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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > february 7 > 2012

Slow-smoked suckling pig empanadas Duck poppers with jalapeño and bacon

3

contents

staff

Publisher  |  Margo DuBos administrative Director  |  MarK KarCHEr  editorial Editor  |  KEVIN aLLMaN Managing Editor  |  KaNDaCE PoWEr graVEs Political Editor  |  CLaNCY DuBos arts & Entertainment Editor  |  WILL CoVIELLo special sections Editor  |  MIssY WILKINsoN staff Writers  |  aLEX WooDWarD,  

february 7, 2012    +    Volume 33     +    Number 6

pullout

CHarLEs MaLDoNaDo

Editorial assistant  |  LaurEN LaBorDE  listingsedit@gambitweekly.com Contributing Writers   

JErEMY aLforD, D. ErIC BooKHarDT, rED CoTToN,    aLEJaNDro DE Los rIos, MEg farrIs, KEN KorMaN,   BrENDa MaITLaND, IaN MCNuLTY,   NoaH BoNaParTE PaIs, DaLT WoNK Contributing Photographer  |  CHErYL gErBEr

Intern   |  MEgaN PErrY production Production Director  |  Dora sIsoN special Projects Designer    sHErIE DELaCroIX-aLfaro

Web & Classifieds Designer  |  MarIa Boué graphic Designers     

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > february 7 > 2012

LINDsaY WEIss, LYN BraNTLEY, BrITT BENoIT,   MarK WaguEsPaCK Pre-Press Coordinator  |  gEorgIa DoDgE

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display advertising fax: 483-3159 | displayadv@gambitweekly.com advertising Director  |  saNDY sTEIN BroNDuM  483-3150  [sandys@gambitweekly.com] advertising administrator  |  MICHELE sLoNsKI  483-3140  [micheles@gambitweekly.com] advertising Coordinator  |  CHrIsTIN JoHNsoN  483-3138  [christinj@gambitweekly.com] sales & Marketing Coordinator  |  BraNDIN DuBos  483-3152  [brandind@gambitweekly.com] senior account Executive  |  JILL gIEgEr  483-3131 [ jillg@gambitweekly.com] account Executives    JEffrEY PIZZo  483-3145  [jeffp@gambitweekly.com] LINDa LaCHIN  483-3142  [lindal@gambitweekly.com] aBBY sHEffIELD   483-3141  [abbys@gambitweekly.com] aMY WENDEL  483-3146  [amyw@gambitweekly.com] MEgaN MICaLE  483-3144  [meganm@gambitweekly.com] sTaCY gauTrEau  483-3143  [stacyg@gambitweekly.com ] marketing Marketing Director  |  JEaNNE EXNICIos fosTEr classifieds 483-3100 | fax: 483-3153 classadv@gambitweekly.com Classified advertising Director  |  sHErrY sNYDEr  483-3122 [sherrys@gambitweekly.com] senior account Executive  |  CarrIE MICKEY-LaCY  483-3121 [carriem@gambitweekly.com] business Billing Inquiries 483-3135 Controller  |  garY DIgIoVaNNI assistant Controller  |  MaurEEN TrEgrE Credit officer  |  MJ aVILEs operations & events operations & Events Director  |  Laura CarroLL operations & Events assistant  |  raCHEL BarrIos

17 on tHe cover: mardi gras

Krewe du Parades ..........................................17 Krewe du Routes ............................................23 Krewe du Brews ..............................................24 Krewe du Chow ...............................................26

7 in seven

Seven Things to Do This Week ............... 5 Krewe of Barkus, Yob and Thou and more

news + views

News .........................................................................7 a new report suggests gulf businesses lost  billions due to last year’s temporary drilling  moratorium. The methodology — and the  people — behind the findings Bouquets + Brickbats .....................................7 Heroes and zeroes C’est What? ..........................................................7 Gambit’s Web poll Scuttlebutt ..........................................................10 News in brief

45 Commentary ...................................................... 11 The NoPD reverses course on releasing  criminal records of murder victims Clancy DuBos ...................................................13 a federal consent decree for the NoPD   can’t come soon enough Blake Pontchartrain ......................................15 The New orleans know-it-all

style + sHopping

What’s In Store ................................................35 st. Charles Vision

eat + drink

Review ...................................................................37 Merchant Fork+Center  .....................................................37 all the news that’s fit to eat 3-Course Interview ..................................38 David gallent

arts + entertainment

A + E News .........................................................45 ’tit rex, the tiniest Carnival procession of all

Music .....................................................................47 PrEVIEW: The Polyphonic spree ................48 Film .........................................................................50 rEVIEW: The City Dark ...................................51 Art ............................................................................53 rEVIEW: Jimmy Descant at the ogden ......54 Stage .....................................................................56 rEVIEW: A Behanding in Spokane ..............57 Events....................................................................59 PrEVIEW: Krewe of Barkus ...........................60 Crossword + Sudoku ....................................70

classifieds

Market Place .....................................................63 Mind + Body + Spirit .....................................64 Weekly Tails .......................................................64 Employment .......................................................65 Real Estate + Rentals ...................................65 Coupons...............................................................71

gambit communications, inc. Chairman  |  CLaNCY DuBos  +  President & CEo  |  Margo DuBos 

gambit (IssN 1089-3520) is published weekly by gambit Communications, Inc., 3923 Bienville st.,  New orleans, La 70119. (504) 486-5900. We cannot be held responsible for the return of unsolicited  manuscripts even if accompanied by a sasE. all material published in Gambit is copyrighted:  Copyright  2012 gambit Communications, Inc.  all rights reserved.

CoVEr DEsIgN BY Dora Sison CoVEr PHoTo BY Cheryl Gerber

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seven things to do in seven days

Doomtree Thu. Feb. 9 | Led by multitalented Rhymesayers punk-rapper Stefon Alexander (P.O.S, Gayngs), Minneapolis hip-hop crew Doomtree issued its second studio LP, No Kings, on its independent self-titled imprint in late 2011. Mr. I opens at One Eyed Jacks. PAGE 47. Oscar-nominated short films Thu.-Thu. Feb. 9-16 | Oscar-nominated short animated and live-action films screen at the Prytania Theatre. The New Orleans Film Society presents documentary short films on Thursday. PAGE 50.

Yob with Thou Fri. Feb. 10 | Playing hooky from a tour with Tool, Eugene, Ore., doom-metal trio Yob teams with New Orleans thrashers Thou for this early show (timed to let out before Eyehategod starts at Siberia), a Mayan calendar end-credits coup-de-grace. At the Big Top Gallery. PAGE 47.

FEB

’tit Rex Sat. Feb. 11 | Carnival’s only microkrewe rolls through Bywater on the way to its ball at the AllWays Lounge. Tiny floats carry Barbie doll-size riders, and krewe members toss bracelets and cookie-sized king cakes. PAGE 45.

Barkus | The Mystic Krewe of Barkus is back in Louis Armstrong Park for its preparade “pawty” and follows an expanded route in the French Quarter. The costumed canines and their escorts parade with the theme “Mission: Impossible — Canine Protocol.” PAGE 60.

Big Easy Blues Fest Sat. Feb. 11 | The Big Easy Blues Fest features Clarence Carter, R&B singer Millie Jackson, soul singer Sir Charles Jones, bluesman Mel Waiters and others. At the UNO Lakefront Arena. PAGE 47.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > february 7 > 2012

Ubu Enchaine Fri.-Sat. Feb. 9-10 | Just in time for Carnival, Cripple Creek Theater unleashes Pere Ubu. The third installment of Alfred Jarry’s absurdist saga features the mad ruler Ubu seeking his own enslavement. The event includes food and live music after the play. PAGE 56.

5

nEwS + viEwS

BouquETS + brickbats ™

S C U T T L E B U T T 10 C O M M E N TA R Y 11

heroes + zeroes

C L A N CY 13 B L A K E 15

knowledge is power

The Drill

Greater New Orleans Inc.’s latest report highlights what it calls the “hidden victims” of the post-BP disaster — businesses impacted by last year’s moratorium on deepwater drilling.

i

planted its 10,000th tree since Hurricane Katrina on Feb. 2. The group, which has supported the New Orleans Department of Parks and Parkways for nearly 30 years, vowed to “ReLeaf New Orleans” after the storm and the federal floods. It has replaced hundreds of downed or dead trees.

Ellen DeGeneres and Randy Jackson

will hold a “Night to Make It Right” fundraiser at the Hyatt Regency New Orleans March 10 to benefit Brad Pitt’s Make It Right foundation. The gala will feature performances by Seal, Sheryl Crow and Dr. John, among others, and Chef John Besh is organizing a multi-course meal with dishes by Emeril Lagasse and Giada de Laurentiis. Tickets are $1,000, and all money raised will benefit Pitt’s local rebuilding efforts.

By Alex Woodward

in its Gulf Permit Index. (In 2009, an average of 5.8 deepwater permits and 7.1 shallow water drilling permits were approved each month.) Approval time also decreased, from an average 60-day waiting period to, in 2011, more than 100 days. BOEM refuses to speed its processing without a firm commitment from the oil industry on drilling safety. This June, a Gulf oil lease sale will open 38 million acres of Gulf waters to resume drilling. The report (“The Impact of Decreased and Delayed Drilling Permit Approvals on Gulf of Mexico Businesses”) isn’t based on a scientific model — instead it gathers data from 102 Louisianabased companies that completed a 17-question online survey created by GNO Inc. “Our hypothesis was there might be … essentially ‘hidden victims,’” says Michael Hecht, president and CEO of GNO Inc. “It was more severe than we even expected. We thought there’d be some impact from the ongoing slowdown. We didn’t expect to see these types of … drops.” Marine services and ship owners and operators each accounted for 29 percent of the surveyed businesses. More than 40 percent that responded said they’re not making a profit, of which 76 percent say they’ve lost cash reserves. Half of respondents reported laying off employees, and 82 percent say they’ve lost personal savings — of which 13 percent say they have lost all their personal savings. To stay afloat without any new work in the Gulf, these businesses are dipping into savings accounts, cutting workers’ benefits or moving out of the Gulf entirely. Hecht page 9

c’est

Big Freedia

made her network television debut Jan. 25 on Jimmy Kimmel Live, where she performed her single “Excuse” and “Na Who Mad.” It was a landmark for the local bounce artist and the bounce scene, which originated in New Orleans and has been popular for years in the hip-hop world with little mainstream attention.

Shawn Payton,

a Detroit resident, admitted to phoning in bomb threats to the Superdome while the New Orleans Saints were beating the Lions, on Jan. 7. The coincidentally named football fan (no relation to Saints coach Sean Payton) appeared in federal court in Detroit on Jan. 30 and is scheduled to appear in U.S. District Court in New Orleans on Feb. 14. He is charged with making a threatening communication through interstate commerce and faces up to five years in prison if convicted.

?

How confident are you in the NOPD’s ability to keep paradegoers safe this Mardi Gras?

Vote on “C’est What?” at www.bestofneworleans.com

40%

Not very much

39%

Pretty much

21%

Very much

THiS wEEK’S question:

What’s your Mardi Gras parade preference?

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > february 7 > 2012

n his January State of the Union address, President Barack Obama told Americans that his administration is going “all out” to beef up domestic energy production. Obama also announced his commitment to justice in making BP accountable for the April 20, 2010 Deepwater Horizon rig explosion and months-long oil gusher into the Gulf of Mexico. The administration’s moratorium on deepwater drilling, which went in place in the days following the explosion, ended in October 2010. During those six months, the government approved no new permits. Now the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), the agency responsible for issuing drilling permits, isn’t doing it fast enough, according to coastal officials. Last year, U.S. Rep. Jeff Landry and U.S. Sen. David Vitter made their outrage public and engaged in a political parlay with Michael Bromwich (then director of the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement [BOEMRE]) to demand swifter permit approvals. (In October 2011, BOEMRE split into BOEM and the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement.) Of course with those permits come jobs — not just for the contract-holding oil companies and rig workers, but for suppliers, dock workers, engineers, caterers and dozens other peripheral and “indirect” employees and businesses. While larger companies can take their drilling operations elsewhere to more profitable, less volatile oil markets, Greater New Orleans Inc. (GNO Inc.) argues many small and mid-sized businesses that can’t do that are getting the shaft . More than 1,777 small businesses in the oil and gas industries stand to make $4 billion in annual revenue and potentially employ more than 9,000 employees, according to GNO Inc., which released a report Jan. 30 outlining what it calls the “hidden victims” of the moratorium. GNO Inc. is southeast Louisiana’s regional economic development group, and its three previous reports — examining the BP disaster’s effect on fisheries, local economy and Louisiana’s “brand,” respectively — were funded through a U.S. Department of Commerce grant. Whereas those reports studied the effects from the BP disaster, the group’s latest self-financed report looks at what it says are the lingering effects of a federal policy: the drilling moratorium. Though the moratorium ended in late 2010, officials routinely call the business dropoff a “permatorium.” Post-moratorium, federal agencies approve an average of two deepwater drilling permits a month — compared to the average of seven approved permits per month before the disaster, which GNO Inc. tallied

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > february 7 > 2012

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scuttlebutt Quote of the week

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“This is no way to conduct the people’s business, sitting up there eating subway meatball sandwiches, walking out to chat.” — Perpetual City Council critic and gadfly Sandra “18-Wheeler” Hester, scolding the council at its Feb. 2 meeting, after Council President Jackie Clarkson threatened to have Hester removed.

curfew Deferred — Again

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > february 7 > 2012

CITY COUNCIL FAILS TO EXPAND 8 P.M. CURFEW CITYWIDE

10

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in a brief New Orleans City Council meeting Feb. 2, council members for the second time deferred a vote on a proposed citywide extension of the curfew ordinance. in early January, the council passed a similar extension for the French Quarter and a portion of the Faubourg Marigny. The proposed extension would make it illegal anywhere in the city for children under 17 to be out between 8 p.m. and 6 a.m. without adult supervision. Last week’s deferral pushes consideration of the curfew extension back to the council’s next meeting on Feb. 16. Kara Johnson, chief of staff for District e Councilman Jon Johnson, says the proposal has drawn concerns from residents and municipal officials. The Orleans Parish sheriff’s Office (OPsO), for example, has expressed worries that the extension would overwhelm its Juvenile Curfew Center. OPsO spokesman Marc Ehrhardt declined to comment, directing all curfew-related questions back to the council. Foundation for Louisiana President Flozell Daniels Jr. tells Gambit he understands the logic behind a curfew in the alcohol-heavy French Quarter, but does not believe curfews typically do much to reduce crime or keep teenagers safer — because, he says, most crime by or against teenagers occurs between 2 p.m. and 8 p.m., not late at night. Daniels says he hopes to sit down with councilmembers and other city officials to look at the research on curfews and perhaps think of other solutions to youth-oriented crime. “we just think this is a good opportunity to press the pause button on this curfew,” he says. But should additional research and public comment conclude that a citywide extension would not reduce crime, and should Councilman Johnson decide to drop the ordinance, the new French Quarter-only curfew would still be in effect. The proposed citywide extension came after criticism that the original proposal, sponsored by District C Councilwoman Kristin Gisleson Palmer, failed to consider the city’s outer neighborhoods and merely sought to keep black teenagers out of the city’s tourist-heavy core. Asked if a decision to kill the citywide curfew proposal ought to prompt the

news + views council to rescind the French Quarter extension, Marjorie Esman, executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Louisiana, says both extensions were rushed through without adequate research. early curfews, when applied even on weekends, “criminalize teenage dating,” she says, adding that curfews in general often are applied disproportionately to nonwhite teenagers. “it should never have been passed in the French Quarter in the first place,” esman says. “whether it’s being applied disparately to minorities and whether it should exist at all are two separate issues.” — ChArLes MALDONADO

HuD Grants equal Access LGBT COMMUNITY AND PUBLIC HOUSING

Following last month’s U.s. Conference of Mayors gathering, at which dozens of municipal chief executives announced support for the Freedom to Marry initiative, the U.s. Department of housing and Urban Development (hUD) announced on Jan. 30 new provisions to “ensure that its core housing programs are open to all eligible persons, regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity.” hUD secretary Shaun Donovan said the Obama administration “has viewed the fight for equality on behalf of the LGBT community as a priority, and i’m proud that hUD has been a leader in that fight. ... with this historic rule, the administration is saying you cannot use taxpayer dollars to prevent Americans from choosing where they want to live on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity — ensuring that hUD’s housing programs are open, not to some, not to most, but to all.” Provisions to protect LGBT communities in public housing previously only fell into the Fair housing Act’s considerations. The New Orleans City Council added a prohibition against gender discrimination to the city’s ordinances in 1997 during the administration of former Mayor Marc Morial. Those ordinances made it unlawful to discriminate for housing, among other things, based on age, race, sex and religion. Donovan announced the latest equal Access to housing rules Jan. 24 at the annual National Gay and Lesbian Task Force “Creating Change” Conference. Marjorie Esman, executive director of the ACLU of Louisiana, said it’s “past time for the federal government to recognize the LGBT community.” The final ruling (“equal Access to housing in hUD Programs — regardless of sexual Orientation or Gender identity”) will be implemented 30 days after its publication this week. hUD also is expanding its race and gender discrimination studies (performed every 10 years) with a study on LGBT discrimination in public housing. — ALex wOODwArD

commentaRy

thinking out loud

Reversing course He also had an arrest record, and not a short one. Somehow Ainsworth’s record didn’t come up at a press conference held that afternoon by Serpas and Mayor Mitch Landrieu. It surfaced the next day — not by NOPD press release, but by the nonprofit journalism organization The Lens. A police spokesperson said the department had always planned to release Ainsworth’s record, under NOPD’s policy, but cops were busy constructing a composite sketch of his killer instead. A subsequent release carried the Good Samaritan’s list of arrests, which further inflamed many New Orleanians. Days later, the NOPD’s curious policy went national, with stories on CNN and the Associated Press about New Orleans’ habit of releasing the arrest records of anyone murdered within its borders. Quite a message for potential visitors, particularly in a month when national media noted the uptick in New Orleans

To visitors, the message appeared to be: If you get killed here, we’re going to release every bit of dirt on you we can find. murders in 2011 and wondered whether the city could be made safe for Mardi Gras. To visitors, the message appeared to be: If you get killed here, we’re going to release every bit of dirt on you we can find. Some message. It’s encouraging to see the department and the administration willing to change a bad policy. We applaud that decision. We also hope the anticipated consent decree between DOJ and NOPD uses the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) as a model in one critical way. Under the LAPD’s consent decree, which was put in place 2001-2009, data was collected about every officer in the department, from use of lethal and nonlethal force to individual driving records. If data about murdered New Orleanians can help stem the crime rate, as Serpas seems to think it does, then scrupulous monitoring and accurate data about the members of a troubled police department should do the same.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > february 7 > 2012

ast March, the U.S. Department of Justice’s (DOJ) Civil Rights Division released a scathing report about the state of the New Orleans Police Department (NOPD). Among the many problems the DOJ found were “a pattern of stops, searches and arrests that violate the Fourth Amendment.” Investigators also noted, “Detentions without reasonable suspicion are routine, and lead to unwarranted searches and arrests without probable cause.” It was not the first time NOPD had received such a warning. “A previous DOJ investigation noted almost 10 years ago that some NOPD officers could not articulate proper legal standards for stops, searches or arrests,” the report states. And this, the DOJ made clear, was not the opinion of civil liberties groups: “Throughout the department, and among other stakeholders in the criminal justice system, we heard broad and emphatic consensus that officers have a poor understanding of how to lawfully execute searches and seizures.” [Emphasis ours.] This longstanding pattern of inappropriate — if not unconstitutional — arrests is what Police Chief Ronal Serpas drew upon when he began releasing the arrest record of every person murdered in New Orleans. Not their record of convictions, but merely their previous arrests — for offenses major and minor, some stretching back decades. Serpas said the records show how many people murdered in the city were involved in a life of crime (and, presumably, to reassure law-abiding New Orleanians that our city’s obscenely high murder rate is not a threat to them). Last week, after mounting public outcry and national headlines, the Landrieu administration and NOPD reversed Serpas’ policy and announced that NOPD would henceforth release monthly aggregated data on the records of murder victims. It was the right move. Civil rights groups, as well as families and loved ones of the victims, had objected to the practice for several reasons. First, an arrest is not a conviction. The presumption of innocence does not go away just because an arrested person has died. Second, a murder victim’s criminal history is irrelevant unless he or she was killed in retaliation for a previous crime. Third, the policy presumed that all murder victims are either bad people or blameless citizens who were simply in the wrong place at the wrong time. The truth is never that simple, as in the case of Harry “Mike” Ainsworth, the Algiers resident slain Jan. 25 while trying to foil a carjacking. He was the 19th person murdered in New Orleans this year, a Good Samaritan who paid for his heroism with his life. Ainsworth volunteered with the NOPD and was by all accounts a force for good in his community.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > february 7 > 2012

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politics

Bad Eggs s if the city’s horrendous murder  rate were not enough to keep  Mayor Mitch Landrieu busy, he  was reminded — again — that the New orleans Police Department (NoPD) still has a  lot of housecleaning to do.     Various news outlets recently reported  that several cops who are part of a multiagency police force allegedly ripped off  a suspected drug dealer in January 2011.  The alleged rip-off was brazen enough,  and evidence of it strong enough, that  DA Leon Cannizzaro’s office dropped all  charges against the suspected drug dealer.     According to WDsu-TV and The TimesPicayune, two building managers say they  saw cops hauling out a pair of safes from  the ArtEgg glassblowing studios in MidCity during a raid on the premises used  by 24-year-old stefan Daigle. There was  no mention of the safes in a police report  about Daigle’s arrest on charges of distributing methamphetamine.     on top of that, Daigle’s defense lawyer,  Roger Kitchens, says cops also extorted  money from Daigle after his arrest. The  station and the T-P reported — and DA 

spokesman Chris Bowman confirmed to  me last week — that Kitchens showed the  DA’s office a video of his client going into  Daigle’s French Quarter apartment with  a pair of cops. The same video shows the  cops leaving a short time later carrying  a bag. Kitchens says the bag contained  $3,500 that Daigle kept in his apartment.      The video does not show what’s in the  bag — but it does undercut sworn testimony by Detective Ray Veit, who Kitchens  says was waiting in an NoPD cruiser  outside the apartment while the other two  cops went in with Daigle. Veit testified that  he and the other two arresting officers did  not go anywhere else with Daigle after his  arrest in Mid-City — and the officers’ report  of Daigle’s arrest makes no mention of any  confiscated money.     The cops are part of a special unit called  the West Bank Major Crimes Task Force,  which was formed in 2006 and includes  cops from NoPD, the Jefferson Parish  sheriff’s office, the Plaquemines Parish  sheriff’s office, the orleans Parish sheriff’s office, the Westwego Police Department and the Gretna Police Department. 

The consent  decree has been  in the works for  almost two years.  It’s high time  it got done.     Gretna cops are now investigating one  of their own in connection with the incident,  and Bowman told me late last week that  Cannizzaro’s office is investigating the  entire matter. NoPD’s Public Integrity  Bureau also is looking into it. Bowman said  Daigle’s lawyers are cooperating fully with  the DA’s request for evidence of the cops’  wrongdoing.     As bad as all this sounds, it’s going to  get worse. several lawyers familiar with  the case told me last week that this case is 

going to get “real ugly” and “much bigger.”  If that’s so, and I have no reason to doubt  these guys, don’t be surprised to see the  feds get involved.     Which brings us to a related topic: the  federal consent decree to reform NoPD.  The decree has been in the works for almost two years. Notwithstanding the feds’  well-established reputation for moving at  a snail’s pace, it’s high time the decree got  done. Even if the ArtEgg case does not get  bigger — but it probably will — it shows that  police corruption is costly on several levels.  It allows suspected drug dealers to go free.  It undermines public confidence in cops.  And no doubt it demoralizes the many honest cops who are busting their butts and  risking their lives to make the city safer.     All of which argues for the drastic measures that a federal consent decree puts  in place, starting with a top-down federal  takeover of a department that clearly is  out of control. If the latest scandal is any  indication, nothing less will rid NoPD of its  bad eggs. 

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > february 7 > 2012

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BLakePONTCHARTRAIN New Orleans Know-it-all Questions for Blake: askblake@gambitweekly.com

Hey Blake,

I recently moved to the Lewisburg area just west of Mandeville. Other than the sign that indicates that the Village of Lewisburg was established in 1834, there is no information regarding the area. Do you have any information on its history and for whom it was named?

ana in 1815, the second election after Louisiana had become a state. At the time, the political rivalry was between local Creoles and newly arrived Americans. The candidate for the French Creoles was Jacques Villere, who defeated Lewis by a small margin.

Lars

We have President Thomas Jefferson to thank for Judge Joshua Lewis moving to New Orleans, where he fought for the Americans against the British in the War of 1812 and became a leading citizen and court justice.

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When Lewis died in 1833, a group of lawyers wanted to build a monument to his memory where he could be buried. His children, however, declined because Lewis had wanted to be buried in a cemetery near Madisonville beside his wife, who had died three years earlier. A town was created on his property, and it was named Lewisburg in his honor. Joshua and America Lawson Lewis had 10 children. One son, John Lawson Lewis, became sheriff of Orleans Parish and mayor of New Orleans from 18541856. He also was a major general of the state militia at the opening of the Civil War, and advanced to colonel and brigadier general in the Confederate Army.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > february 7 > 2012

Dear Lars, The village of Lewisburg in St. Tammany Parish was named after Judge Joshua Lewis, and there’s an interesting story behind the man who inspired the town’s name. Joshua Lewis was the grandson of John Lewis, the first settler of Augusta County, Va. Joshua was born in Virginia in 1772 and married America Lawson in 1797. The Lewis family had a distinguished background, and many of them were personally acquainted with President Thomas Jefferson. Joshua’s uncle was the famous Meriwether Lewis, whom Jefferson sent with William Clark to lead an expedition to the Pacific Ocean in 1804 to explore the newly acquired Louisiana Territory. Lewis, a graduate of Washington College, was a lawyer. He first practiced in Richmond, Va., and then moved to Lexington, Ky., where he was appointed prosecutor for Jessamine County in 1798. He was elected to the Kentucky House of Representatives three times. Shortly after the Louisiana Purchase in 1803, President Jefferson sent Lewis to New Orleans to deal with land titles. In 1807, Jefferson appointed Lewis one of three Superior Court justices of the Territory of Orleans, while the judge also continued to serve as land claims commissioner. When Louisiana was admitted into the Union in 1812, Lewis was made judge of the First Judicial District and served in that position until he died. During the second war with Great Britain, Lewis was captain of a military company composed of American soldiers. He served under Gen. Andrew Jackson and participated in the Dec. 23, 1814, night attack on the British, the first of several skirmishes that culminated in the Battle of New Orleans and the end of the War of 1812. Lewis was a prominent citizen of New Orleans and ran for governor of Louisi-

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mardi gras 2012

STREET SCENES Rex Duke™, the world’s first and foremost parade critic, previews the first weekend of Carnival parades.

T

he first official parades of Carnival hit the streets this weekend, and Rex Duke™, New Orleans’ foremost parade critic, looks forward to a season full of my favorite things: kings, queens, flambeaux, marching bands, lavishly decorated floats and more. The krewes celebrate everything from Louisiana’s bicentennial to festivals from around the globe to popular music and more. Below are my previews of parade themes, routes, special throws, reigning monarchs and special guests. Enjoy!

TABLE OF CONTENTS THROWING PARTIES

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Previews for the first weekend parades

ROUTE CAUSES

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Maps for first weekend parades

A Carnival parade turns onto Canal Street.

OSHUN 6PM Location: Uptown Theme: Child’s Play Floats: 17 Shango: Ronald Joseph Lewis Jr. Oshun: Deborah Singleton Rogers Throws: light-up peacocks, krewe medallions

Oshun celebrates children’s stories and rhymes in floats such as “Itsy Bitsy Spider,” “Twinkle Twinkle Little Star” and “A Tisket, A Tasket.” Marching bands from O. Perry Walker High School, Warren Easton Charter High School and St. Mary’s Academy join the procession. Guest riders include grand marshal Oliver Thomas, DJ Captain Charles and Tulane University football coach Curtis Johnson.

CLEOPATRA 6:30PM Location: West Bank Theme: Cleopatra Tips Her Hat to Mardi Gras Floats: 15 Cleopatra: Kimberly Buck Throws: beads with hat charms, cups, yard dogs, footballs Cleopatra celebrates headgear on the opening night of the official parade calendar. Floats depict

PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

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Finding beer along parade routes

KREWE DU CHOW

Finding food along parade routes

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > february 7 > 2012

KREWE DU BREWE

FRIDAY, Feb. 10

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mardi gras 2012

Revelers on Canal Street call for beads.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > february 7 > 2012

PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

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everything from Carnival hats to Southern Belles to LSU and New Orleans Saints helmets.

EXCALIBUR 7PM

Location: Metairie Theme: A Knight in China Floats: 22 King: Tom Stephens Queen: Jamie Renton Throws: chopsticks, fortune cookies, pagoda medallion beads, krewe cups and doubloons

The knights of Camelot and Ladies of Avalon celebrate the Chinese New Year with floats depicting creatures from the Chinese zodiac, including the rooster and the dog. Regular Excalibur floats feature Merlin and Morgana. Guest riders include nine members of LSU’s 1958 national championship football team, whose defensive unit was known as the Chinese Bandits. Bag of Donuts band members ride as grand marshals.

ATLAS 7:30PM Location: Metairie Theme: A Little Bit of This, A Little Bit

of That Floats: 14 King: David Charles Rollo Queen: Brandi Lynn Bourgeois Throws: beads For nearly 40 years, the Krewe of Atlas has tried to mix it up in Metairie. This year’s theme juggles a potpourri of floats depicting everything from smoke signals to computers, jesters to weather.

ADONIS 11:45AM

Location: West Bank Theme: Adonis in Louisiana: 200 Years Floats: 14 King: Theodore “Teddy” Morgan Queen: Iliana Maria Morgan Throws: krewe cups, doubloons and coozies

The krewe celebrates Louisiana’s bicentennial. Floats will depict local culture and history. Sample subjects include voodoo, seafood, Lake Pontchartrain, Jean Lafitte, swamps and the maritime industry.

PONTCHARTRAIN 2PM

SATURDAY, Feb. 11 CHOCTAW 11AM

Location: West Bank Theme: Listen to the Music Floats: 18 Chief: Bill Bubrig Princess: Brittany Bubrig Throws: plush tomahawks and spears, captain’s wooden nickels

The Krewe of Choctaw puts on a hit parade. Floats will feature Elvis’ “Hound Dog,” Madonna’s “Material Girl,” “Twist and Shout,” Garth Brooks’ “Rodeo” and KISS’s “Calling Dr. Love.”

Location: Uptown Theme: Where is What Louisiana Festival Floats: 15 King: Adam William Winningkoff Queen: Kelsi Marie Dixon Throws: Footballs, large cups, 3-D grouper medallion beads and new krewe insignia magnets

The Krewe of Pontchartrain continues its puzzling ways with viewers challenged to guess the names and locations of Louisiana festivals depicted on floats. The Ponchatoula Strawberry Festival and French Quarter Festival are a couple of easy ones. They get more challenging. The Big Easy Rollergirls

will join the procession. The krewe is introducing a new throw: doubloonsized magnets depicting its symbol, a grouper.

CAESAR 6PM Location: Metairie Theme: Festivals of the World Floats: 26 Emperor: David Lapuyade Empress: Ashleigh Glidden Throws: plush leopards, foam spears, light-up beads, krewe cups and throwing discs Caesar’s family-friendly procession will feature Sesame Street’s Elmo and Cookie Monster as grand marshals. Floats will depict festivals from around the globe, including England’s Renaissance Festival, Germany’s Oktoberfest, Mexico’s Day of the Dead, Hawaii’s Polynesian Festival and the Chinese New Year. The krewe throws an array of krewe emblem items and light-up beads.

SPARTA 6PM

Location: Uptown Theme: Le Carnaval des Animaux Floats: 16 King: announced day of parade Queen: Erin Elizabeth Patin Throws: LED medallion beads, krewe

mardi gras 2012 cups, coozies, throwing discs and anniversary medallions, the Spartan mystery throw The Knights of Sparta celebrate their 60th anniversary, and officers will hand out commemorative “Sparta Gazette” posters. The theme is carried out in French with animals and birds, including “Le Loup” (the wolf), “Le Cigne” (the swan) and “Le Chanticleer” (the rooster). Sparta maintains many Carnival traditions and the procession features a mule-drawn king’s float, mounted officers and flambeaux.

PYGMALION 6:45PM

Location: Uptown Theme: The Name of the Game Is… Floats: 18 King: Brent Starring Queen: Dr. Celine Lemieux Throws: stuffed Pygmammoths, doubloons in many colors, Junior Pygmalion medallion beads

The Krewe of Pygmalion introduces a new signature float: the Pygmammoth. The woolly beast carries 10 riders and is equipped with fiber optic lights. Special throws will depict the creature. Theme floats will feature popular games such as Monopoly, Candy Land, Connect 4 and Hungry Hungry Hippos. St. Augustine’s Marching 100 is among the procession’s 10 marching bands.

tine’s Marching 100, O. Perry Walker, West Jefferson High School and the U.S. Marine Corps band.

CARROLLTON

NOON

Location: Uptown Theme: Celebrate Louisiana Floats: 20 King: Kirk Leonard Queen: Ashley Michelle Cuccia Throws: Louisiana state flags, theme medallion beads, a variety of krewe logo beads

The Krewe of Carrollton honors Louisiana’s bicentennial. Floats depict aspects of Louisiana history and culture such as riverboats, voodoo and wildlife.

KING ARTHUR 1:15PM Location: Uptown Theme: King Arthur Celebrates the Louisiana Statehood Bicentennial Floats: 25 King Arthur: Rhett Gonzales Guinevere: Donna F. Gonzales Throws: plush dragons and spears

The Knights of King Arthur celebrate their 35th anniversary by saluting Louisiana’s 200th. Floats will depict Cajun culture, the French Quarter and LSU.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > february 7 > 2012

THOR 2PM

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SUNDAY, Feb. 12 ALLA NOON Location: West Bank Theme: Alla’s Astrological Odyssey Floats: 26 Maharajah: Russell S. Lloyd Maharani: Christy Marie Lawson Throws: Plush spears and roses, a variety of cups and doubloons The Krewe of Alla marks its 80th anniversary by looking to the stars. Signs of the zodiac will be depicted on floats, and the procession includes the Coonass and Allagator signature floats. Jay Paul Molinere and R.J. Molinere from Swamp People will ride as special guests. Alla always has a strong contingent of bands, and participating schools include St. Augus-

Location: Metairie Theme: Rocking with the Oldies Floats: 17 King: Allen Joseph Boudreaux Queen: Chelsea Danielle Boudreaux Throws: long beads and plush toys

Thor features a couple of firsts. The Tulane University marching band will lead the procession in its first Carnival parade in Metairie, and also appearing for the first time at Mardi Gras on Veterans Memorial Boulevard is Chris Owens, who will be dressed as Elvis. The floats cover hit songs from various eras, and they include “I Heard It Through the Grapevine,” “Return to Sender” and “Proud Mary.” Gibson Guitar will have a float featuring some of its recording artists as parade guests.

The Krewe of Alla parades with a large contingent of area high school marching bands. PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > february 7 > 2012

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If you’re visiting for Mardi Gras from outside New Orleans (or are a local with friends visiting from out of town), the French Quarter is likely where you’ll spend much of your time. The neighboring Faubourg Marigny is a good post-parade destination for music and food. Industry Bar & Kitchen (240 Decatur St., 581-6969) — This corner bar is a common destination for service-industry workers. It has a decent tap list of beers like Stone, Sierra Nevada, NOLA Brewing and Abita, as well a varied list of bottles.

1

Rouses Supermarket (701 Royal Street, 523-1353; www.shop.rouses.com) — This is a grocery store, but it’s got a great selection of beer, including a wide variety in cans. Remember: You can walk on the streets with beer in your hand, but it must be in a can or plastic cup (no glass).

2

d.b.a. (618 Frenchmen St., 942.3731; www.dbabars.com/dbano) — Owned by the late Ray Deter, d.b.a. New Orleans is similar to the one in New York. The one on Frenchmen Street, however, seems to focus more on music than beer. It still has a good beer selection, though.

3

CBD/WAREHOUSE DISTRICT

In the area bounded by Canal Street and the Pontchartrain Expressway, the Mississippi River and South Claiborne Avenue, not much is going on beerwise, but here are my picks: Gordon Biersch (200 Poydras St., 552-2739; www.gordonbiersch. com) — There is no beer-to-go option, but if you want to get away from the crush of crowds, this is a great place to get fresh beer and good food.

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here’s a strong beer culture in New Orleans, and beer and Carnival go together like red beans and rice; king cakes and plastic babies; gold, green and purple — everything. Being on a parade route doesn’t limit you to whatever lukewarm swill you can pick up from a vending cart or convenience store. I blog about Louisiana beer on my website, The Beer Buddha (www.thebeerbuddha.com), and I’ll give you the lowdown on where to find good beer near parade routes, and a few places to stock up.

KINGCAKE GELATO • BLOOD ORANGE & LOUISIANA GRAPEFRUIT ICE

Cochon Butcher (930 Tchoupitoulas St., 588-7675; www.cochonbutcher.com) — With its great food and a nice beer selection, this place is a must-go. I recommend the Cubano sandwich with the Bayou

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Teche LA 31 Biere Pale. Rouses Supermarket (701 Baronne St., 227-3838; www. shop.rouses.com) — This is a fancyschmancy Rouses near Lee Circle. It has a good cold beer selection, and it’s a great place to pick up a quick sixer or case of your favorite brew.

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UPTOWN

There is more to Uptown than just Uptown, but to make things easy (and in deference to the Uptown parade routes) we’re going to use the term “Uptown” to include a wide area from Lee Circle to Carrollton Avenue. Avenue Pub (1732 St. Charles Ave., 586-9243; www.theavenuepub. com) — This is the best place to watch parades bar-wise: You can catch almost all the parades from right there and have a choice of some of the best beers in the city. These beers will be served in plastic cups.

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Stein’s Market and Deli (2207 Magazine St., 527-0771; www.steinsdeli.net) — If you’re looking for a great selection of brews to take back to your base of Carnival operations, look no further than Stein’s (unless it’s Monday, when the store is closed). You can’t drink on the premises, but you can stock up here. My favorite sandwich is the Rachel.

2

Slice Pizzeria (1513 St. Charles Ave., 525-7437; 5538 Magazine St., 897-4800; www.slicepizzeria.com) — Damn good beer selection and even better pizza. And it’s located right on the parade route.

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Squeal (8400 Oak St., 302-7370; www.squeal-nola.com) — This barbecue joint has a very nice selection of craft beer and also serves some kickass barbecue. The barbecue tacos kick major ass.

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Whole Foods Market (5600 Magazine St., 899-9119; www.wholefoodsmarket.com) — The Arabella Station store on Magazine Street has a great beer selection. Perhaps one day it will have beer on tap like Whole Foods

5

stores in New York. Breaux Mart (3233 Magazine St., 262-6019; www.breauxmart.com) — This small, locally owned grocery store on Magazine Street (one of five in the metro area), has a diverse selection of craft beers and imports. It even has a section devoted solely to Louisiana beers.

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Cooter Brown’s Tavern (509 S. Carrollton Ave., 866-9104; www.cooterbrowns.com) — This legendary tavern and oyster bar has a good beer selection on tap, and a huge selection of bottled beer. I recommend the cheese fries, Radiator’s Special and the NOLA Philly.

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The Bulldog (3236 Magazine St., 891-1516; www.bulldog.draftfreak. com) — There’s a large selection of beers on tap and a decent bottle selection. The outdoor patio is a great place to pass the time (and people watch) during good weather; check out the patio fountain made from taps. Be sure to try the Crawfish Banditos.

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Le Bon Temps Roule (4801 Magazine St., 897-3448) — This neighborhood bar can get rowdy at times. You can get NOLA Brewing on tap here, and if you go on Thursday night, you can sip it while listening to the Soul Rebels Brass Band.

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The Club Ms. Mae’s (4336 Magazine St., 218-8035) — Oh yeah, I did. There is no better place to get your cheap beer (and well drinks!). Sip your Miller High Lifes while you wait for the 610 Stompers.

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The Irish House (1432 St. Charles Ave., 595-6755; www.theirishhouseneworleans.com) — An authentic upscale Irish pub with great grub and an amazing beer list? Yes, please. And no, it isn’t just Irish beer. The restaurant has options like Mikkeller, Lindeman’s, Stone and Delirium Tremens, as well as local favorites like Abita, NOLA and Heiner Brau.

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MID-CITY

If you’re in Mid-City during Carnival it’s probably because someone enticed you (or vice versa) to see Endymion. Make the most of it; here is where to go: Cork & Bottle Wines (3700 Orleans Ave., Suite 1C, 483-6314; www.cbwines.com) — This small store is focused mainly on wine but also has an interesting beer selection.

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The Bulldog (5135 Canal Blvd., 488-4191; www.bulldog-midcity.draftfreak.com) — See The Bulldog listing in the Uptown section. The difference here is there is a lot more space. Crawfish Banditos still apply.

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Bayou Beer Garden (326 N. Jefferson Davis Pkwy., 302-9357; www.bayoubeergarden.com) — Near Cork & Bottle on North Jefferson Davis Parkway, the beer garden is in a double shotgun house with neon all over the place. There’s a great beer selection and satisfying food options. I recommend Disco Fries with an Abita Andygator.

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Crescent Pie & Sausage Company (4400 Banks St., 4822426; www.crescentpieandsausage. com) — Ah, pizza and beer. It seems to be a recurring theme, but this place isn’t just a pizza shop. It’s a Bart Bell-owned restaurant complete with Bad Bart’s Black Jambalaya, pizza and a wide array of sandwich options. The shop also has homemade sausages and a great craft beer selection.

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METAIRIE

If your plans include watching Carnival parades along Veterans Memorial Boulevard in Metairie, here are my picks of where to drink.

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Phil’s Grill (3020 Severn Ave., Metairie, 324-9080; www.phils-grill. com) — Possibly one of the best burger joints in the area, at Phil’s Grill you can create your own burger. The Beer Buddha Burger would be 100 percent Black Angus beef on an onion roll with Creole aioli, beer-sauteed onions, bacon and Havarti cheese served with a locally brewed beer.

Boucherie (8115 Jeannette St., 862-5514; www.boucherie-nola. com) — Upscale Southern cuisine with a fantastic beer list? Check. A bread pudding made from Krispy Kreme

Martin Wine Cellar (714 Elmeer Ave., Metairie, 896-7300; www.martinwine.com) — Right on the Metairie parade route, Martin Wine Cellar has the best beer selection of all the locations. While you’re there, grab some gourmet grub. I recommend the boneless pork loin with some Havarti.

Rendon Inn (4501 Eve St., 826-5605) — It’s got a great beer selection, although J’anita’s closed recently so I can’t comment on the food. I recommend a NOLA Hopitoulas.

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King CaKe BaBies

Lagers (3501 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 887-9923; www.lagersmetairie.draftfreak.com) —This place is like The Bulldog’s kid sister. It has a great beer selection and, oh yeah, Crawfish Banditos.

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Wear a piece of Mardi Gras all year round with this new twist on the King Cake baby by Molly McNamara Jewelry Design. Available at

MOLLY McNAMARA JEWELRY DESIGN

Available at

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > february 7 > 2012

Midway Pizza (4725 Freret St., 322 2815; www. midwaypizzanola.com) — I really dig this place. It has a great beer selection, and I enjoy the pizza. It’s not quite deep-dish, but similar and tasty, and it has a pizza lunch buffet.

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donuts? Check.

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EATING THROUGH ENDYMION Mid-City gets just one parade, but the intensity of Endymion is second to none. The crowds are so thick, in fact, it can be hard to access some restaurants along stretches of North Carrollton Avenue and Canal Street, but the blocks just off the route offer backstreet finds. For instance, there are barbecue sandwiches, burgers and boudin pistolettes at Boo Koo BBQ (www. bookoobbq.com), a walk-up window inside Finn McCool’s Irish Pub (3701 Banks St., 486-9080; www.finnmccools.com), and Norma’s Sweets Bakery (2925 Bienville St., 309-5401), a new addition to the area, serves Latin dishes, including tamales, a great Cuban sandwich and hot plates. Lemonade Parade (4709 S. Carrollton Ave., 428-2200) is another good option. It’s a take-out joint offering hot tamales and grilled cheese sandwiches.

OUTSIDE THE BOX, INSIDE THE GROCERY The middle of a Mardi Gras parade might not seem like the best time to make groceries, but markets near parade routes can be invaluable. Both locations of Zara’s Little Giant Supermarket (2042 Prytania St., 523-3658; 4838 Prytania St., 895-0581; www.zarasmarket.com) offer hot rotisserie chickens and bargain po-boys, and the new Rouses Supermarket (701 Baronne St., 227-3838; www.rouses.com) in the Warehouse District has a burrito bar, pizza by the slice, sushi, plate lunches, panini and even bowls of pho to go. Rouses is also debuting its party-size muffuletta this Carnival season. It is a $50 sandwich that weighs more than 13 pounds and can feed many.

BUSINESS AS USUAL, SOMEHOW



Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > february 7 > 2012

While some restaurants modify their business models at Carnival time, with buffets, table rentals or pay-one-price access, others take Mardi Gras madness in stride. The Uptown location of New Orleans Hamburger and Seafood Co. (4141 St. Charles Ave., 247-9753; www.nohsc.com) was open for three months last year when Mardi Gras rolled around, but its managers decided to throw the doors open and see what happened. “We struggled at first with a few different plans, but in the end we decided that since we’ve branded ourselves as a neighborhood restaurant we should be open to the neighborhood,” says manager Damien Harvey. The menu of burgers and po-boys was curtailed a bit, but the restaurant’s dining room, bar, beignet shop and bathrooms were open. This approach was successful, and Harvey says he’s confident it will work again this year. “We’re reserving our parking lot for our employees, but otherwise it’s business as usual,” he says. The Milk Bar (1514 Delachaise St., 891-9361) splits the difference between business as usual and no business at all. Tucked just off St. Charles Avenue, it serves unusual and uncommonly delicious sandwiches (like roasted lamb with spinach and mozzarella on an oversized ciabatta roll). During Mardi Gras, the restaurant follows its normal schedule, opening for weekdays only 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., and foregoing weekends, even though crowds surge nearby for the super-krewe parades. “We want to party ourselves on the weekends, that’s why we picked this Monday to Friday format for our business in the first place,” says Inta Phayer, who owns the Milk Bar with her husband Kevin. The following week, they close the Milk Bar altogether for Lundi Gras, Mardi Gras and Ash Wednesday, the better to revel, and to recover. “You’ve got to have some fun too,” Phayer says. “After all, you can’t take it with you when you go.”

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Presents

a hometown ConCert

A Valentine’s Day Jazz Concert featuring the

New OrleaNs Jazz Orchestra ConDuCteD by

leON “Kid chOcOlate” BrOwN

duKe elliNgtON’s “such sweet thuNder”

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > february 7 > 2012

Performing

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May we suggest:

Skin Care Products

Gift Certificates

Shaving Cream

cufflinks

luggage

Watches

aftershaves

Shaving Equipment books

wallets

neck ties

Colognes

bow ties

pocket knives

Valentine’s Day February 14th

7pm & 9pm shows new orleans mint perForming arts Center 400 esplanaDe aVenue For ticket information visit

www.thenoJo.com www.imandthenoJo.frontgatetickets.com

JEANNE & KEVIN POORMAN FAMILY FOUNDATION

SOLEDAD O’BRIEN FAMILY FOUNDATION

A limited number of Valentine’s Date Reservations (dinner & concert for two) are available through The Grill Room at Windsor Court. Please call 504.522.1994 for details.

AN IN A

DINNER SETTING

OFFERING A SPECIAL VALENTINE’S MENU VALENTINE’S WEEKEND A LA CARTE OR 3 COURSE PRIX FIX VALENTINE’S EVENING CALL FOR RESERVATIONS

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SUGARCANE CURED OVEN ROASTED DUCK BREAST Blackberry port demi-glace, pepper jelly gastrique

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VALENTINES’S DAY Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > february 7 > 2012

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > february 7 > 2012

N ow

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WHAT’S

in store

Easy

by Carrie Marks

ON THE EYES

W

A customer is all smiles as she is fitted for glasses at St. Charles Vision. PHOTO bY CHeRYl GeRbeR

Glaser to trade and technology shows in New York: “He focuses on finding the most cutting-edge lab equipment and seeing what new research is out there,” Yarbrough says. “I spend my time looking for new shades.” St. Charles Vision keeps an eye on both fashion and medical trends. On the scientific side, Yarbrough has noticed an increased focus within the eye care industry on patients who have struggled with contacts due to factors like dryness, uncommon eye shape, extremity of vision, or astigmatism. St. Charles Vision now employs new lensfitting technology so these patients can wear contacts comfortably. Regarding fashion trends, Yarbrough touts St. Charles Vision’s selection. “We try to carry something for everyone, but our focus is definitely high-end,” he notes. “Geek chic” is still a prevalent trend, he reports, along with the emergence of lightweight metal frames in bright colors that have the popular oversized look but less bulk. With locations everywhere from Marrero to Mandeville, the company is running out of room to expand — and that’s fine for now, says Yarbrough, who describes Glaser as “more than satisfied” with how his vision and St. Charles Vision have sustained one another through the years.

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SHopping NEWS

by Missy Wilkinson

New Orleans native Daquari Alane Deleon recently launched a new clothing line, HOldiNg HArTS, which features T-shirts painted with messages and images that raise awareness about childhood sexual abuse. Prices start at $42, and the shirts are for sale at www.holdingharts.com. Now through Feb. 23, MACY’S (The esplanade, 1401 W. esplanade Ave., Kenner, 461-4800; lakeside Shopping Center, 3301 Veterans Memorial blvd., Metairie, 484-4600; www.macys.com) celebrates black History Month by offering shoppers a chance to win a trip for two to Paris. Visit www.macys.com/celebrate to enter to win the trip and a $500 Macy’s shopping card.

THE BluE NilE COSTuME BAzAAr (532 Frenchmen St., 948-2583; www. bluenilelive.com) is a free event from noon to 5 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 12 that features costumes, hats, masks and accessories by local designers THrEAdHEAd rECOrdS FOuNdATiON is the nonprofit sponsor for the event. gErMAN COAST FArMErS MArkET (782-8517; www.germancoastfarmersmarket.org) hosts its sixth annual Kid Krewe du Market parade at 10 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 11, at OrMONd PlANTATiON (13786 River Road, Destrehan, 985-764-8544; www.plantation.com). enter the wagon “float”-deocrating contest. Contact Ann Montgomery at (985) 764-9762 for more information.

TRAFFIC TICKETS ALCOHOL-RELATED OFFENSES EXPUNGEMENTS

Green Parrot Nursery 201 NASHVILLE AVE. NASHVILLE & THE RIVAH

(504) 894-1100 www.greenparrotnursery.com

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(504) 835-9248 3231 N. I-10 Service Rd • Metairie, LA 70002 I can help to Prevent Increased Insurance Premiums, Protect Your Driving & Criminal Record, Affordable Fees. (EXCLUDING

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > february 7 > 2012

hen Dr. Charles Glaser first conceived of creating a coalition of optometrists 25 years ago, it wasn’t because he sensed a desperate need for eye doctors in New Orleans. Rather, his commitment to the science of sight was so great it seemed his career path couldn’t lead anywhere else. “I’ve never met anyone who was so passionate about their field, or who had such a strong interest in every single aspect of the industry,” says Chris Yarbrough, a colleague of Glaser’s and manager and buyer of the Uptown branch of St. Charles Vision (citywide; www.stcharlesvision.com). Glaser’s singular purpose has served him well: What began as a small solo practice has grown to seven locations sprinkled throughout the greater New Orleans area, three of which he owns. The company’s locations serve as a onestop shop for all things vision-related, from fitting eyeglasses, diagnosing diseases to providing dry-eye relief. “We do everything short of surgery,” Yarbrough says. Prada, Paul Smith and conjunctivitis don’t often find themselves in the same sentence, let alone the same building — but that’s what makes St. Charles Vision unique. Glaser’s passion for every aspect of optometry led him to form a business that’s part stylish sunglasses and corrective eyewear boutique, part doctor’s office and part laboratory, where the latest fashions in glasses share space with the newest optometric advancements. Yarbrough frequently accompanies

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EAT driNk

+

FOrk + center IAN MCNuLTy Email Ian McNulty at mcnulty@cox.net

putting everything on the table

Merchant of Modernity

Striking design and Europeanstyle eats define a new CBD cafe. By Ian McNulty 

C

    The smoke is getting thicker in Fat  City. Last fall, Saucy’s BBQ Grill (3244  Severn Ave., Metairie, 322-2544; www. saucysbbqgrill.com) opened near Lakeside Shopping Center, and more recently  Smokin’ Buddha BBQieux (3206 N.  Arnoult Road, Metairie, 304-6602; www. smokinbuddhabbqieux.com) joined the  scene a few blocks away.      Smokin’ Buddha BBQieux is the first  restaurant venture from Rob Bechtold  and Eric Heyde, two friends who share a  passion for the smoker.      “Rob has cooked at just about every  major restaurant you can think of, and I’m a  carpenter by trade,” Heyde says. “We got  together and started cooking barbecue  and people kept telling us we had to open  a restaurant.”       They previewed their barbecue at the  Crescent City Blues & BBQ Festival  last fall and did a pop-up for a while at  the Dragon’s Den (435 Esplanade Ave.,  phone n.a.) bar in the Marigny.      They opened their restaurant in Fat City  in December. It’s difficult to spot, but it’s  certainly worth tracking down. The meats  are smoked over pecan wood, and in  addition to platters and sandwiches the  page 38

WiNE OF THE week Questions? Email winediva1@earthlink.net.

Piper-Heidsieck Brut Rose Sauvage Champagne Reims, FRance $47-$65 Retail

Merchant serves sandwiches, soups and coffee drinks. PHOTO By CHERyL GERBER

where

800 Common St.,   571- 9580; www.merchant-  neworleans.com

Superb coffee, fresh salads,  baguette sandwiches

what works

Counter seats are   uncomfortable 

what doesn’t when

Breakfast, lunch,   early dinner daily 

how much Inexpensive 

reservations Not accepted 

check, please

A CBD cafe with a “some   other city” feel

For Valentine’s Day, many Champagne  lovers look for delicious rose wines that  pair well with food. This jewel is a beautifully hued blend of 55 percent Pinot Noir,  30 percent Pinot Meunier and 15 percent  Chardonnay. It is aged more than 30  months in Piper-Heidsieck’s cellars. Both  elegant and playful, the Brut Sauvage  offers aromas of plum,  tart cherry, strawberry,  cranberry, citrus and  mineral notes. On the  palate, taste bone dry  expressions of plump  red berries and blood  orange with toasty  notes and a well balanced finish. Drink it as an aperitif with  hors d’oeuvres or caviar or with salmon,  light meats or desserts. Buy it at: The  Wine Seller, Whole Foods Markets, most  Rouses and Acquistapace’s Covington  Supermarket. Drink it at: W Hotel’s  Whiskey Blue and Living Room bar.   — Brenda Maitland

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > february 7 > 2012

onversations about New Orleans lunch joints usually  touch on where they get their po-boy bread, how they  cook their roast beef and maybe their histories. Rarely,  in my experience, does such talk get around to which architect  was involved.      But in the case of Merchant, a new cafe in the CBD, a  tip of the hat is in order to architect Ammar Eloueini. The  strikingly modern look and feel he designed for Merchant is  what many people talk about during their first visit. As sleek  and white as an Apple device, though grounded with some  rough-hewn planks of bargeboard, it seems like a cafe  pulled from the future, or at least from Europe.      Co-owner Rosario Tortorice wanted to bring something  different to New Orleans when he and his partners opened  Merchant last fall in the ground floor of the revamped  Maritime Building, and in this they’ve succeeded. Tortorice  is a coffee distributor with an east Texas drawl, Italian family  roots and a penchant for French street food. So Illy, the  Trieste-based coffee brand he represents, is in Merchant’s  espresso machines for excellent and refreshingly affordable drinks that are prepared and presented with great  reverence. Many items on the menu are hybrids of Italian  meats and cheeses worked into baguette sandwiches,  crepes and exuberantly fresh salads.      The entire operation is in plain view behind a gleaming  diner counter. That means you can watch the enthusiastic  staff ladle batter onto crepe irons and dispense bits of  pancetta with basil and mozzarella, or thick slices of salami  and egg. Diners pick their own combinations for the sweet  crepes, and I recommend Nutella, the Italian chocolate and  hazelnut wonder spread, with just about anything else.      The crepes are fine for a quick, light lunch, though the  spare fillings stop short of actually filling them and the batter  itself is too bland to carry the day. The pressed sandwiches,  called croque batons, are more consistently satisfying. For  one, the crusty, chewy baguette holds layers of prosciutto with  a light touch of truffle butter, invisible but arrestingly aromatic.  My favorite has dense, dark, olive oil-soaked tuna dressed with  paper-thin sliced lemon and crackling-crisp arugula.      The breakfast menu is brief — pastries, quiche, toasted  baguettes with butter and jam — but some of the more  involved coffee preparations are better suited for a calm  midday break than the morning race to the office. Merchant  has potential as an after-hours spot, and extended evening  hours are in the works. Plates of crostini do the same job as  tapas, and Merchant offers an eclectic selection of bottled  beer and wines poured into stubby juice glasses.      Some of Merchant’s produce is from Hollygrove Market  & Farm, which hosts a satellite market in the same building  each Sunday. Lunch joints getting their goods from farmers  markets may be a growing trend, but the futuristic Merchant  still seems a step ahead with a farmers market that comes  to it. 

New in BBQieux

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page 37

interview Smokin’ Buddha menu uses its meats in savory fried pies, over nachos and fries and in tacos. Choucroute makes an interesting barbecue side, as does the kitchen’s bacon and blue cheese potato salad. Cajun pastrami, sliced into dense, beet-red planks, is one of the more unusual meat options here, and the pulled pork I tried was crusty, luscious and smoky. Smokin’ Buddha BBQieux is open Tuesday through Saturday, serving lunch from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and dinner from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. The restaurant is BYOB while a liquor license application is in the works.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > february 7 > 2012

The Joint is Jumping Down the Street

38

The Joint (701 Mazant St., 949-3232; www.alwayssmokin.com) has relocated to a new address four blocks from its original Poland Avenue location. “We’re really focused to keep the same feel of the place, because everyone hates it when their favorite place moves and it changes,” says Jenny Breen, who owns the Joint with her husband Pete Breen. The couple opened the Joint in 2004, taking over the address that was previously occupied by Palmer’s Jamaican Restaurant. The humble, low-slung, cinderblock building actually inspired the name the Breens chose for their restaurant. The new restaurant has a much larger kitchen and more storage space, which the owners say they need to keep up with their expanded catering and festivals work. The dining room also is bigger, and the newly renovated Bywater building features a great deal of original and repurposed woodwork. “When we were working on it, we stripped the place down and it looked so pretty we just decided to go with it like this,” Breen says. There’s a bar in the works for the new Joint, though with its liquor license still pending the restaurant is BYOB for now. The new bar itself is made of pecan, which not coincidentally is the wood the Joint uses in its smoker. That smoker, a giant, custom-built contraption, also made the trip to Mazant Street. “We’ll keep the menu the same to start and once we get settled in we want to add some things to it, like cornbread and more fresh sides,” Breen says. Seasonal pies could be on the way too, she adds. But fans of the Joint’s current desserts should be reassured that the peanut butter pie is always in season. The Joint serves lunch and dinner Monday through Saturday.

MVB Returns at Liberty’s Kitchen

MVB had a short but good run as an Uptown pop-up, taking over Slim Goodies Diner (3322 Magazine St., 891-3447) on Sunday nights to serve burgers. Start-

DaVID GaLLEnT

FIVE in FIVE TaKES On chIMIchuRRI

I n d ep en d en t F O O d p h OtO gr A p h er C u l I n A ry M ed I A S p eC I A l I S t

D

avid Gallent (www.gumbogood.com) spends a lot of time behind the camera shooting Louisiana food. But as a “culinary media specialist” he also works as a food stylist, recipe editor and cooking instructor. The Baton Rouge native attended the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, N.Y., which led to a job as a food stylist for Oxmoor House, the publisher of cookbooks for brands including Southern Living, Cooking Light and Weight Watchers. He shoots food for many Louisiana restaurants and he’s contributed to cookbooks including chef John Folse’s The Encyclopedia of Cajun and Creole Cuisine and After the Hunt. People might assume culinary school leads to a chef position, but you took a different path. What has guided your career? Gallent: I went to culinary school not necessarily to learn how to work in a restaurant but to learn about food. I studied photography at LSU earlier and then being a food stylist inspired me to pick up the camera again. In the studio, we’d slave for hours over a single plate, and then the photographer would come over, spend 15 minutes and then go back to his world. I thought, “I can do both.”

What’s the biggest challenge with this type of photography? G: The fact that food dies. You have a short window to shoot everything, especially if you’re looking for steam or a frozen element. Very few things you shoot will be the same 30 minutes after you set it up. Food styling work is like sculpting, and the photography is all about the light and trying to capture that moment when it looks its best. Do you ever eat the food after a shoot? G: No, you never eat set food. You might brush it with oil to give it a wet look. Or I’m using tools, like this set of crookneck tweezers I have for making little adjustments, placing that last chive just so, and those tools are never sanitized. You use spit sometimes to highlight the inside of a steak. I set up one shot of a bowl of mussels and I had my hands all around in there positioning them in the bowl. So, no, you never want to eat set food, even when it looks really good. — IAN MCNULTY

ing Thursday, the star item from its menu, the Most Valuable Burger, will have a permanent home at Liberty’s Kitchen (422 S. Broad St., 822-4011; www.libertyskitchen.org), a nonprofit cafe in MidCity that doubles as a training program for teens and young adults who want to change the course of their lives. MVB was a side project of Liberty’s Kitchen chef Hardie McDonald, local restaurateur and caterer Joel Dondis and Peter Thriffiley and Rene Louapre, two attorneys who run the food blog BlackenedOut.com. They ended the project last year, and McDonald credits Louapre with the idea of using the MVB recipe as a way to help Liberty’s Kitchen. “It makes a lot of sense,” McDonald says. “Our students will get experience making burgers from scratch and cooking them to order properly in the cafe.” The way burger joints are proliferating that looks to be marketable experience. Liberty’s Kitchen has already placed one of its graduates at Tru Burger (8115 Oak St., 218-5416; www.truburgers.com), the new burger joint from chef Aaron Burgau and partners, and McDonald

says the nonprofit is also talking with the Company Burger (4600 Freret St., 267-0320; www.thecompanyburger. com), chef Adam Biderman’s burger shop, about a job there for another graduate. MVB made a straightforward burger featuring a modest, six-ounce patty with a blend of chuck and brisket, cooked on a flat top griddle and served on a potato bun. The burger, and perhaps the cachet of its pop-up format, made MVB a huge hit, and it was typical to see a line stretching down the block from Slim Goodies on Sunday nights. The MVB partners looked into starting a more conventional restaurant, but McDonald says they never found the right location and when new burger specialists began emerging they felt they’d missed their moment. “It’s run its course at this point,” he says. “But maybe having the burger here will carry the torch for a while and keep it alive. Who knows what will happen.” Liberty’s Kitchen serves breakfast and lunch Monday through Friday.

La Boca 857 Fulton St., 525-8205 www.labocasteaks.com This Argentine steak steakhouse serves the nation’s native sauce.

Baru Bistro & Tapas 3700 Magazine St., 895-2225 www.barutapas.com Chimichurri laces skirt steak served with asparagus and Manchego fries.

Flaming Torch Restaurant 737 Octavia St., 895-0900 www.flamingtorchnola.com The sauce comes over seared diver scallops served with potato, bacon and corn hash.

Canal Street Bistro 3903 Canal St., 482-1225 www.ecocafeno.com Chimichurri is slathered on roasted pork inside a breakfast quesadilla.

Juan’s Flying Burrito 2018 Magazine St., 569-0000; 4724 S. Carrollton Ave., 486-9950 www.juansflyingburrito.com A frequent taco special features chimichurri over grilled steak.

OFF

the

menu

Trends, notes, quirks and quotes from the world of food. “Ding. Bzzzt. Bap. Beep. That’s the sound of conversation in restaurants these days. Where cellphones once posed a nuisance as people chatted loudly into them during meals, they now present a whole new set of etiquette issues as entire tables disappear into the Internet via small glowing screens.” – los Angeles times reporter Jessica Gelt, in a recent article on how restaurants have adapted to the ubiquity of smartphones. Gelt reports that one Los Angeles restaurant now offers small plates to hold phones at the table, others keep spare chargers handy to loan to guests, and server training at some restaurants now includes guidance on how to approach customers while they use their phones.

to

EAT

breakfast, lunch, dinner & late-night COMPLETE LISTINGS AT WWW.BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM

you are where you eat

Out 2 Eat is an index of Gambit contract advertisers. Unless noted, addresses are for New Orleans. Dollar signs represent the average cost of a dinner entree: $ — under $10; $$ — $11 to $20; $$$ — $21 or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax 483-3116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

AMERICAN FAT HEN GROCERY — 7457 St. Charles Ave., 266-2921; www.fathengrill.com — Barbecue is the specialty at chef Shane Pritchett’s casual cafe with an upscale deli menu. Order barbecued pulled-pork, Texasstyle brisket or St. Louis ribs. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ O’HENRY’S FOOD & SPIRITS — 634 S. Carrollton Ave., 8669741; 8859 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Kenner, 461-9840; www. ohenrys.com — Complimentary peanuts are the calling card of these casual, family friendly restaurants. The menu includes burgers, steaks, ribs, pasta, fried seafood, salads and more. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BAR & GRILL BAYOU BEER GARDEN — 326 N. Jefferson Davis Pwky., 302-9357 — Head to Bayou Beer Garden for a 10-oz. Bayou burger served on a sesame bun. No reservations. Lunch and dinner, late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $ THE RIVERSHACK TAVERN — 3449 River Road, 834-4938; www.therivershacktavern.com — This bar and music spot offers a menu of burgers, sandwiches overflowing with deli meats and changing lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ SHAMROCK BAR & GRILL — 4133 S. Carrollton Ave., 301-0938 — Shamrock serves burgers, shrimp or roast beef po-boys, Reuben sandwiches, cheese sticks and fries with cheese or gravy. No reservations. Dinner and late night daily. Credit cards. $ ZADDIE’S TAVERN — 1200 Jefferson Hwy., Jefferson, 8320830 — Zaddie’s serves burgers,

BARBECUE BOO KOO BBQ — 3701 Banks St., 202-4741; www.bookoobbq. com — The Boo Koo burger is a ground brisket patty topped with pepper Jack cheese, boudin and sweet chile aioli. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., latenight Fri.-Sat. Cash only. $ SAUCY’S BBQ GRILL — 3244 Severn Ave., Metairie, 322-2544; www.saucysbbqgrill.com — Saucy’s serves slow-smoked St. Louis-style pork ribs, pulled pork, brisket, smoked sausage and grilled or jerk chicken. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

BREWPUB CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — 527 Decatur St., 522-0571; www.crescentcitybrewhouse.com — Live jazz and German-style beers complement creative cooking at this brewpub. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BURGERS BEACHCORNER BAR & GRILL — 4905 Canal St., 4887357; www.beachcornerbarandgrill.com — Top a 10-oz. Beach burger with cheddar, blue, Swiss or pepper Jack cheese, sauteed mushrooms or house-made hickory sauce. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ BUD’S BROILER — Citywide; www.budsbroiler.com — Bud’s Broiler is known for charcoalbroiled burgers topped with hickory-amoked sauce. There’s also hot dogs and chicken sandwiches. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $

CAFE CAFE FRERET — 7329 Freret St., 861-7890; www.cafefreret. com — Signature sandwiches include the Chef’s Voodoo Burger, muffuletta and Cuban po-boy. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Fri.-Wed., dinner Mon.Wed., Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ CANAL STREET BISTRO & ECO CAFE — 3903 Canal St., 561-6585; www.ecocafeno.com — This cafe serves sandwiches like the veggie club, layered with Swiss cheese, tomatoes, onions, cucumbers, spinach and baby pickles. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ GOTT GOURMET CAFE — 3100 Magazine St., 373-6579; www.gottgourmetcafe.com

— This cafe serves a variety of gourmet salads, sandwiches, wraps, Chicago-style hot dogs, burgers and more. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ LAKEVIEW BREW COFFEE CAFE — 5606 Canal Blvd., 483-7001 — This casual cafe offers gourmet coffees and a wide range of pastries and desserts, plus specialty sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PARKVIEW CAFE AT CITY PARK — City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 483-9474 — Located in the old Casino Building, the cafe serves gourmet coffee, sandwiches, salads and ice cream. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $ PRAVDA — 1113 Decatur St., 581-1112; www.pravdaofnola. com — The kitchen offers pierogies, beef empanadas, curry shrimp salad and a petit steak served with truffle aioli. No reservations. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

CHINESE CHINA ORCHID — 704 S. Carrollton Ave., 865-1428; www.chinaorchidneworleans. com — Sizzling black pepper beef or chicken is prepared with onions, red and green peppers and brown sauce and served on a hot plate with steamed rice on the side. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

Monday-Friday

M o n d ay

red beans with rice

t u e s d ay Meat sauce & spaghetti

w e d n e s d ay chicken stew

t h u r s d ay haMburger steak

f r i d ay shriMp stew

504 373 6439 Sunday - WedneSday 7am-10pm

ThurSday - SaTurday 7am-laTe

620 Conti St. French Quarter More than just great food...

ANTOINE’S ANNEX — 513 Royal St., 581-4422; www. antoines.com — The Annex is a coffee shop serving pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads

February 1st-6th

Red Velvet Pancakes

with mascarpone butter & maple pecan syrup

February 7th-13th

Mo’ Nanna

chocolate chunk pancakes with tempura bananas & chocolate sauce

February 14th-20th

Raspberry Lemon Delight

BOOK YOUR

MARDI GRAS PRIVATE PARTY

TREY YUEN CUISINE OF CHINA — 600 N. Causeway Approach., Mandeville, (985) 626-4476; 2100 N. Morrison Blvd., Hammond, (985) 3456789; www.treyyuen.com — A house specialty is fried soft-shell crab topped with Tong Cho sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

COFFEE/DESSERT

A tribute to Pancakes The Month of February $12 per order served until 3pm

all served with potato salad or green salad

FIVE HAPPINESS — 3511 S. Carrollton Ave., 482-3935 — The large menu at Five Happiness offers a range of dishes from wonton soup to sizzling seafood combinations. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ JUNG’S GOLDEN DRAGON — 3009 Magazine St., 891-8280; www.jungsgoldendragon2.com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, Thai and Korean cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

Pancake Month

6

private dining areas corporate parties rehearsal dinners business meetings

Call Our Special Events Planner Gift Certificates Available

raspberry pancakes with fresh raspberry & lemon whipped cream

February 21st-29th

The Hawaiian

caramelized pineapple pancakes with macadamia nuts & toasted coconut

FAT HEN GROCERY

7457 St. Charles Avenue

mon-fri 9am-5pm

(504) 266-2921

or

Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner

504.581.1103

504.525.4790 tommysneworleans.com

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK www.fathengrill.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > february 7 > 2012

SOMETHIN’ ELSE CAFE — 620 Conti St., 373-6439; www.somethingelsecafe.com — Combining Cajun flavors and comfort food, Somethin’ Else offers shrimp baskets, boudin balls and alligator corn dogs. There are burgers, po-boys and sandwiches, too. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, late-night Thu.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

alligator sausage, boudin, tamales and meat or crawfish pies. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $

& dinner daily lunCh SpeCialS

39

The Little Restaurant that is getting Big Rave Reviews!

ORLEANS GRAPEVINE wine bar & bistro 720 ORLEANS AVE

Between Bourbon & Royal

504-523-1930 • OPEN DAILY AT 4PM

DINNER AT 5PM • WWW.ORLEANSGRAPEVINE.COM

tropical isle® HOME OF THE Hand Grenade® -Sold Only At-

435, 600, 610, 721, 727 Bourbon St.

New Orleans’ Most Powerful Drink! Live Entertainment Nightly

CHOCOLATE No Better Way to Say

“Be My Valentine”

OuT to EAT and gelato. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ KUPCAKE FACTORY — 800 Metairie Road, Metairie, 2674990; 819 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 464-8884; 6233 S. Claiborne Ave., 267-3328; www. thekupcakefactory.com — The Fat Elvis is made with banana cake and topped with peanut butter frosting. No reservations. Hours vary by location. Credit cards. $ MAURICE FRENCH PASTRIES — 3501 Hessmer Ave., Metairie, 885-1526; 4949 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 455-0830; www.mauricefrenchpastries. com — Maurice French Pastries offers an array of continental and French baked goods as well as specialty cakes, cheesecakes and pies. No reservations. Hessmer Avenue: breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. West Napoleon: breakfast and lunch Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PINKBERRY — 300 Canal St.; 5601 Magazine St., 899-4260; www.pinkberry.com — Pinkberry offers frozen yogurt with an array of wet and dry topping choices. There also are fresh fruit parfaits and green tea smoothies. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CONTEMPORARY

5707 Magazine St. 504.269.5707 www.BlueFrogChocolates.com

Valentine’ s Day

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > february 7 > 2012

CALL TO MAKE YOUR

40

REsERvATiOns nOw tuesday — friday

DAMAGED ART WORK? Paintings • Prints • Frames • Mirrors Photos • Sculpture • Glass • Ceramic Professionally Restored

The New Orleans Conservation Guild, Inc. 15 years in New Orleans 3620 Royal St • In Bywater 10-5pm • Mon-Fri [504] 944-7900 www.art-restoration.com

5pm — 10pm

5 FIFTY 5 — 555 Canal St., 553-5638; www.555canal.com — The lobster mac and cheese combines lobster meat, elbow macaroni and mascarpone, boursin and white cheddar cheeses. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ BAYONA — 430 Dauphine St., 525-4455; www.bayona.com — House favorites on Chef Susan Spicer’s menu include sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ OAK — 8118 Oak St., 3021485; www.oaknola.com — This wine bar offers small plates and live musical entertainment. Gulf shrimp fill tacos assembled in house-made corn tortillas with pickled vegetables, avocado and lime crema. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ ONE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE — 8132 Hampson St., 301-9061; www.one-sl.com — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes like char-grilled oysters topped with Roquefort cheese and a red wine vinaigrette, seared scallops with roasted. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CREOLE ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713 St. Louis St., 581-4422; www.antoines.com — Signature dishes include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ GUMBO SHOP — 640 St. Peter St., 525-1486; www. gumboshop.com — Gumbo and New Orleans classics such as crawfish etouffee dominate the

menu. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ MELANGE — 2106 Chartres St., 309-7335; www.melangenola.com — Dine on French-Creole cuisine in a restaurant and bar themed to resemble a lush 1920s speakeasy. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily, brunch Sunday. Credit cards. $$ MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000 N. Peters St., 524-4747 — The menu includes crawfish etouffee, boiled crawfish, red beans and rice and bread pudding for dessert. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

CUBAN/ CARIBBEAN MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — 437 Esplanade Ave., 252-4800; www.mojitosnola. com — Mojitos serves a mix of Caribbean, Cuban and Creole dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sat.-Sun., dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $$

DELI CG’S CAFE AT THE RUSTY NAIL — 1100 Constance St., 722-3168; www.therustynail. biz — Inside the Rusty Nail, CG’s offers a menu of innovative sandwiches. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $ KOSHER CAJUN NEW YORK DELI & GROCERY — 3519 Severn Ave., Metairie, 888-2010; www.koshercajun.com — This New York-style deli specializes in sandwiches, including corned beef and pastrami that come straight from the Bronx. No reservations. Lunch Sun.-Thu., dinner Mon.-Thu. Credit cards. $ MARTIN WINE CELLAR — 714 Elmeer Ave., Metairie , 896-7350; www.martinwine. com — The wine emporium offers gourmet sandwiches and deli items. The Reuben combines corned beef, melted Swiss, sauerkraut and Russian dressing on rye bread. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Fri., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

FRENCH FLAMING TORCH — 737 Octavia St., 895-0900; www. flamingtorchnola.com — Chef Nathan Gile’s menu includes panseared Maine diver scallops with chimichurri sauce and smoked bacon and corn hash. Coffeeand coriander-spiced rack of lamb is oven roasted and served with buerre rouge and chevre mashed potatoes. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ MARTINIQUE BISTRO — 5908 Magazine St., 891-8495; www.martiniquebistro.com — This French bistro has both a cozy dining room and a pretty courtyard. Try dishes such as Steen’s-cured duck breast with satsuma and ginger demi-glace and stoneground goat cheese grits. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GOURMET TO GO BREAUX MART — 315 E. Judge Perez, Chalmette, 262-

0750; 605 Lapalco Blvd., Gretna, 433-0333; 2904 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-5565; 9647 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 737-8146; www.breauxmart. com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux” as well as weekday specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

INDIAN JULIE’S LITTLE INDIA KITCHEN AT SCHIRO’S — 2483 Royal St., 944-6666; www. schiroscafe.com — The cafe offers homemade Indian dishes prepared with freshly ground herbs and spices. Selections include chicken, lamb or shrimp curry or vindaloo and vegetarian saag paneer. Schiro’s also serves New Orleans cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $ NIRVANA INDIAN CUISINE — 4308 Magazine St., 8949797 — Serving mostly northern Indian cuisine, the restaurant’s extensive menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner Tue.Sun. Credit cards. $$ TAJ MAHAL INDIAN CUISINE — 923-C Metairie Road, Metairie, 836-6859 — The traditional menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways, including curries and tandoori. Vegetarian options are available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

ITALIAN ANDREA’S RESTAURANT — 3100 N. 19th St., Metairie 834-8583; www.andreasrestaurant.com — Chef/owner Andrea Apuzzo’s specialties include speckled trout royale which is topped with lump crabmeat and lemon-cream sauce. Capelli D’Andrea combines house-made angel hair pasta and smoked salmon in light cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ CAFE GIOVANNI — 117 Decatur St., 529-2154; www. cafegiovanni.com — Chef Duke LoCicero serves inventive Italian cuisine and Italian accented contemporary Louisiana cooking. Shrimp Dukie features Louisiana shrimp and a duck breast marinated in Cajun spices served with tasso-mushroom sauce. Belli Baci is the restaurant’s cocktail lounge. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ MOSCA’S — 4137 Hwy. 90 W., Westwego, 436-8950; www. moscasrestaurant.com — This family-style eatery has changed little since opening in 1946. Popular dishes include shrimp Mosca, chicken a la grande and baked oysters Mosca, made with breadcrumps and Italian seasonings. Reservations accepted. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $$$ RED GRAVY — 125 Camp St., 561-8844; www.redgravycafe. com — The cafe serves breakfast items including pancakes, waffles and pastries. At lunch, try meatballs, lasagna and other Italian specialties, panini,

OuT to EAT wraps, soups and salads. Open Sundays before New Orleans Saints home games. Reservations accepted for large parties. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ VINCENT’S ITALIAN CUISINE — 4411 Chastant St., Metairie, 885-2984; 7839 St. Charles Ave., 866-9313; www. vincentsitaliancuisine.com — Try house specialties like veal- and spinach-stuffed canneloni. Bracialoni is baked veal stuffed with artichoke hearts, bacon, garlic and Parmesan cheese and topped with red sauce. Reservations accepted. Chastant Street: lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. St. Charles Avenue: lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

JAPANESE KYOTO — 4920 Prytania St., 891-3644 — Kyoto’s sushi chefs prepare rolls, sashimi and salads. “Box” sushi is a favorite, with more than 25 rolls. Reservations recommended for parties of six or more. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$ MIKIMOTO — 3301 S. Carrollton Ave., 488-1881; www.mikimotosushi.com — Sushi choices include new and old favorites, both raw and cooked. The South Carrollton roll includes tuna tataki, avocado and snow crab. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Delivery available. Credit cards. $$

ORIGAMI — 5130 Freret St., 899-6532 — Nabeyaki udon is a soup brimming with thick noodles, chicken and vegetables. The long list of special rolls includes the Big Easy, which combines tuna, salmon, white fish, snow crab, asparagus and crunchy bits in soy paper with eel sauce on top. Reservations accepted. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ ROCK-N-SAKE — 823 Fulton St., 581-7253; www.rocknsake. com — Rock-n-Sake serves traditional Japanese cuisine with some creative twists. There’s a wide selection of sushi, sashimi and rolls or spicy gyoza soup, pan-fried soba noodles with chicken or seafood and teriyaki dishes. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ WASABI SUSHI — 900 Frenchmen St., 943-9433; 8550 Pontchartrain Blvd., 267-3263; www.wasabinola.com — Wasabi serves a wide array of Japanese dishes. Wasabi honey shrimp are served with cream sauce. The Assassin roll bundles tuna, snow crab and avocado in seaweed and tops it with barbecued eel, tuna, eel sauce and wasabi tobiko. No reservations. Frenchmen Street: Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner daily. Pontchartrain Boulevard: lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

BOMBAY CLUB — 830 Conti St., 586-0972; www.thebombayclub.com — Mull the menu at this French Quarter hideaway while sipping a well made martini. The duck duet pairs confit leg with pepper-seared breast with black currant reduction. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, latenight Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ BOUCHE — 840 Tchoupitoulas St., 267-7485; www.bouchenola.com — This wine bar and restaurant serves creative dishes like tasso truffle mac and cheese with three cheeses and Mornay sauce, baby spinach salad with Maytag blue cheese and bacon lardons, and crispy duck breast with Grand Marnier sweet potatoes and vanilla-balsamic extract. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ K-PAUL’S LOUISIANA KITCHEN — 416 Chartres St., 596-2530; www.chefpaul.com — At chef Paul Prudhomme’s restaurant, signature dishes include blackened Louisiana drum, Cajun jambalaya and the blackened stuffed pork chop. Lunch service is deli style and changing options include po-boys and dishes like tropial fruit salad with bronzed shrimp. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ MANNING’S — 519 Fulton St., 593-8118; www.harrahsneworleans.com — Named for former New Orleans Saints quarterback Archie Manning, this restaurant’s game plan sticks to Louisiana flavors. A cast iron skillet-fried filet is served with two-potato hash, fried onions and Southern Comfort pan sauce. The fish and chips feature black drum crusted in Zapp’s Crawtator crumbs served with Crystal beurre blanc. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ MILA — 817 Common St., 4122580; www.milaneworleans.com — MiLA takes a fresh approach to Southern and New Orleans cooking, focusing on local produce and refined techniques. Try New Orleans barbecue lobster with lemon confit and fresh thyme. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri. dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ RALPH’S ON THE PARK — 900 City Park Ave., 488-1000; www.ralphsonthepark.com — Popular dishes include baked oysters Ralph, turtle soup and the Niman Ranch New York strip. There also are brunch specials. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ TOMAS BISTRO — 755 Tchoupitoulas St., 527-0942 — Tomas serves dishes like semiboneless Louisiana quail stuffed with applewood-smoked bacon dirty popcorn rice, Swiss chard and Madeira sauce. The duck cassoulet combines duck confit and Creole Country andouille in a white bean casserole. No reservations. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ TOMMY’S WINE BAR — 752 Tchoupitoulas St., 525-4790 — Tommy’s Wine Bar offers cheese and charcuterie plates as well as

a menu of appetizers and salads from the neighboring kitchen of Tommy’s Cuisine. No reservations. Lite dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEDITERRANEAN/ MIDDLE EASTERN

“CHEF MADE, MAW-MAW INSPIRED”

ATTIKI BAR & GRILL — 230 Decatur St., 587-3756; www.attikineworleans.com — Attiki features a range of Mediterranean cuisine including entrees of beef kebabs and chicken shawarma. Reservations recommended. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $$ BABYLON CAFE — 7724 Maple St., 314-0010; www. babyloncafe.biz —The Babylon platter includes stuffed grape leaves, hummus, kibbeh, rice and one choice of meat: lamb, chicken or beef kebabs, chicken or beef shawarma, gyro or kufta. Chicken shawarma salad is a salad topped with olives, feta and chicken breast cooked on a rotisserie. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

Come Try Our

WEEKLY THROWBACK COCKTAIL!

PYRAMIDS CAFE — 3151 Calhoun St., 861-9602 — Diners will find authentic, healthy and fresh Mediterranean cuisine featuring such favorites as sharwarma prepared on a rotisserie. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

3454 Magazine St. NOLA • 504-899-3374 Hours: Mon-Sat 11am-10pm

MEXICAN & SOUTHWESTERN COUNTRY FLAME — 620 Iberville St., 522-1138 — Country Flame serves a mix of popular Mexican and Cuban dishes. Come in for fajitas, pressed Cuban sandwiches made with hickory-smoked pork and charbroiled steaks or pork chops. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ LUCY’S RETIRED SURFERS’ BAR & RESTAURANT — 701 Tchoupitoulas St., 523-8995; www.lucysretiredsurders.com — This surf shack serves California-Mexican cuisine and the bar has a menu of tropical cocktails. Todo Santos fish tacos feature grilled or fried mahi mahi in corn or flour tortillas topped with shredded cabbage and shrimp sauce, and are served with rice and beans. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily, late night Thu.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

LOVE IS IN THE AIR

VALENTINE’S DAY AT

ORDER YOUR

VALENTINE BOUQUETS TODAY

R E S TA U R A N T & B A R

LOVINGLY PREPARED VALENTINE’S SPECIALS LIVE MUSIC BY JOHN BAGNATO & ALEXANDRA BOSWORTH @ 6:30PM

NACHO MAMA’S MEXICAN GRILL — 3242 Magazine St., 899-0031; 1000 S. Clearview Pkwy., Harahan, 736-1188; www.nachomamasmexicangrill. com — These taquerias serve Mexican favorites such as portobello mushroom fajitas and chile rellenos. There are happy hour margaritas on weekdays and daily drink specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ SANTA FE — 3201 Esplanade Ave., 948-0077 — This casual cafe serves creative takes on Southwestern cuisine. Bolinos de Bacalau are Portuguesestyle fish cakes made with dried, salted codfish, mashed potatoes, cilantro, lemon juice, green onions and egg and served with smoked paprika aioli. Outdoor seating is available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards.

WE’RE CELEBRATING

RESERVATIONS RECOMMENDED

LIVE LATIN JAZZ

EVERY THU & SUN 6:30-9:30

815 FOCIS STREET [OFF VETERANS ]

837-6400

www.santafenola.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > february 7 > 2012

MIYAKO JAPANESE SEAFOOD & STEAKHOUSE — 1403 St. Charles Ave., 410-9997; www.japanesebistro. com — Miyako offers a full range of Japanese cuisine, with specialties from the sushi or hibachi menus, chicken, beef or seafood teriyaki, and tempura. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

LOUISIANA CONTEMPORARY

41

OuT to EAt $$

MUSIC AND FOOD GAZEBO CAFE — 1018 Decatur St., 525-8899; www.gazebocafenola.com — The Gazebo features a mix of Cajun and Creole dishes and ice cream daquiris. The New Orleans sampler rounds up jambalaya, red beans and rice and gumbo. Other options include salads, seafood po-boys and burgers. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ HOUSE OF BLUES — 225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www.hob.com/neworleans — Try the pan-seared Voodoo Shrimp with rosemary cornbread. The buffet-style gospel brunch features local and regional groups. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ THE MARKET CAFE — 1000 Decatur St., 527-5000; www.marketcafenola.com — Dine indoors or out on seafood either fried for platters or po-boys or highlighted in dishes such as crawfish pie, crawfish etouffee or shrimp Creole. Sandwich options include muffulettas, Philly steaks on po-boy bread and gyros in pita bread. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ SIBERIA — 2227 St. Claude Ave., 2658855 — This music clubs serves dishes like fish and chips, spicy hot wings, tacos and more. There are weekly specials and vegetarian and vegan options. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

NEIGHBORHOOD

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > february 7 > 2012

ARTZ BAGELZ — 3138 Magzine St., 3097557; www.artzbagelz.com — Artz bakes its bagels in house and options include onion, garlic, honey whole wheat, cinnamon-raisin, salt and others. Get one with a schmear or as a sandwich. Salads also are available. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

42

BRAXTON’S RESTAURANT — 636 Franklin St., Gretna, 301-3166; www.braxtonsnola. com — Braxton’s serves a mix of salads, po-boys, deli sandwiches and entrees. Start a meal with oysters Louise, featuring fried oysters on a bed of spinach and cheese. The seafood platter includes fried shrimp, oysters, catfish strips, french fries, potato salad and vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ KATIE’S RESTAURANT — 3701 Iberville St., 488-6582; www.katiesinmidcity.com — Favorites at this Mid-City restaurant include the Cajun Cuban with roasted pork, grilled ham, cheese and pickles pressed on buttered bread. The Boudreaux pizza is topped with cochon de lait, spinach, red onions, roasted garlic, scallions and olive oil. There also are salads, burgers and Italian dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, Dinner Tue.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ OLIVE BRANCH CAFE — 1995 Barataria Blvd., Marrero, 348-2008; 3700 Orleans Ave., 302-1220; 5145 Gen. de Gaulle Drive, 393-1107; www.olivebranchcafe. com — These cafes serve soups, salads, sandwiches, wraps and entrees. Chicken and artichoke pasta is tossed with penne in garlic and olive oil. Shrimp Carnival features smoked sausage, shrimp, onion and peppers in roasted garlic cream sauce over pasta. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

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MARKS TWAIN’S PIZZA LANDING — 2035 Metairie Road, Metairie, 832-8032; www.marktwainspizza.com — Disembark at Mark Twain’s for salads, po-boys and pies like the Italian pizza with salami, tomato, artichoke, sausage and basil. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ NEW YORK PIZZA — 4418 Magazine St., 891-2376; www.newyorkpizzanola.com — Choose from pizza by the slice or whole pie, calzones, pasta, sandwiches, salads

OUT to EAT and more. The Big Apple pie is loaded with pepperoni, Canadian bacon, onions, mushrooms, black olives, green peppers, Italian sausage and minced garlic and anchovies and jalapenos are optional. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ NONNA MIA CAFE & PIZZERIA — 3125 Esplanade Ave., 948-1717 — Nonna Mia uses homemade dough for pizza served by the slice or whole pie and offers salads, pasta dishes and panini. Gourmet pies are topped with ingredients like pancetta, roasted eggplant, portobello mushrooms and prosciutto. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ REGINELLI’S — 741 State St., 899-1414; 817 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 712-6868; 874 Harrison Ave., 488-0133; 3244 Magazine St. 895-7272; 5608 Citrus Blvd., Harahan, 818-0111; www.reginellis.com — This New Orleans original offers a range of pizzas, sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ THEO’S NEIGHBORHOOD PIZZA — 4218 Magazine St., 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., 302-1133; www.theospizza. com — There is a wide variety of specialty pies or build your own from the selection of more than two-dozen toppings. Also serving salads and sandwiches. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ WIT’S INN — 141 N. Carrollton Ave., 888-4004 — This Mid-City bar and restaurant features pizzas, calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers for snacking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SANDWICHES & PO-BOYS

MAGAZINE PO-BOY SHOP — 2368 Magazine St., 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of poboys filled with everything from fried seafood to corned beef to hot sausage to veal. There are breakfast burritos in the morning and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Cash only. $ MAHONY’S PO-BOY SHOP — 3454 Magazine St., 8993374; www.mahonyspoboys. com — Mahoney’s serves traditional favorites and original poboys like the Peacemaker, which is filled with fried oysters, bacon and cheddar cheese. There are daily lunch specials as well. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PARKWAY BAKERY AND TAVERN — 538 N. Hagen Ave., 482-3047 — Parkway serves juicy roast beef po-boys, hot sausage po-boys, fried seafood and more. No reservations. Kitchen open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $

THE STORE — 814 Gravier St., 322-2446; www.thestoreneworleans.com — The Store serves sandwiches, salads and hot plates, and there is a taco bar where patrons can choose their own toppings. Red beans and rice comes with grilled andouille and a corn bread muffin. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $$

SEAFOOD GALLEY SEAFOOD RESTAURANT — 2535 Metairie Road, Metairie, 832-0955 — Galley serves Creole and Italian dishes. Blackened redfish is served with shrimp and lump crabmeat sauce, vegetables and new potatoes. Galley’s popular soft-shell crab po-boy is the same one served at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ GRAND ISLE RESTAURANT — 575 Convention Center Blvd., 520-8530; www.grandislerestaurant.com — Grand Isle offers seafood options from raw oysters to lobster St. Malo with combines Maine lobster, shrimp and mussels in seafood broth. Baked Gulf fish are served with compound chili butter, potatoes and a vegetable. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ LA COTE BRASSERIE — 700 Tchoupitoulas St., 613-2350; www.lacotebrasserie.com — This stylish restaurant in the Renaissance New Orleans Arts Hotel serves an array of raw and cooked seafood. Tabasco and Steen’s Cane Syrup glazed salmon is served with shrimp mirliton ragout. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ RED FISH GRILL — 115 Bourbon St., 598-1200; www. redfishgrill.com — Seafood creations by executive chef Brian Katz dominate a menu peppered with favorites like hickory-grilled redfish, pecan-crusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ VILLAGE INN — 9201 Jefferson Hwy., 737-4610 — Check into Village Inn for seasonal boiled seafood or raw oysters. Other options include fried seafood platters, po-boys, pasta and pizza. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

SOUL FOOD BIG MOMMA’S CHICKEN AND WAFFLES — 5741 Crowder Blvd., 241-2548; www. bigmommaschickenandwaffles. com — Big Momma’s serves

hearty combinations like the six-piece which includes a waffle and six fried wings served crispy or dipped in sauce. Breakfast is served all day. All items are cooked to order. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

Lakeview Florist NOW TAKING ORDERS

Red Roses FOR VALENTINE’S DAY

STEAKHOUSE CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — 322 Magazine St., 522-7902; www.centraarchy. com — This traditional steakhouse serves USDA prime beef, and a selection of super-sized cuts includes a 40-oz. Porterhouse for two. The menu also features seafood options and a la carte side items. Reservations recommended. Diner daily. Credit cards. $$$ CRESCENT CITY STEAKS — 1001 N. Broad St., 821-3271; www.crescentcitysteaks. com — Order USDA prime beef dry-aged and hand-cut in house. There are porterhouse steaks large enough for two or three diners to share. Bread pudding with raisins and peaches is topped with brandy sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri. and Sun., dinner Tue.Sun. Credit cards. $$$

TAPAS/SPANISH MIMI’S IN THE MARIGNY — 2601 Royal St., 872-9868 — The decadant Mushroom Manchego Toast is a favorite here. Or enjoy hot and cold tapas dishes ranging from grilled marinated artichokes to calamari. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ SANTA FE TAPAS — 1327 St. Charles Ave., 304-9915 — The menu includes both tapas dishes and entrees. Seared jumbo scallops are served with mango and green tomato pico de gallo. Gambas al ajillo are jumbo shrimp with garlic, shallots, chilis and cognac. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

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PHO NOLA — 3320 Transcontinental Drive, Metairie, 941-7690; www.pho-nola.com — Pho NOLA serves spring rolls and egg rolls, noodle soups, rice and vermicelli dishes and po-boys. Beverages include boba teas, milk teas, coffee drinks and smoothies. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PHO TAU BAY RESTAURANT — 113 Westbank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, 368-9846 — You’ll find classic Vietnamese beef broth and noodle soups, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, shrimp spring rolls with peanut sauce and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Wed. & Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

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VIETNAMESE AUGUST MOON — 3635 Prytania St., 899-5129; www. moonnola.com — August Moon serves a mix of Vietnamese and Chinese cuisine. There are spring rolls and pho soup as well as many popular Chinese dishes and vegetarian options. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $

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5606 Canal Blvd. • 504-483-7001 www.lakeviewbrew.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > february 7 > 2012

DRESS IT — 535 Gravier St., 571-7561 — Get gourmet burgers and sandwiches dressed to order. Original topping choices include everything from sprouts to black bean and corn salsa to peanut butter. For dessert, try a chocolate chip cookie served with ice cream and chocolate sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

PARRAN’S PO-BOYS — 3939 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 885-3416; www.parranspoboy.com — Parran’s offers a long list of po-boys plus muffulettas, club sandwiches, pizzas, burgers, salads, fried seafood plates and Creole-Italian entrees. The veal supreme po-boy features a cutlet topped with Swiss cheese and brown gravy. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Thu.-Sat. Credit cards. $

43

M U S I C 47 FILM 50

AE +

ART 53 S TAG E 5 6

what to know before you go

EVENTS 59

e-disharmony A tiny krewe makes its mark. By Will Coviello

I

name Rex,” says King Logan, a spokesman for Rex. Both sides describe the meetings and correspondence as friendly, and both say they want to find a mutually agreeable solution, but it is unlikely one will be reached before the tiny krewe parades Saturday. Rex offered to license the use of its name to ’tit Rex, but the krewe rejected the offer. Yaslum says the proposal included an admission of copyright infringement and went on to define the small krewe in ways members deemed restrictive. Logan says the offer proposed various points but a legal agreement was not drafted. The group altered its name by replacing the e with a schwa and offered that to Rex officers as a solution. “We tried to honor what they wanted and maintain the identity of our parade,” Schrenk says. The proposal has not yet been considered by Rex and won’t be until after Mardi Gras, Logan says. In the meantime, the issue has spilled over into the parade. The 2012 theme is “Napoleon Avenue Complex.” ’tit Rex’s board of directors chooses an overall theme, and then each member/floatbuilder chooses to illustrate it however he or she wishes. Some have taken up the issue, and a preview of a couple floats shows satirical depictions of Uptown Carnival and some of its sacred cows. Ironically, ’tit Rex was created to be anything but similar to Uptown Carnival and super-krewes. Members hatched the idea on Bacchus Sunday in 2006 in a discussion of the ever-larger super krewes. They pondered taking Carnival parades in the exact opposite direction: going small. Even though they came up with the name that night, the first parade didn’t happen for a few years. In 2009, Traviesa, a member artist of The Front gallery, notified the others that he had reserved a room in the art space for the krewe’s first floats. With a deadline at hand, several prospective members created floats. An eight-block route stretched from the Bywater wine shop Bacchanal to the St. Claude Avenue gallery.

The name ’tit Rex reflected various ideas. It referenced the old-line Carnival krewe as well as T. Rex, the massive dinosaur. And it fit with the Cajun country diminutive — instead of John Jr., a namesake son might be called Petit John, or ’tit John (and there are alternate spellings as well). The krewe registered with the state as a nonprofit, and it has donated leftover funds to Roots of Music, Yuslum says. The parade has drawn enthusiasm from prospective members and spectators alike. And growth is an issue for the krewe. In the second year, the route stretched to more than 20 blocks, which was an epic haul for some of the floats. The group has capped membership to limit the parade to 30 floats. And although it didn’t make a rule, it asked members to resist any urge to make the floats bigger than shoebox size as they became more elaborate. Whether the krewe has to accept any other changes remains to be seen.

Copyright issues have spilled over onto 2012 ’tit Rex floats.

FEB

11

’tit Rex parade 5:30 p.m. Saturday Departs Bywater Bar-B-Que, 3126 Dauphine St.; titrexparade. blogspot.com Ping Pong Ball Follows parade AllWays Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www.theallwayslounge.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > february 7 > 2012

t’s like looking through the wrong end of a telescope, but spectators may notice that the microkrewe ’tit Rex has whimsically appropriated many of the Carnival conventions of Uptown. (The actual spelling of the name has replaced the “e” in Rex with a schwa — the phoneme symbol indicated by an upside down e.) The four-year-old krewe draws on local Mardi Gras traditions. New Orleanians of many generations remember making shoebox floats at Carnival time. “As far back as my parents generation, kids made shoebox floats in school,” says ’tit Rex cofounder Todd Schrenk. “You’d glue some doubloons to them, or some toy soldiers.” The artists, teachers and others who fill the membership of ’tit Rex seem to have more refined craft skills than school kids, and their miniature floats are often artistically inspired. In the New Orleans Saints Super Bowl year, Jonathan Traviesa made a gold field strewn with king cake babies painted as vanquished Indianapolis Colts players. Fabric and mixed-media artist Gina Phillips reinterpreted Alice in Wonderland in miniature. To illustrate the title “Small Victories,” Shrenk built an ant hoisting a breadcrumb like a trophy. Besides the petit pageantry, spectators at Saturday’s parade can enjoy many of the parade conventions of regular sized krewes. Throws often include beaded bracelets, tiny cups, hole-punch aluminum doubloons and acorns painted like coconuts. The group has moved its official reviewing stand, called “Gallier Small,” so the nearly 30 floats will be presented at the Ping Pong Ball at the parade’s end. And fans of the group have been doing their part as well, lining the route with miniature review stands and ladders. “Last year, one person brought a Barbie who was lifting her shirt for beads,” says Jeremy Yuslum, a krewe cofounder and board member. But even if imitation is the best form of flattery, the small krewe’s name caused a big problem. In fall 2011, members of the Rex organization contacted the microkrewe about the use of its registered trade name. “I was shocked and bemused,” Yuslum says. “I almost thought I was being punked.” Some of the ’tit Rex founders met with a lawyer from the Rex organization. “We tried to amicably resolve our concerns with regards to the copyright issue and their use of the

45

MUSIC listings

THURSDAY 9 12 Bar — nothing solid, 9 Banks Street Bar — rx filled, 10 Bayou Beer Garden — walter “wolfman” washington, 8 Blue Nile — micah mckee & the little movers, 7

Complete listings at www.bestofneworleans.Com

Lauren LaBorde, Listings Editor listingsedit@gambitweekly.com 504.483.3110 faX: 504.483.3116

BMC — soula billy swamp boogie band, 5; andy J. forest, 8; Young pinstripe brass band, 11 Bombay Club — matt lemmler & Jason marsalis, 7:30 Buffa’s Lounge — tom mcDermott & aurora nealand, 8 Cafe Istanbul — michaela Harrison, 8

all show times p.m. unless otherwise noted.

TUeSDAY 7 Banks Street Bar — roy mcgrath Quartet, 10 Blue Nile — steve marquette feat. Jeff albert, brad walker, Jesse morrow, & marcello benetti, 10 BMC — Carolyn broussard, 5; new orleans breeze, 8; lagniappe brass band, 11 Checkpoint Charlie — nervous Duane, 7; tourette seizure blues, 11 Chickie Wah Wah — House of Clements, 8:30 d.b.a. — treme brass band, 9 Dragon’s Den — billy franklin’s smoke ‘n’ bones trio feat. eduardo tozzato & gabriel Velasco, 10 Hi-Ho Lounge — bon bon Vivant, 10

The Maison — gregory agid Quartet, 6; magnitude, 9 Maple Leaf Bar — rebirth brass band, 10 Old Point Bar — Josh garrett & the bottom line, 8 Preservation Hall — preservation Hall-stars feat. shannon powell, 8 Siberia — anvil, mountain of wizard, 10 Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — planet D nonet, 8 & 10 Spotted Cat — brett richardson, 4; smokin’ time Jazz Club, 6; aurora nealand & the royal roses, 10

WeDneSDAY 8 12 Bar — brass-a-Holics, 9 Blue Nile — United postal project, 8; pYmp feat. Danny able, 11 BMC — brent walsh Quartet, 5; blues4sale, 8; Deja Vu brass band, 11 Cafe Istanbul — nasimiyu Jordan, 8 Checkpoint Charlie — tbone stone, 7; mike Darby & the House of Cards, 11

d.b.a. — tin men, 7; walter “wolfman” washington & the roadmasters, 10 Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — bob andrews, 9:30 Hi-Ho Lounge — firebug, Voodoo town, 10 House of Blues — rebelution, the green, pep love, 8:30 Howlin’ Wolf (The Den) — baby bee, 7 Irvin Mayfield’s I Club — mia borders, 8 Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse — Kipori woods, 5; irvin mayfield’s noJo Jam, 8 Kerry Irish Pub — pat Cooper, 9 The Maison — roy mcgrath, 6; Upstarts, 9; penthouse sessions (upstairs), 10 Maple Leaf Bar — luther Dickinson, James singleton & Johnny Vidacovich, 10 Old U.S. Mint — Jesse mcbride, noon Palm Court Jazz Cafe — lars edegran & topsy Chapman feat. palm Court Jazz band, 7 Preservation Hall — preservation Hall Jazz band feat. mark braud, 8 Rock ’N’ Bowl — Jerry embree, 8:30 Rusty Nail — Jen Howard, 9 The Saint — Vox & the Hound, slaughterhouse Chorus, Henry’s rifle, 9 Siberia — riotgod, sunrise: sunset, Dinola, 10 Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Delfeayo marsalis & the Uptown Jazz orchestra, 8 & 10 Spotted Cat — brett richardson, 4; orleans 6, 6; st. louis slim & the frenchmen st. Jug band, 10 Three Muses — monty banks, 4:30; Davis rogan, 7 Victory — sombras brilhantes, 7:30

Checkpoint Charlie — Domenic, 7; gristle, 11 Chickie Wah Wah — electric Yat string Quartet, 5:30; bradley’s Circus, 8 Circle Bar — other planets, sarah Quintana, 10 d.b.a. — Jon Cleary, 7; Hurray for the riff raff, tumbleweeds, 10 Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — todd Duke, 9:30 Hi-Ho Lounge — stooges brass band, 10 Irvin Mayfield’s I Club — amanda shaw, 8 Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse — roman skakun, 5; James andrews, 8 Kerry Irish Pub — ashmen feat. Damien louviere, 9 The Maison — those peaches, 5; John Dobry, 7; lagniappe brass band, 10 Maple Leaf Bar — the trio, 10 Old Point Bar — blues frenzy, 6:30; mumbles, 9

3-6 pm DAILY

haPPy hour

One Eyed Jacks — Doomtree, 9 Palm Court Jazz Cafe — leroy Jones & Katja toivola feat. Crescent City Joymakers, 7:30

$2 mondays

game rentals • PBr PInts jameSon ShotS

Preservation Hall — tornado brass band, 8

thursday • 2/9 • 9 pm

Rivershack Tavern — two man rubber band, 8

dj mooSehead

Rock ’N’ Bowl — li’l nathan & the big tymers, 8:30

FrIday • 2/10 • 9 pm

Siberia — sphynx, noir fonce, rhodes!!, 10

triCky diCky

Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — stanton moore trio, 8 & 10

saturday • 2/11 • 10pm

Spotted Cat — brett richardson, 4; miss sophie lee, 6; smoking time Jazz Club, 10 Three Muses — tom mcDermott, 4:30; luke winslow-King, 7:30

dj &

danCe ConteStS EVERY SUNDAY • 8pm-2Am

karaoke

Vaughan’s — Kermit ruffins & the barbecue swingers, 8:30 Windsor Court Hotel (Cocktail Bar) — meschiya lake & the little big Horns, 5

FRIDAY 10 12 Bar — lushingtons, 10 3 Ring Circus’ The Big Top

/2 lb. Burger WIth FrIes

1

$6 alWays

4133 S. Carrollton ave ( @ T u l a n e ) 301-0938

S H a M R O C K Pa R T Y. C O M

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > february 7 > 2012

Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse — Jason marsalis, 8

Chickie Wah Wah — sweet olive string band, 5:30; aurora nealand & tom mcDermott, 8

47

two man

RUBBER BanD Friday, Feb. 10th • 10pm

N N E J & rd Howa

MUSIC LISTINGS REVIEW

Crazy MCgEE

Saturday • Feb. 11th

PM 1N0 O COVEr

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LIVE JAZZ 7 NIGHTS A WEEK • 8PM MON-SAT • 7PM SUNDAYS

Saturday, 11th at 8PM

DOORS: 8PM, SHOW: 8:30PM $15 Cover

February 2012

SUNDAY 7PM TYLER’S REVISITED FEATURING 12, 19, 26 GERMAINE BAZZLE & PAUL LONGSTRETH

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > february 7 > 2012

MONDAY 8PM THE ORIGINAL TUXEDO JAZZ BAND 6, 13, 20, 27 WITH SPECIAL GUEST GERALD FRENCH

GLEN DAVID

ANDREWS irvinmayfield.com

For schedule updates follow us on:

IMJazzPlayhouse

THURSDAY 9, 16 23 FRIDAY 10, 17, 24 SATURDAY 11, 25 18

Gallery — Yob, Thou, 9

His Haunted Hearts, 10

8PM TREME NIGHT FEATURING

715 St. Charles Ave. — The New Orleans Bingo! Show, 8

Davenport Lounge — Jeremy Davenport, 9

Babylon Lounge — Necrotic Priapism, Chronic Death Slug, Fat Camp, 10

d.b.a. — Tuba Skinny, 6; Eric Lindell, 10

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S NOJO JAM BLACK

WESS “WARMDADDY” ANDERSON SHANNON POWELL 8PM

LEON “KID CHOCOLATE” BROWN 8PM

GLEN DAVID ANDREWS DON VAPPIE QUARTET

300 BOURBON STREET • NEW ORLEANS 504.553.2299 • WWW.SONESTA.COM

Buffa’s Lounge — Good Children, 8

Every Fri & Sat Night

HAPPY HOUR

Cafe Prytania — e.company, Crooked Culture, Chilldren, Aerial Attack, 10

M-F 3-6pm

FOOD SERVED TIL 1AM

www.attikineworleans.com

Blue Nile — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 7; Voodoo Town (upstairs), 10; Big Chief Monk Boudreaux & Papa Mali, 11

Bombay Club — Monty Banks, 6; Don Vappie Quartet, 9:30

BELLY DANCER

11AM-4AM DAILY

BJ’s Lounge — Little Freddie King, 10:30

BMC — El DeOrazio & Friends, 3; Blue Trees, 6; Dana Abbot Band, 9; Lagniappe Brass Band, 12:30 a.m.

experience the mediterranean

504-587-3756

48

FEATURING MUSIC BY JAMES

8PM Grammy Award-Winning

bar & grill

230 DECATUR

13

8PM

JASON MARSALIS ANDREW BAHAM QUARTET

The Polyphonic Spree

FEB A brief history of the Polyphonic Spree, 8 p.m. Monday as told through wardrobe changes: white robes (the uplifting choir of angels on House of Blues, 2002 debut The Beginning Stages of... ); 225 Decatur St., red robes (festivals, Christmas gigs); Techni310-4999; color robes (prismatic 2004 follow-up Together www.hob.com We’re Heavy); “lifeline” robes (the EKG period from 2005-6, defined by delays and a covers EP aptly titled Wait); all-black karate gis (2007 rock comeback The Fragile Army, or Cobra Kai’s punch-bowl spiked with MDMA); soccer shorts (the Adidassponsored theme for hometown footballers FC Dallas, oddly titled “HOOPS Yes!”); Oscar de la Renta (not really, but the group did headline New York Fashion Week in February 2008); street clothes (presumably — dormant from 200911); one-legged furballs (the glowing protagonist in the interactive iPhone app/ music video for new out-of-the-blue single “Bullseye,” on which fearless leader Tim DeLaughter swallows all of Wayne Coyne’s happy pills); white robes with red hearts (for new out-of-the-blue tour “You + Me,” presage to a 2012 LP, maybe). New Fumes opens. Tickets $17 in advance, $20 day of show, $45 VIP. — NOAH BONAPARTE PAIS

TUESDAY 7, 14, 28 21 WEDNESDAY 8, 15, 22, 29

Attiki

Daily Martini Specials

The Polyphonic Spree

full bar • 10:30-til 738 Toulouse St. • 523-5530 VISIT OUR WEBSITE

www.originaldungeon.com

Checkpoint Charlie — Louisiana Hellbenders, 7; Eve’s Lucky Planet, 10

Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — Eric Traub Trio, 10 Fair Grinds Coffeehouse — Michael Stagliano, 7:30 Hermes Bar — Panorama Jazz Band, 9:30 & 11 Hi-Ho Lounge — Panorama Brass Band, 10 House of Blues — Machine Head, Suicide Silence, Darkest Hour, Rise to Remain, 7 Irvin Mayfield’s I Club — Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 8 Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse — Josh Paxton, 5; Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown, 8; Deja Vu Brass Band, midnight JuJu Bag Cafe and Barber Salon — Michaela Harrison, Todd Duke, 7:30

Chickie Wah Wah — Paul Sanchez, 8; The Tangle, 10

Kerry Irish Pub — Chip Wilson, 5; Rites of Passage, 9

Circle Bar — Mike Hurtt &

The Maison — Those

Peaches, 5; Courtyard Kings, 7; Mainline, 10; Soul Project, midnight

Maple Leaf Bar — North Maple Leaf All-Stars feat. Luther Dickinson, James Singleton & Johnny Vidacovich, 10 Old Point Bar — Lil Red & Big Bad, 9:30 One Eyed Jacks — Scott H. Biram, Lydia Loveless, 9 Palm Court Jazz Cafe — Wendell Brunious & Palm Court Jazz Band, 7 Preservation Hall — Preservation Hall Jazz Masters feat. Leroy Jones, 8 Republic New Orleans — Throwback Friday feat. Force Feed Radio, 10 Rivershack Tavern — Broken Heart Pharaohs, 9:30 Rock ’N’ Bowl — Karma, 9:30 Rusty Nail — N’awlins Johnnys, 10 Siberia — Eyehategod, Black Witch God, 10 Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Ellis Marsalis Quartet, 8 & 10 Spotted Cat — Brett Rich-

MuSIC LISTINGS

The

GREEN ROOM Music Club

FRI

715 St. Charles Ave. — Maedgen/Gillet, 8 Babylon Lounge — House Of Goats, Bad Grass, 10 Banks Street Bar — Crescent Guns, Spillway, Marc Belomi, 10 Blue Nile — Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 7; Hola Hi (upstairs), 10; Brass-A-Holics, 11 BMC — Andre Bouvier, 3; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Jazz Band, 6; Rue Fiya, 9; Ashton & the Big Easy Brawlers Brass Band, midnight Bombay Club — Monty Banks, 6; Luther Kent, 9:30 Buffa’s Lounge — Royal Rounders, 8 Cafe Prytania — Kam Royal CD release feat. Alex Camero, Top Billion & Paasky, 10 Carrollton Station — Alexis Marceaux & the Samurai, 9:30 Checkpoint Charlie — Domenic Fusca CD release, 7 Chickie Wah Wah — Mia Borders, 10 Circle Bar — White Colla Crimes, Blind Texas Marlin, 10

Columns Hotel — Andy Rogers, 9 d.b.a. — John Boutte, 8; Cedric Burnside Project, 11 Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — Tom Fitzpatrick, 10 Dry Dock Cafe — Some Like it Hot!, 7 Hermes Bar — James Martin, 9:30 & 11 Hi-Ho Lounge — Hopetoun Collective, 6; Lynn Drury, 10 House of Blues (Parish) — Mike Doughty, 8 Hyatt Regency New Orleans — Anais St. John, 9 Irvin Mayfield’s I Club — Los Hombres Calientes feat. Irvin Mayfield & Bill Summers, 8 Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse — Glen David Andrews, 8; ReGeneration, midnight Joy Theater — New Orleans Warehouse Revisited, 8 Kerry Irish Pub — Speed the Mule, 5; All Star Drop Outs, 9 The Maison — Kelcy Mae, 5; Smoking Time Jazz Club, 7; Zoogma & Earphunk, 10 Maple Leaf Bar — Jon Cleary’s Philthy Phew, 10

Preservation Hall — Preservation Hall Jazz Band feat. Mark Braud, 8 Rivershack Tavern — Toni O, 10 Rock ’N’ Bowl — Creole String Beans, 9:30 Rusty Nail — Jenn Howard & Crazy McGee, 10:30 Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Steve Masakowski, 8 & 10 Spotted Cat — Jayna Morgan, 3; Panorama Jazz Band, 6; Jazz Vipers, 10 Three Muses — Mumbles, 6:30; Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10 Tommy’s Wine Bar — Julio & Caesar, 10 UNO Lakefront Arena — Big Easy Blues Fest

SuNday 12 715 St. Charles Ave. — New Orleans Bingo! Show, 8

FEB

Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Clarence Johnson III, 8 & 10

FEB

Southport Hall — Dodging Cathrine, Define Our Pride, Nothing Solid, No Seasons Left, 10 Spotted Cat — Rights of Swing, 3; Ben Polcer & the Grinders, 6; Pat Casey, 10; In & Out, 2 a.m. St. Charles Tavern — Maryflynn’s Prohibition Jazz & Blues, 10 a.m. Three Muses — Raphael Bas & Norbert Slama, 5:30; Seva Venet, 8 Tipitina’s — Cajun Fais Do-Do feat. Bruce Daigrepont, 5:30 Apple Barrel — Sam Cammarata, 8 BJ’s Lounge — King James & the Special Men, 10 BMC — Lil Red & Big Bad, 6; Smoky Greenwell’s Blues Jam, 9

BMC — Soula Billy Swamp Boogie Band, 3; Meghan Stewart Band, 6; Chapter: SOUL, 9

d.b.a. — Luke Winslow-King, 6; Glen David Andrews, 10

Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — Vincent Marini, 9:30 Hi-Ho Lounge — Skin ’N’ Bones Gang Mardi Gras Indian practice, 6; Sarah Quintana’s Sirens, 10 The Hookah — Room Service Band, DJ RQaway, 8 Howlin’ Wolf (The Den) — Hot 8 Brass Band, 9 Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse — Germaine Bazzle & Paul Longstreth, 7 Kerry Irish Pub — Irish Session, 5; Beth Patterson, 8 The Maison — Cristina Perez, 7; Eric Gordon & the Lazy Boys, 10 Maple Leaf Bar — Joe Krown Trio feat. Russell Batiste & Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 10 Old Point Bar — Craig Paddock, 3:30 Palm Court Jazz Cafe — Sunday Night Swingsters, 7:30 Preservation Hall — St. Peter Street All-Stars feat. Lars

The Green Demons

11

+ Bruiser’s House of Surf + Norco Lapalco

FRI

Christian Serpas & Ghost Town

17

SAT

VOTED

Live Music Nightly -No Cover

Zagat Rated

Killahouse Party

18

FRI

The Scorseses

24

+ xDefinition

SAT

TUES 2/7

Jackplate

25

+ The Northshore Lethal Ladies

TUE

service industry free red beans night

WED

THU

open mic

ladies night

LATE NIGHT FOOD

served on the patio Wed-Sat OPEN MONDAY - FRIDAY • 2PM-2AM SATURDAY & SUNDAY • 5PM-2AM 521 East Boston Street • Covington, LA 70433

985-892-2225

9PM 5PM 9PM 5PM 9PM

SUN 2/12

IRISH SESSION BETH PATTERSON

5PM 8PM

MON 2/13

KIM CARSON

9PM

WED 2/8 THUR 2/9

W E E K LY S C H E D U L E

MON todd lemoine

HONKY TONK OPEN MIC W/JASON BISHOP PAT COOPER THE ASHMEN W/DAMIEN LOUVIERE CHIP WILSON RITES OF PASSAGE SPEED THE MULE ALLSTAR DROP OUTS

FRI 2/10 SAT 2/11

9PM 9PM

331 Decatur St. • 527-5954 www.kerryirishpub.com

www.GreenRoomLive.net

Chickie Wah Wah — Jon Cleary, 8 Columns Hotel — David Doucet, 8

d.b.a. — Palmetto Bug Stompers, 6; Mardi Gras Indian practice feat. Big Chief Smiley Ricks, 10

SAT

MoNday 13

Blue Nile — Mykia Jovan, 7; Mainline, 10

Circle Bar — King Rey, Unnaturals, 10

FEB

Siberia — Beautiful Bells, Off Balance Atlas, Isidro, Articulated Works Visual Experience, 10

Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — Andrew Duhon, 9:30 Hi-Ho Lounge — Bluegrass Pickin’ Party, 8 House of Blues — Polyphonic Spree, New Fumes, 8 Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse — Gerald French & the Original Tuxedo Jazz Band, 8 Kerry Irish Pub — Kim Carson, 9 The Maison — Royal Roses, 7; Super Jam, 9:30

Showcasing Local Music MON 2/6

Papa Grows Funk

TUE 2/7

Rebirth Brass Band

WED Luther Dickinson, James 2/8 Singleton & Johnny V

TUE COMEDY NIGHT 8:30PM 2/7

W/ JACKIE JENKINS

THU 2/9

Johnny V, George Porter Jr. & Luther Dickinson

WED BRASSAHOLICS 9PM

Preservation Hall — Preservation Players feat. Mark Braud, 8

FRI 2/10

Luther Dickinson, Chris Chew & Johnny V

THU NOTHING SOLID 9PM 2/9

Rivershack Tavern — Dave Jordan, 7

SAT 2/11

Jon Cleary’s Philthy Phew

2/10

FRI

THE LUSHINGTONS 10PM

SAT

FREAK FEST 10PM

Maple Leaf Bar — Papa Grows Funk, 10 Old Point Bar — Brent Walsh Jazz Trio feat. Romy Kaye, 7

Siberia — Boom Bang, Turf Wars, Indian Givers, 10 Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Charmaine Neville Band, 8 & 10 Spotted Cat — Brett Richardson, 4; Dominick Grillo & the Frenchmen Street All-Stars, 6; Jazz Vipers, 10 Three Muses — Joe Cabral, 7

Trio featuring SUN Joe JoeKrown Krown SUN Russell batiste Trio & Walter 2/12 “Wolfman” feat. Russell Batiste & Walter Washington 3/13 Wolfman Washington

2/8

2/11

BECOMING A NEW ORLEANS TRADITION

New Orleans Best Every Night! 8316 Oak Street · New Orleans 70118

(504) 866-9359

www.themapleleafbar.com

608 FULTON STREET NEW ORLEANS • 504-212-6476 WWW.12BARNOLA.COM

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > february 7 > 2012

Clever Wine Bar — Scott Sanders Quartet feat. Olivier Bou, 8

Palm Court Jazz Cafe — Lionel Ferbos & Palm Court Jazz Band, 7:30

Paul McCoy & Eric Weaver of 12 Stones + First Fracture

10

FEB

Saturday 11

One Eyed Jacks — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, Hot 8 Brass Band, Partners N Crime feat. the Big Easy Bounce Band, 9

Edegran, 8

FEB

Three Muses — Bill Malchow, 4; Moonshiners Quartet, 6:30; Glen David Andrews, 10

Old Point Bar — Blues Frenzy, 9:30

FEB

ardson, 4; Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 6:30; New Orleans Cotton Mouth Kings, 10

49

FILM LISTINGS REVIEW

The City Dark

FEB

THEY WERE EXPENDABLE (NR) — John Ford’s  1945 film starring Robert  Montgomery and John Wayne  dramatizes the role of American PT Boats in the defense  of the Philippines in World 

War II. Free admission. 6 p.m. Wednesday, Stage Door Canteen at The National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 528-1944; www.stagedoorcanteen.org AMC Palace 10 (Hammond), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 12 (Clearview), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 16 (Westbank), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 20 (Elmwood),

(888) 262-4386; Canal Place, 363-1117; Chalmette Movies, 304-9992; Entergy IMAX, 581-IMAX; Grand (Slidell), (985) 641-1889; Hollywood 9 (Kenner), 464-0990; Hollywood 14 (Covington), (985) 893-3044; Kenner MegaDome, 468-7231; Prytania, 891-2787; Solomon Victory Theater, National World War II Museum, 527-6012

SCREEN GEMS AND SPYGLASSMUSICENTERTAINMENT PRESENT A BIRNBAUM/BARBER PRODUCTION “THE VOW” SAM NEILL SCOTT SPEEDMAN MUSIC AND JESSICA LANGE SUPERVISOR RANDALL POSTER BY RACHEL PORTMAN MICHAEL BROOK PRODUCERSCO- CASSIDY LANGE REBEKAH RUDD EXECUTIVE PRODUCED PRODUCERS J. MILES DALE AUSTIN HEARST SUSAN COOPER BY ROGER BIRNBAUM GARY BARBER JONATHAN GLICKMAN PAUL TAUBLIEB STORY SCREENPLAY BY STUART SENDER BY ABBY KOHN & MARC SILVERSTEIN AND JASON KATIMS DIRECTED BY MICHAEL SUCSY STARTS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 10

CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > february 7 > 2012

stars of disco at the time. Tickets $8. Midnight FridaySaturday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com

MAKE A DATE.

6 p.m. Tuesday-

    What exactly is lost when the lights  Thursday of our sprawling cities obscure the  Zeitgeist Multi-Discibrilliance of the night sky? That’s the  plinary Arts Center simple question posed by The City Dark, an  engaging documentary by writer-director Ian  1618 Oretha Castle  Cheney. The short answer is “perspective,”  Haley Blvd. a deeper understanding of our place in the  350-1150 universe. While the film takes on a range of  related issues, such as the detrimental health  www.zeitgeistinc.net effects of our artificially lighted 24/7 world,  it stays true to the philosophical concerns it  obviously holds dear. The City Dark is more poetry than science.     Cheney has produced or directed seven documentaries, most notably  2007’s Peabody Award-winning King Corn, for which he and a college  buddy moved to Iowa and grew an acre of the crop to examine the effects  of subsidized industrial farming. But for Cheney, our disappearing stars are  a personal matter. He grew up in rural Maine, building telescopes out of  cardboard tubes and naming his own constellations, and he’s got the vintage  photos to prove it. His comfort with the topic and his passion for it are clear.  He even largely avoids the phrase “light pollution,” which might have mired  the film in the sort of one-issue activism it hopes to transcend.     Instead of politics, The City Dark offers charming homespun animation  and Cheney’s own glorious astrophotography to show exactly what the night  sky is all about. It takes us to the observatories of Hawaii’s volcanic islands,  the best place on earth for watching the cosmos unfold after dark. Experts  abound in the film, from noted astrophysicists to light bulb salesmen, but  they’re there to share personal perspective developed over time. Unafraid to  explore all sides of the story, the film captures the magic of city lights just as it  does the stars.     Crucial observations come from Neil deGrasse Tyson, director of the  Hayden Planetarium in New York City and a regular guest on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart. (He still receives hate mail from third-graders for demoting  Pluto from planet to icy comet.) Experiencing the night sky allows “a resetting  of your ego,” he says. To see the edge of our Milky Way galaxy at night, as  everyone used to do less than 100 years ago, is to understand what it means  to be a speck on just one of 50 billion galaxies known to exist.     Cheney has been taken to task for not providing strong scientific evidence  to support his claims, but the film doesn’t really make any — it’s too Zen for  that. The City Dark concludes that the “luminous fog” of our nocturnal world  is largely a matter of design. It allows the lighting designer for Manhattan’s  gorgeous new High Line park to explain how he recently solved the problem,  at least on a small scale. The universe is a big place, but you’ve got to start  somewhere. — KEN KORMAN

7-9

THIS VALENTINE’S DAY WEEKEND,

51

FRIENDS OF CITY PARK’S

FRIDAY, MARCH 2, 2012 Join us for a fabulous Gala to celebrate the creation of a new entrance to Storyland and the Botanical Garden

PATRON PARTY - THE PERISTYLE - 6:30 TIL 8PM Champagne Reception catered by Chef Donald Link Entertainment by The Peristyle Quartet

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > FEBRUARY 7 > 2012

GALA PARTY

THE GOLDRING/WOLDENBERG GREAT LAWN - 8 TIL 11:30PM

Cuisine from 50 fine New Orleans Restaurants Exciting, one-of-a kind live auction Entertainment by

Leif Pedersen’s 1944 Big Band - 8:00-9:30pm & Big Sam’s Funky Nation - 9:30 - 11:30pm

GALA TICKETS

ATTIRE

$100/person $90/person for members of Friends of City Park. Glamorous and Dapper Must be 21 or older to attend

For Ticket Information Contact the Friends of City Park Office at 504-483-9376 www.friendsofcitypark.com

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Indoor & Outdoor Home Decor

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > february 7 > 2012

(more styles available)

Call (504) 464-8884 to place your order today.

It's our 4th BIrthday! Come Celebrate with us!

FRee mini cupcakes at all locations Fri., Feb. 10th

CHILDREN’S CLOTHING FAMILY SHOES 8119-21 OAK STREET 504-866-9944 Monogramming Available

3 locations:

819 W. Esplanade Ave, Kenner 6233 S. Claiborne Ave, Uptown 800 Metairie Rd, Metairie

www.thekupcakefactory.com

Bruce Davenport Jr. The best kept secret in New Orleans

Homespace Gallery presents

GooD Stuff III

Lloyd Zarnado • John Walton Paje Davenport • Nicole Fernandez Anthony Johnson • Jamar Johnson Nat Williams curAteD by Mr. bruce DAveNPort, Jr.

Plant sales & rentals

HomeSpace Gallery

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NEW ORLEANS

2900 ST. CLAUDE

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brucedavenportcreations.com

art LIStINGS rEVIEW

GALLERY ORANGE. 819 Royal St., 701-0857; www. gallery-orange.com — Art Below pop-up show featuring Inkie, Art Wars, Philip Levine, Sarah Ashley Longshore, Dave Rhodes, Zack Smith and others, through February. THE GEORGES GALLERY. Metairie Park Country Day School, 300 Park Road, Metairie, 837-5204; www.mpcds. com — “the Healing Power of Art,” works by Beverly Morris and artists from the Louisiana Art therapy Association, through March 12. GUY LYMAN FINE ART. 3645 Magazine St., 899-4687; www.guylymanfineart.com — Mixed media with mechanical light sculptures by Jimmy Block, ongoing. HERIARD-CIMINO GALLERY. 440 Julia St., 525-7300; www.heriardcimino. com — “Elemental,” paintings by Regina Scully; “Minor Keys,” wall sculptures by Martin Payton; both through Feb. 19.

tHRu aPr

08

the Shape of Louisiana through April 8 Ogden Museum of Southern Art 925 Camp St. 539-9600 www.ogdenmuseum.org

Assemblages by Jimmy Descant JACK GALLERY. 900 Royal St., 588-1777 — Paintings, lithographs and other works by tom Everhart, Gordon Parks, Al Hirschfeld, Stanley Mouse, Anja, Patrick McDonnell and other artists, ongoing. JAZZ & HERITAGE GALLERY. 1205 N. Rampart St., 558-6100; www.jazzandheritage.org — Works by Sarah Allen Freeman, through March 1. JEAN BRAGG GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART. 600 Julia St., 895-7375; www. jeanbragg.com — “Fantasy Days & Flambeaux Nights,” paintings by Linda Lesperance, through February. JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY. 400A Julia St., 522-5471; www.jonathanferraragallery.com — “State of Nature,” mixed-media sculpture and collage by Marcus Kenney; “Steady Creep,” drawings and sewn constructions by Hannah Chalew, through March 17. LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia St., 522-5988; www. lemieuxgalleries.com — “Mann’s Mind,” works by thomas Mann; “American Ghosts,” works by Olivia Hill, through Feb. 25. MALLORY PAGE STUDIO. 614 Julia St.; www.mallorypage.com — Paintings by Mallory Page, ongoing. MARTINE CHAISSON GALLERY. 727 Camp St., 304-7942; www.martinechaissongallery.com — Paintings by Shay Kun, through March. NEW ORLEANS GLASSWORKS & PRINTMAKING STUDIO. 727 Magazine St.,

He often haunted flea markets and rummage sales, and with his leather jacket and shades, Jimmy Descant looked more like a musician than a visual artist. then his retro-futurist rocket ship sculptures cobbled from vintage vacuum cleaner and car parts began turning up at emerging artist galleries, and he called himself “Rocket Man,” which fit his hip persona. His early work was always fun but more cool than deep, more pop than profound. When Hurricane Katrina struck Descant lost his home and studio. Like many orphans of the storm he wandered, finally settling in Colorado. Flash forward six years and he now has a show at the Ogden Museum, and while the Ogden has always had a populist flair, his recent wall sculptures based on the “shape” of Louisiana, both geographically and figuratively, stand on their own. More urbane than many other self-taught artists, Descant’s works mingle the aura of the past with acerbic social commentary. Louisiana Family Farm (Angola) is a miasma of colorful old electrical parts, telephones, crucifixes, handcuffs, dials, gauges and plastic praying hands all mounted in orderly anarchy on a board in the shape of Louisiana. And like the state itself, it’s a mixture of sweetness and irony, nostalgia and strangeness. Nights of Drunk Driving in the Days of K&B is a tartly amorphous evocation of his Chalmette adolescence complete with old K&B beer cans, chrome trophies, hood ornaments, window cranks and chicken bones all arranged with the taxonomic precision of a hex. We N.O. (pictured) expresses solidarity with tsunami-ravaged Japan, and another features an old photograph of Jimmy Swaggart in a rusty frame encircled by a halo of mouse traps, gears and chicken bones in a metaphysical gumbo. Like the recent video exhibition at the Pearl, or the Music Box performances, or Dawn Dedeaux’s Prospect.2 piece, most of these works convey a surreal sense of place. As Descant puts it: “I live and create in Colorado, but I will always be a New Orleanian.” — D. ERIC BOOKHARDt

art LIStINGS

UPtown PopUP Art Gallery

Catch

THRU FEBRUARY

something,

MARDI GRAS PHOTOGRAPHS

Mister!

NOUVELLE LUNE. 938 Royal St., 908-1016 — Works using reclaimed, re-purposed or salvaged materials by Linda Berman, Georgette Fortino, David Bergeron, Kelly Guidry and tress turner, ongoing. OCTAVIA ART GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 3094249; www.octaviaartgallery. com — “Nature’s Forms,” mixed-media paintings by Brad Robertson and David Kidd, through Feb. 25.

spare spaces CAFE DEGAS. 3127 Esplanade Ave., 945-5635; www. cafedegas.com — “Six Flags New Orleans,” photographs by Frank Aymami, WednesdaysSundays. through March 12. DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR. 5535 Tchoupitoulas St., 891-8500; www. dosjefescigarbar.com — Works by Mario Ortiz, ongoing. NEW ORLEANS PUBLIC LIBRARY. Main Library, 219 Loyola Ave., 596-2602 — “America’s Best Buy: the Louisiana Purchase,” a traveling exhibit from the Louisiana State Museum, through March 15.

PETER O’NEILL STUDIOS. 721 Royal St., 527-0703; www.oneillgallery.com — Works by Peter O’Neill, ongoing.

THREE MUSES. 536 Frenchmen St., 252-4801; www. thethreemuses.com — Portraits by Zack Smith, ongoing.

REYNOLDS-RYAN ART GALLERY. Isidore Newman School, 5333 Danneel St., 896-6369; www.newmanschool.org — “Southern Writers and Other Assorted Images,” photographs by David G. Spielman, through Feb. 16.

museums

SIBLEY GALLERY. 3427 Magazine St., 899-8182 — “Magazine Street of Dreams,” paintings by Hayley Gaberlavage and Robert Post, through February. UPTOWN POPUP ART GALLERY. 7835 Maple St. — “the New South: A Post-Katrina Reimagining of the Confederate Battle Flag,” works by Anne Ashley, through Wednesday. VINCENT MANN GALLERY. 305 Royal St., 523-2342; www.vincentmanngallery. com — Works by Jacob Vincent Manguno, through March 1.

call for artists ST. TAMMANY ART ASSOCIATION. the organization seeks entries for its annual National Juried Artists Exhibition, which opens July 14 and is judged by New Orleans Museum of Art modern and contemporary art curator Miranda Lash. Email info@sttammanyartassociation.org or visit www.sttammanyartassociation. org for details. Submissions deadline is March.

LONGUE VUE HOUSE AND GARDENS. 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue. com — “tea for two,” an exhibition of items related to tea services, through March 13. LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM CABILDO. 701 Chartres St., 568-6968; www.lsm. crt.state.la.us — “New Orleans Bound 1812: the Steamboat that Changed America,” through January 2013. LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM PRESBYTERE. 751 Chartres St., 568-6968; www.lsm.crt.state.la.us — “the Louisiana Plantation Photos of Robert tebbs,” 60 gelatin silver prints by the architecture photographer, through Nov. 30. “Living with Hurricanes: Katrina and Beyond,” ongoing. “It’s Carnival time in Louisiana,” Carnival artifacts, costumes, jewelry and other items, ongoing. LOUISIANA SUPREME COURT MUSEUM. Louisiana Supreme Court, 400 Royal St., 310-2149; www.lasc.org — the Supreme Court of Louisiana Historical Society sponsors the museum’s exhibitions of the people and institutions that have contributed to the development of Louisiana law for 300 years. MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN COCKTAIL. 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.museumoftheamericancocktail.org — “Absinthe Visions,” photographs by Damian Hevia, ongoing.

by Marc Pagani & Charles Oliphant

OTHER FEATURED ARTISTS:

Arthur Silverman Carol Pulitzer Chester Allen Ro Mayer Joan Zaslow Barnett Fine Art Collective World Art

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www. noma.org — “Light to Dark/Dark to Light,” paintings by Wayne Gonzales, through Feb. 26.

7835 Maple Street • 504-813-8292 reg. gallery hours: Wed - Sat 10am - 4pm

OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART. 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — “Ersy: Architect of Dreams”; “Oyeme Con Los Ojos,” photographs by Josephine Sacabo; both through Feb. 26. “the Created World of Enrique Alferez,” sculpture and works on paper by the artist, through April 2. “the Past Still Present,” photographs by David Halliday; “the Shape of Louisiana Commenting on the Shape of Louisiana,” assemblages by Jimmy Descant; both through April 8. SOUTHEASTERN ARCHITECTURAL ARCHIVE. Jones Hall, Tulane University, 6801 Freret St., 865-5699; seaa.tulane.edu — “Following Wright,” an exhibit highlighting Frank Lloyd Wright’s influence with drawings by architects Edward Sporl, Albert C. Ledner, Philip Roach Jr. and Leonard Reese Spangenberg, through Dec. 7. SOUTHERN FOOD & BEVERAGE MUSEUM. Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www. southernfood.org — “tanqueray Olive” and “Guinness Pint,” prints by tom Gianfagna, through Jan. 21, 2013. “Acadian to Cajun: Forced Migration to Commercialization,” a multimedia exhibit; “Laissez Faire — Savoir Fare,” the cuisine of Louisiana and New Orleans; “Eating in the White House — America’s Food”; “tout de Sweet,” an exhibit exploring all aspects of the sugar industry in the South; “Barbecue Nation”; all ongoing. TULANE UNIVERSITY SPECIAL COLLECTIONS ROOM. Jones Hall, room 205, 6801 Freret St., 865-5000; www.tulane.edu — “the Art of Proteus,” an exhibition showcasing the krewe’s costume and float designs from 18821907, through May 30. WILLIAMS RESEARCH CENTER. Historic New Orleans Collection, 410 Chartres St., 523-4662; www. hnoc.org — “In Katrina’s Wake: Restoring a Sense of Place,” photographs by Stephen Wilkes for PhotoNOLA, through March 3.

OPEN

Valentine’s Day

2/14 4P-10P ZAZOU CITY @ 7P

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > february 7 > 2012

RHINO CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS GALLERY. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., second floor, 523-7945; www.rhinocrafts.com — Works by gallery members Maria Fromich, Betsy Meyers-Green, Linda Rosamano, Sharad Mulchand, Jen Chenevert and others, ongoing.

CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER. 900 Camp St., 5283800; www.cacno.org — “As We See It: Youth Vision Quilt,” student-created quilt with more than 400 patches, ongoing.

NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM. 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — “Infamy: December 1941,” oral histories, artifacts and images focusing on the attack on Pearl Harbor, through Feb. 19.

OPEN

529-7277; www.neworleansglassworks.com — “Observation: Alpha Centaurids,” works by Stephen Kraft, Cathy DeYoung and Melissa Clark, through February.

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StAGE LISTINGS REVIEW

A Behanding In Spokane

and finals on April 25. Free admission. 8 p.m. Wednesday.

NATIONAL COMEDY COMPANY. Yo Mama’s Bar & Grill, 727 St. Peter St., 522-1125 — The audience interactive comedy show features live local music. Call 523-7469 or visit www. nationalcomedycompany.com for tickets. Tickets $8 online, $15 at the door. 10 p.m. Saturday.

OPEN MIC STAND-UP. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 231-7011; www. nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts the free open mic. 11 p.m. Friday. STUPID TIME MACHINE. Howlin’ Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www. thehowlinwolf.com — The improv comedy troupe performs. Tick-

ets $5. 8:30 p.m. Tuesday.

THINK YOU’RE FUNNY? COMEDY SHOWCASE. Carrollton Station, 8140 Willow St., 865-9190; www.carrolltonstation.com — The weekly open-mic comedy showcase is open to all comics. Sign-up is 8:30 p.m. Show starts 9 p.m. Wednesday.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > february 7 > 2012

American violence versus French farce is an unlikely faceoff. But how else to describe Martin McDonagh’s A Behanding in Spokane, recently produced by Nola Project at AllWays Lounge and Theatre. The lights come up on Carmichael (John Grimsley), a disheveled vagabond sitting on a bed in a ratty hotel room. He has no left hand. Someone starts banging around in the closet. Carmichael pulls a gun from his belt, opens the closet door and fires. We’ve entered a Sam Shepard-like world, only several circles deeper into Hell. There’s a knock on the door. Carmichael cautiously opens it and sees Mervyn (A.J. Allegra), the desk clerk. Mervyn wants to know where Carmichael’s friends — a white girl and a black guy — are. He seems taken with the girl. Carmichael says they are not friends of his. They were “no good f—king scum.” That type of vernacular runs heavily through the play. Soon, the girl, Marilyn (Natalie Boyd), enters carrying a cigar box. She wants to know where Toby (James Bartelle) is. Carmichael says he shot him “near” the head. Marilyn gets Toby out of the closet. Carmichael wants to recover the hand he lost 27 years ago. Toby and Marilyn want $500 for that hand, which they say they’ve found. When Carmichael opens the cigar box, he finds a hand, but it’s a shriveled, dark-colored hand. “A nigger’s hand!” yells Carmichael, who is a dyed-in-the-wool racist. Toby and Marilyn stole the appendage from a museum, and off we go, further into violence and farce. Toby convinces Carmichael that Marilyn brought the wrong hand and they have the correct hand at home. Carmichael handcuffs the pair to the radiator and takes a container of gasoline from his tote. He plugs the top of the container with a candle that he lights, saying the room will be blown sky high in about 45 minutes. He sets out for Toby’s house to retrieve the hand. We learn from Mervyn that he was fond of a gibbon in a zoo and visited her regularly. Amid all this chaos, there are a host of delightful interconnections. In order to convince Carmichael that the extra hand is his, Toby says it has a tattoo. “Of what?” Carmichael asks. “Love,” Toby says. He later explains he noticed Carmichael’s remaining knuckles were bandaged, probably concealing tattoos. What do white loners get tattooed on their knuckles? “Love” and “hate,” he guesses. That sort of crackpot logic strings the play together. The playwright seems to know precisely what we will be wondering about and eventually he provides an unexpected answer. There also are some wild Marx Brothers-like moments, like when Carmichael’s suitcase is knocked open and dozens of severed hands spill out. Under the skillful direction of Ashley Ricord Santos, the cast turned in excellent performances. Once again Bartelle showed his flair for comedy, and Grimsley fumed like a psychopathic volcano. Bravos all around. — DALT WONk

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COME IN TO SEE THE PARADE SPECIALS

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BREAKFAST • LUNCH • SATURDAY BRUNCH 125 CAMP ST. • 504-561-8822 • 504-561-8844 M&F 6:30 A.M - 3 P.M. • SAT BRUNCH 9 A.M.- 2 P.M. DELIVERY AVAILABLE TO FQ & CBD

EVENT listings

Complete listings at www.bestofneworleans.Com

Lauren LaBorde, Listings Editor listingsedit@gambitweekly.com 504.483.3110 faX: 504.483.3116

fAmilY TUESDAY 7 TODDLER TIME. Louisiana Children’s Museum, 420 Julia St., 523-1357; www.lcm.org —

the museum hosts special tuesday and thursday activities for children ages 3-under and their parents or caregivers. admission $8, free for members. 10:30 a.m.

THURSDAY 9 ART ACTIVITIES DURING AFTER HOURS. Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www. ogdenmuseum.org — the ogden offers art activities for kids during its weekly after Hours concerts. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

fRiDAY 10

EVENTS TUESDAY 7 C.G. JUNG SOCIETY OF NEW ORLEANS PROGRAM. Parker Memorial United Methodist Church, 1130 Nashville Ave., 895-1222 — Karen oser edmunds discusses “louise bourgeois and the role of art in Healing trauma.” admission free for members, $10 nonmembers. 7:30 p.m. DOWNTOWN LUNCHTIME SPIRITUALITY SERIES. Immaculate Conception Jesuit Church, 130 Baronne St., 529-1477; www.jesuitchurch. net — aaron spevack, islamic studies professor at loyola University, discusses “my Journey to islam.” Visit www. loyno.edu/lplc/downtown for details. noon. 12:30 p.m.

SATURDAY 11

PUBLIC HEALTH IN NEW ORLEANS. Fair Grinds Coffeehouse, 3133 Ponce de Leon Ave., 913-9073; www. fairgrinds.com — Christina roux, program director of the albert schweitzer fellowship program’s new orleans chapter, discusses public health initiatives in the new orleans area. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

CHILDREN’S ART WORKSHOP. Rhino Contemporary Crafts Gallery, The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., second floor, 523-7945; www.rhinocrafts.com — metalsmith Cathy Cooper and silk painter Kathleen grumich lead children in making mardi gras masks and Valentine’s Day hearts. email artboxrhino@gmail. com for details. admission $5. 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

RESULTS NEW ORLEANS MEETING. Xavier University, University Center, room 205C, 1 Drexel Drive, 520-5397; www.xula.edu — the advocacy organization aims to equip people with the knowledge and training to engage lawmakers, the media and communities on issues related to poverty. email emoynihan85@gmail. com or visit www.results.org for details. 6:30 p.m.

JUNIOR RANGER KID’S CONCERT. New Orleans Jazz National Historical Park, 916 N. Peters St., 589-4841; www.nps.gov/jazz/index.htm — park rangers Jeff wolin,

WEDNESDAY 8 AMERICAN SOCIETY OF INTERIOR DESIGNERS MEETING. ProSource Flooring, 1525 Edwards

THE BARMAN’S FUND EVENT. Cosimo’s, 1201 Burgundy St., 522-9715 — the local chapter of the organization consists of bartenders who donate their tips to the fund, which benefits local charities. stephanie burfield is the bartender for this night’s event. email thebarmansfundnola@gmail.com for details. 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. KAPLAN ACT TEST STRATEGIES SEMINAR. East Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 8381190 — the one-hour seminar provides students with test-taking strategies for the aCt exam. pre-registration is required. Call (800) 527-8378 or visit www.kaptest.com for details. 6 p.m. ROUND TABLE LUNCHEON. Royal Sonesta Hotel, 300 Bourbon St., 586-0300; www. sonesta.com/neworleans_royal — the monthly luncheon hosted by margarita bergen features a panel of speakers and live entertainment. Call 553-2220 or email nscallan@royalsonestano.com for details. admission $45 in advance, $50 at the door. noon.

THURSDAY 9 CHAMBER AFTER 5. Fogo Data Centers, 935 Gravier St., suite 100, 322-3892; www. fogodatacenters.com — the new orleans Chamber of Commerce’s networking event features hors d’oeuvres, complimentary beer and wine, and door prizes. admission free for members, $10 nonmembers. Visit www.neworleanschamber.org for details. 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. HELLO HEALTH SEMINAR. Ralph’s on the Park, 900 City Park Ave., 488-1000; www. ralphsonthepark.com — Dietician molly Kimball discusses “Cancer prevention nutrition: separating fact from fiction.” Call (866) 624-7637 for details. admission $15. noon. HERB SOCIETY OF AMERICA PROGRAM. Garden Study Center, Botanical Garden, City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 483-9488; www.neworleanscitypark.com — the group hosts a tasting of soups from Vintage garden Kitchens. pre-registration is recommended. Call 866-7795 or email driscoll@driscollantiques.com for details. admission free for members, $5 nonmembers. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. PRINCETON REVIEW ACT TEST STRATEGIES SEMINAR. East Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 838-1190 — princeton review presents the free aCt-prep session.

2nd Saturday Each Month 10am - 4pm Local Art and Artists

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February 11th

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > february 7 > 2012

CRITTER CINEMA. LA/ SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd., 368-5191; www. la-spca.org — the la/spCa screens g-rated movies at the event with pizza, popcorn and animals for cuddling. the event is for children ages 5-10, and guests should bring a sleeping bag and pillow. pre-registration is required. Call 762-3314 or email stephanie@la-spca.org for details. admission $25. 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.

matt Hampsey and bruce barnes and local musicians leroy etienne and michael Harris host a free, educational concert for kids. noon to 1 p.m.

Ave., 733-3070 — the topic of the meeting is “Carpets for Hospitality.” email scousins@ psfloorsinc.com for details. 5:30 p.m.

59

EVENT LiSTiNGS PrEViEw Pre-registration is required.  Call (800) 273-8439 or visit  www.princetonreview.com for  details. 6 p.m.  SISTAHS MAKING A CHANGE. Ashe Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www. ashecac.org — The group offers lessons in African dance  and more, along with nutrition,  health and wellness seminars.  6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday and  Monday.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > february 7 > 2012

UNITED WAY GOT GUMBO? COOKOFF. Royal Sonesta Hotel, 300 Bourbon St., 5860300; www.sonesta.com/ neworleans_royal — Celebrity  judges present awards for  gumbos from New Orleans  chefs and restaurants at the  fundraiser, which also features  live music from Rick Trolsen  and the New Orleans Po-boys  and raffles. visit www.unitedwaysela.org for details. Admission $25 in advance, $30 at  the door. 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. 

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VOLUNTEER INCOME TAX ASSISTANCE PROGRAM. Broadway Activities Center, Room 202, Loyola University New Orleans College of Law, 501 Pine St., 861-5550; www. law.loyno.edu — Loyola University’s College of Law provides  free tax preparation assistance  to people with low to moderate  incomes. Call 861-5668 or  apiacun@loyno.edu for details.  10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday,  5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Monday and  Thursday through April 12  (except Feb. 18, Feb. 20, April  7 or April 9).

Friday 10 APOCALYPSE BALL. Studio 3, 3610 Toulouse St. — The  benefit for the Louisiana  Himalaya Association, a  nonprofit organization working  with Tibetan refugees in india  and Nepal, features free food  and beer until 10:10 p.m.  and music by Stooges Brass  Band, Boombador and DJ  Mike Pheduccia. Admission  $15 in advance, $20 at the  door. Call 493-9236 or email  mistycrawford@gmail.com for  details. 8:30 p.m. to 2 a.m.  BURKENROAD INSTITUTE’S SYMPOSIUM. Dixon Hall, Tulane University, 6823 St. Charles Ave., 865-5000 —  The topic of the symposium,  hosted by Tulane’s A.B.  Freeman School of Business,  is “Taming the Dragon: The  Ethics of Doing Business in  the World of Social Media.” 10  a.m. to 11:30 a.m.  STARLIGHT RACING. Fair Grounds Race Course & Slots, 1751 Gentilly Blvd., 943-1415; www.fairgroundsracecourse. com — The Fair Grounds  hosts a nighttime racing 

event with live music, DJs and  cuisine from local food trucks.  General admission is $5;  clubhouse and beer garden  admission is an additional $5.  5 p.m. to 9 p.m. 

SaTurday 11 ASHTANGA YOGA DEMONSTRATION & INFORMATION SESSION. The Yoga Room, 4905 Freret St., second floor, 813-3738; www.ashtangayogaroom.com — Students of  various ages and experience  levels demonstrate Ashtanga  yoga practice, followed by  a Q&A session, at the free  event. 10:30 a.m. to noon.  DEBT RELIEF CLINIC. Common Ground Relief, 1800 Deslonde St., 940-5682; www. commongroundrelief.org — The  free clinic is designed to provide opportunity to ask lawyers  questions about bill collectors, foreclosures, bankruptcy  and more. Pre-registration is  recommended. Call 717-7324  for details. Noon to 3 p.m.  ERACE NEW ORLEANS MEETING. Christ Church Cathedral, 2919 St. Charles Ave., 895-6602 — ERACE meets  in the church’s Westfeldt  Room for its weekly discussion group. Call 866-1163 for  details. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. GERMAN COAST FARMERS MARKET. Ormond Plantation, 13786 River Road, Destrehan — The market features a wide  range of fresh vegetables,  fruits, flowers and other items.  visit www.germancoastfarmersmarket.org for details. 8  a.m. to noon. MARDI GRAS BEAD SALE. Arc of Greater New Orleans, 925 S. Labarre Road, Metairie, 837-5105; www.arcgno. org — The organization holds  a sale of its recycled Mardi  Gras beads, as well as stuffed  animals, specialty beads and  other throws. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.  MARDI GRAS STACHE BASH. Kookado’s BBQ & Booze, 600 E. Judge Perez Drive, Chalmette — The NOLA  Beard and Moustache Club  hosts its inaugural moustache,  beard and tattoo contest that  also features food, music and  more. The event benefits St.  Bernard Parish firefighter  Earl Borden and his family.  visit www.facebook.com/ nolamoustacheclub for details.  Free admission. Noon.  SAME GENDER LOVING/ GAY MEN OF COLOR MEETING. CC’s Coffeehouse, 2800 Esplanade Ave. — The  group meets on the second  and fourth Saturday of each  month for discussions. Email  kj0040@aol.com for details.  7 p.m.

Mystic Krewe of Barkus Parade

    The Mystic Krewe of  Barkus is re-occupying  Armstrong Park in 2012. The  krewe of costumed canines  parades with the spy theme  Mission: Impossible – Canine Protocol, but after three years  of working around construction that kept the group out  of Louis Armstrong Park, the  big news is that it will have  the run of the park again. The  pre-parade begins at 10:30  a.m. and walk up registration  is still open to those wishing  to march. The krewe resumes  its traditional approach to the  French Quarter from the arch  at St. Ann Street, but eight  blocks have been added to  the route and the group will  march down North Rampart  Street for the first time. The  dogleg in the route has the  krewe looping back on Bur10:30 a.m. Sunday  gundy Street before returning to St. Ann  FEb party; 2 p.m. parade Street and the viewing stand at Good  Friends Bar (740 Dauphine St.). French Quarter     Each year, the queen of the krewe is  www.barkus.org selected from an area shelter. The group was  founded in 1993, and in 19 years it has donated more than $500,000 to shelters and animal welfare organizations in the Gulf region, says spokesperson  Catherine Olivier. Registration $40 until Feb. 10, $50 day of parade.   — WiLL COviELLO

12

SET YOUR PHASERS TO STUNNING KREWE OF CHEWBACCHUS FASHION SHOW. 3 Ring Circus’ The Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com —  The Star Wars and sci-fithemed Carnival krewe hosts  a fashion show of costumes  for the upcoming parade. The  event also features a raffle  and art auction. Email www. chewbacchus.org for details.  Admission $10. 8 p.m. 

SuNday 12 SPAGHETTIBOWL. Irene’s Cuisine, 539 St. Phillip St., 529-8811 — The block party  and luncheon benefits the  Please Foundation, which  provides scholarships for  at-risk children to attend parochial elementary and high  schools, and features a jazz  concert, a live auction, door  prizes, a raffle and more.  visit www.pleasefoundation.org for details. Noon to  4 p.m. 

MoNday 13 CAMP TIGER BENEFIT AUCTION. New Orleans Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma.org — The LSU  Health Sciences Center’s 

New Orleans School of  Medicine hosts the auction to  benefit Camp Tiger, a camp  for children with disabilities  such as Down syndrome and  cerebral palsy. Email twesl5@ lsuhsc.edu for details. 7 p.m.  to 11 p.m. 

Call For aPPliCaTioNS SALUTE TO SENIOR SERVICE. Home instead Senior  Care seeks nominations for  a senior citizen (65 or older)  who does at least 15 hours of  volunteer work a month. The  winner receives, among other  things, a $5,000 donation to  the charity of his or her choice.  Email ckoehler@homeinsteadinc.com or visit www. salutetoseniorservice.com for  details. Application deadline is  March 15.

wordS 17 POETS! LITERARY & PERFORMANCE SERIES. Gold Mine Saloon, 705 Dauphine St., 568-0745; www. goldminesaloon.net — Bill Lavender signs and reads from  Memory Wing. An open mic  hosted by Jimmy Ross follows.  8 p.m. Thursday. CONSTANCE ADLER. Garden District Book Shop, The

Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 8952266 — The author signs My Bayou: New Orleans Through the Eyes of a Lover. 5:30 p.m.  Thursday. FAIR GRINDS POETRY EVENT. Fair Grinds Coffeehouse, 3133 Ponce de Leon Ave., 913-9073; www. fairgrinds.com — Jenna Mae  hosts poets and spoken-word  readers on the second, fourth  and fifth Sunday of each  month. 8 p.m. FIRST TUESDAY BOOK CLUB. Maple Street Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www.maplestreetbookshop.com — The group  discusses Siddhartha  Mukherjee’s The Emperor of All Maladies. 6 p.m. Tuesday. GEORGE SCHMIDT. Garden District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The artist signs Satire, Scandal and Spectacle: The Art of George Schmidt. 11 a.m.  Saturday. JOHN BARRY. Maple Street Book Shop at Bayou St. John, 3122 Ponce de Leon St.; www. maplestreetbookshop.com — The author signs Roger Williams and the Creation of the American Soul. 6 p.m. Friday.

MICHAEL JEFFREY LEE. Maple Leaf Bar, 8316 Oak St., 866-9359; www.mapleleafbar.com — The author reads  from, discusses and signs  Something in My Eye. 6 p.m.  Wednesday. NEVADA BARR. East Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 8381190 — The author discusses  and signs The Rope. 7 p.m.  Thursday. PASS IT ON. George & Leah McKenna Museum of African American Art, 2003 Carondelet St., 586-7432; www.themckennamuseum.com — Poet Gian  “G-Persepect” Smith and  Alphonse “Bobby” Smith host  a weekly spoken-word and  music event. Admission $6. 9  p.m. Saturdays. SCIENCE FICTION BOOK CLUB. Octavia Books, 513 Octavia St., 899-7323 — The  group discusses Charles  de Lint’s Spirits in the Wires.  10:30 a.m. Saturday. S.L. ALEXANDER. Octavia Books, 513 Octavia St., 8997323 — The author discusses,  reads from and signs Courtroom Carnival: Famous New Orleans Trials. 6 p.m. Tuesday. TODD STARNES. Garden District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The author discusses  and signs Dispatches From Bitter America: A Gun Toting, Chicken Eating Son of a Baptist’s Culture War Stories. 5:30  p.m. Monday. UNIVERSES. Craige Cultural Center, 1800 Newton St., Algiers — The center hosts a  weekly spoken-word, music  and open-mic event. Tickets  $5. 8 p.m. Sunday.

Call For wriTErS NEW ORLEANS BOOK PROJECT. New Orleanians  are invited to enter short  written works and artwork for  New Orleans by New Orleans,  an upcoming collection of  stories and art inspired by, set  in or about New Orleans. visit  www.bookbyauthors.org for  details. Submissions deadline  is Feb. 14. SWAMP LILY REVIEW. Editors seek fiction, poetry,  nonfiction and creative nonfiction for the spring 2012 issue of  the online publication. Editors  are also open to some book  reviews, interviews, photographs and artwork. Email  swamplilyreview@gmail.com  or visit www.swamplily.com for  details.

CLASSIFIEDS AUTOMOTIVE

483-3100 • Fax: 483-3153 3923 Bienville St. New Orleans, LA 70119

‘05 HONDA S2000 Low Miles $16,900 504-368-5640

Feeling blocked? Seeking destiny? Problems? Sacred African Divination may be the solution. Obtain success in life, business, relationships, health & more. Oracle readings available. Call Olorisa M.S. Akinlana 504-905-6347. www.ileekoasa.com. Se habla Espanol

Mon.-Fri. 8:30 a.m.- 5:30 p.m.

‘06 BMW 325 Ci

BODY & FOOT MASSAGE

classadv@gambitweekly.com CASH, CHECK OR MAJOR CREDIT CARD

Online: When you place an ad in Gambit’s Classifieds it also appears on our website, www.bestofneworleans.com Free Ads: Private party ads for

merchandise for sale valued under $100 (price must be in ad) or ads for pets found/lost. No phone calls. Please fax or email.

IMPORTED AUTOS

Low miles $16,900 504-368-5640

‘08 ACURA TL

With Navie, low miles $20,995 504-368-5640

‘09 ACURA TSX $19,995 Call 504-368-5640

‘10 HONDA ACCORD $15,900 Several to Choose From! 504-368-5640

‘10 HONDA CIVIC

$13,995 Several to Choose From! 504-368-5640

‘10 VOLVO S40 $17,995 504-368-5640

Deadlines:

1980 MERCEDES 300SD

Note: Ad cancellations and changes for all display ads must be made by Wednesday at 5 pm prior to the next issue date. Ad cancellations and changes for all line ads must be made by Thursday at 5 pm prior to the next issue date. Please proof your first ad insertion to make sure it is correct. Gambit only takes responsibility for the first incorrect insertion.

SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES

• For all Line Ads - Thurs. @ 5 p.m. • For all Display Ads - Wed. @ 5 p.m.

Runs Great $3995 504-368-5640

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > february 7 > 2012

Rentals &

Employment

NOLA

MARKETPLACE Gambit’s weekly guide to Services, Events, Merchandise, Announcements, and more for as little as $60

Massage therapists are required to be licensed with the State of Louisiana and must include the license number in their ads.

7 Passenger $17,900 504-368-5640

CASH FOR CARS

Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com

PARTS/ACCESSORIES CARGO PROTECTOR MAT

Never used real area cargo protector mat. Retails $120. Will sell for $40. Fits 2002-2006 Honda CRV. 504-273-3835.

CHIROPRACTORS ARCHER CHIROPRACTIC

ARCHER CHIROPRACTIC CENTER We focus on relief care, to get you out of pain as quickly as possible. 3301 Canal St. 504 - 252 - 9182 WALKS - INS WELCOME

COUNSELING/THERAPY ALTERNATE CHOICES

Suffering from Alcohol/Substance Abuse, Anxiety or Depression that may be related to the upcoming holidays? Contact us about our programs/ services that may begin a New path for you & your family. 504-888-8600 www.newfreedom.info To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

$295 Brand New Iron Queen Bed with mattress set, all new. Can deliver. (504) 952-8403 King Pillowtop Mattress, NEW!!! ONLY $199. Can deliver. (504) 846-5122 NEW Pub Height Table Set all wood, still boxed. Delivery available. $325 (504) 846-5122 Queen Mattress Set $149 Still in wrapper. Will deliver. (504) 846-5122

Jeannie LMT #3783-01. Flexible appointments. Uptown Studio or Hotel out calls. 504.894.8856 (uptown)

BYWATER BODYWORKS

Swedish, deep tissue, therapeutic. Flex appts, in/out calls, OHP/student discounts, gift cert. $65/hr, $75/ 1 1/2hr. LA Lic# 1763 Mark. 259-7278

QUIET WESTBANK LOC

Swedish, Relaxing Massage. Hours 9am-6pm, M-F. Sat 10-1pm $70. LA Lic #1910. Sandra, 504-393-0123.

RELAX RELAX RELAX

STRESS HURTS

STRESS? PAIN?

DAVID YURMAN

18” Heart & Diamond Pendent. Perfect for Valentines! $650. Call (504) 330-0323.

Relax with a massage. Amazing Hands by Patrick. LMT Lic 4005. 504-717-2577 www.amazinghands.us

USED HOT TUB!

LOST/FOUND PETS REWARD- LOST

(Mid City but could be anywhere by now),Ozzie, male, brown/black stripe (brindle), pit mix, sweet, call him & he will come, hold him &call me asap, Traci 504-975-5971.

PET ADOPTIONS BEAGLE/TERRIER MIX

Pup! Friendly & playful. Ranger - URGENT! sweet as can be pup, good with dogs, needs home or foster to keep out of shelter. Tracy - 874-0598

FRANCINE

Playful attitude. Loves long walks in the grass, give this girl a home full of warmth, laughter & love. Courtney Boes, courtneyboes@me.com Sweet & laid back, snuggle. JR - male, 16lbs, 4 yrs old, housebroken. Laid back, cuddler, playful, good on leash, good w/ kids & dogs. Itraci - tbkestler@cox.net

Terrier mx needs a loving & caring home

ANNOUNCEMENTS EDUCATOR

Get Ready For Mardi Gras! Art & Craft Supplies Especially for Mardi Gras. Glitter & Colored Rolls of Paper. Metairie: (504) 454-514, Gretna: (504) 367-8910. educatorsupplies.com

NEW ORLEANS BICYCLE RENTALS

Rent A Bike From Us & Experience New Orleans On Two Wheels! SEE US AT GREG’S ANTIQUES, 1209 Decatur St. (504) 202-8577

LEGAL NOTICES Need Something Notarized?

24hrs/7days Traveling Notaries Melissa Culotta - (504) 473-1215 Isabelle Montelepre (504) 220-2503

Weekly Tails

Ivengar Yoga, Level 1 - 3 Free classes for new students Jan 7-13 - 511 Octavia St. 504-821-9885 www.audubonyoga.com

Lucille is a 1-year-old, spayed, Shih Tzu mix who enjoys being held and snuggled. Lucille came to the shelter so severely matted that her eye was infected and had to be removed; but nothing stops her now. To meet Lucille or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191.

Free Pilates Reformer Class With paid class $20. 10 years teaching experience. 504-220-5589. www.pilateswithconstance.com

MERCHANDISE ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES LUCILLE Kennel #A15044303

SCHWEGMANN BAGS

Original - Mint condition $50. Framed $80 Call Greg, 504-390-5052

BLDG. MATERIALS 1 MOBILE OFFICE

Back from lease. Call (504) 888-6152.

10x12 STORAGE SHED

Surplus price - $1699. Call (504) 888-6152.

FURNITURE/ACCESSORIES $125 Full/Double Size Mattress Set, still in original plastic, unopened. We can deliver. (504) 846-5122

Sweet & snuggly, adorable. Little over 1 yr, petite side of medium, female. Great w/other dogs. LOVES PEOPLE, snuggler. tbkestler@cox.net

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293

PETS

AUDUBON YOGA STUDIO

This ain’t your Grandma’s Antiques! 1209 Decatur St. (504) 202-8577

ROO - TERRIER MIX

ADOPTIONS

5 person with Gazebo, $3000. Call (504) 888-6152.

YOGA/MEDITATION/PILATES

GREG’S ANTIQUES & JUNK

Tiger is a big, strong boy, full of energy. Possibly a Boxer/St. Bernard mix. Needs secure space to run. Looks like a Bengal Tiger! Applicants will be screened. Call 504-586-1019

ANNOUNCEMENTS

SPA EQUIPMENT

JACK RUSSELL TERRIER

BEAUTIFUL, LOVING PUPPY

Jojo- shots current, sweet as can be, snuggler, great w/ kids/cats/chickens contact Traci- tbkestler@cox.net 504-975-5971

JEWELRY

A BODY BLISS MASSAGE

Welcome Film Industry, Visitors & Locals. Take a break & get a massage experience you’ll love. Call Matteo LA#0022 for more info. Metairie area. 504-832-0945.

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT

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NOTICE

‘07 VOLVO XC 90

5 speed, 4 WD, good A/C, power windows & mirrors dependable, 104,000 miles. Needs paint & tires. $3300. Call 417-0005

WANTED TO PURCHASE

Real Estate

LICENSED MASSAGE

Swedish massage by strong hands. Call Jack at 453-9161 La lic #0076.

$19,995 504-368-5640

ASK ABOUT OUR SPECIAL RATES FOR

Open 7 days - 10am-10pm Jasmine Health Spa 614 Causeway, Metairie 504-273-7676 Chnese Health Spa 2424 Williams Blvd Suite S Kenner - 504-305-5177

‘00 TOYOTA RAV 4

‘09 HONDA PILOT EX

64

HEALING ARTS At Crossroads In Life?

XANE Kennel #A15008529

Xane is a 6-month-old, neutered,

DSH, with classic orange tabby markings. Xane likes toys of all varieties—balls, catnip-filled, string—anything will do just fine to entertain this young lad! To meet Xane or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. To look for a lost pet come to the Louisiana SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), Mon-Sat. 9-5, Sun. 12-5 or call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org

CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATE

EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT

CAREER PREPARATION Teach English Abroad! 4-week TEFL course in Prague. Job assistance worldwide. We have over 1500 graduates teaching in 60+ countries. www.teflworldwideprague.com. info@ teflworldwideprague.com

FARM LABOR TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

Clark & Co., Shelby, MS has 4 positions for cotton, rice & oilseed crops; 3 mos. experience required for job duties listed, must be able to obtain clean U.S. driver’s license in 30 days following hire; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $9.30/ hr; work period guaranteed from 3/01/12 – 12/01/12. Apply at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order MS45414.

PROFESSIONAL Associate Registrar

Associate Registrar for Technology Responsible for student records modules of PeopleSoft; troubleshoots & fixes software problems; responsible for testing record system processes, processing data, data maintenance, writing queries, training & reporting; serves as supervising lead for personnel responsible for technology functions w/in Registrar’s office. Must have MBA, MS Computer Science, or related field; in depth knowledge of PeopleSoft 9, AdAstra Scheduling, & Singularity Imaging Systems; all areas of operation w/in a registrar’s office. Extensive knowledge of: creating & maintaining web pages; updates, changes & additions to university catalogues; creation of online bulletin; production of online forms; database queries. Mail resume & credentials to Christie Thomas, University of New Orleans, 2000 Lakeshore Dr., ED 122, New Orleans, LA 70148; refer to Job #11180.

TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

TRADE/SKILLS OMEGA NATCHIQ, INC A Subsidiary of ASRC Energy Services

IS NOW HIRING FOR I&E Superintendents Instrument Fitters Electricians Automation Technicians - 7&7

Great Company Benefits - EOE Send Resume To: Recruiter 4418 Pesson Road New Iberia, LA 70560 Phone # (337) 365-6028 e-mail: recruiter@asrcenergy.com

SERVICE TECHNICIANS

Qualified techs needed. Must be able to pass a pre-employment drug & background check. Must be reliable & have a clean, valid drivers license. (504) 304-0443.

POSITIONS WANTED

David W. Stroope Honey Co., Sanger, TX, has 4 positions for bees & honey; 3 mos. experience required for job duties listed, must be able to obtain clean U.S. driver’s license in 30 days following hire; must be able to lift 50 lbs when moving bees or pulling honey; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $10.57/hr; depending on location; work period guaranteed from 3/12/12 – 1/12/13. Apply at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order TX8167992.

Let Me Work For You

Taking care of elderly, handicapped, etc. Light meals, sitz bath. Certified CNA+. Refs. (504) 427-1445, leave msg if no answer.

VOLUNTEER

LOWER GARDEN DIST./ IRISH CHANNEL 962-64 FELICITY $299K

NOTICE:

All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act and the Louisiana Open Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. For more information, call the Louisiana Attorney General’s Office at 1-800-273-5718

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

JAZZY WINGS

Now Hiring: DELIVERY DRIVER. Apply 2-4pm at 3328 LaSalle Street, NOLA 70115

FRENCH QUARTER/ FAUBOURG MARIGNY

To Advertise in

EMPLOYMENT Call (504) 483-3100

IS COMING TO METAIRIE!

1020 ESPLANADE #103. Lovely 2 br, 2 ba condo, high ceil in den, sparkling pool, courtyd, fenced pkg. Private attached alley could be dog run. $339K. Lana Sackett, Gardner Realtors, 504352-4934. www.lanasackett.com

HISTORIC VICTORIAN

Renovated, 2 blocks from the Fr. Quarter. 4 bedrooms/4baths, 2 story with courtyard - FANTASTIC! Call Aimee with DEMAND REALTY at 319-0443 or 837-3000.

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT 100 MARYLAND DR. $459K

Great buy on Golf course. Stately home on quiet street near park, 4/2.5, Must see! Call Cecelia, 583-2902,Gardner Realtors.

1201 Napoleon - Rare Oppty

Historic 3 story, 5000 sq ft, attch’d 2 story gar., on parade route. 14’ ceil $1.35 mil. Margaret Oesterle, Keller Williams N.O. 504-975-1833. Independently Owned & Operated.

3516 NASHVILLE AVE.

2 BR, 2 BA, total renovation. Great curb appeal! Offstreet parking. $289,000. Janet Favrot, Coldwell Banker TEC REALTORS, 504-615-0813

1414 EUTERPE ST-CONDO

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE

Call (504) 483-3100

1/1 Upper. 2 balcs, hist. charm w/big windows, hi ceil & fp mantles. $135K Caroline Mang, (504) 251-0385, (504) 895-4663. Latter & Blum, ERA powered is independently owned and operated. 1233 Esplanade #16 $145,000

1117 Burgundy $425,000

Just a stones throw away from the French Quarter. This 2 bed/ 1 bath condo with kitchen and living on the first level, bedrooms and bath on the second level. Features stainless appliances, ventless washer and dryer hookups, reasonable condo fees. One assigned covered garage parking space included. Nice pool area and more!

2227 CHESTNUT ST.

Beautifully appointed 3/2, two story home. Courtyard, cocktail pool. $525,000. Ricky Lemann, 504-4606340. Keller Williams Realty N.O. 504-862-0100. Independently owned & operated.

3655-57 TCHOUPITOULAS

Nice dbl, shotgun, 3 rooms, kit & bath. Ready to rent. 4 yr roof, spacious back yd. Only $85,000. Walk to supermart. Lois Landry Realty, 504-586-1019

5014 WILLOW STREET

Double, shot gun, xlnt cond, owner’s unit has separate enclosed rms. original pine wood floors, 12 ft ceil, $177,500. Myrna Shelton, 504-288-9938. Gardner Realtors, 504-891-6400

726 Aline St. $479,000

Beautiful New Renovation. 3 BR, 2 BA. Parking. Steve Richards, 504-2581800. Latter & Blum, ERA powered. Independently owned & operated, 504-948-3011

823-825 DELACHAISE ST

Historic district double, 2BR/1BA each, $250,000. Sharron Baudier, 504-339-6932. Keller Williams New Orleans, 504-862-0100. Each office independently owned & operated.

Condo, 1550 2ND ST. #2E

1/1, Lg Liv/Din rm, rooftop patio. Bldg faces St. Charles. $$169,000. Judy Phillips, Latter & Blum, ERA powered, independently owned & operated. 985-641-1000, 504-669-4969 (cell)

1028 St Philip $515,000

RENTALS

519 Iberville #5 Early 1800’s $1600 masonry cottage 2 bed/ 2 bath & handsome 2 Renovated w/ stainless story depenappliances,hardwood flooring, dency. Main house is approx exposed brick walls, washer 700sqft and has fabulous 10” and dryer in the unit and private pine floors & brick pavers in the balcony over the courtyard. kitchen. 12’ ceilings. Simple • but lovely wooden mantle in the 937 Barracks Unit 1 living room. Coal burning grate $875 & exposed brick chimney in br. 1BR/1BA Central HVAC. Brick crtyrd sepa- Ground floor apt in the lower FQ. rates the guest qtrs. 420sqft w/ Common courtyard. sitting rm, kitchenette, br & full New Carpet. New tile in bath.

ba. Come dream a little dream.

Samara D. Poché 504.319.6226 sam@fqr.com

504.949.5400

NOW HIRING: Assistant General Manager/Kitchen Manager 3 Years of Management Experience Required To apply, visit http://BWWJobs.chmgmt.net

Studio w/full ss/granite kit, gtd pkng, marble bath, wd flrs, w/d. Josie Occhipinti, Realtor (504) 710-1771,(504) 710-1771 Latter & Blum, ERA powered is independently owned and operated.

4510 Lennox Blvd $255K

Best Value in French Qtr

Classy renovation of this upscale condominium! Sit out back and enjoy the covered deck or watch the world stroll by from the front porch. Condo features 12’ ceilings, glossy hardwood flooring, an abundance of natural lighting and beautiful working fireplaces. Gourmet kitchen with granite countertops and stainless steel appliances. Ask agent about parking!

LGD CONDO $118,000

$555K 2/2 corner unit. Conv. of historic bldg. 2 gtd & assign’d pkng places, hdwd, marble flrs, hi ceils, millwk, gran. cntrs, ss appli. Jetted tubs, spa-style shwrs, stone vanities, lndry w/stack w/d. Jeff Craig @ 504-352-6190.

sampochesells.com

Ann de Montluzin Farmer

BROKER

Historic House and Luxury Home Specialist

Motivated Sellers: Want to know the value of your property? Call today ... No obligation.

(504) 895-1493 (504) 430-8737

Residential /Commercial Sales and Leasing, Appraisals.

farmeran@gmail.com

www.demontluzinrealtors.com

Building on a real estate heritage since 1905

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > february 7 > 2012

To Advertise in

RESTAURANT/HOTEL/BAR

Offers Volunteer Opportunities. Make a difference in the lives of the terminally ill & their families. Services include: friendly visits to patients & their families, provide rest time to caretaker, bereavement & office assistance. School service hours avail. Call Volunteer Coordinator @ 504-818-2723 #3016

Lower Garden District, handsome renovation, off of Magazine, 10 minutes from CBD, Mike (504) 715-1056, (504) 895-4663. Latter & Blum, ERA powered is independently owned and operated.

Uptown Charm renov w/all amenities. 3 /3, 2 car off st pkg. Helen Katz, 504-236-6825. Latter & Blum Realtors, ERA powered. independently owned & operated. 504-866-2785.

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

Roeder Honey Farms, San Augustine, TX, has 4 positions for bees & honey; 3 mos. experience required for job duties listed, must be able to obtain clean U.S. driver’s license in 30 days following hire; must be able to lift 50 lbs when moving bees or pulling honey; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $10.57/ hr depending n location; work period guaranteed from 3/15/12 – 6/15/12. Apply at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order TX2635831.

1301 N. RAMPART #301

65

reaL esTaTe

SHOWCaSe MS GULF COAST

BAY ST. LOUIS

FRENCH QUARTER

FOR TRADE OR SALE Waterfront lot in Timber Ridge, Pass Christian, MS

Boating/golfing community 1 hr from NOLA. Will consider trade for house in Met or NO - any condition.

504-258-2464 or lozes29@msn.com

Craftsman Style Mansion

1706 Jackson Ave. Over 6000 sq ft, 10 BR, 7 BA, 3 stories. $590,000. Debbie Powell, 504-352-5956, Keller Williams, N.O. 504-862-0100. Each office independently owned & operated.

Fabulous Deal on the Avenue!

1750 St. Charles, #312. $199,900. 2/2 condo. 24 hr sec, fitness ctr, rooftop terr. Covered gar. Short sale, bring offer. Samara Poche, 504-319-6226. French Quarter Realty. 504-949-5400

Garden District 2 BR

Freshly painted condo in fab location. Priced to sell at $179,500. Gail Ruddock 504-897-6000. Gardner Realtors 504-891-6400

Unique Renovation, University

2 story with huge brick patio, Super large kitchen with granite & SS, 2/2 down & 3/1 up. $349,500. Eileen Wallen, 504-250-5656. Gardner Realtors 504-867-7575.

ST. BERNARD PARISH 523 Angela, Old Arabi

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > february 7 > 2012

3 miles from Marigny. 10 Min from The Quarter. 110 year old home, fully restored, 1200 sq ft, 12’ ceil, orig hdwd flrs, 2 firepl, 2 BR, 2 BA, granite in kit $145K. 504-554-4800

66

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

CORPORATE RENTALS LOWER GARDEN DISTRICT

3 BR, 3 BA Greek Revival. Totally renovated. Completely furnished incl linens. $250/day (10 day minimum) or $3000/mo. 504-202-0381, 738-2492.

NEW ORLEANS RIVERFRONT

2 BR, 2.5 BA. Furn, healthclub, pool, parking. All util incl, wifi. Minimum 1 month. $3000/mo. Also 3 BR Penthouse $3800/mo. 781-608-6115.

Charming 3bd./2ba. 1604 sq.ft. cottage. 1.17 acres w/mature landscaping, saltwater pool + 2 outbldgs for studios/wrkshp. Near beach/Old Town. No flooding. $299,000. Photos and more info: www.clarkproperty.weebly.com. For appt. call Sandra 228-332 0632 Brokers welcome.

New Orleans Area (Metairie) 10 Min to Downtown N.O.

1 & 2 Br Apts, 1 Ba, furn. Qn bed, WiFi, Cbl. Pkg.Util Incl. Lndry Fac. Sec Cameras From $1200/mth. 1 mth min. 2200 Pasadena, Met. 504-491-1591.

COMMERCIAL RENTALS

GARDEN DISTRICT

1, 2, 3 & 4 ROOM OFFICES STARTING AT $495 INCLUDING UTILITIES

CALL 899-RENT

922-24 Dauphine St. $875K Four 1 bedroom apartments. Parking for 5+ cars.

HARAHAN/RIVER RIDGE FABULOUS RENOV 4BR/2BA

Quiet cul-de-sac, walk to levee, new hdwd/ceramic floors, surround snd, recess lighting, sec sys, great backyd & deck for entertaining. Pets OK. Lse. $1600/mo Sylvia 504-415-6501

METAIRIE FURNISHED 1 BRDM CONDO Great location, w/d, gated, nr Causeway & Veterans. $900/mo incls utils. Call 504-957-6456 or 504-838-9253

OLD METAIRIE 1/2 OFF FIRST MONTH OLD METAIRIE SECRET

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE

Living room, kit & bath, private balcony, gated. Water included & laundry facilities on property. Gated. $850/mo + dep. Call (504) 615-1716.

1208 N. GAYOSO

Upper 2 BR, LR, DR, 1 BA, KIT, wood/ ceramic flrs, high ceilings, cen a/h, w/d hkups, no pets. $1050 mo. 432-7955.

GENTILLY 3838 Havana Place. 2 BR, quiet neighborhood, cent air & heat, alarm. granite counters in kit, fenced yd. $1025/mo. Call 504-430-1164

Just pennies a day.

Did you know your landlord’s insurance only covers the building? Protect your stuff. There’s no reason to take a chance. Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there.®

ALGIERS POINT HISTORIC ALGIERS POINT

LOW PRICED OFFICE

2273 Barataria Blvd. 900 sq ft office + half bath. 2 rms, prof’l mgmt. Easy free parking. Desks avail. $800/month. 781-608-6115

ESPLANADE RIDGE 1 BEDROOM

1 or 2 BR, Sparkling Pool, Bike Path, 12’ x 24’ Liv.Rm, Sep Din, King Master, No Pets, No Sect 8, $699 & $799 . 504-236-5776

60 NEURON PLACE

MARRERO - WESTBANK

617 Duphine St. $268K Spacious light filled condo. Great floor plan. Fabulous pool and courtyard. Being sold furnished. In the heart of the quarter.

Beautiful New Renovation

1014 HARMONY

Central Met 2909 Division St. Approx 1385sf. $9/sf per yr + electric. Emily Kramer, Corporate Realty, 504-5815005. ekramer@corp-realty.com

835 Royal St. $349.5K Great location, secluded hideaway! Spac 2 br, 2 marble tile baths. Small rear balc overlooking garden.

Paula Bowler • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 • www.frenchquarterrealty.com

High end 1-4BR. Near ferry, clean, many x-tras, hrdwd flrs, cen a/h, no dogs, no sec 8, some O/S prkng $750$1200/mo. 504-362-7487

OFF MAGAZINE. COMMERCIAL. $1850 PER MONTH. Call (504) 895-6394 or (504) 289-9977.

938 Royal St. A $215K Great location for this condo. Perfect for your weekend getaways! Quaint & comfortable. 1 br, great kit & bath.

CALL ME TODAY.

CARROLLTON Grt for prof/med student, 1 BR/1 BA LR, DR, Sitting Rm, furn kit, c-heat/ air units, c-fans, wd flrs, w/d avil, off st prkg, balcony, univ area. No smkrs/pets. $1200/mo+1yr lse. 504-460-2852

CITY PARK/BAYOU ST. JOHN

Carl Mixon, Agent

4716 Canal Street New Orleans, LA 70119 504-482-7897 carl.mixon.gxo3@statefarm.com

statefarm.com

State Farm Fire and Casualty Company, State Farm General Insurance Company, Bloomington, IL

3324 DESOTO

Living room, large bedroom, tile bath, furnished kitchen. No pets. $850/ month + deposit. 504-494-0970

Call (504) 483-3100

THE FERNANDEZ HOUSE

927 DAUPHINE STREET $1,895,000 An excellent example of an early creole cottage set in a serene compound. Beautiful courtyard with mature plantings in a classic partere garden. Property consists of the main house, 4 income producing apartments and a large bonus space-- office, workshop, gym, etc. Parking for multiple cars. Great location.

Paula Bowler • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 www.frenchquarterrealty.com

455 Phillip Street, $ 239,000

817 Amelia Street, $239,900

Was gutted to the studs in 2004/05 and underwent a high quality renovation. 3 independent bedrooms, 2 full baths, master with whirlpool plus nice walk-in closet, off street parking in a great close to town location.

Rustic charm on this unique home fashioned from joining two separate cottages. Great flowing floor plan and with a second front door that’s great for working from home. Off street parking.

Michael L. Baker, ABR/M, CRB, HHS President Realty Resources, Inc. 504-523-5555 • cell 504-606-6226

Licensed by the Louisiana Real Estate Commission for more than 28 years with offices in New Orleans, LA 70130

CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATE IRISH CHANNEL 2505 CONSTANCE

3 BR, 1 BA, liv rm, kit with refrig & stove, hardwood floors. Bath & kitchen ceramic tile. $850/mo. Call 504-4950074.

LAKEVIEW/LAKESHORE 110 EGRET, LAKE VISTA

2 BR, DUPLEX. Walk to Pios School & City Park. All appliance. One offst parking. Small pets OK with deposit. $1100. 504-908-6751.

6233 CATINA

3/2, furn kit, w/d hkps, ca/h, carport w/storage in back alley. All renov’t. No pets, no smoking. $1200 + $1200 sec. dep. 1 yr lease, refs. 455-2674

LAKEFRONT LARGE ATTRACTIVE APT

2BR, 2BA w/ appls, beautiful courtyard setting w/swimming pool, quiet neighborhood. $850/mo. 504-495-6044 or 504-756-7347

4 BLKS FROM TULANE

5512 Cucullu. Newly renov 2 br 1 ba, lr, din rm, kit w appl w\/d hkups, cent a/h, offst pking, hdwd flors. $1000/ mo. 504-874-4330

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT 1113 Cadiz Street

Large 1 bedroom, Central A/H, Dishwasher, Washer & Dryer , Water Paid. $1000/month. Call 899-4494.

1913 7th St. 1 BR $475

SMALL OFFICE SPACE

MID CITY - Offstreet parking for one vehicle. Separate entrance. Available Now. Contact Jane, (504) 482-5292

UNIVERSITY AREA 3301 JEFFERSON AVE.

Spacious & Bright, 1 br, 1 ba, living rm, , dining rm, furnished kitchen with washer & dryer. Secure. Dep + lease. 504-865-7815

Elegant 2/2 condo, fully furn. gourmet kit, garden tub, pool, secure pkg. $2500. Joy Naylon, 504-616-7455 RE/ MAX Affiliates, 504-838-7629. Each office independent owned & operated.

OLD NEW ORLEANS CHARM

1 BR 1 BA Condo. Completely renovated, High ceil, hardwood flrs. 754 Louisiana, Close to Magazine & shopping. 700 sq ft, $1350/mo. Lease. 504-214-7215

St. Charles Ave. - Rent

1 bd, 1ba, gated cvrd park! Fab Cond. Storage! $1,300 504-579-4717. Middleton O’Malley - Keller Williams New Orleans. Each Agency Independently Owned & Operated

RENTALS TO SHARE ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com.

Redone & All New. Water Paid. Deposit $475. Credit & employment checked. Downing Realty, 504-813-3086

2 BEDROOM APT

2511 S Carrollton Ave. 2/1 Furn kit, cen a/h, off st pkg. $825/mo, wtr pd. Background ck required. 504-450-7450.

2 Blks to Law School

1 Bedrm, Liv,kit/din area, 1ba, good closets, A/C, free laundry, parking, bike storage, wood fls, mini blinds $795 Clara owner/agent 858-5837

3008 DELACHAISE

MID CITY

8416 OAK ST. CORPORATE

3 BR, 1 BA, front porch, back yard, stove & refrig incl. W/D hkups, cent air/heat, hardwood flrs. $800/mo. Call Ann, de Montluzin investments, 504-895-1493, 504-430-8737.

3BR, 2BA

Single family home. 8117 Apricot St. (off S. Carrollton Ave). Refrig, gas range, yd with slate patio. $1650/mo.. Call Suzanne (504) 342-2425

FURN. CORP APT

Beautifully furn 1 BR/1.5 BA apt. w/ hdwd flrs, nice kit, lg patio, pool, pkng & laundry. Avail now! Maselli Properties, (504) 891-2420.

DORIAN M. BENNETT • 504-236-7688 dorian.bennett@sothebysrealty.com

RESIDENTIAL RENTALS 713 Camp - 1 bd/ 1ba Furn ............. $2200 1301 N. Rampart - 1 bd/ 1.5ba ............. $1500 2625 Baronne - 3 bd/ 1.5ba .............$1350 5446 Dauphine - 3 bd/ 2 ba .................. $900

French Quarter Realty Wayne • Nicole • Sam • Jennifer • Brett • Robert • George • Baxter • Kaysie • Billy

504-949-5400 1201 Chartres 13 3/2.5 Hdwd Flrs, Renov Kit/Baths, Prkng $2850 1418 Chartres studio charming! Washer/Dryer on site $700 517 Dumaine 2R 2/3 Newly Renov. Jaccuzzi tub. Pool $2500 1000 Royal #4 2/1 Newly renov, gallery balc on royal $2,500 814 Lafayette A 1/1 courtyard off of bd! No smoking $1000 301 Seattle #11 1/1 furnish. Newly renov. Balc. Crtyrd. $1200 712 St Philip Upper 1/1 spacious w/2nd flr balc.Util included. $1895 937 Barracks #1 1/1 Grnd flr apt. New carpet/tile. ctyrd.$875 602 Burgundy 1/1.5 Huge2story!hdwdflrs,hiceils,grtlight $1050 1019 Ursulines 1/1 Grnd flr.hi ceil.lrg kitch.Wtr included $1300

CONDOS FOR SALE 421 Burgundy #1-6 1/1 1014 Esplanade #4 1/1 919 St Philip #6 1/1 1323 Esplanade “A” 1/1 929 Dumaine # 14 studio 1418 Chartres D 2/1 1028 St Philip 2/2 1233 Esplanade #16 2/1 1608 N Broad 2/2

Six Total units.Crtyrd & Balc $105k - $235k Ground floor. 2 courtyards! $249,000 spac w/nice floorplan. courtyard $224,000 grndflrw/hiceils&pool.SHORTSALE$149,999 3rd flr condo w/nice light! low dues $106,500 charmw/expbrck.wdbeamscrtyrd$225,000 Sngl fam home w/rear dependency $515,000 Twnhouse style w/prkg,pool&more $145,000 Single fam renov Near fairgrounds $87,500

CALL FOR MORE LISTINGS!

COMMERICAL

2340 Dauphine Street • New Orleans, LA 70117 (504) 944-3605

1839 N Rampart 2/4 Dual income.Comm.&resid.Nice renov $329k 512 Wilkinson Row Comm Commercial condo quaint st in FQ. $465,000 We have qualified tenants for your rentals. Call us!

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > february 7 > 2012

67

CLASSIFIEDS PUZZLE PAGE MAGAZINE ST. CONDO

JOHN SCHAFF CRS

(c) 504.343.6683 (O) 504.895.4663

3222 Coliseum 4941 St. Charles 2721 St. Charles 5528 Hurst 1750 St. Charles 1750 St. Charles 20 Anjou 1544 Camp 3915 St. Charles 1544 Camp 1544 Camp 1224 St. Charles 2721 St. Charles

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > february 7 > 2012

ANSWERS FOR LAST WEEK ON PAGE 65

70

TOO LATE! ..............................$2,495,000 Grand Mansion.......................$2,300,000 (3 bdrm/3.5ba w/pkg) ............$1,579,000 TOO LATE! ..............................$1,300,000 TOO LATE! ................................ $429,000 Commercial ............................. $349,000 (4 bdrm/2 ba w/pkg) ................ $220,000 (2 bdrm/2ba w/pkg) ................. $239,000 TOO LATE!................................. $315,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) ............................ $159,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) ............................ $149,000 (Only 6 Left!)...............starting at $79,000 (efficiency condo)..................... $169,000

BROADMOOR

4850 MAGAZINE

1208/1210 S. GENOIS

Newly renovated 1bdrm, 1 ba, open floor plan. Beautiful original hardwood floors, 12 ft ceilings, updated kitchen - everything new! Hardwood floors. On a quiet block of Magazine, close to everything. EASY TO PARK. $145,000

IMMEDIATE CASH FLOW. Property is currently getting $1800 rent, potentially more. Gutted after Katrina, renovations completed in 2006 include new roof, dry wall, and wiring, 2 new central heaters installed since 2006. Long term tenants, excellent return on investment. Close to the Blue Plate Mayonnaise Building. $125,000

(504) 895-4663 Latter & Blum, ERA powered is independently owned and operated.

ROuSES IS A

Mardi Gras Tradition

When you’ve been in business for more than 50 years, and you have stores along parade routes all over South Louisiana and the Mississippi Gulf Coast, you see every character imaginable during Mardi Gras. We love Mardi Gras as much as you do, and people watching is just as much fun as the parades. So whatever your costume, whatever your plans, whether you’re walking, marching, riding or sitting back and taking in the show, thank you for making us a part of your celebration again this year.

Zulu Social Aid & Pleasure Club Members Selecting Their Coconuts

There’s a Reason We Sell More King Cakes Than Any Other Bakery

Always Fresh!

We’ve been baking real Louisiana king cakes for 50 years. In fact, we were one of the very first bakeries to make cream cheese and filled king cakes. Our classic king cakes are made with our exclusive gourmet cinnamon dough, braided by hand and baked fresh throughout the day. And oh baby do they taste good! You can get our classic king cakes plain or filled, or try one of four new gourmet king cakes available exclusively in our bakery.

CLASSIC KING CAKES

Available in traditional or filled with your favorite flavor

GOuRmET FLAvORS

A new twist on our classic King Cake

Red Velvet Cream Cheese • German Chocolate Triple Chocolate Fudge • Black Forest Sorry, gourmet flavors not available for shipping.

K ing Cakes are a Local Tradition That’s Meant to be Shared

WE SHIp ANyWHERE IN THE CONTINENTAL uS

www.rouses.com

KING CAKE HOTLINE 1-800-688-5998 ORDER ONLINE www.rouses.com


Gambit's Guide to Mardi Gras 2012