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NEW ORLEANS KNOW-IT-ALL

Questions for Blake: askblake@gambitweekly.com

HEY BLAKE, ON THE WALL OF 516 GOV. NICHOLLS ST., THREE STORIES UP, IS A FADED TEXT THAT READS â&#x20AC;&#x153;A. BOTSAY/BOX FACTORY.â&#x20AC;? ITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NOT ENTIRELY LEGIBLE. WHO WAS BOTSAY AND WHAT KIND OF BOXES DID HE MAKE? WONDERING

DEAR WONDERING, Before the street was renamed after Gov. Francis T. Nicholls, it was Hospital Street for 180 years. And 516 Hospital St. was the residence and business of Alexander Botsay, a pioneer cigar box maker of the South. It was about 1860, just four years after arriving in this country, that Botsay introduced the cigar box industry to New Orleans. Before that, cigar boxes were imported. Botsay came to New Orleans in 1856 from Budapest. He was a revolutionary when the Hungarians fought for their freedom against Austria. He married in New Orleans and had a large family and a successful business. When the Northern blockade cut off supplies to New Orleans during the Civil War, Botsay saw an opportunity. He bought up old cigar boxes and reworked them for his trade. He did well, receiving as much as 50 cents per box. Botsay stayed active in his business well into his eighties. He died Dec. 22, 1913. HEY BLAKE, IS THERE A CONCERT TAPE OF JIM MORRISONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LAST PERFORMANCE WITH THE DOORS IN NEW ORLEANS ON DEC. 12, 1970? PETE

R R s ai h n in e o

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 14 > 2011

The hisToric New orleaNs collecTioN PreseNTs

blake

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www.hnoc.org

DEAR PETE, Back in 2005, I wrote that The Doorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; keyboard player Ray Manzarek was looking for a tape of the last concert. Then I received an email from George M. Friedman, which I will share with you in its entirety: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I received word that your column had had some inquiry about the lost tape of the Doors concert at the Warehouse, Jim Morrisonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very last performance. The tape isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t lost. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had it in a safety deposit box for several years. I was a stage manager at the Warehouse during that and most of the shows at that classic venue. The tape is in two-channel stereo,

having been recorded by â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Stagehand Bobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; on the same machine he used for just about every early show at the Warehouse. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My recollection is that I came upon the tape when Beaver Productions moved its offices out of the Warehouse, Uptown into a building at the Riverbend. The Doors tape, along with a stack of other Warehouse show tapes, were cast off and left behind as debris during the move. The rest of the tapes may have been destroyed. I regret leaving behind the Jimi Hendrix tape. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At some time along the way, I spoke with a gentleman named Sugarman, who

The faded business sign is still visible on the French Quarter building where Alexander Botsay lived and sold cigar boxes. PHOTO BY KANDACE POWER GRAVES

represented himself to be a manager of the Doors. Mr. Sugarman said that the keyboard player had only a curiosity interest in that nightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rendition of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Riders on the Storm,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; if I have that songâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name right, but had no real interest in acquiring the tape, Jim Morrisonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s last performance notwithstanding. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Doors shows back then were chaotic, but the Warehouse performance was more music than theater. An exception to that would be at the very end of the show, when Morrison, who was wacked near a stupor that night, suddenly jumped up, grabbed the microphone and then smashed it right through the floor of the stage. What an ending to a great show. Nobody knew it when it happened, but the music indeed was over when they turned out the lights and the Doors left the stage.â&#x20AC;? The Mr. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sugarmanâ&#x20AC;? referred to was Danny Sugerman, the manager of The Doors, who died in 2005.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > MORE >> SCUTTLEBUTT JEREMY ALFORD CLANCY DUBOS < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < KNOWLEDGE < < < < < < < < < < <IS < <POWER <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< 13 15 17 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

scuttle Butt

QUOTES OF THE WEEK

“His administration initiated progressive policies that focused on honesty, transparency, fiscal accountability, and technological enhancement; eliminated back-to-back budget deficits; and launched a highly acclaimed city website.” — From the biographical blurb on the back of former mayor Ray Nagin’s memoir Katrina’s Secrets: Storms After the Storm. The book is set for release June 22. “Hurricane season just started, and on June 1 the [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers] announced the incompletion of a version of Option I as outlined in the film. It’s officially rated as ‘100-year protection’ — which sounds good until you find out that the Japanese and the Dutch are both building to 10,000-year standards. It turns out that levees built to 100year flood standards are at the lowest level of protection in the Western world.” — Filmmaker Harry Shearer, promoting The Big Uneasy, his documentary about the 2005 levees collapse in New Orleans. “Former Governor Kathleen Babineaux Blanco has been diagnosed with choroidal melanoma, a rare eye cancer that affects roughly six in 1 million people. It was discovered in one eye during a comprehensive eye exam and confirmed by cancer specialists in early June. The Blancos are grateful for your support and ask for your prayers.” — A statement from former Gov. Blanco’s office June 8.

Charter Chatter FROM PUSHING AMENDMENTS TO WAR CRIES FOR A COMPLETE REWRITE, LAWMAKERS ARE ABUZZ ABOUT THE LOUISIANA CONSTITUTION.

A detail from the 1868 reconstructed Constitution of the State of Louisiana.

“People saw on TV the same brown pelican coated with what looked like three inches of oil, I mean, looked like a chocolate pelican. And they showed it every hour, every PAGE 13

PHOTO COURTESY LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

c'est what? ON JUNE 1, THE LOUISIANA SENATE ONCE AGAIN KILLED A BILL THAT WOULD HAVE BANNED SMOKING IN LOUISIANA BARS. WOULD YOU SUPPORT A BAN?

W

54% 25% yes

Vote on “c’est what?” on bestofneworleans.com THIS WEEK’S QUESTION

PAGE 10

BoUQuets Robert Hernandez,

no

21%

with some exceptions, like cigar bars

Do you support Sen. Rob Marionneaux’s bill to phase out Louisiana’s individual and corporate income taxes?

THIS WEEK’S HEROES AND ZEROES

a traveler from New Orleans, redeemed more than 483,000 of his frequent flyer miles to join 50 Delta Air Lines employees in Pinghu, China, for the seventh annual international Habitat for Humanity Build. The project helped build five homes in the region near Shanghai, where many families live without proper sanitation in mud-brick homes.

Reconcile New Orleans,

which provides job training for at-risk youth through Cafe Reconcile, was awarded a $268,000 grant from Baptist Community Ministries. The grant will aid Reconcile’s mental and physical health care programs and support program graduates. Since 2000, more than 600 graduates have completed the Cafe Reconcile Culinary Training Program and gone on to jobs in local restaurants.

Chef Greg Reggio

of Restaurant Zea, along with fiddler Amanda Shaw and 25 volunteers, packed seven trucks with fresh Louisiana seafood headed for residents of tornado-stricken Joplin, Mo. Once there, Reggio and other chefs served Louisiana dishes to thousands at Joplin’s Landreth Park. The gesture was featured on that evening’s NBC Nightly News in the show’s “Making a Difference” segment.

Joshua Hunt,

a New Orleans Police Department (NOPD) officer, resigned following accusations that he was at a dental appointment while a police report shows him arresting a suspect in possession of crack cocaine. Before Hunt resigned, the NOPD’s Public Integrity Bureau told WDSU’s I-Team that Hunt and another officer involved were reassigned “pending investigation of allegations of perjury and neglect of duty.”

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 14 > 2011

Affairs Committee, but its fate remains in limbo. “When I initially thought about this idea,” Foil says, ill the third time be the charm for state “it came to me when we were having all those issues Rep. Franklin Foil? Probably not, but the about dedicated funds and what to do with them. And freshman Republican from Baton Rouge now, we’re dealing with the issue of doing away with is at least going out swinging. Every year since the state income tax.” 2009, Foil has proposed a commission to study the The state treasury is weighed down by dedicated idea of a constitutional convention and advise the funds, which are pools of cash committed to certain Legislature accordingly. functions that are constitutionally or statutorily proTwo years ago, the initiative made it all the way to the tected. When budget shortfalls crop up, such as the Senate floor and stalled. Last year, it cleared the House current $1.6 billion gap, lawmakers instinctively want again, but got stuck in a Senate committee. This year, to cherry-pick dollars from the dedicated funds, but House Concurrent Resolution 3 is off to the same start. their hands are tied. It has been approved by the House and Governmental This year has also seen efforts to abolish or phase BY JEREMY ALFORD

09

iDeal Gifts for Dad.     • House Bill 135 by Rep. Rickey Nowlin,  R-Natchitoches,  would  prohibit  the  levying  of  new  taxes  or  fees  upon  the  sale or transfer of immovable property,  such as family homes.      •  House  Bill  341  by  Rep.  Chris  Hazel,  R-Pineville,  authorizes  the  Legislature  to establish the Patient’s Compensation  Fund  as  a  private  custodial  fund.  Any  income the fund earns, and anything it  owns, would not be public.     •  Senate  Bill  113  by  Sen.  A.G.  Crowe,  R-Slidell,  redirects  and  transfers  dedicated  funds  to  the  state  budget  as  needed.     Among  the  biggest  complaints  from  the  public  when  it  comes  to  constitutional  amendments  is  the  language  used on the ballots. The words and sentences  can  be  complex,  even  for  lawmakers, who have grumbled a bit about  the  matter  themselves  over  the  years.  That  inspired  Rep.  Barbara  Norton,  D-Shreveport,  to  file  House  Concurrent  Resolution 4, which already has cleared  the  Lower  Chamber.  The  measure  calls  for  “clear,  concise,  and  unbiased  language  in  constitutional  amendment  ballot  language.”  She  argues  that  all  amendments should be posed to voters  as questions, beginning with the phrase,  “Do you support an amendment to...”

FiNALLY, WHAT WOULD A DeBATe OveR  constitutional  issues  be  without  the  input  of  the  Tea  Party  of  Louisiana?  Louisiana’s tea party has a loud voice at  the Capitol, and it has declared war on  House  Bill  388  by  Rep.  Nickie  Monica,  R-LaPlace.  Monica’s  bill  would  change  the  way  Louisiana  selects  its  presidential electors by implementing a national  popular vote system.       A  national  popular  vote  would  allow  presidential  candidates  to  win  the  White  House  by  simply  earning  50  percent  of  the  popular  vote,  plus  one.  Critics say a national popular vote could  weaken  the  role  of  smaller  states  in  presidential elections because it would  allow presidential candidates to win the  White House by focusing on places like  New York City, Los Angeles and Chicago  because of their massive populations.     “This  would  be  the  end  of  the  American  republic,  if  this  bill  passes,”  says  Bob  Reid,  spokesman  for  the  Tea  Party  of  Louisiana.  At  the  time  of  his  remarks,  the  measure  appeared  to  be  stalled on the House floor. “The founders of America created the most sophisticated  system  of  government  known  to  man  —  a  government  designed  to  give  the  people  more  power  than  the  government. This national popular vote  initiative would literally uproot our system of government and would destroy  our country.”     No doubt it would take more than a  national  popular  vote  to  “destroy”  the  anchor  of  the  free  world.  Such  rhetoric  shows  how  emotional  the  debate  over  constitutional  issues  has  become.  it also helps brighten the line between  those who want to tear into Louisiana’s  constitution  with  red  pens  and  those  who  want  to  leave  well  enough  alone.  At least for now. 

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 14 > 2011

O N   OT H eR   FRO N T S ,   T H e   1 0T H  Amendment to the U.S. Constitution is  under  fire  this  year.  Rep.  Joe  Harrison,  R-Napoleonville,  has  brought  forth  House Concurrent Resolution 51, which  once  again  claims  state  sovereignty  for  Louisiana.  Many  lawmakers  view  it  as  a  tool  to  oppose President  Barack  Obama’s federal health care overhaul.      Primarily,  Harrison  is  pushing  the  resolution  —  a  non-starter  among  his  colleagues  —  to  demand  that  the  federal  government  “cease  promulgating  unconstitutional  mandates.”  Harrison  cites  a  1992  U.S.  Supreme  Court  case  —  New  York  v.  United  States,  112  S.  Ct.  2408 — that found Congress “may not  simply commandeer the legislative and  regulatory processes of the states.”     The  “states’  rights”  argument  is  likewise  being  used  by  the  Louisiana  Department  of  Wildlife  and  Fisheries  this  year  to  wrest  oversight  of  certain  species  (such  as  red  snapper)  from  the  federal government. Assistant Fisheries  Secretary  Randy  Pausina  told  lawmakers  recently  that  House  Bill  293  would  create  a  pilot  program  that  could  help  convince the feds that Louisiana would  do a better job than the Gulf of Mexico  Fisheries Management Council.     Based on fisheries the state currently  manages  —  spotted  (speckled)  trout,  flounder  and  crab,  to  name  a  few  —  and  compared  to  those  overseen  by 

the  federal  government  (red  snapper,  amberjack  and  tuna),  there’s  a  strong  case to build, Pausina says. “We feel all  of the animals we manage are in good  shape, and those managed by the federal  government,  not  so  good  shape,”  he adds.     Additionally,  he  argued  that  states  like Texas and Florida already enjoy such  broader  authority;  he  says  the  legislation  would  help  bring  Louisiana  up  to  par. The legislation, authored by House  Natural  Resources  Chairman  Gordon  Dove,  R-Houma,  is  expected  to  pass  the  Senate  and  win  support  from  Gov.  Bobby Jindal.

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11

news

views

Real Melodrama

June 18

Le Petit theatre’s board seLLs 60 Percent of the buiLding, sParking Protest and a PossibLe Lawsuit. by kevin aLLman

he behind-the-scenes melodrama regarding the future of Le Petit Theatre du Vieux Carre took center stage June 9 at a press conference at the theater, where the board members of Le Petit announced a pending deal to sell 60 percent of the building to French Quarter restaurateur Dickie Brennan, who will build an onsite restaurant. Cassie Steck Worley, chair of Le Petit’s board of governors, made the announcement flanked by a dozen board members, including City Council President Jackie Clarkson and actor Bryan Batt. The Dickie Brennan Restaurant Group operates several French Quarter restaurants, including the Palace Cafe, Dickie Brennan’s Bourbon House and Dickie Brennan’s Steakhouse. Financial terms of the deal (which Clarkson says isn’t completely signed, but is in “due diligence” review) were not disclosed, and Brennan wasn’t present at the announcement. The proposed restaurant has no name or concept as of now, according to the board. Worley said Le Petit, the oldest surviving community theater in the U.S., needs more than $1 million in repairs and carries a $700,000 mortgage. The sale of the property will help retire that debt, Worley said, while leaving the 365-seat mainstage theater for future productions. A restaurant would be built on the Chartres Street side of the building (eliminating the smaller second stage), and the two operations would share lobby space and the famous courtyard in the center of the theater. Worley mentioned that shared restaurant-theater space was not uncommon elsewhere in the country, and Batt brought up the example of New York’s Lincoln Center. (Asked to clarify if the new operation would be a “dinner theater,” the board answered in nearunison: “No!”) Le Petit canceled its most recent season due to its financial difficulties. Asked when it would resume producing plays, Worley said, “2012.” She later clarified the board was aiming to remount its regular offerings for the 2012-2013 season, beginning in fall 2012. Earlier in the week, Le Petit board member Judith Fos Burrus resigned from the board, saying she had been neither consulted about the sale nor allowed to vote on it. “I love Le Petit Theatre but I felt I must submit my resignation in protest,” Burrus wrote in a statement. “I am against losing one of the theatre’s stages

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to a restaurant and am saddened by the dysfunction of this board.” Le Petit’s support guild has been in open revolt against the current board for months, accusing its members of operating without “an open and transparent process regarding the historic establishment’s future.” The guild has begun a website, Save Le Petit (www.savelepetit. com), where it’s been collecting signatures demanding Le Petit’s board “review all options.” On the day of the press conference, the guild released a letter from Le Petit’s former artistic director, Gary Solomon Jr., which reads in part: “In response to the critical financial situation facing Le Petit, I began assembling a group of philanthropic investors to rescue the theatre long before news of negotiations with Dickie Brennan became public. I unveiled the opportunity at an emergency meeting of the Guild, called in response to news of a purported deal with Brennan. Our proposal is just one of many options I urge you to take into consideration before rushing into a course of action that could forever change this important New Orleans institution.” Jim Walpole, a former board member who is now president of the anti-board Le Petit Guild, sat silently in the back of the theater while the announcement was made, refusing to speak to reporters: “We don’t want to interrupt their press conference.” After it was over, he left the building before commenting. “We do not feel the board of governors has exercised all available remedies,” Walpole said, adding guild members“fail to see why the board of governors didn’t put out RFPs [requests for proposals]” before entering into the Brennan deal. He concluded by saying the guild will “pursue all remedies.” Asked if those remedies would be legal in nature, he repeated, “We will pursue all remedies.” Perhaps only Blake Pontchartrain will remember this, but the current Le Petit imbroglio has some parallels in the history of the French Opera House, which stood at the corner of Bourbon and Toulouse at the end of the 19th century, holding not only operas but also Carnival balls and other glittery affairs. Like Le Petit, it fell on hard financial times and was forced into receivership in 1913, whereupon a donor bought the building and donated it to Tulane University. The opera house burned down in 1919 — the casualty of a grease fire in an adjacent restaurant.

scuttlebutt

page 9

day, 24 hours a day for weeks and weeks and weeks. And the news media, particularly 24-hour cable TV, gave citizens the impression the whole Gulf Coast was coated in oil.” — Miss. Gov. Haley Barbour, blaming the oiled-pelican photograph for damaging Mississippi tourism. “[Gov. Bobby] Jindal says folks in Washington have a spending problem .... thank goodness they do! Otherwise LA wld be in bad shape!” — State Sen. Karen Carter Peterson on Twitter, during last week’s budget squabbles in Baton Rouge.

Stelly Reduction Redux

New Orleans Police Chief Ronal Serpas traditionally has been a big proponent of the weekly COMSTAT crime report briefings, but in an interview on June 6 he said he’s considering canceling the Friday morning COMSTAT meetings for a month. The reason: a new crime-fighting program by the Omega Group called CrimeView, which Serpas says concentrates on “problem places, not problem people.” A great feature built into CrimeView, according to the chief, is the ability to filter out crimes that are a result of random encounters — i.e., two guys with a beef who run into one another on the street unexpectedly. Instead, CrimeView can concentrate on specific areas where criminal activity is persistent or endemic. “Now we can see it, first time ever,” Serpas told Gambit. “We’ve never had this technology here before, and it will make us smarter.” Regarding COMSTAT, Serpas said, “I’m on the verge of canceling it here for about a month because we’ve got to reboot people’s thinking. It’s just they’re stuck in 1997, ’98, ’99. And we’ve got to change that.” Serpas introduced the CrimeView mapping technology to the public June 1, and the maps are online for the public as well as for cops. To see the maps in action, go to www.crimemapping.com/map/la/ neworleans. — Kevin Allman

StReetcaR deSiReS

Mayor Mitch Landrieu and city and Regional Transit Authority (RTA) officials joined U.S. Department of Transportation Sec. Ray LaHood last week to break ground on the Loyola Avenue Streetcar line, scheduled to open June 2012. Funded by a $45 million grant, the line will run from the Union Passenger Terminal to Canal Street via Loyola Avenue. LaHood says the Loyola corridor already is seeing economic development in anticipation of the streetcar’s traffic. The next project, slated to begin in summer 2012, is the French Quarter loop extension, a 2.48-mile rail expansion of the Riverfront streetcar line via Elysian Fields Avenue to Press Street in Bywater. That line — a $73 million project fully funded by a 2010 sales tax revenue bond — is scheduled to open in fall 2013. Not yet scheduled for construction is the anticipated St. Claude Avenue corridor line to connect the French Quarter loop (via a spur on Elysian Fields) to St. Claude and continue to Press Street. Patrice Bell Mercadel, the RTA’s director of marketing and communication, says the RTA is conducting environmental assessments along the proposed line and hopes to have the “financial capacity” to send the line beyond Press to Poland Avenue. “We’re open to the feasibility,” she said. — Alex Woodward

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > JUNE 14 > 2011

The ongoing legislative debate over eliminating or phasing out state income tax has given some veteran lawmakers a case of deja vu. “This is looking an awful lot like the Stelly rollback,” says one New Orleans-area legislator, adding, “I wonder how long it will take to flush out Bobby Jindal this time.” Several income tax repeal measures have been introduced, but the one with the most traction is authored by state Sen. Rob Marionneaux, D-Livonia. It passed the Senate last week, but was heavily amended. It now goes to the House for consideration. The lawmaker’s reference to Jindal harkens back to 2008, when the governor initially (but very quietly) opposed the so-called rollback of the Stelly income tax brackets. At no time did Jindal himself make any appearances or statements against it. The governor’s absence on that issue allowed the Stelly rollback to gather so much momentum that it soon became unstoppable — at which point Jindal rushed to the front of the parade and pronounced himself in favor of the idea. And he has been taking credit for it ever since. When Marionneaux and others introduced their income tax repeal bills this year, few took them seriously. Now, however, Marionneaux’s bill has grown some legs. Many Democratic lawmakers who are unhappy with Jindal have been supporting the repeal in the hopes of “jamming” Jindal into opposing it. They should think twice. Given Jindal’s obvious national ambitions, he might welcome the chance to sign an income tax repeal law into effect. He could campaign for re-election on that platform in the fall — and then bail out of Louisiana long before the fiscal chickens come home to roost, leaving the next governor and future legislators to figure out how to fund highways, hospitals, universities, police protection, flood protection and many other items the state pays for each year. And, of course, all the while he’ll be traveling the country claiming that he eliminated income taxes in Louisiana. — Clancy DuBos

omega man

13

jeremy ALFORD

THE STATE OF THE STATE

Mapping the Future â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and the Past A NEW COASTAL MAP PRODUCED IN LAFAYETTE HAS LOCAL AND NATIONAL SIGNIFICANCE.

T

but many are out of date, provide data for limited time periods or fail to explain how and when losses occurred. Under the leadership of Turnipseed, and with the resources of the United States Geological Service (USGS), the map was constructed by more than 150 engineers, programmers and ecologists. Turnipseed described it as a fitting endeavor in the face of such a massive challenge. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is a continental issue,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a continental tragedy.â&#x20AC;? When the USGS, which oversees the wetlands center, presented the map and related findings to state lawmakers last week, several legislators complimented Turnipseedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s team on its unique methods. To track landscape changes, the project team relied on historical surveys, aerial data, personal interviews, satellite data and more. Others on the Joint Natural Resources Committee asked Turnipseed why he limited his research scope. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have a 95-year-old trapper in Larose [who] tells me that the oilfield contributed to the erosion but it started with a four-legged varmint â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and not a nutria: the muskrats,â&#x20AC;? said Rep. Jerry â&#x20AC;&#x153;Truckâ&#x20AC;? Gisclair, D-Larose. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The muskrat was a root-eating varmint. The nutria ate the greens.â&#x20AC;? Gisclair urged the federal government to begin interviewing other sources, including trappers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You hit it right on the head,â&#x20AC;? USGS geographer Brady Couvillion told Gisclair. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the roots holding onto the soil that help prevent erosion from happening.â&#x20AC;? In building the map, the wetlands center extrapolated some new twists to data youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve probably heard before. Like the fact that today, Louisiana loses one football field worth of land every hour. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There was a time when we were losing a foot-

Volunteers bulk up a coastline in Plaquemines Parish, which has lost 1,200 square miles during the past 78 years. COURTESY LOUISIANA OFFICE OF COASTAL PROTECTION AND RESTORATION

ball field every half an hour,â&#x20AC;? Turnipseed said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It has declined over the last few years if you take out the fact that we have had four or five of the most severe hurricanes to hit the North American coast.â&#x20AC;? That recently adjusted statistic doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take into account those areas that have converted to water but have not yet exhibited the persistence necessary to be classified as a â&#x20AC;&#x153;loss.â&#x20AC;? Even with the variables, trend analyses by the wetlands center show that from 1985 to 2010 there was a wetland loss rate of 16.57 square miles per year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If it was a constant rate, we would be losing about the island of Manhattan annually,â&#x20AC;? Turnipseed said. Lawmakers last week also viewed slides recounting Louisianaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s historic river levels. While this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s flood presents challenges, the event is also pushing sediment-rich water into the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s marshes. This will build up land â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the antithesis of coastal erosion. But there is bad news as well: The sediment doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t always go where ecologists and biologists think it should, Turnipseed said. Science and technology help, but Louisianaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s infrastructure isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t quite ready to accommodate such a flow right now.

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unfortunate to see both the land loss rate and the potential thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s being lost,â&#x20AC;? said Jerome Zeringue of the Governorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office of Coastal Activities. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You look at all that sediment that could be used as a positive (to) take advantage of the situation, but we ... donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have the ability to do that right now.â&#x20AC;? Zeringue said, however, the state is working with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers on a variety of projects that could soon help Louisiana push that valuable sediment into all the right places. As for the parishes with the most land loss under the survey, Plaquemines leads the way with nearly 1,200 square miles lost over the past 78 years. Terrebonne is right behind with 800 square miles lost since 1932, then Cameron with 600 and Lafourche with nearly 400. Not surprisingly, the crown jewel of south Louisiana is the Atchafalaya Delta Basin. Always rich with sediment, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the only area in coastal Louisiana showing an increase in land mass, but the rate of growth there is not sufficient to offset the losses elsewhere on Louisianaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coast, particularly in years of increased hurricane activity. To view the map and findings, go to http://pubs.usgs.gov/sim/3164/.

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hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an adage among geographers that you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t manage the landscape without measuring it first. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s true of Louisianaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coastal wetlands, which bear the brunt of 90 percent of the land loss suffered by the continental U.S. It was with that in mind that the National Wetlands Research Center in Lafayette produced an unprecedented, multi-layered topography system that not only accurately depicts Louisianaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coast but also shows 78 yearsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; worth of shoreline activity. The map and data produced by the project were released last week and republished by dozens of print, broadcast and online outlets around the world. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a synopsis of the headlines still being rolled out: The seventh-largest delta on the earthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s surface has experienced a net loss of 1,883 square miles since 1932. That delta, of course, is Louisianaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wetlands, which also have experienced a decline in rate of land loss over the past 25 years, due chiefly to renewed interest in public advocacy and taxpayer-funded coastal restoration and protection. D. Phil Turnipseed, director at the Lafayette center, said the emerging government-led industry that is inventing new forms of engineering to add infrastructure to Louisianaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coast requires such a map. Among the mapâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unique features is its ability to show areas that have lost land since 1932 and explain, for each point in history, why land was lost â&#x20AC;&#x201D; whether it was the result of a storm, oil activity, natural subsidence or other factors. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We believe this map will help the decision makers and the agencies that are strapped with the responsibility of having to look at this loss,â&#x20AC;? Turnipseed said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We believe it will be a great restoration tool.â&#x20AC;? The significance of the new map is all about timing. Previous studies have analyzed land change in coastal Louisiana,

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THE COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF NEW ORLEANS IS SOLICITING PROPOSALS FROM EXPERIENCED PROFESSIONALS OR PRIVATE FIRM(S) TO CONDUCT AN ADMINISTRATIVE HEARING PROCESS ON BEHALF OF THE COUNCIL IN ITS CAPACITY AS THE “BOARD OF REVIEW”, CONCERNING TAXPAYER APPEALS OF THEIR 2012 PROPERTY TAX ASSESSMENTS. THE REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS IS AVAILABLE ON THE COUNCIL’S WEBSITE, WWW.NOLACITYCOUNCIL.COM OR MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE OFFICE OF THE COUNCIL CHIEF OF STAFF, ROOM 1E06, CITY HALL, 1300 PERDIDO STREET, (504) 658-1093.  PROPOSALS MUST BE RECEIVED BY 4:00 P.M., TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 14 > 2011

PEGGY LEWIS, MMC CLERK OF COUNCIL PUBLICATION DATES:  JUNE 14, 2011

16

clancy DUBOS

POLITICS Follow Clancy on Twitter @clancygambit.

A Birthday Gift for Bobby ast Friday, June 10, was Bobby Jindal’s 40th birthday. I wasn’t there to give him a present in person, and since the Big Four-O is, well, a big deal, I thought I would present him with a special gift in this space: a synopsis of my forthcoming book, Leadership for Dummies. I’m thinking of dedicating the book to Gov. Jindal. After all, he inspired not only the book’s title but also its contents. His, um, not-quite-brilliant approach to governing these past three-and-a-half years gave me so many examples to cite. Plus, it’s obvious that everything he knows about leadership he read (or wrote) somewhere in a book, so what better way to wish him a happy birthday? So, Governor, I hope you enjoy my little primer on leadership. It’s a special edition, just for you. 1. Grow a pair. Quit being so afraid of offending every right-wing yahoo whose support you cravenly debase yourself to keep. Show some balls. No, not like Anthony Weiner; more like Ronald Reagan. This whole “tax virginity” thing only reinforces the fact that you actually look like a 40-yearold virgin. Leaders don’t need to be pure; they need to show courage. Stop running from tough issues. Learn to take a punch — it might hurt you but it won’t kill you. In fact, it will make you stronger. 2. Stop faking it. You’re not a redneck, so stop trying to blend. You don’t look good in camo, and I doubt you know which end of a shotgun to shoulder. Stop running away from your heritage, your Ivy League education, your Rhodes

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Scholar credentials — and stop pretending you’re not looking for the first ticket out of Louisiana. 3. Lead by example. You say you want to make Louisiana a place our kids will want to come back to. Great. Start by not leaving the state so often to raise money and build a network for the national campaign you say you’re not waging. 4. Keep your promises. As a candidate, you promised transparency; then you became the least transparent governor Louisiana has ever known. As a candidate, you promised ethics reform. As governor, you reformed everybody but yourself. As a candidate, you promised not to use onetime money for recurring expenses. As governor, you’ve done just that several years in a row. Stop it. 5. Own your mistakes. We all make mistakes. The difference between men and boys is boys hide from their mistakes, men own theirs. Man up, dude. Rolling back Stelly was a mistake. Pushing creationism in public schools is a mistake. Not addressing this year’s budget gap years ago was a mistake. Trying to sell off prisons to balance a budget is a mistake. Vetoing a 4-cent cigarette tax is a mistake. These and others are your mistakes. Own ’em. 6. Walk the walk. Quit writing books about leadership when you clearly don’t know the subject. Once you master these baby steps, I’ll send you my sequel: Leadership for Rhodes Scholars. Happy birthday.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 14 > 2011

A year ago,

INTERVIEW BY KEVIN ALLM AN & CL ANCY DUBOS PHOTOS BY CHERY L GERBER

when Gambit sat down with New Orleans Police Department (NOPD) Superintendent Ronal Serpas, the newly arrived police chief had just returned from the top cop job in Nashville, Tenn., the hand-picked choice of Mayor Mitch Landrieu. He took the reins of a highly dysfunctional NOPD, which later was slammed in a scathing report by the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) in March. Serpas has found his latest assignment tough going, particularly with the scandal involving the NOPD’s paid detail program. The outsourcing of traffic camera reviews to Anytime Solutions LLC, a company owned by the chief’s close friend, 8th District Commander Edwin Hosli, has touched off calls for Serpas’ ouster — despite a statement from Inspector General Ed Quatrevaux, who is investigating the Anytime Solutions contract, that he had found no wrongdoing on Serpas’ part. Mayor Mitch Landrieu has also stood by Serpas publicly. Add to the list of Serpas’ headaches the firings and resignations in NOPD’s rank and file, the federal convictions in the Henry Glover case, a murder rate that remains unchanged since he arrived — and, scheduled to start June 20, the federal trial for the Danziger Bridge shootings. Gambit talked to Serpas in his office June 6.

★★★★★★★★★★

What progress has been made on the findings of the DOJ report that came out in March? SERPAS They gave us 16 recommendations, and there’s 147 action items within those 16 recommendations. So the first thing we did was begin a process of identifying by sentence what are those 147 recommendations. And we sent that out to the entire department. Now we’re collecting what has been done, what needs to continue to be done. We still have to sit down and negotiate with [the DOJ] on every single one of these issues. So that hasn’t started yet. There’s been some preliminary discussions. But we needed to know what’s in place, what’s in progress, and what’s being moved on.

Sounds like you’re still gathering information internally? SERPAS Yeah. There’s 147 things that they say need to be done. … So when we sit down and actually negotiate the consent decree, we’ll have this map, if you will, of the things that they think we should do, the things that we think we can agree to,

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 14 > 2011

★★★★★★★★★★

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 14 > 2011

COVER STORY

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i don’t know if you can get the same 50 percent reduction (in crime) when the advancements that we made in american policing in the mid-’90s have not seen another iteration that was so groundbreaking. ★★★★★★★★★★ and then the things we need even more information. … It’s going to be this negotiation process. So I’m limited in what I can do just yet. So what’s the timetable? SERPAS It remains to be worked out with the Department of Justice.

How many officers have been hired, fired, and chased away since you came here? SERPAS Since I came onboard, we’ve lost at least 150 people. There have been quite a few that have gone because the prospect of being [fired or suspended] for untruthfulness has caused some people to come in and resign right away. We have not hired a police officer since I’ve

been here. We hope to be able to hire some people toward the end of this year. That’s a very delicate position because if we hire somebody, it’s 12 months before they’re on the street by themselves. The academy is six months long, and we’re restructuring the entire training academy with the assistance of DOJ. So that’s an issue for us, that we have not hired anybody since I’ve been chief. And we are at least 150 people down. We’ve had some people that we’ve terminated that have been, you know, covered in the media. We’ve also had some people that have resigned in lieu of termination hearings that were pending against them. And we’ve had a lot of people that have just retired. So it’s about 150 people total we’ve lost.

be able to hire people? Is it a budgetary thing?

Is there a prospect of when you’ll

The DOJ reports cited paid detail as

SERPAS Yeah, it’s a budget issue. … It’s a combination of money and getting the academy ready.

So with 150 cops gone, what’s the size of the force now? SERPAS We’re probably 1,386 or something like that. We’ll get you the exact numbers.

(In an email the next day, NOPD communications director Remi Braden wrote the department had 1,395 officers as of May 31, 2011 and had 1,445 officers in May 2010 — a difference of 50.)

one of the big issues and recommended setting up a single office to deal with them. That was in March. Where are we with that? SERPAS When Mayor-elect Landrieu and I interviewed in April 2010, one of the key points he and I talked about was a dramatic reformation of the paid detail system. So none of this is new. It’s been going on for quite some time. So in the summer of 2010 and in the fall of ’10, we were working with the DOJ, and we had visits from another police department that had a paid detail system we took a look at. We looked at paid detail systems around us. And we also created for the first time some real data. You know, we never had any idea the size of the paid detail system in New Orleans. So we created PAGE 31

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COVER STORY

★★★★★★★★★★

to be hammered out as part of the consent decree. We’ve been working on it for about 10 months. When did you find out about the Anytime Solutions deal? SERPAS In March, when the [8th District] inspection report came in. That’s part of what the inspector general was looking at. The fact that the city had been doing a paid detail [for traffic camera citations] for three years came to us probably in November. But the actual Anytime Solutions Limited Liability Company (LLC) came to my attention at the end of March, when I got the inspection report.

The Inspector General has cleared you personally of any wrongdoing in this case. But would you agree that setting up a company to outsource work that could have and should have been done on officers’ work time is wrong? SERPAS There’s no question we’ve got a couple of issues here. One, we have evidence now of many officers who created LLCs, which in and of themselves is not bad except that we don’t want you to use them to manage paid details. And that’s been on the books for quite a long time.

Is that one of those policies that just wasn’t followed? SERPAS Absolutely. I’ve got a letter from an

NOPD Chief Ronal Serpas riding a mounted detail on Canal Street during Mardi Gras. Serpas interacts with the public on a regular basis, attending community crime forums and walking a monthly march against crime in various neighborhoods. officer telling me that a deputy chief told him to set one up in 2009 to do that very same thing. So it’s clearly a policy that was routinely ignored by those people who were in that type of work, if you will, the people, the handful of officers that do these coordinations of large details. Secondly, as to whether or not to use onduty officers or off-duty officers to handle the red light cameras, clearly it’s better if it’s on duty. And that’s been put in place. But sometime in 2008 a decision was made to make it a paid detail. And this is kind of the thing that’s been lost in this whole red light camera thing. It’s been a paid detail. What got lost in this whole debate is that it had been a paid detail for three years. Some say you have a credibility problem because the Anytime Solutions issue has affected people close to you. How do you respond to those who question your credibility on this? SERPAS I think the OIG (Office of Inspector General) responded for us. I mean, the OIG

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 14 > 2011

we have not hired a police officer since i’ve been here. we hope to be able to hire some people toward the end of this year. that’s a very delicate position because if we hire somebody, it’s 12 months before they’re on the street by themselves.

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COVER STORY looked at it and said Serpas had no wrongdoing here. That meant I didn’t have anything to do with selecting these people, I didn’t have anything to do with whoever they picked. That was all done by the Department of Public Works. I think the question also that got a bit lost in the translation is we have 1,100 officers working paid details. And they’ve worked now nearly 40,000 or 45,000 entries [this year]. And I didn’t ever want to know anything about paid details. I’m the first chief other than Richard [Pennington] who probably didn’t work the Superdome or didn’t oversee those paid details. I’ve been approached by a lot of people since I’ve been back, asking, ‘Hey, Chief, do you want to run the Superdome detail?’ Hell no. ‘Well, do you want to run the Jazz Fest?’ Hell no. ‘Do you want to run the Arena?’ Hell no. So for me, this is no part of what I want to be involved with. During the 10 years I was gone, I got very accustomed to a centralized office managing paid details that took care of all those issues. So the fact that I didn’t know what two or three

the city working as the chief. That’s just not what I do when I’m off. The money involved in reviewing the tickets was $35-$55 an hour. A detail on a movie set typically runs about $25 an hour, and even captains who work Superdome details make $39 an hour. Why was the Anytime Solutions contract so much higher for what seems like easier work? SERPAS At the end of the day, the ‘coordination fee’ has to end because we don’t want that going on with the officers anymore. The $35 per hour fee for the officers had been in place since 2008, as far as I know. I don’t want coordination fees because I think that’s really the biggest issue we needed to overcome. Part of the centralized office is that there won’t be coordination fees by the officers.

Have you seen the setup for the system of reviewing the red-light camera photos? Was it set up by someone in Commander Hosli’s garage? Was it in his living room?

I guess they would check off on each one, whatever they were supposed to do. And then that process is on its way. As far as I know, there was never one place where you had to sit and do it. It was always Internet-based. But there will be a central office for reviewing tickets going forward? SERPAS Right now our officers who are the traffic officers, we gave them access in their district stations to go online.

Remotely? SERPAS Yeah, they all do. And then the supervisors get kicked the tickets that people can’t make decisions on. And they have to approve those. They’re the only ones that can do that. Modern technology.

Have you had any conversations with Commander Hosli since this issue arose? SERPAS

Oh, no. He’s under investiga-

Could you make the same promise today? SERPAS Things were completely different in 1996. In 1996 our department did not do a very good job at several things: We were not coordinated across the department between detectives and officers, which is why we decentralized. So we anticipated that we could get a greater reduction in some of the violent crimes by having better coordination, and that turned out to be true. We also had very little effort at all in investigating less-than-lethal events. In fact, most of them just ended up in a file cabinet. And nobody ever did any follow up. So we estimated in ’96 when we decentralized and took those cases and made them a responsibility of someone who would have to go do the follow up, we anticipated that would help us reduce the murder rate. We also anticipated that we were starting some groundbreaking domestic violence work that had not been done anywhere in the nation at that time. And we know that there’s some predictabil-

during the 10 years i was gone, i got very accustomed to a centralized off ice managing paid details that took care of all those issues. so the fact that i didn’t know what two or three employees were doing with paid details, if it’s a credibility issue, i apologize for that, but i don’t keep up with that stuff. employees were doing with paid details, if it’s a credibility issue, I apologize for that, but I don’t keep up with that stuff. That stuff does not typically cross my desk. And yet there are still people who feel that you haven’t given a thorough enough explanation of how you did not know. Oh, I gave an incredibly thorough explanation to the person who matters right now, and that was the Inspector General. I completely discussed the issues. I see the intuitiveness of it. But, you know, now that I have been forced to know more about this than I wanted to know, it turns out that one of the officers had been working paid details in and around the 8th District for years. And I’m very strong about this. And I know people may or may not agree, but when I’m off, I am not talking to my son-in-law, who is not a ranking officer, about anything to do with this police department. I’ve been to my daughter’s house three times in the 13 months I’ve been back in SERPAS

Or was there an office somewhere? SERPAS Oh, I don’t know. It’s Internetbased, as far as I know. My understanding is that it was always set up where you would log into the site that actually holds the pictures.

So officers would look at them remotely?

tion. I can’t talk to him about this stuff; absolutely not. Setting up LLCs to handle paid details clearly seems to be a direct violation of NOPD policy. Is that something that people get fired over?

SERPAS So you could look from anywhere, yeah.

SERPAS No, not under our policy. Our policies and discipline are based on a matrix that’s been around for almost 15, 20 years now.

So these people were not going [to Hosli’s house] for the weekends?

Is there a timetable for when this new central office will be set up?

SERPAS No. Oh, no, no, no, no.

SERPAS It’s part of our continuing dialogue with the Department of Justice and part of the consent decree.

I think that’s a misconception of the public, then, was that there was an office, a physical office there. SERPAS No. From the very beginning the vendor made it possible that people could dial in remotely from anywhere from passwords and stuff and see the films. I don’t know, I’ve never done it. But

In 1996 your mentor and friend, Richard Pennington, promised the City Council that he would cut New Orleans’ murder rate in half in three years if given more resources. He got the resources, including a pay raise for police officers, and kept his promise.

ity that you might be able to interrupt some of the domestic violence murders if you have a very aggressive investigative strategy. The other thing is, we had a very robust expansion of NORD (New Orleans Recreation Department) in giving young people quality afternoon experiences that might help them learn how to deal with conflict. So our estimation of a 50 percent reduction of murder was based on some pretty solid analysis that turned out to be true. Now, 15 years later, we’re still doing a much better job of a decentralized investigative strategy, so we can’t really advance that much compared to what we did 15 years ago. We do have a fairly robust domestic violence system that could be more robust, and it’s a staffing question. And you want to put more people in all these assignments. But we’ve lost over 150 people since I’m back. So you’ve really got to start weighing those issues. … So I don’t know if you can get the same 50 percent reduction when the advance-

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 14 > 2011

★★★★★★★★★★

35

ments that we made in American policing in the mid ’90s have not seen another iteration that was so groundbreaking. The best analogy I can think of is, we are more likely to be a very good offensive pulling guard in the fight against murder. We’re not the quarterback. We’re not the wide receiver. We’re not going to be the big playmaker. The big playmaker in reducing murder in any community is changing family dynamics, changing economic opportunities, changing educational achievement. Those are the big playmakers in reducing murders, no question about it. The sociology on that is clear. The criminology on that is clear. We’re a good offensive guard. We need to do our work right. But we’ve got a lot of other players.

Dance Recital Gifts

Since last year the murder rate hasn’t changed appreciably. SERPAS As of today [June 6] there’s 90 murders this year compared to 90 murders last year. It’s a crime that continues to require a tremendous amount of attention. But I think my analogy best explains it. We have to be very good at what we’re doing. But the big playmakers are the other parts of the system.

“WHERE THE UNUSUAL IS COMMONPLACE.”

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > JUNE 14 > 2011

5101 W. ESPLANADE AVE. METAIRIE, LA 70006 504-885-4956 • 800-222-4956

36

There’s a real fear that crime is spiking Uptown — armed robberies, burglaries, sexual assaults. What’s being done about that?

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SERPAS I hope we can give context — to every robbery victim, it’s 100 percent up for them. And we understand that. But January, February, March and April, there were tremendous reductions in robberies in the 2nd District and throughout the city. In May we had a spike in these robberies. Commander [Darryl] Albert and his team did a tremendous job responding to it, put a lot of extra boots on the ground. And then from May 23 until today there have been two robberies. One involved a prostitution date, and then the one we had Sunday (June 5) on Marengo Street, which is clearly a ‘stranger’ robbery. So the context of it is, the 2nd District and the city was experiencing dramatic double-digit reductions in robbery all the way up until the 2nd District had the spike. We’re estimating right now, citywide, we’re about 22, 24 percent down in armed robberies for the year, and we’re down about 18 percent in simple robberies for the year. So, for every robbery victim, it’s 100 percent up for them, and we understand that. But across the city it’s actually trending down nicely.

On the issue of community outreach, last time we spoke you emphasized the El Protector program: outreach to the

Hispanic and Vietnamese communities. SERPAS Jan. 1 we put the two officers in place. One is in the Hispanic community; the other is in the Vietnamese community. Through the gracious assistance of the Police Foundation and some grant funds that the New Orleans Crime Coalition and the Police Foundation was able to put together for us, at the end of May our El Protector team and the supervisor of those officers visited Nashville. And they spent a week up there getting some boots-on- the-ground kind of experience, how do you set these things up.

What sort of outreach have you done. other than the El Protector program, to reach out to the Spanishspeaking community? SERPAS I do radio shows. I make myself available to different events. I’ve worked with Catholic Charities. We’re about, what, 390 days into this administration. So we’ve still got plenty of ground to plow. But we’re working on it every single day.

According to surveys, citizen satisfaction within the NOPD is up in every district except the 5th District. What are you doing to work on that? SERPAS Well, you know, we use that survey tool. The New Orleans Crime Coalition has agreed to do that every six months for us. And it’s an incredibly important tool. … In the 5th District, we had a lot of things going on in the St. Roch neighborhood. We had a lot of crime, and it spiked up very quickly. And Commander [Bernadine] Kelly at that time really got a hold of it and did some incredible work, even brought in some resources from the federal government. And we kind of turned that tide really quickly. But that perception remained strong. So I met with Commander [Christopher] Goodly, who has since taken over, and said, ‘Look, here’s what the people are thinking. Here’s some strategies that you can use, and you can think up your own strategies.’ And we look forward to the August report to see how it’s changed. But here’s the goody bar: We care enough to do it. I mean, the New Orleans Crime Coalition is gracious enough to fund this stuff.

What’s the status of construction on a new 5th District station? SERPAS On the drawing board. The 7th District station should be done by the end of the summer, and the 5th District station is one of the many capital projects that have to be dealt with, especially in the wake of Katrina.

COVER STORY One question about the 3rd District. When you were here last — during the ’90s — there was a cooperative endeavor agreement reached with the Levee District where the Levee Police were patrolling north of Robert E. Lee Boulevard. And NOPD was not — is not — patrolling there. Now that the Levee District is cutting back on cops, is NOPD — despite having fewer officers — ready to step in again to patrol those neighborhoods?

SERPAS Absolutely. They don’t have the same limits. When I joined policing 30 years ago, I was going to be here for 30 years. The people who join today do not see that. That’s not the way they’ve been raised. That’s not the way they’ve been educated. … Also, this will be the first time in American policing history where we have to change our models to meet the employee instead of the employee changing their models to meet us. That’s a fact.

SERPAS We have to. We don’t have a choice. I don’t think that we ever abandoned patrolling in general. … We’re responsible for everything at the end of the day. The Levee District’s decisions will complicate perhaps some of our deployment packages. And these budget questions are more daunting than I think we’ve ever faced in our time. I’ve never seen, as I have in these last two or three years, how state and local government budgets are just dramatically different than they’ve ever been. And it’s going to change the way we think.

What’s been your proudest moment — and your biggest disappointment — since you’ve been here as chief?

Let’s talk about salaries. What’s the salary range for patrolmen, sergeants, and lieutenants, and do you think that they need to be adjusted?

What’s the biggest reason all that came off the track?

SERPAS My understanding is we probably are very close to the state police right now with our pay. And the state police is the highest. So, by and large, our salaries are not completely out of whack like they were in the ’90s.

If police are paid more, what should the city expect to gain from that?

But those have always been the facts. What’s different about this generation? SERPAS The whole X/Y thing, that generation, they view the world completely different.

Their expectations are different?

SERPAS It’s about leadership. DOJ came here in the fall of ’96, and they investigated this Police Department all the way until March or April 2004, when they sent a letter, saying ‘You made changes we wanted, you made changes you wanted.’ No consent decree, no court order, nothing. Sometime between that date and 2010, in a very short period of time, a lot of things went wrong. So we had good leaders, but the system of leadership, I think, failed.

What’s been the department’s biggest success since you returned? SERPAS How many of these men and women come to work and work hard every day. I mean, I get to see it. I go to roll calls. I walk on Bourbon Street. I walk on the parade route. When I see these young men and women doing the things that we ask them to do every day and doing it with pride and dignity and respect, and you see the survey results showing 33 percent in August of ’09, 50 percent approval in August of ’10, 60 percent in February of ’11. And then you look at the individual officers’ survey data, which says 74 percent of the time it was a professional exchange. I mean, those things bring me tremendous pride.

What do you expect to be bragging about next year when we do this? SERPAS I hope by next year we would have a finalized consent decree that tells us exactly what it is we need to do. I’m hoping that the consent decree will have been in place and we start making measurable progress that people can have faith and confidence in.

when i joined policing 30 years ago, i was going to be here for 30 years. the people who join today do not see that. that’s not the way they’ve been raised. that’s not the way they’ve been educated. ★★★★★★★★★★

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 14 > 2011

SERPAS A better quality candidate. There is a small number of people in America who want to be police officers now, and they’re mobile. And there’s even a smaller number that you really want. So if you’re not hiring quickly, if you don’t have a compensation package that’s strong, they’re going to go wherever they’re going to get hired. And then, on top of all that, the children we raised, the Xs and Ys … we get young men and women who come in for the police service, and then they find out we were serious about working at night. We were serious about working on weekends. We were serious about working on holidays. And, oh, yeah, by the way, you could get killed. And over a period of time a lot of these young people are going to move on to something else.

SERPAS The biggest disappointment has been how the system just really came apart. When Richard [Pennington] came, we had examples of very bad people doing very bad things. But we also had systems that were working. What’s different here now is that all the systems came off the track — the training system, the education of new employees, the education of existing employees, the disciplinary system, use of force, paid details.

37

sHTo P aLK

BY LINDSEY DARNELL

SHOPPING NEWS BY MISSY WILKINSON

Art-felt Gifts hen shoppers enter Isabella’s Gallery (1901 Manhattan Blvd., Suite B101, Harvey, 304-4861; 3331 Severn Ave., Suite 105, Metairie, 779-3202; www.isabellasgallery.com), they’re greeted with a plethora of colorful, handcrafted objects. Isabella’s combines the utility of a gift shop with the character of a boutique and the artistry of a gallery. “It’s not a typical ... gift shop where you get the same thing at several different stores,” says Denise Flynn, manager of the West Bank location. Kelly Torres and her husband Oscar “OT” Torres started Isabella’s three years ago. Named after their 10-year-old daughter, Isabella’s specializes in handcrafted jewelry, home decor and gifts. “Everything in the store is usable art, handmade by artists from all over the country,” Flynn says. Isabella’s Gallery features jewelry, Isabella’s novel mix of merchandise includes practical products like decorative home decor and gift items handpigskin glass plates, crafted from recycled window glass, water-based paint, foil, crafted by artists across the U.S. screen mesh and leather, and whimsical items such as glow-in-the-dark gilded barstools and toilet seat covers. “Kelly has this eye for stuff that does great,” Flynn says. “And sure enough people come in and they’re like, ‘Toilet seat covers? What an awesome idea!’” Items in Isabella’s unique jewelry collection range from hand-decorated watches that are individually numbered like fine art prints, to Trollbeads, which are limited-edition glass, gemstone and silver charms. With her innate sense for design, Torres, who is also a jewelry designer, can sense what will surprise and satisfy her customers. “You see something different every time you come in,” Flynn says. “Everybody says, ‘Wow, I’ve never seen this stuff at other places,’ and that’s what Kelly goes for.”

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 14 > 2011

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> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> < <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << MUSIC FILM ART STAGE EVENTS CUISINE > >>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE YOU GO < <<<<<<<<<< << 44 48 50 54 56 61 > >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> < <<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << THE > >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> >> < <<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>> < <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<< JUN > >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >BOOTSY COLLINS WITH DJ SOUL SISTER < <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <PHOTO BY MICHAEL WEINTROB >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> James Brown’s funk buddy and George Clinton’s second-in-command, bassslapper William “Bootsy” Collins, headlines his first U.S. tour since 1995, a baked baker’s dozen featuring members of P-Funk, Public Enemy and the Pretenders along with celebrity guests. Tha Funk Capital of the World (Megaforce), whose first track alone features Chuck D, Ice Cube and Snoop Dogg, descended in April. DJ Soul Sister opens. Tickets $37. 9 p.m. Wednesday. Tipitina’s, 501 Napoleon Ave., 895-8477; www.tipitinas.com

15

THE SHOW IS THE RAINBOW

Listen to the Doctor DR. MICHAEL WHITE RELEASES A NEW ALBUM. BY ROGER HAHN

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15

Darren Keen’s Tony Clifton alias started life in 2003 as a jokey, one-man spoken-word rant, a crash-test vehicle to broadside more successful, self-serious artists (Conor Oberst, mostly). The Lincoln, Neb., outfit is now a less-jokey, one-tothree-man band whose oddball pop sensibilities are showcased on 2009’s Wet Fist (Retard Disco). Call for ticket information. 10 p.m. Wednesday.

Dr. Michael White explores well beyond traditional New Orleans jazz on his new album.

Siberia, 2227 St. Claude Ave., 265-8855

PHOTO BY SYNDEY BYRD

never quite reach. “But now it’s really fun to connect those dots. So, I wanted to bring my own experiences from the past couple of years into the studio, into the music, to show what those older musicians — who were the very first generation jazz musicians — were trying to say.” White currently occupies the Keller Endowed Chair for the Humanities at Xavier University, but he’s been very busy in the studio, having recently recorded with Eric Clapton, Marianne Faithful, Paul Simon and Taj Mahal. Along with Jason Marsalis and Bruce “Sunpie” Barnes, White joined West Africa percussionist Seguenon Kone’s Ensemble Fatien two years ago. The experimental ensemble released an album in June 2010 on Threadhead Records. That month, White also made his first appearance at New York City’s Vision Festival, a 10-day celebration of free jazz, where he joined with free-jazz stalwart and fellow clarinetist Perry Robinson in the North-South Clarinet Ensemble. So what’s a trad guy like him doing in such avantgarde surroundings? “I was a little shocked and surprised myself,” he admits. “But I sat in with Perry during a couple of sets and I began to feel comfortable in that context, I really heard and felt the connection between the New Orleans tradition and free jazz. Experiences like that gave me some of the confidence I needed to really develop a vision for New Orleans jazz as world music, and then trust the experiment enough to make it work.” When does he expect to release Adventures in New Orleans Jazz, Vol. 2? Next year, after he’s had a chance to do a little more exploring.

REBIRTH BRASS BAND 28TH ANNIVERSARY

JUN

17

The longtime ensemble’s trademark Tuesday night gig at their Uptown base the Maple Leaf is a New Orleans institution. Led by brothers Keith and Phil Frazier, the heavy funk and brass band counts powerhouse players like drummer Derrick Tabb in its ranks, and Kermit Ruffins among veterans of its 28-year career. Tickets $15. 10 p.m. Friday

Howlin’ Wolf, 907 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.howlin-wolf.com

ROB RIGGLE

JUN

19

The former Daily Show correspondent and Upright Citizens Brigade and SNL alum is a reliable presence across the comedy world, from The Office to The Hangover. Watch Riggle, a real-life Marine, claim in a recent FunnyOrDie.com viral video that he’s responsible for Osama Bin Laden’s death — while partying to “Sweet Home Alabama” and re-enacting the event with cheeseburgers. Tickets $27.50. 7:30 p.m. Sunday.

House of Blues, 225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www.hob.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 14 > 2011

hen traditional jazz revivalist Dr. Michael White was awarded a National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) Heritage Fellowship in 2008, he told NEA interviewer Mary Eckstein, “I think that I’m on the cusp of a new style, or new approach, or another major wave of how traditional New Orleans jazz will be played.” If his latest album, Adventures in New Orleans Jazz, Vol. 1, (due out June 21 on Basin Street Records) is any indication, he may be on to something. The new recording builds on his two previous releases, Dancing in the Sky and Blue Crescent, and expands to incorporate songs by Bob Marley, Curtis Mayfield and Miriam Makeba and “The Lion Sleeps Tonight.” Organized as a series of extended medleys and new compositions interspersed with a few cameo appearances, Adventures is dedicated “to the memory of my mother and best friend, Mrs. Helen Forcia White (19222009)” and closes with a beautifully rendered solo version of “Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child,” followed by a street-parade celebration of Paul Simon’s “Take Me to the Mardi Gras,” done in the traditional New Orleans jazz ensemble style. “This was an important CD for me to do,” White says. “When I was coming up, the older musicians used to say they could play any kind of music as New Orleans jazz, that New Orleans jazz was more of an approach to music than it was a specific genre of music. In the past couple of years, I’ve been exploring a much wider range of music, partly to test that theory, and so I’ve been growing a lot, and feeling like now I can connect a lot of musical dots I used to think about but could

JUN

43

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MUSIC

LISTINGS

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13 14 WED 15 THU 16 FRI 17 SAT 18 SUN 19 MON

CHARMAINE NEVILLE BAND

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MARK GROWDEN & his New Orleans Band DELFEAYO MARSALIS & UPTOWN JAZZ ORCH. ED PETERSEN & THE TEST CD Release Party

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com

All-Stars, 9:30 EIFFEL SOCIETY â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Vivaz!, 8

preview

THE FAMOUS DOOR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

FAX:483-3116

FUNKY PIRATE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

HI-HO LOUNGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Buskersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ballroom, Sweet Street Symphony, 10

ELLIS MARSALIS QUARTET VERNEL BAGNERIS' "Tribute to Jelly Roll" BETTY SHIRLEY w/ the Chuck Chaplin Trio

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All show times p.m. unless otherwise noted.

HOWLINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; WOLF (THE DEN) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; George Prentice, 10 IRVIN MAYFIELDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sasha Masakowski, 5; Irvin Mayfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s NOJO Jam, 8

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JIMMY BUFFETTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Lisa Lynn, 3; Joe Bennett, 6; Andy J. Forest, 9

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BANKS STREET BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; NOLA Treblemakers, 9; Micah Mckee & Friends, 11 BISTREAUX â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Aaron LopezBarrantes, 6 BLUE NILE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Alford/Morrow/ Cappello, 10 BMC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; William C. Stebon, 6; Royal Rounders, 8:30; Free Spirit Brass Band, 11 BOMBAY CLUB â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Amanda Walker, 7

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FUNKY PIRATE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 14 > 2011

THE FAMOUS DOOR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

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Songs from the Heartless

LACAVAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SPORTS BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Crossfire, 9

PHOTO BY FELICIA GRAHAM

MAPLE LEAF BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jeff â&#x20AC;&#x153;Guitarâ&#x20AC;? Nelson, 10

If any nonmetal band deserves an unalloyed heavy-metal pedigree, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the Heartless Bastards. The Austin, Texasbased quartet is led by witchy singer/songwriter Erika Wennerstrom, who reaches deep into her throat for every vocal, delivering her wavering lines somewhere between a bray and a howl â&#x20AC;&#x201D; cold, hard lines about odysseys through concrete and steel, spilled blood and tasteless lead. A lumberjack with an electric guitar, Wennerstrom also knows how to lay down a lick, as the first four bars of any of her songs can attest. But these Bastards are, at heart, a purebred, unvarnished heartland garage band, one that has steadily shed its â&#x20AC;&#x153;Female Black Keysâ&#x20AC;? billing on each of its three Fat Possum LPs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do the things I used to/ Because I feel old,â&#x20AC;? Wennerstrom cursed on 2005 debut Stairs and Elevators, clenching a saw-toothed blues riff. On 2009â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more moving The Mountain, backed by strings, mandolin and lap-steel guitar, her limitations become a defiant affirmation: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hold on/ To what you know.â&#x20AC;? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a rare display of self-awareness from a rock band more reckless than Reckless Kelly but less explosive than The Exploding Hearts. Tickets $12. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Noah Bonaparte Pais

JUNE

17

HEARTLESS BASTARDS 10 p.m. Friday One Eyed Jacks, 615 Toulouse St., 569-8361; www.oneeyedjacks.net

JIMMY BUFFETTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ched Reeves, 3; Brint Anderson, 6; Truman Holland, 9 LAFITTEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BLACKSMITH SHOP â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mike Hood, 9

MAPLE LEAF BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Rebirth Brass Band, 10 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Dr. Bone & the Hepcats, 6; Lagniappe Brass Band, 9:30 NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Meghan Swartz, 3 OLD OPERA HOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Charlie Cuccia & Old No. 7 Band, 7 OLD POINT BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Josh Garrett & the Bottom Line, 8 PRESERVATION HALL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Preservation Hall-Stars feat. Charlie Gabriel, 8 RALPHâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ON THE PARK â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Joe Krown, 5

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Monica McIntyre, 6; Lantana Combo, 9:30 MOJO STATION â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ed Wills, Blues for Sale, 8 NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jim Hession, 12 OAK â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Amanda Walker, 7 OLD COFFEE POT RESTAURANT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Gypsy Elise & Ryan Way, 8 OLD FIREMENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S HALL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Two Piece & a Biscuit feat. Brandon Foret, Allan Maxwell & Brian Melancon, 7:30 OLD OPERA HOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Vibe, 8:30

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Lars Edegran & Topsy Chapman feat. Palm Court Jazz Band, 7 PRESERVATION HALL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Preservation Hall Jazz Band feat. Mark Braud, 8 RALPHâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ON THE PARK â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Joe Krown, 5 ROCK â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; BOWL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Joe Krown, 8:30

IRVIN MAYFIELDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jason Marsalis, 8

LE CHAT NOIR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; New Orleans Bingo! Show, 8 S BOY POD O O F SEA IALS C E P S LY DAI IALS C SPE

KRAZY KORNER â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Death by Orgasm, 8:30

SIBERIA â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Psychosomatic, Donkey Puncher, Peckernut, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mark Growden & his New Orleans Band, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brett Richardson, 4; Smokinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Time Jazz Club, 6; Davis Rogan Band, 10

Wednesday 15 12 BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brass-A-Holics, 8:30 BACCHANAL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jazz Lab feat. Jesse Morrow, 7:30 BANKS STREET BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Major Bacon, 10 THE BEACH â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Chicken on the Bone, 7 BIG ALâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SALOON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jumpinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Johnny Sansone Blues Party, 7 BISTREAUX â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Paul Longstreth, 7 BLUE NILE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; United Postal Project,

8; Gravity A, 11 BMC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Peter Novelli Band, 6; Blues4Sale, 9:30 BOMBAY CLUB â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Marlon Jordan Jazz Trio, 8 CANDLELIGHT LOUNGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Treme Brass Band, 9 CAROUSEL PIANO BAR & LOUNGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Louis Prima Night feat. John Autin, Austin Clements & Tyler Clements, 8 CHECK POINT CHARLIE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Creepy Fest feat. The Pallbearers, Before I Hang, Toxic Rott, Crotch Breaker, Donkey Puncher, Concrete Shoes, 8 CHICKIE WAH WAH â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tom McDermott, 8 D.B.A. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tin Men, 7; Walter â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wolfmanâ&#x20AC;? Washington & the Roadmasters, 10 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mark Growden & the Dos Jefes

SIBERIA â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Show is the Rainbow, Super Nice Bros., Rhodes!!!, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Delfeayo Marsalis & the Uptown Jazz Orchestra, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brett Richardson, 4; Orleans 6, 6; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10 THREE MUSES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jayna Morgan, 7

TIPITINAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Bootsy Collins, DJ Soul Sister, 9 WEDNESDAY AT THE SQUARE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Cyril Neville & Monk Boudreaux, Gravy, 5 WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Zaza, 6

Thursday 16 12 BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ted Boasso, The Reveners, 10 BACCHANAL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Courtyard Kings, 7; Vincent Marini, 9:30

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

BANKS STREET BAR — The Hannah KB Band, 9; Dave Jordan & the Neighborhood Improvement Associatio, 10 BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Armand St. Martin, 7 BAYOU PARK BAR — Ron Hotstream & the F-Holes, 9 THE BEACH — Chicken on the Bone, 7 BISTREAUX — Paul Longstreth, 7 BMC — The Ramblin’ Letters, 6; Charley & the SoulaBillySwampBoogie Band, 9:30 BOMBAY CLUB — Marlon Jordan Jazz Trio, 8 BOOMTOWN CASINO — Cypress, 8 CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Domenic, 7; Stephanie Nilles, 11 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Smoking Time Jazz Club, 8 DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 5:30 D.B.A. — Jon Cleary, 7; Jake Eckert Band, 10 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Loren Pickford, 9:30 THE EMBERS “ORIGINAL” BOURBON HOUSE — Curtis Binder, 6 THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3 FUNKY PIRATE — Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30 HI-HO LOUNGE — Stooges Brass Band, 10 THE INN ON BOURBON — Joe Ashlar, 6

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Beth Patterson, 3; Colin Lake, 6; Captain Leo, 9 KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & the Zydeco Hellraisers, 4; Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LAFITTE’S BLACKSMITH SHOP — Mike Hood, 9

LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Soul Rebels Brass Band, 11 THE MAISON — Influencia de Jazz, 7; Big Fun Brass Band, 10 MAPLE LEAF BAR — The Trio, 10 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Peter Novelli Band, 6; Smoky Greenwell’s Blues Jam, 9:30 NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Meghan Swartz, 3 OAK — Kristin Diable, 8 OLD COFFEE POT RESTAURANT — Gypsy Elise & Ryan Way, 8 OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 4; Vibe, 8:30

ONE EYED JACKS — Lost Bayou Ramblers, Vagabond Swing, 9 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Duke Heitger & Otis Bazoon feat. Crescent City Joymakers, 7

PAVILION OF THE TWO SISTERS — Thursdays at Twilight feat. The Mystics, 6 PRESERVATION HALL — Survivors Brass Band feat. Jeffrey Hills, 8

PRIME EXAMPLE — George French & Germaine Bazzle, 8 & 10

RALPH’S ON THE PARK — Tom Worrell, 5 RAY’S — Bobby Love Band, 6 REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — Datsik, 10

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Nathan & the Zydeco Cha Chas, 8:30 SIBERIA — The Parishioners, The Fens, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Ed Petersen & the Test CD release, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Miss Sophie Lee, 6; New Orleans Moonshiners, 10 THREE MUSES — Luke Winslow-King, 7:30

VAUGHAN’S — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 8:30

Louisiana Hellbenders, 7; Fish Out of Water, 11

DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 9 D.B.A. — Hot Club of New Orleans, 6 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Grayson Capps, 10 DRAGON’S DEN — The Switchers, Motion Turns It On, Hot Coke Sex, Chelsea Rainwater, 9:30

THE EMBERS “ORIGINAL” BOURBON HOUSE — Curtis Binder, 6 EMERIL’S DELMONICO — Bob Andrews, 7 FELIPE’S TAQUERIA — Fredy Omar con su Banda, 10 FUNKY PIRATE — Mark Penton, 4:30; Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30 HERMES BAR — Alex McMurray & Bill Malchow, 9:30 & 11 HI-HO LOUNGE — Bones, 10 HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION — Concerts in the Courtyard presents Sunpie & the Louisiana Sunspots, 6 THE HOOKAH — Don Chezina, 10

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6

Friday 17

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — The Tangle, 10

BABYLON LOUNGE — Peckernut, Power Blvd., 10 BANKS STREET BAR — Roarshark, Tryptyck, 9 BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Armand St. Martin, 7; Philip Melancon, 8

BISTREAUX — Paul Longstreth, 7 BLUE NILE — Mykia Jovan & Jason Butler, 8; Bottoms Up Blues Gang, 9; Soul Rebels, 10

BMC — Moonshine & Caroline, 7; Mark Pentone & Smoky Greenwell Trio, 9; Soul Project, 10; One Mind Brass Band, 1 a.m. BOMBAY CLUB — Monty Banks, 6; Tim Laughlin & Trio, 9:30 BOOMTOWN CASINO — Gashouse Gorillaz, 9

CARROLLTON STATION — Joe Andragna CD release feat. Kelcy Mae, 9 CHECK POINT CHARLIE —

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HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — Nicole Atkins & the Black Sea, Sun Hotel, 9:30 HOWLIN’ WOLF — Rebirth Brass Band 28th Anniversary Party, 10

AUSTIN’S RESTAURANT — Scott Kyser, 6:30

Showcasing Local Music

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Paul Sanchez, 8; Ray Bonneville, 10

THE INN ON BOURBON — Joe Ashlar, 6 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Tom Worrell, 5; Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown, 8; Burlesque Ballroom feat. Linnzi Zaorski, midnight JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Colin Lake, 3; Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 6 & 9 JUJU BAG CAFE AND BARBER SALON — Michaela Harrison, Todd Duke, 7:30 KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Joe Krown, 7; Soul Project, 11 THE MAISON — Kristina Morales, 7; Dirty Bourbon River Show, Blair Crimmins & the Hookers, Megan Jean & the KFB, 10 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Gravy, 10 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Jerry Jumonville, 4; Alex Bosworth, 7; Fredy Omar PAGE 46

MON 6/13

Papa Grows Funk

TUE 6/14

Rebirth Brass Band

WED 6/15

Jeff “Guitar” Nelson

THU The Trio featuring 6/16 Johnny V & Special Guests FRI 6/17

Gravy

SAT 6/18

Kris Royal & Dark Matter

TrioTrio w/ Walter SUN Joe JoeKrown Krown SUN “Wolfman” Washington feat. Russell Batiste & Walter& 6/19 3/13 Russell Batiste Wolfman Washington

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > JUNE 14 > 2011

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Roman Skakun, 5; Shamarr Allen, 8

OLD POINT BAR — Blues Frenzy, 6:30; Maxwell Eaton & the Goldtooth Players, 9

MUSIC

45

MUSIC

Quench your Summertime Thirst 2.50 SPECIAL

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WEDNESDAY SANGRIA

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LUNCH MON-FRI 11-3, SAT 11-4 DINNER MON-SAT 5-9

LISTINGS

PAGE 45

con su Banda, 10:30 NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Richard Scott & Stephen Dale, 2 NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART — Kora Konnection, 5:30

BEST DAILY

OAK — Christina Perez, 6; Geoff Clapp Trio, 10

SPECIALS

OLD COFFEE POT RESTAURANT — Gypsy Elise & Ryan Way, 8

LUNCH

3001 MAGAZINE ST. · 891-0997 www.joeyksrestaurant.com

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1; Vibe, 8:30 OLD POINT BAR — Thomas Johnson & the People, 9:30 ONE EYED JACKS ��� Heartless Bastards, Micah McKee, members of Little Maker, 9

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Clive Wilson & Palm Court Jazz Band, 7 PELICAN CLUB — Sanford Hinderlie, 7

THE PERFECT FIT BAR & GRILL — Rechelle, Regeneration, 5:30 PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Masters feat. Leroy Jones, 8 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Glen Davis Andrews feat. Mia Borders, 9:30

SHAMROCK BAR — Groovy 7, 9 SIBERIA — Happy Talk Band, Graves Brothers Deluxe, Jai Young Kim, My Graveyard Jaw, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Ellis Marsalis Quartet, 8 & 10

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 14 > 2011

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 6:30; New Orleans Cotton Mouth Kings, 10

46

THREE MUSES — Raphael Bas, 7; Glen David Andrews, 10

TIPITINA’S — Gal Holiday & the Honky Tonk Revue, 10 TOMMY’S WINE BAR — Tommy’s Latin Jazz Band feat. Matthew Shilling, 9

VOILÀ — Mario Abney Quartet, 5 WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6; Anais St. John, 9

Saturday 18 12 BAR — Call Girls, 7; Louisiana Rhythm Katz, 10 APPLE BARREL — Peter Orr, 7

ARTEGG BUILDING — ArtEgg Tenth Anniversary Fundraiser feat. The Scorseses, Sweet Jones, Fast Niki, Luke Starkiller, The Unnaturals, 4

LUNCH SPECIALS Monday-Friday 11am-2pm

LIVE MUSIC

Monday, Thursday-Saturday NO COVER AT ALL!!! Check website for listings.

3449 River Rd. (at Shrewsbury in Jefferson Parish) • 834-4938 • www.therivershacktavern.com

ATCHAFALAYA — Atchafalaya All Stars, 11 a.m.

AUSTIN’S RESTAURANT — Scott Kyser, 6:30

Unnaturals, 10 BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Armand St. Martin, 7; Philip Melancon, 8

BISTREAUX — Paul Longstreth, 7 BLUE NILE — Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 7; Fish Out of Water, 9; Brass-A-Holics, 10 BMC — New Orleans Jazz Series, 3; Jayna Morgan & Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 6:30; Gypsy Elise & Ryan Way, 8; Mainline, 9:30; Ashton & the Big Easy Brawlers, 12:30 a.m.

BOMBAY CLUB — Monty Banks, 6; Leroy Jones & Quartet, 9:30 BOOMTOWN CASINO — Aaron Foret, 9

BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Tim Paco & Company, 8 CARROLLTON STATION — Alexis Marceaux, Cortland Burke, 9 CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Ocean Of Storms, Chaos Of The Cosmos, 7; Sam Hooper Group, 11

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Mem Shannon & the Membership, 10

DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 9 D.B.A. — Linnzi Zaorski, 7; Otra, 11

DECKBAR & GRILLE — Miche & MixMavens, 8 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Sunpie & the Louisiana Sunspots, 10 THE EMBERS “ORIGINAL” BOURBON HOUSE — Curtis Binder, 6 EMERIL’S DELMONICO — Bob Andrews, 7

FUNKY PIRATE — Mark Penton, 4:30; Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30 HARRAH’S CASINO (HARRAH’S THEATRE) — Average White Band, 7 & 10 HERMES BAR — Glen David Andrews, 9:30 & 11

HI-HO LOUNGE — Starbolt9, Streetzie Desire, 10

HOUSE OF BLUES — The Chee Weez, The Brandon Foret Band, 9

HOWLIN’ WOLF — Birdfinger, 10

Mike Hood, 9 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Funkifry’d, 11 LOUISIANA MUSIC FACTORY — Grayson Capps, 2; Gravy, 3; Joe Adragna, 4

THE MAISON — Ramblin’ Letters, 5; Soul Project, 10; Tony Skratchree & friends, 10 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Khris Royal & Dark Matter, 10 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Charley & the SoulaBillySwampBoogie Band, 7; Dana Abbot Band, 10:30; The Mumbles, 12:30 a.m. MULATE’S CAJUN RESTAURANT — Bayou DeVille, 7 NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — New Orleans Women in Music Showcase, 2 OAK — Jenn Howard, 9

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1; Vibe, 8:30 OLD POINT BAR — The Space Heaters, 9:30

ONE EYED JACKS — Sick Like Sinatra, Big Fat & Delicious, Rok Boms, 9 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lionel Ferbos & Palm Court Jazz Band, 7 PELICAN CLUB — Sandford Hinderlie, 7

PRESERVATION HALL — 726 Jazz Band feat. William Smith, 8 RITZ-CARLTON — Catherine Anderson, 1

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Kermit Ruffins & the BBQ Swingers, 9:30 SIBERIA — The Paperhead, Nature Boys, Bipolaroid, SS Boombox, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Vernel Bagneris, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Luke WinslowKing, 3; Kat Walker Jazz Combo, 6

THREE MUSES — Steven Walker, 7; Jug Band, 10 TOMMY’S WINE BAR — Julio & Caesar, 10 TOOLOULA’S — Minimum Wage, 9

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6; Anais St. John, 9

THE INN ON BOURBON — Joe Ashlar, 6

Sunday 19

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — James Andrews, 8; Kinfolk Brass Band, midnight

ARNAUD’S — Gumbo Trio, 10:30 a.m. & 6:30

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Joe Bennett, 3; Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 6 & 9

BABYLON LOUNGE — Interior Decorating, Hairspray Queens, 10

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30

BANKS STREET BAR —

LAFITTE’S BLACKSMITH SHOP —

ATCHAFALAYA — Sam & Boone, 11 a.m. BALCONY MUSIC CLUB (BMC) — Andy J. Forest, 10 BANKS STREET BAR — The Bad Assets, 9 BISTREAUX — Aaron LopezBarrantes, 6 BLUE NILE — Mainline, 10

Garden Concert Series

THIS WEEK’S PERFORMANCE

The New Orleans Mystics Featuring the music of Motown

FILM

Thursdays at Twilight

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

NOW SHOWING

BEYOND ALL BOUNDARIES (NR) —

The museum screens a 4-D film, bringing audiences into battle using archival footage and special effects. National World War II Museum Solomon Victory Theater

JUNE 16

BRIDESMAIDS (R) — A comically

Adults: $8 / Children 5-12: $3 Children 4 & Under = FREE Mint Juleps and other refreshments available for purchase For more information call

(504) 483-9488

struggling woman (Kristen Wiig) tries to get her life in order while also serving as her best friend’s maid of honor. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

FAST FIVE (PG-13) — Vin Diesel and

Dwayne Johnson star in the latest installment of the Fast and the Furious franchise. AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 THE HANGOVER PART II (R) — After

the infamous bachelor party in Las Vegas, Stu (Ed Helms) tries to play it safe for his wedding in Thailand — but things once again go awry. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 14 > 2011

48

learned to fly (voiced by Jesse Eisenberg) and his female counterpart get caught up in a perilous adventure. Hollywood 14

SOMETHING BORROWED (PG-13) —

A successful and unhappily single attorney falls for her best friend’s fiance. AMC Palace 20, Hollywood 14

SUPER 8 (PG-13) — A group of

friends in 1979 start to witness strange occurrences after a catastrophic train crash in J.J. Abrams’ sci-fi drama. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies, Grand

THOR (PG) — Chris Hemsworth

plays the powerful but arrogant Marvel Comics hero who is cast down to Earth to live among humans. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 1

X-MEN: FIRST CLASS (PG-13) — The prequel tells the origin story of the Marvel Comics supergroup. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 YELLOWBRICKROAD (R) — A team of

researchers sets out to uncover the mystery surrounding the sudden disappearance of the inhabitants of a New Hampshire town in the horror-thriller. AMC Palace 20

JUMPING THE BROOM (NR) —

DC Comics adaptation that was filmed in New Orleans, a hot-shot test pilot must maintain peace in the universe using a mystical green ring.

KUNG FU PANDA 2 (PG) — The

animated sequel stars Jack Black as the voice of the titular warrior. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

MIDNIGHT IN PARIS (PG-13) — In

the Woody Allen film, a screenwriter and aspiring novelist (Owen Wilson) finds himself travelling back in time to the Jazz Age while touring Paris at night. AMC Palace 20, Canal Place

PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES (PG-13) — In the

latest installment of the franchise, Captain Jack Sparrow’s (Johnny Depp) past comes back to haunt him when he encounters Angelica (Penélope Cruz), a pirate he once loved. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

REJOICE AND SHOUT (PG) —

ALD-A028-1

RIO 3-D (G) — A macaw who never

OPENING FRIDAY

Worlds collide when two AfricanAmerican families from disparate socioeconomic backgrounds get together for a wedding in Martha’s Vineyard. AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Hollywood 9

www.theoriginalleakspecialist.com

the history of Gospel music. AMC Palace 20

JUDY MOODY AND THE NOT BUMMER SUMMER (PG) — The book

series by Megan McDonald gets a big-screen adaptation. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

(504) 522-9897

A ROOM WITH A VIEW

Through photos, rare recordings, film appearances and TV performances, the documentary traces

GREEN LANTERN (PG-13) — In the

SPECIAL SCREENINGS ALL ABOUT EVE (NR) — Bette Davis

and Anne Baxter star in the 1950 film about an aging movie star who is threatened by an ambitious ingenue. Tickets $5.50. Noon Wednesday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com

BRIT WIT — The Big Top screens

British comedies every week. 7 p.m. Tuesday, 3 Ring Circus’ The Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com

THE FIRST BEAUTIFUL THING (NR) —

Italian director Paolo Virzì’s film follows a vivacious mother who raises her children to appreciate the small joys in life. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 7:30 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday, Zeitgeist MultiDisciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net FROM BRITAIN WITH LOVE — The

Film Society of the Lincoln Center, UK Film Council and Emerging Pictures presents the touring showcase of British films. Films include Toast, Africa United, A Boy Called Dad, In Our Name and Third Star. Visit www.frombritain-

Ryan Reynolds tries to make the universe a peaceful place in the Green Lantern, opening Friday. PHOTO COURTESY WARNER BROS. PICTURES & © DC COMICS

withlove.org for the full schedule. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members, $20 series pass (includes all five films). Friday-Monday, then nightly through June 23, Zeitgeist MultiDisciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net HANDMADE NATION (NR) — In the documentary, Faythe Levine explores the D.I.Y. and crafts movement in America. The New Orleans Craft Mafia will host a craft market before and after the screening, part of the Green Project and Charitable Film Network’s Green Screen series. Free admission. 7 p.m. Thursday, Green Project, 2831 Marais St., 945-0240; www.thegreenproject.org THE LORD OF THE RINGS TRILOGY — Local theaters (AMC Palace

20, AMC Palace 16, Hollywood 14) screen the Academy Awardwinning trilogy in three parts. 7 p.m. Tuesday, June 21 and June 28.

REAR WINDOW (NR)— Alfred Hitchcock’s 1954 mystery stars James Stewart and Grace Kelly as a couple who thinks one of the neighbors has committed murder. Free admission. 8 p.m. Monday, La Divina Gelateria, 621 St. Peter St., 302-2692; www.ladivinagelateria. com THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW (R) — Tim Curry stars in the rock

movie-musical that lends itself to audience participation. Tickets $8. Midnight Friday-Saturday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com

SINGIN’ IN THE RAIN (NR) — Gene Kelly’s 1952 movie-musical follows a silent film production company as they make a difficult transition to talkies. Tickets $5.50. Noon Saturday-Sunday and June 22, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com THE TOPP TWINS: UNTOUCHABLE GIRLS (NR) — A compilation of

interviews, performance footage, home videos and newsreel archives tells the story of Jools and Lynda Topp, the yodeling, lesbian, country-and-western-singing twins from New Zealand. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students

and seniors, $5 members. 6 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday, Zeitgeist MultiDisciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net TWO SPIRITS (NR) — Lydia

Nibley’s film tells the story of Fred Martinez, who was brutally murdered at age 16 because of his unique gender identity. Reservations are recommended. Email mail@charitablefilmnetwork. org for details. 7 p.m. Saturday, Antenna Gallery, 3161 Burgundy St., 957-4255; www.antennagallery.org

!WOMEN ART REVOLUTION (NR) — Lynn Hershman Leeson’s film

explores the “secret history” of feminist art through conversations, archival footage and works of artists, historians, curators and critics. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 7:30 p.m. Friday-Monday, then nightly through June 23, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

AMC Palace 10 (Hammond), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 12 (Clearview), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 16 (Westbank), (888) 2624386; AMC Palace 20 (Elmwood), (888) 262-4386; Canal Place, 3631117; Chalmette Movies, 304-9992; Entergy IMAX, 581-IMAX; Grand (Slidell), (985) 641-1889; Hollywood 9 (Kenner), 464-0990; Hollywood 14 (Covington), (985) 893-3044; Kenner MegaDome, 468-7231; Prytania, 891-2787; Solomon Victory Theater, National World War II Museum, 527-6012 Compiled by Lauren LaBorde

ART

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Alex Woodward listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

MARTIN LAWRENCE GALLERY NEW ORLEANS. 433 Royal St.,

299-9055; www.martinlawrence. com — Works by René Lalonde, through June. Opening reception 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday.

GALLERIES

ARTICHOKE GALLERY. 912 Decatur St., 636-2004 — Artists work on

BERGERON STUDIO & GALLERY. 406 Magazine St., 522-7503; www. bergeronstudio.com — Photographs by Michael P. Smith, Jack Beech, Harriet Blum, Kevin Roberts and others, ongoing.

ALL IN THE FRAME GALLERY. 2596 Front St., Slidell, (985) 290-1395 — “Serene Waters, Clear Horizons,” paintings by Annie Strack, ongoing. ANTON HAARDT FOLK GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www.antonart.com — Works

by Anton Haardt, Christopher Moses and others, ongoing. ARIODANTE GALLERY. 535 Julia St., 524-3233 — Group exhibi-

tion featuring Cheri Ben-Iesau, Isabelle Dupuy, Susan Landry, Ro Mayer, Myra Williamson Wirtz, Alicia Windham and Maria Etkind, through July 30. ART GALLERY 818. 818 Royal St., 524-6918 — Paintings, sculpture

and jewelry by local artists Noel Rockmore, Michael Fedor, Xavier de Callatay, Charles Bazzell, Bambi deVille and Ritchie Fitzgerald, ongoing.

ARTHUR ROGER GALLERY. 432

tion, through July 5.

CALICHE & PAO GALLERY. 312 Royal St., 588-2846 — Oil paintings

by Caliche and Pao, ongoing.

CALLAN FINE ART. 240 Chartres St., 524-0025; www.callanfineart. com — Works by Eugene de

Blass, Louis Valtat and other artists of the Barbizon, Impressionist and Post-Impressionist schools, ongoing.

CARDINAL GALLERY. 541 Bourbon St., 522-3227 — Exhibition of

Italian artists featuring works by Bruno Paoli and Andrea Stella, ongoing.

CARIBBEAN ARTS LTD. 720 Franklin Ave., 943-3858 — The gallery showcases contemporary Haitian and Jamaican art. CASELL GALLERY. 818 Royal St., 524-0671; www.casellartgallery. com — Pastels by Joaquim

Casell; etchings by Sage; oils by Charles Ward; all ongoing.

COLE PRATT GALLERY. 3800 Magazine St., 891-6789; www. coleprattgallery.com — “Inter-

GALERIE ROYALE. 3648 Magazine St., 894-1588; www.galerieroyale. com — “Expressions of Me,”

ISABELLA’S GALLERY. 3331 Severn Ave., Suite 105, Metairie, 779-3202; www.isabellasgallery.com — Hand-blown glass works by Marc Rosenbaum; raku by Kate Tonguis and John Davis; all ongoing.

making invitational, through Aug. 6.

DUTCH ALLEY ARTIST’S CO-OP GALLERY. 912 N. Peters St., 4129220; www.dutchalleyonline. com — Works by New Orleans

BRYANT GALLERIES. 316 Royal St., 525-5584; www.bryantgalleries. com — Paintings by Dean Mitchell, ongoing.

by gallery artists; 504 Toys, locally handcrafted toys; both ongoing.

COLLECTIVE WORLD ART COMMUNITY. Poydras Center, 650 Poydras St., 339-5237; www.collectiveworldartcommunity.com —

DU MOIS GALLERY. 4921 Freret St., 818-6032 — “Cold Drink” print-

BERTA’S AND MINA’S ANTIQUITIES GALLERY. 4138 Magazine St., 895-6201 — “Louisiana! United

BYRDIE’S GALLERY. 2422-A St. Claude Ave., www.byrdiesgallery. com — Artfully Aware exhibi-

featuring works by nine gallery artists, through July 9.

Again,” exhibition of work by gallery artists from the past year, through Aug. 4.

ACADEMY GALLERY. 5256 Magazine St., 899-8111 — Annual AG WAGNER STUDIO & GALLERY. 813 Royal St., 561-7440 — Works

tography by Christopher Porche West, ongoing.

D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., 524-3936 — “So Much Art, So Little Time,

We Stand to Save Our Wetlands,” works by Nilo and Mina Lanzas; works by Clementine Hunter, Noel Rockmore and others; all ongoing.

student exhibition, through July 23.

twined,” paintings by Karen Stastny, through June 25.

Paintings from the Blue Series by Joseph Pearson, ongoing.

A GALLERY FOR FINE PHOTOGRAPHY. 241 Chartres St., 568-1313; www.agallery.com — “Coun-

terfeit,” works by Louviere + Vanessa, through June.

artists, ongoing.

ELLIOTT GALLERY. 540 Royal St., 523-3554; www.elliottgallery. com — Works by gallery artists Coignard, Engel, Papart, Petra, Tobiasse, Schneuer and Yrondi, ongoing. FAIR FOLKS & A GOAT. 2116 Chartres St., 872-9260; www. fairfolksandagoat.com — “An American Memory,” a group exhibition curated by Michael Martin, through July 15. “Foot-aNight,” installation by Hannah Chalew, ongoing. FIELDING GALLERY. 525 E. Boston St., Covington — Metal sculpture

by Keith Villere, through July 13.

FRAMIN’ PLACE & GALLERY. 3535 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-3311; www.nolaframing.com — Prints

by Tommy Thompson, Phillip Sage, James Michalopoulos and others, ongoing. FREDRICK GUESS STUDIO. 910 Royal St., 581-4596; www.fredrickguessstudio.com — Paintings by

Fredrick Guess, ongoing.

THE FRONT. 4100 St. Claude Ave.; www.nolafront.org — “Love,

the Front,” a group exhibition featuring old and new gallery artists, through July 3.

GALERIE D’ART FRANCAIS. 541 Royal St., 581-6925 — Works by

Todd White, ongoing.

GALERIE PORCHE WEST. 3201 Burgundy St., 947-3880 — Pho-

FREE DELIVERY

GALLERIA BELLA. 319 Royal St., 5815881 — Works by gallery artists, ongoing. GALLERY 421. 421 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 898-5858 —

More than 500 pieces of art by more than 50 artists, ongoing.

GALLERY BIENVENU. 518 Julia St., 525-0518; www.gallerybienvenu. com — “My Pinocchio Syndrome for Abigail ... Ten Years Later. This Aint’t Disney Jeff,” mixed media by Blake Boyd, through July 23. THE GARDEN DISTRICT GALLERY. 1332 Washington Ave., 891-3032; www.gardendistrictgallery. com — “Seeing Music,” a group

exhibition exploring interpretations of music, through July 3.

GEORGE SCHMIDT GALLERY. 626 Julia St., 592-0206; www. georgeschmidt.com — Paintings

by George Schmidt, ongoing.

GOOD CHILDREN GALLERY. 4037 St. Claude Ave., 616-7427; www. goodchildrengallery.com — “Grant v. Lee,” contemporary works related to the Civil War, through July 3. GRAPHITE GALLERIES. 936 Royal St., 565-3739 — “Sinners and

Saints,” works by Joe Hobbs; works by Christy Lee Rogers; both ongoing.

GUTHRIE CONTEMPORARY. 3815 Magazine St., 897-2688; www. guthriecontemporary.com —

“Schemata,” works by Susan Dory, ongoing.

GUY LYMAN FINE ART. 3645 Magazine St., 899-4687; www. guylymanfineart.com — Mixed media with mechanical light sculptures by Jimmy Block, ongoing. HAROUNI GALLERY. 829 Royal St., 299-8900 — Paintings by David

Harouni, ongoing.

HERIARD-CIMINO GALLERY. 440 Julia St., 525-7300; www.heriardcimino.com — Group exhibition

JAMIE HAYES GALLERY. 621 Chartres St., 592-4080; www.jamiehayes.com — New Orleans-style art by Jamie Hayes, ongoing.

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Shannon Landis Hansen; textile constructions by Christine Sauer, through July 30. LIVE ART STUDIO. 4207 Dumaine St., 484-7245 — “New Orleans

is Alive,” acrylics by Marlena Stevenson, through July.

LOUISIANA CRAFTS GUILD. 608 Julia St., 558-6198; www.louisianacrafts.org — Group show featuring works from guild members, ongoing.

JEAN BRAGG GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART. 600 Julia St., 895-7375; www.jeanbragg.com — “Rhythm

MALLORY PAGE STUDIO. 614 Julia St.; www.mallorypage.com — Paintings by Mallory Page, ongoing.

JON SCHOOLER GALLERY. 8526 Oak St., 865-7032; www. jonschooler.com — “Sublimi-

MARTINE CHAISSON GALLERY. 727 Camp St., 304-7942; www. martinechaissongallery.com — “Embers of a Floating World,” works by Caroline Wright, through July 9.

JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY. 400A Julia St., 522-5471; www. jonathanferraragallery.com —

MICHALOPOULOS GALLERY. 617 Bienville St., 558-0505; www.michalopoulos.com — Paintings by James Michalopoulos, ongoing.

on the River,” paintings by Derenda Keating, through June.

nal WOWs,” paintings by Jon Schooler, ongoing.

“Wrong Sounding Stories,” paintings by Adam Mysock; “Eternal Moment,” drawings by Rieko Fujinami, through June.

JULIE NEILL DESIGNS. 3908 Magazine St., 899-4201; www.julieneill. com — “Facade,” photographs

MICHELLE Y WILLIAMS GALLERY. 835 Julia St., 585-1945; www.michelleywilliams.com — Works by

Michelle Y. Williams, ongoing.

NEW ORLEANS ARTWORKS. 727 Magazine St., 529-7279 — Illumi-

KAKO GALLERY. 536 Royal St., 5655445; www.kakogallery.com —

nated glass sculpture by Curt Brock; enameled copper jewelry by Cathy DeYoung; hand-pulled prints by Dominique Begnaud, through July 30.

KURT E. SCHON. 510-520 St. Louis St., 524-5462 — The gallery spe-

NEWCOMB ART GALLERY. Woldenberg Art Center, Tulane University, 865-5328; www. newcombartgallery.tulane.edu — “The History of the Future,” photographs by Michael Berman and Julián Cardona, through June 29.

L9 CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 539 Caffin Ave., 948-0056 — “Faces

OCTAVIA ART GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www. octaviaartgallery.com — Acrylic on canvas by Cleland Powell, through June 28.

by Lesley Wells, ongoing.

Paintings by Don Picou and Stan Fontaine; “Raku” by Joy Gauss; 3-D wood sculpture by Joe Derr; all ongoing. cializes in 18th and 19th century European oil paintings by artists from the French Salon and Royal Academy as well as French Impressionists.

of Treme,” works by Chandra McCormick and Keith Calhoun, ongoing. LE PETIT SALON DE NEW ORLEANS. 906 Royal St., 524-5700 — Paintings by Holly Sarre,

ongoing.

LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia St., 522-5988; www.lemieuxgalleries.com — “Breaking Muse!”

ceramic assemblages by

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 14 > 2011

Julia St., 522-1999; www.arthurrogergallery.com — Paintings by James Barsness; “Postcards From Plaquemines,” oil paintings and drawings by Simon Gunning, both through June 25.

site in all media; watercolors and limited-edition prints by Peter Briant, ongoing.

OPENING

50

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& decorators alike 300 Jefferson Hwy.(A cr oss fr om Lowe’s) New Orleans 504.231.3397 www.dopantiques.com

ONE SUN GALLERY. 616 Royal St., (800) 501-1151 — Works by local and national artists, ongoing. PARSE GALLERY. 134 Carondelet St. — “Chicken Lovers,” works by Barbie L’Hoste and Megan Hillerud, through June 24. PEARL ART GALLERY. 4421 Magazine St., 228-5840 — Works

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

Park Road, Metairie, 837-5204; www.mpcds.com — “The Unconventional Portrait,” works by Mark Bercier, David Halliday, Gina Phillips and Alexander Stolin, ongoing. MOJO COFFEE HOUSE. 1500 Magazine St., 525-2244; www. myspace.com/mojoco — Photographs by Marc Pagani, ongoing. NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE. 5110 Danneel St., 891-3381; www.neutralground. org — Work by local artists,

ongoing.

NEW ORLEANS CAKE CAFE & BAKERY. 2440 Chartres St., 943-0010 — Oil landscapes

of the Ustabes by Will Smith, ongoing.

PEACHES RECORDS. 408 N. Peters St., 282-3322 — “Gospel

and Blues,” photographs by Rita Posselt, ongoing.

ROYAL BLEND CAFE. 621 Royal St., 523-2716 — Black-and-white

photographs by Jocelyn Marquis, through September.

GERMAN-AMERICAN CULTURAL CENTER. 519 Huey P. Long Ave., Gretna, 363-4202; www.gaccnola.com — Museum exhibits

depict the colonial experience, work, culture and religion of German immigrants.

GREAT AMERICAN ALLIGATOR MUSEUM. 2051 Magazine St., 523-5525 — The museum

features fossils, taxidermy, folk art, kitsch, Americana and more.

HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION. 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www.hnoc.org — “The Threads

of Memory: Spain and the United States,” a traveling exhibition of rare materials from the Archive of the Indies in Seville, Spain, through July 10. “The Golden Legend in the New World: Art of the Spanish Colonial Viceroyalties,” paintings from the New Orleans Museum of Art collection, through Aug. 14.

LONGUE VUE HOUSE AND GARDENS. 7 Bamboo Road, 4885488; www.longuevue.com —

SOUND CAFE. 2700 Chartres St., 947-4477 — Mixed-media

“Magic Spell of Memory: The Photography of Clarence John Laughlin,” through fall 2011.

SURREY’S CAFE & JUICE BAR. 1418 Magazine St., 524-3828; www.surreyscafeandjuicebar. com — Watercolor, pen and ink series of New Orleans landmarks by Will Smith, ongoing.

LOUISIANA FILM MUSEUM. Montrel’s Bistro, 1000 N. Peters St., 524-4747; www.louisianafilmmuseum.org — The museum features props, costumes, video clips, still photographs, posters and other exhibits from major films produced in Louisiana.

paintings by YA/YA alumnus Gerard Caliste, ongoing.

THREE MUSES. 536 Frenchmen St., 298-8746; www.thethreemuses.com — Portraits by Zack

Smith, ongoing.

MUSEUMS AMERICAN-ITALIAN MUSEUM & RESEARCH LIBRARY. 537 S. Peters St., 522-7294 — Permanent

AMISTAD RESEARCH CENTER. 6823 St. Charles Ave., 862-3222 — “Richmond Barthe: Builder

of Pictures,” an exhibition highlighting the life and career of the Harlem Renaissance sculptor, through June.

ASHE CULTURAL ARTS CENTER. 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — “Ashe in Retrospect: 19982008,” photographs by Morris Jones Jr., Eric Waters, Jeffrey Cook and others, ongoing. BACKSTREET CULTURAL MUSEUM. 1116 St. Claude Ave.; www.backstreetmuseum.org —

Permanent exhibits of Mardi Gras Indian suits, jazz funeral memorabilia and social aid and pleasure club artifacts, ongoing.

CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER. 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www. cacno.org — “As We See It: Youth Vision Quilt,” studentcreated quilt with more than 400 patches, ongoing.

photographs illustrating the impact of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, through August. “Holding Out and Hanging On: Surviving Hurricane Katrina,” photographs by Thomas Neff, through Sept. 12. “Living With Hurricanes: Katrina and Beyond,” an exhibition of stories, artifacts and science displays; “It’s Carnival Time in Louisiana,” Carnival artifacts, costumes, jewelry and others items; ongoing.

LOUISIANA SUPREME COURT MUSEUM. Louisiana Supreme Court, 400 Royal St., 3102149; www.lasc.org — The

Supreme Court of Louisiana Historical Society sponsors the museum’s exhibitions of the people and institutions that have contributed to the development of Louisiana law for 300 years.

MAIN LIBRARY. 219 Loyola Ave., 529-7323; www.nutrias. org — “Hidden from History: Unknown New Orleanians,” photographs of the city’s working poor, ongoing. MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN COCKTAIL. 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www. museumoftheamericancocktail. org — “Absinthe Visions,”

photographs by Damian Hevia, ongoing. NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF

ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma. org — “Ancestors of Congo Square: African Art in the New Orleans Museum of Art,” through July 17. “Read My Pins: The Madeleine Albright Collection,” more than 200 pins from Albright’s personal collection, through Aug. 14. “Peter Carl Faberge and Other Russian Masters,” permanent collection of Faberge objects; “Six Shooters,” photographs from the New Orleans Photo Alliance; both ongoing. NEW ORLEANS PHARMACY MUSEUM. 514 Chartres St., 5658027; www.pharmacymuseum. org — Exhibits about 19th-

century pharmacy, medicine and health care, all ongoing.

OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART. 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org —

Endangered Species Day Art Contest Exhibition, through July 16. “Art & Jazz: Preservation Hall at 50,” “New Orleans Craft & Design”; “One World, Two Artists,” works by John Alexander and Walter Anderson; “Juke Joint,” photographs by Birney Imes; all through July 24.

OLD URSULINE CONVENT. 1100 Chartres St., 529-3040 — “France in America,” pho-

tographs by Arielle de la Tour d’Auvergne, through June.

OLD U.S. MINT. 400 Esplanade Ave., 568-6990; lsm.crt.state. la.us/site/mintex.htm — “Race: Are We So Different?” an exhibit exploring the history, science and everyday experience of race, through Sept. 25. SOUTHERN FOOD & BEVERAGE MUSEUM. Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood. org — “Acadian to Cajun:

Forced Migration to Commercialization,” a multimedia exhibit; “Laissez Faire — Savoir Fare,” the cuisine of Louisiana and New Orleans; “Eating in the White House — America’s Food”; “Tout de Sweet,” an exhibit exploring all aspects of the sugar industry in the South; “Barbecue Nation”; all ongoing. TANGIPAHOA AFRICAN-AMERICAN HERITAGE MUSEUM & BLACK VETERANS ARCHIVES. 1600 Phoenix Square, Hammond, (985) 542-4259; www.africanamericanheritagemuseum. com — The museum exhibits

works that preserve and tell the history of African-American ancestors in Louisiana; it also houses the country’s first memorial to black Vietnam War veterans, ongoing.

TULANE UNIVERSITY. Joseph Merrick Jones Hall, 6823 St. Charles Ave. — “Treme: People and Places,” maps, architectural drawings and photographs celebrating the bicentennial of Faubourg Treme, through November.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 14 > 2011

exhibits of jazz artists, a St. Joseph’s altar replica, the Louisiana Italian-American Sports Hall of Fame and a research library with genealogy records.

LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM PRESBYTERE. 751 Chartres St., 568-6968; www.lsm.crt.state. la.us — “Before During After,”

ART

53

STAGE

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly. com; FAX:483-3116

GET IN ON THE ACT

review

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

THEATER

ADULT PETTING ZOO. Shadowbox Theatre, 2400 St. Claude Ave., 523-7469; www. theshadowboxtheatre.com — The New Orleans Fringe Festival hosts the night of fashion design, burlesque, song and theater, including the 2010 Fringe Festival selection 52 Man Pick-Up by Desiree Burch. Visit www.nofringe.org for reservations. Tickets $15. 11 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 8 p.m. Sunday.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 14 > 2011

ANNIE. River Region Performing Arts & Cultural Center, 15146 River Road, Norco, 904-1129; www.rrpa.org — In the upbeat musical, a spunky orphan looks for a family amid the Great Depression. Tickets $20 general admission, $10 preview performance (Tuesday). 7:30 p.m. Wednesday-Friday.

54

JULIUS CAESAR. Lupin Theatre, Tulane University, 865-5106; www.tulane.edu — The production sets the William Shakespeare tragedy in 1930s America amid a povertystricken population lead by scheming politicians. The play is part of the New Orleans Shakespeare Festival at Tulane. Call the box office or email box@tulane.edu for reservations. Tickets $5 mimimum donation for “pay what you will performance” (Sunday), $30 general admission. 7:30 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 1:30 p.m. Sunday through June 25. MILDRED, DEAREST. Le Chat Noir, 715 St. Charles Ave., 5815812; www.cabaretlechatnoir. com — Running With Scissors regulars star in the send-up to Hollywood’s greatest legends. Tickets $26 (includes $5 drink credit). 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 6 p.m. Sunday through June 26. OUTSIDE IN. Cutting Edge

Theater at Attractions Salon, 747 Robert Blvd., Slidell, (985) 290-0760; www.cuttingedgeproductions.org — A self-diagnosed agoraphobic’s fears begin to permeate his dysfunctional household in Bud Faust’s comedy. Tickets $18.50. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday through June 25.

War Bonds

The Sherman tank in front of the theater primes you for the nostalgia onstage. On The Air at the National World War II Museum is an upbeat musical revue set in a New Orleans radio studio in 1945. The show features a dynamite local cast that clowns around and holds the audience spellbound with a series of period hit songs. This is simple entertainment, but it never feels skimpy. Writer Sean Patterson, who co-directed with Victoria Reed, downplayed the tragic side of the war, but he didn’t flinch entirely, for On the Air takes place on Mother’s Day, and many mothers felt anxious about a son in harm’s way. As the show begins, the actors enter a ramshackle studio — the women: Melba Tompkins (Troi Bechet), her daughter Dorothy (Idella Johnson) and Betty Lou Fairchild (Courtney Boe); and the men: sound-effects mastermind Buddy Bordelon (Gary Rucker) and head honcho Frank Dane (Bob Edes Jr.). These veteran troupers are in top form and all deserve a spot in the winner’s circle, but I was particularly struck by Bechet, who sang with more than her usual confidence and strength. During her solo “God Bless the Child,” you could hear a pin drop. The plot centers on Dorothy and Melba. When Dorothy first enters, her mom Melba greets her with warmth and pride because she thinks Dorothy has just returned from a long singing tour. We later learn it was not a singing tour at all — although Dorothy shows she has enough pizzazz for the stage with a Carmen Miranda-style rendition of “Chattanooga Choo Choo.” Courtney Boe, a pert blond chanteuse, takes the spotlight as Little “Boe” Peep (who lost her jeep). In another number, she astonishes everyone by stripping off a prim suit to reveal fringed lingerie for “I Wish I Could Shimmy Like My Sister Kate”. In fact, as she demonstrates, she can. Near the end of the show, Dorothy re-enters the studio — wearing a WAC (Women’s Army Corps) uniform. She confesses to her mother that she lied; she had never been on tour but instead was in basic training for the Army. For the first time, the war comes home in a real flesh-and-blood way. Like so many other mothers, Melba will have to say goodbye to her daughter and hope and pray she’ll see her again. This revelation isn’t played like a big sentimental, get-out-your-handkerchief moment. But it’s a reminder that war is hell. Despite that reality, On The Air serves lots of fun and fine music. It’s an excellent cabaret. — Dalt Wonk

PRELUDE TO A KISS. Actor’s

Theatre of New Orleans, WTIXFM Building, second floor, 4539 N. I-10 Service Road, Metairie, 456-4111 — Craig Lucas’ play tells the story of a young couple that, shortly after getting married, is confronted with supernatural phenomena that tests their relationship. Tickets $20 general admission, $18 students and seniors. 7:30

THRU JUNE

26

ON THE AIR 6 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 11 a.m. Sunday

National World War II Museum, Stage Door Canteen, 945 Magazine St., 528-1943; www.nationalworldwarIImuseum.org Tickets $30 show only, $60 dinner and show Fri.-Sat.; $60 adults, $45 children, Sunday brunch and show

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com STAGE p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 2:30 p.m. Sunday. THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW. All-

Ways Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www.theallwayslounge.com — Becky Allen stars in the campy cult classic about a young, naive couple that stumbles onto a mansion with strange inhabitants. Contests, games and prize giveaways begin an hour prior to performances, and official audience participation bags will be available for purchase. Tickets $20; available at the door only. Call 452-9836 or visit www.rockyrocksnola. com for details. 8 p.m. and midnight Friday-Saturday, 8 p.m. Sunday through July 2.

THE TRIP TO BOUNTIFUL. NOCCA

Riverfront, Nims Blackbox Theatre, 2800 Chartres St. — The cast of professionals and NOCCA students performs Horton Foote’s drama about a widow longing to return to the small town of her youth. Call 940-2875 or email boxoffice@ nocca.com for reservations. Tickets $20 general admission, $12 students and seniors. 7:30 p.m. Thursday-Saturday and June 23-25, 2 p.m. Sunday.

WIN, PLACE & SHOW: FAIRGROUND TALES. Studio A at

the Steak Knife, 888 Harrison Ave., 488-8981; www.steakkniferestaurant.com — Chris Champagne performs monologues based on stories from behind the betting windows at the Fair Grounds. Call 3309117 for tickets. Tickets $15 in advance, $20 at the door. 8 p.m. Thursday.

BURLE SQUE

& CABARET Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse, 300 Bourbon St., 553-2270; www. sonesta.com — Trixie Minx stars in the weekly burlesque show featuring the music of Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown. Call 553-2331 for details. 11:50 p.m. Friday.

NOTHING LIKE A DAME: THE WOMEN OF ROGERS AND HAMMERSTEIN. Le Chat Noir, 715 St.

Charles Ave., 581-5812; www. cabaretlechatnoir.com — Ricky Graham directs the cabaret show created and performed by Amy Alvarez and pianist Jefferson Turner. Tickets $26 (includes $5 drink credit). 8 p.m. Thursday.

AUDITIONS CRESCENT CITY SOUND CHORUS. Delgado Community

College, City Park campus, Orleans Avenue, between City Park Avenue and Navarre Street; www.dcc.edu — The women’s chorus holds weekly auditions for new members. Call 453-0858 or visit www. crescentcitysound.com for details. 7 p.m. Monday.

2422-A St. Claude Ave. — The meetings discuss performing in the festival, the application process, volunteer information and other details. Email info@ nofringe.org or visit www. nofringe.org for details. 6 p.m.

COMEDY A.S.S.TRONOTS. La Nuit Com-

edy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — Four “androids” improvise a space voyage based on audience suggestions. Tickets $6. 8:30 p.m. Thursday.

BASED ON REAL LIFE. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — The weekly long-form improv comedy show features some guys, a girl and someone named John Stewart. Tickets $6. 8:30 p.m. Saturday. BROWN HQ. Pip’s Bar, 5252 Vet-

erans Blvd., 456-9234 — Audience members can participate in the show performed by select cast members of the improv comedy troupe. Visit www.brownimprovcomedy. com/BrownHQ for details. Tickets are free for performers, $5 general admission. 8 p.m. Tuesday.

BROWN IMPROV COMEDY. 12

Bar, 608 Fulton St., 212-6476; www.12barnola.com — The improv troupe performs. Visit www.brownimprovcomedy. com for details. Tickets $10 general admission, $7 students. 9 p.m. Friday, starting May 20. COMEDY CATASTROPHE. Lost

Love Lounge, 2529 Dauphine St., 949-2009; www. lostlovelounge.com — The bar hosts a free weekly stand-up comedy show. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

COMEDY GUMBEAUX. Howlin’

Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf.com — Local comedians perform, and amateurs take the stage in the open mic portion. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Thursday. COMEDY OPEN-MIC. La Nuit

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts a weekly open-mic comedy night. (Sign-up time is 10:45 p.m.) Tickets $8. 11 p.m. Friday. COMEDY SPORTZ NOLA. La Nuit

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts a safe-for-all-ages team comedy competition. Tickets $10. 7 p.m. Friday-Saturday.

FEAR & LOATHING IN NEW ORLEANS. La Nuit Comedy The-

ater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The sketch comedy show boasts vampires, zombies, relationship advice and other horrors. 8:30 p.m. Friday.

FRIDAY NIGHT LAUGHS. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www. nolacomedy.com — Jackie Jenkins Jr. hosts the open-mic comedy show. Free admission. 11 p.m. Friday.

The best kept secret in New Orleans

GOD’S BEEN DRINKING. La Nuit

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — Actors improvise a comedy based on audience suggestions. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Friday.

GROUND ZERO COMEDY. The Maison, 508 Frenchmen St., 3715543; www.maisonfrenchmen. com — The show features local stand-up comedians. Sign-up is 7:30 p.m; show is 8 p.m. Friday.

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LA NUIT STAND-UP OPEN MIC.

La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts an open mic following the God’s Been Drinking show. 11 p.m. Friday.

LAUGH OUT LOUD. Bootleggers Bar and Grille, 209 Decatur St., 525-1087 — Simple Play presents a weekly comedy show. 10 p.m. Thursday.

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Live Entertainment Nightly

NATIONAL COMEDY COMPANY.

Yo Mama’s Bar & Grill, 727 St. Peter St., 522-1125 — The interactive improv comedy show features B97 radio personality Stevie G, Lynae LeBlanc, Jay Tombstone, Richard Mayer and others. Call 523-7469 or visit www.nationalcomedycompany.com for tickets. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Saturday. PERMANENT DAMAGE STANDUP COMEDY. Bullets Sports Bar,

2441 A.P. Tureaud Ave., 9484003 — Tony Frederick hosts the open mic comedy show. 8 p.m. Wednesday.

ROUNDHOUSE. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 6444300; www.nolacomedy.com — Comedians perform a barefoot, long-form improvisation show. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Friday.

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SIDNEY’S STAND-UP OPEN MIC. Sidney’s, 1674 Barataria

Blvd., Marrero, 341-0103 — The show features professional, amateur and first-time comics. Free admission. Sign-up is 8 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Thursday. TEE RAE. Boomtown Casino,

4132 Peters Road, Harvey, 3667711; www.boomtownneworleans.com — The stand-up comedian performs. Free admission. 8 p.m. Wednesday.

THINK YOU’RE FUNNY? Carrollton Station, 8140 Willow St., 865-9190; www.carrolltonstation.com — The weekly open-mic comedy showcase is open to all comics. Sign-up is 8:30 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Wednesday.

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > JUNE 14 > 2011

BURLESQUE BALLROOM. Irvin

NEW ORLEANS FRINGE FESTIVAL INFO MEETINGS. Byrdie’s,

55

EVENTS

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

BE THERE DO THAT

preview

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

FAMILY Tuesday 14 ALADDIN . Rogers Memorial Chapel, Tulane University, 862-3214 — The Patchwork Players present their outside-the-box, audience participation-heavy version of the tale. Reservations are recommended. Call 314-2579, email patchworkplayersnola@gmail.com or visit www. patchworkplayersnola.com for details. Tickets $8. 10 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. Tuesday-Friday and Monday, then daily through June 24, 11 a.m. June 25. TODDLER TIME. Louisiana Children’s

Museum, 420 Julia St., 523-1357; www.lcm.org — The museum hosts special Tuesday and Thursday activities for children ages 3-under and their parents or caregivers. Admission $8, free for members. 10:30 a.m.

Wednesday 15 IT’S MUSIC TIME . Old Metairie

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 14 > 2011

Library, 2350 Metairie Road, Metairie, 838-4353 — Boardcertified music therapist Sharon Blackmon’s music program encourages children to sing, dance and have fun while building basic social, language, motor and academic skills. The program is geared toward toddlers through early school-age children. 2:30 p.m.

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Thursday 16 ART ACTIVITIES DURING AFTER HOURS. Ogden Museum of

Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 5399600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — The Ogden offers art activities for kids during the weekly After Hours concerts. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Saturday 18 OGDEN PLAYDATE: PRESERVATION HALL FAMILY DAY. Ogden Museum

of Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 5399600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — In celebration of Preservation Hall’s 50th anniversary and the museum’s Art & Jazz: Preservation Hall at 50 exhibit, the event includes art activities for children, a performance by the Preservation Hall Junior Jazz and Heritage Brass Band and an interactive performance by Carl LeBlanc. Free admission. 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

EVENTS Tuesday 14 BOULIGNY LECTURE SERIES ON SPANISH LOUISIANA . Historic New

Drink and Jive

Burlesque troupes in New Orleans seem to form at an exponential rate. The Contemporary Arts Center’s annual Bourbon & Burlesque fundraiser is an opportunity to see many of them in one night, all while enjoying inventive cocktails and classy gala offerings. The troupes on the roster this year represent the new (the recently formed Crescent City Cupcakes), the stalwarts (Fleur de Tease, pictured) and the alternative (Queerlesque!, an LGBT troupe), plus others. Beyond burlesque, performing artists Angela Eve and Anastasios Ketsios, aerial artist Sarah the Bobcat, and chanteuses Ann Howe and Sasha Masakowski also perform. Dickie Brennan’s Bourbon House provides cuisine, and cocktails feature Blanton’s, Buffalo Trace, Jack Daniel’s and Wild Turkey bourbon. Advance tickets $60 general admission, $25 CAC members; day of event, $80 general admission, $45 CAC members. VIP access tickets also are available. 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. — Lauren LaBorde

JUNE

18

BOURBON & BURLESQUE Contemporary Arts Center, 900 Camp St., 528-3805; www.cacno.org

Orleans Collection, 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www.hnoc.org — Dennis Reinhartz, professor emeritus of history at University of TexasArlington, discusses “The European Mapping of the Gulf of Mexico and the Greater Southwest, 1492–1750.” Free admission. 6:30 p.m. CANCER EDUCATION CLASS. East

Jefferson General Hospital, 4200 Houma Blvd., Metairie, 454-4000; www.ejgh.org — The hospital hosts “I Can Cope,” a series of educational classes for people facing cancer. Call 456-5000 for information. 6 p.m.

info@thefundingseed.com for details. Admission $65. 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. HOLOCAUST WORKSHOP FOR TEACHERS. National World War II

Museum, 945 Magazine St., 5276012; www.nationalww2museum. org — The museum and the AntiDefamation League offer the free workshop for middle and high school teachers. Space is limited and registration is required. Call 528-1944 ext. 225 for details. 9 a.m. to noon.

DEALING WITH LOSS. West Jefferson Behavioral Medicine Center, 229 Bellemeade Blvd., Gretna, 391-2440 — The center offers a weekly support group. Call Doreen Fowler for details. 6 p.m.

LEGACY SERIES LUNCHEON. Hotel Monteleone, 214 Royal St., 5233341; www.hotelmonteleone.com — Gambit political editor Clancy DuBos hosts the lunch forum discussing Louisiana governors, with panelists including former Mayor Moon Landrieu, The Advocate reporter Lanny Keller, LSU professor Alecia Long, and former columnist and TV reporter Rosemary James. Admission $35. Call 681-445 or visit www.hotelmonteleone.com/ legacy-3 for reservations. Noon to 1:30 p.m.

GRANT WRITING WORKSHOP.

YAPPY HOUR . Fetch! Mid-City, 3536

CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET.

Tulane University Square, 200 Broadway St. — The weekly market features fresh produce, kettle corn, Green Plate specials and flowers. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Longue Vue House and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www. longuevue.com — The Funding Seed hosts the workshop discussing three steps to successful grant writing. Call 307-7220 or email

Toulouse St., 373-5417; www.fetchmidcity.com — The dog boutique hosts a happy hour event with a wine tasting (for both humans and dogs), dog treats, adoptable dogs and an “express” dog wash with

proceeds benefiting Schnauzer Rescue of New Orleans. Free admission. 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

Wednesday 15 COVINGTON FARMERS MARKET. Covington City Hall, 609 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-1873 — The market offers fresh locally produced foods every week. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. FRENCH MARKET FARMERS MARKET.

French Market, French Market Place, between Decatur and N. Peters streets, 522-2621; www. frenchmarket.org — The weekly market offers seasonal produce, seafood, prepared foods, smoothies and more. 3 p.m. to 7 p.m.

GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP. East Jefferson General Hospital, 4200 Houma Blvd., Metairie, 454-4000; www.ejgh.org — The American Cancer Society sponsors a group for people who have experienced the death of a loved one. Call 456-5000 for details. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. HELLO HEALTH SEMINAR. Chateau

Golf and Country Club, 3600 Chateau Blvd., Kenner, 467-1351; www.chateaugc.com — Dr. Wei Guo, family medicine and acupuncture practitioner, leads the health

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com EVENTS

discussion hosted by Ochsner Health System. Call (866) 6247637 for details. Admission $15. Noon. INFANCY TO INDEPENDENCE.

St. Matthew/Central United Church of Christ, 1333 S. Carrollton Ave., 861-8196; www.stmatthew-nola.org — The parent-child education and support group uses enriching activities in music, art and play. Visit www.infancytoindependence.org for details. 9:30 a.m. to noon Wednesday-Thursday. LGBT YOUNG ADULT PEER SUPPORT GROUP. LGBT

Community Center of New Orleans, 2114 Decatur St., www. lgbtccno.org — The group supports 18- to 24-year-olds dealing with the struggles of coming out, sexuality, family and relationships. 7 p.m. LUNCHBOX LECTURE. National

World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — The semi-monthly lecture series focuses on an array of World War II-related topics. Call 528-1944 ext. 229 for details. Noon.

MODEL GREEN HOUSE . Global

Green Holy Cross Project, 409 Andry St.; www.globalgreen. org/neworleans — Global Green provides tours of its model green house, which uses renewable energy from solar panels and other sources. Call 525-2121 or visit the website for details. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday and Friday, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday.

NONPAC MEETING. Seventh

District Station, 10555 Lake Forest Blvd. — The New Orleans Neighborhood Policing Anti-Crime Council holds its monthly meeting. 7 p.m.

SAVE OUR CEMETERIES CEMETERY TOURS. The group

conducts tours of New Orleans cemeteries. Call 525-3377 for details.

TALENT SHOWCASE . Le Roux, 1700 Louisiana Ave. — Masse Media Consulting, KMP and Men of Business host a weekly “You’ve Got Talent” showcase open to all poets, singers, dancers and others. Call 899-4512 for details. General admission $10, performers $5. 9 p.m. to midnight. WEDNESDAY NIGHTS AT JW MARRIOTT. JW Marriott New

Orleans, 614 Canal St., Suite 4, 525-6500; www.marriott.com — The hotel showcases local music and art with spirit tastings and hors d’oeuvres. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

WESTWEGO FARMERS & FISHERIES MARKET. 484 Sala

Thursday 16 BREASTFEEDING SUPPORT GROUP. St. Tammany Hospital’s

Parenting Center, 1505 N. Florida St. Suite B, Covington, (985) 898-4435; www.stph. org — A certified lactation consultant answers questions related to breastfeeding in the monthly group. Noon to 1 p.m.

CHANGES. Hey! Cafe, 4332

Magazine St., 891-8682 — The weekly meetings teach focusing, a method of directing attention outside one’s body to affect change. Call 232-9787 for details. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

EPILEPSY & SEIZURE EDUCATIONAL SUPPORT GROUP.

East Jefferson General Hospital, 4200 Houma Blvd., Metairie, 454-4000; www.ejgh.org — The Epilepsy Foundation of Louisiana holds a monthly support group for adults who have or are impacted by epilepsy or seizure disorders. The group meets in the Foundation Board Room. Call (800) 960-0587 or email kelly@epilepsylouisiana. org for details. 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. FRESH MARKET. Circle Food

Store, 1522 St. Bernard Ave. — The Downtown Neighborhood Market Consortium market features fresh produce, dairy, seafood, baked goods and more. EBT and WIC accepted. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. GIRLS’ NIGHT OUT FITNESS. East

Jefferson General Hospital, Conference Center, 454-4000; www.ejgh.org — An OB/GYN, the EJGH Wellness Center Director and a boxing trainer offer ways to stay fit at the event also featuring food and wine. Call 456-5000 for details. Admission free for Healthy Lifestyles members, $10 nonmembers.

LIVE & LOCAL. The Inn on Bourbon, 541 Bourbon St., 5247611; www.innonbourbon.com — The hotel’s monthly event features live entertainment and beer tastings from local breweries. Free admission. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Third Thursday of every month. PAUSE 4 DINNER. Several res-

taurants in the Greater New Orleans area donate 20 percent of their dinner proceeds to the LA/SPCA. Visit www.la-spca. org/dinner for participating restaurants.

RINGLING BROS. AND BARNUM & BAILEY’S BARNUM 200.

New Orleans Arena, 1501 Girod St., 587-3663; www. neworleansarena.com — The “Greatest Show on Earth” gets a reboot with more than 130 performers from six continents.

Visit www.ringling.com for details. Admission $15-$90 (includes fees). 7 p.m. ThursdaySaturday, 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. Saturday, 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. Sunday. SISTAHS MAKING A CHANGE .

Ashe Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — The group offers lessons in African dance and more, along with nutrition, health and wellness seminars. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday and Monday. ST. TAMMANY HOME & GARDEN SHOW. Castine Center, Pelican

Park, 63350 Pelican Drive, Mandeville, (985) 626-7997 — This show features approximately 100 vendors displaying the latest goods and services in building, remodeling and outside decor. Visit www. sthba.org, call (985) 882-5002 or email jessica@sthba.org for details. Thursday-Friday. SUMMER READING KICK-OFF. Vintage 329, 329 Royal St., 525-2262; www.vintage329. com — The event kicks of the Friends of New Orleans Public Library’s summer reading program with theatrical readings and the opportunity to view rare firsts editions of several classic books. Reservations are required. Call 525-2262 or 5962587 for details. 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

WINES & VINES: SIPPING IN SYDNEY. Longue Vue House and

Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 4885488; www.longuevue.com — A wine educator explores wines from the region while a chef offers samples of complementary dishes. Pre-registration is required. Call 293-4723 or email jgick@longuevue.com for details. Admission $40. 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

Friday 17 ADULT CHILDREN OF ALCOHOLIC/DYSFUNCTIONAL FAMILIES. Fair Grinds

Coffeehouse, 3133 Ponce de Leon Ave., 913-9073; www. fairgrinds.com — The weekly support group meets at 6:15 p.m. Fridays. Visit www.adultchildren.org for details.

MARCH OF DIMES SPOTLIGHT ON SUCCESS GALA. Generations

Hall, 310 Andrew Higgins Drive, 581-4367; www.generationshall.net — The gala honors 24 business professionals in the community, and the event features a silent auction, food from local restaurants and music by the Bucktown Allstars. WWL-TV ‘s Camille Whitworth is the event’s emcee. Call 836-2087 or visit www.marchofdimesnola.com for details. Admission $60 in advance, $70 at the door. 7:30 p.m. to midnight.

MARKETPLACE AT ARMSTRONG PARK. Armstrong Park, North

Rampart and St. Ann streets — The weekly market features

fresh produce, baked goods, Louisiana seafood, natural products, art, crafts and entertainment. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays. ROSLYN WALKER. New Orleans Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 6584100; www.noma.org — The Curator of African Arts from the Dallas Museum of Art discusses “Olowe of Ise: A Yoruba Sculptor to King.” The lecture is in conjunction with the museum’s Ancestors of Congo Square: African Art in the New Orleans Museum of Art exhibit. 6 p.m. WHERE Y’ART. New Orleans

Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 6584100; www.noma.org — The museum’s weekly event features music, performances, film screenings, family-friendly activities and more. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Fridays.

Saturday 18 ARTEGG 10TH ANNIVERSARY & CHARITY CONCERT. ArtEgg

Studios, 1001 S. Broad St., 8224002; www.artegg.com — The event features live music, a silent art auction, spoken word/poetry offerings, a history of the ArtEgg building, food and drinks. Free admission. 4 p.m. to 11 p.m. BARKING BOOT CAMP. LA/

SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd., 368-5191; www.la-spca.org — A fitness trainer teaches the dogand-owner class that mixes cardio, resistance training, obstacle courses and “doga” (dog yoga). Proceeds benefit the LA/SPCA. Pre-registration is required. Call 810-1835 or visit www.barkingbootcamp.com for details. Admission $40 for four sessions. 7 a.m. to 7:45 a.m.

CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Magazine Street

Market, Magazine and Girod streets, 861-5898; www.marketumbrella.org — The weekly market features fresh produce, flowers and food. 8 a.m. to noon.

EAGLE WATCH. Fontainebleau

State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — A park ranger leads a viewing of the park’s eagle nest. 3 p.m.

ERACE NEW ORLEANS MEETING.

Christ Church Cathedral, 2919 St. Charles Ave., 895-6602 — ERACE meets in the church’s Westfeldt Room for its weekly discussion group. Call 866-1163 for details. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

GERMAN COAST FARMERS MARKET. Ormond Plantation,

13786 River Road, Destrehan — The market features a wide range of fresh vegetables, fruits, flowers and other items. Visit www.germancoastfarmersmarket.org for details. 8 a.m. to noon. GRETNA FARMERS MARKET.

Gretna Farmers Market, Huey

P. Long Avenue, between Third and Fourth streets, Gretna, 362-8661 — The weekly rainor-shine market features more than 30 vendors offering a wide range of fruits, vegetables, meats and flowers. Free admission. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. KNIT-IN AT THE MUSEUM.

National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — The event provides an opportunity for participants to work on items for the museum’s Knit Your Bit Campaign. Visit www.nationalww2museum.org/knitting for details. Free admission. Noon to 4 p.m. LIVING HISTORY CORPS.

National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — The museum’s re-enactors share their knowledge about the day-to-day lives of military men and women and the broader lessons of World War II. Free with museum admission. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. LOVE A PET ADOPTION DRIVE . Bryan Subaru, 8213 Airline Drive — Bryan Subaru and the nonprofit Friends of the Jefferson Parish Animal Shelter host an adoption drive featuring kittens and cats puppies and dogs available for adoption at the shelter. Free admission. MADISONVILLE ART MARKET. Madisonville Art Market, Tchefuncte River Front at Water St., Madisonville, (985) 871-4918; www.artformadisonville.org — The monthly market features fine art from local artists including painting, mixed media, photography, jewelry, wood carving, sculpture, stained glass and more. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. MEL OTT PARK COUNTRY FAIR .

sankofafarmersmarket.org — The weekly market offers fresh produce and seafood from local farmers and fishermen. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. SNO-BALL EXHIBIT OPENING PARTY. Southern Food &

Beverage Museum, Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood.org — To celebrate the opening of its summer exhibit about the classic New Orleans treat, the museum hosts a party with samples and a discussion. Free admission. 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.

SOLAR DAY. Whole Foods Market Arabella Station, 5600 Magazine St., 899-9119 — Ten vendors, including nonprofit organizations and local solar companies, discuss the benefits of solar energy. Email julia@lagreencorps.org or visit www.gsreia.org/events/solarday-2011 for details. Free admission. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. TREME UNDER THE BRIDGE MARKET. North Claiborne

Expressway, between Ursulines Avenue and Gov. Nicholls Street — The new monthly market highlights local artwork and features live music from local bands, high schools and choirs; community services like health and legal aid; and educational services and exhibits. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. VISITING PET PROGRAM VOLUNTEER ORIENTATION.

Harahan Senior Center, 100 Elodie St., 737-3810 — The animal assisted therapy program provides an orientation for new volunteers. Pre-registration is required, and there is a $10 fee to attend. Email paws4visits@ gmail.com or visit www.visitingpetprogram.org for details. 10 a.m. to noon.

Mel Ott Park, 2310 Belle Chasse Hwy., Gretna — The fair features craft booths, food, music, games, hayrides and a petting zoo. Call 361-4287 or email melottpark@gretnala.com for details. Free admission. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Sunday 19

NATURE: A CLOSER LOOK.

New Orleans Lyceum, 618 City Park Ave., 460-9049; www. lyceumproject.com — The nonreligious, holistic discussion group focuses on human behavior with the goal of finding fulfillment and enlightenment. Call 368-9770 for details. Free. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers lead a weekly nature hike. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. RESURRECTION AFTER EXONERATION’S CELEBRATION OF FREEDOM & FATHERS.

Resurrection After Exoneration Building, 1212 St. Bernard Ave., 943-1902; www.r-a-e. org — The group that supports wrongly incarcerated individuals hosts a fundraiser featuring guest speaker Lolis Eric Elie, live music by the Leroy Jones Jazz Trio, hors d’oeuvres, wine and cocktails. Tickets start at $75. 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. SANKOFA FARMERS MARKET.

Sankofa Farmers Market, 5500 St. Claude Ave., 975-5168; www.

ABITA ARTISTS. 9th Street

Gallery, 71377 St. Mary St., Abita Springs — Local artists hold a monthly meeting. Call Lana at 898-3071 for details. 3 p.m.

DIMENSIONS OF LIFE DIALOGUE.

NEEDLE JUNKIES. 3 Ring Circus’

The Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com — The knitting group meets every Sunday. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

PRIMITIVE WOODWORKING.

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers host a weekly demonstration of woodworking techniques. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 14 > 2011

The parade featuring elephants, clowns, the ringmaster and other performers from the circus (Thursday-Sunday) starts at the corner of Loyola Avenue and Girod Street and ends at Poydras Street and Loyola Avenue. 11 a.m.

Ave., Sala Avenue at Fourth Street, Westwego — The market offers organic produce, baked goods, jewelry, art and more, with live music and pony rides. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

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GAMBIT AND THE

BRIDGE LOUNGE

presents

THE PERFECT

Happy Hour THURSDAY

4:00

TIL

JUNE 23 RD 7:00pm

EVENTS

LISTINGS

Monday 20 TOASTMASTERS MEETING .

Milton H. Latter Memorial Library, 5120 St. Charles Ave. — The New Orleans Toastmasters Club hosts an open weekly meeting (except holidays) to hone the skills of speaking, listening and thinking. Call 251-8600 or visit www.notoast234.freetoasthost.org for details. 6 p.m. UNITED NONPROFITS OF GREATER NEW ORLEANS.

Goodwill Training Center, 3400 Tulane Ave. — Nonprofit Central hosts a weekly meeting for all leaders of nonprofit groups. Email susan_unp@yahoo.com for details. 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.

SPORTS NEW ORLEANS JESTERS. Pan

American Stadium, City Park, 1 Zachary Taylor Drive — The Jesters play the Chivas El Paso Patriots. Visit www.nolajesters.com for details. 7 p.m. Saturday.

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS L’OREAL PARIS WOMEN OF WORTH. Ten women dedi-

cated to volunteerism and community will be awarded money for their charities of choice. Visit www.womenofworth.com for details. Application deadline is June 30.

PROJECT HOMECOMING . The

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 14 > 2011

$6 PERFECT VODKA

58

Cocktails $7 PERFECT VODKA Martinis

PLUS

PERFECT VODKA SAMPLES

+ DOOR PRIZES

faith-based nonprofit seeks homes to rebuild that suffered damage of 50 percent or more from Hurricane Katrina. Call 942-0444, ext. 244 for details.

CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY.

American Cancer Society, 2605 River Road, Westwego, 833-4024 or (800) ACS-2345; www.cancer.org — The American Cancer Society needs volunteers for upcoming events and to facilitate patient service programs. Opportunities are available with Relay for Life, Look Good … Feel Better, Hope Lodge, Man to Man, Road to Recovery, Hope Gala and more. Call for information. ANOTHER LIFE FOUNDATION VOLUNTEERS. Another Life

EDUCATION . Bayou Rebirth

seeks volunteers for wetlands planting projects, nursery maintenance and other duties. Visit www.bayourebirth.org for details.

BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS VOLUNTEERS. Big Brothers Big

Sisters of Southeast Louisiana, 2626 Canal St., Suite 203, 3097304 or (877) 500-7304; www. bbbssela.org — Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southeast Louisiana needs volunteers to serve as mentors. A volunteer meets two to three times a month with his or her Little Brother or Sister. You can play games, watch movies, bake cookies, play sports or plan any other outings you both would enjoy. Call for information.

CASA NEW ORLEANS. The organization seeks volunteer Court Appointed Special Advocates to represent abused and neglected children in New Orleans. Thorough training and support is provided. Call Mike Madej at 522-1962 ext. 213 or email mmadej@casaneworleans.org for details. CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. CCFM and marke-

tumbrella.org seek volunteers to field shopper questions, assist seniors, help with monthly children’s activities and more. Call 495-1459 or email latifia@marketumbrella. org for details.

EDGAR DEGAS FOUNDATION . The nonprofit seeks volunteers to contribute to the development of the foundation. Call 821-5009 or email info@degashouse.com for details. GREATER NEW ORLEANS FAIR HOUSING ACTION CENTER .

The center seeks part-time civil rights investigators with excellent writing skills, reliable transportation and no criminal convictions to help expose housing discrimination in the New Orleans metro area. Call 717-4257 or email mmorgan@ gnofairhousing.org for information. HANDSON NEW ORLEANS.

The volunteer center for the Greater New Orleans area invites prospective volunteers to learn about the various opportunities available, how to sign up to attend service projects and general tips on how to be a good volunteer. Call 483-7041 ext. 107, email nkennebrew@ handsonneworleans.com or visit www.handsonneworleans.org for details.

Foundation seeks volunteers recovering from mental illness to help mentor others battling depression and suicidal behaviors. Free training provided. For details, contact Stephanie Green at (888) 5433480, anotherlifefoundation@ hotmail.com or visit www. anotherlifefoundation.org.

HOSPICE VOLUNTEERS.

BAYOU REBIRTH WETLANDS

JACKSON BARRACKS MUSEUM

Harmony Hospice, 519 Metairie Road, Metairie, 832-8111 — Harmony Hospice seeks volunteers to offer companionship to patients through reading, playing cards and other activities. Call Jo-Ann Moore at 832-8111 for details.

VOLUNTEERS. The museum

seeks volunteers to work one day a week for the Louisiana National Guard Museum. Volunteers prepare military aircraft, vehicles and equipment for display. Call David at 837-0175 or email daveharrell@yahoo.com for details. JEFFERSON COMMUNITY SCHOOL . The charter school

that educates at-risk middle school students who have been expelled from Jefferson Parish’s public schools seeks adult mentors for its students. Call 836-0808 for details.

LOWERNINE.ORG VOLUNTEERS.

Lowernine.org seeks volunteers to help renovate homes in the Lower 9th Ward. Visit www.lowernine.org or email lauren@lowernine.org for details.

MEAL DELIVERY VOLUNTEERS. Jefferson Council on Aging seeks volunteers to deliver meals to homebound adults. Gas/mileage expenses will be reimbursed. Call Gail at 8885880 for details. MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY ASSOCIATION . The MDA seeks

volunteers ages 16 and older for its weeklong summer camps around the country. Call (800) 572-1717 or visit www.mda.org/summercamp for details.

NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM . National World War

II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — The museum accepts applications for volunteers to meet and greet visitors from around the world and familiarize them with its galleries, artifacts and expansion. Call 527-6012 ext. 243 or email katherine.alpert@ nationalww2museum.org for details.

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ & HERITAGE FESTIVAL . Volunteers

are needed for the festival’s production team. Visit www. nojazzfest.com/volunteer for details.

OPERATION REACH VOLUNTEERS.

Operation REACH and Gulfsouth Youth Action Corps seek college student volunteers from all over the country to assist in providing recreation and education opportunities for New Orleans-area innercity youth and their families. For information, visit www. thegyac.org and www.operationreach.org. SENIOR COMPANION VOLUNTEERS. New Orleans

Council on Aging, Annex Conference Room, 2475 Canal St., 821-4121; www.nocoa.org — The council seeks volunteers to assist with personal and other daily tasks to help seniors live independently. Call for details.

START THE ADVENTURE IN READING. The STAIR program

holds regular volunteer training sessions to work one-

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Email Ian McNulty at imcnulty@cox.net. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <CHEESE PLEASE > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >On June 21, British cheese expert Juliet Harbutt, editor of < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <PUTTING < < < < < < <EVERYTHING < < < < < < < < < <ON < < <THE < < < TABLE < < < < < < < < < < < < < <The World Cheese Book, leads the class “Strange Bedfellows,” pairing cheeses with unconventional liqueurs and aperitifs The class is at at St. James Cheese Co. (5004 Prytania St., 8994737; www.stjamescheese.com). On June 22, she’ll be part of WHAT a pairing at local distributor Purveyor of Fine Wines (www. Tout de Suite winepurveyors.com). Admission is $35 for each event or $60 for both. Call St. James Cheese for reservations.

am

B

WHERE

347 Verret St., 362-2264 WHEN

Breakfast, lunch and early dinner daily RESERVATIONS

Not accepted

HOW MUCH

Inexpensive

WHAT WORKS

LAGNIAPPE LAGER

Zea Rotisserie & Grill (Citywide, www.zearestaurants.com) salutes Father’s Day with a special offer. Dine with dad at any Zea location on June 19 (and order at least two entrees) and the restaurant will give dad a four-pack sampler of its custombrewed bottled beers.

five 5 IN

Five Splendid Sweetbreads

Artful ambience, nutritional awareness

BISTRO DAISY

WHAT DOESN’T

Grilled and served over sweet potato hash with pecans and bacon.

Lunch options are limited CHECK PLEASE

A colorful, kid-friendly neighborhood nexus

5831 MAGAZINE ST., 899-6987 www.bistrodaisy.com

DOMINIQUE’S ON MAGAZINE

4729 MAGAZINE ST., 894-8869 OR 894-8881 www.dominiquesonmag.com

A tart, garlicky chimichurri electrifies these numbers.

Suite Spot

FLAMING TORCH RESTAURANT

HEARTY AND HEARTWARMING IN ALGIERS POINT BY IAN MCNULTY

I

PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

to open when the chips were down, Tout de Suite endeared itself to Algiers, and the neighborhood has returned the favor ever since, packing the place on weekends or after services at the Holy Name of Mary church across the street. It also helps that Tout de Suite is such a neat place. There is something interesting at every turn, from art market trinkets to the patina-laden plank walls to a play table for kids. Perhaps most riveting is the service counter — densely stacked with house-made pastries, towering quiches and a jewelry case full of cookies. Breakfast is the strong point, especially with the kitchen’s creative compositions of poached eggs. Boudin underlies one version while sauce piquant goes over the top. For another, grit cakes and sausage patties are the foundation and Steen’s cane syrup is the glue. The true charm of Tout de Suite, though, comes across in homey and refreshingly light dishes such as bowls of yogurt or Irish oatmeal loaded with tart berries and house-made granola. Triangles of wheat toast are topped with avocado, feta, cucumber and tomato like open-faced tea sandwiches. At lunch, you can get a scoop of quinoa beside your pressed Reuben or a pasta salad strung with chopped greens and golden cherry tomatoes. The house salad dressing is a cocktail of flaxseed oil, miso, apple cider vinegar and other feelgood ingredients. It feels like someone is looking out for you here, and that’s as admirable a quality for a family-friendly brunch spot as it is for a tight-knit neighborhood.

737 OCTAVIA ST., 895-0900 www.flamingtorchnola.com

Sauteed and sauced with mushroom cream meuniere.

IRIS

321 N. PETERS ST., 299-3944 www.irisneworleans.com

The “veal” deal, over risotto with shiitakes and sage.

MILA

817 COMMON ST., 412-2580 www.milaneworleans.com

Nestled in a base of rich grits and gilded with truffle sauce.

Questions? Email winediva1@earthlink.net.

2010 Six Hats Chenin Blanc

WESTERN CAPE, SOUTH AFRICA $10-$13 RETAIL

South Africa is producing possibly the best value-priced Chenin Blanc in the New World. This wine exhibits aromas of melon, tropical notes, spices and a stony minerality. It has a lively acidity and hints of peach, citrus and guava. Serve chilled with salads, cold soups, pate, crawfish, fish and Asian cuisine. Buy it at: Cork & Bottle, Wine Seller, W.I.N.O. and Vine & Dine. Drink it at: Chateau du Lac, W.I.N.O. and Vine & Dine Wine Bar & Bistro. Listings current at press time. — Brenda Maitland Questions? Email winediva1@bellsouth.net

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 14 > 2011

can never find Tout de Suite by the same route twice. Invariably I get turned around in the offkilter grid of Algiers Point streets, so each visit first entails an inadvertent tour around this beautiful neighborhood of gingerbread woodwork and pocket parks. As it turns out, this makes an appropriate introduction to Tout de Suite, because upon arriving it’s clear this eclectic, colorful cafe is a focal point for the neighborhood around it. Tout de Suite is a place for Algerians to grab a croissant on the way to work, read the Sunday paper over a skillet of biscuits and gravy or hang out outside near a corkboard stuck with ads for real estate and guitar lessons. It’s also a place that reflects a neighborhood full of young families. While their parents order Cuban sandwiches or H&H-brand bagels with lox, kids point to their favorite Whole Foods-friendly cereal boxes on display at the counter and order their French toast “PB&J” style. During weekend brunch, acoustic music from street buskers invited inside or a bluegrass musician adds a live soundtrack to the scene. Jill Marshall opened Tout de Suite early in 2005 following a catering career around Seattle. Though new, the place rose to the occasion immediately after Hurricane Katrina, a time when a functioning cafe was something between a community center and a first responders’ lounge. One customer hauled in her own printer and ran a nonprofit from a window seat after the storm. National Guardsmen set down their rifles for coffee and scones. Like other New Orleans businesses who were able

Breakfast — and a weekend brunch — make Tout de Suite a popular dining spot for residents of the neighborhood.

61

S:2.281”

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

TREY YUEN CUISINE OF CHINA — 600 N. Causeway Approach.,

Mandeville, (985) 626-4476; 2100 N. Morrison Blvd., Hammond, (985) 345-6789; www.tryyuen. com — House specialties include fried soft-shell crab topped with Tong Cho sauce, and Cantonese-style stir-fried alligator and mushrooms in oyster sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

COFFEE/ DESSERT ANTOINE’S ANNEX — 513 Royal

St., 581-4422; www.antoines.com — The Annex is a coffee shop serving pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. The Royal Street salad features baby spinach and mixed lettuces with carrots, red onion, red peppers, grapes, olives, walnuts and raspberry vinaigrette. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

BEN ’N JERRY’S — 3500 Veterans

Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 8875656 — Ben ’n Jerry’s offers rich

rie Road, Metairie, 267-4990; 819 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 4648884; 6233 S. Claiborne Ave., 2673328; www.thekupcakefactory. com — Choose from a large selection of gourmet cupcakes. The Fat Elvis is made with banana cake and topped with peanut butter frosting. The Strawberry Fields tops strawberry cake with strawberry buttercream frosting. Other options include white chocolate raspberry and a banana cupcake. No reservations. Hours vary by location. Credit cards. $

MAURICE FRENCH PASTRIES — 3501

Hessmer Ave., Metairie, 885-1526; 4949 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 455-0830; www.mauricefrenchpastries.com — Maurice French Pastries offers an array of continental and French baked goods as well as specialty cakes, cheesecakes and pies. No reservations. Hessmer Avenue: breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. West Napoleon: breakfast and lunch Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PINKBERRY — 300 Canal St.; 5601

Magazine St., 899-4260; www. pinkberry.com — Pinkberry offers frozen yogurt with an array of wet and dry topping choices including caramel, honey, fruit purees, various chocolates and nuts and more. There also are fresh fruit parfaits and green tea smoothies. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CONTEMPORARY 5 Fifty 5 — 555 Canal St., 553-5638;

www.555canal.com — New Orleans dishes and Americana favorites take an elegant turn in dishes such as the lobster mac and cheese, combining lobster meat, elbow macaroni and mascarpone, boursin and white cheddar cheeses. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ BAYONA — 430 Dauphine St., 525-

4455; www.bayona.com — House

PHOTO By CHERyL GERBER

TICKETS: $50

favorites on Chef Susan Spicer’s menu include sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce and the appetizer of grilled shrimp with black-bean cake and coriander sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$$

RSVP to Joan at 522-8946

FEAST NEW ORLEANS — 200 Julia

St., 304-6318; www.feastneworleans.com — Feast serves rustic European dishes in a casual setting. Cock-a-Leekie is a dish of braised chicken with cream, bacon, plums, leeks and red potatoes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

THE GREEN GODDESS — 307 Ex-

change Alley, 301-3347; www. greengoddessnola.com — Chef Chris DeBarr’s contemporary cooking combines classic techniques, exotic ingredients and culinary wit. At lunch, Big Cactus Chilaquiles feature poached eggs on homemade tortillas with salsa verde, queso fresca and nopalitos. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Thu.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

OAK — 8118 Oak St., 302-1485;

www.oaknola.com — This wine bar offers small plates and live musical entertainment. Gulf shrimp fill tacos assembled in house-made corn tortillas with pickled vegetables, avocado and lime crema. The hanger steak bruschetta is topped with Point Reyes blue cheese and smoked red onion marmalade. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

ONE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE —

8132 Hampson St., 301-9061; www.one-sl.com — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes like char-grilled oysters topped with Roquefort cheese and a red wine vinaigrette, seared scallops with roasted garlic and shiitake page 64

PINTS & POBOYS

Choose a 3-inch Poboy & a Pint of Beer • $8

plus tax

show your thanks with a sizzling steak dad will love.

Every Night • 7-10pm Choices include: Fried Green Tomato & Remoulade, Overstuffed Shrimp, Root Beer & Glazed Ham & Cheese, Pattons Hot Sausage, Certified Angus Roast Beef, or French Fry, Roast Beef & Cheddar Poboy

Come Try Our Weekly Throwback Cocktail! EXTENDED HOURS!

Mon-Sat 11am-10pm

3454 Magazine St. NOLA 504-899-3374

Metairie • New Orleans • Biloxi

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 14 > 2011

THREE HAPPINESS — 1900 Lafayette St., Suite 4, Gretna, 3681355; www.threehappiness.com — Three Happiness serves Chinese and Vietnames dishes and dim sum specials on weekends. Westlake duck features tender duck with snow peas, corn, straw mushrooms and napa cabbage. Vietnamese crepes are served with pork and shrimp. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

KUPCAKE FACTORY — 800 Metai-

The American Sector serves food themed to the World War II years.

S:10.833”

JUNG’S GOLDEN DRAGON — 3009 Magazine St., 891-8280; www. jungsgoldendragon2.com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, Thai and Korean cuisine. Chinese specialties include Mandarin, Szechuan and Hunan dishes. Grand Marnier shrimp are lightly battered and served with Grand Marnier sauce, broccoli and pecans. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

ice creams in signature flavors, ice cream cakes, frozen drinks, fruit smoothies and sundaes. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

63

Shanghai grilled Shrimp or ChiCken Salad — Grilled shrimp or chicken with romaine lettuce, cucumber, tomato, edamame and honey roasted pecans in chef’s sesame vinaigrette dressing. Served with sesame wheat noodles.......... with ChiCken $9.95 · with Shrimp $10.95 Beef Chow fen noodle — Marinated beef with fen noodle and Chinese vegetables................................................................................................................................$9.50 aSparaguS Sautéed with ChiCken — In brown or garlic sauce... $10.95 fried Bean Curd in teriyaki SauCe — Teriyaki sauce with black mushrooms, peas and carrots.............................................................................................................$8.95 Stuffed ChineSe eggplant — Chinese eggplant stuffed with pork and shrimp with chef’s special sauce.................................................................................................... $10.95 Come Join uS for

father’S DaY 3605 South Carrollton ave · reServationS / take-out 482-3935 · www.fivehappineSS.Com mon-thurS 11am-10pm · fri & Sat 11am-11pm · Sun 11am-10pm

OUT2EAT page 63 polenta cakes and a memorable cochon de lait. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CREOLE ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713 St.

Louis St., 581-4422; www.antoines. com — The city’s oldest restaurant offers a glimpse of what 19th century French Creole dining might have been like, with a labyrinthine series of dining rooms. Signature dishes include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ GUMBO SHOP — 640 St. Peter

437 Esplanade Ave. at Frenchmen 504.252.4800 www.mojitosnola.com

St., 525-1486; www.gumboshop. com — Gumbo and New Orleans classics such as crawfish etouffee dominate the menu. Their spicy flavors meld into a dish that represents the city’s best and redefines comfort food. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

Tuesday-Friday 4pm-close Saturday & Sunday 11am-close

LIVE MUSIC...CREOLE-INSPIRED, CARIBBEAN-INFLUENCED CUISINE... ARTISINAL RUM

LE CITRON BISTRO — 1539 Religious

MOJITOS & MOJO

HAPPY HOUR

TUESDAY-FRIDAY 4pm-7pm

EVERY SUNDAY Salsa Night with Javier Olondo and AsheSon

COOL DRINK SPECIALS FOOD & DRINK PAIRINGS

Explore the

ON SELECTED WEDNESDAYS THIS SUMMER.

Marriage

of Wine and Food

AND CHEF SUSAN SPICER

PREPARE A FOUR COURSE MENU _ $88 _

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — 437

Esplanade Ave., 252-4800; www. mojitosnola.com — Mojitos serves a mix of Caribbean, Cuban and Creole dishes. Caribbean mac and cheese pie is made with chunks of lobster, tomatoes, scallions, garlic and creamy cheese sauce and is served over a bed of spicy corn maque choux. Reservations accepted. Lunch, dinner and late-night Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

WITH WINE PAIRINGS CHOSEN BY SHANNON FRISTOE GR EECE | JUNE 22 MOROCCO | JUNE 29 VIETNA M | JULY 6

ALSACE | AUGUST 24 SPAIN | AUGUST 31

430 RUE DAUPHINE • RESERVATIONS 504-525-4455

6215 WILSON ST.

HARAHAN • 737-3933

515 HARRISON AVE.

LAKEVIEW • 484-0841

m ake all of our signature recipes dail y.

monday: Pulled Pork tuesday: Cuban wednesday: BBQ Shrimp thursday: Chicken Parmesan friday: Soft Shell Crab

G ott Gour met Cafe uses the fre s h

rving end Now se &Week e n i W Beer, ls Cocktai ith Meal Brunch w er Be 2 for 1 4pm-close Tue-Fri 11am-9pm ri, Tues-F th Sat-Sun 8am-5pm on t h is m

Weekend Breakfast Sat-Sun

3100 Magazine St. • 504-373-6579 www.gottgourmetcafe.com

d e dressings, sauces and meats to

Sandwich Specials!

MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000 N. Peters St., 524-4747 — This casual restaurant serves Creole favorites. The menu includes crawfish etouffee, boiled crawfish, red beans and rice and bread pudding for dessert. Outdoor seating is adjacent to Dutch Alley and the French Market. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

CUBAN/ CARIBBEAN

m es t ingredients available for our home a

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 14 > 2011

CHEF DE CUISINE BRETT DUFFEE

64

St., 566-9051; www.le-citronbistro.com — Located in a historic building, the quaint bistro serves starters like chicken and andouille gumbo and fried frogs legs. Entrees include choices like fried chicken, Gulf fish and burgers. Reservations accepted. Dinner Wed.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

EVERY FRIDAY Latin Beats with Fredy Omar con su Banda

Sun.-Thu., dinner Mon.-Thu. Credit cards. $

MARTIN WINE CELLAR — 714 El-

meer Ave., Metairie , 896-7350; www.martinwine.com — Sandwiches piled high with cold cuts, salads, hot sandwiches, soups and lunch specials are available at the deli counter. The Cedric features chicken breast, spinach, Swiss, tomatoes and red onions on seven-grain bread. No reservations. Lunch daily. Credit cards. $

DINER DAISY DUKES — 121 Chartres St.,

561-5171; www.daisydukesrestaurant.com — Daisy Dukes is known for its seafood omelet and serves a wide variety of Cajun spiced Louisiana favorites, burgers, po-boys and seafood, including boiled crawfish and oysters on the half-shell. Breakfast is served all day. No reservations. Open 24 hours daily. Credit cards. $$

FRENCH FLAMING TORCH — 737 Octavia

St., 895-0900; www.flamingtorchnola.com — Chef Nathan Gile’s menu includes pan-seared Maine diver scallops with chimichurri sauce and smoked bacon and corn hash. Coffee- and coriander-spiced rack of lamb is oven roasted and served with buerre rouge and chevre mashed potatoes. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

MARTINIQUE BISTRO — 5908 Magazine St., 891-8495; www. martiniquebistro.com — This French bistro has both a cozy dining room and a pretty courtyard. Try dishes such as Steen’s-cured duck breast with satsuma and ginger demi-glace and stoneground goat cheese grits. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sat.Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GOURMET TO GO BREAUX MART — 315 E. Judge

Perez, Chalmette, 262-0750; 605 Lapalco Blvd., Gretna, 433-0333; 2904 Severn Ave., Metairie, 8855565; 9647 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 737-8146; www.breauxmart.com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux” as well as weekday specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

INDIAN DELI CG’S CAFE AT THE RUSY NAIL —

1100 Constance St., 722-3168; www.therustynail.biz — Inside the Rusty Nail, CG’s offers a menu of sandwiches. The Piggly Wiggly features pulled pork on a sesame seed bun with coleslaw and pickle chips on the side. The Wild Turkey is layered with Granny Smith apple slices, provolone, bacon and garlic mayo. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $ KOSHER CAJUN NEW YORK DELI & GROCERY — 3519 Severn Ave.,

Metairie, 888-2010; www.koshercajun.com — This New York-style deli specializes in sandwiches, including corned beef and pastrami that come straight from the Bronx. No reservations. Lunch

JULIE’S LITTLE INDIA KITCHEN AT SCHIRO’S — 2483 Royal St., 944-

6666; www.schiroscafe.com — The cafe offers homemade Indian dishes prepared with freshly ground herbs and spices. Selections include chicken, lamb or shrimp curry or vegetarian saag paneer. Schiro’s also serves New Orleans cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NIRVANA INDIAN CUISINE — 4308

Magazine St., 894-9797 — Serving mostly northern Indian cuisine, the restaurant’s extensive menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TAJ MAHAL INDIAN CUISINE —

923-C Metairie Road, Metairie, 836-6859 — The traditional menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways, including curries and tandoori. Vegetarian options are available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.Sun. Credit cards. $$

ITALIAN ANDREA’S RESTAURANT — 3100

N. 19th St., Metairie 834-8583; www.andreasrestaurant.com — Chef/owner Andrea Apuzzo’s specialties include speckled trout royale which is topped with lump crabmeat and lemon-cream sauce. Capelli D’Andrea combines house-made angel hair pasta and smoked salmon in light cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

CAFE GIOVANNI — 117 Decatur St., 529-2154; www.cafegiovanni. com — Chef Duke LoCicero serves inventive Italian cuisine and Italian accented contemporary Louisiana cooking. Shrimp Dukie features Louisiana shrimp and a duck breast marinated in Cajun spices served with tassomushroom sauce. Belli Baci is the restaurant’s cocktail lounge. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

RICCOBONO’S PEPPERMILL RESTAURANT — 3524 Severn Ave.,

Metairie, 455-2266 — This Italianstyle eatery serves New Orleans favorites like stuffed crabs with jumbo lump crabmeat with spaghetti bordelaise and trout meuniere with brabant potatoes. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ TONY MANDINA’S RESTAURANT — 1915 Pratt St., Gretna, 362-2010;

www.tonymandinas.com — Tony Mandina’s serves Italian and Creole cuisine. Dishes include pasta, veal parmigiana, veal Bordelasie and specialties like shrimp Mandina and battered eggplant topped with shrimp and crabmeat in cream sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

JAPANESE KYOTO — 4920 Prytania St., 891-

3644 — Kyoto’s sushi chefs prepare rolls, sashimi and salads. “Box” sushi is a favorite, with more than 25 rolls. Reservations recommended for parties of six or more. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$

MIKIMOTO — 3301 S. Carrollton Ave., 488-1881; www.mikimotosushi.com — Sushi choices include new and old favorites, both raw and cooked. The South Carrollton roll includes tuna tataki, avocado and snow crab. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Delivery available. Credit cards. $$

MIYAKO JAPANESE SEAFOOD & STEAKHOUSE — 1403 St. Charles

Ave., 410-9997; www.japanesebistro.com — Miyako offers a full range of Japanese cuisine, with specialties from the sushi or hibachi menus, chicken, beef or seafood teriyaki, and tempura. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

ROCK-N-SAKE — 823 Fulton St., 581-7253; www.rocknsake.com — Rock-n-Sake serves traditional Japanese cuisine with some cre-

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

ative twists. There’s a wide selection of sushi, sashimi and rolls or spicy gyoza soup, pan-fried soba noodles with chicken or seafood and teriyaki dishes. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ WASABI SUSHI — 900 Frenchmen St.,

943-9433; 8550 Pontchartrain Blvd., 2673263; www.wasabinola.com — Wasabi serves a wide array of Japanese dishes. Wasabi honey shrimp are served with cream sauce. The Assassin roll bundles tuna, snow crab and avocado in seaweed and tops it with barbecued eel, tuna, eel sauce and wasabi tobiko. No reservations. Frenchmen Street: Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner daily. Pontchartrain Boulevard: lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

LOUISIANA CONTEMPORARY BOMBAY CLUB — 830 Conti St., 5860972; www.thebombayclub.com — Mull the menu at this French Quarter hideaway while sipping a well made martini. The duck duet pairs confit leg with pepper-seared breast with black currant reduction. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ BOUCHE — 840 Tchoupitoulas St., 267-

7485; www.bouchenola.com — This wine bar and restaurant serves creative dishes like tasso truffle mac and cheese with three cheeses and Mornay sauce, baby spinach salad with Maytag blue cheese and bacon lardons, and crispy duck breast with Grand Marnier sweet potatoes and vanilla-balsamic extract. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ MIA’S — 1622 St. Charles Ave., 301-9570

— Veal Oscar features lightly breaded veal topped with lump crabmeat and hollandaise, served with garlic red potatoes and grilled asparagus. The alligator pear and crabmeat salad combines avocado and crabmeat over tomatoes, red onions and greens in balsamic glaze. Reservations accepted. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $$

MILA — 817 Common St., 412-2580;

RALPH’S ON THE PARK — 900 City Park Ave., 488-1000; www.ralphsonthepark. com — Popular dishes include baked oysters Ralph, turtle soup and the Niman Ranch New York strip. There also are brunch specials. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

REDEMPTION — 3835 Iberville St., 3093570 — Redemption offers contemporary Louisiana cooking. Chambord duckling is served with cherry vinaigrette. Seared foie gras is complemented by vanilla parsnip puree. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ TOMMY’S WINE BAR — 752 Tchoupitou-

las St., 525-4790 — Tommy’s Wine Bar offers cheese and charcuterie plates as well as a menu of appetizers and salads from the neighboring kitchen of Tommy’s Cuisine. No reservations. Lite dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEDITERRANEAN/ MIDDLE EASTERN ATTIKI BAR & GRILL — 230 Decatur St.,

587-3756;

www.attikineworleans.com

PYRAMIDS CAFE — 3151 Calhoun St.,

861-9602 — Diners will find authentic, healthy and fresh Mediterranean cuisine featuring such favorites as sharwarma prepared on a rotisserie. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEXICAN & SOUTHWESTERN COUNTRY FLAME — 620 Iberville St., 522-1138 — Country Flame serves a mix of popular Mexican and Cuban dishes. Come in for fajitas, pressed Cuban sandwiches made with hickorysmoked pork and char-broiled steaks or pork chops. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ JUAN’S FLYING BURRITO — 2018 Maga-

zine St., 569-0000; 4724 S.Carrollton Ave. 486-9950; www.juansflyingburrito.com — This wallet-friendly restaurant offers new takes on Mexicaninspired cooking. It’s known for its meal-and-a-half-size signature burritos. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

NACHO MAMA’S MEXICAN GRILL — 3242

Magazine St., 899-0031; 1000 S. Clearview Pkwy., Harahan, 736-1188; www. nachomamasmexicangrill.com — These taquerias serve Mexican favorites such as portobello mushroom fajitas and chile rellenos. There are happy hour margaritas on weekdays and daily drink specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ SANTA FE — 3201 Esplanade Ave., 948-

0077 — This casual cafe serves creative takes on Southwestern cuisine. Bolinos de Bacalau are Portuguese-style fish cakes made with dried, salted codfish, mashed potatoes, cilantro, lemon juice, green onions and egg and served with smoked paprika aioli. Outdoor seating is available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.Sun. Credit cards. $$

TOMASITO’S MEXICAN CUISINE — 755

Tchoupitoulas St., 527-0942 — Tomasito’s is an upscale cantina with a patio for outdoor dining. The carnitas platter features marinated and slow-cooked pork served with Mexican rice, refried beans and a choice of salsa verde, smoky chipotle or a traditional Mexican sauce. No reservations. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MUSIC AND FOOD GAZEBO CAFE — 1018 Decatur St., 525-

8899; www.gazebocafenola.com — The Gazebo features a mix of Cajun and Creole dishes and ice cream daquiris. The New Orleans sampler rounds up jambalaya, red beans and rice and gumbo. Other options include salads, seafood po-boys and burgers. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ HOUSE OF BLUES — 225 Decatur St.,

310-4999; www.hob.com/neworleans — Try the pan-seared Voodoo Shrimp with rosemary cornbread. The buffetstyle gospel brunch features local and regional groups. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

THE MARKET CAFE — 1000 Decatur

St., 527-5000; www.marketcafenola. com — Dine indoors or out on seafood either fried for platters or po-boys or highlighted in dishes such as crawfish pie, crawfish etouffee or shrimp Creole. Sandwich options include muffulettas, Philly steaks on po-boy bread and gyros in pita bread. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SIBERIA — 2227 St. Claude Ave., 265-

8855 — This music clubs serves dishes like fish and chips and a bison burger topped with blue cheese, foie gras and a sunny-side-up egg. There are weekly specials and vegetarian and vegan options. No reservations. Dinner and latenight Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — 626

Frenchmen St., 949-0696; www.snugjazz.com — Traditional Creole and Cajun fare pepper the menu along with newer creations such as the fish Marigny, topped with Gulf shrimp in a Creole cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

NEIGHBORHOOD BRAXTON’S RESTAURANT — 636 Franklin Ave., Gretna, 301-3166; www.braxtonsnola.com — Braxton’s serves a mix of salads, po-boys, deli sandwiches and entrees. Start a meal with oysters Louise, featuring fried oysters on a bed of spinach and cheese. The seafood platter includes fried shrimp, oysters, catfish strips, french fries, potato salad and vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

KATIE’S RESTAURANT — 3701 Iberville St., 488-6582; www.katiesinmidcity.com — Favorites at this Mid-City restaurant include the Cajun Cuban with roasted pork, grilled ham, cheese and pickles pressed on buttered bread. The Boudreaux pizza is topped with cochon de lait, spinach, red onions, roasted garlic, scallions and olive oil. There also are salads, burgers and Italian dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, Dinner Tue.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ KOZ’S — 515 Harrison Ave., 484-0841;

6215 Wilson St., Harahan, 737-3933; www.kozcooks.com — Louisiana favorites such as seafood platters, muffulettas and more than 15 types of po-boys, ranging from hot sausage to cheeseburger, are available at Koz’s. The Will’s Chamber of Horrors sandwich features roast beef, ham, turkey, Swiss and American cheese, Italian dressing and hot mustard. . No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

OLIVE BRANCH CAFE — 1995 Barataria

Blvd., Marrero, 348-2008; 3700 Orleans Ave., 302-1220; 5145 Gen. de Gaulle Drive, 393-1107; www.olivebranchcafe. com — These cafes serve soups, salads, sandwiches, wraps and entrees. Chicken and artichoke pasta is tossed with penne in garlic and olive oil. Shrimp Carnival features smoked sausage, shrimp, onion and peppers in roasted garlic cream sauce over pasta. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

RAJUN CAJUN CAFE — 5209 W. Napo-

leon Ave., Metairie, 883-5513; www. rajuncajuncafe.com — The cafe serves soups, salads, po-boys, muffulettas, seafood plates and a few entree platters. Daily specials include items such as breaded pork chops on Wednesdays and seafood options on Friday. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

www.marktwainspizza.com — Disembark at Mark Twain’s for salads, poboys and pies like the Italian pizza with salami, tomato, artichoke, sausage and basil. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

ITALIAN PIE — Citywide; www.italian-

pie.com — Italian Pie offers an array of pizzas, calzones, sandwiches, wraps and salads. The Mediterranean pie is topped with artichoke hearts, kalamata olives, red onion, tomatoes, herbed ricotta, mozzarella and pesto sauce. The spinach and artichoke pie includes mushrooms, onion, feta, mozzarella and garlic sauce. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

MARKS TWAIN’S PIZZA LANDING —

2035 Metairie Road, Metairie, 832-8032;

PO'BOYS! IN NOLA

NONNA MIA CAFE & PIZZERIA — 3125

Esplanade Ave., 948-1717 — Nonna Mia uses homemade dough for pizza served by the slice or whole pie and offers salads, pasta dishes and panini. Gourmet pies are topped with ingredients like pancetta, roasted eggplant, portobello mushrooms and prosciutto. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

REGINELLI’S — 741 State St., 899-1414; 817

W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 712-6868; 874 Harrison Ave., 488-0133; 3244 Magazine St. 895-7272; 5608 Citrus Blvd., Harahan, 818-0111; www.reginellis.com — This New Orleans original offers a range of pizzas, sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CALL (504)

482-3047 11AM TO 10PM CLOSED TUESDAYS

Bringing you quality, consistency and value since 1971.

R&O’S RESTAURANT — 216 Old Ham-

mond Hwy., 831-1248 — R&O’s offers a mix of pizza and Creole and Italian seafood dishes. There’s everything from seafood gumbo and stuffed artichokes to po-boys and muffulettas. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $



SLICE PIZZERIA — 1513 St. Charles Ave.,

525-7437; 5538 Magazine St., 897-4800 — Neapolitan-style pizza rules, but you can buy pizza by the slice and add or subtract toppings as you choose. There are also a full coffee bar, Italian sodas and organic teas. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

THEO’S NEIGHBORHOOD PIZZA — 4218 Magazine St., 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., 302-1133; www.theospizza.com — There is a wide variety of specialty pies or build your own from the selection of more than two-dozen toppings. Also serving salads and sandwiches. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

Now open 7 days a week in Mandeville LUNCH : Mon - Fri 11-2pm DiNNER: Mon -Thu 5-930pm Fri & Sat 5-10pm · Sun 1130a - 930p 600 N. Causeway, Mandeville 2100 N. Morrison, Hammond

985/626-4476

985/345-6789

WIT’S INN — 141 N. Carrollton Ave., 4861600 — This Mid-City bar and restaurant features pizzas, calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers for snacking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SANDWICHES & PO-BOYS MAGAZINE PO-BOY SHOP — 2368 Magazine St., 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of po-boys filled with everything from fried seafood to corned beef to hot sausage to veal. There are breakfast burritos in the morning and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Cash only. $ MAHONY’S PO-BOY SHOP — 3454 Mag-

azine St., 899-3374; www.mahonyspoboys.com — Mahoney’s serves traditional favorites and original po-boys like the Peacemaker, which is filled with fried oysters, bacon and cheddar cheese. There are daily lunch specials as well. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PARKWAY BAKERY AND TAVERN — 538

PIZZA

FOR

N. Hagen Ave., 482-3047 — Parkway serves juicy roast beef po-boys, hot sausage po-boys, fried seafood and more. No reservations. Kitchen open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $

TRACEY’S — 2604 Magazine St., 899-

2054; www.traceysnola.com — The roast beef po-boy dripping with garlicky gravy is the highlight of a menu transplanted from the former Parasol’s to this Uptown bar. Other options include fried seafood and bar noshing items. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Cash only. $

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 14 > 2011

www.milaneworleans.com — MiLA takes a fresh approach to Southern and New Orleans cooking, focusing on local produce and refined techniques. Try New Orleans barbecue lobster with lemon confit and fresh thyme. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri. dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

— Attiki features a range of Mediterranean cuisine including entrees of beef kebabs and chicken shawarma. Reservations recommended. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $$

PARKWAY

page 66

65

SPECIAL REAL ESTATE SECTION

The Francher-Perrin Group L. BRYAN FRANCHER Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 14 > 2011

Call 251-6400

68

Visit: www.francherperrin.com

Dorian M. Bennett 504.236.7688 dorian@dbsir.com

for more information on listings AWARDS Chairman's Circle Platinum Award Spirit Award Top of the Rock Award 3+ Achiever Award Group is Top 3% Nationwide

• President, Dorian Bennett Sotheby’s International Realty • Over 30 Years of Experience in Local Real Estate • Board Member of the Faulkner Society • Board Member of Sculpture for New Orleans • Board Member of Jazz & Heritage Foundation • Supporter of New Orleans Museum of Art • N.O.M.A. Board of Trustees for 3 years • 2-Term Board Member of the Contemporary Arts Center • Prior Board Member of the New Orleans Opera Assoc.

N E W

O R L E A N S

congratulates

• Board Member, 3 Ring Circus Gallery

Ricky Lemann

2009 Top Producer 2009 NOMAR Platinum Award 2009 NOMAR 4th Place Super Star Assisted GCC 2009 NOMAR 7th Place Super Star Assisted Transactions Gambit's Best Male Real Estate Agent 2009

rickylemann.com

each office independently owner and operated.

Ricky Lemann • 504-460-6340 5 0 4 - 8 6 2 - 0 1 0 0

(office)

Neighborhood Expertise – International Influence 504.944.3605

2340 Dauphine St., New Orleans www.dbsir.com • information@dbsir.com Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated

MEN IN REAL ESTATE JOHN SCHAFF CRS ASSOCIATE BROKER

CELL

504.343.6683

OFFICE

504.895.4663

John is one of New Orleans’ leading REALTORS. When it comes to Real Estate, he knows what it takes to get you what you want. John is a Certified Residential Specialist and Associate Broker with over fifteen years of experience in his field. He has won numerous awards for achievement as well as being names one of the “TOP 200 REALTORS” in the nation by The Wall Street Journal. John’s attention to detail and exceptional people skills make him the REALTOR of choice for the discriminating client.

Todd Taylor, Realtor, (504) 232-0362 • RE/MAX Real Estate Partners, (504) 888-9900

Locally owned and operated, Lalla Real Estate appreciates our city and our clients. Our goal is to provide accurate, current information on the ever changing real estate market and sound advice based on that information. The Lalla Real Estate team strives to exceed our clients’ expectations. Whether representing a seller or buyer, a landlord or tenant, or managing a residential or commercial property, we make sure that the best interest of our client always comes first.

Each office individually owned and operated RE/MAX & NOMAR Award Winning Agent

toddtaylorrealtor@yahoo.com • www.toddtaylorrealestate.com

4707 Baccich Street - $140K Country living in the heart of Gentilly, this 3 bd./1ba home is more space than you can believe. Priced to sell, a mini mansion at over 2,100 sq. ft. of living space. For Sale 2109 Fourth Street - $94,999 5946 Jamison Street - $65K 6640 Rue Louis Phillippe - $97K 107 West Park Court - $65K 2317 Westmere Street - $129K

5026 Congress Drive - $229K New construction in Gentilly Woods, this 4bd/2.5ba home has a grand kit. w/granite countertops, HUGE 2nd. flr. bonus room & an inground swimming pool. Over 2,800 sq. ft. Vacant Land 3 Lots on Nolan - $8K/Lot 8015 Unity Drive - $48K 2 Lots on Walter Street - $8K/Lot

2524-6 Jena St - $185K Great 3bd/1.5 ba Uptown owner/occ. dup w/easy access to the metro area. Bdrms. are independent, lrg. open floor plan living space. Each unit has its own inside laundry, both have great sitting porches, & a comfy shared backyard. Owner is licensed Realtor.

For Rent 227 1/2 Papworth Street - $950 2619 Vienna Street - $1,350

LEO LALLA OWNER/AGENT 504.975.2554 Leo@LallaRealEstate.com

Frank@LallaRealEstate.com

www.LALLAREALESTATE.com

935 Gravier St, Suite 110, New Orleans, LA 70112

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 14 > 2011

FRANK MISURACA JR. AGENT 504.416.2269

69

MEN IN REAL ESTATE 4328 Bancroft Drive $625,000 A LARge WAteRfRont HoMe on pReStIgIouS StReet. 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, Elevator, Master with large walk-in closet, bonus room over garage, office and situated on beautiful Bayou St. John. Great location near City Park and just 3 miles to the French Quarter. Owner financing via Bond for Deed with 25% down on this property.

Michael L. Baker, ABR/M, CRB, HHS President Realty Resources, Inc. 504-523-5555 • cell 504-606-6226 Licensed by the Louisiana Real estate Commission for more than 28 years with offices in new orleans, LA 70130

DALE R. FLEISHMANN APPRAISAL SERVICES Over 25 years experience in Real Estate Appraisals

100K sq ft of office/retail space North Shore, New Orleans, Metairie, Gretna. Ranging from I-10 Frontage to Veterans Blvd.

504-309-1849

Covering over 7 parishes Orleans, Jefferson, St. Bernard, Plaquemines, St. Charles, St. John, and St. Tammany Single Family Residence Townhouses Commercial Tax assessment SBA loans Sale/Purchase evaluations

Multi-Family Residence Land Estate Planning Marital Separation Foreclosure Desk/Field Reviews

Condominiums PUD’s Successions VA & FHA Bankruptcy Expert Witness

504-455-5411 office • 504-455-4654 fax Dalemann@bellsouth.net • Reappr@bellsouth.net

“Bringing life, business & community together.”

200,000 sq ft residential from low-moderate to luxury lofts. New Orleans, Gretna, Metairie, Kenner.

304-HOUSe (4687)

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 14 > 2011

www.BrunoInc.com

71

CLASSIFIEDS ‘08 CHEVY AVALANCHE

483-3100 • Fax: 483-3153 3923 Bienville St. New Orleans, LA 70119 Mon.-Fri. 8:30 a.m.- 5:30 p.m.

classadv@gambitweekly.com

AUTOMOTIVE

$24,995 504-466-6200

DOMESTIC AUTOS

‘08 LINCOLN MARK PU

Online: When you place an ad in Gambit’s Classifieds it also appears on our website, www.bestofneworleans.com Free Ads: Private party ads for

merchandise for sale valued under $100 (price must be in ad) or ads for pets found/lost. No phone calls. Please fax or email.

IMPORTED AUTOS

• For all Line Ads - Thurs. @ 5 p.m. • For all Display Ads - Wed. @ 5 p.m. Note: Ad cancellations and changes for all display ads must be made by Wednesday at 5 pm prior to the next issue date. Ad cancellations and changes for all line ads must be made by Thursday at 5 pm prior to the next issue date. Please proof your first ad insertion to make sure it is correct. Gambit only takes responsibility for the first incorrect insertion.

Massage therapists are required to be licensed with the State of Louisiana and must include the license number in their ads.

‘04 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER $9,995 504-368-5640

‘07 INFINITY FX35 $26,995 504-466-6200

A Touch

$27,995 504-466-6200

Leather, sunroof $14,995 504-368-5640

massage & body work

‘07 FORD EXPLORER

pain management & relaxation • Lomi Lomi - 90 minutes • Deep Tissue • Swedish • Waxing Services Available evening appts avail. 6 -10pm weekdays. 10am-7pm on weekends.

40K MI $15,995 Call 504-368-5640

‘09 SCION XD $13,995 504-368-5640

‘08 HUMMER H3 $26,995 504-466-6200

‘09 SUBARU IMPREZA i $13,995 504-368-5640

‘09 LEXUS GX470

‘10 HONDA FIT

$45,995 504-466-6200

Certified $15,995 504-368-5640

504-258-3389

$15,995 504-466-6200

$20,995 504-466-6200

QUIET WESTBANK LOC

Swedish, Relaxing Massage. Hours 9am-6pm, M-F. Sat 10-1pm $70. LA Lic #1910. Sandra, 504-393-0123.

MOPEDS/SCOOTERS

TRUCKS ‘03 CHEVY SSR $21,995 504-466-6200

Garden District Motor Scooters & Repair

Hours: 10am-7:30pm Mon - Sat

5 min from Elmwood

Alicia LA Lic# 520

16 yrs exp. Non-Sexual

Swedish, deep tissue, therapeutic. Flex appts, in/out calls, OHP/student discounts, gift cert. $65/hr, $75/ 1 1/2hr. LA Lic# 1763 Mark. 259-7278

‘10 CHEVY HHR

‘10 SUBARU LEGACY

La Lic #2983 • Member of BBB Providing Therapeutic Massage/Non Sexual

BYWATER BODYWORKS

$27,995 504-466-6200

“Servicing Most Asian Motor Scooters” For appointment call 504-621-4013

$40

90 min. avail • Swedish & Deep Tissue

Jeannie LMT #3783-01. Flexible appointments. Uptown Studio or Hotel out calls. 504.894.8856 (uptown)

‘09 SUBARU TRIBECA

$12,995 504-368-5640

Introductory price 1 hr

A BODY BLISS MASSAGE

AWD $18,995 Call 504-368-5640

$10,995 504-368-5640

Summer Special

2209 LaPalco Blvd

www.atouchofaloha.massageplanet.com

‘09 SUBARU FORESTER

‘10 HYUNDAI ACCENT

gift Certificates for Father’s Day

Aloha

of

‘07 CADILLAC ESCALADE

‘10 HYUNDAI SONATA GLS

Deadlines:

NOTICE

SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES

‘08 VW JETTA SE

CASH, CHECK OR MAJOR CREDIT CARD

LICENSED MASSAGE

$32,995 504-466-6200

‘09 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER $10,995 504-368-5640

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT

RELAX RELAX RELAX

Swedish massage by strong hands. Call Jack at 453-9161. La lic #0076.

call

504-317-4142

MERCHANDISE APPLIANCES 18 Cubic Ft Fridge

Almond Color. $50. Call 943-7699.

ELECTRIC RANGE

Hotpoint Almond Color 30in, Good working Condition. $50. Call 943-7699

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 14 > 2011

FURNITURE/ACCESSORIES

72

ASK ABOUT OUR SPECIAL RATES FOR

Real Estate Rentals &

Employment Advertise in

NOLA

MARKETPLACE Gambit’s weekly guide to Services, Events, Merchandise, Announcements, and more for as little as $60

• NAILS

15 OFF %

• WAXING

PETS

• MASSAGE

retail or services with this coupon expires 12-11

504-779-3200

• FACIALS • RETAIL

• 4433 Veterans Blvd.

(across from Clearview Mall) • www.Bare-Spa.com

Follow us on Twitter @BareSpa

$125 Full/Double Size Mattress Set, still in original plastic, unopened. We can deliver. (504) 846-5122 $295 Brand New Iron Queen Bed with mattress set, all new. Can deliver. (504) 952-8403 King Pillowtop Mattress, NEW!!! ONLY $199. Can deliver. (504) 846-5122 NEW Pub Height Table Set all wood, still boxed. Delivery available. $325 (504) 846-5122 Queen Mattress Set $149 Still in wrapper. Will deliver. (504) 846-5122

Check into Foursquare

Friend us on Facebook

PET ADOPTIONS BRYAN SUBARU LOVE A PET ADOPTION DRIVE SATURDAY, JUNE 18

In partnership with the ASPCA, The Friends of Jefferson Animal Shelter will showcase some of their adoptables on June 18, 2011 at 12 noon at Bryan Subaru, 8213 Airline Drive, Met. 70003. Free kittens to good home. We live in New Orleans please call Pricilla @ (601) 569-3661

Lab Mix

3 yr/ M, Neuterd, House Broken, Up to date on vaccines, Playful & Sweet Brenda 504-838-0736 bmigaud@cox.net SFS Cat Adoptions has a large variety of sweet beautiful rescues that need good indoor homes-Siamese , Russian blues, etc all cats are spayed /neutered and vacs. 504 462-1968

CLASSIFIEDS LEGAL NOTICES

ANNOUNCEMENTS

STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF CHARLESTON IN THE FAMILY COURT FOR THE NINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DOCKET NO. 2010-DR-10-4117 CHARLESTON COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICES VERSUS CHIMERE JASMINE, STEPHEN JASMINE, WALLACE FRANCOIS AND DUANE HURSTON. NOTICE TO ALL INTERESTED PARTIES: You are hereby summoned and required to answer the Complaint in this action filed with the Clerk of Court for Charleston County on October 27, 2010. Upon proof of interest, a copy of the Complaint will be delivered to you upon request from the Clerk of Court in Charleston, and you must serve a copy of your Answer to the Complaint on the Plaintiff, the Charleston County Department of Social Services, at the office of their Attorney, The Legal Department of the Charleston County Department of Social Services, 3366 Rivers Ave., N. Charleston, South Carolina 29405-5714, within thirty days of this publication. If you fail to answer within the time set forth above, the Plaintiff will proceed to seek relief from the Court. The Hearing on the Merits of this action has been scheduled for 2:30 p.m. on August 11, 2011, in the Family Court for the Ninth Judicial Circuit, located at 100 Broad Street, Charleston, South Carolina.

ANNOUNCEMENTS HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-800-532-6546 Ext. 97 http:// www.continentalacademy.com

ADOPTIONS PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293

To Advertise in

Call (504) 483-3100

IN THE CHANCERY COURT OF ADAMS COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI

EMPLOYMENT

AIR COND/HEATING

EMPLOYMENT

SUPERIOR AIRE INC

Trane 3 Ton Freon Replacement System, 13 seer, 10 year compressor. $3990 INSTALLED 12 months same as cash 504-465-0688

CLEANING/JANITORIAL CRISTINA’S CLEANING SERVICE

Let me help you with your Cleaning Needs including After Construction Cleaning Residential & Commerical Licensed & Bonded 232-5554 or 831-0606

HANDYMAN HARRY’S HOUSE HELPERS * Small Jobs *Repairs *Carpentry *Painting *Install AND MORE! Insured & Priced-Right Harry’s Helpful Ace Hardware Uptown * 504-896-1500 Metairie * 504-896-1550

LANDSCAPE/HORTICULTURE DELTA SOD

Certified Grade “A” Turf St. Augustine, Tifway Bermuda Centipede, Zoysia. WE BEAT ALL COMPETITORS! 504-733-0471

TREE MEDICS

$50 OFF Trimming & Removal To Gambit Readers - Thru May Free estimates 504-488-9115 nolatrees.com

CAUSE NO.: 2010-770 GERALDINE SEWELL, PETITIONER SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION THE STATE OF LOUISIANA PARISH OF ORLEANS TO: ALL BORN, KNOWN, ABSENT OR UNKNOWN HEIRS OF CATHERINE ELLIS, DECEASED, TOLLIVER CARTER, CYNTHIA ELLIS, SHAREE JACKSON, TERRY JACKSON AND ANTONY JACKSON WHO ARE NOT TO BE FOUND IN THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI AFTER DILIGENT INQUIRY You have been made a respondent in the Petition to Determine Heirs filed

within the Court by Geraldine Sewell, seeking a judicial determination of the heirs of Catherine Ellis, Deceased. You are summoned to appear and defend against said petition filed against you in this action before the Honorable George Ward, July 28, 2011 at 9:00 a.m., at the Adams County Chancery Court Building, Natchez, Mississippi, and in case of your failure to appear and defend a judgment will be entered against you for the things demanded in the petition. You are not required to file an answer or other pleading but you may do so if you desire. ISSUED UNDER MY HAND AND SEAL OF THIS COURT, this the 7 day of June, 2011.

Tommy O’Beirne, Chancery Clerk Adams County Chancery Court Clerk By: R.M. EDMOND D.C. Publish Dates: JUNE 14, 2011, JUNE 21, 2011, JUNE 28, 2011 OF COUNSEL: JOHN D. GIDDENS, ESQUIRE (MSB # 9357) John D. Giddens, P.A. Post Office Drawer 22546

PEST CONTROL ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE FOR FORMOSAN TERMITES Injected into Trees. One Price: $185. ADRIAN’S TREE SERVICE 504-367-1160 www.adrianstrees.com

Paid In Advance! Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net

CAREER PREPARATION

Sales, Graphics/Web, Marketing, Accounting, A&R, $25-50K Email resume to: louisianaredhotrecords@gmail.com

PART TIME PAINT STORE

PT position for paint mixer with retail exp. Some computer exp. required. Will train right individual. Fax resume to: 504-948-9670.

EARN $75 - $200 HOUR. Media Makeup Artist Training. Ads, TV, Film, Fashion. One week class. Stable job in weak economy. Details at http://www.AwardMakeUpSchool.com 310-364-0665

ADVERTISING/MARKETING Offers Volunteer Opportunities. Make a difference in the lives of the terminally ill & their families. Services include: friendly visits to patients & their families, provide rest time to caretaker, bereavement & office assistance. School service hours avail. Call Volunteer Coordinator @ 504-818-2723 #3016

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Advertising Sales Bi-Lingual (English/ Spanish) The ideal candidate will be organized, self starter, motivated & have exp selling advertising. Stipend + Commission & Bonus Call for interview 504.628.1028

AUDITIONS ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS

Needed immediately for upcoming roles $150-$300/day depending on job requirements. No experience, all looks. 1-800-560-8672 A-109. For casting times/locations.

Weekly Tails

BEAUTY SALONS/SPAS OLD METAIRIE DAY SPA

seeks exp Nail Tech for FT position. Under new ownership. High volume salon. Fax resume to 504-837-4792.

Mama is a 2-year-old, spayed, black & tan Cocker mix. She was hit by a car before coming to the shelter and has healed nicely and only has a small limp that doesn’t affect her ability to run & play. To meet Mama or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191.

FARM LABOR TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

Belcan Service Group, El Campo, TX, has 19 positions for rice. 3 mths experience required w/references; valid and clean DL; tools & equipment provided, housing and trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb; $9.65/hr; 3/4 work period guaranteed from 5/29/11 - 2/29/12. Apply at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order TX6805599.

MAMA Kennel #A12676734

Home of the $650 Termite Damage Repair Guarantee! WE DO IT ALL... Termites, Roaches, Rats & Ants Too. New Orleans Metro - 504-834-7330 2329 Edenborn, Metairie www.terminixno.com

PLUMBING ROOTER MAN

POOL SERVICES MAGNOLIA POOLS

Specializing in Saltwater Systerms Service, Maintenance, Repair 504-270-7307 www.magnoliapools.org

$$$HELP WANTED$$$ Earn Extra income assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! CALL OUR LIVE OPERATORS NOW! 1-800-405-7619 ext. 2450 http:// www.easywork-greatpay.com $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Earn Extra income assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! CALL OUR LIVE OPERATORS NOW! 1-800-405-7619 ext. 2450 http:// www.easywork-greatpay.com

VOLUNTEER

TERMINIX

Sewer & Drain Cleaning Specialists Plumbing Repair Specialists New Orleans 504-522-9536. KennerJefferson 504-466-8581. Westbank 504-368-4070. Laplace 985-6520084. Mandeville 985-626-5045. Slidell 985-641-3525. MENTION GAMBIT FOR A DISCOUNT

MISCELLANEOUS

MUSIC/MUSICIANS LA RED HOT RECORDS

DEWEY Kennel #A13116335

Dewey is a 1 ½-year-old, neutered, Siamese mix. He has a long creamy coat, crossed blue eyes and is a wonderful/ loving guy. To meet Dewey or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. To look for a lost pet come to the Louisiana SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), Mon-Sat. 9-5, Sun. 12-5 or call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 14 > 2011

IN RE: THE ESTATE OF CATHERINE ELLIS, DECEASED

Jackson, Mississippi 39225-2546 (601) 355-2022 (601) 355-0012 fax

SERVICES

EMPLOYMENT

LEGAL NOTICES

CLASSIFIEDS EMPLOYMENT

73

reaL esTaTe

SHOWCaSe OLD METAIRIE

GENTILLY

RIVER RIDGE

GENTILLY

BILOXI, MS

5542 Charlotte Dr. $99,500 Slab Ranch - 3 BR, 2 BA Partially renov + Guest Cottage 504-568-1359

Only Beachfront Resort in Biloxi/Gulfport - Bank Owned 3 bedroom/3 bath, 2161 sf. Amenities, covered parking Call Janine 228-313-1352 FIDELIS REALTY Please ask me about other foreclosures

9012 Rosecrest Lane 324 Metairie Rd - $1,950,000 Desirable Met Rd prop. Comm retail under non-conforming use. Inc 16,090 sq. ft. of land w/ exc. frontage on Met Rd & Vincent Ave. Loading dock & 7 parking spaces. Exc. redevel opp. for commercial/townhomes/single-family. Contact Josh Gertler, Basis Brokerage 504.261.8048 josh@basis-development.com

Newly renovated brick home, 1420 sq. ft., 2 bedroom, 2 bath, hardwood floors through out, appliances included, covered carport, large 62x120 lot w/open backyard & additional shed. 5 min. from Mathews & St. Rita.

4336 St Anthony $99,000

Charming renovated 2 bedroom/1 bath/ Cen a/h/Off street Parking/ Ceramic Tile/Corner lot/ Near Universities.

Reduced! $184,000

Southern Spirit Realty Keisha Washington 504-319-2693

Call (504) 915-3220

CLASSIFIEDS ESPLANADE RIDGE 1208 N. GAYOSO

Upper 2 BR, LR, DR, 1 BA, KIT, wood/ ceramic flrs, high ceilings, cen a/h, w/d hkups, $1150/mo. 432-7955.

2919 Lapage

2b/1b, living, din, funr kit, w/d, cen a/h, wd flrs, high cel. garage 1100/ mo, no dogs 985-231-8597

FRENCH QUARTER/ FAUBOURG MARIGNY 1103 ROYAL UNIT A

1 bedroom, 1 bath, cen a/h, Jacuzzi tub, w/d, water incl. Furnished or unfurnished. $1500/mo. Avail June 1. Call for appt, 504-952-3131.

1 Blk to St. Charles

IRISH CHANNEL 1/2 BLOCK TO MAGAZINE

1 BR $695/mo. 2 BR, $900/mo (2 BR includes utilities), hardwood/carpet floors. . 504-202-0381, 738-2492.

LAKEVIEW/LAKESHORE TOWNHSE- 6604 BELLAIRE

2 story, 3 BR upstairs, 2 half BA, 1 full BA. Formal dining. Washer, dryer, backyard. $1200. 504-301-7239

MID CITY 3122 PALMYRA STREET

Completely renov, 1/2 dbl, 1BR, 1BA, hdwd flrs, new appls, ceil fans, wtr pd. $700/mo+dep. Call 504-899-5544

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT 1 BLK TO AUDUBON PARK

6230 Annunciation, 3 BR, 2 BA, furn kit, cen a/h, w/d, off st prkg, $1950, lease. Call 621-7795

1711 2nd St. Lrg 1b/1b, dish washer, w/d onsite, cent AC, marble mantels, patio $850/mo 895-4726 or 261-7611

1026 LYONS ST

2 br, 1 ba, furn kit, w/d hkps, cen a/h, hdwd flrs, 10’ ceils, off st parking. $1200/mo. Call 9-5, M-F, ASC Real Estate 504-439-2481

1205 ST CHARLES/$1075

Fully Furn’d studio/effy/secure bldg/ gtd pkg/pool/gym/wifi/laundry. 985871-4324, 504-442-0573.

361 LOWERLINE ST.

1/1, w/d, shared yard & storage. Walk to strtcar, Tulane, Loyola & Audubon pk. Pets ok. $750/mo + dep. 225810-6770

4129 VENDOME PLACE

Beautifully renovated spacious home. 3/4 br, 3 BA, kit w/ ss appl. w/d, cen a/h, lg yard, small gar. $2500/mo. $1500 dep. 504-621-9337

French Quarter Realty Wayne • Nicole • Sam • Jennifer • Brett • Robert • George • Baxter • Kaysie • Billy

4830 1/2 CHESTNUT

GRT LOCATIONS!

577 S CARROLLTON

LOWER GARDEN DISTRICT St. Andrew - O/S, gtd pkng, pool, laun, $775/mo & up 2833 MAGAZINE 1BR/1BA Mod kit, o/s pkng, pool, coin op laun, $800/mo 891-2420

1 bdrm, furn kit, cen a/h, wd flrs, hi ceil, w/d hkps, ceil fans, balc. $750/ mo. ASC Real Estate. Call between 10am & 4pm. 504-439-2481. By St. Charles, 3BR, 1BA, furn kit, w/d, cen air, $1450/mo util & Direct TV incl 504-913-6999, 504-259-6999

6317 S. PRIEUR

Near Tulane 2 bedroom, living room, dining room, furn kit, tile bath. No pets. $800/mo, Call 504-283-7569

HOWARD SCHMALZ & ASSOCIATES REAL ESTATE Call Bert: 504-581-2804

$1695

$1000

1/1 Furn chic renov w/parking!

1024 Bourbon

2/2 renov. fully furn all utilities inc $2,750

1207 Jackson 1br/1ba "Aquatic Garden Apt"

$750

1430 Chartres

2/1 shotgun wood floors courtyard $1200

1514 Euterpe

$600

519 Iberville

1/1 renov apt w/balcony over courtyard $1125

718 Barracks #7

1/1 newly remodeled,prvt pool,great Loc! $2200

937 Barracks #2

2/2 charming,in lower quarter w/balc!

1233 Esplanade #16

2/1 renov.pool.prking for additional $50. $1000

712 St Philip A

1/1 fully furn, fab location. courtyard $1,550

712 St Philip B

1/1 fully furn guesthouse. fab loc $1,425

929 Dumaine #14 511 Gov Nicholls D

Across from Pontchartrain Golf Course! 4 BR/2 BA, CA&H. Built In electric. No smokers. Avail now! $1500/mo + deposit. Call 504-491-9834

Complete w/fridge, w&d, mw, stove, sec sys, CA&H, os pkng. On srtcr & Busline. Quiet n’bhood. $1,100 mo + sec dep. No pets/smokers. Call (504) 866-2250

835 Julia #3

studio cozy, skylights, common ctyd

$109,000

1/1 updated,modern, 533 sqft $229,000 2/1.5 fab condo w/balc! 1040 sqft

$369,900

812 Esplanade #2

1/1 grnd flr w/pool! 481sqft

$189,000

1233 Decatur #8

1/1 3rdflw/tonsofcharm 608sqft $199,000

1119 Dauphine

921 Chartres #9

2/1.5 spacious, Crtyrd, 1188 sqft

$359,000

We have qualified tenants for your rentals. Call us!

1726 St. Charles 1br/1ba Apartment Over Pralines $800 "Efficiency Off St. Charles"

$1200

1233 Esplanade #19 studio furn, renov w/ open flr plan $69,000

SINGLE FAMILY HM

FURN 2BDRM/1BA HOUSE

3 BR 2 BA, Close to Univ, med & law schools. The best apt you’ll see. Cent a/h, hdwd flrs. Lots of closet space. Offst Pkg, Water pd. Avail 6/1. No smokers, no pets. $1650. Paula 504-952-3131

628 Julia 1br/1ba "Arts District Apartment"

CONDOS FOR SALE

GENTILLY

2 Eff apts. Lower $625 tenant pays elec. Upper $700 incl util, w/d on site 1-888-239-6566 or mballier@ yahoo.com

2011 GEN PERSHING Beautiful Neighborhood!

DORIAN M. BENNETT • 504-236-7688 dorian.bennett@sothebysrealty.com

RESIDENTIAL RENTALS

1301 N. RAMPART FURN-1 bd/ 1.5 ba ...... $2000 1301 N. RAMPART FURN-2 bd/ 2 ba ....... $3000 1029 Esplanade - 1 bd/ 1 1/2 ba ............. $1950 824 Royal - 2 bd/ 2 ba ...................... $3500 925 Clouet - 2 bd/ 1 ba ....................... $880 823 Ursulines - 1 bd/ 1 ba ..................... $800

CALL FOR MORE LISTINGS!

2340 Dauphine Street • New Orleans, LA 70117 (504) 944-3605

NEAR SACRED HEART

Fantastic neighborhood, 3 br, 2.5 baths, fenced in yard. Lovely details and amenities. Ready 6/17/11 $1,800/mo. 4620 Carondelet St. 7234472 or 872-9365

RAISED COTTAGE UPPER

Deluxe furn 2 Br, w/10x12 luxury ba, cent. air, wd & tile floors, ceil fans, mini blinds, yd, screen prch, w/d, 5300 Freret at Valmont. $1200$1400/mo incl. gas/wtr 504-8993668

RENTALS TO SHARE ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Findyour roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com.

UPTOWN/ GARDEN DISTRICT

1, 2 & 3

BEDROOMS AVAILABLE CALL

899-RENT

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 14 > 2011

504-949-5400

1510 CARONDELET 1 block to St. Charles

REAL ESTATE

75

PUZZLE PAGE CLASSIFIEDS BETWEEN JEFFERSON & OCTAVIA • 3222 Coliseum • 4941 St. Charles • 2721 St. Charles • 5528 Hurst • 1750 St. Charles • 1750 St. Charles • 20 Anjou • 1544 Camp • 3915 St. Charles • 1544 Camp • 1544 Camp • 1224 St. Charles

(New Price!) $2,495,000 Grand Mansion $2,300,000 (3 bdrm/3.5ba w/pkg) $1,579,000 TOO LATE! $1,300,000 TOO LATE! $429,000 Commercial $399,000 (4 bdrm/2 ba w/pkg) $220,000 (2 bdrm/2ba w/pkg) $239,000 (1bdrm/1ba w/pkg) $315,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $159,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $149,000 starting at $79,000

YOUR PROPERTY COULD BE LISTED HERE!!!

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 14 > 2011

ANSWERS FOR LAST WEEK ON PAGE 73

78

John Schaff crs CELL

504.343.6683

office

5419 LASALLE ELEGANT UPTOWN HOME. Nestled between Jefferson & Octavia on a quiet block , this newly renovated home features a spacious living area with high ceilings & lots of natural light. Expansive eat-in kitchen overlooks deck & gorgeous courtyrd surrounded by garden.

504.895.4663 (504) 895-4663

Living rm opens to large porch. Master bdrm suite opens onto large balcony has closet & storage space galore! Attached sitting/dressing room has additional closets. 3BR/3BA, 3,050 sq. ft. Must see!! $595,000.

d e t vi

n I e

'r u Yo

17th St. at Severn 504-835-3151 5200 Veterans 504-780-9970

17th St. at Severn â&#x20AC;˘ 5200 Veterans

Summer Give Aways Get your Perks simply by dropping

off your email address in our glass bowls located on the bar at any of our locations. Or receive a text message by leaving your cell number. Don't Be Left Out!

We would like to give thanks to all our customers who have supported us through the years. We are personally going door to door to give away a total of $250,000 in $5 Gift Certificates. Look for yours!

Keep It Fresh Check out our

Breakfast and Lunch Menu at www.lovepuccinos.com


Gambit New Orleans- June 14, 2011