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MARCH 15, 2011 · VOLUME 32 · NUMBER 11

> > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >ADMINISTRATIVE > > > > > > > > DIRECTOR > > > > > >MARK > > >KARCHER > < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < NEWS&VIEWS <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >EDITORIAL > > > > > > > >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> FAX: 483-3116 | response@gambitweekly.com Cover Story 15 <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Will 2011 be the year the Louisiana legislature EDITOR KEVIN ALLMAN > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > outlaws > > > > > smoking > > > > > >in>bars > > >—> and > > >even > > >casinos >>>>— > > > > > > >MANAGING > > > > > >EDITOR > > > >KANDACE > POWER GRAVES across the state?

Bouquets & Brickbats

9

POLITICAL EDITOR CLANCY DUBOS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR WILL COVIELLO SPECIAL SECTIONS EDITOR MISSY WILKINSON STAFF WRITER ALEX WOODWARD EDITORIAL ASSISTANT LAUREN LABORDE listingsedit@gambitweekly.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS JEREMY ALFORD, D. ERIC BOOKHARDT, MEG FARRIS, BRENDA MAITLAND, IAN McNULTY, NOAH BONAPARTE PAIS, DALT WONK CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER CHERYL GERBER INTERNS CARRIE MARKS, MARGUERITE LUCAS, MARTA JEWSON

C’est What?

9

PRODUCTION DIRECTOR

Commentary

7

Blake Pontchartrain

8

Farewell, Carnival

New Orleans know-it-all

News 9 Artists are using “crowdfunding”— micropayments from fans — to finance their projects This week’s heroes and zeroes

15

Gambit’s Web poll

Scuttlebutt

9

Politics / Clancy DuBos

13

Rex Duke™ / Mardi Gras Parade Reviews

20

From their lips to your ears Mitch’s mess at City Hall

Gambit’s esteemed parade critic bestows his golden crowns on local krewes

Green Matters

The Lafitte Greenway holdup; an eco-house tour; recycling used grease and more

25

A&E News

33

Gambit Picks

33

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > MARCH 15 > 2011

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Noah Bonaparte Pais / On the Record

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Cuisine

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The Puzzle Page

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A conversation with Parts and Labor

Ian McNulty on Parasol’s and Tracey’s 5 in Five: Five meatless meals for Lent Brenda Maitland’s Wine of the Week

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REVIEW: Making the Boys

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PULL-

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36

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REVIEW: Sculpture by David Borgerding, Paulina Sierra and Emily Ferranto

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REVIEW: The Amazing Acro-Cats

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PREVIEW: St. Pat’s in the Irish Channel

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STAGE

EVENTS

Market Place

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Commentary

thinking out loud

Farewell, Carnival

I

descended from his perch at Gallier Hall to bust a move on St. Charles Avenue with some Zulu dancers. The krewe that overcame the greatest challenge this year was Endymion, which was forced to reschedule its Saturday MidCity roll to an Uptown route on Sunday following Bacchus. (It was also a blow to Mid-City merchants, for whom Endymion is the most lucrative weekend of the year.) There were few reports of trouble on parade routes this year, but there was an ugly clash between the walking Krewe of Eris and officers from NOPD’s Fifth District; a melee broke out on March 6 in the Faubourg Marigny. Eris, named for the god of discord, is a krewe that doesn’t believe in permits. NOPD shut down the group in 2009.

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Mostly, Mardi Gras was yet another chance for New Orleanians to throw the best party in the world. According to several witnesses, a small number of people in the group this year caused a great deal of trouble: keying cars, scrawling graffiti, carrying lighted torches through residential areas of the French Quarter and Faubourg Marigny, and jumping from car roof to car roof. Cops responded with Tasers and pepper spray, and in one video an NOPD officer is seen physically attacking a bystander who’s attempting to record the scene. NOPD said in a statement that 12 marchers were arrested and six officers were hurt; the department’s public integrity division and independent police monitor Susan Hutson have each opened investigations. The fracas was a major blot on a near-perfect Carnival season. Mostly, Mardi Gras was yet another chance for New Orleanians to throw the best party in the world before entering the Lenten season. Next year’s Fat Tuesday falls on Feb. 21, which means you’ve only got 11 months to get some rest — and your costume.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 15 > 2011

f Mardi Gras 2011 left you staggered (or staggering), that’s no surprise. City officials were still tallying the numbers late last week, but Stephen Perry, president of the New Orleans Convention and Visitors Bureau, estimated the crowds to be the largest not only since Katrina, but the largest in a decade. Mardi Gras 2010 coincided with the New Orleans Saints’ Super Bowl victory. This year, the very late date for Fat Tuesday — the latest, in fact, in more than a century — coincided with college spring break, filling hotels and Bourbon Street with young people. But anyone who marched in the French Quarter and Faubourg Marigny, watched parades on St. Charles Avenue, grilled under the North Claiborne Avenue overpass or walked the Argus route in Metairie can tell you it seemed as though the entire metro population turned out to enjoy New Orleans’ unique celebration. We were blessed with a streak of good weather for most parades, beginning Feb. 19 as the irreverent Krewe du Vieux’s mule-drawn floats made their ramshackle ramble through the Marigny and Vieux Carré. At the other end of the Carnival spectrum, the Krewe of Barkus saw thousands of mutts and their owners squeezed onto the small side lawn of the Municipal Auditorium as a staging area; let’s hope the entrance to Armstrong Park is repaired by Mardi Gras 2012. The masked balls came off without a hitch this year, from Algiers’ hallucinogenic M.O.M.’s Ball to the traditional meeting of Rex and Comus. The parades shone with talent, flash and imagination (see Rex Duke’s reviews on page 20), aided immeasurably by the city’s many brass bands and high school marching bands, as well as all the marching groups — including the 610 Stompers, the all-male troupe that became a favorite after debuting at the “Buddy D” parade in 2009. Artistry was on full display everywhere on Fat Tuesday, from the dazzling suits of the Mardi Gras Indians to the annual Society of St. Anne parade into the French Quarter and the eye-popping, R-rated spectacle of the Bourbon Street Costume Contest, where Police Chief Ronal Serpas paid his respects on horseback — and even District Attorney Leon Cannizzaro was spotted smiling on a balcony. On Lundi Gras, when bad weather threatened to douse Fat Tuesday celebrations, a local TV meteorologist brought on the Krewe of Zulu’s Witch Doctor, who cast a spell of protection over Mardi Gras. (Only in New Orleans, perhaps … but it worked.) The big day dawned warm and mostly dry for the rolling of Zulu, Rex and Argus. Mayor Mitch Landrieu even

07

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blake

PONTCHARTRAIN™

NEW ORLEANS KNOW-IT-ALL

Questions for Blake: askblake@gambitweekly.com

HEY BLAKE, I went to see the Christmas decorations in the new Roosevelt Hotel and was disappointed to see that everything had changed. Can you tell us about the time when the old Roosevelt was in business? ELOISE

DEAR ELOISE, You are not the only person who has complained about the change in the hotel lobby’s Christmas decorations. Many were expecting the lobby of old with the canopy of angel hair and the Christmas ornaments and decorated trees. The original Roosevelt Hotel had this name from 1923 to 1965. Before that, it was the Grunewald Hotel, and in the 1960s it became the Fairmont Hotel. But at all times it was quintessentially New Orleans. Throughout the rich history of the Roosevelt Hotel, it was visited by presidents, royalty, movie stars, musicians and athletes. It also housed one of the best nightclubs in America, The Blue Room, a truly classy venue for dining, dancing and listening to internationally renowned performers. Going to The Blue Room was a treat for anyone, but especially for kids who got to sit up front near the entertainers. The Roosevelt was Huey Long’s favorite hotel in New Orleans, partly because of the Sazerac Bar with its Ramos Gin Fizzes. Long was elected governor in 1928, and one of his projects was to build a highway from Baton Rouge to New Orleans that cut nearly 40 miles off the journey. It also shortened the time it took the governor to get to the Roosevelt Hotel and a Ramos Gin Fizz. For ordinary folks who never saw Huey Long, The Blue Room or the Sazerac Bar, there was the annual tradition of walking through the block-long lobby during the Christmas season. It was magical, even for adults. The Christmas decorating tradition at the Roosevelt dates to the 1940s, when the hotel created an angel hair lobby by covering the ceiling with white angel hair, glowing lights and hanging ornaments — and filling the lobby with Christmas trees, toys, wrapped presents, elves, angels and a child-size gingerbread house. When the hotel reopened as the Roosevelt, many people were eager to revisit the lobby. In the new Christmas

display, the angel hair was replaced by a canopy of white birch branches decorated with lights and flocked, decorated fir trees. HEY BLAKE, In my neighborhood on Thursdays, everybody gets a copy of The Times-Picayune, apparently just the social section, whether they want it or not. I assume this is citywide. What’s the story with this? DAVID IN THE MARIGNY

DEAR DAVID, The story is marketing. The Times-Picayune would like everyone, or at least every household, to get a copy of the paper every day, preferably by subscription. Since this is not the case, the paper tries to tempt potential subscribers by providing them with a free section of the

The Roosevelt Hotel in 2009, with its updated Christmas lobby. Gone was the angel hair canopy New Orleanians had come to expect.

PHOTO BY FLICKR USER INFROGMATION; USED UNDER CREATIVE COMMONS LICENSE

paper once a week. This section is called the Picayune and is regional or “zoned.” This means that the version of Picayune delivered to you in the Marigny is not the same as the Picayune delivered in Metairie or on the West Bank. This part of the paper contains local news, advertisements and classified ads specific to your neighborhood. Advertising is essential for all newspapers to stay in business. In the case of Gambit, you get the same version metrowide — and you get it free, no “subscription” necessary.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > MORE SCUTTLEBUTT CLANCY DUBOS < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < KNOWLEDGE < < < < < < < < < < <IS < <POWER <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< 10 13 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

scuttle Butt

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“Our lieutenant governor is using these funds to play politics instead of using this money in the most impacted areas. The governor committed $3 million to each of the hardest-hit parishes in November of last year. ... It’s not right that Dardenne gives 64 parishes money for a spill that happened along the coast.” — Plaquemines Parish president Billy Nungesser March 9, complaining about Lt. Gov. Jay Dardenne’s adminstration of the first $30 million tourism payout from BP. Dardenne pointed out the deal was struck before he became lieutenant governor last November, and said he was just distributing the funds.

People Powered CROWDFUNDING IS CHANGING THE WAY MUSIC, FILMS AND OTHER ART PROJECTS GET MADE BY TAKING IN PUBLIC FUNDING — ONE DOLLAR AT A TIME.

HEITMEIER PLAN SCORES BIG FOR LOCAL HOSPITALS

BY GR AYSON CURRIN

W

When Frontier Ruckus, a Michigan band, needed a new touring van, the band used its website to “crowdfund” the purchase. For $10, fans received previously unreleased demo songs; for $1,000, the band would play at your house. Frontier Ruckus ended up raising more than $5,000. ten a new van one way or the other,” says frontman Matthew Milia. “But we could use a new van, so we wanted to get our fans involved with it. I saw it as an opportunity to have a garage sale to make these offkilter artifacts accessible. And if they’d like some of these things, it goes in a useful direction for us.” Milia and Frontier Ruckus are part of a growing movement called crowdfunding. With crowdfunding, people interested in seeing a certain endeavor completed can contribute money in tiered amounts in exchange for gratitude or goods. Kickstarter.com, the largest site behind crowdfunding, has driven more than

PAGE 10

c'est what? WOULD YOU SUPPORT THE SUNO/UNO MERGER THAT’S BEEN DISCUSSED?

49% yes

Doris Hicks

no

8% not sure

Vote on “c’est what?” on bestofneworleans.com THIS WEEK’S QUESTION

PAGE 11

BoUQuets

43%

Government officials say that — despite the BP oil disaster — Gulf seafood is safe to eat. Do you agree?

THIS WEEK’S HEROES AND ZEROES

will be presented with the Leo B. Marsh Award in New York City March 17 as one of the honorees at the 41st National Salute to Black Achievers in Industry gala. Dr. Hicks, the principal at Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Charter School for Science and Technology, led the fight to reopen the school after the floods of Hurricane Katrina. She is a graduate of Dillard University and the University of New Orleans.

Ken Thompson

was recognized by President Barack Obama and the disaster relief charity ShelterBox USA for his work helping survivors of the Haitian earthquake. Thompson, a Slidell resident, raised more than $27,000 to supply Haitians with ShelterBoxes, which contain a tent, a cookstove, water purification tablets, blankets, groundsheets, a toolkit and other necessities.

Wishing Well Foundation, USA,

a Metairie-based charity providing “wishes” to terminally ill children, only uses five cents of every dollar raised to provide wishes, according to an investigation by WWL-TV. In 2008, Wishing Well took in more than $1.3 million, but only spent $36,000 to grant wishes. The nonpartisan charity analyst Charity Navigator has given Wishing Well its lowest rating for six years in a row.

RJ Reynolds

issued a limited-edition run of “Camel New Orleans” cigarettes, featuring a redesigned pack showing our skyline and a Mardi Gras-themed ad campaign referring to the city as “N’awlins.” Mayor Mitch Landrieu sent a letter to Reynolds accusing the company of “exploiting both our city’s name and our proud history.” Turned out the campaign was already over — but let’s hope it doesn’t make a return visit.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 15 > 2011

hen violinist and vocalist Caitlin Cary needed to buy a new van for her current pop band, The Small Ponds, she used one of the most traditional methods. Cary went to the bank, applied for a loan and paid about $3,000 for Evangeline, a two-tone 1993 Ford 15-passenger that’s pushing 200,000 miles. With her previous bands, Whiskeytown and Tres Chicas, record labels and managers had helped to handle such exigencies. But The Small Ponds — a new band without a large label, a manager or a big operating budget — needed to find a way to make its first 1,400-mile trek to the world’s biggest music conference, South by Southwest, this week in Austin, Texas. Cary had to do it herself. But when Frontier Ruckus, a Pontiac, Mich. quintet, decided it needed a new van, the band asked its fans to help pay. On its website, Frontier Ruckus posted seven options for potential benefactors. For a $10 contribution, you’d receive a set of previously unreleased demos. For $20, you’d hear the demos and two live recordings. A pledge of $40 earned you concert tickets, while $150 warranted a personalized song. Pony up $1,000, and Frontier Ruckus would come perform in your house. Two people donated a grand to Frontier Ruckus. In fact, the band raised more than $5,000, money the band has since put in the bank for the day that Dessie — their 1999 Ford Club Wagon XLT, which boasts 200,000 miles and top speeds of 30 miles per hour on mountainsides — finally dies. “We’re not completely destitute. We would’ve got-

Amid all the bad news about Louisiana’s fiscal problems, one bit of good news has emerged: state Sen. David Heitmeier (D-Algiers) is succeeding in his efforts to leverage more federal health care dollars for Louisiana community and private hospitals, which have been hard hit since Hurricane Katrina. The latest example: $27 million in federal Upper Payment Limit (UPL) payments to Louisiana hospitals at the end of 2010, including more than $20 million for private hospitals in the New Orleans area. Heitmeier, an optometrist, has established himself as the legislature’s health care financing expert. His plan — dubbed “The Heitmeier Plan” by Gambit two years ago — is a twotiered approach to leveraging more federal health care money for area hospitals. The plan also saves the state millions in public health care expenses. The first tier taps into the federal UPL program by allowing private hospitals to form joint nonprofits that provide health

09

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care services to low-income citizens — services otherwise provided by the state. Many private hospitals already provide care for the poor, but those services either are uncompensated or under-compensated by the feds. Heitmeier’s plan allows them to tap the federal UPL program and become fully compensated. Louisiana became the second state (after Texas) to tap into the UPL program under a bill Heitmeier introduced and passed two years ago. The second tier taps into the federal “physician UPL” program and, when fully implemented, will provide funds for publicly owned community hospitals such as East Jefferson and West Jefferson hospitals. Both phases of Heitmeier’s plan require complex approvals at the state and federal levels, but potentially the state can realize more than $700 million a year in savings, he says. “Louisiana is eligible for $250 million a year in the general UPL program, but the state has not realized that potential because it did not have matching dollars available,” Heitmeier says. “Now we’re doing it by allowing the private nonprofits to perform services previously provided by the state, which frees up state general fund dollars for the match. Both the state and the hospitals benefit from this.” Heitmeier says Louisiana has the potential to tap another $25 million to $40 million under the physicians’ UPL program. The latter program is still in the developmental stages for Louisiana, he says. “Potentially, the general UPL, which is $250 million this year, could provide Louisiana with $700 million a year using an additional $450 million in federal Disproportionate Share funds, which is another pool of reimbursements. And next year our share of the general UPL could be $350 million.” The state’s potential to tap all that money depends on how quickly parishes and hospitals get comfortable with the concept and get on board — and how quickly the state can identify services it currently delivers, but which the nonprofits could just as easily deliver, Heitmeier says. In the December payments, Tulane University Medical Center received $8.6 million; hospitals operated by Ochsner received just over $8 million; Touro Infirmary received $3.4 million; and Children’s Hospital received $57,000. “This is all new money, with not one penny in additional taxes,” Heitmeier says. “This $27 million is the first installment. We should get another payment of close to $100 million at the end of March.” — Clancy DuBos

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“Michael sold his car. It was an old BMW — nothing new, nothing fancy, a box model from the ’80s,” remembers Mark Holland, one of two twin brothers who founded the idiosyncratic Chapel Hill, N.C. band Jennyanykind in 1991. “We’ve all done that before, we’ve all run down to the music store with that $1,500

Telecaster that we didn’t really need. We’ve all been there when we want to finance a dream.” In 1993, the dream for Jennyanykind was putting out a debut 7-inch single. They did, and the trio’s career progressed. They signed to a small label and then to Elektra Records, whose roster extended from Tom Waits and the Eagles to Anthrax and Missy Elliott. Holland remembers it as a time when bands were coddled, “put into the studio for weeks ... where you don’t have to care about anything.” But Jennyanykind didn’t turn their major-label gig into millions of dollars, and, eight years after the release of the last Jennyanykind album, the Holland brothers are just hobbyist musicians with kids and jobs and lives. They have their own bands and projects now; until last May, they hadn’t played together as Jennyanykind in nearly a decade. They decided to give Jennyanykind another chance, starting again with a 7-inch single split with Chapel Hill rock duo The Moaners. Instead of selling the family car, though, they decided to procure the $2,000 they’d need for the single through Kickstarter. The Moaners and Jennyanykind will release the record with a celebratory concert in May. “I was really skeptical at first,” Holland admits. “We haven’t really done anything in a long time. The question was, ‘Who is going to care?’” Kickstarter and other crowdfunding sites are structured around deadlines. When someone launches a project, it’s open to funding for a set number of weeks. If people don’t pledge enough money to meet the funding goal during that window, the project fails. Any money pledged goes back into the pledger’s pocket. Such thresholds become apparent when considering niche markets or projects based around a small but rather loyal fan base. Most any pop, country, rock or hip-hop group has the potential to sell thousands or hundreds of thousands of records, should the right song land upon the right ears at the right time. But all independent bands or labels aren’t offering the sort of music that could make them famous or give them the sort of profit margin it takes to make and market a record. Thomas Costello, a clerk at Chapel Hill’s CD Alley, says he’s happy to buy the music when it’s available for purchase, even if it was recorded with money raised via Kickstarter. But as a fan of a band or a label, he doesn’t feel like it’s his job to pay directly for a product up front. “It’s almost like the cool kid asking the dorks to front him some lunch money. It’s like, ‘C’mon, you like me. I represent something you care about, so why

don’t you give me a little cash so I don’t have to bartend a few nights a week?’” Costello says, admitting his analogy is reductive but accurate to an extent. “Just because the Internet makes it available, that doesn’t mean you should take advantage of that fan relationship.” Milia, the Frontier Ruckus frontman who helped raise money for his band’s new van with crowdfunding, shares that concern, too. Frontier Ruckus worked to alleviate the groveling aspect of such campaigns with a quixotic name — ”Dessie’s Retirement FUNRaiser,” they called it — and by using it as a chance to interact with fans. A $40 pledge to Frontier Ruckus meant the next time the band’s new tour van rolled through your town, they would have dinner with you. “Yeah, there’s that racketeering, exploitive side of it,” Milia says. “But everyone sells merchandise on their website to people who want that merchandise due to their celebrity. It’s just giving that merchandise an express purpose.”

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CROwDFUnDinG new ORLeAns At Kickstarter.com, there are a number of New Orleans-based projects seeking donations from interested parties. Among them*: • The Whole Gritty City, producer/ director Richard Barber’s documentary about two high school marching bands. Backers: 94 Pledged: $10,805 (of $20,000 goal) Days to go: 34 • The Empanada Intifada, Taylor Jackson’s proposed “guerrilla gourmet food truck,” which would sell empanadas in New Orleans neighborhoods underserved by supermarkets. Backers: 13 Pledged: $246 (of $9,000 goal) Days to go: 4 • Protei, an “Open Hardware Oil Spill Cleaning Sailing Robot” — an oil skimmer using wind power for propellant Backers: 52 Pledged: $4,994 (of $27,500 goal) Days to go: 34 * All information recorded Mar. 7, 2011.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 15 > 2011

5,000 projects, including movies, tours, books, software and albums, since its launch less than two years ago. Some bands who’ve used Kickstarter think it might forever change the music industry — and, arguably, culture itself — by allowing consumers to put their funds where their fandom is. But it’s not that simple, some say. Such systems take advantage of old fans by having them invest in a project that’s not yet complete, critics say, and create illusions of demand. Those concerns haven’t curbed the interest in crowdfunding, though; more than 2,500 projects are currently being funded through Kickstarter alone, and for each of the last eight weeks, more than a million dollars has passed through the network. “For the past 60 years of recorded music, it’s been prescribed, the way you record music and share it with people. There’s no reason why that still has to be the case,” says Kickstarter founder Yancey Strickler. “The reason it still is the case is that, if you go to a record label and they give you money to make a record, they expect a record out of it. They expect a predictable piece of work. But as this grows, you’re not beholden to that.” Indeed, the crowdfunding phenomenon now extends far beyond the arts and Kickstarter. More than a dozen websites offer such services. Microgiving. com gathers funds for individual philanthropy projects, while Crowdrise.com gives charities and volunteer organizations access to a worldwide network of would-be contributors. A California news organization, spot.us, uses such techniques to fund journalism; if a potential story is important to enough people, it gets funded, reported and written. For Rob Berliner, who plays mandolin and sings in the Philadelphia band Hoots & Hellmouth, crowdfunding fundamentally alters the way people can support what they value. It turns artistic commerce into a public radio pledge drive. To wit, his band raised more than $20,000 to record an EP and an LP via Kickstarter. “We live in this world where the consumer can go see a movie in a theater, or you can find an illegal way to watch it at home,” Berliner says. “That’s where a lot of things are going now — you can take whatever you want from the Internet, and you can spend exactly what you want on things, and nothing more.”

11

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clancy DUBOS

POLITICS Follow Clancy on Twitter @clancygambit.

Bricks in the Ground ent is known as the somber season. For Mayor Mitch Landrieu, the onset of Lent coincided perfectly with a real downer of a report on city government by The Public Strategies Group (PSG), which Landrieu hired to give him the down-and-dirty on just how dysfunctional City Hall has become. So how dysfunctional is it? Put it this way: Sackcloth and ashes feel like “Singin’ in the Rain” after reading the PSG report. Landrieu called it “very sobering.” The report cited more than a dozen areas of official dysfunction — more than any other city PSG has seen. “The problems created by Katrina are well known, but they impacted a city government that was already suffering from incompetent leadership and widespread corruption,” the report states. The leading problem areas include “crisis management” (i.e., incessant crises that overwhelm any ability to focus on the big picture), a culture of corruption, poor management, a “hierarchical organization” that lacks clear lines of authority, low employee

L

morale and performance, “woeful” technology systems, onerous red tape, a pathological lack of accountability, fragmentation of city services and weak customer service. None of this is surprising, but Landrieu admits he was surprised by the degree of the city’s pathology. “The relentless emergencies, constantly having to fix what’s been broken for a long time, all surprise me,” he said. “There is no more low-hanging fruit. … This stuff is very, very deep and difficult.” Although the report has received widespread coverage for its negative portrait of city government, PSG also noted the city’s strengths, including “vital, engaged civic groups” eager to work with City Hall, new leadership with a mandate for change and broad support citywide, lots of federal funds still flowing into town, and “a more positive racial climate than the city has experienced in a long time.” Those are the tools that Landrieu will need to make the transformational changes he wants to bring to City Hall. He has assigned individual staff members to tackle each problem area noted in the report, and he appears ready to take the kind of

methodical approach necessary to make it all happen. “We will use this as a baseline for what we want to do,” Landrieu says. Make no mistake, this will be a long, difficult slog. City Hall’s problems didn’t linger for decades by accident. A lot of people are quite comfortable with the status quo. Landrieu will have to step on some toes

City Hall’s problems didn’t linger for decades by accident. A lot of people are quite comfortable with the status quo.

to make the changes New Orleans needs, and he’s going to take some punches in the process. “Our aim is to recalibrate the whole mousetrap at City Hall,” he says. “I really believe the people of New Orleans are smart. If you tell them the truth, they will rise to the occasion. We’re all impatient, but I think people are behind the idea that we have to make dramatic change. “Our challenge is not to get upset and defensive about all this. We’re laying the foundation for whoever comes next. It’s like putting bricks in the ground. Hopefully we’ll get enough of them in the ground so that the folks who come after us have a fighting chance to really get good at things.” Most mayors aspire to leave physical monuments as their legacies — a new city hall, a park, a convention center. Landrieu aspires to leave a functioning city government. Based on the PSG report and knowing how change-averse many folks are at City Hall, erecting a new city hall building sounds a lot easier than changing the culture in the existing edifice. Good luck, Mr. Mayor.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 15 > 2011

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 15 > 2011

THE LOUISIANA LEGISLATURE

BY JEREMY ALFORD, KE VIN ALLMAN & ALE X WOODWARD

SEEMS POISED TO TAKE UP DISCUSSION OF A STATEWIDE SMOKING BAN — AGAIN. IS 2011 THE YEAR BARS ACROSS THE STATE WILL GO SMOKE-FREE BY LAW? AND WHAT DO NEW ORLEANS BAR OWNERS THINK ABOUT THE POSSIBILITY?

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 15 > 2011

n the earliest days of the Bayou State’s politics — circa late 1700s — the Choctaw and Chicksaw tribes grew a specialized tobacco called perique for their own cultural and economic needs. Perique is still harvested today in St. James Parish and has cultivated a fan base for its supposedly complex flavor in blended pipe tobaccos. Only a few dozen acres are being farmed these days. But in 1922, there were some 1,000 acres of perique growing around the area of Grand Point. That was the beginning of the Golden Age of Smoking. It’s also around the time state government got a whiff of the policy potential of tobacco. In 1926, the Louisiana Legislature passed its firstever tax on cigarettes — a penny for every dime’s worth of price on a pack. Today the state excise tax is the country’s fourth-lowest (just behind Virginia, Missouri and South Carolina). Whether it’s Gov. Bobby Jindal’s chief of staff, Timmy Teepell, spitting chew in a cup just off the House floor (the lower chamber subsequently adopted its own internal ban) or campaign donations spread around Baton Rouge by cigarette manufacturers, tobacco has always had a role in modern Louisiana politics. According to the Louisiana Tobacco Control Program, more than 734,000 Louisianans smoke cigarettes and one out of every 10 pregnant women continues to smoke while gestating. Louisiana has the second highest rate of all cancers in the nation, and the state Department of Health and Hospitals has posted the following as “fact” on its website: “Even if it doesn’t kill, secondhand smoke can cause all types of illnesses, including lung cancer, heart disease, nasal sinus cancer, respiratory disease, bronchitis, middle ear infections, asthma and pneumonia.” Then there’s all the stuff they print on cigarette packs — warnings that will become more explicit (and gory) next year when the U.S. Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act goes into effect. (Soon to be free with every pack: color photos of mouth cancers and tracheotomies.) Unlike several other countries (including Canada), the U.S. has never established a nationwide smoking policy, preferring to leave the issue to states and municipalities. The result has been a patchwork of laws. In 2007, smoking was banned in Louisiana restaurants, though it remained legal in bars. In 2009, the legislature seemed poised to ban the practice in bars as well — but a late addition of casinos into the bill seemed to be the poison pill that convinced legislators to vote no, and the whole ban was shelved. A complete ban was approved by the state Senate last year, but later failed to gain traction during a hearing before the House Health and Welfare Committee (HWC). Just this week, the issue of smoking in casinos was back in court. On March 9, the mother of the late Maceo Bevrotte Jr., a former card dealer at Harrah’s New Orleans, filed a federal lawsuit against Harrah’s owner Caesars Entertainment Corp., claiming her son’s cancer was due to

15

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prolonged exposure to secondhand smoke in the workplace. The suit asked the judge to certify the lawsuit as a class action suit, meaning 1,000 nonsmoking Harrah’s employees could become plaintiffs. (At press time, Caesars Entertainment still had made no comment.)

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When lawmakers convene in Baton Rouge April 25, the usual suspects will be lined up for another political battle over smoking in bars and casinos, which are the last bastions for tobacco consumers under Louisiana’s Smoke-Free Air Act. This year, in anticipation of a rematch, sources say bars and casinos are already working on various marketing campaigns. The anti-tobacco forces are as well; on March 19, the Louisiana Campaign for TobaccoFree Living (TFL), which is funded by a 2002 excise tax on cigarettes, will hold its fourth annual Youth Summit at Southern University in Baton Rouge, where students will discuss what the TFL calls “tobaccorelated local policy change.” State Sen. Rob Marionneaux, D-Grosse Tete, says, “There will be a bill filed for consideration this year,” saying he isn’t ready “to disclose the details of the bill at this time.” Marionneaux, a term-limited lawmaker prepping a run for Iberville Parish sheriff, grabbed headlines statewide last year for pushing legislation to ban smoking in bars and casinos. How this legislation will play in this year’s climate, where “lower taxes, less government” is the prevailing mantra, has yet to be seen; last year, Marionneaux, a gifted trial lawyer, framed the debate as nonsmoking David versus Big Tobacco Goliath. “How many more studies do we need before we do the right thing and make bars and casinos in Louisiana smokefree?” Marionneaux asked at the time. “I hope that my colleagues in the House listen to the facts and to the voice of the nonsmoking

majority in our state and do their part to protect the health and wellbeing of thousands of hard-working Louisianans.” In May 2010, after passing the Senate by a vote of 23-12, Marionneaux’s drive was dealt a fatal blow when the House Health and Welfare Committee rejected his bill by a vote of 8-4. No big surprise, really; health aside, the HWC has a reputation for sacrificing just about any bill that might be unhealthy for the tobacco industry. In 2009 and 2010, members of the HWC drew at least $18,430 from tobacco companies, related subsidiaries and connected lobbying firms, according to the Louisiana Ethics Administration. Leading the way in tobacco contributions: HWC Chairwoman Kay Katz, R-Monroe, with $4,150. She voted against Marionneaux’s proposed ban last year, along with Reps. Richie Burford, R-Stonewall, $1,000; Jean Doerge, D-Minden, $1,274; Robert Johnson, D-Marksville, $1,500; John LaBruzzo, R-Metairie, $2,250; Bernard LeBas, D-Ville Platte, $579; Scott Simon, R-Abita Springs, $1,750; and Thomas Willmott, R-Kenner, $1,427. But practically everyone on the committee has tobaccorelated loot in their campaign kitties. Voting for Marionneaux’s ban were Reps. Regina Barrow, D-Baton Rouge, who received $750 in donations; Walker Hines of New Orleans, then a Democrat but now a Republican, $1,750; Rickey Nowlin, R-Natchitoches, $1,250; and J. Rogers Pope, R-Denham Springs, $750. If the push for a complete ban falls short again, anti-smoking advocates will probably have another policy horse to follow during this year’s regular session, which is dedicated chiefly to fiscal issues. Stewart Gordon, president of the Louisiana chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics, told the Baton Rouge Press Club recently that his organization is actively supporting increasing taxes on cigarettes: “We do sup-

COVER STORY

port a tobacco tax,” Stewart told the press club. With the state facing a $1.6 billion budget shortfall, the idea is sure to stimulate more than a few lawmakers. New York state, facing many of the same deficit problems as Louisiana, raised statewide cigarette taxes to $4.35 per pack in June 2010, on top of a $1.50 municipal tax (putting the price of a pack of cigs in Manhattan between $12 and $15). Taxwise, Louisiana smokers have it good. Go buy a pack of butts in Mandeville or Monroe today and you’ll pay 36 cents per pack in state taxes, well below New York and well below the national average of $1.45. In 2009, the last time the Louisiana Legislature conducted a fiscal session, the HWC shot down a proposed tax hike of $1, which would have created a new state tax of $1.36 per pack and brought the price of a pack of smokes closer to the national average. What the stats don’t cover, though, and what no one can predict right now, is what kind of fate such anti-smoking bills have when faced by a governor who refuses to pass taxes — no matter the cause and effect — and a legislature that is largely up for re-election later this fall. There’s also no way to tell if lawmakers are actively collecting money from Big Tobacco prior to the session’s start, since the next reporting period is still several months away.

Owner Max Chesney allows smoking at the Bridge Lounge, and is a smoker himself — but says he isn’t opposed to a smoking ban. PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 15 > 2011

No one is arguing the health issues related to smoking any more. Economics, though, are still up for debate. If it becomes illegal to light up in Louisiana bars, both smokers’-rights groups and the clear-theair groups come armed with their own statistics as to the financial impact. Not surprisingly, they range from hospitality-industry calamity (smokers will start drinking at home!) to an increase in revenues (nonsmokers who may have avoided smoky taverns will become

regular barflies!). Add in the public health costs — both immediate and years down the line — and you’ve got confusion as well as contention. At Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar on Tchoupitoulas Street, the bar’s perpetual cloud of smoke is what brings in business. During each legislative session in Baton Rouge, when lawmakers thumb through potential smoke-killing legislation, Dos Jefes owner Ritchie Shaner pins up flyers and presses representatives to shoot them down. “You don’t just drink Cognac. You drink Cognac with a freakin’ cigar. It’s as simple as that,” he says. Cigar sales are a big chunk of Dos Jefes’ business — a smoking ban would eliminate those sales, Shaner says. But for venues that aren’t selling cigars, the proposition of a smoking ban gets hazier: How do you keep your smoking and nonsmoking customers happy, and how do you attract customers who would prefer to avoid smelling like an ashtray? The TFL’s Let’s Be Totally Clear campaign has gathered steam via viral support through Facebook and Twitter, reaching out to get smokefree venues on the map — and to get smoke-friendly venues to make the switch. The campaign also has a more public profile — its campaigners are local musicians (Chubby Carrier, Deacon John Moore) and bartenders, featured on high-rise billboards throughout the city. The campaign supports “100 percent smoke-free air” to protect all employees. “We don’t think there are any second-class citizens in Louisiana,” says TFL’s New Orleans coordinator Cassandra Contreras, who argues that bars fearing a harsh economic impact would feel a neutral one at worst. Contreras says TFL’s biggest concern is the health of the employees (including musicians) and patrons constantly surrounded by cigarette smoke. According to Contreras, employees in smoke-

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Robert LeBlanc took his nightclub, Republic, smoke-free in 2007. LeBlanc says he’s happy to talk to other club owners about the benefits, but is hesitant about a ban, preferring bar owners be allowed to make their own choices. PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

filled environments are 17 percent more likely to develop heart disease, lung cancer and emphysema than any in other workplaces. “Any level of secondhand smoke, any exposure, can lead to respiratory infection and other health problems,” she says. “There is no safe level of exposure in secondhand smoke.” The campaign frequently partners with music venues to host a night of smoke-free music and events — and some of those venues, including d.b.a. and Tipitina’s, have made the switch to prohibit smoking in their clubs. Let’s Be Totally Clear now lists more than 30 New Orleans bars and venues in its smoke-free directory, from AllWays Lounge on St. Claude Avenue, to Chickie Wah Wah in MidCity, to Maison on Frenchmen Street and Cure on Freret Street. This year, the directory added both d.b.a. and the bar at the Columns Hotel to its list of smoking-prohibited venues. Contreras says the number of smoke-free clubs in the city has doubled since 2009. Republic made the switch in spring 2007, more than a year after it opened, and offers a smoking patio adjacent to the club’s main floor. Owner Robert LeBlanc’s other ven-

tures like Capdeville, loa and LePhare also prohibit smoking. LeBlanc says the venues went smoke-free to protect employees, who LeBlanc says were formerly surrounded by “heavy, heavy smoke clouds,” though he admits he was “tepid” about the decision at the beginning. “We have a pretty young workforce, so it’s not like we saw a lot of ill effects,” he says. “It’s just one of those things you just kind of see in the future — it’s not going to end well.” LeBlanc also works closely with TFL and says he is “very supportive in telling people the benefits in our experience, being candid and opening the books, for what we went through” making the switch. But — surprise — LeBlanc says he wouldn’t support a ban. “Bar owners and restaurant owners should have choices,” he says. “I’m not in favor of forcing people to do something against their will with blanket legislation.” Conversely, there’s Bridge Lounge owner Max Chesney. Chesney is a smoker, and smoking is allowed at his Garden District watering hole, but he says he’s not opposed to a ban. Without that legislative pressure, however, the smoking sign at

Bridge Lounge will stay on. “I love (TFL), I actively support them, and I’m willing to go as far as they need us to go to get the message out,” LeBlanc says. “I’m not trying to put one foot in the boat and one in the dock, I just genuinely feel that (smoking) is a choice.” Jacob Grier, a writer who has covered tobacco policy issues for publications including The Washington Post and The Oregonian, has had a front-row seat for the smoking wars. Since Grier moved to Oregon from Washington, D.C. several years ago, Oregon outlawed smoking in bars. Grier says that there’s no way a statewide ban can be enacted anywhere without having some impact on jobs, though he says it may not be across the board. “There are certain individual businesses that will be impacted — some bars, smoke shops, hookah lounges — those individual places are going to be massively impacted,” Grier says. “The day after the ban here went into effect, a local (smoking) lounge laid off four employees.” Also down in Oregon, he says: video poker and lottery revenues, which in that state, as in Louisiana, are sources of

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 15 > 2011

COVER STORY

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revenue for public schools. As for an overall economic impact, Grier is skeptical of the numbers put forth by both sides. “It’s hard to measure,” he says. “If you pass a ban in a recession, you can’t tell if revenues are down because of the recession or because of the ban. If you pass it during an economic boom, the opposite is true. It’s hard to generalize.” Nevada took no chances. When the state passed the Nevada Clean Indoor Air Act in 2007, it specifically exempted casinos, the lifeblood of the state’s economy. But when the Smoke-Free Illinois Act went into effect in 2008, it barred smoking in casinos as well as bars and restaurants. In an analysis written for The Regional Economist, authors Thomas A. Garrett and Michael R. Pakko cited statistics from the Illinois Casino Gaming Association showing casino revenue dropped 19 percent that year. Critics pointed out 2008 was a recession year — but casino revenue in neighboring states where smoking was still allowed (Indiana, Iowa, Missouri) actually went up. Garrett and Pakko estimated the state’s tax loss at $200 million, adding “In a full analysis, these costs need to be considered alongside

other costs and benefits, including the public health benefits of the legislation.” Meanwhile, in 2009, it took Atlantic City, N.J. one month to reverse a ban on smoking in casinos, reverting to a previous law where 75 percent of a casino floor had to be smoke-free, though New Jersey may take up the issue again this year. Last month, TFL released results from air-quality tests it analyzed in Lafayette barrooms during December and January. The tests, performed by TFL and Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center’s School of Public Health, rated 17 of 22 smoke-filled barrooms as “unhealthy,” “very unhealthy” or “hazardous,” measurements defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Those readings present “serious risk of respiratory effects in the general population, and significant aggravation of heart or lung disease and premature mortality in people with cardiopulmonary disease and the elderly,” according to the report. Contreras says bar owners are largely in support of a smoke-free option, but without the cover of the law, they’re concerned about doing

it on their own. “Most people not in support of it fear what it would do to their business,” she says. “A lot of (the campaign) is educating the business community with what it really means to go smoke-free — cutting down on cleaning costs, less sick days from employees. There are a lot of positive benefits. Plus you get patrons that weren’t coming out before because there was smoke. The fears there are really just based on what people are unsure of.” If a law should pass, smoking destinations like Dos Jefes, Shaner feels, would take a hit to their business, just as Grier predicts. “People would want to smoke somewhere else. Most people that come here smoke. It’s what it is: a cigar bar,” he says. “The music, the fine liquor — it’s all just the atmosphere that goes with the cigar bar, the smoking. It’s the whole genre, the whole thing about it.” Since he banned smoking inside Republic, LeBlanc says, “We, if anything, experienced an uptick (in business). We still have plenty of people who smoke. They just smoke outside, and I think they appreciate it as well.”

Deacon John Moore is among the musicians in the Louisiana Campaign for Tobacco-Free Living campaign to ban smoking in bars on the grounds that bar employees and musicians deserve smoke-free work environments. PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

COVER STORY

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 15 > 2011

USA

TERRY PKWY · GRETNA

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Rex Duke™ 2011

Parade Reviews REX DUKE™, THE WORLD’S FIRST AND FOREMOST PARADE CRITIC, OFFERS HIS TAKE ON CARNIVAL 2011.

Hail, Loyal Subjects and Carnival Devotees!

I, Rex Duke™, the world’s first and foremost Mardi Gras parade critic, enjoy a surprise almost as much as I enjoy a prime parade-viewing spot. While a late Fat Tuesday brought mostly temperate weather for parade watching, some early showers shook up our annual festivities and caused several processions to reschedule. I was thus quite pleased to see Mardi Gras’ spirit affirmed as Endymion, though unfortunately forced from its Saturday route in Mid-City, rallied to present an excellent pageant on a Sunday already bursting with parade activity. Endymion’s dedication delivered wondrous results, and paradewatchers who stuck out the day’s two superkrewes were well rewarded. Indeed, there were many fine parades in 2011, both in Orleans and Jefferson parishes. Rex Duke™ dutifully attended as many as possible and appreciates the efforts of all riders and krewe members who work so hard year-round to entertain us. Below are my scores for the highest-rated parades — and special recognition for superlative efforts, as usual. As much as I love tradition, I also recognize — and reward — innovation that keeps Mardi Gras fresh and new. I, too, must keep up with the times, and therefore, starting this year, I will issue reviews in the print editions of Gambit for only those parades meriting at least three and a half crowns on my traditional scale of one-to-five crowns. My reviews of all parades may be found online at www.bestofneworleans.com — where you can also view some moving pictures I captured of this year’s Best Overall Parade. Herewith, I offer my reflections — and I bid you well until Carnival 2012, and Fat Tuesday next February 21.

TM

Yours,

REX DUKE TM

RATINGS KEY

EXCELLENT SETS A NEW CARNIVAL STANDARD

BEST DAY PARADE TUCKS

was filled to the brim with enthusiastic (and generous) riders. Overall, Endymion set a spectacular new standard for float illumination and thematic execution this year — and overcame a postponement that would have sidelined a lesser krewe. Congratulations to the captain and krewe of Endymion on winning this year’s “Best Superkrewe” and “Best Overall” ratings!

BEST NIGHT PARADE HERMES

HERMES

TOP PARADES

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 15 > 2011

BEST OVERALL PARADE ENDYMION

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VERY GOOD TO OUTSTANDING

BEST SUPERKREWE ENDYMION BEST SUBURBAN PARADE CAESAR

ENDYMION I must admit I did not have high expectations after Endymion was rained out on Saturday. Rumors swirled up and down St. Charles Avenue that this superkrewe would have no marching bands. Much to my delight, Endymion had more than a dozen outstanding college and military bands, led by a Marine Corps troop that wowed the crowd with its rendition of John Boutte’s Treme theme. Carnival’s largest krewe then lit up the night with a dazzling display of innovative illumination. The krewe’s captain promised to break new ground with Endymion’s new light show, and he kept his word. Several early floats boasted shimmering fleurs-delis that changed colors before our eyes. Others used pulsating or streaming lights to convey movement or flowing water (as in the float “Ol’ Man River”). Other fine examples of Endymion’s brilliantly executed theme of “American Masters” included floats honoring Herman Melville (with Moby Dick), Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (Evangeline), Norman Rockwell, Clementine Hunter and Edgar Allan Poe. Riders’ costumes matched individual floats, and despite the rain delay every float

Hermes’ procession was a salute to the Court of the Great Mogul and featured beautiful and finely detailed artwork in brilliant color. The Court of the Great Mogul was illustrated with floats festooned with well-made paper flowers and bouncing 3-D elements. Impressive figures included the Great Mogul on his Birthday, the mythical bug-like creatures identified as the Enchanted Gatekeepers, the Hand of Attis, the Pyramid of the Sun float, the Turkish horses and the duo of monkey attendants. Hermes’ king’s float was redone and featured bright, fiery orange lions and details. A substantial lineup of bands included St. Augustine, McDonogh 35 and Warren Easton high schools and the U.S. Marine Corps Band. Overall, it was a lavishly rendered parade in bright colors matching floats and costumes. For its efforts and originality, Hermes wins “Best Night Parade” honors.

LE KREWE D’ÉTAT Le Krewe d’État was on its game with “Wide World of Sports.” There were many great satirical jabs at sports figures (Brett “Minnesota Chubby” Favre) as well as the usual suspects: Gov. Bobby Jindal as a featherweight contender, for example. Local sports fans surely enjoyed the “Two Minute Thrills” float featuring LSU football coach Les “Mad Hatter” Miles, and the “Illegal Procedures” float rehashing the University of Southern California’s myriad recruiting problems in major sports programs. Attention to detail included many parting

GOOD

FAIR

POOR

shot jokes on the back of the floats. The “Zona Defense” float lambasting Arizona’s draconian response to illegal immigration featured President Barack Obama ushering Latinos into the float’s rear entrance — painted as a voting booth. While most of the float ideas were funny, and some spirited in local commentary (the Kern family spat), Rex Duke is reminded that a good joke is the crucial difference between edgy satire and mere mockery.

MUSES Leave it to the Krewe of Muses to try to lead with a dancing theme. The women pulled it off expertly. Hilarious floats included Sen. David Vitter as the “Vitterbug,” the “Hustle” float featuring Greg Meffert, the Sarah Palin “Poll Dancing” float and President Barack Obama dancing “The Robot.” Attention to detail included disco hats on one float’s riders, and the krewe sustained a funny concept through a procession of more than 25 floats. As usual, there was a wide variety of unique throws and the poster was a nice souvenir. The krewe also had a contingent of nearly 20 bands and many walking groups, including the Camel Toe Lady Steppers, Pussyfooters, 610 Stompers and others. This parade kept viewers on their feet.

ORPHEUS Orpheus’ “Visions of Other Worlds” took viewers to exotic locations, ancient times and imagined lands. Notable floats included “Forests of Enchantment,” “The Abode of Faeries” and “The Dream of Utopia.” It also featured a crown-pleasing nod to the vision of New Orleans in David Simon’s Treme. One float carried Wendell Pierce, Steve Zahn and other cast members from the show. The procession also featured more than 15 bands with fine performances by St. Mary’s Academy, Walter L. Cohen High School and others. Throws included everything from light-up Treme beads to plush flambeaux. PAGE 22

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 15 > 2011

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perhaps a few of them could have turned their sirens off. Other noteworthy details included the colorful maids dresses and tall collars, which matched the theme.

BACCHUS Bacchus offered a superb theme this year — a salute to the “Greatest Generation,” World War II Veterans and those who sacrificed for the war effort — and a fine parade with an ebullient grand marshal in actor Andy Garcia. Unfortunately, this usually outstanding superkrewe fell short of its potential on other fronts. The bands were numerous and excellent, especially the many local public high school marching bands, and riders’ costumes matched the theme as well as individual floats. Several floats, however, had entire sections with no riders, and occasionally I saw riders (not many, but enough to notice) taking off their masks — a big no-no. Throws were bountiful but generally lacked originality (though I did like the grape football, even if it had nothing to do with World War II). Overall, Bacchus’ theme offered great potential for an over-the-top delivery of unique WWII-era floats and throws. What I saw was nice — but short of what it could have been.

CAESAR

The Rex parade arrives on Canal Street. PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER PAGE 20

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 15 > 2011

PROTEUS

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Proteus posed for an elegant portrait in a parade devoted to its namesake’s lore, titled “Prophetic Old Man of the Sea.” Traditional wooden wheel floats were beautifully adorned with images of the sea god and the oceans, as well as the many forms he takes. Proteus succeeds in presenting (and preserving) some of Carnival’s finest traditions, and floats were beautifully detailed and painted, from sea blues and greens to the red of his guise in flame. It reminds Rex Duke™ that New Orleanians once went to parades solely to view the pageantry. Proteus also had almost as many marching bands as floats.

REX The British Isles got some sun courtesy of a bright and colorful tribute from Rex in its “This Sceptered Isle” parade. The floats drew inspiration from history and literature, and notable artwork animated Macbeth’s three witches, the characters of Lewis Carroll and the legend of St. George and the dragon. Standout bands included Warren Easton and Tulane University, and a contingent of bagpipe players underscored the theme. Costumes were as vibrant as the floats and matched individual float themes, and Rex members are consummate traditionalists in staying masked. Crowds liked Rex bracelets and crown pillows. Overall, it was a truly regal affair.

ALLA Alla’s “Superfriends” parade was supersized, to say the least. One of the most impressive things about the krewe is how consistently it fills its procession with more than 20 bands on a busy parade day. Some standouts this year included St. Augustine, O. Perry Walker, Archbishop Shaw, Tulane and others. The theme was carried out well on floats, which generally had very good props (Hulk, Batman) and paint jobs carried through on the entire float. The procession was also filled by numerous mounted riding groups, bands on trailers and a bevy of emergency vehicles (ambulances, fire trucks), although

There’s the extensive procession of royalty and named characters, like the Big Shot. The procession included a stunning 30 bands. Throws were exceptional, with everything from treasured light coconuts to umbrellas, tambourines, stuffed toys and more. Unfortunately the theme was sprawling as well. Nominally, it was “Zulu Celebrates Hollywood Movies,” but there were floats that didn’t seem to relate to film, such as one about Match. com. The Queen of Hearts from Alice in Wonderland was a more appropriate subject and an impressive prop. Costumes generally did not match the float theme, but Zulu has traditional costumes for its riders.

BABYLON The “Birthstones” theme lent a dazzling array of light and color to Babylon’s procession. The krewe used the theme to tie in float themes and costume colors. Some notable floats included the “Turquoise” float with Mayan and Aztec details, the “Aquamarine” float with a seahorse prop and riders in Poseidon crowns, and the “Sapphire” float with riders in red. The procession was very pretty, but the krewe was a little light on bands and throws.

IRIS

Caesar’s procession highlighted careers kids might aspire to as they grow up, with realistic options like chef or construction worker and more fanciful ones like superhero. The costumes matched the floats, which is always a plus. Notable performances were turned in by the East Jefferson, Riverside and Ponchatoula high school bands. The costumed Star Wars guests were popular with the crowd. The array of throws included footballs, basketballs and flying discs.

Iris is to be commended for not letting its spirits dampen on a rainy Saturday afternoon. “In Your Wildest Dreams” sounded a bit racier than the krewe’s very traditional and wholesome identity. Fun examples of the floats included “At the Seaside,” with riders in beach gear and straw hats, and “At the Ballgame,” with riders in old-school uniforms. Bands also endured the downfall, and Wright Charter and Wingfield High School from Jackson, Miss., played on valiantly.

CHAOS

NAPOLEON

The subtitle “no reservations” flew below “Chaos Eats Out,” and the satirical krewe was full of biting wit. New Orleans Police Superintendent Ronal Serpas stared through glazed eyes on a float festooned with donuts. Obamacare was presented as a bitter pill. And the New Orleans Saints were dubbed “Unlucky Dogs” for a disappointing early end to their season. The food theme was well integrated into all the floats. Costumes were bright and colorful. Notable marching bands included Roots of Music and Chalmette High School, which entertained the crowd with “Crazy Train.”

THOTH Thoth schooled parade viewers on college life. “Thoth Goes to College” hit the books, particularly on floats featuring college majors, with pretty floats depicting astronomy and oceanography. Rex Duke™ wishes his college had offered Scandinavian studies. Nonetheless, he appreciates that riders often wore float-appropriate costumes, like the barbershop quartet outfits on the music float. There were many bands and a healthy addition of extra-curricular marchers, including the Pussyfooters and Gris-Gris Strut, plus many original throws.

TUCKS Tucks offered up one of the most timely and topical themes, lampooning digital technology and cell phone use with “iTucks: What’s Appening?” Floats referenced Farmville, and Wikileaks was turned into a tiki-themed “Wi Ki Leaks.” Characters from Pulp Fiction adorned the float titled “Say Tweet Again.” It was a fun and original theme — and it coupled with the krewe’s preferred toilet humor, with toilet paper raining down from the floats. The procession included more than 20 bands. Congratulations to Tucks on winning “Best Day Parade” honors!

ZULU In many ways, Zulu is over-the-top in a pleasing manner.

The Corps of Napoleon endeared itself to Rex Duke™ and locals alike with its parade down memory lane titled “Ain’t Dere No More.” Floats recalled K&B, Schwegmann’s and McKenzie’s Bakery, and there were logo beads to match many float themes. The D.H. Holmes float had Mr. Bingle on it. Of course, Benny Grunch and the Bunch, who wrote the anthem, rode with the procession. The Marine Corps band entertained with “Bourbon Street Parade.”

MID-CITY Mid-City marched to its own beat this year. The theme reworked the word “march” into many clever turns of phrase. Some standouts included “Time Marches On,” with a clock decorated with signature tin foil, and other common sayings like “In Like a Lion” and “Out Like a Lamb” were featured. There were several bands visiting from out of state to fill in the lineup and Rex Duke™ snagged some signature potato chips from a kind rider.

N.O.M.T.O.C. N.O.M.T.O.C. has become a favorite suburban parade because of its eye-catching floats — they’re always exciting and colorful — and its joyful riders, who are generous with throws. With a theme of “Great Works of Fiction,” it presented commemorations of popular stories, such as “Terror in the Lab,” a rendition of The Fly with a giant fly bearing a human face, “The Dark Knight,” with an image of Batman, and “The Siege of New York” with Dr. Octopus from Spider-Man. Riders hold to Carnival traditions in dressing to match the floats and staying masked.

PONTCHARTRAIN Pontchartrain was on the “ball” this year with clever turns of phrase using the word. In a gimmick the krewe often uses, float titles required viewers to fill in the blank. The crowds enjoyed Lucille Ball and “meatballs.” The krewe increased the number of bands from recent years, and Holy Cross and Miller-McCoy Academy performed notably. There were plentiful plush footballs and krewe cup.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 15 > 2011

Thursday, March 24, 2011

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 15 > 2011

reen matters

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ + + +bringing +++++++++++++ ++++++++++++ home + + + + + + + +sustainability ++++++++ ++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

27 greenlight 28 greeniverse micro

reens

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Re-jeweled

walk thIs way

Plans for the lafitte Corridor “greenway” are still on the roCky road to reCovery.

Hikers walk the path of the proposed Lafitte greenway.

By alex woodward

I

coming from different areas and  backgrounds are going to have  different ideas about the process,”  Everson says. “The greenway has to  reflect the communities’ desires or  it’s not going to be successful. It’s  our role to make sure the process at  this stage is an honest, open, transparent process and the community  really is engaged.”     In November 2009, the city picked Austin, Texas landscape architecture and urban planning firm  Design Workshop to turn a former  railway into a 3-mile linear park.  The project was backed in part  by an $11.6 million Community  Development Block Grant (CDBG),  but an audit by the Department  of Housing and Urban Development screened all projects using  CDBG funds, which led the city to  prematurely terminate its contract  with Design Workshop in January 2010. Incoming Mayor Mitch  Landrieu asked Mayor Ray Nagin,  who was leaving office, to freeze all  city contracts. Therefore, by the end  of Nagin’s term, no bidder had been  selected for the project. When the  project was rebid, Design Workshop  was re-selected in August 2010.     Despite enthusiasm from the  Landrieu administration and City  Council members, the greenway  project has yet to find its legs;  Design Workshop and FOLC are 

waiting for word on whether the  city will put its seal of approval on  the contract.     “We’re trying not to be impatient,” says Everson, who has been  following the project since 2005. It  has been the topic of several planning meetings and has garnered  neighborhood interest since the  ’70s. Everson, who commutes by  bicycle, founded the FOLC in 2006  after exploring the corridor a year  earlier, and the group has held annual Hike the Lafitte Corridor events  since. In 2009, Everson says, “Spirits  were at an all-time high,” with more  than 200 attendees hiking the  course of the proposed greenway  and anticipating a groundbreaking  by the following year. But in 2010,  following Nagin’s cancelation of  the Design Workshop contract, the  group lost its morale, Everson says.     “Time and money and effort  spent — once it’s gone, it’s gone,”  says Design Workshop principal  Steven Spears. “It wasn’t just lost  time on our behalf. The city staff  spent a significant amount of time  and effort under the Nagin administration. They’ve also looked at this  opportunity as, ‘That was the past,  this is the future, we’re going to  make this right.’ There are no hard  feelings. Everyone has the momentum to move this forward.” Page 29

GaRden PaRty

    Celebrating its fifth year, the Edible School Yard New  Orleans (ESY NOLA) and FirstLine schools are hosting  the second annual Edible Evening from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  March 24 at ESY NOLA’s flagship site, Samuel J. Green  Charter School (2319 Valence St.).     Founded in 2006, FirstLine schools have integrated  the hands-on, organic garden into the classroom experience, involving students in all aspects of the garden,  from planting seeds to cooking and enjoying the food  grown there. The one-third-acre garden produces more  than 3,000 pounds of produce each year, which is used  not only in cooking classes in the edible kitchen but also  is given to  students’ families to enjoy at home.     “The students love [the garden],” says ESY NOLA’s  executive director Donna Cavato. “It gives them a sense  of wonderment. They get to explore different kinds of  vegetation and lifeforms they’ve never seen. It’s very  sensory and hands-on.”     While raising money for the garden, ESY NOLA hopes  the event highlights the work accomplished not only  at Green Charter School but in the surrounding Central  City neighborhood. “We want to show the larger community what we’ve been able to do in the past five  years,” Cavato says.      The party will feature live music, wine and cocktails, and seasonal dishes from Bacchanal, Broussard’s  Restaurant, Capdeville, Cochon, Commander’s Palace,  Domenica, Emeril’s Restaurant, Oak and others. Tickets  start at $45 and are available at www.esynola.org or by  calling 267-9035. — Lucas

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 15 > 2011

n August 2010, the city of New  Orleans acquired a 16.5-acre  parcel of land stretching  from Claiborne Avenue to North  Dorgenois Street — the former site  of the failed Louisiana Institute of  Film Technology studio. That chunk  of land would add to the city’s  plans for its first park in 20 years.  But when will ground break? The  project is part the Lafitte Corridor, where a years-in-the-making  “greenway” will link downtown  neighborhoods to Lakeview over a  3-mile-long stretch of bike paths,  green space, public gardens and  other community resources.     Last spring, national urban planners, conservationists and politicians descended on the site for a  think tank and workshop centered  around the Lafitte greenway’s  future. Then-U.S. Rep. Anh “Joseph”  Cao and other officials made appearances and voiced their support  — but a year later, the soil remains  untouched. Community meetings,  which will offer input on how planners should utilize the site, have yet  to be held.     Bart Everson, president of the  Friends of Lafitte Corridor (FOLC),  hopes that won’t deter residents.  The project, he says, can’t go on  without their input — or their vision.     “(The corridor) goes through  a number of different neighborhoods, and people presumably 

    When Stephán Wanger came to New Orleans after  Hurricane Katrina to help the city rebuild, he was upset  to see people discarding materials during the process of  gutting their homes.     “They were throwing out completely good materials  — wrought-iron doors, shelving and cabinets — because they were crooked,” Wanger says.     When he saw how many beads were thrown away  after Carnival parades, he made it his mission to show  the art of recycling.     Using discarded and donated beads, along with old  mirrors, cabinet doors, shelves and two-by-fours for  frames, Wanger began a collection titled “A Million  Greetings From New Orleans.” Upon completion,  Wanger plans to showcase it in Europe, starting in his  native Germany, to promote New Orleans tourism.     In most of his installations, Wanger uses mostly  recycled beads, only purchasing new ones if he needs  smaller beads to add depth or a bead of a particular  color too hard to find among the donations. The only  other materials he purchases are glue and paint. Many  of Wanger’s beads come from St. Michael Special  School, which recycles, packages and sells Carnival  beads (Wanger also uses those they discard). The artist  says his installation already has used more than 1 million  individual Mardi Gras beads.     “A little spray paint, good glue, it doesn’t look recycled,” Wanger says.     Pointing to the lack of recycling facilities (until  recently) in New Orleans, Wagner hopes people here  value recycling.     “Every time I open the door and see a bag of beads  waiting for me it’s almost like someone is telling me to  get to work,” he says.     See the installation and other completed works at  Galeria Alegria (1914 Magazine St.; www.galeriaalegria. com). Donate beads at the gallery or at Saint Michael  Special School (1522 Chippewa St., 524-7285).  — Marguerite Lucas  

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oel Ross, an architect at the firm John C. Williams, has found the key to something rare in New Orleana: consistently low energy bills. Attaining this took some time, however. He outfitted his 130-year-old St. Claude Avenue home with an energy-efficient ductless air conditioning system, and he installed new windows to keep air in. “There’s no air leaks anywhere. It’s not like any house I’ve ever lived in in New Orleans where when it gets cold, you can feel the air coming through the walls, windows and floor. Now you don’t feel any drafts in my house,” he says. “You can turn on the heat for a minute and heat the house up very quickly, or in the summer you can turn on the air conditioning and cool the house down. It’s similar to a cooler, like a Rubbermaid cooler.” Ross’ experience demonstrates how “green” building offers the potential for big savings, but the initial cost and time it takes to incorporate energy efficient appliances and building materials can be formidable. In an effort to highlight the benefits of sustainable living, the Youth Leadership Council (YLC) created the Le Vert Tour, a self-guided driving tour of eco-friendly homes around New Orleans. The project grew from the YLC’s Leadership Development Series, an event for YLC members to learn about developing organizations and projects through a series of seminars on various topics. “The goal of the Leadership Development Series is to fill a void in the community,” says Chappell Williams, a YLC member and executive assistant at John C. Williams, which is involved with many green building projects. “We thought (reducing carbon footprints) is such an important, current issue, and we wanted people to have an opportunity to see what’s being done in our city.” To find houses for the tour, Williams tapped into a small, tight-knit network of enthusiastic homeowners. “Most of the homeowners know each other pretty well. They’ve all crossed paths on their mission with trying to design houses both economically friendly and environmentally friendly,” she says. “There’s been a lot of trials and errors, but they’ve all done what they could with the resources we have in our city.” The 11 homes on the tour stretch from Mid-City to the Lower Garden District, Uptown and Central City and display an array of green building technologies including solar panels, low-flush toilets and ductless air conditioners like in Ross’ home, which is part of the tour, as

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Architect Joel Ross uses a ductless air conditioning system to maintain low energy bills at his home. “There isn’t really a profiteering interest here,” says Amy Boyle Collins, YLC executive director. “There isn’t one company self-interested in promoting something … it’s purely young professionals who are very interested in this burgeoning field who are exploring how it’s been done, the lessons learned from it, in a very zero-sales-pressure kind of way. Usually if you go to home shows, you always have to be wary of the salespeople, or the sales angle. There’s really not that here. These are just people interested in trying to live eco-friendly lives who are willing to share their experiences.” By emphasizing a lack of sales interest, the tour hopes to function as an honest discussion about green building. “People will be honest about what systems did and didn’t work,” Ross says. “If you go to Home Depot or whatever, you’ll probably be overwhelmed by all the green technologies and people touting their product as the best, and this way you can have maybe 10 people telling you what product did work the best.”

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 15 > 2011

well as eco-friendly building materials and refurbished goods. The homes also maintain some traditional aspects of New Orleans architecture. “There will be a good mix of old and new in terms of new systems in the house, like overhauling the air conditioning to be more energy efficient, to old strategies that have been in Louisiana for a while, like daylighting in single shotguns,” Ross says. “We kind of forgot how to build like that in the ’50s, ’60s, ’70s, ’80s and ’90s. (The homes) utilize trends that have been in Louisiana for a long time along with the modern systems like the ductless air conditioner from Japan. (They mix) what the international community can teach us along with Louisiana’s unique concepts.” At each stop on the tour, homeowners will be available to discuss their building experiences and answer questions. “(The home oweners) are very passionate about what they’ve done to their property and they are very candid about the process,” Williams says. “It’s very entertaining and educational to hear about the hoops they had to go through and the people who helped them along the way.” Partnering organizations the Preservation Resource Center, Make It Right Foundation and Global Green, along with others, also will be present in the homes to answer questions and talk about their services.

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    And the momentum has been  building. A 2010 conference held by  the Rails-to-Trails Conservancy (RTC), a  Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit turning former railways into usable public  spaces, brought national attention to  the Lafitte project. “We were able to  compare notes with people from other  communities that have been working  on these projects even longer than we  have,” Everson says. “We’ve had it easy  by comparison.”     Earlier this year, the American Institute of Architects honored Waggoner  & Ball Architects with an award for the  project’s sustainable water management plans, which utilize former canals  and waterways to manage stormwater  and provide natural drainage.     “From an ecological point of view  there’s significance, dealing with storm  water in an innovative way, that’s on  our radar,” Spears says. “From a community point of view, the river half of  the trail lends itself to some tourism  activity, but it also connects to culturally  significant neighborhoods like Treme,  whereas the lake end links to the existing neighborhoods. We don’t foresee it  as just another tourist attraction. It’ll be  something more profound. Tourists and  locals will be able to use and enjoy (the  greenway) for alternative transporta-

tion (and) recreation.”     Spears says the firm anticipates its  contract getting a thumbs-up from  the city in April, after which Design  Workshop will hold dozens of community meetings to discuss the greenway’s  features and to develop a master plan  for revitalization projects for neighborhoods within a half-mile radius of each  side of the greenway.     “I look forward to a robust public  participation process facilitated by a  creative and motivating design team,”  District A councilwoman Susan Guidry  says in an email to Gambit. “I am certain  our residents will let their creativity  flow during the design process, and that  the greenway will become one of the  great natural gems of our city, as well as  a powerful economic engine.”     Spears estimates the meetings will  last a year before ground breaks on the  greenway. Construction on the project  — paving its pathways and grooming  the landscape — would take less than  two years. The most vital part, Everson  says, is the citizen-driven planning  process.     “Now is the time go get involved,”  he says. “You can be at the forefront of  the design process. Come with an open  mind (and) say ‘Here’s what I would like  to see.’” 

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > MARCH 15 > 2011

Stemming from an informal tradition founded in 2005, the Friends of Lafitte  Corridor (FOLC) hosts an annual hike through the proposed 3-mile linear  green space linking the French Quarter, Treme, Mid-City and Lakview. The  event includes live music, food and access to community resources along the  Lafitte Corridor. Visit www.folc-nola.org for details.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 15 > 2011

FASHION. CONNECT. IMPRESS.

March 15-18, 2011

THE SUGAR MILL 1021 Convention Center Blvd, New Orleans

Over 25 Spectacular Runway Shows, a Top Designer Competition, and Silent Auctions benefiting NO/Aids Task Force, Dress for Success, FINO, and the New Orleans Firefighters Foundation.

For ticket information visit www.fashionweeknola.com

Finish Studio

a full service hair salon

>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << MUSIC >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE YOU GO << <<<<<<<<<< << 36 >> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << THE >> >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>> << <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> > << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< < >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

FILM

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ART

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STAGE

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Sharon Jones & the Dap-Kings

INTERSTATE FRINGE 8 P.M. FRIDAY-SATURDAY, MAR. 18-19 MICHALOPOULOS STUDIO, 527 ELYSIAN FIELDS AVE.; WWW. NOFRINGE.ORG TICKETS $15

EVENTS

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CUISINE

51

MAR

15

Soul and R&B revivalists Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings have been popular fixtures at Jazz Fest and the Voodoo Experience in recent years, delivering phenomenal live performances. The band has been touring heavily since releasing I Learned the Hard Way (Daptone) in April 2010. Los Po-Boy-Citos open. Tickets $26.50. 8 p.m. Tuesday. House of Blues, 225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www.hob.com

Love Letters

MAR

18

Bryan Batt and Patricia Clarkson star in A.R. Gurney’s Pulitzer-nominated Love Letters, the story of an intimate friendship revealed in letters exchanged over the course of five decades. All proceeds benefit Le Petit Theatre du Vieux Carre, which cancelled its season last year due to financial woes. Tickets $100-$300. 8 p.m. Friday; 3 p.m. Sunday. Le Petit Theatre, 616 St. Peter St., 522-2081; www.lepetittheatre.com

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Box Set INTERSTATE FRINGE PUTS THE SHOW ON THE ROAD. BY WILL COVIELLO

A

during the New Orleans Fringe in November, says director Kristen Evans. The Houston dance company FrenetiCore was only able to do two instead of the requested three performances of its dance piece. But FrenetiCore operates a theater space in Houston and its director agreed to reciprocate an exchange, hosting New Orleans performers on its stage. For the New Orleans leg of Interstate Fringe, a Houston theater group and comedy troupe will perform. Yes, Cassandra re-envisions Aeschylus’ account of the Trojan War from the point of view of Cassandra, who foresaw the fall of Troy and was captured by the Greeks. Rogue Improv does group improv work. The fourth group is Chard Gonzalez Dance Theatre, which reprises its New Orleans Fringe show The Divine Feminine, which also had a very successful run at the November festival. For Kaminstein and Goat in the Road, the Fringe helped allow them to debut their hour-long work. It’s the third part of a trilogy about politics and the media. The group created a 25-minute piece called Whatever Just Happened, Didn’t Happen about Ken Starr’s investigation into President Bill Clinton’s affair with Monica Lewinsky. In the show, Kamenstein and Will Bowling play two clerks tasked with cataloging the voluminous report and its testimony, and they re-enact scenes described in testimony. They later created a short piece about the Meese Commission’s 1980s investigation of pornography. The group would like to tour with the trio, Kaminstein says. And Interstate Fringe will help the team get some touring experience.

Low PHOTO BY SARA KIESLING

MAR

19

Maybe it’s Low’s lifelong fidelity to trawling tempos that made the four years since its last album, 2007’s (relatively) riled-up war protest Drums and Guns (Sub Pop), feel even longer. Due in April, C’mon, the Duluth, Minn., trio’s ninth LP, promises a return to the intense focus and pressed-flesh intimacy of harmonized heartaches Trust (2002) and Things We Lost in the Fire (2001). Tickets $12 in advance, $15 at the door. 8:30 p.m. Saturday. Republic, 828 S. Peters St., 528-8282; www. republicnola.com

MAR

Mike Watt & the Missingmen 20 Post-punk pioneer Mike Watt has spent his post-

post-Minutemen years providing spring-loaded bass support on divergent reboots of the Stooges and Kelly Clarkson. Hyphenated-Man (Clenchedwrench), his first semisolo outing since 2004, is a 30-track glossary of the creations of Hieronymus Bosch (“Hollowed-OutMan,” “Bell-Rung-Man”) composed on fallen frontman D. Boon’s Fender Telecaster. Lite and Narcissy open. Tickets $15. 10 p.m. Sunday. One Eyed Jacks, 615 Toulouse St., 569-8361; www.oneeyedjacks.net

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 15 > 2011

lternative theater doesn’t necessarily emanate from abstract or complicated ideas. Chris Kaminstein and fellow writers in Goat in the Road Productions created the hilarious one-act play Our Man, an absurd radio show reminiscence about Ronald Reagan performed in a five-by-five foot plexiglas box, off two simple parameters. “We wanted to do a show in a box, and we wanted to do a show about Reagan,” Kaminstein says. “Tight restrictions make good theater. The box is inherently funny — you can’t even fully stand up in it.” In Our Man, two radio announcers serially recount, revise, embellish and outright fabricate heroic tales about Ronald Reagan. As they get ever more enthusiastic about Reagan, they begin acting out the scenes, including one anachronistic fantasy in which Reagan and Knute Rockne are fellow soldiers fighting behind enemy lines in World War II. Reagan never served overseas, and Rockne died in 1931. But Reagan played George Gipp in the film Knute Rockne All American (1940), and it’s where he got his “Gipper” persona, which became part of his political appeal. Our Man debuted at the New Orleans Fringe Festival in November and was one of the best shows in the alternative theater event. Goat in the Road is reprising it for this showcase called Interstate Fringe, produced in conjunction with Houston’s fringe. Both evenings include two shows from New Orleans and two from Houston, which will be performed Friday and Saturday here, and then in Houston the following week. Interstate Fringe grew out of a scheduling conflict

Chris Kaminstein and Will Bowling wrote and starred in Our Man, performed in a five foot by five foot Plexiglas box.

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March 15

MASTERS

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March 19

BILL SUMMERS

BRaSS BaND JaM

2011

MARCH

EVERY SATURDAY AT MIDNIGHT

Play HOUR

EVERY WEDS. THURS. FRI. 5-8pm

Monday 14, 21, 28

BOB FreNCH aNd tHe

OrIGINal tUXedO Jazz BaNd

tuesdays Masters MONtH

Building legacy

3/22: ed PeterseN PreseNts tHe MUsIC OF

thursday 17, 24, 31

sHaMarr alleN

PreseNts tHe MUsIC OF

Friday 18, 25

JaMes BlaCK

starring

TRiXiE MiNX

EVERY FRIDAY AT MIDNIGHT

wednesdays IrVIN MaYFIeld’s NOJO JaM presents the music of: 3/16: dONald BYrd 3/23: CHICK COrea 3/30: CHarlIe ParKer

HarOld BattIste

3/29: steVe MasaKOwsKI

Burlesque Ballroom

saturday 26

KHrIs rOYal sunday 20, 27

tYler’s reVIsIted FeatUrING

GerMaINe Bazzle & PaUl lONGstretH

leON “KId CHOCOlate” BrOwN

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 15 > 2011

irvinmayfield.com For more information: IMJazzPlayhouse 300 Bourbon Street • New Orleans • 504.553.2299 • www.sonesta.com

34

noah

BONAPARTE PAIS

ON THE RECORD

Labor Unrest PARTS & LABOR’S CONSTANT FUTURE

gering samples nonstop Parts & Labor’s onstage. The cover art is as finely detailed as its comband found its positions. answer in Joe Kremer, singer/ PHOTO BY BROCK FETCH guitarist for tourmate Pterodactyl; Friel, in turn, is contributing electronics to Pterodactyl’s sets. “They’re going to be doing double duty every night for the entire tour,” Warshaw says. “In our original lineup, Dan was switching off between keyboards and guitar. In those days, he was making samples and basically juggling constantly. I was doing the same: I used to have an electronics table, and was playing bass. While that allowed us to be significantly louder, it also caused us to have significantly less fun playing live. I think having an extra person playing those instruments changes things and makes them more organic, as opposed to just making a drone and triggering it on and off. That can tend to get a little robotic. We really like playing as a four-piece.”

MAR

Parts & Labor with DOM and Pterodactyl 10 P.M. TUESDAY

15

HOWLIN’ WOLF DEN, 901 S. PETERS ST., 529-5844; WWW.THEHOWLINWOLF.COM

PARISH

C

past lineup. … There was also a concerted effort to really arrange tightly as a band. There’s a lot more parts that I feel are interlocking with this band, whereas in the past — especially moments on Receivers — we were just piling on layers of noises and sounds, not only fan samples but our own electronics, our own drums. This was more about the live performance: what each member does individually and where our strengths are, and playing to those strengths during the writing process.” Shedding guitarist Sarah Lipstate meant finding a replacement or returning to their old ways of trading instruments and trig-

3/15 Tennis plus La Sera plus Callers 3/16 Maps & Atlases and Fang Island 3/18 Jermaine Quiz presents MashUp NOLA 3/19 Lost Bayou Ramblers plus Brother Dege 3/21 Rock 92.3 present Young The Giant plus The Apache Relay plus Kittens

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 15 > 2011

liches be damned: Go ahead and judge Parts & Labor’s fourth album, Constant Future (out this week on Jagjaguwar), by its cover, says singer/bassist and creator B.J. Warshaw. “It’s very similar to the way we write music,” Warshaw says of his artistic process. “I’ll come up with sketches or ideas or mockups, and I’ll send images to (singer/keyboardist) Dan (Friel) and (drummer) Joe (Wong) and see what they think.” At first glance, the image appears straightforward: a tree, a field, an overcast sky. Look closer. Those clouds are floating dental X-rays, and the flora — the plant, the tree trunk, its leaves and branches — consists entirely of brightly colored hands. They belong to the record’s makers, as well as Warshaw’s girlfriend and family. “Each individual flower was handmade,” Warshaw says. “I took photos of our hands, cut them out and put them in Photoshop, printed them out and photocopied them. I use a lot of photocopying in all the artwork — that kind of collaged look. Then I hand-painted them with watercolors, assembled the collages and scanned them back in, and then assembled the bedrock of flowers.” The covers are created specifically for their contents, Warshaw explains, which draws one arc for both artist and band: the simple, impressionistic landscape of Rise, Rise, Rise (2003) and three silhouettes under a streaking sky on Jagjaguwar debut Stay Afraid (2006); the scorching sun and ashen landscape of 2007’s lava-spewing Mapmaker and the amorphous beast on 2008’s Receivers emitting rainbow smoke through eight spiny stacks on its back. The last LP was built around hundreds of found-sound samples submitted by fans. For Constant Future, Parts & Labor’s most tightly coiled, song-driven effort to date, the Brooklyn-based noise/rock band turned its focus inward. Tracks like “Skin and Bones” and “Echo Chamber” are hulking pop compositions, their groupshouted vocal hooks and squealing synths rippling atop crunchy electric guitars and motorik Krautrock drums. “Over the course of recording, we had this kind of soul-searching,” Warshaw says. “I feel like there are moments on this record that are representative of every other album that we’ve done, and every

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 15 > 2011

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MUSIC

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly. com; FAX:483-3116

STICK THIS IN YOUR EAR

preview Musical Phenomena

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

All show times p.m. unless otherwise noted. ALL SHOW TIMES P.M. UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

Tuesday 15 BACCHANAL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mark Weliky, 7:30 BANKS STREET BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; NOLA Treblemakers, 10 BEACH HOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Candy Riedl-Lowe, 7 BMC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Dana Abbott Band, 6; Royal Rounders, 8:30; Lagniappe Brass Band, 11 CHECK POINT CHARLIE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Nervous Duane, 7; Sequoyah Prep School, Riverwinds, Gone by Daylight, 11 CHICKIE WAH WAH â&#x20AC;&#x201D; New Orleans Nightcrawlers, 8 CIRCLE BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tom Paines, 6 D.B.A. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; New Orleans Cotton Mouth Kings, 9 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tom Hook, 9:30 EUCLID RECORDS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Baseball Project, 5 HOSTEL NEW ORLEANS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Soul School feat. Elliot Luv & the Abney Effect, 8 HOUSE OF BLUES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sharon Jones & the Dap-Kings, Los Po-boy-citos, 8 HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tennis, La Sera, Callers, 10 HOWLINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; WOLF (THE DEN) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Parts & Labor, DOM, Pterodactly, 9 IRVIN MAYFIELDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Victor Atkins, 8 JIMMY BUFFETTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Chad Reeves, 3; Brint Anderson, 9 KERRY IRISH PUB â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Crescent City Celtic Band, 8 MAPLE LEAF BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Rebirth Brass Band, 10 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jacqueline Francis, 7; Tom Henehan, 8; Luster, 9; Shay, 10; Natalie Palms, 11 OLD POINT BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Scott Jackson & Friends, 8 PRESERVATION HALL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Preservation Hall Stars feat. Shannon Powell, 8 REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Menomena, Megafaun, 8 ROCK â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; BOWL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brint Anderson, 8:30 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Thelonious Monk Institute Ensemble, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brett Richardson, 4; Smokinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Time Jazz Club, 6; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 10

Wednesday 16 12 BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brass-a-holics, 9 BACCHANAL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jazz Lab feat. Jesse Morrow, 7:30 BANKS STREET BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Old Glorys, 8; Andrew Duhon & Tony Italiano, 10 BIG ALâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SALOON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jumpinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Johnny Sansone Blues Party, 7 BLUE NILE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; United Postal Project, 8; Khris Royal & Dark Matter, 10 BMC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jameson Family Band, 6; Lynn Drury, 8:30; Blues4Sale, 11 CANDLELIGHT LOUNGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Treme

When MENSA gets around to hiring a house band, Portland, Ore., audio collagists Menomena (pronounced as the Muppets would) should get the right of first refusal. Danny Seim, Justin Harris and Brent Knopf, who recently left the band, had habitually been the smartest guys in the club, scrambling record titles into anagrams (the first Menomena album: I Am the Fun Blame Monster!), crafting liner notes as hand-animated flipbooks and using proprietary software to digitally loop recordings (personalized under the Kubrickesque rubric Deeler). But their most impressive achievement may have been making cerebral rock that hit closer to the thorax. On Barsuk releases Friend and Foe (2007) and Mines (2010), the band seems to be speaking its own amalgamated musical language: one thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s as catchy as pop, as glitchy as electronica, as classy as classical and as spazzy as free jazz. Swapping instruments and vocals onstage, they melt mountainous layered crescendos into river rapids of piano and punctuate round-robin harbingers of doom with a tromboneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nose-blown punch line. Megafaun opens. Tickets $12 in advance, $15 at the door. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Noah Bonaparte Pais

MAR

15

Menomena with Megafaun 9 p.m. Tuesday Republic, 828 S. Peters St., 528-8282; www.republicnola.com

Brass Band, 9 CHECK POINT CHARLIE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; T-Bone Stone, 7; Citizen Icon, 10:30; Coleman Jernigan Project, midnight CHICKIE WAH WAH â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Packway Handle Band, 5; Tom McDermott & Meschiya Lake, 8 CIRCLE BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jim O. & the No Shows feat. Mama Go-Go, 6 D.B.A. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tin Men, 7; Walter â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wolfmanâ&#x20AC;? Washington & the Roadmasters, 10 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Bob Andrews, 9:30 EIFFEL SOCIETY â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Vivaz!, 8 FRAT HOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Liquid Peace Revolution, Ozzy Cash, 10 HI-HO LOUNGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Elephant Stone, Supercluster, Casper, Cookies, 10 HOUSE OF BLUES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; G. Love & Special Sauce, Andrew Greene, 9:30 HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Fang Island, Maps & Atlases, 9:30 IRVIN MAYFIELDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sasha Masakowski, 5; Irvin Mayfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s NOJO Jam, 8 JIMMY BUFFETTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Lisa Lynn, 3; Joe Bennett, 6; Andy J. Forest, 9 KERRY IRISH PUB â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Fidgety Rabbit feat. Beth Patterson, 9 MAPLE LEAF BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Khris Royal & Dark Matter, 10 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; She Rides, 9; Jennifer Sluder, 10; J. Cavineau, 11 NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Meghan Swartz, 12 OLD OPERA HOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Vibe, 8:30 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Lars Edegran & Topsy Chapman feat. Palm Court Jazz Band, 8

PRESERVATION HALL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Preservation Hall Jazz Band feat. Shamarr Allen, 8 ROCK â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; BOWL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Swing-A-Roux, 8:30 SHAMROCK BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Beth Patterson, 9 SIBERIA â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Biters, The Booze, Burning Itch, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Delfeayo Marsalis & the Uptown Jazz Orchestra, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brett Richardson, 4; Orleans 6, 6; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10 YUKI IZAKAYA â&#x20AC;&#x201D; By and By, 8

Thursday 17 BACCHANAL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Courtyard Kings, 7; Vincent Marini, 9:30 BANKS STREET BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Fat Stupid Ugly People, Communion of Thieves, Orlu Saki & the Foot, 9 BAYOU PARK BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ron Hotstream & the F-Holes, 9 BLUE NILE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Gravity A, 10 BMC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Rambling Letters, 6; Coot, 8:30; Low-Stress Quintet, 10 BOOMTOWN CASINO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brandon Foret, 8 CAFE PRYTANIA â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Lollies, Atlas the Atom Smasher, Les Doux, 9 CHECK POINT CHARLIE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Domenic, 7; Happy Talk Band, 10; R. Scullyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rough Seven, midnight CHICKIE WAH WAH â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Smoking Time Jazz Club, 8 CIRCLE BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sam and Boone, 6 COLUMNS HOTEL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Fredy Omar, 8 D.B.A. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Paul Sanchez, 7; Louisiana Cane Cutters, 10 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

Todd Duke Trio, 9:30 HI-HO LOUNGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Stooges Brass Band, 10 IRVIN MAYFIELDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Roman Skakun, 5; Shamarr Allen, 8 JIMMY BUFFETTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jimmy James, 3; Colin Lake, 6; Captain Leo, 9 KERRY IRISH PUB â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Kenny Klein & friends, 11 a.m; Speed the Mule, 2; Rites of Passage, 7:30 LE BON TEMPS ROULE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Soul Rebels Brass Band, 11 THE MAISON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Influencia de Jazz, 7; Magnetic Ear, 10 MAPLE LEAF BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Trio, 10 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Nattie, 8; Frans Schumann, 9; Mario Ortiz, 10 OLD POINT BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Blues Frenzy, 6:30; Adam Crochet, 9 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tim Laughlin & Duke Heitger feat. Crescent City Joymakers, 8 PRESERVATION HALL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tornado Brass Band feat. Darryl Adams, 8 PRIME EXAMPLE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Donald Harrison, 8 & 10 ROCK â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; BOWL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Leon Chavis, 8:30 SATURN BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Alex McMurray, 9 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Hector Gallardo Quartet, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brett Richardson, 4; Miss Sophie Lee, 6; New Orleans Moonshiners, 10 THREE MUSES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Washboard Rodeo, 10 TIPITINAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jean-Eric, Big History, Super Nice Bros, 9 VAUGHANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 8:30 YUKI IZAKAYA â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Norbert Slama Trio, 8

Friday 18 12 BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Randy Jackson, 9 3 RING CIRCUSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; THE BIG TOP GALLERY â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Suave, Elliot Luv, DJ Yamin, DJ Dubla, 10 BANKS STREET BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Elliott Cohnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s All New Cosmic Sweat Society, 10 BMC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Moonshine & Caroline, 7; Mark Pentone & Smoky Greenwell Trio, 9; Rue Fiya, 10; One Mind Brass Band, 12:30 a.m. BOOMTOWN CASINO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Fleur de Lis, 9:30 CARROLLTON STATION â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Alex McMurray, 8:30 CHECK POINT CHARLIE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Stephanie Nilles, 7; Woodenhead, 10 CHICKIE WAH WAH â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Pfister Sisters, 5:30; Paul Sanchez, 8; Joan Caddell & the Midnight Choir, 10 CIRCLE BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jim O. & Sporadic Fanatics, 6 D.B.A. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Hot Club of New Orleans, 6; Johnny Vidacovich Trio feat. Matt Perine & Keiko Komaki, 10 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Rick Trolsen, 10 HANGAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Agalloch, Daniel Menche, Worm Ouroboros, 10 HERMES BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Shannon Powell Trio, 9:30 & 11 HI-HO LOUNGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Steve Eck, Suitcase Junkies, 10 HOUSE OF BLUES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Marsha Ambrosius, Melanie Fiona, 8 HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jermaine Quiz & guests, 10 HOWLINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; WOLF â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Lords of Acid, Angelspit, Radical G, Chant, 9 IRVIN MAYFIELDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tom Worrell, 5; Leon â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kid Chocolateâ&#x20AC;? Brown, 8; Burlesque Ballroom feat. Linnzi Zaorski, midnight

bestofneworleans.com

MUSIC

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Colin Lake, 3; Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 6 JUJU BAG CAFE AND BARBER SALON — Micheala Harrison, Todd Duke, 7:30 KERRY IRISH PUB — Damien Louviere, 5; Foot & Friends, 9 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Soul Project, 11 THE MAISON — Kristina Morales, 7; Daria & the Hip Drops, 10; Brass-a-holics, midnight MAPLE LEAF BAR — Gravy CD release feat. 101 Runners, 10 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — John Eubanks, 7; Fredy Omar, 10 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Damn Hippies, 7; Gallivan Burwell, 9; Gina Forsyth, 10; Ryan Chatelain, 11 NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — John Royen & Barry Martyn, 2 OLD POINT BAR — By & By String Band, 9:30 ONE EYED JACKS — Queens of the Stone Age, 9 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Clive Wilson & Palm Court Jazz Band, 8 PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Masters feat. Leroy Jones, 8 REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — Bassik, Bare, Ana Sia, 10 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 9:30 SIBERIA — Toxic Rott, Pallbearers, Solid Giant, Vapo Rats, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Ellis Marsalis Quartet, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 6:30; New Orleans Cottonmouth Kings, 10 ST. ROCH TAVERN — The Way, 9 TIPITINA’S — Drivin’ N Cryin’, 10 YELLOW MOON BAR — Michael James & His Lonesome, 9

Saturday 19

PAGE 39

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 15 > 2011

APPLE BARREL — Peter Orr, 7 BABYLON LOUNGE — Black Primer, Pests, Mad Dog, 10 BANKS STREET BAR — Joystick, Reagabomb, Stereohype, 10 BLUE NILE — Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 7 BMC — New Orleans Jazz Series, 3; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 6:30; Ellen Smith, 9:30; Ashton & the Big Easy Brawlers Brass Band, 12:30 a.m. BOOMTOWN CASINO — Blue Oyster Cult, 8 CAFE NEGRIL — Smoky Greenwell & the Blues Gnus, 10 CARROLLTON STATION — Cortland Burke Band, Hannah Krieger-Benson, 9:30 CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Green Mantles & Bedlamville Triflers, 8 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Iguanas, 10 CIRCLE BAR — Jazzholes, 6 D.B.A. — John Boutte, 8; Cedric Burnside Project CD release, 11 DECKBAR & GRILLE — Miche & MixMavens, 8 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Courtyard Kings feat. Kristina Morales, 10 EIFFEL SOCIETY — Sasha Masakowski & the Musical Playground, 7 EPIC CENTER — Bamboula 2000, 10 HERMES BAR — John Rankin Trio, 9:30 & 11 HOUSE OF BLUES — Raphael Saadiq, Quadron, 8 HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — Lost Bayou Ramblers & Brother Dege, 10 HOWLIN’ WOLF — Salva, B. Bravo, Epcot, Carmine P. Filthy and others, 9 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Bill Summers, 8; Brass-a-holics, midnight JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Joe Bennett, 3; Irving Bannister’s AllStars, 6 KERRY IRISH PUB — Buddy Francioni & Home Grown, 5; Lynn Drury & the Honeypots, 9 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Ramblin Letters, 11

37

Le Petit Théâtre du Vieux Carré with Jay, Andree, Bailey, Kelly Batt, Bryan Batt and Tom Cianfichi

&

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 15 > 2011

present

38

Oscar nominee and two-time Emmy Winner

Two-time Screen Actors Guild Award Winner

PATRICIA CLARKSON in BRYAN BATT LOVE LETTERS by A. R. Gurney

Two of the brightest stars in Hollywood and on Broadway star in a special benefit for Le Petit Théâtre du Vieux Carré for TWO PERFORMANCES ONLY!

Friday, March 18 at 8 p.m. Sunday, March 20 at 3 p.m. 616 St. Peter Street on Jackson Square Tickets: $100 A limited number of PRIORITY SEATS are available for $300 (two for $500) and include a meet-and-greet soiree with the cast after the show. Call (504) 522-2081 or visit www.lepetittheatre.com for tickets. This production of LOVE LETTERS is dedicated in loving memory of Gayle Batt.

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

PAGE 37 LOUISIANA MUSIC FACTORY — Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 3; HG Breland, 4; Crowbar, 5 THE MAISON — Dave Easley, 5; Ashton Hines & the Big Easy Brawlers, 10; Captain Green, midnight MAPLE LEAF BAR — Feed the Kitty, 10 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Kevin Clark, 10 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Michael James & his Lonesome Gracias, 7; Clint Kaufmann, 8; Mr. Steve, 9; Brittany Cean, 10 NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Pacelli Catholic High School Choir, 9:30 a.m; Cassandra Ankrum, Meghan Swartz & Brian Seeger, 11 a.m. OLD POINT BAR — Mike Burkhart, 9:30 ONE EYED JACKS — Metal Alliance Tour feat. Helmet, St. Vitus, Crowbar, Intronaut, Atlas Moth, Howl, Naam and others, 9 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lionel Ferbos & Palm Court Jazz Band, 8 PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Swing Kings feat. William Smith, 8 REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — Low, 8 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue

Swingers, 9:30 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Victor Goines & Delfeayo Marsalis, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — John Royan Trio, 3; Panorama Jazz Band, 6; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 10 TIPITINA’S — North Mississippi Allstars, 10

Sunday 20 BANKS STREET BAR — Open Mic feat. Ron Hotstream & the F-Holes, 9 BMC — Nola Music Series, 1; Christina Perez, 6; Andy J. Forest, 9; Kid Red, midnight CHAMPIONS SPORTS PUB & GRILL — Sam Cammarata, 8 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Mark Hummel’s Blues Harmonica Blowout feat. Johnny Sansone & Jason Ricci, 7 CIRCLE BAR — Micah McKee & Loren Murrell, 7 COLUMNS HOTEL — Chip Wilson, 11 a.m. COURT OF TWO SISTERS — Mary Flynn, 9:30 a.m. D.B.A. — Palmetto Bug Stompers, 6; Louisiana Hellbenders, 10 DONNA’S BAR & GRILL — Jesse McBride & the Next Generation Jazz Band, 9 EUCLID RECORDS — Des Ark, Pygmy Lush, Screaming Females, Thou, 2 HI-HO LOUNGE — Madison

Sqare Gardeners, Cave Singers, Lia Ices, 10 HOUSE OF BLUES — Sunday Gospel Brunch, 10 a.m; Collie Buddz, New Kingston, Los Rakas, DJ T Roy, 9 HOWLIN’ WOLF — Daedalus, TOKiMONSTA, Shlomo, Rekanize, Ryan Pearce, 9 HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Hot 8 Brass Band, 9 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Germaine Bazzle & Paul Longstreth, 7 JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 3; Cindy Chen, 6; Chad Reeves, 9 KERRY IRISH PUB — Traditional Irish Session, 5; Schatzy & Associates, 8 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Brass Sunday, 9 THE MAISON — Orange Kellin’s New Orleans Deluxe Orchestra, 4; Larry Scala, 7; Corporate America, 10 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Joe Krown Trio feat. Russell Batiste & Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 10 NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Stephen Dale & Tom Hook, 3 OLD POINT BAR — Jesse Moore, 3:30 ONE EYED JACKS — Mike Watt & the Missingmen, Lite & Narcissy, 9 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lucien Barbarin & Palm Court

Monday 21 APPLE BARREL — Sam Cammarata, 8 BACCHANAL — Jonathan Freilich, 7:30 BANKS STREET BAR — N’awlins Johnnys, 10 BJ’S LOUNGE — King James & the Special Men, 10 BLUE NILE — Armchairs, Arrah, Ferns (upstairs), 8; Big Pearl & the Fugitives of Funk, 9 BMC — Fun in the Pocket feat. Mayumi Shara, 5; Smoky Greenwell’s Monday Night Blues Jam, 9:30 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Jon Cleary, 8 D.B.A. — Glen David Andrews, 9

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DONNA’S BAR & GRILL — Les Getrex & the Blues All-Star Band, 9 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — John Fohl, 9:30 HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — Young the Giant, 8:30 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Bob French & the Original Tuxedo Jazz Band, 8 JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Truman Holland, 3; Brint Anderson, 6; Chad Reeves, 9 KERRY IRISH PUB — Lynn Drury, 9 LOUISIANA MUSIC FACTORY — Tyne Darling, 6 THE MAISON — James Copeland Band, 5; Jayna Morgan, 7 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Papa Grows Funk, 10 MUDLARK THEATRE — Rex Complex, Railbird, 8 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Danielle Thomas, 8; Big Tree, 9; Songwriter’s Symposium, 10 OLD POINT BAR — Brent Walsh Trio, 6:30 ONE EYED JACKS — Civil Wars, Grant Watts & the Old Family, 9 PRESERVATION HALL — St. Peter Street Playboys feat. Maynard Chatters, 8 REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — Hugh Cornwell, 8 THE SAINT — Moon Duo, TRMRS, Dives, 8

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SIBERIA — The Body, Whitehorse, Hull, Batillus, Mutilation Rites, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Charmaine Neville Band, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Dominic Grillo & the Frenchmen Street AllStars, 6; Jazz Vipers, 10 ST. ROCH TAVERN — Washboard Lissa Orchestra, 7

classical/ concerts HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION — 533 Royal St.,

523-4662; www.hnoc.org — Fri: Concerts in the Courtyard presents New Orleans Moonshiners, 6 TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH — 1329 Jackson Ave., 522-0276; www.trinitynola.com — Tue: Organ & Labyrinth, 6; Thu: Evensong Choir, 6:30; Fri-Sat: Bach Around the Clock, 7; Sun: Terry Rappold, St. Mary’s International Varsity Male Vocal Ensemble, 5; Mon: Taize, 6 TULANE UNIVERSITY — Dixon Hall, 865-5105 ext. 2; www. tulane.edu — Wed: New Orleans Friends of Music presents Kronos Quartet, 8; Mon: An Evening of Classical Song feat. Phyllis Treigle & Anne Copeland Sumich, 7:30

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 15 > 2011

Bringing you quality, consistency and value since 1971.

Jazz Band feat. Mark Braud, 8 THE PERFECT FIT BAR & GRILL — Brass-a-holics, 8 PRESERVATION HALL — Tommy Sancton’s New Orleans Jazz Band, 8 REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — Deep Dark Robot, 9 SIBERIA — Zoroaster, 9 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Roger Lewis, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Rights of Swing, 3; Kristina Morales, 6; Pat Casey & the New Sound, 10 TIPITINA’S — Cajun Fais Do Do feat. Bruce Daigrepont, 5:30 YUKI IZAKAYA — Luke Winslow King, 7

MUSIC

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This project is made possible by a grant from the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services. Photo courtesy of DePauw University Archives

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 15 > 2011

WW2-141248_OnTheAir_Gambit.indd 2

40

3/10/11 9:42 AM

STARTS FRIDAY, MARCH 18TH AT THEATRES EVERYWHERE NO PASSES ACCEPTED

FILM

LISTINGS

A ROOM WITH A VIEW

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

NOW SHOWING THE ADJUSTMENT BUREAU (PG-13) — A politician poised

to win a Senate seat falls for a beautiful ballet dancer, but mysterious men want to keep the two apart. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14, Prytania BATTLE: LOS ANGELES (PG-13) — After Earth is attacked by

unknown forces, Los Angeles becomes the last stand for mankind as the world’s cities crumble. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

BEASTLY (PG-13) — The

modern-day Beauty and the Beast follows a New York teen transformed into a monster to find true love. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 14

BEYOND ALL BOUNDARIES (NR) — The museum screens a 4-D

film, bringing audiences into battle using archival footage and special effects. National World War II Museum Solomon Victory Theater

BIG MOMMAS: LIKE FATHER LIKE SON (PG-13) — Martin

CEDAR RAPIDS (R) — A sheltered insurance agent (Ed Helms) has his boundaries pushed while representing his company on a convention. Canal Place DEEP SEA (NR) — Audiences experience the depths of the ocean. Entergy IMAX DINOSAURS ALIVE! (NR) —

David Clark helms a CGI jaunt in a Jurassic park. Entergy IMAX, Kenner MegaDome GNOMEO & JULIET (G) — The

animated film is a spin on the Shakespeare tale with feuding gardeners and their lawn gnomes and flamingos. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 14 GRAND CANYON: RIVER AT RISK (NR) — Robert Redford

narrates a 15-day river-rafting trip that highlights the beauty of the Colorado River. Entergy IMAX

HALL PASS (R) — Two women

Boy Crazy

One of the more amusing moments in Making the Boys is playwright Edward Albee explaining why he opposed the initial production of The Boys in the Band in New York City in 1968. Mort Crowley’s drama about a bunch of gay men celebrating a friend’s birthday was the first production to feature not just openly gay characters but all gay characters. The production debuted a year before the homosexual rights movement was ignited by the Stonewall riots. And though playwrights like Tennessee Williams had had huge success on Broadway, New York’s drama world didn’t embrace open discussion of homosexuality or feature noncloseted gay characters. Albee, who had declined to discuss his sexuality for decades, didn’t like negative gay stereotypes in the play, and he advised producers not to support it. But it was a nearly instant hit, and for many gay people just getting negative stereotypes on stage was a huge breakthrough. Within months it moved from off-Broadway to Broadway, where it had a five-year run, and it was made into a movie (pictured) in 1970. Clayton Robey’s entertaining documentary Making the Boys rehashes the homophobia of the 1950s and 60s, and it includes accounts of the Stonewall uprising. That material is good, though it’s been amply covered in other recent documentaries. But the main focus is Crowley, his early career (including his friendship and work with Natalie Wood) and the phenomenon that The Boys became. The film has great footage from Hollywood (including parties filled with acting legends at Roddy McDowall’s Malibu beach house) and interviews with playwrights and writers from Tony Kushner (Angels in America) to Dominick Dunne (who was a producer of the film version of The Boys in the Band), and it’s an interesting peek into what was a small world of writers and celebrities who circulated between Hollywood and New York. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students/seniors, $5 Zeitgeist members. — Will Coviello

Making the Boys 7:30 p.m. Friday-Thursday 18-24 Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

MAR

sensing their husbands’ restlessness decide to grant them one week of freedom to do whatever they want. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 I AM NUMBER FOUR (PG-13) — A teen who hides a secret

identity and extraordinary abilities must elude an enemy who seeks to destroy him. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

JUST GO WITH IT (PG-13) —

Adam Sandler and Jennifer Aniston star in the romantic comedy about a plastic surgeon who enlists the help of his assistant and her kids to woo a much younger schoolteacher. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 JUSTIN BIEBER: NEVER SAY NEVER (G) — The documen-

tary on the 16-year-old pop sensation features concert footage and screaming teenagers. AMC Palace 12, AMC

COLUMBIA PICTURES PRESENTS IN ASSOCIATION WITH RELATIVITY MEDIA AN ORIGINAL FILM PRODUCTION “BATTLE: LOS ANGELES” AARON ECKHART MICHELLE RODRI GUEZ RAMON RODRIGUEZ BRIDGET MOYNAHAN MUSIC EXECUTIVE AND MICHAEL PEÑA BY BRIAN TYLER PRODUCERS JEFFREY CHERNOV DAVID GREENBLATT NE-YO WRITTEN PRODUCED DIRECTED BY CHRIS BERTOLINI BY NEAL H. MORITZ ORI MARMUR BY JONATHAN LI EBESMAN

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 15 > 2011

Lawrence reprises his role as FBI agent Malcolm Turner who disguises himself as an old woman. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9

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Firth stars as King George VI, who unexpectedly becomes king when his brother Edward relinquishes the throne, in the Oscar Best Picture winner. AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 14 MARS NEEDS MOMS (PG) — In

the animated film, a 9-yearold finds out just how much he needs his mom when she’s abducted by Martians. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

MY DOG TULIP (NR) — A middle-aged British man adopts a German shepard who ends up becoming the perfect friend he’s always wanted. Chalmette Movies RED RIDING HOOD (PG-13) —

Amanda Seyfried stars in the reboot of the fairy tale.

RANGO (PG) — Johnny Depp is

the voice of a chameleon who finds himself in a Western town plagued by bandits. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

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THE ROOMMATE (PG-13) — A

college freshman is assigned a dorm room with a crazy person who becomes obsessed with her. Hollywood 7

TAKE ME HOME TONIGHT (R) —

A recent MIT grad employed at a video store is asked to an end-of-the-summer party by his high school crush, and the experience changes the course of his life. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 15 > 2011

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(Liam Niason) awakens after a car accident and discovers another man has assumed his identity. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9

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THE LINCOLN LAWYER (R) — A

slick Los Angeles attorney who operates out of the back of his Lincoln lands a case that isn’t what it appears to be.

SPECIAL SCREENINGS AFRICAN QUEEN (NR) —

Humphrey Bogart and Katharine Hepburn star in the 1951 film set in Africa during World War I. Tickets $5.50.

Noon Saturday-Sunday and March 15, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com BRIT WIT — The Big Top

screens British comedies every week. 7 p.m. Tuesday, 3 Ring Circus’ The Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com

CLIMATE REFUGEES — Michael

Nash’s documentary examines the plight of people around the world displaced by climatically-induced environmental disasters. A Skype Q&A with the filmmakers follows the screening. Free admission. 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Contemporary Arts Center, 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www.cacno.org

DOUBLE INDEMNITY (NR)— In

the 1944 film noir, an experienced insurance rep is talked into a murder/insurance fraud scheme by the seductive wife of one of his clients. Tickets $5.50. Noon SaturdaySunday and March 23, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 8912787; www.theprytania.com

THE FUGITIVE KID (NR) — Sidney Lumet’s 1960

drama, based on Tennessee Williams’s Orpheus Descending, stars Marlon Brando as a drifter who wanders into a small town in Mississippi and falls into a tragic love affair. The screening is in conjunction with the collection’s “Drawn to Life: Al Hirschfeld and the Theater of Tennessee Williams” exhibit. Free admission. 2 p.m. Sunday, Historic New Orleans Collection, 533 Royal St., 5234662; www.hnoc.org

THE JOURNEY OF THE LION (NR) — The documentary

follows a Jamaican Rastafari on a journey to find his roots and identity that takes him through three continents. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 Zeitgeist members. 6 p.m. Tuesday-Wednesday, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

KEEPER OF THE FLAME FILM FUNDRAISER — The fundraiser

for the film about Mardi Gras Indians culture features a sneak preview of the film, a discussion with filmmaker Brian Harrison Nelson and cast members, and a second line and performance by Guardians of the Flame Mardi Gras Indians. Call 231-5780 or email keeperoftheflamemovie@gmail.com for details. 6 p.m. Wednesday, International House, 221 Camp St., 553-9550; www.ihhotel.com

film is a portrait of the leaders of the Jamaican music movement and how Reggae became a worldwide phenomenon. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 Zeitgeist members. 8 p.m. Tuesday-Wednesday, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net MAKING THE BOYS (NR) — The documentary explores the making and legacy of The Boys in the Band, which is considered the first major play and film to revolve around gay characters. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 Zeitgeist members. 7:30 p.m. FridayMonday, then March 22-24, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net PUSHING THE ELEPHANT (NR) — A mother and daughter

separated during civil war in the Congo reunite more than a decade later. The screening is part of the monthly New Orleans Community Cinema series. Free admission. 6 p.m. Saturday, Antenna Gallery, 3161 Burgundy St., 957-4255; www. antennagallery.org

SOUTHERN STORIES (NR) — Filmmakers Paul Harrill

and Ashley Maynor present screenings of Gina, An Actress, Age 29, Quick Feet, Soft Hands and For Memories’ Sake. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 Zeitgeist members. 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Zeitgeist MultiDisciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 8275858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

YOUSSOU N’DOUR: RETURN TO GOREE (NR) — Pierre-Yves

Borgeaud‘s documentary follows Senegalese singer N’Dour on his journey to perform a concert in Gorée, an island that today symbolizes the West African slave trade. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 Zeitgeist members. 9:30 p.m. Friday-Monday, then March 22-23, Zeitgeist MultiDisciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 8275858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

chaun whose pot of gold was stolen goes on a killing spree. Tickets $8. Midnight FridaySaturday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com

AMC Palace 10 (Hammond), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 12 (Clearview), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 16 (Westbank), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 20 (Elmwood), (888) 2624386; Canal Place, 363-1117; Chalmette Movies, 304-9992 ; Entergy IMAX, 581-IMAX; Grand (Slidell), (985) 6411889; Hollywood 9 (Kenner), 464-0990; Hollywood 14 (Covington), (985) 893-3044; Kenner MegaDome, 468-7231; Prytania, 891-2787; Solomon Victory Theater, National World War II Museum, 5276012

MADE IN JAMAICA (NR) — The

Compiled by Lauren LaBorde

LEPRECHAUN (R) — A lepre-

LISTINGS

WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

ART

Inner Space

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

OPENING ST. TAMMANY ART ASSOCIATION. 320 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-8650; www. sttammanyart.org — Mem-

bers’ Gallery Group Exhibition, through Friday. Opening Wednesday. WINDSOR COURT HOTEL. 300 Gravier St., 522-1922; www. windsorcourthotel.com —

Photographs by Brian K. Miller. Artist’s reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday.

GALLERIES 022 GALLERY. 1022 Lowerline St., 301-0679; www.1022gallery. blogspot.com — Paintings by

Tim Trapolin, through April 18.

3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY. 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com — “Mwwwahahahhhaaa!”

mixed media by Ryan Ballard, through March 30.

811 GALLERY. 811 Howard Ave., 524-3872; www.francoalessandrini.net — Photographs

by Riccardo Lorenzi, through April 10.

A GALLERY FOR FINE PHOTOGRAPHY. 241 Chartres St., 568-1313; www.agallery.com — Photographs by Michael

Kenna; photographs by Sebastiao Salgado, through April.

Look at the Flower,” paintings, ceramics and photographs by gallery artists, through March 26.

ANGELA KING GALLERY. 241 Royal St., 524-8211; www. angelakinggallery.com — Paint-

David Borgerding’s finely crafted metal sculptures may resonate differently with different viewers. To some, they may look cellular. Living creatures are made up of cells, but Borgerding’s just happen to be several feet long and as finely made as aircraft components, leapfrogging our evolution from primal ooze to the space shuttle. But the cells and armatures of works like Aelu, Supo or Adawa can also appear mantislike, as if sleekly elegant insects had evolved on metallic asteroids somewhere in the reaches of outer space. But like the surrealist Joan Miro before him, Borgerding can return the mind of the viewer to the shadowy depths of inner space. Paulina Sierra’s sculptures deal with space and form in ways that are familiar yet spooky. In one, a bit of florid lace stocking conforms to the shape of a delicate female foot but is empty of flesh, and the effect is about as ornately ghostly as a recently shed snakeskin. That sense of emptiness within presence also appears in a life-size table set with a cup and saucer. A chair awaits its occupant, but like the cup and saucer and even the table itself, this is a gauzy lace concoction crystallized into a chair through a space-age hardening agent. Sagging under the weight of its gossamer filaments, it occupies a world of tangible auras where absence is suggested by presence in much the way that the scent of perfume on a pillow lingers like an afterimage. Ghostly too are Emily Farranto’s paintings in the adjacent chamber. Some are more fully realized than others, but in one a swimming pool shimmers with a quality of light that is as warm and inviting as it is elusive. Here the rays of a distant sun come to rest in a pleasantly diffuse and lightly chlorinated evocation of the infinite. — D. Eric Bookhardt

THRU MAR

19

ings by Steve Taylor, through Tuesday.

ANTON HAARDT FOLK GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www.antonart.com — Works

by Anton Haardt, Christopher Moses and others, ongoing. ARIODANTE GALLERY. 535 Julia St., 524-3233 — Works by Elsie

Semmes, Abe Geasland, Kiki Huston and Phillip Spence, through March. ART GALLERY 818. 818 Royal St., 524-6918 — Paint-

ings, sculpture and jewelry by local artists Noel Rockmore, Michael Fedor, Xavier de Callatay, Charles Bazzell, Bambi deVille and Ritchie Fitzgerald, ongoing.

ARTICHOKE GALLERY. 912 Decatur St., 636-2004 — Artists work on site in all media; watercolors and prints by Peter Briant, ongoing.

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Intimate Topographies: Work by Paulina Sierra Slowness: Paintings by Emily Farranto Coup d’Oeil Art Gallery, 2033 Magazine St., 722-0876; www.coupdoeilartconsortium.com

T H R U Recent Sculpture: Bronzes MAR and Stainless Steel Works by David Borgerding Gallery Bienvenu, 518 Julia St., 525-0518; www.gallerybienvenu.com

28

BARRISTER’S GALLERY. 2331 St. Claude Ave., 525-2767; www. barristersgallery.com — “Read

My Lips,” paintings by Terrence Sanders, through April 4.

BERGERON STUDIO & GALLERY. 406 Magazine St., 522-7503; www.bergeronstudio.com —

Photographs by Michael P. Smith, Jack Beech, Harriet Blum, Kevin Roberts and others, ongoing.

BERTA’S AND MINA’S ANTIQUITIES GALLERY. 4138 Magazine St., 895-6201 — “Louisiana!

United We Stand to Save Our Wetlands,” works by Nilo and Mina Lanzas; works by Clementine Hunter, Noel Rockmore and others; all ongoing. BRYANT GALLERIES. 316 Royal St., 525-5584; www.bryantgalleries.com — Paintings by

Dean Mitchell, ongoing.

PAGE 44

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ACADEMY GALLERY. 5256 Magazine St., 899-8111 — “A Fresh

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43

ART

LISTINGS

PAGE 43 BYRDIE’S GALLERY. 2422-A St. Claude Ave., www.byrdiesgallery.com — “Byrdie’s Land-

ing,” carved wood sculpture installation by Swamp Deville, through April 6. CALICHE & PAO GALLERY. 312 Royal St., 5882846 — Oil paintings by Caliche and Pao, ongoing. CALLAN FINE ART. 240 Chartres St., 524-0025; www.callanfineart.com — Works by Eugene

de Blass, Louis Valtat and other artists of the Barbizon, Impressionist and PostImpressionist schools, ongoing.

CARDINAL GALLERY. 541 Bourbon St., 522-3227 — Exhibition of Italian artists featuring

works by Bruno Paoli and Andrea Stella, ongoing.

CASELL GALLERY. 818 Royal St., 524-0671; www.casellartgallery.com — Pastels by

Joaquim Casell; etchings by Sage; oils by Charles Ward; all ongoing.

COLLECTIVE WORLD ART COMMUNITY. Poydras Center, 650 Poydras St., 339-5237; www.collectiveworldartcommunity.com — Paintings from the Blue Series by Joseph Pearson, ongoing. COLLECTIVE WORLD ART COMMUNITY. 2820 St Claude Ave., 339-5237; www.collectiveworldartcommunity.com — “An Artist’s Rage: Crimes Against Humanity,” paintings and installations by Gustavo Duque, through April 20. COLLINS C. DIBOLL ART GALLERY. Loyola University, Monroe Library, 6363 St. Charles Ave., fourth floor, 861-5456 — “In the Blink of an Eye,” photographs by Harold Baquet, through March 24. COUP D’OEIL ART CONSORTIUM. 2033 Magazine St., 722-0876; www.coupdoeilartconsortium.com — “Intimate Topographies,”

sculpture by Paulina Sierra; “Slowness,” paintings by Emily Farranto, both through Friday.

D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., 524-3936 — “Surroundings,” mixed-media sculpture by Allen Wynn, through March. DU MOIS GALLERY. 4921 Freret St., 818-6032 — “Emit,” works by William DePauw, Sean

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 15 > 2011

Friloux and Cory Knott, through April 3.

44

ELLIOTT GALLERY. 540 Royal St., 523-3554; www.elliottgallery.com — Works by gallery

artists Coignard, Engel, Papart, Petra, Tobiasse, Schneuer and Yrondi, ongoing.

FAIR FOLKS & A GOAT. 2116 Chartres St., 8729260; www.fairfolksandagoat.com — “Permanence,” paintings by Timothy Cavnar, through April 3. FREDRICK GUESS STUDIO. 910 Royal St., 5814596; www.fredrickguessstudio.com — Paint-

ings by Fredrick Guess, ongoing.

THE FRONT. 4100 St. Claude Ave.; www. nolafront.org — Works by Lee Deigaard, Alex

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Podesta, Tippy Tippens and Dave Greber, through April 3.

GALERIE D’ART FRANCAIS. 541 Royal St., 5816925 — Works by Todd White, ongoing. GALLERY 421. 421 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 898-5858 — More than 500 pieces of art by more than 50 artists, ongoing. GALLERY BIENVENU. 518 Julia St., 525-0518; www.gallerybienvenu.com — Sculpture by David Borgerding, through March 28.

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GEORGE SCHMIDT GALLERY. 626 Julia St., 5920206; www.georgeschmidt.com — Paintings by George Schmidt, ongoing. GRAPHITE GALLERIES. 936 Royal St., 565-3739 — “Sinners and Saints,” works by Joe Hobbs,

ongoing.

GUTHRIE CONTEMPORARY. 3815 Magazine St., 897-2688; www.guthriecontemporary.com —

“Schemata,” works by Susan Dory, ongoing.

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

HAROUNI GALLERY. 829 Royal St., 299-8900 — Paintings by David

Harouni, ongoing.

ISABELLA’S GALLERY. 3331 Severn Ave., Suite 105, Metairie, 779-3202; www. isabellasgallery.com — Hand-blown

glass works by Marc Rosenbaum; raku by Kate Tonguis and John Davis; all ongoing.

JAMIE HAYES GALLERY. 621 Chartres St., 592-4080; www.jamiehayes.com — New Orleans-style art by Jamie Hayes, ongoing. JAZZ & HERITAGE GALLERY. 1205 N. Rampart St., 558-6100; www.jazzandheritage.org — “Femme Fest,” an exhibition of female artists curated by the Women’s Caucus for Art of Louisiana, through April 15. JEAN BRAGG GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART. 600 Julia St., 895-7375; www.jeanbragg.com — “A Toast

to Louisiana Seafood,” a group exhibition of oil and acrylic works, through March. JON SCHOOLER GALLERY. 8526 Oak St., 865-7032; www.jonschooler.com — “Subliminal WOWs,” paintings by Jon Schooler, ongoing. JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY. 400A Julia St., 522-5471; www.jonathanferraragallery.com — “Wrapped,” sculp-

ture by Sidonie Villere, through April 9. “The Theatre of Cultural Strata: A Visual Journey of Urban Archeology and Cultural Veneer,” a multimedia exhibition by Krista Jusrisich, through May 2.

JULIE NEILL DESIGNS. 3908 Magazine St., 899-4201; www.julieneill.com — “Facade,” photographs by Lesley

Wells, ongoing.

KAKO GALLERY. 536 Royal St., 565-5445; www.kakogallery.com —

Paintings by Don Picou and Stan Fontaine; “Raku” by Joy Gauss; sculpture by Joe Derr; all ongoing. “Knead,” works by Kristian Hansen, Tora Lopez, John Oles and William Murphy, ongoing.

KURT E. SCHON. 510-520 St. Louis St., 524-5462 — The gallery specializes

in 18th and 19th century European oil paintings by artists from the French Salon and Royal Academy as well as French Impressionists.

L9 CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 539 Caffin Ave., 948-0056 — “Faces of Treme,”

MICHELLE Y WILLIAMS GALLERY. 835 Julia St., 585-1945; www.michelleywilliams.com — Works by Michelle Y.

Williams, ongoing.

NEW ORLEANS ARTWORKS. 727 Magazine St., 529-7279 — “The Saints

Go Green,” works by Chad Ridgeway, Teri Walker, Carol Rivers, Tish Douzart and Pamela Conway Caruso, through March 30.

NEWCOMB ART GALLERY. Woldenberg Art Center, Tulane University, 865-5328; www.newcombartgallery.tulane.edu — “Reflections on Water in Ameri-

can Painting,” through April 24.

OAK STREET GALLERY. 111 N. Oak St., Hammond, (985) 345-0521 — “Cuba on my Mind,” photographs by Katie Wainwright and Denise Tullier-Holly, through April. OCTAVIA ART GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www.octaviaartgallery.com — “An Earthly Paradise,”

works by Stefan Szczesny, through March 26.

PEARL ART GALLERY. 4421 Magazine St., 228-5840 — Works by Cindy and

Drue Hardegree, Erica Dewey, John Womack, Sontina, Lorraine Jones and S. Lee, ongoing. REINA GALLERY. 4132 Magazine St., 895-0022; www.reinaart.com —

“Vintage New Orleans Artists,” watercolors, etchings and folk art; “Patron Saints,” works by Shelley Barberot; both ongoing. RHINO CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS COMPANY. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www.rhinocrafts.com — Kathleen

Grumich, Vitrice McMurry, Deborah Morrissey, Cathy DeYoung and others, ongoing.

RIVERSTONE GALLERIES. 719 Royal St., 412-9882; 729 Royal St., 581-3688; Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 36, 566-0588; 733 Royal St., 525-9988; www.riverstonegalleries.net — Multimedia works by Ricardo Lo-

zano, Michael Flohr, Henry Ascencio, Jaline Pol and others, ongoing.

RODRIGUE STUDIO. 721 Royal St., 5814244; www.georgerodrigue.com — Works by George Rodrigue, ongoing. ROSETREE GLASS STUDIO & GALLERY. 446 Vallette St., Algiers Point, 366-3602; www.rosetreeglass.com —

works by Chandra McCormick and Keith Calhoun, ongoing.

Hand-blown glass work, ongoing.

LE DESIGNS LLC. 3512 Magazine St., 373-6413 — Jewelry by Vicki, paintings by Peter Drasutis and furniture by Whilite Design, through March.

Linde, ongoing.

LE PETIT SALON DE NEW ORLEANS. 906 Royal St., 524-5700 — Paintings

by Holly Sarre, ongoing.

LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia St., 522-5988; www.lemieuxgalleries.com — “Confluence,” works by Kathryn

Hunter, through April 16.

LOUISIANA CRAFTS GUILD. 608 Julia St., 558-6198; www.louisianacrafts. org — Group show featuring works from guild members, ongoing. MARTINE CHAISSON GALLERY. 727 Camp St., 304-7942; www.martinechaissongallery.com — “Altered

States,” works by Herman Mhire, through April 23.

RUSTY PELICAN ART. 4031 St. Claude Ave., 218-5727; www.rustypelicanart. com — Works by Travis and Lexi SALONE DELL’ARTES ARTEMISIA. 3000 Royal St., 481-5113 — “I Genti H2O,”

works by Shmuela Padnos, ongoing. SHEILA’S FINE ART STUDIO. 1427 N. Johnson St., 473-3363; www.sheilaart. com — Works by Sheila Phipps. SLIDELL CULTURAL CENTER. 2055 Second St., Slidell, (985) 646-4375 —

“The Talent Within: Creative Works from the Commission on the Arts,” through Thursday.

ST. TAMMANY ART ASSOCIATION. 320 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-8650; www.sttammanyart.org — Photographs by Robert Dutruch,

through April 9.

STELLA JONES GALLERY. Place St. Charles, 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 132, 568-9050 — “Losing My Religion,

Choosing My Confessions,” mixed media by Charly Palmer, through March.

STEVE MARTIN STUDIO. 624 Julia St., 566-1390; www.stevemartinfineart. com — Contemporary sculpture and paintings by Steve Martin and other Louisiana artists, ongoing. STUDIO BFG. 2627 Desoto St., 9420200; www.studiobfg.com — “Peel

Sessions: First Installment,” works by Tina Stanley, ongoing. STUDIO GALLERY. 338 Baronne St., Third Floor, 529-3306 — Works by YA/ YA artists, ongoing. THOMAS MANN GALLERY I/O. 1812 Magazine St., 581-2113; www. thomasmann.com — “Where’s the

Money?” group exhibit interpreting the economy, ongoing.

TRIPOLO GALLERY. 401 N. Columbia St., (985) 893-1441 — Works by Bill

Binnings, Robert Cook, Donna Duffy, Scott Ewen, Juli Juneau, Kevin LeBlanc, Ingrid Moses, Gale Ruggiero, Robert Seago and Scott Upton, ongoing. UNO-ST. CLAUDE GALLERY. 2429 St. Claude Ave. — “Dual Tense,” works

by Robyn Denny; “Functional for your Purpose,” works by Jason Derouin, through April 3.

VINCENT MANN GALLERY. 305 Royal St., 523-2342; www.vincentmanngallery.com — Paintings by Jacob Manguno and Luc Didier, through May 7. WMSJR. 1061 Camp St., 299-9455; www.wmsjr.com — Paintings by Will Smith, ongoing. A WORK OF ART GALLERY. 8212 Oak St., 862-5244 — Glass works by Juli

Juneau; photographs from the New Orleans Photo Alliance; both ongoing.

ZEITGEIST MULTI-DISCIPLINARY ARTS CENTER. 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net — “Analog Frontiers,” a collection of

steampunk art curated by Theodora Eliezer, through March.

CALL FOR ARTISTS ANTENNA GALLERY. The gallery

seeks work that uses, recreates or interprets meaning from the artist’s childhood artwork for a May exhibition. Email nataliemclaurin@ gmail.com for details. Submission deadline is April 20. COLD DRINK PRINTMAKING INVITATIONAL. Du Mois Gallery, 4921 Freret

St., 818-6032 — The gallery accepts submissions for the exhibition juried by New Orleans Museum of Art modern and contemporary art curator Miranda Lash. Email dumoisgallery@gmail.com for details. Submission deadline is March 31.

MUSEUMS ASHE CULTURAL ARTS CENTER. 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — “Ashe in Retrospect: 1998-2008,” photographs by

Morris Jones Jr., Eric Waters, Jeffrey Cook and others, ongoing. CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER. 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www.cacno. org — “As We See It: Youth Vision Quilt,” student-created quilt with more than 400 patches, ongoing. HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION. 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www.hnoc.org — “Drawn to Life:

Al Hirschfeld and the Theater of Tennessee Williams,” drawings by Hirschfeld, through April 2. “In Search of Julien Hudson: Free Artist of Color in Pre-Civil War New Orleans,” through April 20.

LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM PRESBYTERE. 751 Chartres St., 568-6968; www.lsm.crt.state.la.us — “Before

MI

NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM. 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — “Ours To Fight For: American Jews in the Second World War,” an exhibit on loan from the Museum of Jewish Heritage, through April 24. NEW ORLEANS AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM. 1418 Gov. Nicholls St., 566-1136; www.noaam.com — “The

American Dream,” the National Conference of Artists’ Martin Luther King Jr. art exhibition honoring Dr. Margaret Burroughs, through March 26. “Photography as a Healing Art,” photographs by Jim Belfon, through April 2. “Drapetomania: A Disease Called Freedom,” 18th- and 19th-century documents and artifacts about slavery from the Derrick Beard Collection, through May 28. NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma.org — “Residents and

Visitors: 20th Century Photographs of Louisiana,” a collaboration with the Historic New Orleans Collection, through March 27. “The Sound of One Hand: Painting and Calligraphy by Zen Monk Hakuin,” through April 17. “Lofty Ideals: Selections of Nineteenth-Century French Sculpture from the Permanent Collection,” through April 24. “Different Strokes for Different Folks: Glass Works from Harter, Jastremski and Sawyer Gifts,” through May 15.

OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART. 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www. ogdenmuseum.org — “Big-Hearted

Pots,” ceramic pots by Mark Hewitt; “North Carolina Craft Now,” an exhibition by the Center for Southern Craft and Design, through April 10. “A Life in Glass,” glass vessels by Richard Ritter; “Selections from ‘Partial to Home,’” photographs by Birney Imes, through April 15. SOUTHERN FOOD & BEVERAGE MUSEUM. Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood.org — “Aca-

dian to Cajun: Forced Migration to Commercialization,” a multimedia exhibit; “Laissez Faire — Savoir Fare,” the cuisine of Louisiana and New Orleans; all ongoing.

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During After,” photographs illustrating the impact of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, through August. “Living With Hurricanes: Katrina and Beyond,” an exhibition of stories, artifacts and science displays; “It’s Carnival Time in Louisiana,” Carnival artifacts, costumes, jewelry and others items; both ongoing.

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KKPROJECTS. 2448 N. Villere St., 415-9880; www.kkprojects.org —

MICHALOPOULOS GALLERY. 617 Bienville St., 558-0505; www.michalopoulos.com — Paintings by James Michalopoulos, ongoing.

ART

45

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 15 > 2011

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LISTINGS

GET IN ON THE ACT

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

THEATER 6X6. Le Chat Noir, 715 St. Charles Ave., 581-5812; www.cabaretlechatnoir.com — Six playwrights get a topic and one week to write a 10-minute-long play. Tickets $10. 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. CLOSER. AllWays Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www. marignytheatre.org — The lives of four strangers intertwine in Patrick Marber’s Tony Award-winning portrait of love and betrayal. Tickets $15 general admission, $10 students/seniors and on opening night (Thursday). 8 p.m. ThursdaySaturday, 6 p.m. Sunday through March 27. DON’T DRINK THE WATER. Slidell

Little Theatre, 2024 Nellie Drive, Slidell, (985) 641-0324; www.slidelllittletheatre.org — Woody Allen’s farce follows a family of tourists seeking refuge at an embassy behind the Iron Curtain. Tickets $14 general admission, $7 children. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday.

FANTASTIC MISTER FOX. Contem-

porary Arts Center, 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www.cacno.org — Roald Dahl’s adventure comes to life in cardboard tunnels, allowing audiences to crawl through the production’s sets. Tickets $20. Runs through April 3. Days and times vary; visit the CAC website for details.

GYPSY. Cutting Edge Theater at

INTERSTATE FRINGE. Michalopoulos Studio, 527 Elysian Fields Ave. — The two-day event features memorable offerings from the New Orleans and Houston Fringe Festivals. The New Orleans shows include Goat in the Road Productions’ Our Man and The Divine Feminine by Chard Gonzalez Dance Theatre. Visit www. nofringe.org for tickets. Tickets $15. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday. INTRINGULIS. Southern Rep Theater,

The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 522-6545; www. southernrep.com — Carlo Alban chronicles his experiences as an undocumented immigrant who became a TV and film actor. Tickets $29 Thursday and Sunday, $35 Friday-Saturday. 8 p.m. ThursdaySaturday, 3 p.m. Sunday.

LOVE LETTERS. Le Petit Theatre, 616 St. Peter St., 522-2081; www. lepetittheatre.com — Bryan Batt and Patricia Clarkson star in A.R. Gurney ‘s play about two people sharing their lives together through

handwritten letters. Proceeds from the play benefit Le Petit Theater. Tickets start at $100. 8 p.m. Friday, 3 p.m. Sunday. MAMA DRAMA. Actor’s Theatre of New Orleans, WTIX-FM Building, second floor, 4539 N. I-10 Service Road, Metairie, 456-4111 — A collection of vignettes about the joys, trials and tribulations of being a mother. Tickets $20 general admission, $18 students and seniors. 7:30 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 2:30 p.m. Sunday through April 2.

review By the Shorthairs

MARRERO ACTION. Anthony Bean Community Theater, 1333 S. Carrollton Ave., 862-7529; www.anthonybeantheater.com — Hal Clark’s play follows a man whose father’s stroke prompts him to return to New Orleans for the first time in 12 years. Tickets $20 general admission, $18 students and seniors. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday through March 27. RICK GRAHAM’S 2011 RENEW REVUE.

Le Chat Noir, 715 St. Charles Ave., 581-5812; www.cabaretlechatnoir. com — The annual cabaret show celebrating life in New Orleans features Yvette Hargis, Amanda Zirkenbach, Matthew Mickal and Jefferson Turner. Tickets $32 (includes $5 drink credit). Mystic Krewe of Satyricon performance 8 p.m. March 18 (call 525-4498 for that performance only). 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 6 p.m. Sunday through April 3.

SECONDARY CAUSE OF DEATH.

Rivertown Repertory Theatre, 325 Minor St., Kenner, 468-7221 — The play is Peter Gordon’s sequel to the comedic murder-mystery Murdered to Death, a satirical whodunit set in England. Tickets $30 general admission, $28 seniors and students, $15 children. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2:30 p.m. Sunday through April 3. THE SOUND OF MUSIC. Jefferson Performing Arts Center, 400 Phlox St., Metairie, 885-2000; www.jpas. org — A nun leaves the convent to serve as governess for the children of a strict widower in Rodgers and Hammerstein’s musical. Tickets $15-$35. 7:30 p.m. Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday through April 3. WEST SIDE STORY. Mahalia Jackson

Theater for the Performing Arts, 1419 Basin St., 525-1052; www.mahaliajacksontheater.com — The theater hosts the touring production of the stage-musical that interprets Romeo and Juliet as a story of gang warfare in 1950s New York City. Tickets start at $25. 8 p.m. TuesdaySaturday, 2 p.m. Saturday, 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Sunday. YOU CAN’T TAKE IT WITH YOU.

Playmakers Theater, 19106 Playmakers Road (off Lee Road), Covington, (985) 893-1671; www.playmakersinc. com — George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart’s Pulitzer Prize-winning play follows two star-crossed lovers. Tickets $15 general admission, $10 students. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday through April 3.

AUDITIONS A CHORUS LINE. Rivertown Reper-

tory Theatre, 325 Minor St., Kenner, 468-7221 — The theater seeks sing-

“An Ng on Eat Wel ... l!”

Barnum and Bailey step aside — and take your big, fierce cats with you. The Acro-Cats recently thrilled audiences at the Shadowbox Theatre. Now, these domestic felines don’t throw anyone into a panic when they prowl the stage, but they are willful. Cats are famously impervious to training and cooperation of any kind. And part of the fun of this show was when one of the performers decided not to perform. The small stage was crowded with miniature circus apparatus. Ringmaster Samantha White, wearing a black, long-tailed tux with purple satin lapels and kitty ears, directed the action. Tuna, a white, four-legged diva, was the unchallenged star, and she kicked off the show by turning on a light and unfolding a sign calling for applause. Watching cats perform is entertaining in itself, but original stunts kept the show lively. A cat on a skateboard rolled down a ramp with great aplomb. One kitty entered, pushing a miniature supermarket cart stuffed with who knows what. More conventional tricks included a cat crossing a tube from end to end and hanging upside down. And there were various leaps from one raised platform to another. One cat clawed up a very tall pole to a tiny platform and then leapt onto White’s back. Most of these cats are rescued animals. Pudge was found in a box by the side of a road. Others came from shelters. White, who hails from Chicago, says all these cats live with her and adds, “I’m not married.” For her main act, Tuna whizzed through various challenges: jumping through hoops and over hurdles. Finally, she faced a chicken in a bowling contest. The chicken shamed her and then shamed her even worse in a bell-ringing contest. The climax of the show featured a five-piece band consisting of guitar, drums, keyboard, tambourine and cowbell — all played by cats, except the tambourine which the chicken plucked at industriously. “This next song is going to sound a lot like the last,” White announced as the show ended, “It’s all original material.” — Dalt Wonk ers and dancers ages 17 and up for the production of the musical. Call 259-6338 or the theater for details. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. NORDC/NOBA CENTER FOR DANCE.

Tulane University, McWilliams Hall, 6823 St. Charles Ave., 865-5105 ext. 2; www.neworleansshakespeare.com — The partnership between the New Orleans Recreation Development Commission and the New Orleans Ballet Association holds auditions for its Summer Dance Intensive in July. Dancers must have at least two years of ballet training. Call 522-0996 for details. Ages 9 to 12 audition from 10 a.m. to noon, ages 13-18 at 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

Saturday. THE TAVERN. Playmakers Theater, 19106 Playmakers Road (off Lee Road), Covington, (985) 893-1671; www.playmakersinc.com — The theater seeks actors for its May production of George M. Cohan’s play. 2 p.m. Saturday-Sunday.

COMEDY TOMMY G & JAYSON CROSS.

Boomtown Casino, 4132 Peters Road, Harvey, 366-7711; www.boomtownneworleans.com — The stand-up comedians perform. Free admission. 8 p.m. Wednesday.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 15 > 2011

Attractions Salon, 747 Robert Blvd., Slidell, (985) 290-0760; www. cuttingedgeproductions.org — The musical based on the memoirs of burlesque dancer Gypsy Rose Lee focuses on her and her sister’s childhood with their overbearing stage mother. Tickets $18.50. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday through April 9.

STAGE

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EVENTS

WEDNESDAY • 3/16 • 9PM

St.Patrick’s

Eve

y Part

Parishioners

•FREE SHOW• $1 JAMESON SHOTS $2 GREEN BEER PINTS ALL NIGHT LONG FRIDAY • 3/18 • 9 PM

LOCAL SKANK • $5 4133 S. CARROLLTON AVE ( @ T U L A N E ) 301-0938

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

BE THERE DO THAT

spotlight Seeing Double

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

FAMILY Saturday 19 TENNIS CARNIVAL. Audubon Park

Tennis Facility, 6320 Tchoupitoulas St. — Kids ages 10 and under can sign up for spring and summer tennis programs at the United States Tennis Association’s event, which also features free instruction and prize giveaways. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

EVENTS Tuesday 15 FASHION WEEK NEW ORLEANS.

Sugar Mill, 1021 Convention Center Blvd., 586-0004; www.sugarmillevents.com — The event features more than 25 runway shows, a top designer competition and silent auctions benefiting the NO/AIDS Task Force. Visit www.fashionweeknola.com for details. Tickets $35 general admission, $25 students, $135 VIP week pass. 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Tuesday-Friday.

PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

Irish eyes — and many others — always smile during the annual St. Patrick’s Day block party traditionally hosted by Parasol’s Bar & Restaurant at the corner of Third and Constance streets. This year, however, revelers may think they’re seeing double as two green-themed bashes crank up right beside each other in the Irish Channel. The recent change in ownership at Parasol’s is the cause (see “Meat and Greet,” p. 51), and the upshot is dueling, adjacent parties this St. Patrick’s Day. John Hogan, the new owner of Parasol’s, has pledged to keep the traditional block party unchanged, with outdoor bars and beer trucks, food, music and Irish decor. Meanwhile, Jeff Carreras, the former operator of Parasol’s, will host the inaugural St. Patrick’s Day block party for his new Tracey’s Bar & Restaurant just one block away, with outdoor bars, traditional Irish eats, Celtic music outside, a DJ inside and giveaways throughout the day. Free admission. — Ian McNulty

MAR

17

St. Patrick's Day Block Parties 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday Parasol’s, 2533 Constance St., 302-1543; Tracey’s, 2604 Magazine St., 897-5413

MEET THE CURATOR. National

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 15 > 2011

Thursdays at Twilight

48

Garden Concert Series

THIS WEEK’S PERFORMANCE

Ven Pa´Ca Flamenco guitar

MARCH 17

World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — Curator Lou Levine discusses the museum’s “Ours to Fight For: American Jews in the Second World War” exhibit. 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

NINTH LES COMÉDIENS FRANÇAIS LECTURE. Historic New Orleans

Collection, 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www.hnoc.org — Professor Dana Kress and pianist Jean-Baptiste Monno present the lecture about the New Orleans free people of color community’s contributions to the literary and performing arts. Free admission. 6:30 p.m. SUGAR, SLAVERY, ART AND PATRONAGE IN THE AMERICAS, 17501950. Southern Food & Beverage

Museum, Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood.org — Kathie Manthorne discusses the visual culture of the sugar trade from colonial sugar trading to the present day. Free admission. 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Adults: $8 / Children 5-12: $3 Children 4 & Under = FREE Mint Juleps and other refreshments available for purchase For more information call

(504) 483-9488

Wednesday 16 AIRBEER & BOURBON PARTY. d.b.a.,

618 Frenchmen St., 942-3731; www. dbabars.com/dbano — Airbnb. com, the site that connects travelers with local accommodations, hosts a party with an hour of free beer and bourbon. Visit www.nolabash.eventbrite.com for details. Free admission. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. (free alcohol 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.) LUNCHBOX LECTURE. National

World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — The

semi-monthly lecture series focuses on an array of World War II-related topics. Call 528-1944 ext. 229 for details. Noon. NONPAC MEETING. Seventh District Station, 10555 Lake Forest Blvd. — The New Orleans Neighborhood Policing Anti-Crime Council holds its monthly meeting. 7 p.m. SPRING GREENING EVENT. Lower

9th Ward Village, 1001 Charbonnet St. — The event is a week-long revitalization effort in the Lower 9th Ward. Visit www.historicgreen. org for details. Admission $15 (for project materials). 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Wednesday-Monday, then March 22-24. TALENT SHOWCASE. Le Roux, 1700

Louisiana Ave. — Masse Media Consulting, KMP and Men of Business host a weekly “You’ve Got Talent” showcase open to all poets, singers, dancers and others. Call 899-4512 for details. General admission $10, performers $5. 9 p.m. to midnight.

A WOMAN’S SPIRITUAL JOURNEY SERIES. St. Francis Xavier Parish

Center, 444 Metairie Road, Metairie, 834-0340; www.stfrancisxavier.com — Catholic Women in Action hosts the four-part Lenten series that inclues Mass followed by panel discussions. Call 310-6981 or email awaldron@arch-no.org for details. 8 a.m.

WOMEN & WINE ON WEDNESDAYS.

Ralph’s on the Park, 900 City Park Ave., 488-1000; www.ralphsonthepark.com — The women’s networking and social event features wine specials. Visit www.women-

winewednesday.com for details. 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Thursday 17 BETWEEN JOY AND LAMENTATION: HURRICANES OF THE GULF OF MEXICO. Louisiana State Museum

Presbytere, 751 Chartres St., 5686968; www.lsm.crt.state.la.us — Theologian, ethicist and lawyer M. Christian Green explores the ethical questions raised by Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Free admission. 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

CRIMESTOPPERS ANNUAL LUNCHEON. Hilton New Orleans

Riverside, 2 Poydras St., 561-0500; www.hilton.com — The luncheon recognizes law enforcement as well as civic leaders, community members and corporations who are committed to community safety. Jefferson Parish Sheriff Newell Normand is the keynote speaker. Admission $50 in advance, $75 at the door. Noon to 1:45 p.m. FINN MCCOOL’S ST. PATRICK’S DAY BLOCK PARTY. Finn McCool’s Irish

Pub, 3701 Banks St., 486-9080; www.finnmccools.com — The party features free food, the “Irish Olympics,” karaoke and a book signing with Stephen Rea, author of Finn McCool’s Football Club: The Birth, Death, and Resurrection of a Pub Soccer Team in the City of the Dead.

FRIENDS OF THE JEFFERSON PUBLIC LIBRARY BIG BOOK SALE .

Pontchartrain Center, 4545 Williams Blvd., Kenner, 465-9985; www.pontchartraincenter.com — The sale includes used books, puz-

zles, DVDs, CDs, video tapes, music tapes and records. Call 455-2665 or email friendsjpl@yahoo.com for details. Free admission. 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, noon to 5 p.m. Sunday. HEALING STORY CIRCLE . Women With a Vision, 215 N. Jefferson Davis Pkwy., 301-0428; www. wwav-no.org — Women With a Vision hosts a healing circle for women who have been charged with a crime against nature or have been sex workers. 4 p.m. IRON RAIL LADIES’ NIGHT. The Iron Rail, 511 Marigny St., 948-0963; www.ironrail.org — Iron Rail offers a weekly creative space for women. Email ladiesnight.ironrail@gmail. com for info. 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. NEW ORLEANS HOME & GARDEN SHOW. Ernest N. Morial Convention

Center, 900 Convention Center Blvd. — The event showcases a variety of home-related products and services, plus cooking demonstrations and opportunities to meet renovation and design industry experts. Visit www.nolahomeandgardenshow.com for details. Tickets $9 general admission, free for children ages 12 and under. 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday, noon to 9 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday. SISTAHS MAKING A CHANGE . Ashe Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — The group offers lessons in African dance and more, along with nutrition, health and wellness seminars. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday and Monday.

TRACEY’S ST. PATRICK’S DAY BLOCK PARTY. Tracey’s, 2604 Magazine St.,

897-5413; www.traceysnola.com — The bar hosts its annual block party featuring Irish food and more. 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.

WINES & VINES: FABULOUS IN FRANCE . Longue Vue House and

Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 4885488; www.longuevue.com — The program features French wines paired with complementary foods. Admission $40. 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

Friday 18 FISH FRYDAYS. Our Lady of the

Rosary Church, 1322 Moss St., 4882659 — The church hosts weekly fish fry events during Lent. Visit www.fsjna.org for details. 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.

GENTILLY BUSINESS COMMUNITY BLOOD & BONE MARROW DRIVE. In

the Master’s Hands Salon & Spa, 3810 Elysian Fields Ave., 943-8873 — The blood drive is on behalf of two people diagnosed with lymphoma. Call 234-7443 or email anlewis3@gmail.com for details. 2 p.m. to 6 p.m.

LARK IN THE PARK. Pavilion of the

Two Sisters, City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 482-4888 — The Friends of City Park’s gala raises money for a new miniature golf course to be located in the park, and the event features food, auctions, drinks and music by Harvey Jesus and Fire. Call 483-9376 or visit www.friendsofcitypark. com/events for details. Admission $100 general admission, $90

bestofneworleans.com EVENTS

Friends of City Park. 7:30 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. ST. BALDRICK’S FOUNDATION EVENTS. Rivershack Tavern, 3449 River Road, Jefferson, 834-4938; www.therivershacktavern.com — Participants shave their heads to benefit the foundation, which raises money for childhood cancer research. Visit www.stbaldricks.org for details. Events are 9 p.m. Friday (Rivershack Tavern), noon Saturday (8300 Oak St. and Finn McCool’s Irish Pub, 3701 Banks St.). TULANE FAMILY BUSINESS CENTER FORUM .

Tulane University, Lavin-Bernick Center, Kendall Cram Lecture Hall — Bret Pinson of Pinson & Associates leads the workshop discussing “Leading and Leading Change: Understanding the Difference.” Call 8628482 or email familybiz@tulane.edu for details. 8 a.m. to noon.

WHERE Y’ART. New Orleans Museum of

Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 6584100; www.noma.org — The museum’s weekly event features music, performances, film screenings, family-friendly activities and more. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Fridays.

PRESENTED BY

Saturday 19 CATWALK FOR WATER . Metropolitan, 310

Andrew Higgins Drive, 568-1702; www.themetropolitannightclub.com — The Aveda Institutes of Louisiana’s fashion show featuring clothing made from recycled materials benefits the Gulf Coast Restoration Fund. Call 454-1400 for details. Admission $15. 7 p.m.

COPPER ENAMELING WORKSHOP. Rhino

Contemporary Crafts Company, The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www.rhinocrafts.com — The workshop covers the basics of copper enameling, and each participant will make one enameled pendant. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

LOS ISLENOS HERITAGE & CULTURAL SOCIETY FIESTA . Islenos Museum Complex, 1357

Bayou Road, 523-2245 — The two-day event celebrates Isleno culture with living history demonstrations, Isleno artisans, food, folk dancing and live music by Fredy Omar con su Banda, The Top Cats and others. Noon to 8 p.m. Saturday-Sunday.

PRESERVATION SALVAGE WORKSHOP. Preservation Salvage Store, 2801 Marais St., 947-0038; www.prcno.org — Participants work with salvaged materials from the Preservation Salvage Store to create picture frames. Email mallweiss@prcno.org for details. 10 a.m. to noon.

MASTER OF CEREMONIES

HONORARY THEATER CHAIRMAN

LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

BRYAN BATT

DENNIS G. ASSAF

JOHN O’ NEAL

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VIP TABLES FOR TEN

H A R R A H ’ S T H E AT E R

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FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 483-3129 MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED

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DENTAL CLEANING SPECIAL

RACE JUDICATA . Audubon Park, Shelter

10, 6500 Magazine St. — Proceeds from Loyola Law School’s 1-mile and 5K run/ walks benefit Boys Hope Girls Hope. Visit www.racejudicata.org for details. Admission $18-$25. 8:30 a.m. registration, 9:15 a.m. 1-mile run/walk, 10 a.m. 5K run/ walk.

SAVE CDP FAIR . Palmer Park, South

Claiborne and Carrollton avenues, 5231465 — The fair featuring a children’s area, game booths, an art market, food and live music by Jason Marsalis, Earphunk and others raises funds for the Child Development Program’s nursery school. Call 861-4120, email kid@cdpkid.com or visit www.cdpkid.com for details. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > MARCH 15 > 2011

JANE AUSTEN LITERARY FESTIVAL. The Jane Austen Foundation of Louisiana’s event features book signings, readings, lectures, contests and other activities celebrating the author. Call (985) 951-6460 or visit www.janeaustenfestival.org for the event schedule and location details. SaturdaySunday.

MONDAY, MARCH 28TH 7:00 PM - 10:00 PM

49

S:2.281”

EVENTS

NEW FESTIVAL MENU MARCH 22 STARTERS:

Savory Shrimp & Alligator Sausage Cheesecake Topped with a Chipotle Aioli

Buffalo Style Fried Calamari

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Pain Perdu of Duck Confit Sliced Sour Dough Grilled with Apple Butter, Duck Confit & Brie,Topped with Peach Chutney ENTREES: S:10.833”

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 15 > 2011

Tossed with a Tomato-Chili & Kalamata Olive Dressing & Parmesan Cheese

Blackened Flounder Topped with Crawfish Dynamite served with Lyonnaise Potatoes, sauteed Spinach & a Lemon Aoili

Deep Fried LOUISIANA GULF FISH Atop a Crab, Shrimp & Calamari Thai Coconut Curry Hot Pot

Pecan Crusted Louisiana Redfish Topped with Creole Meuniere Sauce & Crab & Truffle Micro Greens served over Acadian Popcorn Rice & Southern Greens

Filet of Beef Topped with a Green Peppercorn Demi-Glace & Boursin Cheese served with Truffle Smashed Potatoes & Grilled Asparagus

LUNCH HOURS TUES-FRI 11AM-2PM

DINNER HOURS MON-THUR 5:30-10PM FRI & SAT 5:30-10:30PM » Now accepting « Reservations for parties of 5 or more

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LISTINGS

SONG & SCORE SYMPOSIUM . Nunemaker Auditorium, Monroe Hall, Loyola University New Orleans, 6363 St. Charles Ave., 8652011; www.loyno.edu — The event focuses on the art of film scoring and commercial songwriting. Featured speakers include George S. Clinton, Christopher Young, Jay Weigel and Shy Carter. Call 460-5479 or email pbreagin@loyno.edu for details. Free admission. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Sunday 20 ABITA ARTISTS. 9th Street

Gallery, 71377 St. Mary St., Abita Springs — Local artists hold a monthly meeting. Call Lana at 898-3071 for details. 3 p.m.

CAR WASH FUNDRAISER. Sun Shades, 9121 Jefferson Hwy., 737-0150 — Members of the Archbishop Chapelle class of 2000 host the car wash benefiting a newly orphaned 5-year-old boy. 10 a.m. A DAY AT THE RACES. Fair

Grounds Race Course & Slots, 1751 Gentilly Blvd., 943-1415; www.fairgroundsracecourse. com — The New Orleans Alumni Chapter of Xavier University’s event benefits its scholarship fund, and admission includes the racing program and a buffet. Call 520-6782 or email xuclub1@ hotmail.com for details. Admission $45. 11 a.m. SUNDAY AT EMERIL’S.

Emeril’s Restaurant, 800 Tchoupitoulas St., 528-9393; www.emerils.com — The LSUHSC’s Department of Psychiatry hosts a dinner featuring cocktails and hors d’oeuvres followed by food and wine pairings. Call 5686004 for details. 5:30 p.m. WOOFSTOCK. Pelican Park,

Castine Center, 63350 Pelican Drive, Mandeville — The St. Tammany Humane Society’s annual event features lowcost pet vaccinations, live music, food, drinks, a vendor market and dog costume contests. Tickets $5 general admission, $2 children in advance; $10 general admission, $5 children at the door. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

YOUTH SERVICE BUREAU CHEF SOIREE. Bogue Falaya Park,

downtown Covington, (985) 892-1811 — The event features food and drinks from more than 100 restaurants, plus a raffle, live music and a fireworks display. Visit www. chefsoiree.com for details. Admission $125. 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.

SPORTS NEW ORLEANS HORNETS.

New Orleans Arena, 1501 Girod St., 587-3663; www. neworleansarena.com — The Hornets play the Phoenix

BE THERE DO THAT

Suns (Wednesday) and the Boston Celtics (Saturday). Visit www.nba.com/hornets for details. 7 p.m.

WORDS 17 POETS! LITERARY & PERFORMANCE SERIES. Gold

Mine Saloon, 705 Dauphine St., 568-0745; www.goldminesaloon.net — Poet Jean-Mark Sens reads. An open mic hosted by Jimmy Ross follows. Visit www.17poets.com for details. 7:30 p.m. Thursday. COOKBOOK CLUB. Garden

District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — Jessica Harris signs High On The Hog: A Culinary Journey from Africa to America. Bringing food is encouraged but not required. 6 p.m. Wednesday. DEBORAH HAMLIN . Maple Street Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www. maplestreetbookshop. com — The author signs My Optimism Is Killing Me. 6 p.m. Thursday. DINKY TAO POETRY. Molly’s

at the Market, 1107 Decatur St., 525-5169; www.mollysatthemarket.net — The bar hosts a free weekly poetry reading with open mic. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

EARL J. HIGGINS. Octavia Books, 513 Octavia St., 8997323 — The author signs Metairie, Ames, High: The Streets of Jefferson Parish. 6 p.m. Tuesday. ERIC BAUS. Ogden Museum of

Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — The poet signs and reads from his books. 3:30 p.m. Saturday.

INTERNATIONAL FICTION BOOK CLUB OF NEW ORLEANS.

Blue Cypress Books, 8126 Oak St., 352-0096 — The group discusses Elizabeth Bowen’s The Heat of the Day. 5:30 p.m. Wednesday.

LINDA YASNYI . Latter

Memorial Library, 5120 St. Charles Ave., 596-2625; www. nutrias.org — The author discusses self-publishing and reads from Selling the Shoes Without Touching the Feet. 2 p.m. Saturday. LIZ SCOTT MONAGHAN . St.

Tammany Parish Library, Causeway Branch, 3457 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (985) 6269779 — The author behind the persona Modine Gunch discusses Never Clean Your House during Hurricane Season. 1 p.m. Tuesday.

OCTAVIA BOOKS BOOK CLUB. Octavia Books, 513 Octavia St., 899-7323 — The group discusses William Faulkner’s Sanctuary. 10:30 a.m. Saturday. PASS IT ON . George & Leah McKenna Museum of African American Art, 2003

Carondelet St., 586-7432; www.themckennamuseum.com — Poet Gian “G-Persepect” Smith and Alphonse “Bobby” Smith host a weekly spoken-word and music event. Admission $6. 9 p.m. Saturdays. POETRY MEETING . New Orleans Poetry Forum, 257 Bonnabel Blvd., Metairie, 835-8472 — The forum holds workshops every Wednesday. 8 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. SAMANTHA PEREZ . Octavia

Books, 513 Octavia St., 8997323 — The author signs The Isleños of Louisiana. 6 p.m. Wednesday.

THE SCENE OF THE CRIME . St. Tammany Parish Library, Slidell Branch, 555 Robert Blvd., Slidell, (985) 893-6280; www.stpl.us — The group meets to discuss mystery novels the third Monday of each month, through December. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. SPOKEN WORD. Ebony Square, 4215 Magazine St. — The center hosts a weekly spokenword, music and open-mic event. Tickets $7 general admission, $5 students. 11 p.m. Friday. TAO POETRY. Neutral Ground Coffeehouse, 5110 Danneel St., 891-3381; www.neutralground.org — The coffeehouse hosts a weekly poetry reading. 9 p.m. Wednesday. TROY GILBERT. Southern

Food & Beverage Museum, Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 5690405; www.southernfood. org — The author signs Cafe Degas Cookbook. 2 p.m. Saturday.

UNIVERSES. Craige Cultural Center, 1800 Newton St., Algiers — The center hosts a weekly spoken-word, music and open-mic event. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Sunday. VALERIE MARTIN . Tulane University, Lavin-Bernick Center, Kendall Cram Lecture Hall — The author of Property, Trespass, Mary Reilly and others reads from her works. Free admission. 7 p.m. Monday. WALLACE STEVENS GROUP. New Orleans Lyceum, 618 City Park Ave., 460-9049; www. lyceumproject.com — The group meets every other Sunday to discuss the poet’s works. Call 460-9049 for details. 10 a.m. WRITERS’ CIRCLE . Maple Street Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www.maplestreetbookshop.com — The group reads and discusses books about writing, engages in writing exercises, and shares and critiques members’ works. This meeting discusses The Writing Life by Annie Dillard. 6 p.m. Monday.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Email Ian McNulty at imcnulty@cox.net. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <WHO LET THE DOGS OUT? > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >Dat Dog (5031 Freret St., 899-6883; www.datdognola.com) is a new eatery that takes the humble hot dog seriously. The short < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <PUTTING < < < < < < <EVERYTHING < < < < < < < < < <ON < < <THE < < < TABLE < < < < < < < < < < < < < <menu at this tiny joint is devoted to gourmet hot dogs, plus international sausages ranging from kielbasa to local crawfish sausage. They all go into big, grilled sourdough buns with toppings including guacamole and wasabi.

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B

ESSENCE OF SICILY

Swirl Wine Market (3143 Ponce de Leon St., 304-0635; www. swirlinthecity.com) has teamed up with a Mano (870 Tchoupitoulas St., 208-9280; www.amanonola.com) to host a Sicilian wine tasting guided by Robert Camuto, author of Palmento: A Sicilian Wine Odyssey. This March 20 event at a Mano will feature 12 Sicilian wines and an assortment of Sicilian small plates from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. The cost is $35. Call Swirl for reservations. On March 21, Camuto will be at Wine Institute of New Orleans (610 Tchoupitoulas St., 324-8000; www.winoschool.com) for another discussion and Sicilian wine tasting from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Admission is $25.

five 5 IN

Five Finds For Meatless Meals

BENNACHIN

1212 ROYAL ST., 522-1230

Traditional West African dishes include many meatless appetizers and entrees.

BOUCHERIE

8115 JEANNETTE ST., 862-5514 www.boucherie-nola.com

Meat and Greet PO-BOYS GET PARTISAN IN THE IRISH CHANNEL. BY IAN MCNULTY

F

PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

Meanwhile, today’s Parasol’s (2533 Constance St., 302-1543) is essentially an all new Parasol’s. It has an established name and well-known address but new owners, new recipes and the challenge to introduce itself to customers. The roast beef po-boy here is quite different from its predecessor, but it’s excellent by any standard. The beef is debris style, all tiny particles bound together in gravy as thick as a glaze. This too is packed into a Leidenheimer loaf, only here a streak of parsley-flecked garlic butter goes across the lid. That’s one example of how this new Parasol’s does business. It’s traditional and clearly has the basics down, but it puts some different ideas into play, too. That seems a sound course for a place trying to earn its own following, and it works out deliciously with the firecracker shrimp po-boy, in which large fried shrimp are coated in a mix of butter, hot sauce and garlic, and also with a clever novelty called the Irish sundae, which is a paper boat filled with horseradishlaced potato salad topped with debris. Given the New Orleans penchant for food nostalgia and the loyalty of so many local eaters, the story behind the Parasol’s and Tracey’s situation is bound to inspire some partisan posturing. But where it really matters, when you unwrap that po-boy at the table — or the bar top — what we have are two very good po-boy restaurants on the same block. Tracey’s is a bustling spot with an emerging reputation as an Uptown sports bar, and it’s clear Parasol’s is making an inspired effort to win the hearts and stomachs of skeptics. It doesn’t take a pair of emerald-colored glasses to see this is good news.

Despite the name, there are always thoughtfully composed vegetarian options.

CARMO

527 JULIA ST., 875-4132 www.cafecarmo.com

A casual Brazilian cafe with vegan dishes and mock meat.

GREEN GODDESS

307 EXCHANGE PLACE, 301-3347 www.greengoddessnola.com

Though meat abounds, look for multiethnic meatless dishes and tasting menus.

TAN DINH

1705 LAFAYETTE ST., GRETNA, 361-8008

A new specials board lists many vegetarian Vietnamese dishes.

Questions? Email winediva1@earthlink.net.

2009 3 Stones Sauvignon Blanc

MARLBOROUGH, NEW ZEALAND /

$15 RETAIL One of the world’s most noted areas for growing Sauvignon Blanc, New Zealand’s Marlborough region on the northern tip of the country’s south island produces distinctive wines with great style. This wine is fermented in stainless steel to retain its fresh flavors. Savor light citrus aromas followed by slightly tart flavors of grapefruit and lime balanced by melon, passion fruit and other tropical fruit bursts, hints of green pepper and delightful minerality. It has a clean and crisp finish with good acidity. Drink it with seafood, salads, soups, light meats, Asian and Cajun dishes. Buy it at: Dorignac’s. Drink it at: Bistro at Maison de Ville and Coquette.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 15 > 2011

or those out on a jolly spree this St. Patrick’s Day, all may seem copacetic in the Irish Channel. Parasol’s Bar & Restaurant and Tracey’s Bar & Restaurant are each hosting their own independent block parties for the holiday, though the two taverns are so close that the happy reveler may see it all as one big, green-clad bash. Once the paper shamrocks are put away, however, Parasol’s and Tracey’s will get back to a roiling new food rivalry that’s drawn a sharp line down the short block between them. In business since 1952 and long famous for its roast beef po-boys, Parasol’s made news last summer when its family owners sold the ramshackle corner joint to John and Thea Hogan, who moved here from Florida to buy the business. That didn’t sit well with Jeff Carreras, who had leased Parasol’s and operated the business there for 12 years. Carreras decided to open his own place, Tracey’s, just one block away, and he took with him his staff, his recipes and everything from the bar’s framed memorabilia to its battered beer coolers. That essentially makes Tracey’s (2604 Magazine St., 897-5413; www.traceysnola.com) the old Parasol’s in exile. Compared to the original place, Tracey’s is huge, airy and bright, though the food remains true to the Parasol’s heritage. This is where to find the roast beef po-boy you remember from down the street, with the beef done in thick shreds and long strands and served on Leidenheimer bread. Parasol’s bar snacks like fried pickles, fried okra and boudin balls also made the trip down the block, though so too did the annoying tendency of Parasol’s fried shrimp to shed their batter in the po-boy loaf.

There’s a new roast beef po-boy on the block at Parasol’s, which is under new ownership.

51

>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<

YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT >>>>>>>>>

>>>> MAURICE FRENCH PASTRIES — 3501 < < < < < < <Hessmer < Ave., Metairie, 885-1526; 4949 > > > > > > > > > W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 455-0830; www.mauricefrenchpas<<< tries.com — Maurice French Pas>> tries offers an array of continental <and < French baked goods as well as

specialty cakes and pies. No reservations. Hessmer Avenue: break< < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <fast < and lunch Mon.-Sat. West Napoleon: breakfast and lunch > > > > > > > > > > > > > Out > > >2 >Eat > >is>an > >index > > >of> Gambit > > > > >contract > > > > >advertisers. > > > > > > >Unless > > > >noted, > > > >addresses > > > > > >are > >for > >New > > >Orleans. > > > > > > > Tue.-Sat. >> Credit cards. $ Dollar signs represent the average cost of a dinner entree: $ — under $10; $$ — $11 to $20; $$$ —

$21 or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax 483-3116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

AMERICAN FAT HEN GRILL — 1821 Hickory Ave.,

Harahan, 287-4581; www.fathengrill.com — Fat Hen serves barbecue, burgers and breakfast. Pitcooked barbecue options include St. Louis-style spare ribs. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BAR & GRILL DINO’S BAR & GRILL — 1128 Tchoupitoulas St., 558-0900 — Dino’s kitchen serves burgers, chicken tenders, salads and wraps. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards and checks. $

861-7890; www.cafefreret.com — The cafe serves breakfast itemes like the Freret Egg Sandwich with scrambled eggs, cheese and bacon or sausage served on toasted white or wheat bread or an English muffin. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Fri.-Wed., dinner Mon.-Wed., Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ LAKEVIEW BREW COFFEE CAFE —

River Road, 834-4938; www.therivershacktavern.com — This bar and music spot offers a menu of burgers, sandwiches and lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

Carrollton Ave., 301-0938 — Shamrock serves burgers, shrimp or roast beef po-boys, Reuben sandwiches, cheese sticks and fries with cheese or gravy. No reservations. Dinner and late night daily. Credit cards. $

City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 483-9474 — Located in the old Casino Building, the cafe serves gourmet coffee, sandwiches, salads and ice cream. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SHAMROCK BAR & GRILL — 4133 S.

BARBECUE ABITA BAR-B-Q — 69399 Hwy. 59,

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 15 > 2011

CAFE CAFE FRERET — 7329 Freret St.,

5606 Canal Blvd., 483-7001 — This casual cafe offers gourmet coffees and a wide range of pastries and desserts baked in house, plus a menu of specialty sandwiches and salads. Breakfast is available all day on weekends. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

THE RIVERSHACK TAVERN — 3449

52

No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

Abita Springs, (985) 892-0205 — Brisket and pork are specialties at this Northshore smokehouse. The half-slab rib plate contains six ribs and a choice of two sides. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ WALKER’S BAR-B-QUE — 10828

Hayne Blvd., 281-8227; www.cochondelaitpoboys.com — The makers of the Jazz Fest cochon de lait po-boy serve pork, ribs, chicken and more. The family feast includes a half-slab of ribs, half a chicken, brisket, pork and sausage, and sides. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Saturday. Cash only. $

BREWPUB CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — 527

PARKVIEW CAFE AT CITY PARK —

PRAVDA — 1113 Decatur St., 581-1112; www.pravdaofnola.com — Pravda is known for its Soviet kitsch and selection of absinthes, and the kitchen offers pierogies, beef empanadas and a petit steak served with truffle aioli. No reservations. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ RICCOBONO’S PANOLA STREET CAFE — 7801 Panola St., 314-1810

— Specialties include crabcakes Benedict and the Sausalito omelet with spinach, mushrooms, shallots and mozzarella. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily. Credit cards. $

TERRAZU — 201 St. Charles Ave., 287-

0877; www.terrazu.net — Located in the lobby of Place St. Charles, Terrazu serves sandwiches like the Brie cheese press with turkey, Brie, spinach and sweet and spicy raspberry coulis in pita bread. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $

VINE & DINE — 141 Delaronde St.,

Decatur St., 522-0571; www.crescentcitybrewhouse.com — Live jazz and German-style beers complement creative cooking at this brewpub. Pan-seared redfish St. Louis is topped with fried oysters and barbecue sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

361-1402; www.vine-dine.com — The cafe serves cheese boards and charcuterie plates. There also is a menu of sandwiches, quesadillas, bruschettas, salads and dips. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

BURGERS

CHINA ORCHID — 704 S. Carrollton

BUD’S BROILER — Citywide; www. budsbroiler.com — Bud’s Broiler is known for charcoal-broiled burgers topped with hickory-amoked sauce. The Clearview Parkway and 24-hour City Park location also offer shrimp and catfish po-boys.

CHINESE Ave., 865-1428; www.chinaorchidneworleans.com — Choose from a wide array of Chinese dishes. Sizzling black pepper beef or chicken is prepared with onions, red and green peppers and brown sauce and served on a hot plate with

steamed rice on the side. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ CHINA ROSE — 3501 N. Arnoult

Road., Metairie, 887-3295 — Lomi Lomi combines jumbo shrimp, pineapple and water chestnuts wrapped in bacon, fries them golden brown and serves them on a bed of sautéed vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

FIVE HAPPINESS — 3511 S. Carrollton

Ave., 482-3935 — The large menu offers a range of dishes from wonton soup to sizzling seafood combinations served on a hot plate to sizzling Go-Ba to lo mein dishes. Delivery available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

JUNG’S GOLDEN DRAGON — 3009

Magazine St., 891-8280; www. jungsgoldendragon2.com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, Thai and Korean cuisine. Grand Marnier shrimp are lightly battered and served with Grand Marnier sauce, broccoli and pecans. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

THREE HAPPINESS — 1900 Lafayette

St., Suite 4, Gretna, 368-1355; www. threehappiness.com — Three Happiness serves Chinese and Vietnames dishes and dim sum specials on weekends. Westlake duck features tender duck with snow peas, corn, straw mushrooms and napa cabbage. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TREY YUEN CUISINE OF CHINA —

600 N. Causeway Approach., Mandeville, (985) 626-4476; 2100 N. Morrison Blvd., Hammond, (985) 345-6789; www.tryyuen.com — House specialties include fried soft-shell crab with Tong Cho sauce, and alligator and mushrooms in oyster sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

PINKBERRY — 300 Canal St.; 5601

Magazine St., 899-4260; www. pinkberry.com — Pinkberry offers frozen yogurt with an array of wet and dry topping choices including caramel, honey, fruit purees, various chocolates and nuts and more. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CONTEMPORARY 5 Fifty 5 — 555 Canal St., 553-5638;

www.555canal.com — New Orleans dishes and Americana favorites take an elegant turn in dishes such as the lobster mac and cheese. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

BAYONA — 430 Dauphine St., 525-

4455; www.bayona.com — House favorites include sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce and the appetizer of grilled shrimp with black-bean cake and coriander sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$$ FEAST NEW ORLEANS — 200 Julia

St., 304-6318; www.feastneworleans.com — Feast serves rustic European dishes in a casual setting. Cock-a-Leekie is a dish of braised chicken with cream, bacon, plums, leeks and red potatoes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ THE GREEN GODDESS — 307 Ex-

change Alley, 301-3347; www.greengoddessnola.com — Chef Chris DeBarr’s contemporary cooking combines classic techniques, exotic ingredients and culinary wit. Big Cactus Chilaquiles feature poached eggs on tortillas with salsa verde, queso fresca and nopalitos. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Thu.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

ONE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE —

8132 Hampson St., 301-9061; www. one-sl.com — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes like char-grilled oysters topped with Roquefort cheese and red wine vinaigrette, and a memorable cochon de lait. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CREOLE COFFEE/ DESSERT ANTOINE’S ANNEX — 513 Royal St.,

581-4422; www.antoines.com — The Annex is a coffee shop serving pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. The Royal Street salad features baby spinach and mixed lettuces with carrots, red onion, red peppers, grapes, olives, walnuts and raspberry vinaigrette. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

BEN ’N JERRY’S — 3500 Veterans

Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 887-5656 — Ben ’n Jerry’s offers rich ice creams in signature flavors, ice cream cakes, frozen drinks, fruit smoothies and sundaes. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713 St.

Louis St., 581-4422; www.antoines. com — The city’s oldest restaurant offers a glimpse of 19th century French Creole dining. Signature dishes include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GUMBO SHOP — 640 St. Peter St., 525-1486; www.gumboshop.com — Gumbo and New Orleans classics such as crawfish etouffee dominate the menu. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

LE CITRON BISTRO — 1539 Religious

St., 566-9051; www.le-citronbistro. com — Located in a historic building, the quaint bistro serves start-

ers like chicken and andouille gumbo and fried frogs legs. Entrees include choices like fried chicken, Gulf fish and burgers. Reservations accepted. Dinner Wed.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000 N.

Peters St., 524-4747 — This casual restaurant serves Creole favorites. The menu includes crawfish etouffee, boiled crawfish, red beans and rice and bread pudding for dessert. Outdoor seating is adjacent to Dutch Alley and the French Market. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

DELI KOSHER CAJUN NEW YORK DELI & GROCERY — 3519 Severn Ave., Me-

tairie, 888-2010; www.koshercajun. com — This New York-style deli specializes in sandwiches, including corned beef and pastrami that come straight from the Bronx. No reservations. Lunch Sun.-Thu., dinner Mon.-Thu. Credit cards. $

MARTIN WINE CELLAR — 714 Elmeer Ave., Metairie , 896-7350; www. martinwine.com — Sandwiches, salads, hot sandwiches, soups and lunch specials are available at the deli counter. No reservations. Lunch daily. Credit cards. $

DINER DAISY DUKES — 121 Chartres St., 561-

5171; www.daisydukesrestaurant. com — Daisy Dukes is known for its seafood omelet and serves a wide variety of Cajun spiced Louisiana favorites, burgers, po-boys and seafood. No reservations. Open 24 hours daily. Credit cards. $$

STEVE’S DINER — 201 St. Charles Ave., 522-8198 — Steve’s serves hot breakfasts until 10 a.m. Lunch features sandwiches, salads and hot plate lunches such as fried catfish and baked chicken Parmesan. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $

FRENCH FLAMING TORCH — 737 Octavia St.,

895-0900; www.flamingtorchnola. com — Enjoy classic French dishes from escargot in garlic butter to veal liver or steak au poivre. Reservations accepted. Lunch Mon.Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ MARTINIQUE BISTRO — 5908 Mag-

azine St., 891-8495; www.martiniquebistro.com — Try dishes such as Steen’s-cured duck breast with satsuma and ginger demi-glace and stone-ground goat cheese grits. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GOURMET TO GO BREAUX MART — 315 E. Judge Perez,

Chalmette, 262-0750; 605 Lapalco Blvd., Gretna, 433-0333; 2904 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-5565; 9647 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 737-8146; www.breauxmart.com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux” as well as weekday specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

INDIAN JULIE’S LITTLE INDIA KITCHEN AT SCHIRO’S — 2483 Royal St., 944-

6666; www.schiroscafe.com — The cafe offers homemade Indian dish-

es prepared with freshly ground herbs and spices. Selections include chicken, lamb or shrimp curry or vegetarian saag paneer. Schiro’s also serves New Orleans cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $ NIRVANA INDIAN CUISINE — 4308

Magazine St., 894-9797 — Serving mostly northern Indian cuisine, the restaurant’s extensive menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TAJ MAHAL INDIAN CUISINE — 923-

C Metairie Road, Metairie, 836-6859 — The traditional menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways, including curries and tandoori. Vegetarian options are available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

ITALIAN CAFE GIOVANNI — 117 Decatur

St., 529-2154; www.cafegiovanni. com — Chef Duke LoCicero serves inventive Italian and Louisiana cooking. Shrimp Dukie features Louisiana shrimp and a duck breast marinated in Cajun spices served with tasso-mushroom sauce. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

RICCOBONO’S PEPPERMILL RESTAURANT — 3524 Severn Ave., Metairie,

455-2266 — This Italian-style eatery serves New Orleans favorites like stuffed crabs with jumbo lump crabmeat with spaghetti bordelaise and trout meuniere with brabant potatoes. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TONY MANDINA’S RESTAURANT — 1915 Pratt St., Gretna, 362-2010;

www.tonymandinas.com — Tony Mandina’s serves pasta, veal parmigiana, veal Bordelasie and specialties like shrimp Mandina and battered eggplant topped with shrimp and crabmeat in cream sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

JAPANESE KYOTO — 4920 Prytania St., 891-

3644 — Kyoto’s sushi chefs prepare rolls, sashimi and salads. “Box” sushi is a favorite, with more than 25 rolls. Reservations recommended for parties of six or more. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

MIKIMOTO — 3301 S. Carrollton Ave., 488-1881; www.mikimotosushi.com — Sushi choices include new and old favorites. The South Carrollton roll includes tuna tataki, avocado and snow crab. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Delivery available. Credit cards. $$ MIYAKO JAPANESE SEAFOOD & STEAKHOUSE — 1403 St. Charles

Ave., 410-9997; www.japanesebistro.com — Miyako offers a range of Japanese cuisine, with specialties from the sushi or hibachi menus, chicken, beef or seafood teriyaki, and tempura. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

ROCK-N-SAKE — 823 Fulton St., 581-7253; www.rocknsake.com — Rock-n-Sake serves a wide selection of sushi, sashimi and rolls or spicy gyoza soup, pan-fried soba

PAGE 54

Come enjoy our delightful Vietnamese items such as

Winter & Spring, along with all of your favorite CHINESE and VEGETARIAN dishes.

LUNCH SPECIALS starting at $5.45 Daily soup or Salad with your lunch for only $1.95 DINE IN • TAKE OUT CATERING • DELIVERY 3635 Prytania St.

(at Amelia)

NOLA 70115

(504)899-5129 For full Menu please visit our web site:

www.moonnola.com

CRISPY LEMON GRASS SHRIMP w/SOFT RICE VERMICELLI $8.95

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 15 > 2011

SPRING ROLLS, PHO, CRISPY LEMON GRASS SHRIMP, which is perfect for

53

Out2Eat page 52

Weekly Specials Now Serving

Alcohol!

WEEKLY

WINE SPECIALS

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614 South Carrollton Ave., New Orleans 504-866-9301 • www.jazminecafe.com Tuesday-Sunday 11am-9pm

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noodles with chicken or seafood and teriyaki dishes. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.Sun. Credit cards. $$

LOuISIaNa CONtEMPORaRY BOMBAY CLUB — 830 Conti St., 5860972; www.thebombayclub.com — The duck duet pairs confit leg with pepperseared breast with black currant reduction. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ BOUCHE — 840 Tchoupitoulas St., 267-

7485; www.bouchenola.com — This wine bar and restaurant serves creative dishes like tasso truffle mac and cheese with three cheeses and Mornay sauce, and crispy duck breast with Grand Marnier sweet potatoes and vanilla-balsamic extract. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

MILA — 817 Common St., 412-2580;

www.milaneworleans.com — MiLA takes a fresh approach to Southern and New Orleans cooking, focusing on local produce and refined techniques. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri. dinner Mon.-Sat. $$$

RALPH’S ON THE PARK — 900 City Park

7329 FRERET • 861-7890 (1 block off Broadway)

Now Accepting NOLA Bucks!

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > MARCH 15 > 2011

Sandwich Specials!

54

monday: Pulled Pork tuesday: Cuban wednesday: BBQ Shrimp thursday: Chicken Parmesan friday: Soft Shell Crab

Ave., 488-1000; www.ralphsonthepark. com — Popular dishes include baked oysters Ralph, turtle soup and the Niman Ranch New York strip. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

6215 WILSON ST.

515 HARRISON AVE.

LAKEVIEW • 484-0841

3570 — Chef Michelle Matlock offers contemporary Louisiana cooking. Chambord duckling is served with cherry vinaigrette. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

TOMMY’S WINE BAR — 752 Tchoupitoulas St., 525-4790 — Tommy’s Wine Bar offers cheese and charcuterie plates as well as a menu of appetizers and salads from the neighboring kitchen of Tommy’s Cuisine. No reservations. Lite dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEDItERRaNEaN/ MIDDLE EaStERN ATTIKI BAR & GRILL — 230 Decatur St.,

PYRAMIDS CAFE — 3151 Calhoun St., 861-

9602 — Mediterranean dishes include such favorites as sharwarma prepared on a rotisserie. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEXICaN & SOutHWEStERN COUNTRY FLAME — 620 Iberville St.,

on Room Restaurant & Plantati

2 ENTREES FOR THE PRICE OF 1

CHOOSE YOUR ENTREES FROM OUR SPECIAL DINNER MENU, TUES-FRI 4-9PM One coupon per table-Second Entree of equal or greater value May not be used with any other offer or Gift Certificate

5725 JEFFERSON HWY | HARAHAN, LA (CORNER OF EDWARDS) | 504-733-3000

SANTA FE — 3201 Esplanade Ave., 948-

0077 — This casual cafe serves creative takes on Southwestern cuisine. Fried green tomatoes are topped with grilled shrimp and roasted chili remoulade and capers. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MuSIC aND FOOD GAZEBO CAFE — 1018 Decatur St., 525-

8899; www.gazebocafenola.com — The Gazebo offers Cajun and Creole dishes. The New Orleans sampler rounds up jambalaya, red beans and rice and gumbo. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ HOUSE OF BLUES — 225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www.hob.com/neworleans — Try Voodoo Shrimp with rosemary cornbread. The gospel brunch features local and regional groups. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

THE MARKET CAFE — 1000 Decatur St., 527-5000; www.marketcafenola.com — Dine on seafood in platters or po-boys or highlighted in dishes such as crawfish pie, crawfish etouffee or shrimp Creole. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — 626

Frenchmen St., 949-0696; www.snugjazz.com — Creole and Cajun fare pepper the menu along with creations such as the fish Marigny, topped with Gulf shrimp in Creole sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

REDEMPTION — 3835 Iberville St., 309-

587-3756; www.attikineworleans.com — Attiki features a range of Mediterranean cuisine including entrees of beef kebabs and chicken shawarma. Reservations recommended. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $$

HARAHAN • 737-3933

tas and chile rellenos. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

522-1138 — Come in for fajitas, pressed Cuban sandwiches made with hickorysmoked pork and char-broiled steaks or pork chops. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

JUAN’S FLYING BURRITO — 2018 Magazine St., 569-0000; 4724 S.Carrollton Ave. 486-9950; www.juansflyingburrito.com — This wallet-friendly restaurant is known for its meal-and-a-half-size signature burritos. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ NACHO MAMA’S MEXICAN GRILL —

3242 Magazine St., 899-0031; 1000 S. Clearview Pkwy., Harahan, 736-1188; www.nachomamasmexicangrill.com — These taquerias serve Mexican favorites such as portobello mushroom faji-

NEIGHBORHOOD KATIE’S RESTAURANT — 3701 Iberville St.,

488-6582; www.katiesinmidcity.com — The Cajun Cuban includes roasted pork, grilled ham, cheese and pickles pressed on buttered bread. There also are salads, burgers and Italian dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, Dinner Tue.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ KOZ’S — 515 Harrison Ave., 484-0841; 6215 Wilson St., Harahan, 737-3933; www.kozcooks.com — Louisiana favorites such as seafood platters, muffulettas and po-boys, ranging from hot sausage to cheeseburger, are available at Koz’s. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

RAJUN CAJUN CAFE — 5209 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 883-5513; www. rajuncajuncafe.com — The cafe serves soups, salads, po-boys, muffulettas, seafood plates and a few entree platters. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

PIZZa MARKS TWAIN’S PIZZA LANDING —

2035 Metairie Road, Metairie, 832-8032; www.marktwainspizza.com — Disembark at Mark Twain’s for salads, poboys and pies like the Italian pizza with salami, tomato, artichoke, sausage and basil. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NONNA MIA CAFE & PIZZERIA — 3125 Esplanade Ave., 948-1717 — Nonna Mia uses homemade dough for pizza and offers salads, pasta dishes and panini. Gourmet pies are topped with ingredients like pancetta, roasted eggplant, and prosciutto. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

REGINELLI’S — 741 State St., 899-1414; 817 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 712-6868; 874 Harrison Ave., 488-0133; 3244 Magazine St. 895-7272; 5608 Citrus Blvd., Harahan, 818-0111; www.reginellis.com — This New Orleans original offers a range of pizzas, sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

R&O’S RESTAURANT — 216 Old Hammond Hwy., 831-1248 — R&O’s offers a mix of pizza and Creole and Italian seafood dishes. There’s everything from seafood gumbo to po-boys and muffulettas. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $

SLICE PIZZERIA — 1513 St. Charles Ave.,

525-7437; 5538 Magazine St., 897-4800 — Neapolitan-style pizza rules, but you can buy pizza by the slice and add or subtract toppings as you choose. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

THEO’S NEIGHBORHOOD PIZZA — 4218 Magazine St., 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., 302-1133; www.theospizza.com — There is a wide variety of specialty pies or build your own from the selection of more than two-dozen toppings. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ WIT’S INN — 141 N. Carrollton Ave., 486-

1600 — This Mid-City bar and restaurant features pizzas, calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers for snacking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SaNDWICHES & PO-BOYS MAGAZINE PO-BOY SHOP — 2368 Maga-

zine St., 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of po-boys filled with everything from fried seafood to corned beef to hot sausage to veal. There are breakfast burritos in the morning and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Cash only. $

MAHONY’S PO-BOY SHOP — 3454 Magazine St., 899-3374; www.mahonyspoboys.com — Mahoney’s serves traditional favorites and original poboys like the Peacemaker, which is filled with fried oysters, bacon and cheddar cheese. There are daily lunch specials as well. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PARKWAY BAKERY AND TAVERN — 538 N. Hagen Ave., 482-3047 — Parkway serves juicy roast beef po-boys, hot sausage po-boys, fried seafood and more. No reservations. Kitchen open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $ TRACEY’S — 2604 Magazine St., 899-

2054; www.traceysnola.com — The roast beef po-boy dripping with garlicky gravy is the highlight of a menu transplanted from the former Parasol’s to this Uptown bar. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Cash only. $

SEaFOOD GRAND ISLE RESTAURANT — 575 Convention Center Blvd., 520-8530; www.grandislerestaurant.com — Grand Isle offers seafood options from raw oysters to lobster St. Malo with combines Maine lobster, shrimp and mussels in seafood broth. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ JACK DEMPSEY’S — 738 Poland Ave.,

943-9914 — The Jack Dempsey seafood platter serves a feast of gumbo, shrimp, oysters, catfish, redfish and crawfish pies, plus two side items. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat. and dinner Wed.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ LA COTE BRASSERIE — 700

Tchoupitoulas St., 613-2350; www. lacotebrasserie.com — This stylish restaurant serves an array of raw and cooked seafood. Tabasco and Steen’s Cane Syrup glazed salmon is served with shrimp mirliton ragout. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

RED FISH GRILL — 115 Bourbon St., 5981200; www.redfishgrill.com — Seafood creations by chef Brian Katz dominate a menu with favorites like hickory-grilled

redfish, pecan-crusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ VILLAGE INN — 9201 Jefferson Hwy.,

737-4610 — Check into Village Inn for seasonal boiled seafood, raw oysters, fried seafood platters, po-boys, pasta or pizza. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

SOuL FOOD BIG MOMMA’S CHICKEN AND WAFFLES — 5741 Crowder Blvd., 241-2548; www.

bigmommaschickenandwaffles.com — Big Mamma’s serves combinations like the six-piece which includes a waffle and six wings served crispy or dipped in sauce. Breakfast is served all day. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., Lunch daily, dinner Sun. Credit cards. $

StEaKHOuSE RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE — Harrah’s

Hotel, 525 Fulton St., 587-7099; 3633 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 888-3600; www.ruthschris.com — Ruth’s top-quality steaks are broiled in 1,800-degree ovens and arrive at the table sizzling. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

taPaS/SPaNISH MIMI’S IN THE MARIGNY — 2601 Royal

St., 872-9868 — Mushroom Manchego Toast is a favorite here. Or enjoy hot and cold tapas dishes ranging from grilled artichokes to calamari. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

VEGA TAPAS CAFE — 2051 Metarie Road, 836-2007; www.vegatapascafe.com — Vega’s mix of hot and cold tapas dishes includes a salad of lump crabmeat on arugula with blood orange vinaigrette, steamed mussels and shrimp with tomatoes and garlic in caper-basil cream. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$$

VIEtNaMESE AUGUST MOON — 3635 Prytania St.,

899-5129; www.moonnola.com — August Moon serves a mix of spring rolls and pho soup as well as many popular Chinese dishes and vegetarian options. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

DOSON NOODLE HOUSE — 135 N. Carrollton Ave., 309-7283 — Noodles abound at this Mid-City eatery, which excels at vinegary chicken salad over shredded cabbage, as well as bowls of steaming pho. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards and checks. $$

PHO HOA RESTAURANT — 1308 Manhat-

tan Blvd., 302-2094 — Pho Hoa serves staple Vietnamese dishes including beef broth soups, vermicelli bowls, rice dishes and banh mi sandwiches. Bo kho is a popular beef stew. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

PHO NOLA — 3320 Transcontinental Drive, Metairie, 941-7690; www.phonola.com — Pho NOLA serves spring rolls and egg rolls, noodle soups, rice and vermicelli dishes and po-boys. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PHO TAU BAY RESTAURANT — 113 Westbank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, 368-9846 — Enjoy Vietnamese beef broth and noodle soups, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, shrimp spring rolls with peanut sauce and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Wed. & Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

NOLA MARKETPLACE

CASCADE STABLES IS NOW OFFERING A

AROUND AUDUBON PARK! Rides will be held Fri, Sat, & Sun on the hour from 1:00pm-4:00pm Please call (504) 891-2246 for Reservations! Age 8 and up

In Home Personal Training

3 TON A/C condenser & installed

GET IN SHAPE FOR SPRING BREAK!

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"Where we bring the gym to you"

LESSON PROGRAM

FOR CHILDREN 4 TO ADULT

GROUPS COUPLES

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Group Lesson

WE BEAT ALL COMPETITORS!

4950

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464-1267

All lessons are in the riding arena with an instructor

Residential • Commercial

Service Calls $

20 min for $25

HARRY'S

LAKEVIEW CLEANING SERVICE

TENANDUNDERTENNIS

HOUSE HELPERS Susana Palma

AFTER CONSTRUCTION CLEANING

Light/General Housekeeping • Heavy Duty Cleaning Summer Cleaning • Supplies Provided

504-250-0884 • 504-286-5868 Fully Insured & Bonded Locally owned & serving New Orleans area for 19 years

504-899-0005

tobacco • pipes Hookahs • Vaporizers

www.upinsmokeneworleans.com

Dance the Day Away

$30 for a 45 min

A “Mini Lesson” is a one-on-one 20 minute private lesson offered for children ages 4&5 to learn the basics of horseback riding before moving up into half hour private lessons or 45 minute group lessons (Starting at age 6).

11am to 7pm daily

Exp 4/1/2011

The barn is closed on Mondays!

Private Lesson

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5 YEAR WARRANTY

• KIDS NEW!

Lessons by appointment only Tues - Sun, 9am-6pm

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Come Visit Us At Our New Location!

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Call us today for your free consultation INDIVIDUALS •

YOUR GUIDE TO: MERCHANDISE • SERVICES • EVENTS ANNOUNCEMENTS • AND MORE

• Small JobS • RepaiRS • inStall

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Harry's Helpful Ace Hardware

~ Open House Monday May 21st ~ Classes include hip hop, latin, kickboxing, pilates, ballet body, and body sculpting

6500 Spanish Fort Blvd • (504) 834-1233

CRISTINA’S

CLEANING SERVICE

Sat. 3/19 10 am - 1 PM

Let me help you with your

FREE Instructions from Area Tennis Professionals!

After Construction Cleaning

Visit: NewOrleansTennis.com for more information

cleaning needs including

Residential & Commercial Licensed & Bonded

232-5554 or 831-0606

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 15 > 2011

Uptown• 504-896-1500 Metairie • 504-896-1550

in Lake Vista

55

EMPLOYMENT CLASSIFIEDS EMPLOYMENT $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Earn Extra income assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! CALL OUR LIVE OPERATORS NOW! 1-800-405-7619 ext. 2450 http:// www.easywork-greatpay.com Paid In Advance! Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net

CAREER PREPARATION EARN $75 - $200 HOUR. Media Makeup Artist Training. Ads, TV, Film, Fashion. One week class. Stable job in weak economy. Details at http://www.AwardMakeUpSchool.com 310-364-0665

BEAUTY SALONS/SPAS

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT DRIVERS/DELIVERY

MIND-BODY-FITNESS

DRIVERS

Some Local & Out/Back. Free Health Ins.& Benefits. CDL-A w/Hazmat, Tanker End., TWIC Card & 1 yr TT Exp. Required 1-888-380-5516

MODELING/ACTING PHONE ACTRESSES FROM HOME. BEST PAY OUTS, BUSY SYSTEM, BILINGUAL/SP A+. Weekends a must! Land Line / Good Voice 1-800-4037772. LIPSERVICE.NET

POSITIONS WANTED PRIVATE SITTER SEEKING WORK I am a Certified CNA+. Sit w/elderly, sick & children. Menus, tube feedings & sitz baths. If I may be of service please call Joni @ 427-1445.

NOTICE

Massage therapists are required to be licensed with the State of Louisiana and must include the license number in their ads.

RESTAURANT/HOTEL/BAR ELEVEN 79 Restaurant

in the Warehouse District

Seeks Exp Pantry/Line Cook.Call 504-299-1179 & provide resume for interview.

HEALING ARTS VOLUNTEER

in search of talented HAIRSTYLIST COLORIST APPRENTICE

Remote Energy Healing Repair tears in energy field, charge chakras, remove negative energy, toxins, static electrics, heavy metals. Restore Physical body frequencies. Psychic clearing. ACamurlu@gmail. com 973.931.713

Please Call

568.0050

for interview Information Systems

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 15 > 2011

REDEFINED

56

Offers Volunteer Opportunities. Make a difference in the lives of the terminally ill & their families. Services include: friendly visits to patients & their families, provide rest time to caretaker, bereavement & office assistance. School service hours avail. Call Volunteer Coordinator @ 504-818-2723 #3016

LOOK WHAT’S COOKING ... Ralph Brennan’s newest property at

growth, challenge & community Valero Energy Corporation is committed to delivering long-term value to all stakeholders - our employees, communities, investors and customers - by pursuing profitable, value-enhancing strategies with a focus on world-class operations. Realizing our employees are our greatest asset, we help them develop and grow personally while empowering teams to achieve together. Valero is accepting applications for an I/S Analyst at our St. Charles Refinery, located at 14902 River Road, Norco, Louisiana.

2700 Metairie Road Opening Soon

NOW HIRING ALL POSITIONS Competitive salary & great benefits! Apply online rbmet@neworleans-food.com or fax resume 504-581-9795 Drug free workplace

High school diploma or GED required. Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science, Engineering, or related field preferred. Three years of experience with Windows XP, Microsoft Office, Desktop Hardware, and Customer Service required. Successful completion of the TWIC (Transportation Worker Identification Card) process required.

Apply online at www.valero.com Valero Energy is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer that values the ideas, perspectives and contributions of our diverse workforce.

Jeannie LMT #3783-01. Flexible appointments. Uptown Studio or Hotel out calls. 504.894.8856 (uptown)

BYWATER BODYWORKS

Swedish, deep tissue, therapeutic. Flex appts, in/out calls, OHP/student discounts, gift cert. $65/hr, $75/ 1 1/2hr. LA Lic# 1763 Mark. 259-7278

MASSAGE BY JAMIE

SW/DT or Gen Relaxation. Safe, priv & quiet location. Awesome work. $60/hr & $95/1.5hr. 8am-9pm. 504-2311774. LA#509

QUIET WESTBANK LOC

Swedish, Relaxing Massage. Hours 9am-6pm, M-F. Sat 10-1pm $70. LA Lic #1910. Sandra, 504-393-0123.

A Touch of

Aloha La Lic #2983

massage & body work

pain management & relaxation • Lomi Lomi - 90 minutes • Deep Tissue • Swedish evening appts avail. 6 -10pm weekdays. 10am-7pm on weekends.

504-258-3389

2209 LaPalco Blvd

I/S AnAlySt

The Valero Refining Customer Support team is looking for a motivated team member with excellent customer service skills. This team is responsible for supporting Desktop Hardware and Software, Telephones, Network Infrastructure, Cable Plant, and other I/S needs.

LICENSED MASSAGE A BODY BLISS MASSAGE

www.atouchofaloha.massageplanet.com Member of BBB Providing Therapeutic Massage/Non Sexual

Irrigation Specialist

Maintain and install all zoo and park irrigation systems. Runs all hand operated systems as needed, inspects all irrigation systems, repairs breaks, adjusts watering times, notes box and panel failures. Must maintain files on each system, and trim plant growth affecting the systems. Also includes weed-eating and spraying all fence lines, including perimeter fence lines at ground level around zoo. Qualifications: Three to five years experience in maintaining and installing Hunter and Rainbird irrigation systems. Must be able to safely operate and maintain power tools and equipment. Experience in herbicidal application preferred. Proven ability to work without supervision. Apply online at www.auduboninstitute.org or email resume to jobs@auduboninstitute.org

CLASSIFIEDS

REAL ESTATE

Ann de Montluzin Farmer

broker

Historic House and Luxury Home Specialist Residential /Commercial Sales and Leasing, Appraisals.

JOIN US FOR THE NEXT MFC MEETING

Multifamily Report by Schedler & Associates with Madderra & Cazalot Thursday, April 7, 2011 @ Vincent’s Restaurant 4411 Chastant St., Metairie $30 members • $35 non-members

(504) 895-1493 (504) 430-8737

farmeran@gmail.com

HBA- 2424 N Arnoult Rd • Metairie, LA 70001

Licensed in Louisiana for 32 years, building on a real estate heritage since 1905

817 AMELIA STREET $249,000 IRISH CHANNEL

Not a shotgun! 2 small cottages joined in the middle creating one unique single home, Granite counters, central air and heat, nice wood floors, and recycled wooden paneling lend a rustic charm. Small yard makes this a great condo alternative.

Michael L. Baker, ABR/M, CRB, HHS President Realty Resources, Inc. 504-523-5555 • cell 504-606-6226 Licensed by the Louisiana Real Estate Commission for more than 28 years with offices in New Orleans, LA 70130

BEECHGROVE & CLAIBORNE HOMES Tammy Schindler 504- 373-5581 804 Sherry Lane Westwego, LA 70094 Managed by NDC Real Estate Management

DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENT GROUP

& METRO WIDE APARTMENTS 304-HOUSE (4687) www.BrunoInc.com PARTNERSHIP IN PROTECTION Commercial Services 137 Canvasback Drive, St. Rose, LA 70087

(504) 486-5846

with

New Orleans, LA 70123-2306 (504) 731-8777

5035 BLOOMFIELD STREET Jefferson, LA 70121 (504) 733-8381

FONTENELLE & GOODREAU INSURANCE, LLC 4508 CLEARVIEW PKWY SUITE 200 METAIRIE, LA 70006 PHONE (504) 454-8939 • FAX (504)454-8979

Washers and Dryers • Gated • Home Office Spaces Pet Friendly • 24/7 Emergency Maintenance 24/7 Online Resident Services Features vary by community.

INTERESTED IN JOINING THE COUNCIL? CONTACT: KATHY D. BARTHELEMY, COUNCIL DIRECTOR (504) 837-2700 OR KATHY@HOME-BUILDERS.ORG WWW.MFCNO.COM Affiliated with

H O M E B U I L D E R S A S S O C I AT I O N O F G R E AT E R N E W O R L E A N S

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 15 > 2011

APARTMENTS

5403 POWELL STREET

57

reaL esTaTe

OLD METAIRIE

SHOWCaSe METAIRIE

MID CITY 217 N. SCOTT ST.

1/2 OFF FIRST MONTH OLD METAIRIE SECRET

GENTILLY

WAGGAMAN

FRENCH QUARTER

1 or 2 BR, Sparkling Pool, Bike Path, 12’ x 24’ Liv.Rm, Sep Din, King Master, No Pets, No Sect 8, $699 & $799 . 504-236-5776

227 CODIFER BLVD

Old Met 2 br lower duplex. Lg fenced yd, off st pkg, small pet OK. Walk to everything! $1100. 504-908-6751

Great 1 Bdrm Condo for Rent in Metairie! Gated Community, ground floor unit, reserved parking outside your door! Fitness Ctr & Pool! Granite & SS appliances. Washer/Dryer. Conv. to Hosp, I10, Shopping! $950/mo. Donna Chandler • Re/Max Affiliates O: 504-838-7649 or C: 504-669-4677

5542 Charlotte Dr. $99,500 Slab Ranch - 3 BR, 2 BA Partially renov + Guest Cottage 504-568-1359

REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT CONDO FOR SALE

1 Blk off St. Charles. 2/2, wd flrs, appls & w/d incl., grnite cntrtps & ss appl. OS pkng. $169,900 Darlene, Hera Realty 504-914-6352

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

CORPORATE RENTALS New Orleans Area 10 Min to Downtown

1Br, 1 Ba, Nwly Remod, furn. Qn bed, WiFi, Cbl. Pkg.Util Incl. Lndry Fac. Sec Cameras $1200/mth. 1 mth min. 2325 Pasadena, Met. 504-491-1591.

Garden Home, gated, 3br, 2 ba wd flrs, 10’ ceil, granite. 1634 sq ft liv, 2250 total. $249K. 985-892-5533

3 SMALL OFFICES - CBD

From 135 - 220 sq ft. Can be subdivided. $500 each. Parking available. Call 561-1216 for info.

MUST MOVE/HEALTH PROBLEMS Diamondhead. ALL amen! I-10 - blks. 3-3-2+ Lx Stucco, Split fpln cnr lot, deck & iron fencing. Many unique feat, Arched ent, Copper awnings, hi ceils, cer flrs/crpt skylts. $289,900. Hate 2 part w/it - but nature calls! 228-348-1754.

LOTS/ACREAGE ARIZONA BIG BEAUTIFUL LOTS, $99/ mo., $0-down, $0-interest. Golf Course, Nat’l Parks. 1 hour from Tucson Int’l Airport. Guaranteed Financing. NO CREDIT CHECK! (800) 631-8164 Code 4054 www. sunsiteslandrush.com OWN 20 ACRES, Only $129/mo. $13,900 near growing El Paso, Texas (safest city in America!) Low down, no credit checks, owner financing. Free map/pictures. 866-257-4555 www. sunsetranches.com

Jennifer Shelnutt French Quarter Realty 388-9383

4340 S. Carrollton 1 BR,1 BA, new appl, w/water $825. 3222 Napoleon 2 Rms Avail, $600 w/utils. No Pets + Deposit • 504-376-4676

TREME 1137 TREME

2 blks to Fr Qtr, lg 1 BR apt, furn kitchen, 2nd flr with balcony, prkg, $700. 504/525-6520, 390-4362.

CLASSIFIEDS FRENCH QUARTER/ FAUBOURG MARIGNY FRENCH QUARTER

1 bedroom, 1 bath, balcony with view of Mississippi & Fr Qtr. $1000/mo w/ dep. Call 504-909-2104.

LARGE 1BR STUDIO

420’. Full kit & bath. Historic feat., crtyrd, fr. drs, W/D. $795/mo + $100 incl. util. Pets neg. Long-term, refs req’d. + dep. 504-588-2733

NEW RENTAL 556 N. Rochblave

Walking distance to Ffairgrounds. Newly renov. 3 rms, kit, bath, washrm, fridge, mw, stove & washer. $650 mo/neg. 504-905-9086, 504-717-7394.

LAKEVIEW/LAKESHORE

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT

BOATHOUSE

Nice loft, full kit w/great view, 40 ft cov’d slip. $1700/mo. Jennifer 504250-9930. HGI Realty 504-207-7575.

1 BEDROOM APT

2511 S Carrollton Ave. Furn kit, cen a/h, off st pkg. $700/mo, wtr pd. Background ck required. 504-450-7450.

LAKEFRONT LRG ATTRACTIVE APT

1 Blk to St. Charles

2BR, 2BA w/ appls, beaut crtyd setting w/swimming pool, quiet nb’hood. $875/mo. 504-495-6044 or 504-756-7347

1711 2nd St. Lrg 1b/1b, dish washer, w/d onsite, cent AC, marble mantels, patio $850/mo 895-4726 or 261-7611

1014 WASHINGTON AVE

Completely renov 2 br, 2 ba, cen a/h, wood flrs, w/d hkps, new appls, lg rear yard. $1395/mo. O/A, 891-3180.

METAIRIE LUXURY APTS

3 BR, 2 full baths, LR, DR, kit, w&d hkups, faux fireplace, fans, blinds. No pets. $850/mo. 504-443-2280

BIG OFFICE SPACE ON CANAL 4220 Canal Street - Ground Floor On Streetcar Line 1,800 Sq. Ft. Large Central Room, three Separate Offices, Great for Group Practice or Studio $1,575/Mo + Utilities peggy.leblanc@ live.com, 488-6401

ALGIERS POINT 605 VALLETTE ST

3br 2ba house. Updated kit & ba, wd fls, high ceil, cent a/h, w/d hkup, walk to ferry, parks, $1500. 713-204-5342

HISTORIC ALGIERS POINT

High end 1-4BR. Near ferry, clean, many x-tras, hrdwd flrs, cen a/h, no dogs, no sec 8, some O/S prkng $750-$1200/mo. 504-362-7487

BROADMOOR MISSISSIPPI

ONLY 4 UNITS LEFT. STARTING AT 93,500

COMPLETELY REMODELED

Big Beautiful Bargain

2-3 BR, 2 full ba, lg upper, furn kit, wd/cer flrs, cf. CH, grt flrplc. Lotsa closets & o/s pkg. Pets ok. $1100/ mo. 874-3195

BYWATER 1023 PIETY ST

Freshly remodeled 2 br, 2 full ba, w/d hkps, cen a/h, c-fans, fncd yd, avail now. $875. 888-239-6566 or mballier@yahoo.com

CARROLLTON 8131 PLUM - LG 1 BR

Beau upr apt, lg lr/dr comb, frplce w/ mantel, cen a/h, wd flrs, blt-in kit, wd on premises, off st pkg. $850/mo, lse/dep. 909-5541 or 865-1091.

8131 PLUM ST

Lg studio, wk in closet, stcar line. Lg eat-in kit, wd flrs, hi ceil, cen a/h, w/d on site, off st pkg. $800 dep/lse. 9095541 or 865-1091.

EE

COVINGTON 227 S. ORCHARD LANE

COMMERCIAL RENTALS

FRENCH QUARTER CONDOS 929 Dumaine

N O $3 SSI DERSION I S M U N MI AD12 & AD

58

Irish Channel did not flood Katrina damaged house with 2 & 1/3 L-shaped lots. 2 lots each 30x120’ = 60’ x 120’ & rear portion of corner lot 35’ x 25’, double driveway in front with also a single tin garage & a single driveway on side street. $8,567 roof, 7 rooms & 3 bathrooms. Fourth sewer line in rear, 2 large walk in closets. Large walk in pantry. Huge, red brick floor to ceiling double sided fireplace. Could house 1 family or owner occupied plus 1 rental, or 2 rentals, or could build single or double on second lot. Much space to add on Huge yard for in-ground pool. Many options for house and land. Paved front patio with 2 large red brick planters. $210,000, 504-832-1901.

$1250/mo. 1 BR/1 1/2BA. Hot tub & Pool, pkng. New kit. Util & TV incld., 24 hr desk service. 504-628-4996

1 blk City Park betw Carrollton/Cty Pk Ave, 3 lg rms cent a/h w/d hdwd flrs, ceil fans, thruout. Avail immed. $900/ mo. 504-234-0877

FR

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 15 > 2011

MAKE ME BEAUTIFUL AGAIN!

4208 DUMAINE STREET

METAIRIE TOWERS 55 Richelle Street 3BD/2BA Additional Large Lot $135,000 Prudential Gardner Kathy Hunter 985-688-5873

800 sq/ft., wd flrs, 2 firepl mantels, ceil fans, LR, DR, kit, bath w/clawfoot, hall closet, BR w/closet. Cent a/h, DW, fridge w/ice & wtr, Stackable W&D, small front yd, EZ on st pkg. Walk to Rouses, bars & restaurants. Pets OK w/fee. Avail April 1. $780/lse. (504) 908-5210 for appt.

2340 Dauphine Street

(504) 944-3605

RESIDENTIAL RENTALS 936 ESPLANADE-1 bd/ 1 ba $750 1301 N. RAMPART-2 bd/ 2 ba $3200 4721 MAGAZINE - Comm.

$1700

1161 LAKE AVE-1 bd/ 1ba prkg $75 837 ROYAL - 2 bd/ 1.5 ba

Between 1778 and 1783, the king of Spain sent Canary Islanders, known as Isleños, to colonize Louisiana.

$3200

CALL FOR MORE LISTINGS! GENTILLY

SATURDAY Noon -12:00pm

LARGE 2 BR, 1 BA APT

Newly renov, new appls, cen a/h, w/d, alarm, fncd yd, off st prkg, priv entrance, $875+util. 504-283-8450.

MARCH 19

OPENING CEREMONY

Noon - 12:00pm

MARCH 20

CHALMETTE HIGH SCHOOL JAZZ BAND

SENIOR HERITAGE PROGRAMS 1:00 - 3:00pm

FREDY OMAR CON SU BANDA

To Advertise in

3:00 - 4:00pm

LA PARRANDA DE TEROR

REAL ESTATE

4:00 - 8:00pm

WAY DOWN SOUTH

Call (504) 483-3100

SUNDAY

1:30 - 2:30pm

JUNIOR HERITAGE PROGRAM

2:30 - 4:00pm

LA PARRANDA DE TEROR

4:00 - 8:00pm

THE TOP CATS

Delicious authentic Spanish food, folklife exhibits, crafts, living history and activities for the children

IRISH CHANNEL 1/2 BLOCK TO MAGAZINE

Furn Rms, Prefer Nght wrkrs. 1&2 BDRM, hardwd/crpt floors. $175/ wk to 900/mo +dep. 504-202-0381, 738-2492.

Call 504-277-4681 or 504-676-3098 or 504-554-8412 or visit www.losislenos.org for Info

ISLEÑOS MUSEUM COMPLEX 1357 BAYOU ROAD · SAINT BERNARD, LOUISIANA · 70085

CLASSIFIEDS

HOWARD SCHMALZ & ASSOCIATES REAL ESTATE Call Bert: 504-581-2804

1406 Magazine 2br/1ba "Lower Garden District" 248 Cherokee 2br/2ba "University Area Condo" 7522 Benjamin 1br/1ba "Cool Pool Condo" 912 Harding Dr. 1br/1ba "Bayou Efficiency"

506 FERN

2 bdrms, 1 ba, liv rm, din rm, furn kitchen, central a/h, hdwd floors, w/d hkps. $900/mo. 899-7657.

6317 S. PRIEUR

Near Tulane 2 bedroom, living room, dining room, furn kit, tile bath. No pets. $800/mo, Call 504-283-7569

7522 BENJAMIN - NR UNIV

$1050 $1200 $700 $600

1 br condo w/ pool, prkg, laundry, gated community. $675/mo w/wtr pd. No pets. (504) 858-2162.

7821 JEANETTE

Lrge 3 bdrms, 2 ba, liv rm, din rm. furn kit, cen a/h, hdwd flrs, wsher/ dryer. $1800/mo. 899-7657.

815 PINE ST 1205 ST CHARLES/$1050

Fully Furn’d studio/effy/secure bldg/ gtd pkg/pool/gym/wifi/laundry. 985871-4324, 504-442-0573. Avail May!

1750 ST. CHARLES APT

1 LARGE BR, large walk-in closet, new renov, new appliances, security, parking space. $1550. Call 899-0607

CLASSIFIEDS

REAL ESTATE

2 UPTOWN APARTMENTS

2 BR & 3 BR. hdwd floors, cent a/c, Lusher School District, University area. $950 - $1300. Chris - 861-7528

2368 CHIPPEWA

1BR/1BA, tile flr, side entrance, pets negotiable. $600/mo + deposit. Owner on premises. Avail April 1. 228-8687

Suites at Exchange Centre

935 Gravier Street, Suite 600 • New Orleans, LA 70112

1 BR unfurnished apt, 3 blocks to universities, $700/mo, utilities incl. No pets. 504-865-8437 for appt.

8217 PLUM ST

Near univ, 1 br, furn kit, wd flrs, cen a/h, new ba, w/d on site. $900 furn, $850 unfurn, 1 yr lse. 504-415-1030

1510 CARONDELET 1 block to St. Charles

1 BR balc apt, $750 . Studio lg rm, kitc, full bath, $650 w/d on site 1-888-239-6566 or mballier@yahoo.com

Where Innovation and Opportunity Connect

AUTOMOTIVE DOMESTIC AUTOS 05 FORD TAURUS Only $3995 Call 504-365-1655

IMPORTED AUTOS ‘03 MERCEDES BENZ E320 $11,995 504-368-5640

‘05 KIA RIO

4 door, perfect condition, fully loaded. Only 40K miles. For sale, leaving town. $5800 obo. Call 504-836-9801 24/7

‘06 ACURA TL $16,995 504-368-5640

‘06 INFINITY G35 COUPE $16,995 504-368-5640

‘08 HONDA ACCORD LXP 33K Miles, $14,995 504-368-5640

‘09 ACCORD COUPE EXL V6, LOW LOW MILES $21,900 504-368-5640

‘09 HONDA CIVIC

LARGE HUTCH

Approx 8’ H x 8’L x 3’D (from front to back of cabinet section. Features 6 doors w/ 2 inside adjustable shelves & top section holds 6 adjustable shelves. Solid cypress by Boesch Cabinetmakers, finished by Littleton & Pruit. $700. E-mail bcieditor@cox.net NEW Pub Height Table Set all wood, still boxed. Delivery available. $325 (504) 846-5122 Queen Mattress Set $149 Still in wrapper. Will deliver. (504) 846-5122

RESTAURANT/BAR EQUIP CASH REGISTER SYSTEM

Tech 200. 3 terminals, 6 printers, 4 cash drawers, 5 keyboards. $2500. Call Dennis, 486-1600 9am - 12 noon.

MISC. FOR SALE LEYLAND CYPRESS

Fast-growing evergreen hedges. 100 trees, 8-12 inches, $88.94. 50 trees, 8-12 inches, $59.94. 12-18 inches, $82.94 per 50. Includes shipping. www.auckersnursery.com 352-528-3889

PETS

DX, 4 door $11,995 504-368-5640

Executive suites at an incredible value with a unique array of services and a unique approach to pricing – offering one very reasonable price that includes everything! Exterior and interior offices available ranging from $425-$900.

$11,995 504-368-5640

TRUCKS ‘08 FORD 150 XL Crew Cab $18,995 504-368-5640

SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES

Melissa Pittman 985.630.7769

GRT LOCATIONS!

Melissa.pittman@transwestern.net

Louis Vergona 504.799.3122

504-949-5400 (parking) offstreet, gated, remote ctrl entry $175+

931 Bienville

500 Mandeville #5 1127 Chartres #2 222 London #224

2/2 Marigny,cvd pkg,pool,all extras! $1600 2/1 spacious, lots of closets, 1st floor

$1100

2/1.5 prkng,2nd flr,new carpets&paint $895

1035 Chartres USQ

1/1 pvt cytd balc, great loc, hdwd flrs $825

715 Esplanade A

3/2 Pvt Balc, hdwd flrs, Parking(3) $2750

NEAR UNIV•GARDEN DIST

Studios, 1 & 2 bd + loft. 1.5 - 2 baths apts. some uitl pd. Hdwd flrs, hi ceil, cen a/h, furn kit with d/w, lndry. $600 - $1200/mo. 388-7426.

NEAR UNIVERSITIES

3/1.5 Dublin near streetcar. Lv, furn kit, w/d hkp, hdwd flrs, ceil fans, scrn porch. $1050 + deposit. Owner/Agent, 442-2813.

RENTALS TO SHARE ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Findyour roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com.

HOUSEMATE studio Cozy, 2nd flr condo, no kitchen $576

715 Royal F 829 Ursulines #6

2/2 renov,blac,prvt patio&prvt pool $2950

CONDOS FOR SALE

ROOMS FOR RENT

1233 Esplanade #19 studio condo with pool

$69,000

3139 Burgundy ½

$85,000

929 Dumaine 421 Burgundy #4

1/1 condo with parking studio great location! 1/1 ground floor, courtyard

Renovated, , 1900 sq ft half double. Medium size BR. Wireless internet & Direct TV in den and util incl. $500. No pets, no smokers. 377-8768

$99,000 $125,000

CANAL ST - 1 ROOM

Very, very clean. Great n’hood, 6 mo rent agreement. $140/wk, incl wtr & elec. 282-7296. NO CALLS AFT 7PM

‘07 HONDA PILOT LX Low miles $17,995 Call 504-368-5640

MERCHANDISE

ZACK

Kennel #A12335237

APPLIANCES 18 Cubic Ft Fridge

Almond Color. $65. Call 943-7699.

ELECTRIC RANGE

Hotpoint Almond Color 30in, Good working Condition. $65. Call 943-7699

FURNITURE/ACCESSORIES $125 Full/Double Size Mattress Set, still in original plastic, unopened. We can deliver. (504) 846-5122 $295 Brand New Iron Queen Bed with mattress set, all new. Can deliver. (504) 952-8403 King Pillowtop Mattress, NEW!!! ONLY $199. Can deliver. (504) 846-5122

Adoring couple longs to adopt newborn. secure, endless love awaits. Christine & Paul, 1-800-774-0854. Expenses paid. PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293

ANNOUNCEMENTS FREE HD FOR LIFE! Only on DISH NETWORK. Lowest Price in America! $24.99/mo. for OVER 120 CHANNELS! PLUS-$550 Bonus! Call Today, 1-888-904-3558

PORTRAITS

By Artist Alexander Samuel Schwartz Private & Public collections. Appt. only, 775-354-4464

Weekly Tails

Josi Kennel #A12375277

Josi is an 11-year-old, spayed, DSH, calico with celadon green eyes. She’s an independent gal, front declawed, and has a crooked tail with unknown origins. To meet Josi or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. To look for a lost pet come to the Louisiana SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), Mon-Sat. 9-5, Sun. 12-5 or call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 15 > 2011

French Quarter Realty Wayne • Nicole • Sam • Josh • Jennifer • Brett • Robert • George • Baxter

MAGAZINE ST O/S gtd pkng, pool, lndry $775/mo LOWER GARDEN DISTRICT St. Andrew- O/S, gtd pkng, pool, laun, $775/mo & up NAPOLEON 1 BR, pool, lndry, os pkng, $700/mo 891-2420

ADOPTIONS ADOPT

Zack is a 3-year-old, neutered, Shepherd/Terrier mix with a great big smile! He knows how to sit and shake (for a treat) and gives kisses for belly rubs. Zack will require TLC during his complimentary heartworm treatment. To meet Zack or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191.

‘09 NISSAN CUBE

ALL INCLUSIVE HIGHLIGHTS • Fully furnished and equipped suites available at affordable, all inclusive rate • Unique amenities including fitness room, media centre, and training room all included in pricing.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

59

PUZZLE PAGE CLASSIFIEDS warehouse dist. saLe PeNdiNG

• 3222 Coliseum • 4941 St. Charles • 2721 St. Charles • 5528 Hurst • 1750 St. Charles • 1750 St. Charles • 20 Anjou • 1544 Camp • 3915 St. Charles • 1125 Felicity • 1544 Camp • 1544 Camp • 1224 St. Charles

Wonderful renov $2,700,000 Grand Mansion $2,300,000 (3 bdrm/3.5ba w/pkg) $1,579,000 TOO LATE! $1,300,000 TOO LATE! $429,000 TOO LATE! $299,000 (4 bdrm/2 ba w/pkg) $220,000 (2 bdrm/2ba w/pkg) $239,000 (1bdrm/1ba w/pkg) $209,000 (2 bdrm/2ba w/pkg) $179,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $159,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $149,000 starting at $79,000

YOUR PROPERTY COULD BE LISTED HERE!!!

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 15 > 2011

ANSWERS FOR LAST WEEK ON PAGE 59

62

John Schaff crs CELL

504.343.6683

office

504.895.4663

BetweeN uPtowN & oChsNer New ListiNG

330 s. diaMoNd st.

131 BrooKLYN aVe.

HISTORIC BUILDING IN WAREHOUSE DISTRICT PRE-1850. Stand alone building on street with beautiful neutral ground. Artist studio since 1997, open floor plan-loft style. Can be developed into exquisite residence or commercial space. Enclosed patio. Zoned CBD-8. UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY. $425,000

CLASSIC SHOTGUN. Excellent location, minutes from Uptown. High ceilings. Hardwood & slate flooring. Furnished kitchen. Whirlpool. New central A/C.Well maintained home w/large backyard & off street parking. Right near levee. Great for bike riding & dog walking! Owner/Agent $114,131

(504) 895-4663

Home&Garden

Gambit’s Guide to Home & Garden Professionals

Grout Works LLC

Tile Grout Cleaning & Color Sealing • America’s Premier Tile & Color Sealing Company • • • • • • •

Grout Cleaning Grout Color Sealing Grout Repair Shower Restoration Natural Stone Care Tile Replacement Recaulking

CommerCial • reSidenTial • Free eSTimaTeS Jay Broadwell • www.grout-works.com • 504-309-2509 Perfecting the art of grout restoration since 1994

- Chip/Spot Repair - Colors available - Clawfoot tubs & hardware FOR SALE

DON’T REPLACE YOUR TUB,

A BEST Sewer & Drain Service, Inc. Since 1975

REGLAZE IT 348-1770

NEW ORLEANS

522-9536

Southernrefinishing.com

708 BARATARIA BLVD.

SOUTHERN REFINISHING LLC Certified Fiberglass Technician

LAPLACE

652-0084

KENNER-JEFFERSON

466-8581 MANDEVILLE

626-5045

WESTBANK

368-4070 SLIDELL

641-3525

MENTION GAMBIT FOR A DISCOUNT! 2545 DELAWARE AVE. KENNER, LA 70062 • FAX 504-468-1838

“WHEN YOUR DRAINS DON’T WORK - WE DO”™

Family Owned & Operated

Improving the Health of your Indoor Air! • St. Augustine

(Including Palmetto®)

www.healthyairductcleaning.org

Locally Owned

376-2444

Licensed

FREE ESTIMATES

Insured

Freret Garden Center & Landscaping (formerly Weber's)

GET READY FOR SPRING! Fertilizer & Spring color has arrived

We offer: Maintenance, Landscaping, and Irrigation

504-895-3022

Residential Commercial Marine

The Contractor’s Choice for Premium Quality Grass!

CONTAINER TRASH REMOVAL Self-Contained & Stationary Compactors

RENTALS • SALES • SERVICE Roll Off Containers 15,20,30, 40 Cu. Yds.

Fully insured Construction Commercial Industrial Residential Maritime

Locally owned and operated since 1969 FREE QUOTES • SAME DAY SERVICE • NO DELIVERY FEE EXPIRES 2/28/11

• Tifway Bermuda • Centipede • Zoysia

WE BEAT ALL COMPETITORS!

RELIABLE SERVICE IS WHAT WE DELIVER

American Standard 3 Ton Condenser I N S T A L L E D

$1400 5 YEARS PARTS & LABOR

366-3535 456-2002 OVER 40 YEARS IN BUSINESS

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 15 > 2011

IF YA’ COUGHING AND YA’ SNEEZING, YOUR DUCTS COULD BE THE REASON!

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Gambit - March 15, 2011