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C’est What?

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Scuttlebutt

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Unhappy Halloween

The New Orleans know-it-all Trader Joe’s, IKEA and other popular national chains still aren’t opening in New Orleans This week’s heroes and zeroes

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Gambit’s Web poll From their lips to your ears

Clancy DuBos / Politics

Julie Quinn: doing well while doing good?

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commentary

thinking out loud

Unhappy Halloween

I

though it undoubtedly makes many people feel safer. Then again, tens of thousands of locals and visitors regularly cut loose outside the Superdome on Saints game days without random violence erupting — and without a show of force by NOPD. The message there may be that circumstances and surroundings matter. After Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans spent millions improving Canal Street with new lighting, sidewalks and streetcar stops. The Downtown Development District has also given parts of the CBD a facelift. It’s therefore baffling why the city treats the 100 blocks of Bourbon, Royal and Chartres streets as an afterthought. There are decent businesses on all these blocks, but — as anyone who’s brought out-of-town friends and family into the Vieux Carre surely knows — the first blocks off Canal Street are some of the

all dressed up

silks & velvets

taupe

black

clothes + accessories

New Orleans doesn’t have years to wait. We need short-term solutions as well, and we need them now. most unwelcoming in the Quarter, with boarded-up storefronts, uneven lighting and often aggressive panhandling. New Orleans is preparing to show off its assets in a series of major events. The Sugar Bowl and BCS National Championship will be played in the Superdome in early January. The NCAA Final Four is coming to town next March and April, and in February 2013 our city once again will host the Super Bowl. The eyes of the world will be upon us, and hundreds of thousands of people will experience New Orleans in person, some for the first time. Cleaning up the doorway to the French Quarter — improving streetlights, undertaking beautification projects and encouraging rather than discouraging talented street musicians to play there — may not solve crime, but it surely will help make things better for both visitors and New Orleanians who work in what should be the safest place in the city.

7732 maple 865 . mon - sat 10-6

9625

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 08 > 2011

t was a busy Halloween weekend in New Orleans, with tourism officials reporting 99 percent hotel occupancy for Saturday night, Oct. 29. The 11th annual Voodoo Experience drew tens of thousands to City Park for three days of music. Residents in eastern New Orleans held the Friends Festival, a two-day, all-ages celebration in Joe Brown Park inspired by Mayor Mitch Landrieu’s September crime summit. The Krewe of MOMS held its annual Halloween Ball — always a place for spectacular costuming. The Women of Class Social Aid and Pleasure Club threw a Sunday afternoon second line with help from one of the city’s brightest young ensembles, the TBC Brass Band. On Halloween night, kids took to the streets for trick-or-treating with their parents (among them, Drew Brees, who took his role as a trick-or-treat dad seriously and dressed as a centurion). All of it was largely peaceful, creative and filled with the New Orleans spirit that makes us all proud. Then, later Halloween night, things went downhill fast. Within 10 hours, five horrific acts of gun violence erupted in the waning hours of a wonderful weekend. In one incident on Canal Street, a gunman fired 32 times. In all, the gunfire wounded 16 people, seven of them at the corner of Bourbon and St. Louis streets — just two blocks from the NOPD’s 8th District station. Two victims died. Here’s another unhappy number: The next morning, more than 500 stories about New Orleans appeared in the national news — and they weren’t about the costumes or the parades. “16 Shot, 2 Fatally, on Halloween in New Orleans,” was the headline on ABC News, which, like many media, mentioned “gunfire on Bourbon Street, the tourist hot spot in the French Quarter.” Mayor Mitch Landrieu, NOPD Superintendent Ronal Serpas and city crime commissioner James Carter quickly called a press conference. Landrieu reiterated his belief that New Orleans crime has reached “epidemic proportions,” and Serpas assured residents, “Our police department is not sitting on its hands.” Both men once again called for a “holistic” approach to healing our broken city, with investment in youth, mentoring and other planks that are part of Landrieu’s Save Our Sons initiative. They’re not wrong about long-term solutions to crime, but New Orleans doesn’t have years to wait. We need short-term solutions as well, and we need them now. At the press conference, Serpas mentioned that NOPD had more than 100 officers in the French Quarter and on Bourbon and Canal streets when the shootings occurred. Clearly, putting cops on the street doesn’t deter violence,

07

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DEAR JOHN, Thank you for the question, John; it gave me the opportunity to recall some great times in the early 1980s playing games in the arcade, eating at what seemed like the largest food court ever, picking out new clothes and watching first-run movies at the ritziest mall on the West Bank. Belle Promenade had about 85 stores, anchored by D.H. Holmes (Dillard’s after 1989) and J.C. Penney. When it opened in 1983, Belle Promenade’s location near the intersection of Barataria and LaPalco boulevards was in the heart of West Bank suburbs that were expanding quickly to accommodate workers in the booming oil industry. For the first couple of years, Belle Promenade attracted customers from all over the metro area — and posed a financial threat to the struggling Oakwood Mall only a few miles away in Gretna, closer to the Crescent City Connection and New Orleans. A movie theater opened in 1985 and was larger, had more seating and offered more film selections than other theaters. The Marrero mall (like many other busiAn artist’s rendering of the proposed Wayne’s World Family Entertainment Center on the site of the former Belle Promenade Mall. PHOTO COURTESY WAYNE’S WORLD FEC

nesses) was hit hard by the oil bust of the mid-’80s, and its customer base dwindled until, in 1989, stores and restaurants began to close or move. The mall was renovated in 1993 but never regained the popularity it enjoyed a decade earlier. When it closed in March 2000, only four businesses remained, including United Artists, which screened movies for another three months. The commercial buildings were demolished between 2001 and 2003. Since then, businesses of several types and sizes have popped up singly and in small strip centers. A large section of the old mall site is grass-covered and undeveloped, surrounded by a construction fence that bears a sign advertising “Wayne’s World Family Entertainment Center — Opening Soon.” Wayne’s World is the dream and brainchild of Indianapolis Colts wide receiver Reggie Wayne, a Marrero native and John Ehret High School alumnus. Wayne put up $7 million of his own money to secure financing for what then was estimated to be a $16 million to $17 million project that broke ground Jan. 12, 2010. Plans for the 58,000-square-foot, 6-acre Wayne’s World site — near John Ehret — include a bowling alley (a favorite pastime for Wayne), laser tag complex, video arcade and restaurant. The original contractor estimated construction would take a year. Work stopped a few months after it started, when the economy took a dive and financing dried up for such projects, according to Earl Brandon, Wayne’s business partner and fellow John Ehret alumnus. Wayne plans to restart the project as soon as he can secure financing. “It’s not dead,” Brandon said. “The project was just put on hold. Wayne is looking at financing … but it’s still his dream to build it.”

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < KNOWLEDGE < < < < < < < < < < <IS < <POWER <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < QUOTE OF THE WEEK > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > “You all have a great team, maybe one of the best Alabama <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< < < < < < < < teams > > > > >ever, > > > but > > >it> really > > > > doesn’t > > > > > >matter > > > > >who > > >LSU’s > > > >opponent >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> is — because, as we say in Louisiana, the honey badger takes < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < what he wants, and we’re looking forward to doing that on

scuttle Butt

Saturday night.” — U.S. Sen. David Vitter on the Senate floor Nov. 2, referencing the popular YouTube video (albeit without the swearing) in a bit of friendly trash talk with Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions.

Yanking Our Chains

FUSS AND BUDGET

NEW ORLEANS IS LOOKING GOOD TO NATIONAL RETAILERS — BUT WHERE ARE TRADER JOE’S, IKEA AND THE OTHER CHAINS BELOVED BY THE BUDGET-CONSCIOUS? HERE’S WHY YOU’RE STILL WAITING FOR BILLY BOOKCASES AND TWO-BUCK CHUCK. B Y A L E X W O O D WA R D

I

As soon as plans are announced for large retail developments, Internet comments, social networks and water coolers light up with speculation: IKEA! Trader Joe’s! H&M! Crate & Barrel! Bookstores! Shopping malls! — all

Specialty market Trader Joe’s, a favorite on the West and East coasts, is one of the national chains with no presence in the New Orleans metro area. CREATIVE COMMONS/FLICKR USER KAWANET

the commercial makings of a super metro area, none of which New Orleans, and in some cases Jefferson Parish, has managed to attract. Then there’s the great contradiction: Petitions and Facebook pages (“Bring Trader Joe’s to New Orleans,” with more than 200 members, and a similarly titled “Bring Trader Joe’s to New Orleans!!!,” with more than 800 members) aim to attract big retailers in a city that prides itself on “local,” with a hardy Stay Local! campaign and a growing field of locally owned businesses. But here’s why some of those prized big boxes will never, ever, open in New Orleans — for now. Despite District E New Orleans City councilman Jon Johnson’s hints at discussions with the company at an Oct. 20 meeting, Trader Joe’s spokesperson Alison Mochizuki said the company keeps a low profile, and doesn’t discuss its business model, not even what it takes to sustain one of its stores, or how they distribute products. Trader Joe’s mostly sells products bearing

PAGE 12

c'est what? HOW DO YOU THINK THE NEW ORLEANS ECONOMY WILL BE IN 2012?

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donated her 1963 Corvette to Warren Easton Charter High School for auction. The winning bid was $75,200, which will go toward scholarships for college-bound Easton seniors — and Bullock kicked in a personal check for $50,000 more. The actress and part-time New Orleanian has been a financial angel for the school — and a role model of philanthropy in general — since Hurricane Katrina.

Leslie Jacobs

was named one of “The World’s 7 Most Powerful Educators” this week by Forbes.com. Jacobs, head of the nonprofit group Educate Now!, is a businesswoman and former member of the Orleans Parish School Board and the Louisiana Board of Elementary and Secondary Education. The financial magazine noted, “Leslie’s ideas are shaping other states’ approaches to improve underperforming schools.”

“Tigers for Tuscaloosa,”

a project of the United Way of Southeast Louisiana, brought a special dimension of charitable spirit to the red-hot Nov. 5 LSU-Alabama college football matchup. United Way groups around Louisiana collected donations of winter clothes for the people of Tuscaloosa, Ala., the city that was hit by an enormous tornado in April, leaving thousands homeless.

Odd Future,

the California hip-hop collective, attacked credentialed photojournalists in the pit at the Voodoo Experience during Halloween weekend. After kicking at the cameras, performer Vyron “Left Brain” Turner slapped photographer Amy Harris. The group’s publicist denied the incident happened, but local photographers on the scene confirmed it, and Voodoo officials have rightly issued an apology.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 08 > 2011

KEA, the Swedish retailer (and world’s largest furniture retailer), houses thousands of products throughout its several floors in its stores, hundreds of thousands of square feet and warehouse space, all under a copypaste, blue-and-yellow shell that’s ubiquitous in dozens of American metropolitan areas. Except New Orleans. The nearest Trader Joe’s, the California-based specialty grocery store, is in Nashville, and there are seven locations in Georgia (including two in Atlanta). Buzz about a new store occupying a 500,000 square feet riverfront warehouse ended in a shrug when the tenant was revealed not as a Trader Joe’s but a Bass Pro Shop. A Mid-City development in a former car dealership will be anchored by a new Winn-Dixie concept — plans for a Target several blocks away (and several years earlier) were scrapped. Borders’ closure (itself occupying a former funeral home) on St. Charles Avenue sparked rumors over new tenants (an Apple store for Orleans Parish?), but developers announced a grocery store — the high-end chain The Fresh Market — would take its place. Meanwhile, Costco recently revealed plans to develop the vacant Carrollton Shopping Center across from Xavier University.

New Orleans Municipal Court Chief Judge Paul Sens called Mayor Mitch Landrieu’s proposed 2012 budget for the court “deeply disturbing” at the Nov. 2 City Council budget hearing. The Landrieu administration’s 2012 budget for the court is $2.56 million, a decrease of $233,000 from the 2011 budget, and $1 million less than the $3.6 million the court requested. Last year Municipal Court, which historically handles cases in which suspects are accused of breaking city ordinances, also began taking on nonviolent misdemeanor cases from state court and the Orleans Parish Criminal District Court — an arrangement intended to give the District Attorney’s office more time to handle state felony cases. Now, Sens says, his court will begin hearing all misdemeanor cases. According to its budget request, Municipal Court had funding for 52 full-time employees in 2011 and expects to handle 80 percent of all charges filed by the New Orleans Police Department (NOPD) — including 40 percent of what has been the Criminal District Court’s docket. Its budget request includes $800,000 to cover increased expenses, with a large portion allocated to improving mental health services. Sens says his court sees a startling rate of recidivism among mentally ill defendants who are not competent to stand trial. Typically, he says, those defendants are referred to University Hospital, which releases them after 72 hours. Many of those defendants end up back in Municipal Court “time and time

09

scuttlebutt

page 9

OPP-POsed tO Per diems

During last week’s budget hearing with Orleans Parish Sheriff Marlin Gusman, District A City Councilwoman Susan Guidry called for an end to the per-inmate daily reimbursement structure, or per diem, the city uses to fund jails run by the sheriff’s office. Under the current system, the city pays Gusman’s office $22 per inmate per day of incarceration. Gusman, whose office additionally receives a $26 daily reimbursement from

the state for state prisoners, says the city’s per diem should be raised. However, Guidry contended that when costs for inmate medical care are added, the city’s actual per diem rate is closer to $34, $8 more than the state’s rate. “But we shouldn’t have a per diem,” Guidry said, drawing applause from a group of audience members holding “no per diem” signs. “This is a perverse incentive to keep people in jail.” Guidry added she does not believe the sheriff’s office keeps people in jail longer than necessary, but the very existence of such an “incentive” demands that it be removed. Gusman and City Budget Director Cary Grant said they are open to changing the system and moving the city’s jails to a normal, predetermined budget, as is the case for most city-funded departments. Guidry demanded that the city “not let another year go by” without changing the sheriff’s funding structure, but Grant said making the change would be “more complicated than it sounds.” “OK, how many people are working on it now?” Guidry asked, to which Grant replied, “Not as many as there should be.” — Maldonado

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A newly formed organization with a goal to promote the local Irish culture and enhance connections within the local Irish-American community will host a night of Irish music, dancing and cuisine — with help from Irish Ambassador Michael Collins — at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 10, at Gallier Hall. The group, Irish Network-New Orleans (IN-NOLA), is part of a growing national network that has spawned local branches in a dozen U.S. cities. Representatives from Irish Network chapters in other cities also will join in IN-NOLA’s official launch party. Collins will speak at Tulane University Friday and will visit Cafe Hope, St. Dominic School, the Celtic Cross in Lakeview and the Lower 9th Ward Memorial. IN-NOLA members include “Irish, Irish American and friends of Ireland, collectively known simply as Irish,” according to the group’s website (www.irishnetworkneworleans.org). Attendance at the Gallier Hall gala is free for members. People can join online at the group’s website. — Clancy DuBos

JPK • maruca • Jon hart • mary francis • seasona

12

know there’s just a huge wealth of frequent flyers [mentally ill reoffenders] in his court,” Tebo says. “It really is a public health and safety issue.” A lack of state funding is the primary problem, Tebo says, but Landrieu’s proposed cuts to the Municipal Court budget exacerbate the situation. “My response to the city is: This should be the first allocation of money. We have been screaming for years that we have an epidemic of chronically mentally ill, that are creating a public safety concern,” Tebo adds. “It is horrific. It’s unimaginable. And let me tell you, it’s negligent. This is pure negligence.” — Charles Maldonado

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 08 > 2011

again,” Sens says. “The city has no resources for the mentally ill and that is hugely problematic.” The number of mentally ill defendants in his court will only increase as Municipal Court takes on more state misdemeanor cases, he adds. Sens also has asked the city for $350,000 to fund mental health commission evaluations, which are required when it is suspected a state defendant is mentally ill. Sens further notes that if psychiatric facilities don’t have enough beds to accommodate these offenders, the suspects are sent to Orleans Parish jails, where incarceration costs the city $22 a day — plus medical expenses. Deputy Mayor and Chief Administrative Officer Andy Kopplin, when questioned by councilmembers following Sens’ presentation, acknowledged that some adjustments may have to be made. Contacted by Gambit after the meeting, Cecile Tebo, a mental health advocate and, until earlier this month, the head of the NOPD’s Crisis Unit, says she’s not surprised at the state’s lack of mental health funding. In the past, she has worked with Sens to plead with the state for more resources to handle the mentally ill. “I

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Doing Well While Doing Good n politics and in life, it’s not where you start but how and where you finish that matters. That bit of wisdom came to mind when I read last week’s TimesPicayune story about state Sen. Julie Quinn advocating for rule changes in the state’s $750 million home-elevation program after going on the payroll of the program’s largest local contractor. Quinn is near the end of her tenure as a Louisiana state senator. Throughout her political career, she touted her credentials as a reformer who railed against insider dealing. Now, as she prepares to leave the Senate, she apparently has concluded that it’s OK to use her political stroke to promote the interests of her client-turned-employer — as long as it’s also good for consumers. Quinn told the T-P that her actions do not conflict with Louisiana’s ethics laws. She says she fully disclosed her relationship with Orleans Shoring in the course of her dealings with high-ranking state officials who could affect rule changes benefiting Orleans Shoring — and consumers. Here are the facts as set forth in David

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Hammer’s T-P story: Last April, while lawmakers were still in session, Quinn went to work for Orleans Shoring as an attorney making $150 an hour. She filed a disclosure form with the state Ethics Board stating that the scope of her representation included working “in connection with collecting on invoices owed to Orleans Shoring under the federal Hazard Mitigation Grant Program.” Under the program, the state pays Orleans using federal funds, so Senator Quinn’s job was to help Orleans Shoring collect from the state. Almost immediately after being retained by Orleans, Quinn began lobbying the Jindal Administration for rule changes, starting at the top — with Commissioner of Administration Paul Rainwater. She says she disclosed her relationship with Orleans in her dealings with administration officials. Quinn sent dozens of emails to administration officials seeking specific rule changes, particularly those relating to insurance and bonding requirements. Those requirements protect consumers when something goes wrong on the job.

In July, a month after her last legislative session — but with six months left in her term as a state senator — Quinn joined Orleans’ parent company as its chief operating officer. That same month, she appeared before a committee of her legislative colleagues to challenge Legislative Auditor Daryl Purpera’s conclusions about the reasonableness of costs that the state was allowing contractors like Orleans to charge the program. In August, she asked the attorney for the agency that oversees the home elevation program to make specific rule changes. The attorney offered to “compare notes” with Quinn before agreed-upon changes became official. Quinn followed up by asking for an alternative to one provision that would benefit Orleans specifically — essentially allowing her employer to remain self-insured. So what are we to make of all this? Ralph Waldo Emerson once said, “Doing well is the result of doing good. That’s what capitalism is all about.” Then again, disgraced former Jefferson Parish President

Aaron Broussard also went to work for one of Orleans’ competitors. Moreover, former Wildlife and Fisheries Commissioner Henry Mouton, who was hired by River Birch landfill as a “lobbyist” in 1996, pleaded guilty to federal conspiracy charges the same month that Quinn stepped up her email lobbying efforts on behalf of Orleans. Quinn’s statement that she complied with state ethics laws, which are riddled with loopholes, offers cold comfort. While disclosure is required when a potential conflict arises, it’s best to avoid conflicts altogether. Just ask Mouton. Quinn may be on her way out as a senator, but it’s an open secret that she wants to be a judge. The Canons of Judicial Conduct require judges to avoid even the appearance of impropriety or conflicts of interest. If she runs for judge any time soon, it will be interesting to see how Jefferson voters react to Quinn’s attempt to do well while doing good.

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“soMething for anD against everyone”

Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary arts Center marks 25 years of sCreening unique offerings under the guidanCe — and vision — of one Man.

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audience seated in puffy armchairs and sofas in front, rows of grey cushioned Office Depot chairs, and more rows of chairs from hotels. He previews upcoming films and events, and before flipping the light switch as he walks back to the projector, he reminds patrons of Zeitgeist’s longstanding mission statement: “Something for and against everyone.” In Zeitgeist’s 25 years, Broussard has presented such a wide variety of films, theater productions and music events that it’s nearly impossible to characterize its offerings. The one common thread is that most of it would otherwise never have been presented publicly in New Orleans. While everyone can find something in Zeitgeist’s programming that’s appealing, it’s far easier to remember the “against” items — the upsetting or controversial elements. “I get it from everyone,” Broussard says with a bemused shrug. He’s currently putting the final touches on December’s New Orleans Middle East Film Festival. One of his goals is to bring Ahmad Abdalla in as a guest. The Egyptian filmmaker chronicled underground and rebellious street culture (graffiti, music) in advance of the eruption of the Arab Spring, which brought down President Hosni Mubarak and saw uprisings and demonstrations in many Arab nations. As he’s tried to raise funds to fly in Abdalla from Egypt, he’s been in regular contact. Broussard was very pleased with his poster art, featuring a keffiyeh, the headdress common in many Middle Eastern nations, wrapped around a film reel, and he emailed an image to Abdalla. page 16

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 08 > 2011

e’re the only theater in the world that doesn’t sell popcorn,” Rene Broussard says, smiling. Instead, the makeshift concession counter at Broussard’s Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center includes traditional movie candies like Snickers and Reese’s Pieces, along with Japanese rice crackers mixed with dried anchovies and wasabi peas, Lebanese sesame crackers, chocolates from Turkey, fair trade almonds and locally made Popstars gourmet popsicles in flavors like pineapple kiwi mojito. As ticket buyers approach the desk he uses as a box office, Broussard swivels in his chair to offer items from the array of concessions. At showtime, Broussard heads to the front of his large and minimally converted commercial space, facing an

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 08 > 2011

“He didn’t like it,” Broussard says. “He said that it’s black and white, which is really identified with Palestinians. He said it should be green, because that represents more of the Muslim world.” It’s not the first time Middle Eastern programming at Zeitgeist has roiled people. One pro-Palestinian slate of films drew thousands of emails and calls from pro-Israel people, he says. A previous New Orleans Middle East Film Festival resulted in complaints from Muslim attendees who objected to alcohol being available on opening night. “I was told I’m culturally insensitive,” he says. “It’s a Middle Eastern film festival, not a Muslim film festival.” He rolls his eyes. You can’t please everyone.

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Zeitgeist’s whiff of controversy always attracts attention, and some remember the theater’s most notoriously disgruntled ticket buyer, or attempted ticket buyer: David Duke. In the mid-1990s, Zeitgeist screened the documentary The Wonderful, Horrible Life of Leni Riefenstahl (1993). The German filmmaker was exceptionally talented, but some of her bestknown works were propaganda films for Adolf Hitler and the Nazis, including Triumph of the Will (1934) and Tag der Freiheit: Unsere Wehrmacht (Day of Freedom: Our Armed Forces, 1935). The first screening of the documentary sold out quickly, and Broussard had to tell arrivals the theater was full. “Just as I said that — I had no idea — the next guy in line was David Duke,” Broussard says. “He thought I was not letting him in for political reasons. I showed him we were full. I said, ‘Look, sorry, there are no empty seats.’” Duke left, and accounts of the event somehow made Broussard into a hero for denying entrance to the former Ku Klux Klan leader. But there was no principled statement in the works. Duke returned the next day — a half-hour early — in order to get a seat. “I’m not going to turn away anyone if they’re paying,” Broussard says. He once also had to turn away Taylor Hackford and Helen Mirren after the couple rolled up in a limousine to see a compilation of short animated films by the Quay brothers, which already was sold out. There’s no obvious formula for what packs the house at Zeitgeist. Sometimes it’s obscure experimental films that appeal to cult fans, sometimes it’s controversial films or events

— the Sex Workers Art Show used to be an annual sellout. A more recent success was the debut and subsequent run of Pearl Jam Twenty, Cameron Crowe’s documentary about the Seattle band’s career. Zeitgeist was the only theater in Louisiana to screen it on the night of its worldwide premiere, and it was one of only eight theaters in the United States permitted to do a theatrical run. “It was amazing,” Broussard reported after opening night. “We had an incredible line. I put food and drinks in a cart and went down the line while people waited for the second screening.” But even Broussard isn’t happy with every packed house. Where’s the limit of his tolerance for popular subjects? Alex Gibney’s Gonzo: The Life and Work of Dr. Hunter S. Thompson, is one example. Gibney is the award-winning director of such films as Taxi to the Darkside, about the war in Afghanistan, and Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room, about the company’s accounting scandal. Gonzo was well reviewed by critics, and its only other local screening was in the New Orleans Film Festival. “I ran it for like two weeks and made a shitload of money,” Broussard says. “But I hate Hunter S. Thompson. The whole drunk gun thing — what a douche. Just trying to read him is one of the worst things ever.” Broussard constantly scans film festivals and reaches out personally to directors for screening copies, but programming at Zeitgeist has always been feast or famine. The recent Samuel Goldwyn release The Whistleblower, which in years past would have been more likely to run locally at the Landmark Theatres chain at Canal Place, drew only a dozen people on opening night at Zeitgeist.

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International  Human  Rights  Festival  has  used  the  theater  as  a  participating venue. Other events have included  the  NOLA  Veggie  Fest  and  a  recent  Steampunk art and film showcase. While  such  diversity  might  seem  like  a  natural  asset,  it  also  presents  challenges. All the dissimilarity can be an  obstacle  to  building  an  audience  or  identity,  says  Don  Marshall,  director  of  the  New  Orleans  Jazz  &  Heritage  Foundation, and a founding organizer  of both the New Orleans Film Festival  (NOFF)  and  the  Tennessee  Williams  New Orleans Literary Festival. Lesserknown films may not stick out among  the  city’s  abundance  of  entertainment options.     “He’s  showing  some  of  the  best  films  around,  and  unfortunately  New  Orleans doesn’t seem to embrace that,”  Marshall  says  of  Broussard.  “He  runs  this  as  a  personal  cause.  He  doesn’t  want  strings  attached,  and  he  makes  unusual sacrifices to do what he does.”       Marshall  suggests  a  location  next  to a university community would help  the  theater.  But  maybe  also  a  university  in  a  town  with  a  different  intellectual climate.     “(Zeitgeist)  would  be  packed  with  people  every  night  if  it  were  in  Cambridge  (Mass.)  or  Ann  Arbor  (Mich.),” he says.      Although  New  Orleans  used  to  be  full  of  single-screen  neighborhood  theaters,  art  house  offerings  are  slim.  At  Chalmette  Movies,  proprietor  Ellis  Fortinberry  sometimes  runs  an  independent  feature  or  documentary  on  one  of  the  theater’s  six  screens.  He  recently  screened  the  original  Israeli  version of The Debt in conjunction with  the  New  Orleans  Film  Society,  but  for  two nights only. page 18

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 08 > 2011

    While  Broussard  screens  a  lot  of  American  independent  films,  a  film  from  a  major  Hollywood  studio  isn’t  typical fare. Broussard takes particular  pride  in  culling  films  that  get  positive  attention  at  film  festivals  and  foreign  films  not  otherwise  distributed  in  the  United States.     “I am very aggressive about our programming,” he says.     The  result  is  evident  in  any  sampling  of  Zeitgeist  offerings.  In  recent  months, he’s presented the following:     • Circumstance, Maryam Keshavarz’s  sensuous  debut  feature  about  two  Iranian  girls’  love  amid  the  hip-hop,  house parties and illicit club culture of  contemporary Iran.     •  Two  recent  foodie-friendly  films:  Toast,  starring  Helena  Bonham  Carter  as the stepmother of future food writer  Nigel  Slater,  and  El Bulli: Cooking in Progress,  an  artsy  documentary  about  the  world’s  most  famous  avant-garde  restaurant.     •  Archangel  (Broussard’s  favorite  film),  one  of  Canadian  filmmaker  Guy  Maddin’s  eccentric  black-and-white  melodramas mimicking the style of the  end of the age of silent films.     •  Waste Land,  the  Oscar-winning  documentary about Brazilian artist Vik  Muniz’s  collaborative  profiles  of  garbage  pickers  living  at  Rio  de  Janeiro’s  largest landfill.     • Tucker and Dale Vs. Evil is a recent  comic horror film parody pitting misunderstood hillbillies against a bunch  of  preppy  college  kids  camping  in  the woods.     Zeitgeist  also  hosts  music  and  film  festivals, including showcases of experimental  jazz,  which  have  featured  artists  including  James  Singleton,  Kidd  Jordan, Andrew Cyrille, Helen Gillet and  many others. Patois: The New Orleans 

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 08 > 2011

husband, who now lives in California. Gailiunas completed his late wife’s feature. While he was working on it, Broussard held a fundraiser to help Gailiunas finish the work. The film debuted at the Ann Arbor Film Festival, and it recently screened in the New Orleans Film Festival, including a packed showing at Zeitgeist attended by Gailiunas. “It was a bit of a hard trip,” Broussard says. “But it ended up being worth it. Friends came out. Church members (of the congregation of the dressmaker) attended each night.”

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Most of Broussard’s programming is simply not the most commercially available offerings, rather than explicitly controversial pieces, but in its early years, Zeitgeist was all about provocative subjects. As a student at UNO, Broussard had directed several short plays. For a class project, he set out to direct a full production of Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s Blood on the Cat’s Neck. The piece features Phoebe Zeit-Geist, a character from a comic serialized in the Evergreen Review in the late 1960s. Zeit-Geist was a debutante who was kidnapped by white slavers and subjected to numerous humiliations by Nazis and various sexual freaks. When she was finally killed, the degradations continued as her corpse was sold to necrophiliacs. In Fassbinder’s graphic continuation of her ordeal, Zeit-Geist is a zombified alien who returns to Earth. When word of the production got out, the administration wanted it canceled. “It got censored, so I took it off campus,” Broussard says. The production ran at the Can Can Cabaret in the French Quarter. “It was a big, big hit, and that’s how Zeitgeist got founded.” He took Phoebe’s name and created Zeitgeist Theater Experiments. (He actually chose between two names: Zeitgeist and Holocene, the term for the current geological epoch. “For 25 years, I have been kicking myself,” Broussard says. “I went with Zeitgeist, but now ‘zeitgeist’ is everywhere. I can’t get it as a domain name. Nobody is using holocene.”) In 1987, Broussard incorporated Zeitgeist as a Louisiana nonprofit. Though there was ample space on the forms for a mission statement, he wrote simply “Something for and against everyone.” It was simple, and he notes, very broad. “I was all about breaking the rules (then),” he says. Other early productions included a reworking of Max Frisch’s The Firebugs, a parable about the rise of Hitler, which Broussard formatted like a TV talk show. He followed up with Shakespeare the Sadist, which in Act 2 turns the Bard’s works into Swedish porn film scenes. The Commune, which views the Manson family and its murder spree as a metaphor for American history, was presented along with screenings of 16mm short films Brian De Palma made in film school. They were the first films screened under the banner of Zeitgeist. In case New Orleans wasn’t clear that he liked pro-

vocative subjects, Broussard then scheduled a series of works by artists then under national scrutiny for works funded by the National Endowment for the Arts. Photographer Robert Mapplethorpe was the poster child of what critics deemed obscene art. Zeitgeist hosted filmmakers Leslie Thornton, Alan Sondheim, Tom Zummer and Julie Zando in a program he titled “The World Made Flesh: American Experiments in Marginality.” Zando then recommended him to Hallwalls Contemporary Arts Center in Buffalo, N.Y., one of the nation’s leading contemporary arts centers, for a film curator position. Broussard had not gradu-

addressed issues of being overweight and gay. The first installment was accepted and screened in more than 100 film festivals. The middle chapter, Boy With a Bugle, featured a series of discourses in which he imagined himself as the child of Lucille Ball and Bea Arthur. He took the roles they played in Mame (1974) and transformed them into an eccentric lesbian couple. The idea for the film came from a theater version he presented at Zeitgeist when the theater was on lower Magazine Street. He used that space to both live and work, and theatergoers had to walk through his bedroom to get to the restroom. When he staged Boy With

HIGHLIGHTS OF ZEITGEIST’S 25TH ANNIVERSARY SCHEDULE Being Elmo: A Puppeteer’s Journey. Constance Marks and Philip Shane’s documentary chronicles the life of Kevin Clash, the man who made the squeaky-voiced Muppet a superstar. Tyrannosaur. There’s already Oscar buzz for stars Olivia Colman and Peter Mullan of this recent star of the Toronto International Film Festival. Giorgio Moroder’s Metropolis. The man behind the soundtracks of Top Gun and Flashdance added a rock ’n’ roll score to this German arthouse classic silent film. Piano Players Rarely Ever Play Together. A 30th anniversary screening of the documentary about local keyboard legends Professor Longhair, Allen Toussaint and Isodore “Tuts” Washington. It screens along with director Stevenson J. Palfi’s short feature The World According to Ernie K. Doe.

ated from UNO, but he was hired in 1990 and spent three years at the center, traveling home and keeping Zeitgeist screenings going during holidays and summer. Broussard returned to New Orleans to stay when his father was diagnosed with cancer. In 1993, Broussard began full-time programming for Zeitgeist, screening films on different nights in different locations, including the music club Muddy Waters and X Art Gallery in the Warehouse District. Over the years, he’s screened films in many New Orleans neighborhoods, from Bywater (Pussycat Caverns) to Mid-City (Movie Pitchers) to the CBD to Lower Magazine Street and Central City, with his longest tenure being 10 years split between two locations on Oretha Castle Haley Boulevard (he shared space with Barristers Gallery, now on St. Claude Avenue, before moving to his current space, owned by Saturn Screen Printing, which has its facilities upstairs). Besides screening films, Broussard became a filmmaker. His early projects included short features and documentaries. Tattoos for Tots is a seven-minute piece about a sleazy tattoo parlor operator who tries to convince kids to upgrade from gumball-machine temporary tattoos to permanent ink ones. Strangled By a Large Intestine was a documentary about Guy Maddin, and the title referred to a scene in Archangel. Broussard found critical and commercial success with his biopic trilogy The Fat Boy Chronicles, which

a Bugle, Broussard moved chairs into his bedroom and performed the piece naked while reclined on his bed. “It was a piece about revelation,” Broussard says. “It was about going from being ashamed of my body to being an international male model.” Broussard has posed twice for art photographers. Screenings and selling DVDs provided Broussard with an income as he maintained Zeitgeist as an artistic and free speech mission. He’s also taught classes about film and theater. And when the levees failed in 2005, among Broussard’s losses were 400 hours of footage for a documentary he was hired to make about the New Orleans Shell Shockers soccer team. Since the storm, he’s focused mostly on Zeitgeist programming. The wave of AmeriCorps and Common Ground volunteers who came to help rebuild and the young arts and social entrepreneurs who have moved to the city have become some of his most familiar new regulars, he says. But his simple reason for staying was caught on film on the first day New Orleanians were allowed back into the city. The final scene of Eye of the Storm features Broussard outside his sister’s flooded Lakeview home. “The only places I’ve ever been happy was in Buffalo and Berlin,” he says. “I finally have an excuse to leave. But if all these artists and musicians leave, then there’s no reason to rebuild the city. F—k! I have to stay.”

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Tom Carson (pictured), James Farwell, James Nolan, Lee Papa (aka Rude Pundit), Andre Codrescu and a host of other writers, literary critics, agents and artists discuss topics ranging from working in the global village to getting manuscripts published. The Pirate’s Alley Faulkner Society’s annual conference includes readings, book signings, classes, seminars and more. Various locations. Visit the website for schedule and registration details: www.wordsandmusic.org

NOMA 100: Gifts for the Second Century NOV. 13-JAN. 22, 2012 NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART, 1 COLLINS DIBOLL CIRCLE, 658-4100; WWW.NOMA.ORG

BY WILL COVIELLO

PHOTO BY ROMAN ALOKHIN

lthough the New Orleans Museum of Art isn’t celebrating its official birthday until Dec. 16, it is opening a show of its gifts a little early. “It’s an important way to celebrate the museum’s history, its legacy and the legacy of our donors,” director Susan Taylor says. “A milestone characterizes an institution.” NOMA began commemorating its centennial year last November with the show Great Collectors, Great Donors: The Making of the New Orleans Museum of Art, 1910-2010. This new exhibition, NOMA 100: Gifts for the Second Century, features more than 100 works solicited as donations to its permanent collection, and the December celebration will mark the actual anniversary with an array of special events. Plans to commemorate the 100th anniversary began in 2006, when then-director (current director emeritus) John Bullard started working with Anne Milling and the museum board of trustees to solicit gifts for the permanent collection. They sought works in a variety of media to add to all of the museum’s collections. The museum recently announced a total of 110 gifts, with many featuring multiple pieces for a total of nearly 500 works. Joshua Mann Pailet, the proprietor of A Gallery for Fine Photography donated 30 portraits of jazz musicians by photographer Herman Leonard. Judy Chicago, a friend of Bullard, donated a master set of her prints, a collection including 106 prints plus related drawings. “This exhibit will give people an idea of just how

A

broad our collections are,” Bullard says. Some of the highlights include works by Jasper Johns, Albrecht Durer, Andy Warhol, Dale Chihuly, Robert Polidori, Matthew Barney, Kathe Kollwitz, Gabrielle Munter, Do-Ho Suh and others. Six of the gifts are sculptures that will be placed in the Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden. When the Isaac Delgado Museum of Art opened in 1911, it had only nine pieces of art. The institution has grown in a variety of ways (changing its name to the New Orleans Museum of Art in 1971), and is the third oldest museum in the South. Delgado provided funds for construction of the original building, there were major expansions in the early 1970s and ’90s, and the sculpture garden opened in 2003. Collections now comprise more than 35,000 pieces. “We have top national collections of Japanese art, African art, outsider art, photography and decorative arts,” Taylor says. The museum also hosted major traveling exhibitions, including the landmark 1977 Treasures of King Tutankhamun, which attracted 900,000 visitors. Other major shows featured works by Auguste Rodin, Pablo Picasso, Peter Carl Faberge and others. There also are increasing shows and visits by contemporary artists at a time when the city is gaining a reputation for contemporary art made or displayed here. “We’re firmly planted in the 21st century,” Taylor says. “We’re in a very vital energized community. Artists are truly enthusiastic about coming here.

NOV

10

On 2010’s Shame, Shame (Anti-), Philadelphia’s band of brotherly love trimmed its shaggy bangs, tied its shoes and hit a full-tilt sprint. Scott McMicken and Toby Leaman’s parallel classic-rock revivals have never sounded so different, nor so right together. The Felice Brothers and Quiet Life open. Tickets $16 in advance, $18 at the door. 9 p.m. Thursday. Tipitina’s, 501 Napoleon Ave., 895-8477; www.tipitinas.com

JACOBY & PRONK

NOV

11-12

In 2007, veteran dancers Rubinald Pronk and Drew Jacoby created a company focused on choreographing contemporary ballets. The globetrotting troupe, including four other dancers, performs a world premiere commissioned by New Orleans Ballet Association in this presentation of several short pieces. Tickets $65. 8 p.m. Fri.-Sat., 2 p.m. Sat. NOCCA, 2800 Chartres St., 522-0996; www.nobadance.com

WALE

House of Blues hosts a two-night MC symposium, with New Orleans’ prodigious son Curren$y (midnight Saturday; tickets $25) following label mate and Washington, D.C., representative Wale (pictured), whose aptly titled second album, Ambition (Warner Bros.), dropped Nov. 1. Tickets $22. 11:11 p.m. Friday. House of Blues, 225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www-hob. com

NOV

11

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 08 > 2011

NOMA PRESENTS A COLLECTION OF NEW ACQUISITIONS.

Painter Odili Donald Odita just completed a commissioned mural marking the centennial of the New Orleans Museum of Art.

Artistically Gifted

DR. DOG WITH THE FELICE BROTHERS

31

LISTINGS

STICK THIS IN YOUR EAR

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com; FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

All show times p.m. unless otherwise noted.

Tuesday 8 BANKS STREET BAR — Michael Matthews & Friends, 9 BLUE NILE — Caroline Davis, 10

BMC — Mikey B3 Organ Combo, 6; Peter Novelli, 9; Lagniappe Brass Band, 11 CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — Bart Ramsey, 6:30 COLUMNS HOTEL — John Rankin, 8

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Street Beat, 6

D.B.A. — Treme Brass Band, 9 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Tom Hook, 9:30

THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

FUNKY PIRATE — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30 HOUSE OF BLUES — Peter Murphy, She Wants Revenge, Hussle Club, 8 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Kristina Morales, 8

MAISON DUPUY HOTEL — Aaron Lopez-Barrantes, 6 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Rebirth Brass Band, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Mary Flynn’s Prohibition Jazz & Blues Band, 6; Blue Threes, 9:30 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Sazerac the Clown’s Cabinet of Wonders, 10 OLD POINT BAR — Josh Garrett & the Bottom Line, 8

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall-Stars feat. Shannon Powell, 8 RALPH’S ON THE PARK — Tom Worrell, 5 SIBERIA — Thee Oh Sees, Total Control, Dead People, Nervous Juvenile, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Andre Bohren, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Smokin’ Time Jazz Club, 6; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 10 WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Kirk Branch, 6

12 BAR — Brass-A-Holics, 9

ALLWAYS LOUNGE — Gypsy Hotel Club, Why Are We Building Such a Big Ship?, Maddie Ruthless, Urban Voodoo Machine and others, 9

BANKS STREET BAR — Micah Mckee’s Songwriters Showcase, 9; Major Bacon, 10 THE BEACH — Rev. Robert Rockefeller, Chicken on the Bone, 7:30

BIG AL’S DECKBAR SEAFOOD & BLUES — Oscar & the Blues Cats, 8 BLUE NILE — United Postal Project, 8

BMC — Treme Funktet feat. Corey Henry, 11 a.m.; Bryce Eastwood, 6; Blues4Sale, 8

CAFE NEGRIL — Jamey St. Pierre & the Honeycreepers, 9 CANDLELIGHT LOUNGE — Treme Brass Band, 9

CAROUSEL PIANO BAR & LOUNGE — Louis Prima Night feat. John Autin, Austin Clements & Tyler Clements, 8 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Meschiya Lake & Tom McDermott, 8

CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — George Keys, 6:30

COLUMNS HOTEL — Ricardo Crespo, 8

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Street Beat, 6

D.B.A. — Tin Men, 7; Walter “Wolfman” Washington & the Roadmasters, 10 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Bob Andrews, 9:30 EIFFEL SOCIETY — Vivaz!, 8

THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

FUNKY PIRATE — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30 HI-HO LOUNGE — My Graveyard Jaw, Whiskey Dick, Black Eyed Vermillion, 10

(upstairs), 9

MAISON DUPUY HOTEL — Aaron Lopez-Barrantes, 6

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Johnny Sketch & the Dirty Notes, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Funkin’ the Pocket feat. Mayumi Shara, 6; Mike Kobrin Q-tet, 9:30

OLD FIREMEN’S HALL — Two Piece & a Biscuit feat. Brandon Foret, Allan Maxwell & Brian Melancon, 7:30 OLD U.S. MINT — Hidden Treasures of the Louisiana State Museum Series feat. Henry Butler, 7

ONE EYED JACKS — Trashy Diva 15th Anniversary Bash feat. Rasputina, Rock City Morgue, 10 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lars Edegran & Topsy Chapman feat. Palm Court Jazz Band, 7

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Band feat. Mark Braud, 8 RALPH’S ON THE PARK — Joe Krown, 5 SIBERIA — Fletcher C. Johnson, Cussins, Jonesbirds, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Uptown Jazz Orchestra, 8 & 10

LACAVA’S SPORTS BAR — Crossfire, 9

THE MAISON — The Cat’s Pajamas Funk All Stars, 9; Mario Abney Quartet

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TUE

Thursday 10

WED BRASS-A-HOLICS 9PM

12 BAR — Jessie Brooks, Heartbreak Therapy, Wooden Wings, 9

BROOKS, THU JESSIE HEARTBREAK THERAPY AND

BMC — Griffin Sample Trio, 6; Chapter: SOUL, 8; Eric Gordon & the Lazy Boys, 10:30

KERRY IRISH PUB — Chip Wilson, 9

FRIDAY • 11/11 • 9 pm

STAGE DOOR CANTEEN AT THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM — Victory Belles, noon

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Zach Deputy, 10

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — The Session, 5; Irvin Mayfield’s NOJO Jam, 8

THURS. • 9pm • LADIES NITE

ST. ROCH TAVERN — J.D. & the Jammers, 7:30

BANKS STREET BAR — Dave Jordan & Lynn Drury, 10

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S I CLUB — Mia Borders, 8

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SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Orleans 6, 6; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10

HOUSE OF BLUES — Yellowcard, Every Avenue, Go Radio, 6

HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — Earphunk, Rubblebucket, 10

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THE BEACH — Chicken on the Bone feat. Rev. Robert Rockefeller, 7:30

BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Tom McDermott & Aurora Nealand, 8

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Nick Moss & the Flip Tops, 8

CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — George Keys, 6:30 COLUMNS HOTEL — Fredy Omar, 8

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Street

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THE MAISON — Gregory Agid Quartet, 6; Magnitude, 9

Wednesday 9

MUSIC

33

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Eric Traub Trio, 10

EMERIL’S DELMONICO — Bob Andrews, 7

FUNKY PIRATE — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30 GALVEZ RESTAURANT — Campbell Perkins, 6:30

HARRAH’S CASINO (MASQUERADE) — Bottoms Up, 9 HERMES BAR — Shannon Powell Trio, 9:30 & 11

HOUSE OF BLUES — Wale, Black Cobain, Brenton Duvall DJ set, 11

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Melo-D Showcase, 10 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S I CLUB — Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 8

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — David Reis, 5; Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown, 8; Burlesque Ballroom feat. Linnzi Zaorski, midnight

JOEY K’S RESTAURANT — Maryflynn’s Prohibition Jazz & Blues, 5 JUJU BAG CAFE AND BARBER SALON — Michaela Harrison, Todd Duke, 7:30 KERRY IRISH PUB — Chip Wilson, 5; Crescent City Celtic Band, 9

LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Joe Krown, 7 LEGENDS BAR & GRILL — Tricks, 10

THE MAISON — Those Peaches, 6; Soul Project, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Bryce Eastwood, 4; Eudora Evans & Deep Soul, 7; Fredy Omar con su Banda, 10:30 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — High Ground Drifters, 7; John Parker, 10 OAK — Coco Robichaux, 9

OLD POINT BAR — Rick Trolsen, 5; Josh Garrett & the Bottom Line, 9:30

ONE EYED JACKS — Revivalists, Rotary Downs, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Ellis Marsalis Quartet, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; St. Louis Slim & Andy J. Forest, 6:30; New Orleans Cotton Mouth Kings, 10 THREE MUSES — Debbie Davis, 4; Mumbles, 6:30; Barry Stephenson, 10

TIPITINA’S — Raw Oyster Cult feat. Dave Malone, Camile Baudoin, Frank Bua, Dave Pomerleau, John “Papa” Gros and others, 10 WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Larry Sieberth, 6; Anais St. John, 9

Saturday 12 1700 BLOCK OF ORETHA C. HALEY BOULEVARD — Make a Joyful Noise Gospel Festival feat. James Hall, Jo-Cool Davis, Rev. Lois Dejean & the Johnson Extension and others, 10 a.m. ATCHAFALAYA — Atchafalaya All Stars, 11 a.m.

BABYLON LOUNGE — Calibrate the Massacre, Action After Dark, Azitiz, 10 BANKS STREET BAR — Snow Blind, 10

BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Philip Melancon, 8 BAYOU BEER GARDEN — Ron Hotstream & the F-Holes, 10

BLUE NILE — Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 7; Soul Project (upstairs), 10; Johnny Sketch & the Dirty Notes, 11 BMC — Andre Bouvier, 3; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 6; Sweet Jones (courtyard), 9; Revealers, 9; Ashton & the Big Easy Brawlers Brass Band, midnight BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Royal Rounders, 8

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Clive Wilson & Palm Court Jazz Band, 7

CAFE NEGRIL — Jamey St. Pierre & the Honeycreepers, 7

THE PERFECT FIT BAR & GRILL — Rechelle, Regeneration, 5:30

CHICKIE WAH WAH — By & By String Band, 9; Gal Holiday & the Honky Tonk Revue, 10

PELICAN CLUB — Sanford Hinderlie, 7

CARROLLTON STATION — Juniper Row, 9

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Masters feat. Leroy Jones, 8

CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — Amanda Walker, 6:30

REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — Aquaforce, Team Robot, 10

RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Juice, 9:30 THE SAINT — Forthrights, Maddie Ruthless, 10

SATURN BAR — High in One Eye, Native America, Brass

COLUMNS HOTEL — Andy Rogers, 9

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Street Beat, 6

THE CYPRESS — Oh! The Moment, Versus Robots, Abide In Me, Carpe Diem, 7 DAVENPORT LOUNGE —

Jeremy Davenport, 9

D.B.A. — Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 7; Americanos feat. De Los Muertos, 11

DARTS • POOL • DARTS • POOL • DARTS • POOL • DARTS • POOL

NOV 11

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Vivaz, 10

NO COVER

10PM

EMERIL’S DELMONICO — Bob Andrews, 7

FUNKY PIRATE — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30

HAPPY HOUR • MON-FRI • 3-7PM

GALVEZ RESTAURANT — Campbell Perkins, 6:30

MON: FREE POOL 6-10pm

WED: Blues Jam Night 8-11pm THURS: Steak Night 6pm-till FRI: Fish Fry Night 4-8pm SAT: Karaoke 9pm

SUN: Happy Hour ALL DAY

HERMES BAR — Mia Borders, 9:30 & 11 HI-HO LOUNGE — Dana Abbott, 10

HOUSE OF BLUES — Curren$y, Monsta Beatz, midnight HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — Orgone, 11 HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Bunga Bunga, Boom Chick, 10

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S I CLUB — Los Hombres Calientes feat. Irvin Mayfield & Bill Summers, 8

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Alexey Marti, 8; Kinfolk Brass Band, midnight KERRY IRISH PUB — Speed the Mule, 5; Rites of Passage, 9 LEGENDS BAR & GRILL — Flashback, 10

LOUISIANA MUSIC FACTORY — Debauche, 2; Ed Barrett Trio, 3

MAGAZINE STREET AND NAPOLEON AVENUE — Magazine Street Blues Festival feat. Brass-AHolics, 11:30 a.m.; Kipori “Baby Wolf” Woods, 1:30; Hwy. 61 Blues Revue feat. John Mooney, Jumpin’ Johnny Sansone, Nick Moss & Michael Ledbetter, 3:30; Rockin Dopsie & the Zydeco Twisters, 5:30

THE MAISON — Kelcy Mae, 5; Gregory Agid Quartet, 7; Jermaine Quiz & Miles Felix (upstairs), 10; Debauche, 10; Yojimbo, midnight MAPLE LEAF BAR — 101 Runners, Blue Brass Project, 10 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Mumbles, 1; Kristina Morales, 4; Kipori Woods, 7:30; SoulaBillySwampBoogie Band, 11 MULATE’S CAJUN RESTAURANT — Bayou DeVille, 7

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Mark Growden, 9; Lilli Lewis, 10; Daryl Scherrer, 11 OAK — Sunpie Barnes, 9

OLD POINT BAR — Major Bacon, 9:30

OLD U.S. MINT — Old U.S. Mint Performance Hall Opening feat. Treme Brass Band, 1:30; Wendell Brunious & Wendell Eugene

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 08 > 2011

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Terry Evans, 10

Bed, 10

SIBERIA — Bills CD release, Sluts, Poots, Dummy Dumpster, 10

MUSIC

35

FILM

LISTINGS

A ROOM WITH A VIEW

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

review

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

NOW SHOWING 50/50 (R) — The dramedy follows a 25-year-old (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) as he deals with a cancer diagnosis. AMC Palace 20 ANONYMOUS (PG-13) — The

film explores the theory that Edward de Vere was the true author of the works credited to William Shakespeare, set amid a time of scandal in Elizabethan England. AMC Palace 20, Canal Place

THE BIG FIX (NR) — The docu-

mentary explores the effects of the BP oil disaster through interviews and archival footage. Chalmette Movies

THE BIG YEAR (PG) — Three

men (Jack Black, Steve Martin and Owen Wilson) face off in a bird-watching competition in 1998, when El Nino brought an influx of species to North America. Grand

COURAGEOUS (PG-13) — From the creators of the Christian drama Fireproof, the movie centers on police officers in various stages of fatherhood and their struggles with faith. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 14

HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 2 (PG-13) — The Harry Potter

series culminates in an epic showdown with Lord Voldemort. Entergy IMAX

IDES OF MARCH (R) — In the political thriller based on an acclaimed play by Beau Willimon, Ryan Gosling plays a staffer who is introduced to the dark side of politics while working on a presidential campaign. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Hollywood 14 IN TIME (PG-13) — Justin

Timberlake stars in the sci-fi thriller about a world where everyone is programmed to die at age 25. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

LAUGH AT MY PAIN (R) — The

film documents Kevin Hart’s Los Angeles show during his 90-city stand-up comedy

Martha Marcy May Marlene hits local theaters after closing the New Orleans Film Festival in October, roughly concurrent with its national release date. It has garnered critical raves as a tense psychological thriller, and Elizabeth Olsen, younger sister of twins Mary-Kate and Ashley, is excellent as Martha, a distraught young woman who flees a cult in Upstate New York and tries to get her life back in order. The film begins with Martha slipping out of a farmhouse at dawn and fleeing through a forest to a small town where she makes a distress call to her sister, whom she hasn’t communicated with in some time. Lucy (Sarah Paulson) whisks her away to the lush vacation home she and husband Ted (Hugh Dancy) share in an affluent area of Connecticut. Though jittery and distraught, Martha offers no more explanation than that she left a bad relationship because her boyfriend lied to her. But something is clearly wrong, and writer/director Sean Durkin initially sets off telling differences as matters of perspective. When Martha peels off her clothes to go skinny-dipping, Lucy overreacts, practically hissing that it’s not socially appropriate where they live. But far more haunting symptoms of social dysfunction suggest Martha has a very serious problem. The film teases out ambiguity over whether Martha is the severely traumatized victim of recent abuse or mentally unstable and delusional. Martha’s ever-increasing difficulties with Lucy and Ted are interspersed with flashbacks to the commune, which was run by Patrick (John Hawkes), an extremely charismatic, manipulative and cryptic leader. The group seems to have had no principles other than what was convenient for Patrick to control the group, and he puts them through perverse tests of submission and allegiance. Fear of the group coming to find her keeps Martha preoccupied if not paranoid. There is ominous portent in every rustle in the woods and glimmer of the lake where she swims. All these exterior signs and focuses are very effective in a voyeuristic way, and the tension never subsides. But there also is a downside to the distance Durkin maintains, and some ambiguity is overburdened —almost to the point of evasive storytelling. Getting inside Martha’s head seems like it would have offered a deeper and more dramatic sense of her internal chaos and struggle and animated the deteriorating relationship with her sister, rather than having viewers rely on their own expressions of disbelief. — Will Coviello tour. Chalmette Movies MARGIN CALL (R) — The thrill-

er follows key figures at an investment firm in a 24-hour period amid the height of the financial crisis. AMC Palace 20

MONEYBALL (PG-13) — Brad Pitt plays Billy Beane, the general manager of the Oakland Athletics who used a computer-based analysis to draft players. AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand

K AND JILL” CHTEL C A J “ R E L D N A S GAN ADAM ON-WIL IAMS WADDY WA U D S I N N E D Y B M L S FI PRODUCTION A RADY MUSICBY RUPERT GREG STORYBY BEN ZOOK D A O R N E K O G R /B KS ARTHUR KEVIN MIGEL TIM HERLIRIECHYTED S DUGAN N O S I D A M Y P P A H ESENTS AMUSIC CHAEL DILBECK BROO EVE KOREN ROBERT S ARNER D BY DENNI R P S E R U T C I P COLUMBIA AL PACINO SUPERVISION BY MI VIVIANO AL EN COVERT ST JACK GIARRAPUTO TODD G A D KATIE HOLMESPEXRECOADNUUTICVERES BARRY BERNARDI BETSTAINNDLER PRODUCEDBY ADAM SANDLER N & ADAM SCREENPLAYBY STEVE KORE

starts fridaY, noVemBer 11

check local listings for theaters and showtimes

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 08 > 2011

FOOTLOOSE (PG-13) — The 1980s classic is re-imagined in a modern setting with eye-catching choreography. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

Martha Marcy May Marlene

37

traditional • contemporar y • vintage

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FILM

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LISTINGS PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 3 (R) —

The latest installment of the night vision-horror franchise takes place before the other two films, when the main protagonists were children dealing with supernatural occurrences. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

REAL STEEL (PG-13) — In the near future, where giant robots have replaced humans in the sport of boxing, a washed-up former fighter (Hugh Jackman) teams up with his son to build and train their own fighter. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 THE RUM DIARY (R) — Johnny Depp stars in the adaptation of the Hunter S. Thompson novel, an unhinged account of a journalist’s stint at a Puerto Rican newspaper. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 SARAH’S KEY (PG-13) — While

Canal Furniture

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in France pursuing a story on the Vel’ d’Hiv Roundup in 1942, an American journalist’s life intertwines with that of one of her subjects. AMC Palace 16

TAKE SHELTER (R) — An ordinary family man is haunted by apocalyptic visions. Canal Place

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 08 > 2011

THE THING (R) — An experi-

38

ment on a research site in Antarctica frees a dangerous alien that had been trapped under ice, putting the team of scientists in danger. Grand

THE THREE MUSKETEERS (R) — Alexandre Dumas’ classic

swashbuckling tale gets a bigscreen reboot. AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand

A VERY HAROLD AND KUMAR CHRISTMAS (R) — The stoner

“splendid”

roger ebert / chicago sun-times

“a blast of entertainment.” marshall fine / huffingtonPost.com

romp is back with more hijinx and Neil Patrick Harris cameos. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

OPENING FRIDAY AMIGO (R) — John Sayles’ drama is a fictional account of the Philippine–American War. IMMORTALS (R) — Zeus choos-

es a mortal man to lead the fight against King Hyperion (Mickey Rourke).

JACK AND JILL (PG) — A man’s twin sister visits him and refuses to leave in the comedy starring Adam Sandler, who plays both twins.

check local listings for theaters and showtimes

MARTHA MARCY MAY MARLENE (R) — A young

woman tries to escape a cult

review

Sigur Ros — Inni

The Icelandic “post-rock” band Sigur Ros stars in Inni, its second live performance film, following the 2007 tour documentary Heima, which was colorfully shot at open-air concerts in the band’s homeland. For Inni, director Vincent Morisset filmed two November 2008 concerts at London’s Alexandra Palace — far removed from Iceland’s gorgeous panoramic landscapes. Morisset filmed the performances in black-and-white digital HD, then filmed that footage on 16 mm film, then refilmed it again, sometimes through prisms and other abstractions, adding gauzy layers, dense visual static and sometimes glowing textures to the monochromatic film. Morisset alternates tight shots of the band members’ faces and instruments with distorted wide shots, and blinding flashes of fuzzy white light with claustrophobic darkness. Though it focuses intimately on the stage and its players, a few brief wide shots including the audience (and its applause) make the size and scope of the performance wonderfully disorienting, and stage lights appear like stars, or the sun, and it’s unclear whether the setting is still indoors or some other abstract place. Between songs is archival footage from the band’s 15-year history, briefly telling its story, including awkward spots on NPR and onstage — an early performance shot inside a small venue shows the band juggling with its soon-to-be huge sound, which fades beautifully into the concert film in near-fast-forward, then rewinds to clips of the band members riding bikes as “Sæglopur” begins to fade into “Festival.” Fans of the band get a beautiful, 70-minute concert film, but anyone unfamiliar with Sigur Ros at least will see Morisset’s interesting vision of a performance. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students/seniors, $5 Zeitgeist members. — Alex Woodward

NOV

11-17

Sigur Ros — Inni 9 p.m. Fri.-Tue. Zeitgiest Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

and put her life back together in this psychological thriller.

SPECIAL SCREENINGS THE 39 STEPS (NR) — Alfred

Hitchcock directs the 1935 British spy-chase thriller. Tickets $5.50. Noon SaturdaySunday and Nov. 16, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 8912787; www.theprytania.com

BABY DOLL (NR) — The contro-

versial 1956 film stars Carroll Baker as an empty-headed 19-year-old virgin at the cen-

ter of a battle between her husband and his competitor. Free admission. 7:30 p.m. Monday, La Divina Gelateria, 621 St. Peter St., 302-2692; www.ladivinagelateria.com CIRCUMSTANCE (R) — The

coming-of-age film cracks open the hidden, underground world of Iranian youth culture through the stories of two young women. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 7:30 p.m. TuesdayThursday, Zeitgeist MultiDisciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 08 > 2011

41

ART

LISTINGS

WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET

PAGE 40

curated by Nick Stillman, through Dec. 4. HERIARD-CIMINO GALLERY. 440 Julia St., 525-7300; www. heriardcimino.com — “4 Works:

1968-2010,” neon light sculpture by Keith Sonnier, through Nov. 25. “Mallarme,” works by George Dunbar, through November.

ISAAC DELGADO FINE ARTS GALLERY. Delgado Community College, Isaac Delgado Hall, third floor, 615 City Park Ave., 361-6620 — “Below Sea Level,”

a panoramic video installation by by Pawel Wojtasik for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29.

ISABELLA’S GALLERY. 3331 Severn Ave., Suite 105, Metairie, 7793202; www.isabellasgallery.com — Hand-blown glass works by Marc Rosenbaum; raku by Kate Tonguis and John Davis; all ongoing. JEAN BRAGG GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART. 600 Julia St., 895-7375; www.jeanbragg.com — “Crystallography,” paint-

ings by Carol Scott, through November. “The Painter on An Extended Voyage,” paintings by Bernard Beneito, through Jan. 29.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 08 > 2011

42

photographs by Lesley Wells, ongoing.

KAKO GALLERY. 536 Royal St., 565-5445; www.kakogallery. com — Paintings by Don Picou

and Stan Fontaine; “Raku” by Joy Gauss; 3-D wood sculpture by Joe Derr; all ongoing.

KEN KIRSCHMAN ARTSPACE. NOCCA Riverfront, 2800 Chartres St. — “Off the Beaten

4 3 0 8 M AG A Z I N E S T • 8 9 4 - 9 7 9 7

MALLORY PAGE STUDIO. 614 Julia St.; www.mallorypage.com — Paintings by Mallory Page,

ongoing.

MARTINE CHAISSON GALLERY. 727 Camp St., 304-7942; www. martinechaissongallery.com — “Close Your Eyes,” works

by Norman Mooney, through November.

MICHALOPOULOS GALLERY. 617 Bienville St., 558-0505; www. michalopoulos.com — Paint-

Works by Michelle Y. Williams, ongoing.

JULIE NEILL DESIGNS. 3908 Magazine St., 899-4201; www. julieneill.com — “Facade,”

OFF-SITE CATERING ALSO AVAILABLE

LOUISIANA CRAFTS GUILD. 608 Julia St., 558-6198; www. louisianacrafts.org — Group show featuring works from guild members, ongoing.

JON SCHOOLER GALLERY. 8526 Oak St., 865-7032; www. jonschooler.com — “Subliminal WOWs,” paintings by Jon Schooler, ongoing.

“Junk Shot,” mixed media by Skylar Fein, through Nov. 19.

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flowers,” hand-painted silk wall hangings by Ray Cole; watercolors by Sean Friloux; “A 30-Year Retrospective of Photography,” photographs by Eliot Kamenitz; “Delta Dogs,” clay sculpture by Larone Hudson, through Jan. 4.

ings by James Michalopoulos, ongoing.

JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY. 400A Julia St., 522-5471; www. jonathanferraragallery.com —

LUNCH 11:30AM-2:30PM DINNER 5:30- 10:30PM

LIVE ART STUDIO. 4207 Dumaine St., 484-7245 — “Sun-

JIMMY MAC POP-UP GALLERY. 802 Elysian Fields Ave. —

“Mudcolors,” mixed media on canvas by Jimmy Mac, through Jan. 1.

OPEN TUE-SUN

St., 522-5988; www.lemieuxgalleries.com — “The Value of Value,” still life paintings by Benjamin J. Shamback; sculpture by Kate Samworth; both through Nov. 26.

Path: Violence, Women, and Art,” a touring group exhibit produced and curated by Art Works for Change in conjunction with Prospect.2, through Dec. 16.

KURT E. SCHON. 510-520 St. Louis St., 524-5462 — The gallery

specializes in 18th and 19th century European oil paintings by artists from the French Salon and Royal Academy as well as French Impressionists.

L9 CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 539 Caffin Ave., 948-0056 — “Faces

of Treme,” works by Chandra McCormick and Keith Calhoun, ongoing. LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia

MICHELLE Y WILLIAMS GALLERY. 835 Julia St., 585-1945; www. michelleywilliams.com —

NEW ORLEANS HEALING CENTER. 2372 St. Claude Ave., 9489961; www.neworleanshealingcenter.org — Works by

Keith Duncan for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29, 2012.

NEWCOMB ART GALLERY. Woldenberg Art Center, Tulane University, 865-5328; www. newcombartgallery.tulane. edu — Works by Nick Cave and Joyce J. Scott for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29. OAK STREET GALLERY. 111 N. Oak St., Hammond, (985) 345-0521 —

Hammond Art Guild Holiday Show and Sale, through Dec. 14.

OCTAVIA ART GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www. octaviaartgallery.com — “Re-

luctant Memories,’ mixedmedia paintings by James Henderson, through Dec. 3.

ONE SUN GALLERY. 616 Royal St., (800) 501-1151 — Works by local

and national artists, ongoing.

PEARL ART GALLERY. 4421 Magazine St., 228-5840 — Works by Cindy and Drue Hardegree, Erica Dewey, John Womack, Sontina, Lorraine Jones and S. Lee, ongoing. PETER O’NEILL STUDIOS. 721 Royal St., 527-0703; www. oneillgallery.com — Works by Peter O’Neill, ongoing. PHOTO WORKS NEW ORLEANS. 521 St. Ann St., 593-9090; www. photoworksneworleans.com —

Photography by Louis Sahuc,

ongoing. POETS GALLERY AND CUSTOM FRAMING. 3113 Magazine St., 899-4100 — “Carnival of

Saints and Souls II,” a group exhibition featuring dolls and photography, through November.

REINA GALLERY. 4132 Magazine St., 895-0022; www.reinaart. com — “Vintage New Orleans

Artists,” watercolors, etchings and folk art; “Patron Saints,” works by Shelley Barberot; both ongoing.

REYNOLDS-RYAN ART GALLERY. Isidore Newman School, 5333 Danneel St., 896-6369; www.newmanschool.org —

“United We Stand: American Propaganda Posters of WWII,” 44 propaganda posters used by the U.S. and other Allied Forces during World War II, through Nov. 17. RHINO CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS GALLERY. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www. rhinocrafts.com — “Muses: Art

Inspired by Artists,” works by Rhino artists, through Nov. 19. Works by Margo Manning, Chris Menconi, Chip Tipton, Andrew Jackson Pollack and others, ongoing.

RIVERSTONE GALLERIES. 719 Royal St., 412-9882; 729 Royal St., 581-3688; Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 36, 566-0588; 733 Royal St., 5259988; www.riverstonegalleries. net — Multimedia works by

Ricardo Lozano, Michael Flohr, Henry Ascencio, Jaline Pol and others, ongoing.

RODRIGUE STUDIO. 721 Royal St., 581-4244; www.georgerodrigue. com — Works by George Rodrigue, ongoing. ROSETREE GLASS STUDIO & GALLERY. 446 Vallette St., Algiers Point, 366-3602; www. rosetreeglass.com — Hand-

blown glass works, ongoing.

RUSTY PELICAN ART. 4031 St. Claude Ave., 218-5727; www.rustypelicanart.com — Works by

Travis and Lexi Linde, ongoing. SALONE DELL’ARTES ARTEMISIA. 3000 Royal St., 481-5113 — “I

Genti H2O,” works by Shmuela Padnos, ongoing.

SCOTT EDWARDS PHOTOGRAPHY GALLERY. 2109 Decatur St., 610-0581 — “Burlesque Ex-

posed,” a group photography exhibition, through December.

SHEILA’S FINE ART STUDIO. 1427 N. Johnson St., 473-3363; www. sheilaart.com — Works by

Sheila Phipps, ongoing.

SLIDELL CULTURAL CENTER. 444 Erlanger St., (985) 646-4375 —

“Andy Warhol: Celebrities,” 15 silkscreened works by the artist, through Dec. 16.

SOREN CHRISTENSEN GALLERY. 400 Julia St., 569-9501; www. sorengallery.com — “Light & Stone,” abstract mixed-media works by Steven Seinberg,

LISTINGS

at bestofneworleans.com WHATExpanded YOU SEElistings IS WHAT YOU GET

through Nov. 29. STAPLE GOODS. 1340 St. Roch Ave., 908-7331; www.postmedium.org/staplegoods — “Fresh Produce,” works by gallery members in conjunction with Prospect.2 St. Claude Satellites, through Jan. 8. STELLA JONES GALLERY. Place St. Charles, 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 132, 568-9050 — “Maha-

lia: Queen of Gospel Music,” a group exhibition of works inspired by Mahalia Jackson, through Jan. 6.

STEVE MARTIN STUDIO. 624 Julia St., 566-1390; www. stevemartinfineart.com — Contemporary sculpture and paintings by Steve Martin and other Louisiana artists, ongoing. STUDIO BFG. 2627 Desoto St., 942-0200; www.studiobfg. com — “Peel Sessions: First

Installment,” works by Tina Stanley, ongoing.

STUDIO GALLERY. 338 Baronne St., Third Floor, 529-3306 —

Works by YA/YA artists, ongoing.

T-LOT. 1940 St. Claude Ave., (865) 567-9766; www.t-lot. tumblr.com — “Parallel Play,”

a group exhibition featuring works on paper, architectural installations, sculpture and performance, through Jan. 31. TAYLOR/BERCIER FINE ART. 233 Chartres St., 527-0072 —

“Wanderlust,” paintings and drawings by Michele Muennig, through Nov. 26.

TRIPOLO GALLERY. 401 N. Columbia St., (985) 893-1441 — Works by Bill Binnings,

Robert Cook, Donna Duffy, Scott Ewen, Juli Juneau, Kevin LeBlanc, Ingrid Moses, Gale Ruggiero, Robert Seago and Scott Upton, ongoing.

TROUSER HOUSE. 4105 St. Claude Ave. — “Salon des Refuses,” an exhibition of contemporary art by local, national and international artists, through November. UNO-ST. CLAUDE GALLERY. 2429 St. Claude Ave. — Works by Ivan Vezzoli for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29. VENUSIAN GARDENS ART GALLERY. 2601 Chartres St., 9437446; www.venusiangardens. com — “Luminous Sculpture,”

works by Eric Ehlenberger, ongoing.

WMSJR. 1061 Camp St., 2999455; www.wmsjr.com — Paintings by Will Smith, ongoing. A WORK OF ART GALLERY. 8212 Oak St., 862-5244 — Glass

works by Juli Juneau; photo-

review NOLA NOW at the Contemporary Arts Center After meandering through the Prospect.2 exhibits on the first and second floors of the Contemporary Arts Center, ascend to the rarely open third floor and you enter another world. There the raw wood columns, brick walls and rough wooden floors reveal what the CAC looked like prior to its elegant renovation in the late 1980s. Some think that with all the polish it may have lost some of its soul, and this NOLA NOW show, and the raw space it occupies, strongly hints at that less complicated if perhaps more vital time. In fact, Christopher Saucedo’s weird pagan temple atop an oyster shell mound titled New Orleans 2011 (pictured) with Sally Heller’s polyvinyl mesh fantasy forest in the background looks like a flashback to the CAC’s early years — and in a good way. Much experimental and emerging art that used to appear at the CAC now more often appears on St. Claude Avenue, and this show draws heavily from the emerging artist community that migrated to the city in large numbers after Hurricane Katrina, mingled with a variety of veteran artists. The resulting exhibition reflects what curator Amy Mackie calls “a new creative class” whose work expresses a desire for “an environment less scathed,” or “a stronger sense of purpose in a world where things fall apart over and over again.” Here 19th century optimism is echoed in James Taylor Bonds’ ironic paintings of 21st century ruins inhabited by figures reminiscent of a more rustic past, just as the ruins of the Six Flags theme park in eastern New Orleans look bizarrely buoyant in Andy Cook’s colorful photographs. Similarly, Luba Zygarewicz’s tersely minimal Petrified Time dryer lint totems, and Robin Levy’s Threshold installation of an empty utility room with its echoes of abandoned housing, are balanced by Monica Zeringue’s and Grace Mikell’s intriguing magic realist investigations of the female psyche. All in all, NOLA NOW provides an insightful cross section of some of the most recent trends in local contemporary art. — D. Eric Bookhardt

THRU JAN

29

NOLA NOW, Part I: Swagger for a Lost Magnificence Contemporary Arts Center, 900 Camp St., 528-3805; www.cacno.org

graphs from the New Orleans Photo Alliance; both ongoing.

application fee. Application deadline is November 30.

CALL FOR ARTISTS

MUSEUMS

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ & HERITAGE FESTIVAL CRAFTS VENDORS. Artists and craftspeople

are invited to submit applications to sell their wares at the festival. Visit www.nojazzfest. com for details. There is a $30

1850 HOUSE. 523 St. Ann St., 5686968 — Works by Sophie Calle for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29. CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER. 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www. cacno.org — “NOLA Now PAGE 44

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Entrees

Herb Roasted Turkey · Deep Fried Turkey · Roasted Pork Tenderloin Beef Tenderloin · Orange Honey Glazed Ham · Grilled Duck Breasts Wrapped w/ Bacon

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Turkey Gravy · Marchand de Vin Sauce · Cranberry Conserve Cornbread Sausage & Pecan Dressing Oyster Dressing · Crawfish Cornbread Dressing · Seafood Stuffed Mirliton Casserole · Roasted Garlic Mashed Potatoes · Classic Potatoes au Gratin · Sweet Potato Crunch Casserole · Spinach Casserole · Green Bean Casserole w/ Mushroom Sauce Brussels Sprouts w/ Shallots and Bacon · Roasted Asparagus Spears with Parmesan · Wild Mushroom Ragoût with Proscuitto · Corn Macque Choux with Tasso · Wild Rice Pilaf w/ Almonds and Golden Raisins

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 08 > 2011

THOMAS MANN GALLERY I/O. 1812 Magazine St., 581-2113; www.thomasmann.com — “Food for Thought,” a group exhibition of wearable art and functional sculpture, through Nov. 13. “Where’s the Money?” group exhibit interpreting the economy, ongoing.

Become a Counselor

ART

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Call 482-0312 or visit www. louisianalandmarks.org for reservations. Tickets $15 general admission, $10 Louisiana Landmarks Society members. 4 p.m. Sunday. NEW PLAY CELEBRATION.

University of New Orleans, Performing Arts Center, 280-7469; www.uno.edu — Theatre UNO performs one-act and ten-minute plays written by university alumni and the winner of last years’ Tennessee Williams One-Act Playwriting contest. Visit www.theatre. uno.edu for the full schedule and other details. Tickets $5 per show, $15 all performances. 2:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Tuesday-Sunday.

A NIGHT OF OPERA AND BROADWAY. Tulane University,

Dixon Hall, 865-5105 ext. 2; www.tulane.edu — Broadway actors Brad Little and Leslie Castay and opera singer Juan Carlos Valls perform songs by Puccini, Gershwin, Cole Porter, Rodgers and Hammerstein and others. Call 885-2000 or visit www.jpas.org for reservations. Tickets $30 general admission, $27 seniors/military, $20 students, $15 for children 12 and under. 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. The show also is performed at the Northshore Harbor Center (100 Harbor Center Blvd., Slidell, 985-7813650) 2 p.m. Sunday.

PCHILE GOYIN. PS.NODEF, 1919

PLAY DATES. Mid-City Arts

Theater, 3540 Toulouse St., 488-1460 — Garry Rucker stars in Sam Wolfson’s comedy that explores love and relationships, from childhood crushes to marriage and everything in between. Visit www.theatre-13.com for reservations. Tickets $25. 8 p.m. ThursdaySaturday through Nov. 19. RED. Southern Rep Theater, The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 522-6545; www. southernrep.com — Aimee Hayes directs Bob Edes Jr. and Sean Glazebrook in John Logan’s drama about artist Mark Rothko. Tickets $29 Thursday and Sunday, $35 Friday-Saturday. 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday through Nov. 20. THE WOMAN IN BLACK.

Playmakers Theater, 19106 Playmakers Road (off Lee Road), Covington, (985) 8931671; www.playmakersinc.com — Stephen Mallatratt’s horror play follows a lawyer whose visit to a client’s funeral leads him to a terrifying discovery. Tickets $15 general admission, $10 students. 8 p.m. Friday-

BURLESQUE

& CABARET BURLESQUE BALLROOM. Irvin

Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse, 300 Bourbon St., 553-2270; www. sonesta.com — Trixie Minx stars in the weekly burlesque show featuring the music of Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown. Call 553-2331 for details. 11:50 p.m. Friday.

AUDITIONS CRESCENT CITY SOUND CHORUS. Delgado Community

College, City Park campus, Orleans Avenue, between City Park Avenue and Navarre Street; www.dcc.edu — The women’s chorus holds weekly auditions for new members. Call 453-0858 or visit www. crescentcitysound.com for details. 7 p.m. Monday.

DANCE

JACOBY & PRONK CONTEMPORARY DANCE ARTISTS. NOCCA

Riverfront Lupin Hall, 2800 Chartres St., 940-2787; www. nocca.com — The contemporary ballet duo performs along with guest dancers and choreographers. Call 522-0996 or visit www.nobadance.com for reservations. Tickets $65. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Saturday.

COMEDY

COMEDY CATASTROPHE. Lost

Love Lounge, 2529 Dauphine St., 944-0099; www. lostlovelounge.com — The bar hosts a free weekly stand-up comedy show. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

COMEDY GUMBEAUX. Howlin’

Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf.com — Local comedians perform, and amateurs take the stage in the open mic portion. 8 p.m. Thursday. COMEDY OPEN-MIC. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts a weekly open-mic comedy night. (Sign-up time is 10:45 p.m.) Free admission. 10 p.m. Friday. COMEDY SPORTZ NOLA. La Nuit

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts a safe-for-all-ages team comedy competition. Tickets $10 ($5 with drink purchase). 7 p.m. Saturday.

FEAR & LOATHING IN NEW ORLEANS/GOD’S BEEN DRINKING. La Nuit Comedy Theater,

5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The sketch comedy show with vampires, zombies, relationship advice and other horrors is followed by the improvised comedy program. Admission $10 ($5 with drink purchase).

8:30 p.m. Friday. GROUND ZERO COMEDY. The

Maison, 508 Frenchmen St., 3715543; www.maisonfrenchmen. com — The show features local stand-up comedians. Sign-up is 7:30 p.m.; show is 8 p.m. Friday. HELL YES FEST. Curated by comedian Chris Trew, the four-day festival features improv, sketch and stand-up comedians including Moshe Kasher, Sean Patton, groups from Improv Olympic in Chicago and Upright Citizens Brigade Theater in New York, and more. Visit www.hellyesfest.com for the full schedule and other details. WednesdaySaturday.

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IVAN’S OPEN MIC NIGHT. Rusty Nail, 1100 Constance St., 5255515; www.therustynail.org — The Rusty Nail hosts a weekly open-mic comedy and music night. 9 p.m. Tuesday. LA NUIT STAND-UP OPEN MIC.

La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts an open mic following the God’s Been Drinking show. 11 p.m. Friday.

LAUGH OUT LOUD. Bootleggers Bar and Grille, 209 Decatur St., 525-1087 — Simple Play presents a weekly comedy show. 10 p.m. Thursday.

4920 Prytania St. • 891-3644 • www.kyotonola.com closed sundays • closed Nov. 24th

NATIONAL COMEDY COMPANY.

Yo Mama’s Bar & Grill, 727 St. Peter St., 522-1125 — The audience interactive comedy show features live local music. Call 523-7469 or visit www.nationalcomedycompany.com for tickets. Tickets $8 online, $15 at the door. 10 p.m. Saturday. PERMANENT DAMAGE STANDUP COMEDY. Bullets Sports Bar,

2441 A.P. Tureaud Ave., 9484003 — Tony Frederick hosts the open mic comedy show. 8 p.m. Wednesday. SIDNEY’S STAND-UP OPEN MIC. Sidney’s, 1674 Barataria

Blvd., Marrero, 341-0103 — The show features professional, amateur and first-time comics. Free admission. Sign-up is 8 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Thursday. SNACK TIME WITH THE ANVIL COMPANY. La Nuit Comedy

Theater, 5039 Freret St., 6444300; www.nolacomedy. com — The improv and sketch comedy troupe performs. Tickets $10 ($5 with drink purchase). 8:30 p.m. Saturday.

STUPID TIME MACHINE. Howlin’ Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf.com — The improv comedy troupe performs. Tickets $5. 8:30 p.m. Tuesday. THINK YOU’RE FUNNY? Carrollton Station, 8140 Willow St., 865-9190; www.carrolltonstation.com — The weekly open-mic comedy showcase is open to all comics. Sign-up is 8:30 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Wednesday.

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Burgundy St. — New Noise and Mondo Bizzarro’s production uses large-scale puppetry to tell the story of a woman who is swallowed by a lake and finds herself in a strange world. Call (225) 571-2929 for reservations. Tickets $10. 8 p.m. Friday-Sunday, 9 p.m. Nov. 18-20.

Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday through Nov. 20.

Menu Tailgateeekend

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STAGE

m es t ingredients available for our home a

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m ake all o f our signature recipes dail y.

G ott Gour met Cafe uses the fre s h

47

EVENTS

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

Holiday Menu NOW ACCEPTING ORDERS FOR THANKSGIVING SAMPLE MENU

SOUPS Abita Beer & Cheddar Soup Crab and Corn Bisque Smoked Pork Soup

MAIN COURSES Hot Smoked Salmon Smoked Turkey Smoked Prime Rib

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 08 > 2011

SIDES

48

Shrimp & Eggplant Dressing ShaneSmoked Sausage and Cornbread stuffing Coleslaw Potato salad

DESSERTS Red Velvet Cake, Carrot Cake, Chocolate Cake Pumpkin Pie Apple pie Crack pie Mocha Chip Cookies

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FAMILY Tuesday 8 TODDLER TIME . Louisiana Children’s

Museum, 420 Julia St., 523-1357; www.lcm.org — The museum hosts special Tuesday and Thursday activities for children ages 3-under and their parents or caregivers. Admission $8, free for members. 10:30 a.m.

Thursday 10

ART ACTIVITIES DURING AFTER HOURS. Ogden Museum of

Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 5399600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — The Ogden offers art activities for kids during its weekly After Hours concerts. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

BE THERE DO THAT

preview Hell Yes Fest

Chris Trew co-founded the Austin, Texas improv comedy conservatory The New Movement theater in 2009, later expanding classes and adding home bases in Houston and New Orleans, with the help of local improv crew Stupid Time Machine. Trew, a New Orleans native, debuts a local edition of Hell Yes Fest this weekend, bringing together dozens of local and national comics and improv groups over four days at venues across the city. Los Angeles comic Moshe Kasher headlines the opening event Wednesday at Republic New Orleans, with Trew and Dane Faucheaux opening. The event’s nine other shows are split between the Shadowbox Theatre and Cafe Istanbul (inside the New Orleans Healing Center). Other performers include improv groups Laughter Against the Machine, Tesla and Awkward Headbutt, and comics Sean Patton, Kath Barbadoro, Neal Stastny and others. Weekend passes $55, all shows $10. Visit the website for details. — Alex Woodward

Saturday 12

NOV

NEIGHBORHOOD TOY STORE DAY. Le Jouet, 1700 Airline Drive, 837-0533; www.lejouet.com — The toy store celebrates the day with craft-making activities and a reading from Johnette Downing. 10 a.m.

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SOUTHERN ART, SOUTHERN STORIES.

Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www. ogdenmuseum.org — Children can hear stories, explore the museum and create art inspired by themes found throughout the museum in the monthly event. The program is for children ages 4-7 accompanied by a caregiver. Call 539-9608 or email ebalkin@ogdenmuseum.org for details. Admission $15 members, $18 nonmembers. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

EVENTS Tuesday 8 CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Tulane University Square, 200 Broadway St. — The weekly market features fresh produce, kettle corn, Green Plate specials and flowers. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Wednesday 9 COVINGTON FARMERS MARKET.

Covington City Hall, 609 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 8921873 — The market offers fresh locally produced foods every week. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. ENCOURAGE SUPPORT GROUP MEETING. Center for Restorative

Breast Surgery, 1717 St. Charles Ave., (888) 899-2288; www.breastcenter. com — Linda Hill, a multiple cancer survivor and nationally recognized inspirational speaker, discusses coping with cancer through humor. Admission is free, but reservations are required. Call 899-2800 or email encourage@breastcenter.

produce, dairy, seafood, baked goods and more. EBT and WIC accepted. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

HELL YES FEST Republic New Orleans, 928 S. Peters St., 528-8282; Cafe Istanbul, 2372 St. Claude Ave.; Shadowbox Theatre, 2400 St. Claude Ave., 298-8676; www.hellyesfest.com

com for details. 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

members. 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m.

FRENCH MARKET FARMERS MARKET.

WESTWEGO FARMERS & FISHERIES MARKET. 484 Sala Ave., Sala

GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP. East

WORDS & MUSIC: A LITERARY FEAST. Authors Nilo Cruz (Anna

French Market, French Market Place, between Decatur and N. Peters streets, 522-2621; www. frenchmarket.org — The weekly market offers seasonal produce, seafood, prepared foods, smoothies and more. 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. Jefferson General Hospital, 4200 Houma Blvd., Metairie, 454-4000; www.ejgh.org — The American Cancer Society sponsors a group for people who have experienced the death of a loved one. Call 456-5000 for details. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. HARRISON AVENUE MARKETPLACE.

Lakeview Grocery, 801 Harrison Ave., 293-1201; www.lakeviewgrocery.com — The market features items from local artists and crafters, food, drinks and live music. Free admission. 5 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

LAGNIAPPE LECTURE. National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — Chrissy Gregg discusses “Showing the America I Knew: Norman Rockwell’s Illustration of the American Experience.” Call 5281944 ext. 229 for details. Noon. ¡SALUD!. Galvez Restaurant, 914 N. Peters St., 595-3400; www. galvezrestaurant.com — The World Affairs Council of New Orleans’ Spain-themed fundraiser features tapas, sangria, an open bar and a silent auction. Tickets must be purchased in advance. Call 280-5591 or visit www.wacno.org for details. Admission $35 members, $45 non-

Avenue at Fourth Street, Westwego — The market offers organic produce, baked goods, jewelry, art and more, with live music and pony rides. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday. in the Tropics), Junot Diaz (The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao) and Armando Valladares (Against All Hope) headline the Faulkner Society’s annual literary event with readings, discussions, dramatic performances, parties and more. Visit www.wordsandmusic.org for the full schedule and other details. Wednesday-Sunday.

Thursday 10 CANCER EDUCATION CLASS. First Baptist Church of New Orleans, 5290 Canal Blvd., 482-5775; www. fbcno.org — The church hosts “I Can Cope,” a series of educational classes for people facing cancer. Call 957-5226 for information. 6:30 p.m. ETHICS IN EXTREMIS: TARGETED KILLINGS AND THE MORALITY OF HARD CHOICES. Tulane University,

Lavin-Bernick University Center, McAlister Drive, 247-1507 — Author and University of Illinois law and philosophy professor Michael Moore presents the lecture. 4 p.m.

FRESH MARKET. Circle Food Store, 1522 St. Bernard Ave. — The Downtown Neighborhood Market Consortium market features fresh

GLOBAL GREEN SUSTAINABILITY SERIES. AIA New Orleans Center

for Design, 1000 St. Charles Ave., 525-8320; www.aianeworleans.org — The panel discusses how to get involved with NOLA Wise, a new energy efficiency, job creation and financing program funded by the Department of Energy. Free admission. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. KENNER FOOD & WINE EXPERIENCE.

Chateau Golf and Country Club, 3600 Chateau Blvd., Kenner, 4671351; www.chateaugc.com — The inaugural event features more than 60 wines, food from local restaurants and live music by Groovy 7. Admission $65. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

SISTAHS MAKING A CHANGE. Ashe

Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — The group offers lessons in African dance and more, along with nutrition, health and wellness seminars. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday and Monday.

UNCORK THE CURE. Republic New Orleans, 828 S. Peters St., 528-8282; www.republicnola.com — The fundraiser for the Louisiana chapter of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation features a variety of Champagnes and sparkling wines, food from local restaurants, a silent auction and live entertainment. Visit www.cff. org/chapters/louisiana for details. Admission $45. 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. WHAT’S COOKIN’ WITH CASA FUNDRAISER. Jax Brewery

Riverview Room, 600 Decatur St., 525-3000 — Wendell Pierce is the honorary chairman at the fundraiser for Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) New Orleans, which features food from local restaurants, music by Gina Brown & Anutha Level, an auction and more. Call 522-1962 or email khenry@ casaneworleans.org for details. Admission $100 patron party, $50 gala. Patron party 6:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. gala.

Friday 11 11-11-11 PARTY. New Orleans Healing Center, 2372 St. Claude Ave., 9489961; www.neworleanshealingcenter.org — The benefit for the Alliance for Affordable Energy features artist Amzie Adams, live electronic music, a costume contest, Turkish tapas and more. Admission $11. 9 p.m. 610 STOMPERS MACY’S THANKSGIVING PARADE SEND-OFF.

Howlin’ Wolf, 907 S. Peters St., 5229653; www.thehowlinwolf.com — The men’s marching group hosts the party featuring a sneak preview of its performance for the televised parade. Visit www.610stompers. com for details. Admission $25. 9 p.m. BOUDIN & BEER. The Foundry, 333 St. Joseph St., 586-1309 — Emeril Lagasse, Mario Batali, Donald Link and more than 20 other top chefs prepare boudin and artisan sausages, paired with Abita craft beers, to benefit the Emeril Lagasse Foundation. Visit www.boudi-

GRIL OPE L LAT N E!

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com EVENTS

nandbeer.com for details. Admission $75. 8 p.m. to 11 p.m.

Saturday 12

GATOR FEST. Holy Name of

Food & Beverage Museum, Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 5690405; www.southernfood. org — The author discusses Southern food festivals, their place in the culinary culture of the South and how they came to be. Free admission. Noon.

Jesus School, 6325 Cromwell Place, 861-1466; www. hnjschool.org — Rockin’ Dopsie Jr. and Papa Grows Funk perform at the community fair featuring rides, games, children’s activities, food and more. Visit www. hnjfair.com for details. 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday., 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday. MARKETPLACE AT ARMSTRONG PARK. Armstrong Park, N.

Rampart and St. Ann streets — The weekly market features fresh produce, baked goods, Louisiana seafood, natural products, art, crafts and entertainment. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. NATIONAL WWII MUSEUM VETERANS DAY ACTIVITIES.

National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — Veterans receive free admission to the museum and its 4-D film Beyond All Boundaries on Veterans Day. The museum also hosts a ceremony to honor veterans (11 a.m.) and a spoken-word program by Orlin Corey (1 p.m.).

VETERANS CRUISE . Steamboat

Natchez, Toulouse Street Wharf, 586-8777; www. steamboatnatchez.com — Veterans can take a free two-hour cruise on Friday and Saturday of Veterans Day weekend. 11:30 a.m. (boarding at 11 a.m.) Friday, 2:30 p.m. (boarding at 2 p.m.) Saturday.

VETERANS DAY CEREMONY.

Chalmette Battlefield of Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve, 8606 W. St. Bernard Hwy., Chalmette, 589-3882; www.nps.gov/ jela — The Louisiana Living History Foundation hosts the event with a flag-lowering ceremony and a concert by the Navy Band New Orleans. 4 p.m. WHERE Y’ART. New Orleans

Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma.org — The museum’s weekly event features music, performances, film screenings, family-friendly activities and more. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

AUDUBON CHARTER SCHOOL FALL FETE. Audubon Charter

School, 438 Broadway St., 862-5135; www.auduboncharter.com — The fundraiser features food, children’s activities, a French and English book and DVD sale, entertainment from Colin Lake and his band, Victor Atkins, Dancingman 504 and others, a second line workshop and more. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. BROAD STREET BAZAAR. 300 N. Broad St., corner of Bienville Street — The monthly market features health screenings, jewelry, food vendors and more. Call 561-7495 or visit www.broadcommunityconnections.org for details. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Magazine Street

Market, Magazine and Girod streets, 861-5898; www. marketumbrella.org — The weekly market features fresh produce, flowers and food. 8 a.m. to noon. DAUGHTERS OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE IN LOUISIANA PUB NIGHT. Palm Court Jazz Cafe,

1204 Decatur St., 525-0200; www.palmcourtcafe.com — The fundraiser for the philanthropic group of British women living in America features live music, British food and drink, an auction, a seated dinner, games and more. Proceeds benefit the Mountbatten House and the New Orleans Musicians’ Clinic. Call 367-4116 or visit www.dbeinla.org for details. Admission $60. 6 p.m.

EAGLE WATCH. Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — A park ranger leads a viewing of the park’s eagle nest. 3 p.m. ERACE NEW ORLEANS MEETING. Christ Church

Cathedral, 2919 St. Charles Ave., 895-6602 — ERACE meets in the church’s Westfeldt Room for its weekly discussion group. Call 8661163 for details. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

GERMAN COAST FARMERS MARKET. Ormond Plantation,

13786 River Road, Destrehan — The market features a wide range of fresh vegetables, fruits, flowers and other items. Visit www.germancoastfarmersmarket.org for details. 8 a.m. to noon. GRETNA FARMERS MARKET.

Gretna Farmers Market, Huey P. Long Avenue, between

KNIT-IN AT THE MUSEUM.

National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — The event provides an opportunity for participants to work on items for the museum’s Knit Your Bit Campaign or other knitting projects. Visit www.nationalww2museum.org/knitting for details. Free admission. Noon to 4 p.m.

LUNCH SPECIALS Monday-Friday 11am-2pm

LIVE MUSIC

Friday & Saturday Nights!

NO COVER AT ALL!!! Check website for listings.

3449 River Rd. (at Shrewsbury in Jefferson Parish) • 834-4938 • www.therivershacktavern.com

MAGAZINE STREET BLUES FESTIVAL. Magazine Street

and Napoleon Avenue, New Orleans — The festival featuring live music, a children’s area, food trucks, an artists’ village and more benefits the Second District Police’s citizen’s organization, Cops 2. Visit www.facebook.com/ magazinestreetbluesfestival for details. 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.

NATURE: A CLOSER LOOK.

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers lead a weekly nature hike. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. NOMA ODYSSEY BALL. New Orleans Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma. org — The New Orleans Museum of Art celebrates its 100th anniversary with a gala featuring a VIP Lounge, the ActionActionReaction Indie Dance Party in Cafe NOMA, music by Deacon John & the Ivories, food from Ralph Brennan Restaurant Group, auctions and more. Visit www.noma.org/odysseytickets.html for details. Admission $95 patrons 35 and younger (limited to 200 reservations), $250 patron party tickets, $150 and up for gala admission. 7:30 p.m. patron party, 9 p.m. gala. OLD U.S. MINT PERFORMANCE HALL GRAND OPENING. Old

Saturday

November 12th

2nd Saturday Each Month 10am - 4pm Local Art and Artists

on the Riverfront in Madisonville

madisonvilleartmarket.com

U.S. Mint, 400 Esplanade Ave., 568-6990; lsm.crt.state. la.us/site/mintex.htm — The New Orleans Jazz National Historical Park hosts the grand opening celebration for the Mint’s new performance hall, the result of a partnership between the National Park Service and the Louisiana State Museum. The event features music by the Treme Brass Band, Wendell Brunious, Wendell Eugene and more. 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.

PRESS STREET DRAW-A-THON .

The Old Ironworks, 612 Piety St., 908-4741 — The annual 24-hour drawing marathon is punctuated by two-hour drawing workshops by local artists and arts educators. Visit www.press-street.com

3 full bars • 10:30-til 738 Toulouse St. • 523-5530

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 08 > 2011

ST. RITA PECAN FESTIVAL. St. Rita Church, 7100 Jefferson Hwy., 737-2915; www.stritaharahan.com — The festival features rides, a children’s area, inflatables, food and live music by Weathered, Category 6 and the Molly Ringwalds. Visit www. stritapecanfestival.com for details. 6 p.m. to midnight Friday, noon to midnight Saturday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday.

ANN CHANDONNET. Southern

Third and Fourth streets, Gretna, 362-8661 — The weekly rain-or-shine market features more than 30 vendors offering a wide range of fruits, vegetables, meats and flowers. Free admission. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

VISIT OUR WEBSITE

www.originaldungeon.com

49

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com EVENTS

for details. Free admission. 6:30 a.m. Saturday to 6:30 a.m. Sunday. THE PULSE . Hyatt Regency

Hotel, 601 Loyola Ave., 5611234; www.neworleans.hyatt. com — Lead by a faculty that includes industry heavyweights such as Brian Friedman, Mia Michaels, Wade Robson, Cris Judd, Laurieann Gibson and others, the weekend dance event includes dance classes, forums, scholarship opportunities, meet-and-greets and more. Visit www.thepulseontour.com for details. Admission starts at $220. 7 a.m. SaturdaySunday.

RECORD RAID. 2200 block of St.

Claude Avenue, New Orleans — More than 20 vendors sell 45s, LPs, CDs, cassettes and more. Visit recordraid.wordpress.com for details. Noon to 6:30 p.m. SAME GENDER LOVING/GAY MEN OF COLOR MEETING . CC’s

Coffeehouse, 2800 Esplanade Ave. — The group meets on the second and fourth Saturday of each month for discussions. Email kj0040@aol.com for details. 7 p.m.

SANKOFA FARMERS MARKET.

Holy Angels Complex, 3500 St. Claude Ave., 875-4268; www. sankofafarmersmarket.org — The weekly market offers fresh produce and seafood from local farmers and fishermen. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. ST. BERNARD SEAFOOD & FARMERS MARKET. Aycock Barn,

THREE RIVERS ART FESTIVAL .

Columbia Street, downtown Covington, Columbia Street, (985) 892-1873 — Artists and craft vendors fill downtown Covington for the festival with live music, a children’s area, food, a fun run and awards for participating professional and student artists. Visit www. threeriversartfestival.com for details. Free admission. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. WALK TO CURE DIABETES.

Audubon Park, Shelter 10, 6500 Magazine St. — The New Orleans chapter of the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation hosts the 2.5-mile walk to raise money for diabetes research. Visit www.jdrf.org for details. Registration 8:30 a.m., walk at 9:30 a.m.

Sunday 13 ART IN THE ALLEY. Dutch Alley,

Near French Market, on North Peters Street — The weekly market features artists offering hand-made artwork including paintings, photography, mixed media and more. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

game viewing area and more. Free admission. Call 523-3525 or visit www.ya4la.org for details. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

EMPTY BOWL/FILL THE BOWL PROJECT. The Lakehouse, 2025

TOASTMASTERS MEETING.

Lakeshore Drive, (985) 6263006; www.lakehousecuisine. com — More than 500 handmade ceramic bowls will be on display and ready for purchase to fill with food from local restaurants at the event, which raises money to assist the hungry. Admission $25. 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. INTRODUCTION TO JUDAISM.

Temple Sinai, 6227 St. Charles Ave. — Rabbi Edward Cohn leads a free class for those seeking information about Judaism or considering conversion. Reservations are recommended. 9 a.m.

OPERA ORIENTATION & ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION. New

Orleans Opera Association’s Women Guild Home, 2504 Prytania St., 899-1945 — The New Orleans Opera Association Women’s Guild and Junior Committee present the roundtable discussion featuring guests from the upcoming production of Verdi’s A Masked Ball. Call 529-2278 ext. 227 for details. Admission $25 Women’s Guild members, $15 Junior Committee members, $30 nonmembers. 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.

PRIMITIVE WOODWORKING.

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers host a weekly demonstration of woodworking techniques. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. PURPLEBOWL. Rock ‘N’ Bowl, 3016 S. Carrollton Ave., 8611700; www.rocknbowl.com — The New Orleans affiliate of the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network hosts the fundraiser featuring bowling, a silent auction, live music, food and drink. Visit www.pancan.org/neworleans for details. Admission starts at $30. Free for pancreatic cancer survivors. 5 p.m. SIERRA CLUB PROGRAM.

Audubon Zoo, Dominion Auditorium, 6500 Magazine St. — Birder and traveler Joelle Finley discusses birds and nature in Argentina. Call 3070187 for details. 7 p.m. YOUNG AUDIENCES’ 50TH ANNIVERSARY GAMEDAY PICNIC. The Peristyle, City Park,

1 Palm Drive — The arts education nonprofit hosts the picnic with live entertainment, arts projects, a barbecue, a Saints

Monday 14 SONDHEIM MEETS SATCHMO FUNDRAISER . Dooky Chase

Restaurant, 2301 Orleans Ave., 821-0535 — The event raising money for singer Chase Kamata’s move to New York features a performance by Kamata and cuisine from chef Leah Chase. Admission $30. 6:30 p.m.

Milton H. Latter Memorial Library, 5120 St. Charles Ave. — New Orleans Toastmasters Club hosts an open weekly meeting (except holidays) to hone the skills of speaking, listening and thinking. Call 2518600 or visit www.notoast234. freetoasthost.org for details. 6 p.m. UNITED NONPROFITS OF GREATER NEW ORLEANS.

Goodwill Training Center, 3400 Tulane Ave. — Nonprofit Central hosts a weekly meeting for all leaders of nonprofit groups. Email susan_unp@ yahoo.com for details. 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.

CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS BAYOU REBIRTH WETLANDS EDUCATION . Bayou Rebirth

seeks volunteers for wetlands planting projects, nursery maintenance and other duties. Visit www.bayourebirth.org for details.

CASA NEW ORLEANS. The

organization seeks volunteer court-appointed special advocates to represent abused and neglected children in New Orleans. The time commitment is a minimum of 10 hours per month. No special skills are required; thorough training and support is provided. Call Brian Opert at 522-1962 ext. 213 or email info@casaneworleans. org for details. GREATER NEW ORLEANS FAIR HOUSING ACTION CENTER .

The center seeks part-time civil rights investigators with excellent writing skills, reliable transportation and no criminal convictions to help expose housing discrimination in the New Orleans metro area. Call 717-4257 or email mmorgan@ gnofairhousing.org for information. HANDSON NEW ORLEANS. The

volunteer center for the Greater New Orleans area invites prospective volunteers to learn about the various opportunities available, how to sign-up to attend service projects and general tips on how to be a good volunteer. Call 483-7041 ext. 107, email volunteer@ handsonneworleans.org or visit www.handsonneworleans.org for details. HOSPICE VOLUNTEERS.

Harmony Hospice, 519 Metairie Road, Metairie, 832-8111 — Harmony Hospice seeks volunteers to offer companionship to patients through reading, playing cards and other activities. Call Jo-Ann Moore at 832-8111 for details. LOUISIANA SPCA VOLUNTEERS.

Dorothy Dorsett Brown LA/ SPCA Campus, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd., Algiers, 368-5191; www. la-spca.org — The Louisiana SPCA seeks volunteers to work with the animals and help with special events, education and more. Volunteers must be at least 12 years old and complete a volunteer orientation to work directly with animals. Call or email Dionne Simoneaux at dionne@la-spca.org.

MEAL DELIVERY VOLUNTEERS.

Jefferson Council on Aging seeks volunteers to deliver meals to homebound adults. Gas/mileage expenses will be reimbursed. Call Gail at 8885880 for details. MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY ASSOCIATION . The MDA seeks

volunteers ages 16 and older for its weeklong summer camps around the country. Call (800) 572-1717 or visit www.mda.org/ summercamp for details. SENIOR COMPANION VOLUNTEERS. New Orleans

Council on Aging, Annex Conference Room, 2475 Canal St., 821-4121; www.nocoa.org — The council seeks volunteers to assist with personal and other daily tasks to help seniors live independently. Call for details.

TEEN SUICIDE PREVENTION .

The Teen Suicide Prevention Program seeks volunteers to help teach middle- and upperschool New Orleans students. Call 831-8475 for details.

TOURO VOLUNTEER SERVICES. Touro Volunteer Services, 1401 Foucher St., 897-8107; www. touro.com/content/careercamp — The infirmary seeks adult volunteers to assist with the Family Surgery Lounge, patient information desk, book and goody cart, hospital tours and health screenings. Call volunteer services at 897-8107 for information.

WORDS 17 POETS! LITERARY & PERFORMANCE SERIES. Gold

Mine Saloon, 705 Dauphine St., 568-0745; www.goldminesaloon.net — Alison Peregrin and Kristin Sanders read. An open mic hosted by Jimmy Ross follows. Visit www.17poets.com for details. 8 p.m. Thursday. BARNES & NOBLE JR. Barnes

& Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 455-5135 — The bookstore regularly hosts free reading events for kids. Call for schedule information.

COOKBOOKS & COCKTAILS SERIES. Kitchen Witch

Cookbooks Shop, 631 Toulouse St., 528-8382 — The group

meets weekly to discuss classic New Orleans cookbooks. 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Friday. DINKY TAO POETRY. Molly’s at

the Market, 1107 Decatur St., 525-5169; www.mollysatthemarket.net — The bar hosts a free weekly poetry reading with open mic. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

PASS IT ON . George & Leah McKenna Museum of African American Art, 2003 Carondelet St., 586-7432; www.themckennamuseum.com — Poet Gian “G-Persepect” Smith and Alphonse “Bobby” Smith host a weekly spoken-word and music event. Admission $6. 9 p.m.

DR. LAWRENCE DORR. Garden

POETRY MEETING . New Orleans Poetry Forum, 257 Bonnabel Blvd., Metairie, 835-8472 — The forum holds workshops every Wednesday. 8 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.

FAIR GRINDS POETRY EVENT.

SCIENCE FICTION BOOK CLUB. Octavia Books, 513 Octavia St., 899-7323 — The group discusses Charles Stross’ Accelerando. 10 a.m. Saturday.

District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The author discusses and signs Die Once Live Twice. 5:30 p.m. Tuesday. Fair Grinds Coffeefhouse, 3133 Ponce de Leon Ave., 913-9073; www.fairgrinds.com — Jenna Mae hosts poets and spokenword readers on the second, fourth and fifth Sunday of each month. 8 p.m.

FALL CREATIVE ARTS READING . NOCCA Riverfront, Nims Blackbox Theatre, 2800 Chartres St., 940-2875; www. nocca.com — Patrick Thomas Casey and Toi Derricotte read from their works. 7 p.m. Tuesday. FRIENDS OF THE NEW ORLEANS PUBLIC LIBRARY BOOK SALE .

Latter Library Carriage House, 5120 St. Charles Ave., 596-2625; www.nutrias.org — The group hosts twice-weekly sales of books, DVDs, books on tape, LPs and more. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

JAMES NOLAN . Octavia Books,

513 Octavia St., 899-7323 — The author signs and reads from Higher Ground. 6 p.m. Wednesday.

JIM AXELROD. Metairie Park Country Day School, 300 Park Road, Metairie, 837-5204; www.mpcds.com — The CBS News correspondent discusses and signs In the Long Run. 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. LAURA LIPPMAN . Garden

District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The author discusses and signs The Most Dangerous Thing. 1 p.m. Saturday.

LAURIE TRIPLETTE . Southern

Food & Beverage Museum, Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 5690405; www.southernfood. org — The author signs her cookbook Gimme Some Sugar Darlin’: The Secret Lexicon of Southernness and One Old Bride’s Guide to Cooking Southern. 2 p.m. Saturday.

LOCAL WRITERS’ GROUP.

Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 455-5135 — The weekly group discusses and critiques fellow members’ writing. All genres welcome. 7:30 p.m. Monday.

MAPLE LEAF READING SERIES.

Maple Leaf Bar, 8316 Oak St., 866-9359; www.mapleleafbar. com — The weekly reading series presents featured writers followed by an open mic. Free admission. 3 p.m. Sunday.

SPOKEN WORD. Ebony Square, 4215 Magazine St. — The center hosts a weekly spoken-word, music and open-mic event. Tickets $7 general admission, $5 students. 11 p.m. Friday. TAO POETRY. Neutral Ground Coffeehouse, 5110 Danneel St., 891-3381; www.neutralground. org — The coffeehouse hosts a weekly poetry reading. 9 p.m. Wednesday. TAV FALCO. Euclid Records, 3401

Chartres St.; www.euclidnola. com — The author reads from Mondo Memphis: Ghosts Behind the Sun. 5:30 p.m. Sunday.

UNIVERSES. Craige Cultural Center, 1800 Newton St., Algiers — The center hosts a weekly spoken-word, music and open-mic event. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Sunday. W. FITZHUGH BRUNDAGE.

Tulane University, Woldenberg Art Center, Freeman Auditorium, 314-2200; www. tulane.edu — The author discusses The Long History of American Torture: From the Early Republic to Abu Ghraib. 7 p.m. Wednesday. THE WELL: A WOMEN’S POETRY CIRCLE . St. Anna’s Episcopal

Church, 1313 Esplanade Ave., 947-2121; www.stannanola. org — The group meets at 2 p.m. Mondays. Call 289-9142 or email poetryprocess@gmail. com for details.

YVONNE SPEAR PERRET. Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 455-5135 — The author signs Yat Wit: Chicken Gumbo for the New Orleans Soul. 1 p.m. Saturday.

CALL FOR WRITERS BOB KAUFMAN BOOK PRIZE IN POETRY. Trembling Pillow

Press presents the contest. The winner will be published in 2012. Visit www.tremblingpillowpress.com for details. Submissions deadline is Nov. 15. For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 08 > 2011

409 Aycock St., Arabi — The market showcases fresh seafood, local produce, jams and preserves, baked goods, crafts, live entertainment, children’s activities and more. Call 3554442 or visit www.visitstbernard.com for details. 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.

DANCE FOR LIFE. NOCCA Riverfront, 2800 Chartres St., 940-2787; www.nocca.com — The event is a day of music and dance workshops taught by New Orleans-based dance companies including Casa Samba Brazilian Music and Dance Company, Kumbuka African Drum & Dance Collective, Culu Children’s Traditional African Dance Company and others. The workshops are open to all ages and experience levels. Call (646) 504-4325 or visit www. nfungotah.com for details. Free admission. 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.

51

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Email Ian McNulty at imcnulty@cox.net. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< THREE AND OUT >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Mat & Naddie’s (937 Leonidas St., 861-9600; www.matandPUTTING EVERYTHING ON THE TABLE < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <naddies.com) has a new weekday lunch format. Instead of its long-running lunch buffet, the bistro has a “meat and three” menu featuring entrees and an array of side dish options. WHAT Entrees include fried chicken, Salisbury steak, seared fish, or shrimp and crawfish cakes and can be ordered with choices like Kanno California turnip greens, macaroni and cheese, and okra with tomatoes. Sushi Bar

am

B

WHERE

3205 Edenborn Ave., Metairie, 455-5730 WHEN

Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. HOW MUCH

Moderate

RESERVATIONS

Accepted

WHAT WORKS

Five Offbeat Gumbos

Smoked mahi mahi joins crab, shrimp and sweet potato in a unique gumbo.

Hidetoshi Suzuki presents Dijon tuna at Kanno. PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

BY IAN MCNULTY

muddle, as with pale slices of toro brought from the sushi fridge like jewels from the case. Kanno’s menu runs the gamut of Japanese cuisine, though as it moves toward more conventional sushi bar items the chef’s attention seems to wander. Some of the specialty rolls are nearly the size of burritos and prove about as messy with sauces, cream cheese and fried seafood routinely overwhelming their wrappers. The tiny confines of Kanno itself put some limitations on the potentially epic meals Suzuki can deliver. When the restaurant is crowded at lunch the place can feel swamped, and at night the jukebox at the adjacent bar is sometimes loud enough to reverberate through the strip mall’s thin wall and across the surface of your sake. But the small scale of this place can also be a blessing, especially with the attention Suzuki and his wife Lin can pay to details. Plenty of Japanese restaurants serve broiled fish neck, but here a salmon neck is smoked so deeply your hands smell like a campfire afterwards. And while the wasabi is a reconstituted paste, as usual, Kanno takes some time preparing this staple, resulting in something that’s sharp but also deeply flavored and almost creamy. Sometimes fresh wasabi root, a pugnacious rarity, turns up in a dish, and it made an erstwhile plain avocado and tofu salad downright exhilarating. For lessons in how a deft hand can transform a few simple ingredients into a craving, it’s best to just belly up to this Fat City bar and ask for something new.

527 JULIA ST., 875-4132 www.cafecarmo.com

COCHON

930 TCHOUPITOULAS ST., 588-2123 ww.cochonrestaurant.com

A rustic-style roux is studded with black-eyed peas and smoked pork.

CHATEAU DU LAC

2037 METAIRIE ROAD, METAIRIE, 831-3773 www.chateaudulacbistro.com

Foie gras enriches the roux and a seared slice floats on top.

PARKWAY BAKERY & TAVERN

538 HAGAN ST., 482-3047 www.parkwaybakeryandtavernnola.com

Turkey and alligator sausage supplant the chicken and andouille standard.

PATOIS

6078 LAUREL ST., 895-9441 www.patoisnola.com

Smoked rabbit and greens join andouille in a dark, thick roux.

Questions? Email winediva1@earthlink.net.

2008 Vitiano Rosso UMBRIA, ITALY / $10-$13 RETAIL

This blend of roughly equal parts Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Sangiovese was produced in Italy’s Umbria region, just below Tuscany’s southern border. The versatile, food-friendly bottling offers subtlety and substance. Aged in French barrels for three months, the wine exhibits aromas of ripe dark fruit with hints of spice and oak. On the palate, taste blackberry, cherry, a hint of anise, an attractive earthy character and a lingering finish. Enjoy it with pizza, meatballs, grilled meats, pasta dishes and cheeses. Buy it at: Whole Foods Markets and Dorignac’s. Drink it at: Domenica. — Brenda Maitland

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 08 > 2011

F

IN

WHAT DOESN'T

A precise chef puts his own spin on Japanese flavors

at City has never been the prettiest part of the metro area. But beyond gritty bars and nightclubs, the unexceptional entertainment district has nurtured a lushly diverse dining scene, thanks in large part to first-generation immigrants and other entry-level entrepreneurs opening small eateries. Kanno is in that number, and chef/owner Hidetoshi Suzuki has feathered a little nest he found in a cinderblock strip mall. It’s unique and has become one of the best Japanese restaurants in the area. A native of Osaka, Japan, Suzuki says he was trained as a fine-dining chef back home before learning his sushi skills here in the U.S. That background might explain his penchant for small, composed dishes over the standard array of rolls. The sashimi I’ve tried at Kanno always has been unimpeachably fresh and luscious. But what makes this restaurant worth seeking out are dishes like the Dijon tuna, a sculpted tower made from thick chunks of ruby-red raw fish dressed in a mixture of ponzu and mustard seeds. Miso soup is a standard, but here the “special spicy” miso soup is indeed both. The brick-colored broth — peppery and awash with minced garlic and slices of soft onion— could be a winter’s cure. There’s little need for the standard soy sauce dipping plate at Kanno. The fish arrives either elaborately dressed by the chef, as with swordfish sashimi in a tangle of green and white onions, or too pristine to

five 5 CAFE CARMO

CHECK, PLEASE

BELLY UP TO THIS SUSHI BAR FOR SOME UNUSUAL AND ORIGINAL DISHES.

There’s a new burger specialist in Metairie. Cheeseburger Eddie’s (4517 W. Esplanade Ave., Metairie, 455-5511) opened in October with a menu that includes salmon and tuna burgers, fried pickles and shakes. The Eddie in the name is owner Ed McIntyre, who runs a slew of Jefferson Parish eateries including the mid-range steakhouse Austin’s Restaurant and the neighborhood style Mr. Ed’s restaurants.

Raw fish preparations beyond familiar sushi Bigger rolls can get zany and unwieldy

Fish Tales

CHEESEBURGER, CHEESEBURGER

55

CUISINE

SCUTTLEBITES All the news thAt’s fit to eAt. By I a n M cn u lt y

fReRet Gets sUshi

LUNCH SPECIAL 3 Courses for $15 Mon-Fri Soup or Salad and 2 Tapas with soft drink plus tax & gratuity

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 08 > 2011

open daily lunch & dinner til midnight fri & sat

56

HAPPY HOUR monday-friday 4-7 pm 3226 magazine street 371.5809 www.salurestaurant.com

BOOK YOUR HOLIDAY PARTY NOW! Private Room for up to 120 guests Magazine St. location only

COME HANG OUT WITH OUR AWARD WINNING BARTENDER

Our mixes are always made fresh! Margaritas • Mojitos & Sangria by the glass or pitcher Hand Crafted Cocktails Try our Amazing Fresh Fruit Cello's and Bellini's • Award Winning White Buffalo

EST 1994

3218 MAGAZINE ST. 894.1233

1501 METAIRIE RD 834.9773

It had been a whole two months since a new restaurant opened along the Freret Street commercial corridor. But for anyone who was getting antsy over the lull in the fast-growing restaurant row, relief came just last week. Veteran local sushi chef Mitsuko Tanner and her business partners opened the Japanese restaurant and sushi bar Origami (5130 Freret St., 899-6532). tanner has owned or been a partner in Japanese restaurants around new Orleans for years, starting with Shigure on Jeanette Street back in the 1990s. She was co-owner of Kyoto (4920 Prytania St., 891-3644; www.kyotonola.com) for a time and was most recently sushi chef at the Mid-city location of Little Tokyo (310 n. carrollton ave., 485-5658; www.littletokyonola.com). “this will be my fourth restaurant, and hopefully my retirement,” tanner says with a laugh. Her partners in the new venture include sushi chefs Masayuki Tsukikawa and Thaun Vu, who formerly was at little tokyo as well. the restaurant took over the address that had long been home to Friar Tuck’s, a college bar that closed earlier this year after a string of run-ins with city officials and a murder just outside its doors in January. the transformation from college dive bar to contemporary Japanese restaurant required a thorough renovation, and for this work tanner turned to a Freret Street neighbor Matthew Kohnke, a partner in the upscale cocktail lounge Cure (4905 Freret St., 302-2357; www.curenola.com) who also runs the design/build firm MNK Construction. Origami has a full bar and features a large selection of cold sakes. the restaurant serves lunch and dinner daily.

eVeninG eXPAnsions

Cafe Carmo (527 Julia St., 875-4132; www.cafecarmo.com) and Satsuma Cafe (3218 Dauphine St., 304-5962; www.satsumacafe.com) are two popular lunch spots that have quickly built niches for themselves — carmo for serving a refreshingly different (and often meatless) tropical cuisine in the Warehouse District, Satsuma for bringing the farm-to-table approach to its coffee house setting in Bywater. Both now also serve dinner, adding offbeat, affordable options in their respective neighborhoods. as of last week, carmo started serving dinner from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. thursday through Saturday — in addition to its ongoing lunch hours of 11:30 a.m. to 3

p.m. tuesday through Saturday. the prevailing theme at cafe carmo is Brazilian cooking, but don’t look for the typical Brazilian steakhouse experience. Instead, owners Christine and Dana Honn specialize in different, often complex tropical cooking with traditional Brazilian dishes as well as many other influences from africa to asia. While it is not a vegetarian restaurant per se, vegan substitutions are available, and often specifically engineered, for many of the dishes. Evening service features the most popular dishes from lunch, plus some new dinner items. a few examples include acaraje, a Brazilian black-eyed pea fritter filled with shrimp and doused with hot sauce; rum-cured, cold-smoked tuna with chili oil and pickled quail eggs; an oyster plate with cold-smoked, pickled oysters and marinated, hot-smoked oysters, and dumplings with blue crab, cabbage and mushrooms. carmo recently expanded from its initial tiny space, roughly doubling its seating inside and adding sidewalk seating as well. the cafe now has a full bar and offers delivery for dinner. It is not accepting reservations for now. In the Bywater, Satsuma has launched dinner service from Wednesday through Saturday, beginning at 6:30 p.m. Satsuma took over a former coffee shop, and while it certainly serves a good cup of coffee, the place made a name for itself by working plenty of seasonal, locally sourced foods into its inexpensive breakfast and lunch menu. Owners Cassi and Peter Dymond have served dinner at the cafe before for special fundraising events, most recently in September to help an employee’s family recover from flooding after Hurricane Irene. at the time, they said the event would double as a test run for future dinner service. now, the menu and format for evening service is underway with Michael Costantini as the dinner chef and Christina Balzabre as the pastry chef. the menu includes a short list of snacks, like Spanish anchovies and spiced Marcona almonds; a collection of hot and cold small plates, like a beet and crab salad and gnocchi with kale and sage; entrees like roasted chicken, hanger steak salad and flounder with fried garlic, fennel and peppers; and desserts such as ginger cake with plum-blackberry compote and cardamom cream. Satsuma is ByOB, with no corkage fee. Reservations are not accepted.

OUT2EAT and the kitchen offers pierogies, beef empanadas, curry shrimp salad and a petit steak served with truffle aioli. No reservations. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

FEATURING CHEF SPECIALS • Sizzling jumbo Shrimp • CriSpy ginger Shrimp • CriSpy beef with blaCk pepper & onion • jumbo SCallop with aSparaguS & baby Corn

• Stuffed ChineSe eggplant • ChiCken almond CruSt with lemon SauCe

RICCOBONO’S PANOLA STREET CAFE — 7801 Panola St., 314-1810

— Specialties include crabcakes Benedict — two crabcakes and poached eggs topped with hollandaise sauce and potatoes — and the Sausalito omelet with spinach, mushrooms, shallots and mozzarella. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily. Credit cards. $

we deliver banQuetS & pr ivate partieS 3605 South Carrollton ave. Mon-Thurs 11am-10pm • Fri & Sat 11am-11pm • Sun 11am-10pm

reServationS / take-out 482-3935 • www.fivehappineSS.Com B A N Q U ET S & P R I VAT E PA RT I E S

VINE & DINE — 141 Delaronde St.,

361-1402; www.vine-dine.com — The cafe serves cheese boards and charcuterie plates with pate and cured meats. There also is a menu of sandwiches, quesadillas, bruschettas, salads and dips. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CHINESE CHINA ORCHID — 704 S. Carrollton

Ave., 865-1428; www.chinaorchidneworleans.com — This longtime Riverbend restaurant offers a wide array of Chinese dishes. Sizzling black pepper beef or chicken is prepared with onions, red and green peppers and brown sauce and served on a hot plate with steamed rice on the side. Other options include fried rice, noodle and egg foo young dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

CHINA ROSE — 3501 N. Arnoult

Road., Metairie, 887-3295 — China Rose offers many Chinese seafood specialties. The Lomi Lomi combines jumbo shrimp, pineapple and water chestnuts wrapped in bacon, fries them golden brown and serves them on a bed of sautéed vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

58

ton Ave., 482-3935 — The large menu at Five Happiness offers a range of dishes from wonton soup to sizzling seafood combinations served on a hot plate to sizzling Go-Ba to lo mein dishes. Delivery and banquest facilities available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SUN-THU 5:30PM-10PM FRI & SAT 5:30PM-11PM COURTYARD SEATING AVAILABLE

RESERVATIONS AVAILABLE

JUNG’S GOLDEN DRAGON — 3009 Magazine St., 891-8280; www. jungsgoldendragon2.com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, Thai and Korean cuisine. Chinese specialties include Mandarin, Szechuan and Hunan dishes. Grand Marnier shrimp are lightly battered and served with Grand Marnier sauce, broccoli and pecans. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

PLEASE CALL FOR PRIVATE PARTIES

755 TCHOUPITOULAS ST 504-527-0942 FREE DELIVERY

A U T H E N T I C J A PA N E S E C U I S I N E

Now Serving FRESH

H I Su n

-Th u

33

TORO

and SEA URCHIN

11:0 01 S. 1 Carro 0a m -10:3 llton • 488-188m-11:00pm 0pm · Fri 11:00am 00p -11:00pm · Sat 4:

TREY YUEN CUISINE OF CHINA — 600 N. Causeway Approach.,

SUSHI BAR

www . M IKIMOTOS U S

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 08 > 2011

FIVE HAPPINESS — 3511 S. Carroll-

Mandeville, (985) 626-4476; 2100 N. Morrison Blvd., Hammond, (985) 345-6789; www.tryyuen. com — House specialties include fried soft-shell crab topped with Tong Cho sauce, and Cantonese-style stir-fried alligator and mushrooms in oyster sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

COFFEE/ DESSERT ANTOINE’S ANNEX — 513 Royal

St., 581-4422; www.antoines.com — The Annex is a coffee shop

serving pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. The Royal Street salad features baby spinach and mixed lettuces with carrots, red onion, red peppers, grapes, olives, walnuts and raspberry vinaigrette. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ KUPCAKE FACTORY — 800 Metai-

rie Road, Metairie, 267-4990; 819 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 4648884; 6233 S. Claiborne Ave., 2673328; www.thekupcakefactory. com — Choose from a large selection of gourmet cupcakes. The Fat Elvis is made with banana cake and topped with peanut butter frosting. The Strawberry Fields tops strawberry cake with strawberry buttercream frosting. Other options include white chocolate raspberry and a banana cupcake. No reservations. Hours vary by location. Credit cards. $

MAURICE FRENCH PASTRIES — 3501

Hessmer Ave., Metairie, 885-1526; 4949 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 455-0830; www.mauricefrenchpastries.com — Maurice French Pastries offers an array of continental and French baked goods as well as specialty cakes, cheesecakes and pies. No reservations. Hessmer Avenue: breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. West Napoleon: breakfast and lunch Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PINKBERRY — 300 Canal St.; 5601

Magazine St., 899-4260; www. pinkberry.com — Pinkberry offers frozen yogurt with an array of wet and dry topping choices including caramel, honey, fruit purees, various chocolates and nuts and more. There also are fresh fruit parfaits and green tea smoothies. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CONTEMPORARY 5 Fifty 5 — 555 Canal St., 553-5638;

www.555canal.com — New Orleans dishes and Americana favorites take an elegant turn in dishes such as the lobster mac and cheese, combining lobster meat, elbow macaroni and mascarpone, boursin and white cheddar cheeses. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

BAYONA — 430 Dauphine St., 5254455; www.bayona.com — House favorites on Chef Susan Spicer’s menu include sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce and the appetizer of grilled shrimp with black-bean cake and coriander sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$$ THE GREEN GODDESS — 307 Ex-

change Alley, 301-3347; www. greengoddessnola.com — Chef Chris DeBarr’s contemporary cooking combines classic techniques, exotic ingredients and culinary wit. At lunch, Big Cactus Chilaquiles feature poached eggs on homemade tortillas with salsa verde, queso fresca and nopalitos. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Thu.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ OAK — 8118 Oak St., 302-1485;

www.oaknola.com — This wine bar offers small plates and live musical entertainment. Gulf shrimp fill tacos assembled in house-made corn tortillas with pickled vegetables, avocado and lime crema. The hanger steak bruschetta is topped with Point Reyes blue cheese and smoked red onion marmalade. No reser-

vations. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

ONE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE —

8132 Hampson St., 301-9061; www.one-sl.com — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes like char-grilled oysters topped with Roquefort cheese and a red wine vinaigrette, seared scallops with roasted garlic and shiitake polenta cakes and a memorable cochon de lait. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CREOLE ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713 St.

Louis St., 581-4422; www.antoines. com — The city’s oldest restaurant offers a glimpse of what 19th century French Creole dining might have been like, with a labyrinthine series of dining rooms. Signature dishes include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ GUMBO SHOP — 640 St. Peter

St., 525-1486; www.gumboshop. com — Gumbo and New Orleans classics such as crawfish etouffee dominate the menu. Their spicy flavors meld into a dish that represents the city’s best and redefines comfort food. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

LE CITRON BISTRO — 1539 Religious St., 566-9051; www.le-citronbistro.com — Located in a historic building, the quaint bistro serves starters like chicken and andouille gumbo and fried frogs legs. Entrees include choices like fried chicken, Gulf fish and burgers. Reservations accepted. Dinner Wed.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000 N. Peters St., 524-4747 — This casual restaurant serves Creole favorites. The menu includes crawfish etouffee, boiled crawfish, red beans and rice and bread pudding for dessert. Outdoor seating is adjacent to Dutch Alley and the French Market. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

CUBAN/ CARIBBEAN MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — 437 Esplanade Ave., 252-4800; www. mojitosnola.com — Mojitos serves a mix of Caribbean, Cuban and Creole dishes. Caribbean mac and cheese pie is made with chunks of lobster, tomatoes, scallions, garlic and creamy cheese sauce and is served over a bed of spicy corn maque choux. Reservations accepted. Lunch, dinner and late-night Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

DELI CG’S CAFE AT THE RUSTY NAIL — 1100 Constance St., 722-3168;

www.therustynail.biz — Inside the Rusty Nail, CG’s offers a menu of sandwiches. The Piggly Wiggly features pulled pork on a sesame seed bun with coleslaw and pickle chips on the side. The Wild Turkey is layered with Granny Smith apple slices, provolone, bacon and garlic mayo. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $

bestofneworleans.com

KOSHER CAJUN NEW YORK DELI & GROCERY — 3519 Severn Ave., Metairie, 888-2010; www.

Treat Every Day Like It’s Friday!

koshercajun.com — This New York-style deli specializes in sandwiches, including corned beef and pastrami that come straight from the Bronx. No reservations. Lunch Sun.-Thu., dinner Mon.-Thu. Credit cards. $

MARTIN WINE CELLAR — 714 Elmeer Ave., Me-

tairie , 896-7350; www.martinwine.com — The wine emporium offers gourmet sandwiches and deli items. The Reuben combines corned beef, melted Swiss, sauerkraut and Russian dressing on rye bread. The Sena salad features chicken, golden raisins, blue cheese, toasted pecans and pepper jelly vinaigrette over field greens. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Fri., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

DINER DAISY DUKES — 121 Chartres St., 561-5171; www.

daisydukesrestaurant.com — Daisy Dukes is known for its seafood omelet and serves a wide variety of Cajun spiced Louisiana favorites, burgers, po-boys and seafood, including boiled crawfish and oysters on the half-shell. Breakfast is served all day. No reservations. Open 24 hours daily. Credit cards. $$

$ PICK 2 FOR 10 1 ENTRÉE + 1 STARTER OR 1 DESSERT Entrées

FRENCH FLAMING TORCH — 737 Octavia St., 895-0900;

www.flamingtorchnola.com — Chef Nathan Gile’s menu includes pan-seared Maine diver scallops with chimichurri sauce and smoked bacon and corn hash. Coffee- and corianderspiced rack of lamb is oven roasted and served with buerre rouge and chevre mashed potatoes. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

MARTINIQUE BISTRO — 5908 Magazine St.,

891-8495; www.martiniquebistro.com — This French bistro has both a cozy dining room and a pretty courtyard. Try dishes such as Steen’scured duck breast with satsuma and ginger demi-glace and stone-ground goat cheese grits. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

CRISPY GREEN BEAN FRIES

Starters

Spinach Florentine Flatbread Savory Soup of Your Choice Fried Mozzarella Pan-Seared Pot Stickers Crispy Green Bean Fries Classic Wedge Salad

GOURMET TO GO BREAUX MART — 315 E. Judge Perez, Chalmette,

JULIE’S LITTLE INDIA KITCHEN AT SCHIRO’S —

2483 Royal St., 944-6666; www.schiroscafe.com — The cafe offers homemade Indian dishes prepared with freshly ground herbs and spices. Selections include chicken, lamb or shrimp curry or vindaloo and vegetarian saag paneer. Schiro’s also serves New Orleans cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NIRVANA INDIAN CUISINE — 4308 Magazine St., 894-9797 — Serving mostly northern Indian cuisine, the restaurant’s extensive menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

Desserts

PARMESAN-CRUSTED CHICKEN

Valid for a limited time at participating T.G.I. Friday’s ® Restaurants. Dine-in only. One offer per person. Not valid in conjunction with any other offer or discount. Offer good on select items only. © 2011 TGI Friday’s Inc. The trademark JACK DANIEL’S is used under license to TGI Friday’s Inc. All rights reserved. Oreo is a registered trademark of Kraft Foods Holdings, Inc. used under license to TGI Friday’s Inc.

O

R YA ONLI DER KO NE NO @ LA. CO M

MI

TAJ MAHAL INDIAN CUISINE — 923-C Metairie

Road, Metairie, 836-6859 — The traditional menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways, including curries and tandoori. Vegetarian options are available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

ITALIAN ANDREA’S RESTAURANT — 3100 N. 19th St., Metairie 834-8583; www.andreasrestaurant. com — Chef/owner Andrea Apuzzo’s specialties include speckled trout royale which is topped with lump crabmeat and lemon-cream sauce. Capelli D’Andrea combines house-made

VANILLA BEAN CHEESECAKE

Oreo® Madness Chocolate Peanut Butter Pie Vanilla Bean Cheesecake

& NT NER ME DIN RTAIN TLY E H ENT NIG

A Salute to

Bombay Club MEMBERS OF OUR MILITARY A complimentary dinner for all active duty & veterans from our U.S. military.

DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS

starting from $5.50

LUNCH:sun-fri 11am-2:30pm DINNER: mon-thurs 5pm-10pm fri 5pm-10:30pm SATURDAY 3:30pm-10:30pm SUNDAY 12 noon-10:30pm 1403 st. charles ave. new orleans 504.410.9997 www.japanesebistro.com security guard on duty

FRIDAY, NOV. 11TH • 5-10PM reservations are required & seating is limited

military service members must present a valid military ID

Free Veterans Day Dinner to all U.S. Military Veterans & those on active duty

830 Conti Street (in the Prince Conti Hotel) 504.586.0972 • 800.699.7711

www.thebombayclub.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 08 > 2011

262-0750; 605 Lapalco Blvd., Gretna, 433-0333; 2904 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-5565; 9647 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 737-8146; www.breauxmart.com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux” as well as weekday specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

INDIAN

Bruschetta Chicken Pasta Friday’s® Shrimp NEW Balsamic Glazed Chicken Caesar Salad Chicken Fingers Parmesan-Crusted Chicken Black Angus Cheeseburger Dragonfire Chicken NEW Jack Daniel’s® Pulled Pork Sandwich NEW Pan-Seared Parmesan Flounder

59

OUT2EAT angel hair pasta and smoked salmon in light cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

CAFE GIOVANNI — 117 Decatur St., 529-2154; www.cafegiovanni. com — Chef Duke LoCicero serves inventive Italian cuisine and Italian accented contemporary Louisiana cooking. Shrimp Dukie features Louisiana shrimp and a duck breast marinated in Cajun spices served with tassomushroom sauce. Belli Baci is the restaurant’s cocktail lounge. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

MOSCA’S — 4137 Hwy. 90 W.,

PARKWAY

Bringing you quality, consistency and value since 1971.

FOR

PO'BOYS!

RED GRAVY — 125 Camp St., 561-

IN NOLA CALL (504)

482-3047 11AM TO 10PM CLOSED TUESDAYS

Now open 7 days a week in Mandeville LUNCH : Mon - Fri 11-2pm DiNNER: Mon -Thu 5-930pm Fri & Sat 5-10pm · Sun 1130a - 930p 600 N. Causeway, Mandeville 2100 N. Morrison, Hammond

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 08 > 2011

985/626-4476

canal street bistro @ Eco cafE

now serving world cuisine by chef guillermo peters 3903 canal St

(cornEr of n. Scott)

Mid-city, nEw orlEanS

482.1225

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7329 FRERET • 861-7890 (1 block off Broadway)

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Now Accepting NOLA Bucks!

Westwego, 436-8950; www. moscasrestaurant.com — This family-style eatery has changed little since opening in 1946. Popular dishes include shrimp Mosca, chicken a la grande and baked oysters Mosca, made with breadcrumps and Italian seasonings. Reservations accepted. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $$$

985/345-6789

8844; www.redgravycafe.com — The cafe serves breakfast items including pancakes, waffles and pastries. At lunch, try meatballs, lasagna and other Italian specialties, panini, wraps, soups and salads. Open Sundays before New Orleans Saints home games. Reservations accepted for large parties. Breakfast and lunch Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $ RICCOBONO’S PEPPERMILL RESTAURANT — 3524 Severn Ave.,

Metairie, 455-2266 — This Italianstyle eatery serves New Orleans favorites like stuffed crabs with jumbo lump crabmeat with spaghetti bordelaise and trout meuniere with brabant potatoes. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ VINCENT’S ITALIAN CUISINE — 4411

Chastant St., Metairie, 885-2984; 7839 St. Charles Ave., 866-9313; www.vincentsitaliancuisine.com — Bracialoni is baked veal stuffed with artichoke hearts, bacon, garlic and Parmesan cheese and topped with red sauce. Reservations accepted. Chastant Street: lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. St. Charles Avenue: lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

JAPANESE KYOTO — 4920 Prytania St., 891-

3644 — Kyoto’s sushi chefs prepare rolls, sashimi and salads. “Box” sushi is a favorite, with more than 25 rolls. Reservations recommended for parties of six or more. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$ MIKIMOTO — 3301 S. Carrollton

Ave., 488-1881; www.mikimotosushi.com — Sushi choices include new and old favorites, both raw and cooked. The South Carrollton roll includes tuna tataki, avocado and snow crab. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Delivery available. Credit cards. $$ MIYAKO JAPANESE SEAFOOD &

STEAKHOUSE — 1403 St. Charles Ave., 410-9997; www.japanesebistro.com — Miyako offers a full range of Japanese cuisine, with specialties from the sushi or hibachi menus, chicken, beef or seafood teriyaki, and tempura. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ ROCK-N-SAKE — 823 Fulton St.,

581-7253; www.rocknsake.com — Rock-n-Sake serves traditional Japanese cuisine with some creative twists. There’s a wide selection of sushi, sashimi and rolls or pan-fried soba noodles with chicken or seafood and teriyaki dishes. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

WASABI SUSHI — 900 Frenchmen St., 943-9433; 8550 Pontchartrain Blvd., 267-3263; www.wasabinola. com — The Assassin roll bundles tuna, snow crab and avocado in seaweed topped with barbecued eel, tuna, eel sauce and wasabi tobiko. No reservations. Frenchmen Street: Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner daily. Pontchartrain Boulevard: lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

LOUISIANA CONTEMPORARY BOMBAY CLUB — 830 Conti St., 586-0972; www.thebombayclub. com — Sip a well-made martini while waiting for the duck duet, which pairs confit leg with pepper-seared breast with black currant reduction. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, latenight Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ BOUCHE — 840 Tchoupitoulas St., 267-7485; www.bouchenola.com — This wine bar and restaurant serves creative dishes like tasso truffle mac and cheese with three cheeses and Mornay sauce. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ MIA’S — 1622 St. Charles Ave., 301-9570 — Veal Oscar features lightly breaded veal topped with lump crabmeat and hollandaise, served with garlic red potatoes and grilled asparagus. Reservations accepted. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $$

MILA — 817 Common St., 412-2580; www.milaneworleans.com — MiLA takes a fresh approach to Southern and New Orleans cooking, focusing on local produce and refined techniques. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri. dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

RALPH’S ON THE PARK — 900 City Park Ave., 488-1000; www. ralphsonthepark.com — Popular dishes include baked oysters Ralph, turtle soup and the Niman Ranch New York strip. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

REDEMPTION — 3835 Iberville St.,

309-3570 — Chambord duckling is served with cherry vinaigrette. Seared foie gras is complemented by vanilla parsnip puree. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

752 Tchoupitoulas St., 525-4790 — Tommy’s Wine Bar offers cheese and charcuterie plates as well as appetizers and salads from Tommy’s Cuisine next door. No reservations. Lite dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

TOMMY’S WINE BAR —

MEDITERRANEAN/

MIDDLE EASTERN ATTIKI BAR & GRILL — 230 Decatur

St., 587-3756; www.attikineworleans.com — Attiki features a range of Mediterranean cuisine including entrees of beef kebabs and chicken shawarma. Reservations recommended. Lunch,

dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $$ — 7724 Maple St., 314-0010; www.babyloncafe.biz —The Babylon platter includes stuffed grape leaves, hummus, kibbeh, rice and one choice of meat: lamb, chicken or beef kebabs, chicken or beef shawarma, gyro or kufta. Chicken shawarma salad is a salad topped with olives, feta and chicken breast cooked on a rotisserie. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ BABYLON CAFE

PYRAMIDS CAFE — 3151 Calhoun

St., 861-9602 — Diners will find authentic, healthy and fresh Mediterranean cuisine featuring such favorites as sharwarma prepared on a rotisserie. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEXICAN & SOUTHWESTERN COUNTRY FLAME — 620 Iberville St., 522-1138 — Country Flame serves a mix of popular Mexican and Cuban dishes. Come in for fajitas, pressed Cuban sandwiches made with hickory-smoked pork and char-broiled steaks or pork chops. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

JUAN’S FLYING BURRITO — 2018 Magazine St., 569-0000; 4724 S.Carrollton Ave. 486-9950; www. juansflyingburrito.com — This wallet-friendly restaurant offers new takes on Mexican-inspired cooking. It’s known for its mealand-a-half-size signature burritos. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

NACHO MAMA’S MEXICAN GRILL — 3242 Magazine St., 899-0031;

1000 S. Clearview Pkwy., Harahan, 736-1188; www.nachomamasmexicangrill.com — These taquerias serve Mexican favorites such as portobello mushroom fajitas and chile rellenos. There are happy hour margaritas on weekdays and daily drink specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SANTA FE — 3201 Esplanade Ave., 948-0077 — This casual cafe serves creative takes on Southwestern cuisine. Bolinos de Bacalau are Portuguese-style fish cakes made with dried, salted codfish, mashed potatoes, cilantro, lemon juice, green onions and egg and served with smoked paprika aioli. Outdoor seating is available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.Sun. Credit cards. $$ TOMASITO’S MEXICAN CUISINE —

755 Tchoupitoulas St., 527-0942 — Tomasito’s is an upscale cantina with a patio for outdoor dining. The carnitas platter features marinated and slow-cooked pork served with Mexican rice, refried beans and a choice of salsa verde, smoky chipotle or a traditional Mexican sauce. No reservations. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MUSIC AND FOOD GAZEBO CAFE — 1018 Decatur St.,

525-8899; www.gazebocafenola. com — The Gazebo features a mix of Cajun and Creole dishes and ice cream daquiris. The New Orleans sampler rounds up jambalaya, red beans and rice and gumbo. Other options include salads, seafood po-boys and

OUT2EAT mata olives, red onion, tomatoes, herbed ricotta, mozzarella and pesto sauce. The spinach and artichoke pie includes mushrooms, onion, feta, mozzarella and garlic sauce. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ MARKS TWAIN’S PIZZA LANDING —

2035 Metairie Road, Metairie, 8328032; www.marktwainspizza.com — Disembark at Mark Twain’s for salads, po-boys and pies like the Italian pizza with salami, tomato, artichoke, sausage and basil. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NEW YORK PIZZA — 4418 Magazine St., 891-2376; www.newyorkpizzanola.com — Choose from pizza by the slice or whole pie, calzones, pasta, sandwiches, salads and more. The Big Apple pie is loaded with pepperoni, Canadian bacon, onions, mushrooms, black olives, green peppers, Italian sausage and minced garlic and anchovies and jalapenos are optional. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ NONNA MIA CAFE & PIZZERIA — 3125

Esplanade Ave., 948-1717 — Nonna Mia uses homemade dough for pizza served by the slice or whole pie and offers salads, pasta dishes and panini. Gourmet pies are topped with ingredients like pancetta, roasted eggplant, portobello mushrooms and prosciutto. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ REGINELLI’S — 741 State St., 899-

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 08 > 2011

1414; 817 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 712-6868; 874 Harrison Ave., 488-0133; 3244 Magazine St. 8957272; 5608 Citrus Blvd., Harahan, 818-0111; www.reginellis.com — This New Orleans original offers a range of pizzas, sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

62

R&O’S RESTAURANT — 216 Old Hammond Hwy., 831-1248 — R&O’s offers a mix of pizza and Creole and Italian seafood dishes. There’s everything from seafood gumbo and stuffed artichokes to po-boys and muffulettas. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $

SLICE PIZZERIA — 1513 St. Charles Ave., 525-7437; 5538 Magazine St., 897-4800 — Neapolitan-style pizza rules, but you can buy pizza by the slice and add or subtract toppings as you choose. There are also a full coffee bar, Italian sodas and organic teas. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

THEO’S NEIGHBORHOOD PIZZA —

4218 Magazine St., 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., 302-1133; www.theospizza.com — There is a wide variety of specialty pies or build your own from the selection of more than two-dozen toppings. Also serving salads and sandwiches. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

WIT’S INN — 141 N. Carrollton Ave., 888-4004 — This Mid-City bar and restaurant features pizzas, calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers for snacking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SANDWICHES & PO-BOYS DRESS IT — 535 Gravier St., 571-7561

— Get gourmet burgers and sandwiches dressed to order. Original topping choices include everything from sprouts to black bean and corn salsa to peanut butter. For dessert, try a chocolate chip cookie served with ice cream and chocolate sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

MAGAZINE PO-BOY SHOP — 2368

Magazine St., 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of po-boys filled with everything from fried seafood to corned beef to hot sausage to veal. There are breakfast burritos in the morning and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Cash only. $

MAHONY’S PO-BOY SHOP — 3454 Magazine St., 899-3374; www. mahonyspoboys.com — Mahoney’s serves traditional favorites and original po-boys like the Peacemaker, which is filled with fried oysters, bacon and cheddar cheese. There are daily lunch specials as well. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PARKWAY BAKERY AND TAVERN — 538 N. Hagen Ave., 482-3047 —

Parkway serves juicy roast beef po-boys, hot sausage po-boys, fried seafood and more. No reservations. Kitchen open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $ PARRAN’S PO-BOYS — 3939 Vet-

erans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 885-3416; www.parranspoboy.com — Parran’s offers a long list of poboys plus muffulettas, club sandwiches, pizzas, burgers, salads, fried seafood plates and Creole-

Italian entrees. The veal supreme po-boy features a cutlet topped with Swiss cheese and brown gravy. No reservations. Lunch Mon.Sat., dinner Thu.-Sat. Credit cards. $

TRACEY’S — 2604 Magazine St., 899-2054; www.traceysnola.com — The roast beef po-boy dripping with garlicky gravy is the highlight of a menu transplanted from the former Parasol’s to this Uptown bar. Other options include fried seafood and bar noshing items. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Cash only. $

Credit cards. $$

SOUL FOOD BIG MOMMA’S CHICKEN AND WAFFLES — 5741 Crowder Blvd., 241-2548;

www.bigmommaschickenandwaffles.com — Big Mamma’s serves hearty combinations like the six-piece which includes a waffle and six fried wings served crispy or dipped in sauce. Breakfast is served all day. All items are cooked to order. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., Lunch daily, dinner Sun. Credit cards. $

SEAFOOD

STEAKHOUSE

GRAND ISLE RESTAURANT — 575

CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — 322

Convention Center Blvd., 520-8530; www.grandislerestaurant.com — Grand Isle offers seafood options from raw oysters to lobster St. Malo with combines Maine lobster, shrimp and mussels in seafood broth. Baked Gulf fish are served with compound chili butter, potatoes and a vegetable. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

JACK DEMPSEY’S — 738 Poland Ave., 943-9914 — The Jack Dempsey seafood platter serves a trainingtable feast of gumbo, shrimp, oysters, catfish, redfish and crawfish pies, plus two side items. Other dishes include broiled redfish and fried soft-shell crab. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat. and dinner Wed.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

700 Tchoupitoulas St., 613-2350; www. lacotebrasserie.com — This stylish restaurant in the Renaissance New Orleans Arts Hotel serves an array of raw and cooked seafood. Tabasco and Steen’s Cane Syrup glazed salmon is served with shrimp mirliton ragout. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ LA

COTE

BRASSERIE

RED FISH GRILL — 115 Bourbon

St., 598-1200; www.redfishgrill. com — Seafood creations by executive chef Brian Katz dominate a menu peppered with favorites like hickory-grilled redfish, pecancrusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ VILLAGE INN — 9201 Jefferson Hwy.,

737-4610 — Check into Village Inn for seasonal boiled seafood or raw oysters. Other options include fried seafood platters, po-boys, pasta and pizza. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat.

Magazine St., 522-7902; www.centraarchy.com — This traditional steakhouse serves USDA prime beef, and a selection of super-sized cuts includes a 40-oz. Porterhouse for two. The menu also features seafood options and a la carte side items. Reservations recommended. Diner daily. Credit cards. $$$

CRESCENT CITY STEAKS — 1001 N. Broad St., 821-3271; www.crescentcitysteaks.com — Order USDA prime beef dry-aged and hand-cut in house. There are porterhouse steaks large enough for two or three diners to share. Bread pudding with raisins and peaches is topped with brandy sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri. and Sun., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$ RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE —

Harrah’s Hotel, 525 Fulton St., 5877099; 3633 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 888-3600; www. ruthschris.com — Ruth’s top-quality steaks are broiled in 1,800-degree ovens and arrive at the table sizzling. Reservations recommended. Fulton Street: Lunch and dinner daily. Veterans Memorial Boulevard: Lunch Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

TAPAS/SPANISH MIMI’S

IN

THE

MARIGNY

2601 Royal St., 872-9868 — The decadant Mushroom Manchego Toast is a favorite here. Or enjoy hot and cold tapas dishes ranging from grilled marinated artichokes to calamari. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner and latenight Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

SANTA FE TAPAS — 1327 St. Charles Ave., 304-9915 — The menu includes both tapas dishes and entrees. Seared jumbo scallops are served with mango and green tomato pico de gallo. Gambas al

ajillo are jumbo shrimp with garlic, shallots, chilis and cognac. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

VEGA TAPAS CAFE — 2051 Metarie Road, 836-2007; www.vegatapascafe.com — Vega’s mix of hot and cold tapas dishes includes a salad of lump crabmeat on arugula with blood orange vinaigrette, seared tuna with avocado and tomato relish, braised pork empanadillos, steamed mussels and shrimp with tomatoes and garlic in caper-basil cream. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

There’s more Japanese cuisine than just sushi at Wasabi (900 Frenchmen St., 943-9433; 8550 Pontchartrain Blvd., 267-3263; www.wasabinola.com). PHOTO BY CHeRYL GeRBeR

soup and thick spring rolls make a refreshing, satisfying meal. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards and checks. $$

PHO NOLA — 3320 Transcontinental

VIETNAMESE AUGUST MOON — 3635 Prytania

St., 899-5129; www.moonnola.com — August Moon serves a mix of Vietnamese and Chinese cuisine. There are spring rolls and pho soup as well as many popular Chinese dishes and vegetarian options. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

DOSON NOODLE HOUSE — 135

N. Carrollton Ave., 309-7283 — Noodles abound at this Mid-City eatery, which excels at vinegary chicken salad over shredded cabbage, as well as bowls of steaming pho. Vegetable-laden wonton

Drive, Metairie, 941-7690; www. pho-nola.com — Pho NOLA serves spring rolls and egg rolls, noodle soups, rice and vermicelli dishes and po-boys. Beverages include boba teas, milk teas, coffee drinks and smoothies. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PHO TAU BAY RESTAURANT — 113 Westbank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, 368-9846 — You’ll find classic Vietnamese beef broth and noodle soups, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, shrimp spring rolls with peanut sauce and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Wed. & Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

CLASSIFIEDS CHATTY CAT

AUTOMOTIVE

DSH, Gray/Brown/Black Tabby white chest, chin, feet. Appx. 1years, Neut. Vacs/Vet Ck/litter trained/Rescue. Small, Precious, Talkative & Super gentle! Would be great pet for child or Senior. Wt. 7 lbs. (504) 460-0136

ANTIQUES & CLASSICS 1965 PLYMOUTH BARRACUDA Great Driver! $7000. Call Mark at (504) 944-7733.

Elijah

5 yr old gorgeous solid white Angora male cat super smart and sweet.Shots ,neuter ,rescue 504 462-1968

DOMESTIC AUTOS ‘09 PT CRUISER $10,990 504-368-5640

Kit Kit

Muted Gray Tabby DSH , appx. 1 year old, VetCk/Vacs/Spayed/ Litter Trained/Super Sweet/ Rescue (504) 460-0136

‘10 CHEVROLET HHR $11,995 Several to Choose From! 504-368-5640

‘10 CHEVY COBALT LT $10,995 Several To Choose From! 504-368-5640

IMPORTED AUTOS

Koko pure bred poodle

MASSAGE BY JAMIE

8mos.sweet & playful, good w/ another playful dog. energy & charisma Tracitbkestler@cox.net 504-975-5971

MASSAGE EXTRAORDINAIRE

curious, sweet, cuddly & playful Randblack & Raymon- white/grey current shots. litter trained Traci- tbkestler@ cox.net 504-975-5971

SW/DT or Gen Relaxation. Safe, priv & quiet location. Awesome work. $60/hr & $95/1.5hr. 8am-9pm. 504-2311774. LA#509

$19,995 504-368-5640

24 yrs exp to give you the ultimate in relaxation. Call Matteo. LA 0022, for your next appt. Metairie area. 504-8320945. No Outcalls

‘08 ACURA TL

QUIET WESTBANK LOC

‘06 LEXUS IS 350

$22,900 504-368-5640

‘09 NISSAN ALTIMA $14,995 504-368-5640

‘10 HONDA CIVIC

$15,995 Several to Choose From! 504-368-5640

Swedish, Relaxing Massage. Hours 9am-6pm, M-F. Sat 10-1pm $70. LA Lic #1910. Sandra, 504-393-0123.

STRESS? PAIN?

Relax with a massage. Amazing Hands by Patrick. LMT Lic 4005. 504-717-2577 www.amazinghands.us

M/ 8wks Kittens

MISHKA

Beautiful long hair Russian Blue mix 5 yr old sweetie ,spayed vacs ,504 462-1968

Princess Leila

solid white 6yr old female cat , very loving and talkative spayed ,shots ,rescue 504 462-1968

ANNOUNCEMENTS

‘10 VOLVO S40 $18,995 504-368-5640

‘11 HYUNDAI SONATA $17,995 504-368-5640

DANCE Classical Ballet for children & adults. Home of Ballet Hysell, Koenka, Fiesta Flamengo, D’project. 5956 Magazine St. 504-891-0038 nodanceacademy@ aol.com

HEALTH/FITNESS

CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS

FURNITURE/ACCESSORIES

With Focus On NOLA’s history, culture, influences, etc. joan34@me.com

NEW BOOK CLUB

TRAINER TO GO

In Home Personal Training “Where we bring the gym to you” For info: 504-994-3822 www.trainertogonola.com

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT LICENSED MASSAGE NOTICE

Massage therapists are required to be licensed with the State of Louisiana and must include the license number in their ads.

A BODY BLISS MASSAGE

Jeannie LMT #3783-01. Flexible appointments. Uptown Studio or Hotel out calls. 504.894.8856 (uptown)

BODY & FOOT MASSAGE Open 7 days - 10am-10pm Jasmine Health Spa 614 Causeway, Metairie 504-273-7676 Chnese Health Spa 2424 Williams Blvd Suite S Kenner - 504-305-5177

BYWATER BODYWORKS

Swedish, deep tissue, therapeutic. Flex appts, in/out calls, OHP/student discounts, gift cert. $65/hr, $75/ 1 1/2hr. LA Lic# 1763 Mark. 259-7278

PETS

LOST/FOUND PETS REWARD- LOST

(Mid City but could be anywhere by now),Ozzie, male, brown/black stripe (brindle), pit mix, sweet, call him & he will come, hold him &call me asap, Traci 504-975-5971.

PET ADOPTIONS Alexa

Purrfect 5/mo old adorable, beautiful & sweet kitten silver tabby ,vacs & spayed . rescue 504 462 -1968

ALLEY CAT

DSH White with Gray Tabby Markings, de-clawed, appx 1 year old, Vet Ck/ Vacs/Neut./Litter Trained/ Super Sweet/Rescue Wt. 9 lbs.. (504) 460-0136

Bubba-colorful large Iguana

needs a good home w/ lots of space. Prefer outdoor space. contact Tracitbkestler@cox.net 504-975-5971

Caffe

Adorable male 5/mo old Bobtail kitten Very sweet and playful ,tested vacs neutered 504 462-1968

Lorenzo is a 3-year-old, neutered, Pit Bull. He’s SUPER-sweet, loves being petted, enjoys treats, knows how to sit and will require TLC during heartworm treatment. To meet Lorenzo or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/ SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191.

ROOFING GEAUX CONSTRUCTION

“Your Roofing Professional” Shingle roofs, flat roofs, slate roofs, tile roofs, roof repairs, insurance claims. FREE INSPECTIONS. Member BBB & HBA. GAF certified. (504) 810-1100

PROFESSIONAL EDITING WORLD’S BEST WRITING HELP

LOREnZO Kennel #A10382468

RESEARCH PAPERS FICTION - ESSAYS 452-3697 or ROBERBRIDE@LIVE.COM

LEGAL SERVICES ATTN: CONDO ASSOCIATIONS Total Condo Problem Analysis Carolyn Aiken Chesnutt Attorney at Law (504) 909-7367

SCHOENFELD LAW CORPORATION 24-hr mobile notary services. Successions, Wills, Power of Attorney, etc, We’ll come to you! 504-416-2489

MAXinE Kennel #A12985280

Maxine is a 3 ½-year-old, spayed, DSH with brown/white/torbie markings. She enjoys playing hide & seek with toys, will follow you around like a dog and loves to just hang. To meet Maxine or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/ SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. To look for a lost pet come to the Louisiana SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), Mon-Sat. 9-5, Sun. 12-5 or call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org.

SERVICES

HOME SERVICES Don’t Replace Your Tub REGLAZE IT

Chip/Spot Repair - Colors Available Clawfoot tubs for sale Southern Refinishing LLC Certified Fiberglass Technician Family Owned & Operated 504-348-1770 southernrefinishing.com

INSULATION AUDUBON SPRAY FOAM INSULATION

Save up to 50% on ac/heat bills; live more comfortably; Improve sound control, reduce your carbon footprint. Roland (Rusty) Cutrer Jr, Owner 504-432-7359 www.audubonsprayfoam.com

LANDSCAPE/HORTICULTURE DELTA SOD

Certified Grade “A” Turf St. Augustine, Tifway Bermuda Centipede, Zoysia. WE BEAT ALL COMPETITORS! 504-733-0471

The Cracked Pot Garden Center

2 mi west of Airport on Airline Hwy 504-466-8813 Fall Landscaping Clean Up Special Free Estimates

PEST CONTROL DELUXE PEST CONTROL

Commercial & Residential Celebrating 50 yrs in New Orleans Great Rates & Service. 504-837-5800 www.deluxepestcontrol.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 08 > 2011

NEW ORLEANS DANCE ACADEMY

MERCHANDISE

$125 Full/Double Size Mattress Set, still in original plastic, unopened. We can deliver. (504) 846-5122 $295 Brand New Iron Queen Bed with mattress set, all new. Can deliver. (504) 952-8403 King Pillowtop Mattress, NEW!!! ONLY $199. Can deliver. (504) 846-5122 NEW Pub Height Table Set all wood, still boxed. Delivery available. $325 (504) 846-5122 Queen Mattress Set $149 Still in wrapper. Will deliver. (504) 846-5122

Weekly Tails

Sewer & Drain Cleaning Specialists Plumbing Repair Specialists New Orleans 504-522-9536. KennerJefferson 504-466-8581. Westbank 504-368-4070. Laplace 985-6520084. Mandeville 985-626-5045. Slidell 985-641-3525. MENTION GAMBIT FOR A DISCOUNT

NEED A NOTARY NOW?

‘10 KIA OPTIMA $11,995 504-368-5640

PLUMBING ROOTER MAN

65

reaL esTaTe

SHOWCaSe SLIDELL

CBD/WAREHOUSE DISTRICT

33 Chamale Cove • $179,000 Enjoy the Easy Life! 3 BR + loft condo min from Lake. Spectacular view of Marina. Totally renovated with lg boat slip. Joleen Samrow Re/Max Real Estate Partners 985-646-1888 985-640-7776 Each office individually owned and operated

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

FRENCH QUARTER/ FAUBOURG MARIGNY 2231 N. RAMPART- MARIGNY Free standing cottage w/2 charming porches. Bright open fl plan, hdwd flrs throughout, ss appl, ceramic cntrr & bath. Huge bdrm w/skylights. Secure offst. pkng. $159,000. Robert Armstrong 504-616-3615

Best Value in French Qtr

1020 ESPLANADE #103. Lovely 2 br, 2 ba condo, high ceil in den, sparkling pool, courtyd, fenced pkg. Private attached alley could be dog run. $349K. Lana Sackett, Gardner Realtors, 504352-4934. www.lanasackett.com

FRENCH QUARTER STUDIOS

514 DUMAINE , Units 3 & 6. Charming ground & 2nd fl courtyard/ balcony. Awesomely located. Each unit $105,000 www.JudyFisher.net; Judy Fisher, Inc, 504-388-3023

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 08 > 2011

PRIME FQ COMMERCIAL

66

301 Decatur St. Rare corner. Zoning allows live entertainment. 9,000 sq ft (Approx 3,000 sq ft ea. floor). Beautiful light filled loft style spaces. Possible owner financing. $1,650,000. Judy Fisher Inc. 504-388-3023. www.JudyFisher.net

GENTILLY $174,900

2500 GENTILLY BLVD. 2BR/2BA, Lr, dr, den, kit w/granite, fp, hdwd flrs, inground pool. Call (504) 669-7263.

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

FRENCH QUARTER

1 RIVER PLACE • $1,149,000 Breathtaking view of the River & Bridge. Wall of windows allows natural light to flow thru. 2BR/2BA condo. Amaz flrpln. 1918 sq ft w/elegant dsgnr details Joy North • Gardner Realtors 504-400-0274 • cocohocke@aol.com

922-24 Dauphine St. $875K Four 1 bedroom apartments. Parking for 5+ cars.

LAKEVIEW/LAKESHORE

WAREHOUSE DISTRICT

1161 ROBERT E. LEE BLVD

Furnished 1 Bedroom—1 Bath

MID-CITY 3924 B CLEVELAND $160K

Off Canal & Carrollton. 2br/1ba, CA&H, hdwd flrs, crown molding, ss appliances. Washer/Dryer/Fridge included. (504) 559-1993

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT 2123-25 LAUREL ST $270K

Restored 2 unit Creole cottage in Lwr Gard Dist. Walk to Magazine St. Nr CBD. 6BR/2BA, all elec, cen a/h, 2900 sf liv area, porch. 30x158 lot. John, 508-5799.

835 Royal St. $349.5K Great location, secluded hideaway! Spac 2 br, 2 marble tile baths. Small rear balc overlooking garden.

617 Duphine St. $268K Spacious light filled condo. Great floor plan. Fabulous pool and courtyard. Being sold furnished. In the heart of the quarter.

Paula Bowler • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 • www.frenchquarterrealty.com

Million Dollar Club; Gold Award Winner

Luxury home in Lake Vista near the lakefront. Over 4000 sq ft. 4 BR, 4.5 BA. Custom kit Lovely pool. $775,000. G.L. Schroeder Realtor, Contractor. 504.241.1000. Cell 504.722.2928. schroederbuild@yahoo.com

938 Royal St. A $215K Great location for this condo. Perfect for your weekend getaways! Quaint & comfortable. 1 br, great kit & bath.

Furnished Condo in Warehouse District. Secure building, top floor, end unit. Rent includes utilities, pool, gym, cable, internet. Apt has W/D, stainless steel appliances, central heat/air. Central to to French Quarter, West Bank, Uptown, parade route, streetcar. Loft with desk. Available 11/1. Call Bonnie at Soniat Realty, 504-488-8988. $1600, negotiable.

COVINGTON ELEGANT COUNTRY LIVING

Mins. from downtown Covington. Custom European estate on Bogue Falaya River. Main hse 3500 sf, 3 br, 3.5 ba. Guest hse 1000 sf, 2 br, 1 ba. On 4.66 acres. $1,099,000. By Appt. 985-5022882. CovingtonRiverEstate.com.

621-623 9th Street

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

GENERAL REAL ESTATE METROWIDE APARTMENTS

NOLA * Gretna * Metairie * Kenner. Affordable Luxury Living, 1, 2, 3 BDs, $545 & up! Gtd. Pkng, Lndry, Courtyards, FREE WI FI. 504-304-4687 www.BrunoInc.com

CORPORATE RENTALS New Orleans Area (Metairie) 10 Min to Downtown N.O.

1 & 2 Br Apts, 1 Ba, furn. Qn bed, WiFi, Cbl. Pkg.Util Incl. Lndry Fac. Sec Cameras From $1200/mth. 1 mth min. 2200 Pasadena, Met. 504-491-1591.

NEW ORLEANS RIVERFRONT

2 BR, 2.5 BA. Furn, healthclub, pool, parking. All util incl, wifi. Min 1 month. $3000/mo. Also Penthouse $3800/ mo. 781-608-6115.

COMMERCIAL RENTALS CBD ON ST. CAR LINE

720 Carondelet - Lots of exposure. Possible deli, diner, retail, office. 1200 sq ft Contact: REO LLC. ronkeever@ hotmail.com.

ELMWOOD CONDO

2/2, Appl inc. w&d, walk-in closets, pkng, priv. patio, pool, tennis crts. Earhart - 1 mile. No smokers. $1050, Glenn, 504-450-5634

JEFFERSON 102 RIVER ROAD

Fully furn beau 2 br, 1.5 ba TH, cen a/h, dvwy. Great loc on river levee. $1200. Gardner Realtors, 874-3295

511 1/2 LABARRE RD

HARAHAN/RIVER RIDGE 1828 HICKORY AVE

2 BR, 1.5 BA, washer/dryer hookups. Ceramic floors, ceil fans, offst parking. No pets. Must have references. $750/ mo. $750 dep. 504-457-2598

Near Ochsner, small efficiency. Kitchenette, water paid. $525/ month(504) 913-6999, (504) 2596999

NEAR OCHSNER

Beautiful 2 BR, 2 BA, large jacuzzi in master bath, high end appliances incl washer & dryer, pool. $1200/mo. 504-835-1577

8309 Sycamore Street & 2214 Dante Street

Lovely Double, Uptown area. 2 bdrm, 1 ba each side, hardwood floors, ceil fans, . $185,000. Call April Gongora, Gardner Realtors, 504-606-0466.

PRICED TO SELL NOW

427 ARABELLA Unique sgl. architectually designed interior, 2-3 BR, 2 BA, 2000+ sq ft. Only $385K. 917 RACE Historical 1850’s gem. Beautiful stairway, orig pocket doors, L shaped yd, much more. Call for info. $350K 3655-57 TCHOUPITOULAS Ready to rent, nice dble, lg yd, new roof. $110K. Lois Landry Realty, 504-586-1019 To Advertise in

EMPLOYMENT Call (504) 483-3100

Ann de Montluzin Farmer broker SALE PENDING 1016 NAPOLEON AVE • $350,000 3 br, 2.5 bA, 2088 Sq Ft. Spacious 1st floor w/ wrap around pvt brick patio. Separate dining room and living room with built in bookshelves. Wood burning fireplace in den with French doors opening onto the patio. Located at rear of complex so very private. Assigned parking space. Located on parade route and close to Magazine Street and many amenities. Must see!

(504) 895-1493 (504) 430-8737 farmeran@gmail.com www.demontluzinrealtors.com Licensed in Louisiana for 32 years, building on a real estate heritage since 1905

Large executive sized home (5000 sq. ft.) on double lot with gourmet kitchen, chic master bath, huge den, 4 bedrooms, 4.5 baths, sutdio/game room/2nd den and an office plus a six (6) car garage and 3 bedroom/2 bath rental (great tenant at $1575 per month) on an adjacent property. Package Price $ 699,000 Sycamore house may be sold separately for $ 529,000

Michael L. Baker, ABR/M, CRB, HHS President Realty Resources, Inc. 504-523-5555 • cell 504-606-6226

Licensed by the Louisiana Real Estate Commission for more than 28 years with offices in New Orleans, LA 70130

THE FERNANDEZ HOUSE

927 DAUPHINE STREET $1,895,000 An excellent example of an early creole cottage set in a serene compound. Beautiful courtyard with mature plantings in a classic partere garden. Property consists of the main house, 4 income producing apartments and a large bonus space-- office, workshop, gym, etc. Parking for multiple cars. Great location.

Paula Bowler • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 www.frenchquarterrealty.com

CLASSIFIEDS PUZZLE PAGE BROADMOOR

FAUBOURG ST. JOHN

SALE PENDING

JOHN SCHAFF CRS

(c) 504.343.6683 (O) 504.895.4663

3222 Coliseum 4941 St. Charles 2721 St. Charles 5528 Hurst 1750 St. Charles 1750 St. Charles 20 Anjou 1544 Camp 3915 St. Charles 1544 Camp 1544 Camp 1224 St. Charles 2721 St. Charles

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > noVember 08 > 2011

ANSWERS FOR LAST WEEK ON PAGE 67

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TOO LATE! ..............................$2,495,000 Grand Mansion.......................$2,300,000 (3 bdrm/3.5ba w/pkg) ............$1,579,000 TOO LATE! ..............................$1,300,000 TOO LATE! ................................ $429,000 Commercial ............................. $349,000 (4 bdrm/2 ba w/pkg) ................ $220,000 (2 bdrm/2ba w/pkg) ................. $239,000 TOO LATE!................................. $315,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) ............................ $159,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) ............................ $149,000 (Only 6 Left!)...............starting at $79,000 (efficiency condo)..................... $169,000

1208/1210 S. GENOIS

3104-06 ST. PHILIP

IMMEDIATE CASH FLOW. Property is currently getting $1800 rent, potentially more. Gutted after Katrina, renovations completed in 2006 include new roof, dry wall, and wiring, 2 new central heaters installed since 2006. Long term tenants, excellent return on investment. Close to the Blue Plate Mayonnaise Building. $125,000

LARGE DOUBLE GREAT BLOCK. This double is in the Heart of Faubourg St John -- walking distance to the Bayou. Structurally sound -- needs updating. Explore the possibility of converting to a fabulous single or renovate as double and have premium rentals. High ceiling, mantles, original floors under carpet -- likely. $195,000

(504) 895-4663


Gambit New Orleans: Nov. 8, 2011