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PUBLISHER MARGO DUBOS Free Alterations > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > NEWS > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >ADMINISTRATIVE > > > > > > > > DIRECTOR > > > > > >MARK > > >KARCHER > < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <Commentary < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <7< < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < Open til 8pm Thurs.> > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >EDITORIAL > > > > > > > >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> Social media and the revolution FAX: 483-3116 | response@gambitweekly.com < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <Blake < < <Pontchartrain < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <8< < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < EDITOR KEVIN ALLMAN > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > New > > > Orleans > > > > >know-it-all > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >MANAGING > > > > > >EDITOR > > > >KANDACE > POWER GRAVES

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Bouquets & Brickbats

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C’est What?

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New Orleans Ladies Arm Wrestling: raucous, raunchy ... and charitable This week’s heroes and zeroes Gambit’s Web poll From their lips to your ears And the feds turn an eye to Jefferson Parish

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Krewe du Routes

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Krewe du Apps

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Krewe du Chow

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Krewe du Brew

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A&E News 43 Krewe du Cork wines its way through the Quarter Gambit Picks 43 Best bets for your busy week Noah Bonaparte Pais / On the Record 45 Elephant 6 Collective’s Holiday Surprise tour Feature: Family Gras 46 Jefferson Parish’s own Carnival celebration is back Cuisine Ian McNulty on Kim Son

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5 in Five: 5 places to dine on artichokes Brenda Maitland’s Wine of the Week

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ART

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PREVIEW: Marnie Stern

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PREVIEW: Film series kicks off at NOMA

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53

REVIEW: Carlos Betancourt at HeriardCimino; Jason Leinwand at the Front

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REVIEW: The Color Purple

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STAGE

EVENTS

57

58 PREVIEW: Ian McNulty’s Louisiana Rambles 58

CLASSIFIEDS Market Place

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Guide to Real Estate

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Weekly Tails

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Job Search

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THE COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF NEW ORLEANS IS SOLICITING PROPOSALS FROM EXPERIENCED PROFESSIONALS OR PRIVATE FIRM(S) TO PROVIDE ASSISTANCE TO THE COUNCIL AND TO ITS COMMITTEES WITH EVALUATION OF POSSIBLE CHANGES TO THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEES’ PENSION SYSTEM, THE FIREFIGHTERS’ PENSION SYSTEM, AND THE POLICE PENSION SYSTEM. THE REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS IS AVAILABLE ON THE COUNCIL’S WEBSITE, WWW.NOLACITYCOUNCIL.COM OR MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE OFFICE OF THE COUNCIL CHIEF OF STAFF, ROOM 1E06, CITY HALL, 1300 PERDIDO STREET, (504) 658-1093.    PROPOSALS MUST BE RECEIVED BY 3:00 P.M., FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2011. PEGGY LEWIS, MMC CLERK OF COUNCIL PUBLICATION DATES:  FEBRUARY 22, 2011

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The Fight for Freedom

D

told the media, “I wouldn’t know a Twitter from a Tweeter,” but someone must have brought her up to speed since then. On Feb. 15, during a speech on Internet freedom at George Washington University in Washington, D.C., Clinton said protecting freedom of the Internet around the world remains “one of the grand challenges of our time.” She also promised to invest $25 million of government money to help freedom fighters around the world battle “thugs, hackers and censors.” In that effort, Clinton could start at home. Legislation titled “Protecting Cyberspace as a National Asset,” championed by Sen. Joe Lieberman, I-Conn., is couched as an attempt to protect American Internet infrastructure in the event of a terrorist attack — but computer security experts say it could be used the same way Mubarak shut down

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No president should have the fearsome authority to shut down Americans’ Internet access.

Egyptian Internet providers. Supporters claim the bill is necessary in an age of cyber attacks. As written, however, the proposed law would only kick in if a cyber attack causes more than $25 billion in damages. Critics point out, rightly, that the legislation would effectively close the barn door after the horse has gotten out. In our view, no president — Democrat or Republican — should have the fearsome authority to shut down Americans’ Internet access. Doing so would be akin to shutting down newspapers and television news stations. The U.S. government is learning the value of social networking. This month, the State Department set up two special Twitter accounts, @USAdarFarsi and @USAbilAraby, to broadcast news in Farsi to anti-government protesters in Iran — a 21st-century Voice of America. That’s a noble effort, but the fight for freedom continues on the home front as well.

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uring the recent uprising that toppled Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak, Egypt completely shut down the Internet within its borders — an unprecedented move by any country, and a worrisome one. The Egyptian government owns the country’s largest Internet provider and easily shut down other providers within hours. Engineers from Google and Twitter, alarmed at the development, quickly formed a workaround called “speak2Tweet” aimed at keeping the Egyptian protesters in touch with the rest of the world. They set up an international phone number where Egyptians with any sort of phone connection could leave voicemails that would automatically be transcribed and sent out over Twitter. Egyptian writer Parvez Sharma noted that poverty is high in Egypt, and the number of people with smartphones is much smaller than in America, saying the Facebook/ Twitter influence during the country’s uprising was just one component of a popular revolution. In early February, social media research firm Sysomos analyzed the number of Twitter users who identified their location as Egypt, Tunisia or Yemen, and found it to be less than 15,000. Nevertheless, it was enough of a factor that a panel was hastily convened on the last day of New York’s Social Media Week on Feb. 11, where Ahmed Shihab-Eldin, a producer for the Al-Jazeera English news network, told the room, “Social media didn’t cause this revolution. It amplified it. It accelerated it.” That’s good enough. While the ouster of Mubarak was years in the making, its actual execution took only 18 days once the protests began. There was violence, to be sure, but nowhere near the kind of massive bloodshed (or genocide) that often accompanies revolutions. A good argument can be made that the protesters’ links to the outside world helped galvanize world opinion — quickly — against Mubarak. The New York Times reported last week that the young Egyptians who spearheaded the revolution “brainstormed on the use of technology” with their counterparts in Tunisia, which earlier saw a successful uprising led by young people. “Breaking free from older veterans of the Arab political opposition, they relied on tactics of nonviolent resistance channeled from an American scholar through a Serbian youth brigade — but also on marketing tactics borrowed from Silicon Valley,” the Times wrote. Repressive governments naturally fear social networking. China blocks both Facebook and Twitter — and censored as much of the news coming out of Egypt as it could. (Chinese people entering the word “Egypt” on their search engines during the time got an error message from the government.) During the contentious Iranian elections of 2009, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton

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NEW ORLEANS KNOW-IT-ALL

Choctaw Indians brought their blankets, medicinal herbs, baskets and powdered sassafras root to trade for guns, knives and trinkets. On Saturday, June 8, 1867, the LeBreton Market opened on the site. The New Orleans Times newspaper assured us the new market would be fully stocked with meat, vegetables, fish and just about anything else one could want. The markets proliferated, and at one time there were more than two dozen all over the city. But in 1946, the city sold the 16 remaining markets, keeping only the French Market

I can try, but you know how people are. They believe what they want to believe — and pronunciation of street names in New Orleans is idiosyncratic. The Frenchman for whom the street is named — Valmont Soniat DuFossat — would have pronounced his name with the accent on the second syllable. The vowel in the third syllable is pronounced like “cat,” but the “t” is silent. The street was named in 1841 when plantation owner because of its historiFrancois Robert Avart subThe city opened the cal value. LeBreton Market in 1867 divided his land. He named and closed it in 1946 In 1845, Benjamin one street Robert after himalong with all its other M. Norman wrote in self and three other streets public markets except Norman’s New Orleans — Valmont, Soniat and the French Market. and Environs: “The DuFossat — after his son-inPHOTO BY WORKS PROGRESS markets are a promilaw. Avart must have been ADMINISTRATION nent feature in a devery fond of his daughter scription of New OrAlmaris’ husband because he named another street in the suburb leans. They are numerous and dispersed Bellecastle for a branch of the Soniat fam- to suit the convenience of citizens. The greatest market day is Sunday during the ily, which never actually got to America. morning. At break of day the gathering commences — youth and age, beauty and HEY BLAKE, not-so-beautiful — all colors, nations and MY 89-YEAR-OLD FATHER JOHN tongues are commingled in one heteroBONURA WORKED FOR HIS FATHER, geneous mass of delightful confusion. … JOSEPH BONURA, AT THE LEBRETON The traveler who leaves the city without MARKET ON NORTH DORGENOIS visiting one of the popular markets on STREET AND BAYOU ROAD. MY Sunday morning has suffered a rare treat FATHER SAID THE ORIGINAL NAME to escape him.” WAS THE INDIAN MARKET. HE SAID Those neighborhood markets are a loss THERE WERE OTHER PUBLIC MAR- to the city, but new ones have sprung KETS, AND HE THINKS THEY WERE up to replace them. We now have three CLOSED IN 1945. PLEASE TELL ME Crescent City Farmers Markets in New THE HISTORY OF THE INDIAN MAR- Orleans. The downtown market is held KET AND THE LEBRETON MARKET. every Saturday morning from 8 a.m. JOANNE BONURA DOMILISE until noon at 700 Magazine St. on the corner of Girod Street. There’s one on Tuesday mornings from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. DEAR JOANNE, Public markets were an integral part at 200 Broadway St. in Uptown New of commercial life even before Bienville Orleans. Also, there’s a Mid-City market arrived to found New Orleans in 1718. on Thursdays from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. in the The Indian market was the oldest in the parking lot of the American Can Co. at area. It was a trading center where the Orleans Avenue and Bayou St. John.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> MORE SCUTTLEBUTT CLANCY DUBOS < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < KNOWLEDGE < < < < < < < < < < <IS < <POWER <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< 15 17 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

scuttle Butt

QUOTES OF THE WEEK

“New Orleans suffered a steeper population decline than any other city in the country thanks to Hurricane Katrina, which displaced much of the population and made it difficult — if not impossible — for some to return. However, the majority of those who were displaced have since begun to return to the city, as have a number of new residents and businesses. So while the city’s population may be down from what it was in 2000, it is clearly on the rise going into the new decade.” — Newsweek, oddly citing New Orleans as being “on the rise” while naming it No. 1 in a list titled “America’s Dying Cities.” Newsweek, which has lost more than $44 million since 2007, was sold in August 2010 by the Washington Post Company to investor Sidney Harman for the sum of $1 — $3.95 less than it costs to buy a single issue of the troubled newsweekly.

Ladies At Arms THE FIRST RULE OF NEW ORLEANS LADIES ARM WRESTLING: DON’T TAKE IT TOO SERIOUSLY. BY RACHEL ARONS PHOTOS BY SHAWN ESCOFFERY

W

“It is Newsweek that is dying. NOLA is thriving with an influx of young civic-minded new residents. If anything, Katrina actually helped this transformation. I applaud the city rising from the ashes and wish I could be a part of it.” — Jim Gilbert, commenting on the Newsweek site “This is somebody who is sitting in an office that’s writing something that they don’t know what they are talking about. It makes you cringe a little bit.” — Mayor Mitch Landrieu on Newsweek’s list jailbird’s teardrop tattoo. Wrestler’s taunt It takes only a few minutes of each other before watching these bawdy, gendera match. bending characters brawl it out on stage to see that, in a town known for outrageous spectacles, NOLAW puts on one of the most outrageous spectacles in town. And it’s all for a good cause. NOLAW IS THE LOCAL CHAPTER OF A NATIONAL NETwork of women’s arm wrestling leagues whose mission is part entertainment and part philanthropy, with a wallop of female empowerment mixed in. Founded in 2008 in Charlottesville, Va., the original LAW league has spawned similar groups in seven other areas across the country, forming a national movement that reaches from Taos, N.M. to New York City. Feldman, 23, originally was a member of Hudson Valley B.R.A.W.L. (Broads Regional Arm Wrestling League) near her college in upstate New York. When she moved to New Orleans after graduation, she knew an event involving elaborate costumes, wild antics and a way to give back to the community could find a home in the Crescent City. “I was like, ‘This will catch on like

CRIMES AGAINST NATURE LAW CHALLENGED

Several groups joined together Feb. 16 to file a federal civil rights challenge against Louisiana’s crimes-against-nature statute. The Center for Constitutional Rights (CCR), the Loyola Law Clinic and private-practice attorney Andrea J. Ritchie brought the challenge on behalf of nine anonymous plaintiffs who were charged with violating the statute, which is a felony in Louisiana. The crime of soliciting for prostitution, on the other hand, is a misdemeanor in the Bayou State. PAGE 15

c'est what? WHAT DO YOU THINK OF SAINTS HEAD COACH SEAN PAYTON MOVING HIS FAMILY TO DALLAS?

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BoUQuets Civic Duty Shoes

THIS WEEK’S HEROES AND ZEROES

is donating 100 percent of the profits from its new line of sneakers to benefit Common Ground Relief in the 9th Ward. The shoes are made of Tyvek®, the material most often seen on houses under construction or being rebuilt, and the packaging is made from recycled materials. The New Jersey-based Civic Duty Shoes was founded in 2009 by Steven Weinreb after he lost his job.

Melissa Bourgeois,

a Jefferson Parish-born author now living in California, is contributing a portion of the proceeds from her new novel, Belle Douleur, to the Greater New Orleans Foundation to aid in Gulf Coast oil relief efforts. Bourgeois recently held a reading and signing at the Maple Street Book Shop in Uptown. Belle Douleur means “beautiful pain” in French.

Patricia Gay

received the Lifetime Contribution to the Humanities award from the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities (LEH). Gay, who has been executive director of the Preservation Resource Center (PRC) for 30 years, was cited by the LEH for growing the PRC from a staff of two to 60 full- and part-time employees. She will be honored April 2 at Houmas House Plantation in Darrow, La.

Sean Payton’s Play It Forward Foundation

has provided 18 tractor-trailers of food and household supplies to Gulf Coast families through an arrangement with the international relief organization Feed the Children. The New Orleans Saints coach’s donation is going to residents in Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama. The food and other goods were delivered Feb. 16 in Gulfport, Miss., and will be distributed this week to 400 families there.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 22 > 2011

hen New Orleans Ladies Arm Wrestling (NOLAW) founder Nina Feldman first arm wrestled in upstate New York back in 2009, she thought she was going to get her ass kicked. “My persona was The Runt,” says Feldman, who stands 5 feet, 4 inches. But when The Runt’s gold lamé Spandex and onstage antics carried her to the finals that night, Feldman learned the first rule of Ladies Arm Wrestling: “It’s not only about brute strength,” she says with a mischievous twinkle in her eye. Not that New Orleans Ladies Arm Wrestling participants aren’t tough women — many are blacksmiths, carpenters, farmers, athletes, or just plain jacked. But in NOLAW, as in the WWF, attitude is at least as important as muscle mass. Take Justin Beaver, for example. At the NOLAW tournament last December, she made her grand entrance with a lip-synched performance of teen heartthrob Justin Bieber’s hit song “Baby.” Her costume’s clever allusion to the photo blog Lesbians Who Look Like Justin Bieber — or, in this case, Justin Bieber in a pair of rodent teeth and a beaver tail — made her an instant crowd favorite. Then there was the Vagitarian. She wasn’t even that great of a wrestler, but what she lacked in strength she more than made up for in sheer raunchiness. Her costume: a white chef’s uniform with an enormous pink vagina hand-sewn in the back. Her signature move? Reaching back over her shoulder to give those faux-lady parts a tickle. In past tournaments, there was the busty and flatulent Dolly Fartin, the lady cop Armed And Dangerous, a rugby player dressed as a Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle and a John Waters-inspired Cry-Baby complete with a

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last spring, a wrestler named Bait and Tackle sparked NOLAW’s first dance-off competition. No one quite remembers how it happened, but by all accounts she began the night wrapped in fishing net and ended it dancing onstage in nothing but a NOLAW muscle shirt and a pair of underwear. “It seemed to happen as an organic ground swell, in some psychic group decision that this needed to happen,” Christian says. Bait and Tackle went home a champion that night, and the dance-off has since become a NOLAW institution. Another institution is the “celebrity judges” — costumed duos (Freddie Mercury and Andy Warhol, say, or Tonya Hard-On and Nancy Tear-It-Off) who sit onstage during each tournament to add an extra dose of drama to the show. Last spring one celebrity judge impersonated M.I.A., the British rapper and political provocateuse who performed at the Grammy Awards while nine months pregnant. “She didn’t really look anything like [M.I.A.] but she had a great accent,” Feldman says. “And then, at the end of the show, she did a bit about how we’re all terrorists, and then broke her water on stage and sprayed the water on the crowd.” OCCASIONALLy, NOLAW EvENTS HAvE spiraled completely out of control, thanks to a bribing system put in place to encourage big spending. During a normal bet, $1 buys an audience member one ticket for a wrestler of her choice — winning bettors earn a chance to win prizes like gift certificates to local bars and restaurants — and wrestlers must adhere to a set of rules: wrestling elbow on the table, one butt cheek firmly planted. But for $40, an audience member can have the ref blindfolded and for $60, she can buy a rematch and bring back an eliminated wrestler. For $80, a member of the crowd can buy a “guest match.” When the vagitarian and Armed And Dangerous squared off in front of a blindfolded ref at The Maison, the battle that ensued looked more like Ultimate Fighting than arm wrestling. “It was complete lack of decorum,” page 13

Armed et Dangereux OLAW’s next event is Fri., Feb. 25 at 8 p.m. at The Maison (508 Frenchmen St., 371-5543; www.maisonfrenchmen.com). The event is free and open to the public, though “betting” is encouraged and all proceeds benefit the New Orleans Birthing Project. For more information, visit www.wearenolaw.wordpress.com or friend “New Orleans Ladies Arm Wrestling” on Facebook.

n

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 22 > 2011

wildfire,’” she says. Feldman called her friend Ari Braverman, who called her friends, who called theirs. Before they knew it, they had formed NOLAW’s core organizing committee — now known as the Council of Elders — to organize the first event. It took place at Finn McCool’s Irish Pub in Mid-City in January 2010. “No one had any idea that it was gonna be that successful and that packed,” says Charlie Christian, who emcees the events with Feldman. “Finn McCool’s was bursting at the gills.” NOLAW has since held a handful of events at venues across town, from Handsome Willy’s to the AllWays Lounge, and has amassed increasing numbers of fans along the way. Admission to NOLAW events is free, but money spent betting on wrestlers goes to local organizations that benefit women and children. The most recent, at The Maison on Frenchmen Street, helped fund an entrepreneurial printmaking workshop for women led by the Louisiana ArtWorks Community Print Shop, and before that, another one benefited a mental health program for families affected by the BP oil disaster. On average, Feldman says, NOLAW participants are five to 10 years younger than those in other LAW leagues, and audiences are younger, too. The young crowds have made the cash flow slower than in other leagues — the group raises about $1,000 per event, while other leagues have raised as much as $5,000 — but they’ve also made NOLAW tournaments more fun. “The other leagues are much more preoccupied with following the rules,” Feldman says. “We get a little dirty.” This down-and-dirty, anything-canhappen quality has become NOLAW’s trademark style. The basic outline of each brawl is like a standard tournament: eight wrestlers start out the night, one goes home the champion. But that format is really just a jumping-off point for the outrageous sideshows that unfold spontaneously along the way. “It all goes by in a terrible blur,” Christian says. At the Allways Lounge tournament

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 22 > 2011

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    “The fact that the women take it to  that level and are so engrossed in it is  what’s  fun  to  watch,”  he  says.  “I  like  watching  that  level  of  acting  in  general, regardless of sex.”     Zach Gong, 24, is another man who  has been a huge NOLAW fan since the  beginning.  He  sees  ladies’  arm  wrestling  as  a  product  of  the  current  zeitgeist in the city. “In 2010 New Orleans,  [NOLAW]  is  a  quintessential  type  of  event,”  he  says.  “It’s  driven  by  young  people. There’s no budget. And it’s an  altruistic venture.” NOLAW’s fIrsT TOurNAmeNT Of THe  new year is friday, feb. 25 — a benefit  for  the  New  Orleans  Birthing  Project,  an organization that provides mentors  for  underserved  and  at-risk  mothersto-be.      To prepare for the event, the Council  of elders has been busy hatching new  ideas.  They  want  to  attract  an  older  audience (with deeper pockets) to their  shows,  and  they’re  hoping  to  raise  enough money to help fund the formation of a national Ladies Arm Wrestling  organization  to  unite  the  disparate  leagues under one umbrella nonprofit.     They’ve  also  been  busy  assembling  a  fresh batch of lady wrestlers. At a recent  party  in  the  Bywater,  feldman  had  her  eye on a toned landscaper in a sleeveless  shirt.        “I  noticed  her  arms  across  the  room,” feldman says. “And I thought,  ‘she should wrestle.’”

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Christian  says.  “It  reminded  me  of  those  scenes  on  [the  Discovery  Channel’s]  Planet Earth  where  two  stags meet on a rocky crag. They lost  all sense of self-preservation.”     But for the most part, NOLAW manages  to  navigate  a  fine  line  between  unpredictability  and  control  (though  wrestlers are asked to sign safety waivers,  just  in  case).  “It’s  like  going  to  the  zoo,”  Christian  says.  “You  get  to  get  really  close  to  a  lion  and  it’s  really  nervewracking. But you know there are  bars there and you’re not really gonna  get eaten.”     And with its crazy mashup of campy  humor, sports, pop culture and theater,  NOLAW events have earned fans from  all walks of New Orleans life.     “You’re appealing to butch or buff or  athletic chicks, and you’re appealing to  feminists, and you’re appealing to guys  who are there for a little bit of tits and  ass, and you’re appealing to the theater  crowd,  and  you’re  appealing  to  strippers,” feldman says.      Attracting  such  a  diverse  group  to  such  a  gender-bending,  femaledriven  event  is  one  of  the  Ladies  Arm  Wrestling  movement’s  greatest  achievements,” feldman says.      “People’s notions of traditional gender  norms  are  transformed  just  by  going.  It’s  really  easy  to  cast  off  feminist  activities  or  movements  as  angry  or  fruitless;  and  you  go  to  something  like this and have a blast, and you realize  you  just  supported  one,  no  matter  who you are,” feldman says.      As  the  only  male  participant  on  stage, part of Christian’s role as emcee  is  to  demonstrate  that  men,  too,  can  enjoy  such  an  overtly  female  event  —  and not just for the T&A. 

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    Gov.  Bobby Jindal’s  frequent  out-ofstate  fundraising  junkets  in  2010  paid  off,  according  to  his  Feb.  15  filing  with  the Louisiana Ethics Administration. Jindal  raised $3.4 million last year, an eyebrowraising  sum  for  a  Republican  governor  with  no  Democratic  challenger  on  the  horizon. Jindal raised much of his money  outside  the  state,  yet  he  continues  to  insist he has no eye on higher office.      By comparison, Anh “Joseph” Cao, the  former  congressman  who  fought  and  lost  a  high-profile  re-election  campaign  last  fall  against  Cedric Richmond,  raised  only  $2  million,  while  Richmond  raised  half  that.  The  injection  of  funds  brought  Jindal’s total war chest to $9.2 million for 

the  Oct.  22  gubernatorial  primary.  The  governor  continues  to  raise  money  at  every opportunity.     Meanwhile,  one  potential  Jindal  challenger  piqued  the  interest  of  the  press  this  week.  State  Senate  President Joel Chaisson’s  finance  report  noted,  under  the  category  “Office  Sought,”  three  words:  “a  statewide  office.”  Chaisson  quickly  told  Politico  he  had  no  plans  to  run for governor this time around, though  he didn’t rule it out for the future. “There’s  some  talk  our  governor  may  not  serve  a  full  term,”  Chaisson  told  Politico.  “I  have  no  illusions  of  doing  it  this  fall  for  that  seat.  Our  governor  has  a  very  large  war  chest.” — Allman

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    By  2100,  rising  sea  levels  will  threaten  9  percent  of  the  land  in  coastal  U.S.  cities,  according  to  a  report  released  this  month  by  the  University  of  Arizona.  Scientists  there  say  the  current  rate  of  greenhouse  gas  emissions  contributing  to  global  warming  —  and  increasing  the  earth’s average temperature by 8 degrees  Fahrenheit — continue to melt ice sheets,  and sea levels will rise 4 to 6 feet over the  next  few  centuries.  The  total  population  of  potentially  impacted  cities  and  towns  is 40 million people, and 20 of those locations  hold  more  than  300,000  people.  Nine big coastal cities, including New York  and  Boston,  will  face  a  potential  10  percent land loss — and so will New Orleans,  according to the report.     Jeremy Weiss,  senior  research  specialist  at  the  university’s  Department  of  Geosciences,  co-authored  the  study,  which used U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)  data  to  determine  affected  areas.  The  USGS data predates recent levee construction,  though  the  city’s  levee  systems  are  factored into the data. The report’s maps  show  much  of  the  city  lying  at  or  below  1  meter  of  elevation,  with  areas  immediately  along  the  Mississippi  River  (read:  levee protection and higher ground) lying  at or below 6 meters of elevation.      “I  think  one  of  the  main  points  that  come  out  of  our  work  (is)  some  municipalities  will  have  a  relatively  large  area  potentially  impacted,  some  will  have  a  relatively  small  area  potentially  impacted,” Weiss says.     The  report  doesn’t  offer  any  solution  as to what needs to happen at the state  and  municipal  levels  to  prevent  those  impacts,  though  its  title  (“Implications  of Recent Sea Level Rise Science for Lowelevation  Areas  in  Coastal  Cities  of  the  Conterminous  U.S.A.”)  gives  those  governments a heads-up.      “Even  though  this  is  a  global  issue  —  the human cost to climate change, global  sea  level  rise  —  the  potential  impacts  from rising sea levels are very much a local  phenomenon,”  Weiss  says.  “It’s  going  to  be  different  from  location  to  location  in  the lower 48.” — Alex Woodward

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    The  statute  criminalizes  “unnatural  copulation” — generally accepted as oral  and  anal  sex  —  while  not  mentioning  vaginal sex, an interpretation the groups  claim  has  been  used  to  target  gay  and  transgendered people.     A  Louisiana  resident  convicted  of  a  crime  against  nature  —  even  a  consensual  one  —  must  register  with  the  state  for a minimum of 15 years and send periodic  notices  to  neighbors  and  neighboring businesses, as well as have the words  “Sex  Offender”  stamped  on  his  or  her  Louisiana  identification  card  in  orange  letters.  The  notification  process  is  the  same  one  that  must  be  obeyed  by  people  convicted  of  child  molestation  and  rape, which the law groups claim unfairly  stigmatizes sexual minorities by associating  their  behavior  with  that  of  violent  criminals. “The toll it takes is devastating,”  says  Deon Haywood,  executive  director  of  the  New  Orleans  group  Women  With  a  Vision.  “I  have  worked  with  women  affected by this every day.”     “This archaic law is being used to mark  people  with  a  modern-day  scarlet  letter  without any justification,” says CCR attorney  Alexis Agathocleous.  “Our  clients  pose no threat to anyone. None of them  has ever been convicted of a sex offense  involving children, violence or force. Their  inclusion on the sex offender registry violates  basic  constitutional  equal  protection  principles  and  constitutes  cruel  and  unusual punishment.”     In  last  year’s  legislative  session,  state  Sen.  J.P. Morrell,  D-New  Orleans,  introduced  a  bill  that  reduced  the  penalty  for  a  first  crime-against-nature  conviction  from  a  felony  to  a  misdemeanor,  a  bill signed into law by Gov. Bobby Jindal.  But  the  legal  groups  representing  the  plaintiffs in this case say Louisiana’s definition of crimes against nature is unique  in  the  United  States.  “No  other  state  in  the  country  requires  [those  convicted  of  crimes  against  nature]  to  register  as  sex  offenders,” Ritchie says.     The original crimes-against-nature statute was adopted by Louisiana in 1805. — Kevin Allman

15

NTC Lecture Rushkoff Gambit 1-4 Ad Rev2_Layout 1 16/02/2011 10:24 Page 1

Douglas RusHkoFF program or be programmed the 2011 Newcomb-tulane College Lecture welcomes renowned media theorist and Internet pioneer Douglas Rushkoff, the originator of ideas such as “viral media” and “social currency.” See why timothy Leary calls him “one of the great thinkers of our time.”

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 22 > 2011

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POLITICS

DUBOS

Follow Clancy on Twitter @clancygambit.

The Other Jefferson Scandals ere’s a pop quiz: When was the last time you saw a local district attorney bring a public corruption case in Louisiana? It’s not a trick question. I’m not sure I know the answer myself. Let’s just say it’s rare. There are several reasons why, and they all have to do with politics. Go figure. DAs have to run for office, so they typically have to line up support among the local courthouse crowd. Bringing public corruption cases against those same folks is the political equivalent of biting the hand that feeds you. At the same time, if a DA were to bring corruption charges against a local official, many would look first at the political implications — and potential motivations — behind the charges. The law requires prosecutors to recuse themselves when there might be a conflict of interest; DAs thus ask the state attorney general’s office to step in or appoint a special prosecutor when that happens. So, if a DA fails to investigate, he’s suspected of playing politics. If he brings charges, same rules apply. I’m not justify-

H

ing the lack of local corruption cases … I’m just explaining it. All of which underscores the role the U.S. Justice Department plays in the fight against corruption in Louisiana. If it weren’t for the feds, we might never see crooked politicians go to jail. I was reminded of this last week when news broke that former Jefferson Parish President Aaron Broussard, his ex-wife, and his former parish attorney reportedly received “target letters” from federal investigators. Also last week, members of the Parish Council — and new Parish President John Young, himself a former council member — were subpoenaed by a federal grand jury investigating an array of potential corruption cases in Jefferson. And this is just the start. Broussard and former parish attorney Tom Wilkinson will have to explain how Broussard’s ex, Karen Parker, worked as a paralegal in Wilkinson’s office even though she had no qualifications to do so. Being classified as a paralegal allowed Parker to earn $65,000 a year while she did her job as an ID card processor, a job that paid no more than $43,000.

Broussard and Wilkinson resigned under a cloud last year; Parker was later canned. Other “paralegals” with no certification have since been fired. A target letter is not an indictment, but it usually means the recipient is about to get indicted. Broussard’s attorney confirmed possible charges of wire fraud, conspiracy and misuse of federal money. This is not a complicated case, and the feds typically start with the low-

If a revolution can happen in 18 days in Egypt, it can happen in six months in Jefferson.

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hanging fruit. As for the council members, I must note that they are witnesses, not targets. Their subpoenas may have more to do with a potential case involving the lucrative but controversial landfill contract awarded to River Birch Inc. during Broussard’s tenure as parish president. The Jefferson Parish investigations have been public knowledge for a while, but now they have entered a more public phase. Which gives this story a political twist: Parish elections are coming up in the fall, along with statewide elections. The timing of these investigations couldn’t be worse for Jefferson Parish incumbents. The normally placid waters of Jefferson politics have been roiling since the scandals broke in late 2009. Jefferson Parish voters historically have tolerated their politicians’ chumminess, but they are plenty pissed off — and rightly so — at the arrogance currently on display. It’s a safe bet that voter unrest, if not outright hostility, will be a big factor in parish elections in October. If a revolution can happen in 18 days in Egypt, it can happen in six months in Jefferson.

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18

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 22 > 2011

mardi gras 2011

LET THE

PARADES BEGIN REX DUKE™, THE WORLD’S FIRST AND FOREMOST PARADE CRITIC, PREVIEWS THE FIRST WEEKEND OF CARNIVAL PARADES.

Parade spectators grab for beads during the Bacchus parade.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

19

KREWE DU APPS

29

KREWE DU CHOW

31

KREWE DU BREW

35

Going to the parades? There’s an app for that, no matter what kind of smartphone is in your pocket. Kevin Allman breaks down your choices Parade route food that’s a cut above fast food? Easy. Ian McNulty tells you where to find it and what to order Just because you’re at a parade doesn’t mean you can’t drink good beer. Beer blogger Jeremy Labadie on the bars and stores near parade routes where quality suds can be found

ith Fat Tuesday falling in the second week of March, Rex Duke™, Carnival’s foremost parade critic, has had plenty of time to get excited about Mardi Gras. The pageantry finally kicks off this week as krewes take to the streets throughout the New Orleans area. Get ready to pick a parade spot with his previews below. There is information on krewes, floats, bands, honored royalty, guest riders, routes and more. Enjoy!

W

FRIDAY, Feb. 25 OSHUN 6PM

anchor Nancy Parker is slated to ride along with local favorite Al “Carnival Time” Johnson.

CLEOPATRA 6:30PM

Location: Uptown Theme: The Best of Broadway Floats: 18 King Shango: Kenneth Errol Johnson Sr. Queen Oshun: Kiefe Marie Miles Throws: Krewe cups, lighted Oshun peacock and Oshun medallion beads

Location: West Bank Theme: Egyptian Treasures Floats: 14 Cleopatra: Kyla Clement Diehl Throws: “Cleocatra” dolls, emblem beads and light up beads

Oshun lights up St. Charles Avenue with its Best of Broadway theme. Watch for floats celebrating hits including The Color Purple and Cats. WVUE-TV Fox 8

Cleopatra honors Egyptian mythology and landmarks. Floats feature the ancient cities of Memphis and Alexandria, the Valley of the Kings

and Egyptian gods and goddesses including Sekhmet (the lioness/warrior goddess) and Ma’at (the feathered goddess of truth and order). One prized throw will be the catheaded doll Bastet, Egypt’s popular feline goddess.

EXCALIBUR 7PM

Location: Metairie Theme: A Knight of Rock ’N’ Roll Floats: 20 King Arthur: Michael Yenni Queen Guenevere: Michelle Swanner Throws: Wooden shields, medieval hats, fiberoptic light-up beads

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 22 > 2011

KREWE DU ROUTES

Maps, schedules and all the info on the parades coming up this week, courtesy of Rex Duke™

PAGE 21

19

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 22 > 2011

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The St. Augustine High School Marching 100 parades during Carnival. PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

The knights and ladies of Excalibur pull out all the stops for their 10th anniversary parade. The rock ’n’ roll theme highlights musicians including the Beach Boys, Cher, Madonna and Michael Jackson, and Bag of Donuts ride as guests. Riders’ tunics each reflect the float’s title. Throws commemorating the anniversary include a jukebox bead, shields hand-decorated by members, and crowns and medieval caps for children.

ATLAS 7:30PM

Location: Metairie Theme: Atlas Travels Time Floats: 15 King: announced at parade time Queen: announced at parade time Named for the Greek god who holds the world on his shoulders, the Krewe of Atlas travels through time in its parade. Floats depict famous events and faraway places.

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SATURDAY, Feb. 26 CHOCTAW 11AM

Location: West Bank Theme: It’s All Elementary Floats: 18 Chief: Darren M. Laurent Princess: Kathie Sanchez Millet

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The Krewe of Choctaw has paraded for more than three-quarters of a century, and on occasion embarked on river parades. It honors that tradition with a steamboat ride event a week prior to the parade. On the route, its throws are themed to match its Native American lore.

ADONIS 11:45AM

Location: West Bank Theme: Childhood Memories Floats: 14 Adonis XIII: Brian Robert Queen Adonis XIII: Tiffany Nicole Smith

PAGE 23

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 22 > 2011

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Throws: Krewe cups and koozies Adonis revels in Childhood Memories. Krewe floats depict children’s literature and fairy tales including Treasure Island, Charlotte’s Web and Little Red Riding Hood.

PONTCHARTRAIN 2PM

Time: 2 p.m. Location: Uptown Theme: Can You Name That Ball? Floats: 15 King: Lt. Joseph Denton Wright III Queen: Alexandra Grace Simpson Throws: Krewe cups, three-dimensional medallion grouper beads and Pontchartrain footballs. Pontchartrain loves to play word games, and there’s usually a bit of a riddle to the title. Rex Duke™ offers the clue that this year’s floats include Powerball, Lucille Ball and Ball and Chain. The procession features a U.S. Marine Corps Band as well as the freewheeling Big Easy Rollergirls.

CAESAR 6PM

Location: Metairie Theme: When I Grow Up

Floats: 27 Emperor: Michael Falgout Empress: Heather Miranne Throws: Felt spears, battle axes, light-up beads, stuffed tigers Caesar is planting ideas with a parade featuring professions children might want to be when they grow up, including astronaut, judge, construction worker and New Orleans Saint. Former Saint Morten Andersen and pro-golfer Fuzzy Zoeller will ride in the parade, as well as a costumed contingent of Smurfs. Caesar’s largesse is marked by its unique neon-lit collars on krewe royalty.

SPARTA 6PM

Location: Uptown Theme: I Write the Songs Floats: 16 King: Announced day of parade Queen: Laura Hutton Chapman Throws: Multi-medallion beads, cups, koozies, plush swords, glass beads, light-up medallion beads and a new Sparta mystery throw.

In tune with its theme, Sparta floats feature Elvis, Ike and Tina Turner and the Beach Boys. Among the traditional elements in the procession are the mule-drawn Spartan helmet minifloat and flambeaux. Special throws include the Sparta Gazette, parade posters distributed from the prince and princess’ float.

Poseidon helms a float rolling down St. Charles Avenue. PHOTO BY DAVID R AE MORRIS

PAGE 25

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Location: Uptown Theme: It’s All Greek to Me Floats: 17 King: Walter Leger III Queen: Arita M.L. Bohannan Throws: Light-up medallion beads, gel-figure light-up hammer, doubloons Pygmalion celebrates all things ancient and Greek. Floats depict heroes such as Hercules, the goddess Aphrodite, the city-state Sparta and the legend of Pandora. Doubloon collectors should note there are special doubloons for the royalty and a black captain’s doubloon. Pygmalion Fest, following the parade at Generations Hall, is open to the public.

sunday, Feb. 27 ALLA NOON

Location: West Bank Theme: Alla’s Superfriends

Floats: 23 King: Bryan Adams Queen: Lindsay Leman Throws: Plush spears and fleur-delis, seven different colored doubloons, special cups from Allagator and Coon-Ass floats Alla is in league with the Superfriends. Floats feature famous comic book heroes including the Incredible Hulk, Captain America and Iron Man, and there is a Justice League float. The massive procession features more than 20 marching bands, including St. Augustine High School, Tulane University and a U.S. Marine Corps, as well as eight equestrian units and more. New Orleans Saints join the Sunshine Kids as guest riders.

CARROLLTON NOON

Location: Uptown Theme: Broadway on Parade Floats: 20 King: William Taylor III Queen: Andre’a Michelle Foote

PAGE 26

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Throws: Doubloons, captain’s doubloons, krewe cups Join Carrollton as the krewe takes Broadway to the streets. Carrollton revives greats such as Beauty and the Beast, Damn Yankees and Fiddler on the Roof. Mounted riding lieutenants offer a special captain’s doubloon.

KING ARTHUR 1:15PM

Location: Uptown Theme: Floating Down Da Nile Floats: 22 King Arthur XXXIV: Dr. Jacob Philip Bitoun Queen Guinevere: Ashley Marie Catherine Robichaux Throws: Plush swords and dragons King Arthur’s knights set out for the distant lands of Egypt. The theme Floating Down Da Nile is illustrated by floats depicting King Tut, Cleopatra, the feline goddess Bastet and others.

RHEA 2PM

Location: Metairie Theme: Memorable Musicals

Floats: 20 King: Maurizio Francescon Queen: Tania Hunter Throws: Ruby colored cups For its 40th anniversary, Rhea celebrates family ties. The Captain has members of four generations of her family riding in the procession. Appropriate to the anniversary, ruby is the key to specialty throws, particularly krewe cups. The theme recalls famous musicals, including Viva Las Vegas, Grease and Show Boat.

THOR 3PM

Time: 3 p.m. Location: Metairie Theme: The Bucket List Floats: 14 King: Steve Campo Throws: Stuffed animals, long beads Thor moves its parade to Sunday and offers viewers a peek at its Bucket List. Among the things the krewe aims to check off the list: “To Be a Ringmaster in the Circus,” “To Take a Ride in a Hot Air Balloon” and “To Take a Trip to South America.”

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ne of the biggest advantages to having a smartphone during Mardi Gras is the ability to keep a Carnival guide at your fingertips at all times — a guide that doesn’t need to be rolled up and shoved in your pocket. This year you’ve got several choices, each of which has something the others don’t — so try out as many as you like. All but one are free:

O

WWL-TV and Zehnder Communications have developed Experience Mardi Gras, which has all major parade schedules (they added Jefferson Parish and outlying parades after requests from Gambit readers), along with zoomable route maps, Mardi Gras headlines and club listings. Some parades will be trackable by GPS. Free; iPhone, Android

The Mardi Gras Party Guide is sponsored by PJ’s Coffee (and gives users a chance to win some of the roaster’s annual King Cake Blend). It has a parade schedule, restaurant and bar listings and Twitter and Facebook integration. It also allows users to upload their own photos and videos to share. Free; iPhone, Android, BlackBerry Arthur Hardy’s Mardi Gras Guide was voted Best Local Mobile App in Gambit’s online 2010 Web Awards. Unlike the others, it’s not free, but it’s meaty, with much of the same content as Hardy’s annual magazine, including a large section for first-time Mardi Gras revelers. It also integrates with WDSU-TV Carnival updates. $4.99; iPhone — Kevin Allman

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WDSU-TV is back with its Parade Tracker app, which provides real-time location of the lead float for all Uptown parades, as well as Argus in Metairie. Parade information comes from Arthur Hardy’s Mardi Gras Guide, and this app also coordinates with WDSU’s Carnival Twitter feed, @parades. Free; iPhone

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BY IAN MCNULTY PHOTOS BY CHERYL GERBER he marching orders for Mardi Gras are parades and house parties, late-night balls and gallivanting in the streets. It’s no surprise that convenience and portability often trump all when it’s time to eat. In fact, some people manage to sustain themselves for days on end with little more than cold fried chicken, king cake and pickled garnishes from Bloody Marys in go-cups. Others succumb to the lurid temptation of midway carny carts and add funnel cake and corn dogs to this diet of depravity. But there are more and better eats on the streets if you just know where to look. Many restaurants near the parade routes prove surprisingly adept at accommodating the surging crowds. Some are simply good choices for refreshingly different takeout, others modify their business models during Mardi Gras with added grab-and-go options, and representatives of the nascent local food truck scene make a showing, too. What follows is a scouting report for easy take-away food near the major New Orleans and Metairie parade routes this year. While by no means comprehensive, it hopefully will keep you on the right track and one step ahead of the carny carts.

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To Start at the beginning, those who like to catch the Uptown parades by their common starting point on Napoleon Avenue will find something new nearby on Magazine Street. The building where people used to line up for pralines and pies from Tee-Eva’s sweet shop has been transformed into the Turkish and Persian restaurant Courtyard Grill (4430 Magazine St., 875-4164; www.courtyardgrillnola.com). While the building renovation was dramatic, it retained an old walk-up service window which opens to the kitchen; from here Courtyard Grill serves kebab, falafel and gyros sandwiches on pita or house-made loaves. “We’ll serve them right there in the front for takeout only, so people can go back to the parade right away,” owner Eddie Salmanian says. A number of Carnival krewes (Druids, Muses, D’Etat and Morpheus) have moved their own starting point for the Uptown route farther upriver to Jefferson Avenue in recent years, and entrepreneurs out to feed Delachaise chef R.J. Tsarov will serve the the Mardi Gras masses restaurant’s regular menu at the bar durhave taken note. On days ing Uptown parades, and there also are when parades line up at takeout-only options for revelers who want to eat on the go. this newer starting point, look for the Taceaux Loceaux food truck parked along Jefferson Avenue between Magazine and Tchoupitoulas streets. Alex and Maribeth Del Castillo will sling their usual array of multi-ethnic tacos (try the “Seoul man” with Korean-style barbecue chicken or the new breakfast tacos, served anytime). Look for them as Thoth rolls in this vicinity too, while updates on other locations can be found by following their Twitter handle, @tlnola. Thoth time on Magazine Street may not be the best time to make groceries at Whole Foods Market (5600 Magazine St., 899-9119; www.wholefoodsmarket.com), but with its location directly on the Magazine Street parade route,

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DOWNTOWN As the Uptown parade route progresses farther downtown, the carny carts begin to materialize with greater frequency, but there’s still much more homegrown food to find close at hand. Just off Canal Street, the hole-in-the-wall Cajun Mike’s Pub (116 Baronne St., 566-0055; www.cajunmikes.com) has a small, speedy tavern kitchen kicking out such worthy take-away items as fried boudin balls and crawfish eggrolls. Pressed sandwiches like the traditional Cuban or a hot version of the muffuletta, compacted to a crisp, buttered shell, are durable enough to keep their form even if you’re eating one while running after a parade. The three-month-old downtown location of the Ruby Slipper Cafe (200 Magazine Street, 525-9355; www.therubyslippercafe.net) is new to the scene this year, but this creative diner is jumping into the fray with extended evening hours for parade dates and a takeout menu of chicken sausage kolaches and biscuit sandwiches stuffed with eggs and sausage. Co-owner Erich Weishaupt says customers can order these items to go directly from the bar.

METAIRIE The Metairie parade route passes by a broad swath of eating options as it traverses the suburban shopper’s paradise. You can quickly sate your hunger at either Bud’s Broiler (2929 N. Causeway Blvd., Metairie, 833-3770; www.budsbroiler.com) or Lee’s Hamburgers (3516 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 8854291; www.leesburgers.com), two local chains serving similarly modest, man-

ageable and widely beloved burgers topped with shredded cheddar. Down the line a bit there’s Byblos Market (2020 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 837-9777; www.byblosrestaurants.com), the grocery and deli related to the local chain of Middle Eastern restaurants. The deli at the rear of the market serves pita sandwiches twirled in foil for easy handling, and the house specialty is the chicken shawarma with garlic sauce. Where Metairie parades turn onto Bonnabel Boulevard, look for the Zip Thru beverage store, which also is home to an outpost of Brooklyn Pizzeria (1809 Veterans Blvd., 834-1030; www.eatbrooklyn.net). This drive-through pizza shop normally serves only customers in vehicles, but while the surrounding streets are closed to traffic for the parades, pedestrians can step up for big, floppy, New York-style slices and orders of baked dough knots covered with garlic butter.

MID-CITY Only one parade passes through Mid-City these days, but it’s the biggest of all Carnival processions in New Orleans. That’s Endymion, of course, and it inspires a scene that resembles one gigantic, linear tailgating party for at least its first few miles. Revelers fire up countless grills during the run-up to the parade, and this year Scot Craig, owner of Katie’s Restaurant & Bar (3701 Iberville St., 488-6582; www.katiesinmidcity.com), is joining that number. While he plans to open the Katie’s dining room as normal on Endymion Saturday, outside he’ll have grills cooking char-grilled oysters and three-quarter-pound burgers along with Cajun-style cochon de lait, all for quick, take-away service. “This way people who want to come in, sit down and have a meal can do that, but people who want to get something off the grill and get back to the route can do that too,” Craig says. The crew at Angelo Brocato Ice Cream (214 N. Carrollton Ave., 486-1465; www.angelobrocatoicecream.com) has worked out a different plan for its storefront, which is directly on the route. Hungry Endymion parade-goers can have They convert the shop’s front a sit-down meal inside Katie’s Restaurant door into a takeout counter and & Bar, but owner Scot Craig says he’ll also serve their full array of gelato barbecue char-grilled fare outside for those who want takeout. flavors (plus Italian cookies, cannoli and espresso drinks) during the day before the parade begins, then close down as the floats roll past. This will be the first Endymion for Lemonade Parade (4709 S. Carrollton Ave., phone n.a.), a walk-up smoothie and juice stand in the same building that was once home to the legendary Manuel’s Hot Tamales. Given that pedigree, it seems only fitting that Lemonade Parade also serves bundles of spicy tamales. They’re not Manuel’s recipe, but they’re in the same spirit and make indulgent, even nostalgic, parade food. Kjean’s Seafood (236 N. Carrollton Ave., 488-7503) is there to satisfy another perennial craving. Always takeout only, this boiled seafood joint is at its busiest for Endymion as people ferry bags and boxes of crawfish, crabs and shrimp back to their parade spots. “The day is equivalent to, and sometimes greater than, Good Friday here, which is our other busiest day,” Kjean’s owner Kenan Buchert says. “When the parades are rolling, everyone is eating around here.”

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 22 > 2011

the deli at this upscale supermarket is well provisioned for offbeat parade food. Pick up a whole rotisserie-cooked chicken and show it no mercy. The nearby outpost of Slice Pizzeria (5538 Magazine St., 897-4800; www.slicepizzeria.com) will serve its namesake product as well during parades. Moving down the St. Charles Avenue parade route, the Delachaise (3442 St. Charles Ave., 895-0858; www.thedelachaise.com) is an obvious target for food, and chef R.J. Tsarov is ready for the onslaught. The Delachaise kitchen is well-known for its upscale bar food (frog legs with spicy remoulade, smoked salmon Johnny cakes, house-made pate). While this regular menu will be available at the bar during Mardi Gras, Tsarov also plans to serve takeout-only items designed for eating on the go. “We’ll be doing sliders, fish and chips, some maque choux for vegetarians,” Tsarov says. “I’m doing a duck and andouille gumbo, which will be great if it’s cold out there.” Just around the corner, August Moon (3635 Prytania St., 899-5129; www.augustmoonneworleans.com) will serve its normal menu of Chinese and Vietnamese dishes. In cold or mild weather, a takeout container of pho or egg drop soup and a clutch of fried egg rolls or fresh spring rolls could be a lifesaver on the route. Across St. Charles Avenue, and a block up Louisiana Avenue, the scruffy but prodigious Louisiana Super Saver (1641 Louisiana Ave., 891-6670) lives up to its name with enormous po boys that also live up to their names. Low on glamour, high on value, this meat market specializes in 32-inch, wholeloaf po-boys for between $8 and $12. Haul one of these whoppers back to the parade route and you can easily feed four people. You Chef Dorian Garner and sous chef Joshua Hobson at might even need the new downtown Ruby Slipper will create plenty two people just to of takeout chicken sausage kolaches and biscuit carry one. sandwiches stuffed with eggs and sausage to fuel revelers during parades.

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french Quarter/faubourg marigny It’s the French Quarter: land of cheap beer, boozy concoctions in grenadeshaped plastic cups and dudes flipping signs that read “Big Ass Beers.” Your choices are somewhat limited, but there are outposts of beer civilization — and there’s always the Marigny. Here are my picks:

1

D.B.A. (618 Frenchmen St., 942-3731, www.drinkgoodstuff.com) — d.b.a. is owned by the same guy as the one in New York. The New Orleans branch focuses more on music than beer — but still has a great selection of brews.

2

MIMI’S IN THE MARIGNY (2601 Royal St., 872-9868) — A great bar with a good local beer selection and a nice variety of locals. Catch DJ Soul Sister on Saturday nights.

3

CLUB DECATUR (240 Decatur St., 581-6969) — Club Decatur has a nice tap list with beers like Stone, Sierra Nevada, NOLA and Abita. The bar also has a decent bottle list.

4

ROUSES (701 Royal St., 523-1353, www.rouses.com) — Yes, it’s a grocery store but they’ve got a great selection of beer: Stone, Bayou Teche, Abita, etc. Their cheap canned selection is good as well: PBR, Miller High Life and others. Remember: Just ’cause it’s cheap doesn’t make it bad.

5

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE (527 Decatur St., 522-0571, www.crescentcitybrewhouse.com) — The oldest brewpub in the city celebrates its 20th anniversary this year. Decent local craft beers and a nice food selection. PAGE 36

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ardi Gras! A time to Le Bon Temps Rouler on Magazine eat king cake, drink Street always has cold beer on tap. beer, go to parades, drink beer, catch beads, drink PHOTO BY GARY LOVERDE beer, go to more parades, eat more king cake and then drink more beer. Just because it’s Carnival time doesn’t mean your beer selection has to be swill. I blog about local beer on my website, The Beer Buddha (www.thebeerbuddha.com), and I’ll give you a full beer geek’s breakdown of the best bars and stores for good beer near the Mardi Gras parade routes — as well as some stores where you’ll find beer to bring to your parade spot.

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mardi gras 2011

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CBD/WAREHOUSE DISTRICT Like the French Quarter, there isn’t much going on here in terms of better beer, but here are three from that area that I recommend:

1

GORDON BIERSCH (200 Poydras St., 552-2739, www.gordonbiersch.com) — A lot of locals think of Biersch only as a tourist destination, but it’s actually a hangout for many local home brewers, and head brewer Tom Conklin makes a mean beer.

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UGLY DOG SALOON (401 Andrew Higgins Blvd., 569- 8459, www.uglydogsaloon.net) — Beer and barbecue. How could you go wrong?

RUSTY NAIL (1100 Constance St., 525-5515, www.therustynail.biz) — A little bar off the beaten path that has live music. Known mostly for its incredible selection of Scotches, the Rusty Nail also has a nice selection of beers.

UPTOWN We’re just going to use the general term Uptown here. Yeah, yeah, I know there is more to Uptown than just Uptown, but let’s make it easy.

BEER BUDDHA'S 10 TIPS & THINGS TO REMEMBER AT MARDI GRAS 1 Don’t be a douche. Tip your bartender. 2) Just because beer is cheap doesn’t mean it’s bad. If you like it, drink it. That’s all that matters. 3 Don’t play Jimmy Buffett over and over again on the jukebox. We get it. You love “Margaritaville.” But the locals don’t need to hear it 50 times a day.

1

4 Hang up your cell phone when ordering at the bar. You really aren’t that important — and that goes for the Bluetooth device stuck in your ear, too. It just makes you look crazy.

2

5 NOLA Brewing makes these things called “draft packs.” They are perfect for parades: a full case of craft beer for around $40.

3

6 Know what you want before you approach the bar and order everything all at once. It’ll make your life — and your bartender’s life — much easier.

AVENUE PUB (1732 St. Charles Ave., 586-9243, www.avenuepub.com) — There is no better place to go beer-wise. You can catch almost all the parades from right here and choose from the best beers in the city. Check the Pub’s website, because it will list special tappings of certain beers at Avenue Pub during the parades, including NOLA cask, Abita cask, St. Arnold’s and Sierra Nevada’s new Hoptimum. And make sure to try the Buddha’s Temptations when you’re there. STEIN’S DELI (2207 Magazine St., 527-0771, www.steinsdeli.net) — If you’ve gone here for the incredible sandwiches and didn’t notice the beer selection, you should see your optometrist. Dan Stein is the godfather of the better beer movement here in New Orleans, and his selection reflects that. Get a sandwich and tell Dan the Eagles suck. He might give you a discount. SLICE (1513 St. Charles Ave., 525-7437; 5538 Magazine St., 897-4800; www.slicepizzeria.com) — Damn good beer selection and even better pizza, located right on the parade route.

4

SQUEAL (8400 Oak St., 302-7370, www.squeal-nola.com) — This barbecue joint has a very nice selection of craft beers while also making some kick-ass barbecue — and the barbecue tacos pair well with the Bayou Teche Biere Pale.

5

WHOLE FOODS (5600 Magazine St., 899-9119, www.wholefoods.com) — It’s Whole Foods. You’ve been to Whole Foods. We’ve all been to Whole Foods. The one on Magazine Street has a great beer selection.

6

BREAUX MART (3233 Magazine St., 262-6019, www.breauxmart.com) — This small, locally owned grocery store has a diverse selection of craft and imports. It even has a section devoted solely to local beers.

7

COOTER BROWN’S (509 S. Carrollton Ave., 866-9104, www.cooterbrowns. com) — A legend in New Orleans, with a great beer selection on tap and a huge bottle selection. Do not go by its online beer list, as it hasn’t been updated in a long time. Cooter’s has beers that aren’t even distributed in New Orleans.

8

THE BULLDOG (3236 Magazine St., 891-1516, www.bulldog.draftfreak.com) — Large selection of beers on tap and very good bottle selection.

9

LE BON TEMPS ROULER (4801 Magazine St., 897-3448) —Where else can you go and drink great beer and listen to the Soul Rebels?

DELACHAISE (3442 St. Charles Ave., 895-0858, www.thedelachaise.com) 10 THE — The Delachaise is known mostly as a wine destination, but it has a nice,

small tap list and even better bottled beer list to accompany its incredible food menu.

7 Do you want to get in good with your barkeep? Bring him or her some grub! It’s a welcome gesture for someone who has been standing on his or her feet for nine hours without anything to eat. 8 It’s a marathon, not a sprint. Miller Lite has 4.1 percent alcohol by volume. Stone Arrogant Bastard has 7.2 percent. You do the math. 9 If a place doesn’t charge to use the bathroom, make sure you buy something. It’s really nice of them to not charge you, so show some respect and purchase something. 10 Support local breweries. Keep your money local!

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CORK & BOTTLE (3700 Orleans Ave., 483-6314, www.cbwines.com) — Disclaimer: I work at Cork & Bottle as the beer guy. But since I’m the Beer Buddha, make the trek and find out what I’m up to. Great beer selection and I even carry the cheap yet good stuff, like PBR and High Life.

200 Julia St • 504-304-6318 www.feastneworleans.com

FOR

Radio Flyer, Step 2, and others

METAIRIE 1

MARTIN WINE CELLAR (714 Elmeer Ave., 896-7300, www.martinwine.com) — With one of the better retail selections in Metairie, the store practically sits on the Veterans Memorial Boulevard parade route. Check its hours on parade days so you can stock up on your beer needs.

Le Jouet Toy Store 1700 Airline Drive, Metairie, LA 70001 504-837-0533 Open Monday – Saturday, 9am to 6pm

2

LAGER’S (3501 Veterans Memorial Blvd., 887-9923, www.lagersmetairie.draftfreak.com) — Lager’s is the red-headed stepchild of The Bulldog. Great beer selection, same food selection as the New Orleans Bulldogs, and it sits right on the parade route.

3

PHIL’S GRILL (3020 Severn Ave., 324-9080, www.phils-grill.com) — What could possibly go better with the Beer Buddha Burger than some locally brewed craft beer from NOLA Brewing? (OK, so there isn’t a Beer Buddha Burger, but I can hope.) Great local beer selection and some of the best burgers in the metro New Orleans area. There you have it: my favorite stores, bars and beers for Mardi Gras. In the end, what you like is all that matters, but I hope my list will introduce you to some new places or new beers to try. Right now the beer scene in New Orleans is burgeoning. Searching out new beers and drinking establishments can be quite the adventure, so have fun! Cheers and Happy Mardi Gras!

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 22 > 2011

THE BULLDOG MID-CITY (5135 Canal Blvd., 488-4191, www.bulldog-midcity.draftfreak.com) — Like the Uptown version of the Bulldog; the difference is there’s a lot more space at this location.

Happy Hour Food and Drink Specials from 5-6:30pm

37

sHTo P aLK

BY BY MISSY KAT STROMQUIST WILKINSON

Petal Pushers wo days after a hectic Valentine’s Day (“We completely sold out of flowers,” says co-owner Kenny Thone), Federico’s Family Florist (815 Focis St., Metairie, 837-6400) slowly refilled its stock of orchids, roses, tulips and other blooming tokens of affection. Even in the wake of what is perhaps the most flower-centric of all holidays, customers trickled steadily through the 3,000-square-foot warehouse, buying cash-and-carry roses by the dozen or ordering arrangements for a never-ending procession of birthdays, weddings, funerals and Carnival balls. “What color does she like?” floral designer Steve Lonero asked a gray-haired couple who had come to order flowers for their granddaughter’s dance recital. “We can wrap them up with a bow?” Since 1976, Federico’s has kept New Orleans in bloom. The fullservice florist supplies custom arrangements starting at $40, as Federico’s Family Florist co-owner well as bulk flowers and deals like a dozen roses for $6.50. Federico’s is consisKenny Thone (left) and floral tently voted among New Orleans’ top florists by Gambit readers in the annual designer Steve Lonero show off a Best of New Orleans poll. Thone believes affordable prices are one reason many bumper crop of tulips. customers have stuck with the shop for decades. “We have customers who have been here since day one,” Thone says. “We would rather sell in bulk and make customers happy than charge outrageous prices.” Lonero says his favorite part of the job is making customers feel good, and delivery driver Erni Godfrey agrees. “I love my job. When I see the smile that the delivery puts on people’s faces, that is what makes my day,” she says. Business isn’t all sunshine and roses, even for florists, however. Often, penitent husbands and boyfriends come to the shop seeking assistance from the pros. “A lot of guys get in the doghouse, and we help them out,” Thone says. “If his wife or girlfriend likes roses, we’ll send those. If she likes lilies, we’ll send lilies. And if that doesn’t work, we send him to the jewelry store, because he’s in trouble.”

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 22 > 2011

T

SHOPPING SHOPPING NEWS NEWS BY BYMISSY MISSYWILKINSON WILKINSON LAKESIDE CAMERA PHOTOWORKS (2121 N. Causeway Blvd., Mandeville, 985-626-1776; 3508 21st St., Metairie, 885-8660; www.lakesidecamera. com) is holding a New Orleans-themed photo contest. Submit your photo on its website by Saturday, March 12, to win a canvas wrap valued at $203. All contestants receive a free print of their photo entry and a free aerial print of New Orleans worth $20. AMERICAN BIKE RENTAL COMPANY (317 Burgundy St., Suite 24, 866-293-4037; www.amebrc.com) opened this month and rents men’s and women’s cruiser bicycles for $50 a day, or $35 for a half day. The rental fee lincludes the price of bike delivery and pickup anywhere in the French Quarter. Engaged couples can enter to win the STEAMBOAT NATCHEZ’ (400 N. Peters St., Suite 203; 5868777; www.steamboatnatchez.com) Tie The Knot Wedding Giveaway by completing a form on the company’s Facebook page (www.facebook.com/steamboatnatchez) by March 13. Facebook fans will vote on a winner from 10 randomly selected finalists. The winning couple receives a $5,000 wedding package, which includes a marriage ceremony on the steamboat, a wedding cake, a reception in the Magnolia Suite, a Champagne toast and more. Costumes, masks, wigs, accessories and other vintage, secondhand or handcrafted disguise items by more than 20 local designers are for sale from noon to 5 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 27, at the 20TH ANNUAL NOLA DESIGNER COSTUME BAZAAR at BLUE NILE (532 Frenchmen St., 948-2583; www.bluenilelive.com). Call Cree McCree at 269-3982 for more information.

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CARNIVAL: KREWE OF CORK PAGE 43

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Experience a once in a lifetime, behind the scenes Family Gras experience with premium stage level viewing, front stage viewing, gated hospitality, and upscale restrooms. Purchase your $99 weekend ROYAL PASS through .

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Ne le

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February 23

IRVIN MAYFIELD & THE NOJO JAM presents the music of

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Put on your dancing shoes! Come swing with 17 of New Orleans’ renowned musicians, performing the musical treasures of the 1940s with wonderful guest vocalists.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 22 > 2011

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>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << MUSIC FILM ART STAGE EVENTS CUISINE >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE YOU GO << <<<<<<<<<< << 45 53 55 57 58 64 >> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << THE >> >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>> << <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> > FEB << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< < No, New Orleans electronic duo Buttons isn’t >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> kind of blue. This double entendre comes courtesy of Omaha, Neb., dance-rockers The Faint, whose post-concert DJ sets evolved from immaculately curated lagniappe into a full-on side project in 2010. QWERTY (Mad Decent), the group’s first EP, arrived in December. Jim-E Stack opens. Tickets KREWE $8 in advance, $10 at the OF CORK PARADE door. 9 p.m. Wednesday. Republic, 828 S. Peters St., 3 P.M. FRIDAY, FEB. 25 528-8282; www.republicFRENCH QUARTER nola.com

Depressed Buttons

VISIT WWW.KREWEOFCORK.COM FOR DETAILS ABOUT MEMBERSHIP AND EVENTS

Grand Krewe THE KREWE OF CORK TOASTS CARNIVAL. BY WILL COVIELLO

K

“We were sitting at the Bistro on a Friday having some lunch and some wine and a parade went by the window,” van Hoorebeek says. “We said, ‘We can do that.’” The krewe’s first foray ventured only a couple of blocks. Prospective members had to show up with a collection of 365 corks to join, arbitrary proof that they drank at least a bottle of wine every day. They used the corks as krewe throws, but many people tossed them back, so the following year the krewe had its own corks made with its name printed on the side. The California cork-maker found the request odd, since it had never produced corks not inserted into bottles. It put information about the krewe on its website, but the group was already on the radar of California winemakers. Steve Reeder, now a vice president at Simi Winery, met van Hoorebeek in the late 1990s at a wine presentation he was giving at Commander’s Palace. He was offered the position of grand marshal in 2004, but he had to wait and serve in 2005. That year, as the krewe emerged from its luncheon at the Court of Two Sisters to begin the parade, it started to rain. “By the time we were at the end of the first block, it was pouring,” Reeder says. “Patrick and the organizers were thinking about canceling the parade and going back inside, and I asked, ‘Do I have any authority here as grand marshal?’ And they said I did. So I said, ‘Let’s march.’ We got totally soaked. I think we had to pay for destroying the costumes we had rented. But it was great.” Reeder hasn’t missed a Krewe of Cork parade since, PAGE 44

FEB

25

It’s shirts against blouses. The second installment in Cliff Hines’ tribute series (the NOCCA guitar instructor bowed to Bowie in October) is part homage, part Mardi Gras dress rehearsal and part New Orleans musical mixer, drawing from acute angles of the Crescent City creative class: members of Big History, Magnetic Ear, Sun Hotel, the Next Generation and Hines’ jazz quintet. Tickets $10 general admission, $7 in costume. 10 p.m. Friday. One Eyed Jacks, 615 Toulouse St., 569-8361; www.oneeyedjacks.net

Ubu Cocu

FEB

25

Just in time for Carnival, Andrew Vaught reigns as the rogue/clown king of absurdist French theater, Pere Ubu in Ubu Cocu, sequel to the landmark Ubu Roi, which opened to a minor riot in 1896. Cripple Creek Theatre is aspiring to a slightly more tame opening for the onenight-only show, inviting the audience to dress for Carnival, imbibe and enjoy musical opener Tuba Skinny (8 p.m.) before the show (9 p.m.). Tickets $15 general admission, $25 reserved seating (via Cripple Creek’s website only). AllWays Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave.; www.theallwayslounge.com or www.cripplecreekplayers.org

Anders Osborne & Lubriphonic

FEB

26

New Orleans blues rocker Anders Osborne gets Tipitina’s funky Carnival vibes going. Opening is Chicago-based Lubriphonic (pictured), a large guitar-and-horns, James Brown-style funk and soul ensemble full of former sidemen to headliners Buddy Guy and Koko Taylor. Ivan Neville plays keyboards on its recent release The Gig is On. Tickets $15. 10 p.m. Saturday. Tipitina’s, 501 Napoleon Ave., 895-8477; www.tipitinas.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 22 > 2011

rewe of Cork King for Life Patrick van Hoorebeek has a confession: “Natural corks are a pain in the behind,” he says, laughing. “They are very hard to work with; they’re not easy to cut.” The sommelier, best known for his past 18-year tenure at the Bistro at the Maison de Ville, isn’t talking about extracting a cork from a bottle of wine. He’s referring to his first costume for the krewe’s first parade. He decided to cover a suit in corks and found that while the elastic-but-firm stoppers keep wine in a bottle, they are less than ideal as craft materials. That’s why he wears the same cork suit every year when he greets the guest grand marshal in advance of the krewe’s annual Mardi Gras festivities. The Krewe of Cork’s Carnival calendar starts on Wednesday with a wine dinner honoring the grand marshal, generally a vintner or winery owner invited to serve. John Conover of Northern California’s Plumpjack and CADE wineries is this year’s grand marshal. There’s a party for the entire krewe Thursday evening, and on Friday, roughly 400 costumed members parade through the French Quarter, stopping at hotels and restaurants to offer toasts to sommeliers, managers and proprietors. “The krewe is made up of many restaurant industry people, and also people who like wine and dine out three times a week,” van Hoorebeek says. “Many of them know each other.” The 11-year-old krewe started like many marching krewes do in New Orleans: on a whim.

Patrick van Hoorebeek is King for Life of Krewe of Cork.

A Tribute to Prince

23

43

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PAGE 43

and that includes two annual events. The krewe marches on the Friday 11 days before Fat Tuesday and during the Royal Street Stroll at the annual New Orleans Wine and Food Experience in May. At Carnival, Reeder dresses as the Pope of Cork, and wife Donna costumes as the Blue Nun. The kreweâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s officials are installed as lifetime members. Instead of royals, the group chooses a vintner as a grand marshal. Past grand marshals have included Clovis Taittinger of the renowned French Champagne-producing family, Robert Mondavi Jr. and Kathy Benziger of Benziger Family Winery.

44

Simi Wineryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Steve Reeder is the Pope of Cork and marches with wife Donna, the kreweâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Blue Nun.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 22 > 2011

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The highlight of the Mardi Gras festivities is the parade, and krewe members are fortified by wine dispensed from golf-cart floats managed by wine police tasked â&#x20AC;&#x153;To protect and to serve.â&#x20AC;? Most of the wine is donated by sponsoring wineries. Reeder is bringing four family members to march with him this Carnival, and heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s learned a few things over the years. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Libation Ball after the parade is at the Royal Sonesta,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I got us rooms there, because I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to try to walk anywhere else after the party.â&#x20AC;? The krewe is full of familiar faces in the local restaurant industry. Van Hoorebeek had hoped to open Patrickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bar Vin in the St. Louis Hotel in time to have the krewe toast it. But that will have to wait for another holiday: St. Patrickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day. If he can open on that day, he promises to christen the venture with Jameson Irish whiskey.

noah

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Showcasing Local Music

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by NMH’s and the Music Tapes’ Julian Koster, which sprouted into a tree. Now, in Hart’s kitchen, they’re breaking out the axes again. “We still are good friends and hang out a good bit, but not as much — everybody’s got different things going on in their lives,” says Elf Power’s Andrew

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New Orleans Best Every Night! Rieger, who with Elephant 6 is a bandmate Laura collective of artists Carter runs the E6 from many bands and is undertaking relative Orange a 2011 reunion tour. Twin, a likeminded label and sustainable commune. “It’s cool to have a reason to get together, and a reason to be making music is always great.” Rieger estimates the ensemble has 60 to 70 songs ready to go, a lively recipe for an ever-changing set list. “I think we got a couple celebrity guests lined up,” he says. “I can’t really talk about it because I don’t know if it’s really happening. In each town that we know people in, we’re going to try and have them come to sound check and work up a song or two. We’re trying to make each show a little different.” Asked if one of the holiday surprises could be Mangum, who dropped off the grid following Aeroplane but recently resurfaced for a series of solo and group shows (including several dates on the 2008 tour), both Rieger and Hart demur. “We’ll probably be in the car and somebody will pick up (the phone): ‘Jeff’s coming to that,’” Hart says, laughing. “Last time he had a lot of fun. It was nice to see him out again after such a long time.” “I really don’t know,” Rieger says. “I haven’t talked to him lately. The last tour he just kind of showed up and jumped on board and played a bunch of the shows. So I would say there’s a chance.”

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301-0938

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 22 > 2011

or the past month, Will Cullen Hart’s tenants have been treated to a special form of dinner theater: rehearsals for the Elephant 6 collective’s 2011 reunion tour. “It’s in our kitchen,” says Hart, a cofounder of both the Athens, Ga.-based constellation of psychedelic pop revivalists and its revered copilot, The Olivia Tremor Control. “It’s a twostory house that my soon-to-be wife bought, and we have roommates that aren’t in the band at all. They’re cool with it. I was like, ‘We don’t need to go set our stuff up at some practice space that we have to rent. Let’s just do it in the kitchen!’” With typically anachronistic humor, the tour — a reprisal of the initial E6 reunion in fall 2008, which featured a dozen or more members playing each other’s songs — bears the same “Holiday Surprise” motif, despite the fact that it commences this week in Roswell, Ga. (Give them this: They never specified which holiday.) “There’s an Olivia Tremor Control song I wrote called ‘Holiday Surprise, 1, 2, 3,’” Hart says. “It’s hard to get everybody together. You know, like, ‘Oh, I could do that in six months.’” That they’re doing it at all is momentous. The E6, whose origins trace back to Ruston High School in north Louisiana’s Lincoln Parish, is something of a holy grail for independent pop/rock: an elusive, artistically untouched endeavor, formed accidentally by childhood friends (Hart, Bill Doss, Robert Schneider and Jeff Mangum) who in their 20s forged a network of 1990s-defining underground bands (OTC, Apples in Stereo and Neutral Milk Hotel, to be joined later by Of Montreal, Elf Power, Beulah and many others). After a stunning run of self-produced albums — including NMH’s spirit-visited 1998 opus In the Aeroplane Over the Sea, a tortured-folk, singing-saw interpretation of The Diary of Anne Frank, now recognized among the best records of the decade — the co-op dissolved. Some bands went on temporary or permanent hiatus (OTC, NMH), others mutated (Of Montreal), still others continued making records (Apples, Elf Power). The 2008 reunion was the result of a phone call

45

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MUSIC

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 22 > 2011

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ritish pop-star Natasha Bedingfield, Tito Jackson and Honor Society headline the fourth installment of Family Gras. The three-day event features live music at one spot along the parade route in Metairie, offering fans a mix of Mardi Gras and festival attractions. “I personally am looking forward to Tito Jackson, who plays early Jack son songs in the second half of his show,” says Violet Peters, CEO of the Jefferson Convention and Visitors Bureau. “Of course, nearly everyone we talk to is interested in seeing Natasha Bedingfield, Little Big Town and Neon Trees. Those artists have exploded in popularity, and we are fortunate to host them at Family Gras.” Jefferson Parish organizers have built the festival as a hub of Carnival activity, offering entertainment before, during and after parades roll. Friday, Feb. 25, features Northshore fiddling prodigy Amanda Shaw and country music headliner Little Big Town. Bedingfield and Jackson perform Saturday, Feb. 26, along with a diverse lineup including Memphis’ rock trio Ingram Hill, alt-rocker Sister Hazel, the Tex-Mex grooves of the Iguanas, the updated New Orleans rock and R&B of the Creole String Beans and country singer David Worley. Sunday, Feb. 27, concludes with indie rockers Neon Trees, soul singer Eli “Paperboy” Reed and the True Loves, Jonas Records-signees Honor Society and Cowboy Mouth. The eclectic lineup is meant to offer something for everyone. “We literally go from a group like Honor Society that toured with the Jonas Brothers to a group like Tito Jackson who will appeal to those children’s grandparents,” says producer Greg Buisson.

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The scheduling complements the Natasha parade schedule. Bedingfield performs Saturday Buisson says there at Family Gras. will be enough time between sets for people to make their way to the parade route. “We want the main event to be, always, the Mardi Gras parade,” he says. “We want the whole purpose to be giving people a chance to experience Carnival and the art of costume, and then enjoy the concerts.” Family Gras has an array of activities and costuming is encouraged, with Friday dedicated to sports themes and Sunday designated for traditional Carnival garb. An art market showcases more than 50 artists and craftspeople. The Jester’s Kids Tent offers face painting and storytelling. There also is a food area with local fare such as crawfish pasta, muffulettas, pizza and more. Admission to the festival area is free, but a VIP pass offers access to bathrooms and a reserved viewing area throughout Family Gras. The inaugural Family Gras was in 2007. Attendance at the last Family Gras in 2009 reached 80,000, Buisson says. The event was canceled last year to avoid competing with the Super Bowl. “Weather permitting we would like to see 100,000 visitors [this year],” Buisson says.

FAMILY GRAS FRIDAY-SUNDAY, FEB. 25-27 FESTIVAL PLAZA, VETERANS MEMORIAL BOULEVARD NEUTRAL GROUND AT LAKESIDE SHOPPING CENTER, 3300 VETERANS MEMORIAL BLVD., METAIRIE; WWW.EXPERIENCEJEFFERSON.COM

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AL “LIL FATS” JACKSON February 26 • 9:30pm

Boomerssm WEDNESDAYS COMEDY • 8pm

FEB 23

Tom Hester featuring Mike Weldon

MAR 9

Wild Bill Dykes and special guests

MAR 2

Steve Hirst featuring Rob Jenkins

MAR 16

Tommy G featuring Jayson Cross

THURSDAYS LADIES NIGHT • Budweiser specials all night. Ladies enjoy 2-for-1 mixed drink specials

LIVE MUSIC • 8pm

FEB 24 Brandon Foret

MAR 3 Brandon Foret

MAR 10 Brandon Foret

MAR 17 Brandon Foret

FRIDAYS LIVE MUSIC • 9:30pm

FEB 25 No Idea

MAR 4 Foret Tradition MAR 18 Fleur de Lis

SATURDAYS LIVE MUSIC • 9:30pm

PHOTO BY HEDI SLIMANE

FEB 26 Al “Lil Fats” Jackson Lil’ Wayne

MAR 12 Burgundy

MAR 5

Bobby J & Stuff Like That

Blue Oyster Cult MAR 19 (Tickets start at $25)

2010 Winner “Best place to go dancing” Boomers

NEW ORLEANS ARENA UPCOMING EVENTS New Orleans Hornets.................................................................... Regular Season through April 11

New Orleans VooDoo ......................................................................................... First home game March 11 Rascal Flatts .................................................................................... Rescheduled for March 13 @ 8:00 PM

2011 Men’s NCAA Basketball Southeast Regional .................................................. March 24 & 26 Lady Gaga................................................................................................................. April 9 @ 8:00 PM Lil’ Wayne ................................................................................................................ April 14 @ 7:00 PM Rush .......................................................................................................................... June 10 @ 7:30 PM Taylor Swift ........................................................................................................ October 5 @ 7:00 PM

Tickets can be purchased at www.ticketmaster.com, all Ticketmaster Outlets, the New Orleans Arena Box Office, or charge by phone at 1-800-745-3000.

Where the Locals Party, Play... and Win! boomtownneworleans.com • 504.366.7711 4132 Peters Road, Harvey, LA 70058 Must be 21. Entertainment start times may vary. Shows are subject to change. ©2011 Pinnacle Entertainment, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 22 > 2011

MAR 11 The Topcats

47

MUSIC

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde

listingsedit@gambitweekly.com;

FAX:483-3116

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

All show times p.m. unless otherwise noted.

Tuesday 22 ALLWAYS LOUNGE — Bulgarika, 8:30 BACCHANAL — Mark Weliky, 7:30

BANKS STREET BAR — P.Y.M.P., 10 BAYOU PARK BAR — Parishioners, 9

BEACH HOUSE — Candy RiedlLowe, 7 BLUE NILE — Jeff Albert’s Instigation Quartet, 10

BMC — Royal Rounders, 7; Gypsy Elise & the Royal Blues, 9:30 BOMBAY CLUB — Amanda Walker, 7

CAFE NEGRIL — John Lisi & Delta Funk, 9 CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Nervous Duane, 7

CHICKIE WAH WAH — New Orleans Nightcrawlers, 8

CIRCLE BAR — Tom Paines, 6 D.B.A. — New Orleans Cottonmouth Kings, 9

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Tom Hook, 9:30

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 22 > 2011

DRAGON’S DEN — Lollies, 9

48

HOSTEL NEW ORLEANS — Soul School feat. Elliot Luv & the Abney Effect, 8

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Jason Marsalis, 8 JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Brint Anderson, 7

KERRY IRISH PUB — Honky Tonk Open Mic feat. Jason Bishop, 9 LAFITTE’S BLACKSMITH SHOP — Mike Hood, 9

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Rebirth Brass Band, 10 MY BAR — Danny T, 8

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Joe T., 8; B-List Allstars, 9; Putnam Smith, 10; Vanessa Torres, 11

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Bruce Barnes & Matt Hampsey, 3

STICK THIS IN YOUR EAR Clown, 9

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Thelonious Monk Institute Ensemble, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Smokin’ Time Jazz Club, 6; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 10

YUKI IZAKAYA — Norbert Slama Trio, 8

Wednesday 23 12 BAR — Brass-a-holics, 9

BACCHANAL — Jazz Lab feat. Jesse Morrow, 7:30 BANKS STREET BAR — Major Bacon, 10

BEACH HOUSE — Poppa Stoppa Oldies Band, 8

BIG AL’S SALOON — Jumpin’ Johnny Sansone Blues Party, 7 BLUE NILE — United Postal Project, 8; Khris Royal & Dark Matter, 10 BMC — Lynn Drury, 7; Blues4Sale, 9:30

BOMBAY CLUB — Marlon Jordan Jazz Trio, 8 CANDLELIGHT LOUNGE — Treme Brass Band, 9

CAROUSEL PIANO BAR & LOUNGE — John Autin, 9 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Iguanas, 8:30 CIRCLE BAR — Jim O. & the No Shows feat. Mama Go-Go, 6

D.B.A. — Tin Men, 7; Walter “Wolfman” Washington & the Roadmasters, 10 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Bob Andrews, 9:30 EIFFEL SOCIETY — Vivaz!, 8 HI-HO LOUNGE — Buskers’ Ballroom, 10 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Sasha Masakowski, 5; Irvin Mayfield’s NOJO Jam, 8

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Ched Reeves, 2; Joe Bennett, 7

KERRY IRISH PUB — Chip Wilson, 9 KRAZY KORNER — Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LACAVA’S SPORTS BAR — Crossfire, 9

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Brian Stoltz, 10

MOJO STATION — Ed Wills, Blues for Sale, 8 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Clyde Albert, 9

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Charlie Cuccia & Old No. 7 Band, 7

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Tom McDermott, 3

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall-Stars feat. Shannon Powell, 8

OLD FIREMEN’S HALL — Two Piece & a Biscuit feat. Brandon Foret, Allan Maxwell & Brian Melancon, 7:30

SIBERIA — Happy Talk Band, Michael James, Stalebread Scottie, Izzy, Stumps the

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lars Edegran & Topsy Chapman feat. Palm Court Jazz Band, 8

OLD POINT BAR — Westbank Mike, 8

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Neslort, 8:30

OAK — Amanda Walker, 7

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Vibe, 8:30

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Band feat. Mark Braud, 8 REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — Depressed Buttons, Jim-E Stak, 9

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Big Sandy & the Fly-Rite Boys, 8:30 SHAMROCK BAR — Beth Patterson, 9

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Uptown Jazz Orchestra, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Orleans 6, 6; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10 STAGE DOOR CANTEEN AT THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM — Victory Belles, 1 YUKI IZAKAYA — By and By, 8

Thursday 24 12 BAR — Lil Red & Big Bad, 10

BACCHANAL — Courtyard Kings, 7; Vincent Marini, 9:30 BANKS STREET BAR — Ponykiller & guests, 10 BAYOU PARK BAR — Ron Hotstream & the F-Holes, 9

BEACH HOUSE — Beach House All-Stars, 8 BIG AL’S SALOON — Danny Alexander’s Blues Jam, 8 BLUE NILE — Gravity A, 10

BMC — Ruby Moon, 7; LowStress Quintet, 10

BOMBAY CLUB — Marlon Jordan Jazz Trio, 8

BOOMTOWN CASINO, BOOMERS SALOON — Brandon Foret, 9:30 CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Domenic, 7; Hooch Riders, 11

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Putnam Smith & Nate Spencer feat. Richard Julian, Rosita Kess, 8

CIRCLE BAR — Sam and Boone, 6 D.B.A. — Eric Lindell, 7; Egg Yolk Jubilee, 10 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Rick Trolsen, 9:30

DRAGON’S DEN — Jack Locke, 9 HARRAH’S CASINO (MASQUERADE) — Gina Brown & Another Level, 6

HI-HO LOUNGE — Stooges Brass Band, 9:30 HOUSE OF BLUES — Keller Williams, 9

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Lollipop Factory, The Way, 11

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Roman Skakun, 5; Shamarr Allen, 8 KERRY IRISH PUB — Buddy Francioni & Home Grown, 9 KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & the Zydeco Hellraisers, 4; Death by Orgasm, 8:30

DOMINO SOUND RECORD SHACK — Panorama Jazz Band, 7

Stern Warning Zach Hill (Hella) produced and played drums on Marnie Stern’s self-titled 2010 album, the 34-yearold New Yorker’s third increasingly knee-buckling release on Kill Rock Stars in the last three years. This needs no formal announcement or liner note. It’s made plain within nanoseconds of the start of the first song, “For Ash,” a blurred thimblerig of disguised time signatures and polysyllabic musical phrases whose cannonball percussion explodes out of the chute but shifts its emphases twice by the first wordless, nervous breakdown of a hook — Stern stabbing at and sustaining the vowels “I” and “A,” eventually striking a simple yet gut-rattling couplet (“I cannot bear/ No one compares”). Nothing that follows is quite so devastating, but the nine taut, tightrope-walking tracks are still equivalent to punk playgrounds for the fantastically talented singer/guitarist. When her index-fingered heavy metal guitar riffs and ambulance-hijacking, Pat Benatar-on-an-air-horn rails hit at the same time as Hill’s SWAT team of rhythms, as on B-side highlight “Cinco de Mayo,” it’s an overwhelming, everything-at-once, battering-ram rush. Caddywhompus opens; Tera Melos headlines. Tickets $8.50. — Noah Bonaparte Pais

FEB

25

Marnie Stern with Tera Melos and Caddywhompus

9 p.m. Friday The Parish at House of Blues, 229 Decatur St., 310-4999; www.hob.com

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Benyaro, 8; Mario Ortiz, 9; Biff Rose, 10 NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Bruce Barnes & Matt Hampsey, 3 OAK — Cristina Perez Trio, 8

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 4; Vibe, 8:30

OLD POINT BAR — Blues Frenzy, 8 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Tim Laughlin & Crescent City Joymakers, 8 PRESERVATION HALL — Paulin Brothers Brass Band feat. Dwayne Paulin, 8 REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — Bassik, Excision, Downlink, Antiserum, Black Swan, 9 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Geno Delafose, 8:30

SATURN BAR — Alex McMurray, 9

SIBERIA — Polymorphines, Makeshift Lover, Dead People, Bills, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Max Grosch feat. Jesse Boyd Trio, 8 & 10

LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Soul Rebels Brass Band, 11

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Miss Sophie Lee, 6; New Orleans Moonshiners, 10

MAPLE LEAF BAR — The Trio, 10

TIPITINA’S — Days Taken,

THE MAISON — Natalie Mae, 7; Margie Perez, 10

D.B.A. — Linnzi Zaorski, 6; Honey Island Swamp Band, 10

preview

THREE MUSES — Washboard Rodeo, 10

Nomad, Luckylou, Ziggy Slim, 8:30

VAUGHAN’S — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 8:30 YUKI IZAKAYA — Norbert Slama Trio, 8

Friday 25 12 BAR — Benny Turner & Real Blues, 10

BANKS STREET BAR — Cha-Wa Mardi Gras Indians, 10

BEACH HOUSE — Bobby Cure & the Summertime Blues, 9 BLUE NILE — Mykia Jovan & Jason Butler, 8; PYMP, Noise Org., Up Until Now, 10

BMC — Caroline Fourmy & Her Jazz Band, 7; Rue Fiya, 10; One Mind Brass Band, 1 a.m. BOMBAY CLUB — Monty Banks, 6

BOOMTOWN CASINO, BOOMERS SALOON — No Idea, 9:30 CARROLLTON STATION — Jenn Howard & Crazy McGee, 9:30 CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Hellbenders, 7; Mike Darby & the House of Cards, 11 CHICKIE WAH WAH — By & By String Band, 5; Kelcy Mae Band, 9

CIRCLE BAR — Jim O. & Sporadic Fanatics, 6 CLUB 7140 — Michael Ward, 8

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Eric Traub Trio, 10 DRAGON’S DEN — Lady Baby Miss, 9

HARRAH’S CASINO (HARRAH’S THEATRE) — MC Hammer, 10

HERMES BAR — Shannon Powell Trio, 9:30 & 11

HI-HO LOUNGE — Martin Krusch Magnetic Ear, Panorama Brass Band, 10 HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — Tera Melos, Marnie Stern, Caddywhompus, 9

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Professor Piano Series, 5; Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown, 8; Burlesque Ballroom feat. Linnzi Zaorski, midnight JACE’S PLACE — Jager Maestros, 10

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Colin Lake, 2; Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 7 JUJU BAG CAFE AND BARBER SALON — Micheala Harrison, Todd Duke, 7:30 KERRY IRISH PUB — Damien Louviere, 5; Foot & Friends, 9

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Dave Reis, 7; R. Scully’s Rough Seven, 11

THE MAISON — Derrick Freeman, midnight MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Alex Bosworth, 10

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Daniel Black, 7; Serge Villanova, 8; Phil Minissale, 9; Mike True, 10 OAK — Reed Alleman Trio, 6; Andrew Duhon Trio, 10

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1; Vibe, 8:30 OLD POINT BAR — Jeff Chaz, 9:30

ONE EYED JACKS — Cliff Hines, 9 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Clive Wilson & Palm Court Jazz Band, 8 PELICAN CLUB — Sanford Hinderlie, 7

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Masters feat. Leroy Jones, 8 REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — G-Eazy, 10

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Eric Lindell feat. John Nemeth, 9 THE SAINT — Rotary Downs, Buttons, 10

SIBERIA — Eyehategod, Phobia, Venomous Maximus, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Ellis Marsalis Quartet, 8 & 10

SOUTHPORT HALL — Scott Major Memorial Benefit Concert feat. Mrz Crowley, Grunge Factory, August Rush, BRAH and others, 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett PAGE 50

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/HOBNOLA

/HOBNewOrleans

WORLD FAMOUS GOSPEL BRUNCH EVERY SUNDAY Old School 106.7 and Power 102.9 present SATURDAY THE MARDI GRAS BRASS BAND BLOWOUT FEBRUARY 26 featuring: Hot 8 Brass Band, New Birth Brass Band, Free Agents 9PM Brass Band, TBC Brass Band, DJ Captain Charles and DJ Chicken HOT TUNA BLUES featuring TUESDAY MARCH 1 Hot Tuna, Charlie Musselwhite, 8PM and Jim Lauderdale

FRIDAY MARCH 4 10PM SATURDAY MARCH 5 10PM SUNDAY MARCH 13 8PM

BETTER THAN EZRA'S KREWE OF ROCCKUS PRESENTS

PAT GREEN WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

BETTER THAN EZRA

BETTER THAN EZRA'S KREWE OF ROCCKUS PRESENTS

BETTER THAN EZRA WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

BIG SAM’S FUNKY NATION

MINT CONDITION

WEDNESDAY MARCH 16 8:30PM

SATURDAY MARCH 19 8PM SUNDAY MARCH 20 9PM

BET MUSIC MATTERS TOUR PRESENTS

MARSHA &MELANIE AMBROSIUS FIONA STONE ROLLIN’ TOUR

PLUS NEW KINGSTON PLUS LOS RAKAS

2/25 Tera Melos and Marnie Stern

plus Caddywhompus 2/26 The Scorseses CD Release Party plus Lovey Dovies plus Luke Starkiller

3/4 Jermaine Quiz presents MashUp NOLA with Jamal Batiste and Khris Royal

3/10 Innerpartysystem

plus Swiss Chriss (of TKVR)

3/13 SOJA

plus Mambo Sauce, Chris Boomer and Seedless

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 22 > 2011

FRIDAY MARCH 18 8PM

49

MUSIC

LISTINGS

PAGE 48 Richardson, 4; Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 6:30; New Orleans Cottonmouth Kings, 10

ST. ROCH TAVERN — The Way, 9

STAGE DOOR CANTEEN AT THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM — Victory Big Band, 8

TIPITINA’S — Get Together feat. Leo Nocentelli, Art Neville, Bill Dickens, CR Cruver & Jamal Batiste, Yo Mama’s Big Fat Booty Band, 10 TOMMY’S WINE BAR — Tommy’s Latin Jazz Band feat. Matthew Shilling, 9

TUGENDHAFT’S TAVERN — Doctor Jazz, 6 YELLOW MOON BAR — Michael James & His Lonesome, 9

Saturday 26 12 BAR — Glen David Andrews, 9:30 APPLE BARREL — Peter Orr, 7

BABYLON LOUNGE — Voodoo Highway, 10

BANKS STREET BAR — Friends of Fire, Red Reed, 10 BAYOU PARK BAR — Blues4Sale, 10

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BLUE NILE — Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 7; Johnny Sketch & the Dirty Notes, 10 BMC — New Orleans Jazz Series, 3; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 6:30; Cha Wa Mardi Gras Indians, 9:30; Ashton & the Big Easy Brawlers Brass Band, 12:30 a.m. BOMBAY CLUB — Monty Banks, 6; Luther Kent Quartet, 9:30

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 22 > 2011

BOOMTOWN CASINO, BOOMERS SALOON — Al “Lil Fats” Jackson, 9:30

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CARROLLTON STATION — Craig Paddock Band, Chase McCloud, 9:30

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Domenic, Fat Stupid Ugly People, Sci-fi Zeros, Jimmy Howell, 9 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Shannon McNally & Hot Sauce, 9 CIRCLE BAR — Jazzholes, 6

COCONUT CLUB — Uncle Wayne Daigrepont, 7:30

D.B.A. — John Boutte, 8; Lost Bayou Ramblers, 11 DECKBAR & GRILLE — Miche & MixMavens, 8

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Sunpie & the Louisiana Sunspots, 10 EPIC CENTER — In Session, 10

FRENCH MARKET — Divine Gospel Singers, New Sensations, Archbishop Jocita Williams, 12 FRITZEL’S — Leslie P. Martin, 3

HI-HO LOUNGE — Debauche, 10

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HOUSE OF BLUES — Mardi Gras Brass Band Blowout feat. Hot 8 Brass Band, New Birth Brass Band, Free Agents Brass Band and others, 9

CAFE — Joe Bennett, 2; Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 5

KERRY IRISH PUB — Speed the Mule, 5; Rites of Passage, 9 KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30

LAFITTE’S BLACKSMITH SHOP — Mike Hood, 9 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Brass-aholics, 11

MAHALIA JACKSON THEATER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS — Rickey Smiley, 7 THE MAISON — Christina Perez, 5; Smoking Time Jazz Club, 7; Darla & the Hip Drops, 10; Lagniappe Brass Band, midnight

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Kevin Clark, 10

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Cross Walk & Numerals, 7; Richard Bienvenu, 8; Badura, 9; Rupert Wales, 10 NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Cornerstone Harmonizers, 2 OAK — Kristin Diable, 8

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1; Vibe, 8:30

OLD POINT BAR — Thomas Johnson & the People, 9:30 ONE EYED JACKS — Elephant 6 Holiday Surprise Tour, 9

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lionel Ferbos & Palm Court Jazz Band, 8

PELICAN CLUB — Sandford Hinderlie, 7 PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Band feat. Mark Braud, 8 REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — Big Easy Bounce Band feat. DJ Jubilee, 5th Ward Weebie, 10 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 9:30 SIBERIA — Parasytic, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Astral Project, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Luke Winslow-King, 3; Panorama Jazz Band, 6; Dominic Grillo & the Frenchmen Street All-Stars, 10 STARBUCKS — Abiea, 7:30

TIPITINA’S — Anders Osborne, Lubriphonic, 10

TOMMY’S WINE BAR — Julio & Caesar, 10

TOOLOULA’S — Second Hand Blues Band, 10

Sunday 27 BANKS STREET BAR — Ron Hotsream & the F-Holes, Bad Assets, 9 BLUE NILE — Mainline, 10

BMC — Nola Music Series, 1; Cristina Perez, 6; Andy J. Forest, 9; Sweet Jones, midnight BOMBAY CLUB — Monty Banks, 6

HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — Scorseses CD release, 9

BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Some Like it Hot, 11 a.m.

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Don Vappie, 8; Kinfolk Brass Band, midnight

CHAMPIONS SPORTS PUB & GRILL — Sam Cammarata, 8

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Big Blue Marble, Tim LeBlanc, 9

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE

CAFE NEGRIL — Smoky Greenwell & the Blues Gnus, 10

CIRCLE BAR — Micah McKee & Loren Murrell, 7

D.B.A. — Palmetto Bug Stompers, 6; Dharma Bums, 10

D.B.A. — Luke Winslow-King, 6; Panorama Brass Band, 9

DRAGON’S DEN — Davy Mooney, 9

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — John Fohl, 9:30

DONNA’S BAR & GRILL — Jesse McBride & the Next Generation Jazz Band, 9

FINNEGAN’S EASY — Laissez Faire, 3 HI-HO LOUNGE — Burning Spear Indians, 7

HOUSE OF BLUES — Sunday Gospel Brunch, 10 a.m. HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Hot 8 Brass Band, 9

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Germaine Bazzle & Paul Longstreth, 7 JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Irving Bannister’s AllStars, 2; Cindy Chen, 7 KERRY IRISH PUB — Steve Keith, 5; Schatzy & Associates, 8

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30 MADIGAN’S — Anderson/Easley Project, 9

DONNA’S BAR & GRILL — Les Getrex & the Blues All-Star Band, 9

DRAGON’S DEN — Domenic, Ruby Moon, 9

HI-HO LOUNGE — Blue Grass Pickin’ Party, 8 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Bob French & the Original Tuxedo Jazz Band, 8 JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Truman Holland, 2; Brint Anderson, 7 KERRY IRISH PUB — Kim Carson, 9 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Papa Grows Funk, 10 MY BAR — Danny T, 8

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Dave Easley, 8; Dave Maleckar, 9; Genial Orleanians, 10 OLD POINT BAR — Brent Walsh Trio, 6:30

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Joe Krown Trio feat. Russell Batiste & Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 10

PRESERVATION HALL — St. Peter Street Playboys feat. Mark Braud, 8

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Charmaine Neville Band, 8 & 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Kevin Clark & Tom McDermott, 11 a.m.; Javier Olondo, 7

RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Dave Jordan, 7

OLD POINT BAR — Jesse Moore, 3:30

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Dominic Grillo & the Frenchmen Street All-Stars, 6; Jazz Vipers, 10

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lucien Barbarin & Sunday Night Swingsters, 8 THE PERFECT FIT BAR & GRILL — Brass-a-holics, 8

THE PRECINCT — Funk Express, 7:30

classical/ concerts

PRESERVATION HALL — Tommy Sancton’s New Orleans Jazz Band, 8

DEGAS HOUSE — 2401 Esplanade

SPOTTED CAT — Rights of Swing, 3; Ben Polcer & friends, 6; Pat Casey & the New Sound, 10

DELGADO COMMUNITY COLLEGE — 615 City Park Ave., Rehearsal Hall, Bldg. 1; 671-5000; www.dcc.edu — Thu: S.O.U.L., 12:30

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Davy Mooney Quartet, 8 & 10

ST. CHARLES TAVERN — Maryflynn Thomas, 10 a.m. STAGE DOOR CANTEEN AT THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM — Victory Big Band, 1

TIPITINA’S — Cajun Fais Do Do feat. Bruce Daigrepont, 5:30 YUKI IZAKAYA — Luke Winslow King, 7

Ave., 821-5009; www.degashouse. com — Thu: The Session, Sasha Masakowski’s Musical Playground, 7

HOLY NAME OF JESUS CHURCH —

6367 St. Charles Ave., 865-7430; www.hnjchurch.org — Fri: S.O.U.L., Symphony Chorus of New Orleans, Delgado Community College Chorus and others, 7:30

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — 916 N. Peters

BMC — Fun in the Pocket feat. Mayumi Shara & Reinaldo, 6; Smoky Greenwell’s Monday Night Blues Jam, 9:30

St., 589-4841; www.nps.gov/jazz/ index.htm — Tue: Bruce Barnes & Matt Hampsey, 3 SLIDELL LITTLE THEATRE — 2024 Nellie Drive, Slidell, (985) 6410324; www.slidelllittletheatre. org — Fri-Sat: “Hot Jazz on a Cool Night” feat. members of Slidell Little Theatre Orchestra & Bayou Liberty Jazz Band, 9 TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH — 1329 Jackson Ave., 522-0276; www. trinitynola.com — Tue: Organ & Labyrinth, 6; Thu: Evensong Choir, 6:30; Sun: Sophie Kuhn & Albinas Prizgintas, 5; Mon: Taize, 6 TULANE UNIVERSITY — Dixon Hall, 865-5105 ext. 2; www.tulane.edu — Mon: Il Giardino Armonic, 8

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Tom McDermott, 8

For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.

Monday 28 APPLE BARREL — Sam Cammarata, 8 BACCHANAL — Jonathan Freilich, 7:30 BANKS STREET BAR — N’awlins Johnnys, 10

BJ’S LOUNGE — King James & the Special Men, 10

BLUE NILE — Fugitives of Funk feat. Russell Batiste, 9

BOMBAY CLUB — Amanda Walker, 7

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LISTINGS

A ROOM WITH A VIEW

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

Brad Miska, BLOODY-DISGUSTING

spotlight Crime Scenes

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

NOW SHOWING BARNEY’S VERSION (R) — The

film spans three decades and three continents to tell the story of one man’s extraordinary life. Canal Place

THE EAGLE (PG-13) — A Roman soldier striving to honor his father embarks on a dangerous journey. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 THE FIGHTER (R) — Mark Wahlberg stars as boxer “Irish” Micky Ward, a world lightweight champion trained by his brother (Christian Bale). Grand, Prytania (starting Friday) THE GREEN HORNET (PG-13) —

After his father dies, a playboy (Seth Rogan) decides to fight crime. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 14

I AM NUMBER FOUR (PG-13) — A teen who hides a secret

identity must elude an enemy who seeks to destroy him. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

THE KING’S SPEECH (R) — Colin

SANCTUM (R) — James

Cameron produces the 3-D thriller that finds adventurers stuck inside the South Pacific’s Esa-Ala Caves. AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand

TRUE GRIT (PG-13) — A 14-year-

old girl, a U.S. marshal and a Texas ranger try to track down her father’s murderer. Canal Place, Grand, Prytania

UNKNOWN (PG-13) — A man

(Liam Niason) awakens after a car accident and discovers another man has assumed his identity. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

OPENING FRIDAY DRIVE ANGRY 3-D (R) — A

hardened felon is hellbent on stopping the cult that murdered his daughter.

HALL PASS (R) — Two women

grant their husbands one week of freedom.

The New Orleans Museum of Art screens the Japanese classic Rashomon as part of its Friday night Where Y’Art series. Legendary director Akira Kurosawa’s 1950 film introduced Japanese cinema to the world. A study of the nature of truth, perception and justice, the film recounts a murder and a rape from four different points of view. It’s the first of a couple of Japanese film screenings coinciding with exhibits of Japanese painting and calligraphy. Tickets $10 general admission, $5 New Orleans Film Society members, free for museum members. — Will Coviello

FEB

25

“Must be experienced on the big screen.” Capone, Capone, AIN’T AIN’T IT IT COOL COOL NEWS NEWS

“Nicolas Cage at his action-packed best.” Ryan Ryan Turek, Turek, SHOCKTILL SHOCKTILLYOUDROP YOUDROP

“An insanely fun ride.” Peter Peter Sciretta, Sciretta, SLASHFILM SLASHFILM

Rashomon 7 p.m. Friday New Orleans Museum of Art, Stern Auditorium, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma.org

SPECIAL SCREENINGS ANOTHER THIN MAN (NR) — The third installment of

the 1939 film series starring William Powell and Myrna Loy. Free admission. 8 p.m. Monday, La Divina Gelateria, 621 St. Peter St., 302-2692; www.ladivinagelateria.com

JOHNNY MAD DOG (NR) — The film follows a group of child soldiers fighting during the second Liberian civil war. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 7:30 p.m. TuesdayThursday, Zeitgeist MultiDisciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 8275858; www.zeitgeistinc.net THE ORDER OF MYTHS (NR) —

Margaret Brown’s documentary examines segregated Mardi Gras in Mobile, Ala. A Q&A with Brown follows the screening. Tickets $5 New Orleans Film Society members, $7 general. 7 p.m. Tuesday, Contemporary Arts Center, 900 Camp St., 5283800; www.cacno.org. It also screens at The Porch 7th Ward Neighborhood Center (1943 Pauger St.). A Q&A with Brown follows. Free admission. 7 p.m. Wednesday. THE RITCHIE BOYS (NR) — The documentary focuses on the elite intelligence unit credited with an early end to World War II. Free admission. 6 p.m. Wednesday, Stage Door Canteen at The National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 528-1944 ROMAN HOLIDAY (NR) — The

1953 romantic comedy stars Gregory Peck and Audrey Hepburn. Tickets $5.50. Noon Saturday-Sunday and March 2, Stage Door Canteen at The National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 528-1944 ROPE (NR) — In Alfred

Hitchcock’s 1948 drama, two men strangle a third in an attempt to create “the perfect murder.” Tickets $5.50. Noon Wednesday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 8912787; www.theprytania.com

SCHEHERAZADE TELL ME A STORY (NR) — A female talk

show host in Cairo stirs up political controversy. Tickets $7 general, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, Monday and nightly through March 3, 3 p.m. Sunday, Zeitgeist MultiDisciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 8275858; www.zeitgeistinc.net AMC Palace 10 (Hammond), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 12 (Clearview), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 16 (Westbank), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 20 (Elmwood), (888) 262-4386; Canal Place, 363-1117; Chalmette Movies, 304-9992 ; Entergy IMAX, 581-IMAX; Grand (Slidell), (985) 641-1889; Hollywood 9 (Kenner), 464-0990; Hollywood 14 (Covington), (985) 893-3044; Kenner MegaDome, 468-7231; Prytania, 891-2787;Solomon Victory Theater, National World War II Museum, 527-6012

SUMMIT ENTERTAINMENT IN ASSOCIATION WITH MILLENNIUM FILMS PRESENT A MICHAEL DELUCA PRODUCTION AND A NU IMAGE PRODUCTION IN ASSOCIATION WITH SATURN FILMS A FILM BY PATRICK LUSSIER NICOLAS CAGE “DRIVE ANGRY” AMBER HEARD WILLIAM FICHTNER BILLY BURKE ANDDIRECTED DAVID MORSE WRITTENBY TODD FARMER & PATRICK LUSSIER BY PATRICK LUSSIER © 2011 SUMMIT ENTERTAINMENT, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

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LISTINGS

WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

ART ARTICHOKE GALLERY. 912 Decatur St., 636-2004 — Artists work on site in all media; watercolors and limited-edition prints by Peter Briant, ongoing. BARRISTER’S GALLERY. 2331 St. Claude Ave., 525-2767; www. barristersgallery.com — “Classi-

OPENING

fied,” works by Aaron Mcnamee and Nina Schwanse, through March 5.

SLIDELL CULTURAL CENTER. 2055 Second St., Slidell, (985) 646-4375 — “The Talent Within: Creative

BERGERON STUDIO & GALLERY. 406 Magazine St., 522-7503; www.bergeronstudio.com —

Works from the Commission on the Arts,” through March 18. Opening reception 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday.

GALLERIES 1022 GALLERY. 1022 Lowerline St., 301-0679; www.1022gallery. blogspot.com — Paintings by Tim Trapolin, through April 18. 3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY. 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com — “Nothing is

Ever Hopeless,” mixed media, digital images and paintings by Ryan Alvarez, through Saturday.

A GALLERY FOR FINE PHOTOGRAPHY. 241 Chartres St., 568-1313; www.agallery.com — Photo-

graphs by Michael Kenna; photographs by Sebastiao Salgado; both through Monday.

ACADEMY GALLERY. 5256 Magazine St., 899-8111 — “A Fresh

Look at the Flower,” paintings, ceramics and photographs by gallery artists, through March 26.

AG WAGNER STUDIO & GALLERY. 813 Royal St., 561-7440 — Works

ALL IN THE FRAME GALLERY. 2596 Front St., Slidell, (985) 2901395 — “Serene Waters, Clear Horizons,” paintings by Annie Strack, ongoing. ANGELA KING GALLERY. 241 Royal St., 524-8211; www.angelakinggallery.com — Paintings by

Steve Taylor, through March 15.

ANTENNA GALLERY. 3161 Burgundy St., 957-4255; www. antennagallery.org — “We’re

Goin’ Down,” prints, drawings and installations by Ben Fox-McCord and Craig Branum, through March 6. Paintings by Steve Taylor, ongoing. ANTON HAARDT FOLK GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www.antonart.com — Works

by Anton Haardt, Christopher Moses and others, ongoing. ARIODANTE GALLERY. 535 Julia St., 524-3233 — Paintings by

Robere Lord, ceramics by Dawn Chatoney and jewelry by Sylvan Spirit, through Monday. ART GALLERY 818. 818 Royal St., 524-6918 — Paintings, sculpture

and jewelry by local artists Noel Rockmore, Michael Fedor, Xavier de Callatay, Charles Bazzell, Bambi deVille and Ritchie Fitzgerald, ongoing.

BERTA’S AND MINA’S ANTIQUITIES GALLERY. 4138 Magazine St., 895-6201 — “Louisiana! United

We Stand to Save Our Wetlands,” works by Nilo and Mina Lanzas; works by Clementine Hunter, Noel Rockmore and others; all ongoing.

BRYANT GALLERIES. 316 Royal St., 525-5584; www.bryantgalleries.com — Paintings by Dean Mitchell, ongoing. BYRDIE’S GALLERY. 2422-A St. Claude Ave., www.byrdiesgallery. com — “A Little Picture Show,”

small-scale collage work by Christopher Stone, through March 9.

CALICHE & PAO GALLERY. 312 Royal St., 588-2846 — Oil paintings

by Caliche and Pao, ongoing.

CALLAN FINE ART. 240 Chartres St., 524-0025; www.callanfineart. com — Works by Eugene de

Blass, Louis Valtat and other artists of the Barbizon, Impressionist and Post-Impressionist schools, ongoing.

CARDINAL GALLERY. 541 Bourbon St., 522-3227 — Exhibition of Ital-

ian artists featuring works by Bruno Paoli and Andrea Stella, ongoing.

CARIBBEAN ARTS LTD. 720 Franklin Ave., 943-3858 — The gallery showcases contemporary Haitian and Jamaican art. CASELL GALLERY. 818 Royal St., 524-0671; www.casellartgallery. com — Pastels by Joaquim

Casell; etchings by Sage; oils by Charles Ward; all ongoing.

COLE PRATT GALLERY. 3800 Magazine St., 891-6789; www. coleprattgallery.com — “Beauty,

Power & Circumstance,” female nudes in color pencil and acrylic by Richard Johnson, through March 12.

COLLECTIVE WORLD ART COMMUNITY. Poydras Center, 650 Poydras St., 339-5237 — Paintings

from the Blue Series by Joseph Pearson, ongoing.

COLLINS C. DIBOLL ART GALLERY. Loyola University, Monroe Library, 6363 St. Charles Ave., fourth floor, 861-5456 — “In the

Blink of an Eye,” photographs by Harold Baquet, through March 24.

COUP D’OEIL ART CONSORTIUM. 2033 Magazine St., 722-0876; www.coupdoeilartconsortium. com — “Intimate Topographies,”

Miami Vices Looking at Carlos Betancourt’s work can be like stepping through the looking glass: It all seems familiar yet skewed in unlikely ways. In art as in life, context is everything, but here we are strangers in a strange land of exotic flora and preposterous kitsch where everything makes a bold statement — even if that statement has been digitally encrypted as decorously exotic babble. Cynics might say that sounds a bit like Miami, and they would be right. Betancourt was born in Puerto Rico of Cuban parentage but has lived in Miami since 1981, so it should come as no surprise that his work suggests a nexus where Carmen Miranda and Tito Puente meet Jeff Koons and Lady Gaga. Miami is where New York meets the tropics, and Betancourt evokes a loopy new strand of aesthetic DNA. Large, kaleidoscopic photomontages like Re-Collections (pictured) mingle flowers, butterflies, starfish and fruit with candy, beads and action figures in explosive cornucopias of pop-cultural delirium. His sculptures are neoclassical columns that might evoke the gravitas of ancient Rome were they not festooned with bananas, pineapples, grapes and bunches of other stuff that look like leftovers from Miranda’s crazy carioca hats. In these works, Betancourt takes the typically tart conceptual art memes of appropriation and deconstruction to giddy new levels of tropical extravagance. More kaleidoscopic compositions appear in Jason Leinwand’s meticulous paintings at the Front. Based on G.I. Gurdjieff’s metaphysics, and psychedelic in tone and content, they also employ pop-cultural references such as UFOs and hearts and skulls in tattoo-like abandon to produce images that are seriously mystical yet also zany, recalling both the Aleister Crowley tarot deck and old Grateful Dead album jackets. The kitsch may conflict with the metaphysics, but Brooklyn-based Leinwand is serious, and the intensity he puts into his work augurs well for its future evolution. — D. Eric Bookhardt

T H R U Mine Eyes: Works by Jason Leinwand, M A R Lindsay Kane and Rachel DeTrinis The Front, 4100 St. Claude Ave., 920-3980; www.nolafront.org

06

T H R U Portrait of a Garden: Photomontages M A R and Sculpture by Carlos Betancourt Heriard-Cimino Gallery, 440 Julia St., 525-7300; www.heriard-cimino.com

20

sculpture by Paulina Sierra; “Slowness,” paintings by Emily Farrant; both through March 19. D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., 524-3936 — “Surroundings,” mixed-

media sculpture by Allen Wynn, through March.

DU MOIS GALLERY. 4921 Freret St., 818-6032 — “Per Se,” a group

exhibition featuring works by Angela Burks, Ken Kenan and Christian Van Campen, through March 6. DUTCH ALLEY ARTIST’S CO-OP GALLERY. 912 N. Peters St., 4129220; www.dutchalleyonline. com — Works by New Orleans

com — Works by gallery artists Coignard, Engel, Papart, Petra, Tobiasse, Schneuer and Yrondi, ongoing. FAIR FOLKS & A GOAT. 2116 Chartres St., 872-9260; www. fairfolksandagoat.com — “Per-

manence,” paintings by Timothy Cavnar, through April 3. FRAMIN’ PLACE & GALLERY. 3535 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-3311; www.nolaframing.com — Prints

by Tommy Thompson, Phillip Sage, James Michalopoulos and others, ongoing.

artists, ongoing.

FREDRICK GUESS STUDIO. 910 Royal St., 581-4596; www.fredrickguessstudio.com — Paintings by

ELLIOTT GALLERY. 540 Royal St., 523-3554; www.elliottgallery.

THE FRONT. 4100 St. Claude Ave.;

Fredrick Guess, ongoing.

GALERIE D’ART FRANCAIS. 541 Royal St., 581-6925 — Works by

Todd White, ongoing.

GALERIE PORCHE WEST. 3201 Burgundy St., 947-3880 — Pho-

tography by Christopher Porche West, ongoing. GALERIE ROYALE. 3648 Magazine St., 894-1588; www.galerieroyale. com — “Featuring Fabrics,”

mixed media on canvas by Jessie Trinchard, through March 4. GALLERIA BELLA. 319 Royal St., 581-5881 — Works by gallery artists, ongoing. GALLERY 421. 421 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 898-5858 —

More than 500 pieces of art by more than 50 artists, ongoing.

GALLERY BIENVENU. 518 Julia St., 525-0518; www.gallerybienvenu. com — Sculpture by David Borgerding, through March 28. THE GARDEN DISTRICT GALLERY. 1332 Washington Ave., 891-3032; www.gardendistrictgallery.com —

“Eat, Drink & Be Merry,” a group invitational exhibit featuring 14 artists, through March 6. GEORGE SCHMIDT GALLERY. 626 Julia St., 592-0206; www. georgeschmidt.com — Paintings by George Schmidt, ongoing. GRAPHITE GALLERIES. 936 Royal St., 565-3739 — “Sinners and

Saints,” works by Joe Hobbs, ongoing.

GUTHRIE CONTEMPORARY. 3815 Magazine St., 897-2688; www. guthriecontemporary.com — “Schemata,” works by Susan Dory, ongoing.

JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY. 400A Julia St., 522-5471; www.jonathanferraragallery. com — “Heroes and Villains,”

works by Gina Phillips; “Refresh, Reconstitute, Embellish,” works by Matthew Cox; both through March 3. JULIE NEILL DESIGNS. 3908 Magazine St., 899-4201; www. julieneill.com — “Facade,” photo-

graphs by Lesley Wells, ongoing.

KAKO GALLERY. 536 Royal St., 5655445; www.kakogallery.com —

Paintings by Don Picou and Stan Fontaine; “Raku” by Joy Gauss; 3-D wood sculpture by Joe Derr; all ongoing. KKPROJECTS. 2448 N. Villere St., 415-9880; www.kkprojects.org — “Knead,” works by Kristian

Hansen, Tora Lopez, John Oles and William Murphy, ongoing.

KURT E. SCHON. 510-520 St. Louis St., 524-5462 — The gallery specializes in 18th and 19th century European oil paintings by artists from the French Salon and Royal Academy as well as French Impressionists. L9 CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 539 Caffin Ave., 948-0056 — “Faces

of Treme,” works by Chandra McCormick and Keith Calhoun, ongoing.

LE DESIGNS LLC. 3512 Magazine St., 373-6413 — Jewelry by Vicki, paintings by Peter Drasutis and furniture by Whilite Design, through March. LE PETIT SALON DE NEW ORLEANS. 906 Royal St., 524-5700 — Paintings by Holly Sarre,

ongoing.

LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia St., 522-5988; www.lemieuxgalleries.com — “Corpus Cupiditas,”

works by Steve Teeters, through Saturday.

HAROUNI GALLERY. 829 Royal St., 299-8900 — Paintings by David

LOUISIANA CRAFTS GUILD. 608 Julia St., 558-6198; www.louisianacrafts.org — Group show featuring works from guild members, ongoing.

HOME SPACE GALLERY. 1128 St. Roch Ave — “The Good Stuff 2,”

M. FRANCIS GALLERY. 604 S. Julia St., 875-4888; www.mfrancisgallery.com — “Black Art Now,”

Harouni, ongoing.

works by Bruce Davenport Jr., Nicole Fernandez, Taneeka Jackson and John Walton, through March 12. ISABELLA’S GALLERY. 3331 Severn Ave., Suite 105, Metairie, 779-3202; www.isabellasgallery. com — Hand-blown works by

Marc Rosenbaum; raku by Kate Tonguis and John Davis; all ongoing. JAMIE HAYES GALLERY. 621 Chartres St., 592-4080; www.jamiehayes.com — New Orleans-style

art by Jamie Hayes, ongoing.

a group exhibition featuring works by eight artists, through March 1.

MARTINE CHAISSON GALLERY. 727 Camp St., 304-7942; www. martinechaissongallery.com — Computer-generated imagery by Sean Capone; paintings and sculpture by Bonnie Maygarden; both through March 5. MICHALOPOULOS GALLERY. 617 Bienville St., 558-0505; www.michalopoulos.com — Paintings by James Michalopoulos, ongoing. MICHELLE Y WILLIAMS GALLERY. 835 Julia St., 585-1945; www.michelleywilliams.com — Works by

JEAN BRAGG GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART. 600 Julia St., 895-7375; www.jeanbragg.com —

Michelle Y. Williams, ongoing.

JON SCHOOLER GALLERY. 8526 Oak St., 865-7032; www. jonschooler.com — “Subliminal WOWs,” paintings by Jon Schooler, ongoing.

NEW ORLEANS ARTWORKS. 727 Magazine St., 529-7279 — Sandblasted photography by Drake Fuller, feathered metal sculpture by Josh Cohen, glass Mardi Gras masks by Teri Walker and prints by Tish Douzart, through Saturday.

“Threads of Carnival,” works in oil by Linda Lesperance, through Monday.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 22 > 2011

by gallery artists; 504 Toys, locally handcrafted toys; both ongoing.

Photographs by Michael P. Smith, Jack Beech, Harriet Blum, Kevin Roberts and others, ongoing.

review

www.nolafront.org — “Mine Eyes,” works by Rachel DeTrinis, Jason Leinwand and Lindsay Kane; installations by Josephine Durkin; “Everyday Abstract,” works by Brooke Pickett and Suzanne Bennett; all through March 6.

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LISTINGS

NEWCOMB ART GALLERY. Woldenberg Art Center, Tulane University, 865-5328; www.newcombartgallery.tulane.edu — “Reflections on Water in American Painting,” through April 24. OAK STREET GALLERY. 111 N. Oak St., Hammond, (985) 345-0521 — “Points

of Reference,” sculpture by Anne Boudreau, through Monday.

OCTAVIA ART GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www.octaviaartgallery.com — “An Earthly Paradise,” works by Stefan Szczesny, through March 26. PARSE GALLERY. 134 Carondelet St —

“Still Life with Bombs,” paintings by Brook Inman and Jess Laskosky, through Saturday.

PHOTO WORKS NEW ORLEANS. 521 St. Ann St., 593-9090; www.photoworksneworleans.com — Photography by

Louis Sahuc, ongoing.

REINA GALLERY. 4132 Magazine St., 895-0022; www.reinaart.com —

“Vintage New Orleans Artists,” watercolors, etchings and folk art; “Patrons Saints,” works by Shelley Barberot; both ongoing.

PLACE ST. CHARLES 201 ST. CHARLES AVE.

MON-FRI 7AM-2PM • 504-522-8198

Download a Menu at

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 22 > 2011

Grand Opening

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TAPAS

Style Restaurant

REYNOLDS-RYAN ART GALLERY. Isidore Newman School, 5333 Danneel St., 896-6369; www.newmanschool. org — “The Art of Reflection,” oil on

canvas by Lory Lockwood, through March 3.

RHINO CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS COMPANY. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www.rhinocrafts.com — Kathleen

Grumich, Vitrice McMurry, Deborah Morrissey, Cathy DeYoung and others, ongoing.

RIVERSTONE GALLERIES. 719 Royal St., 412-9882; 729 Royal St., 581-3688; Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 36, 566-0588; 733 Royal St., 525-9988; www.riverstonegalleries.net — Multimedia works by Ricardo Lo-

zano, Michael Flohr, Henry Ascencio, Jaline Pol and others, ongoing.

ROSETREE GLASS STUDIO & GALLERY. 446 Vallette St., Algiers Point, 366-3602; www.rosetreeglass.com —

Hand-blown glasswork, ongoing.

RUSTY PELICAN ART. 4031 St. Claude Ave., 218-5727; www.rustypelicanart. com — Works by Travis and Lexi

Linde, ongoing.

SALONE DELL’ARTES ARTEMISIA. 3000 Royal St., 481-5113 — “I Genti H2O,”

works by Shmuela Padnos, ongoing.

Dinner Tuesday - Saturday 5pm - 11pm Late Night Menu Friday - Saturday 11pm - 1am

SHEILA’S FINE ART STUDIO. 1427 N. Johnson St., 473-3363; www.sheilaart. com — Works by Sheila Phipps,

ongoing.

STELLA JONES GALLERY. Place St. Charles, 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 132, 568-9050 — “Losing My Religion,

Choosing My Confessions,” mixed media by Charly Palmer, through March.

TAYLOR BERCIER FINE ART. 233 Chartres St., 527-0072 — “Suffer Little Children,” paintings and collages by Dona Lief; “Assignations,” paintings by Ann Hornback; “What Bugs Me,” sculpture by Andrew Bascle; all through March 15. THOMAS MANN GALLERY I/O. 1812 Magazine St., 581-2113; www. thomasmann.com — “Where’s the

2106 Chartres St. New Orleans, LA 70116 504-943-0416

Money?” group exhibit interpreting the economy, ongoing.

TRIPOLO GALLERY. 401 N. Columbia St., (985) 893-1441 — Works by Bill

Binnings, Robert Cook, Donna Duffy, Scott Ewen, Juli Juneau, Kevin LeBlanc, Ingrid Moses, Gale Ruggiero, Robert Seago and Scott Upton, ongoing. VENUSIAN GARDENS ART GALLERY. 2601 Chartres St., 943-7446; www. venusiangardens.com — “Luminous

Sculpture,” works by Eric Ehlenberger, ongoing.

VINCENT MANN GALLERY. 305 Royal St., 523-2342; www.vincentmanngallery.com — Paintings by Jacob

Manguno and Luc Didier, through May 7.

WMSJR. 1061 Camp St., 299-9455; www.wmsjr.com — Paintings by Will Smith, ongoing. A WORK OF ART GALLERY. 8212 Oak St., 862-5244 — Glass works by Juli

Juneau; works from the New Orleans Photo Alliance; both ongoing. ZEITGEIST MULTI-DISCIPLINARY ARTS CENTER. 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc. net — “Hostile Takeover: Ninth Ward

and Other Evidence,” photographs by Andrew Garn, through Sunday. “Analog Frontiers,” a collection of steampunk art curated by Theodora Eliezer, through March.

CALL FOR ARTISTS ANTENNA GALLERY. The gallery seeks work that uses, recreates or interprets meaning from the artist’s childhood artwork for a May exhibition. Email nataliemclaurin@ gmail.com for details. Submission deadline is April 20. COLD DRINK PRINTMAKING INVITATIONAL. Du Mois Gallery, 4921 Freret

St., 818-6032 — The gallery accepts submissions for the exhibition juried by New Orleans Museum of Art modern and contemporary art curator Miranda Lash. Email dumoisgallery@gmail.com for details. Submission deadline is March 31. DELGADO STUDENT ART ASSOCIATION. The group seeks art from

Delgado Community College students and alumni to be included in a calendar. Call 258-5011 or email xdesot92940@dcc.edu for details. Submission deadline is March 15. EBB & FLOW. A Studio in the Woods seeks works for its fall artist residency series. Artists are asked to propose works addressing global ecological challenges exemplified in south Louisiana. Email applications@astudiointhewoods.org for details. Submission deadline is March 1. LOUISIANA ART AND ARTISTS’ GUILD SPRING SHOW. The arts nonprofit

accepts works for its February juried exhibition in Baton Rouge. Artists must bring their works to the show site Wednesday. Email laagbr@laag-site.org or visit www. laag-site.org for details. MICHAEL P. SMITH DOCUMENTARY PHOTOGRAPHY GRANT. The New

Orleans Photo Alliance awards a $5,000 grant to a documentary photographer. Call 610-4899 or visit www.neworleansphotoalliance.org for details. Submission deadline is Monday.

PELICAN D’OR FILM FESTIVAL. Nunez

Community College seeks short films in DVD format for its March film festival. Submission categories are films 10-30 minutes long and films up to 10 minutes long. Call 278-6289 or email nmcpherson@ nunez.edu for details. Submission deadline is March 18.

MUSEUMS AMERICAN-ITALIAN MUSEUM & RESEARCH LIBRARY. 537 S. Peters St., 522-7294 — Permanent exhibits of

jazz artists, a St. Joseph’s altar replica, the Louisiana Italian-American Sports Hall of Fame and a research library with genealogy records. ASHE CULTURAL ARTS CENTER. 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — “Ashe in Retrospect: 1998-2008,” photographs by Morris Jones Jr., Eric Waters, Jeffrey Cook and others, ongoing. BACKSTREET CULTURAL MUSEUM. 1116 St. Claude Ave.; www.backstreetmuseum.org — Permanent exhibits

of Mardi Gras Indian suits, jazz funeral memorabilia and social aid and pleasure club artifacts, ongoing.

CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER. 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www. cacno.org — “Ephemera: River with Flowers,” installation by Brandon Graving, through Sunday. “Music Rising from the Rubble: Photo Essay of the Haitian Youth Music Relief Organization,” through Sunday. “As We See It: Youth Vision Quilt,” student-created quilt with more than 400 patches, ongoing. GEORGE & LEAH MCKENNA MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN ART. 2003 Carondelet St., 586-7432; www. themckennamuseum.com — “Tam-

bourine and Fan,” works by Jamar Pierre and Gregoryuan MgheeHunter, through March 12.

GERMAN-AMERICAN CULTURAL CENTER. 519 Huey P. Long Ave., Gretna, 363-4202; www.gacc-nola. com — Museum exhibits depict the

colonial experience, work, culture and religion of German immigrants.

GREAT AMERICAN ALLIGATOR MUSEUM. 2051 Magazine St., 523-5525 — The museum features fossils,

taxidermy, folk art, kitsch, Americana and more.

HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION. 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www. hnoc.org — “Seventh Ward: People,

Places and Traditions,” a group exhibition in conjunction with PhotoNOLA, through Monday. “Drawn to Life: Al Hirschfeld and the Theater of Tennessee Williams,” drawings by Hirschfeld, through April 2. “In Search of Julien Hudson: Free Artist of Color in Pre-Civil War New Orleans,” through April 20.

LONGUE VUE HOUSE AND GARDENS. 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www. longuevue.com — “Untitled No.

6029,” sculpture by Eric Dallimore, through February. “All That Glitters,” an exhibition of Carnival jewelry, through March 13. LOUISIANA FILM MUSEUM. Montrel’s Bistro, 1000 N. Peters St., 524-4747; www.louisianafilmmuseum.org — The museum features

props, costumes, video clips, still photographs, posters and other exhibits from major films produced in Louisiana. LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM PRESBYTERE. 751 Chartres St., 568-6968; www.lsm.crt.state.la.us — “Before

During After,” photographs illustrating the impact of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, through Aug. 31, and more.. LOUISIANA SUPREME COURT MUSEUM. Louisiana Supreme Court, 400 Royal St., 310-2149; www.lasc. org — The Supreme Court of Loui-

siana Historical Society sponsors the museum’s exhibitions of the people and institutions that have contributed to the development of Louisiana law for 300 years. MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN COCKTAIL. 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.museumoftheamericancocktail.org — “Absinthe

Visions,” photographs by Damian Hevia, ongoing.

NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM. 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — “Ours To Fight For: American Jews in the Second World War,” an exhibit on loan from the Museum of Jewish Heritage, through April 24. NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma.org — “The Most Beau-

tiful Day of My Youth,” photographs by Bernard Faucon, through March 13. “Residents and Visitors: 20th Century Photographs of Louisiana,” a collaboration with the Historic New Orleans Collection, through March 27. “The Sound of One Hand: Painting and Calligraphy by Zen Monk Hakuin,” through April 17. “Lofty Ideals: Selections of Nineteenth-Century French Sculpture from the Permanent Collection,” through April 24. “Different Strokes for Different Folks: Glass Works from Harter, Jastremski and Sawyer Gifts,” through May 15, and more.

NEW ORLEANS PHARMACY MUSEUM. 514 Chartres St., 565-8027; www.pharmacymuseum.org — Exhibits on

19th-century pharmacy, medicine and health care, all ongoing.

OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART. 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www. ogdenmuseum.org — “Big-Hearted

Pots,” ceramic pots by Mark Hewitt; “North Carolina Craft Now,” an exhibition by the Center for Southern Craft and Design, through April 10. “A Life in Glass,” glass vessels by Richard Ritter; “Selections from ‘Partial to Home,’” photographs by Birney Imes, through April 15. SOUTHERN FOOD & BEVERAGE MUSEUM. Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood.org — “Aca-

dian to Cajun: Forced Migration to Commercialization,” a multimedia exhibit, and more.

TULANE UNIVERSITY. Joseph Merrick Jones Hall, 6823 St. Charles Ave — “Treme: People and Places,” maps, architectural drawings and photographs celebrating the bicentennial of Faubourg Treme, through November. For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com

LISTINGS

GET IN ON THE ACT

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

STAGE

COMEDY

review Black and Blue and Purple

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

THEATER THE ADDING MACHINE.

NOCCA|Riverfront, Nims Blackbox Theatre, 2800 Chartres St — NOCCA students perform Elmer Rice’s play about an accountant at a large corporation who, after 25 years at the job, is replaced by an adding machine. Tickets $10. 7 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Saturday.

FANTASTIC MISTER FOX. Contem-

porary Arts Center, 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www.cacno.org — Roald Dahl’s adventure comes to life with twisting cardboard tunnels, allowing audiences to crawl through the multi-media production’s sets. Tickets $20. Runs through April 3. Days and times vary; visit the CAC website for details.

LES LIAISONS DANGEREUSES. Lupin

Theatre, Tulane University, 865-5105 ext. 2; www.tulane.edu — Two rivals and ex-lovers use sex as a weapon to degrade others in the stage adaptation of Choderlos de Laclos’ novel. Tickets $12 general admission, $9 Tulane faculty and staff, $8 students and seniors. 8 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Saturday-Sunday.

RICKY GRAHAM’S ... AND THE BALL AND ALL. Le Chat Noir, 715 St. Charles

Ave., 581-5812; www.cabaretlechatnoir.com — Graham’s long-running show features Becky Allen and Amanda Hebert as the yatty girls from the Mystic Krewe of Terpsichore. Tickets $32 (includes $5 drink credit). 8 p.m. Thursday and Feb. 28, 6 p.m. Sunday. TECHNO. Delgado Community

College, Isaac Delgado Hall, Drama Hall, third floor, 616-6066; www. dcc.edu — Written by students and Gamal Chasten, the play explores humans’ relationship with technology. Call 671-6360 for tickets. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday. THREE TALL WOMEN. Shadowbox

Theatre, 2400 St. Claude Ave., 5237469; www.theshadowboxtheatre. com — Silk Dress Productions presents Edward Albee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning play about three stages of one woman’s life represented by three characters. Call 931-8297 or visit www.silkdressproductions.com for tickets. Tickets $15 general admission, $12 seniors and students. 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday.

UBU COCU. AllWays Lounge, 2240

St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www.

marignytheatre.org — The sequel to Alfred Jarry’s Ubu Roi finds the title character on a reign of terror against all landlords. Visit www. cripplecreekplayers.org for tickets. Tickets $15 general admission, $25 reserved seating. Food and live music at 8 p.m., show at 9 p.m. Friday.

SLOW BURN BURLESQUE. Howlin’ Wolf, 907 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf.com — The burlesque troupe presents “Burlesque to the Future” featuring guest performer Angela Eve. Tickets $15 general admission, $20 VIP. 11 p.m. Friday.

BURLESQUE & CABARET

AUDITIONS

BURLESQUE BALLROOM. Irvin

Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse, 300 Bourbon St., 553-2270; www.sonesta.com — Trixie Minx stars in the weekly burlesque show featuring the music of Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown. Call 553-2331 for details. 11:50 p.m. Friday.

THE MIDNIGHT REVUE. Starlight

by the Park, 834 N. Rampart St., 561-8939; www.starlightbythepark. com — Marcy Marcell directs a weekly female-impersonation jazz cabaret. Call for ticket information. Midnight Friday.

BARBERSHOP HARMONY SOCIETY.

Christ the King Lutheran Church, 1001 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 469-4740; www.ctk-nola.org — The Greater New Orleans Chapter holds auditions for its Mardi Gras Chorus. Call 363-9001 for details. 7:15 p.m. Tuesday.

CRESCENT CITY SOUND CHORUS. Delgado Community College, City Park campus, Orleans Avenue, between City Park Avenue and Navarre Street; www.dcc.edu — The women’s chorus holds weekly auditions for new members. Call 453-0858 or visit www.crescentcitysound.com for details. 7 p.m. Monday.

BROWN! IMPROV COMEDY. City Bar,

3515 Hessmer Ave., 309-5325; www. citybarnola.com — The comedy troupe stars Johnathan Christiansen, Gant Laborde, Ken Lafrance, Bob Murrell and Kelli Rosher. Visit www.brownimprovcomedy.com for details. 8:30 p.m. Saturday.

COMEDY CATASTROPHE. Lost

Love Lounge, 2529 Dauphine St., 949-2009; www.lostlovelounge. com — The bar hosts a free weekly stand-up comedy show. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

CUBAN & MEXICAN FOOD

COMEDY GUMBEAUX. Howlin’ Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf.com — Local comedians perform, and amateurs take the stage in the open mic portion. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Thursday.

PUERCO FRITO - $9.90 PORK FAJITAS - $8.00 ROPA VIEJA - $7.75

COMEDY OPEN-MIC. La Nuit Comedy

Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts a weekly open-mic comedy night. (Sign-up time is 10:45 p.m.) Tickets $8. 11 p.m. Friday.

I DELIVER!

COUNTRY FLAME

FEAR & LOATHING IN NEW ORLEANS.

La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — The sketch comedy show boasts vampires, zombies, relationship advice and other horrors. 8:30 p.m. Fridays.

620 IBERVILLE STREET • 522.1138 OPEN EVERYDAY ‘TIL 8:30PM

GOD’S BEEN DRINKING. La Nuit

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — Actors improvise a comedy based on audience suggestions. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Friday.

DAMAGED ART WORK? Paintings • Prints • Frames • Mirrors Photos • Sculpture • Glass • Ceramic Professionally Restored

GROUND ZERO COMEDY. The Maison,

508 Frenchmen St., 371-5543; www. maisonfrenchmen.com — The show features local stand-up comedians. Sign-up is 7:30 p.m; show is 8 p.m. Friday.

The New Orleans Conservation Guild, Inc. 13 years in New Orleans 3620 Royal St • In Bywater 10-4pm • Mon-Fri

LA NUIT STAND-UP OPEN MIC. La

Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts an open mic following the God’s Been Drinking show. 11 p.m. Friday.

LAUGH OUT LOUD. Bootleggers Bar and Grille, 209 Decatur St., 525-1087 — Simple Play presents a weekly comedy show. 10 p.m. Thursday. PERMANENT DAMAGE STAND-UP COMEDY. Bullets Sports Bar, 2441

[504] 944-7900 www.art-restoration.com

DENTAL CLEANING SPECIAL

A.P. Tureaud Ave., 948-4003 — Tony Frederick hosts the open mic comedy show. 8 p.m. Wednesday.

ROUNDHOUSE. La Nuit Comedy

Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — Comedians perform a barefoot, long-form improvisation show. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Friday.

TOM HESTER & MIKE WELDON. Boom-

town Casino, Boomers Saloon, 4132 Peters Road, Harvey, 366-7711; www. boomtownneworleans.com — The stand-up comedians perform. Free admission. 8 p.m. Wednesday.

For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 22 > 2011

NORMAN, IS THAT YOU?. Actor’s Theatre of New Orleans, WTIX-FM Building, second floor, 4539 N. I-10 Service Road, Metairie, 456-4111 — In Ron Clark and Sam Bobrick’s comedy, a man and his errant wife struggle to come to terms with their son’s homosexuality. Tickets $20 general admission, $18 students and seniors. 7:30 p.m. Thursday-Saturday.

Alice Walker’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Color Purple might not seem like an obvious choice to adapt into a splashy musical, but the touring Broadway production at the Mahalia Jackson Theater recently offered rocking good entertainment. Set in rural Georgia in the 1930s, the story centers on Celie (Dayna Dantzler), a 14-year-old girl who has been raped by her Pa (Mark Hall) and becomes pregnant. He takes the baby from her, and she fears he’s murdered the infant. Celie’s Pa is a rough, mean character, as are most of the men in the story, while the women tend to be more vulnerable and feeling creatures. Pa fobs off Celie to Albert, who is attracted to Celie’s sister Nettie. Albert treats Celie like a slave, and she becomes a Cinderella figure — minus the fairy godmother, Prince Charming and glass slipper. “The lord works in mysterious ways” one of the gospelbased songs informs us, and so does the script of The Color Purple, which twists through many subplots. Nettie is not dead as Celie supposes, but alive and well in Africa, where she was taken by a missionary couple, along with Celie’s two children. This crucial revelation comes from Shug Avery, a former lover of Albert’s. Avery is a blues singer and sets off a minor bacchanal at the local juke joint when she launches into a raunchy, double entendre number called “Push Da Button.” The blues diva was sensitively played by New Orleans-born and NOCCA-trained actress Taprena Augustine. Avery, who dazzles everyone with her beauty, and Celie, who is continually berated as ugly, form an intimate bond. Avery discovers Albert has been intercepting and hiding Nettie’s letters to Celie. The news of Nettie’s life is accompanied by African dance numbers that seem like a cross between exotic rites and the pseudo-street rumbles of West Side Story. The dancing, like the singing, was excellent and stood out imaginatively in the lighter, freer moments. Despite the grim opening scenes and the story’s many horrors, the sun emerges in the final scene and shines happily on a picnic gathering in which all parties are reunited and mutually forgiven. The resolution may not be convincing, but it fits a big Broadway musical. — Dalt Wonk

BASED ON REAL LIFE. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The weekly long-form improv comedy show features some guys, a girl and someone named John Stewart. Tickets $6. 8:30 p.m. Saturday.

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FAMILY Tuesday 22 KINDER GARDEN: WINTER IN THE GARDEN . Longue

plus tax

Every Night • 8-10pm

Now Open

Mon-Sat 11am-10pm

3454 Magazine St. NOLA 504-899-3374

BE THERE DO THAT

preview Rambling Man

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

Choose a 3-inch Poboy & a Pint of Beer • $8

NEW HOURS!

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

PINTS & POBOYS

Choices include: Fried Green Tomato & Remoulade, Overstuffed Shrimp, Root Beer & Glazed Ham & Cheese, Pattons Hot Sausage, Certified Angus Roast Beef, or French Fry, Roast Beef & Cheddar Poboy

EVENTS

Dat’s Awtsy door decoration

2727 Prytania • 891-7018 Monday-Saturday 10am-5pm

Vue House and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue.com — Children and accompanying adults explore the world of insects through age-appropriate activities. Tickets $12 general admission, $10 members. Call 293-4722 or email lvaughn@longuevue.com for details. 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

Friday 25 ABRACADABRA MAGIC SHOW.

Children’s Castle, 501 Williams Blvd., Kenner, 468-7231 — Irwin Royes, the World’s Smallest Magician, presents a magic show. Admission $5. 11:30 a.m.

Gambit food writer Ian McNulty doesn’t just eat. He drives. And canoes. And dances. He even went to prison — to report on the Angola Prison Rodeo. His new book Louisiana Rambles (University Press of Mississippi) explores the cultural richness of South Louisiana outside of New Orleans. Its rubbermeets-the-road reporting sets it apart from travel books, but it’s a deliberate tour of the region and particularly the food, music and traditions produced and enjoyed there. And he introduces readers to the people who live and work in places as far flung as the low-frills zydeco dancehall Fred’s Lounge in Mamou to bayou fishermen in St. Bernard Parish. McNulty takes readers canoeing in swamps, searching for andouille on Cajun country back roads and reveling at Acadiana’s horsebackmounted Carnival festivities. McNulty also drinks, and he’ll hand out koozies at his signing events this week, including one at Finn McCool’s, where he wrote much of the book. — Will Coviello

FEB

24

EVENTS “Since 1969”

Tuesday 22

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 22 > 2011

DAWLIN’ HEART AWARDS LUNCHEON . Broussard’s

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METAIRIE 750 MARTIN BEHRMAN AVE (504) 833-3716 COVINGTON 1027 VILLAGE WALK (985) 809-9101 WWW.VILLERESFLORIST.COM

Restaurant, 819 Conti St., 581-3866; www.broussards. com — The French Quarter Business Women’s Network’s luncheon honors French Quarter Business Association executive director Annie Flettrich, police Chief Ronal Serpas, French Quarter police officer Don Powers and Tales of the Cocktail founder Ann Tuennermann. Reservations are required. Call (773) 3546366 for details. Admission $40. 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

EUCLID RECORDS TRIVIA NIGHT.

Hi-Ho Lounge, 2239 St. Claude Ave., 945-4446; www.hiholounge.net — The game tests knowledge of New Orleans and non-New Orleans music trivia. Prizes include bar tabs, record store gift certificates and more. 8 p.m. Tuesdays.

GLOBAL GREEN BUILD IT BACK GREEN PROGRAM . Green

Building Resource Center, 841 Carondelet St., 525-2121; www. globalgreen.org — The workshop topic is “Identifying and Eliminating Energy Waste in Your Home.” Free admission. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

THE PEOPLE SAY PROJECT.

Louisiana Humanities Center,

FEB

27

Louisiana Rambles launch parties and signing 6 p.m. Thursday Garden District Book Shop, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266; www.gardendistrictbookshop.com Louisiana Rambles launch parties and signing 2 p.m.-6:30 p.m. Sunday Finn McCool’s, 3701 Banks St., 4869080; www.finnmccools.com

938 Lafayette St., Suite 300, 523-4352; www.leh.org — Louisiana Humanities Center program director Brian Boyles moderates a discussion with local artists and musicians that is followed by a reception. This week’s meeting features Alex McMurray and Truth Universal. Call 620-2632 or email boyles@leh.org for details. 5 p.m. SCRABBLE NIGHT. St.

Tammany Parish Public Library, Mandeville Branch, 844 Girod St., (985) 626-4293; www.sttammany.lib.la.us — The library hosts a night of Scrabble playing for adults and teens. 6 p.m. to 7:45 p.m.

Wednesday 23 INFANCY TO INDEPENDENCE .

St. Matthew/Central United Church of Christ, 1333 S. Carrollton Ave., 861-8196; www.stmatthew-nola.org — The parent-child education and support group uses enriching activities in music,

art and play. Visit www. infancytoindependence.org for details. 9:30 a.m. to noon Wednesday-Thursday. LAGNIAPPE LECTURE . National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — Walt Burgoyne discusses “For We Are Called: The British Royal Family in World War II.” Call 528-1944 ext. 229 for details. Noon to 1 p.m. PAWS ON PARADE . W Hotel

New Orleans, 333 Poydras St., 525-9444 — The event celebrates the LA/SPCA’s public art project with a preview of the works and an opportunity to mingle with the artists. Email pr@la-spca.org. 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Wed., Feb. 23.

SAVE OUR CEMETERIES CEMETERY TOURS. The group

conducts tours of New Orleans cemeteries. Call 5253377 for details.

TALENT SHOWCASE . Le Roux, 1700 Louisiana Ave. — Masse Media Consulting, KMP and

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com EVENTS

Men of Business host a weekly “You’ve Got Talent” showcase open to all poets, singers, dancers and others. Call 899-4512 for details. General admission $10, performers $5. 9 p.m. to midnight. TAPAS CRAWL . Riverbend-

area restaurants including Saltwater Grill, Brigtsen’s Restaurant, Barcelona Tapas, Sara’s and Hana serve wine and a choice of tapas-sized dishes. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Fourth Wednesday of every month.

TCHEFUNCTE RIVER FOUNDATION FUNDRAISER .

Morton’s Seafood Restaurant, 702 Water St., Madisonville, (985) 845-4970; www.mortonsseafood.com — The event raises money to restore the sandbar at the mouth of the Tchefuncte River at Lake Ponchartrain and features artwork by Carol Hallock. Email trfoundation2011@ yahoo.com for details. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Thursday 24 ALVAR CHESS. Alvar Library,

913 Alvar St., 596-2667 — Library guests can play chess with expert player Bernard Parun Jr. 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

FRENCH QUARTER BUSINESS ASSOCIATION LUNCH FORUM .

IRON RAIL LADIES’ NIGHT. The Iron Rail, 511 Marigny St., 948-0963; www.ironrail.org — Iron Rail offers a weekly creative space for women. Email ladiesnight.ironrail@ gmail.com for details. 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. A JOURNEY TO PORTO. Martin

Wine Cellar Deli & Catering, 714 Elmeer Ave., Metairie, 896-7350; www.martinwine. com — Wine consultant Damien Abrusley pairs eight ports with food and discusses Portugal and the Douro wine region. Admission $35. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

LE CLUB DE LECTURE POUR TOUS. St. Tammany Parish

Library, Covington Branch, 310 W. 21st Ave., Covington, (985) 893-6280; www.sttammany.lib.la.us/covington. html — The group for those who speak and read French provides a language immersion experience through reading and discussing books. 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

MAD HATTER’S LUNCHEON .

PRSA NEW ORLEANS LUNCHEON . Calcasieu, 930

Tchoupitoulas St., 588-2188; www.calcasieurooms.com — Msnbc.com senior producer/ editor Cynthia Joyce discusses “The Case for Middle-Aged Media: How to use new media to leverage information in an ever-changing ‘old media’ landscape.” Email wendee.bloom@heart.org or visit www.prsaneworleans. org for details. Admission $25 PRSA members and students, $35 general admission. 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.

SISTAHS MAKING A CHANGE . Ashe Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac. org — The group offers lessons in African dance and more, along with nutrition, health and wellness seminars. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday and Monday.

Friday 25 ADULT CHILDREN OF ALCOHOLIC/DYSFUNCTIONAL FAMILIES. Fair Grinds

Coffeehouse, 3133 Ponce de Leon Ave., 913-9073; www. fairgrinds.com — The weekly support group meets. Visit www.adultchildren.org for details. 6:15 p.m. Fridays.

GREER-HEARD POINT COUNTERPOINT FORUM . New

Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary, 3939 Gentilly Blvd., 282-4455 — The twoday forum discusses “Can We Trust the Bible on the Historical Jesus?” and features a variety of authors, religious scholars and others. Visit www.greerheard.com for details. Admission $20 online, $25 at the door. 7 p.m. Friday-Saturday. MYSTIC KREWE OF SATYRICON BAL MASQUE . Sugar Mill,

1021 Convention Center Blvd., 586-0004; www.sugarmillevents.com — Becky Allen and Ricky Graham emcee the ball featuring performances by Lisa Picone, Dorian Rush and Anais St. John. Formal attire or costumes are encouraged. Call 525-4498 for details. Admission starts at $20. 7 p.m.

WHERE Y’ART. New Orleans

Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 6584100; www.noma.org — The museum’s weekly event fea-

tures music, performances, film screenings, familyfriendly activities and more. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Fridays.

Saturday 26 ARTS MARKET OF NEW ORLEANS. Palmer Park, South

Claiborne and Carrollton avenues, 523-1465; www. artscouncilofneworleans. org — The Arts Council of New Orleans presents the monthly market featuring art and live music. Free admission. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. BABY DOLL LADIES CENTENNIAL KICKOFF GALA . New Orleans African

American Museum, 1418 Gov. Nicholls St., 566-1136; www.noaam.com — The gala celebrates the masking and dance traditions of the Baby Dolls and announces the New Orleans Society of Dance’s upcoming Baby Dolls exhibit. 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Magazine Street

Market, Magazine and Girod streets, 861-5898; www. marketumbrella.org — The weekly market features fresh produce, flowers and food. 8 a.m. to noon. EAGLE WATCH . Fontainebleau

State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — A park ranger leads a viewing of the park’s eagle nest. 3 p.m.

ERACE NEW ORLEANS MEETING . J. Singleton School,

1924 Philip St., 581-2388 — ERACE meets for its weekly discussion group. Call 8661163 for details. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. FIRST TEE OF GREATER NEW ORLEANS KICKOFF PARTY.

TPC Louisiana, 11001 Lapalco Blvd., Avondale, 436-TPC1 (8721); www.tpc.com/daily/ louisiana — The group celebrates the beginning of its 2011 programming with a brunch, an adult-junior golf clinic and a king cake party. Call 304-3309 or visit www.thefirstteenola.org for details. Admission starts at $25. 10:30 a.m. FONTAINEBLEAU HISTORY TOUR . Fontainebleau State

Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — The session discusses the history of the park, as well as the life of Bernard de Marigny and his influence on Louisiana’s history. 11 a.m.

GERMAN COAST FARMERS MARKET. Ormond Plantation,

13786 River Road, Destrehan — The market features a wide range of fresh vegetables, fruits, flowers and other items. Visit www.german-

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > FEBRUARY 22 > 2011

Antoine’s Restaurant, 713 St. Louis St., 581-4422; www. antoines.com — District C Councilmember Kristin Gisleson Palmer speaks at the meeting. Reservations are required. Call 309-1423 or email annie@fqba.org for details. Admission $35 members, $40 general admission. 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

Astor Crowne Plaza Hotel, 100 Bourbon St. — The Women’s Guild of the New Orleans Opera Association sponsors the annual event featuring a hat contest, a silent auction and raffle, and a fashion show by Saks Fifth Avenue. Call 450-2788 or visit www.neworleansopera.org for details. Admission $25-$85. 10 a.m.

59

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 22 > 2011

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Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com EVENTS

coastfarmersmarket.org for details. 8 a.m. to noon. GREEN PROJECT SATURDAY WORKSHOP. Green Project,

2831 Marais St., 945-0240; www.thegreenproject. org — Ford Brewster from HandsOn teaches the basics of small engine maintenance. Admission $5, free for members. 10 a.m. to noon. GRETNA FARMERS MARKET.

Gretna Farmers Market, Huey P. Long Avenue, between Third and Fourth streets, Gretna, 362-8661 — The weekly rain-or-shine market features more than 30 vendors offering a wide range of fruits, vegetables, meats and flowers. Free admission. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

GULF COAST NATURAL HAIR CARE EXPOSE . Ashe Cultural

Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 5699070; www.ashecac.org — The one-day event focuses on the needs, issues and lifestyles of people of color who are seeking an alternative to chemical hair care. Visit www.beautyondebayou.com for details. Admission $10. 11 a.m.

MARDI GRAS MAMBO.

NATURE: A CLOSER LOOK .

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers lead a weekly nature hike. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

NOLA-EATS.COM KING CAKE TASTING PARTY. Barbara

Yochum’s 906 Dream Studio, 906 Royal St.; www.spiritpainter.com — Guests can taste traditional and nontraditional king cakes and decide who offers the best in the area, and prizes from local vendors will be given away. Admission $5. Email leslie@nola-eats.com or visit www.nola-eats.com for details. 7 p.m.

RENAISSANCE MARKETPLACE OF EASTERN NEW ORLEANS.

Renaissance Marketplace, 5700 Read Blvd — The market offers cuisine from area restaurants, shopping, arts and crafts, children’s activities and more. 1 p.m. to 6 p.m.

SEASONAL CHANGES IN THE FOREST. Bogue Chitto

Park, 17049 State Park Blvd., Franklinton, (888) 677-7312 — The park ranger discusses seasonal changes in the forest habitat of the park. 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. UPPER NINTH WARD MARKET. Frederick Douglass Senior High School, 3820 St. Claude Ave. — The weekly Upper Ninth Ward Farmers Market offers fresh local produce, seafood, bread, cheese and plants. Sponsored by the Downtown Neighborhood Market Consortium. Call 482-5722 or email ggladney@ therenaissanceproject.la for details. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Sunday 27 OSCAR NIGHT AMERICA . The Theatres at Canal Place, 333 Canal St. — The Academy Awards viewing party featuring food and drinks from the theater’s Gusto Cafe benefits the American Red Cross Southeast Chapter. Call 6203162 or visit www.arcno.org for details. Admission $100$175. 6:30 p.m. PRIMITIVE WOODWORKING . Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers host a weekly demonstration of woodworking techniques. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. RUN FOR OZ . Audubon Park,

6500 Magazine St. — The 5K race benefits the Ozanam Inn Weekend Clinic. Visit www. raceforoz.eventbrite.com for details. Admission $10. 9 a.m.

Monday 21 NATIONAL COUNCIL OF JEWISH WOMEN HANNAH G. SOLOMON LUNCHEON.

Hilton New Orleans, 333 St. Charles Ave., 524-8890; www. hilton.com — The council presents the award to Joan S. Berenson. Call 861-7788 or visit www.ncjwneworleans. org for details. 11:30 a.m.

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS BUILD-A-BEAR WORKSHOP HUGGABLE HEROES. The pro-

gram recognizes young leaders ages 8 to 18 with college scholarships and donations to the charities of their choice.

Visit www.lovehugssmiles. com/huggableheroes.aspx for details. Application deadline is Monday. THE GREEN GIANT AWARD.

The award honors an individual who has made significant contributions to the environmental welfare of New Orleans and southeast Louisiana. Visit www. thegreenproject.org for details. Nomination deadline is Monday.

WORDS ALEX BEARD. Maple Street Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www.maplestreetbookshop.com — The author reads from and signs Monkey See, Monkey Draw. 11:30 a.m. Saturday. BOOKS SANDWICHED IN . St.

Tammany Parish Library, Covington Branch, 310 W. 21st Ave., Covington, (985) 8936280; www.sttammany.lib. la.us/covington.html — The library hosts a lunchtime book club. Noon to 1:30 p.m. Fourth Tuesday of every month.

BRIAN CLAREY. 45 Tchoup,

4529 Tchoupitoulas St., 8951456 — The author reads from The Anxious Hipster and Other Barflies I’ve Known. 6 p.m. Tuesday.

DOUGLAS RUSHKOFF. Tulane University, Dixon Hall, 8655105 ext. 2; www.tulane.edu — The media theorist speaks and signs his books. 7 p.m. Wednesday. FURNISHING LOUISIANA: CREOLE AND ACADIAN FURNITURE, 1735–1835. Historic

New Orleans Collection, 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www. hnoc.org — The book’s authors, editors and photographers sign the book. 6 p.m. Wednesday.

IAN MCNULTY. Garden District

Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The Gambit food writer signs Louisiana Rambles. 6 p.m. Thursday. He also appears at Finn McCool’s Irish Pub (3701 Banks St., 486-9080; www. finnmccools.com). 2 p.m. Sunday.

JEANIENE FROST & PAMELA PALMER . Garden District

Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — Frost signs This Side of the Grove and Palmer discusses Hunger Untamed. 5:30 p.m. Wednesday. MICHAEL LEWIS. Afro-

American Book Stop, 7056 Read Blvd., 243-2436 — The former New Orleans Saints player signs Beer Man. Noon Saturday.

For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 22 > 2011

Maxein’s Coffee House, 115 Girod St., Mandeville — The 2-mile run/walk and post-race party for pets and people supports the St. Tammany Humane Society, St. Tammany Parish Animal Services and the Feral Cat Consortium. Registration 7 a.m., race 8 a.m. Call 909-8207, 460-2991 or visit www.15thstreetflyers.org for details. Admission free for dogs, $10 ages 16 and under, $20 general admission.

SANKOFA FARMERS MARKET. Sankofa Farmers Market, 5500 St. Claude Ave., 9755168; www.sankofafarmersmarket.org — The weekly market offers fresh produce and seafood from local farmers and fishermen. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays.

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>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Email Ian McNulty at imcnulty@cox.net. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >VINTAGE DINING < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <Chefs Mary and Greg Sonnier recently lost a contentious > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >zoning change request in an effort to reopen their former < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <PUTTING < < < < < < <EVERYTHING < < < < < < < < < <ON < < <THE < < < TABLE < < < < < < < < < < < < < <Mid-City restaurant Gabrielle in the Uptowner (438 Henry Clay Ave.), an events hall they bought for the purpose. This week, however, a social dining club called Vintage Orleans will host a WHAT dinner at the Uptowner featuring Gabrielle dishes prepared by Kim Son Chinese the Sonniers. The five-course “Gabrielle in Purgatory” dinner & Vietnamese begins at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 24. It costs $85 per person. Restaurant For reservations, email vintageorleans@gmail.com.

am

B

WHERE

349 Whitney Ave., Gretna, 366-2489; www.kimsonnola.com WHEN

Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. RESERVATIONS

Accepted

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Inexpensive

WHAT WORKS

“Salt baked” seafood, cook-your-own beef dishes. WHAT DOESN'T

Chinese dishes are ordinary; pho is better elsewhere. CHECK, PLEASE

A veteran Vietnamese restaurant full of delicious surprises.

Surf, Turf and Pho DECODING “SALT BAKED” SEAFOOD AND OTHER PLEASURES AT KIM SON.

Lobster is among the saltbaked seafood specialties at Kim Son. PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

SMALL PLATES, BIG PAYBACK

The owners of the tapas restaurant Salu (3226 Magazine St., 371-5809; www.salurestaurant.com) have revived a tradition they began at their now-closed restaurant Table One. During its monthly Dine Out for a Cause event, Salu will donate 20 percent of each table’s bill to a charity. The next event is Wednesday, Feb. 23. The beneficiary is St. Michael Special School for developmentally disabled children.

five 5 IN

FIVE WAYS TO FILL UP ON STUFFED ARTICHOKES FRANKY & JOHNNY’S RESTAURANT 321 ARABELLA ST., 899-9146 www.frankyandjohnnys.com

Pick apart an artichoke between baskets of boiled crawfish.

CAFE ETIENNE

423 10TH ST., GRETNA, 309-4072 www.cafeetienne.com

Fried seafood and artichoke hearts are stuffed back inside the artichoke.

MONDO

900 HARRISON AVE., 224-2633 www.mondoneworleans.com

In a scaled-down appetizer, an artichoke is quartered and roasted in the wood-burning oven.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 22 > 2011

B Y I A N M C N U LT Y

64

he name of the Gretna restaurant Kim Son means “golden mountain,” but whenever I hear it I think of “salt baked” seafood, of an exceptional, multi-course beef dinner and one of the best tofu dishes in town. Kim Son proprietor Tina Dieu and her family must have seemed like trailblazers when they opened their restaurant near the Oakwood Center in 1988, a time when Vietnamese set pieces such as pho, bun and spring rolls had nowhere near the local popular appeal they enjoy today. But even as such dishes proliferate across the New Orleans dining scene, a roster of distinctive house specialties sets Kim Son apart. Among these specialties are rang muoi dishes, which are loosely though inaccurately translated as “salt baked.” They aren’t baked or particularly salty but instead are wok-fried and smothered with onion and black pepper. The misnomer shouldn’t give much pause to New Orleanians who know that barbecue shrimp have nothing to do with barbecue. The salt-baked crabs are especially good. Served in the shell and hacked into quarters, they make the palate pulse with peppery spice and cover the fingers with buttery sauce. It’s a dish for a group to attack with hungry abandon. The fried shells of salt-baked shrimp are too crunchy for me (I peel them, others eat the tails whole), though scallops and squid given the same treatment are easier to love. A tofu dish prepared in the salt-baked style is one of my favorite meatless meals, especially when paired with a plate of garlicky

T

sauteed greens like gai lan or water spinach. Other specialties here belong to a category of interactive and entertaining dishes cooked at the table. Ordering the bo nuong vi, for instance, calls for a portable, table-top brazier on which you grill thinly sliced, marinated beef with knobs of butter before folding them into rice paper rolls with fresh herbs, pickled vegetables and fish sauce. You decide how crisp or tender to cook the meat. I like to vary the texture for a contrast in each roll. The bo nhung dam entails a similar process, though this dish requires you to dredge raw beef in a “fondue” of bubbling rice vinegar. These dishes are best when shared around the table, but to really put Kim Son through its paces find a willing dining companion and get the Imperial Seven (or Bo 7 Mon). For $35 total, the staff will ferry out a progressive dinner for two with seven courses of beef. The grilled and fondue dishes above start things off, then there’s broiled beef encased in grilled green onions, grape leaves stuffed with ground beef and peanuts, strips of caramelized, slightly chewy beef and a dish of cool, rare beef with onions and lemon juice that tastes like Vietnamese carpaccio. Then, as if standing in for dessert, the meal ends with a soupy rice porridge with shallots, pepper and, of course, bits of ground beef. The Imperial Seven may not spring to mind as often as pho, but those planning to bid adieu to meat during Lent this year may want to consider it for a memorable last indulgence.

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An old-school recipe yields artichokes stuffed big enough to feed a family.

ZIMMER’S SEAFOOD

4915 ST. ANTHONY AVE., 282-7150 www.zimmersseafood.webs.com

Steamed in the seafood boiling pots, these get plenty of ambient “boil” flavor.

Questions? Email winediva1@earthlink.net.

2007 Bodega Norton Malbec Reserva

MENDOZA, ARGENTINA / $14-$17 RETAIL

The Malbec grape from Cahors, France, southwest of Bordeaux, has found a welcoming environment in Argentina’s Mendoza region. This hearty wine is a good expression of the varietal, exhibiting aromas of ripe red and black fruit, cedar and spice. On the palate, the velvety wine exudes flavors of dark fruit, some toast, pepper and smooth tannins on the long finish. Drink it with meat dishes or firm cheeses. Buy it at: Elio’s Wine Warehouse, Langenstein’s in Metairie, Cost Plus World Markets and Acquistapace’s Covington Supermarket. Drink it at: Galatoire’s, Restaurant August, Dickie Brennan’s Steakhouse and Vincent’s Italian Cuisine. — Brenda Maitland

>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<< >>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<

YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT >>>>>>>>>

>>>> COFFEE/ <<< <<<<< DESSERT >>>>>>>>> ANTOINE’S ANNEX — 513 Royal St., <<< 581-4422; www.antoines.com — >> The Annex is a coffee shop serv<ing < pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. The Royal Street salad features baby spinach and

< < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <mixed < lettuces with carrots, red red peppers, grapes, olives, > > > > > > > > > Out > > >2>Eat > >is>an > >index > > > of > >Gambit > > > > Weekly > > > > >contract > > > > >advertisers. > > > > > > >Unless > > > >noted, > > > >addresses > > > > > >are > >for > >New > > > > > >onion, > Orleans. Dollar signs represent the average cost of a dinner entree: $ — under $10; $$ — $11 to $20; $$$ — $21 or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax 483-3116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

AMERICAN FAT HEN GRILL — 1821 Hickory Ave.,

Harahan, 287-4581; www.fathengrill.com — Fat Hen serves barbecue, burgers and breakfast. Pitcooked barbecue options include St. Louis-style spare ribs. Burgers are made with all Black Angus beef ground in-house daily. There is a full bar. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BAR & GRILL DINO’S BAR & GRILL — 1128

Tchoupitoulas St., 558-0900 — Dino’s kitchen serves burgers, chicken tenders, salads and wraps. Happy hour is from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards and checks. $

THE RIVERSHACK TAVERN — 3449 River Road, 834-4938; www. therivershacktavern.com — This bar and music spot offers a menu of burgers, sandwiches overflowing with deli meats and changing lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

ABITA BAR-B-Q — 69399 Hwy.

59, Abita Springs, (985) 892-0205 — Slow-cooked brisket and pork are specialty at this Northshore smokehouse. The half-slab rib plate contains six ribs served with a choice of two sides. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

WALKER’S BAR-B-QUE — 10828 Hayne Blvd., 281-8227; www.cochondelaitpoboys.com — The makers of the Jazz Fest cochon de lait po-boy serve pork, ribs, chicken and more. The family feast includes a half-slab of ribs, half a chicken, half a pound of brisket, pork and sausage, two side orders, bread and sauce. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Saturday. Cash only. $

BREWPUB CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE —

527 Decatur St., 522-0571; www. crescentcitybrewhouse.com — Live jazz and German-style beers complement creative cooking at this brewpub. Pan-seared redfish St. Louis is topped with fried oysters and barbecue sauce. Starters include Brewhouse hot wings, baked oysters and fried calamari with spicy marinara. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

861-7890; www.cafefreret.com — The cafe serves breakfast itemes like the Freret Egg Sandwich with scrambled eggs, cheese and bacon or sausage served on toasted white or wheat bread or an English muffin.Signature sandwiches include the Chef’s Voodoo Burger, muffuletta and Cuban po-boy. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Fri.-Wed., dinner Mon.-Wed., Fri.Sat. Credit cards. $$ LAKEVIEW BREW COFFEE CAFE —

5606 Canal Blvd., 483-7001 — This casual cafe offers gourmet coffees and a wide range of pastries and desserts baked in house, plus a menu of specialty sandwiches and salads. Breakfast is available all day on weekends. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PARKVIEW CAFE AT CITY PARK —

City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 483-9474 — Located in the old Casino Building, the cafe serves gourmet coffee, sandwiches, salads and ice cream till early evening. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

PRAVDA — 1113 Decatur St., 581-1112; www.pravdaofnola.com — Pravda is known for its Soviet kitsch and selection of absinthes, and the kitchen offers pierogies, beef empanadas, curry shrimp salad and a petit steak served with truffle aioli. No reservations. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ RICCOBONO’S PANOLA STREET CAFE — 7801 Panola St., 314-1810

— Specialties include crabcakes Benedict — two crabcakes and poached eggs topped with hollandaise sauce and potatoes — and the Sausalito omelet with spinach, mushrooms, shallots and mozzarella. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily. Credit cards. $

TERRAZU — 201 St. Charles Ave., 287-

0877; www.terrazu.net — Located in the lobby of Place St. Charles, Terrazu serves sandwiches like the Brie cheese press with turkey, Brie, spinach and sweet and spicy raspberry coulis in pita bread. The Terrazu shrimp salad combines boiled shrimp, hearts of palm, tomato and avocado with tarragon vinaigrette. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $

VINE & DINE — 141 Delaronde St.,

361-1402; www.vine-dine.com — The cafe serves cheese boards and charcuterie plates with pate and cured meats. There also is a menu of sandwiches, quesadillas, bruschettas, salads and dips. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CHINESE CHINA ORCHID — 704 S. Carrollton

BEN ’N JERRY’S — 3500 Veterans

Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 887-5656 — Ben ’n Jerry’s offers rich ice creams in signature flavors, ice cream cakes, frozen drinks, fruit smoothies and sundaes. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

Ave., 865-1428; www.chinaorchidneworleans.com — This longtime Riverbend restaurant offers a wide array of Chinese dishes. Sizzling black pepper beef or chicken is prepared with onions, red and green peppers and brown sauce and served on a hot plate with steamed rice on the side. Other options include fried rice, noodle and egg foo young dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MAURICE FRENCH PASTRIES — 3501 Hessmer Ave., Metairie, 885-1526; 4949 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 455-0830; www.mauricefrenchpastries.com — Maurice French Pastries offers an array of continental and French baked goods as well as specialty cakes, cheesecakes and pies. No reservations. Hessmer Avenue: breakfast and lunch Mon.Sat. West Napoleon: breakfast and lunch Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

CHINA ROSE — 3501 N. Arnoult Road., Metairie, 887-3295 — China Rose offers many Chinese seafood specialties. The Lomi Lomi combines jumbo shrimp, pineapple and water chestnuts wrapped in bacon, fries them golden brown and serves them on a bed of sautéed vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

Magazine St., 899-4260; www. pinkberry.com — Pinkberry offers frozen yogurt with an array of wet and dry topping choices including caramel, honey, fruit purees, various chocolates and nuts and more. There also are fresh fruit parfaits and green tea smoothies. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

FIVE HAPPINESS — 3511 S. Carrollton

Ave., 482-3935 — The large menu at Five Happiness offers a range of dishes from wonton soup to sizzling seafood combinations served on a hot plate to sizzling Go-Ba to lo mein dishes. Delivery and banquest facilities available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

JUNG’S GOLDEN DRAGON — 3009

Magazine St., 891-8280; www. jungsgoldendragon2.com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, Thai and Korean cuisine. Chinese specialties include Mandarin, Szechuan and Hunan dishes. Grand Marnier shrimp are lightly battered and served with Grand Marnier sauce, broccoli and pecans. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

THREE HAPPINESS — 1900 Lafayette

St., Suite 4, Gretna, 368-1355; www. threehappiness.com — Three Happiness serves Chinese and Vietnames dishes and dim sum specials on weekends. Westlake duck features tender duck with snow peas, corn, straw mushrooms and napa cabbage. Vietnamese crepes are served with pork and shrimp. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TREY YUEN CUISINE OF CHINA —

600 N. Causeway Approach., Mandeville, (985) 626-4476; 2100 N. Morrison Blvd., Hammond, (985) 345-6789; www.tryyuen.com — House specialties include fried soft-shell crab topped with Tong Cho sauce, and Cantonese-style stir-fried alligator and mushrooms in oyster sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

PINKBERRY — 300 Canal St.; 5601

CONTEMPORARY 5 FIFTY 5 — 555 Canal St., 553-5638;

www.555canal.com — New Orleans dishes and Americana favorites take an elegant turn in dishes such as the lobster mac and cheese, combining lobster meat, elbow macaroni and mascarpone, boursin and white cheddar cheeses. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ BAYONA — 430 Dauphine St., 5254455; www.bayona.com — House favorites on Chef Susan Spicer’s menu include sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce and the appetizer of grilled shrimp with black-bean cake and coriander sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$$ FEAST NEW ORLEANS — 200 Julia

St., 304-6318; www.feastneworleans.com — Feast serves rustic European dishes in a casual setting. Cock-a-Leekie is a dish of braised chicken with cream, bacon, plums, leeks and red potatoes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

CREOLE ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713 St.

Louis St., 581-4422; www.antoines. com — The city’s oldest restaurant offers a glimpse of what 19th century French Creole dining might have been like, with a labyrinthine series of dining rooms. Signature dishes include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GUMBO SHOP — 640 St. Peter St., 525-1486; www.gumboshop.com — Gumbo and New Orleans classics such as crawfish etouffee dominate the menu. Their spicy flavors meld into a dish that represents the city’s best and redefines comfort food. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

ONE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE — 8132 Hampson St., 301-9061; www.

FRENCH FLAMING TORCH — 737 Octavia St.,

895-0900; www.flamingtorchnola.com — Enjoy classic French dishes from escargot in garlic butter to veal liver or steak au poivre. Other dishes include roasted duck and New Orleans-style barbecue shrimp. Reservations accepted. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ MARTINIQUE BISTRO — 5908 Magazine St., 891-8495; www.martiniquebistro.com — This French bistro has both a cozy dining room and a pretty courtyard. Try dishes such as Steen’s-cured duck breast with satsuma and ginger demi-glace and stone-ground goat cheese grits. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

LE CITRON BISTRO — 1539 Religious

St., 566-9051; www.le-citronbistro. com — Located in a historic building, the quaint bistro serves starters like chicken and andouille gumbo and fried frogs legs. Entrees include choices like fried chicken, Gulf fish and burgers. Reservations accepted. Dinner Wed.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000 N.

Peters St., 524-4747 — This casual restaurant serves Creole favorites. The menu includes crawfish etouffee, boiled crawfish, red beans and rice and bread pudding for dessert. Outdoor seating is adjacent to Dutch Alley and the French Market. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

DELI KOSHER CAJUN NEW YORK DELI & GROCERY — 3519 Severn Ave., Me-

tairie, 888-2010; www.koshercajun. com — This New York-style deli specializes in sandwiches, including corned beef and pastrami that come straight from the Bronx. No reservations. Lunch Sun.-Thu., dinner Mon.-Thu. Credit cards. $

MARTIN WINE CELLAR — 714 Elmeer Ave., Metairie , 896-7350; www. martinwine.com — Sandwiches piled high with cold cuts, salads, hot sandwiches, soups and lunch specials are available at the deli counter. The Cedric features chicken breast, spinach, Swiss, tomatoes and red onions on seven-grain bread. No reservations. Lunch daily. Credit cards. $

THE GREEN GODDESS — 307 Ex-

change Alley, 301-3347; www.greengoddessnola.com — Chef Chris DeBarr’s contemporary cooking combines classic techniques, exotic ingredients and culinary wit. At lunch, Big Cactus Chilaquiles feature poached eggs on homemade tortillas with salsa verde, queso fresca and nopalitos. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Thu.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

STEVE’S DINER — 201 St. Charles Ave., 522-8198 — Located in the Place St. Charles food court, Steve’s serves hot breakfasts until 10 a.m. Lunch features sandwiches, salads and hot plate lunches such as fried catfish and baked chicken Parmesan. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $

GOURMET TO GO BREAUX MART — 315 E. Judge Perez,

Chalmette, 262-0750; 605 Lapalco Blvd., Gretna, 433-0333; 2904 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-5565; 9647 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 737-8146; www.breauxmart.com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux” as well as weekday specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

INDIAN JULIE’S LITTLE INDIA KITCHEN AT SCHIRO’S — 2483 Royal St., 944-

6666; www.schiroscafe.com — The cafe offers homemade Indian dishes prepared with freshly ground herbs and spices. Selections include chicken, lamb or shrimp curry or vegetarian saag paneer. Schiro’s also serves New Orleans cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NIRVANA INDIAN CUISINE — 4308

Magazine St., 894-9797 — Serving mostly northern Indian cuisine, the restaurant’s extensive menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TAJ MAHAL INDIAN CUISINE — 923-

C Metairie Road, Metairie, 836-6859 — The traditional menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways, including curries and tandoori. Vegetarian options are available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

DINER DAISY DUKES — 121 Chartres St., 5615171; www.daisydukesrestaurant. com — Daisy Dukes is known for its seafood omelet and serves a wide variety of Cajun spiced Louisiana favorites, burgers, po-boys and seafood, including boiled crawfish and oysters on the halfshell. Breakfast is served all day. No reservations. Open 24 hours daily. Credit cards. $$

ITALIAN CAFE GIOVANNI — 117 Decatur St.,

529-2154; www.cafegiovanni.com — Chef Duke LoCicero serves inventive Italian cuisine and Italian accented contemporary Louisiana cooking. Shrimp Dukie features Louisiana shrimp and a duck breast marinated in Cajun spices served with tasso-mushroom sauce. Belli

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 22 > 2011

BARBECUE

CAFE CAFE FRERET — 7329 Freret St.,

walnuts and raspberry vinaigrette. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

one-sl.com — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes like char-grilled oysters topped with Roquefort cheese and a red wine vinaigrette, seared scallops with roasted garlic and shiitake polenta cakes and a memorable cochon de lait. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

65

Out2Eat Baci is the restaurant’s cocktail lounge. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ RICCOBONO’S PEPPERMILL RESTAURANT — 3524 Severn Ave., Metairie,

455-2266 — This Italian-style eatery serves New Orleans favorites like stuffed crabs with jumbo lump crabmeat with spaghetti bordelaise and trout meuniere with brabant potatoes. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TONY MANDINA’S RESTAURANT — 1915 Pratt St., Gretna, 362-2010;

www.tonymandinas.com — Tony Mandina’s serves Italian and Creole cuisine. Dishes include pasta, veal parmigiana, veal Bordelasie and specialties like shrimp Mandina and battered eggplant topped with shrimp and crabmeat in cream sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

JaPaNESE KYOTO — 4920 Prytania St., 891-

3644 — Kyoto’s sushi chefs prepare rolls, sashimi and salads. “Box” sushi is a favorite, with more than 25 rolls. Reservations recommended for parties of six or more. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

MIKIMOTO — 3301 S. Carrollton Ave., 488-1881; www.mikimotosushi.com — Sushi choices include new and old favorites, both raw and cooked. The South Carrollton roll includes tuna tataki, avocado and snow crab. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Delivery available. Credit cards. $$

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 22 > 2011

MIYAKO JAPANESE SEAFOOD & STEAKHOUSE — 1403 St. Charles

66

Ave., 410-9997; www.japanesebistro.com — Miyako offers a full range of Japanese cuisine, with specialties from the sushi or hibachi menus, chicken, beef or seafood teriyaki, and tempura. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ ROCK-N-SAKE — 823 Fulton St., 5817253; www.rocknsake.com — Rockn-Sake serves traditional Japanese cuisine with some creative twists. There’s a wide selection of sushi, sashimi and rolls or spicy gyoza soup, pan-fried soba noodles with chicken or seafood and teriyaki dishes. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

LOuISIaNa CONtEMPORaRY BOMBAY CLUB — 830 Conti St.,

586-0972; www.thebombayclub. com — Mull the menu at this French Quarter hideaway while sipping a well made martini. The duck duet pairs confit leg with pepper-seared breast with black currant reduction. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, latenight Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ BOUCHE — 840 Tchoupitoulas St.,

267-7485; www.bouchenola.com — This wine bar and restaurant serves creative dishes like tasso truffle mac and cheese with three cheeses and Mornay sauce, baby spinach salad with Maytag blue cheese and bacon lardons, and crispy duck breast with Grand Marnier sweet potatoes and vanilla-balsamic extract. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat., late-

night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ MILA — 817 Common St., 412-2580;

www.milaneworleans.com — MiLA takes a fresh approach to Southern and New Orleans cooking, focusing on local produce and refined techniques. Try New Orleans barbecue lobster with lemon confit and fresh thyme. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.Fri. dinner Mon.-Sat. $$$ RALPH’S ON THE PARK — 900 City

Park Ave., 488-1000; www.ralphsonthepark.com — Popular dishes include baked oysters Ralph, turtle soup and the Niman Ranch New York strip. There also are brunch specials. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

REDEMPTION — 3835 Iberville St., 309-3570 — Chef Michelle Matlock offers contemporary Louisiana cooking. Chambord duckling is served with cherry vinaigrette. Seared foie gras is complemented by vanilla parsnip puree. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ TOMMY’S WINE BAR — 752 Tchoupitoulas St., 525-4790 — Tommy’s Wine Bar offers cheese and charcuterie plates as well as a menu of appetizers and salads from the neighboring kitchen of Tommy’s Cuisine. No reservations. Lite dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEDItERRaNEaN/ MIDDLE EaStERN ATTIKI BAR & GRILL — 230 Decatur

St., 587-3756; www.attikineworleans.com — Attiki features a range of Mediterranean cuisine including entrees of beef kebabs and chicken shawarma. Reservations recommended. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $$

PYRAMIDS CAFE — 3151 Calhoun St.,

861-9602 — Diners will find authentic, healthy and fresh Mediterranean cuisine featuring such favorites as sharwarma prepared on a rotisserie. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SANTA FE — 3201 Esplanade Ave., 948-0077 — This casual cafe serves creative takes on Southwestern cuisine. Fried green tomatoes are topped with grilled jumbo shrimp and roasted chili remoulade and capers. Outdoor seating is available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MuSIC aND FOOD GAZEBO CAFE — 1018 Decatur St.,

525-8899; www.gazebocafenola. com — The Gazebo features a mix of Cajun and Creole dishes and ice cream daquiris. The New Orleans sampler rounds up jambalaya, red beans and rice and gumbo. Other options include salads, seafood poboys and burgers. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

HOUSE OF BLUES — 225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www.hob.com/neworleans — Try the pan-seared Voodoo Shrimp with rosemary cornbread. The buffet-style gospel brunch features local and regional groups. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ THE MARKET CAFE — 1000 Decatur

St., 527-5000; www.marketcafenola.com — Dine indoors or out on seafood either fried for platters or po-boys or highlighted in dishes such as crawfish pie, crawfish etouffee or shrimp Creole. Sandwich options include muffulettas, Philly steaks on po-boy bread and gyros in pita bread. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — 626 Frenchmen St., 949-0696; www. snugjazz.com — Traditional Creole and Cajun fare pepper the menu along with newer creations such as the fish Marigny, topped with Gulf shrimp in a Creole cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

NEIGHBORHOOD

522-1138 — Country Flame serves a mix of popular Mexican and Cuban dishes. Come in for fajitas, pressed Cuban sandwiches made with hickory-smoked pork and char-broiled steaks or pork chops. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

KATIE’S RESTAURANT — 3701 Iberville St., 488-6582; www.katiesinmidcity.com — Favorites at this Mid-City restaurant include the Cajun Cuban with roasted pork, grilled ham, cheese and pickles pressed on buttered bread. The Boudreaux pizza is topped with cochon de lait, spinach, red onions, roasted garlic, scallions and olive oil. There also are salads, burgers and Italian dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, Dinner Tue.Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

JUAN’S FLYING BURRITO — 2018

KOZ’S — 515 Harrison Ave., 484-

MEXICaN & SOutHWEStERN COUNTRY FLAME — 620 Iberville St.,

Magazine St., 569-0000; 4724 S.Carrollton Ave. 486-9950; www. juansflyingburrito.com — This wallet-friendly restaurant offers new takes on Mexican-inspired cooking. It’s known for its mealand-a-half-size signature burritos. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

NACHO MAMA’S MEXICAN GRILL —

3242 Magazine St., 899-0031; 1000 S. Clearview Pkwy., Harahan, 7361188; www.nachomamasmexicangrill.com — These taquerias serve Mexican favorites such as portobello mushroom fajitas and chile rellenos. There are happy hour margaritas on weekdays and daily drink specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

0841; 6215 Wilson St., Harahan, 7373933; www.kozcooks.com — Louisiana favorites such as seafood platters, muffulettas and more than 15 types of po-boys, ranging from hot sausage to cheeseburger, are available at Koz’s. The Will’s Chamber of Horrors sandwich features roast beef, ham, turkey, Swiss and American cheese, Italian dressing and hot mustard. . No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $ RAJUN CAJUN CAFE — 5209 W.

Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 883-5513; www.rajuncajuncafe.com — The cafe serves soups, salads, po-boys, muffulettas, seafood plates and a few entree platters. Daily specials include items such as breaded pork chops on Wednesdays and

seafood options on Friday. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

fried oysters, bacon and cheddar cheese. There are daily lunch specials as well. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PIZZa

PARKWAY BAKERY AND TAVERN — 538 N. Hagen Ave., 482-3047 —

MARKS TWAIN’S PIZZA LANDING —

2035 Metairie Road, Metairie, 8328032; www.marktwainspizza.com — Disembark at Mark Twain’s for salads, po-boys and pies like the Italian pizza with salami, tomato, artichoke, sausage and basil. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NONNA MIA CAFE & PIZZERIA — 3125 Esplanade Ave., 948-1717 — Nonna Mia uses homemade dough for pizza served by the slice or whole pie and offers salads, pasta dishes and panini. Gourmet pies are topped with ingredients like pancetta, roasted eggplant, portobello mushrooms and prosciutto. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ REGINELLI’S — 741 State St., 899-

1414; 817 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 712-6868; 874 Harrison Ave., 488-0133; 3244 Magazine St. 8957272; 5608 Citrus Blvd., Harahan, 818-0111; www.reginellis.com — This New Orleans original offers a range of pizzas, sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

R&O’S RESTAURANT — 216 Old Hammond Hwy., 831-1248 — R&O’s offers a mix of pizza and Creole and Italian seafood dishes. There’s everything from seafood gumbo and stuffed artichokes to po-boys and muffulettas. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, dinner Wed.Sun. Credit cards. $ SLICE PIZZERIA — 1513 St. Charles Ave., 525-7437; 5538 Magazine St., 897-4800 — Neapolitan-style pizza rules, but you can buy pizza by the slice and add or subtract toppings as you choose. There are also a full coffee bar, Italian sodas and organic teas. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ THEO’S NEIGHBORHOOD PIZZA —

4218 Magazine St., 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., 302-1133; www.theospizza.com — There is a wide variety of specialty pies or build your own from the selection of more than two-dozen toppings. Also serving salads and sandwiches. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ WIT’S INN — 141 N. Carrollton Ave., 486-1600 — This Mid-City bar and restaurant features pizzas, calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers for snacking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SaNDWICHES & PO-BOYS MAGAZINE PO-BOY SHOP — 2368

Magazine St., 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of po-boys filled with everything from fried seafood to corned beef to hot sausage to veal. There are breakfast burritos in the morning and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Cash only. $

MAHONY’S PO-BOY SHOP — 3454 Magazine St., 899-3374; www. mahonyspoboys.com — Mahoney’s serves traditional favorites and original po-boys like the Peacemaker, which is filled with

Parkway serves juicy roast beef po-boys, hot sausage po-boys, fried seafood and more. No reservations. Kitchen open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $ TRACEY’S — 2604 Magazine St., 899-2054; www.traceysnola.com — The roast beef po-boy dripping with garlicky gravy is the highlight of a menu transplanted from the former Parasol’s to this Uptown bar. Other options include fried seafood and bar noshing items. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Cash only. $

SEaFOOD GRAND ISLE RESTAURANT — 575

Convention Center Blvd., 520-8530; www.grandislerestaurant.com — Grand Isle offers seafood options from raw oysters to lobster St. Malo with combines Maine lobster, shrimp and mussels in seafood broth. Baked Gulf fish are served with compound chili butter, potatoes and a vegetable. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

JACK DEMPSEY’S — 738 Poland Ave., 943-9914 — The Jack Dempsey seafood platter serves a training-table feast of gumbo, shrimp, oysters, catfish, redfish and crawfish pies, plus two side items. Other dishes include broiled redfish and fried soft-shell crab. No reservations. Lunch Tue.Sat. and dinner Wed.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ LA COTE BRASSERIE — 700

Tchoupitoulas St., 613-2350; www. lacotebrasserie.com — This stylish restaurant in the Renaissance New Orleans Arts Hotel serves an array of raw and cooked seafood. Tabasco and Steen’s Cane Syrup glazed salmon is served with shrimp mirliton ragout. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

RED FISH GRILL — 115 Bourbon St., 598-1200; www.redfishgrill. com — Seafood creations by executive chef Brian Katz dominate a menu peppered with favorites like hickory-grilled redfish, pecancrusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ VILLAGE INN — 9201 Jefferson Hwy.,

737-4610 — Check into Village Inn for seasonal boiled seafood or raw oysters. Other options include fried seafood platters, po-boys, pasta and pizza. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

SOuL FOOD BIG MOMMA’S CHICKEN AND WAFFLES — 5741 Crowder Blvd., 241-2548;

www.bigmommaschickenandwaffles.com — Big Mamma’s serves hearty combinations like the six-piece which includes a waffle and six fried wings served crispy or dipped in sauce. Breakfast is served all day. All items are cooked to order. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., Lunch daily, dinner Sun. Credit cards. $

StEaKHOuSE RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE —

Harrah’s Hotel, 525 Fulton St., 5877099; 3633 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 888-3600; www. ruthschris.com — Ruth’s top-quality steaks are broiled in 1,800-degree ovens and arrive at the table sizzling. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

taPaS/SPaNISH MIMI’S

IN

THE

MARIGNY

2601 Royal St., 872-9868 — The decadant Mushroom Manchego Toast is a favorite here. Or enjoy hot and cold tapas dishes ranging from grilled marinated artichokes to calamari. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner and latenight Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ VEGA TAPAS CAFE — 2051 Metarie Road, 836-2007; www.vegatapascafe.com — Vega’s mix of hot and cold tapas dishes includes a salad of lump crabmeat on arugula with blood orange vinaigrette, seared tuna with avocado and tomato relish, braised pork empanadillos, steamed mussels and shrimp with tomatoes and garlic in caper-basil cream. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

VIEtNaMESE AUGUST MOON — 3635 Prytania

St., 899-5129; www.moonnola.com — August Moon serves a mix of Vietnamese and Chinese cuisine. There are spring rolls and pho soup as well as many popular Chinese dishes and vegetarian options. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

DOSON NOODLE HOUSE — 135 N.

Carrollton Ave., 309-7283 — Noodles abound at this Mid-City eatery, which excels at vinegary chicken salad over shredded cabbage, as well as bowls of steaming pho. Vegetable-laden wonton soup and thick spring rolls make a refreshing, satisfying meal. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards and checks. $$

PHO HOA RESTAURANT — 1308 Manhattan Blvd., 302-2094 — Pho Hoa serves staple Vietnamese dishes including beef broth soups, vermicelli bowls, rice dishes and banh mi sandwiches. Bo kho is a popular beef stew. Appetizers include fried egg rols, crab rangoons and rice paper spring rolls. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $ PHO NOLA — 3320 Transcontinental

Drive, Metairie, 941-7690; www. pho-nola.com — Pho NOLA serves spring rolls and egg rolls, noodle soups, rice and vermicelli dishes and po-boys. Beverages include boba teas, milk teas, coffee drinks and smoothies. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PHO TAU BAY RESTAURANT — 113 Westbank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, 368-9846 — You’ll find classic Vietnamese beef broth and noodle soups, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, shrimp spring rolls with peanut sauce and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Wed. & Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $


Gambit- Mardi Gras 2011