERS ASSOCIATED WITH ENTERGY NEW ORLEANS, INC. (ENO) AND ENTERGY LOUISIANA, LLC (ELL) IN THE PROVISION OF ELECTRIC AND NATURAL GAS SERVICES IN ORLEANS PARISH AND TO ADDRESS A BROAD RANGE OF UTILITY ISSUES AS THEY ARISE. BOTH ENO AND ELL ARE WHOLLY OWNED SUBSIDIARIES OF ENTERGY CORPORATION (ENTERGY), A MULTISTATE HOLDING COMPANY. A COMPLETE COPY OF THE REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS IS AVAILABLE AT THE CITY COUNCIL’S WEBSITE AT www.nolacitycouncil.com. COMPLETE STATEMENTS OF QUALIFICATIONS MUST BE RECEIVED BY THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2011 at 3:00 P.M. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION AND THE REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS PACKET PLEASE CONTACT:

COUNCIL CHIEF OF STAFF 1300 PERDIDO STREET - ROOM 1E06 NEW ORLEANS, LA 70112 E-Mail: efpugh@nola.gov

CLASSIFIEDS ANNOUNCEMENTS

AIR COND/HEATING

INTERIOR DESIGN

PEST CONTROL

HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-800-532-6546 Ext. 97 http:// www.continentalacademy.com

MERVYNS Heating & A/C Service

HELM PAINT & DECORATING

TERMINIX

ADOPTIONS ADOPT: Loving couple promises your baby, endless love, Christine & Tom 888-316-5136 exp pd. PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293

SERVICES

HOME SERVICES Don’t Replace Your Tub REGLAZE IT

Chip/Spot Repair - Colors Available Clawfoot tubs for sale Southern Refinishing LLC Certified Fiberglass Technician Family Owned & Operated 504-348-1770 southernrefinishing.com

RELIABLE DISPOSAL CO

Now Offering Portable Toilet Service. Container Trash Removal Free Quotes; Same Day Service Keeping our Water & Environment Clean One Job at A time Since 1969 504-835-1696

To Advertise in

EMPLOYMENT Call (504) 483-3100

Residential Service All Makes & Models Service - Installation- Repairs Free Estimates on Replacements & New Installations 504-701-3605 - jcollins51@cox.net

SAVE $100

AC/HEATING UNIT REPLACEMENT Authentic Air, LLC Air Conditioning & Heating. Lic & Ins . 24/7 Emergency. All Major Brands. 504-421-2647. AuthenticAirLLC.com

SUPERIOR AIRE INC

Trane 3 Ton Freon Replacement System, 13 seer, 10 year compressor. $3990 INSTALLED 12 months same as cash 504-465-0688

GENERAL CONTRACTORS MELIDA INC. CONSTRUCTION HOME IMPROVEMENT EXPERTS

For ALL your home improvement needs from foundations to roofing & EVERYTHING in between. Fully Insured, $1,000,000 General Liability & Workers Comp. LA Home Improvement Registration # 554588. 3 Generations of Quality & Excellence in SE La since 1988. 985768-0276 www.melidainc.com

INSULATION AUDUBON SPRAY FOAM INSULATION

Save up to 50% on ac/heat bills; live more comfortably; Improve sound control, reduce your carbon footprint. Roland (Rusty) Cutrer Jr, Owner 504-432-7359 www.audubonsprayfoam.com

Are you having a hard time deciding on your colors? Let the Helm Paint Design Experts help! We are Now Offering Design Consultation! For a limited time only receive an in-home design consultation for only $40. We will help you pick your colors! www. helmpaint (504) 861-8179

Home of the $650 Termite Damage Repair Guarantee! WE DO IT ALL... Termites, Roaches, Rats & Ants Too. New Orleans Metro - 504-834-7330 2329 Edenborn, Metairie www.terminixno.com

LANDSCAPE/HORTICULTURE

Sewer & Drain Cleaning Specialists Plumbing Repair Specialists New Orleans 504-522-9536. KennerJefferson 504-466-8581. Westbank 504-368-4070. Laplace 985-6520084. Mandeville 985-626-5045. Slidell 985-641-3525. MENTION GAMBIT FOR A DISCOUNT

DELTA SOD

Certified Grade “A” Turf St. Augustine, Tifway Bermuda Centipede, Zoysia. WE BEAT ALL COMPETITORS! 504-733-0471

ONE KRAYZEE KAJUN

LAWN & LANDSCAPE Design * Install *Maintain Licensed & Insured LH#3824 “Caring for God’s green Earth, one Lawn at a time” Jacob@OneKrayzeeKajun.com www.OneKrayzeeKajun.com (504) 382-8133

The Cracked Pot Garden Center

2 mi west of Airport on Airline Hwy 504-466-8813 Fall Landscaping Clean Up Special Free Estimates

JEFFERSON FEED

Pet & Garden Center GREEN GRASS - REAL FAST The Only Certified Grade A St. Augustine Sod For New Orleans Conditions. Save with our Do-It-Yourself Lawn Maintenance Program. 733-8572. To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

PLUMBING ROOTER MAN

EMPLOYMENT RETAIL

EMPLOYMENT MODELING/ACTING ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS

Needed immediately for upcoming roles $150-$300/day depending on job requirements. No experience, all looks. 1-800-560-8672 A-109. For casting times/locations.

FRIENDLY FACES WANTED

Now accepting applications for several full, part time positions. Must be motivated, hard working & friendly. Retail experience a plus. Apply in person Mon-Fri, 12-5pm only. Southern Candymakers, 334 Decatur St.

SUZETTE’S NOW HIRING

Part-time, temporary work. Please apply after 3 pm to Suzettes, 4636 W. Esplanade, Metairie.

MUSIC/MUSICIANS LA RED HOT RECORDS

Jobs in Sales, Graphics/Web, Marketing, Accounting, A&R, $25-50K Email resume to: louisianaredhotrecords@ gmail.com

VOLUNTEER

POOL SERVICES MAGNOLIA POOLS

Specializing in Saltwater Systerms Service, Maintenance, Repair 504-270-7307 www.magnoliapools.org

RESTAURANT/HOTEL/BAR

ROOFING GEAUX CONSTRUCTION

“Your Roofing Professional” Shingle roofs, flat roofs, slate roofs, tile roofs, roof repairs, insurance claims. FREE INSPECTIONS. Member BBB & HBA. GAF certified. (504) 810-1100

LEGAL SERVICES Carolyn Chesnutt ATTORNEY AT LAW

ATTN: CONDO ASSOCIATIONS Delinquent Condo Dues? Total Condo Analysis carolynchesnutt@gmail.com

WIT’S INN Bar & Pizza Kitchen

Offers Volunteer Opportunities. Make a difference in the lives of the terminally ill & their families. Services include: friendly visits to patients & their families, provide rest time to caretaker, bereavement & office assistance. School service hours avail. Call Volunteer Coordinator @ 504-818-2723 #3016

Pizza Maker & Bartender w/ food experience

Apply in person Mon-Fri,1-5pm 141 N. Carrollton Ave.

DREAM Taste the

NOW HIRING • Managers 1009 Poydras St.

Apply on-line

Walk-Ons.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

PLAY IT • LIVE IT • LOVE IT

71

reaL esTaTe

CLASSIFIEDS

REAL ESTATE

SHOWCaSe

GENTILLY

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

FRENCH QUARTER

2500 GENTILLY BLVD. 2BR/2BA, Lr, dr, den, kit w/granite, fp, hdwd flrs, inground pool. Call (504) 669-7263.

EAST NEW ORLEANS LOOK NO FURTHER! - $175,000 7516 Ebbtide Dr. 3/2, Mstr w/jac tub & dbl vanities, wbfp, hdwd flrs, ss appl, vltd ceils, granite, custom closets, fnced yd, 2 car garage, tiled patio, auto sprinkler 504-421-4841.

922-24 Dauphine St. $900K Four 1 bedroom apartments. Parking for 5+ cars.

938 Royal St. A $216K Great location for this condo. Perfect for your weekend getaways! Quaint & comfortable. 1 br, great kit & bath.

835 Royal St. $365K Great location, secluded hideaway! Spac 2 br, 2 marble tile baths. Small rear balc overlooking garden.

Paula Bowler • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 • www.frenchquarterrealty.com

Ann de Montluzin Farmer broker 1016 NAPOLEON AVE • $350,000

3 br, 2.5 bA, 2088 Sq Ft. Spacious 1st floor w/ wrap around pvt brick patio. Separate dining room and living room with built in bookshelves. Wood burning fireplace in den with French doors opening onto the patio. Located at rear of complex so very private. Assigned parking space. Located on parade route and close to Magazine Street and many amenities. Must see!

(504) 895-1493 (504) 430-8737

FRENCH QUARTER/ FAUBOURG MARIGNY Best Value in French Qtr

1020 ESPLANADE #103. Lovely 2 br, 2 ba condo, high ceil in den, sparkling pool, courtyd, fenced pkg. Private attached alley could be dog run. $349K. Lana Sackett, Gardner Realtors, 504-352-4934. www. lanasackett.com

FRENCH QUARTER STUDIOS

514 DUMAINE , Units 3 & 6. Charming ground & 2nd fl courtyard/ balcony. Awesomely located. Each unit $105,000 www.JudyFisher.net; Judy Fisher, Inc, 504-388-3023

PRIME FQ COMMERCIAL

301 Decatur St. Rare corner. Zoning allows live entertainment. 9,000 sq ft (Approx 3,000 sq ft ea. floor). Beautiful light filled loft style spaces. Possible owner financing. $1,650,000. Judy Fisher Inc. 504-388-3023. www.JudyFisher.net

LAKEVIEW/LAKESHORE 1161 ROBERT E. LEE BLVD

Luxury home in Lake Vista near the lakefront. Over 4000 sq ft. 4 BR, 4.5 BA. Custom kit Lovely pool. $775,000. G.L. Schroeder Realtor, Contractor. 504.241.1000. Cell 504.722.2928. schroederbuild@yahoo.com

MAKE ME BEAUTIFUL AGAIN!

Irish Channel did not flood Katrina damaged house w/2 & 1/3 L-shaped lots. 2 lots each 30x120’ = 60’x120’ & rear portion of corner lot 35’x25’, dble driveway in front w/a single tin garage & single driveway on side street. $8,567 roof, 7 rms & 3 bathrooms. 4th sewer line in rear, 2 lg walk in closets. Large walk in pantry. Huge, red brick floor to ceiling dble sided fireplace. Could house 1 family or owner occupied + 1 rental, or 2 rentals, or could build single/double on second lot. Much space to add on. Huge yd for in-ground pool. Many options for house & land. Paved front patio w/ 2 lg. red brick planters. $195,000, 504-832-1901.

THE FERNANDEZ HOUSE

2320 - 2322 LOWERLINE

Spacious raised basement duplex. Craftmen windows, built-ins, large balconies. Wd flrs up & down. Lg basement. Off st. pkg. $339,000. Jennifer Pearl, Realtor. Cell 504-258-5724, Ofc 488-0950. www.jennifervpearl.com

621-623 9th Street

Lovely Double, Uptown area. 2 bdrm, 1 ba each side, hardwood floors, ceil fans, . $185,000. Call April Gongora, Gardner Realtors, 504-606-0466.

COVINGTON ELEGANT COUNTRY LIVING

LOWER GARDEN DIST./ IRISH CHANNEL

farmeran@gmail.com www.demontluzinrealtors.com Licensed in Louisiana for 32 years, building on a real estate heritage since 1905

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT

$174,900

Mins. from downtown Covington. Custom European estate on Bogue Falaya River. Main hse 3500 sf, 3 br, 3.5 ba. Guest hse 1000 sf, 2 br, 1 ba. On 4.66 acres. $1,099,000. By Appt. 985-5022882. CovingtonRiverEstate.com.

FOLSOM 50175 SAGE RD, FOLSOM $249,000

Adorable Acadian Cottage on 5 cres. 3BR/2BA w/new kitchen, all new appl & updated baths. Only 40 min from NOLA. Country living close to the city! Delery Comarda Realtors, 504-8753555 www.NOLAHomefinder.com

SLIDELL 1407 ROYAL PALMS #B

3BD/3.5BA fee simple Townhome on the water in Clipper Estates. Relax on the large rear deck. $199,900. Karin Lorenz Crosby, Coldwell Banker TEC Realtors. Off: 985-845-2001 x175, or cell: 985-630-2514

927 DAUPHINE STREET $1,895,000

Large executive sized home (5000 sq. ft.) on double lot with gourmet kitchen, chic master bath, huge den, 4 bedrooms, 4.5 baths, sutdio/game room/2nd den and an office plus a six (6) car garage and 3 bedroom/2 bath rental (great tenant at $ 1300 per month) on an adjacent property. Package Price $ 699,000 Sycamore house may be sold separately for $ 529,000

Paula Bowler • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 www.frenchquarterrealty.com

Michael L. Baker, ABR/M, CRB, HHS President Realty Resources, Inc. 504-523-5555 • cell 504-606-6226

Licensed by the Louisiana Real Estate Commission for more than 28 years with offices in New Orleans, LA 70130

1323 Esplanade A&D $165k-$185k

Shadows fall as light as feathers from the tree lined Ave. Quality & detail throughout this historic restoration. A :1BD/1BA grnd flr condo. D: 2BD/2BA 2nd lvl condo. Hi ceil & orig wd flrs. Granite counters & stainless appl in kitchen. Whirlpool tub. The pool is cool! In the trendy Treme. Bank must approve short sale.

812 Esplanade #2 $170k

This condo has lots of pizzaz. Located on the ground level. One bed one bath French Quarter condo with brick paver floors. Separate but efficient kitchen. Lots of windows overlooking patio allow lots of light to stream in. Use of laundry and pool across the courtyard. You’ve gotta see it. Open to best offer!

1809 Burgundy $238k

Lights! Camera! Action! Zoom in for a close up look at this beauty. This house has the qualities, originality and style of something spectacular, but needs facelift. Shotgun style with 12’ ceil, orig pine flrs, transom wndws and frpl mantle in every room. Trad flr plan: kitch, BA & laundry at rear. Back deck/ brick patio w bedding along edges.

919 St Philip # 6 $224,000

Spacious one bedroom located in the lower French Quarter. Nice open floorplan with new flooring throughout. Splashy renovated tiled bathroom. Local grocery store is conveniently located nearby. Lush courtyard. Only a few blocks from your favorite restaurants and festival attractions.

Samara D. Poché 504.319.6226 sam@fqr.com

504.949.5400

sampochesells.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

An excellent example of an early creole cottage set in a serene compound. Beautiful courtyard with mature plantings in a classic partere garden. Property consists of the main house, 4 income producing apartments and a large bonus space-- office, workshop, gym, etc. Parking for multiple cars. Great location.

8309 Sycamore Street & 2214 Dante Street

73

REAL ESTATE CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

VACATION RENTALS BAY ST. LOUIS

On Main St. in Old Town. 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath. Sleeps 6. 2 nite min@$150/ nite or $800/week for 4. www.baycottagesllc.com

GENERAL REAL ESTATE METROWIDE APARTMENTS

NOLA * Gretna * Metairie * Kenner. Affordable Luxury Living, 1, 2, 3 BDs, $545 & up! Gtd. Pkng, Lndry, Courtyards, FREE WI FI. 504-304-4687 www.BrunoInc.com

CORPORATE RENTALS LOWER GARDEN DISTRICT

3 BR, 3 BA Greek Revival. Totally renovated. Completely furnished including linens. $2995/mo. 504-202-0381, 738-2492.

New Orleans Area (Metairie) 10 Min to Downtown N.O.

1 & 2 Br Apts, 1 Ba, furn. Qn bed, WiFi, Cbl. Pkg.Util Incl. Lndry Fac. Sec Cameras From $1200/mth. 1 mth min. 2200 Pasadena, Met. 504-491-1591.

NEW ORLEANS RIVERFRONT

2 BR, 2.5 BA. Furn, healthclub, pool, parking. All util incl, wifi. Min 1 month. $3000/mo. Also Penthouse $3800/ mo. 781-608-6115.

COMMERCIAL RENTALS CBD OFFICES FOR RENT

Individual or groups with administrative space & copier, fax, phone, computer & furniture, if needed. $500 per office per month. For information email: sybil.alexander5@gmail.com. Also please call Hayden Wren at Corporate Realty, 504/581-5005 for an update on listing effort in progress.

CBD ON ST. CAR LINE

720 Carondelet - Lots of exposure. Possible deli, diner, retail, office. 1200 sq ft Contact: REO LLC. ronkeever@hotmail.com.

HARAHAN/RIVER RIDGE 1828 HICKORY AVE

1/2 OFF FIRST MONTH OLD METAIRIE SECRET

5029 EIGHTY ARPENT RD.

102 RIVER ROAD

1 or 2 BR, Sparkling Pool, Bike Path, 12’ x 24’ Liv.Rm, Sep Din, King Master, No Pets, No Sect 8, $699 & $799 . 504-236-5776

511 1/2 LABARRE RD

CHARMING OLD METAIRIE HOME

HISTORIC ALGIERS POINT

2 BR, 1.5 BA, washer/dryer hookups. Ceramic floors, ceil fans, offst parking. No pets. Must have references. $750/ mo. $750 dep. 504-457-2598

JEFFERSON Fully furn beau 2 br, 1.5 ba TH, cen a/h, dvwy. Great loc on river levee. $1200. Gardner Realtors, 874-3295 Near Ochsner, small efficiency. Kitchenette, water paid. $550/month (504) 913-6999, (504) 259-6999

KENNER Private room w/bath & common TV room. No formal kitchen. Cable & utilities paid, $450 - $500/mo. 504-737-2068

Full Service Property Management Over 30 years of selling properties & filling vacancies!

504-736-0544

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

www . mauriceguillot . com

74

WEST BANK TERRYTOWN

NEAR WMS & W. NAPOLEON

Properties For Lease and For Sale

OLD METAIRIE METAIRIE TOWERS

METAIRIE A HIDDEN GEM

Chic seclusion - Heart of Metairie. 1 bdrm + bonus room, from $735. Wtr pd., Rsvd pkg,1 car. No smoking/ pets 504-780-1706 orrislaneapts.com

Metairie house for Lease

5 BR, 3.5 bath house for Lease, near Transcontinental & W. Esplanade, great neighborhood, schools and churches, convenient shopping. Pets ok. $1950 per month + deposit.

SPACIOUS MODERN CONDO

2BR, top quality appl, w/d in unit, granite, lots of closets, balcony, 2513 Pasadena $795/mo, water pd. 504488-RENT. Superior Property Mgmt

1BR, 1-1/2 BA, pool. Elec & cable included, parking. 24 hr Concierge Service, Reduced to $880/mo 914882-1212.

On Elmeer Ave. Approx. 1350 sq. ft. 3BR/1.5BA. Renov’t, SS kit, beautiful hrwd flrs, ceil fans, CA&H. Study area, fenced. $1685 + dep. (504) 554-3844.

STUDIO APT.

Recently renov. Utilities incl. Internet & cable, hdwd flrs. Small pet considered. $625 + dep. 504-251-1946

434 Bruce Ave, 3 BR, 1.5 BA, patio, util rm, carport, lg liv/din, kit w/oven, refrig, cabinets, cooktop. Lg yd. Lse $1000/mo. No smoke. 451-0913. 3Bd/2.5Ba. NEW A/C, Lg yd. Never flooded. Dbl Carport, Workshop/strge bldg. $1500/mo. Call Brent 458-1205.

ALGIERS POINT High end 1-4BR. Near ferry, clean, many x-tras, hrdwd flrs, cen a/h, no dogs, no sec 8, some O/S prkng $750$1200/mo. 504-362-7487

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

HOWARD SCHMALZ & ASSOCIATES REAL ESTATE Call Bert: 504-581-2804 6608 Marshall Foch 3br/2ba "Lakeview Duplex" $1400 87 Egret 2br/2ba "Sanctuary Living" $1275 248 Cherokee #19 "University Area Condo" $1200

CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATE BROADMOOR

CARROLLTON

1819 S. LOPEZ ST.

Broadmoor 1/2 Shotgun dbl 2BR/ 1.5BA. Hrdwd flr. Cen. A/H, w/d. $1100/mo. 1 yr lse req. + sec. dep. Avail. 10/1. 504-577-0938. edgeglow@ yahoo.com.

CITY PARK/BAYOU ST. JOHN

8216 FIG

Good landlord looking for good tenant! 1 blk off Carrollton. 2br/1ba, 1/2 dble, hdwd flrs, CA&H. $850/mo Call Chuck at 504-236-3609

Wayne • Nicole • Sam • Jennifer • Brett • Robert • George • Baxter • Kaysie • Billy

222 London(Metairie) 2/1.5 pool, parking, 960 sq ft

$850

studio pvt balc, w/d on site, lrg ctyd

$775

1/1 lrg ctyd gallery, inground pool

$1400

5519 Rosemary Pl

2/2 nice flrpln, front porch

718 Barracks #5

1/1 lots storage, gated ent, com crtyrd $900

835 St Louis “F”

$1025

studio 3rd Flr. Cent AC, Hi Ceil Wd Flr Balc $950

1005 Josephine A

2/1.5 newly renov, rftp deck, gated ent $1400

1005 Josephine B

3/2 newly renov, rftp deck, gated ent $1500

931 Bienville

parking remote entry, well lit

$175

3198 DeSaix

2.5/1 lrg backyard, garage, w/d hookups $950

633 St Peter

1/2 fullyfurn,balc,completelyremodeled $1175

CONDOS FOR SALE 222 London(Metairie) 2/1.5 3141 Ponce de Leon #7 1/1 812 Esplanade #2 1/1 1233 Decatur #8 1/1 1809 Burgundy 1/1 919 St philip #6 1/1 1014 Esplanade #4 1/1 856 Carondelet #4 1/1.5 712 Deerfeild Road 3/2

1/2 Dble 2 Sty, 2Bd, 1Ba, A/C, Refig, Stove, W/D, Garage. $1275/mo, 1-yr Lse Sec Dep., No Pets. Call 225802-6554/ email dicklea@cox.net

4706 ST. PETER ST.

Nr Delgado, all new 2 BR, kit, lr, backrm, w/d/fridge, o/s pkng. $900/mo includes wtr. pd. 504-535-0446, Mark.

504-949-5400

906 Esplanade “D”

One block from City Park. Liv rm, lge closet, cen a/h, w/d, refrig, d/w, fans, wood flrs, granite countertops, $850/ mo. 504-234-0877

4228 ORLEANS AVE.

French Quarter Realty

928 Conti #7

1BR/1BA, 4208 Dumaine

pool, parking, 960 sqft $97k shotgun style, wd flrs, fab loc $149,5k grnd flr w/ pool! 481 sq ft $170k 3rd fl , tons of charm 608 sq ft $199k spectacular, needs facelift $238k spacious, nice floorplann, crtyd $224k Tonsofnaturallight,wdfls. 2crtyds! $249k elev, parking, crtyds and terrace! $ 375k Ranch-StyleTerrytown! updated,gar.$165k

We have qualified tenants for your rentals. Call us!

DOWNTOWN 1329 FRENCHMAN ST.

Living room, 1 BR, kitchen, tile bath. No pets. $500/mo. Call 504-494-0970.

ESPLANADE RIDGE 1208 N. GAYOSO

Upper 2 BR, LR, DR, 1 BA, KIT, wood/ ceramic flrs, high ceilings, cen a/h, w/d hkups, no pets. $1100 mo. 432-7955.

FRENCH QUARTER/ FAUBOURG MARIGNY HISTORIC VICTORIAN

Renovated, 2 blocks from the Fr. Quarter. 4 bedrooms/4baths, 2 story with courtyard - FANTASTIC! Call Aimee with DEMAND REALTY at 319-0443 or 837-3000.

LAKEFRONT LARGE ATTRACTIVE APT

2BR, 2BA w/ appls, beautiful courtyard setting w/swimming pool, quiet neighborhood. $900/mo. 504-495-6044 or 504-756-7347

MID CITY

Great landlord looking for great tenants! Near Tulane Univ., 1 br, 1 bath, CA & H, equip’d kit, fenced in yard. $695 Call Chuck, 504-236-3609.

SMALL OFFICE SPACE

1508 CARONDELET ST- 2 APTS

MID CITY - Offstreet parking for one vehicle. Separate entrance. Available 10/1. Contact Jane, (504) 482-5292

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT 1 BR EFF. CLOSE UNIV

Furn eff w/lr, a/h unit, ceil fans, wood/tile floors, w/d onsite. Clara by Nashville. Avail Oct. $550/mo. 504895-0016.

1205 ST CHARLES/$1075

Fully Furn’d studio/effy/secure bldg/ gtd pkg/pool/gym/wifi/laundry. Avail 11/1. 985-871-4324, 504-442-0573.

1510 CARONDELET

Lg 1 BR Apt, 1 blk St. Charles. open floor plan, remodeled kit & bath, laundry facilities on site. $800.1-888239-6566 or mballier@yahoo.com

3921 CONSTANCE

DORIAN M. BENNETT • 504-236-7688 dorian.bennett@sothebysrealty.com

RESIDENTIAL RENTALS

824 Royal - Retail/Gallery ................... $4300 933 Burgundy - 1 bd/ 1ba ................. $2500 830 St. Philip - 1 bd/ 1ba pkg ............. $2300 1139 Burgundy - 1 bd/ 1 ba ............. $1500 822 Touro - 1 bd/ 1ba pkg ............. $1100 718 Frenchmen - 1 bd/ 1ba pkg ............. $750 CALL FOR MORE LISTINGS!

2340 Dauphine Street • New Orleans, LA 70117 (504) 944-3605

215 MILLAUDON

133 S. Rendon, 2bd/1bath, 504-473-4022

IDEAL!MID-CITY LOC

1/2 double, living room, bedroom, kitchen, bath, a/c unit. $675/mo. Call 895-6394 or 289-9977.

Studio, newly remodeled kit & ba, hdwd flrs. $800/mo. Util incl. Huge 2 BR Apt. Bright, spacious,, high ceilings, hdwd flrs, $1100 Both have Cent a/h, laundry facility avail 24 hrs. Walk 1 blk to St. Charles St Car, easy access to I-10, CBD & FQ. No pets/ No smokers. 1-888-239-6566. mballier@yahoo.com

FURN 2BDRM/1BA HOUSE

Complete w/fridge, w&d, mw, stove, sec sys, CA&H, os pkng. On srtcr & Busline. Quiet n’bhood. $1,100 mo + sec dep. No pets/smokers. Call (504) 866-2250

2BR/1BA

Sun porch, patio, new stove, CA&H, os pkng, W&D, water pd. Gd N’borhood. 1 blk off Magazine near Louisiana. $1250/ mo + dep. Call Bob Ferris (504) 2315311, Century 21 Richard Berry & Assoc. (504) 367-2345.

LOWER GARDEN DIST./ IRISH CHANNEL 1/2 BLOCK TO MAGAZINE

GARDEN DISTRICT

1, 2, 3 & 4 ROOM OFFICES STARTING AT $695 INCLUDING UTILITIES

CALL 899-RENT

2 BR, Newly renov shotgun style $895/mo Also: Rms by week, private bath. $175/wk all util incl. 504-2020381, 738-2492.

WAREHOUSE DISTRICT CBD CONDO WITH BALC

441 Gravier cor Magazine. Large 1 bdrm, 1 ba, with garage parking, huge windows, fully equippped kit, w/d. Avail Sept 1. $2035/mo. S. Talbot 504-9759763. TALBOT REALTY GROUP

RENTALS TO SHARE ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Findyour roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

75

PUZZLE PAGE CLASSIFIEDS D

D

JOHN SCHAFF CRS (c) 504.343.6683

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 04 > 2011

ANSWERS FOR LAST WEEK ON PAGE 72

78

SOLD

$2,495,000 TOO LATE! Grand Mansion $2,300,000 (3 bdrm/3.5ba w/pkg) $1,579,000 $1,300,000 TOO LATE! TOO LATE! $429,000 Commercial $349,000 $220,000 (4 bdrm/2 ba w/pkg) (2 bdrm/2ba w/pkg) $239,000 TOO LATE! $315,000 $159,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) (1 bdrm/1ba) $149,000 (Only 6 Left!) starting at $79,000 $169,000 (efficiency condo)

D

D

(O) 504.895.4663

D 3222 Coliseum D 4941 St. Charles D 2721 St. Charles D 5528 Hurst D 1750 St. Charles D 1750 St. Charles D 20 Anjou D 1544 Camp D 3915 St. Charles D 1544 Camp D 1544 Camp D 1224 St. Charles D 2721 St. Charles

BAYOU ST. JOHN

UPTOWN COTTAGE Open House Sun. Oct. 16 3 - 5

NEW LISTING

1216 NORTH LOPEZ

2215 SONIAT ST.

BAyOu ST JOHN 4 PLEx on huge lot. Well maintained. Owner’s unit has open flr plan, crown molding & whirlpool. Hdwd flrs throughout. Totally renov in 2007. Re-wired, plumbing, roof, drywall, & cen A/C throughout. Living rm opens onto patio & pool. Enjoy this tranquil setting from porch or huge balc. Pool house has storage & guest accommodations with 2 full baths. 4153 sq. ft. plus 576 Sq ft pool house. $595,000

CHARMING VICTORIAN SIDEHALL COTTAGE! Pristine 3bdrm 2 ba home, original hardwood floors, 12ft ceilings, remodeled kitchen, granite counters. New light fixtures throughout. Plenty of closets & built in shelving. Lovely private backyard, w/deck, patio & palm trees. Off-street parking. Be part of the Freret St Renaissance, steps from restaurants, coffee shops, groceries, night spots. Excellent value! $225,000

(504) 895-4663

r i c e m i l l l o f t s

01-03 bedrooms 750-2100 s q f t $1600-$4000 522 montegut @ chartres

n o w

o p e n

A b u i l d i n g of br e at ht ak i ng o r i gi nal i t y . C a pt iva ti n g rive r v i ews. I n sp i re d st r e e t a r t . Subl i m e o p e n s p a c e. Arc h i tec tur a l a rt ifa c ts. H osp i ta l i t y s e r vi c es. A j o y ful t r i but e t o c rea t i v i ty a n d bea u ty . 504.300.1 1 30 | r i c e m i l l l o f ts.c o m

in the bywater


Gambit New Orleans- Oct 4, 2011