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cOmmentary

thinking out loud

Lucy’s Football

O

door to teaching creationism in public school biology classes — got whacked in the Senate Education Committee, despite support from 43 Nobel laureates. Another committee unanimously approved a bill to install a statue of the Ten Commandments on the Capitol grounds. Legislators even knocked down an innocuous bill by Rep. Austin Badon, D-New Orleans, to outlaw bullying in schools. Opponents claimed the anti-bullying bill would lead to acceptance of “alternative lifestyles.” Badon saw through that, telling Gambit, “What it really was was a ‘scorecard’ vote for the [Louisiana] Family Forum (LFF). It’s an election year, and members wanted to look good on the scorecard that the Family Forum sends out.” The Baton Rouge-based LFF, formed in 1998, holds little sway in New Orleans, but its annual “scorecard” of legislative votes seems to turn lawmakers’ knees to

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No Fortune 500 company would move to a state where creationism is taught as biology. water elsewhere in the state. Its power has grown under the reign of purported small-government conservatives. LFF director Gene Mills delivered the daily prayer on the floor of Congress on May 25. Worst of all, Jindal supports every sop to the Intolerant Right, which belies his pro-business platitudes. The truth is, no Fortune 500 company would move to a state where creationism is taught as biology. Meanwhile, what of the Tea Parties? Despite their purported distaste for business as usual, there hasn’t been a peep out of them as lawmakers and Jindal have divided us once again on social issues rather than uniting us behind economic development opportunities. As major companies continue to avoid Louisiana, voters who were seduced by some lawmakers’ promises of nonintrusive government find themselves like Charlie Brown, flat on their backs after Lucy has once again snatched away the football.

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ne of the recurring motifs in Charles Schulz’s classic comic strip Peanuts involves the character Lucy and her football. Time and again she tees up the ball for the hapless everyman Charlie Brown to placekick, and every time she snatches it up at the last moment, leaving him to fall flat on his back. No matter how many times she tricks him, Charlie Brown always believes that next time will be different — and he always ends up flat on his back. That’s a fitting metaphor for Louisiana voters and some of the people they send to Baton Rouge. Every election, we’re promised fiscal reform, higher ethical standards and no-nonsense governance — and every time we end up on our backs. In 2007, Gov. Bobby Jindal promised ethics reform and a better business climate. Once in office, he fought every bill to make his office more transparent and proceeded to pander to the Religious Right on a number of issues that would give any major employer pause before moving to Louisiana. Last year brought a new promise of change, with a slate of candidates backed by the various Tea Parties across the state — candidates who promised to focus on lower taxes, fiscal responsibility and opposition to President Barack Obama’s health care initiative. The New York Times noted then that the Tea Parties seemed to differ from their predecessors in one significant way: They were focused on fiscal, not social issues. “God, life and family get little if any mention in statements or manifestos,” the Times wrote. Last fall, buoyed by statewide anti-Obama sentiment and a neutered Democratic party, Republicans took control of both houses of the Louisiana Legislature, promising to roll up their sleeves and tackle a projected $1.6 billion state deficit. Then — surprise — Lucy snatched the ball away. In the weeks before budget talks began, right-wing lawmakers dropped their “Don’t Tread On Me” flags and took up conservative social issues with renewed vigor. Rep. John LaBruzzo, R-Metairie, who was kicked off the House Health & Welfare Committee in 2008 when he embarrassed the GOP by proposing paid sterilization for women on government assistance, was suddenly back in the spotlight, reviving an oft-killed bill to require drug testing of individuals on government assistance. This year LaBruzzo, who faces a difficult re-election fight, also offered a measure that would charge abortion providers with feticide, even though such bills have been struck down summarily by the courts. It didn’t end there. A bill to repeal the misnamed Louisiana Science Education Act — which opens the

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I SAW THE 9TH WARD MARCHING BAND IN TWO PARADES DURING THE MARDI GRAS SEASON. WHAT CAN YOU TELL ME ABOUT THIS WONDERFUL NEW ORLEANS GROUP? GLENN

DEAR GLENN, Fashioned after high school marching bands, the 9th Ward Marching Band was founded around 1998 by a group of friends who played music in the 9th Ward, including organist/ inventor Mr. Quintron (real name Robert Rolston), leader of the oneman band Quintron; musician/puppeteer Miss Pussycat (Panacea Theriac), Quintron’s partner; Elizabeth Macey and Judy Bolton, who are responsible for most of the band’s outfits; and Jon Henry Kelly, Lefty Parker, Strangebone, Julien Fried, MC Trachiotomy, Matt Vis and Jamie Kallel. The band’s colors are red, white and silver, reflected in the various uniforms — mostly pants, shirts, vests and hats — worn by different divisions of the band as well as pom-poms used by its cheerleaders. Heather Sher is the original uniform designer and inventor of the now-famous one-eyed cat with a “9” band logo. In the early years, the group was ragged and undisciplined, but today it has more than 150 members and sections including drums, brass, glockenspiels, cymbals, rifle girls, cheerleaders, batons, flags, cowgirls, spirit sticks, a dance squad and a “team gong” that is used during the performance.

HEY BLAKE,

MY WIFE AND I WERE WALKING ALONG BAYOU ST. JOHN AND CAME UPON A STREET NAMED ST. JOHN’S COURT. WHAT’S THE STORY ON THIS? WAS IT SET UP AS A PRIVATE ENCLAVE THAT IS NOW PUBLIC? JOE TOUPS

DEAR JOE, St. John’s Court was established in 1917 when real estate developer J.F. Lafont acquired the property and built the quaint subdivision of houses on a cul-de-sac to rent to workers at the nearby American Can Company. Instead of using numbers, Lafont lettered the houses A through P. In 1923, a person could buy one of the 15 cottages for $4,000 or $4,500. That’s right; for a down payment of $750 in cash and mortgage of $32.50 to $37.50 every four weeks, you could stop paying rent and live in a fiveroom cottage with a living room, dining room, two bedrooms, kitchen and bathroom. When the cottages went up for sale, they were being completely renovated and painted inside and out. The real estate agents described St. John’s Court as “one of the beauty spots of New Orleans … conveniently located along Bayou St. John. It’s the only one of its kind in the city. It has a beautiful garden and lawn with shade trees forming a central park with 15 cottages around it.” And it still is.

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scuttle Butt

QUOTES OF THE WEEK

“The lawmakers of Louisiana are a laughingstock as far as the scientific community is concerned. The present situation should be likened to requiring Louisiana school texts to include the claim that the sun goes round the Earth.” — Harold Kroto, a Nobel Prize-winning scientist and a professor at Florida State University. On May 26, the state Senate Education Committee voted 5-1 to defer a bill (effectively killing it) that would have repealed the misnamed Louisiana Science Education Act, which is widely interpreted as opening the door for teaching creationism in public school biology classes.

Sedimental Journey THANKS TO A MYOPIC U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS AND STUBBORN COASTAL POLITICS, LOUISIANA IS SQUANDERING AN OPPORTUNITY WITH THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER FLOOD.

“The Indians are scalping Louisiana. They pay no state taxes.” — State Sen. Rob Marionneaux, D-Livonia, who was proposing to extend his Louisiana Clean Air Act to include a ban on smoking at all casinos in the state, including those on Native American land. The amended bill failed.

B Y WA LT E R P I E R C E

A

MR. MANNERS

Silty water floods across south-central Louisiana following the opening of the Morganza Spillway. Coastal leaders want sediment piped into their areas to restore vanishing wetlands, but they balk at the thought of using controlled flooding from structures like the Morganza to do so.

Freshman U.S. Rep. Jeff Landry, R-New Iberia, isn’t the only Louisiana congressman fond of emailing press-ready quotes detailing his opposition to President Barack Obama’s administration, but he’s probably the most prolific. “Furious Landry Attacks Obama For Ignoring Oil Spill Region on Anniversary While Travelling to Facebook” and “Landry’s Statement on Obama’s Lack of Support for Israel” are typical subject lines of his emails. But Landry seemed to step in it June 1 with an email trumpeting “Congressman Landry Declines Invitation to White House.” “I have respectfully declined the president’s invitation to PAGE 12

c'est what?

PHOTO COURTESY STATE OF LOUISIANA

HOUSE BILL 587, SPONSORED BY METAIRIE REP. JOHN LABRUZZO, WOULD CLASSIFY ABORTION IN LOUISIANA AS FETICIDE, WITH CRIMINAL PENALTIES FOR ANY INDIVIDUAL PERFORMING AN ABORTION. DO YOU SUPPORT THIS PROPOSED LAW?

the flood for crawfishermen and shrimpers — an influx of fresh water in the basin where crawfish breed and along the coast where shrimp spawn will likely be a boon for the those populations. WHAT HASN’T BEEN WIDELY DISCUSSED, EXCEPT among scientists, is both the benefit of millions of tons of sediment from the diverted Mississippi River replenishing our wetlands, and the politically sensitive idea of using river control structures like the one at Morganza to do what Old Man River did for millions of years through annual spring floods: build land.

37%

City Councilman Arnie Fielkow

no

Vote on “c’est what?” on bestofneworleans.com THIS WEEK’S QUESTION

PAGE 11

BoUQuets

63%

yes

On June 1, the Louisiana Senate once again killed a bill that would have banned smoking in Louisiana bars. Would you support a ban?

THIS WEEK’S HEROES AND ZEROES

led his fourth annual youth trip to Birmingham and Tuscaloosa, Ala., on May 31, taking 240 New Orleans kids to meet civil rights leaders, visit the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute and take in a minor league baseball game. This year’s trip included a meeting with the Revs. Skip Alexander and Bill Greason, the latter of whom played in baseball’s Negro League. Also on the trip was another Negro League ball player, Herbert Simpson.

VAYLA-NO,

the Vietnamese American Young Leaders Association of New Orleans, celebrated its fifth anniversary on May 21 at its inaugural Heritage and Hope Gala, held at the W Hotel. VAYLA is a youth-led, community-based group dedicated to social change and empowerment among Vietnamese-American youth. The group advocates for environmental, educational and social justice in eastern New Orleans and elsewhere.

The Youth Rescue Initiative (YRI)

kicked off its third annual “Power Through Reading” book drive, which collects books for pre-K through middle-school children in New Orleans, on June 1. The program is led by YRI president James Bernazzani and Irvin Mayfield, a musician and chairman of the board of the New Orleans Public Library. Last year Power Through Reading collected 10,400 books, which were distributed by area nonprofit groups.

Louisiana

was ranked the third most dangerous state in the nation for pedestrians in a new report released recently by Transportation for America (TFA). The groups reported that 1,040 Louisianans were killed while out walking in the decade between 2000-2009. When it came to metro areas with populations of more than a million, New Orleans came in 15th of 52 major areas. For an interactive map of the TFA’s research and conclusions, go to www.t4america.org.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 07 > 2011

t a May 16 forum in Belle Chasse hosted by the America’s Wetland Foundation (AWF), virtually everyone — politicians, ecologists, hydrologists, constables, merchants, geologists, land owners and residents — agreed: Louisiana’s coast is nearing a point of no return and desperate measures to restore it must be undertaken. Yesterday. But that meeting south of New Orleans also underscored how diverse the stakeholders are in coastal restoration, and how unanimity on the solution is nearly impossible. Many coastal politicians want massive federal projects to pipe sediment into the marshes to restore land, believing that their political livelihoods depend on keeping their constituents — people living in areas that, before the 1927 flood and the advent of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers levees and river-control structures, routinely flooded each spring — high and dry. What gets almost no traction at these meetings is talk of restoring the river’s natural processes, because while a flood may be good for the coast, it’s bad for people. The backdrop of the meeting was a once-in-a-lifetime flood from a swollen Mississippi River, and efforts — heroic, praise-worthy and widely disseminated by the media — to mitigate it, to save homes, pets and people. “This is a national disgrace,” AWF Chair R. King Milling of New Orleans said at the meeting. “During this flood season, we are painfully reminded that actions of man have trapped these wetland-building waters and funneled them past some of our most deteriorating ecosystems in the world.” A few media outlets have reported on the plus side of

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â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201A;Walter Pierce is the managing editor of Theâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;Independentâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;in Lafayette, Louisiana, where a version of this story first appeared.

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â&#x20AC;&#x201A; â&#x20AC;&#x201A; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Politicallyâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; notâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; aâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; veryâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; popularâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; opinion,â&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201A; saysâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; Dr.â&#x20AC;&#x201A; Lenâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; Bahr,â&#x20AC;&#x201A; anâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; authorityâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; onâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; coastalâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; ecologyâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; andâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; aâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; formerâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; LSUâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; professor.â&#x20AC;&#x201A; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Butâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; afterâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; thisâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; flood,â&#x20AC;&#x201A; thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; aâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; greatâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;opportunityâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;toâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;makeâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;thatâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;caseâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;again.â&#x20AC;&#x201A; Peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;canâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;understand,â&#x20AC;&#x201A;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;think.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201A; â&#x20AC;&#x201A; Bahrâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; spentâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; almostâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; twoâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; decadesâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; inâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; theâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; Governorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; Officeâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; ofâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; Coastalâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; Activitiesâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; afterâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; hisâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; yearsâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; atâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; LSUâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; andâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; wasâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; aâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; criticâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; ofâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; Gov.â&#x20AC;&#x201A; Bobbyâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; Jindalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; bermâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; planâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; duringâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; lastâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; year.â&#x20AC;&#x201A; Bahrâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; andâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; otherâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; scientistsâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; unencumberedâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; byâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; balancingâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; constituentsâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; againstâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; aâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;coastâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;inâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;peril,â&#x20AC;&#x201A;believesâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;thisâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;historicâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;floodâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; eventâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;providedâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;anâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;opportunityâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201A;oneâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;thatâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; weâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;areâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;squandering. â&#x20AC;&#x201A; â&#x20AC;&#x201A; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; myâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; feelingâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; ...â&#x20AC;&#x201A; thatâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; theâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; Corpsâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; ofâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; Engineersâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;hasâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;longâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;knownâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;thatâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;theyâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;shouldâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; beâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;preparingâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;forâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;unusualâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;highâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;floodâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;eventsâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; likeâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; thisâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; ..â&#x20AC;&#x201A; andâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; rightâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; nowâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;veâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; hadâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; veryâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; littleâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; capacityâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; toâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; takeâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; advantageâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; ofâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; that,â&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201A; Bahrâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;says.â&#x20AC;&#x201A;â&#x20AC;&#x153;So,â&#x20AC;&#x201A;whenâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;theâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;sedimentâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;comesâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; downâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; itâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; getsâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; eitherâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; washedâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; offshoreâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; intoâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; deepâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; waterâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; orâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; itâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; fillsâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; upâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; theâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; [man-madeâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; navigation]â&#x20AC;&#x201A; channelsâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; andâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; getsâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; dredgedâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; andâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; dumpedâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; offshore.â&#x20AC;&#x201A; Andâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; justâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; aâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; tremendousâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;wasteâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;ofâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;aâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;resource.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201A; â&#x20AC;&#x201A; Paulâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; Kempâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; ofâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; theâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; Nationalâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; Audubonâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; Societyâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; agrees,â&#x20AC;&#x201A; recentlyâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; tellingâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; NPRâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; All Things Considered,â&#x20AC;&#x201A;â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;wouldâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;haveâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;lovedâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;toâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; say,â&#x20AC;&#x201A; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Thisâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; wasâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; theâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; eventâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; weâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; wereâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; waitingâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; for.â&#x20AC;&#x201A; Weâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; wereâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; preparedâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; andâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; weâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; wereâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; ableâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; toâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;doâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;50â&#x20AC;&#x201A;yearsâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;ofâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;restorationâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;inâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;oneâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;year.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x201A;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;tâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;sayâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;thatâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;today.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201A; â&#x20AC;&#x201A; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;tragedyâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;ofâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;thisâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;opportunityâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;isâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;thatâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; thereâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; areâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; tonsâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; ofâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; sedimentâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; movingâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; pastâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; anâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; areaâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; vitallyâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; starvedâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; forâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; it,â&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201A; Valâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; Marmillion,â&#x20AC;&#x201A;managingâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;directorâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;ofâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;theâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;AWF,â&#x20AC;&#x201A; toldâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; theâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; Daily Cometâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; inâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; Thibodauxâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; lastâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; month.â&#x20AC;&#x201A; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ourâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; countryâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;tâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; planâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; aheadâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; enoughâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; toâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; realizeâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; thatâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; weâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; canâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; takeâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; thatâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; sedimentâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;suspendedâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;inâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;theâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;riverâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;andâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;useâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;itâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; toâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;buildâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;land.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201A; â&#x20AC;&#x201A; Bahrâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; andâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; othersâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; contendâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; theâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; Corpsâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; isâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; tooâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; focusedâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; onâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; controllingâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; theâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; riverâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; andâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;tâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; payâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; enoughâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; attentionâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; toâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; workingâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; withâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; theâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; riverâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; toâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; ensureâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; theâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; long-termâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; rebuildingâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;ofâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;theâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;coast. â&#x20AC;&#x201A; â&#x20AC;&#x201A; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;Corpsâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;ofâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;Engineersâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;hasâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;beenâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;givenâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; threeâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;missionsâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;butâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;theyâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;onlyâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;payâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;attentionâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; ...â&#x20AC;&#x201A;toâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;twoâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;ofâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;themâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201A;navigationâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;andâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;floodâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; protection,â&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201A; Bahrâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; says.â&#x20AC;&#x201A; â&#x20AC;&#x153;So,â&#x20AC;&#x201A; theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;veâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; regulatedâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;theâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;wholeâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;riverâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;systemâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; toâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;theâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;pointâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; whereâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;reâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;veryâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;proudâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;ofâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;havingâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;devisedâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; waysâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;ofâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;keepingâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;itâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;withinâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;theâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;leveesâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;mostâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; years.â&#x20AC;&#x201A;Andâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;whenâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;somethingâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;likeâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;thisâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; eventâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;happens,â&#x20AC;&#x201A;theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;reâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;totallyâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;unpreparedâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; toâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;beâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;ableâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;toâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;harvestâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;anyâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;ofâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;thatâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;sediment.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201A; â&#x20AC;&#x201A; Bahrâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;citesâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;twoâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;examplesâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201A;little-known,â&#x20AC;&#x201A; smallerâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; floodâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; controlâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; structuresâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; onâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; theâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; eastâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; bankâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; ofâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; theâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; Riverâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; southâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; ofâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;Newâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;Orleansâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;knownâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;asâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;Davisâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;Pondâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;andâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; Caernarvonâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201A;thatâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;wereâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;notâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;unlockedâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;byâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; theâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; Corpsâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; forâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; thisâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; event.â&#x20AC;&#x201A; Openingâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; thoseâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; structuresâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; wouldâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; haveâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; divertedâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; tonsâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; ofâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; sedimentâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; intoâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; theâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; marshes.â&#x20AC;&#x201A; Butâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; coastalâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; politicians,â&#x20AC;&#x201A; oystermenâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; andâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; othersâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; haveâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; longâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; foughtâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; suchâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; emergencyâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; measures,â&#x20AC;&#x201A; andâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;theâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;Corpsâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;keptâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;themâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;shut.â&#x20AC;&#x201A; â&#x20AC;&#x201A; â&#x20AC;&#x201A; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; thirdâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; missionâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; ofâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; theâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; Corpsâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; isâ&#x20AC;&#x201A; toâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;

11

scuttlebutt

page 9

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the White House today,” Landry wrote, before adding, not particularly respectfully, “I don’t intend to spend my morning being lectured to by a president whose failed policies have put our children and grandchildren in a huge burden of debt. … Until the president produces a responsible deficit reduction plan, I’m not going to the White House to negotiate with myself.” The political websites Roll Call and The Hill noted the snub, as did The Washington Post’s editorialist Stephen Stromberg, who wrote, “How classless. Just a guess: If a Democratic lawmaker so rudely refused to meet with a Republican president about a matter of critical national importance, Landry would be among the first to condemn such arrogance.” Even The Hayride, the firebrand website for Louisiana conservatives, called Landry’s words “rude,” adding, “We’re very sympathetic to the idea that Landry is giving Obama exactly what he deserves. We don’t like it, though.” Landry’s canned quote ended with the words, “I refuse to partake in his (Obama’s) political grandstanding that will ultimately do nothing for debt reduction and job creation.” — Kevin Allman

GOP PeckinG Order

Organizers are finalizing the schedule for the Republican Leadership Conference, the meeting of GOP heavy hitters which will be held at the New Orleans Hilton Riverside June 16-18. Roger Villere Jr., head of the Louisiana Republican Party, and Charlie Davis, deputy chairman, are frontloaded on Thursday afternoon, just after former Gov. Mike Huckabee holds a book signing and VIP reception. That evening, Rep. Steve Scalise, R-Metairie, will speak just before former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, one of the many attendees who’s got his eye on the White House in 2012. The Louisiana delegation will be heaviest on Saturday, with the first four speakers being former Gov. (and now presidential candidate) Buddy Roemer, freshman U.S. Rep. Jeff Landry, R-New Iberia, U.S. Sen. David Vitter, and U.S. Rep. Bill Cassidy, R-Baton Rouge. Later in the day come U.S. Reps. John Fleming Jr., R-Minden, Rodney Alexander, R-Monroe, and Charles Boustany, R-Lafayette. Notably absent from this year’s roster: former Congressman Anh “Joseph” Cao, whose oft-touted bipartisanship and friendship with President Barack Obama made him a somewhat controversial figure at the 2010 gathering. Cao, who was defeated in November 2010 by U.S. Rep. Cedric Richmond, is now touting his conservative bona fides and seems poised to run for Louisiana Secretary of State. Perhaps unluckiest of all is Gov. Bobby Jindal, who has the misfortune to follow current GOP favorite U.S. Rep. Michele Bachmann on Friday afternoon. Last year, Jindal had the job of following then-Gov.

Sarah Palin of Alaska. Palin’s possible attendance at this year’s event was still undetermined at press time. — Allman

Senate killS SmOkinG Ban

With a 15-22 vote, the Louisiana Senate last week shot down a bill that would have banned smoking in Louisiana bars. The vote came after the Senate Health & Welfare Committee approved Senate Bill 133 by state Sen. Rob Marionneaux, D-Livonia. Marionneaux’s bill was lobbied hard on both sides. The Louisiana Campaign for Tobacco Free Living (TFL) mounted an aggressive ad campaign in support of the measure, while casinos joined with bars to fight it. Casinos were initially exempt from the bill’s provisions, but an amendment was added to prevent the state Department of Health and Hospitals from renewing or issuing health permits to “any facility operated by or on the lands of a sovereign Indian nation” unless compliant with the law. That put some casinos back in the mix, effectively destroying any chance of the bill succeeding. A similar situation occurred in 2009, when lawmakers were poised to ban smoking in bars. That effort failed after a late addition of casinos, previously exempt from the potential ban. Marionneaux authored last year’s bill as well. TFL’s “Let’s Be Totally Clear” campaign, via billboard, print and TV ads, pushed for smoke-free workplaces, citing health concerns for patrons and employees. Earlier this year the group published results from air quality tests in Lafayette barrooms taken during December 2010 and January 2011. The tests, performed by TFL and Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center’s School of Public Health, rated 17 of 22 smoke-filled barrooms as “unhealthy,” “very unhealthy” or “hazardous,” measurements defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Those readings present “serious risk of respiratory effects in the general population, and significant aggravation of heart or lung disease and premature mortality in people with cardiopulmonary disease and the elderly,” according to the report. Local bars like Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar, which thrives on its smoke factor, oppose a smoking ban. But bar owner Robert LeBlanc voluntarily made his bars Capdeville, LePhare, Loa and Republic smoke-free. Music venues like Tipitina’s and d.b.a. also made the switch. Carrie Broussard, TFL’s policy manager, said the campaigns will continue. “We would love to see the day all employees and workplaces are protected from second-hand smoke,” she said. “But ... our job is to build awareness about health issues and to ensure those who are unprotected have a voice.” — Alex Woodward

jeremy ALFORD

THE STATE OF THE STATE

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may suffer in the future — as a result of the disaster. After a hearing that kept lawmakers at the Capitol late into the evening June 1, his bill was stripped of nearly all its substantive language. Supporters say the maneuver means victims will face huge challenges trying to address future medical issues. In many respects, the debate over Connick’s bill had all the makings of a classic tort reform showdown, pitting trial lawyers against big business. The measure sought to make “null, void and unenforceable” all settlements and releases executed by BP that, in turn, let the energy giant off the hook for latent illnesses or diseases that could be medically connected to the BP spill. “Today we have word that we still have oil at the base of the Gulf and plumes are out there,” Connick told the House Civil Law Committee. “I had people from my district that were just covered with dispersant.” Connick faced two main arguments, the chief one tort reform. The Louisiana Association of Business and Industry (LABI) and others cited the bill’s retroactivity. “This is going to make it very difficult for anyone to settle a lawsuit in this state,” says Chuck McMains, a former state lawmaker from Baton Rouge and spokesman for the U.S. Chamber Institute for Legal Reform. Others argued that the measure was not needed. “Couldn’t we just have the state sue BP for any medical needs and costs that might come up?” asked Rep. John LaBruzzo, R-Metairie. Rep. Neil Abramson, D-New Orleans, amended the bill to provide that all waivers obtained by BP will be governed by Louisiana law, which may or may not help victims. “I’m not sure this bill does anything at all,” Abramson says. “I think these kinds of claims are already protected.” Connick and others countered that victims need additional protections. “[The amendment] would gut the bill and it would not protect those folks who need to be tested,” he says. With the Deepwater rig explosion more than a year old, doing nothing sounds like the worst idea. But with only three weeks left in the session, lawmakers will be challenged to do anything else. Jeremy Alford can be reached at jeremy@ jeremyalford.com.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 07 > 2011

special state tax exemption for individuals affected by last year’s Gulf oil disaster has been placed on hold by the House Ways and Means Committee. Chairman Hunter Greene, R-Baton Rouge, refers to the holdup as the “bone pile” because the delay may be permanent. Such is the fate of all legislation that would cost the state money this year. If the fiscal picture brightens, Greene says bills from the bone pile might advance before the current legislative session’s final day on June 23. Time is short. “I certainly feel sympathy for this situation,” Greene says. “I think this is one of those bills we have to take a closer look at.” The tax break (House Bill 620) is among the few remaining measures that could offer some relief to victims of BP’s 2010 disaster in the Gulf. It would exempt from state income taxes any payments for lost wages and income, such as those resulting from a lawsuit against BP or awarded from the Gulf Coast Claims Facility (GCCF), which is beginning to shutter offices in Louisiana. “Most of these people have been kicked around by four hurricanes and now they’re suffering because of the oil spill,” says the bill’s author, Rep. Damon Baldone, D-Houma. “We don’t need to kick them again by forcing them to pay taxes on this money.” Baldone adds that many of his constituents have exhausted their savings trying to stay afloat, and a “shocking number” of them are facing foreclosure. Greg Albrecht, the Legislature’s chief economist, says the explosion of the Deepwater Horizon and the resulting pollution and federal drilling moratorium were “extraordinary enough” for the Legislative Fiscal Office to avoid ascribing a price tag to the bill. He notes that so far this year, BP or the GCCF have paid $14.7 million in relief payments, which would be exempt from income taxation under Baldone’s bill. Greene says that figure was high enough for him to move to shelve the bill, at least temporarily. Then there’s the fight led by Rep. Patrick Connick, R-Marrero, who’s trying to help coastal residents, particularly cleanup workers, recover money for medical conditions they suffered — and

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Hospital Drama t’s been a rough spring for LSU. Its baseball team failed to draw a berth in the NCAA tournament. The University of New Orleans is breaking away from the LSU System to join the more hospitable University of Louisiana System. And now opponents of the proposed LSU teaching hospital in New Orleans are crowing about a consultant’s report on the hospital’s size and cost. The baseball team’s woes will soon be forgotten. There’s always next year. UNO’s move could actually be good for LSU. “Losing” UNO will force the mullahs who run the LSU System to focus more on the main campus. The hospital drama’s ending is not so easy to predict, but it’s where everyone has the most to lose. The institution’s stakeholders extend far beyond LSU. They include insured as well as uninsured patients across south Louisiana, doctors and others in the health care profession, and the entire metro New Orleans area. The planned University Medical Center (UMC) will do much more than replace the shuttered Charity Hospital, which flooded

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during Katrina. If it realizes its potential, UMC will be the biggest economic development engine the city has ever known — which is why some folks (read: certain private hospitals) don’t want to see it built to its original scale. The key to understanding that dynamic is that UMC will be much, much more than a replacement for Big Charity. In fact, any reference to the new hospital as a “replacement” for Charity does everyone a disservice. A true teaching hospital, which is what UMC aspires to be, will not only pick up Charity’s uninsured patient load but also attract private patients. Ah, there’s the rub. While some question whether a public institution ought to compete with counterparts in the private sector, the issue is not as simple as that. Consider, for example, the famed M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. Everyone knows M.D. Anderson’s outstanding reputation, but not everyone knows M.D. Anderson is a public hospital. In fact, it is officially The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. Yep, it’s UT’s teaching hospital. And as for whether it

competes with private hospitals, even a casual glance at Houston’s medical corridor will provide ample evidence that the operative word is “synergy,” not competition. Unfortunately for UMC, its battles include more than the public-private debate. Preservationists are furious about the way LSU demolished old houses without trying harder to relocate those with architectural significance. They also bemoan, rightfully, the hospital’s “suburban” look — although Mayor Mitch Landrieu has leveraged concessions on that front.

Any reference to the new hospital as a “replacement” for Charity does everyone a disservice.

UMC’s biggest problem, right now and for the foreseeable future, is money. Costconscious legislators question the need for UMC’s planned 424 beds (and its $1.2 billion price tag, of which $400 million must be borrowed), and the consultant’s report projects state subsidies of up to $100 million by 2020. The bed-count issue relates back to competition, and that fight will not end amicably. The price tag gives UMC’s opponents a potent weapon. UMC supporters will have to dig deep to address that issue. As for the $100 million annual subsidy — which is a top-end estimate for a decade hence — let’s keep things in perspective. While $100 million is a lot of money, it’s a fraction of the state’s operating budget today, and it will be a smaller fraction by 2020. Moreover, when you consider UMC’s potential economic impact on the city and the state, $100 million a decade from now will likely be far less than the institution generates. Getting from here to there will not be easy, however. Nothing worthwhile ever is.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > JUNE 07 > 2011

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 07 > 2011

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seated on the banquette next to one of the Hall’s resident white cats, Sweet Sage, who despite the commotion is sound asleep. Outside the gate, half as many more remain in line, waiting for the 9 p.m. second set and their turn. Alexander, the girlfriend of Hall publicity and marketing head Ron Rona (aka New Orleans Bingo! Show MC Ronnie Numbers), next informs the visitors of some basic house rules, largely unaltered since 1961: no flash photography, no video recording. (Smoking also has joined the outlawed list; beverages, never offered by the Hall and previously forbidden, now are allowed, and some listeners hold Pat O’Brien’s plastic Hurricane cups.) At 8:15 p.m., the portico crowd parts for the seven members of the band, clad in jet black suits and crisp white shirts, carrying their instruments and proceeding one-by-one into the rapidly warming room: singer and trumpeter Mark Braud, the group’s youngest member at 37; singer and clarinetist Charlie Gabriel, at 78 its eldest; singer and tenor saxophonist Clint Maedgen; trombonist Freddie Lonzo; and Benjamin Jaffe, his tuba shouldered. Rickie Monie and Joe Lastie Jr. — the pianist and the percussionist, respectively — enjoy the easiest walk. Nodding and smiling at the audience and at each other, the musicians take their seats. Three shoe taps, a drum roll and a trumpet charge, and they’re off. A week LATeR ANd A wORLd AwAy, BeN JAFFe iS GiviNG AN interview from the back of a New york City taxicab. “One of the things as a traveling musician that i find very challenging, when you’re on the road, playing one-night shows every night of the year, is the satisfaction you get when you actually sit down and breathe and let ideas come into your head,” Jaffe, the Hall’s creative director since 1993, says over the din of traffic. “Most of the time you’re just worried about how

you’re going to get from point A to point B. you’re like, i got to get in a taxi, i got to do a sound check, i got a show, then i got to do an interview, then i have to go to sleep because i have to be up at 4 in the morning to catch a flight. That’s your job, just going from A to B. The only moment you get to go into this creative cocoon is when you perform, and i want to amplify that. i want to make it bigger.” The “creative cocoon” in this case is Preservation Hall west (see sidebar, page 21), an expansion to San Francisco’s Mission district and the largest of several Hall endeavors in this, its 50th anniversary year. The project, long a fascination for Jaffe, has flown past the city planning commission and is currently under construction, on schedule for a fall soft opening during the Hardly Strictly Bluegrass Festival (Sept. 30-Oct. 2) and a grand ribbon-snipping to follow in early 2012. But first there is the matter of today’s points A and B: Midtown meetings with the publicist for American Legacies, the Preservation Hall Jazz Band’s current recording with Appalachian bluegrass smokers the del McCoury Band; and with Liz Leavitt, agent for photographer/director danny Clinch, whose latest film Louisiana Fairytale documents the band’s fruitful friendship with Louisville sluggers My Morning Jacket — “Sweet kentucky boys,” as Rona calls them — beginning with the 2010 all-star compilation Preservation: An Album to Benefit Preservation Hall & the Preservation Hall Music Outreach Program, and culminating in a joyous midnight matinee at the Hall during Jazz Fest 2010. HOveRiNG AROuNd THe Mid-30,000S iN uNiTS MOved, Preservation is the Hall’s best-selling “off-the-shelf” product according to Jaffe. (its top grosser overall, not coincidentally, is its first: New Orleans’ Sweet Emma and Her Preservation Hall Jazz Band, with founders “Sweet” emma Barrett, “Big” page 22

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THE STORY BEHIND BEN JAFFE’S MANIFEST DESTINY: PRESERVATION HALL WEST chased New College’s 7,000 square feet of prime Mission District real estate in 2009. “It’s a beautiful location, on Valencia Street in the heart of the Mission,” Jaffe says. “The building is an old mortuary and mortuary school, and the portion that will house Preservation Hall West is an old chapel. I thought, how appropriate that the first Preservation Hall we’re opening outside of New Orleans is going to be in a church.” When the opportunity he’d been waiting for appeared last year, Jaffe bought a plane ticket the same day. “I walked in and I was like, oh my God, this is it,” he recalls. “I could’ve moved in there the next day with a piano and opened up.” The band is already intimate with the space, having tracked American Legacies with the Del McCoury Band during renovations. “As we were doing takes, we had to ask them to stop jackhammering while we recorded,” Jaffe says with a laugh. And, he points out, its connections to the city are hard to ignore: “The fact that the band used to open for the Grateful Dead, that I spent every summer of my childhood (there). It was traditional for the Preservation Hall Jazz Band to be in San Francisco for the July 4 weekend. “Without even having to look for it, someone is showing you the future of Preservation Hall,” Jaffe says of that first visit. “We walked through the property with [Knowles] and basically had one of these come-to-God moments: I’m putting myself out into the world, and this is what I want to do out here. It makes absolutely no sense, I can’t tell you how it’s going to work, I can’t even give you a balance sheet or a business plan. All I can give you is myself and the reputation of Preservation Hall, and all of the things that we do. It resonated.”

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n the darkest corner of some New Orleans jazz purist’s mind lies an unspeakable fear: Preservation Halls, everywhere. To that person, Ben Jaffe says: Step away from the levee. “I would’ve never gone out and tried to recreate a Disney version of Preservation Hall, where every floorboard is reproduced,” Jaffe says. “It’s against what we stand for. What we’re creating out there is the Preservation Hall experience, all the things the Hall represents. … It’s something that my father considered years ago and that I always wanted to do.” “Out there” in Jaffe-speak is San Francisco, home to the future offspring — and, most likely, only child — of Preservation Hall. If you’ve talked to him about it, you know he’s excited. “It’ll be more in the spirit of a performing arts center than it will be a music venue or music hall,” Jaffe says. “I’m envisioning people like Steve Earle coming in, Ani DiFranco. Have them come out and spend maybe two weeks at a time, where we can get them involved in activities in the community, get them doing extended residencies and encourage them to do projects.” Less House of Blues, in other words, more house of the proverbial rising sun. Or house of the holy (it is a former chapel). “I want people to be able to be in that creative cocoon for weeks at a time,” Jaffe says, wielding his preferred metaphor. “Where I can go to somebody and say, ‘What is your dream project? What is the project you’ve always dreamt of doing, and what would it take to achieve that?’” It’s a powerful thought. Jaffe is nothing if not connected — to artists as disparate as Terence Blanchard and Andrew Bird as well as to entrepreneurs like Jack Knowles, regular Jazz Fester and proprietor of the Oakland restaurant A Cote, who pur-

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cove r story Page 20

Pianist “Sweet” Emma Barrett (right) played with the Preservation Hall Jazz Band in the early 1960s.

Brinkman and eve Abrams’ reverential pictorial Preservation Hall), modern dance (twin collaborations with the touring Trey McIntyre Project) or fine art (the Ogden Museum of Southern Art’s current Art & Jazz: Preservation Hall at 50 or the Louisiana State Museum’s forthcoming retrospective at the Old u.S. Mint). Or, more likely, they might catch a YouTube cartoon of a remixed, centuries-old folk song: the 2009 recontextualization of “St. James Infirmary” by Lafayette animation company TancoToons and Philadelphia DJ King Britt. The superbly subversive vision featuring a wailing Maedgen — along with a pallbearing cast of Hall characters present and past — chased by Old Joe McKenzie’s baby around a Max Fleischer nightmare of New Orleans, heading to St. Louis Cemetery No. 1 to wake Marie Laveau’s ghost before hotwiring the Pontchartrain Beach’s zephyr roller coaster as a getaway vehicle. “That was a real turning point for me and for Preservation Hall in a lot of ways,” says Jaffe, citing Moby’s fusion of house music and gospel on 1999 Platinum smash Play as a precursor. “It was so different from the way that many people had viewed the Hall.” The project and its overwhelmingly positive buzz spurred Jaffe to take a closer look at the way people experience music today. “St. James Infirmary” was part of an online bundle of tracks and videos from the St. Peter Street Serenade, offered solely via digital download — the Hall’s first embrace of Internet-only releases. “That’s important,” Jaffe says. “Musicians, from the beginning of time, have either kept in step with their audience, or led their audience, or interacted with their audience. But it’s always been some type of important relationship with your audience that you have to maintain.”

Jim Robinson, Alcide “Slow Drag” Pavageau and Percy and Willie Humphrey, recorded in 1964 and reissued in 2005. “If you sell 1,000 copies a year and multiply that over 50 years, you can see the success of the project,” Jaffe says. “But,” he adds with a laugh, “it’s a very slow return on your investment.”) The Preservation compilation may hold more value for its wellspring of relationships: with My Morning Jacket and McCoury, whose DelFest in Cumberland, Md., is the band’s next port of call after New York City; with Tao Rodriguez-Seeger and Pete Seeger, who invited the band to perform at Pete’s 90th birthday bash at Madison Square Garden in May 2009; and with Tom Waits, whose 78 rpm vinyl edition of the Mardi Gras Indian hoot “Tootie Ma is a Big Fine Thing” — Preservation’s swinging, scatting high note — ripped through its limited pressing. (For a $200 donation, the package included a souvenir suitcase phonograph, replicating the hook and bait Jaffe and Rona used to lure in Waits.) All now belong to Preservation Hall’s extended family, Jaffe says. “There were so many connections between the (McCoury) Band members and Del and myself and my family, the fact that the kids are in the band and that I’m in the Preservation Hall Band, second generation,” he says. “When I met Del, it was eerie how much it felt like meeting my dad again. It was really sort of spooky in that way. The music that he plays comes from the same piece of the soul that New Orleans jazz comes from. With (My Morning Jacket’s) Jim (James), the same thing happened. He came into the Hall, and it felt like I was saying hello to someone I

THeRe ARe THOSe WHO FeeL JAFFe HAS STeeReD the ship too far from its original course, that to see My Morning Jacket or Bonnie “Prince” Billy — or Robert Plant or the edge, for that matter — perform rock ’n’ roll songs in that sacred space either damages its position as a bastion for New Orleans jazz or, more puzzlingly, tarnishes its legacy or its purity. “I know there are many people who probably disagree with how the Hall has evolved and the direction it’s taken under Ben’s leadership,” says trumpeter Leroy Jones, who leads the Preservation Hall Jazz Masters on Fridays. “And that would be in respect to the different musical genres he’s introduced post-Katrina. But when I think about it, Ben is a good businessman, who’s doing his best to make sure Preservation Hall maintains its existence for future generations. And the fact that he employs the services of (traditional jazz) musicians like me proves that he is certainly not trying to move away from the tradition that made the venue famous.” Jaffe has taken fire for opening his arms to the New Orleans Bingo! Show and Maedgen, derisively pegged in some Nola.com comments as the boatrocking “spiky-haired fellow.” That kind of separatism, while nowhere near as malignant, is more in line with the forces the Hall was created to contradict. “I always think that there’s some fault to be found,” Maedgen says. “It depends on who you’re asking and when you’re asking them. I shake things up with my band. Most people that really know me, and know my role within Preservation Hall, will admit that I’m the first one to want to play an old tune, harvesting those “Sweet” emma Barrett songs and trying to bring those out. If you ask me what song I want to play, I want to play ‘Whenever You’re Lonesome, Telephone

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 07 > 2011

Photo by Dan Leyrer/ Courtesy Preservation haLL

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had known my whole life. … It immediately felt right.” Jaffe believes his mother and father, Sandra and the late Allan Jaffe, must have had a similar feeling 50 years ago when, en route from a honeymoon in Mexico to their home in Pennsylvania, they followed a second line back to Larry Borenstein’s art gallery at 726 St. Peter St. “They happened upon a brass band, and the leader of that brass band was Percy Humphrey, who my dad would end up playing with for over 20 years,” Jaffe says. “These are all things that seemingly happen by chance, but those moments of randomness ended up leading my dad to his career and the history of Preservation Hall. It could’ve been one of 20 trumpet players, and maybe it wouldn’t have had an impact; maybe my parents would’ve walked right by the band and not taken notice if it was a different person. There’s certain music that speaks to me, that means something to me.” IT STARTS WITH NeW ORLeANS JAzz, OF COuRSe, AND the Preservation Hall legacy of perpetuity, being next in line. But Ben Jaffe’s unshakable faith, in himself as well as his family’s institution, has led both into a much larger arena. Twenty years ago, there were three places you were likely to find the Preservation Hall Jazz Band: on record, at the Hall or on the road. In 2011, teenagers more into Kid Rock or Kid Cudi than Kid Sheik Cola and Kid Thomas Valentine can encounter the latter’s music by seeing a play (Tom Sancton’s stage production Song For My Fathers, adapted from his memoir), reading a book or going to the movies (Clinch’s Louisiana Fairytale). They can stumble on it through photography (Shannon

The performance space at Preservation Hall has barely changed during its five decades on St. Peter St. photo by Cheryl Gerber

— all the while remaining faithful to the traditional roots.” For 45 minutes, in the first of three sets tonight, the Preservation Hall Jazz Band and its audience forget the day, the week, the month, the year. Gabriel pauses, grins and points at the crowd as he croons the chorus to “Exactly Like You,” his fingers doing George Lewis’ arachnid walk up and down the clarinet. Braud, sitting in departed uncle John Brunious Jr.’s chair, blows gusty one-note trumpet solos using his hand as a mute, the room and band shouting in unison, “Oh, play that thing!” Maedgen, at the crowd’s behest (despite no one coughing up $2 for the kitty), gives them a spirited, reined-in “St. James Infirmary.” A bigger hand is reserved for his crying take on Sam Morgan’s “Short Dress Gal,” tambourines cracking all around like broken glass. They’d like to keep playing, Braud explains, but drummer Joe Lastie Jr.’s tired. (It’s true, Lastie nods amiably.) After a lengthy ovation, the masses stream into the porte-cochere. The fans go right, stopping to pet Sweet Sage before exiting through the wrought-iron gate, beneath the two instrument cases and out onto St. Peter Street, where they are awakened to the present day by the warring sounds of Bourbon Street’s Cat’s Meow and Krazy Korner, blasting Heart and REO Speedwagon as if mad at one another. The band goes left, carrying their instruments and ambling one by one toward the courtyard. Maedgen, the last to leave, is still playing his saxophone.

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Me.’ It’d be pretty easy to see me onstage and think of me as the one who’s trying to change things, but I’m a pretty staunch traditionalist. That’s what I lean towards.” “It’s obviously something that I’m well aware of,” Jaffe says. “I don’t live in a bubble. I’m hyper-aware of the dangerous road we travel. I also know that it’s impossible to satisfy everybody. So at the end of the day, you have to do what my parents did, which is follow your heart and your interests and the things that make you happy and bring you joy in life. What’s important to me are the musicians at Preservation Hall and the music they play.” Tom Sancton, a clarinetist and former Paris bureau chief for Time magazine, draws a subjective line, and then crosses it: “Do I personally like to see rock bands in there? Not particularly. Do I think Benji shouldn’t be doing that? No. … I think he’s trying, with a lot of courage and a lot of conviction, to do something that’s faithful to the roots of the place, that’s faithful to what his parents built, and that has some kind of future. “Benji faces a challenge,” Sancton says. “Either he says, ‘All right folks, show’s over, everybody’s gone and it’ll never be “Sweet” Emma and George Lewis again. It was nice for 50 years, and that’s it.’ Or he finds some way to make it relevant and attract new audiences, younger audiences. And that’s what he’s trying to do. I would hate to see the place close, and I think he’s trying to find a way to make it work, to give it forward spin, to give it a future

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Standing Firm tep inside David Sherman’s heavily fenestrated office at Chehardy Sherman (1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1100, Metairie, 833-5600; www.chehardy.com) law firm, and the surroundings reveal a New Orleanian who’s enthusiastic about his community. A glass fleur de lis serves as a paperweight. There’s a framed photo of Sherman decked out in royal finery from his reign as King Argus during Mardi Gras 2010. A seersucker jacket hangs from his door. “From the Monday after Easter to the Friday before Labor Day, I only wear seersucker,” says Sherman, a partner at Chehardy Sherman who has 33 years of experience practicing law. “I seriously put all my navy and gray suits away. I have to be fashionably correct.” His devotion to New Orleans and all its quirks is a quality endemic to the law firm, which has served the city for 22 years. Chehardy Sherman lawyers have extensive experi“We have a good mix of attorneys who can handle any legal ence in many fields of law. Standing (left to right): P.J. Stakelum III, George Recile, David Sherman, Jacqueline need … from estate planning or will preparations to contract Griffith, Steven Hayes. Seated (left to right): Michael negotiations and real estate,” says managing partner LawEllis, Lawrence Chehardy, Julian Murray. rence Chehardy. The firm’s 25 lawyers can address legal issues at the parish, state or federal levels. Because these lawyers practice in different fields of law, clients have access to a range of professionals who can assist with any legal issue that arises. Chehardy Sherman also makes community outreach a priority. Sherman is a founding member of the Greater New Orleans Sports Foundation, a nonprofit organization that works to attract sporting events like the NBA All-Star game and the AAU Junior Olympics to New Orleans. “As far as the firm is concerned, we’re very proud of it,” Sherman says. “Our advertising uses the phrase ‘firm for all.’ Not only do we make our own living, but we’re involved in various aspects of the community, and we also give back.”

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 07 > 2011

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WEDDING BELLES (891-1005; www.weddingbellesneworleans.com) and STATIONER (8954868; www.stationernola.com) host the first installment of a free, four-part wedding planning series from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Wednesday, June 8, in their shared location at 3632 Magazine St. A nutritionist, dermatologist and personal trainer will discuss how brides can look their best on their wedding day. Complimentary hors d’oeurves and drinks will be served. The price of a one-day Jazzy Pass, which provides unlimited rides on all REGIONAL TRANSIT AUTHORITY (RTA) vehicles, has been reduced from $5 to $3. Call 248-3900 or visit www.norta. com to find a listing of ticket machines and vendors that sell the pass. W HOTEL NEW ORLEANS (333 Poydras St., 5259444; www.starwoodhotels.com/whotels) hosts a poolside fashion show of Kelly Dooley’s BodyRock Sport activewear collection from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday, June 9. The $10 cover charge includes a cocktail, snacks and music by DJ Otto. BLACK SOCIALITE (315-5889; www.blacksocialitemagazine.com), a new monthly lifestyle and fashion magazine for New Orleans’ black community, launches its first issue this month. Subscriptions are $18.95 a year, and the magazine will be distributed free at more than 100 locations citywide.

COUPLES THERAPY PAGE

27

MATT & KIM

AT HOUSE OF BLUES

STAGE: PUPPETS AT THE CAC | PAGE 27 ART: NEW PHOTOGRAPHY | PAGE 38 CUISINE: DANTE’S KITCHEN | PAGE 51

>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << MUSIC FILM ART STAGE EVENTS CUISINE >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE YOU GO << <<<<<<<<<< << 29 35 38 43 45 49 >> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << THE >> >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>> << <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<< JUN >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> > << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< < >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Portland, Ore., punk trio the Thermals upstaged itself during the band’s last visit here, inviting three burlesque dancers to shed their Jehovah’s Witness outfits in time to fire-andFRUIT OF brimstone encore “Here’s ZALOOM Your Future.” Frontman 7:30 P.M. FRI.-SAT., Hutch Harris has had eight JUNE 10-11 months to devise a topper. TICKETS $18, $10 Autobot of Flosstradomus STUDENTS, $15 CAC opens; Matt and Kim headline. Tickets $22. 8 p.m. Wednesday. MEMBERS House of Blues, 225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www.hob.com

Matt & Kim with the Thermals

“THEATER OF TRASH” WORKSHOP 7:30 P.M. THU. FREE ADMISSION CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER, 900 CAMP ST., 528-3800; WWW.CACNO.ORG

Puppet Regime PAUL ZALOOM BLENDS PUPPETRY, COMEDY AND POLITICAL SATIRE. n his satire The Adventures of White-Man, Paul Zaloom uses a collection of found objects to play White-Man, including a golf trophy, a polar bear, a teapot and a California Highway Patrol doll. God is sometimes represented as a beard or a gay tornado. Zaloom’s found-object shows have not always been perceived as puppetry. “You better call me a puppeteer,” he responds in his New York accent when asked if that’s an appropriate title. Whether he’s working with a rod puppet, a Little Mermaid electric toothbrush, a plastic statue of the Virgin Mary or a toaster, Zaloom believes there is a simple art to puppetry. “With technique — it is important to me that I do it really well. If I take a rod puppet or a hand puppet or overhead projection, I have to imbue it with life. You want to manipulate the thing so it’s real.” Zaloom works with classic puppet forms, including rod puppets and toy theater, but some of his most inspired work comes from animating found objects. It’s not improv; he works off scripts, but in some shows, his irreverence and occasional foul-mouthed candor echoes comedians like Lenny Bruce and George Carlin. Zaloom offers a more simple explanation of his shows. “It’s like making movies for $9,” he says. “Except they’re live, and they’re not movies.” At the Contemporary Arts Center, Zaloom presents an episode of White-Man, The Punch and Jimmy

I

Show and a prologue about “American Bumper Sticker Literature.” He’ll also lead a workshop, and participants are encouraged to bring at least six objects to create their own scenes. Zaloom has a background in puppetry, which one could almost call a formal education. He essentially skipped college to work with Vermont’s Bread and Puppet Theater, but he was attending a hippie alternative college, which gave him credit for the work. “We didn’t have classes, we didn’t have grades,” he says. “We had our own strain of the clap.” Bread and Puppet’s massive puppet shows attracted him, and he worked with the group for a dozen years before starting his solo career. (He returns to work with the company every summer). He had more of a taste for humor than Bread and Puppet, and he has no problem with being called an entertainer or artist. Some of Zaloom’s shows are based on traditional forms. The Punch and Jimmy Show is an updated and twisted version of the Punch and Judy characters, derived from commedia dell’arte characters (the trickster Punchinello and his wife), but Jimmy is a cop and the play is about gay assimilation. White-Man is about social anxieties about multiculturalism. His political leanings are both liberal and non-partisan irreverent. “It’s like a USO show for the left,” he says.

PHOTO BY JOHN BARROIS

JUN

9

The New Orleans Shakespeare Festival at Tulane kicks off its summer season with Julius Caesar. The tragedy is set in 1930s America, and it’s a timeless tale of backroom deals, political grandstanding and the risks and rewards of seeking to manipulate the masses. Tickets $30, $15 previews (Thu.-Fri.), $40 opening night (Sat.). 7:30 p.m. Thu.-Sat.; 1:30 p.m. Sun.; through June 25. Tulane University, Lupin Theater, 865-5106; http:// neworleansshakespeare.tulane.edu

Mildred, Dearest

JUN

10

Hide your wire hangers, Running With Scissors is paying homage to Joan Crawford and Mommie Dearest in Mildred, Dearest. Brian Peterson stars as Joan, trying to keep the house clean and her stardom afloat as she ages — less than gracefully. Opening night is sponsored by the Mystic Krewe of Satyricon. (Call 5254498 for that show only.) Tickets $21-$26 (includes $5 drink credit). 8 p.m. Fri.-Sat.; 6 p.m. Sun.; through June 26. Le Chat Noir, 715 St. Charles Ave., 581-5812; www.cabaretlechatnoir.com

Bahamas with Noah & the Whale

JUN

13

Bahamas is the nom de plume of Afie Jurvanen, a melodyblessed Quebecan whose simple, intimate guitar-pop songs are shot through with warmer-clime blues. His full-length debut, Pink Strat, arrived in April. Earnest English rockers Noah and the Whale headline. Tickets $15. 10 p.m. Monday. One Eyed Jacks, 615 Toulouse St., 569-8361; www. oneeyedjacks.net PAGE 28

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 07 > 2011

BY WILL COVIELLO

Paul Zaloom created The Punch and Jimmy Show with a twisted update on the classic characters Punch and Judy.

Julius Caesar

8

27

LISTINGS

the return of

STICK THIS IN YOUR EAR

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly. com; FAX:483-3116

Boozinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Bingo

MUSIC DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Bob Andrews, 9:30

preview

EIFFEL SOCIETY â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Vivaz!, 8

thurs., june 9th â&#x20AC;˘ 8pm

THE FAMOUS DOOR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

$2 tacos by CGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

FUNKY PIRATE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30 HEY! CAFE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Milk Music, Broach, Nervous Juvenile, 8

JIMMY BUFFETTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Lisa Lynn, 3; Joe Bennett, 6; Andy J. Forest, 9

BACCHANAL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mark Weliky, 7:30 BISTREAUX â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Aaron LopezBarrantes, 6

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Joe Krown, 9:30 THE FAMOUS DOOR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

FUNKY PIRATE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30 GENNAROâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Harvey Jesus & Fire, 8 IRVIN MAYFIELDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jason Marsalis, 8

LAFITTEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BLACKSMITH SHOP â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mike Hood, 9 MAPLE LEAF BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Rebirth Brass Band, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Dr. Bone & the Hepcats, 6; Eudora Evans & Deep Soul, 9:30

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Bruce Barnes & Matt Hampsey, 3 OLD OPERA HOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Charlie Cuccia & Old No. 7 Band, 7 OLD POINT BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Josh Garrett & the Bottom Line, 8

ONE EYED JACKS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Eagles of Death Metal, Gnarltones, Star & Dagger, 9 PRESERVATION HALL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Preservation Hall-Stars feat. Charlie Gabriel, 8

SIBERIA â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Back Pockets, Hawn, Room 101, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; UNO Jazz Ambassadors, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brett Richardson, 4; Smokinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Time Jazz Club, 6; Davis Rogan Band, 10

ZEITGEIST MULTI-DISCIPLINARY ARTS CENTER â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Shitstorm, White Lung,

Music Exchange

Neutral Milk Hotelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Anne Frank-ingesting magnum opus In the Aeroplane Over the Sea (1998) is independent rockâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best book report, and Gulag Orkestar â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the 2005 debut by Beirut, the Middle Eastern-titled, Eastern Europeaninspired, Santa Fe, N.M.-residing bedroom recordings of (then) 18-year-old Zachary Condon â&#x20AC;&#x201D; is its most inked passport. (Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a connection: NMH multi-instrumentalist Jeremy Barnes plays on Gulag.) Condon became infatuated by Balkan folk songs as a teen traveler abroad and he brought some serious spirits back in his suitcase, arisen in the form of lyric trumpets and mournful flugelhorns, skittering ukuleles and polkaing accordions, and a marching bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bass-drum triplet banging out last-dance waltzes and hesitating Slavic second-line dirges. And Condonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s finest instrument: his high-pitched hummingbird vocals, carrying vowels over entire measures and always hovering as if he was Morrisseyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s younger, hostel-hopping cousin. Now two LPs and EPs in and a bona fide sensation in Brazil (whose countrywide 2009 holiday Beirutando na Praca is butchered Portuguese for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beiruting in the Streetsâ&#x20AC;?), the band has settled into a one-trick-pony trot, assembling new songs like Lego sculptures out of the better remnants of old ones. But that single trick is Houdini-esque and the pony is a show horse. Twin Sister, an Ambien-groovy New York pop quintet, opens. Tickets $25 in advance, $28 at the door. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Noah Bonaparte Pais

JUN

10

BEIRUT WITH TWIN SISTER 10 p.m. Friday Republic New Orleans, 828 S. Peters St., 528-8282; www.republicnola.com

Wednesday 8 12 BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brass-A-Holics, 8:30 BACCHANAL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jazz Lab feat. Jesse Morrow, 7:30 THE BEACH â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Chicken on the Bone, 7 BIG ALâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SALOON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jumpinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Johnny Sansone Blues Party, 7 BISTREAUX â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Paul Longstreth, 7 BLUE NILE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; United Postal Project, 8; Gravity A, 11 BMC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Peter Novelli Band, 6; Blues4Sale, 9:30

BOMBAY CLUB â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Marlon Jordan Jazz Trio, 8

CAFE NEGRIL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jamey St. Pierre & the Honeycreepers, 9 CANDLELIGHT LOUNGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Treme Brass Band, 9

CAROUSEL PIANO BAR & LOUNGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Louis Prima Night feat. John Autin, Austin Clements & Tyler Clements, 8

CHECK POINT CHARLIE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tourette Seizure Blues, 7; House of Cards, 11 CHICKIE WAH WAH â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tom McDermott, 8

D.B.A. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 7; Walter â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wolfmanâ&#x20AC;? Washington & the Roadmasters, 10

Every Fri & Sat Night

FOOD SERVED TIL 1AM

MOJO STATION â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ed Wills, Blues for Sale, 8

Worldly Wine/ Martinis

HOOKAH

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jim Hession, noon

230 DECATUR

OAK â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Amanda Walker, 7

11AM-4AM DAILY

OLD COFFEE POT RESTAURANT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Gypsy Elise & the Royal Blues, 7

www.attikineworleans.com 504-587-3756

OLD FIREMENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S HALL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Two Piece & a Biscuit feat. Brandon Foret, Allan Maxwell & Brian Melancon, 7:30 OLD OPERA HOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Vibe, 8:30

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Lars Edegran & Palm Court Jazz Band feat. Tom Sancton, 7 PRESERVATION HALL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 50th Anniversary Party feat. Preservation Hall Jazz Band and others, 8

tropical isleÂŽ HOME OF THE Hand GrenadeÂŽ -Sold Only At-

ROCK â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; BOWL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Johnny Angel, 8:30

435, 600, 610, 721, 727

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Delfeayo Marsalis & the Uptown Jazz Orchestra, 8 & 10

New Orleansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Most Powerful Drink!

SIBERIA â&#x20AC;&#x201D; High Priest, HOD, Serpentis, The F-ckheads, 10

Bourbon St.

Live Entertainment Nightly

SPOTTED CAT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brett Richardson, 4; Orleans 6, 6; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10 STAGE DOOR CANTEEN AT THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Victory Belles, noon THREE MUSES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Schatzy, 7

Nu Sensae, Thou, Small Bones, 7

BELLY DANCER

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Maryflynn & Prohibition Blues, 6; 19th Street Red, 9:30

TWIST â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Robin Barnes & the Soul Heirs, 7 WEDNESDAY AT THE SQUARE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Galactic, Marc Stone, 5

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Zaza, 6

Thursday 9 12 BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Green Genes, Toast Beards, Aura, 10 BACCHANAL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Courtyard Kings, 7; Vincent Marini, 9:30

BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Armand St. Martin, 7 BAYOU PARK BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ron Hotstream & the F-Holes, 9

â&#x20AC;˘nug â&#x20AC;˘arbor 7Ă&#x160;",  -½Ă&#x160;*,  ,Ă&#x160;<<Ă&#x160; 1

06 07 WED 08 THU 09 FRI 10 SAT 11 SUN 12 MON

CHARMAINE NEVILLE BAND

TUE

UNO JAZZ AMBASSADORS DELFEAYO MARSALIS & UPTOWN JAZZ ORCH. GUITARIST OTTORINO GALLI from Italy MOSE ALLISON w/ Johnny Vidacovich & Jim Singleton MOSE ALLISON w/ Johnny Vidacovich & Jim Singleton JIM SINGLETON & ILLUMINASTI

-"7/ -\ nĂ&#x160;EĂ&#x160;£äĂ&#x160;*

  Ă&#x160;,"Ă&#x160;x*

â&#x20AC;˘4â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 07 > 2011

JIMMY BUFFETTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ched Reeves, 3; Brint Anderson, 6; Truman Holland, 9

experience the mediterranean

MAPLE LEAF BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jeff â&#x20AC;&#x153;Guitarâ&#x20AC;? Nelson, 10

BOMBAY CLUB â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Amanda Walker, 7

D.B.A. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Young Pinstripes Brass Band, 10

bar & grill

LACAVAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SPORTS BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Crossfire, 9

BMC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; William C. Stebon, 6; Royal Rounders, 8:30; Lagniappe Brass Band, 11

COLUMNS HOTEL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; John Rankin & Friends, 8

Attiki

KRAZY KORNER â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Death by Orgasm, 8:30

BLUE NILE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Helen Gillet CD release, 10

CHICKIE WAH WAH â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Grayson Capps, 8

therustynail.biz

IRVIN MAYFIELDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sasha Masakowski, 5; Irvin Mayfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s NOJO Jam, 8

12 BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ciel Rouge CD release, 9

CHECK POINT CHARLIE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Nervous Duane, 7; Jimmy Howell, 11

lliope

Enter/Exit on Ca

HOUSE OF BLUES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Matt & Kim, The Thermals, Autobot, 8

Tuesday 7

CAFE NEGRIL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; John Lisi & Delta Funk, 9

5-5515 St. â&#x20AC;˘ NOLA â&#x20AC;˘ 52 1100 Constance le ab ail Av Parking

HI-HO LOUNGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Buskersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ballroom, Sweet Street Symphony, 10

All show times p.m. unless otherwise noted.

29

MUSIC

LISTINGS

THE BEACH — Chicken on the Bone, 7 BISTREAUX — Paul Longstreth, 7

BMC — Ramblin’ Letters, 6; Charley & Soulbillyswampboogie, 9:30

BOMBAY CLUB — Marlon Jordan Jazz Trio, 8 BOOMTOWN CASINO — Moonshyn, 8

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Domenic, 7; Austin Miller, 11 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Smoking Time Jazz Club, 8

DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 5:30

D.B.A. — Jon Cleary, 7; Shannon McNally, 10 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Survivors Brass Band feat. Jeffrey Hills, 8; Wendell Brunious, 9:30 THE EMBERS “ORIGINAL” BOURBON HOUSE — Curtis Binder, 6 THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

FUNKY PIRATE — Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30 HI-HO LOUNGE — Stooges Brass Band, 10

HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — Legalpalooza feat. the Ibervillians feat. Margie Perez, The Soul Practitioners, Sombrero Verde, 7 THE INN ON BOURBON — Joe Ashlar, 6 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Roman Skakun, 5; Shamarr Allen, 8

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & the Zydeco Hellraisers, 4; Death by Orgasm, 8:30

LAFITTE’S BLACKSMITH SHOP — Mike Hood, 9 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Soul Rebels Brass Band, 11 THE MAISON — Alex Pena, 10

MAPLE LEAF BAR — The Trio, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Peter Novelli Band, 6; Smoky Greenwell’s Blues Jam, 9:30 OAK — Kristin Diable, 8

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 07 > 2011

OLD COFFEE POT RESTAURANT — Gypsy Elise & the Royal Blues, 7

30

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 4; Vibe, 8:30 OLD POINT BAR — Blues Frenzy, 6:30; The Mumbles, 9 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Leroy Jones & Katja Toivola feat. Crescent City Joymakers, 7

PAVILION OF THE TWO SISTERS — Thursdays at Twilight feat. New Orleans Moonshiners & Cristina Perez, 6

PRESERVATION HALL — Paulin Brothers Brass Band, 8 PRIME EXAMPLE — David Torkanowsky, 8 & 10 RAY’S — Bobby Love Band, 6

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REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — Big Freedia, Sissy Nobby, DJ Jubilee, Ricky B, Katey Red, Rusty Lazer, Flyboy Keno, Nicky Da B, 10

CHARCOAL BROILED HAMBURGERS

RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Johnny T. & Claire Audrey, 7 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Leon Chavis, 8:30

SIBERIA — Reckless, Fast Boyfriends, Adults, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Ottorino Galli & Hot Club of New Orleans, 8 & 10

CHERRY, APPLE & PEACH ALSO SERVING SHRIMP & CATFISH PO-BOYS • GRILLED CHICKEN

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SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Miss Sophie Lee, 6; New Orleans Moonshiners, 10 THREE MUSES — Luke Winslow-King, 7:30 TIPITINA’S — The Radiators, 11

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

VAUGHAN’S — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 8:30

& Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30

BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Armand St. Martin, 7; Philip Melancon, 8

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6

LE BON TEMPS ROULE — C.R. Cruver, 7; Khris Royal & Dark Matter, 11

Friday 10

THE MAISON — Pinettes Brass Band, 10; Doombalaya, midnight

THE BLUE BENGAL — Grunge Factory, 10

MAPLE LEAF BAR — “The Loop” film fundraiser feat. Bacon, Ramblin’ Letters, 10

BLUE NILE — Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 7; Hot 8 Brass Band, 11

3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY — Green Demons CD release, 9 AUSTIN’S RESTAURANT — Scott Kyser, 6:30 BALCONY MUSIC CLUB (BMC) — Moonshine & Caroline, 7 BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Armand St. Martin, 7; Philip Melancon, 8 BISTREAUX — Paul Longstreth, 7 BLUE NILE — Mykia Jovan & Jason Butler, 8; Brass-A-Holics feat. Dr. Gonzeaux, 10; Subliminal Holistics (upstairs), 10 BMC — Moonshine & Caroline, 7; Soul Project, 10; One Mind Brass Band, 12:30 a.m. BOMBAY CLUB — Monty Banks, 6; Johnny Angel & the Swinging Demons, 9:30 BOOMTOWN CASINO — Junior & Sumtin Sneaky, 9 CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Stephanie Nilles, 6; Secret Society in Smaller Lies, Solid Giant, 11 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Creole String Beans, 8 DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 9 D.B.A. — Hot Club of New Orleans, 6; Lost Bayou Ramblers, 10 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Eric Traub Trio, 10 DRAGON’S DEN — Mad Conductor, ATM, Tygah Woods, Infinite intelligence, 9:30

EMERIL’S DELMONICO — Bob Andrews, 7 FELIPE’S TAQUERIA — Fredy Omar con su Banda, 10 FUNKY PIRATE — Mark Penton, 4:30; Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30 HERMES BAR — The IQ feat. members of Iguanas, 9:30 & 11 HOUSE OF BLUES — The Gemini Jump Off, 11 HOWLIN’ WOLF — The Sky Walkas, Gus, Southern Hard Hittaz, Nectune Ins., 10 THE INN ON BOURBON — Joe Ashlar, 6 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Joe Krown, 5; Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown, 8; Burlesque Ballroom feat. Linnzi Zaorski, midnight JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Irving Bannister’s AllStars, 6 & 9 JUJU BAG CAFE AND BARBER SALON — Michaela Harrison, Todd Duke, 7:30 KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie

NEW ORLEANS ARENA — Rush, 7:30 NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Barry Martyn & John Royen, 2 OAK — Reed Alleman, 6; Jayna Morgan, 10 OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1; Vibe, 8:30 OLD POINT BAR — Charley & the Soula Billy Swamp Boogie Band, 9:30 ONE EYED JACKS — Settly, The Help, 9 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Clive Wilson & Palm Court Jazz Band feat. Butch Thompson, 7 PELICAN CLUB — Sanford Hinderlie, 7 THE PERFECT FIT BAR & GRILL — Rechelle, Regeneration, 5:30 PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Masters feat. Leroy Jones, 8 REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — Beirut, Twin Sister, 10 RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Refried Confuzion, 9:30 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Gal Holiday & the Honky Tonk Revue, 9:30 SHAMROCK BAR — Live’n n’Kick’n, 9 SIBERIA — Stinking Lizaveta, Spickle, Erode & Disappear, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Mose Allison feat. Johnny Vidacovich & Jim Singleton, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 6:30; New Orleans Cotton Mouth Kings, 10 THREE MUSES — Christina Perez, 7; Glen David Andrews, 10 TIPITINA’S — The Radiators, 11:11 TOMMY’S WINE BAR — Tommy’s Latin Jazz Band feat. Matthew Shilling, 9 TOOLOULA’S — R&R Acoustic, 9 VOILÀ — Mario Abney Quartet, 5 WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6; Anais St. John, 9

Saturday 11 12 BAR — Kevin Theriot benefit concert feat. Randy Jackson, 8 APPLE BARREL — Peter Orr, 7

BMC — New Orleans Jazz Series, 3; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 6:30; The Revealers, 9:30; Ashton & the Big Easy Brawlers Brass Band, 12:30 a.m. BOMBAY CLUB — Monty Banks, 6; Legendary Luther Kent & His Quartet, 9:30 BOOMTOWN CASINO — Al “Lil Fats” Jackson, 9 CAFE NEGRIL — Jamey St. Pierre & the Honeycreepers, 7; Smoky Greenwell & the Blues Gnus, 10:30 CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Unclean, Swing Shot, Scent Of Remains, New Diabolic, Local Totenbett, 11 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Roddie Romero & the Hub City Allstars, 10 CLEVER WINE BAR — Scott Sanders Quartet feat. Olivier Bou, 8 DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 9 D.B.A. — John Boutte, 8; Little Freddie King, 11 DECKBAR & GRILLE — Miche & MixMavens, 8 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Gringo Do Choro feat. Rick Trolsen, 10 THE EMBERS “ORIGINAL” BOURBON HOUSE — Curtis Binder, 6 EMERIL’S DELMONICO — Bob Andrews, 7 FUNKY PIRATE — Mark Penton, 4:30; Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30 HERMES BAR — Shannon Powell Trio, 9:30 & 11 HI-HO LOUNGE — Long Long Long, Pepper Rabbit, 10 HOUSE OF BLUES — Poltern Kinder, Robert Fortune Band, Godspeed the Jackal, The Auto-Pilots, 9

Dark Matter, 10 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Kristina Morales, 4; Charley & the Soula Billy Swamp Boogie Band, 7; Dana Abbot Band, 10:30; The Mumbles, 12:30 a.m. MULATE’S CAJUN RESTAURANT — Bayou DeVille, 7 NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Shotgun Jazz Band, 2; Jerry Embree, 4 OAK — Billy Iuso, 9 OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1; Vibe, 8:30 OLD POINT BAR — Ian Cunningham, 9:30 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lionel Ferbos & Palm Court Jazz Band, 7 PELICAN CLUB — Sandford Hinderlie, 7 PONTCHARTRAIN VINEYARDS — Jazz ’n the Vines presents Javier Gutierrez & Vivaz, 6:30 PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Swing Kings, 8 RITZ-CARLTON — Catherine Anderson, 1 RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Refugeze, 10 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Deacon John & the Ivories, 9:30 SIBERIA — Strange Boys, White Fence, The Vignettes, Dead People, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Mose Allison feat. Johnny Vidacovich & Jim Singleton, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Luke Winslow-King, 3; Panorama Jazz Band, 6; Jazz Vipers, 10 THREE MUSES — Young Spodie, 7; Jug Band, 10 TIPITINA’S — The Radiators, 11:11 TOMMY’S WINE BAR — Julio & Caesar, 10 TOOLOULA’S — Papa P, 9 WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6; Anais St. John, 9

Sunday 12

THE INN ON BOURBON — Joe Ashlar, 6

ARNAUD’S — Gumbo Trio, 10:30 a.m. & 6:30

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Jaz Sawyer & the Crescent City Allstars, 8; Brass-A-Holics, midnight

ATCHAFALAYA — Sam & Boone, 11 a.m.

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Joe Bennett, 3; Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 6 & 9

BISTREAUX — Aaron LopezBarrantes, 6 BLUE NILE — Mainline, 10

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LAFITTE’S BLACKSMITH SHOP — Mike Hood, 9 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Johnny Angel & the Swinging Demons, 11

ATCHAFALAYA — Atchafalaya All Stars, 11 a.m.

THE MAISON — Chapter Soul feat. Kirk Joseph, Calvin Johnson & Kevin O’ Day, 10

AUSTIN’S RESTAURANT — Scott Kyser, 6:30

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Johnny Sketch & the Dirty Notes, 10; Khris Royal &

BMC — Charley & Soulbillyswampboogie, 1; Dana Abbot Band, 7; Andy J. Forest, 9:30 BOMBAY CLUB — Monty Banks, 7 BOOMTOWN CASINO — Captain “Chiggy Chiggy” Charles, 7 BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Some Like it Hot, 11 a.m. CAFE RANI — Courtyard Kings, 11 a.m. COURT OF TWO SISTERS — Mary Flynn, 9:30 a.m. D.B.A. — Palmetto Bug Stompers, 6; PAGE 34

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 07 > 2011

THE EMBERS “ORIGINAL” BOURBON HOUSE — Curtis Binder, 6

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Jerry Jumonville, 4; Alex Bosworth, 7; Fredy Omar con su Banda, 10:30

BISTREAUX — Paul Longstreth, 7

MUSIC

31

SCHEDULE IN SOME FUN AT HARRAH’S THEATRE!

MUSIC

LISTINGS

PAGE 31

Louisiana Hellbenders, 10

ROOSEVELT HOTEL (BLUE ROOM) — James Rivers Movement, 11 a.m.

FINNEGAN’S EASY — Robin Clabby, Chris Alford, Erik Golson & Nick O’Gara, 12:30

SIBERIA — Guitar Lightnin’ Lee & His Thunder Band, The Lushingtons, The Bills, 10

FRENCH QUARTER PIZZERIA — Nervous Duane, 8

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Jim Singleton & Illuminasti, 8 & 10

HOMEDALE INN — Sunday Night Live Jam Session feat. Homedale Boys, 7

CHIPPENDALES

Tickets on sale now

Tickets on sale now

Saturday, June 18

HOUSE OF BLUES — Sunday Gospel Brunch, 10 a.m.; Poppa’s Party House, midnight

®

HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — The Sword, 8

Friday, June 24

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Hot 8 Brass Band, 9 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Germaine Bazzle & Paul Longstreth, 7 JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 3; Cindy Chen, 6; Chad Reeves, 9 KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Chapter:SOUL, 9 LE PAVILLON HOTEL — Philip Melancon, 8:30 a.m.

MARC BROUSSARD Saturday, July 9

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 07 > 2011

Tickets on sale now

MADIGAN’S — Anderson/ Easley Project, 9

BILL BELLAMY Girls Night Out Tour Saturday, July 30 Tickets on sale now

Tickets on sale now. Purchase tickets online at HarrahsNewOrleans.com or call Ticketmaster at 1-800-745-3000.

THREE MUSES — Linnzi Zaorski, 7 TIPITINA’S — Sunday Music Workshop feat. Johnny Vidacovich Trio, 1; Cajun Fais Do Do feat. Bruce Daigrepont, 5:30 WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Mario Abney Quartet, 6

Monday 13 APPLE BARREL — Sam Cammarata, 8 ATCHAFALAYA — Burke Ingraffia, Dr. Danny Acosta, 7 BACCHANAL — Jonathan Freilich, 7:30

BJ’S LOUNGE — King James & the Special Men, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Tom McDermott & Kevin Clark, 11 a.m.; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 5; Javier Olondo & Asheson, 8

BLUE NILE — Big Pearl & the Fugitives of Funk, 9 BMC — Fun in the Pocket feat. Mayumi Shara, 5; Smoky Greenwell’s Monday’s Blues Jam, 9:30

MULATE’S CAJUN RESTAURANT — Bayou DeVille, 7

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lucien Barbarin & Sunday Night Swingsters, 7 THE PERFECT FIT BAR & GRILL — Brass-A-Holics, 8 THE PRECINCT — Funk Express, 7:30 PRESERVATION HALL — Tommy Sancton’s New Orleans Legacy Band, 8 RITZ-CARLTON — Armand St. Martin, 10:30 a.m.; Catherine

5/16/11 6:04 PM

SUGAR MILL — Sisters of the Holy Family Benefit Concert feat. Irma Thomas, Ellis Marsalis, Charmaine Neville, Sharon Martin and others, 6

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Joe Krown Trio feat. Russell Batiste & Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 10

OLD POINT BAR — Jesse Moore, 3:30

V3_52957.1_4.729x10.833_4c_Ad.indd 1

ST. CHARLES TAVERN — Mary Flynn Thomas & Prohibition Blues, 10 a.m.

BISTREAUX — Aaron LopezBarrantes, 6

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1

34

SPOTTED CAT — Rights of Swing, 3; Ben Polcer & the Grinders, 6; Pat Casey, 10

THE MAISON — Christina Perez, 7; Refried Confuzion, 10

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Uptown Suzuki Strings, 1:30; Sheri Lynn Colby Botel, 3

Must be 21 or older to enter casino and to gamble. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® ©2011, Caesars License Company, LLC.

Anderson, 2

THE EMBERS “ORIGINAL” BOURBON HOUSE — Curtis Binder, 6

FUNKY PIRATE — Mark Penton, 4:30; Willie Lockett & All Purpose Blues Band, 8:30

AVERAGE WHITE BAND

STICK THIS IN YOUR EAR

BOMBAY CLUB — Amanda Walker, 7 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Jon Cleary, 8 D.B.A. — Paul Sanchez, 6; Glen David Andrews feat. Paul Sanchez, 9 DONNA’S BAR & GRILL — Les Getrex & the Blues All-Star Band, 9 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Mark Growden & the Dos Jefes All-Stars, 9:30 THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3 FOUR POINTS BY SHERATON (M!X ULTRALOUNGE) — Tim Sullivan Jazz Trio, 7 FUNKY PIRATE — Willie Lockett & All Purpose Blues Band, 8:30 GREEN ROOM — For Karma, 10 HI-HO LOUNGE — Bluegrass

Pickin’ Party, 8 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Bob French & the Original Tuxedo Band, 8 JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Truman Holland, 3; Brint Anderson, 6; Chad Reeves, 9 LE CHAT NOIR — New Orleans Bingo! Show, 8 LUCKY’S — USA2000, Blaine Brown, The Robert Street Band, 9 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Papa Grows Funk, 10 MAT & NADDIE’S RESTAURANT — Courtyard Kings, 7 OLD POINT BAR — Brent Walsh Jazz Trio feat. Romy Kaye, 7 ONE EYED JACKS — Noah & the Whale, Bahamas, 9 PRESERVATION HALL — St. Peter Street Playboys feat. Mark Braud, 8 RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Dave Jordan, 7 SIBERIA — Life Erased, Embolization, Holy Dirt, Struggle Bear, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Charmaine Neville Band, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Dominic Grillo & the Frenchmen Street AllStars, 6; Jazz Vipers, 10 ST. ROCH TAVERN — Washboard Lissa Orchestra, 7 THREE MUSES — Mario Abney, 7

classical/ concerts ACADEMY OF OUR LADY — 537

Avenue D, Marrero, 341-6217 — Fri: Jefferson Chorale presents “A Li’l Bit Country,” 7:30

BOURBON ORLEANS HOTEL —

717 Orleans St., 523-2222; www. bourbonorleans.com — Fri: New Orleans Traditional Jazz Camp Concert, 7

DUTCH ALLEY — near French

Market, on North Peters Street — Sun: Summer Twilight Romance Series presents Harmoniemusik, 7

ST. AGNES SCHOOL — 3410

Jefferson Hwy., Jefferson, 8333366 — Sat: Jefferson Chorale presents “A Li’l Bit Country,” 7:30

TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH —

1329 Jackson Ave., 522-0276; www.trinitynola.com — Tue: Organ & Labyrinth, 6; Thu: Evensong Choir, 6:30; Sun: Greater New Orleans Orchestra, 5; Mon: Taize, 6

FILM

LISTINGS

A ROOM WITH A VIEW

review

Virginia is for Loving

By wonderful happenstance, Loving Day is named for Richard and Mildred Loving, whose marriage is validated not just by a marriage license but a 1967 Supreme Court case (Loving v. Virgina). The case ended race-based restrictions on the issuance of marriage licenses, and Loving Day (June 12) celebrates the civil rights victory. The New Orleans Loving Festival presents a series of films about interracial relationships and multiracial identity, as well as an art show at Antenna Gallery. Richard Friedenberg’s Mr. & Mrs. Loving is about the Virginia couple and their fight against antiquated miscegenation laws. It screens at 7 p.m. Sunday at the Antenna Gallery. The festival kicks off at Ashe Cultural Arts Center at 7 p.m. Friday with a screening of One Big Hapa Family, Jeff Chiba Stearns’ largely autobiographical documentar about Canadians of Japanese descent. It examines a burst of interracial marriages, when a great number of Canadian-born citizens of Japanese and European descent intermarried. The trend relates to the internment of Japanese-descended Canadians during World War II. Stearns examines the history of internment and contemporary notions of how race and nationality are perceived. Much of the film focuses on how people in multiple generations of his family describe themselves, and it ultimately offers a very optimistic outlook on changing attitudes and tolerance. Stearns will attend the screening and discuss the film. For a full schedule of festival events, visit www.press-street.com or www.charitablefilmnetwork.org. Free admission. — Will Coviello

JUN

1012

NEW ORLEANS LOVING FESTIVAL Antenna Gallery, 3161 Burgundy St.; Ashe Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org or www.press-street.com

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

NOW SHOWING BEYOND ALL BOUNDARIES (NR) — The museum screens a 4-D

film, bringing audiences into battle using archival footage and special effects. National World War II Museum Solomon Victory Theater

BRIDESMAIDS (R) — A comical-

ly struggling woman (Kristen Wiig) tries to get her life in order while also serving as her best friend’s maid of honor. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

DEEP SEA (NR) — Audiences experience the depths of the ocean. Entergy IMAX FAST FIVE (PG-13) — Vin Diesel and Dwayne Johnson star in the latest installment of the Fast and the Furious franchise. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 GRAND CANYON: RIVER AT RISK (NR) — Robert Redford

narrates a 15-day river-rafting trip that highlights the beauty of the Colorado River. Entergy IMAX

THE HANGOVER PART II (R) —

After the infamous bachelor party in Las Vegas, Stu (Ed Helms) tries to play it safe for his wedding in Thailand — but things once again go awry. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14, Prytania

JUMPING THE BROOM (NR)

— Worlds collide when two

African-American families from disparate socioeconomic backgrounds get together for a wedding in Martha’s Vineyard. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9

KUNG FU PANDA 2 (PG) — The

animated sequel stars Jack Black as the voice of the titular warrior. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

MADEA’S BIG HAPPY FAMILY (PG-13) — Director and star

Tyler Perry returns as the tough and eccentric Madea. AMC Palace 16 PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES (PG-13) — In the latest installment

of the franchise, Captain Jack Sparrow’s (Johnny Depp) past comes back to haunt him when he encounters Angelica (Penélope Cruz), a pirate he once loved. AMC Palace 10,

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 07 > 2011

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

35

FILM

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PRIEST (PG-13) — A priest living in a vampire-infested, Church-controlled dystopian city breaks his vows to find his niece after she’s abducted. AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand

never learned to fly (voiced by Jesse Eisenberg) and his female counterpart get caught up in a perilous adventure. Hollywood 14

WED BRASS-A-HOLICS 8:30PM 6/8 S.I.N. NIGHT 10:30PM

6/10

AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

RIO 3-D (G) — A macaw who

CD RELEASE PARTY

THU GREEN GENES, TOAST 6/9 BEARDS AND AURA 10PM

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SOMETHING BORROWED (PG13) — A successful and unhap-

Buy 2 Entrees Get 1 Free Appetizer Buy 3 Entrees Get 2 Free Appetizers BRUNCH WEEKDAYS ONLY DINNER MENU 4PM-9:30PM MON-FRI 11AM-9:30PM SAT 12 NOON-9:30PM DINNER MENU ONLY

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pily single attorney falls for her best friend’s fiance. AMC Palace 20 THOR (PG) — Chris

Hemsworth plays the powerful but arrogant Marvel Comics hero who is cast down to Earth to live among humans. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 1

UNDER THE SEA 3-D (G) — Jim Carrey narrates the documentary exploring the Great Barrier Reef. Entergy IMAX WHITE IRISH DRINKERS (R) —

John Gray’s autobiographical drama follows a drunken working-class family in 1970s Brooklyn. Chalmette Movies X-MEN: FIRST CLASS (PG-13) —

Dance Recital Gifts

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 07 > 2011

Showcasing Local Music

36

MON 6/6

Papa Grows Funk

TUE 6/7

Rebirth Brass Band

WED 6/8

Jeff “Guitar” Nelson

THU The Trio featuring 6/9 Johnny V & Special Guests

“WHERE THE UNUSUAL IS COMMONPLACE.” 5101 W. ESPLANADE AVE. METAIRIE, LA 70006 504-885-4956 • 800-222-4956

FRI 6/10

Bacon + Ramblin’ Letters

SAT 6/11

Johnny Sketch & the Dirty Notes

TrioTrio w/ Walter SUN Joe JoeKrown Krown SUN “Wolfman” Washington & feat. Russell Batiste 6/12 Russell Batiste & Walter 3/13 Wolfman Washington

New Orleans Best Every Night! 8316 Oak Street · New Orleans 70118

(504) 866-9359

www.themapleleafbar.com

The prequel tells the origin story of the Marvel Comics supergroup. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 YELLOWBRICKROAD (R) — A

team of researchers sets out to uncover the mystery surrounding the sudden disappearance of the inhabitants of a New Hampshire town in the horror-thriller. AMC Palace 20

OPENING FRIDAY JUDY MOODY AND THE NOT BUMMER SUMMER (PG) —

The book series by Megan McDonald gets a big-screen adaptation.

REJOICE AND SHOUT (PG) —

Through photos, rare recordings, film appearances and TV performances, the documentary traces the history of Gospel music. AMC Palace 20 SUPER 8 (PG-13) — A group

of friends in 1979 start to witness strange occurrences after a catastrophic train crash in J.J. Abrams’ sci-fi drama.

SPECIAL SCREENINGS ALL ABOUT EVE (NR) — Bette

Davis and Anne Baxter star

A ROOM WITH A VIEW

in the 1950 film about an aging movie star who is threatened by an ambitious ingenue. Tickets $5.50. Noon June Saturday-Sunday and June 15, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www. theprytania.com BRIT WIT — The Big Top

screens British comedies every week. 7 p.m. Tuesday, 3 Ring Circus’ The Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com

THE FIRST BEAUTIFUL THING (NR) — Italian director Paolo

Virzì’s film follows a vivacious mother who raises her children to appreciate the small joys in life. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 7:30 p.m. Friday-Monday, then nightly through June 16, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net

FREE FLICKS FRIDAY— Grease

is screened at the outdoor movie series. Refreshments will be available for purchase. Free admission. Park opens at 7 p.m., screening at 8 p.m. Friday, Mandeville Trailhead, 675 Lafitte St., Mandeville, (985) 624-3147; www.mandevilletrailhead.com

GENTLEMEN PREFER BLONDES (NR) — Marilyn Monroe stars

in the 1953 movie-musical about friends who go to Paris looking for husbands. Tickets $5.50. Noon Wednesday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www. theprytania.com

I HEART HUCKABEES (R) — A

pair of existentialist detectives lead a man down a philosophical path in the 2004 comedy. Tickets $8. Midnight Friday-Saturday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 8912787; www.theprytania.com

MR. & MRS. LOVING (NR) —

The film follows a mixed-race couple living in 1960 in a town where interracial marriage is illegal. The screening is part of the New Orleans Loving Festival. Free admission. 7 p.m. Sunday, Antenna Gallery, 3161 Burgundy St., 9574255; www.antennagallery.org

NEDS (NR) — Peter Mullan’s

film is a savage study of thwarted, violent youth in 1970s Scotland. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 9:15 p.m. WednesdayThursday, Zeitgeist MultiDisciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 8275858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

ONE BIG HAPA FAMILY (NR) — Inspired by interracial mar-

riages in his own family, Jeff Chiba Stearns explores the phenomenon of JapaneseCanadian marriages in Canada. A Q&A with Sterns follows the screening. The short film Something Other

Than Other plays before the main feature. The screenings are part of the New Orleans Loving Festival. Visit www. neworleansfilmsociety.org for details. Free admission. 7 p.m. Friday, Ashe Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www. ashecac.org PROHIBITION (NR) —

Florentine Films and WYES screen a 60-minute preview of Kevin Burns’ documentary about the national alcohol ban of the 1920s. A Q&A with Burns follows the screening. Reservations are recommended. Call 840-4885 or email membership@wyes.org for details. Free admission. 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nunemaker Auditorium, Monroe Hall, Loyola University New Orleans, 6363 St. Charles Ave., 865-2011; www.loyno.edu

REBECCA (NR) — The cafe screens Alfred Hitchcock’s 1940 adaptation of the Daphne Du Maurier novel. Free admission. 8 p.m. Monday, La Divina Gelateria, 621 St. Peter St., 302-2692; www.ladivinagelateria.com THE TOPP TWINS: UNTOUCHABLE GIRLS (NR) — A

compilation of interviews, performance footage, home videos and newsreel archives tells the story of Jools and Lynda Topp, the yodeling, lesbian, country-and-westernsinging twins from New Zealand. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 7:30 p.m. Wednesday-Thursday, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net AMC Palace 10 (Hammond), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 12 (Clearview), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 16 (Westbank), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 20 (Elmwood), (888) 2624386; Canal Place, 363-1117; Chalmette Movies, 304-9992 ; Entergy IMAX, 581-IMAX; Grand (Slidell), (985) 6411889; Hollywood 9 (Kenner), 464-0990; Hollywood 14 (Covington), (985) 893-3044; Kenner MegaDome, 468-7231; Prytania, 891-2787; Solomon Victory Theater, National World War II Museum, 5276012 Compiled by Lauren LaBorde

ART

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

OPENING CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE. 527 Decatur St., 522-0571; www. crescentcitybrewhouse.com —

Artists reception with Will Smith and Mardi Claw, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Wednesday.

DU MOIS GALLERY. 4921 Freret St., 818-6032 — “Cold Drink” print-

making invitational, through Aug. 6. Opening reception 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday.

THE FRONT. 4100 St. Claude Ave.; www.nolafront.org — “Love,

the Front,” a group exhibition featuring old and new gallery artists, through July 3. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday.

GOOD CHILDREN GALLERY. 4037 St. Claude Ave., 616-7427; www. goodchildrengallery.com — “Grant v. Lee,” contemporary works related to the Civil War, through July 3. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday. UNO-ST. CLAUDE GALLERY. 2429 St. Claude Ave. — “mara/thal-

assa/kai: the SEA,” works by Anastasia Pelias, Rian Kerrane and Melissa Borman, through July. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 07 > 2011

GALLERIES

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A GALLERY FOR FINE PHOTOGRAPHY. 241 Chartres St., 568-1313; www.agallery.com — “Coun-

terfeit,” works by Louviere + Vanessa, through June.

ACADEMY GALLERY. 5256 Magazine St., 899-8111 — Annual

student exhibition, through July 23.

AG WAGNER STUDIO & GALLERY. 813 Royal St., 561-7440 — Works

by gallery artists; 504 Toys, locally handcrafted toys; both ongoing.

ALL IN THE FRAME GALLERY. 2596 Front St., Slidell, (985) 2901395 — “Serene Waters, Clear Horizons,” paintings by Annie Strack, ongoing. ANTON HAARDT FOLK GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www.antonart.com — Works

by Anton Haardt, Christopher Moses and others, ongoing.

ARIODANTE GALLERY. 535 Julia St., 524-3233 — Group exhibition

featuring Cheri Ben-Iesau, Isabelle Dupuy, Susan Landry, Ro Mayer, Myra Williamson Wirtz, Alicia Windham and Maria Etkind, through July 30.

WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET ART GALLERY 818. 818 Royal St., 524-6918 — Paintings, sculpture

and jewelry by local artists Noel Rockmore, Michael Fedor, Xavier de Callatay, Charles Bazzell, Bambi deVille and Ritchie Fitzgerald, ongoing.

review

D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., 524-3936 — “So Much Art, So Little Time, Again,” exhibition of work by gallery artists from the past year, through Aug. 4.

by James Barsness; “Postcards From Plaquemines,” oil paintings and drawings by Simon Gunning, both through June 25.

DUTCH ALLEY ARTIST’S CO-OP GALLERY. 912 N. Peters St., 4129220; www.dutchalleyonline. com — Works by New Orleans

ARTICHOKE GALLERY. 912 Decatur St., 636-2004 — Artists work on site in all media; watercolors and limited-edition prints by Peter Briant, ongoing.

by Marcel Flisiuk, through Saturday.

BERGERON STUDIO & GALLERY. 406 Magazine St., 522-7503; www.bergeronstudio.com — Photographs by Michael P. Smith, Jack Beech, Harriet Blum, Kevin Roberts and others, ongoing. BERTA’S AND MINA’S ANTIQUITIES GALLERY. 4138 Magazine St., 895-6201 — “Louisiana! United

We Stand to Save Our Wetlands,” works by Nilo and Mina Lanzas; works by Clementine Hunter, Noel Rockmore and others; all ongoing.

BRYANT GALLERIES. 316 Royal St., 525-5584; www.bryantgalleries.com — Paintings by Dean

Mitchell, ongoing.

CALICHE & PAO GALLERY. 312 Royal St., 588-2846 — Oil paintings

by Caliche and Pao, ongoing.

CALLAN FINE ART. 240 Chartres St., 524-0025; www.callanfineart. com — Works by Eugene de

Blass, Louis Valtat and other artists of the Barbizon, Impressionist and Post-Impressionist schools, ongoing.

CARDINAL GALLERY. 541 Bourbon St., 522-3227 — Exhibition of Ital-

ian artists featuring works by Bruno Paoli and Andrea Stella, ongoing.

CARIBBEAN ARTS LTD. 720 Franklin Ave., 943-3858 — The gallery

showcases contemporary Haitian and Jamaican art.

CASELL GALLERY. 818 Royal St., 524-0671; www.casellartgallery. com — Pastels by Joaquim

Casell; etchings by Sage; oils by Charles Ward; all ongoing.

COLE PRATT GALLERY. 3800 Magazine St., 891-6789; www. coleprattgallery.com — “Inter-

twined,” paintings by Karen Stastny, through June 26.

COLLECTIVE WORLD ART COMMUNITY. Poydras Center, 650 Poydras St., 339-5237; www. collectiveworldartcommunity. com — Paintings from the Blue

COUP D’OEIL ART CONSORTIUM. 2033 Magazine St., 722-0876; www.coupdoeilartconsortium. com — “Stay Crazy,” mixed-me-

dia works by Mason Saltarrelli, through Saturday.

ARTHUR ROGER GALLERY. 432 Julia St., 522-1999; www.arthurrogergallery.com — Paintings

BARRISTER’S GALLERY. 2331 St. Claude Ave., 525-2767; www. barristersgallery.com — Works

Series by Joseph Pearson, ongoing.

artists, ongoing.

Documented Immigrants Portentously titled La Historia del Futuro, or “The History of the Future,” this stark exhibition of photographs by Michael Berman and Julian Cardona is billed as “focusing on the wild places in the desert southwest and the people crossing these lands at the U.S./Mexico border.” Its implicit message — that Mexicans are not only coming, but will keep coming — is fraught with perplexities best left for discussion elsewhere. What we see are stark blackand-white documentary photographs, mostly of Mexicans in dire straits amid landscapes so desolate as to make Death Valley look inviting. Indeed, the threat of death is inescapable as the travelers endure 40-mile marches across blazing circuitous wastelands for the privilege of working at tasks that don’t tempt unemployed Americans. Although generally in the social documentary vein of the 1930s WPA (Works Progress Administration) photographers, the drama here is mostly cumulative as images of new wayfarers lighting votive candles in a church yield to panoramas of heat, dust, bones and privation suggesting that vast stretches of our border with Mexico, and those who cross it, occupy the far reaches of Hades, and we can only contemplate with wonder and dread the desperation of those compelled to undertake such ordeals. A very different approach is on display at the Darkroom, in the Synthesis expo of images derived from alternative photographic processes. Documented here are the psychic states expressed in works like Terry DeRoche’s palimpsest blowup of a 1968 Polaroid family portrait with superimposed handwritten commentaries, and Ann Schwab’s deadpan-poetic self portrait with thread and botanical specimens (all of which are eloquently complemented by the rather psychodramatic Between Fateful and Forlorn show at the Photo Alliance Gallery through June 5). Unfortunately, this is the Darkroom’s final exhibit as this local institution suspends operations this month. It will be missed. — D. Eric Bookhardt

THRU JUNE

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THRU JUNE

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La Historia del Futuro: Photographs by Michael Berman and Julian Cardona Newcomb Art Gallery, Tulane University, 865-5328; www.tulane.edu/~newcomb/ artindex.html

Synthesis: Mixed Media photography ( by appointment ) The Darkroom, 1927 Sophie Wright Place, 522-3211; www.neworleansdarkroom.com

ELLIOTT GALLERY. 540 Royal St., 523-3554; www.elliottgallery. com — Works by gallery artists

Coignard, Engel, Papart, Petra, Tobiasse, Schneuer and Yrondi, ongoing.

FAIR FOLKS & A GOAT. 2116 Chartres St., 872-9260; www. fairfolksandagoat.com — “An American Memory,” a group exhibition curated by Michael Martin, through July 15. “Foota-Night,” installation by Hannah Chalew, ongoing. FIELDING GALLERY. 525 E. Boston St., Covington — Elizabeth

Brown, David Henson, Tracy Lambert, Keith Villere and Stephanie Schoen, through June.

FRAMIN’ PLACE & GALLERY. 3535 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-3311; www.nolaframing.com — Prints

by Tommy Thompson, Phillip Sage, James Michalopoulos and others, ongoing. FREDRICK GUESS STUDIO. 910 Royal St., 581-4596; www.fredrickguessstudio.com — Paintings

by Fredrick Guess, ongoing.

GALERIE D’ART FRANCAIS. 541 Royal St., 581-6925 — Works by

Todd White, ongoing.

GALERIE PORCHE WEST. 3201 Burgundy St., 947-3880 — Pho-

tography by Christopher Porche West, ongoing.

GALERIE ROYALE. 3648 Magazine St., 894-1588; www.galerieroyale. com — “Expressions of Me,”

mixed media on canvas by Kim Albrecht, through July 4.

GALLERIA BELLA. 319 Royal St., 581-5881 — Works by gallery

artists, ongoing.

GALLERY 421. 421 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 898-5858 — More than 500 pieces of art by more than 50 artists, ongoing. THE GARDEN DISTRICT GALLERY. 1332 Washington Ave., 891-3032; www.gardendistrictgallery. com — “Seeing Music,” a group

exhibition exploring interpretations of music, through July 3.

GEORGE SCHMIDT GALLERY. 626 Julia St., 592-0206; www. georgeschmidt.com — Paintings by George Schmidt, ongoing.

GRAPHITE GALLERIES. 936 Royal St., 565-3739 — “Sinners and

Saints,” works by Joe Hobbs; works by Christy Lee Rogers; both ongoing.

GUTHRIE CONTEMPORARY. 3815 Magazine St., 897-2688; www. guthriecontemporary.com — “Impact,” works by Bernd Haussmann; “Schemata,” works by Susan Dory; both ongoing. GUY LYMAN FINE ART. 3645 Magazine St., 899-4687; www. guylymanfineart.com — Mixed media with mechanical light sculptures by Jimmy Block, ongoing. HAROUNI GALLERY. 829 Royal St., 299-8900 — Paintings by

David Harouni, ongoing.

HERIARD-CIMINO GALLERY. 440 Julia St., 525-7300; www.heriardcimino.com — Group exhibition featuring works by nine gallery artists, through July 9. ISABELLA’S GALLERY. 3331 Severn Ave., Suite 105, Metairie, 7793202; www.isabellasgallery.com — Hand-blown glass works

by Marc Rosenbaum; raku by Kate Tonguis and John Davis; all ongoing.

JAMIE HAYES GALLERY. 621 Chartres St., 592-4080; www. jamiehayes.com — New Orleans-style art by Jamie Hayes, ongoing. JEAN BRAGG GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART. 600 Julia St., 895-7375; www.jeanbragg. com — “Rhythm on the River,”

paintings by Derenda Keating, through June.

JON SCHOOLER GALLERY. 8526 Oak St., 865-7032; www. jonschooler.com — “Subliminal WOWs,” paintings by Jon Schooler, ongoing. JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY. 400A Julia St., 522-5471; www. jonathanferraragallery.com —

“Wrong Sounding Stories,” paintings by Adam Mysock; “Eternal Moment,” drawings by Rieko Fujinami, through June.

JULIE NEILL DESIGNS. 3908 Magazine St., 899-4201; www. julieneill.com — “Facade,”

photographs by Lesley Wells, ongoing.

KAKO GALLERY. 536 Royal St., 565-5445; www.kakogallery.com — Paintings by Don Picou and

Stan Fontaine; “Raku” by Joy Gauss; 3-D wood sculpture by Joe Derr; all ongoing.

KURT E. SCHON. 510-520 St. Louis St., 524-5462 — The gallery specializes in 18th and 19th century European oil paintings by artists from the French Salon and Royal Academy as well as French Impressionists. L9 CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 539 Caffin Ave., 948-0056 — “Faces

of Treme,” works by Chandra

PAGE 40

ART

LISTINGS

PAGE 38

McCormick and Keith Calhoun, ongoing. LE PETIT SALON DE NEW ORLEANS. 906 Royal St., 524-5700 — Paintings by Holly

Sarre, ongoing.

LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia St., 522-5988; www.lemieuxgalleries.com — “Breaking

Muse!” ceramic assemblages by Shannon Landis Hansen; textile constructions by Christine Sauer, through July 30. LIVE ART STUDIO. 4207 Dumaine St., 4847245 — “New Orleans is Alive,” acrylics by

Marlena Stevenson, through July.

LOUISIANA CRAFTS GUILD. 608 Julia St., 558-6198; www.louisianacrafts.org — Group show featuring works from guild members, ongoing. M. FRANCIS GALLERY. 604 S. Julia St., 875-4888; www.mfrancisgallery.com — Artwork and jewelry by Jamar Pierre, Robert Johnson, Stephen Rue and others, plus participants from Artfully AWARE workshops, through June 13.

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MALLORY PAGE STUDIO. 614 Julia St.; www. mallorypage.com — Paintings by Mallory Page, Mondays-Fridays.

R a n t s gi

Gautreau’s restaurant La Petite Grocery Mark Twain’s Pizza Landing Martinique Bistro Meauxbar Bistro Mia’s Balcony nonna Mia Cafe & Pizzeria Pinkberry

MICHALOPOULOS GALLERY. 617 Bienville St., 558-0505; www.michalopoulos.com — Paintings by James Michalopoulos, ongoing. MICHELLE Y WILLIAMS GALLERY. 835 Julia St., 585-1945; www.michelleywilliams.com — Works by Michelle Y. Williams, ongoing. NEW ORLEANS ARTWORKS. 727 Magazine St., 529-7279 — Illuminated glass sculpture by Curt Brock; copper enameled jewelry by Cathy DeYoung; hand-pulled prints by Dominique Begnaud, through July 30.

On Thursday, June 16 these local restaurants will give 20% of their dinner proceeds to the Louisiana SPCA. So grab your friends and family & dine out for our animals! Bistro daisy The Bulldog- uptown The Bulldog- Mid City Cafe amelie Cafe degas Crescent Pie & sausage Company eat new Orleans

MARTINE CHAISSON GALLERY. 727 Camp St., 304-7942; www.martinechaissongallery.com — “Embers of a Floating World,” works by Caroline Wright, through July 9.

ralph’s on the Park rue 127 santa Fe restaurant santa Fe Tapas Tully’s Italian & seafood Vega Tapas Cafe The Velvet Cactus

F O r M O r e i N F O r M At i O N v i s i t :

La-sPCa.OrG/dInner 504.368.5191 | 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd, New Orleans, LA 70114

NEWCOMB ART GALLERY. Woldenberg Art Center, Tulane University, 865-5328; www. newcombartgallery.tulane.edu — “The History of the Future,” photographs by Michael Berman and Julián Cardona, through June 29. OCTAVIA ART GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www.octaviaartgallery.com — Acrylic on canvas by Cleland Powell, through June 28. ONE SUN GALLERY. 616 Royal St., (800) 5011151 — Works by local and national artists, ongoing. PARSE GALLERY. 134 Carondelet St. — “Chicken Lovers,” works by Barbie L’Hoste and Megan Hillerud, through June 24. PEARL ART GALLERY. 4421 Magazine St., 228-5840 — Works by Cindy and Drue Hardegree, Erica Dewey, John Womack, Sontina, Lorraine Jones and S. Lee, ongoing. PHOTO WORKS NEW ORLEANS. 521 St. Ann St., 593-9090; www.photoworksneworleans.com — Photography by Louis Sahuc, ongoing. REINA GALLERY. 4132 Magazine St., 8950022; www.reinaart.com — “Vintage New

Orleans Artists,” watercolors, etchings and folk art; “Patron Saints,” works by Shelley Barberot; both ongoing.

RHINO CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS COMPANY. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www.rhinocrafts.com —

Priscilla Busch, Natalie Nichols, Andrew

LISTINGS

WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET

Jackson Pollack, Barbara Roberds and others, ongoing. RIVERSTONE GALLERIES. 719 Royal St., 412-9882; 729 Royal St., 581-3688; Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 36, 566-0588; 733 Royal St., 5259988; www.riverstonegalleries. net — Multimedia works by

Ricardo Lozano, Michael Flohr, Henry Ascencio, Jaline Pol and others, ongoing.

ART LeBlanc, Ingrid Moses, Gale Ruggiero, Robert Seago and Scott Upton, ongoing.

BELLA NOLA. 4236 Magazine St., 897-9499; www.bellanola.net — Paintings by Mario Ortiz,

VENUSIAN GARDENS ART GALLERY. 2601 Chartres St., 9437446; www.venusiangardens. com — “Luminous Sculpture,”

BUD’S BROILER. 500 City Park Ave., 486-2559 — Works by

works by Eric Ehlenberger, ongoing.

VINCENT MANN GALLERY. 305 Royal St., 523-2342; www. vincentmanngallery.com —

RODRIGUE STUDIO. 721 Royal St., 581-4244; www.georgerodrigue. com — Works by George

“Françoise Gilot and the Figure: 1940-2010,” paintings and drawings by the artist, through June.

ROSETREE GLASS STUDIO & GALLERY. 446 Vallette St., Algiers Point, 366-3602; www. rosetreeglass.com — Hand-

WMSJR. 1061 Camp St., 2999455; www.wmsjr.com — Paintings by Will Smith, ongoing.

RUSTY PELICAN ART. 4031 St. Claude Ave., 218-5727; www.rustypelicanart.com — Works by

works by Juli Juneau; photographs from the New Orleans Photo Alliance; both ongoing.

Rodrigue, ongoing.

blown glass works, ongoing.

Travis and Lexi Linde, ongoing. SALONE DELL’ARTES ARTEMISIA. 3000 Royal St., 481-5113 — “I

Genti H2O,” works by Shmuela Padnos, ongoing.

SHEILA’S FINE ART STUDIO. 1427 N. Johnson St., 473-3363; www. sheilaart.com — Works by

Sheila Phipps, ongoing.

SIBLEY GALLERY. 3427 Magazine St., 899-8182 — Group

exhibition featuring Anthony Carriere, Hayley Gaberlavage, James Henderson, Susan Madacsi, Caroline Sokol and Wanda Sullivan, through Wednesday. SLIDELL CULTURAL CENTER. 2055 Second St., Slidell, (985) 646-4375 — “Salad Days,” a

juried student art exhibition, through Friday.

STUDIO BFG. 2627 Desoto St., 942-0200; www.studiobfg. com — “Peel Sessions: First

Installment,” works by Tina Stanley, ongoing.

STUDIO GALLERY. 338 Baronne St., Third Floor, 529-3306 — Works by YA/YA artists, ongoing. TAYLOR/BERCIER FINE ART. 233 Chartres St., 527-0072 — “Intri-

cate Terrain,” works by Maysey Craddock, through June 22.

CALL FOR ARTISTS DRAWING THE LINE. Octavia Art Gallery, 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www.octaviaartgallery.com — The gallery seeks

works in all mediums that focus on the use of line for the upcoming juried exhibition (Aug. 6-27). Email art@octaviaartgallery.com for details. Submissions deadline is July 1.

NEW ORLEANS ARTWORKS AT NEW ORLEANS GLASSWORKS & PRINTMAKING STUDIO.

The studio invites artists to submit 2-D and 3-D art entries inspired by the fascinatorstyle hat for an upcoming exhibition. All styles of media except giclee prints are welcome. Email neworleansglassworks@gmail.com or visit www.neworleansglassworks. com for details. Submissions deadline is June 20. NOLA NOW! The Contemporary Arts Center seeks submissions for an exhibit featuring works produced in the last two years by artists currently living and working in the greater New Orleans area. The exhibition opens Oct. 1. Call 528-3805 or visit www.cacno. org for details. Submissions deadline is July 8.

SPARE SPACES

THOMAS MANN GALLERY I/O. 1812 Magazine St., 581-2113; www.thomasmann.com — “Where’s the Money?” group exhibit interpreting the economy, ongoing.

by Betty Petri; “The Solitary Chair,” sculpture by Michael Moreau; both ongoing.

TRIPOLO GALLERY. 401 N. Columbia St., (985) 893-1441 — Works by Bill Binnings,

BACCHANAL. 600 Poland Ave., 948-9111; www.bacchanalwine. com — “Coming Home: 2005-

Robert Cook, Donna Duffy, Scott Ewen, Juli Juneau, Kevin

ALVAR LIBRARY. 913 Alvar St., 596-2667 — “Youth,” sculpture

2009,” photographs by Lee Celano, ongoing.

Andrew Bascle, Evelyn Menge and others, ongoing.

CAMPBELL’S COFFEE & TEA. 516 S. Tyler St., Covington, (985) 2466992; www.campbellscoffee. com — Multimedia works by

Margaux Hymel, ongoing.

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR. 5535 Tchoupitoulas St., 8918500; www.dosjefescigarbar. com — Works by Mario Ortiz,

ongoing.

DRISCOLL ANTIQUES. 8500 Oak St., 866-7795; www.driscollantiques.com — Works by Sandra

Horstman Roberts, ongoing.

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HAZELNUT NEW ORLEANS. 5515 Magazine St., 891-2424; www. hazelnutneworleans.com — Photography by Roy Barloga, ongoing.

EVERY SUNDAY • 8pm-2Am

HI-HO LOUNGE. 2239 St. Claude Ave., 945-4446; www.hiholounge.net — Works by Robin Durand, Brad Edelman, Tara Eden, Eden Gass and others, ongoing.

8 BeeR Pong tABles alwayS Free!

INTERIORS AND IMPORTS. 813 Florida St., Mandeville, (985) 624-7903 — Paintings by Annie

karaoke 4133 S. Carrollton ave ( @ T u l a n e ) 301-0938

S H a M R O C K Pa R T Y. C O M

Strack, ongoing.

INTERNATIONAL HOUSE. 221 Camp St., 553-9550; www.ihhotel.com — Paintings by YA/

YA senior guild and alumni, ongoing.

JAX BREWERY. 600 Decatur St., 299-7163 — Works by YA/YA youth artists, ongoing. JW MARRIOTT NEW ORLEANS. 614 Canal St., Suite 4, 525-6500; www.marriott.com — Works

by Charlene Insley, ongoing.

LIBERTY’S KITCHEN. 422 1/2 S. Broad St., 822-4011 — Paintings

on canvas by YA/YA artists, ongoing.

LIZANO’S GLASS HAUS. 3400 Cleary Ave., Suite B, Metairie, 454-1144 — Fused-glass works by Paulette Lizano, ongoing.

Thursdays at Twilight Garden Concert Series

THIS WEEK’S PERFORMANCE

New Orleans Moonshiners & Cristina Perez Unique originals to traditional jazz.

JUNE 9

MARIGNY PHO. 2483 Burgundy St., 267-5869 — Selections

from “B Movie Double Feature,” photographs and ceramic collectors plates by Heather Weathers, through July. MCKEOWN’S BOOKS AND DIFFICULT MUSIC. 4737 Tchoupitoulas St., 895-1954 — “The Book of

Kells, Revisited,” encaustic paintings by Patricia Kaschalk, ongoing.

METAIRIE PARK COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL. 300 Park Road, Metairie, 837-5204; www. mpcds.com — “The Unconven-

tional Portrait,” works by Mark Bercier, David Halliday, Gina Phillips and Alexander Stolin, ongoing. PAGE 42

Adults: $8 / Children 5-12: $3 Children 4 & Under = FREE Mint Juleps and other refreshments available for purchase For more information call

(504) 483-9488

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 07 > 2011

STEVE MARTIN STUDIO. 624 Julia St., 566-1390; www. stevemartinfineart.com — Contemporary sculpture and paintings by Steve Martin and other Louisiana artists, ongoing.

A WORK OF ART GALLERY. 8212 Oak St., 862-5244 — Glass

ongoing.

41

MAKE

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LISTINGS

PAGE 41

ROSES $650/DZ

MOJO COFFEE HOUSE. 1500 Magazine St., 525-2244; www. myspace.com/mojoco —

Photographs by Marc Pagani, ongoing.

NEOPHOBIA. 2855 Magazine St., 899-2444; www.neophobianola.com — Works by Tanner,

ongoing.

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE. 5110 Danneel St., 891-3381; www.neutralground. org — Work by local artists,

815 FOCIS STREET [OFF VETERANS ]

837-6400

ongoing.

NEW ORLEANS CAKE CAFE & BAKERY. 2440 Chartres St., 943-0010 — Oil landscapes

of the Ustabes by Will Smith, ongoing.

PEACHES RECORDS. 408 N. Peters St., 282-3322 — “Gospel

and Blues,” photographs by Rita Posselt, ongoing.

New Orleans first school dedicated to crafts!

SOUND CAFE. 2700 Chartres St., 947-4477 — Mixed-media

paintings by YA/YA alumnus Gerard Caliste, ongoing.

Pelican Ring

CLASSES NOW REGISTERING! Mosaics, bookbinding, calligraphy, metalsmithing, drawing, oil painting, mask making, print making, watercolors, pen and ink, portraiture, stained glass mixed media and much more! www.nolaartandcraft.com 504.944.7900

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WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET

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SURREY’S CAFE & JUICE BAR. 1418 Magazine St., 524-3828; www.surreyscafeandjuicebar. com — Watercolor, pen and ink series of New Orleans landmarks by Will Smith, ongoing. THREE MUSES. 536 Frenchmen St., 298-8746; www.thethreemuses.com — Portraits by Zack

Smith, ongoing.

MUSEUMS AMERICAN-ITALIAN MUSEUM & RESEARCH LIBRARY. 537 S. Peters St., 522-7294 — Permanent

exhibits of jazz artists, a St. Joseph’s altar replica, the Louisiana Italian-American Sports Hall of Fame and a research library with genealogy records.

AMISTAD RESEARCH CENTER. 6823 St. Charles Ave., 862-3222 — “Richmond Barthe: Builder

of Pictures,” an exhibition highlighting the life and career of the Harlem Renaissance sculptor, through June.

ASHE CULTURAL ARTS CENTER. 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — “Ashe in Retrospect: 19982008,” photographs by Morris Jones Jr., Eric Waters, Jeffrey Cook and others, ongoing. BACKSTREET CULTURAL MUSEUM. 1116 St. Claude Ave.; www.backstreetmuseum.org —

Permanent exhibits of Mardi Gras Indian suits, jazz funeral memorabilia and social aid and pleasure club artifacts, ongoing.

CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER. 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www. cacno.org — “Then & Now,” works by 14 artists who have exhibited at the center, curated by Dan Cameron, through Sunday. “As We See It: Youth Vision Quilt,” student-created quilt with more than 400 patches, ongoing.

GERMAN-AMERICAN CULTURAL CENTER. 519 Huey P. Long Ave., Gretna, 363-4202; www.gaccnola.com — Museum exhibits

depict the colonial experience, work, culture and religion of German immigrants.

GREAT AMERICAN ALLIGATOR MUSEUM. 2051 Magazine St., 523-5525 — The museum

features fossils, taxidermy, folk art, kitsch, Americana and more. HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION. 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www.hnoc.org — “The Threads

of Memory: Spain and the United States,” a travelling exhibition of rare materials from the Archive of the Indies in Seville, through July 10. “The Golden Legend in the New World: Art of the Spanish Colonial Viceroyalties,” paintings from the New Orleans Museum of Art collection, through Aug. 14.

LONGUE VUE HOUSE AND GARDENS. 7 Bamboo Road, 4885488; www.longuevue.com —

“Magic Spell of Memory: The Photography of Clarence John Laughlin,” through fall 2011.

LOUISIANA FILM MUSEUM. Montrel’s Bistro, 1000 N. Peters St., 524-4747; www.louisianafilmmuseum.org — The muse-

um features props, costumes, video clips, still photographs, posters and other exhibits from major films produced in Louisiana.

LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM PRESBYTERE. 751 Chartres St., 568-6968; www.lsm.crt.state. la.us — “Before During After,”

photographs illustrating the impact of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, through August. “Holding Out and Hanging On: Surviving Hurricane Katrina,” photographs by Thomas Neff, through Sept. 12. “Living With Hurricanes: Katrina and Beyond,” an exhibition of stories, artifacts and science displays; “It’s Carnival Time in Louisiana,” Carnival artifacts, costumes, jewelry and others items; both ongoing.

LOUISIANA SUPREME COURT MUSEUM. Louisiana Supreme Court, 400 Royal St., 310-2149; www.lasc.org — The Supreme

Court of Louisiana Historical Society sponsors the museum’s exhibitions of the people and institutions that have contributed to the development of Louisiana law for 300 years. MAIN LIBRARY. 219 Loyola Ave., 529-7323; www.nutrias. org — “Hidden from History:

Unknown New Orleanians,” photographs of the city’s working poor, ongoing. MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN COCKTAIL. 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www. museumoftheamericancocktail. org — “Absinthe Visions,”

photographs by Damian Hevia, ongoing.

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma. org — “Ancestors of Congo

Square: African Art in the New Orleans Museum of Art”, through July 17. “Read My Pins: The Madeleine Albright Collection,” more than 200 pins from Albright’s personal collection, through Aug. 14. “Peter Carl Faberge and Other Russian Masters,” permanent collection of Faberge objects; “Six Shooters,” photographs from the New Orleans Photo Alliance; both ongoing. NEW ORLEANS PHARMACY MUSEUM. 514 Chartres St., 5658027; www.pharmacymuseum. org — Exhibits on 19th-cen-

tury pharmacy, medicine and health care, all ongoing.

OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART. 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — En-

dangered Species Day Art Contest Exhibition, through July 16. “Art & Jazz: Preservation Hall at 50,” “New Orleans Craft & Design”;“One World, Two Artists,” works by John Alexander and Walter Anderson; “Juke Joint,” photographs by Birney Imes; all through July 24. OLD URSULINE CONVENT. 1100 Chartres St., 529-3040 — “France in America,” pho-

tographs by Arielle de la Tour d’Auvergne, through June.

OLD U.S. MINT. 400 Esplanade Ave., 568-6990; lsm.crt.state. la.us/site/mintex.htm — “Race: Are We So Different?” an exhibit exploring the history, science and everyday experience of race, through Sept. 25. SOUTHERN FOOD & BEVERAGE MUSEUM. Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood. org — “Acadian to Cajun: Forced

Migration to Commercialization,” a multimedia exhibit; “Laissez Faire — Savoir Fare,” the cuisine of Louisiana and New Orleans; “Eating in the White House — America’s Food”; “Tout de Sweet,” an exhibit exploring all aspects of the sugar industry in the South; “Barbecue Nation”; all ongoing. TANGIPAHOA AFRICAN-AMERICAN HERITAGE MUSEUM & BLACK VETERANS ARCHIVES. 1600 Phoenix Square, Hammond, (985) 542-4259; www.africanamericanheritagemuseum.com — The museum exhibits works

that preserve and tell the history of African-American ancestors in Louisiana; it also houses the country’s first memorial to black Vietnam War veterans, ongoing.

TULANE UNIVERSITY. Joseph Merrick Jones Hall, 6823 St. Charles Ave. — “Treme: People and Places,” maps, architectural drawings and photographs celebrating the bicentennial of Faubourg Treme, through November.

LISTINGS

GET IN ON THE ACT

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly. com; FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

THEATER ADULT PETTING ZOO. Shadowbox Theatre, 2400 St. Claude Ave., 523-7469; www.theshadowboxtheatre.com — The New Orleans Fringe Festival hosts the night of fashion design, burlesque, song and theater, including the 2010 Fringe Festival selection 52 Man Pick-Up by Desiree Burch. Visit www. nofringe.org for reservations. Tickets $15. 11 p.m. Saturday and June 17-18, 8 p.m. Sunday and June 19. JULIUS CAESAR. Lupin Theatre, Tulane University, 865-5106; www.tulane.edu — The production sets the William Shakespeare tragedy in 1930s America amid a poverty-stricken population lead by scheming politicians. The play is part of the New Orleans Shakespeare Festival at Tulane. Call the box office or email box@tulane. edu for reservations. Tickets $15 preview performances (Thursday-Friday), $40 opening night gala (Saturday), minimum $5 donation for “pay what you will performance” (June 19), $30 general admission. 7:30 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 1:30 p.m. Sunday through June 25. MILDRED, DEAREST. Le Chat

ON THE AIR. Stage Door Canteen

at The National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 528-1944 — Bob Edes Jr., Gary Rucker and others star in the musical that pays tribute to the heyday of radio broadcasts. Call 528-1943 or visit www.stagedoorcanteen.org for details. 6 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 11 a.m. Sunday through June 26.

THE TRIP TO BOUNTIFUL. NOCCA Riverfront, Nims Blackbox Theatre, 2800 Chartres St. — The cast of professionals and NOCCA students performs Horton Foote’s drama about a widow longing to return to the small town of her youth. Call 940-2875 or email boxoffice@ nocca.com for reservations. Tickets $20 general admission, $12 students and seniors. 7:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 16-18 and 23-25, 2 p.m. Sunday and June 19.

BURLESQUE & CABARET BURLESQUE BALLROOM. Irvin

Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse, 300 Bourbon St., 553-2270; www. sonesta.com — Trixie Minx stars in the weekly burlesque show featuring the music of Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown. Call 553-2331 for details. 11:50 p.m. Friday.

BUSTOUT BURLESQUE. House of Blues, 225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www.hob.com — Ruby Joule performs with the burlesque troupe. Tickets $20 (plus fees). 8 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. Friday. FLEUR DE TEASE. One Eyed Jacks, 615 Toulouse St., 569-8361; www.oneeyedjacks.net — The burlesque troupe performs. Call 319-8917 or email info@fleurdetease.com for reservations. Tickets $15 general admission, $20 reserved table seating. 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. SaturdaySunday.

DANCE KOMENKA ETHNIC DANCE & MUSIC ENSEMBLE SPRING CONCERT.

Louis J. Roussel Performance Hall, Loyola University New Orleans, 6363 St. Charles Ave., 865-2074; www.montage. loyno.edu — Ethnic dance and music performances represent Bulgaria, Estonia, Canada, Haiti and more. Call 529-4676, email rodij@copper.net or visit www.komenka.com for details. Tickets $15 general admission, $10 seniors, students and children. 7:30 p.m. Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday.

OPERA OPERA RETURNS TO BOURBON STREET. The Inn on Bourbon,

541 Bourbon St., 524-7611; www. innonbourbon.com — Vocalists from Bon Operatit! perform. Free admission. 7 p.m. Wednesday.

AUDITIONS CRESCENT CITY SOUND CHORUS.

World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — The winner of the singing contest will perform with the Victory 6 band during the museum’s Sunday Swing concert Aug. 28. Singers should prepare a song written or recorded in the 1940s for the auditions. Call 528-1944 ext. 287 or email ginny.clauss@nationalww2museum.org for details. 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Monday.

8:30 p.m. Friday.

review Howling Woolf

GOD’S BEEN DRINKING. La Nuit

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — Actors improvise a comedy based on audience suggestions. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Friday.

GROUND ZERO COMEDY. The Maison, 508 Frenchmen St., 3715543; www.maisonfrenchmen. com — The show features local stand-up comedians. Sign-up is 7:30 p.m; show is 8 p.m. Friday.

CALL FOR THEATER NEW ORLEANS FRINGE FESTIVAL INFO MEETINGS. Shadowbox

Theatre, 2400 St. Claude Ave., 523-7469; www.theshadowboxtheatre.com — The meetings discuss performing in the festival, the application process, volunteer information and other details. The meetings are at 4 p.m. Sunday at Shadowbox Theater (2400 St. Claude Ave.) and 6 p.m. June 14 at Byrdie’s Coffee Shop (2422-a St. Claude Ave.). Email info@nofringe.org or visit www.nofringe.org for details.

COMEDY A.S.S.TRONOTS. La Nuit Comedy

Theater, 5039 Freret St., 6444300; www.nolacomedy.com — Four “androids” improvise a space voyage based on audience suggestions. Tickets $6. 8:30 p.m. Thursday.

BASED ON REAL LIFE. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — The weekly long-form improv comedy show features some guys, a girl and someone named John Stewart. Tickets $6. 8:30 p.m. Saturday. BROWN HQ. Pip’s Bar, 5252 Veter-

ans Blvd., 456-9234 — Audience members can participate in the show performed by select cast members of the improv comedy troupe. Visit www. brownimprovcomedy.com/ BrownHQ for details. Tickets are free for performers, $5 general admission. 8 p.m. Tuesday.

Delgado Community College, City Park campus, Orleans Avenue, between City Park Avenue and Navarre Street; www.dcc. edu — The women’s chorus holds weekly auditions for new members. Call 453-0858 or visit www.crescentcitysound.com for details. 7 p.m. Monday.

BROWN IMPROV COMEDY. 12 Bar, 608 Fulton St., 212-6476; www.12barnola.com — The improv troupe performs. Visit www.brownimprovcomedy. com for details. Tickets $10 general admission, $7 students. 9 p.m.

JEFFERSON PERFORMING ARTS SOCIETY. Jefferson Performing

Love Lounge, 2529 Dauphine St., 949-2009; www.lostlovelounge. com — The bar hosts a free weekly stand-up comedy show. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

COMEDY CATASTROPHE. Lost

Arts Center, 400 Phlox St., Metairie, 885-2000; www.jpas.org — JPAS seeks singers, dancers and actors ages 17 and older for its 2011-2012 season. Audtioners are required to submit an online form prior to the audition, and auditions are by appointment only. Call 885-2000 ext. 204 or email audition@jpas.org for details. Friday-Sunday.

COMEDY GUMBEAUX. Howlin’ Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf.com — Local comedians perform, and amateurs take the stage in the open mic portion. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Thursday.

STAGE DOOR IDOL. National

COMEDY OPEN-MIC. La Nuit

FRIDAY NIGHT LAUGHS. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — Jackie Jenkins Jr. hosts the open-mic comedy show. Free admission. 11 p.m. Friday.

“Martha loved her husband madly.” That was the opinion of the Marquis de Lafayette. Of course, he was talking about George Washington’s wife, who joined her husband during the brutal winter at Valley Forge. The loving madness of Martha in Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? is a different story, and she likely would not win praise for marital devotion. She and husband George are entrenched in their own never-ending battles. Edward Albee’s three-act drama won both the 1963 Tony and New York Drama Critics Circle awards. It was also selected for the Pulitzer Prize, but the advisory committee was too shocked by the work’s language and sexuality to bestow the award. Jennifer Growden recently directed an intense production at Shadowbox Theatre. As the play begins, the slightly inebriated George (Michael Martin) and Martha (Kathryn Talbot) stagger into their living room after a faculty party thrown by her father, president of the college where George is an associate history professor. As with many other things about George, the title “associate” irritates Martha. She’s built up resentment over George’s failure to prove himself worthy in her father’s eyes. It’s 2 a.m., so George slips off his shoes, but Martha says she’s invited guests. Mostly, they drink and insult each other until the guests arrive. Nick (Matt Story) is a handsome, 29-year-old former athlete who has been hired to teach biology. His mousy wife Honey (Giselle M. Chatelain) loves to drink brandy but gets tipsy and ill easily. Whether due to alcohol or genetics, Honey sometimes seems not to be playing with a full deck. The metaphor is apt, for this is an evening of fun and games — although the games are not fun, they are psychologically punishing. Nick hopes to ingratiate himself with Martha to advance his own career. Martha knows this and dangles the advantages of her good will before him. She also seduces him — although it turns out that the vast quantities of booze have sabotaged his libido. The highbrow colleagues sing “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” to one another to break the tension at various intervals. They all are afraid, of course, and in the end, there’s no place to hide. Under Growden’s direction, the talented cast kept the complex, weird and at times absurdist play enthralling. One hardly noticed the three acts stretched to an equal number of hours. — Dalt Wonk Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — The theater hosts a weekly open-mic comedy night. (Sign-up time is 10:45 p.m.) Tickets $8. 11 p.m. Friday. COMEDY SPORTZ NOLA. La Nuit

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — The theater hosts a

safe-for-all-ages team comedy competition. Tickets $10. 7 p.m. Friday-Saturday. FEAR & LOATHING IN NEW ORLEANS. La Nuit Comedy Theater,

5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The sketch comedy show boasts vampires, zombies, relationship advice and other horrors.

IVAN’S OPEN MIC NIGHT. Rusty Nail, 1100 Constance St., 525-5515; www.therustynail.org — The Rusty Nail hosts a weekly openmic comedy and music night. 9 p.m. Tuesday. JASON RUSSELL. Boomtown Casino, Boomers Saloon, 4132 Peters Road, Harvey, 366-7711; www.boomtownneworleans. com — The stand-up comedian performs. Free admission. 8 p.m. Wednesday. LA NUIT STAND-UP OPEN MIC.

La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www. nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts an open mic following the God’s Been Drinking show. 11 p.m. Friday.

LAUGH OUT LOUD. Bootleggers Bar and Grille, 209 Decatur St., 525-1087 — Simple Play presents a weekly comedy show. 10 p.m. Thursday. NATIONAL COMEDY COMPANY.

Yo Mama’s Bar & Grill, 727 St. Peter St., 522-1125 — The interactive improv comedy show features B97 radio personality Stevie G, Lynae LeBlanc, Jay Tombstone, Richard Mayer and others. Call 523-7469 or visit www.nationalcomedycompany.com for tickets. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Saturday. PERMANENT DAMAGE STAND-UP COMEDY. Bullets Sports Bar, 2441

A.P. Tureaud Ave., 948-4003 — Tony Frederick hosts the open mic comedy show. 8 p.m. Wednesday.

ROUNDHOUSE. La Nuit Comedy

Theater, 5039 Freret St., 6444300; www.nolacomedy.com — Comedians perform a barefoot, long-form improvisation show. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Friday.

SIDNEY’S STAND-UP OPEN MIC.

Sidney’s, 1674 Barataria Blvd., Marrero, 341-0103 — The show features professional, amateur and first-time comics. Free admission. Sign-up is 8 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Thursday.

THINK YOU’RE FUNNY? Carrollton Station, 8140 Willow St., 865-9190; www.carrolltonstation.com — The weekly open-mic comedy showcase is open to all comics. Sign-up is 8:30 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Wednesday.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 07 > 2011

Noir, 715 St. Charles Ave., 5815812; www.cabaretlechatnoir. com — Running With Scissors regulars star in the send-up of Hollywood’s greatest legends. Mystic Krewe of Satyricon performance 8 p.m. Friday (call 525-4498 for tickets for that show only). Tickets for all other performances $26 (includes $5 drink credit). 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 6 p.m. Sunday through June 26.

STAGE

43

LISTINGS

BE THERE DO THAT

Listings editor: Alex Woodward listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

FAMILY Tuesday 7 TODDLER TIME . Louisiana

Children’s Museum, 420 Julia St., 523-1357; www.lcm.org — The museum hosts special Tuesday and Thursday activities for children ages 3-under and their parents or caregivers. Admission $8, free for members. 10:30 a.m.

Thursday 9 ART ACTIVITIES DURING AFTER HOURS. Ogden Museum of

Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — The Ogden offers art activities for kids during the weekly After Hours concerts. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Saturday 11 CHILDREN’S ART WORKSHOP.

Rhino Contemporary Crafts Company, The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www.rhinocrafts. com — Kids create tie-dyed shoelaces for the workshop open to children of all ages. Reservations are recommended. Email artboxrhino@gmail. com for details. Admission $5. 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Royal St., 523-3341; www.hotelmonteleone.com — Monte the Lion, the hotel’s mascot, is having a birthday party with cupcake decorating, food, games and the debut of his children’s book. Visit www.hotelmonteleone.com/montebirthday for details. Tickets $25. 10 a.m. to noon.

SIBSHOPS NOLA . Audubon Zoo,

6500 Magazine St., 581-4629; www.auduboninstitute.org — The group provides support, information and recreation opportunities for children ages 8-13 who have siblings with disabilities. Call 943-0343 or email sibshopsnola@yahoo.com for details. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. .

EVENTS Tuesday 7 CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Tulane University

Square, 200 Broadway St. — The weekly market features fresh produce, kettle corn, Green Plate specials and flow-

ers. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. DEALING WITH LOSS. West

Jefferson Behavioral Medicine Center, 229 Bellemeade Blvd., Gretna, 391-2440 — The center offers a weekly support group. Call Doreen Fowler for details. 6 p.m.

DEPRESSION AND BIPOLAR SUPPORT ALLIANCE. Tulane-

Lakeside Hospital, 4700 South I-10 Service Road West, Metairie — The peer support group meets the first and third Tuesdays of every month. Visit www.dbsaneworleans.org for details. 7:30 p.m.

NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON VOLUNTEERING AND SERVICE.

Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, 900 Convention Center Blvd. — The conference features more than 150 workshops, 11 immersion learning sessions and 7 forums about topics ranging from disasters to youth leadership. Visit www.volunteeringandservice.org for the full schedule and other details. Through Wednesday. PLESSY DAY. NOCCA Riverfront,

2800 Chartres St., 940-2787; www.nocca.com — The event celebrates the work of Homer Plessy with an event featuring live music by Carl LeBlanc and Jonathan Bloom, readings by A.P. Tureaud Jr. and Rachel Emanuel, and light refreshments. 6 p.m.

Wednesday 8 AMERICAN SOCIETY OF INTERIOR DESIGNERS MEETING . Classic

Cupboards, 5809 River Oaks Road South, 734-9088; www. classiccupboards.com — The New Orleans chapter of the group meets. Email monique@ classiccupboards.com or visit www.asidneworleans.org for details. 5:30 p.m.

COVINGTON FARMERS MARKET.

Covington City Hall, 609 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-1873 — The market offers fresh locally produced foods every week. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday.

FRENCH MARKET FARMERS MARKET. French Market, French

Market Place, between Decatur and N. Peters streets, 522-2621; www.frenchmarket.org — The weekly market offers seasonal produce, seafood, prepared foods, smoothies and more. 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. GET TO KNOW GOD. Lost

& Found Center, 901 Independence St., 344-1234; www.lostandfoundcenter.org — The group meets every week to discuss Bible Scriptures. 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP. East

Jefferson General Hospital, 4200 Houma Blvd., Metairie, 454-4000; www.ejgh.org — The American Cancer Society sponsors a group for people who have experienced the

death of a loved one. Call 4565000 for details. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. INFANCY TO INDEPENDENCE.

St. Matthew/Central United Church of Christ, 1333 S. Carrollton Ave., 861-8196; www.stmatthew-nola.org — The parent-child education and support group uses enriching activities in music, art and play. Visit www.infancytoindependence.org for details. 9:30 a.m. to noon Wednesday-Thursday. LAKEVIEW MARKETPLACE.

Harrison Avenue Marketplace, 801 Harrison Ave.; www.harrisonavenuemarketplace.org — The Lakeview Neighborhood Association presents an outdoor event with live music, food, drinks, handmade crafts and activities for kids. 5 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. MODEL GREEN HOUSE. Global

Green Holy Cross Project, 409 Andry St.; www.globalgreen. org/neworleans — Global Green provides tours of its model green house, which uses renewable energy from solar panels and other sources. Call 525-2121 or visit the website for details. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday and Friday, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. SIGNS OF LIFE. Bogue Chitto

Park, 17049 State Park Blvd., Franklinton, (888) 677-7312 — The park ranger discusses the wildlife of the park and signs that indicate where they have been. 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. WEDNESDAY NIGHTS AT JW MARRIOTT. JW Marriott New

Orleans, 614 Canal St., Suite 4, 525-6500; www.marriott.com — The hotel showcases local music and art with spirit tastings and hors d’oeuvres. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

WESTWEGO FARMERS & FISHERIES MARKET. 484 Sala

Ave., Sala Avenue at Fourth Street, Westwego — The market offers organic produce, baked goods, jewelry, art and more, with live music and pony rides. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

Thursday 9 ALVAR CHESS. Alvar Library, 913

Alvar St., 596-2667 — Library guests can play chess with expert player Bernard Parun Jr. 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

CANCER EDUCATION CLASS. First

Baptist Church of New Orleans, 5290 Canal Blvd., 482-5775; www.fbcno.org — The church hosts “I Can Cope,” a series of educational classes for people facing cancer. Call 957-5226 for information. 6:30 p.m.

CHANGES. Hey! Cafe, 4332

Magazine St., 891-8682 — The weekly meetings teach focusing, a method of directing attention outside one’s body to affect change. Call 232-9787 for details. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. FRESH MARKET. Circle Food

Store, 1522 St. Bernard Ave. — The Downtown Neighborhood Market Consortium market features fresh produce, dairy, seafood, baked goods and more. EBT and WIC accepted. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. FRIENDS OF LAFITTE CORRIDOR AND DESIGN WORKSHOP MEETING. GRACE EPISCOPAL CHURCH, 3700 Canal St., 482-

5242 — The two organizations meet to discuss the start of the Lafitte Corridor project. The meeting is open to Friends of the Lafitte Corridor members; guests can sign up at the meeting. Visit www.folc-nola.org for details. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

INTRODUCTION TO CAMPING.

Bogue Chitto Park, 17049 State Park Blvd., Franklinton, (888) 677-7312 — The session covers the basics of tent camping, including information about supplies, equipment and safety. 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. NEW ORLEANS CRAFT MAFIA 6TH BIRTHDAY PARTY. Du

Mois Gallery, 4921 Freret St., 818-6032 — The celebration includes drinks, snacks, crafts and a giveaway featuring a gift basket of handmade products. Free admission. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. OF YOUTH, BEAUTY, AND DESIRE: NINETEENTH-CENTURY LOUISIANA PORTRAITS.

Louisiana State Museum Cabildo, 701 Chartres St., 5686968; www.lsm.crt.state. la.us — Tony Lewis, Louisiana State Museum curator of visual arts, leads the discussion. Free admission. 6 p.m.

SISTAHS MAKING A CHANGE.

Ashe Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — The group offers lessons in African dance and more, along with nutrition, health and wellness seminars. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday and Monday.

Friday 10 ADULT CHILDREN OF ALCOHOLIC/DYSFUNCTIONAL FAMILIES. Fair Grinds

Coffeehouse, 3133 Ponce de Leon Ave., 913-9073; www. fairgrinds.com — The weekly support group meets at 6:15 p.m. Fridays. Visit www.adultchildren.org for details. MARKETPLACE AT ARMSTRONG PARK. Armstrong Park, North

Rampart and St. Ann streets — The weekly market features fresh produce, baked goods, Louisiana seafood, natural products, art, crafts and entertainment. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays. NEW ORLEANS LOVING FESTIVAL. The Charitable Film

Network and Press Street sponsor the festival promoting the fight against racial prejudice, and events include film screenings, a gallery opening, food and live music. Email mail@ charitablefilmnetwork.org or visit www.charitablefilmnet-

work.org for details. FridaySunday. PRC LADIES IN RED GALA . Generations Hall, 310 Andrew Higgins Drive, 581-4367; www.generationshall.net — The gala supports the Preservation Resource Center’s African American Heritage Preservation program, and it features music by the George French Band and others and food from local restaurants. Call 636-3399, email sblaum@ prcno.org or visit www.prcno. org for details. Tickets start at $75 for the gala and at $150 for the patron party. 7 p.m. patron party, 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. gala. SWOON EXHIBITION OPENING AFTER-PARTY. Bywater, 1029

Piety St.; www.neworleansairlift.org — New Orleans Airlift hosts an party to celebrate the opening of artist Swoon’s “Thalassa” exhibition at New Orleans Museum of Art. Big Freedia, DJ Rusty Lazer, Katey Red and Why Are We Building Such a Big Ship? perform. 8 p.m. to midnight.

VINO ON THE BAYOU. Pitot

House, 1440 Moss St. — The event features wine from Cork & Bottle, live music by the Courtyard Kings and a book signing by Lake Douglas. Visit www.louisianalandmarks. org for details. Admission $5 Landmarks Society members, $10 non-members. 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

WHERE Y’ART. New Orleans

Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 6584100; www.noma.org — The museum’s weekly event features music, performances, film screenings, family-friendly activities and more. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Fridays.

Saturday 11 610 STOMPERS BALL CRAWL .

Mid City Yacht Club, 440 S. St. Patrick St., 483-2517; www.midcityyachtclub.com — The allmale dance troupe leads a bar crawl through Mid-City starting at Mid-City Yacht Club and ending at Bayou Beer Garden (326 N. Jefferson Davis Pkwy.). Visit www.ballcrawl2.eventbrite.com for tickets. Admission $35, $25 610 Stompers members. 2 p.m. to 10 p.m.

ALLIGATOR LIFE. Fontainebleau

State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — The program focuses on one of Louisiana’s most-well known residents: the American alligator. 11 a.m.

BARKING BOOT CAMP. LA/

SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd., 368-5191; www.la-spca.org — A fitness trainer teaches the dogand-owner class that mixes cardio, resistance training, obstacle courses and “doga” (dog yoga). Proceeds benefit the Louisiana SPCA. Pre-registration is required. Call 810-1835 or visit www.barkingbootcamp.com

for details. Admission $40 for four sessions. 7 a.m. to 7:45 a.m. Saturdays through June 25. BROAD STREET BAZAAR . 300 N. Broad St., corner of Bienville Street — The monthly market features health screenings, jewelry, food vendors and more. Call 561-7495 or visit www. broadcommunityconnections. org for details. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. CAN I EAT THAT?. Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — The site ranger leads a hike focusing on edible plants that can be found along the nature trail. 10:30 a.m. CREOLE TOMATO FESTIVAL.

French Market, French Market Place, between Decatur and N. Peters streets, 522-2621; www. frenchmarket.org — The festival features tomato tastings, live Cajun and Zydeco music, food booths and demonstrations, tomato-eating contests and a children’s area. Free admission. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Magazine Street

Market, Magazine and Girod streets, 861-5898; www.marketumbrella.org — The weekly market features fresh produce, flowers and food. 8 a.m. to noon.

EAGLE WATCH. Fontainebleau

State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — A park ranger leads a viewing of the park’s eagle nest. 3 p.m.

ERACE NEW ORLEANS MEETING .

J. Singleton School, 1924 Philip St., 581-2388 — ERACE meets for its weekly discussion group. Call 866-1163 for details. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

GERMAN COAST FARMERS MARKET. Ormond Plantation,

13786 River Road, Destrehan — The market features a wide range of fresh vegetables, fruits, flowers and other items. Visit www.germancoastfarmersmarket.org for details. 8 a.m. to noon.

GRETNA FARMERS MARKET.

Gretna Farmers Market, Huey P. Long Avenue, between Third and Fourth streets, Gretna, 362-8661 — The weekly rainor-shine market features more than 30 vendors offering a wide range of fruits, vegetables, meats and flowers. Free admission. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. HELLO HURRICANE SUMMIT.

New Orleans Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma.org — Evacuteer.org hosts the event to gather community members, volunteers and partner organizations to discuss plans for promoting public safety and preparedness in the city. Email laine@evacuteer.org for details. 9:30 a.m. to noon.

LOUISIANA CAJUN-ZYDECO FESTIVAL. Old U.S. Mint, 400

Esplanade Ave., 568-6990; lsm.crt.state.la.us/site/mintex.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 07 > 2011

MONTE THE LION BIRTHDAY PARTY. Hotel Monteleone, 214

EVENTS

45

13TH ANNUAL ™

SATURDAY, JUNE 11, 2011 • 10AM-4PM Traditional and Alternative Health Care · Beauty · Eye Care Green Living · Weight Loss Nutrition · Exercise · Eco-Building

REACH MORE THAN

Contact MICHELE at

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 07 > 2011

HEALTHY ALTERNATIVES FOR BET TER LIVING

47

EVENTS

LISTINGS

camps around the country. Call (800) 572-1717 or visit www.mda.org/summercamp for details. NEW ORLEANS JAZZ & HERITAGE FESTIVAL . Volunteers

are needed for the festival’s production team. Visit www.nojazzfest.com/volunteer for details. OPERATION REACH VOLUNTEERS. Operation

REACH and Gulfsouth Youth Action Corps seek college student volunteers from all over the country to assist in providing recreation and education opportunities for New Orleans-area inner-city youth and their families. For information, visit www.thegyac. org and www.operationreach. org. SENIOR COMPANION VOLUNTEERS. New Orleans

Council on Aging, Annex Conference Room, 2475 Canal St., 821-4121; www.nocoa.org — The council seeks volunteers to assist with personal and other daily tasks to help seniors live independently. Call for details.

START THE ADVENTURE IN READING. The STAIR program

holds regular volunteer training sessions to work oneon-one with public school students on reading and language skills. Call 899-0820, email elizabeth@scapc.org or visit www.stairnola.org for details.

TEEN SUICIDE PREVENTION .

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 07 > 2011

Year after year, we find we still get the

48

MOST BANG FOR OUR ADVERTISING BUCK with Gambit.

It’s timely, relevant, and accessible. Every week, customers come into the stores, or call us, about the merchandise we featured in Gambit.

The Teen Suicide Prevention Program seeks volunteers to help teach middle- and upperschool New Orleans students. Call 831-8475 for details.

TOURO VOLUNTEER SERVICES.

Touro Volunteer Services, 1401 Foucher St., 897-8107; www. touro.com/content/careercamp — The infirmary seeks adult volunteers to assist with the Family Surgery Lounge, patient information desk, book and goody cart, hospital tours and health screenings. Call volunteer services at 8978107 for information.

WORDS 17 POETS! LITERARY & PERFORMANCE SERIES. Gold

Evie Poitevent, Owner

SHO E LUS T HAN DBA G ENV Y

Mardi Gras Ball Shoes!

ALLEN ESKEW, STEVE DUMEZ & MARK RIPPLE. Octavia

UPTOWN 4119 MAGAZIN E ST. 899 -68 00

Mon-Sat 10-6 | Thurs

Mine Saloon, 705 Dauphine St., 568-0745; www.goldminesaloon.net — Poet Jerome White reads. An open mic follows the reading. 7:30 p.m. Thursday.

FRENCH QUAR TER 526 ROYAL ST. 569 -00 05

10-7 | Sun 12:30 -5

FE ET FIR ST ST

OR ES .CO M

Call Sandy @ 504-483-3150 to learn how Gambit can work for your business.

Books, 513 Octavia St., 8997323 — The authors discuss and sign Building Community: The Work of Eskew + Dumez + Ripple. 6 p.m. Thursday.

BARNES & NOBLE JR . Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 455-5135 — The bookstore regularly hosts free

reading events for kids. Call for schedule information. COOKBOOKS & COCKTAILS SERIES. Kitchen Witch

seum.com — Poet Gian “G-Persepect” Smith and Alphonse “Bobby” Smith host a weekly spoken-word and music event. Admission $6. 9 p.m. Saturday.

DINKY TAO POETRY. Molly’s

POETRY MEETING . New Orleans Poetry Forum, 257 Bonnabel Blvd., Metairie, 835-8472 — The forum holds workshops every Wednesday. 8 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.

Cookbooks Shop, 631 Toulouse St., 528-8382 — The group meets weekly to discuss classic New Orleans cookbooks. 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Friday. at the Market, 1107 Decatur St., 525-5169; www.mollysatthemarket.net — The bar hosts a free weekly poetry reading with open mic. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

DON KEITH MIDKIFF. East Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 838-1190 — The author signs New Orleans Beseiged. 7 p.m. Wednesday. FAIR GRINDS POETRY EVENT.

Fair Grinds Coffeehouse, 3133 Ponce de Leon Ave., 913-9073; www.fairgrinds.com — Jenna Mae hosts poets and spokenword readers on the second, fourth and fifth Sunday of each month. 8 p.m.

FIRST TUESDAY BOOK CLUB.

Maple Street Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www.maplestreetbookshop. com — The group discusses Rebecca Skloot’s The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. 6 p.m. Tuesday.

FRIENDS OF THE NEW ORLEANS PUBLIC LIBRARY BOOK SALE .

Latter Library Carriage House, 5120 St. Charles Ave., 5962625; www.nutrias.org — The group hosts twice-weekly sales of books, DVDs, books on tape, LPs and more. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

JOHN SWENSON . Garden

District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The author signs and discusses New Atlantis: Musicians Battle For the Survival of New Orleans. 1 p.m. Saturday.

LAKE DOUGLAS. Longue Vue House and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue.com — The author discusses Public Spaces, Private Gardens: A History of Designed Landscapes in New Orleans. 5:30 p.m. Tuesday. LOCAL WRITERS’ GROUP.

Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 455-5135 — The weekly group discusses and critiques fellow members’ writing. All genres welcome. 7:30 p.m. Monday.

MAPLE LEAF READING SERIES. Maple Leaf Bar, 8316 Oak St., 866-9359; www.mapleleafbar.com — The weekly reading series presents featured writers followed by an open mic. Free admission. 3 p.m. Sunday. PASS IT ON . George & Leah McKenna Museum of African American Art, 2003 Carondelet St., 586-7432; www.themckennamu-

SARA GRAN . Garden District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The author discusses and signs Claire DeWitt and the City of the Dead. 5:30 p.m. Thursday. The author also appears at Octavia Books (513 Octavia St., 899-7323) 6 p.m. Saturday. SCIENCE FICTION BOOK CLUB. Octavia Books, 513 Octavia St., 899-7323 — The group discusses Robert Silverberg’s Dying Inside. 10:30 a.m. Saturday. SPOKEN WORD. Ebony Square, 4215 Magazine St. — The center hosts a weekly spokenword, music and open-mic event. Tickets $7 general admission, $5 students. 11 p.m. Friday. TAO POETRY. Neutral Ground Coffeehouse, 5110 Danneel St., 891-3381; www.neutralground.org — The coffeehouse hosts a weekly poetry reading. 9 p.m. Wednesday. UNIVERSES. Craige Cultural Center, 1800 Newton St., Algiers — The center hosts a weekly spoken-word, music and open-mic event. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Sunday. WALLACE STEVENS GROUP. New Orleans Lyceum, 618 City Park Ave., 460-9049; www. lyceumproject.com — The group meets every other Sunday to discuss the poet’s works. Call 460-9049 for details. 10 a.m. WOMEN’S POETRY CIRCLE . St. Anna’s Episcopal Church, 1313 Esplanade Ave., 947-2121; www.stannanola.org — The group meets at 2 p.m. Mondays. Call 289-9142 or email poetryprocess@gmail. com for details.

CALL FOR WRITERS SWAMP LILY REVIEW. The

online journal of Louisiana literature and arts accepts submissions for its fall issue. The journal publishes poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, art and photography. Email swamplilyreview@gmail.com or visit www.swamplily.com for details.

For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Email Ian McNulty at imcnulty@cox.net. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> DOES DINNER < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < MARTIN < > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >The > Metairie location of Martin Wine Cellar (714 Elmeer Ave., www.martinwine.com) now serves dinner. The wine < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <PUTTING < < < < < < <EVERYTHING < < < < < < < < < <ON < < <THE < < < TABLE < < < < < < < < < < < < < 896-7300; < shop and deli serves its regular menu of sandwiches, salads and entree specials along with new dinner options Monday through Friday from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.

am

B

WHAT

Dante’s Kitchen WHERE

736 Dante St., 861-3121; www.danteskitchen.com WHEN

Dinner Wed.-Mon., brunch Sat. and Sun. RESERVATIONS

Recommended (not accepted for brunch) HOW MUCH

Expensive

BAYONA GOES GLOBAL

The menu at Bayona (430 Dauphine St., 525-4455; www.bayona. com) has always taken a globetrotting approach, but for a series of special wine dinners this summer chef/owner Susan Spicer and chef de cuisine Brett Duffee will highlight specific cuisines and regions. The dinners are scheduled on selected Wednesdays from June through August and include four courses with wine pairings for $88 per person plus tax and tip. The series begins June 22 with Greek cuisine, then moves on to Morocco (June 29), Vietnam (July 6), Alsace (Aug. 24) and Spain (Aug. 31).

five 5 IN

Five Fantastic Fries

WHAT WORKS

Substantial local sourcing, inventive ideas. WHAT DOESN'T

Compared to dinner, brunch is a letdown CHECK, PLEASE

A colorful cottage bistro centered on local bona fides

Cultivated Tastes A FARM-TO-TABLE TRAILBLAZER COMES OF AGE IN THE RIVERBEND. BY IAN MCNULTY

T

PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

mellows it and truly smoky pulled duck confit stokes it all from beneath. Brunch is big here, but it’s not the time to see Dante’s in full bloom. Prices plummet and some dinner dishes get a morning reprise, like the reliable shrimp and grits with andouille gravy. But portions are often less than satisfying and, with no reservations at brunch, a hungry wait is inevitable. The way to put Dante’s through its paces is at dinner with people who like to share, and the menu encourages this. From appetizers, it moves to more substantial “small plates” and then to a column of family-style, pass-around vegetable platters. Dessert is mandatory, especially the mystifyingly light “blue velvet” cake or the banana pudding tart with its salty, crumbled pretzel crust. A few mainstay dishes are such constants the kitchen refers to them as the “big three”: trios mignons, a study of steak with pork debris, Stilton and marchands du vin; “chicken under a brick,” which employs a blunt instrument with deft effect; and the simplest, “redfish on the half shell,” a long, plump, skin-on fillet covered with crabmeat and a salad of parsley, cilantro, mint, dill and tarragon. The herbs and a splash of vinaigrette take this masterpiece of local waters to places the buttery preparations of traditional Creole kitchens don’t, and altogether the dish demonstrates beautifully how a new look at our most common local ingredients can produce something extraordinary. That’s why, even after all this time, redfish on the half shell tastes like Dante’s Kitchen in a nutshell.

2505 WHITNEY AVE., GRETNA, 366-3995 www.bistrogallerie.com

Thick fries are designed for dipping in fondue and complementing mussels.

THE DELACHAISE

3442 ST. CHARLES AVE., 895-0858 www.thedelachaise.com

Thin-cut fries are served in bouquets with aioli and satay sauce.

GOTT GOURMET

3100 MAGAZINE ST., 373-6579 www.gottgourmetcafe.com

Greaseless, flecked with skin and fried to the hue of a rusty sunset.

JOE SEPIE’S CAFE

4402 JEFFERSON HWY., JEFFERSON, 324-5613

Freshly cut, medium-thick spuds achieve the diner ideal.

LA BOCA

857 FULTON ST., 525-8205 www.labocasteaks.com

Dunk fries in chimichurri sauce or the molten provoleta cheese appetizer.

Questions? Email winediva1@earthlink.net.

2009 D. Ventura Vina Caneiro GALICIA, SPAIN / $22 RETAIL

From the tiny wine denomination of Ribeira Sacra (“sacred river”), situated between Rias Baixas and Bierzo in northwest Spain, 80-yearold vineyards produce deeply nuanced fruit on steeply terraced slopes. Made from 100 percent Mencia grapes, the wines are fermented in stainless steel with local yeasts, without any filtering or fining. The medium-bodied wine exudes aromas of red berries, black cherry and floral and mineral notes. On the palate, taste bright red and black berry fruit, hints of spice, lively acidity and silky tannins. Decant an hour before serving. Drink it with roast pork and other meats, pate and cheeses. Buy it at: Cork & Bottle. Bottle — Brenda Maitland

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 07 > 2011

he restaurant trend of using local sourcing and house-made ingredients had a slow start in New Orleans, but one of the places where its impact was early and obvious was Dante’s Kitchen. Now, after 11 years in the game, the Riverbend bistro feels ahead of the curve with a deeply rooted supply network and a mature culture of in-house crafting. The evidence is everywhere, from the blackboard detailing the day’s locavore-friendly larder to the rainbow of jarred vegetables arrayed around the bar for easy access rather than rustic decor. Ambience here is marked by the happy bustle of people chowing down in this antique cottage’s array of small dining rooms, out in the patio under interlocking umbrellas and even on the narrow porch. It feels like a farmhouse taken over for one big, rollicking fieldto-table tasting. This was the vision of chef Emanuel “Eman” Loubier, a New York native who spent the 1990s at Commander’s Palace working with the late Jamie Shannon, an early champion of this culinary aesthetic. Loubier credits Shannon with helping cultivate today’s increasingly fruitful relationships between local chefs and farmers, but he deserves credit too for his own tillage through the years. While the ingredients at Dante’s Kitchen are explicitly local, flavors range widely. Grilled pork steak goes upscale Central American with a pupusa, cabbage salad and very spicy red pepper sauce. Drum, wrapped in crisp pancetta with lemon and bitter greens, is like a Gulf fish vacationing along the Tuscan coast. Persimmon and habanero vinegar ripples over roasted duck while chilled bean salad

Chefs Brian Armour and Emanuel “Eman” Loubier focus on local produce at Dante’s Kitchen.

CLEMENTINE’S BELGIAN BISTROT

49

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<

YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT >>>>>>>>>

>>>> <<< <<<<< >>>>>>>>> <<< >> <<

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Out > > >2 >Eat > >is>an > >index > > >of> Gambit > > > > >contract > > > > >advertisers. > > > > > > >Unless > > > >noted, > > > >addresses > > > > > >are > >for > >New > > >Orleans. >>>>>>>>> Dollar signs represent the average cost of a dinner entree: $ — under $10; $$ — $11 to $20; $$$ — $21 or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax 483-3116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

AMERICAN

Bringing you quality, consistency and value since 1971.



600 N. Causeway, Mandeville 2100 N. Morrison, Hammond

985/626-4476

985/345-6789

Sandwich Specials!

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 07 > 2011

han, 287-4581; www.fathengrill.com — Fat Hen serves barbecue, burgers and breakfast. Pit-cooked barbecue options include St. Louis-style spare ribs. Burgers are made with all Black Angus beef ground in-house daily. There is a full bar. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

O’HENRY’S FOOD & SPIRITS — 634 S.

Now open 7 days a week in Mandeville LUNCH : Mon - Fri 11-2pm DiNNER: Mon -Thu 5-930pm Fri & Sat 5-10pm · Sun 1130a - 930p

50

FAT HEN GRILL — 1821 Hickory Ave., Hara-

monday: Pulled Pork tuesday: Cuban wednesday: BBQ Shrimp thursday: Chicken Parmesan friday: Soft Shell Crab

6215 WILSON ST.

HARAHAN • 737-3933

Carrollton Ave., 866-9741; 8859 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Kenner, 461-9840; www.ohenrys.com — Complimentary peanuts are the calling card of these casual, family friendly restaurants. The menu includes burgers, steaks, ribs, pasta, fried seafood, salads and more. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BAR & GRILL DINO’S BAR & GRILL — 1128 Tchoupitoulas St., 558-0900 — Dino’s kitchen serves burgers, chicken tenders, salads and wraps. Happy hour is from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards and checks. $

THE RIVERSHACK TAVERN — 3449 River Road, 834-4938; www.therivershacktavern.com — This bar and music spot offers a menu of burgers, sandwiches overflowing with deli meats and changing lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SHAMROCK BAR & GRILL — 4133 S. Carrollton Ave., 301-0938 — Shamrock serves burgers, shrimp or roast beef po-boys, Reuben sandwiches, cheese sticks and fries with cheese or gravy. Other options include corned beef and cabbage, and fish and chips. No reservations. Dinner and late night daily. Credit cards. $

seared redfish St. Louis is topped with fried oysters and barbecue sauce. Starters include Brewhouse hot wings, baked oysters and fried calamari with spicy marinara. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BURGERS

BEACHCORNER BAR & GRILL — 4905

BARBECUE ABITA BAR-B-Q — 69399 Hwy. 59, Abita

Springs, (985) 892-0205 — Slow-cooked brisket and pork are specialties at this Northshore smokehouse. The half-slab rib plate contains six ribs served with a choice of two sides. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

WALKER’S BAR-B-QUE — 10828 Hayne

Blvd., 281-8227; www.cochondelaitpoboys.com — The makers of the Jazz Fest cochon de lait po-boy serve pork, ribs, chicken and more. The family feast includes a half-slab of ribs, half a chicken, half a pound of brisket, pork and sausage, two side orders, bread and sauce. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Saturday. Cash only. $

BREWPUB

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — 527 Decatur St., 522-0571; www.crescentcitybrewhouse.com — Live jazz and German-style beers complement creative cooking at this brewpub. Pan-

Canal St., 488-7357; www.beachcornerbarandgrill.com — Top a 10-oz. Beach burger with cheddar, blue, Swiss or pepper Jack cheese, sauteed mushrooms or house-made hickory sauce. Other options include a grilled chicken sandwich. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ BUD’S BROILER — Citywide; www. budsbroiler.com — Bud’s Broiler is known for charcoal-broiled burgers topped with hickory-amoked sauce. The menus also includes hot dogs and chicken sandwiches. The Clearview Parkway and 24-hour City Park location also offer shrimp and catfish poboys. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $

po-boy. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Fri.-Wed., dinner Mon.Wed., Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

LAKEVIEW BREW COFFEE CAFE — 5606 Canal Blvd., 483-7001 — This casual cafe offers gourmet coffees and a wide range of pastries and desserts baked in house, plus a menu of specialty sandwiches and salads. Breakfast is available all day on weekends. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PARKVIEW CAFE AT CITY PARK — City

Park, 1 Palm Drive, 483-9474 — Located in the old Casino Building, the cafe serves gourmet coffee, sandwiches, salads and ice cream till early evening. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

PRAVDA — 1113 Decatur St., 581-1112; www.pravdaofnola.com — Pravda is known for its Soviet kitsch and selection of absinthes, and the kitchen offers pierogies, beef empanadas, curry shrimp salad and a petit steak served with truffle aioli. No reservations. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ RICCOBONO’S PANOLA STREET CAFE —

7801 Panola St., 314-1810 — Specialties include crabcakes Benedict — two crabcakes and poached eggs topped with hollandaise sauce and potatoes — and the Sausalito omelet with spinach, mushrooms, shallots and mozzarella. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily. Credit cards. $

VINE & DINE — 141 Delaronde St., 3611402; www.vine-dine.com — The cafe serves cheese boards and charcuterie plates with pate and cured meats. There also is a menu of sandwiches, quesadillas, bruschettas, salads and dips. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CHINESE CHINA ORCHID — 704 S. Carrollton Ave.,

CAFE

CAFE FRERET — 7329 Freret St., 861-

7890; www.cafefreret.com — The cafe serves breakfast itemes like the Freret Egg Sandwich with scrambled eggs, cheese and bacon or sausage served on toasted white or wheat bread or an English muffin.Signature sandwiches include the Chef’s Voodoo Burger, muffuletta and Cuban

865-1428; www.chinaorchidneworleans. com — This longtime Riverbend restaurant offers a wide array of Chinese dishes. Sizzling black pepper beef or chicken is prepared with onions, red and green peppers and brown sauce and served on a hot plate with steamed rice on the side. Other options include fried rice, noodle and egg foo young dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

CHINA ROSE — 3501 N. Arnoult Road.,

Metairie, 887-3295 — China Rose offers many Chinese seafood specialties. The Lomi Lomi combines jumbo shrimp, pineapple and water chestnuts wrapped in bacon, fries them golden brown and serves them on a bed of sautéed vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

FIVE HAPPINESS — 3511 S. Carrollton

515 HARRISON AVE.

Ave., 482-3935 — The large menu at Five Happiness offers a range of dishes from wonton soup to sizzling seafood combinations served on a hot plate to sizzling Go-Ba to lo mein dishes. Delivery and banquest facilities available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

LAKEVIEW • 484-0841

JUNG’S GOLDEN DRAGON — 3009

Magazine St., 891-8280; www.jungsgoldendragon2.com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, Thai and Korean cuisine. Chinese specialties include Mandarin, Szechuan and Hunan dishes. Grand Marnier shrimp are lightly battered and served with Grand Marnier sauce, broccoli and pecans. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

and Bistro FRESH GREEN FRIENDLY

THREE HAPPINESS — 1900 Lafayette St.,

Breakfast and Lunch! JOIN US FOR

3903 CANAL ST

(CORNER OF N. SCOTT)

MID-CITY, NEW ORLEANS 561.6585 | WWW.ECOCAFENO.COM

Theo’s Neighborhood Pizza (4024 Canal St., 302-1133; 4218 Magazine St., 894-8554; www.theospizza.com) serves thin-crust pies. PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

Suite 4, Gretna, 368-1355; www.threehappiness.com — Three Happiness serves Chinese and Vietnames dishes and dim sum specials on weekends. Westlake duck features tender duck with snow peas, corn, straw mushrooms and napa cabbage. Vietnam-

S:2.281”

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com ese crepes are served with pork and shrimp. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TREY YUEN CUISINE OF CHINA — 600 N.

Causeway Approach., Mandeville, (985) 626-4476; 2100 N. Morrison Blvd., Hammond, (985) 345-6789; www.tryyuen. com — House specialties include fried soft-shell crab topped with Tong Cho sauce, and Cantonese-style stir-fried alligator and mushrooms in oyster sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

Maurice French Pastries offers an array of continental and French baked goods as well as specialty cakes, cheesecakes and pies. No reservations. Hessmer Avenue: breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. West Napoleon: breakfast and lunch Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PINKBERRY — 300 Canal St.; 5601 Maga-

zine St., 899-4260; www.pinkberry.com — Pinkberry offers frozen yogurt with an array of wet and dry topping choices including caramel, honey, fruit purees, various chocolates and nuts and more. There also are fresh fruit parfaits and green tea smoothies. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

COFFEE/DESSERT ANTOINE’S ANNEX — 513 Royal St., 581-

4422; www.antoines.com — The Annex is a coffee shop serving pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. The Royal Street salad features baby spinach and mixed lettuces with carrots, red onion, red peppers, grapes, olives, walnuts and raspberry vinaigrette. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

BEN ’N JERRY’S — 3500 Veterans Me-

morial Blvd., Metairie, 887-5656 — Ben ’n Jerry’s offers rich ice creams in signature flavors, ice cream cakes, frozen drinks, fruit smoothies and sundaes. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

MAURICE FRENCH PASTRIES — 3501

Hessmer Ave., Metairie, 885-1526; 4949 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 455-0830; www.mauricefrenchpastries.com —

5 Fifty 5 — 555 Canal St., 553-5638;

www.555canal.com — New Orleans dishes and Americana favorites take an elegant turn in dishes such as the lobster mac and cheese, combining lobster meat, elbow macaroni and mascarpone, boursin and white cheddar cheeses. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

BAYONA — 430 Dauphine St., 525-4455; www.bayona.com — House favorites on Chef Susan Spicer’s menu include sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce and the appetizer of grilled shrimp with black-bean cake and coriander sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ FEAST NEW ORLEANS — 200 Julia St.,

304-6318; www.feastneworleans.com — Feast serves rustic European dishes in a casual setting. Cock-a-Leekie is a dish of braised chicken with cream, bacon, plums, leeks and red potatoes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

THE GREEN GODDESS — 307 Exchange Alley, 301-3347; www.greengoddessnola. com — Chef Chris DeBarr’s contemporary cooking combines classic techniques, exotic ingredients and culinary

OAK — 8118 Oak St., 302-1485; www. oaknola.com — This wine bar offers small plates and live musical entertainment. Gulf shrimp fill tacos assembled in house-made corn tortillas with pickled vegetables, avocado and lime crema. The hanger steak bruschetta is topped with Point Reyes blue cheese and smoked red onion marmalade. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ ONE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE — 8132

Hampson St., 301-9061; www.one-sl. com — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes like char-grilled oysters topped with Roquefort cheese and a red wine vinaigrette, seared scallops with roasted garlic and shiitake polenta cakes and a memorable cochon de lait. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CREOLE ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713 St.

Louis St., 581-4422; www.antoines. com — The city’s oldest restaurant offers a glimpse of what 19th century French Creole dining might have been like, with a labyrinthine series of dining rooms. Signature dishes include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GUMBO SHOP — 640 St. Peter St., 525-

1486; www.gumboshop.com — Gumbo and New Orleans classics such as crawfish etouffee dominate the menu. Their spicy flavors meld into a dish that represents the city’s best and redefines comfort food. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

LE CITRON BISTRO — 1539 Religious

St., 566-9051; www.le-citronbistro. com — Located in a historic building, the quaint bistro serves starters like chicken and andouille gumbo and fried frogs legs. Entrees include choices like fried chicken, Gulf fish and burgers. Reservations accepted. Dinner Wed.Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ St., 524-4747 — This casual restaurant serves Creole favorites. The menu includes crawfish etouffee, boiled crawfish, red beans and rice and bread pudding for dessert. Outdoor seating is adjacent to Dutch Alley and the French Market. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

CUBAN/CARIBBEAN MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — 437

Esplanade Ave., 252-4800; www.mojitosnola.com — Mojitos serves a mix of Caribbean, Cuban and Creole dishes. Caribbean mac and cheese pie is made with chunks of lobster, tomatoes, scallions, garlic and creamy cheese sauce and is served over a bed of spicy corn maque choux. Reservations accepted. Lunch, dinner and late-night Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

KOSHER CAJUN NEW YORK DELI & GRO-

CERY — 3519 Severn Ave., Metairie, 888-2010; www.koshercajun.com — This New York-style deli specializes in sandwiches, including corned beef and pastrami that come straight from the Bronx. No reservations. Lunch Sun.Thu., dinner Mon.-Thu. Credit cards. $

MARTIN WINE CELLAR — 714 Elmeer Ave., Metairie , 896-7350; www.martinwine.com — Sandwiches piled high with cold cuts, salads, hot sandwiches, soups and lunch specials are available at the deli counter. The Cedric features chicken breast, spinach, Swiss, tomatoes and red onions on seven-grain bread. No reservations. Lunch daily. Credit cards. $

DINER DAISY DUKES — 121 Chartres St., 561-5171;

www.daisydukesrestaurant.com — Daisy Dukes is known for its seafood omelet and serves a wide variety of Cajun spiced Louisiana favorites, burgers, po-boys and seafood, including boiled crawfish and oysters on the half-shell. Breakfast is served all day. No reservations. Open 24 hours daily. Credit cards. $$

FRENCH FLAMING TORCH — 737 Octavia St., 895-

0900; www.flamingtorchnola.com — Chef Nathan Gile’s menu includes pan-seared Maine diver scallops with chimichurri sauce and smoked bacon and corn hash. Coffee- and corianderspiced rack of lamb is oven roasted and served with buerre rouge and chevre mashed potatoes. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

MARTINIQUE BISTRO — 5908 Magazine

St., 891-8495; www.martiniquebistro. com — This French bistro has both a cozy dining room and a pretty courtyard. Try dishes such as Steen’s-cured duck breast with satsuma and ginger demi-glace and stone-ground goat cheese grits. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GOURMET TO GO BREAUX MART — 315 E. Judge Perez,

Chalmette, 262-0750; 605 Lapalco Blvd., Gretna, 433-0333; 2904 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-5565; 9647 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 737-8146; www.breauxmart.com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux” as well as weekday specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

INDIAN JULIE’S LITTLE INDIA KITCHEN AT SCHIRO’S — 2483 Royal St., 944-6666; www.

show your thanks with a sizzling steak dad will love.

schiroscafe.com — The cafe offers homemade Indian dishes prepared with freshly ground herbs and spices. Selections include chicken, lamb or shrimp curry or vegetarian saag paneer. Schiro’s also serves New Orleans cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $ NIRVANA INDIAN CUISINE — 4308 Mag-

DELI

Salu (3226 Magazine St., 371-5809; www.salurestaurant.com) serves creative small plates. PHOTO BY CHerYl GerBer

CG’S CAFE AT THE RUSY NAIL — 1100 Constance St., 722-3168; www.therustynail. biz — Inside the Rusty Nail, CG’s offers a menu of sandwiches. The Piggly Wiggly features pulled pork on a sesame seed bun with coleslaw and pickle chips on the side. The Wild Turkey is layered with Granny Smith apple slices, provolone, bacon and garlic mayo. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sat.

azine St., 894-9797 — Serving mostly northern Indian cuisine, the restaurant’s extensive menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TAJ MAHAL INDIAN CUISINE — 923-C Metairie Road, Metairie, 836-6859 — The traditional menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways, including curries and tandoori. Vegetarian options are available. Res-

page 52

Metairie • New Orleans • Biloxi

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 07 > 2011

MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000 N. Peters

Cash only. $

S:10.833”

KUPCAKE FACTORY — 800 Metairie Road, Metairie, 267-4990; 819 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 464-8884; 6233 S. Claiborne Ave., 267-3328; www.thekupcakefactory.com — Choose from a large selection of gourmet cupcakes. The Fat Elvis is made with banana cake and topped with peanut butter frosting. The Strawberry Fields tops strawberry cake with strawberry buttercream frosting. Other options include white chocolate raspberry and a banana cupcake. No reservations. Hours vary by location. Credit cards. $

CONTEMPORARY

wit. At lunch, Big Cactus Chilaquiles feature poached eggs on homemade tortillas with salsa verde, queso fresca and nopalitos. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Thu.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

51

Out2Eat page 51 ervations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

ItaLIaN ANDREA’S RESTAURANT — 3100

N. 19th St., Metairie 834-8583; www.andreasrestaurant.com — Chef/owner Andrea Apuzzo’s specialties include speckled trout royale which is topped with lump crabmeat and lemon-cream sauce. Capelli D’Andrea combines house-made angel hair pasta and smoked salmon in light cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

CAFE GIOVANNI — 117 Decatur St., 529-2154; www.cafegiovanni. com — Chef Duke LoCicero serves inventive Italian cuisine and Italian accented contemporary Louisiana cooking. Shrimp Dukie features Louisiana shrimp and a duck breast marinated in Cajun spices served with tassomushroom sauce. Belli Baci is the restaurant’s cocktail lounge. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

RICCOBONO’S PEPPERMILL RESTAURANT — 3524 Severn Ave.,

Metairie, 455-2266 — This Italianstyle eatery serves New Orleans favorites like stuffed crabs with jumbo lump crabmeat with spaghetti bordelaise and trout meuniere with brabant potatoes. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TONY MANDINA’S RESTAURANT — 1915 Pratt St., Gretna, 362-2010;

www.tonymandinas.com — Tony Mandina’s serves Italian and Creole cuisine. Dishes include pasta, veal parmigiana, veal Bordelasie and specialties like shrimp Mandina and battered eggplant topped with shrimp and crabmeat in cream sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > JUNE 07 > 2011

JaPaNESE

52

KYOTO — 4920 Prytania St., 891-

3644 — Kyoto’s sushi chefs prepare rolls, sashimi and salads. “Box” sushi is a favorite, with more than 25 rolls. Reservations recommended for parties of six or more. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$

DENTAL CLEANING SPECIAL

MIKIMOTO — 3301 S. Carrollton Ave., 488-1881; www.mikimotosushi.com — Sushi choices include new and old favorites, both raw and cooked. The South Carrollton roll includes tuna tataki, avocado and snow crab. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Delivery available. Credit cards. $$ MIYAKO JAPANESE SEAFOOD & STEAKHOUSE — 1403 St. Charles

89

$

*

(reg. $132)

includes comprehensive exam (#0150), x-rays (#274), cleaning (#1110) or panorex (#330) *NEW PATIENTS ONLY — EXPIRES 06/19/11

DR. GLENN SCHMIDT DR. STEPHEN DELAHOUSSAYE FAMILY DENTISTRY Call For An Appointment

UPTOWN KENNER

Now available at 2 locations!

8025 Maple St. @ Carrollton · 861-9044 www.uptownsmiles.com 1942 Williams Blvd., Suite 8 · 469-9648 www.kennersmiles.com

Ave., 410-9997; www.japanesebistro.com — Miyako offers a full range of Japanese cuisine, with specialties from the sushi or hibachi menus, chicken, beef or seafood teriyaki, and tempura. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

ROCK-N-SAKE — 823 Fulton St.,

581-7253; www.rocknsake.com — Rock-n-Sake serves traditional Japanese cuisine with some creative twists. There’s a wide selection of sushi, sashimi and rolls or spicy gyoza soup, pan-fried soba noodles with chicken or seafood and teriyaki dishes. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch

Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

WASABI SUSHI — 900 Frenchmen St., 943-9433; 8550 Pontchartrain Blvd., 267-3263; www.wasabinola. com — Wasabi serves a wide array of Japanese dishes. Wasabi honey shrimp are served with cream sauce. The Assassin roll bundles tuna, snow crab and avocado in seaweed and tops it with barbecued eel, tuna, eel sauce and wasabi tobiko. No reservations. Frenchmen Street: Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner daily. Pontchartrain Boulevard: lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

LOuISIaNa CONtEMPORaRY BOMBAY CLUB — 830 Conti St., 586-0972; www.thebombayclub. com — Mull the menu at this French Quarter hideaway while sipping a well made martini. The duck duet pairs confit leg with pepper-seared breast with black currant reduction. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, latenight Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ BOUCHE — 840 Tchoupitoulas St.,

267-7485; www.bouchenola.com — This wine bar and restaurant serves creative dishes like tasso truffle mac and cheese with three cheeses and Mornay sauce, baby spinach salad with Maytag blue cheese and bacon lardons, and crispy duck breast with Grand Marnier sweet potatoes and vanilla-balsamic extract. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

MIA’S — 1622 St. Charles Ave., 301-9570 — Veal Oscar features lightly breaded veal topped with lump crabmeat and hollandaise, served with garlic red potatoes and grilled asparagus. The alligator pear and crabmeat salad combines avocado and crabmeat over tomatoes, red onions and greens in balsamic glaze. Reservations accepted. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $$

MILA — 817 Common St., 412-2580; www.milaneworleans.com — MiLA takes a fresh approach to Southern and New Orleans cooking, focusing on local produce and refined techniques. Try New Orleans barbecue lobster with lemon confit and fresh thyme. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri. dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ RALPH’S ON THE PARK — 900 City Park Ave., 488-1000; www. ralphsonthepark.com — Popular dishes include baked oysters Ralph, turtle soup and the Niman Ranch New York strip. There also are brunch specials. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

REDEMPTION — 3835 Iberville St.,

309-3570 — Redemption offers contemporary Louisiana cooking. Chambord duckling is served with cherry vinaigrette. Seared foie gras is complemented by vanilla parsnip puree. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ 752 Tchoupitoulas St., 525-4790 — Tommy’s Wine Bar offers cheese and charcuterie plates as well as a menu of appetizers and salads from the neighboring kitchen of Tommy’s Cuisine. No reserva-

TOMMY’S WINE BAR —

tions. Lite dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEDItERRa— NEaN/MIDDLE EaStERN ATTIKI BAR & GRILL — 230 Decatur St., 587-3756; www.attikineworleans.com — Attiki features a range of Mediterranean cuisine including entrees of beef kebabs and chicken shawarma. Reservations recommended. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $$ PYRAMIDS CAFE — 3151 Calhoun

St., 861-9602 — Diners will find authentic, healthy and fresh Mediterranean cuisine featuring such favorites as sharwarma prepared on a rotisserie. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEXICaN & SOutHWEStERN COUNTRY FLAME — 620 Iberville St., 522-1138 — Country Flame serves a mix of popular Mexican and Cuban dishes. Come in for fajitas, pressed Cuban sandwiches made with hickory-smoked pork and char-broiled steaks or pork chops. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

JUAN’S FLYING BURRITO — 2018 Magazine St., 569-0000; 4724 S.Carrollton Ave. 486-9950; www. juansflyingburrito.com — This wallet-friendly restaurant offers new takes on Mexican-inspired cooking. It’s known for its mealand-a-half-size signature burritos. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

NACHO MAMA’S MEXICAN GRILL — 3242 Magazine St., 899-0031;

1000 S. Clearview Pkwy., Harahan, 736-1188; www.nachomamasmexicangrill.com — These taquerias serve Mexican favorites such as portobello mushroom fajitas and chile rellenos. There are happy hour margaritas on weekdays and daily drink specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SANTA FE — 3201 Esplanade Ave., 948-0077 — This casual cafe serves creative takes on Southwestern cuisine. Bolinos de Bacalau are Portuguese-style fish cakes made with dried, salted codfish, mashed potatoes, cilantro, lemon juice, green onions and egg and served with smoked paprika aioli. Outdoor seating is available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.Sun. Credit cards. $$ TOMASITO’S MEXICAN CUISINE —

755 Tchoupitoulas St., 527-0942 — Tomasito’s is an upscale cantina with a patio for outdoor dining. The carnitas platter features marinated and slow-cooked pork served with Mexican rice, refried beans and a choice of salsa verde, smoky chipotle or a traditional Mexican sauce. No reservations. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MuSIC aND FOOD GAZEBO CAFE — 1018 Decatur St.,

525-8899; www.gazebocafenola. com — The Gazebo features a mix of Cajun and Creole dishes and ice cream daquiris. The New Orleans sampler rounds up jambalaya, red beans and rice and gumbo. Other options include salads, seafood page 54

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > JUNE 07 > 2011

53

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com page 52 po-boys and burgers. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ HOUSE OF BLUES — 225 Decatur

St., 310-4999; www.hob.com/neworleans — Try the pan-seared Voodoo Shrimp with rosemary cornbread. The buffet-style gospel brunch features local and regional groups. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ THE MARKET CAFE — 1000 Decatur

St., 527-5000; www.marketcafenola.com — Dine indoors or out on seafood either fried for platters or po-boys or highlighted in dishes such as crawfish pie, crawfish etouffee or shrimp Creole. Sandwich options include muffulettas, Philly steaks on po-boy bread and gyros in pita bread. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — 626 Frenchmen St., 949-0696; www. snugjazz.com — Traditional Creole and Cajun fare pepper the menu along with newer creations such as the fish Marigny, topped with Gulf shrimp in a Creole cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

NEIGHBORHOOD BRAXTON’S RESTAURANT — 636

Franklin Ave., Gretna, 301-3166; www.braxtonsnola.com — Braxton’s serves a mix of salads, poboys, deli sandwiches and entrees. Start a meal with oysters Louise, featuring fried oysters on a bed of spinach and cheese. The seafood

platter includes fried shrimp, oysters, catfish strips, french fries, potato salad and vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

KATIE’S RESTAURANT — 3701 Iberville St., 488-6582; www.katiesinmidcity.com — Favorites at this Mid-City restaurant include the Cajun Cuban with roasted pork, grilled ham, cheese and pickles pressed on buttered bread. The Boudreaux pizza is topped with cochon de lait, spinach, red onions, roasted garlic, scallions and olive oil. There also are salads, burgers and Italian dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, Dinner Tue.Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ KOZ’S — 515 Harrison Ave., 4840841; 6215 Wilson St., Harahan, 7373933; www.kozcooks.com — Louisiana favorites such as seafood platters, muffulettas and more than 15 types of po-boys, ranging from hot sausage to cheeseburger, are available at Koz’s. The Will’s Chamber of Horrors sandwich features roast beef, ham, turkey, Swiss and American cheese, Italian dressing and hot mustard. . No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $

OLIVE BRANCH CAFE — 1995 Barataria Blvd., Marrero, 348-2008; 3700 Orleans Ave., 302-1220; 5145 Gen. de Gaulle Drive, 393-1107; www.olivebranchcafe.com — These cafes serve soups, salads, sandwiches, wraps and entrees. Chicken and artichoke pasta is tossed with penne in garlic and olive oil. Shrimp Carnival features smoked sausage, shrimp, onion and peppers in roasted garlic cream sauce over pasta. No reser-

vations. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$

RAJUN CAJUN CAFE — 5209 W.

Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 883-5513; www.rajuncajuncafe.com — The cafe serves soups, salads, po-boys, muffulettas, seafood plates and a few entree platters. Daily specials include items such as breaded pork chops on Wednesdays and seafood options on Friday. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

PIZZA ITALIAN PIE — Citywide; www.

italianpie.com — Italian Pie offers an array of pizzas, calzones, sandwiches, wraps and salads. The Mediterranean pie is topped with artichoke hearts, kalamata olives, red onion, tomatoes, herbed ricotta, mozzarella and pesto sauce. The spinach and artichoke pie includes mushrooms, onion, feta, mozzarella and garlic sauce. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ MARKS TWAIN’S PIZZA LANDING —

2035 Metairie Road, Metairie, 8328032; www.marktwainspizza.com — Disembark at Mark Twain’s for salads, po-boys and pies like the Italian pizza with salami, tomato, artichoke, sausage and basil. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ NONNA MIA CAFE & PIZZERIA — 3125

Esplanade Ave., 948-1717 — Nonna Mia uses homemade dough for pizza served by the slice or whole pie and offers salads, pasta dishes and panini. Gourmet pies are

topped with ingredients like pancetta, roasted eggplant, portobello mushrooms and prosciutto. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ REGINELLI’S — 741 State St., 899-

1414; 817 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 712-6868; 874 Harrison Ave., 488-0133; 3244 Magazine St. 8957272; 5608 Citrus Blvd., Harahan, 818-0111; www.reginellis.com — This New Orleans original offers a range of pizzas, sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 07 > 2011

54

JACK DEMPSEY’S — 738 Poland

Ave., 943-9914 — The Jack Dempsey seafood platter serves a training-table feast of gumbo, shrimp, oysters, catfish, redfish and crawfish pies, plus two side items. Other dishes include broiled redfish and fried soft-shell crab. No reservations. Lunch Tue.Sat. and dinner Wed.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

SLICE PIZZERIA — 1513 St. Charles

LA COTE BRASSERIE — 700

Ave., 525-7437; 5538 Magazine St., 897-4800 — Neapolitan-style pizza rules, but you can buy pizza by the slice and add or subtract toppings as you choose. There are also a full coffee bar, Italian sodas and organic teas. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ THEO’S NEIGHBORHOOD PIZZA —

4218 Magazine St., 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., 302-1133; www.theospizza.com — There is a wide variety of specialty pies or build your own from the selection of more than two-dozen toppings. Also serving salads and sandwiches. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ WIT’S INN — 141 N. Carrollton Ave., 486-1600 — This Mid-City bar and restaurant features pizzas, calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers for snacking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

MAGAZINE PO-BOY SHOP — 2368

Magazine St., 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of po-boys filled with everything from fried seafood to corned beef to hot sausage to veal. There are breakfast burritos in the morning and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Cash only. $

MAHONY’S PO-BOY SHOP — 3454 Magazine St., 899-3374; www. mahonyspoboys.com — Mahoney’s serves traditional favorites and original po-boys like the Peacemaker, which is filled with fried oysters, bacon and cheddar cheese. There are daily lunch specials as well. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PARKWAY BAKERY AND TAVERN — 538 N. Hagen Ave., 482-3047 —

Parkway serves juicy roast beef po-boys, hot sausage po-boys, fried seafood and more. No reservations. Kitchen open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $ TRACEY’S — 2604 Magazine St.,

PHOTO BY CHerYl GerBer

Convention Center Blvd., 520-8530; www.grandislerestaurant.com — Grand Isle offers seafood options from raw oysters to lobster St. Malo with combines Maine lobster, shrimp and mussels in seafood broth. Baked Gulf fish are served with compound chili butter, potatoes and a vegetable. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

R&O’S RESTAURANT — 216 Old Hammond Hwy., 831-1248 — R&O’s offers a mix of pizza and Creole and Italian seafood dishes. There’s everything from seafood gumbo and stuffed artichokes to po-boys and muffulettas. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, dinner Wed.Sun. Credit cards. $

SANDWICHES & PO-BOYS

Cured salmon is one of the tapas dishes served at Santa Fe Tapas (1327 St. Charles Ave., 304-9915;www.santafetapas.com).

SEAFOOD GRAND ISLE RESTAURANT — 575

899-2054; www.traceysnola.com — The roast beef po-boy dripping with garlicky gravy is the highlight of a menu transplanted from the former Parasol’s to this Uptown bar. Other options include fried seafood and bar noshing items. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Cash only. $

Tchoupitoulas St., 613-2350; www. lacotebrasserie.com — This stylish restaurant in the Renaissance New Orleans Arts Hotel serves an array of raw and cooked seafood. Tabasco and Steen’s Cane Syrup glazed salmon is served with shrimp mirliton ragout. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

RED FISH GRILL — 115 Bourbon St., 598-1200; www.redfishgrill. com — Seafood creations by executive chef Brian Katz dominate a menu peppered with favorites like hickory-grilled redfish, pecancrusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ VILLAGE INN — 9201 Jefferson Hwy.,

737-4610 — Check into Village Inn for seasonal boiled seafood or raw oysters. Other options include fried seafood platters, po-boys, pasta and pizza. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

SOUL FOOD BIG MOMMA’S CHICKEN AND WAFFLES — 5741 Crowder Blvd., 241-2548;

www.bigmommaschickenandwaffles.com — Big Mamma’s serves hearty combinations like the six-piece which includes a waffle and six fried wings served crispy or dipped in sauce. Breakfast is served all day. All items are cooked to order. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., Lunch daily, dinner Sun. Credit cards. $

STEAKHOUSE CRESCENT CITY STEAKS — 1001

N. Broad St., 821-3271; www.crescentcitysteaks.com — Order USDA prime beef dry-aged and hand-cut in house. There are porterhouse steaks large enough for two or three diners to share. Bread pudding with raisins and peaches is topped with brandy sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri. and Sun., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$ RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE —

Harrah’s Hotel, 525 Fulton St., 5877099; 3633 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 888-3600; www. ruthschris.com — Ruth’s top-quality steaks are broiled in 1,800-degree ovens and arrive at the table sizzling. Reservations recommended. Fulton Street: Lunch and dinner daily. Veterans Memorial Boulevard: Lunch Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

TAPAS/SPANISH MIMI’S

IN

THE

MARIGNY

2601 Royal St., 872-9868 — The decadant Mushroom Manchego Toast is a favorite here. Or enjoy hot and cold tapas dishes ranging from grilled marinated artichokes to calamari. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner and latenight Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ SANTA FE TAPAS — 1327 St. Charles Ave., 304-9915 — The menu includes both tapas dishes and entrees. Seared jumbo scallops are served with mango and green tomato pico de gallo. Gambas al ajillo are jumbo shrimp with garlic, shallots, chilis and cognac. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ VEGA TAPAS CAFE — 2051 Metarie Road, 836-2007; www.vegatapascafe.com — Vega’s mix of hot and cold tapas dishes includes a salad of lump crabmeat on arugula with blood orange vinaigrette, seared tuna with avocado and tomato relish, braised pork empanadillos, steamed mussels and shrimp with tomatoes and garlic in caper-basil cream. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

VIETNAMESE AUGUST MOON — 3635 Prytania

St., 899-5129; www.moonnola.com — August Moon serves a mix of Vietnamese and Chinese cuisine. There are spring rolls and pho soup as well as many popular Chinese dishes and vegetarian options. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

DOSON NOODLE HOUSE — 135 N.

Carrollton Ave., 309-7283 — Noodles abound at this Mid-City eatery, which excels at vinegary chicken salad over shredded cabbage, as well as bowls of steaming pho. Vegetable-laden wonton soup and thick spring rolls make a refreshing, satisfying meal. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards and checks. $$

PHO HOA RESTAURANT — 1308 Manhattan Blvd., 302-2094 — Pho Hoa serves staple Vietnamese dishes including beef broth soups, vermicelli bowls, rice dishes and banh mi sandwiches. Bo kho is a popular beef stew. Appetizers include fried egg rols, crab rangoons and rice paper spring rolls. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $ PHO NOLA — 3320 Transcontinental

Drive, Metairie, 941-7690; www. pho-nola.com — Pho NOLA serves spring rolls and egg rolls, noodle soups, rice and vermicelli dishes and po-boys. Beverages include boba teas, milk teas, coffee drinks and smoothies. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PHO TAU BAY RESTAURANT — 113 Westbank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, 368-9846 — You’ll find classic Vietnamese beef broth and noodle soups, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, shrimp spring rolls with peanut sauce and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Wed. & Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

CLASSIFIEDS AUTOMOTIVE

483-3100 • Fax: 483-3153 3923 Bienville St. New Orleans, LA 70119

DOMESTIC AUTOS

Mon.-Fri. 8:30 a.m.- 5:30 p.m.

$19,595 504-466-6200

classadv@gambitweekly.com CASH, CHECK OR MAJOR CREDIT CARD

Online: When you place an ad in

Gambit’s Classifieds it also appears on our website, www.bestofneworleans.com

Free Ads: Private party ads for

merchandise for sale valued under $100 (price must be in ad) or ads for pets found/lost. No phone calls. Please fax or email.

Deadlines:

• For all Line Ads - Thurs. @ 5 p.m. • For all Display Ads - Wed. @ 5 p.m. Note: Ad cancellations and changes for all display ads must be made by Wednesday at 5 pm prior to the next issue date. Ad cancellations and changes for all line ads must be made by Thursday at 5 pm prior to the next issue date. Please proof your first ad insertion to make sure it is correct. Gambit only takes responsibility for the first incorrect insertion.

‘06 Corvette $29,995 504-466-6200

‘06 MUSTANG GT

‘08 Chrysler 300 SRT8 29,995 504-466-6200

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 07 > 2011

56

Employment

NOLA

MARKETPLACE

Terrier mix

$23,995 504-466-6200

PETS

‘07 SUZUKI FORENZA

‘08 VW JETTA SE Leather, sunroof $14,995 504-368-5640

‘09 SCION XD $13,995 504-368-5640

‘09 SUBARU IMPREZA $13,995 504-368-5640

Providing a relaxing light pressure Swedish or a super deep tissue massage in a beautiful peaceful environment Introductory price 1 hr

90 min. avail

Hours: 10am-7:30pm Mon - Sat

Alicia

LA Lic# 520

$15,995 504-368-5640

16 yrs exp. • Non-Sexual

call 504-317-4142

‘10 SUBARU LEGACY 2.5i

‘97 FORD RANGER

5 speed, ac, good tires & body. 129K. Eng problems. Ideal for mechanic. $895 obo. 504-568-1359

SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES ‘04 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER $10,995 504-368-5640

‘06 HONDA PILOT EX-L $15,995 Call 504-368-5640

40K MI $15,995 Call 504-368-5640

‘07 JEEP WRANGLER $19,995 504-466-6200

‘08 CADILLAC SRX $26,995 504-466-6200

$40

5 min from Elmwood

‘10 HONDA FIT

$24,995 504-466-6200

A Touch

gift Certificates for Father’s Day

Aloha

of

massage & body work

pain management & relaxation • Lomi Lomi - 90 minutes • Deep Tissue • Swedish • Waxing Services Available evening appts avail. 6 -10pm weekdays. 10am-7pm on weekends.

504-258-3389

2209 LaPalco Blvd

www.atouchofaloha.massageplanet.com La Lic #2983 • Member of BBB Providing Therapeutic Massage/Non Sexual

A BODY BLISS MASSAGE

Jeannie LMT #3783-01. Flexible appointments. Uptown Studio or Hotel out calls. 504.894.8856 (uptown)

BYWATER BODYWORKS

Swedish, deep tissue, therapeutic. Flex appts, in/out calls, OHP/student discounts, gift cert. $65/hr, $75/ 1 1/2hr. LA Lic# 1763 Mark. 259-7278

MERCHANDISE

‘09 SUBARU FORESTER AWD $18,995 Call 504-368-5640

3.6R Limited, Pwr Moonroof. $28,995 504-466-6200

Kookola is a sweetheart. Gets along w/ everyone, including cats natured. contact Kathy 348-2049 and 430-5036 ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-800-532-6546 Ext. 97 http:// www.continentalacademy.com

ADOPTIONS

‘07 BMW X3

4 Door $8,995 504-368-5640

Bobbie- 2yr/F. playful w/ dogs &cats. very sweet goofy personality. contact tbkestler@cox.net 504-975-5971 SFS Cat Adoptions has a large variety of sweet beautiful rescues that need good indoor homes-Siamese , Russian blues, etc all cats are spayed /neutered and vacs. 504 462-1968

PETS

IMPORTED AUTOS

‘10 SUBARU OUTBACK

Gambit’s weekly guide to Services, Events, Merchandise, Announcements, and more for as little as $60

Pekingese

Tan Microfiber. excel cond. Sell ASAP $350. No delivery. Email amarceneaux@gmail.com for questions & photo

$18,995 504-368-5640

‘07 FORD EXPLORER

Advertise in

FURNITURE/ACCESSORIES $125 Full/Double Size Mattress Set, still in original plastic, unopened. We can deliver. (504) 846-5122 $295 Brand New Iron Queen Bed with mattress set, all new. Can deliver. (504) 952-8403 King Pillowtop Mattress, NEW!!! ONLY $199. Can deliver. (504) 846-5122 NEW Pub Height Table Set all wood, still boxed. Delivery available. $325 (504) 846-5122 Queen Mattress Set $149 Still in wrapper. Will deliver. (504) 846-5122

Sofa and Loveseat

‘10 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY

TRUCKS

Rentals &

Massage therapists are required to be licensed with the State of Louisiana and must include the license number in their ads.

30,995 504-466-6200

‘06 Chevy SS Intimidator

Real Estate

LICENSED MASSAGE NOTICE

‘08 CHARGER SRT8

Auto, 12k mi $21,995 504-466-6200

ASK ABOUT OUR SPECIAL RATES FOR

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT

APPLIANCES 18 Cubic Ft Fridge

Almond Color. $50. Call 943-7699.

ELECTRIC RANGE

Hotpoint Almond Color 30in, Good working Condition. $50. Call 943-7699

BABY ITEMS Double Stroller

MacLearan Like New.$100 832-1689

PET ADOPTIONS Border Collie

5 yr/F, Spayed House Broken, Up to date vaccines. Brenda 504-838-0736 bmigaud@cox.net

BRYAN SUBARU LOVE A PET ADOPTION DRIVE SATURDAY, JUNE 18

In partnership with the ASPCA, The Friends of Jefferson Animal Shelter will showcase some of their adoptables on June 18, 2011 at 12 noon at Bryan Subaru, 8213 Airline Drive, Met. 70003.

Catahoula mix, male

Buddy boy is sweet and gd with other dogs.Loves to play w/toys. Best in home w/no sm kids. all med done and house broken. Please contact CINDY foxcfox@cox.net 504-451-9335

Cuddly, Grey striped adult male cat.

Hercules loves to enjoy the company and atten. of ppl, children, dogs, & other cats. Lives to cuddle & purr. Please contact Tracy- tbkestler@cox.net 504-975-5971

Elijah

3 yr old gorgeous solid white Angora male cat super smart and sweet.Shots ,neuter ,rescue 504 462-1968

Free Kittens

6 Kittens to loving homes. All colors. 985-232-0913 Free kittens to good home. We live in New Orleans please call Pricilla @ (601) 569-3661

Husky/ Shepherd mix

Satchmo is a 2 yr old, male. Super sweet, playful spirit. Good 2 everyone, incl. cats, dogs, and kids. If int. Please contact Tracy- tbkestler@cox.net 504-975-5971

KOJAK

large cuddly orange Morris the cat look a like. Neutered ,shots rescue 504 462-1968

Lab Mix

3 yr/ M, Neuterd, House Broken, Up to date on vaccines, Playful & Sweet Brenda 504-838-0736 bmigaud@cox.net

Lab/Gold Retriev Mix perfect companion dog.

Jelly-male 40 lb,VERY sweet &mellow. Loves to be social w/ ppl & dogs. Contact Sue @ sumico95@yahoo.com, 504-454-0476

Staffordshire terrier mix ppl lover

Peanut -F/tan . quiet intell, easily trained with treats or toys. Housebroken & crate trained. Loves ppl. contact Sue @ sumico95@yahoo.com, 504-454-0476

pekingese

Billy- laid back 2yr/M. loves belly rubs. playful with other dogs. contact tbkestler@cox.net 504-975-5971

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293

SERVICES

AIR COND/HEATING SUPERIOR AIRE INC

Trane 3 Ton Freon Replacement System, 13 seer, 10 year compressor. $3990 INSTALLED 12 months same as cash 504-465-0688

LANDSCAPE/HORTICULTURE DELTA SOD

Certified Grade “A” Turf St. Augustine, Tifway Bermuda Centipede, Zoysia. WE BEAT ALL COMPETITORS! 504-733-0471

TREE MEDICS

$50 OFF Trimming & Removal To Gambit Readers - Thru May Free estimates 504-488-9115 nolatrees.com

PEST CONTROL ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE FOR FORMOSAN TERMITES Injected into Trees. One Price: $185. ADRIAN’S TREE SERVICE 504-367-1160 www.adrianstrees.com

TERMINIX

Home of the $650 Termite Damage Repair Guarantee! WE DO IT ALL... Termites, Roaches, Rats & Ants Too. New Orleans Metro - 504-834-7330 2329 Edenborn, Metairie www.terminixno.com

PLUMBING ROOTER MAN

Sewer & Drain Cleaning Specialists Plumbing Repair Specialists New Orleans 504-522-9536. KennerJefferson 504-466-8581. Westbank 504-368-4070. Laplace 985-6520084. Mandeville 985-626-5045. Slidell 985-641-3525. MENTION GAMBIT FOR A DISCOUNT

POOL SERVICES MAGNOLIA POOLS

Specializing in Saltwater Systerms Service, Maintenance, Repair 504-270-7307 www.magnoliapools.org

CLASSIFIEDS EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT

BEAUTY SALONS/SPAS

Paid In Advance! Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net

ADVERTISING/MARKETING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Advertising Sales Bi-Lingual (English/ Spanish) The ideal candidate will be organized, self starter, motivated & have exp selling advertising. Stipend + Commission & Bonus Call for interview 504.628.1028

MANAGEMENT OFFICE BUSINESS MANAGER

CBD firm with national client base seeking Office Business Manager. Zehno Cross Media Communications is a marketing communications firm serving educational institutions around the country. We are seeking an experienced business manager to oversee the financial and administrative operations of the company. The financial roles include controller, bookkeeping, invoicing, collections, reporting and project estimating. The administrative arena involves human resources, business development, office equipment maintenance and the general tasks that encourage efficient daily performance. The successful candidate will have a related bachelor’s degree and at least three years previous experience in accounting and office management. Full-time position with a generous benefits package including health insurance and retirement plan. Email cover letter and resume in PDF format to apply@zehno.com.

OLD METAIRIE DAY SPA

seeks exp Nail Tech for FT position. Under new ownership. High volume salon. Fax resume to 504-837-4792.

FARM LABOR TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

Coy Mryrick Farms, Nazareth, TX, has 2 positions for livestock, hay & irrigation. 3 mths experience required w/references; valid and clean DL; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $9.65/hr; 3/4 work period guaranteed from 8/1/11 6/1/12. Apply at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order TX3088920.

TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

S&S Farms, Bay City, TX, has 4 positions for grain & cotton. 3 mths experience required w/references; valid and clean DL; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb; $9.65/ hr; 3/4 work period guaranteed from 7/18/11 - 12/2012. Apply at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order TX8145595.

MUSIC/MUSICIANS

VOLUNTEER

Weekly Tails

LA RED HOT RECORDS

Sales, Graphics/Web, Marketing, Accounting, A&R, $25-50K Email resume to: louisianaredhotrecords@gmail.com

STAFF PIANO ACCOMPANIST

Will work with vocal & instrumental students as needed for lessons, classes, recitals, & other performances. Bachelor’s, Music (Performance); excellent keyboard skills & sight reading ability; broad knowledge & understanding of vocal repertoire from art songs & opera to musical theater, & the standard instrumental repertoire. Audition. Mail resume & credentials to Mickey Eagan, Tulane Univ., 300 Gibson Hall, 6823 St. Charles Ave., New Orleans, LA 70118. Must apply w/in 30 days and refer to job # 10378 to be considered. LA

RETAIL

Offers Volunteer Opportunities. Make a difference in the lives of the terminally ill & their families. Services include: friendly visits to patients & their families, provide rest time to caretaker, bereavement & office assistance. School service hours avail. Call Volunteer Coordinator @ 504-818-2723 #3016

COOKING SCHOOL/STORE

is looking to fill kitchen prep, server & cleaning position. Must be able to work weekends. Call Crescent City Cooks!, Riverwalk 529-1600.

Mojo is a 6-year-old, neutered, Poodle mix. He LOVES to cuddle in your lap and would prefer a quiet household with lots of places to snuggle. To meet Mojo or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/ SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. Artemis is a 5-month-old, spayed, DSH with a super-shiny coal black coat. She really likes other cats and is one of SEVERAL kittens available for adoption. To meet Artemis or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191.

MOJO Kennel #A13170522

To Advertise in

EMPLOYMENT Call (504) 483-3100

MISCELLANEOUS $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Earn Extra income assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! CALL OUR LIVE OPERATORS NOW! 1-800-405-7619 ext. 2450 http:// www.easywork-greatpay.com $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Earn Extra income assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! CALL OUR LIVE OPERATORS NOW! 1-800-405-7619 ext. 2450 http:// www.easywork-greatpay.com

To look for a lost pet come to the Louisiana SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), Mon-Sat. 9-5, Sun. 12-5 or call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org.

ARTEMIS Kennel #A13038777

Don’t miss out on this special feature! Issue Date June 14th Ad deadline June 8th

Size 2 col” x 2” 2 col”x 3” 1/8 page 1/4 page half page full page

Actual Size

(3.083” x 2”) (3.083” x 3”) (4.67” x 2.569”) (4.67” x 5.333”) (9.625” x 5.333”) (9.625” x 10.833”)

26x Rate*

$50 $75 $100 $200 $405 $810

Open Rate

$90 $135 $203 $405 $810 $1620

To Advertise or for more information call your Classified Account Executive At (504) 483-3100 or email classadv@gambitweekly.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 07 > 2011

men realestate in

57

REAL ESTATE CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

OLD METAIRIE METAIRIE TOWERS 401 Metairie Rd

1 bedroom, 1.5 bath, renovated with new appliances and AC’s. $118,000. Call 504-275-5700

VACANT LOT - METAIRIE HEIGHTS

50 x 120. Ready to build $120,000 (504) 451-8118

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT MAKE ME BEAUTIFUL AGAIN!

Irish Channel did not flood Katrina damaged house w/2 & 1/3 L-shaped lots. 2 lots each 30x120’ = 60’x120’ & rear portion of corner lot 35’x25’, dble driveway in front w/a single tin garage & single driveway on side street. $8,567 roof, 7 rms & 3 bathrooms. 4th sewer line in rear, 2 lg walk in closets. Large walk in pantry. Huge, red brick floor to ceiling dble sided fireplace. Could house 1 family or owner occupied + 1 rental, or 2 rentals, or could build single/double on second lot. Much space to add on. Huge yd for in-ground pool. Many options for house & land. Paved front patio w/ 2 lg. red brick planters. $195,000, 504-832-1901.

CONDO FOR SALE

COVINGTON 109 BELLE TERRE BL

Charming cottage on huge lot. 3br, 2 ba. Great schools. 9’ ceil. Den, sunrm, garage converted to huge game rm. Huge bkyd & storage galore. $250,000. Call Joan Soboloff, Avalar Realty. 985-264-1125. soboloff@aol.com.

16062 LAKE RAMSEY RD

Better than new! 3 br, 2 ba. High ceil & crown mouldings. Beaut wd flrs. Huge master ste. Close to town, on a lrg 100 x 300 lot! $179,000. Call Joan Soboloff, Avalar Realty. 985-264-1125. soboloff@aol.com.

19084 S. FITZMORRIS

Custom design, 5 br, 3.5 ba, pristine cond. Open flr plan, hdwd flrs. On 1 acre in River Heights. Lg fen yd, x-large gar, work area. More! $350,000. Joan Soboloff, Avalar Realty. 985-264-1125. soboloff@aol.com.

20152 PALM BLVD

Classy & Custom Built! From the architectural style roof, to hrdwd flrs, & everything in between! Granite counter tops, cherry-wood cabinets, dual vanities. Agent, Tontinette Puissegur, Latter & Blum, 985-630-8465

ELEGANT COUNTRY LIVING

Min. from downtown Covington. Custom European estate on Bogue Falaya River. Main house 3500 sf ft 3 br, 3.5 ba. Guest house 2 br, 1 ba. On 4.66 acres. $1,099,000. By Appt. 985-5022882. CovingtonRiverEstate.com.

1 Blk off St. Charles. 2/2, wd flrs, appls & w/d incl., grnite cntrtps & ss appl. OS pkng. REDUCED PRICE! $149,900. Darlene, Hera Realty 504-914-6352

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 07 > 2011

great

58

MANDEVILLE 147 E RUELLE

Organic Modern! Open, flex flrplan, 5 br, 4.5 ba. Master ste w/ spa. Top of line dream kit Media game rm. On golf course, end of cul-de-sac. $690,000 Call Joan Soboloff, Avalar Realty. 985264-1125. soboloff@aol.com.

12 CHANDON CT

Waterfront home nr Causeway. 4 br 3.5 ba. 2 story. Huge back deck, 2 custom firepl, kit has custom ss countertops, new ac & heat. $337,500. Call Joan Soboloff, Avalar Realty. 985-264-1125. soboloff@aol.com

208 Chateau De Brie

Stunning custom home in Grande Maison. 4 BR, 3.5 BA. On cul-de-sac lot backing greenspace. Gourmet kit, keeping rm, butler’s pantry, bonus rm, basketball court & more. $499,000. 504-2480945. www.sharpmls.com/114561

SLIDELL 120 PARADISE POINT

Outstanding view of majestic wildlife. 2 story, 4BR, 3BA, study, upstairs loft. Bathrooms & kitchen updated. Deck, patio & porch. Quiet cul-de-sac. $419,900. 985640-8775. www.sharpmls.com/114609

133 ABERDEEN DRIVE

1/2 OFF FIRST MONTH OLD METAIRIE SECRET

1 or 2 BR, Sparkling Pool, Bike Path, 12’ x 24’ Liv.Rm, Sep Din, King Master, No Pets, No Sect 8, $699 & $799 . 504-236-5776

CORPORATE RENTALS 1103 ROYAL UNIT A

1 bedroom, 1 bath, cen a/h, Jacuzzi tub, w/d, water incl. Furnished or unfurnished. $1500/mo. Avail June 1. Call for appt, 504-952-3131.

Rent $970/mo 1BR, 1-1/2 BA, pool. Elec & cable incld, prkg. 24 hr Concierge Service- 914-882-1212.

New Orleans Area 10 Min to Downtown

1Br, 1 Ba, Nwly Remod, furn. Qn bed, WiFi, Cbl. Pkg.Util Incl. Lndry Fac. Sec Cameras $1200/mth. 1 mth min. 2325 Pasadena, Met. 504-491-1591.

COMMERCIAL RENTALS 3020 VETERANS BLVD

3000 sg ft for lease off Causeway Blvd. 1 story in small strip mall. A/C, Heat and Water included in lease. Call Rick, 504-486-8951. Kirschman Realty, LLC.

740 N RAMPART

1350 sq ft, zone VCC-2, across from Armstrong Arch, corner of St Ann. $1750. Contact: 504-908-5210

Cross Gates Beauty 4 br 2.5 ba . Beautiful landscaping. Big kit, den, formal dr, office. No flood zone. Home wrnty. Carole Woodward, Keller Williams Realty. (504) 578-7691. www. YourHomeYourCastle.com

201 N. SILVER MAPLE DR

3BR/2.5BA TOWNHOUSE

Ashton Oaks, 4 BR, 2.5 BA. Gameroom, Kit with granite, wood floors down. Big Master ste, hi ceil. Never flooded. Home wrnty. Carole Woodward, Keller Williams Realty. (504)5787691. www.YourHomeYourCastle.com

DOWNTOWN FURNISHED

1 BR & 2 BR Available Now. Free Parking Call 504-717-8204.

High end 1-4BR. Near ferry, clean, many x-tras, hrdwd flrs, cen a/h, no dogs, no sec 8, some O/S prkng $750-$1200/mo. 504-362-7487

BROADMOOR 3626 Upperline

Upr dplx, 3 br, 1.5 ba, wd flrs, cei fans, furn kit, w/d, off st pkg. Nice area. $1200/mo. Louis, 874-3195.

1023 PIETY ST

2 br, 2 full ba, w/d hkps, cen a/h, c-fans, fncd yd, avail now. $875. 888239-6566 or mballier@yahoo.com

ESPLANADE RIDGE 1208 N. GAYOSO

Upper 2 BR, LR, DR, 1 BA, KIT, wood/ ceramic flrs, high ceilings, cen a/h, w/d hkups, $1150/mo. 432-7955.

2919 Lapage

2b/1b, living, din, funr kit, w/d, cen a/h, wd flrs, high cel. garage 1100/ mo, no dogs 985-231-8597

FRENCH QUARTER/ FAUBOURG MARIGNY 1103 ROYAL UNIT A

1 bedroom, 1 bath, cen a/h, Jacuzzi tub, w/d, water incl. Furnished or unfurnished. $1500/mo. Avail June 1. Call for appt, 504-952-3131.

GENTILLY

CBD

KENNER O/S prkng, wtr paid, all kit appls, priv yard, conv. location, cable ready, Pets ok. $1000/mo. 504-913-4803.

METAIRIE LUXURY APTS

1/2 Dble 2 Sty, 2Bd, 1Ba, A/C, Refig, Stove, W/D, Garage. $1300/mo, 1-yr Lse Sec Dep, No Pets.. Call 225-8026554/ email dicklea@cox.net

ALGIERS POINT HISTORIC ALGIERS POINT

BYWATER

THERAPIST OFFICE SPACE

CITY PARK/BAYOU ST. JOHN 4228 ORLEANS AVE.

METAIRIE TOWERS

Victorian Building in Lower Garden District. Fridays Only. Call 670-2575 for information

3 BR, 2 full baths, LR, DR, kit, w&d hkups, faux fireplace, fans, blinds. No pets. $850/mo. 504-443-2280

339 CARONDELET LUXURY 1 BDRM APTS

Newly renovated 1850’s bldg on CBD st car line. 600-1000 sq ft. $1200-$2000/mo. 18 Units. Catalyst Development L.L.C. Owner/Agent. . 504-648-7899

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

SINGLE FAMILY HM

Across from Pontchartrain Golf Course! 4 BR/2 BA, CA&H. Built In electric. No smokers. Avail now! $1500/mo + deposit. Call 504-491-9834

IRISH CHANNEL 1/2 BLOCK TO MAGAZINE

1 BR $695/mo. 2 BR, $900/mo (2 BR includes utilities), hardwood/carpet floors. . 504-202-0381, 738-2492.

Ann de Montluzin Farmer

broker

24/7

The Historic House, Luxury Home and Second Home Specialist

online resident services

pet free

Residential /Commercial Sales and Leasing, Appraisals.

friendly spaces

(504) 895-1493 (504) 430-8737

farmeran@gmail.com www.demontluzinrealtors.com

off street parking

fully

Licensed in Louisiana for 32 years, building on a real estate heritage since 1905

enclosed access gates

Features vary by community.

River Ridge Metairie Baton Rouge

OLD METAIRIE

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

Kenner Slidell Mandeville

Mandeville Jackson, MS Picayune, MS

reaL esTaTe

SHOWCaSe OLD METAIRIE

GENTILLY

GENTILLY

BILOXI, MS

5542 Charlotte Dr. $99,500 Slab Ranch - 3 BR, 2 BA Partially renov + Guest Cottage 504-568-1359

Only Beachfront Resort in Biloxi/Gulfport - Bank Owned 3 bedroom/3 bath, 2161 sf. Amenities, covered parking

RIVER RIDGE 9012 Rosecrest Lane

324 Metairie Rd - $1,950,000 Desirable Met Rd prop. Comm retail under non-conforming use. Inc 16,090 sq. ft. of land w/ exc. frontage on Met Rd & Vincent Ave. Loading dock & 7 parking spaces. Exc. redevel opp. for commercial/townhomes/single-family. Contact Josh Gertler, Basis Brokerage 504.261.8048 josh@basis-development.com

Newly renovated brick home, 1420 sq. ft., 2 bedroom, 2 bath, hardwood floors through out, appliances included, covered carport, large 62x120 lot w/open backyard & additional shed. 5 min. from Mathews & St. Rita.

4336 St Anthony $99,000

Charming renovated 2 bedroom/1 bath/ Cen a/h/Off street Parking/ Ceramic Tile/Corner lot/ Near Universities.

Reduced! $184,000

Southern Spirit Realty Keisha Washington 504-319-2693

Call (504) 915-3220

CLASSIFIEDS LAKEVIEW/LAKESHORE

French Quarter Realty Wayne • Nicole • Sam • Jennifer • Brett • Robert • George • Baxter • Kaysie • Billy

504-949-5400 222 London(Metairie) 2/1.5 pool, pkg, w/d on site, 2nd flr

2 story, 3 BR upstairs, 2 half BA, 1 full BA. Formal dining. Washer, dryer, backyard. $1200. 504-301-7239

MID CITY $875

835 Julia #3

1/1 Furn chic renov w/parking!

1024 Bourbon

2/2 renov. fully furn all utilities inc $2,750

1430 Chartres

2/1 shotgun wood flrs courtyard $1200

519 Iberville

1/1 renov apt w/balcony over courtyard $1125

718 Barracks #7

1/1 newly remodeled,prvt pool,great Loc! $2200

$1695

937 Barracks #2

2/2 charming,in lower quarter w/balc!

1233 Esplanade #16

2/1 renov.pool.prking for additional $50. $1000

712 St Philip A

1/1 fully furn, fab location. courtyard $1,550

712 St Philip B

1/1 fully furn guesthouse. fab loc $1,425

$1200

CONDOS FOR SALE

3122 PALMYRA STREET

Completely renov, 1/2 dbl, 1BR, 1BA, hdwd flrs, new appls, ceil fans, wtr pd. $700/mo+dep. Call 504-899-5544

4322 HAMILTON

2BR/1BA lower, 1000 + sf, hdwd flrs, furn kit, w/d, porch, fen yd, off st pkg, no smokers, pet negot. $900/mo + dep. 488-2969

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT GRT LOCATIONS!

LOWER GARDEN DISTRICT St. Andrew - O/S, gtd pkng, pool, laun, $775/mo & up 2833 MAGAZINE 1BR/1BA Mod kit, o/s pkng, pool, coin op laun, $800/mo 2100 BARONNE 2BR/1.5 ba, hdwd flrs, w&d hkups, Newly renov. $850/mo 891-2420

1 BLK TO AUDUBON PARK

6230 Annunciation, 3 BR, 2 BA, furn kit, cen a/h, w/d, off st prkg, $1950, lease. Call 621-7795

1 Blk to St. Charles

1711 2nd St. Lrg 1b/1b, dish washer, w/d onsite, cent AC, marble mantels, patio $850/mo 895-4726 or 261-7611

RAISED COTTAGE UPPER

Deluxe furn 2 Br, w/10x12 luxury ba, cent. air, wd & tile floors, ceil fans, mini blinds, yd, screen prch, w/d, 5300 Freret at Valmont. $1200-$1400/mo incl. gas/wtr 504-899-3668

4328 Bancroft Drive $625,000

REAL ESTATE

1205 ST CHARLES/$1075

361 LOWERLINE ST.

1510 CARONDELET 1 block to St. Charles

FURN 2BDRM/1BA HOUSE

2 Eff apts. Lower $625 tenant pays elec. Upper $700 incl util, w/d on site 1-888239-6566 or mballier@yahoo.com

Complete w/fridge, w&d, mw, stove, sec sys, CA&H, os pkng. On srtcr & Busline. Quiet n’bhood. $1,100 mo + sec dep. No pets/smokers. Call (504) 866-2250

1730 NAPOLEON AVENUE

S. FRONT - NR. CHILDREN’S HOSP

2011 GEN PERSHING Beautiful Neighborhood!

577 S CARROLLTON

Fully Furn’d studio/effy/secure bldg/ gtd pkg/pool/gym/wifi/laundry. 985871-4324, 504-442-0573.

1 br apt, living rm, furn kit, wd flrs, hi ceil, a/c units. Util incl. 1 blk St Charles. No pets. 251-2564

3 BR 2 BA, Close to Univ, med & law schools. The best apt you’ll see. Cent a/h, hdwd flrs. Lots of closet space. Offst Pkg, Water pd. Avail 6/1. No smokers, no pets. $1800. Paula 504-952-3131

UPTOWN/ GARDEN DISTRICT

1, 2 & 3

BEDROOMS AVAILABLE CALL

899-RENT

1/1, w/d, shared yard & storage. Walk to strtcar, Tulane, Loyola & Audubon pk. Pets ok. $750/mo + dep. 225-810-6770

Newly renov cottage. 1BR, lr, kit, w/d hkups. $750 + dep. No sec 8, no pets. New Owner Special: $100 off 1st mo. rent. 504-891-1889, 473-0821 By St. Charles, 3BR, 1BA, furn kit, w/d, cen air, $1450/mo util & Direct TV incl 504-913-6999, 504-259-6999

6317 S. PRIEUR

Near Tulane 2 bedroom, living room, dining room, furn kit, tile bath. No pets. $800/mo, Call 504-283-7569

4129 VENDOME PLACE

Beautifully renovated spacious home. 3/4 br, 3 BA, kit w/ ss appl. w/d, cen a/h, lg yard, small gar. $2500/mo. $1500 dep. 504-621-9337

LOWER GARDEN DIST./ IRISH CHANNEL 2707 ST. THOMAS

2 BDRM Camelback double. CA&H, all wd flrs. $675 per month + deposit. Call (504) 416-5923.

RENTALS TO SHARE ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Findyour roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com.

HOWARD SCHMALZ & ASSOCIATES REAL ESTATE Call Bert: 504-581-2804

628 Julia 1br/1ba "Arts District Apartment"

$1000

1726 St. Charles 1br/1ba Apartment Over Pralines $800 1207 Jackson 1br/1ba "Aquatic Garden Apt"

$750

1514 Euterpe

$600

UPTOWN DUPLEX

"Efficiency Off St. Charles"

OLD METAIRIE CLUB GARDEN REDUCED

A LARge WAteRfRont HoMe on pReStIgIouS StReet. 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, Elevator, Master with large walk-in closet, bonus room over garage, office and situated on beautiful Bayou St. John. Great location near City Park and just 3 miles to the French Quarter. Owner financing via Bond for Deed with 25% down on this property.

Michael L. Baker, ABR/M, CRB, HHS President Realty Resources, Inc. 504-523-5555 • cell 504-606-6226 Licensed by the Louisiana Real estate Commission for more than 28 years with offices in new orleans, LA 70130

Uptown duplex located on the corner of S Claiborne and Octavia. Great opportunity for owner occupant or as investment property. Approximately 4,348 square feet with 6 bedrooms and 4 ½ baths, detached 2 car garage and carport listed for $455,000.00. Adjacent lot and house available as package for $550,000.00.

33 NASSAU DR. Excellent location in Old Metairie Club Garden. Flooded in Katrina, perfect opportunity for renovation, original marble flooring in foyer and two original marble mantels. Great backyard for entertaining and outdoor cooking. 4 br/ 3 ½ baths. $890,000

Beau Box • 504.525.5354

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 07 > 2011

1233 Esplanade #19 studio studio furn,renov w/open flr plan $69,000 929 Dumaine #14 studio cozy, skylights, common ctyd $109,000 222 London (Met.) 2/1.5 pool, pkg, w/d on site, 2nd flr $99,000 511 Gov Nicholls D 1/1 updated,modern, 533 sqft $229,000 1119 Dauphine 2/1.5 fab condo w/balc! 1040 sqft $369,900 812 Esplanade #2 1/1 grnd flr w/pool! 481sqft $189,000 1233 Decatur #8 1/1 3rdflw/tonsofcharm 608sqft $199,000 921 Chartres #9 2/1.5 spacious, Crtyrd, 1188 sqft $359,000 We have qualified tenants for your rentals. Call us!

TOWNHSE- 6604 BELLAIRE

Call Janine 228-313-1352

Please ask me about other foreclosures

59

PUZZLE PAGE CLASSIFIEDS UPTOWN HOME

• 3222 Coliseum • 4941 St. Charles • 2721 St. Charles • 5528 Hurst • 1750 St. Charles • 1750 St. Charles • 20 Anjou • 1544 Camp • 3915 St. Charles • 1544 Camp • 1544 Camp • 1224 St. Charles

(New Price!) $2,495,000 Grand Mansion $2,300,000 (3 bdrm/3.5ba w/pkg) $1,579,000 TOO LATE! $1,300,000 TOO LATE! $429,000 Commercial $399,000 (4 bdrm/2 ba w/pkg) $220,000 (2 bdrm/2ba w/pkg) $239,000 (1bdrm/1ba w/pkg) $315,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $159,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $149,000 starting at $79,000

YOUR PROPERTY COULD BE LISTED HERE!!!

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 07 > 2011

ANSWERS FOR LAST WEEK ON PAGE 58

62

John Schaff crs CELL

504.343.6683

3506 ANNUNCIATION CHARMING VICTORIAN. Well maintained Historic cottage. Beautiful hardwood floors. 12’ ceilings, plenty of closet/ storage space. Central A/C, & Huge backyard. Excellent location & a great value! $269,000

office

504.895.4663 (504) 895-4663

BETWEEN UPTOWN & OCHSNER

131 BROOKLYN AVE. CLASSIC SHOTGUN. Excellent location, minutes from Uptown. High ceilings. Hardwood & slate flooring. Furnished kitchen. Whirlpool. New central A/C.Well maintained home w/large backyard & off street parking. Right near levee. Great for bike riding & dog walking! Owner/Agent $110,000


Gambit: June 7, 2011