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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 22 > 2010

Get hooked on fresh, wild-caught Louisiana seafood!

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JUNE 22, 2010 · VOLUME 31 · NUMBER 25

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Commentary

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Blake Pontchartrain

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News

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Bouquets & Brickbats

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Câ&#x20AC;&#x2122;est What?

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Scuttlebutt

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We arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the world

New Orleans know-it-all

Charities dig in to help Gulf Coast residents in distress, knowing itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just the beginning This weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s heroes and zeroes

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Gambitâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Web poll From their lips to your ears

Shop Talk

New Orleans Athletic Club

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VIEWS Chris Rose / Rose-Colored Glasses

Secondhand Rose: Chris talks trash

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Jeremy Alford / The State of the State

15 The biggest law in this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s legislative session in Baton Rouge went by the name of Murphy

Clancy DuBos / Politics

Gov. Bobby Jindal guts the arts

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ARTS&ENTERTAINMENT

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A&E News

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Gambit Picks

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Noah Bonaparte Pais / On the Record

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Cuisine

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The Puzzle Page

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A crackdown on street musicians roils the New Orleans music community â&#x20AC;&#x201D; in the streets and online

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > JUNE 22 > 2010

Best bets for your busy week

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We Aren’t the World

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raise awareness; we need to raise money. If dead and dying animals were washing ashore in Malibu or Martha’s Vineyard, we know the response would be different. Is the international music community suffering from “charity fatigue”? Have they conflated the tragedy on the rural Gulf Coast with the urban floods after Hurricane Katrina and concluded they’ve already done enough for us? If so, they’re mistaken. While New Orleans will suffer, our suffering will pale in comparison to the misery of people who are taking it in the throat: Louisianans of Cajun, Isleño, Yugoslavian, Croatian, Cambodian, Vietnamese, AfricanAmerican and Native American descent who have spent their lives putting food on the table for America — and who are

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We don’t need to raise awareness; we need to raise money. If dead and dying animals were washing ashore in Malibu or Martha’s Vineyard, we know the response would be different. seeing their culture and livelihoods vanish with each drop of oil that reaches Barataria Bay, south Terrebonne, or the marshes of Plaquemines Parish. Along with seafood and petroleum, this state has given the country a cornucopia of music, so it’s time for musicians, many of whom are quick to state their Louisiana bona fides in interviews — often at the New Orleans Fair Grounds every spring — to give back. Homegrown relief efforts have been fantastic, and there’s probably not a musician in south Louisiana who wouldn’t pitch in again if asked. But the need is so great on the coast (see Alex Woodward’s story, “First Line,” p. 9), and looks to be so far-reaching and long-lasting, that we need a Gulf Aid of international proportions. Now is the time for ecology-minded musicians and celebrities to put their time and their talents where their collective mouth is.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 22 > 2010

n May, WWOZ, Rehage Entertainment, SDT Waste & Debris Services and Blaine Kern’s Mardi Gras World put together a concert in six days to benefit the Louisiana coast. Titled “Gulf Aid,” the impromptu day of music raised $300,000 for the families whose world was upended by the BP Gulf oil catastrophe. A single by Lenny Kravitz, Mos Def and the Preservation Hall Brass Band promises to raise more. Kravitz and Ani DiFranco held an hour-long concert June 22 for the cause, featuring New Orleans musicians. And in July, the local independent record label Park the Van is planning to release a compilation of songs, the proceeds from which will benefit the Gulf Restoration Network. Americans have responded well to celebrity-driven charities in the past. The all-star “We Are the World” single, performed by dozens of popular singers, raised millions for USA For Africa in 1985. Since then, Farm Aid, Live Aid and telethons to help victims of Hurricane Katrina and the earthquake in Haiti have, through music, shone a light on the needy and inspired people to give tens of millions of dollars in relief. That’s why it’s puzzling to see the greatest environmental disaster in American history, now entering its third month along the Gulf Coast with no good news in sight, receive almost no response from the international music community — particularly from those who have in the past shouted their commitments to the environment, green causes and working people. Where are the Bonos and the Stings (who is in town this week)? Why have we heard not a word from the Springsteens and the Mellencamps, the platinum-selling artists who have been so generous in the past for so many other causes? Gambit spoke to Amy Makowiecki of the Green Music Group (GMG), which describes itself as “a large-scale, highprofile environmental coalition of musicians, industry leaders and music fans using our collective power to bring about widespread environmental change within the music industry and around the globe.” Among its founders are several Jazz Fest stalwarts, including Bonnie Raitt, Willie Nelson and Dave Matthews, as well as one of the music industry’s most visible “green” activists, Sheryl Crow. Yet neither GMG nor its founders have any plans for a large-scale concert, Makowiecki says, though several of its artists are planning to erect educational “eco-villages” at stops on their summer tours. “We recognize that this obviously is a disaster of catastrophic proportions,” Makowiecki says, “and we are working through our well-established artist relationships to raise awareness about the disaster in the Gulf Coast.” With all due respect, we don’t need to

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DEAR YLVA, It was in 1822 that Esplanade Avenue was conceived as a Europeanstyle boulevard that would connect the Vieux Carre to the bayou and incorporate Rue Ste. Julie. But, of course, there is much more to the story. First, I think you have your Moreaus confused. The Julie Moreau who married Claude Treme didn’t inherit the property until 1794. Julie’s father, Martin, was the son of Paul Moreau and Julie Prevost. Paul Moreau, also known as Don Pablo, died in 1775 and left his estate to his wife Julie Prevost. When she died in 1794, her son Martin had predeceased her. Therefore, her granddaughter — also named Julie — became the principal heir. Claude Treme, a Frenchman, married Julie Moreau in 1793; shortly after, they inherited the property from Julie’s paternal grandmother and namesake. Claude Treme’s bride was certainly not a manumitted slave. In fact, in a statement testifying to Treme’s character before his wedding, it was sworn “that he is a bachelor, and that Dona Julia Moro is a pure white person because her parents are of this condition, as such are all members of this family held, considered, and reputed by the general public …”. Treme and his bride took up residence in the enormous plantation house. However, Treme wasn’t planning to cultivate the plantation or run any of the factories or brickyards on the property. Instead he tried to make a private subdivision near the house. By 1798, he had laid out several streets perpendicular to Bayou Road. Among them was Rue St. Claude, named for his patron saint. He also established Rue du Marais from present St. Philip to Bayou Road, and another street he called Ste. Julie. That same year, Treme began selling

off a few lots of his property. Many of the people who bought lots in the Faubourg Treme were free people of color, along with French and Spanish colonial settlers and recent immigrants. In some blocks, all of the lots were sold to free people of color, and many of the buyers were women. Creole cottages soon began to appear on the 60-foot lots. In 1810, Treme sold the rest of his plantation, except for a few lots, to the city of New Orleans for $40,000. Treme then became the city’s first subdivision — the

The Garlands Historic Creole Cottages are what remains of the brickmaking plantation divided and sold to create the Treme neighborhood. earlier subdivisions of Faubourg Ste. Marie and Faubourg Marigny were private projects — and also its largest. In 1807, an act of Congress had given the city of New Orleans title to a band of land downriver from today’s Barracks Street between Rue Levee (North Peters Street) and Rue Rampart. It was referred to in early real estate advertisements as “the Esplanade of the Fort St. Charles,” the old fort which stood near the site of the old U. S. Mint. In 1822, City Surveyor Joseph Pilie surveyed the entire length of the high ground of the ancient Native American portage that connected Bayou St. John with the Mississippi and named the street the “Esplanade Prolongment.” But it would be many years before the avenue became a reality. Lawsuits and hostile landowners got in the way of its completion in the 1860s.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >chris > > rose clancy dubos jeremy alford < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < knowledge < < < < < < < < < < <is < <power < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <13 17 15 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

scuttle Butt

QUOTES OF THE WEEK

First Line LocaL organizations heLp famiLies threatened by the bp oiL disaster — and the need is just beginning. by aLe x woodward

L

“It hardly needs to be said that the public needs no protection from Eddie Price.” — Attorney Ralph Whalen, in a sentencing memo to U.S. District Judge Martin Feldman regarding his client, the former mayor of Mandeville. In April 2008, Price drove his city-owned SUV through a Causeway tollbooth gate around midnight with his lights off and fled the scene when ordered to stop. Feldman sentenced Price to 64 months in federal prison for tax evasion and other convictions. “It’s like this huge committee down there, and every decision that we try to implement, any one person on that committee has absolute veto power.” — Ala. Gov. Bob Riley, on the BP/Coast Guard cleanup crews and their lack of centralized leadership

LANdriEU BACKiNg LEdET

Civil District Court Judge Rose Ledet has picked up the endorsement of Mayor Mitch Landrieu in her bid for the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeal this fall. Ledet is running for the seat currently held by Chief Judge Joan Bernard Armstrong, who has announced her retirement. So far, Ledet has no announced opponents. Landrieu’s support, which came via an affidavit, adds even more weight to an already long list of support that Ledet has lined up for her race. Qualifying for five seats on the Court of Appeal is July 7-9 — the same time as qualifying for U.S. Senate, Congress, First City Court judgeships, and special elections for lieutenant governor and Jefferson Parish president. July 7-9 is also expected to be the qualifying period in a special election yet to be called in state Senate District 2. That seat is currently held by Sen. Ann Duplessis, who is joining the Landrieu administration. — Clancy DuBos page 10

ermen to go out Second Harvest Food Bank of with their ships Greater New Orleans and Acadiana and go booming, volunteers pack emergency or maybe you’re food boxes at the organization’s warehouse in Harahan. involved in animal rescue, there isn’t photo by cheryL gerber really a whole lot people can do but watch and wish there was something. But as a community entity, the center’s here, even if it just helps people combat their isolation and commiserate together over a hot lunch.” Nabatoff arrived in St. Bernard Parish in January 2006 to volunteer at a relief kitchen. (“All I knew is I was

c'est what? what category of hurricane wouLd make you evacuate this year?

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Vote on “c’est what?” on bestofneworleans.com this week’s QUESTION

page 12

BoUQuets

54%

MORE THAN A 3

Do you support the noise ordinance to shut down street musicians in the French Quarter at 8 p.m.?

this week’s heroes and zeroes

members of Tipitina’s Music Internship Program, were awarded full Berklee City Music Summer Scholarships. The Boston university holds an annual summer program for talented young musicians from around the world. The young men — all teenage jazz players — will spend five weeks getting private lessons and performing.

Feed the Multitudes,

the annual free food festival by members of Victory Fellowship in Metairie, will be holding a food outreach to people in Terrebonne Parish as part of this year’s event. The group intends to buy and distribute 5,000 bags of groceries next month through the organization Convoy of Hope. Feed the Multitudes, founded in 1990, hosts its annual community feast July 4 on the campus of its church on Airline Drive.

Congressman Joe Barton,

a Texas Republican, shocked many people on June 17 when he apologized to BP CEO Tony Hayward during a hearing on the Gulf oil disaster. Barton, the ranking GOP member of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, called the Gulf Coast reparations plan a “tragedy,” a “$20 billion shakedown” and referred to Hayward’s appearance at the hearing as a “witch hunt.” The White House characterized Barton’s comments as “shameful.”

Bill Maher

told oilfield workers, “Sorry, roughnecks, but eventually you’re going to have to find something else to do,” and compared their jobs to child pornographers on his HBO show Real Time With Bill Maher June 11. The sentiment was picked up and widely applauded on some influential “progressive” websites like Daily Kos. Blaming the victims instead of the victimizers is contemptible logic — and, for New Orleanians who went through Hurricane Katrina and the federal floods — all too familiar.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 22 > 2010

ast month, the Louisiana Department of Social Services (DSS) opened 14 mobile offices in affected neighborhoods closer to the coast in Plaquemines, St. Bernard, Lafourche, Jefferson, St. Tammany, Terrebonne and Orleans parishes. As of last week, DSS had received more than 1,622 applications for the Louisiana Department of Social Services’ Sup– plemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as food stamps) since the offices opened May 3, accounting for hundreds of families now seeking aid in the wake of the disaster. But that’s just a fraction of the people affected. Second Harvest Food Bank of Greater New Orleans and Acadiana estimates more than 47,000 households may be in need of assistance. Since May 1, Second Harvest officials say they have seen a 15 to 25 percent increase in people seeking aid. Last month, Second Harvest distributed about 40,000 pounds of food and 730 emergency boxes, each packed with about 33 pounds of food — “enough to hopefully help a family get through three or four days,” says Second Harvest president and CEO Natalie Jayroe. “Obviously we know we’ve got a lot more work to do. We’re in the early days still.” Founded in 1982, Second Harvest aims to lead the fight against hunger in south Louisiana — coastal parishes from Vermillion and Cameron to St. Bernard, Plaquemines and St. Tammany all are in its service area. As part of its disaster response, Second Harvest works through faith-based and nonprofit agencies like the Community Center of St. Bernard to find out their needs, then increases its flow and supplies of food. “They’ve been our partners in several disasters, and fortunately for us they keep a close eye on the com-

munities and families and can be good ears and eyes on the ground,” Jayroe says. At the Community Center of St. Bernard, executive director Iray Nabatoff says the number of individuals and families it serves continues to increase as the disaster continues. The center typically serves 500 individuals and 50 families in ZIP codes 70092 and 70085, representing Violet and St. Bernard, respectively — those numbers have increased at least 20 percent since early May. “Everybody’s Katrina angst has re-emerged,” he says. “The level of frustration is very high — unless you’re fortunate enough to be one of the 300 or so fish-

09

MORE scuttlEbutt

Joan Mitchell in New Orleans

page 9

Mission: iT’s PossiBLE

Saturday, June 26, 12:30-7pm Photograph by Hans Namuth ©1991 Courtesy Center for Creative Photography, University of Arizona ©1991 Hans Namuth Estate

The Collaborative Process: From Joan Mitchell to Contemporary Artists Contemporary Arts Center, 900 Camp Street

An afternoon exploring artistic collaboration, beginning with a discussion of its relationship to Joan Mitchell’s work and followed by a conversation with artists who currently collaborate as part of their artistic process.

Joan Mitchell and Kenneth Tyler, 1991

12:30 - 3pm Panel: Working with Joan 3:30 - 6pm Panel: Working with Others 6:15 - 7pm Cocktail Reception This event is free and open to the public with RSVP. Please RSVP to info@cacno.org. Exhibitions organized in collaboration with the Joan Mitchell Foundation and Cheim & Read Gallery, New York.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > JUNE 22 > 2010

On view through June 27 Contemporary Arts Center, Newcomb Art Gallery & New Orleans Museum of Art

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FroM ‘PrincE’ To ‘chiEF’

Joan Mitchell in New Orleans. Three exhibitions bringing together the three major bodies of Joan Mitchell’s work: paintings, works on paper and prints. www.joanmitchellinneworleans.org The Art of Now

Contemporary Arts Center | 900 Camp St. New Orleans | Box Office 504.528.3800 | www.cacno.org

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    One of new NOPD Chief Ronal Serpas’  more  successful  ideas  in  Nashville  was  his  “Mission  One”  program  in  which  every  cop,  regardless  of  rank,  had  to  spend at least one weekend day a month  on patrol in a district or precinct. “It put  more people on the street,” Serpas told  Gambit  in  a  recent  interview.  “The  second  thing  it  did  is  it  started  to  break  down  these  barriers  that  create  themselves  in  very  stoic  organizations  like  Nashville was — not unlike New Orleans  was  in  the  ’80s,  where  you  had  this  almost mystic like Detective Bureau that  had very little to no interaction with the  officers in the field. So what Mission One  did is it brought those people together,  and  they  worked  together  one  day  a  month … me on down.” Serpas says the  program  also  gave  district  supervisors  flexibility  to  “test  drive”  rank-and-file  cops  in  different  assignments,  to  get  them  out  of  the  routine  of  responding  to  radio  calls  and  into  other  areas  of  police work.      So,  does  that  mean  Mission  One  will  come to New Orleans?     “I just don’t know how we’re all situated yet,” Serpas says. It will depend on  how NOPD is reorganized — “how many  people are going to be left at headquarters and how many are going to be able  to  be  bled  into  that  kind  of  a  process.”  — DuBos

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    Police  Chief  Ronal  Serpas  has  often  had to spell — and occasionally explain  — his first name, which looks and sounds  like a misspelling of “Ronald.” The chief’s  explanation: “The only thing I know is —  if it’s true — I was told that in 1939 when  my  father  was  born,  my  grandmother’  favorite  comic  book  was  Prince  Valiant.  And there was a Prince Ronal, R-O-N-A-L.  And supposedly she named him for that  name. And then my dad named me that  name  with  a  different  middle  name.  …  That’s  how  my  name  came.  And  I  get  to  argue  with  people  every  single  day.”  — DuBos

PoLL Dancing

    Louisiana voters think former President  George W. Bush  did  a  better  job  after  Hurricane Katrina than President Barack Obama has done so far with the Gulf oil  catastrophe.  That’s  the  conclusion  of  a  telephone survey taken over the June 12  weekend  by  Public  Policy  Polling  (PPP),  which found 50 percent of respondents  thought  Bush’s  response  was  stronger  than  Obama’s.  The  current  president’s  response to the BP debacle was favored  by 35 percent, and the rest were unsure.  (The poll was taken before Obama’s June  15 Oval Office speech on the oil crisis.)      There was little difference of opinion 

on the hot-button topic of offshore drilling, which was supported by 77 percent of those surveyed (only 11 percent were unsure). The numbers were similar when the question turned to long-term impact: 76 percent of respondents said the oil disaster will be more harmful for the state than was Hurricane Katrina. The PPP survey had mixed news for Gov. Bobby Jindal: 63 percent of respondents approved of his performance as governor — but only 34 percent wanted him to run for president in 2012. Lucky for Jindal, he keeps insisting he hasn’t got an eye on the White House. — Kevin Allman

DEAR JuAn (AnD JOE)

SEx, DRugS, ROck ’n’ ROll

There was a little something for everyone during this year’s legislative session, even for Ian Dury fans. Just consider the following: • Sex: As the session wound down last week, it seemed highly likely that legislation by Sen. J.P. Morrell, D-New Orleans, to level the prostitution playing field was going to pass. Current law defines solicitation for prostitution (chiefly vaginal intercourse) as a misdemeanor, while solicitation of a crime against nature (fellatio, cunnilingus, anal sex and bestiality) comes with a felony label. Senate Bill 381 makes them both a misdemeanor. During debate, supporters argued that johns would be encouraged to change their ways if given a second chance, while opponents countered that johns would indeed be encouraged — encouraged, that is, to seek out more prostitutes. • Drugs: Marijuana, synthetic and otherwise, carried the banner for illegal sub-

In nEED Of AIDE

If you work as a legislative assistant, Rep. Joe Harrison, R-Napoleonville, wants you to get a raise. He’s been trying, in fact, for three years. Harrison’s longtime argument has been that $21,000 a year isn’t enough to hire and keep experienced aides. That’s especially true now, he told the House and Governmental Affairs Committee in the final days of the session. In the wake of cuts lawmakers made this year and last, and then the BP oil debacle, Harrison says his district office has never been busier. “We’re fielding 1,500 to 1,600 calls a day because of the oil spill and seafood industry,” he says. “I’ve already lost two assistants and I’m trying to hang on to this one by paying them through my business.” Harrison’s House Resolution 154 would authorize lawmakers to use a portion of their unvouchered expense allowances to supplement the salaries of legislative assistants. In addition to their $16,800 annual salary and $143-a-day stipend during sessions and year-round committee meetings, lawmakers are given $6,000 a year to pay for office expenses. Before the committee gave Harrison’s revised resolution unanimous approval (the full House was expected to follow suit), Rep. Rosalind Jones, D-Monroe, attached an amendment to allow representatives to conduct performance reviews of House staffers. Under current law, only supervisors conduct such evaluations, and lawmakers have no say in the process. “We have over 100 staff members of the House that work for us and there’s no way for us to evaluate their performance,” Jones says. The amendment directs the Personnel Subcommittee of the House Executive Committee to devise a review process by Nov. 1. — Alford

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At state Rep. Cedric Richmond’s campaign kickoff for the congressional seat held by U.S. Rep. Anh “Joseph” Cao, Richmond seemed to be sending two messages, one direct and the other indirect. The direct message was aimed at Cao, whom Richmond assailed as part of “Sarah Palin’s Republican Party.” Richmond also led the crowd in a chorus of “Say it ain’t so, Joe!” on a variety of Cao’s votes, from health reform to the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009. Richmond’s secondary message at the event, held June 14 at the National World War II Museum, seemed directed at another challenger for the seat: fellow Democratic state Rep. Juan LaFonta. That message came in the form of a phalanx of state representatives that came in from Baton Rouge and stood together in the crowd to show their support. Among them: Reps. Austin Badon, Neil Abramson, Helena Moreno, Jared Brossett, Girod Jackson III, Walt Leger III, Charmaine Marchand Stiaes and Rosalind Jones. Emcee Virginia Boulet even joked that the room held enough state reps to form a quorum. — Allman

stances this session. Many already know that the lab-produced herbal stuff, known as Spice, Voodoo, Mojo and other names, is going to be outlawed. But there was also Senate Bill 576 by Sen. Dan Claitor, R-Baton Rouge, which creates a minimum fine of $250 for second offense possession of marijuana and mandates substance abuse treatment and community service. Claitor originally wanted a 48-hour mandatory jail sentence as well, but lawmakers on the House side told him to chill, dude. • Rock ’n’ roll: Senate Concurrent Resolution 112 by Sen. Sharon Weston Broome, D-Baton Rouge, was given swift passage for good reason. As adopted, it crowns the Louisiana Music Hall of Fame as the “official honors and recognition organization and information resource for Louisiana’s music, musicians and musical heritage.” That heritage, of course, includes a great many rock ’n’ rollers. — Jeremy Alford

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going to be living in a tent, in the middle of total devastation, and it was only 18 days,” he says. “At the end of 18 days I couldn’t leave.”) He opened the center in January 2007. It offers a food pantry, clothing bank, stress reduction services, a media lab and other services. Last week, the center hosted blood pressure and glucose screenings and referrals, a prenatal unit and a legal aid clinic. While some outside support has helped the center, Nabatoff says it’s still a struggle to keep operations moving forward with little room for administrative overhead — Nabatoff and development director Sharon Ober are “long-term volunteers,” he says. “It’s simply easier to hang in there than it would be to disengage, realizing there’s no other entity that can step up to the plate.” And the number of people seeking help only continues to rise. “In every bit of our infrastructure, our numbers are up, primarily due to the effects of this oil spill — families that haven’t had any income in five weeks, the rippling effect in the community and businesses,” Nabatoff says. “People are struggling.” The biggest challenge facing community members, Nabatoff says, is getting clear information from BP. “I’ve heard that the rate of reimbursement is different in east New Orleans for the Vietnamese community; and Lafitte, Grand Isle, St. Bernard and Plaquemines were all ... different,” Nabatoff says. “IT’S A TOuGH ONe,” SAyS JAcOB STrOmAN, shelter director of the Plaquemines Animal Welfare Society (PAWS), a nonprofit, no-kill animal shelter in Belle chasse. “People are in high alert and we’re expecting the worst. right now we’re just bracing ourselves.” Over the last few weeks, PAWS has found an increased number of pets tied to the shelter’s front doors overnight, waiting to be picked up by staff in the morning. callers ask to relinquish their pets. The shelter already has a waiting list “a mile long,” Stroman says, and there are only so many cages and staff members to take in pets without a home or family due to the economic halt from the oil disaster. The shelter is focusing on fundraising efforts to help pay for veterinary care for animals from families now on limited income. “We’re trying our hardest to ask for monetary donations so we can help people when they show up to turn in their pet because they can’t afford to treat for heartworms, or flea prevention, or anything they might need,” Stroman says. “In the past, we would help people, period. If it were something major, we would just take their pets in, care for them and hopefully get them a new place.” Pet food, however, is “showing up in droves,” Stroman says, thanks to dona-

tions from across the country. earlier this month, the Humane Society of the united States (HSuS) helped coordinate a pet food distribution day for Plaquemines residents. HSuS delivered 12.5 tons of dog and cat food to Belle chasse on June 3, and a distribution site opened June 5. The delivery included 24 pallets of dog and cat food, or about 24,604 pounds. Stroman says about 75 people attended, helping feed an estimated 300 animals. “Some came with birds, too, but we didn’t have food for them,” says HSuS Louisiana director Julia Breaux. While its state chapter (Humane Society of Louisiana) is busy monitoring marine life, HSuS is helping coordinate nationwide efforts and food drives to help feed pets in need along the Gulf. Breaux says HSuS will help transport animals from PAWS and the St. Bernard Animal Shelter to other shelters around the country with more room for the animals — mirroring similar pet evacuations following Hurricane Katrina. PAWS and HSuS are planning another food distribution event in the coming weeks. Plaquemines Parish President Billy Nungesser said in a statement, “We can’t forget our pets. … We don’t want people who are directly affected by this tragedy to have to choose between feeding their pets or feeding themselves.” JAyrOe uNderSTANdS THe PuBLIc’S helplessness and the “There’s nothing I can do” anxiety as oil pours into the coast. “We’re a little restless and anxious ourselves. Just like everyone else, we’re watching,” she says. “We’re concerned about the long-term impact on the economy and people’s jobs that rely on seafood. We feel that same level of anxiety.” With daily images of oiled marine life and pelicans huddled into pens, exhausted from thick coats of oil smothering their feathers, it’s hard not to jump online and apply to volunteer organizations. But there also is still work to be done on the home front. • PAWS is still accepting pet food and monetary donations to help keep its operations running and to help families keep their pets. Visit www.paws-4-life.org for details. • Community Center of St. Bernard seeks volunteers and donations of nonperishable food, clothing, hygiene supplies and baby care items. Find more information on its website www.ccstb.org. • Second Harvest needs donations of nonperishable food (which can be dropped off at its warehouse at 700 Edwards Ave.) and it needs volunteers and monetary donations — for $1, the group can provide for a family of four. Visit www.no-hunger.org for more information.

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plain, simple wooden stuff — the kind of furniture you see in the corners of old Van Gogh paintings. The elements of the hoi polloi. A little crooked, a little weary. A little bent, but not broken. Junk. It speaks to me. Some of the odd bits I find I use as canvases for artwork — another 40 bucks for Trombone Shorty! Some is just plain weird stuff that I hang on my fence outside, my decorating style being informed by Sanford & Son more than, say, Pottery Barn.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 22 > 2010

’ve been in this business long enough to know how editors work. So I know this column will have a headline or some other teaser that reads along the lines of: “Confessions of a Dumpster Diver.” (Editor’s note: Guess again, Rose.) Very postmodern. “Confessions of ... ” always arouses the prurient instincts of the public; it’s so HBO, so very ... Twitter. But, in this case, it would be erroneous. It would be erroneous because the word “confession” connotes some sort of shame or fault in the mind of the story teller. And I’ve been told I have no shame by folks who are experts on the subject. I am not ashamed of what I do. I sort through your trash. And I love it. Some folks knit. Some golf. Some go to garage sales. (Which is nothing but glorified — and overpriced — dumpster-diving, in my opinion.) Why pay for something when you can wait months and months for it to eventually show up on a curbside? Some folks do crosswords. Some are hunters. And me: I am a gatherer. The desk where I sit as I write this. The chair I sit in. The little metal table on wheels that holds my notes beside me: These things might have belonged to you — who knows? Maybe you sat in this chair. Maybe it gave you the muse like it does for me. (But then, of course, you wouldn’t have put it on a heap of trash on your curb, would you?) I wait for the day some visitor comes to my house and exclaims: That was my desk lamp! (Yep, the cool little kids’ desk light, made of wood, in the shape of an old-time cowboy. It’s adorable. All it needed was a decent lampshade. And a little love.) My house — it’s filled with Charlie Brown Christmas trees. Your mother never should have thrown out that lamp. And no, you can’t have it back. Maybe I do this because I am thrifty and crafty. Maybe it’s because I have a natural eye for aesthetics that normal folks are not blessed with. Maybe it’s the environmentalist in me. Then again, maybe it’s because I have spent much of my life living paycheck to paycheck, weighing the option of spending my last 40 bucks on a desk lamp — or cover charge and couple of Abitas at the Maple Leaf. Yes, it could be that. New Orleans is a dumpster diver’s paradise. Everything here is so old. Old and wooden. With seven layers of paint. What I search for is most often just

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 22 > 2010

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What Could Have Been After 85 dAys of lAte stArts, divisive politics And countless hours of debAte, one thing is cleAr: this wAs not how the 2010 legislAtive session wAs supposed to end.

T

tinue to rise. As horrific as the BP disaster is, there were still opportunities during the session that lawmakers wasted — opportunities that had little to do with the oil gusher. For example, this was supposed to be the year that lawmakers manned up on public records in Jindal’s office. But, for the third year in a row, they rolled over for the governor and killed bills that would have opened up one of the worst gubernatorial disclosure laws in the nation. Sen. Robert Adley, R-Benton, author of one of this year’s gubernatorial transparency bills, hopes to have the last laugh on that one, though. During the session’s final days, he attached an amendment to a House bill making all of the governor’s oil spill-related communications public record. Of course, Jindal can veto that measure (if it passes — the session doesn’t end until 6 p.m. June 21), so we’ll see who’s laughing by week’s end. Elsewhere, lawmakers lost control of the annual operating budget, thanks partly to the fact that it’s a complicated mess and partly to the overshadowing effect of the BP oil disaster. In the fiscal year that begins July 1, the state is expecting $1 billion less in revenues, and the following fiscal year should see another $2 billion decline. As bad as the future looks, the current fiscal year, which expires June 30, has proven to be a real problem — even though the Jindal administration said things were on track. With 10 days left in the legislative session, state officials concluded that the current year’s revenue projections were off by an additional $261 million. No elected officials saw that one coming, and no one had a contingency plan. Another irony: This was supposed to be the session in which Jindal’s Commission on Streamlining Government and House Speaker Tucker’s Post-secondary Education and Review Commission bore fruit. That basket of fruit never ripened. That’s too bad, because the economic and fiscal impact of the BP debacle will likely push future revenue shortfalls even higher, proving once again that Murphy’s Law not only remains in effect, but also that it is veto-proof and immune to repeal. Jeremy Alford can be reached at jeremy@jeremyalford.com.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 22 > 2010

he most important law adopted during this year’s annual legislative session generated no attention at all, probably because lawmakers failed to give it so much as a hearing. But it was adopted nonetheless — in a very big way — as the normal way of doing business. Better known as Murphy’s Law, the new “act” took hold on the session’s opening day in late March, as House members applied it to the speaker pro tem election — a normally uneventful contest. This year, instead of working things out quietly, the election was a public display of discord and dissent that caused several House members to lose key committee assignments — and a freshman representative to consider resigning. It also contributed to the defeat of a key bill by House Speaker Jim Tucker, R-Algiers, that would have created a single board for all of Louisiana’s four-year colleges. It soon became obvious that the 2010 regular session would require careful observance, for Murphy’s Law dictates that anything that can go wrong will go wrong. Starting with the opening-day debacle in the House, things really unraveled after the BP oil calamity in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20. Ironically, this year’s session was supposed to be a game changer for commercial shrimp harvesters and processors. After months of low dockside prices, Gov. Bobby Jindal got behind bills to create an official Louisiana Shrimp Task Force and to fund an annual seafood marketing and inspection program. Now, instead of celebrating, shrimpers are watching their industry die. While stock assessments aren’t showing major damage at present, no one expects that to last. “We’ve tested all the oyster beds and we’ve taken samples of finfish, crabs, shrimp,” says Dr. Jimmy Guidry, the state’s top medical officer. “We’ve also taken baseline samples before the oil even got here. Because what’s going to be critical moving forward, as we look at the chemicals in our seafood, is that we know where we started.” Truly, April 20 marks the date that Murphy’s Law dealt a catastrophic blow to the state and to the legislative session. Today, enough crude flows into the Gulf every 24 hours to fill an Olympic-sized swimming pool — and estimates con-

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Cultural Destroyers

I

t’s been interesting to watch Gov. Bobby Jindal rail against the federal government for not doing enough to contain, cap and clean up the BP oil gusher in the Gulf of Mexico. Jindal, a Republican and champion of smaller government, daily calls upon President Barack Obama and the feds to do more, more, more. Jindal makes a good argument for bigger government, albeit reluctantly — and he would never admit that bigger government is what he’s promoting. Still, one of the sharpest arrows in his rhetorical quiver is the claim (best articulated by Democratic consultant James Carville) that the BP debacle threatens not only our economy and our environment but also our way of life and an entire culture. He’s absolutely right on all counts. All of which presents another quandary for Jindal, whose executive budget as presented to lawmakers earlier this year does more long-term damage to “culture” across Louisiana than the BP disaster. I’m not exaggerating.

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utive budget, as submitted to lawmakers, will bring to the arts: • $3 million cut from arts and cultural organizations statewide, including grants and direct funding to arts and cultural organizations. That money helps sustain local symphonies, ballets, museums, theaters, festivals, arts councils and artists all over Louisiana. • $2 million cut from the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities, leaving LEH with zero state support. In past years, state funding has comprised up to 40 percent of LEH’s budget. LEH provides $4 million in grants and funds family and adult literacy programs, teacher professional development seminars, and many discussion programs. LEH also is the major source of documentary film funding in Louisiana and has pending $17 million in federal grant requests which will require a local match of 20 percent. All of that will be gone. • Over a two-year period, more than $410,000 in cuts to the Arts Council of New Orleans, which serves Orleans,

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 22 > 2010

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Consider, for example, the governor’s draconian cuts to higher education — more than $250 million over the past 18 months. No university has been spared. LSU, the state’s flagship, has announced it may shut down the T. Harry Williams Center for Oral History (Williams wrote the Pulitzer Prize-winning biography of Huey Long) and the United States Civil War Center. In addition, literary icons like LSU Press (publisher of the Pulitzer Prizewinning A Confederacy of Dunces) and the Southern Review (one of the nation’s most respected literary journals) have taken huge budget hits in the past year and a half. “We are truly in uncharted waters,” wrote LSU Chancellor Michael Martin. “There is no record in LSU’s history that compares to the financial conditions we now face.” Locally, UNO has been cut $14.5 million in the current fiscal year, and its future was uncertain going into the final days of the session. Consider also the cuts that Jindal’s exec-

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 22 > 2010

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 22 > 2010

hen Mayor Mitch Landrieu named Ronal Serpas police chief last month, critics wondered if a third-generation NOPD cop was the right person to clean house in the troubled department. Supporters, including Landrieu, pointed to Serpas’ steady — and rapid — rise through local and national law enforcement ranks, saying he had the potential to bring diverse experience and hometown knowledge to New Orleans police work. Serpas joined the NOPD in 1980, rising to deputy chief under former Chief Richard Pennington before leaving in 2001 to become chief of the Washington State Patrol. In 2004, he accepted the top-cop position in Nashville, a city with twice the population of New Orleans, a much larger footprint and fewer officers. In February, Serpas claimed crime in Nashville had fallen to its lowest point in 20 years, a figure at odds with FBI numbers. Known for his self-

neW oRleans PoliCe suPeRinTenDenT > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >

seRPas

19

COVER STORY confidence and love of statistics, Serpas argues that the FBI’s stat-gathering is less exact than the method used by his department. The new chief is also quick to call out the media as well as his own officers if he thinks they aren’t doing their jobs. Gambit sat down with Serpas June 14 in his fifth-floor office at NOPD headquarters. Neither side pulled any punches.

GAMBIT: Nashville Mayor Karl Dean is asking for an independent audit of your crime stats, saying there are questions as to their validity. The FBI numbers, according to news reports, show crime was actually up in Nashville in 2008. How do you explain that discrepancy? RONAL SERPAS: The Nashville Police Department was audited four times between 2004 and 2009, three times by the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation. The FBI audited the Nashville Police Department in 2007 as part of the audit of the TBI. … I’m glad Mayor Dean called for it because it will be the fifth audit in five years.

Given that you are so publicly affiliated with COMSTAT under Chief Pennington and given that many people, including Gambit, feel the numbers were somewhat cooked back then by downgrading a lot of unsolved felony incidents to misdemeanors, what can you say and what have you done so far to assure citizens that crime stats under your watch as chief will be more accurate than they were 10 to 15 years ago?

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 22 > 2010

G

20

A, I’m not willing to accept that they were inaccurate 10 to 15 years ago. B, what we’ve done in Nashville was created some very, very sophisticated auditing systems. … We called back 4,000 people in Nashville in five years. … We’re going to do the same thing here. We’ve actually already started working a program to do random callbacks, stratified by violent/nonviolent [crimes]. The Office of Inspector General graciously agreed to let his statistician create the package for us — how many people we have to call back by crime type. They have a meaningful, methodologically sound callback system that we’ll do here. I’ve got the final draft on my desk. We’re going to call back people and say, “Hi, this is so and so from Superintendent Serpas’ office. I have a police report in front of me. I would like to read you your victim statement.” And the question will be: “Is this what you said?” And that confirms it.

RS

WE WANT THE

COMMUNITY

TO REPORT MORE

CRIME TO US. ... I AM NOT

W A N T I N G THE COMMUNITY TO REPORT

LESS CRIME. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> But what about classifying the crimes? How will you make sure unsolved felonies aren’t simply downgraded to misdemeanors to make the stats look better?

G

You’re a journalist. You cannot tell me that every tip you get is what you write a story about. You have to use journalistic inquiry. You have to use collaboration. You have to use triangulation. Is it fair to say that when a news reporter gets a tip, oftentimes by the time they finish their investigation, that tip isn’t exactly what they end up writing about?

RS

G

Sure.

Do you think police reports are any different, rhetorically? Of course there’s going to be change, because if a police officer is an investigator, not simply a report writer, and the police officer says, “I was called by the dispatcher on the call of a burglary, and when I got there, I found out that it was a murder,” you would expect him to change the burglary to a murder, wouldn’t you? Well, if a police officer gets to the site of a theft and finds out it’s a burglary, why would we not want them to change the theft to a burglary?

RS

They’ve got it documented. It’s got to be approved by supervisors. So what I’m hoping we can establish with Gambit and all the media is no different than your journalism techniques. You start here; you may end up differently. You start here; you may end up exactly the same. But you have to document it in between. The other thing that you’ve got to do is recognize that we follow the rules of the [FBI’s] Uniform Crime Reports. We don’t create our own rules. … If you fast forward 15 years later, we have to do a lot of work with the public to explain these rules are not ours. Uniform crime reporting rules are theirs. They make us classify crimes in the categories that they want. And you’ll see a difference [between local and FBI figures]. Doesn’t necessarily mean people are cheating; it just means that different rules apply. I am not going to ever say to the community that we’re report writers and not police investigators. If a police officer investigates a crime and it’s not what was dispatched, would we rather believe the dispatcher talking to somebody on the phone, or would we rather believe the outcome of a police investigation? Because they may be different.

G

When Ronal Serpas was hired as chief, there were some who

said this is a guy who was part and parcel of COMSTAT. And COMSTAT created what was, on paper, a great program. But like any other human endeavor, it’s not perfect. There’s a pretty widely held view in the community among people who pay attention to these things that there was a lot of pressure on the district commanders to produce lower numbers. And one of the ways that the numbers got lowered was that crimes were downgraded from what they would normally have been before COMSTAT. Are we going to solve crime with a pencil and eraser, or are we going to solve crime by keeping bad people off somebody’s front porch? We’re going to solve crime by doing what’s ethically legal and professionally correct. What the police officers determine from their investigations is going to be the outcome of their work, and then there are auditing systems that are going on behind the scenes to ensure that what they said they did, they did. The thing that’s of interest, I hope, to the readers is, we have evolved quite a bit in the last 12, 14 years. And I would disagree with you on one thing. I think [former UNO pollster] Susan Howell’s independent polling data, which none of us had any control over, showed that people felt a whole lot less crime in New Orleans between 1994 and 2000. I’m not ready to walk away from that as you may be ready to walk away from that by saying crime was reduced by pencils. Obviously people felt different.

RS

One crime you can’t fudge is homicide. The police don’t classify that; the coroner does, and homicides got cut in half under Pennington.

G

I wish you would write more of that. … The crimes that most criminologists tend to watch — homicide’s one of them — but they also pay really close attention to burglaries and auto thefts, because over the last 40 years there’s always been an insurance component in those two crimes. People tend to report those two crimes a lot. … This is what we’re striving for: We want the community to report more crime to us. You can’t write that enough for me. I am not wanting the community to report less crime. The New Orleans Crime Coalition did a survey in August of 2009. Question Number 23: Were you or a member of your family the victim of a crime? Those who said yes to Question Number 23 were then asked Question 24: Did you report that to 911? Fifty-nine percent said they did. That meant some 40 percent didn’t.

RS

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

But in the ’90s, when the numbers went down, there was a perception that a lot of reports weren’t being filed.

G

 There’s thousands of reports a  year that get done right. And  that’s what we can’t lose sight of. What  about the thousands of times a day  they got it right? Are all those numbers  to be dismissed?

RS

G

No, but if there were a lot of incidents where cops, being

human, or lazy, or tired at the end of the day — or trying to keep the numbers down — didn’t write them up, then the numbers that you are getting are not right. And that’s on top of the 40 or 50 percent that didn’t call in, which skews the numbers even more.  Right. But … this is a human  enterprise. There’s a margin of  error. It’s going to happen every day. I  mean, Toyota can’t even get cars’  brakes to work right now. There’s a  margin of error.     The question is, is the margin of error  being monitored? Is it being trained  to? Is it being educated to? Is it being  disciplined against? There is a 4 percent  expected error. When the FBI comes  down and does their quality assurance  reports of police departments all across  America, they know they’re not going  to get 100 percent accuracy. They’re  looking for accuracy that’s statistically  significant to say we can have some  confidence in this.      I have come to learn — 15, 16 years  later — the more important tool is  independent surveying data that says  how people feel, because there you’re  going to get better information. I’m  more interested in what’s the [district  attorney’s] acceptance rates of these  cases. I’m interested in whether we are  making the best effort to get officers to  investigate crimes.

RS

What do we tell a reader who calls and says, “I called the police and I asked for a report, and I didn’t get a report done” — what are they supposed to do?

G

RS G

 Call us.

Call whom?

 Call the New Orleans Police  Department, nopdchief@cityofno.com. Call 658 5757. [When Gambit called this number, we were referred to  the old Public Integrity Bureau number:  658-6800.] That’s what we’re here for.  We have people who do that. We’re  doing callbacks on people scientifically  in a randomly stratified way so we can  try to get the best information. Certainly  if we have direct information, we want  to act on it.

RS

Let’s shift gears. The ACLU on June 8 called for First Amendment training at NOPD, citing what it says were at least 15 incidents in which people were stopped or arrested simply for observing or documenting police misconduct. What response, if any, have you given to the ACLU, and what specifically will you do to cops who stop or arrest people for documenting police misconduct?

G

RS

 I had a great relationship with  the ACLU in Washington State 

and in Nashville. But the ACLU made  that report and never sent it to me.  They sent it to you first, the media. So  I’m going to respond to it. The response  I found out already is that the police  officers receive First Amendment training while they’re in the academy to tell  them, “Look, you’re public creatures.  You’re a public official. The work that  you do is a public event.” So we’ll continue to exercise those trainings and  exercise those issues. I want to have a  positive relationship with the ACLU, just  like I did everywhere. 

But there is a definite perception that cops in New Orleans don’t like people taking pictures if they’re beating somebody up. There’s a feeling that if the Rodney King beating had happened in Orleans, that tape would not have survived. What will your policy be if you see evidence that cops took away somebody’s cell phone or somebody’s camera or somebody’s video camcorder at a scene where police might have been abusing somebody?

G

 They don’t have a right to do  that. They don’t have a right to  seize anybody’s property, especially as a  police officer, unless there’s a criminal  consequence. So if the person hasn’t  violated a criminal law and we took  their property, that’s against the law. 

RS

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 22 > 2010

    So I need the media to help get  the message out to the community.  Our (crime) maps are never going to  be accurate because people aren’t  reporting everything. Our strategies  of enforcement can’t be as accurate  as they could be if we had 100 percent  of the crime reports. I would rather be  on television tomorrow reporting a  100 percent increase in crime if I knew  every single crime committed had [been  reported]. I would welcome that opportunity.      So the idea that somehow or another  this chief or this administration would  want to reduce crime artificially stands  in the face of the fact that we ain’t getting it all���anyway. What is the logical  reason to reduce crime artificially when  we know that we’re about 50 percent  accurate to begin with? What would be  the logical reason to do that?

page 22

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page 21

YOU DON’T TURN IT AROUND

COVER STORY

BY THROWING

They don’t have a right to do that. The point for me is this: Officers are going to continually be trained and updated. … We are on the verge of instituting some policies here that are going to realign the department’s expectations of truthful behavior. It’s been very successful in other places, and we’re going to do it here.

EVERYBODY

JAIL.

IN

You’ve been up front about G implementing more traffic stops for minor infractions in Nashville. Do you intend to do likewise in New Orleans? I was very up front in Nashville about using vehicle stops as a tool to advance law enforcement, public safety and crime fighting. And it was very successful there. … Here in New Orleans, no less than 20 to 25 percent of all the murders committed in our city: how do you think they happened? Somebody was in their car, got out of their car with their gun, shot and killed somebody, got back in their car, and drove away. Or as they drove by in their car, they reached out the window and started shooting at people. Vehicle stops have been a part of American policing since we’ve had cars. So has warrant service. … Here’s the most important thing about vehicle stops, though: Six years in a row of fewer people going to the hospital after being in an automobile accident. If that’s not public safety, I’m not sure what is. Vehicle stops are just one of the many tools in the tool bag. It’s not the only one. Actually I prefer warrant service, to be honest with you.

YOU TURN IT AROUND BY THE

COMMUNITY

EXERCISING ITS OWN

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 22 > 2010

RS

22

You also increased DUI arrests in Nashville, and there were complaints of a quota system.

G

I don’t believe in quotas, and I’ve never asked for them, except [with] DUI — we ought to find everyone we can. Legal, professional pursuit of drunk drivers saves lives. Period. I don’t know anybody who can legitimately say they don’t believe that. … In some years, drunk drivers kill more than murderers. One of the problems I’ve always had with the media is creating this image of murder as the crime you should be afraid of — it could happen to you tomorrow. Well, the truth of American murder is it’s almost always someone who knew someone that they were mad as hell at. A drunk driver ought to have you shaking in your boots because that’s the stranger you never laid eyes on who will annihilate your family. I take drunk driving very seriously because [preventing] it saves

RS

CONTROL.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> lives. But it’s got to be legal; it’s got to be professional.

Nashville cops busted your G own son twice for DUI. How were those cases adjudicated?

RS

: He was found guilty. And he did time in jail.

Did any of that affect your own thinking about addiction and/or DUI?

G

Absolutely. He was addicted. He was horribly addicted. And his father’s a policeman, his stepmother’s a nurse, his mother’s a nurse, and his sister’s a nurse. He never acted out in front of us. When he got arrested the second time we all realized, “Wow, something’s going on here.” It’s one of the things that makes me a better police chief. I’ve had two members of my wife’s family killed by domestic violence, and my son was arrested for drunk driving twice. I used to read the data that talked about upwards of 24 to 25 percent of all drunk-driving arrests are people with alcohol problems who don’t know it yet. Now I understand it, because my son never demonstrated that behavior in front of his family. We’d have a crawfish boil; he might drink a beer. He never obliterated himself in front of us. So for us, the DUI arrest was what cleaned him up. He’s five years sober now with a

RS

1-year-old baby, married three years.

DA Leon Cannizzaro wants to move minor marijuana cases out of Criminal Court and prosecute them as ticketed misdemeanors. Do you support that idea?

G

Yeah, I am for it. … [It’s a] very efficient and effective way for most low level offenders who really aren’t going to get in trouble too many times. It gets them in the system. They get themselves held accountable. And you’re not sitting in the lockup for two or three hours. I support any use of police resources on an arrest decision that would keep them from having to go to lockup. This segues into an important point: We are not going to be the police department that tells neighborhoods what we think is important for their policing needs. That’s antithetical to community policing. Community policing is, you sit down with the neighborhood group and you say to them, “What is it that’s bothering you? Here’s what we think we can do to help. Here’s the various tools that we have.” What we have to do is be responsive to what their problem is and tailor our response to them so that we do the one thing that makes us all come together — when they feel comfortable and confident with us. … That’s how you turn crime around in a community. You don’t turn it around by

RS

throwing everybody in jail. You turn it around by the community exercising its own control. … That’s what it’s all about — community policing in a nutshell.

Some citizens who do not have faith in NOPD reacted poorly to your selection as chief. What can you tell them, as a third generation cop taking over the New Orleans Police Department, to convince them that you’re going to sweep out corruption and clean things up?

G

I think first and foremost, the 21 years I’ve spent here, I had a chance to be on the ground and see some of the best days of the NOPD — and some ugly days. I saw how the department could respond, and I saw how the department could change, and I saw how the public could respond. Secondly, I’ve been gone for nine years. In the nine years I’ve been gone, I have been the chief twice. I’m the most experienced police chief ever appointed in the history of New Orleans. When Richard [Pennington] came here, he had been a deputy chief. This was his first big job. You go down the line. I’m the first person to ever come here having actually been the chief twice, once in a state police agency and once in a major city twice the size of New Orleans in population. So I bring a whole different set of skills than what I left with. The other thing, yeah, I spent 21 years on the police department, but I spent all my life here. I went to public school here. I dropped out of public school here. I grew up behind the old ice house on Gentilly Boulevard. I know people in New Orleans. I know New Orleans. I’m not, like, coming from Berkeley, Calif., wouldn’t know where Louisiana was except on a map. So my message to the public is, what I’ve learned since I’ve been gone has advanced me a lot further than when I left.

RS

The cover up and guilty pleas in the Danziger Bridge case — and now the indictments in the [Henry] Glover case — confirm the worst fears of many black citizens that NOPD has a significant number of rogue cops who cover up for each other. How do you intend to gain the trust of the AfricanAmerican community, specifically?

G

Several things. One, working through everything we can do to assist the Department of Justice Criminal Division to clear out all these cases and take them to wherever they lead. If there’s anybody else left in this department who had anything to do

RS

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have to do those things. It doesn’t get you any further down the road, and it’s really kind of jejune and television policing. That’s not what this is about. So that’s through leadership and taking roll calls and showing up on scenes and then imposing some disciplinary practices that are rational and sound and based on integrity. For example, in the city of Nashville in the summer of 2004, we implemented a policy that if you’re untruthful in the workplace, you’re terminated — presumptive termination, no progressive discipline. We prevailed at the Tennessee Court of Appeals in January 2010 [after] we fired a police officer for being late and lying about it. That’s what we’re going to do here.

You were former chief G Richard Pennington’s righthand guy. Have you spoken to Chief Pennington since you took this job, and what advice, if any, has he given you? Oh, yeah. Richard and I have maintained a relationship over all these years. … I’ve talked to him since I’ve been here. His advice is the same that we’ve given each other or that we give other people: Keep your nose to the grindstone, keep your facts straight, keep your focus on service, and go to work. That’s what we do.

RS

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with those cases, we need to do everything humanly possible with [U.S. Attorney] Jim Letten and his office to root them out of this organization. There’s no room on this train for them. The second thing is openly embrace the Department of Justice intervention, which we have. Mayor Landrieu’s call for that was perfect, because the Department of Justice can help point out to the community things that the NOPD does well, things that the NOPD could do better, and things the NOPD should not be doing at all. And we will embrace every one of those recommendations. Working closely with the independent police monitor and OIG are two concrete things that weren’t here before. They are now. [Independent Police Monitor] Susan Hutson and I have a great relationship already started. And I’m going to do everything I can to work with her closely to make sure that, to use her words, she can help demystify the process. And we are not going to have any closed doors over here. The fourth thing is how we behave, how we go out there every day and reinforce in the minds of police officers through leadership that every single contact is an opportunity to make a supporter and a friend — every time we talk to anybody, even when we’re arresting them. You don’t have to call people out of their name. You don’t

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gone Clubbin’ ew Orleans Athletic Club (222 N. Rampart St., 525-2375,  www.neworleansathleticclub.com) member and former  club president Frank Rochefort has exercised at the  facility for 80 years, ever since being taught to swim in its pool by  his father at 5 years old. When he was a young man, the club was a  popular party spot, Rochefort says.     “We played a lot of cards, stayed in the (club’s) bar until two or  three in the morning,” Rochefort says.     Current New Orleans Athletic Club (NOAC) bar manager and  event coordinator Angela Haber now serves up protein drinks and  smoothies alongside a standard menu of libations. “My job is to  make sure the members are fortified with all sorts of goodies with  and without alcohol,” she says.     A member of the NOAC since 1996 and employee since 2002,  Haber says she fell in love with the club’s architecture, history and  friendly vibe.     “When I walked in the club, I knew immediately that I was going  to join. … I love the spaciousness and the personal touches. They  have done such a great job of preserving the history of the club —  the placards, trophies and photographs — all the special touches  that are very much a part of the club, they speak to me,” Haber says.     The four-story, 54,000-square-foot club is filled with memorabilia  that has accrued since its inception in 1872. Old trophies share space  with framed black-and-white photographs of burly, mustachioed  athletes. A melange of architectural styles (the newer, front section  features Corinthian columns and slate floors; the older, rear section’s  marble, wood and cast-iron detailing reveals a Spanish influence)  speak to the NOAC’s history and growth as it expanded from a modest backyard gym to occupy the better part of a city block.

N

shoppiNg News by by LeahaNise missY WiLkiNsoN hogaN The 54,000-squarefoot club features state-of-the-art equipment in a luxurious setting.     Over the years, the  NOAC has welcomed  luminaries such as Tennessee Williams, Clark  Gable, Huey, Earl and  Russell Long and Kareem  Abdul Jabbar. Recently,  celebrities like Jude Law,  Kate Hudson and Liv  Tyler have enjoyed the  club’s amenities, which  include a heated pool,  sauna, group exercise  classes ranging from  Spinning to yoga, free  weights, an indoor  track, a boxing ring  and racquetball courts.  The ballroom and pub can also be booked for private parties and  special events.     Despite its storied past and opulence, the club feels grand but   not imposing.     “Even though we are in a large building, it is warm and  comfortable and friendly here,” Haber says. “And that’s what I  remember feeling when I first walked in. I thought, ‘Wow, this  is wonderful.’”   

ISABELLA’S (3331 Severn Ave., Metairie, 779-3202; 1901 Manhattan Blvd., Harvey, 304-4861; www.isabellasgallery.com) offers sales on signature styles to give customers a head start on back-toschool savings. Shop early and receive 25 percent off newly retired Vera Bradley merchandise. Seasonal savings are in order at FRERET GARDEN CENTER AND LANDSCApING (5007 Freret St., 895-3022), where you can pre-order a Christmas tree with a down payment of $25. The garden center will also deliver and set up the tree at no added cost. When customers participate in the punch card program, they receive a $15 gift card for each $100 spent at the store. The freaks come out at night — and so do the bananas, when the “Go Bananas After Dark” tour comes to New Orleans. Monday, June 28, through Wednesday, June 30, Dole and BRENNAN’S RESTAURANT (417 Royal St., 525-9711; www.brennansneworleans.com) team up to feature new banana-centric dinner and dessert choices while revisiting classics like Brennan’s bananas Foster. From 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Thursday, June 24, the NEw ORLEANS CRAFT MAFIA (www.neworleanscraftmafia.com) celebrates its fifth birthday at THE FACTORY (8314 Oak St.; www.thefactorynola. com). The event features music, food, gift bags for the first 20 guests, free beer and free workshops on topics like T-shirt recycling and screen-printing.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 22 > 2010

>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << Music filM art stage events >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> what to know before you go << <<<<<<<<<< << 28 32 35 37 38 >> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << THE >> >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>> << <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> > << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< < J U N Pocahaunted with au Ras >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

41

au Ras and PePi GinsbeRG 10 p.m. Wednesday Circle Bar, 1032 St. Charles Ave., 588-2616

23

Taking It From the Streets

Just as L.A. duo Pocahaunted got its droning, peyote-drugged wheels off the ground, Bethany Cosentino parachuted in favor of the beached pop of Best Coast. Amanda Brown’s rethought group features a full band and a new, albeit hazy, focus on lo-fi funk. Au Ras Au Ras and Brooklynbased Park the Van artist Pepi Ginsberg open. Tickets $5.

after the efforts to save New orleaNs culture iN the wake of katriNa aNd bP disasters, will the city sileNce local musiciaNs?

Macbeth Thu.-Sat.; 1:30 p.m. 24 7:30 Sun.; through July 11 Tulane University, Dixon Hall, 8655106; www.neworleansshakespeare.com JUN

The New Orleans Shakespeare Festival has set recent productions in local settings. Here, the Scottish play, complete with witches, bloody fate and horror, is imagined as a production of an 1830s New Orleans theater. Tickets $15 previews (Thu.-Fri.), $30 general admission, $40 opening night (Sat.), pay what you will Sunday.

by matt davis & will coviello

E

Serpas released The TBC Brass Band gets ready a statement citto play on the corner of Bourbon ing “numerous and Canal streets after NOPD complaints from issued notices of enforcement of ordiances regulating street residents of the performances. French Quarter” about violations Photo by keviN allmaN of existing ordinances by street performers (as well as walking tours). That night, the TBC returned to Bourbon Street, huddled for a quick prayer and then began playing Bob Marley’s “Get Up, Stand Up.” Band members earn about $80 each on a typical night. But the group was unsure what course the night would take. “I wouldn’t mind getting arrested,” said Joseph Maize, who has played trombone with for the band since 2001. “You want to take me for doing the right thing, take me. I’m from the … projects, all the people I know doing the wrong thing, you all don’t take them, so why come take me? It makes me feel frustrated, like: What is your reason for doing this? It’s meaningless. Nobody’s life is in danger here, everybody’s having fun, socializing. But the people whose lives are in danger? You’re not right there.” Among the crowd of roughly 200 spectators were Jacques Morial, co-director of the Louisiana Justice Institute, and defense attorney Carol A. Kolinchak. “They’ll hire these same people to play at their inauguration events, but they punish them for playing in the same spots that got them to where they are,” Kolinchak said. A Facebook page set up in support of the musicians gathered more than 7,000 fans in less than 72 hours. The TBC returned to its regular spot on Thursday night, and friends of the band held signs that read “Keep our culture on the streets,” “Street musicians = an honest living.” “The police haven’t said anything to us yet,” said trombone player Edward “Juicey” Jackson III. “We’ll be out here for a while, if we can.”

tRinity PatRiotic Festival p.m.-6 p.m. Sunday 27 3Trinity Church, 1329 Jackson Ave., 670-2520; www.trinitynola.com JUN

Albinas Prizgintas (pictured), director of music ministries at Trinity Church, gets a jump on Independence Day celebrations with a Patriotic Festival featuring the Navy band of New Orleans playing music by John Philip Sousa. A roster of more than 100 performers includes the Pfister Sisters and the Crescent City Big Band, who will both showcase music from the 1940s and big band era. Free admission.

eaGles oF death Metal with KicK buttKiss 10 p.m. Monday One Eyed Jacks, 615 Toulouse St., 5698361; www.oneeyedjacks.net JUN

28

Cock rock doesn’t get much cockier than Eagles of Death Metal, whose chugging drums (courtesy of Queens of the Stone Age’s Josh Homme) and strutting style (courtesy of singer/guitarist Jesse Hughes’ John Holmes ’stache) beg to be blared from the busted woofers of a 1979 Camaro. The band teams with the selfmythologizing Kick Buttkiss to wish One Eyed Jacks owner Rio Hackford a ridiculously happy birthday. Tickets $20.

With its deep pockets and national reach as a Live Nation company, the House of Blues chain seems to recognize the value of a brand name. But By Will Coviello what’s up with the schedule of tribute bands? Led Zeppelin cover ensemble Zoso has been making regular stops at what has otherwise been a premier local venue (225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www.hob.com) for new and actually classic rock. Appetite for Destruction has brought its Guns N’ Roses schtick to the club, and this week it’s Misstallica (9 p.m. Saturday, June 26; tickets $12), an all-female Metallica tribute group.

Misstaken Identity

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > JUNE 22 > 2010

arly last week, NOPD began presenting musicians with a letter notifying them of looming enforcement of ordinances preventing street performances after 8 p.m. on public streets. Several bands continued to play, unsure what the repercussions would be, and as of press time, there were no known citations or arrests. Asked for comment about the new enforcement, Mayor Mitch Landrieu and City Council District C representative Kristin Gisleson Palmer issued vague statements about reviewing quality of life issues and the ordinances. (City Council president Arnie Fielkow and vice president Jackie Clarkson did not return Gambit’s calls.) But trombonist Glen David Andrews addressed the issue directly in a protest in Jackson Square on Friday afternoon. “We’re not going to have another musician getting a ticket,” Andrews said. “And if we get word, if I get word of any other musicians being harassed, we’re going to get Trombone Shorty, Lenny Kravitz, the Andrews, Rebirth [Brass Band], Dr. John, and we’re going to march on City Hall. “If you’ve got a problem with the Andrews next generation, all the next generation musicians coming up in New Orleans, then why don’t you just give ’em guns and crack and send them in the neighborhoods?” Andrews asked, before leading a second line around the square. “Cause that’s basically what you’re doing.” The TBC Brass Band usually plays on the corner of Bourbon and Canal streets from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. On June 15, NOPD officer Roger Jones notified the band that the city would begin enforcing existing ordinances prohibiting live music after 8 p.m. A copy of an open letter to musicians provided to Gambit cites section 30-1456 of municipal code prohibiting street music or entertainment between 8 p.m. and 6 a.m. on Bourbon Street. It also cited section 66-205, which disallows music on any public rightsof-way between 8 p.m. and 9 a.m. without a permit. In a videotape of police notifying the TBC of the new enforcement, the officer said enforcement would be citywide, including Jackson Square and Frenchmen Street, regular sites for street performances. On Wednesday, NOPD Superintendent Ronal

cuisine

27

>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << Music filM art stage events >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> what to know before you go << <<<<<<<<<< << 28 32 35 37 38 >> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << THE >> >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>> << <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> > << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< < J U N Pocahaunted with au Ras >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

41

au Ras and PePi GinsbeRG 10 p.m. Wednesday Circle Bar, 1032 St. Charles Ave., 588-2616

23

Taking It From the Streets

Just as L.A. duo Pocahaunted got its droning, peyote-drugged wheels off the ground, Bethany Cosentino parachuted in favor of the beached pop of Best Coast. Amanda Brown’s rethought group features a full band and a new, albeit hazy, focus on lo-fi funk. Au Ras Au Ras and Brooklynbased Park the Van artist Pepi Ginsberg open. Tickets $5.

after the efforts to save New orleaNs culture iN the wake of katriNa aNd bP disasters, will the city sileNce local musiciaNs?

Macbeth Thu.-Sat.; 1:30 p.m. 24 7:30 Sun.; through July 11 Tulane University, Dixon Hall, 8655106; www.neworleansshakespeare.com JUN

The New Orleans Shakespeare Festival has set recent productions in local settings. Here, the Scottish play, complete with witches, bloody fate and horror, is imagined as a production of an 1830s New Orleans theater. Tickets $15 previews (Thu.-Fri.), $30 general admission, $40 opening night (Sat.), pay what you will Sunday.

by matt davis & will coviello

E

Serpas released The TBC Brass Band gets ready a statement citto play on the corner of Bourbon ing “numerous and Canal streets after NOPD complaints from issued notices of enforcement of ordiances regulating street residents of the performances. French Quarter” about violations Photo by keviN allmaN of existing ordinances by street performers (as well as walking tours). That night, the TBC returned to Bourbon Street, huddled for a quick prayer and then began playing Bob Marley’s “Get Up, Stand Up.” Band members earn about $80 each on a typical night. But the group was unsure what course the night would take. “I wouldn’t mind getting arrested,” said Joseph Maize, who has played trombone with for the band since 2001. “You want to take me for doing the right thing, take me. I’m from the … projects, all the people I know doing the wrong thing, you all don’t take them, so why come take me? It makes me feel frustrated, like: What is your reason for doing this? It’s meaningless. Nobody’s life is in danger here, everybody’s having fun, socializing. But the people whose lives are in danger? You’re not right there.” Among the crowd of roughly 200 spectators were Jacques Morial, co-director of the Louisiana Justice Institute, and defense attorney Carol A. Kolinchak. “They’ll hire these same people to play at their inauguration events, but they punish them for playing in the same spots that got them to where they are,” Kolinchak said. A Facebook page set up in support of the musicians gathered more than 7,500 fans in less than 72 hours. The TBC returned to its regular spot on Thursday night, and friends of the band held signs that read “Keep our culture on the streets,” “Street musicians = an honest living.” “The police haven’t said anything to us yet,” said trombone player Edward “Juicey” Jackson III. “We’ll be out here for a while, if we can.”

tRinity PatRiotic Festival p.m.-6 p.m. Sunday 27 3Trinity Church, 1329 Jackson Ave., 670-2520; www.trinitynola.com JUN

Albinas Prizgintas (pictured), director of music ministries at Trinity Church, gets a jump on Independence Day celebrations with a Patriotic Festival featuring the Navy band of New Orleans playing music by John Philip Sousa. A roster of more than 100 performers includes the Pfister Sisters and the Crescent City Big Band, who will both showcase music from the 1940s and big band era. Free admission.

eaGles oF death Metal with KicK buttKiss 10 p.m. Monday One Eyed Jacks, 615 Toulouse St., 5698361; www.oneeyedjacks.net JUN

28

Cock rock doesn’t get much cockier than Eagles of Death Metal, whose chugging drums (courtesy of Queens of the Stone Age’s Josh Homme) and strutting style (courtesy of singer/guitarist Jesse Hughes’ John Holmes ’stache) beg to be blared from the busted woofers of a 1979 Camaro. The band teams with the selfmythologizing Kick Buttkiss to wish One Eyed Jacks owner Rio Hackford a ridiculously happy birthday. Tickets $20.

With its deep pockets and national reach as a Live Nation company, the House of Blues chain seems to recognize the value of a brand name. But By Will Coviello what’s up with the schedule of tribute bands? Led Zeppelin cover ensemble Zoso has been making regular stops at what has otherwise been a premier local venue (225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www.hob.com) for new and actually classic rock. Appetite for Destruction has brought its Guns N’ Roses schtick to the club, and this week it’s Misstallica (9 p.m. Saturday, June 26; tickets $12), an all-female Metallica tribute group.

Misstaken Identity

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 22 > 2010

arly last week, NOPD began presenting musicians with a letter notifying them of looming enforcement of ordinances preventing street performances after 8 p.m. on public streets. Several bands continued to play, unsure what the repercussions would be, and as of press time, there were no known citations or arrests. Asked for comment about the new enforcement, Mayor Mitch Landrieu and City Council District C representative Kristin Gisleson Palmer issued vague statements about reviewing quality of life issues and the ordinances. (City Council president Arnie Fielkow and vice president Jackie Clarkson did not return Gambit’s calls.) But trombonist Glen David Andrews addressed the issue directly in a protest in Jackson Square on Friday afternoon. “We’re not going to have another musician getting a ticket,” Andrews said. “And if we get word, if I get word of any other musicians being harassed, we’re going to get Trombone Shorty, Lenny Kravitz, the Andrews, Rebirth [Brass Band], Dr. John, and we’re going to march on City Hall. “If you’ve got a problem with the Andrews next generation, all the next generation musicians coming up in New Orleans, then why don’t you just give ’em guns and crack and send them in the neighborhoods?” Andrews asked, before leading a second line around the square. “Cause that’s basically what you’re doing.” The TBC Brass Band usually plays on the corner of Bourbon and Canal streets from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. On June 15, NOPD officer Roger Jones notified the band that the city would begin enforcing existing ordinances prohibiting live music after 8 p.m. A copy of the open letter to musicians provided to Gambit cites section 30-1456 of municipal code prohibiting street music or entertainment between 8 p.m. and 6 a.m. on Bourbon Street. It also cited section 66-205, which disallows music on any public rightsof-way between 8 p.m. and 9 a.m. without a permit. In a videotape of police notifying the TBC of the new enforcement, the officer said enforcement would be citywide, including Jackson Square and Frenchmen Street, regular sites for street performances. On Wednesday, NOPD Superintendent Ronal

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bonaparte pais

on the record

second thoughts HealTH releases iTs secOnd seT OF remixed sOngs On discO2. ealth, the L.A. noise band, lives in two distinct dimensions. There is the quartet itself, whose two LPs — 2007’s punishing eponymous debut and the (slightly) more toned 2009 follow-up Get Color — are paeans to the imposing primitivism of rock ’n’ roll. But there is a second, parallel Health — an autonomous hive-mind proxy that has less to do with the music’s original vision than with others’ views of it. On Tuesday, Lovepump United Records will release Disco2, Health’s second remix collection. The original Disco, which appeared eight months after its source material, featured tracks from the band’s first album re-imagined as electronic dance pieces by diverse collaborators including Toronto’s Crystal Castles, Denver’s Pictureplane and Vancouver’s CFCF. Those artists all return for Disco2, another shadow album that casts Health’s compositions in a whole new light. “That definitely happens every time we get a good remix,” says singer/guitarist Jake Duzsik. “They’re working within our sound palette, augmenting the structures that we came up with or using the vocals in ways that maybe you wouldn’t have thought of — something that works more emotionally, something that’s more gratifying. Certainly the first remix record allowed us to see ways that we could potentially write songs within the way we already utilize sound, but make them more danceably rhythmic or more catchy.” Nowhere is the contrast more stark than on “Crimewave,” the first song to get the Frankenstein treatment. Originally a two-minute slab of stabbing synths and guitars set to tribal, war-chant drums, the track in Crystal Castles’ hands became a haunting slice of minor-key laptop pop. It also became a minor phenomenon, spawning a split 7-inch single (“Crystal Castles vs. Health”) and an unsolicited, remixed remix by Bearded Baby (included as a bonus track on Disco). “I remember when [Crystal Castles] first emailed it to us, we were like, ‘Oh, this could be a hit,’” Duzsik says. “We really love [Bearded Baby’s] remix too.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 22 > 2010

H

JUN

25

them over some- Health is making thing they already the most out of how others had. There’s not envision its songs. a lot of passion or PHoto by time that goes into Renata RaksHa it. Whereas if you find someone who maybe has never done a remix before, they’ll really put a lot of time into it.” The intriguing Disco2 contains downtempo offerings by established acts like English tourmate Gold Panda and unknowns like Little Loud, another U.K. artist Health found by accident. “We had a friend who was like, ‘You should check out this MySpace page,’” Duzsik says. “No one knows who he is. We had him do a remix and it was really good.” The album begins with the lone original cut, a new electro-pop single titled “USA Boys” that’s the catchiest and most straightforward thing Health has done. It’s a direct influence of the Disco experiments, Duzsik says — in a way, Health remixing Health. “We did that specifically because we knew what kind of record the remix record was. At the time we were able to mix with (producer) Alan Moulder — who worked with My Bloody Valentine, Depeche Mode, Smashing Pumpkins, Nine Inch Nails — and mix it at a really nice studio, Trent Reznor’s (Beverly Hills) house. So that song sounds like it was mixed like a big pop song. We wanted to see what that would sound like.”

HeaLtH WitH GoLD panDa, inDian JeWeLrY anD sMiLeY WitH a KniFe 10 p.m. Friday One eyed Jacks, 615 TOulOuse sT., 569-8361; www.OneeyedJacks.neT TickeTs $10

28

That was unbeknownst to us. … It might be a controversial thing to say, but a lot of big remixers don’t really try very hard, because they don’t have to. A label contacts them, they arrange with their manager how much money they’re going to get them and they take your tracks and drop

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BeAch house â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Candy RiedlLowe, 7

Blue nile â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ed Barrett Trio, 10

Bmc â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Fun in the Pocket feat. Mayumi Shara & Reinaldo, 6:30; Bo Dollis Jr. & the Wild Magnolias, 10 cAfe negril â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Glen David Andrews, 9:30

chickie wAh wAh â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Anders Osborne, John Fohl & Johnny Sansone, 8 circle BAr â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tom Paines, 6; Stampede, Riot Scene, 10 columns hotel â&#x20AC;&#x201D; John Rankin & Friends, 8 d.B.A. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; New Orleans Cottonmouth Kings, 9

dos Jefes uptown cigAr BAr â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tom Hook, 9:30 the fAmous door â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

funky pirAte â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30

hostel new orleAns â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Soul School feat. Elliot Luv & the Abney Effect, 8 howlinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; wolf (the den) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Big Busk: A Night of Street Performers, Dirty Bourbon River Show, 9 irvin mAyfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s JAzz plAyhouse â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jason Marsalis, 8

lAfitteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s BlAcksmith shop â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mike Hood, 9

24

The Thing with Joe McPhee, Tatsuya Nakatani and Donald Miller 8 p.m. Thursday Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com

tropicAl isle BAyou cluB â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Hardly Play Boys, 5 tropicAl isle BourBon â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Frank Fairbanks, 5; Damien Louviere, 9 tropicAl isle originAl â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Plan B, 5; Cruz Missiles, 9

windsor court hotel (polo cluB lounge) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Zaza, 7 yuki izAkAyA â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Norbert Slama Trio, 8

wednesday 23

Matter, Gravity A, 10

Bmc â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Domenic, 7; Benny Turner & Real Blues, 9:30 cAfe negril â&#x20AC;&#x201D; World Jazz Project, 9:30 cAndlelight lounge â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Treme Brass Band, 9

circle BAr â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jim O. & the No Shows feat. Mama Go-Go, 6; Pocahaunted, Au Ras Au Ras, 10 columns hotel â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ricardo Crespo, 8

61 Blues highwAy â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Blues Highway Jam, 8

my BAr â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Danny T, 8

BAnks street BAr â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Bionica, 10

d.B.A. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Tom Paines, 7; Walter â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wolfmanâ&#x20AC;? Washington & the Roadmasters, 10

BAyou pArk BAr â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Lynn Drury & Friends, 10

dos Jefes uptown cigAr BAr â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Bob Andrews, 9:30

Big Alâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sAloon â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jumpinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Johnny Sansone Blues Party, 7

funky pirAte â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30

old point BAr â&#x20AC;&#x201D; West Bank Mike, 6:30

preservAtion hAll â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Preservation Hall-Stars feat. Shannon Powell, 8 rock â&#x20AC;&#x2122;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Bowl â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Little Freddie King, 8:30

snug hArBor JAzz Bistro â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Clarence Johnson III Trio, 8 & 10

spotted cAt â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Casual Baby, 4; Jerry Jumonville, 6; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 10

BAcchAnAl â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jazz Lab feat. Jesse Morrow, 7:30

the BAr â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Nightshade, Blood of the Prophets, Machine Made Slave, 9

deckBAr & grille â&#x20AC;&#x201D; John Lisi & Delta Funk, 8; Dr. Porkchop Blues Band, 10

BeAch house â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Poppa Stoppa Oldies Band, 8

the fAmous door â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

Blue nile â&#x20AC;&#x201D; United Postal Project, 8; Khris Royal & Dark

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 22 > 2010

gennAroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Harvey Jesus & Fire, 8

JUN

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MON

tuesday 22

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WED

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All show times p.m. unless otherwise noted.

Scandinavian free-jazz trio the Thing performs in matching Rubyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s BBQ T-shirts and pals around with rock giants Thurston Moore and Jim Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Rourke. So it shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have been much of a shock that the band opened its 2009 double LP Bag It! (Smalltown Superjazzz) with combustible covers of international punks the Ex (Netherlands) and 54 Nude Honeys (Japan) and closed it with a half-hour improv titled â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beef Brisket (For Rubyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s).â&#x20AC;? Or that it hired power producer Steve Albini to man the boards. (That Albini said yes is another matter.) Closing out the Big Topâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sound-Circus concert series, the Thing â&#x20AC;&#x201D; saxophonist Mats Gustafsson, bassist Ingebrigt HĂĽker Flaten, and drummer Paal Nilssen-Love, with special guest sax sensei Joe McPhee â&#x20AC;&#x201D; is currently in the middle of its â&#x20AC;&#x153;Smoked Meat & BBQ Tour,â&#x20AC;? a saucy jaunt through the South in which stops center around dry-rub menus and set lists are peppered with discombobulated takes on James â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bloodâ&#x20AC;? Ulmer and Lightning Bolt. Someone tell the Joint to pull more pork. Japanese percussionist Tatsuya Nakatani and New Orleans guitarist Donald Miller open. Tickets $20 general admission, $15 students and 3RCP members. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Noah Bonaparte Pais

CHARMAINE NEVILLE BAND

FRI

Swedish Meatballs

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

21 TUE 22 WED 23 THU 24 FRI 25 SAT 26 SUN 27 MON

preview

SAT

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly. com; FAX:483-3116

SAVIN

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music

Listings

Masakowski, 5; Irvin Mayfield’s NOJO Jam, 8

Kerry IrIsh Pub — Chip Wilson, 9 LIttLe troPIcaL IsLe — Frank Fairbanks, 4:30; Frank Fairbanks Duo, 9

MaPLe Leaf bar — Uncle Lucius, 10 Mojo statIon — Ed Wills, Blues for Sale, 8 nowe MIasto — Drooling Slits, Vapo-Rats, Necro Hippies, 7

oLd fIreMen’s haLL — Two Piece & a Biscuit feat. Brandon Foret, Allan Maxwell & Brian Melancon, 7:30 oLd PoInt bar — Mike Burkart, 8 one eyed jacKs — Dead Meadow, PonyKiller, 9

PaLM court jazz cafe — Lars Edegran, Topsy Chapman, Palm Court Jazz Band, 8

rocK ’n’ bowL — Jerry Embree, 8:30 rusty naIL — Jenn Howard, 8

snug harbor jazz bIstro — Delfeayo Marsalis & Uptown Jazz Orchestra, 8 & 10

sPotted cat — Loose Marbles, 6; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10 troPIcaL IsLe bayou cLub — Can’t Hardly Play Boys, 5; T’Canaille, 9

troPIcaL IsLe bourbon — Damien Louvier; Jason Bishop & the Garlic Truck Band, 9 troPIcaL IsLe orIgInaL — Plan B, 5; Late As Usual, 9 wIndsor court hoteL (PoLo cLub Lounge) — Zaza, 7 yuKI IzaKaya — By and By, 8

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 22 > 2010

thursday 24

30

3 rIng cIrcus’ the bIg toP gaLLery — The Thing, Joe McPhee, Tatsuya Nakatani, Donald Miller, Rob Cambre Trio, 8 aLLways Lounge — Shirks, Lovey Dovies, Kicktease, 10

bacchanaL — Courtyard Kings, 7; Vincent Marini, 9:30 banKs street bar — Dave Friends & Friends Acoustic, 9 bayou ParK bar — Ron Hotstream, 9

beach house — Beach House All-Stars, 8 bIg aL’s saLoon — Danny Alexander’s Blues Jam, 8

bMc — Low-Stress Quintet, 7; Jamey St. Pierre & the Honeycreepers, 10

booMtown casIno — Groovy 7, 8:30

carouseL PIano bar & Lounge — John Autin, 9 chIcKIe wah wah — Geraniums, 8

cIrcLe bar — Sam and Boone, 6; Shapiro, Vox & The Hound, 10 cLever wIne bar — Johnny

Sansone’s Mid-City Fill-In & Harmonica Orchestra, 6

coLuMns hoteL — Freddy Omar, 8

davenPort Lounge — Jeremy Davenport, 5:30 d.b.a. — Luke Winslow King, 7; Ernie Vincent & the Top Notes, 10

dos jefes uPtown cIgar bar — Loren Pickford, 9:30 french Quarter PIzzerIa — Big Joe Kennedy, 9

funKy PIrate — Mark Penton, 4; Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30

hI-ho Lounge — Stooges Brass Band, 10

howLIn’ woLf northshore — Black Magnolia, 10

IrvIn MayfIeLd’s jazz PLayhouse — Roman Skakun, 5; Johnaye Kendrick, 8 jIMMy buffett’s MargarItavILLe cafe — Eddie Parrino, 7

Kerry IrIsh Pub — Wilson & Moore CD release, 9

LafItte’s bLacKsMIth shoP — Mike Hood, 9 Le bon teMPs rouLe — Soul Rebels Brass Band, 10

LIttLe troPIcaL IsLe — Al Hebert, 4:30; Frank Fairbanks Duo, 9 MaPLe Leaf bar — The Trio, 10 MIMI’s In the MarIgny — St. Louis Slim Trio, 10

oLd PoInt bar — Andre Bouvier & the Royal Bohemians, 9 PaLM court jazz cafe — Tim Laughlin, Crescent City Joymakers, 8 PreservatIon haLL — New Birth Brass Band, 8 rocK ’n’ bowL — Jeffrey Broussard & the Creole Cowboys, 8:30

saturn bar — Happy Talk Band, Felix, 10 snug harbor jazz bIstro — Kim Prevost & Bill Solley Duo, 8 & 10 sPotted cat — Casual Baby, 4; Miss Sophie Lee, 6; New Orleans Moonshiners, 10

troPIcaL IsLe bayou cLub — Can’t Hardly Play Boys, 5; T’Canaille, 9

troPIcaL IsLe bourbon — Mark Barrett, 4; Debbie & the Deacons, 9 troPIcaL IsLe orIgInaL — Plan B, 5

vaughan’s — Kermit Ruffins & Barbecue Swingers, 8:30

andrea’s caPrI bLu Lounge — Philip Melancon, 7 banKs street bar — Lucky Book, Cape of the Matador, Pests, 10 bayou ParK bar — Crystal Rivers, 10

beach house — Bobby Cure & the Summertime Blues, 9 bIg aL’s saLoon — Brandon Foret Band, 8

bLue nILe — Mykia Jovan & Jason Butler, 7; Local Skank CD release, 10; Abney Effect, 10 bMc — Sasha Masakowski, 7; Mark Pentone & Smoky Greenwell Trio, 9; Fredy Omar Con Su Banda, 10:30; We Are 1 Brass Band, 1 a.m. boMbay cLub — Lisa Lynn, 9:30

booMtown casIno — Junior & Sumtin Sneaky, 9:30 cafe negrIL — Jamey St. Pierre & the Honeycreepers, 7

carouseL PIano bar & Lounge — John Autin, 9 carroLLton statIon — Jeff & Vida, 9:30

chIcKIe wah wah — Kelcy Mae, 5:30; Skeet Hanks & the Crescent City 615, 10:30

cIrcLe bar — Jim O. & Sporadic Fanatics, 6; Gal Holiday & the Honky Tonk Revue, 10 cLever wIne bar — Courtyard Kings, 8 coLuMns hoteL — Alex Bachari, 5

davenPort Lounge — Jeremy Davenport, 9

d.b.a. — Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 6; Lost Bayou Ramblers, 10 dos jefes uPtown cIgar bar — Eric Traub Trio, 10 eMerIL’s deLMonIco — Bob Andrews, 7

french Quarter PIzzerIa — Big Joe Kennedy, 9

funKy PIrate — Mark Penton, 4; Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30 green rooM — 24 Miles, Touching the Absolute, 10 herMes bar — Glen David Andrews, 9:30 & 11

howLIn’ woLf northshore — Herrington, Happy Jack Fequency, Finding Zuko, 9 howLIn’ woLf (the den) — Jimmy Robinson, Russ Broussard, 9

IrvIn MayfIeLd’s jazz PLayhouse — Joe Krown, 5; Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown, 8

wIndsor court hoteL (PoLo cLub Lounge) — Michael Pellera, 7

jIMMy buffett’s MargarItavILLe cafe — Eddie Parrino, 7

friday 25

Le bon teMPs rouLe — Dave Reis, 7; Wild Magnolias, 10

yuKI IzaKaya — Wazozo, 8

3 rIng cIrcus’ the bIg toP gaLLery — No No Nonet, 8

61 bLues hIghway — Jack Yoder & Li’l G, 8

Kerry IrIsh Pub — Damien Louvier, 5; Foot & Friends, 9

LIttLe troPIcaL IsLe — Dwight Breland, 4:30; Frank Fairbanks Duo, 9 MaIson 508 — Some Like it Hot!, 7:30

MaPLe Leaf bar — Bonerama, 10 MarKet cafe — Andy K. and Bobby Love, 4:30 oLd PoInt bar — Wilson & Moore CD release, 9:30

oLIve branch cafe — Jack Yoder, Greg “Lil G” Rosary, 6 one eyed jacKs — HEALTH, Gold Panda, Indian Jewelry, Smiley with a Knife, 9

PaLM court jazz cafe — Palm Court Jazz Band, Gerald Adams, 8

PreservatIon haLL — Preservation Hall Jazz Masters feat. Steve Pistorius, 8

rePubLIc new orLeans — SOLE Fresh, 10 rocK ’n’ bowL — Honey Island Swamp Band, 9:30 rusty naIL — Kirk Holder, 10

snug harbor jazz bIstro — Ellis Marsalis Trio, 8 & 10

cafe negrIL — Jamey St. Pierre & the Honeycreepers, 7; Smoky Greenwell & the Blues Gnus, 10 cafe rose nIcaud — Troy Sawyer, 8

PreservatIon haLL — Preservation Hall Jazz Band feat. William Smith, 8

chIcKIe wah wah — Earphunk, 10

rocK ’n’ bowL — Wise Guys, 9:30

coach’s corner — Savin’ Face, 10

rusty naIL — Wilson & Moore, 10

carroLLton statIon — Lucy’s Walk, 9:30

rItz-carLton — Catherine Anderson, 1

cIrcLe bar — Jazzholes, 6; Sick Like Sinatra, 10

the rugby Pub — Michael Liuzza, 8:30

coLuMns hoteL — Andy Rogers & guest, 8

snug harbor jazz bIstro — Deacon John & the Ivories, 8 & 10

davenPort Lounge — Jeremy Davenport, 9 d.b.a. — John Boutte, 8; SUPLECS, 11

decKbar & grILLe — Miche & MixMavens, 8

dos jefes uPtown cIgar bar — Swing Cats’ Ball feat. Tom Hook, 10

tIPItIna’s — New Orleans Bingo! Show, 10

french Quarter PIzzerIa — Big Joe Kennedy, 9

st. roch tavern — The Way, 9

eMerIL’s deLMonIco — Bob Andrews, 7

toMMy’s wIne bar — Tommy’s Latin Jazz Quartet feat. Matthew Shilling, 10

funKy PIrate — Mark Penton, 4; Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30

troPIcaL IsLe bourbon — Captain Leo, 1; Mark Barrett; Debbie & the Deacons, 9

troPIcaL IsLe orIgInaL — Plan B, 1; Cruz Missiles, 5; Late As Usual, 9

voILà — Mario Abney Quartet, 5 wIndsor court hoteL (PoLo cLub Lounge) — Michael Pellera, 7; Anais St. John, Harry Mayronne Trio, 9

saturday 26 61 bLues hIghway — Soul Blues Players, 8 aPPLe barreL — Peter Orr, 7

austIn’s restaurant — Scott Kyser, 6:30 bacchanaL — Gypsy Swing Club, 8

bayou beer garden — Hawaii 504, 7 bayou ParK bar — Terranova, Makeshift Love, Split Lips, 10 bLue nILe — St. Louis Slim Trio, 7; Kermit Ruffins & the BBQ Swingers, 10

bMc — New Orleans Jazz Series, 3; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 6:30; Chegadao, 9:30; One Mind Brass Band, 12:30 a.m. boMbay cLub — Tim Laughlin, 9:30 booMtown casIno — Louisiana’s LeRoux, 9:30

cafe atchafaLaya — Atchafalaya All Stars, 11 a.m.

PaLM court jazz cafe — Lionel Ferbos, Palm Court Jazz Band, 8

carouseL PIano bar & Lounge — John Autin, 9

sPotted cat — Casual Baby, 4; Jumbo Shrimp, 6; St. Louis Slim Trio, 6:30; New Orleans Cottonmouth Kings, 10

troPIcaL IsLe bayou cLub — Can’t Hardly Play Boys, 1; Can’t Hardly Play Boys, 5; Danny T & the Blue Crawfish Band, 9

one eyed jacKs — Dax Riggs, Bipolaroid, 9

green rooM — For Karma, Five Star Fiasco, 10 herMes bar — Sasha Masakowski, 9:30 & 11

hI-ho Lounge — Debauche, 10 house of bLues — Chee Weez feat. No Exit, 9 house of bLues (ParIsh) — Misstallica, 9

howLIn’ woLf — Touching the Absolute, City Below, 24 Miles, 9 IrvIn MayfIeLd’s jazz PLayhouse — Shannon Powell, 8; Hot 8 Brass Band, midnight

jasMIne’s french restaurant — Darren and Diana, 9 jIMMy buffett’s MargarItavILLe cafe — Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 4

Kerry IrIsh Pub — Tobin -Specht Trio feat. Heidi Campbell, 5; Rites Of Passage, 9 LafItte’s bLacKsMIth shoP — Mike Hood, 9

Le bon teMPs rouLe — Juice, 10 LIttLe troPIcaL IsLe — Jason Bishop, 4:30; Frank Fairbanks Duo, 9 LouIsIana MusIc factory — Andrew Duhon, 2; Bamboula 2000, 3; Tom Paines, 4 MaPLe Leaf bar — Colonel Bruce Hampton & the Quark Alliance, 10

sPotted cat — Luke WinslowKing, 3; Panorama Jazz Band, 6; Dominic Grillo & the Frenchmen Street All-Stars, 10 tIPItIna’s — Vidacovich B-day Bash feat. Johnny & Stanton’s New Thing, 10

toMMy’s wIne bar — Tommy’s Latin Jazz Quartet feat. Matthew Shilling, 10 troPIcaL IsLe bayou cLub — Can’t Hardly Play Boys, 5; Danny T & the Blue Crawfish Band, 9

troPIcaL IsLe bourbon — Captain Leo, 1; Mark Barret, 5; Debbie & the Deacons, 9 troPIcaL IsLe orIgInaL — Butch Fields Band, 1; Cruz Missiles, 5; Late As Usual, 9

twIst of LIMe — Dirt: Alice in Chains tribute band, 10 uno LaKefront arena — Sting, 6

wIndsor court hoteL (PoLo cLub Lounge) — Michael Pellera, 7; Anais St. John & the Harry Mayronne Trio, 9

sunday 27 3 rIng cIrcus’ the bIg toP gaLLery — Universe, Small Bones, 6; Helen Gillet’s Cello Sandwich, Kim Boekbinder & Friends, 9

arnaud’s jazz bIstro — Gumbo Trio, 10:30 a.m & 6:30 banKs street bar — Ruby & Stevie, 9

the bar — Nominon, Infinitum Obscure, Quinta Essentia, Serpentis, 9 bayou ParK bar — SoulSect, 7

bIg aL’s saLoon — Jay B. Elston Band, 3 bMc — Ras Chemash Lamed, 6; Gal Holiday, 9; George Sartin & Jack Cruz Project, midnight

buffa’s Lounge — Some Like it Hot, 11 a.m. cafe atchafaLaya — Sam and Boone, 11 a.m.

MarKet cafe — Andy K. and Bobby Love, 4:30

cafe negrIL — Smoky Greenwell & the Blues Gnus, 10

oLd PoInt bar — Johnny J & the Hit-Men, 9:30

cIrcLe bar — Micah McKee & friends, 6; Mousefire, John

MuLate’s cajun restaurant — Bayou DeVille, 7

cafe ranI — Courtyard Kings, 11 a.m.

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

Elliott, 10

Court of two SiSterS — Mary Flynn, 9:30 a.m.

d.b.a. — Palmetto Bug Stompers, 6; Mas Mamones, 11 donna’S bar & Grill — Jesse McBride & the Next Generation Jazz Band

finneGan’S eaSy — Laissez Faire, 2

funky Pirate — Mark Penton, 4; Willie Lockett & All Purpose Blues Band, 8

HouSe of blueS — Leo Jackson & the Melody Clouds, 10 a.m. Howlin’ wolf (tHe den) — Hot 8 Brass Band, 9

irvin Mayfield’S Jazz PlayHouSe — Mason’s VIP Revisited feat. Germaine Bazzle & guests, 7

JiMMy buffett’S MarGaritaville Cafe — Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 4 kerry iriSH Pub — Damien Louvier, 9 little troPiCal iSle — Jason Bishop, 4:30; Lacy Blackledge, 9 MadiGan’S — Anderson/ Easley Project, 9

MaPle leaf bar — Joe Krown Trio feat. Russell Batiste & Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 10 Market Cafe — Andy K. and Bobby Love, 4:30

Mulate’S CaJun reStaurant — Bayou DeVille, 7

wHiSkey dix — Gypsy Elise & the Royal Blues, 7

windSor Court Hotel (Polo Club lounGe) — Zaza, 7

yuki izakaya — Luke Winslow King, 7

Monday 28 aPPle barrel — Sam Cammarata, 8

baCCHanal — Jonathan Freilich, 7:30

SnuG Harbor Jazz biStro — Aashish Khan & Shringar, 8 & 10 SPotted Cat — Rights of Swing, 3; Loose Marbles, 6; Pat Casey, 10

tiPitina’S — Bruce Daigrepont, 5:30 troPiCal iSle bayou Club — Creole Zydeco Farmers, 1; Can’t Hardly Play Boys, 5; T’Canaille, 9

troPiCal iSle bourbon — Mark Barrett; Debbie & the Deacons, 9

troPiCal iSle oriGinal — Butch Fields Band, 1; Rhythm & Rain, 5; Late As Usual, 9

voilà — Mario Abney Quartet, 9 a.m.

windSor Court Hotel (Polo Club lounGe) — Zaza, 7

Cafe atCHafalaya — Burke Ingraffia, Dr. Danny Acosta, 7 CHiCkie waH waH — Spencer Bohren, 7 CirCle bar — PD Wilder, Summer of Glaciers, 10

ColuMnS Hotel — David Doucet, 8

d.b.a. — Glen David Andrews, 9 donna’S bar & Grill — Les Getrex & the Blues All-Star Band, 9

doS JefeS uPtown CiGar bar — Joe Krown, 9:30 tHe faMouS door — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

funky Pirate — Mark Penton, 4; Willie Lockett & All Purpose Blues Band, 8

Hi-Ho lounGe — Blue Grass Pickin’ Party, 8 Howlin’ wolf (tHe den) — Micah McKee’s Favorite Records, 9

irvin Mayfield’S Jazz PlayHouSe — Bob French & the Original Tuxedo Jazz Band, 8 kerry iriSH Pub — Mark Hessler, 9

little troPiCal iSle — Frank Fairbanks, 4:30; Jason Bishop, 9

MaPle leaf bar — Papa Grows Funk, 10 Mat & naddie’S reStaurant — Courtyard Kings, 7 My bar — Danny T, 8

old Point bar — Brent Walsh Trio, 8

one eyed JaCkS — Eagles of Death Metal, Kick Buttkiss, 9 PreServation Hall — Preservation Hall Jazz Band feat. Clint Maedgen, 8 SnuG Harbor Jazz biStro — Charmaine Neville Band, 8 & 10 SPotted Cat — Vince Carr, 4; Dominic Grillo & the

new HoPe baPtiSt CHurCH — 1807 Lasalle St., 523-5935;

www.newhopeno.org — Fri: Val & Love Alive Mass Choir, 7

new orleanS Jazz national HiStoriCal Park — 916

N. Peters Street, 589-4841; www.nps.gov/jazz/index. htm — Tue: Songs of the Underground Railroad, 3; Wed: Lawrence Cotton, noon; Thu: African Retentions in Jazz, 3

oGden MuSeuM of SoutHern art — 925 Camp

St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — Thu: Phil deGruy, Jimmy Robinson & John Rankin, 6

“Since 1969”

Pavilion of tHe two SiSterS — City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 482-4888 — Thu: Symphony Chorus of New Orleans, 6 PontCHartrain vineyardS — 81250 Hwy. 1082 (Old

Military Road), Bush, (985) 892-9742; www.pontchartrainvineyards.com — Sat: Jazz ’n the Vines presents Jeff & Vida, 6:30

St. anna’S ePiSCoPal CHurCH — 1313 Esplanade Ave., 9472121 — Wed: Mission to Musicians Concert Series presents Wazozo feat. Helen Gillet, 7:30 StaGe door Canteen at tHe national world war ii MuSeuM — 945 Magazine St., 528-1944 — Fri-Sat & Sun: Sentimental Journey: the Big Bands of WWII, 8 FriSat., 11 a.m. Sun. trinity ePiSCoPal CHurCH — 1329 Jackson Ave., 522-

0276; www.trinitynola. com — Thu: Trinity Artist Series presents Evensong Choir, 6:30; Thu: New World Generation Youth Choir, 7; Sun: Independence Day Music Festival, 3; Mon: Taize, 6

unity CHurCH of Metairie — 3303 Richland Ave. Suite

2A, Metairie, 885-7575; www. unitychurchofmetairie. org — Fri: Michele Claiborne, 7:30

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 22 > 2010

tHe Saint — Church of My Love, Roman Gabriel Todd’s Beast Rising Up Out of the Sea, Die Rotzz, 10

troPiCal iSle oriGinal — Damien Louvier, 5; Rhythm & Rain, 9

3 rinG CirCuS’ tHe biG toP Gallery — 1638 Clio St., 5692700; www.3rcp.com — Fri: New Orleans New Music Ensemble presents No No Nonet, 8

Green rooM — Generation Way, 10; Alexis Marceaux, 10

ritz-Carlton — Armand St. Martin, 10:30 a.m; Catherine Anderson, 2

troPiCal iSle bourbon — Joe Bennett, 5; Truman Holland & the Front Porch Revue, 9

bMC — Fun in the Pocket feat. Mayumi Shara & Reinaldo, 7; Smoky Greenwell’s Mondays Blues Jam, 9:30

tHe bar — Night Siege, DCOI! and others, 9

PalM Court Jazz Cafe — Lucien Barbarin, Sunday Night Swingsters, 8

PreServation Hall — Preservation Hall-Stars feat. Lars Edegran, 8

troPiCal iSle bayou Club — Can’t Hardly Play Boys, 5; T’Canaille, 7

classical/ concerts

neutral Ground CoffeeHouSe — Battlelion, 7

tHe PreCinCt — Funk Express, 7:30

Frenchmen Street Allstars, 6; Jazz Vipers, 10

bankS Street bar — N’awlins Johnnys, 9

four PointS by SHeraton (M!x ultralounGe) — Tim Sullivan Jazz Trio, 7

old Point bar — Some Like it Hot!, 5

music

31

fiLm

Listings

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

now showing THE A-TEAM (PG-13) — Liam Neeson stars in the big-screen adaption of the 1980s action TV show. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 CITY ISLAND (PG-13) — A prison guard takes his long-lost son home to his family, which is already filled with secrets. Canal Place GET HIM TO THE GREEK (R) — A record company intern (Jonah Hill) is on a mission to get an oversexed British rock star (Russell Brand) to L.A.’s Greek Theatre. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO (R) — The Swedish film

follows a computer hacker drawn into a murder mystery by an embattled journalist. Canal Place

IRON MAN 2 (PG-13) — Robert Downey Jr. stars as the Marvel Comics character in the sequel to the 2008 blockbuster. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 22 > 2010

JONAH HEX (PG-13) — The life

32

of a haunted bounty hunter changes when the U.S. military makes him an offer he can’t refuse. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 THE KARATE KID (PG) — A 12

year old who moves to China with his family seeks the mentorship of a kung fu master after becoming the target of bullying. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

Dance out a presentation of

A room with A ViEw KILLERS (PG-13) — A woman (Katherine Heigl) meets the man of her dreams (Ashton Kutcher), only to find out he’s an assassin. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 LETTERS TO JULIET (PG) — An American responds to a letter to Juliet Capulet seeking advice about love, leading her and the letter’s author on a journey through Italy. Hollywood 14 MARMADUKE (PG) — The giant dog from the one-panel comic strip gets a movie. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 MOTHER AND CHILD (R) — Three

woman who have never met are profoundly affected by adoption. AMC Palace 20 PLEASE GIVE (R) — A woman

who buys furniture cheaply at estate sales and marks it up at her Manhattan store tries to reconcile her guilt. Canal Place

PRINCE OF PERSIA: SANDS OF TIME (PG-13) — Persian prince

must form alliances to protect a magical dagger. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 ROBIN HOOD (PG-13) — The film uncovers the origins of the hero-outlaw, from his stint as an archer to his exile in Sherwood Forest. AMC Palace 20, Hollywood 14 THE SECRET IN THEIR EYES (R) —

The winner of the 2009 Best Foreign Film Oscar follows a retired police detective who decides to write a novel, and becomes the focus of a dangerous drama. Canal Place

SEX AND THE CITY 2 (R) —

Carrie, Charlotte, Miranda and Samantha leave the Big Apple for Abu Dhabi. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Hollywood 14, Grand

SHREK FOREVER AFTER (PG) —

The titular ogre makes a deal with Rumplestiltskin to get his old life back. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace

16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

review

SPLICE (R) — The human hybrid

out of control It’s almost ironic there was a riot at the Stonewall Inn following a police raid on June 28, 1969. The mob-run bar filled a social void by paying off police in order to sell overpriced, watered-down drinks to a gay and lesbian clientele. Even in New York City’s Greenwich Village, legal bars did not risk losing their liquor licenses by becoming known as gay bars. Police knew about the illegal clubs, and though they usually tipped off the bars in advance, they raided them often. Those arrested could expect their names to be printed in city newspapers, usually costing them jobs or family strife. There simply was no such thing as being “out” at the time, save for a handful of well-known writers like Tennessee Williams and Gore Vidal. It’s entertaining to hear men say they never bought drinks at Stonewall, uncertain of what the bar was actually pouring. But in an environment where police arrested men for wearing suspect clothing (in violation of an archaic New York law prohibiting “masquerading”), the dark and dingy Stonewall was one of the only places men could dance together. That made it worth the risk of frequent police raids. Directors Kate Davis and David Heilbroner’s documentary Stonewall Uprising chronicles the social and legal harassment gays and lesbians endured in the decades prior to the raid. Propaganda film and newsreel footage depicts homosexuality as a mental illness and predatory social menace, and the paranoid tone and disinformation would be funny a la Reefer Madness were it not reflective of actual attitudes at the time. The film is full of interviews with Stonewall patrons and riot veterans, including one police officer, and it captures the landmark confrontation in brilliant personal detail, from accounts of the underground social scene through the raid, three nights of rioting, and the subsequent first gay rights march. At the time, the so-called riot barely made the news. There was violence, but what symbolically marked the event was the refusal of gays and lesbians to run from police. One man tells of forming a Rockette-style kickline with friends in the street and dancing in front of the outnumbered cops. When officers in riot gear charged one way, the crowd simply filled in the area behind them. For one long night, the police ran about, parting the crowd, but never dispersed it. For many gay men and lesbians who had been active in other civil rights efforts, there was no going back into fear or secrecy. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students/seniors, $5 Zeitgeist members. — Will Coviello

thrU JUL

01

stonewall Uprising 7:30 p.m. Fri.-Thu. Zeitgeist Multi-Discipliary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

LO U D 2

TOY STORY 3 (G) — Woody, Buzz and the rest of the toys return to the big screen. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14, Prytania

opening this week KNIGHT AND DAY (PG-13) — See

plot of Killers.

GROWN UPS (PG-13) —

Childhood friends meet each other’s families for the first time.

speciaL screenings AMC SUMMER MOVIE CAMP — AMC Theaters screen kid-

friendly movies. Films vary. Visit www.amcentertainment. com/smc for details. Tickets $1. 10 a.m. Tuesday.

TWO IN THE WAVE (NR) — The

film melds revealing footage of filmmakers and friends Jean-Luc Godard and Francois Truffaut with scenes from their greatest films. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students/ seniors, $5 members. 7:30 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday, 5:30 p.m. Friday-Sunday, Zeitgeist MultiDisciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 8275858; www.zeitgeistinc.net AMC Palace 10 (Hammond), 429-9090; AMC Palace 12 (Clearview), 734-2020; AMC Palace 16 (Westbank), 734-2020; AMC Palace 20 (Elmwood), 734-2020; Entergy IMAX, 581IMAX; Grand (Slidell), (985) 641-1889; Hollywood 9 (Kenner), 464-0990; Hollywood 14 (Covington), (985) 893-3044; Kenner MegaDome, 468-7231; Prytania, 891-2787; Solomon Victory Theater, National World War II Museum, 527-6012

EVERY MONDAY

Beans and Blues

D'PROJECT Eddy Villalta • Artistic Director

Southern VOiCES Eddy Villalta Alice Pascal Escher Choreography by Anne Burr Cheryl O’Sullivan Leigh Brockman Komenka Ethnic Dance Nicole Boyd-Buckels

created by rogue genetic engineers becomes their worst nightmare. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand

JUNE 25 and 26 8pm JUNE 27 2pm

Contemporary Arts Center 504-528-3800 DPROJECT.us CACNO.org

GRILL OPEN LATE 7 DAYS A WEEK LATER ON WEEKENDS

RED BEANS SPECIAL 5PM-10PM AMANDA WALKER 7PM-10PM

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LOCAL LISTINGS FOR STARTS FRIDAY, JUNE 25 CHECK THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES

THUR 6/24 4.729" X 5.333" (1/4 PG SQ) TUE 6/22 4.729" X 5.333" (1/4 PG SQ) NEW ORLEANS GAMBIT WEEKLY NEW ORLEANS GAMBIT WEEKLY

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 22 > 2010

33

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A Monthly Open Air Festival of Creativity in Palmer Park Presented by the Arts Council Of New Orleans A vibrant market featuring original handmade art from the regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best visual artists. Plus live music, creative activities for kids, and foods to satisfy every craving.

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For more information, please call 504-523-1465 or visit artscouncilofneworleans.org

Over 100 artists to choose from, including:

Celebrate New Orleans Culture. Shop the Arts Market!

listings

WHaT yoU see is WHaT yoU geT

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

Opening SLIDELL ART LEAGUE GALLERY. Historic Slidell Train Depot, 1827 Front St., Suite 201, (985) 847-9458 — “Out

of the Blue,” a group exhibition and competition, through Feb. 3. Opening reception 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday.

galleries 1022 GALLERY. 1022 Lowerline St., 301-0679; www.1022gallery.blogspot. com — “James Booker: An Intimate

Portrait,” photographs by Jim Scheurich, through June.

3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY. 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp. com — “B-Movie Double Feature,”

video and photographs by Heather Weathers, through Saturday.

A GALLERY FOR FINE PHOTOGRAPHY. 241 Chartres St., 568-1313; www. agallery.com — “Rock and Roll,” photographs by Lynn Goldsmith, through July 5. AG WAGNER STUDIO & GALLERY. 813 Royal St., 561-7440 — Works by

gallery artists; 504 Toys, locally handcrafted toys; both ongoing.

ANTENNA GALLERY. 3161 Burgundy St., 957-4255; www.antennagallery. org — Saturday-Sunday. “Junkfish

Caviar,” a multi-media installation by Susan Gisleson, through July 5. ANTON HAARDT FOLK GALLERY. 2858 Magazine St., 891-9080; www. antonart.com — Works by Anton

Haardt, Christopher Moses and others. lery artists, through July.

ART GALLERY 811. 811 Royal St., 5246918 — Paintings, sculpture and

jewelry by local artists Noel Rockmore, Michael Fedor, Xavier de Callatay, Charles Bazzell, Bambi deVille and Ritchie Fitzgerald, ongoing.

ARTHUR ROGER GALLERY. 432 Julia St., 522-1999; www.arthurrogergallery.com — “The Gulf: Works Completed Before the BP Oil Spill,” a group exhibition of gallery artists, through July 17. Recent sculptures by James Surls, through Sunday. BARRISTER’S GALLERY. 2331 St. Claude Ave., 525-2767; www.barristersgallery. com — “Hurricanes, Hand Grenades

and Other Delightful Things,” oil on canvas by Scott Guion, through July 17.

BECA ICAD. 527 St. Joseph St., 5668999; www.becaicad.org — “Sub-

lime Affliction,” works by Jenn Parnell, through Friday.

BERGERON STUDIO & GALLERY. 406 Magazine St., 522-7503; www. bergeronstudio.com — Photographs

by Michael P. Smith, Jack Beech, Harriet Blum, Kevin Roberts and others, ongoing.

BERTA’S AND MINA’S ANTIQUITIES

doeilartconsortium.com — “Dew Point,” a group show featuring 12 artists, through July 24.

review

D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., 524-3936 —

greenhouse effect

Botanical art has been with us since the earliest days of civilization, turning up on ancient Egyptian tombs and Greek and Roman monuments. Plants and animals are always in a state of evolutionary flux, so the artists of the past have been a major source of information about species no longer with us today. But art too evolves, and Courtney Egan’s Field Recordings expo reflects a turning point, not only for botanical art but also for video, liberated at last from monitors and projection screens. All that Egan’s work requires is a room with twilight lighting, a cool aesthetic gloom of the sort closed curtains or blinds can easily provide. Gushers is a video of stylized water lilies projected on the wall. Rising from a tidal pool of old speakers on the floor, they gyrate to the electronic rhythms that emanate from the speakers until, one by one, they explode like roman candles, evoking a sense of dystopian irony like genetic modification experiments gone weirdly awry. Sigils is an installation comprised of a pair of sculptural replicas of tree branches from which ghostly Spanish moss seems to dangle and almost dance in the breeze. But there is no breeze, and the moss is all the more ghostly for consisting mainly of light in the form of projected Spanish moss images, all of which is unexpectedly lovely. Repercussion employs similar motifs in the form of a projected time-lapse image of a blooming flower, a yellow angel’s trumpet blossom dripping nectar as an attentive bee darts in and out. This too is ethereally lovely to look at even as its flickering imagery conveys something of the shimmering mystery of early motion picture photography. A night-blooming cereus in a montage of digital video picture frames is no less ethereal. In this amazing show, we see a reordering of ordinary things like flowers, moss and video into a meditation on natural forms and electronic imagery, and the ever-diminishing boundaries between them. — D. Eric Bookhardt

Field recordings: recent Video T H R U and light sculptures by Courtney JUn egan Heriard-Cimino Gallery, 440 Julia St. 525-7300; www.heriardcimino.com GALLERY. 4138 Magazine St., 895-6201 — “Second Line: Lifting Our Souls Up Into Heaven,” works by Nilo and Mina Lanzas; works by Clementine Hunter, Noel Rockmore and others; all ongoing. BRYANT GALLERIES. 316 Royal St., 525-5584; www.bryantgalleries.com — Paintings by Dean Mitchell, ongoing. BYRDIE’S GALLERY. 2422-A St. Claude Ave., www.byrdiesgallery.com — “For

a Canvas of Skin,” tattoo sketches on paper by local tattoo artists, through July 6. CALLAN FINE ART. 240 Chartres St., 524-0025; www.callanfineart. com — Works by Eugene de Blass,

Louis Valtat and other artists of the Barbizon, Impressionist and PostImpressionist schools, ongoing.

CANARY GALLERY. 329 Julia St., 388-7746; www.thecanarycollective. com — “Images from the End of the

Earth,” photographs of Grand Isle by Zack Smith.

CARDINAL GALLERY. 541 Bourbon St.,

522-3227 — Exhibition of Italian artists featuring works by Bruno Paoli and Andrea Stella, ongoing. CAROL ROBINSON GALLERY. 840 Napoleon Ave., 895-6130; www. carolrobinsongallery.com — “30 Year Anniversary Exhibition,” works by David Goodman, John Oles, Christina Goodman and Jere Allen, through July. CASELL GALLERY. 818 Royal St., 5240671; www.casellartgallery.com —

Pastels by Joaquim Casell; etchings by Sage; oils by Charles Ward; all ongoing.

COLE PRATT GALLERY. 3800 Magazine St., 891-6789; www.coleprattgallery. com — “About Face,” paintings by

Andrew Bucci from 1950 to 1962, through June.

COLLECTIVE WORLD ART COMMUNITY. Poydras Center, 650 Poydras St., 339-5237 — Paintings from the Blue

Series by Joseph Pearson, ongoing.

COUP D’OEIL ART CONSORTIUM. 2033 Magazine St., 722-0876; www.coup-

Annual group exhibition featuring sculptures, paintings and mixedmedia works by gallery artists, through Aug. 3.

DU MOIS GALLERY. 4921 Freret St., 818-6032 — “Cold Drink,” a print-

making invitational featuring 31 regional and national printmakers, through July 17.

ELLIOTT GALLERY. 540 Royal St., 523-3554; www.elliottgallery.com — Works by gallery artists Coignard, Engel, Papart, Petra, Tobiasse, Schneuer and Yrondi, ongoing. FRAMIN’ PLACE & GALLERY. 3535 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-3311; www. nolaframing.com — Prints by Tommy

Thompson, Phillip Sage, James Michalopoulos and others, ongoing. THE FRONT. 4100 St. Claude Ave.; www.nolafront.org — “The Achilles

Cycle,” works by Clay Blancett in response to the film God’s Architects; works by Wendy Babcox and April Childers; both through July 3.

GALERIE D’ART FRANCAIS. 541 Royal St., 581-6925 — Works by Todd

White, ongoing.

GALERIE ROYALE. 3648 Magazine St., 894-1588; www.galerieroyale.com —

“Brothers in Arts,” contemporary oils on canvas by Quincy Verdun and Leon Verdun, through June.

GALLERY BIENVENU. 518 Julia St., 525-0518; www.gallerybienvenu.com — “Transfer,” prints by Teresa Cole, through July 22.

1128 Tchoupitoulas St @ I-10 • 558-0900

THE GARDEN DISTRICT GALLERY. 1332 Washington Ave., 891-3032; www. gardendistrictgallery.com — “Trea-

sures of the Gulf,” a group exhibition featuring more than 12 artists, through July.

GOOD CHILDREN GALLERY. 4037 St. Claude Ave., 616-7427; www.goodchildrengallery.com — “Gorgamon,” works by The Joanna, an ongoing collaborative project, through July 3. GRAPHITE GALLERIES. 936 Royal St., 565-3739 — “Sinners and Saints,”

works by Joe Hobbs, ongoing.

GRIS GRIS LAB. 2245 Brainard St., 872-0577; www.grisgrislab.com —

“L’Espirit d’Haiti,” photographs by Christopher L. Mitchell, through July 9. GUTHRIE CONTEMPORARY. 3815 Magazine St., 897-2688; www.guthriecontemporary.com — “Schemata,” works by Susan Dory, ongoing. HERIARD-CIMINO GALLERY. 440 Julia St., 525-7300; www.heriardcimino. com — “Field Recordings,” videos by Courtney Egan, through July 5. ISABELLA’S GALLERY. 3331 Severn Ave., Suite 105, Metairie, 779-3202; www. isabellasgallery.com — Hand-blown works by Marc Rosenbaum; raku by Kate Tonguis and John Davis; all ongoing. JEAN BRAGG GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART. 600 Julia St., 895-7375; www. jeanbragg.com — “Let’s Go to the

Park,” a group exhibition featuring paintings in oil and acrylic by local artists, through June.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 22 > 2010

ARIODANTE GALLERY. 535 Julia St., 524-3233 — Group exhibition of gal-

art

35

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JON SCHOOLER GALLERY. 8526 Oak St., 865-7032; www. jonschooler.com — “Subliminal WOWs,” paintings by Jon Schooler, ongoing.

Tues. 22, 29

JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY. 400A Julia St., 522-5471; www. jonathanferraragallery.com —

BOB FRENCH AND THE ORIGINAL TUXEDO JAZZ BAND JASON MARSALIS Wed. 23, 30

5-8PM

IRVIN MAYFIELD AND THE NOJO JAM

WEDNESDAYS:

Thurs. 24

SASHA MASAKOWSKI

JOHNAYE KENDRICK Fri. 25

THURSDAYS: ROMAN SKAKUM

LEON “KID CHOCOLATE” BROWN Sat. 26

SHANNON POWELL *Sun. 27 (7PM)

SHANNON POWELL

FRIDAYS: JOE KROWN

GLEN DAVID ANDREWS

TRIXIE MINX

‘ROUND MIDNIGHT

BRASS BAND JAM

EVERY FRIDAY AT MIDNIGHT

“reconsidered,” new paintings by Stephen Hoskins, through July 28.

JULIE NEILL DESIGNS. 3908 Magazine St., 899-4201; www. julieneill.com — “Facade,”

photographs by Lesley Wells, ongoing.

JUPITER ARTPROJECTS. 1901 Royal St., 281-4230; www. jupiterartprojects.com — “Can’t

Knock Tha Hustle,” works by Terrence Sanders, through July 15.

KAKO GALLERY. 536 Royal St., 565-5445; www.kakogallery. com — Paintings by Don Picou

and Stan Fontaine; “Raku” by Joy Gauss; 3-D wood sculpture by Joe Derr; all ongoing.

SATURDAY, JUNE 26TH featuring

listings

EVERY SATURDAY AT MIDNIGHT

IMJazzPlayhouse irvinmayfield.com 300 BOURBON STREET • NEW ORLEANS • 504.553.2299 • WWW.SONESTA.COM

KKPROJECTS. 2448 N. Villere St., 415-9880; www.kkprojects.org — “Knead,” works by Kristian

Hansen, Tora Lopez, John Oles and William Murphy, ongoing.

L9 CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 539 Caffin Ave., 948-0056 — “Faces

of Treme,” works by Chandra McCormick and Keith Calhoun, ongoing.

LE PETIT SALON DE NEW ORLEANS. 906 Royal St., 524-5700 — New paintings by Holly

Sarré, ongoing.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 22 > 2010

INVITE YOU AND A GUEST TO AN ADVANCE SCREENING

36

THURSDAY JUNE 24TH AMC Palace Elmwood 7:30 pm

Pick up your complimentary pass

WEDNESDAY JUNE 23RD 1 PM - 5 PM at

While supplies last. Passes are available on a first come, first served basis. No purchase necessary. Limit one (admit-two) pass per person. Rated PG-13. Pass does not guarantee admission.

8108 Hampson St. Riverbend

IN THEATRES FRIDAY, JUNE 25TH

LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia St., 522-5988; www.lemieuxgalleries.com — “Growing Pains,”

a group exhibition curated by Christy Wood; “Our Gulf Coast,” a group exhibition featuring works inspired by the Gulf Coast; both through July 24.

LIVE ART STUDIO. 4207 Dumaine St., 484-7245 — “Festival

Players,” photographs by Randy Sanders; “Loteria Mosaico,” Venetian glass mosaics by Randy Sanders; “Makin’ Music,” giclee prints by Sarah Stiehl; all through June.

OAK STREET GALLERY. 111 N. Oak St., Hammond, (985) 345-0521 — “Random Order,” mixed media by James Henderson; “Deep Horizon,” new works with acrylic and latex house paint by Pat Macaluso; both through June. OCTAVIA ART GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www. octaviaartgallery.com — “The Colors of Summer,” a group show featuring mixed-media paintings, drawings and photographs, through July. PEARL ART GALLERY. 4421 Magazine St., 228-5840 — Works by Cindy and Drue Hardegree, Erica Dewey, John Womack, Sontina, Lorraine Jones and S. Lee, ongoing. REINA GALLERY. 4132 Magazine St., 895-0022; www.reinaart. com — “Vintage New Orleans

Artists,” watercolors, etchings and folk art; “Patrons Saints,” works by Shelley Barberot; both ongoing. RHINO CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS COMPANY. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www. rhinocrafts.com — Works by

Teri Walker, Chad Ridgeway, Tamra Carboni, Caren Nowak and others, ongoing RUSTY PELICAN ART. 4031 St. Claude Ave., 218-5727; www.rustypelicanart.com — Works by

rhinocrafts.com — Artists are invited to submit works on impressions of New Orleans life and culture. Email rhinocrafts@yahoo.com for details. Submission deadline is July 15. NEW ORLEANS PHOTO ALLIANCE. The alliance seeks

submissions for “GULF,” a visual exploration of the Gulf of Mexico to open in August. Visit www.neworleansphotoalliance.org for details. Submission deadline is July 1.

Travis and Lexi Linde, ongoing.

museums

SALONE DELL’ARTES ARTEMISIA. 3000 Royal St., 481-5113 — “I

AMISTAD RESEARCH CENTER. Tilton Hall, Tulane University, 6823 St. Charles Ave., 865-5535 — “Creative Circles: Exploring

Genti H2O,” works by Shmuela Padnos, ongoing.

SHEILA’S FINE ART STUDIO. 1427 N. Johnson St., 473-3363; www. sheilaart.com — Works by

Sheila Phipps, ongoing.

SOREN CHRISTENSEN GALLERY. 400 Julia St., 569-9501; www. sorengallery.com — “Long Story Short,” mixed-media works on canvas and paper by Karen Laborde, through June. STELLA JONES GALLERY. Place St. Charles, 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 132, 568-9050 — “The Tal-

ented Tenth: African American Artists and Musicians of the Harlem Renaissance, the W.P.A. and Beyond,” through July.

STEVE MARTIN STUDIO. 624 Julia St., 566-1390; www.stevemartinfineart.com — Sculpture and paintings by Steve Martin and others, ongoing. STUDIO 525. 525 E. Boston St., Covington; www.studio525covington.com — Photographs by

Sidney Smith; tribal painting and mixed media by Justin Smith; works by Sarah Freeman Carey, Christopher Morrison Slave and Richard Lee; all through June. STUDIO BFG. 2627 Desoto St., 942-0200; www.studiobfg. com — “Peel Sessions: First

Installment,” works by Tina Stanley, ongoing.

TAYLOR/BERCIER FINE ART. 233 Chartres St., 527-0072 —

“Vessels,” paintings by Gary Komarin; “Small Works,” paintings by John Randall Nelson; both through Monday.

THOMAS MANN GALLERY I/O. 1812 Magazine St., 581-2113; www.thomasmann.com — “Where’s the Money?” group exhibit interpreting the economy, ongoing. A WORK OF ART GALLERY. 8212 Oak St., 862-5244 — Glass

works by Juli Juneau; works from the New Orleans Photo Alliance; both ongoing.

Call for artists MY NEW ORLEANS: PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF A CITY IN TRANSITION. Rhino Contemporary Crafts Company, The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www.

Community Within African Art,” through June.

ASHÉ CULTURAL ARTS CENTER. 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — “Ashe in Retrospect: 19982008,” photographs by Morris Jones Jr., Eric Waters, Jeffrey Cook and others, ongoing. CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER. 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www. cacno.org — “Prints,” paintings by Joan Mitchell, through June. LONGUE VUE HOUSE AND GARDENS. 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue. com — “Serigraphs from the

Toussaint L’Ouverture Series, 1986-1997,” by Jacob Lawrence, through July 15.

NEW ORLEANS ARTWORKS. 727 Magazine St., 529-7279 — “Summer Daydreams,” floral watercolors by Carol Greel, through June. NEW ORLEANS JAZZ & HERITAGE FOUNDATION. 1205 N. Rampart St., 522-4786; www. jazzandheritage.org — “The

Passing Parade: New Orleans’ Brass Band Tradition,” a multimedia and interactive exhibit, through June.

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma. org — Oil paintings by Joan

Mitchell, through Sunday. “Patti Smith: A Donation to NOMA,” photographs by the musician, through July 3. “SWEET Suite Louisiana,” color intaglio prints by Warrington Colescott; “The Therapist,” photographs by Donald Woodman; “Beyond the Blues: Reflections on African America from the Fine Arts Collection of the Amistad Research Center,” ; photographs by William Greiner; all through July 11. OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART. 925 Camp St., 5399600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — “Brooching the Subject:

One-of-a-Kind,” jewelry by 22 artists, through July 15. “Give My Poor Heart Ease: Voices of the Mississippi Blues,” photographs by William Ferris; William Ferris Folk Art Collection; both through July 25.

LISTINGS

GET IN ON THE ACT

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

THEATER THE GIN GAME. Luke’s Brisket and

Broadway Dinner Theatre, 1540 Lindberg Drive, Slidell, (985) 781-6565; www.brisketandbroadway.com — Gin rummy games between nursing home residents lead to difficult conversations. Tickets $40 (includes dinner). 7 p.m. Friday-Saturday.

GUTTENBERG! THE MUSICAL! Le Chat

Noir, 715 St. Charles Ave., 581-5812; www.cabaretlechatnoir.com — Sean Patterson and Gary Rucker tell the story of the inventor of the printing press. Tickets $15. 8 p.m. Monday. (HEARSAY) Southern Rep Theater,

The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 522-6545; www. southernrep.com — A history teacher and student a Catholic high school in New Orleans become entangled in gossip. An audience talkback follows. 7 p.m. Wednesday.

MACBETH. Lupin Theatre, Tulane

University, 865-5105 ext. 2 — The play is staged as if by the St. Charles Theater in late 1830s New Orleans. Tickets $30 general admission, $15 previews (Thursday-Friday), $40 opening night gala (Saturday), $5 minimum for Pay What You Will performance (Sunday). 7:30 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 1:30 p.m. Sunday through July 11.

MEN IN UNIFORM. Shadowbox The-

OUR TOWN. Anthony Bean Commu-

nity Theater, 1333 S. Carrollton Ave., 862-7529; www.anthonybeantheater.com — Bean’s spin on the Thorton Wilder classic takes place in a racially diverse Grover’s Corners, N.H. Tickets $20 general admission, $18 students and seniors. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday.

THE REALLY DESPERATE HOUSEWIVES OF STEPFORD PARISH. Le Chat Noir,

715 St. Charles Ave., 581-5812; www. cabaretlechatnoir.com — Something is amiss on the Northshore in the Running With Scissors farce. Tickets $26 Friday-Saturday, $21 Sunday (both include $5 drink credit); 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 6 p.m. Sunday.

VERBATIM VERBOTEN. AllWays

Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 2185778; www.marignytheatre.org — Actors perform staged transcripts of verbal gaffes of notable people. Tickets $7 (includes one drink). 10 p.m. Sunday. VIOLET. NOCCA|Riverfront, Nims

Blackbox Theatre, 2800 Chartres St. — A musical about a woman

review Burn, Baby, Burn

As literary temptation, writing a play about writing a play can be like playing with fire. In The Everlasting Bonfire, Jim Fitzmorris stokes the flames with extra fuel, having characters deconstruct words and phrases, indulge literary references and even animate a punctuation mark (the suspect intentions of an ellipsis), but he manages to ignite a battle of wits with genuine warmth and crackling banter and lets the creative process bask in the light for 70 minutes. Longer than a one-act but not quite the full play Fitzmorris had originally planned, it was presented in the Dixon Hall lab theater as part of the New Orleans Shakespeare Festival at Tulane University. Imagining the life of Edwin Forrest, a character actor who became famous in New Orleans in the early 1800s, the piece follows the boisterously optimistic and determined Edwin (Shad Willingham) as he aspires to fame and consults with a playwright, Jane (Amanda Zirkenbach), who is trying to establish her career, but is struggling. The piece seems to jump around in time, partially because it’s full of anachronistic references and partially because the duo often acts out scenes they are discussing. The two recreate the opening scene of Macbeth, talk of the clairvoyant ghosts Dickens unleashes on Scrooge, sing lyrical bits from The Hobbit and discuss Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. Creating a play is like building a monster, they agree, and to be truly brought to life, it must be allowed to do what it wants — even if it wants to insert a reference to German literary critic and philosopher Walter Benjamin. Ideas and texts are timeless in Bonfire, but context can be somewhat elastic. The action never leaves Edwin’s study, but he is obsessed with a romantic notion of the frontier, both artistic and literal, he expects to find in New Orleans. The city has not been conquered by the “weak and effeminate” influences of the British, who he believes have spoiled theater on their side of the Atlantic as well as in New York and Philadelphia. He gleefully states that Shakespeare was an American, a smug and funny moment typical of the wit and tone Fitzmorris deploys in the piece. Fitzmorris also has a gift for physically grounding his characters’ cerebral jags. As Edwin worked up a lusty fervor over his expectations of New Orleans, he filled a couple of large snifters with generous pours of brown liquor. He cracked a raw egg into each glass and handed one to Jane, who hesitated, transfixed by the bobbing yellow yolk. The audience seemed to wince along with her, unsure of the challenge of handling a little bit of raw material. But damn the salmonella, Edwin quickly downed his, invoking Gen. Andrew Jackson’s victory at the Battle of New Orleans, and gladly relieved Jane of her glass, tossing back the encore. It’s an offbeat and entertaining toast devised by a playwright who also found a muse in the Big Easy. — Will Coviello seeking help from a televangelist. Tickets $20. 7:30 p.m. ThursdaySaturday, 2 p.m. Sunday.

CABARET MEANWHILE, BACK AT CAFÉ DU MONDE ... House of Blues, 225

Decatur St., 310-4999; www.hob. com — New Orleans chefs and personalities share food stories. Ticket $60 (includes two drinks, dinner and dessert). Cocktails and dinner begin at 6:30 p.m., show begins at 7:45 p.m. Monday.

DANCE SOUTHERN VOICES: DANCE OUT LOUD 3. Contemporary Arts Center,

900 Camp St., 528-3800; www. cacno.org — D’Project presents this show featuring local artists choreographers, and dance companies. Tickets $20 general admission, $15 students and CAC members. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday.

AUDITIONS JEFFERSON PERFORMING ARTS SOCIETY. Jefferson Performing Arts

Center, 400 Phlox St., Metairie, 8852000; www.jpas.org — JPAS seeks singers, dancers and actors ages 15 and older for its 2010-2011 season. Auditions are by appointment only. Call 885-2000 ext. 204 or email production@jpas.org for details. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday. NEW ORLEANS FRINGE. New Orleans

Fringe seeks works in a variety of mediums between 30 and 60 minutes long for its November festival. Visit www.nofringe.org for details. Application deadline is July 1.

STAGE DOOR IDOL. Stage Door

Canteen at The National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 528-1944 — The museum theater hosts preliminary auditions for its 1940s-themed singing competition. Call 528-1944 ext. 267 for details. 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Monday.

COMEDY BLUE MONDAY STAND-UP COMEDY.

Bullets Sports Bar, 2441 A.P. Tureaud Ave., 948-4003 — Tony Frederick hosts the weekly open mic. 9 p.m. Monday. BROWN! IMPROV COMEDY. Zeitgeist

Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net — Johnathan Christiansen, Gant Laborde, Ken Lafrance, Bob Murrell and Kelli Rosher perform. Visit www.brownimprovcomedy.com for details. 10 p.m. Saturday.

Pet boarding, doggy dayCare & grooming

ZEUS’

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For monitoring 24/7

Family SuiteS in-HouSe groomer Sunday PiCk-uPS available

1st Pet Full Price - 2nd Pet Half Off!

Your Pet’s Home Away From Home! 4601 Freret St. (corner of Freret & Cadiz) 504.304.4718

www.zeusplace.com

COMEDY LIVES. La Nuit Comedy

Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — Comedy teams Dr. Awkward and Men Not Mars perform improv comedy. Admission $10. 9 p.m. Thursday.

DYKES OF HAZARD. Rubyfruit Jungle, 1135 Decatur St., 571-1863; www. rubyfruit-jungle.com — Kristen Becker hosts a weekly comedy show. Admission $5. 9 p.m. Friday. GOD’S BEEN DRINKING. La Nuit

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — Actors improvise a comedy based on audience suggestions. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Friday.

IVAN’S OPEN MIC NIGHT. Rusty Nail, 1100 Constance St., 525-5515 — Openmic comedy and music night. 9 p.m. Tuesday. NATIONAL COMEDY COMPANY. Shadowbox Theatre, 2400 St Claude Ave., 523-7469; www.theshadowboxtheatre.com — The troupe performs interactive improv comedy. Tickets $5. 7 p.m. Saturday. NATIONAL COMEDY COMPANY DINNER SHOW. Memeworks Integrated

MARK’S

MUFFLER SHOP since 1984

AUTHORIZED FLOWMASTER DEALER 5229 St. Claude Ave. New Orleans 504-944-7733 w w w.mar k smuf f le r sho p.co m

“An Ngon... Eat Well!”

Creative Arts, 527 Julia St., 523-SHOW — Improv comedy show with a dinner option. Tickets $10 for show only. 8 p.m. Friday.

O, VENGEANCE! La Nuit Comedy

Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — Actors improvise Shakespeare based on audience suggestions. Tickets $8. 10 p.m. Saturday.

STUPID TIME MACHINE. Avenue

Pub, 1732 St. Charles Ave., 586-9243 — The improv group performs a weekly comedy show. Tickets $1-$6. 8:30 p.m. Tuesday.

3320 TRANSCONTINENTAL DR., METAIRIE

504.941.7690 TUES-SAT 11AM-8PM SUN 11AM-5PM

www.pho-nola.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 22 > 2010

atre, 2400 St Claude Ave., 523-7469; www.theshadowboxtheatre.com — Antonio Garza’s one-man show about being hassled by authorities. The performance is a fundraiser for a bicycle trip/show tour in Arizona. Tickets $10 suggested donation. 8 p.m. Friday.

STAGE

37

Summer is Satwtheingin’

events

listings

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

Sentimental Journey: The Big Bands of World War II June 25-26-27

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

Dance to our own Victory Big Band bringing back Glenn Miller, Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman and more! Friday and Saturday evenings Dinner @ 6pm; Show @ 8pm: $60 Show only $30 Sunday Brunch Matinée Brunch @ 11am; Show @ 1pm: $55

George M. Cohan Tonight! July 2-3-4 Award-winning NY performer as America’s song and dance man who gave us Yankee Doodle Dandy, Give My Regards to Broadway, Over There, and more! Friday and Saturday evenings Buffet Dinner @ 6pm; Show @ 8pm: $45 Show only $20 Sunday Brunch Matinée Brunch @ 11am; Show @ 1pm: $55

Magazine St. at Poeyfarre H 504.528.1943 H stagedoorcanteen.org

family Tuesday 22 LONGUE VUE VISITS THE LIBRARY: LIFE AROUND OUR POND. New Orleans Public

Library (Lakeview Branch), 6317 Argonne St. — Longue Vue House and Gardens present discussions and activities focused on pond life in libraries around the city. Call 4885488 ext. 320 or email jgick@ longuevue.com. 11 a.m.

Thursday 24 RADIO DISNEY BUS. West Bank Regional Library, 2751 Manhattan Blvd., Harvey, 364-2660; www.jefferson.lib. la.us — The bus’s stop at the library includes a story time, followed by an opportunity to play games for a chance to win Jonas Brothers concert tickets. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m

Saturday 26 WW2-13784_SummerSwings_gambit.indd 1

Mid-City’s first Clothing exChange store

6/16/10 2:24 PM

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 22 > 2010

owned by

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loCals for loCals

MUSIC FOR ALL AGES. New

Orleans Jazz National Historical Park, 916 N. Peters St., 589-4841; www.nps.gov/ jazz/index.htm — Children bring their own instruments and play with a professional brass band for an hour-long performance. 11 a.m.

OGDEN PLAYDATE: BEACH BLANKET BING-O. Ogden

Museum of Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — Children’s artwork will be collected to be sold at the museum, with proceeds benefiting the Louisiana Marine Mammal and Sea Turtle Rescue Program. Call 5234883 or 539-9616 for details. Admission is one piece of artwork on 8 1/2” by 11” paper. 10 a.m. to noon.

STAR SPANGLED BANTER . Children’s Castle, 501 Williams Blvd., Kenner, 468-7231 — The Porta-Puppet Players get ready for the Fourth of July with a patriotic show. Admission $5. 11:30 a.m.

WoMenS, MenS & teen Clothing shoes • purses • belts • and more!

REBIRTH

clothing exchange 140 N. CarrolltoN ave. | 218-8017 NeXt to veNeZIaS

Mon-Fri 11-7 | Sat 11-6 | Sun 12-5

events Tuesday 22 BOUCHE WINE FESTIVAL . Bouche, 840 Tchoupitoulas St., 267-7485; www. bouchenola.com — The event features more than 25 wines,

Be there do that

a sampling of the restaurant’s cuisine and raffles benefiting Gulf oil disaster family assistant projects. Admission $20. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. SCRABBLE NIGHT. St.

Tammany Parish Public Library, Mandeville Branch, 844 Girod St., (985) 626-4293; www.sttammany.lib.la.us — The library hosts a night of Scrabble-playing for adults and teens. 6 p.m. to 7:45 p.m.

Wednesday 23 COVINGTON FARMERS MARKET. Covington City

Hall, 609 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-1873 — The market offers fresh local goods every week. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. FRENCH MARKET FARMERS MARKET. French Market,

French Market Place, between Decatur and N. Peters streets, 522-2621; www.frenchmarket. org — The weekly market offers seasonal produce, seafood, prepared foods, smoothies and more. 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP. East

Jefferson General Hospital, 4200 Houma Blvd., Metairie, 454-4000; www.ejgh.org — The American Cancer Society sponsors a group for those who have experienced the death of a loved one. Call 4565000 for details. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

INFANCY TO INDEPENDENCE .

St. Matthew/Central United Church of Christ, 1333 S. Carrollton Ave., 861-8196; www.stmatthew-nola.org — The parent-child education and support group uses enriching activities in music, art and play. Visit www. infancytoindependence.org for details. 9:30 a.m. to noon Wednesday-Thursday.

MODEL GREEN HOUSE . 409

Andry St., between Douglass Street and the levee; www. globalgreen.org/neworleans — Global Green provides tours of its model green house, which uses renewable energy from solar panels and other sources. Call 525-2121 or visit the website for details. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday and Friday, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday.

SAVE OUR CEMETERIES CEMETERY TOURS. The group

conducts tours of New Orleans cemeteries. Call 5253377 for details.

TALENT SHOWCASE . Le Roux, 1700 Louisiana Ave. — Masse Media Consulting, KMP and Men of Business host a weekly “You’ve Got Talent” showcase open to all poets, singers, dancers and others. Call 899-4512 for details. General admission $10, performers $5. 9 p.m. to midnight.

WEDNESDAY NIGHTS AT JW MARRIOTT. JW Marriott New

Orleans, 614 Canal St., No. 4, 525-6500; www.marriott.com — Enjoy local music and art with spirit tastings and hors d’oeuvres. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

WESTWEGO FARMERS & FISHERIES MARKET. 484 Sala

Ave., Sala Avenue and Fourth Street, Westwego — The market offers organic produce, baked goods, jewelry, art, live music and pony rides. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

WWII PUB QUIZ . Stage Door

Canteen at The National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 528-1944 — The quiz tests knowledge of general trivia as well as WWII questions. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Thursday 24 ALVAR CHESS. Alvar Library, 913 Alvar St., 596-2667 — Library guests can play chess with expert player Bernard Parun Jr. 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. BIOBOOM: MAKING DOLLARS & SENSE OF THE OPPORTUNITY.

Hilton New Orleans Riverside, 2 Poydras St., 561-0500; www.hilton.com — The New Orleans Chamber of Commerce hosts a luncheon and presentation about the economic benefits of the bioscience industry. Preregistration required. Call 7994260 or visit www.neworleanschamber.org/events for details. Admission starts at $50, $40 members. 11 a.m. CHANGES. Hey! Cafe, 4332

Magazine St., 891-8682; www. heycafe.biz — The weekly meetings teach focusing, a method of directing attention outside one’s body to effect change. Call 232-9787 for details. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

CINCO DE CRAFT MAFIOSO. The

Factory, 8314 Oak St. — The New Orleans Craft Mafia celebrates its fifth birthday with free craft workshops, a craft marketplace, music, food and drinks. 6 p.m. to 10 p.m.

FRESH MARKET. Circle Food

Store, 1522 St. Bernard Ave. — The Downtown Neighborhood Market Consortium market features fresh produce, dairy, seafood, baked goods and more. EBT and WIC accepted. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

HOMEBUYER TRAINING CLASSES. Lower 9th Ward

NENA, 1120 Lamanche St., 3736483; www.9thwardnena. org — The weekly class provides assistance to New Orleans-area residents interested in purchasing a home. Pre-registration required. Call 373-6483 or email info@9thwardnena.org for details. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. IRON RAIL LADIES’ NIGHT. The Iron Rail, 511 Marigny St., 948-

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com EvEnts

0963; www.ironrail.org — Iron Rail offers a weekly creative space for women. Email ladiesnight.ironrail@ gmail.com for details. 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.

Foundation hosts its annual fundraiser. Call 392-1934 for details. Admission starts at $60. 7 p.m. patron party, 8 p.m. gala.

LET’S GET ORGANIZED. Longue Vue

Saturday 26

House and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue. com — Professional organizer Amanda Le Blanc presents strategies for eliminating clutter in the home. Pre-registration required. Call 488-5488 ext. 320 or email jgick@longuevue.com for details. Admission $30, $25 for members. 10 a.m. to noon.

LIGHT & LIVELY NEW ZEALAND.

Martin Wine Cellar Deli & Catering, 714 Elmeer Ave., Metairie, 896-7350; www.martinwine.com — Wine consultant Andrew Dike leads a lecture and tasting of eight different wines. Visit www.martinwine.com for details. Admission $25. 6:30 p.m. NOLA PRIDE WEEKEND. Various

locations, visit website for details — The LGBT Community Center presents a weekend of events that includes a gala, a family picnic, a street festival and a karaoke contest. Visit www.nolapride.org for details. Times and locations vary. Thursday-Sunday.

RENOVATORS’ HAPPY HOUR GOES TO CENTRAL CITY. Private Residence,

call for details — The Preservation Resource Center hosts a tour of three newly restored buildings. Call 636-3067 or visit www.prcno.org for details. Admission $7, $5 for PRC members. 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. SISTAHS MAKING A CHANGE . Ashé

Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — The group offers lessons in African dance and more, with nutrition, health and wellness seminars. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday and Monday. Jefferson General Hospital, 4200 Houma Blvd., Metairie, 454-4000; www.ejgh.org — Mackie Shilstone hosts the seminar about how fitness, lifestyle and nutritional tools can help student athletes reach their full potential. 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

TALL CLUBS INTERNATIONAL MEET ’N’ GREET. Doubletree Hotel, 300 Canal

St., 581-1300; www.doubletree.com — Women at least 5’10” and men at least 6’2” can mingle with similarly tall guests at the kickoff event for TCI’s convention. Call (888) I-M-TALL-2 or visit www.tall.org for details. 8 p.m. to midnight.

Friday 25 GIRLS ON THE RUN HAPPY HOUR & SOCIAL . New York Pizza, 4418

Magazine St., 891-2376; www.newyorkpizzanola.com — A portion of the restaurant’s revenue during this event benefits Girls on the Run New Orleans. Visit girlsontherun. org for details. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. MISSION POSSIBLE GALA .

Generations Hall, 310 Andrew Higgins Drive, 581-4367; www. generationshall.net — The New Orleans Medical Mission Services

Palmer Park, South Claiborne and Carrollton avenues, 523-1465; www. artscouncilofneworleans.org — The Arts Council of New Orleans presents the monthly market featuring art and live music. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

COMPREHENSIVE ZONING ORDINANCE MEETING. Dillard

University, Gentilly Campus, 2601 Gentilly Blvd., 283-8822; www.dillard. edu — The meeting explains and seeks feedback on the zoning principles to be used in the land use elements of the citywide Master Plan. Email trene@brightmomentsnola. com for details. 8:30 a.m. CRAFTWERK FOR A CAUSE . Byrdie’s

Gallery, 2422-A St. Claude Ave., www.byrdiesgallery.com — The fundraiser for members of the United Fishermen’s Association features silkscreening, art and clothing for sale, live painting and a dance party. Call 307-2712 or email theartist@minkaart.net. for details. Admission $5. 9 p.m. CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Magazine Street Market, Magazine and Girod streets, 861-5898; www. marketumbrella.org — The weekly market features fresh produce, flowers and food. 8 a.m. to noon. EAGLE WATCH . Fontainebleau State

Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, (888) 6773668 — A park ranger leads a viewing of the park’s eagle nest. 3 p.m.

FRENCH SUMMER WINE FESTIVAL .

Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., 522-9200; www.theshopsatcanalplace.com — The French American Chamber of Commerce presents a night of auctions, entertainment and cooking demonstrations and vendor displays featuring French culinary delicacies. Email info@faccla.com for details. Admission $55, $45 members. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. GRETNA FARMERS MARKET. Gretna

Farmers Market, Huey P. Long Avenue, between Third and Fourth streets, Gretna, 362-8661 — The market features more than 30 vendors offering fruits, vegetables, meats and flowers. Free admission. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

HANDS ACROSS THE SAND.

Woldenberg Riverfront Park, Hibernia Pavilion — The local Sierra Club chapter hosts this nationwide gathering to raise awareness of offshore drilling’s consequences. Call 861-4835 for details. 11 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. LACOMBE CRAB FEST. John Davis

Park, Bayou Lacombe, Lacombe, (985) 882-3010 — Besides a variety of crab dishes, the festival features other local seafood, live entertainment, a cultural village and games for children. Visit www.lacombecrabfest.org for details. 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Saturday, noon to 9 p.m. Sunday.

MODERN CAJUN . Southern Food

& Beverage Museum, Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite

NIGHT VISION . Fairview-Riverside

State Park, 119 Fairview Drive, Madisonville — The nighttime walk through the park teaches participants how human eyes operate and how this relates to animal night vision. 7:15 p.m. PEARL RIVER ROLLER DERBY.

Northshore Harbor Center, 100 Harbor Center Blvd., Slidell, (985) 781-3650 — The Pearl River Swamp Dolls face off against the Cajun Roller Girls in the bout. Admission $10. 6 p.m. to 10 p.m.

RENAISSANCE MARKETPLACE OF EASTERN NEW ORLEANS.

Renaissance Marketplace, 5700 Read Blvd — The market offers cuisine from area restaurants, shopping, arts and crafts, children’s activities and more. 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. RUBARB’S REPAIR-A-THON & FAREWELL PARTY. St. Mary of the

Angels, 3501 N. Miro St., 945-3186 — The fundraiser for Rusted Up Beyond All Recognition Bikes features repair stations, raffles and food. Call 943-0216 or visit www. rubarbike.com for details. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. SIZZLIN’ SUMMER AUCTION . 3 Ring Circus’ The Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com — The New Orleans Food Co-Op’s fundraiser features a live auction, music and free food. Call 324-6849 or email john@nolafoodcoop.com for details. Admission $10, $5 members. 6 p.m. SKULLS & BONES. Fontainebleau State

Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, (888) 677-3668 — The session discusses the bone structure of a variety of different animals living in the park. 11 a.m.

UPPER NINTH WARD MARKET. Frederick Douglass Senior High School, 3820 St. Claude Ave. — The market offers local produce, seafood, bread, cheese and plants. Sponsored by the Downtown Neighborhood Market Consortium. Call 482-5722 or email ggladney@ therenaissanceproject.la for details. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. URBAN LEAGUE ANNUAL GALA .

Sheraton New Orleans Hotel, 500 Canal St., 595-5511; www.sheratonneworleans.com — The civil rights organization’s fundraiser features dinner and music by Dejavu. Visit www.urbanleagueneworleans.org/ gala for details. Admission starts at $150. 8 p.m.

Sunday 27 CEREMONY IN APOLOGY TO THE SPIRITS OF THE OCEAN.

Uptown levee, near Oak Street — Participants perform healing rituals from different world religions against pollution in the Gulf. Call 948-9961 or visit www.neworleanshealingcenter.org for details. 5 p.m.

DIMENSIONS OF LIFE DIALOGUE . New

Orleans Lyceum, 618 City Park Ave., 460-9049; www.lyceumproject.

com — The nonreligious, holistic discussion group focuses on human behavior with the goal of finding fulfillment and enlightenment. Call 368-9770 for details. Free. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. DRINK ’N’ DRAW. Circle Bar, 1032 St. Charles Ave., 588-2616 — The weekly event features a live model, happy hour drink specials and art instruction upon request. Call 299-9455 for details. Admission $20. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. NEEDLE JUNKIES. 3 Ring Circus’ The Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 5692700; www.3rcp.com — The knitting group meets every Sunday. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Entertainment Series

Wednesday Night Comedy The Cowboy Comedian June 23 • 7:30pm & 9:30pm Coming soon: Wild Bill Dykes (6/30)

Monday 28 EDIBLE NEW ORLEANS ISSUE RELEASE PARTY. Bacchanal, 600 Poland Ave.,

948-9111 — The food magazine celebrates the release of its summer issue. Admission is $10 suggested donation for Delta Working Group. 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Call for appliCations LOUISIANA COMPOSERS FORUM .

Composers can submit original compositions for possible inclusion in a Sept. 29 performance by a 20-piece orchestra. Call 831-7145 or email LouisianaComposersForum@gmail. com for details. Deadline is July 3.

Thursdays - Karaoke, Live Band & Ladies Night Budweiser specials throughout the night. Ladies enjoy 2-for-1 mixed drink specials.

Karaoke • 8:30pm-9:30pm Groovy 7 • June 24 • 9:30pm-1:30am Coming soon: The Chee Weez (7/1)

words BRIAN COSTELLO. Garden District

Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The author signs and discusses A History of Pointe Coupee Parish, Louisiana. 1 p.m. Saturday.

Local Favorite Fridays Junior & Sumtin Sneaky June 25 • 9:30pm-1:30am

ELISE BLACKWELL . Octavia Books, 513

Octavia St., 899-7323 — The author signs and reads from An Unfinished Score. 6 p.m. Tuesday.

FAIR GRINDS POETRY EVENT. Fair

Grinds Coffeehouse, 3133 Ponce de Leon Ave., 913-9073; www.fairgrinds. com — Jenna Mae hosts poets on the second, fourth and fifth Sunday of each month. 8 p.m.

JOHN MOSIER. National World War II

Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — The author discusses Deathride. 6 p.m. Wednesday.

KATHY LYNN. Barnes & Noble

Booksellers, 1601 Westbank Expwy., Harvey, 263-1146 — The author signs Voices of Change: Two-Minute Inspirational Stories on Life’s Lessons Learned. 3 p.m. Saturday. M. H. HERLONG. Maple Street Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www.maplestreetbookshop.com — The author signs The Great Wide Sea. 11 a.m. Saturday. STACEY MEYER & TROY GILBERT. Maple Street Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www.maplestreetbookshop.com — The authors sign New Orleans Kitchens: Recipes from the Big Easy’s Best Restaurants. 1 p.m. Saturday.

Louisiana Saturday Nights Louisiana’s LeRoux June 26 • 9:30pm-1:30am

Lee Greenwood Friday, July 2 7:30pm & 9:30pm

Tickets start at $25

Where the Locals Party, Play... and Win! 504.366.7711 4132 Peters Road • Harvey

boomtownneworleans.com/boomers-nightclub Must be 21. Entertainment start times may vary. Shows are subject to change. ©2010 Pinnacle Entertainment, Inc. All rights reserved.

GAMBLING PROBLEM? C A L L 8 7 7. 7 7 0 . S T O P

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 22 > 2010

SPORTS PERFORMANCE & LIFESTYLE MANAGEMENT FOR FAMILIES. East

ARTS MARKET OF NEW ORLEANS.

169, 569-0405; www.southernfood.org — Nancy Wilson of Mam Papaul’s gives a cooking demonstration and discusses the commercialization of Louisiana culture. Admission $10, free for members. 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.

r e m m u S

39

8 k In 1986 k SCHWEGMANN’S , was voted , best supermarket

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 22 > 2010

Which store will win in 2010?

40

Gambit’s Best of New Orleans® Reader’s Poll

the ORigiNal

siNce 1986

Voting starts July 6

in Gambit and on bestofneworleans.com

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Email Ian McNulty at imcnulty@cox.net. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <CORKS AT THE TRACK > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >The Fair Grounds Race Course & Slots (1751 Gentilly Blvd., 9481285; www.fairgroundsracecourse.com) resumes its Tastings at < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <PUTTING < < < < < < <EVERYTHING < < < < < < < < < <ON < < <THE < < < TABLE < < < < < < < < < < < < < <the Track series this Wednesday, June 23, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Held in conjunction with Dorignac’s Food Center (710 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 834-8216; www.dorignacs.com), the WHAT event includes 25 wines from Oregon and Washington. Tickets Satsuma Cafe cost $25 and are available in advance at Dorignac’s or at the door. WHERE

am

B

3218 Dauphine St., 304-5962 WHEN

Breakfast, lunch and early dinner daily HOW MUCH

Inexpensive

RESERVATIONS

Not accepted

WHAT WORKS

Local produce powers juice, breakfast, salads and sandwiches. WHAT DOESN'T

The kitchen is illequipped to handle a rush.

CHECK, PLEASE

A former coffee shop fully embracing the farm-to-table ideal.

Seasonal Affective Order SUMMER IS ON THE MENU AT A FRESH CAFE AND JUICE BAR.

Cassi and Peter Dymond designed Satsuma Cafe’s menu to feature fresh local produce. PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

BAKING ON MAPLE

Most Frenchmen wouldn’t recognize the French bread we use for po-boys in New Orleans as their own, though they should have no trouble identifying with the classic baguettes from a new Uptown bakery. Maple Street Patisserie (7638 Maple St., 247-7912) was opened recently by Ziggy Cichowski, former pastry chef at the Windsor Court Hotel, and Patricia Ann Donahue. It offers an impressive range of breads, cakes and pastries. Don’t miss the croissants or the baba au rhum cakes.

five 5 IN

FIVE PLACES FOR RAW FISH BEYOND THE SUSHI BAR

MESÓN 923

923 S. PETERS ST., 523-9200 www.meson923.com

There’s a section of crudo, including hamachi with blood orange and radish.

GW FINS

808 BIENVILLE ST., 581-3467 www.gwfins.com

Raw yellowfin tuna is served in pristine slices and as tartare.

LILETTE

3637 MAGAZINE ST., 895-1636 www.liletterestaurant.com

The dinner menu’s raw fish appetizer plate changes daily.

BY IAN MCNULTY

Y

from chickens pecking away in the same area code. Shiitakes might turn up in the daily quiche, and the same blueberries sold at the Crescent City Farmers Market might plump up the morning’s pancakes. Arugula works its way into the “green breakfast sandwich,” along with eggs, avocado and cheese. Lumps of crabmeat and planks of bacon take grilled cheese to new heights. Satsuma still looks a lot like Coffea, with its mismatched tables, side patio and exposed brick walls mounting paintings and assorted artsy bric-a-brac. But also like Coffea, there is no proper kitchen. Cooking is done on a butane-fired camping stove, a small convection oven and a toaster. A party of four all ordering egg dishes at once can jam the works, and service often bogs down at prime meal times. But I’ve always been impressed by how neat the end product turns out. A crown of micro-greens and toasted seeds might top a salad of crackling-crisp lettuces, and that’s just the automatic side item for a turkey sandwich. Until a few weeks ago, kale starred in many of these dishes, and you can count me among those looking forward to the potent green’s expected return in fall. But in the meantime, we have the glory that is the Creole tomato. It’s cut thick for one salad with crunchy ribbons of fennel and Vidalia onion and another with local spinach, boiled egg and blue cheese vinaigrette. It’s also blended into a cool but spicy gazpacho with jalapeno and lime. At Satsuma Cafe, the seasonal goods always seem ready for their close ups.

LEONARDO TRATTORIA

709 ST. CHARLES AVE., 558-8986 www.leonardonola.com

Raw, thinly sliced swordfish comes with capers, olive oil and lemon.

BARU TAPAS & BISTRO

3700 MAGAZINE ST., 895-2225

Tuna tartare is laced with coconut oil and served with chips.

Questions? Email winediva1@earthlink.net.

2008 Mohua Pinot Noir CENTRAL OTAGO, NEW ZEALAND /

$21-$22 RETAIL From the world’s southernmost grape growing region, located on New Zealand’s south island, this stylish Central Otago Pinot Noir draws comparisons to wines from Burgundy and west coast U.S. viticultural areas. In the glass, the medium-bodied, velvety wine exhibits some complexity with aromas of red cherry, some earth and attractive spice nuances leading into flavors of dried berries, plum, ripe cranberry and raspberry with fine tannin and acid structures. You can drink it now, but it will improve over the next several years. Enjoy it with tuna, salmon, lamb, veal, pork, grilled chicken and a variety of cheeses. Buy it at: Martin Wine Cellar and Cellars of River Ridge. Drink it: La Thai Uptown. — Brenda Maitland

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 22 > 2010

ou know regulars really treasure a restaurant when they protest a menu change. In the case of Satsuma Cafe, that change was to stop using kale early in June when local farmers growing the burly, vitamin-packed green switched to summer crops. Customers expressed anguish when informed of the change at the cafe’s counter, and a few shared their disappointment in notes on Satsuma’s Facebook page. “No!!!!!!!” was the common thread. Such are the pitfalls of tying a menu to the food local farmers grow and which local seasons allow. Fine-dining chefs know this well. But few casual, inexpensive restaurants are as intimately in sync with local supply as Satsuma Cafe. Cassi and Peter Dymond opened Satsuma Cafe last year, taking their cue from restaurants they’d visited in other cities — everyday places where the farm-to-table aesthetic was in full bloom. This takes considerable effort. They were thrilled to find the former Coffea space available just two blocks from their Bywater home. And although they walk to work, they must log many miles sourcing their menu from a constellation of local suppliers, most of which don’t deliver. They soon had to sell their Corolla and buy a cargo van to accommodate the fresh hauls they collect around the area for their menu. Satsuma Cafe is essentially a coffee shop with a menu of breakfast plates, salads, sandwiches and juices, all revved up by vividly fresh, locally grown produce. Earthy, springy-textured, locally foraged chanterelles are added to scrambled eggs, which are collected

41

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

>>>>>

YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>

<<<< <<< <<<<< >>>>>>>>> <<< >> <<

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Out > > >2 >Eat > >is>an > >index > > >of> Gambit > > > > >contract > > > > >advertisers. > > > > > > >Unless > > > >noted, > > > >addresses > > > > > >are > >for > >New > > >Orleans. >>>>>>>>>

TOP 10 BARS

READERS’ CHOICE AWARDS Go to bestofneworleans.com to vote for your favorite New Orleans bar & see how your pick stacks up against our editors. Winners will be revealed in Gambit's 2010

Top 50 Bars of New Orleans JULY 6TH ISSUE

Dollar signs represent the average cost of a dinner entree: $ — under $10; $$ — $11 to $20; $$$ — $21 or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax 483-3116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

AMERICAN CONTEMPORARY 5 Fifty 5 — 555 Canal St., 553-5638;

www.555canal.com — New Orleans dishes and Americana favorites take an elegant turn in dishes such as the lobster mac and cheese, combining lobster meat, elbow macaroni and mascarpone, boursin and white cheddar cheeses. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

BAYONA — 430 Dauphine St., 5254455; www.bayona.com — House favorites on Chef Susan Spicer’s menu include sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce and the appetizer of grilled shrimp with black-bean cake and coriander sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$$ THE GREEN GODDESS — 307 Ex-

change Alley, 301-3347; www. greengoddessnola.com — Chef Chris DeBarr’s contemporary cooking combines classic techniques, exotic ingredients and culinary wit. At lunch, Big Cactus Chilaquiles feature poached eggs on homemade tortillas with salsa verde, queso fresca and nopalitos. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Thu.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 22 > 2010

ONE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE —

42

presented by

ABSOLUT VODKA To advertise in the Top 50 Bars Issue, call

Sandy at (504) 483-3150 DEADLINE: JUNE 25

8132 Hampson St., 301-9061; www.one-sl.com — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes like char-grilled oysters topped with Roquefort cheese and a red wine vinaigrette, seared scallops with roasted garlic and shiitake polenta cakes and a memorable cochon de lait. Reservations recommended. Lunch Thu.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

BAR & GRILL THE CLUBHOUSE BAR & GRILL —

4617 Sanford St., Metairie, 8835905 — Clubhouse offers burgers and sandwiches. The black and blue burger is stuffed with blue cheese and blackened on the grill. Or try the blackened chicken Caesar wrap. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

DINO’S BAR & GRILL — 1128 Tchoupitoulas St., 558-0900 — Dino’s kitchen serves burgers, chicken tenders, salads and wraps. Happy hour is from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards and checks. $

JIGGERS — 1645 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metaire, 828-3555 — Enjoy daily specials like red and beans rice with a pork chop on Mondays or order burgers, salads and wraps from the regular menu. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

RENDON INN BAR & GRILL — 4501 Eve St., 826-5605 — Try appetiz-

ers such as spinach and artichoke dip, hot wings or fried pickles. Off the grill there are burgers, chicken sandwiches or cheese quesadillas. Other options include salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

THE RIVERSHACK TAVERN — 3449

River Road, 834-4938; www. therivershacktavern.com — This bar and music spot offers a menu of burgers, sandwiches overflowing with deli meats and changing lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

ZACHARY’S BY THE LAKE — 7224 Pontchartrain Blvd., 872-9832; www.zacharysbythelake.com — Zachary’s serves seafood platters, po-boys, salads, barbecue shrimp and more. Jumbo Gulf shrimp with cane syrup are wrapped in bacon, fried crispy and served with pickled okra salad. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BARBECUE ABITA BAR-B-Q — 69399 Hwy.

59, Abita Springs, (985) 892-0205 — Fresh Louisiana boudin made with pork, rice and seasonings is a specialty at this Northshore smokehouse. Also try pulled pork with sides like baked beans and potato salad. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

WALKER’S BAR-B-QUE — 10828 Hayne Blvd., 281-8227; www.cochondelaitpoboys.com — The makers of the Jazz Fest cochon de lait po-boy serve pork, ribs, chicken and more. The family feast includes a half-slab of ribs, half a chicken, half a pound of brisket, pork and sausage, two side orders, bread and sauce. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Saturday. Cash only. $

BREWPUB CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE —

527 Decatur St., 522-0571; www. crescentcitybrewhouse.com — This French Quarter brewhouse serves baked oysters, salads and crabcakes stand alongside grilled strip steaks, crispy duck and tender brewhouse ribs. Beers change seasonally. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

CAFE ELIZABETH’S

RESTAURANT

601 Gallier St., 944-9272; www. elizabeths-restaurant.com — Signature praline bacon sweetens brunch at this Bywater spot. Dinner brings options like fish and scallop specials. Also enjoy homemade desserts. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

LAFITTE’S CAFE — 6325 Elysian Fields Ave., 284-7878; www.lafit-

tescafe.com — Lafitte’s serves wraps with a wide selection of fillings, burgers and patty melts, salads, sandwiches and baked potatoes. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ LAKEVIEW BREW COFFEE CAFE —

5606 Canal Blvd., 483-7001 — This casual cafe offers gourmet coffees and a wide range of pastries and desserts baked in house, plus a menu of specialty sandwiches and salads. Breakfast is available all day on weekends. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PARKVIEW CAFE AT CITY PARK —

City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 483-9474 — Located in the old Casino Building, the cafe serves gourmet coffee, sandwiches, salads and ice cream till early evening. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $ RICCOBONO’S PANOLA STREET CAFE — 7801 Panola St., 314-1810

— Specialties include crabcakes Benedict — two crabcakes and poached eggs topped with hollandaise sauce and potatoes — and the Sausalito omelet with spinach, mushrooms, shallots and mozzarella. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily. Credit cards. $

THE RUBY SLIPPER CAFE — 139

N. Cortez St., 309-5531; www. therubyslippercafe.net — This casual cafe offers breakfast options such as two eggs with sausage or applewood-smoke bacon or barbecued shrimp and grits. Lunch options include burgers, sandwiches, salads and changing specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Tue.-Fri., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $

ST. JAMES CHEESE — 5004 Pryta-

nia St., 899-4737; www.stjamescheese.com — The cheese shop offers more than 100 varieties of cheese from around the world. A small menu includes creative sandwiches, salads and specials. The Radette cheese sandwich includes house-made pastrami and spicy pickles on rye. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

TED’S FROSTOP — 3100 Calhoun St., 861-3615 — The signature Loto-Burger is as good as ever, or try the castle burgers. Fried seafood and plate lunches provide square meals, as do the sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ TERRAZU — 201 St. Charles Ave.,

287-0877 — Located in Place St. Charles, Terrazu serves coffee drinks and a menu of soups, salads and sandwiches. The Terrazu salad is topped with boiled shrimp, hearts of palm and avocado. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

VINE & DINE — 141 Delaronde St., 361-1402; www.vine-dine.com — The cafe serves cheese boards and charcuterie plates with pate and cured meats. There also is a menu of sandwiches, quesadillas, bruschettas, salads and dips. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CHINESE CHINA ORCHID — 702 S. Car-

rollton Ave., 865-1428; wwww. chinaorchidneworleans.com — China Orchid serves a wide array of dishes including soups, fried rice, egg foo young, lo mein and more. Empress chow mein, mango shrimp or chicken, and triple dragon with shrimp, chicken and beef are specialties. Delivery available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CHINA ROSE — 3501 N. Arnoult

Road., Metairie, 887-3295 — China Rose offers many Chinese seafood specialties. The Lomi Lomi combines jumbo shrimp, pineapple and water chestnuts wrapped in bacon, fries them golden brown and serves them on a bed of sautéed vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

FIVE HAPPINESS — 3511 S. Carroll-

ton Ave., 482-3935 — The large menu at Five Happiness offers a range of dishes from wonton soup to sizzling seafood combinations served on a hot plate to sizzling Go-Ba to lo mein dishes. Delivery and banquest facilities available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

JUNG’S GOLDEN DRAGON — 3009 Magazine St., 891-8280; www. jungsgoldendragon2.com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, Thai and Korean cuisine. Chinese specialties include Mandarin, Szechuan and Hunan dishes. Grand Marnier shrimp are lightly battered and served with Grand Marnier sauce, broccoli and pecans. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

ette St., Suite 4, Gretna, 368-1355; www.threehappiness.com — Three Happiness serves Chinese and Vietnames dishes and dim sum specials on weekends. Westlake duck features tender duck with snow peas, corn, straw mushrooms and napa cabbage. Vietnamese crepes are served with pork and shrimp. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TREY YUEN CUISINE OF CHINA — 600 N. Causeway Approach.,

Mandeville, (985) 626-4476; 2100 N. Morrison Blvd., Hammond, (985) 345-6789; www.tryyuen. com — House specialties include fried soft-shell crab topped with Tong Cho sauce, and Cantonese-style stir-fried alligator and mushrooms in oyster sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

COFFEE/ DESSERT ANTOINE’S ANNEX — 513 Royal

St., 581-4422; www.antoines.com — The Annex is a coffee shop serving pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. The Royal Street salad features baby spinach and mixed lettuces with carrots, red onion, red peppers, grapes, olives, walnuts and raspberry vinaigrette. No reserva-

BEN ’N JERRY’S — 3500 Veterans

Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 8875656 — Ben ’n Jerry’s offers rich ice creams in signature flavors, ice cream cakes, frozen drinks, fruit smoothies and sundaes. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CREOLE ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713

St. Louis St., 581-4422; www. antoines.com — The city’s oldest restaurant offers a glimpse of what 19th century French Creole dining might have been like, with a labyrinthine series of dining rooms. Signature dishes include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

AUSTIN’S RESTAURANT — 5101 W. Esplanade Ave., Metairie, 888-5533; www.austinsno.com — Austin’s cooks hearty Creole and Italian dishes like stuffed soft-shell crab and veal Austin, which is crowned with crabmeat. No reservations. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ GUMBO SHOP — 640 St. Peter

St., 525-1486; www.gumboshop. com — Gumbo and New Orleans classics such as crawfish etouffee dominate the menu. Their spicy flavors meld into a dish that represents the city’s best and redefines comfort food. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

LE CITRON BISTRO — 1539 Religious St., 566-9051; www.le-citronbistro.com — Located in a historic building, the quaint bistro serves starters like chicken and andouille gumbo and fried frogs legs. Entrees include choices like fried chicken, Gulf fish and burgers. Reservations accepted. Dinner Wed.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ MR. ED’S CREOLE GRILLE— 5241

Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 889-7992; www. mredsno.com — Mr. Ed’s offers seafood dishes and some Italian accents. Try shrimp beignets with sweet chili glaze or creamy blue crab dip. Eggplant Vincent is a fried eggplant cup filled with crawfish and shrimp and served with pasta. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000 N.

Peters St., 524-4747 — This casual restaurant serves Creole favorites. The menu includes crawfish etouffee, boiled crawfish, red beans and rice and bread pudding for dessert. Outdoor seating is adjacent to Dutch Alley and the French Market. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

DELI MARTIN WINE CELLAR — 714

Elmeer Ave., Metairie , 896-7350; www.martinwine.com — Sandwiches piled high with cold cuts, salads, hot sandwiches, soups and lunch specials are available at the deli counter. The Cedric features chicken breast, spinach, Swiss, tomatoes and red onions on seven-grain bread. No reservations. Lunch daily. Credit cards. $

DINER DOT’S DINER — 2239 Willliams

Blvd., Kenner, 441-5600; 4150 Jef-

ferson Hwy., Jefferson, 833-9349; 6633 Airline Drive, Metairie, 7340301; 10701 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 738-9678; 12179 Hwy. 90, Luling, (985) 785-6836 — Burgers, eggs with bacon, grits and biscuits, fruit pies and daily specials are the pillars of Dot’s menu. Breakfast, lunch and dinner are served all day long. No reservations. Hours vary by location. Credit cards. $

STEVE’S DINER — 201 St. Charles Ave., 522-8198 — Located in the Place St. Charles food court, Steve’s serves hot breakfasts until 10 a.m. Lunch features sandwiches, salads and hot plate lunches such as fried catfish and baked chicken Parmesan. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $

FRENCH MARTINIQUE BISTRO — 5908 Mag-

azine St., 891-8495; www.martiniquebistro.com — This French bistro has both a cozy dining room and a pretty courtyard. Try dishes such as Steen’s-cured duck breast with satsuma and ginger demi-glace and stone-ground goat cheese grits. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GOURMET TO GO BREAUX MART — 315 E. Judge

Perez, Chalmette, 262-0750; 605 Lapalco Blvd., Gretna, 433-0333; 2904 Severn Ave., Metairie, 8855565; 9647 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 737-8146; www.breauxmart.com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux” as well as weekday specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

INDIAN JULIE’S LITTLE INDIA KITCHEN AT SCHIRO’S — 2483 Royal St., 944-

6666; www.schiroscafe.com — The cafe offers homemade Indian dishes prepared with freshly ground herbs and spices. Selections include chicken, lamb or shrimp curry or vegetarian saag paneer. Schiro’s also serves New Orleans cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NIRVANA INDIAN CUISINE — 4308

Magazine St., 894-9797 — Serving mostly northern Indian cuisine, the restaurant’s extensive menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TAJ MAHAL INDIAN CUISINE —

923-C Metairie Road, Metairie, 836-6859 — The traditional menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways, including curries and tandoori. Vegetarian options are available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

ITALIAN ANDREA’S NORTHERN ITALIAN SEAFOOD RESTAURANT — 3100 N.

19th St., Metairie, 834-8583; www. andreasrestaurant.com — Chefowner Andrea Apuzzo’s specialties of the house include Trota Bayou la Fourche — speckled trout served with lump crabmeat in a lemon-cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

BACCO — 310 Chartres St., 5222426; www.bacco.com — Bacco

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 22 > 2010

THREE HAPPINESS — 1900 Lafay-

tions. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

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blends Italian and contemporary Creole cuisine. Chef Chris Montero artfully prepares homemade pastas and fresh seafood, including lobster and shrimp ravioli. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

CAFE DIBLASI — 1801 Stumpf Blvd.,

Gretna, 361-3106; www.cafediblasi.com — For casual Italian dining, head to Cafe DiBlasi for pan-fried veal topped with lump crabmeat and lemon cream sauce or a traditional veal shank osso buco served with rich brown sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

RICCOBONO’S PEPPERMILL RESTAURANT — 3524 Severn Ave.,

Metairie, 455-2266 — This Italianstyle eatery serves New Orleans favorites like stuffed crabs with jumbo lump crabmeat with spaghetti bordelaise and trout meuniere with brabant potatoes. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ TONY MANDINA’S RESTAURANT — 1915 Pratt St., Gretna, 362-2010;

www.tonymandinas.com — Tony Mandina’s serves Italian and Creole cuisine. Dishes include pasta, veal parmigiana, veal Bordelasie and specialties like shrimp Mandina and battered eggplant topped with shrimp and crabmeat in cream sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

JAPANESE KYOTO — 4920 Prytania St., 891-

3644 — Kyoto’s sushi chefs prepare rolls, sashimi and salads. “Box” sushi is a favorite, with more than 25 rolls. Reservations recommended for parties of six or more. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$

MIYAKO JAPANESE SEAFOOD & STEAKHOUSE — 1403 St. Charles

Ave., 410-9997; www.japanesebistro.com — Miyako offers a full range of Japanese cuisine, with specialties from the sushi or hibachi menus, chicken, beef or seafood teriyaki, and tempura. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ ROCK-N-SAKE — 823 Fulton St.,

581-7253; www.rocknsake.com — Rock-n-Sake serves traditional Japanese cuisine with some creative twists. There’s a wide selection of sushi, sashimi and rolls or spicy gyoza soup, panfried soba noodles with chicken or seafood and teriyaki dishes. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.Sun. Credit cards. $$

LATIN AMERICAN LA MACARENA PUPSERIA & LATIN CAFE — 8120 Hampson St., 862-

5252 — Enjoy Latin home cooking in a quaint and festive cafe. Try the namesake Salvadoran pupusas, stuffed cornmeal disks, or Mexican favorites. Latin-style brunch is served on weekends. Reservations accepted. Lunch

LOUISIANA CONTEMPORARY ATCHAFALAYA RESTAURANT —

901 Louisiana Ave., 891-9626; www.cafeatchafalaya.com — Atchafalaya serves creative contemporary Creole cooking. Shrimp and grits feature head-on Gulf shrimp in a smoked tomato and andouille broth over creamy grits. There’s a Bloody Mary bar at brunch. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$ BOMBAY CLUB — 830 Conti St.,

586-0972; www.thebombayclub. com — Mull the menu at this French Quarter hideaway while sipping a well made martini. The duck duet pairs confit leg with pepper-seared breast with black currant reduction. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, latenight Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

MILA — 817 Common St., 412-2580; www.milaneworleans.com — MiLA takes a fresh approach to Southern and New Orleans cooking, focusing on local produce and refined techniques. Try New Orleans barbecue lobster with lemon confit and fresh thyme. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri. dinner Mon.-Sat. $$$ RALPH’S ON THE PARK — 900

City Park Ave., 488-1000; www. ralphsonthepark.com — Popular dishes include baked oysters Ralph, turtle soup and the Niman Ranch New York strip. There also are brunch specials. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

752 Tchoupitoulas St., 525-4790 — Tommy’s Wine Bar offers cheese and charcuterie plates as well as a menu of appetizers and salads from the neighboring kitchen of Tommy’s Cuisine. No reservations. Lite dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

TOMMY’S WINE BAR —

MEDITERRANEAN/ MIDDLE EASTERN ATTIKI BAR & GRILL — 230 Decatur St., 587-3756; www.attikineworleans.com — Attiki features a range of Mediterranean cuisine including entrees of beef kebabs and chicken shawarma. Reservations recommended. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $$ PYRAMIDS CAFE — 3151 Calhoun

St., 861-9602 — Diners will find authentic, healthy and fresh Mediterranean cuisine featuring such favorites as sharwarma prepared on a rotisserie. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEXICAN & SOUTHWESTERN CARLOS MENCIA’S MAGGIE RITAS MEXICAN BAR & GRILL — 200

Magazine St., 595-3211; www.maggieritas.com — Mexican favorites include sizzling fajita platters, quesdillas, enchiladas and a menu of margaritas. There also are Latin American dishes, paella and fried ice cream for dessert. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

COUNTRY FLAME — 620 Iberville St., 522-1138 — Country Flame serves a mix of popular Mexican and Cuban dishes. Come in for fa-

jitas, pressed Cuban sandwiches made with hickory-smoked pork and char-broiled steaks or pork chops. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

JUAN’S FLYING BURRITO — 2018 Magazine St., 569-0000; 4724 S.Carrollton Ave. 486-9550; www. juansflyingburrito.com — This wallet-friendly restaurant offers new takes on Mexican-inspired cooking. It’s known for its mealand-a-half-size signature burritos. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ NACHO MAMA’S MEXICAN GRILL — 3242 Magazine St., 899-0031;

1000 S. Clearview Pkwy., Harahan, 736-1188; www.nachomamasmexicangrill.com — These taquerias serve Mexican favorites such as portobello mushroom fajitas and chile rellenos. There are happy hour margaritas on weekdays and daily drink specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SANTE FE — 3201 Esplanade Ave., 948-0077 — Dine indoors or out at this comfortable Southwestern cafe. Chicken Maximilian is a baked chicken breast roulade with Anaheim peppers, chorizo and Asiago cheese. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ TOMATILLO’S — 437 Esplanade

Ave., 945-9997 — Enjoy combinations like Tomatillo’s Fiesta, which includes a taco, tamale and enchilada served with rice and beans. There are many margarita options. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MUSIC AND FOOD GAZEBO CAFE — 1018 Decatur St.,

525-8899; www.gazebocafenola. com — The Gazebo features a mix of Cajun and Creole dishes and ice cream daquiris. The New Orleans sampler rounds up jambalaya, red beans and rice and gumbo. Other options include salads, seafood po-boys and burgers. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ HOUSE OF BLUES — 225 Decatur

St., 310-4999; www.hob.com/ neworleans — Try the pan-seared Voodoo Shrimp with rosemary cornbread. The buffet-style gospel brunch features local and regional groups. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

THE MARKET CAFE — 1000 Deca-

tur St., 527-5000; www.marketcafenola.com — Dine indoors or out on seafood either fried for platters or po-boys or highlighted in dishes such as crawfish pie, crawfish etouffee or shrimp Creole. Sandwich options include muffulettas, Philly steaks on poboy bread and gyros in pita bread. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — 626 Frenchmen St., 949-0696; www. snugjazz.com — Traditional Creole and Cajun fare pepper the menu along with newer creations such as the fish Marigny, topped with Gulf shrimp in a Creole cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

NEIGHBORHOOD GOTT GOURMET CAFE — 3100

Magazine St., 373-6579; www. gottgourmetcafe.com — Gott Gourmet’s menu of creative dishes and sandwiches includes

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 22 > 2010

MIKIMOTO — 3301 S. Carrollton Ave., 488-1881; www.mikimotosushi.com — Sushi choices include new and old favorites, both raw and cooked. The South Carrollton roll includes tuna tataki, avocado and snow crab. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Delivery available. Credit cards. $$

and dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Cash only. $$

45

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LOVE OUR BRUNCH?

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601 Gallier & Chartres St. · 944-9272 www.elizabeths-restaurant.com

Thursdays at Twilight

DENTAL CLEANING SPECIAL

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3636 Bienville St., 482-9120; www. liuzzas.com — This neighborhood favorite serves casual Creole and Italian fare. The Frenchuletta is a muffuletta on French bread served hot. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $$

MR. ED’S RESTAURANT — 910 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 4633030; 1001 Live Oak St., Metairie, 838-0022 — Popular dishes include seafood-stuffed bell peppers loaded with shrimp, crawfish and crabmeat, topped with buttered breadcrumbs. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ MARKS TWAIN’S PIZZA LANDING — 2035 Metairie Road, Metairie,

WINE BY THE GLASS

LIUZZA’S RESTAURANT 7 BAR —

PIZZa



2 for 1

a cochon de lait po-boy made with pulled pork, homecooked Dr. Pepper-honey-baked ham, pickles, Gruyere cheese, anchohoney coleslaw and honey mustard-chile mayo. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Fri. Credit cards. $

UPTOWN KENNER

Now available at 2 locations!

8025 Maple St. @ Carrollton · 861-9044 www.uptownsmiles.com 1942 Williams Blvd., Suite 8 · 469-9648 www.kennersmiles.com

832-8032; www.marktwainspizza.com — Disembark at Mark Twain’s for salads, po-boys and pies like the Italian pizza with salami, tomato, artichoke, sausage and basil. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ NONNA MIA CAFE & PIZZERIA — 3125 Esplanade Ave., 948-1717

— Nonna Mia uses homemade dough for pizza served by the slice or whole pie and offers salads, pasta dishes and panini. Gourmet pies are topped with ingredients like pancetta, roasted eggplant, portobello mushrooms and prosciutto. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

POMPEII PIZZERIA — 1068 Magazine St., 708-4213; www.pompeiipizzeria.com — The barbecue bacon cheeseburger pizza features ground beef, applewood-smoked bacon, onions and smoky barbecue sauce. The Beaurantula is a Philly cheese steak loaded with vegetables and ranch dressing. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Wed.Mon. Credit cards. $

REGINELLI’S — 741 State St., 8991414; 817 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 712-6868; 874 Harrison Ave., 488-0133; 3244 Magazine St. 8957272; 5608 Citrus Blvd., Harahan, 818-0111; www.reginellis.com — This New Orleans original offers a range of pizzas, sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ R&O’S RESTAURANT — 216 Old

Hammond Hwy., 831-1248 — R&O’s offers a mix of pizza and Creole and Italian seafood dishes. There’s everything from seafood gumbo and stuffed artichokes to po-boys and muffulettas. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $

SLICE RESTAURANT — 1513 St. Charles Ave., 525-7437 — Neapolitan-style pizza rules, but you can buy pizza by the slice and add or subtract toppings as you choose. There are also a full coffee bar, Italian sodas and organic teas. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ THEO’S NEIGHBORHOOD PIZZA —

4218 Magazine St., 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., 302-1133; www.theospizza.com — There is a wide variety of specialty pies or build your

own from the selection of more than two-dozen toppings. Also serving salads and sandwiches. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

WIT’S INN — 141 N. Carrollton Ave., 486-1600 — This Mid-City bar and restaurant features pizzas, calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers for snacking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SaNDWICHES & PO-BOYS MAGAZINE PO-BOY SHOP — 2368

Magazine St., 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of po-boys filled with everything from fried seafood to corned beef to hot sausage to veal. There are breakfast burritos in the morning and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ MAHONY’S PO-BOY SHOP — 3454

Magazine St., 899-3374; www. mahonyspoboys.com — Mahoney’s serves traditional favorites and original po-boys like the Peacemaker, which is filled with fried oysters, bacon and cheddar cheese. There are daily lunch specials as well. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PARKWAY BAKERY AND TAVERN — 538 N. Hagen Ave., 482-3047 —

Parkway serves juicy roast beef po-boys, hot sausage po-boys, fried seafood and more. No reservations. Kitchen open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $ SAMMY’S

PO-BOYS

&

CATER-

ING — 901 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 835-0916; www. sammyspoboys.com — Sammy’s offers a wide array of po-boys and wraps. The house-cooked bottom round beef in gravy is a specialty. The menu also includes salads, seafood platters, a few Italian dishes and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SEaFOOD JACK DEMPSEY’S — 738 Poland Ave., 943-9914 — The Jack Dempsey seafood platter serves a training-table feast of gumbo, shrimp, oysters, catfish, redfish and crawfish pies, plus two side items. Other dishes include broiled redfish and fried soft-shell crab. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat. and dinner Wed.Sat. Credit cards. $$ LA COTE BRASSERIE — 700

Tchoupitoulas St., 613-2350; www. lacotebrasserie.com — This stylish restaurant in the Renaissance New Orleans Arts Hotel serves an array of raw and cooked seafood. Tobasco and Steen’s Cane Syrup glazed salmon is served with shrimp mirliton ragout. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

MARIGNY BRASSERIE — 640

Frenchmen St., 945-4472; www. marignybrasserie.com — Marigny Brasserie serves breakfast items like Cajun eggs Bendict. The lunch and dinner menus include fried seafood po-boys and a host of Italian dishes. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

RED FISH GRILL — 115 Bourbon St.,

598-1200; www.redfishgrill.com — Seafood creations by Execu-

tive Chef Gregg Collier dominate a menu peppered with favorites like hickory-grilled redfish, pecancrusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SOuL WILLIE MAE’S SCOTCH HOUSE —

2401 St. Ann St., 822-9503 — Willie Mae Seaton’s landmark restaurant is run by her granddaughter and serves her renowned fried chicken. There are also changing daily specials. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat. Cash only. $$

StEaKHOuSE RUTH’S CHRIS STEAKHOUSE — 3633

Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 888-3600; www.ruthschris.com — Ruth’s top-quality steaks are broiled in 1,800-degree ovens and arrive at the table sizzling. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

taPaS/SPaNISH GALVEZ RESTAURANT — 914 N.

Peters St., 595-3400; www.galvezrestaurant.com — Located at the former site of Bella Luna, Galvez offers tapas, paella and a Spanishaccented bouillabaisse. Besides seafood, entrees include grilled Black Angus sirloin and roasted chicken. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$ MIMI’S IN THE MARIGNY — 2601 Royal St., 872-9868 — The decadant Mushroom Manchego Toast is a favorite here. Or enjoy hot and cold tapas dishes ranging from grilled marinated artichokes to calamari. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

VIEtNaMESE AUGUST MOON — 3635 Prytania

St., 899-5129; www.moonnola. com — August Moon serves a mix of Vietnamese and Chinese cuisine. There are spring rolls and pho soup as well as many popular Chinese dishes and vegetarian options. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PHO HOA RESTAURANT — 1308

Manhattan Blvd., 302-2094 — Pho Hoa serves staple Vietnamese dishes including beef broth soups, vermicelli bowls, rice dishes and banh mi sandwiches. Bo kho is a popular beef stew. Appetizers include fried egg rols, crab rangoons and rice paper spring rolls. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

PHO NOLA — 3320 Transcontinental Drive, Metairie, 941-7690; www.pho-nola.com — Pho NOLA serves spring rolls and egg rolls, noodle soups, rice and vermicelli dishes and po-boys. Beverages include boba teas, milk teas, coffee drinks and smoothies. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PHO TAU BAY RESTAURANT — 113 Westbank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, 368-9846 — You’ll find classic Vietnamese beef broth and noodle soups, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, shrimp spring rolls with peanut sauce and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Wed. & Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

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BEAUTY SALONS/SPAS BOOTH RENTAL W/FOLLOWING

Available for NO Salon East. Also Sew in Special $175 + save 5% on hair. 504-909-4753

GLENN MICHAEL SALON & BEAUTY ACADEMY No Hiring All Positions: • Front Desk, Customer Service & Retail Manager • Teacher & School Administrators • Stylists (Exp. & AppREnTiCES) • nail Techs Salary, benefits, bonuses, discounts & more. A Great Place to Work, Learn & Grow! E-mail resume with contact name & phone # to: glennmichaelsalonacademy@yahoo.com or call now 504-250-3969 to leave name, ph # & desired position.

Your Future Starts NOW! CLERICAL

Admin Developm Associate

Database exp, MS Office, good cust serv/phone skills. Mail cover letter and res: attn Crystal, WWOZ PO Box 51840 NOLA 70151. No calls.

Guinevere is a 5-month-old, spayed, DSH with an unusual tawny-colored coat and eyes to match. She’s playful and curious and quite calm for a kitten. To meet Guinevere or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191.

SEEKING NEW ORLEANS FINEST SERVICE PROFESSIONALS

NOW HIRING:

• Housekeeping • Food & Beverage • Gift Shop Retail Manager • Floor Supervisor • Bartender • Houseperson • Server’s Assistant • Room Attendant • Sazerac Server • Guest Request Runner • Barista Supervisor • Uniform Room Attendant • Host/Hostess • Room Service Server Professionals must apply online: www.hiltonfamily.jobs

GUINEVERE

Kennel #A10373027

EOE/AA Drug Free Workplace

WIT’S INN Bar & Pizza Kitchen Pizza Maker & Bartender w/ food experience

Apply in person Mon-Fri,1-5pm 141 N. Carrollton Ave.

JERRY

Kennel #A10389094

Jerry is a 5-month-old, neu-

tered, Lab mix. He likes to play with toys, sits for treats and would enjoy taking an obedience class. To meet Jerry or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/ SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. To look for a lost pet come to the Louisiana SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), Mon-Sat. 9-5, Sun. 12-5 or call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 22 > 2010

The Gambit’s weekly guide to Services, Events, Merchandise, Announcements, etc. for as little as $50

mgp1201@hotmail.com. Please include required salary and date available.

47

reaL esTaTe

SHOWCaSe NEW ORLEANS

931-35 Dauphine $935K 1850’S Creole cottage. Updated kit & ba, patio, ctyd w/pond. Back unit has 4 studio apts-7 apts total. $6500/mo rent income.

922-24 Dauphine $900K 4 unit French Quarter multifamily. 3457 sqft total. Great Quarter location!

4526 St. Ann $239K Great views of City Park & perfect deck in rear to view Endymion Parade. Spacious 1 br/1.5 ba totally renov. postKatrina. Wd flrs, hi ceils, stainless steel apps. 1089 square feet.

Paula Bowler • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 • www.frenchquarterrealty.com

SLIDELL

57345 Oak Ave • $125,000 Reduced, 2085 sq ft 3 bedroom home New Carpet, Refreshed kitchen Large rooms, Exposed wood beams Lisa B Simms-Hayles Broker MaRioN B REaL EStatE iNC www.marionb.com • 985-643-4452

DOWNTOWN

RIVERBEND

MISSISSIPPI

GENTILLY

1730 Tchoupitoulas St. • RIVER VIEW 34K sq. ft. of land. 20K sq. ft. of building. Prkg on St. James. Bounded by Celeste, St. James, Tchoupitoulas & S. Peters Streets. Asking Price:$1,200,000 Call Cassandra Sharpe/Broker Cassandra Sharpe Real Estate, Inc. 504-568-1252 • c: 460-7829

FANTASTIC LOCATION Riverbend Victorian Camelback 1028 Joliet, close to river & Oak St., 3br, 2 ba, many original architectural details, off st parking, new roof, wood floors, high ceilings. $269,000 STO Louis Lederman • Prudential Gardner 504-874-3195

506 John Baptiste, Bay St. Louis, MS Located in Shieldsboro, a planned comm w/clubhouse, pool & greenspace close to beach & Old Town. Sev models are avail w/open flr plans, high ceils, FP, molding, granite cntrs, ceil fans & porches. Plus, no flood ins. req & 30% ins. break. MLS#221304 Call Helene at 228-493-4275. Latter & Blum Coastal Living

5542 Charlotte Dr. $99,500 Slab Ranch - 3 BR, 2 BA Partially renov + Guest Cottage 504-568-1359

LAKEVIEW

EASTOVER

For Sale By Owner: Reduced Lake Vista 4 BR 3 BA tri-level, 2985 sq ft., $385k Call 504.723.2840

Priced at $205K, Huge 90x200 lot gated community, ready to renovate. Keisha Washington SOUTHERN SPIRIT REALTY, LLC (504) 319-2693

170 E. Greenbrier

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 22 > 2010

3900 NORTH HULLEN • METAIRIE, LA 70002 WWW.3900NHULLEN.COM

48

123 & 125 Camp St., New Orleans, LA Auction: July 10th 11 AM Held Onsite (3,200 sf.)

• Pub Published Reserve Min. Bid $499,000 Min • 1,6 1,600 sf. commercial spa space lower level • 1,6 1,600 sf. three bedroom res residence upper level wit with a private entrance • 2nd floor balcony, between JW Marriot and Sheraton 2 blocks bl to French Quarter Also selling restaurant kitchen equipment Open House: 6/29 & 6/30 Noon - 4PM

10% buyer’s premium Lousiana AL 1743

Also selling a VIP Box for The New Orleans Saints pre/regular season home games.

Dan Mahaney Auctioneer

877.370.0247 danmahaney.com

Three story, beautiful 6-bedroom. 5.5 baths Chateau-like home, 5,214 sq.ft. The best of everything. Main 1st floor Kitchen, all professional lines Sub-Zero/Viking/, granite counter tops. Second floor kitchen/designer appliances, second floor great den. Master bedroom on first floor w/Jacuzzi tub. Salt water pool with outside Jacuzzi, outside bathrooms. Just minutes from the Causeway and Lakeside Shopping Center.

Offered At: $695,000 Priced under current appraisal Polly Eagan gri, crs - Agent broker licensed in state of la

504-862-0100 • pollyeagan@aol.com KELLER WILLIAMS REALTY New Orleans 8601 Leake Ave. New Orleans, LA 70118-USA

Each OfficE indEpEndEntly OwnEd and OpEratEd

REAL ESTATE CLASSIFIEDS COMMERCIAL RENTALS

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

UPTOWN

GARDEN DISTRICT

BYWATER ELEGANCE IN THE BYWATER

Stunning juxtiposition of architectural integrity & soignee panache. 2000’ 2- 3 bdrms, 2 ba, garden room, steps to river. Offers staring at $299,000. 626 Pauline St. 504-914-5606.

WAREHOUSE SPACE STARTING AT

1, 2 & 3 ROOM OFFICES STARTING AT $500

$750 Call

INCLUDING UTILITIES

Lakefront Harborview Condo 2br, 2ba w/lake view 139K . . . 2834706 www.datakik.com/423

Call 899-RENT

COMMERCIAL PROPERTIES RIVER VIEW - DOWNTOWN

899-RENT

1730 Tchoupitoulas St. 34K sq.ft of land, 20K sq.ft of bldg. Pkng on St. James, Tchoupitoulas & S. Peters. Asking $1,200,000. Call Cassandra Sharpe Real Estate, Inc. 504-5681252, cell 460-7829. See our ad in todays RE showcase!

HARAHAN/RIVER RIDGE 1324 HICKORY

2 BR, 1 BA townhouse, furn kit, w/d hkps, patio, O/A, $700/mo. Call 650-8778

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

HOWARD SCHMALZ & ASSOCIATES

REAL ESTATE Call Bert: 504-581-2804

GENERAL REAL ESTATE ALL AREAS - HOUSES FOR RENT. Browse thousands of rental listings with photos and maps. Advertise your rental home for FREE! Visit: http:// www.RealRentals.com

103 Egret

3/2 "Lake Vista Sanctuary"

1620 Prytania 2/1 Prytania Townhouse

J O I N TO DAY ! We are looking for Multifamily Professionals

like you! Developers, Owners, Builders, Management, Leasing, Vendors.

LIGHTING Check out ANTIQUES & our Mandeville Location FURNITURE 985-249-7145 504-522-9485

Exterior Designs

BEVERLY KATZ | LANDSCAPE DESIGNER 866-0276 www.exteriordesignsbev.com

DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENT GROUP

$1500

& METRO WIDE APARTMENTS

$1000

304-HOUSe (4687) • WWW.BRUNOINC.COM

7801 Hampson 2/1 University Area

$900

1572 Magazine 1/1 Lower Garden District

$700

912 Harding Dr. 1/1 Bayou "Dorm Style"

$550

Sustainable Property Development URBAN DEVELOPMENT • REAL ESTATE CONSULTING

504.274.1930 www.JCHDevelopment.com

Sterling Financial ServiceS, llc

PARTNERSHIP IN PROTECTION Commercial Services

Mortgage Rates are still LOW!!!

(504) 486-5846

Tammy Schindler

4.112% APR

Interest rate quoted assumes a minimum loan amount of $200,000.

Call Michael Schenck

504-889-0737

www.sterlingrates.com

BEECHGROVE & CLAIBORNE HOMES

15 year fixed

No Upfront Fees, Pre-Approval in Minutes!

Rates effective 6/16/2010 and subject to change without notice.

$39,900 - $79,900

CONDOS! TOTAL MONTHLY: $380-$700 NO DOWN PAYMENT! Free Credit Restoration!

ALL UNITS LESS THAN $700 PER MONTH

Ask about the $24 million park!

888-207-1711

Agnes Cardinale, Sales Executive

985-370-7213

BRENT COUTURE

MERIDIEN PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 504-566-1777

504- 373-5581

804 Sherry Lane Westwego, LA 70094 Managed by NDC Real Estate Management

Jodie Luther 504-782-0746 2321 North Arnoult Rd., Metairie, La 70001 www.southlandplumbingsupply.com

Branch

Consulting & Associates, LLC MAX R. JOHNSON 404-401-9680

GIONNE JOURDAN (856) 596-3008 GJOURDAN.MDC@COX.NET

To join: contact Multifamily Council Director, Kathy Barthelemy (504) 837-2700 or kathy@home-builders.org www.mfcno.com Affiliated with

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 22 > 2010

3.875%

137 Canvasback Drive, St. Rose, LA 70087

49

REAL ESTATE CLASSIFIEDS FABULOUS RENOV 4BR/2BA

Quiet cul-de-sac, walk to levee, new hdwd/cer flrs, recess lighting, srnd snd, sec sys, grt bkyd. Never flooded. Zone X, roof 4 yrs. $1600/ mo or $194,900 For Sale. Call Sylvia 415-6501

RIVER RIDGE NR LEVEE

Newly renov 4 plx. 2 br, 1 & 1/2 ba, w/d hkps, cen a/h, off st pkg, wtr pd. No pets. Quiet area suits retired person. $725/mo, refs & dep. 504737-2089.

KENNER NEAR WMS & W. NAPOLEON

Private rm w/bath & kit. Utilities paid, $500/mo. & 3 brm/1 bath house, $900. 504-737-2068

METAIRIE 1 BR CONDO - $675

w/d inside condo, kit, LR, dinette, lrg ba, lrge w/in clst, pool, sm blcny, no pets. 504/885-4304, 914-1705, 473-4304

A HIDDEN GEM

Chic seclusion in the heart of Metairie. All new 1 br fr $660 & 1 br + study fr $785. Furn corp avail. 780-1706 or 388-9972. www.orrislaneapts.com

ALL ELECTRIC - 2 BR

Townhouse. Washer/dryer hookups. 3009 15th Street. Call (504) 8346318.

LUXURY TOWNHOUSE

Open, tile, granite, stainless, jacuzzi, 2/1.5, w/d, double parking, minutes downtown. $975/mo. 452-5172.

OLD METAIRIE $300 OFF 1ST MONTH’S RENT - OLD METAIRIE SECRET 1 or 2 BR, Sparkling Pool, Bike Path, 12’ x 24’ liv rm sep Din, King Master, no Pets, no Sect 8, $699 & $824 • 504-236-5777

METAIRIE TOWERS

Rent or Lease or Lease to Buy, 1BR, 1-1/2 BA, jacuzzi, Elec & TV incld, prkg. 24 hr Concierge Service. $1150/ mo - 914-882-1212

ALGIERS POINT HISTORIC ALGIERS POINT

High end 1-4BR. Near ferry, clean, many x-tras, hrdwd flrs, cen a/h, no dogs, no sec 8, some O/S prkng $750$1200/mo. 504-362-7487

BYWATER

LAKEFRONT

1023 PIETY ST

Freshly remodeled 2 br, 2 full ba, w/d hkps, cen a/h, c-fans, fncd yd, avail now. 888-239-6566 or mrsmell@ comcast.net

FROM $2500/MO! A DEAL FOR 1700 SQ. FT!

Call owner 504-366-7374 or 781-608-6115 cell for best deal! 323 Morgan St., New Orleans, LA 70114

Samara D. Poché

Newly renov’d, 2br/1ba, LR, kit w/ appls, washer/dryer, $975/mo + $975 dep. 504-945-7829 or 817-681-0194.

504.319.6226 sam@ fqr.com

BYWATER EFFICIENCY

Great for One Person - Seeking Nice Tenant w/ Positive Energy. Available June 1 - no utility dep.Furn (incl linens, pots pans dishes), all utils pd, wi-fi & digital cable w/ all premium movie channels, laundry on site $840 inclusive w/ $420 dep. Short term rentals $900/mo or $300/wk. Must be compatible w/ owner, upper apt, off lush patio shared w/ two dogs & cats. Bicycle to Fr Qtr, bus at Royal St, walk on the levee. Nice place, nice people, seeking nice tenant. 483-3130

CARROLLTON

Large storage closets, Direct tv. Wide screen tv! King size master bed bedroom, 2.5 bathrooms. Extra queen sofa bed in living room. All you need is your bag! Completely corporate furnished! Friendly active neighborhood. 3 minute walk to free Algiers Point ferry which takes 8 scenic minutes landing at Canal St. At Harrah's casino/ French Quarter and Central Business District.

504.949.5400

3009 ROYAL ST

8026 COHN STREET

FURNISHED CORPORATE UPSCALE SPACIOUS 2 & 3 BEDROOM CONDOS. SECURED PARKING, GYM, POOL, INTERNET. ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED. New Orleans-Algiers Point river front! Convenient to everything. The longer the stay, the better the deal. Multiple rental discounts. Minimum term is one month. W/D, alarm syst, high ceils, exp. brick, balcs & priv rooftop decks.

LRG ATTRACTIVE APT

1 br upper w/deck, 1 house off S Carrollton, w/d, gas & wtr pd. $575/mo. Avail 7/1. 504-861-7553

CITY PARK/BAYOU ST. JOHN 4704 - A ST. PETER St.

Nr Delgado, all new 1 BR, kit, lr, backrm, w/d/fridge, o/s pkng. $875/ mo includes wtr & elec. pd. 504-3829477, Mark.

NEW CONSTRUCTION!

516 David St, 3BR, 2BA, 12” ceils, ca/h, 1467 sf, new appls incl w/d, granite. 1 blk to bus/st car, walk to City Pk. $1500-$1800. 504-669-7049

FRENCH QUARTER/ FAUBOURG MARIGNY

www. frenchquarterrealty.com

French Quarter realty’S 2007 toP ProDucer

RENTALS 1418 Chartres studio $650 210 Chartres 3d 1/1 $850 1233 esplanade #4 2/1 $900

941 ROYAL ST

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 22 > 2010

Fully furn, 1 br, 1 ba, shared pool & balc, w/d on site. $1200/mo/dep. No Pets. 504-236-5757. FQRental.com

50

MID CITY 1 BDR/BA - CENTRAL A/C

Cozy and bright 1 BDR/BA apartment near Canal St. Central A/C, Ceiling fans, Washer & Dryer. $650 per month plus deposit. 209 S. St. Patrick St. Call (504)913-5669. 1 Bedroom Cottage 2-story, 1 bedroom cottage near Bayou St. John. Gas & Water paid by Owner. Hardwood floors. Wash/Dry hookup. Yard. Pets Negotiable. $760/mo. Available July 1st (504) 975-6137

TREME NICE 1 BEDROOM UNIT

1315 ST PHILIP ST, lr, kitchen w/appls & bath, hdwd flrs, near Fr Qtr, park, wtr pd, $575 • 504-909-5150

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT 1 BDRM - NEAR TULANE

1908 dauphine #2 2/1 $925

7120 Willow Street, living room, tile bath, furnished kitchen. No pets. $700month+deposit. Call 504/283-7569

1022 st peter #203 1/1 $995

1 BDRM CLOSE TO UNIV

210 Chartres #3e 2/1 $1500

Clara St nr Nashvl. Renov Lg upr, 1 br, dr, lr, furn kit, uti rm w/hkps, cen a/h, wd flrs, ceil fans, w/d avl on site. $900/mo. Avl now. 895-0016.

FRENCH QUARTER APTS

1 BEDROOM APT

Next to Rouses Grocery Store, furn/ unfurn, studio/1 BR, $650-$1200. Call 504-919-3426 or 504-581-6350.

2511 S Carrollton Ave. Furn kit, cen a/h, off st pkg. $700/mo, wtr pd. Background ck required. 504-450-7450.

FRENCH QUARTER CHARM

1/2 BLOCK ST CHARLES

1226 Chartres. Newly renov 1 br apt, $1000/mo. Carpet, pool, laundry rm, sec gate. No pets. Mike, 919-4583.

514 MADISON ST/ $1000

1st flr off Decatur. Two 1 br, 1 ba, liv, din area, kit, wd flrs, coin w/d. Eddie 861-4561. Grady Harper Inc

2BR, 2BA w/ appls, beaut crtyd setting w/swimming pool, quiet nb’hood. $975/mo. 504/495-6044

LAKEVIEW/LAKESHORE 6029 BELLAIRE - $1100

Renov, cute 3 br, 2 ba, liv, eat-in kit,w/ gas appls & granite, alarm, drive. Grady Harper Inc, 861-4551.

French Quarter Realty Wayne • Nicole • Sam • Josh • Jennifer • Brett • Robert • George • Baxter

504-949-5400 911 N Derbigny 1/1 Reduced SINGLE HOME RENOV $625 $850 1205 St Charles Studio St. car Line, Pool, Pkng, Gym 830 St Philip “G” 1/1 Hi Ceils,Lg Balc,Prkng,Exc Loc $1995 $850 735 Esplanade “6” 1/1 Hdwd Flrs, Ctyd, Exc Loc $1050 829 Ursulines #1 1/1 furnished w/wifi, tile floors 829 Ursulines #5 1/1 Lots of windows,new carpet,crtyrd $1150 833 Ursulines #4 1/1 tile floors,courtyard,525 sqft $850 833 Ursulines #6 1/1 Upperrearunit,newcarpet,600sqft$1100 448 Julia Unit #219 1/1 furn,Utils Cable/WiFi included $1950 814 Lafayette “A” 1/1 CBD Furnished Utils included $950 $1025 528 Gov Nicholls 1/1 carriage house w/ crtyrd 739 ½ Gov Nicholls 1/1 Util included, furn., great loc! $1000 1625 Harmony 1/1 priv crtyd&balcy,town house $1000 Commerical, 750 sqft $2000 3607 Magazine 1704 Napoleon 1/1 spacious, hi ceils, 2 small side balcs $800 814 Orleans 1/1 new kitch&bath,great location $1500 210 Chartres “3E” 2/1 Fully furnished apt.w/d on site $1450 921 Chartres #9 2/1.5 condoindesirableblock,HUGEcrtyrd!$1700 1233 Esplanade #16 2/1 2 level apt,ss appls,pool&prkng $1000 1028 Kelerec #1 1/1 nicelayout,greatloc,waterpaid $1000 1028 Kelerec #2 1/1 wd flrs,central air,water paid $1000 $1000 1028 Kelerec #3 1/1 d/w, great loc, water paid $1800 1229 Royal 2/1.5 street balc,prkng,prime loc

1629 2nd. Upper rear bright 1 br apt, hdwd flrs, ceil fans, pvt balc, w/d facil. $800/mo, lse, refs. 895-4726 or 261-7611.

1042 SONIAT ST

3 bedrooms, 1.5 ba, lr, dr, furn kit, hdwd flrs, cen a/h, w/d, 1500 sf, 12’ ceils, $1400/mo. 504-952-5102

1106 BOURDEAUX ST

Spac 2 BR, 1 BA, frplc, cen a/h, porch, $1000/month w/ sec dep. 4 blks off St Charles. 504-891-7584 lv msg

1205 ST CHARLES AVE

Furn lux 1 br condo in conv location. Fully equip kit, gated pkg, fitness ctr. Call Mike for price, 281-798-5318.

1417 JOSEPH

GREAT LOCATION! Upper lg 3 br, 3 ba, furn kit, d/w, cen a/h, ceil fans, w/d on site. $1800/mo. 899-7657.

143 CHEROKEE

Lux 1 br, 1 ba, hi ceil, ceil fans, wd flrs, exp brick fplc, cedar lined closets, all appls, w/d. $750. Call Steve w/ Latter & Blum, 650-6770.

1508 CARONDELET, 2 Avail

1 BR, $800 & Studio, $750. Totally remodeled, cen a/h, hi ceils, hdwd flrs. 510-677-5855 or 1-888-239-6566

1702 DANTE ST

2 BR, liv, kit, bath. CH&A, Stove & fridge included. Access to pool & utility room. $800 per mo. Call 504-427-3284

1750 ST CHARLES #424

Totally renov 1 br plus study, SS appls, wd flrs. 24 hr sec. $1695/mo. Call Debbie w/L & B, O/A. 952-0959.

4917 S MIRO ST

2 bedrooms, washer/dryer, cen a/h, pool, closet space, water included. $885/mo. Call 452-2319 or 821-5567

1837 DUBLIN (at Cohn)

Spacious 3br/2ba, LR, Kit, apprx 1500sf. ca&h, c-fans, w/d, hrdwd,1blk off S. Carrollton. $1050/mo. Call 8662383 or 337-356-4497

2023 BROADWAY

Cls to univ/hosp/Lusher, beaut lrg 3 independent BR w/ cntr hall, lr, dr, furn kit, d/w, w/d, 1BA, wd flrs, scrnd prch. $1350 • 504-895-2683

REAL ESTATE CLASSIFIEDS 2 BR, 1 BA - $1200/mo

Napoleon nr St Charles, one of the best apts you will see! 1,500 sq ft living space, c-a/h, hdwd flrs, no pets, near universities. 2011 Gen Pershing, Avail 6/1, water paid. Paula 952-3131

4610 CARONDELET

2902 CAMP - $1500/MO

Lg Garden Dist camelback. Liv, din, furn kit, study, den, 2 br, 2 ba. Charm! Grady Harper, Inc, 861-4551.

By Jefferson. Raised cottage, upper. Deluxe 2br, lux bath/jacuzzi. Furn, W&D, hrdwd flrs, 1400sf, $1300/mo includes gas. 899-3668.

2BR, 2011 GEN PERSHING

5417 STORY ST

Best apt you’ll see! $1200/mo. Near the univs, beaut nb’hood, 1500 sq ft living space, 1 BA, cen a/h, hdwd flrs, No pets. Avail Jun 1. Paula 952-3131

2br/1ba Constance St

2br 1ba,1/2 of a shotgun dbl. Apt includes lvg rm, kit. demand loc. 1 blk off of Mag St. mins from Tulane/Loyola. 7 blks from St. Charles Streetcar. Perfect for profs or grad students! Sec Sys/Pd Mon. Hrdwd flrs W/D in unit, lge deck in bkyd Wireless Included $1200/month + security deposit 1 yr lse required No pets or smokers. 310-597-9749

4106 STATE ST DR•$1000

2 br, 1 ba, lr, dr, furn kit, c-a/h, w/d, c-fans, wd flr, drv, stor shed. Grady Harper, Inc. Eddie 861-4551.

5327 PRYTANIA ST

2BR, 1.5BA, Great loc! lux apt, furn kit, w/d, cen a/h, wd flrs, 12ft ceils, fans, $1500/mo 504-444-1030

4308 CONSTANCE ST

Renov apts, 1/2 blk from Napoleon, 2 br, 1.5 ba, wd flrs, vaulted ceils, mstr suite, sun porch, 2nd br loft, w/d, sec sys, deck, yard & shed. $1500/mo. 804-304-9864

4601 S CLAIBORNE AVE

Spac, lwr 3BR, 2BA, all appls+w/d, fncd yd, off st prkg. $1650. Nr univ, hosp, cbd. Marie 504-236-0644, 504-453-5047

1 blk St Charles. Renov upr 1700 sf, 2 br, solarium, cov’d prch, cen a/h, Italian tile kit & ba, hdwd flrs, frplcs. $1500/mo. 723-0001.

5300 FRERET

3 br, 2 ba duplex. Cen a/h, unfurn w/all appl inc m’wave & w/d. Close to univ & hosp. On bus line. Lg fncd bkyd, off st pkg. Safe n’hood, sec sys all units. $1350/mo. 289-5110.

7522 BENJAMIN - NR UNIV

1 br condo w/ pool, prkg, laundry, gated community. $650/mo w/ wtr pd. No pets. 453-8996.

7535 JEANNETTE ST

1BR, bath, appls, elec, wtr, int/cbl, incld. Nr Lutcher schl, yr lse, dep rqd. No smkr/pet. $850/mo. 219-1422

7614 COHN STREET

1BR/1BA, half a double, nice backyard, university area. $625/mo. 504-782-4848

802 FERN ST

Corner Maple. 2 or 3 br in hist, renov bldg, cen a/h, all appls, w/d, 12’ ceil. $1450-$1850/mo. 723-0001.

A UNIVERSITY AREA

4539 S Roman, 2000sf, 1/2 dbl, 2BR, 2BA, f-kit, w/d, c-a/h, off st pkg, wtr pd, $1100. 504-467-7052, 259-0043

CARROLLTON AVENUE

1 br, furn kit, a/c unit, hdwd flrs, fresh paint, sec gate. Sm pet ok w/dep. $675-$695/mo. Call 899-RENT.

GREAT EFFICIENCY!

One person studio. Near TU Univ. $590/mo net + dep. All utilities pd. 866-7837

CLASSIFIEDS ON HENRY CLAY AVE

Nr Aud Pk, 2 br apt, 1 ba, ac/ht, furn kit w/ w/d, hi ceils, hdwd flrs, sm patio. $1400/mo. 504/897-3816, 504/940-4831

VICTORIAN SHOTGUN

502 Washington, 2BR, 1BA, w/d, c-fans, wd flrs, c-a/h, sec, drvwy, pool, FREE Direct TV, $1095. 813-5822

UPTOWN/ GARDEN DISTRICT

1, 2 & 3

BEDROOMS AVAILABLE CALL

899-RENT

AUTOMOTIVE DOMESTIC AUTOS HONDA ACCORD 2 DR SPT COUPE 2000 Fully loaded, sun roof, low miles (75k). Exc cond. $200 down, take over notes of $145/mo with warranty. Call 667-7810, 24 hours.

IMPORTED AUTOS 2004 MB CLK500. All factory options. Silver with blk leather interior. 456 HP. 33K mi. garage kept, new tires & brakes. $19,500 OBO. 504231-0656.

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT LICENSED MASSAGE

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PUBLIC NOTICE Those having business with Gideon Productions, LLC for the movie “The Fields” should file creditor claims postmarked by Friday, July 9, 2010 to the address 800 Richard St, New Orleans, LA 70130. After July 9, claims should be sent to RC Baral & Co, 15821 Ventura Boulevard, Suite 500, Encino, CA 91436 SERVICES

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 22 > 2010

Bodywerks Massage by Marilyn Tapper La. License #2771. Uptown Studio. 504-782-1452.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 22 > 2010

24/7 Friendly Customer Care 1(888) 634.2628 18+ ©2010 PC LLC

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 22 > 2010

Are you ready to experience more?

53

PUZZLE PAGE CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE OR LEASE

4907 DRYADES A Perfect Blend of Old and New Spacious & Elegant, 2400 Sq. Ft. 3BR/2BA. Unique Modern Architect Designed Renovation. Lots of Natural Light. Excellent Condition. Great Space for Entertaining. Owner/Agent SALE PRICE: $435,000 LEASE: $3200/month

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 22 > 2010

(504) 895-4663

54

MICHAEL ZAROU

(504) 913-2872

cell: email: mzarou@latterblum.com

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 22 > 2010

Mind • Body • Spirit

TO ADVERTISE, CALL 483.3100

55

T:9”

T:10.25”

Enjoy Heineken Light Responsibly. ©2010 Heineken USA Inc., White Plains, NY

Client Name: Heineken Job Number: 0000035157_M01

This advertisement prepared by: Euro RSCG Worldwide


Gambit New Orleans- June 22, 2010