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JESSICA HAWK’S MURDER: 2 YEARS LATER

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

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Camp Swan is a three-day, two-night camp for children age 7-12 who have lost a parent, sibling, or other significant person in their life. The camp combines art, music, individual and group therapies so that so that the need of each child can be addressed. Through these therapeutic experiences the children learn how to have a proper outlet for their feelings of sadness. The Camp takes place at beautiful Bayou Segnette and will take place November 19th, 20th, 21st, 2010. The Camp is sponsored by Canon Hospice and the Akula Foundation. The Camp is free of charge. We are currently accepting applications for volunteers and for children to participate in the camp.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

Does Diagnostic Imaging Services accept Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Louisiana health insurance plans?

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OCTOBER 5, 2010 · VOLUME 31 · NUMBER 40

> > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >ADMINISTRATIVE > > > > > > > > DIRECTOR > > > > > >MARK > > >KARCHER > <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >EDITORIAL >FAX: > > 483-3116 > > > > |>response@gambitweekly.com >>>>>>>>>> NEWS <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< EDITOR KEVIN ALLMAN > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Cover > > > >Story > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >19 > > > > > >MANAGING > > > > > >EDITOR > > > >KANDACE > POWER GRAVES As the Hornets prepare for their first preseason POLITICAL EDITOR CLANCY DUBOS matchup, we look at the state of the game in the ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR WILL COVIELLO locker room — and the front office. SPECIAL SECTIONS EDITOR MISSY WILKINSON

Commentary

7

Blake Pontchartrain

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News

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Second lines aren’t the problem New Orleans know-it-all

Jessica Hawk was murdered two years ago. The killer still hasn’t been found, but her friends won’t let her memory, or the case, fade from view

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From their lips to your ears A guide to Gambit’s all-new website Feet First

VIEWS Chris Rose / Rose-Colored Glasses

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Clancy DuBos / Politics

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Babies who make babies who kill babies Louisiana faces “the cliff year.”

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ARTS&ENTERTAINMENT A&E News

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Gambit Picks

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Noah Bonaparte Pais / On the Record

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Cuisine

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

Carnaval Latino Best bets for your busy week

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Gambit Communications, Inc. CHAIRMAN CLANCY DUBOS PRESIDENT & CEO MARGO DUBOS Gambit (ISSN 1089-3520) is published weekly by Gambit Communications, Inc., 3923 Bienville St., New Orleans, LA 70119. We cannot be held responsible for the return of unsolicited manuscripts even if accompanied by a SASE. All material published in Gambit is copyrighted: Copyright 2010 Gambit Communications, Inc. All rights reserved.

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

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In October 2001, at age 70, Bobby McIntyre unveiled the plan to restore an entire block of downtown New Orleans to its roots during the golden age of jazz. Designed as a living museum depicting life at the turn of the century, the renovation of the 400 block of South Rampart Street will revitalize existing historical structures and recreate the legendary taverns and dance halls that now exist only in faded photos and memories. Visitors to this living jazz museum will experience, firsthand, the sights and sounds of life during that remarkable time.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

It’s easy to look at this forlorn string of buildings and imagine the value of the real estate beneath them. With decades of experience in business, Bobby McIntyre fully understands economics and market demands. But he also understands the value of history and the importance of preserving our links to the past.

06

“I’m 79 years of age, I’ve served many people and many causes, made many friends and now that has led me to this creation of the New Orleans Jazz Museum.”

When Bobby stepped into the cold, musty shell of the structure that once housed the bustling Eagle Saloon, – Bobby McIntyre – he envisioned the very same place where a 12-year-old named Daniel Louis Armstrong first blew his horn and launched a revolution in music. In a town so seemingly rooted in its own sense of place, Bobby McIntyre saw the birthplace of jazz slowly disappearing with each new office tower, condominium and hotel. And so, with a committed group of supporters called the New Orleans Jazz Restoration Society, Bobby set out to preserve the true birthplace of jazz. There is still work to do before the living museum of jazz history becomes a reality. But with the experience, vision and passion of a man like Bobby McIntyre, we look forward to seeing young Louis blow his horn on South Rampart Street once again. Bobby McIntyre… Peoples Health Champion.

www.peopleshealth.com/champions The Peoples Health Champions program demonstrates the excellence that comes through life experience by recognizing exceptional achievement after age 65.

2010 Peoples Health Champions Selection Committee Joe Cook, WVUE-TV Fox 8 David Francis, The Times-Picayune Ben Hales, New Orleans Saints Angela Hill, WWL-TV Channel 4 Kip Holden, Baton Rouge Government Donna Klein, Peoples Health

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Two Way, Pocky Way

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supply. The second line community has been a force for good and an avatar of pride long before the days when any fool could get an automatic weapon, and they do not deserve to be confused with thugs who murder children. New Orleanians who reacted angrily when some suggested Mardi Gras should be canceled after Hurricane Katrina were right — Mardi Gras is part of our city’s culture. No one suggests eliminating the World Cup in response to soccer hooliganism; nor does anyone suggest that Carnival krewes shouldn’t roll because of violence along some parade routes. Central City suffers from a plague of violence, but it’s not because Mardi Gras Indians or brass bands brought it there. After the Sept. 27 press conference, Gerard Dollis, Big Chief of the Wild

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Magnolias tribe, told Gambit he had been at the Young Men Olympians parade that day and tried to help his elderly father down the street when he heard the shots. “It was the outsiders,” Dollis said. Shereece Harrison-Nelson, a thirdgeneration Mardi Gras Indian, said there was another Indian phrase similar to the familiar “hey pocky way,” and that was “two way, pocky way” — “It means, ‘You go your way, and I’ll go mine,’” she explained. This problem cries out for a strong partnership between leaders of the social aid and pleasure clubs and NOPD, and it demands that citizens get involved when they see something wrong. Part of the solution is making sure young people learn right from wrong, a job the men and women of the marching groups and the Mardi Gras Indians are uniquely qualified to carry out. A boy who grows up with a tuba or a headdress in his hand doesn’t have room to hold a gun. Two way, pocky way.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

he story is sadly familiar: A celebration on the streets of New Orleans turns into a nightmare when a thug sprays bullets near a crowd and an innocent bystander is killed. We’ve almost become inured to this, but when it’s a child who’s slain, the infinite senselessness leaves us all the more dumbstruck and groping for answers. On Sept. 26, 2-year-old Jeremy Galmon was sitting in a car with his grandmother, blocks from where the Young Men Olympian Junior Benevolent Association’s second line had passed earlier, when a gunman or gunmen in another car unleashed a fusillade. A bullet shattered Jeremy’s face. Police were on the scene almost immediately and Jeremy was taken to University Hospital, where he died. It’s only human to be furious when something this inexplicable occurs, but some were quick to connect the death of Jeremy Galmon with the second line parade, which was unwarranted and untrue. Galmon’s family hadn’t been to the parade, and the shooter had no connection with the social aid and pleasure club. It was a random act of violence in a neighborhood — and a city — that sees too many of them. The same misplaced blame happened three weeks earlier, when a 32-year-old woman was shot outside Sidney’s Saloon in the 7th Ward on Sept. 5, and some in the media inaccurately reported it as a murder at a second line (the Black Men of Labor had paraded earlier). Some have even suggested that second lines should be shut down. We disagree totally. The second lines don’t need to stop. The shooting needs to stop. At a press conference on Sept. 27, one day after the Galmon shooting, Mayor Mitch Landrieu and New Orleans Police Chief Ronal Serpas stood with members of the African-American faith community, the second line community and Mardi Gras Indians to ask for the public’s cooperation in finding the killers in these cases. Thanks to cooperation between Central City residents and the NOPD, two suspects were arrested by Friday morning. New Orleans’ social aid and pleasure clubs were initially founded in the 1800s as “benevolent societies,” groups that banded together to do community work and cover the funeral expenses of their members. Today, the groups work to strengthen their neighborhoods, providing social outlets for young people, teaching them music and history and how to create the intricate beadwork that makes the Indian suits so beautiful. The groups provide role models for boys in a world where strong role models are in short

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DEAR JUSTIN, The 17-room mansion at 219 S. Miro St. was built by Smith Wendell Green, who was born a slave but as an adult pioneered the image of a successful black businessman in New Orleans. He made his fortune as a grocer, then became president of Liberty Independence Insurance and in 1908 was elected Supreme Chancellor of the Knights of Pythias of Louisiana, a fraternal organization he led for 27 years. That group provided brotherhood for its members, but also helped support widows and orphans and paid for burials. In 1928, Green commissioned Weiss, Dreyfous & Seiferth, architects who later designed the Louisiana State Capitol, the governor’s mansion and Charity Hospital, to build the mansion in a Neo-Classical Revival style with Craftsman influences. “The house is important because, in a city ... so well known for its mansions, this is the only remaining example of an early 20th-century mansion built in the city by an African American,” says architect/ historian Kenneth Bryant, who studied Green and his mansion for 15 years and now is working with its owners, who want to move and renovate the house. The opulence of the mansion, its proximity to a middle-class white neighborhood along Canal Street and its reflection of an African-American’s success as a businessman and community leader stuck in the craw of some people in the white community. In his 2009 article, “A Crucial Piece of Black History Faces the Wrecking Ball in Louisiana,” Bryant says Green received threats during construction, and the house was partially burned, reportedly by the Ku Klux Klan, while it was being built. Green completed the home in Mid-City anyway. Because of Green’s importance to the African-American community, his home came to symbolize how blacks could achieve the American Dream. That is the source of the current controversy. The house, which sits in the LSU/VA footprint, was not on the list of 28 historic homes to be moved to vacant lots in other parts of the city. The concern is that because

Green’s home is not on the list to be moved, it must be scheduled for demolition. Ryan Berni, press secretary for Mayor Mitch Landrieu, says that is not necessarily so. “The city and preservationists would like to see that house saved, but because it’s so large, they’re trying to work out the logistics,” he said last week. “The intention is to save it. They’re trying to find a resolution to this issue.” The process for moving homes from the LSU/VA site calls for state contrac-

tors (including the The Green nonprofit Builders mansion (shown of Hope) to inspect here from the buildings on the side) sits in limbo footprint to make on the footprint of the new LSU/ sure they can be VA hospital. moved without major structural damage. The city hopes to move 100 historically or architecturally significant homes from the area, Berni says. In June, Landrieu demanded the state halt demolitions of historic homes in the hospital footprint and move the homes to sites provided by nonprofits. The nonprofits are scheduled to rehab the houses and sell them at affordable prices. The mansion on South Miro Street isn’t the only architectural treasure Green left as his legacy. In 1909, he commissioned a seven-story Pythian Temple office building at 234 Loyola Ave. in the Central Business District. It cost $200,000 and is considered to be the most expensive building in the city at that time funded by African Americans. That building remains, although it has been covered with a modern facade. Green died in 1946, apparently of old age, Bryant says. “The most fascinating thing about this house is that [the possible demolition] is really a slap in the face,” he says. “Green’s choice of that location was kind of breaking color barriers in an area that was next to middle-class whites. When he built the house, it was bigger than most, if not all, of his neighbors’.”

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> CHRIS ROSE CLANCY DUBOS < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < KNOWLEDGE < < < < < < < < < < <IS < <POWER <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< 15 17 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

scuttle Butt

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“My hold on Mr. Lew’s nomination will remain for the same reason it was placed originally: The administration has not acted to lift its ill-conceived moratoria on offshore drilling that are having such a devastating impact on working people and small businesses throughout the Gulf Coast. Everyone, especially those who live along the coast, wants offshore energy production safety standards strengthened. But we have been able to demonstrate that the oil and gas industry can improve safety progressively over time, without a complete work stoppage.” — Sen. Mary Landrieu, explaining her rationale for continuing her hold on the nomination of Jack Lew, whom the Obama administration has nominated to be director of the Office of Management and Budget.

LA LIKELY TO LOSE ONE CONGRESSIONAL SEAT

Who Killed Jessica Hawk? A MEMORIAL GARDEN IS DEDICATED TO THE VICTIM OF A 2008 BYWATER MURDER.

n 2008, Antoinette K-Doe hung only three photos inside the Mother-In-Law Lounge on Claiborne Avenue. One was a portrait of Barack and Michelle Obama. The other two were of Jessica Hawk. Hawk was found dead inside her Bywater shotgun home on Chartres Street Monday, Aug. 11, 2008. Police discovered her body while conducting a well-being check that morning. She was 32. There have been no arrests. The District Attorney’s Office has yet to file any information. DNA tests — whose results came more than six months after her murder — yielded no

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c'est what? AFTER THE FAILURE TO REPEAL “DON’T ASK, DON’T TELL,” SHOULD PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA HAVE ISSUED AN EXECUTIVE ORDER STOPPING THE DISCHARGE OF GAY AND LESBIAN SERVICE MEMBERS?

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Do you get an annual flu shot?

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BoUQuets

THIS WEEK’S HEROES AND ZEROES

The Gayle & Tom Benson Charitable Foundation

has pledged $8 million to Loyola University to renovate Loyola’s former library into a new headquarters for the school’s Jesuit Center. The 36,000-squarefoot building, which is centrally located on campus, has been unused for more than a decade. Benson, a Loyola alumnus, has been a major donor to the university and received its highest honor, the Integritas Vitae award, earlier this year.

Mac Rebennack,

aka Dr. John, was among this year’s nominees for the 2011 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame announced Sept. 28. Rebennack, 69, has been active in the New Orleans music scene since the 1950s, before becoming world renowned in the 1970s. In the last five years, Dr. John has been a fierce advocate for Katrina relief and wetlands restoration. The Hall of Fame will announce its final selection in December.

City Council President Arnie Fielkow personally donated $25,000 to the 9th Ward Field of Dreams project Sept. 30, bringing the George Washington Carver High School closer to its goal of a stateof-the-art athletic facility that will be open to the community free of charge. The program, which was begun by a young teacher named Brian Bordainick, has raised more than $1 million toward its goal of $1.85 million.

David Simon,

creator of the shows Treme and The Wire, was chosen this week for a fellowship by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, an honor sometimes referred to as the “MacArthur genius grant.” The grant comes with a no-stringsattached cash award of $500,000. Treme, which was largely well-received by critics as well as locals, is set to air its second season in the first half of 2011.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

BY ALE X WOODWARD

suspects. But now, more than two years later, with an awareness campaign and a public determined to shed light on her death, Crimestoppers is upping the reward — the stock $2,500 it offers will jump to $25,000. The reward, along with a Justice for Jessica campaign dedicated to solving her murder and promoting peace, will be announced at the dedication of a memorial garden in the Bywater at 3 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 9. “It hit us that if there were to be any movement on the case, we were going to have to try and help it along,” says Hawk’s former fiance Lee Horvitz. “Planning, finalizing, ordering — in doing all the things with this garden, we also hope in a way is part of Justice for Jessica, that it might create some kind of spirit that is going to help solve the case.” The garden sits on the neutral ground at the neighborhood marker — behind the Bywater sign at Press Street and St. Claude Avenue, behind the railroad tracks — where raised beds with flowers and herbs form a box with a tree standing in its center. Quotes from Tennessee Williams and Hawk’s mother appear on plaques in the beds, and a main

Although results of the 2010 Census are not yet official, preliminary numbers appear to confirm early fears that Louisiana will lose a congressional seat as a result of reapportionment next year. Louisiana had eight seats in Congress before the 2000 Census, but lost one seat afterward as a result of outmigration. Continued loss of population, particularly after the 2005 hurricanes, is likely to cost the state yet another seat, dropping its total to six seats by 2012. The official Census numbers are set to be released in December, but a recent estimate and analysis done for the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) shows Louisiana as one of eight states losing one seat each. New York and Ohio stand to lose two seats each. The big gainers

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marker is dedicated to Hawk. Horvitz helped develop the garden with the Bywater Neighborhood Association and the city’s Department of Parks and Parkways, which provided the space (on public property) and gave planning guidance. “Early on, the deepest motivation for me in doing this was a voice that came to me and said, ‘Jessica will not be erased,’” Horvitz says. “When I and a few others … first had this idea, someone said to me, ‘You know, it’s not going to bring her back.’ And I thought, ‘What kind of idiot do you think I am? Of course it’s not going to bring her back.’ Then I realized, unconsciously, I was thinking it would bring her back. But I’ve learned it won’t. But it does keep her here, in some way.” Horvitz says the garden is built to last at least 100 years. “It’s the perfect place,” he says. “Her voice must be heard on this issue for decades and decades to come.” HAWk AND HOrvITz mOvED frOm OHIO into a home in Uptown New Orleans in 2003. The couple evacuated the city before Hurricane katrina and the levee failures, then returned two-and-a-half months later and found a rental in the Bywater. Hawk was hired as an entomologist on the team that opened the Audubon Insectarium in June 2008, and she also was awarded the first post-katrina scholarship for graduate study in the biology department at the University of New Orleans. The couple was engaged in 2006, but separated the following year. Hawk was living alone in the apartment, but the two stayed in touch and made plans to have dinner Sunday, Aug. 10. When Horvitz tried to reach Hawk that weekend, she never replied. “We believe … she was killed either friday night or Saturday sometime,” he says. “That’s how I turned out to be the one that got thinking, ‘What’s going on here?’” Horvitz called police, and officers performed a wellness check monday morning. Police discovered her body, which had multiple stab wounds. Within 15 minutes, a crime scene developed — the New Orleans Police Department, National Guard and army personnel crowded the shotgun apartment. Detectives asked Horvitz, “Did you kill her?,” Horvitz remembers.

“You just have to look him in the eye and respond,” he says. DNA swabs and samples were sent to Baton rouge. Horvitz and Hawk’s family waited more than six months for the results, which found only Hawk’s DNA at the scene. Homicide detective Winston Harbin says there was no indication of forced entry. “from our point of view, the forensic team didn’t do a good job,” says Ivonne Garzon, Hawk’s friend and an activist for a DNA lab in New Orleans. “We asked about fingerprints, fingernails, (NOPD) said there was no evidence. Her apartment was small. We don’t understand how someone could break in and not leave a trace.” New Orleans lost its DNA lab following the 2005 levee failures, when the facility flooded. Samples are now sent to Louisiana State Police in Baton rouge, where they’re outsourced, again, to a private company. The building that housed the New Orleans lab was demolished in 2009. (See “DNA D.O.A.,” cover story, Aug. 2, 2010.) “It took six-and-a-half months for the DNA results to come back, and for a case like this, that is beyond outrageous,” Horvitz says. “I would rank that as offensive to the citizenry as the condition of [New Orleans recreation Department], which is absolutely scandalous. Why (do) New Orleanians seem willing to accept conditions that are unacceptable in certain areas of life?” With the launch of a Justice for Jessica campaign, Horvitz hopes to reopen the case and attract more public attention — not just for Hawk, but other victims of crime, as well as the severity of violence in New Orleans. The campaign hopes to promote the case with street-level public awareness (“Who killed Jessica Hawk” stickers and posters), and, with the cooperation and guidance of NOPD, potentially hire a forensic pathologist and independent detective. Horvitz also helped Crimestoppers increase its reward from the standard $2,500 to $25,000, which will be announced at the Oct. 9 memorial service. Crimestoppers executive director Darlene Cusanza says the reward is an opportunity to “generate some publicity” for the case, despite it sitting cold for more than a year.

Harbin says the reward increase is likely to generate interest. An announcement made in July to increase the reward for information on the July 2004 murder of John macLellan in Lakeview helped Harbin find a person of interest in the case. But for now, Harbin says, detectives have nothing further to go on in Hawk’s case. “It’s sad to say,” Harbin says. “The only thing we can do at this time is get it in the public.” THE WEEk fOLLOWING HEr DEATH, Hawk was scheduled to begin a new job at the New Orleans Botanical Garden at City Park. She was working at Harold’s IndoorOutdoor Plants — across the street from her memorial garden. Narrating a YouTube video about the memorial garden, Horvitz says, “Her case remains unsolved. We are determined to close it.” “When you say something like that, you’re aware it’s just bravado, wish and hope,” he says. Horvitz says it was Harold’s owner Harold Applewhite’s idea to build the garden in the neutral ground, where organizers broke ground in August 2009. “The garden is a way for us to keep a little piece of Jessica in the city,” Garzon says. The dedication ceremony will include a vigil with members of the anti-violence group Ceasefire, led by organizer Charles Anderson, as well as a performance by Lisa Lynn and Leslie martin playing music from a list of Hawk’s favorite songs. Attendees are encouraged to write their names or messages to Hawk on a 9 feet by 4 feet concrete slab, which then will be protected with a sealant. “It’s a celebration, but we did not want to gloss over the fact that she was murdered,” Horvitz says. A Tennessee Williams quote appears on one plaque: “After all, a high station in life is earned by the gallantry with which appalling experiences are survived with grace.” “We not only have to live on,” Horvitz says, “we have to live better.” Anyone with information is asked to contact Crimestoppers at 822-1111 or toll free at (877) 903-STOP. Callers do not have to give their names or testify to receive the cash reward.

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are expected to be Texas, which stands to gain four seats, and Florida, which could gain two seats. Six other states appear likely to gain one seat each. The study for NCSL was done by Esri, a national GIS and demographics consulting company. Esri used U.S. Census Bureau population estimates and its own additional research to track and project population trends. According to Esri’s analysis, Louisiana’s latest population figure will be slightly more than 4.5 million. The median population for a congressional district will be approximately 715,000. Once the official census figures are released, individual state legislatures must redraw districts for local, state and federal officials who represent districts. Louisiana lawmakers are expected to convene in a special session early next year to deal with reapportionment issues. In addition to losing a congressional seat, state legislative seats will be reshuffled significantly as a result of post-Katrina population shifts. In that reshuffling, the New Orleans area is likely to lose at least one state Senate seat and up to three state House seats. To complicate things further, Louisiana is a Voting Rights Act state, which means all new district boundaries are subject to review by the U.S. Justice Department, which must “preclear” new district boundaries before elections can be held in those new districts. The new district lines also can be challenged in court — as they have been many times in the past. — Clancy DuBos

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(DHH) was to receive $15 million, the largest single grant among the states. In July, Alan Levine, then-secretary of the DHH, had requested nearly $29 million from the oil giant. — Kevin Allman

Barry Warns spill panel

Regional levee board member and historian John Barry painted a bleak picture for members of the Oil Spill Commission in recent testimony, saying that failure to act soon to shore up Louisiana’s coast will have dire economic and environmental consequences for the entire nation. Noting that Louisiana has lost an area larger than the state of Delaware to coastal erosion, Barry said, “If you place Delaware between New Orleans and the sea, it wouldn’t need any levees. Land loss has made populated areas in Louisiana and Mississippi vastly more vulnerable than did nature. They are vastly more vulnerable than they were even 50 to 60 years ago. And that land loss is continuing.” Barry also cited figures underscoring Louisiana’s strategic economic and energy significance to the rest of the nation. For example: • The majority of all domestic oil and gas is produced offshore of Louisiana. • Louisiana is home to 19 refineries (15 percent of the nation’s refining capacity), all within reach of hurricane storm surge. • The life cycle of more than 90 percent of all fish and 98 percent of all commercial species in the Gulf of Mexico depends on Louisiana marshes. • By weight, 40 percent of all commercial fish caught in the U.S. is caught in Louisiana waters. • Five of the 15 largest ports in the country are in Louisiana, and 18 percent of all waterborne commerce in the United States passes through Louisiana waters. • Twenty percent of all U.S. exports (56 percent of all U.S. grain exports) travel down the Mississippi River. “The continued erosion of the Louisiana coast threatens all of that,” Barry told the commission. “The national economy and national security depend on protecting and preserving the economic infrastructure currently in place.”

As proof of that claim, Barry noted that gasoline prices spiked $1 a gallon after Hurricane Katrina interrupted gulf supplies and refining. Katrina also knocked out access to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, he said. “That’s just the impact on national energy supplies, not the port system,” Barry added. “There is simply no other way to give the interior of the nation — the body of the nation — cheap, efficient access to the sea. … So, what’s at stake is the well-being of the entire nation.” — DuBos

Bp’s animal Toll

A month after the oil gusher was capped at the site of the Deepwater Horizon rig in the Gulf of Mexico, response teams continue to collect oiled or injured animals in the disaster’s wake — and the casualties continue to mount. Animals are dying not just in the water, but also in captivity. A consolidated Deepwater Horizon Response report from Sept. 30 shows that since disaster response began in April, wildlife agencies have collected 8,130 birds, 1,124 sea turtles and 105 mammals. Of those totals, 6,104 birds, 593 turtles and 98 mammals were found dead, and 2,076 birds, 534 turtles and nine mammals were collected alive. Those that survived capture and were successfully rehabilitated and released include 1,122 birds, 316 turtles and only three mammals. (The release of a bottlenose dolphin scheduled for Oct. 1 has been postponed until later this week, according to the Audubon Nature Institute, which has cared for the 2-year-old dolphin at its Audubon Aquatics Center.) That means that of those animals collected alive, 840 birds, 218 turtles and eight mammals are not reflected in the report. According to Charna Lefton, a spokeswoman with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, those animals are not in the report because they either died in captivity from injuries (related to oil or not) or were euthanized after they were determined “not candidates for release.” Some birds and mammals are under longterm care and have yet to be released. — Alex Woodward

Call for NomiNatioNs: 40 UNder 40

Gambit is looking for the best and brightest area residents under 40 years old to be honored in our annual “40 Under 40” issue. We are looking for nominees who are outstanding in their field, including business, community service, education, health and science, the arts and sports. Please help us identify this year’s honorees. Nominations should include the name and age of the nominee (birth dates are appreciated), a contact number and email address for them, their occupation, any community organizations or volunteer groups they support, and why they are a good candidate for this honor. Also include your name and phone number. There is no minimum age requirement. You can nominate as many people as you feel deserve the honor. Elected officials are not eligible. Submit your nomination in writing to Kandace Power Graves at kandaceg@gambitweekly.com or fax to 483-3116. Deadline for submissions is Oct. 7. Winners will be announced in the Nov. 2 issue of Gambit.

Become an Educator

Our Lady of Holy Cross College graduates are highly regarded in the workplace for their exceptional knowledge, skills and professionalism. Undergraduate degrees majoring in Elementary Education. Contact Dr. Lisa Sullivan lsullivan@olhcc.edu. (504) 398-2141 Alternative Teacher Certification in: • Elementary Education • Secondary Education Contact Dr. Rebecca Maloney rmaloney@olhcc.edu • (504) 398-2180

his week, we’re rolling out a completely revamped website at www.bestofneworleans.com, redesigned from the ground up. As news consumers, we’ve had many of the same frustrations with newspaper websites as you have, and the new Gambit site has been designed to be less cluttered, easier to navigate, faster to load and very easy to search. Here are some of the highlights: • New content every day on the main page. News doesn’t happen once a week, and you’ll find stories from Gambit writers posted in a more timely fashion. You also can share any story on Facebook, Twitter, Digg or del.icio.us with one click. • A simplified navigation bar. At the top of every page, you’ll find the categories NEWS, ARTS, MUSIC, FILM, EAT+DRINK, HEALTH, SHOPPING, CLASSIFIEDS, and WIN (where we post the latest Gambit giveaways and contests — and we’re always giving away something great). • The most complete listings in town just got easier to navigate: Our new

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listings search box is on the top right of every page. You can specify dates, categories and neighborhoods to find the best things going on around town. Once you’ve made your pick, send yourself an email reminder or add it to your iCal calendar with one click. (And our revamped movie listings page is like none other.) • The Blog of New Orleans is joining the Gambit site. At the top of the site will be the three latest posts from our blog, and you can click on them to read the entire blog, which also has been redesigned to be more reader friendly. • Our columnists — Clancy DuBos, Chris Rose and Blake Pontchartrain — will have permanent homes on the front page, where you can access their latest columns easily. • A box on the front page features the Top 10 most viewed stories, most commented-upon stories and stories most shared on Twitter and Facebook. See what other people are talking about — and have your own say. • Social media: Our Facebook and Twitter feeds will be updated in real

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time on the front page. • More video. Besides YouTube, we’ll post informative and fun videos from Hulu, Vimeo, cable news, Comedy Central and more. We’ll also present news from our partners and friends at WWL-TV (your favorite news station in our annual Best of New Orleans poll), including Clancy DuBos’ political analysis, music writer Noah Bonaparte Pais’ Thursday morning weekend picks and CUE editor Missy Wilkinson’s monthly guide to fashion. • Finally: ease of search. Gambit content reaching back to 2001 is completely free to access, and now we’ve made all those stories easier to find. Please forgive any temporary bugs you might find as we get the new Gambit rolled out online. If you have any praise, complaints, suggestions or general feedback, we’d love to hear from you at response@gambitweekly.com. From all of us at Gambit — thank you for a great 30 years. Here’s to 30 more — in print and online. Kevin AllmAn, editor

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The Broken Record

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them. Lack of caring, nurturing, supervision. Lack of giving a damn. I hate to go all Oprah on you, but there is no hope for a child raised without love. It’s a sad, sick, sorry-ass state of affairs: Babies make babies who kill babies. But no one wants to talk about it. No one wants to suggest it. That would mean we have to talk about race and class and it would mean that it is not institutions, but actual individuals, who are responsible for all of this. I’m not a psychologist, sociologist, academic or expert on the matter, but I tell you with absolute authority that this is the case. There is a colossal, nearly pathological epidemic of the failure to acknowledge personal responsibility in this community. And no one wants to dig real deep into that discussion because it makes us really uncomfortable.

A Woman’s Work Is Never Done

Rebuilding and Reforming New Orleans Historian Pamela Tyler, author of Silk Stockings and Ballot Boxes: Women and Politics in New Orleans, 1920-1965, explores the changes women’s organizations have brought to the social and political life of New Orleans. Civic leaders Ruthie Frierson, Citizens for 1 Greater New Orleans; Anne Milling, Women of the Storm; and LaToya Cantrell, Broadmoor Improvement Association, will join Dr. Tyler for a discussion about their work since Katrina.

Thursday, October 7, 2010, 7 p.m. Nunemaker Auditorium FREE

It’s a sad, sick, sorry-ass state of affairs: Babies make babies who kill babies. Much easier to create a jobs program, to cut the ribbon at a new pool that will begin to fall into immediate disrepair or to throw money at failing schools. Because we don’t even know we have a problem on our hands until 16 years after the fact, after a child has been raised by wolves in the street, and you don’t have to strain to hear them howl their sorrows and lamentations at the moon every night. The sound is very familiar: gunshots. Sixteen years after the fact is the point at which an unloved, unlearned, unwanted teenager picks up a gun and strikes out for what he deserved all along but never got at home — respect and a guide to manhood. And then he blows the face off a 2-yearold boy and makes us all mad as hell. And so the question is: What do we do about parents who do not love their children, who do not raise their children, who do not supervise their children? I’ll repeat that: What do we do about parents who do not raise their children? Exactly my point.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

he record shows: As far as New Orleans goes, I’m a booster. A big fan. I really dig the place. The record shows. So I’m not particularly comfortable in the role of the edgy pessimist. But there is a local movie I’ve seen too many times to think the ending is going to change now. It has run on endless loop for the 25 years I have called New Orleans home: A terrible, horrible crime occurs. The city gets up in arms. March on City Hall. Demand change. We’re mad as hell and not gonna take it anymore! Editorials bray. Politicians bloviate. Time passes. Nothing changes. A year or two later — a terrible, horrible crime occurs. The city gets up in arms. Rinse. Repeat. Sound cynical? You bet. Sound familiar? All too. Some unfortunate child, musician or tourist becomes a cause celebre, the flavor of the month on the bleeding-heart special, then just fades into another name etched into this city’s sickeningly thick portfolio of homicide victims. So we promise ourselves we will change, we will remember. But we’re so deep in denial we can’t see past the yellow police tape and flashing cherrytops that block our view of the crime scene. As a community, we roleplay as Charlie Brown and Lucy: C’mon, Charlie Brown! Come kick the ball! It will be different this time! But it won’t be different this time. That’s just New Orleans being New Orleans. Remember the Louisiana Pizza Kitchen! Remember Amy Silberman! Remember Helen Hill! Remember Dinerral Shavers! Remember Jeremy Galmon! Who could forget, really? The real question is: After we remember ... then what? What happens? What do we do? What is the answer? When — and how — do we really change? When do we stop frantically looking for answers under the same sofa cushions we’ve looked under hundreds of times before? Schools. Playgrounds. Jobs. It’s all piffle. These guys don’t want jobs. These guys don’t shoot each other because they don’t have jobs. Whoever shot Jeremy Galmon is not going to take the stand in his defense and say he had no other choice because he couldn’t find work. And to suggest otherwise is more navel-gazing denial — but we have to suggest it, because not to suggest it is to admit there is no solution. And we can’t do that. But neither the problem nor the solution is about schools, jobs or second line parades. The problem is and has been the same for as long as I have lived in this town. The problem is parents. And lack of

15

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clancy dubos

politics Follow Clancy on Twitter @clancygambit.

out of Crisis, opportunity or several years now, state officials have known that the next fiscal year will see the most dramatic revenue decline in Louisiana history. They have dubbed it “the cliff year,” as in falling off a fiscal cliff. It’s an appropriate metaphor. Most state legislators are looking to the spring of 2011 with dread, knowing they will have to make deep budget cuts right before they run for re-election. And that’s right after redrawing House and Senate districts (in a separate special session), which is always a bloody mess. I have followed Louisiana’s legislative process for more than three decades. Fiscal crises are nothing new. The one staring lawmakers and Gov. Bobby Jindal in the face, however, looms larger than anything in our lifetimes. If the governor and lawmakers fail to make good choices in the next eight months, their decisions could wipe out some public universities and hospitals … or set them back so far that it will take decades to recover. It doesn’t have to be that way. With vision and leadership, Jindal and lawmakers can approach this crisis as an opportunity — a chance to reinvent

F

state government. They still would have to make tough decisions, but their decision-making matrix would shift from a short-term, one-year plan to a long-term, three- to five-year plan for changing the scope of state government and turning our balkanized higher education system into one with integrated flagship, junior and community colleges — a system based on excellence, not politics. That takes leadership, which is in short supply these days. Jindal, who likes to portray himself as decisive, is actually the most risk-averse governor in my lifetime. Instead of seeing this crisis as a chance to reinvent state government, he’s posing for photo ops, passing the buck, and raising millions out of state on his perpetual I’m-not-really-running-for-president campaign. Fiscally, Jindal is preparing another oneyear budget that he is keeping under wraps (his administration is, after all, one of the least “transparent” in the nation) until February. That will leave lawmakers very little time to study his proposed budget and suggest alternatives. Thankfully, some lawmakers are working on the problem on their own.

State Sen. Jack Donahue, R-Covington, and House Speaker Jim Tucker, R-Algiers, chaired special committees tasked with recommending ways to trim state government and higher education costs last year, with mixed results. Senate President Joel Chaisson, D-Destrehan, and others are talking about suspending some tax breaks that lawmakers foolishly adopted in 2008 (such as rolling back the Stelly income tax brackets — which voters adopted in 2002 in a

The proposed suspensions could be enacted via a concurrent resolution, which Jindal could not veto.

statewide referendum). Interestingly, the proposed suspensions could be enacted via a concurrent resolution, which Jindal (who values his “tax virginity” more than the state’s long-term fiscal viability) could not veto. Another interesting tack comes from state Sen. David Heitmeier, D-Algiers, a practicing optician who has made it his mission to spare public hospitals from unnecessary cuts. In 2009, Heitmeier authored a bill to leverage parish contributions to community hospitals to get more federal health care dollars. Earlier this year, he expanded that idea to reengineer the funding and operations of local health services contracts so state dollars could be redirected to leverage even more federal matching dollars. State and federal health officials are working out details of the Heitmeier plan, but in the coming years his proposals could bring in well over half a billion dollars in health care funds for public, private and community hospitals. That’s the kind of vision and leadership that’s needed across the board. Unfortunately, it’s not what we’ve been getting from Bobby Jindal.

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

BLUE & WHITE

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Beer Tasting to ra ise money for the Louisiana SPCA

Saturday • Oct. 9, 2010 Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

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NBA Big guNs like Chris Paul have more Control over their destinies than ever —

respoNsiBility.

more

as the Preseason begins,

2010 New orleANs horNets.

gambit looks at the state of the

H

ere’s a quick trivia question: Who owns the New Orleans Hornets? If you said George Shinn — the franchise’s only owner — you’re technically right. If you said Gary Chouest, Louisiana’s lone billionaire who’s been named as Shinn’s successor, you’d also be right (though the monthslong process is not complete). But what if you said Chris Paul? Crazy as it may sound, this may be the current, if temporary, state of NBA economics. Star players like CP3 now possess far greater leverage to make demands and play where — and with whom — they want. “Basketball players are different now,” Hornets general manager Dell Demps told reporters at the team’s media day

Sept. 26. “With all the tournaments they play in high school, they become friends. How they’re coming into the NBA has changed.” Demps was hired among swirling trade rumors involving Paul and his friends around the league. On media day, the new GM addressed how the Internet has allowed players from New York to California to stay in touch and form bonds through high school, college and into the pros. There’s also the rejuvenated Team USA basketball program, which has grabbed the best, but unproven, young talent in the league to re-establish America’s basketball dominance. It was on Team USA that LeBron James became close with Paul and emerging stars Chris Bosh and Dwyane Wade

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

but with that freedom Comes

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six years ago. So while James was vilified after ditching his hometown Cleveland Cavaliers to play with Bosh and Wade for the Miami Heat, close observers of the league might have seen it coming. Back in 2007, Bosh, Wade and James all signed relatively short contract extensions for less short-term money in exchange for the chance to decide their collective futures in 2010. But while James drew the most attention and criticism for not reupping with Cleveland (not to mention the ESPN circus that was “The Decision”), Carmelo Anthony of the Denver Nuggets is now trying to forgo fulfilling his contract altogether. As teams enter training camp, the big news has been Anthony ’s demand to be traded to the

DAVID WEST SAYS THE NBA HAS ONLY FOUR OF FIVE TEAMS IN THE “UPPER ECHELON” — AND THE HORNETS AREN’T ONE OF THEM.

COVER STORY

New Jersey Nets. While talks of the trade were stalled at press time, the fact that a franchise player still under contract could even get his team to negotiate trading him (and to the 12-70 Nets!), speaks volumes about the shifting power dynamics of the league: The players are running things.

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ENTER CHRIS PAUL. PAUL HAS built a reputation as a social player and is known for hosting members of opposing teams in his New Orleans penthouse the night before games. And, as the eyes of the basketball world were fixed on James, Paul seemed to be ever in the periphery, partying with the Heat forward and signing with LeBron’s management company. As a result of his connections (Anthony and Paul, as it turns out, also share an agent), Hornets fans had to chew their fingernails over rumors Paul might be traded. Paul was reported to be unhappy with the Hornets’ declining record over the past few years, and there were also reports of clashes with former GM Jeff Bower. On July 12, the New York Post reported that Paul made a toast at Anthony’s wedding saying that they, along with Amar’e Stoudemire of the New York Knicks, should “form our own Big 3” with the Knicks. Talk of players leaving teams and recruiting their friends to join them has been the dominant story of the NBA offseason. That pushed commissioner David Stern to send out a memo to all 32 teams reiterating the rules banning teams from reaching out to players under contract, specifically citing the Chris Paul rumors. That didn’t stop Paul, though, as he demanded a trade the same day the Hornets hired a new GM. His departure and the Hornets’ fall into obscurity seemed a real possibility. And yet none of that happened. While the focus was on Paul’s demands to leave (and a collective New York sports media salivation at the possibility of a PaulAnthony-Stoudemire trio reviving the region’s teams), Hornets president Hugh Weber pulled off what the San Antonio Spurs’ Greg Popovich described as a “masterstroke” and hired Demps as general manager.

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    Demps’  arrival  coincides  with  his  emergence  as  a  hot  commodity.  As  a  front-office  guy  with  the  Spurs,  he  worked  his  way  up  to  become  coach  Gregg  Popovich’s  right-hand man as vice president of basketball operations.  Demps’  excellent  film  study  and  basketball  knowledge  is  credited with helping build the rosters that gave the Spurs  four NBA titles in eight years.      Demps and the Hornets’ new coach, Monty Williams, have  roots dating back to when they played together for the Spurs  in the 1990s. They’ve already put that connection to good use.  The day after Demps was hired, he joined Williams and Hornets  president  Hugh  Weber  to  talk  to  Paul  about  staying  in  New  Orleans. Both sides came away praising the other, and a potentially volatile situation was diffused. The youngest coach in the  league (Williams is 38) and a GM on his first day on the job  were able to convince their superstar point guard that  their  uncertain  future  was  cause  for  excitement,  not  concern.  Suddenly,  the  Hornets  were  a  new team.      OK,  not  a  completely  new  team  in terms of personnel — Demps  and  Williams  eventually  would  move  half  their  roster  and  replace  24  of  28  basketball  operations  employees  —  but  definitely  a  new  team  in  terms of outlook.      Demps  and  Williams  followed  the  meeting  with aggressive and intelligent  roster  moves  that  seem  to  have  been  in  short supply in recent seasons. It started with a fourteam deal that sent rookie  sensation Darren Collison  and  James  Posey  (and  his  bloated  $7  million  contract)  to  the  Indiana  Pacers  and  brought  in  Trevor  Ariza  from  Houston,  where  he  had  just  had  his  best  season  with  the  Rockets.  Ariza,  also  a  standout  with  the  Los  Angeles  Lakers  from  2007  to  2009,  gives  the  Hornets depth and athleticism in the frontcourt. page 25

Peja Stojakevic has become a pricey veteran reserve, with a $14 million contract.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

BLUE JAY ALUmnI,

24

including our next group of newest alumni — the Seniors of the Class of 2011 — are invited to attend the Homecoming mass and the Jazz reception and Brunch. In addition to honoring John Charbonnet, Jesuit will recognize the graduates of the Golden Anniversary Class of 1960 and the Silver Anniversary Class of 1985.

Homecoming mass and reception 10 Am • Sunday • October 10 • 2010 Chapel of the north American martyrs Jazz reception and Brunch in the Student Commons begins immediately after mass. Homecoming mass and Jazz reception/Brunch are events for Jesuit Alumni Only.

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COVER STORY

PAGE 22

NEW HORNETS GM DELL DEMPS (LEFT) AND COACH MONTY WILLIAMS HAVE BEEN WORKING TO REMAKE THE FRANCHISE.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

SMART MOVES, BUT NONE OF THIS COMES CLOSE TO SOLVING THE Hornets’ roster issues. And while registering immediate success is vital to keep Paul, the Hornets are realistic about where they are as a franchise. At media day, forward David West said there are probably just four or five teams that can be considered in the “upper echelon of teams” — and the Hornets are not in that number. “Guys want the opportunity to win,” West said. “If you’re going to beat those teams, you need some weapons.” The Hornets’ roster is mostly unproven, with more than half the players going to training camp sporting less than three seasons of NBA experience. Marcus Thornton showed flashes of brilliance in his rookie season, but will be expected to carry a heavier load to keep his starting role. And after him, only D.J. Strawberry, son of baseball star Darryl Strawberry, has averaged more than 12 minutes a game over his short career. The Hornets’ veteran reserves are a problem. Twelve-year veteran Peja Stojacovic has seen his points per game drop steadily over the past four seasons, yet will earn a staggering $14 million this year. The next most productive reserve is Jannero Pargo, who was reacquired from the Chicago Bulls after he left the Hornets in the summer of 2008. Last year with Chicago, Pargo averaged 5.5 points and 13 minutes per game. Even Paul is a question mark after injuries limited him to a career-low 45 games last season. Paul insists he’s 100 percent healthy, but Williams believes the point guard has been overused in the past and that by the end of the season, “he’s running on fumes.” Paul has averaged more than 36 minutes per game every season, and finding players that can share point guard duty will be crucial to the Hornets’ success. And there’s the biggest question mark. The Hornets have regressed every year since their run to the conference semi-finals three years ago, while CP3 has played himself into the ground. Now the players harbor no illusions of their place in the NBA. “We’ve got to get ourselves in the top-10-in-the-West discussion,” West said. “It’s going to take a lot of work to get there.” Though Demps and Williams have quietly reshaped the franchise, only Ariza and Emeka Okafor have deals that go beyond the 2011-2012 season. Stojakovic’s big payroll is off the books after this year and that means the Hornets have the potential — and the bucks — to acquire and cultivate quality talent. The Hornets have set themselves up as a young, athletic team with a solid starting five. Williams’ ability to teach (Paul calls Williams’ basketball IQ “unbe-

25

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lievable”) puts him in a good position to mold this team’s identity. For his part, Williams is definitely eager to prove himself and halt the onslaught of questions about whether he can keep Chris Paul happy. “I’d much rather talk about basketball,” Williams said in a rare moment alone on media day. “Unfortunately you have to an-swer every question you’ve been asked about the situation.” A media horde descended on Williams and peppered him with more questions about Paul. Later, CP3 would face similar questions to which he mostly replied that he was ready to play and the behind-thescenes drama this summer wouldn’t affect his effort. “I’ve always said any time I step onto the court, everything else falls out of my head,” he said. Unfortunately, the question of whether Paul will be busting his butt for a contender or a doormat won’t be answered until this team hits the hardwood at the New Orleans Arena; the first preseason game is Saturday, Oct. 9, against the Memphis Grizzlies, who are in the process of finding their own identity. And then, finally, we’ll really have something to talk about.

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Shoe In e’ve come a long way in 33 years,” says Evelyn Poitevent, co-owner of Feet First (4119 Magazine St., 899-6800; 526 Royal St., 569-0005; www.feetfirststores.com), a shoe store her parents founded in 1977 on Maple Street. After Hurricane Katrina, Poitevent and her brother took over the business and revamped the store’s design at its new Magazine Street location. No longer a discount shoe outlet, the emporium stocks more than 50 brands of high-quality women’s shoes, along with accessories ranging from jewelry and handbags to scarves and ties. The staff prides itself on first-rate customer service. “We are not so much concentrated on making the sale here and now,” Poitevent says, “but rather establishing ... a lifetime customer by offering a memorable shopping experience that’s upbeat, warm and welcoming.” Poitevent wants the family-owned and operated boutique to garner Feet First carries a selection of “wow generations of customers. factor” shoes, like these bright cow“I want mothers to bring in their daughters and those daughters to bring theirs to pass boy boots. down the ... shopping experience we offer,” she says. The store has doubled its size and expanded its offerings to include more upscale, novelty shoes — what Poitevent terms “wow factor” shoes. Since 2005, the owners also have made a conscious effort to carry local designers. To stand out among other retailers, Feet First aims to provide shoes for every style. “From dressy to casual, simple to loud and flat to high for old and young — our goal is to make it a challenge not to find something you like,” Poitevent says. Shoes and other accessories are relatively low-budget ways to update a wardrobe, , Poitevent points out. “Since the economy has sunk, I try to carry shoes that are practical, but still edgy — durable and versatile shoes with a day-to-night crossover,” she says. As New Orleans’ largest independent shoe and accessory retailer, Feet First is a one-stop shop for cost-effective accessories ranging from studded, buckled knee-high boots to feather-adorned satin clutches. “To quote Steel Magnolias,” Poitevent says, “‘The only thing that separates us from the animals is our ability to accessorize.’”

In celebration of its 10th anniversary, the RITZ-CARLTON NEW ORLEANS (921 Canal St., 524-1331; www.ritzcarlton.com/neworleans) is offering a $10 Blue Dog Plate Lunch for two at its M Bistro restaurant and two-for-$10 martinis at the Davenport Lounge. The special prices are good throughout October. BLACKSHEEP COUTURE hosts its inaugural fashion show at 5 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 10, at THE BIG TOP GALLERY (1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com). The event features pieces designed by Zynani Nakhid and entertainment provided by Crescent City Choreographers and DJ RQ-away. During Beauty Week from Sunday, Oct. 3, to Saturday, Oct. 9, at SAKS FIFTH AVENUE (The Shops at Canal Place, 301 Canal St., 524-2200; www.saksfifthavenue.com), receive a tote bag filled with samples and a free year’s subscription to Harper’s Bazaar when you buy $100 or more in the beauty department. Call 524-2200 ext. 5261 for details.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

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>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << MUSIC FILM ART STAGE EVENTS >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE YOU GO << <<<<<<<<<< << 32 39 42 48 51 >> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << THE >> >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>> << <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> > << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< < O C T THE MYSTERY OF IRMA VEP 8 p.m. Fri.-Sat., 6 p.m. Sun.; >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

CUISINE

57

08

through Oct. 24 Le Chat Noir, 715 St. Charles Ave., 581-5812; www.cabaretlechatnoir.com

Varla Jean Merman and Ricky Graham star as Lady Enid and Lord Edgar and a host of other characters in Charles Ludlam’s quick-change farcical mix of Victorian melodrama, Alfred Hitchcock works and horror film classics. After the death of his first wife, Irma Vep, Edgar moves on quickly to his second, Enid, and intrigue abounds. Tickets $29 (includes $5 drink credit).

VAMPIRE WEEKEND WITH BEACH HOUSE 09 8 p.m. Saturday Mahalia Jackson Theater, 801 N. Rampart St., 525-1052; www.mahaliajacksontheater.com OCT

Latin Flair CARNIVAL LATINO CELEBRATES GROWING HISPANIC CULTURES. BY KEN KORMAN

H

put a spotlight on the great variety of Latin cultures while appealing to both Hispanic and nonHispanic audiences. Headliners for this year’s festival include chart-toppers Los Lonely Boys, which blends Texas rock and blues with Tejano music, and most significantly, Omara Portuondo, perhaps the most well-known living exponent of traditional Cuban music across the globe, thanks in part to her participation in the 1997 documentary film and album Buena Vista Social Club. Portuondo last appeared in New Orleans more than a decade ago with a concert at the Saenger Theatre. But her long absence was not by choice. “After George W. Bush came into power, all musical exchanges with Cuba were stopped,” Rodriguez says. “Obama has relaxed these rules. In 1959, Havana was the number one trading partner for the city of New Orleans. Some have suggested that when they slammed that embargo on Cuba, they also slammed it on us. There’s a real change in the air, and we’re excited to be a part of it.” Carnaval Latino presents 16 Latin bands on two stages. Local favorites include Latin dance bands Rumba Buena and Fredy Omar con Su Banda, and Afro-Cuban jazz purveyors Otra. Each day will feature a leading band from Honduras: Los Silver Star on Saturday, and Casabe on Sunday. Ten food vendors will be on hand throughout the weekend, offering tastes of Mexico, Cuba, Colombia, El Salvador, and other countries. An amusement park has been added to this year’s festivities.

YEASAYER WITH WASHED OUT 09 10 p.m. Saturday House of Blues, 225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www.hob.com OCT

Carnaval Latino 2 P.M.-UNTIL SAT.SUN., OCT. 9-10 BLAINE KERN’S MARDI GRAS WORLD, 1380 PORT OF NEW ORLEANS PLACE TICKETS $20 IN ADVANCE, $25 AT THE DOOR, $35 WEEKEND PASS

Yeasayer set an impossibly exotic pop standard with “2080,” the world-beating, choir-chanted first single from 2007 debut All Hour Cymbals (We Are Free). The Brooklyn band went weirder on February follow-up Odd Blood (Secretly Canadian), obfuscating could-be hits with ghost-in-the-machine vocals and ping-ponging electronics. Washed Out opens. Tickets $18.50.

LOCAL NATIVES WITH RUBY SUNS 11 6 p.m. Monday Tulane University, LavinBernick Center Quad, 31 McAlister Drive, 314-2188; www.tucp.net OCT

Tulane University Campus Programming is having quite the couple of weeks with concerts by Ratatat, Dr. Dog (6:45 p.m. Thu., Oct. 7) and this combo of Los Angeles’ Local Natives and New Zealand’s Ruby Suns, whose respective Gorilla Manor (Frenchkiss) and Fight Softly (Sup Pop) are two of 2010’s fresher rock releases. The Union Line also opens. Free admission. utat. Ullaorp erostionsed tie Iquis nonsequis aliquat iscidunt luptat, quisit am vulput ullan

Strange Appetites BY WILL COVIELLO

Get a taste of the New Orleans Fringe Festival (Nov. 17-21; www.nofringe.org) at its Pu Pu Platter from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. Saturday at the NOLA Candle Factory (4537 N. Robertson St.). There will be short previews of theater, dance, spoken word, puppetry, comedy and multi-media shows by 14 groups scheduled to perform at the festival. Admission is free, and there’s free beer.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

istorians say Latin sounds first became a major ingredient in New Orleans music in 1884, when the 80-piece concert band of the 8th Mexican Cavalry — which included musicians from all over the Caribbean and Latin America — began a half-year residency at the “World’s Industrial and Cotton Centennial Exposition” in Audubon Park. Now, more than a century later in post-Katrina New Orleans, the size of the local Latino population has finally begun to match that of its cultural influence. Recent studies have singled out the Hispanic community as the fastest growing ethnic group across Louisiana. So has the time finally come for a major festival of Latin culture in New Orleans, one that may someday rival the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival for international appeal to culture-loving tourists? The organizers of Carnaval Latino (Oct. 9-10) believe the annual celebration is poised for a major breakthrough. “We don’t want to do just another neighborhood festival,” says Carnaval Latino co-founder Romualdo “Romi” Rodriguez. “To help the city and to help our local Latino musicians, you’ve got to have this kind of large-scale festival. But it’s a year-round project to sell this. It’s not easy.” Carnaval Latino began in 1989 and ran until 1995, when a number of new festivals were introduced across the region and sponsorship money became scarce. It was revived in 2007, in part because of the influx of Hispanics to the area. Now a presentation of the nonprofit Hispanic-American Musicians and Artists Cultural Association, Carnaval Latino finds its purpose in musical and culinary offerings that

Texas’ Los Lonely Boys headline Carnaval Latino.

Baltimore duo Victoria Legrand and Alex Scally have emboldened their drowsy dream pop on each of three releases as Beach House, from the hazy, heavy-lidded memorials of 2006’s self-titled debut to January revelation Teen Dream (Sub Pop), a blown-out synthetic orchestra looping Scally’s swooning organs with Legrand’s husky seductions. Vampire Weekend headlines. Tickets $37.50.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

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ere we are snowed in at Flying Tiger Sound,â&#x20AC;? Stuart McLamb says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;with three songs to try to accomplish in these three days.â&#x20AC;? So opens a revealing behindthe-scenes video of the making of Libraries, the sophomore album from Durham, N.C.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s The Love Language, released on Merge Records in July. Where many artists guard the sanctity of the recording process like a nest, McLamb invited cameras into friend B.J. Burtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s studio to capture his capturing of The Love Languageâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leap from lo-fi bedroom project to grand-sounding rock band. The intimate short film shows McLamb and Burton laying down guitar, drum and vocal tracks and discussing possible mixes in between childlike breaks for slap shots and sledding. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We were in the middle of the album at that point,â&#x20AC;? McLamb recalls. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We were together for almost two months straight, recording like every hour of every day.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was a bunch of overnight sessions,â&#x20AC;? Burton says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;During the day we would just kind of hang out and talk about music and the album.â&#x20AC;? The fruit of those wintry all-nighters is a richly produced LP, summery in its lush â&#x20AC;&#x2122;60s pop sheen but autumnal in subtextual tone. As on his eponymous 2009 debut, a vigorously cathartic breakup record written for an ex, McLamb sings of familiar mope tropes: changing seasons, fleeting feelings, loves heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s actively losing. But Librariesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ambitions are clear from the start. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pedals,â&#x20AC;? the albumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s heftiest arrangement, crashes like a tidal wave 40 seconds in, a rip tide of breathcatching strings, Phil Spector-borrowed drum hits and yearning Morrissey vocals yielding an immediate rush. That mic mastery is perhaps The Love Languageâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s greatest transmutation between albums; a distortion-masked yelper before, here McLamb stretches octaves like Patsy Cline (â&#x20AC;&#x153;This Blood is Our Ownâ&#x20AC;?) and coaxes serenades like Roy Orbison (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Summer Dustâ&#x20AC;?). â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was dealing with a lot of the same themes,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The difference is, on the first record, I wouldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve probably recorded the next day on a shitty eighttrack I had. There was an immediacy to that album on how quickly the songs

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Stuart McLamb sings for Durham, N.C.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s The Love Language. were documented after conception. On Libraries, I spent about a year writing the songs and making demos, and it was recorded in a month and a half. At the time of recording, my thoughts were more into the sounds; I was removed from the emotions a little bit. It was more about the sonics on this record.â&#x20AC;? The sound changed dramatically from the spare demos McLamb first brought in, Burton says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As we were laying stuff down, it would trigger new ideas and we would embellish them,â&#x20AC;? he says â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Pedalsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; turned real shoegaze-y, with atmospheric guitars and reverb. Then we had the strings come in, and we kept rolling with it. We were excited about how big it sounded, new and fresh, experimenting with a big landscape of sound.â&#x20AC;? McLamb credits Burton with realizing his visions both in the studio and onstage, where the producer has joined the band as a regular guitarist. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had ideas about how it needed to sound, but I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have the engineering expertise,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I explained what I wanted and he nailed the sound. In the live setting, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been great for understanding nerdy shit like (room) sonics and EQ-ing our amps so everything sits at a good level. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m dependent on him. If you watch me at sound check, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to plug in my pedals, turn on my amp, play some shit and look right at B.J. and be like, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Sound cool? All right.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;?

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LISTINGS

STICK THIS IN YOUR EAR

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly. com; FAX:483-3116

MUSIC

Showcasing Local Music

preview

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

All show times p.m. unless otherwise noted.

Tuesday 5 BACCHANAL — Mark Weliky, 7:30

BANKS STREET BAR — Pymp, 10 BAYOU PARK BAR — Parishioners, 9

BMC — Johnny Angel, 9:30; Abita Blues, 7 CAFE NEGRIL — John Lisi & Delta Funk, 9

CARROLLTON STATION — Notes & Quotes Songwriters Night feat. Ron Hotstream, 9 CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Nervous Duane, 7

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Ruby & Suki, 6 CIRCLE BAR — Phil Parnell Trio, Wagner Logic, 10; Tom Paines, 6 COLUMNS HOTEL — John Rankin & Friends, 8 D.B.A. — New Orleans Cottonmouth Kings, 9

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Tom Hook, 9:30 HOSTEL NEW ORLEANS — Soul School feat. Elliot Luv & the Abney Effect, 8

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Rebirth Brass Band, 10 MY BAR — Danny T, 8

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Breaux Brothers, 7; Ken Troncoso, 8; Deanna & Cal, 9 OAK — Austin Alleman, 7

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Charlie Cuccia & Old No. 7 Band, 7

OLD POINT BAR — West Bank Mike, 6:30 ONE EYED JACKS — Peelander-Z, MOTO, Die Rottz, Poots, 9

Every stateside rock band employing wheezing squeezeboxes and polka-dotted rhythms owes Gogol Bordello a dividend check. As Eastern European originators in American independent music go, the Lower East Side Manhattan gypsy punks are Ellis Island: mustachioed Ukrainian frontman Eugene Hütz, shirtless and sweat-slick, the embodiment of vodka-fueled Slavic mania; his eight-deep contingent, a powder keg of sawedoff klezmer fiddles and Russki-reggae accordion plunges. Fifth album Trans-Continental Hustle, released in April, is most informed by two factors: Hütz’s move to Brazil in 2008 (broadening an already transcontinental sound), and the band’s move to super-producer Rick Rubin’s American Recordings imprint (amping up the guitars and refining the grit, for better or worse, on its abrasive, sandpapery finish). Gypsyphonic Disko and Outernational open. Tickets $25 advance purchase, $28 at the door. — Noah Bonaparte Pais

OCT

08

Wednesday 6 3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY — Chicken Little, Hellen Keller’s Ukulele, Scissor Dicks, Joy Beasley, 7:30

61 BLUES HIGHWAY — Blues Jam feat. Wardell Williams & the Blues Hwy. Band, 8 BACCHANAL — Jazz Lab feat. Jesse Morrow, 7:30 BANKS STREET BAR — Major Bacon, 9 BAYOU PARK BAR — Lynn Drury, 10

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall-Stars feat. Shannon Powell, 8

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Lynn Drury, 8:30

BISTREAUX — Paul Longstreth, 7

RALPH’S ON THE PARK — Joe Krown, 5

BIG AL’S SALOON — Jumpin’ Johnny Sansone Blues Party, 7

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Phil DeGruy, 8 & 10

BLUE NILE — Gravity A (upstairs), 11

YUKI IZAKAYA — Norbert Slama Trio, 8

TUE 10/5

Rebirth Brass Band

WED 10/6

The Jameson Family

THU 10/7

The Trio

FRI 10/8

Johnny Sketch’s Dirty Harry Gnutt

SAT 10/9

Flow Tribe

feat. Johnny V, George Porter Jr. & Mark Mullins

CD Release Party

SUN Joe Krown Trio 10/10 feat. Russell Batiste & Walter Wolfman Washington

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TUES COMEDY NIGHT 8PM

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10/6

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THURS THE PINETTES

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ALL GIRL BRASS BAND 9PM

FRI

JOHNNY J & GARY HIRSTUIS 7PM

10/8 SAT

10/9

REFRIED CONFUSION 10PM

608 Fulton Street New Orleans • (504) 212-6476 www.12barnola.com

Gogol Bordello 9:30 p.m. Friday Republic, 828 S. Peters St., 528-8282; www.republicnola.com

BEACH HOUSE — Poppa Stoppa Oldies Band, 8

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Smokin’ Time Jazz Club, 6; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 10

Papa Grows Funk

BMC — Caroline Fourmy & Her Jazz Band, 7; Rue Fiya, 9:30 CANDLELIGHT LOUNGE — Treme Brass Band, 9

CAROUSEL PIANO BAR & LOUNGE — John Autin, 9

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — T-Bone Stone, 7

CHICKIE WAH WAH — John Mooney, 8

CIRCLE BAR — Pork Dukes, Bastard Sons of Marvin Hirsch, 10; Jim O. & the No Shows feat. Mama Go-Go, 6

VOTED

Live Music Nightly -No Cover

Zagat Rated

COLUMNS HOTEL — Ricardo Crespo, 8

D.B.A. — John Gros & the Roadmasters, 10; Mirlitones, 7

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Bob Andrews, 9:30 THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

FUNKY PIRATE — Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8 HOWLIN’ WOLF — Curren$y, Big Krit, Smoke Dza, Mac Miller, Boaz, Rich Mill, 10

HUDDLE SPORTS BAR — Band of Brothers, 9 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Sasha Masakowski, 5; Irvin Mayfield’s NOJO Jam, 8

KRAZY KORNER — Death by Orgasm Rock ’n’ Roll Band, PAGE 35

FRI 10/8

FOOT & FRIENDS

9PM

Kerry Irish Pub

17th Anniversary Party! SAT 10/9 SAT 10/9 THU 10/14

FRI 10/15 FRI 10/15 SAT 10/16

SPEED THE MULE RITES OF PASSAGE

5PM 9PM

ULTIMATE IRISH SESSION w/ “FILID” FROM ITALY performing TRAD. IRISH MUSIC w/ NOLA IRISH SESSION MUSICIANS 8:30PM DAMIEN LOUVIERE 5PM THE ROSENCRANZ (INDIE ROCK) 9PM “FILID” FROM ITALY TRAD. IRISH MUSIC 5PM

331 Decatur St. • 527-5954 www.kerryirishpub.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Jason Marsalis, 8

Eastern Block Party

MON 10/4

33

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

TWIN SISTER ROCK 92.3 PRESENTS PLUS

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34

DEVENDRA BANHART AND THE GROGS

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SUNDAY OCTOBER 17 8PM WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 20 8PM THURSDAY OCTOBER 21 8:30PM

LIVE IN CONCERT

JONNY LANG

FRIDAY OCTOBER 22 9PM Coming Soon: 10/24 Bone Thugs N Harmony, 10/26 Circa Survive, 10/28 Finger Eleven, 10/31 Jenny & Johnny, 11/2 Wiz Khalifa, 11/4 Gwar, 11/7 DJ Shadow, 11/8 Deerhunter, 11/14 Iration

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

PAGE 33

8:30

LACAVA’S SPORTS BAR — Crossfire, 9 MOJO STATION — Ed Wills, Blues for Sale, 8

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Pat Flory, 9 OAK — Matt Lemmler, 7

OLD FIREMEN’S HALL — Two Piece & a Biscuit feat. Brandon Foret, Allan Maxwell & Brian Melancon, 7:30 OLD OPERA HOUSE — Vibe, 8:30

ONE EYED JACKS — David Bazan, Mynabirds, 9

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lars Edegran & Topsy Chapman, Palm Court Jazz Band, 8

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Band feat. Mark Braud, 8 REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — Beats Antique, Yard Dogs Road Show, Lynx, 8 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Johnny Angel, 8:30

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Delfeayo Marsalis & Uptown Jazz Orchestra, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Loose Marbles, 6; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10 THREE MUSES — Delia & Peter, 7

COLUMNS HOTEL — Freddy Omar, 8 DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 5:30

D.B.A. — Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 7; Ernie Vincent & the Top Notes, 10

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Courtyard Kings, 9:30

THE EMBER’S “ORIGINAL” BOURBON HOUSE — Curtis Binder, 6 THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

FUNKY PIRATE — Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8 HI-HO LOUNGE — Stooges Brass Band, 9:30

HOSTEL NEW ORLEANS — Uniquity feat. Slangston Hughes and Elliot Luv, 11 HOUSE OF BLUES — Devendra Banhart & the Grogs, Twin Sister, 8

BANKS STREET BAR — Dave Jordan & the Neighborhood Improvement Association, 10 BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Armand St. Martin, 7 BAYOU PARK BAR — Ron Hotstream, 9 BEACH HOUSE — Beach House AllStars, 8

THE BEACH — Chicken on the Bone, 7 BIG AL’S SALOON — Danny Alexander’s Blues Jam, 8

BISTREAUX — Paul Longstreth, 7

BMC — Low-Stress Quintet, 7; J.P. Carmody & the Micro Brues, 10 CAFE NEGRIL — Soul Project, 6

CAROUSEL PIANO BAR & LOUNGE — John Autin, 9 CARROLLTON STATION — Jimmy Robinson’s Music Works feat. Cranston Clements, 9

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Domenic, 7; Eyes Around, 9; Crescent Storm, 11

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Craig Aspen & Daemon Shea, 7 CIRCLE BAR — Cary Ann Hearst, Hannah Kreiger-Benson, 10; Sam and Boone, 6

AUSTIN’S RESTAURANT — Scott Kyser, 6:30

BANKS STREET BAR — Rebirth Brass Band, 9

BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Armand St. Martin, 7 BEACH HOUSE — Bobby Cure & the Summertime Blues, 9

LAFITTE’S BLACKSMITH SHOP — Mike Hood, 9

MAPLE LEAF BAR — The Trio, 10

OAK — Amanda Walker, 7

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 4; Vibe, 8:30

OLD POINT BAR — Phil Tarnell Jazz Trio, 9

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Crescent City Joymakers, 8 PAVILION OF THE TWO SISTERS — Twilight in the Garden Concert Series presents John Rankin, 6

PRESERVATION HALL — New Birth Brass Band, 8

RALPH’S ON THE PARK — Joe Krown, 5 REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — Big Freedia, Sissy Nobby, Katey Red, Rusty Lazer, Monster with the Fade, 11 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Geno Delafose, 8:30 SANTE FE RESTAURANT — Gatto Bagnatto Trio, 6

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Jolly House, 8 & 10 SPECKLED-T’S & AFTER DARK — Harvey Jesus & Fire, 8

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Miss Sophie Lee, 6; New Orleans Moonshiners, 10 TELLO’S BISTRO — Jerry Nuccio, 5

BMC — Abita Blues, 3:30; Sasha Masakowski, 7; Fredy Omar Con Su Banda, 10:30; Young Pinstripe Brass Band, 1 a.m;

CAFE NEGRIL — Higher Heights, 9

CAROUSEL PIANO BAR & LOUNGE — John Autin, 9 CARROLLTON STATION — Pony Space, Lynn Drury Band, 9:30

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Hellbenders, 7; Green Mantles, 11; Stephanie Nilles, midnight

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Craig Aspen & Daemon Shea, 5:30; Coot, 10 CIRCLE BAR — Love Language, Giant Cloud, 10; Jim O. & Sporadic Fanatics, 6 CLEVER WINE BAR — Courtyard Kings, 8 CLUB 7140 — Michael Ward, 8

COLUMNS HOTEL — Ross McIntire Band, 5 DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 9

D.B.A. — Happy Talk Band feat. Greg Dulli, 10 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Eric Traub Trio, 10

THE EMBER’S “ORIGINAL” BOURBON HOUSE — Curtis Binder, 6 EMERIL’S DELMONICO — Bob Andrews, 7

FUNKY PIRATE — Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8 GREEN ROOM — Syllable 7, Peripheral, 10

HOUSE OF BLUES — 12 Stones, Nothing More, Inner 61, 8 HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — Reckless Kelly, 8

HOWLIN’ WOLF — Monster Dash: Cystic Fibrosis Benefit feat. Flashback, 6

TULANE UNIVERSITY — Dr. Dog, Gumby, 6:45

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Tom McDermott, 5; Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown, 8; Burlesque Ballroom feat. Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 12 a.m

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie

TIPITINA’S — Lukas Nelson & Promise of the Real, Kristen Diable, 9

VAUGHAN’S — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 8:30

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Eddie Parrino, 7

& Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm Rock ’n’ Roll Band, 8:30

LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Tom Worrell, 7; R. Scully’s Rough 7, 11

THE MAISON — Some Like it Hot!, 7:30

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Bloomin’ Onions, 7; Agent 86, 8; John Parker, 10; Greg Hayden, 11 OAK — Kristina Perez, 6:30; Reed Alleman Duo, 10 OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1; Vibe, 8:30

OLD POINT BAR — Lynn Drury, 9:30 OLIVE BRANCH CAFE — Jack Yoder, Greg “Lil G” Rosary, 6

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Clive Wilson & Palm Court Jazz Band, 8

PELICAN CLUB — Sandford Hinderlie, 7 PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Masters feat. Leroy Jones, 8 REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — Gogol Bordello, Outernational, 9 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — New Orleans Blues Society championship finals, 8

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Jason Marsalis Vibes Quartet, 8 & 10 SPECKLED-T’S & AFTER DARK — Gashouse Gorillaz, 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 6:30; New Orleans Cottonmouth Kings, 10

Happy

Hour

f ro m 4 - 6 p m where all drinks are

2 for 1

Late night

entertainment GREAT FOR BIRTHDAYS, BACHELORETTE PARTIES, RETIREMENTS , ANNIVERSARIES, OR ANY REASON TO HAVE A GOOD TIME!!

WED. • OCT. 6TH • 7PM

MURDER-A-LA CARTE (TICKETED EVENT)

THURS. • OCT. 7TH • 8PM

Harvey Jesus & Fire

ST. ROCH TAVERN — The Way, 9

FRI. • OCT. 8TH • 10PM

TIPITINA’S — Music for Matt feat. Glasgow, Rotary Downs, Dee-1, 10

GASHOUSE GORILLAZ

SWIZZLE STICK BAR — YaDonna West Jazz Trio, 5

TOMMY’S WINE BAR — Tommy’s Latin Jazz Band feat. Matthew Shilling, 9

VOILÀ — Mario Abney Quartet, 5

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6; Anais St. John, 9

Saturday 9 APPLE BARREL — Peter Orr, 7

AUSTIN’S RESTAURANT — Scott Kyser, 6:30

BABYLON LOUNGE — Chronic Death Slug, Life & Limb, Rock ’n’ Roll Zombies, 10 BACCHANAL — Gypsy Swing Club, 8

BANKS STREET BAR — Local Skank, 9

BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Armand St. Martin, 7 BAYOU PARK BAR — Vision Winged Party Cult, 10 BISTREAUX — Paul Longstreth, 7

SAT. • OCT. 9TH • 10PM

Sweet Root (FROM BATON ROUGE)

FRI. • OCT. 15TH • 10PM ALTERED (FROM ATLANTA, GA) SAT. • OCT. 16TH • 10PM FLASHBACKS S AT U R D AY

OCT. 30

BAG OF DONUTS

BLUE NILE — Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 7

BMC — Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 6:30; Wild Magnolias, 9:30; Ashton & the Big Easy Brawlers Brass Band, 12:30 a.m; New Orleans Jazz Series, 3 BOMBAY CLUB — Banu Gibson, 9:30

158 S. Military Road Slidell, LA 985-646-1728

CAFE ATCHAFALAYA — Atchafalaya

Mon 11am-9pm Tue-Thur 11am-12am (midnight) Fri & Sat 11am-2am • Sun 11am-8pm

BOOMTOWN CASINO — BJ Thomas, 9:30 PAGE 37

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

BACCHANAL — Courtyard Kings, 7; Vincent Marini, 9:30

ANDREA’S CAPRI BLU LOUNGE — Philip Melancon, 7

BOMBAY CLUB — Legendary Luther Kent, 9:30

Thursday 7

ALLWAYS LOUNGE — Why Are We Building Such a Big Ship?, Dark Dark Dark, 10

61 BLUES HIGHWAY — Jack Yoder & Li’l G Delta Blues, 8

KRAZY KORNER — Death by Orgasm Rock ’n’ Roll Band, 8:30; Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 4

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Eddie Parrino, 7

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Camille Bloom, 7; Chris Perkins, 8; Mark Fernandez, 9; Buddy Mann, 10

61 BLUES HIGHWAY — Will Work for Whiskey, 4

3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY — Friday Night Music Camp feat. Dirty Bourbon River Show, 5

BISTREAUX — Paul Longstreth, 7

LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Soul Rebels Brass Band, 11

3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY — Esben & the Witch, Self-Help Tapes, Kindest Lines, 7

Friday 8

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Roman Skakun, 5; Shamarr Allen, 8

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6 YUKI IZAKAYA — By and By, 8

LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6

YUKI IZAKAYA — Norbert Slama Trio, 8

MUSIC

35

OCTOBER2010 3

4

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MASTERS MONTH

7

1

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BILL SUMMERS

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FRENCH

19

BLAKEY 8pm

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STEVE MASAKOWSKI INTERPRETS

II TROVATORE 8pm

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Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

PAGE 35

All Stars, 11 a.m.

CAROUSEL PIANO BAR & LOUNGE — John Autin, 9 CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Rockabilly Surf Cochon Fest feat. Americanos, Bedlamville Triflers, Louisiana Hellbenders and others, 1 CIRCLE BAR — Jazzholes, 6; Debauche, 10

COLUMNS HOTEL — Jeff Tucker, 8

DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 9 D.B.A. — Little Freddie King, 11

DECKBAR & GRILLE — Miche & MixMavens, 8

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Acoustic Swiftness, 10 DRAGON’S DEN — Ingrid Lucia, 10 FUNKY PIRATE — Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8

GREEN ROOM — Midlife Crisis, 10 HI-HO LOUNGE — My Graveyard Jaw, 10 HOUSE OF BLUES — Yeasayer, Washed Out, 10 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Glen David Andrews, 8; Kinfolk Brass Band, midnight

JASMINE’S FRENCH RESTAURANT — Darren and Diana, 9 JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 4

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm Rock ’n’ Roll Band, 8:30 LAFITTE’S BLACKSMITH SHOP — Mike Hood, 9

LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Captain Legendary Band, 11 LOUISIANA MUSIC FACTORY — Josh Hyde, 2; We Are One Brass Band, 3; Tuba Skinny, 4 MAHALIA JACKSON THEATER OF THE PERFORMING ARTS — Vampire Weekend, Beach House, 8 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Flow Tribe CD release, 10

MARDI GRAS WORLD’S RIVER CITY BALLROOM — Los Lonely Boys, 3 MULATE’S CAJUN RESTAURANT — Bayou DeVille, 7

the Honky Tonk Revue, 9:30

ONE EYED JACKS — Suplecs, 9

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lionel Ferbos & Palm Court Jazz Band, 8 PELICAN CLUB — Sandford Hinderlie, 7

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Band feat. Mark Braud, 8 RITZ-CARLTON — Catherine Anderson, 1 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Kermit Ruffins, 9:30

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Topsy Chapman & Solid Harmony, 8 & 10

SPECKLED-T’S & AFTER DARK — Sweet Root, 10 SPOTTED CAT — Smokin’ Time Jazz Club, 6; Jazz Vipers, 10; Luke Winslow King, 3

SWIZZLE STICK BAR — YaDonna West Jazz Trio, 5 and Oct. 9, 5

TIPITINA’S — Robert Randolph & the Family Band, 10 TOMMY’S WINE BAR — Julio & Caesar, 10

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1; Vibe, 8:30

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6; Anais St. John, 9

OLD POINT BAR — Gal Holiday &

TWIST OF LIME — Big Frank, 10 VAUGHAN’S — Morella & the Wheels of If CD release, 8

NOBA Presents

FUNKY PIRATE — Willie Lockett & All Purpose Blues Band, 8

ARNAUD’S JAZZ BISTRO — Gumbo Trio, 10:30 a.m. & 6:30 BAYOU PARK BAR — Hooch Riders, 9

BMC — NOLA Music Series, 1; George Sartin & Jack Cruz Project, 12 a.m; Joe Kennedy Project, 5:30; Gal Holiday & the Honky Tonk Revue, 9

BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Some Like it Hot, 11 a.m.

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — High Ground Drifters, 7; Ayla Miller, 9; Mark Saucier, 10 OAK — Andrew Duhon, 8

Sunday 10

CAFE NEGRIL — Smoky Greenwell & the Blues Gnus, 10 CHAMPIONS SPORTS PUB & GRILL — Sam Cammarata, 8

CIRCLE BAR — Sons of Hippies, 10; Micah McKee & friends, 6

COLUMNS HOTEL — Chip Wilson, 11 a.m. D.B.A. — Jackals, 10; Palmetto Bug Stompers, 6 DONNA’S BAR & GRILL — Jesse McBride & the Next Generation Jazz Band, 9

THE EMBER’S “ORIGINAL” BOURBON HOUSE — Curtis Binder, 6 FINNEGAN’S EASY — Laissez Faire, 3

FRENCH QUARTER PIZZERIA — Nervous Dwayne, 8

HOUSE OF BLUES — Sunday Gospel Brunch, 10 a.m.

HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — Pharoahe Monch, Boot Camp Clik feat. Buckshot, Sean Price and others, 8:30

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Hot 8 Brass Band, 9 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Germaine Bazzle & Paul Longstreth, 7

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 4

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm Rock ‘n’ Roll Band, 8:30 LE PAVILLON HOTEL — Philip Melancon, 8:30 a.m.

MADIGAN’S — Anderson/Easley Project, 9 THE MAISON — Porch Party Band, 4 MARKET CAFE — Andy K. & Bobby Love, 4:30

MULATE’S CAJUN RESTAURANT — Bayou DeVille, 7

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1 OLD POINT BAR — Wilson & Moore, 6

MUSIC

Carmel, Karma to Burn, 9

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lucien Barbarin & Sunday Night Swingsters, 8

THE PRECINCT — Funk Express, 7:30

PRESERVATION HALL — 726 Jazz Band, 8 RALPH’S ON THE PARK — Joe Krown, 11:30 a.m.

RITZ-CARLTON — Armand St. Martin, 10:30 a.m; Catherine Anderson, 2

ROOSEVELT HOTEL (BLUE ROOM) — James Rivers Movement, 11 a.m. SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Jesse Boyd Trio, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Rights of Swing, 3; Loose Marbles, 6; Pat Casey, 10 ST. CHARLES TAVERN — Maryflynn Thomas, 10 a.m.

TIPITINA’S — Cajun Fais Do Do feat. Bruce Daigrepont, 5:30; Eisley, Ives the Band, Christie DuPree, 9

VOILÀ — Mario Abney Quartet, 9 a.m. WHISKEY DIX — Gypsy Elise & the Royal Blues, 7

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Mario

ONE EYED JACKS — Mount

PAGE 38

MOMIX in

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October 22 & 23, 8 p.m. | Mahalia Jackson Theater MOMIX goes green and blooms in Botanica, the new work from the whimsical imagination of choreographer Moses Pendleton. With huge puppets, multimedia projections and larger-than-life props by Michael Curry (The Lion King), this world famous company of dancer-illusionists transports you to a breathtaking fantasyland. Take the entire family to this enchanting Avatar-like world that is “eye-popping and mind-boggling.” (New York Times)

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10.08 10.09 10.15 10.16 10.23 10.29 10.30

MUSIC

LISTINGS

PAGE 37

Abney Quartet, 6

YUKI IZAKAYA — Luke Winslow King, 7

Syllable 7 + Peripheral

Monday 11

Midlife Crisis

APPLE BARREL — Sam Cammarata, 8

Mike Darby & the House of Cards Generation Way + John Saavedra Sick Like Sinatra

BACCHANAL — Jonathan Freilich, 7:30

BANKS STREET BAR — N’awlins Johnnys, 8 BJ’S LOUNGE — King James & the Special Men, 10

BMC — Fun in the Pocket feat. Mayumi Shara & Reinaldo, 6; Smoky Greenwell’s Monday Night Blues Jam, 9:30

24 Miles

CAFE ATCHAFALAYA — Burke Ingraffia, Dr. Danny Acosta, 7

90's Night

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Jimmy Robinson & Cranston Clements, 7

SUNdays KARAOKE

WEDNESDAYS

Mondays

THURSDAYS

singer/songwriter showcase

booty shakin’ night

OPEN MIC

INDOOR TAILGATE PARTY every

BLACK & GOLD game

CIRCLE BAR — Rosencranz, 10 COLUMNS HOTEL — David Doucet, 8

D.B.A. — Glen David Andrews feat. Derrick Tabb, 9 DONNA’S BAR & GRILL — Les Getrex & the Blues All-Star Band, 9

DRAGON’S DEN — Ryat, High in One Eye, Domenic, 10 THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

FOUR POINTS BY SHERATON (M!X ULTRALOUNGE) — Tim Sullivan Jazz Trio, 7

FUNKY PIRATE — Willie Lockett & All Purpose Blues Band, 8

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

GREEN ROOM — John Saavedra, 10

38

preview

HI-HO LOUNGE — Blue Grass Pickin’ Party, 8

HOUSE OF BLUES — Three Days Grace, 8 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Bob French & the Original Tuxedo Jazz Band, 8

MAT & NADDIE’S RESTAURANT — Courtyard Kings, 7 MY BAR — Danny T, 8

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Uke Joint, 7; Emil Brynge & Emaline Delapaix, 9

OLD POINT BAR — Brent Walsh Trio, 8 ONE EYED JACKS — Deer Tick, J-Roddy Walston & the Business, 9

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Band feat. Mark Braud, 8 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Charmaine Neville Band, 8 & 10

The Shipping News

Since 2006, the Eastern Bloc-influenced Bywater crew Why Are We Building Such a Big Ship? has contracted and expanded like bandleader Walt McClements’ accordion — at times slimming down to a sextet, at others swelling to as many as 10, a musical co-op swapping members with familial neighbors Hurray For the Riff Raff and the Panorama Jazz Band. McClements, who plays with both groups, similarly vacillates between forlorn gypsy jazz and big-band folk rock, seamlessly changing outfits and countries like a foreign diplomat but never losing the local signifiers imparted by a sousaphone’s anchor and a second line’s stutter. Big Ship’s third self-released album, Of Resolutions and Resolve, is due this fall. Dark Dark Dark, also featuring McClements, opens. Admission $5. — Noah Bonaparte Pais

OCT

07

Why Are We Building Such a Big Ship? with Dark Dark Dark 10 p.m. Thursday AllWays Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www.marignytheatre.org

Natives, Ruby Suns, Union Line, 6:30

classical/ concerts COVINGTON TRAILHEAD — 419

N. Hampshire St., Covington — Thu: Rockin’ the Rails presents Four Unplugged, 5 DER RATHSKELLER — Tulane University, Lavin Bernick Center, McAlister Drive — Thu: Jazz at the Rat presents “Saxophone Colossus: Cannonball & Coltrane,” 8 FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF KENNER — 1400 Williams

Blvd., Kenner, 466-5381; www. fbckenner.org — Fri: Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra presents Beethoven Symphony No. 5, 7:30

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF NEW ORLEANS — 5290 Canal Blvd.,

482-5775; www.fbcno.org — Thu: Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra presents Beethoven Symphony No. 5, 7:30

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Dominic Grillo & the Frenchmen Street AllStars, 6; Jazz Vipers, 10

LAFAYETTE SQUARE — 601 S.

TULANE UNIVERSITY — Local

NUNEMAKER AUDITORIUM —

ST. ROCH TAVERN — Washboard Lissa Orchestra, 7

Maestri Place, 581-1039 — Wed: Harvest the Music Concert Series presents Dr. John & the Lower 911, Treme Brass Band, 5

Monroe Hall, Loyola University New Orleans, 6363 St. Charles Ave.; www.loyno.edu — Fri: Indian Arts Circle of New Orleans presents Jugalbandi Concert, 8

PONTCHARTRAIN VINEYARDS —

81250 Hwy. 1082 (Old Military Road), Bush, (985) 892-9742; www.pontchartrainvineyards. com — Sat: Jazz ’n the Vines presents Benny Grunch & the Bunch, 6:30

THE SANDBAR AT UNO —

Lakefront Campus, University Center, Flambeau Room, 280-6039 — Wed: Jazz at the Sandbar presents Brice Winston, 7:30

ST. ANDREW’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH — 1031 S. Carrollton Ave. — Sun: New Orleans Musica da Camera, 3

ST. PETER CLAVER MUSIC HALL —

1020 N. Prieur St., 822-8191 — Sat: Annual Jazz Extravaganza feat. Rockin’ Dopsie Jr., Ten Mo’ Tenors, Sharon Martin and others, 8

TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH — 1329 Jackson Ave., 522-

0276; www.trinitynola.com — Thu: Trinity Artist Series presents Quinn Peeper & Michael Howard, 7; Sun: Jerry Zachary & Robert J. Siegel, 5; Mon: Taize, 6; Tue: Organ & Labyrinth, 6

A room with A ViEw

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

now showing ALPHA AND OMEGA (PG)—

Two wolves with conflicting personalities get stuck together on a journey to find their way home. AMC Palace 10, Hollywood 9 BEYOND ALL BOUNDARIES (NR) — The museum screens a 4-D

film, bringing audiences into battle using archival footage and special effects. National World War II Museum Solomon Victory Theater

CASE 39 (R) — A well-mean-

ing social worker (Renee Zellweger) encounters dark forces while trying to rescue a girl from her seemingly cruel parents. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 14 CATFISH (PG-13) — Two filmmakers document their photographer brother as he pursues an online relationship, not aware the project would take an unexpected and unsettling turn. AMC Palace 20 DEEP SEA (NR) — Audiences experience the depths of the ocean. Entergy IMAX

DINOSAURS ALIVE! (NR) —

David Clark helms a CGI jaunt in a Jurassic park. Entergy IMAX, Kenner MegaDome EASY A (PG-13) — A high school student takes advantage of untrue rumors circulating about her. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 GET LOW (PG-13)— A cranky old recluse decides to have a funeral for himself while he’s still alive. Canal Place HATCHET II (NR)— A woman

returns to the Louisiana swamps to seek revenge against a maniacal killer. AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20 GRAND CANYON: RIVER AT RISK (NR) — Robert Redford

narrates a 15-day river-rafting trip that highlights the beauty of the Colorado River. Entergy IMAX

HURRICANE ON THE BAYOU (NR) — Greg MacGillivray

directs a film about Louisiana’s eroding wetlands and the natural protection they provide against hurricanes. Includes performances by Tab Benoit, Amanda Shaw, Allen Toussaint, Chubby Carrier and Marva Wright. Narrated by Meryl Streep. Entergy IMAX

LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS: THE OWLS OF GA’HOOLE (PG) — Based on the book series, a

young barn owl and his friends escape the orphanage where captives are brainwashed into becoming soldiers. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 14

LET ME IN (R) — In the American remake of the Swedish film Let the Right One In, a misfit 12-year-old boy befriends a vampire child. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 14 LIFE AS WE KNOW IT (PG-13) —

Two adults (Katherine Heigl and Josh Duhamel) with a dissonant relationship unexpectedly become the caregivers of their godchild when the baby’s parents die in an accident. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 20 LOTTERY TICKET (PG-13) —

Rapper Bow Wow plays a lottery winner who has to keep quiet about his good fortune in the days before he can cash in his ticket. AMC Palace 16

THE OTHER GUYS (PG-13) —

Two mediocre cops (Will Ferrell and Mark Wahlberg) stumble into a case that gives them a chance to prove their worth. Grand, Hollywood 14 RESIDENT EVIL: AFTERLIFE (R) — Milla Jovovich returns

as Alice, a survivor in a world ravaged by a virus infection. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 14

SECRETARIAT (PG) — The film chronicles the life of Penny Chenery, owner of the Triple Crown-winning racehorse Secretariat. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 14 THE SOCIAL NETWORK (PG13) — Aaron Sorkin and

COLUMBIA PICTURES PRESENTS IN ASSOCIATION WITH RELATIVITY MEDIA A SCOTT RUDIN / MICHAEL DE LUCA / TRIGGER STREET PRODUCTION A DAVID FINCHER FILM “THE SOCIAL NETWORK” JESSE EISENBERG ANDREW GARFIELD JUSTIN TIMBERLAKE ARMIE HAMMER MAX MINGHELLA MUSIC BY TRENT REZNOR & ATTICUS ROSS EXECUTIVE PRODUCER KEVIN SPACEY BASED UPON THE BOOK “THE ACCIDENTAL BILLIONAIRES” BY BEN MEZRICH SCREENPLAY BY AARON SORKIN PRODUCED BY SCOTT RUDIN DANA BRUNETTI MICHAEL DE LUCA CEÁN CHAFFIN DIRECTED BY DAVID FINCHER

David Fincher’s film follows the complicated ascent of Facebook creator Mark Zuckerberg. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace

CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES

© 2010 Overture Films

4.729" X 8.083" (3/8 PG3700 V) Orleans Ave. • In the AmericanTUE 10/5 Can Building NEW ORLEANS GAMBIT WEEKLY 504.483.6360 • www.cleverwines.com

Be

Let me in Chloe Moretz stars as Abby in Let Me In, an American remake of the acclaimed 2008 Swedish film Let the Right One In, intertwining a story of adolescent alienation and bullying with the thirst of a forever young, child vampire.

After Work

Live Jazz & Blues

Every Thursday, Friday & Saturday night

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

DEVIL (PG-13) — A group of people are trapped in an elevator, and one of them is the devil. AMC Palace 10, AMC

Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

fiLm

Listings

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Storyland Amusement Park Botanical Garden Celebration in the Oaks © 2010 Columbia PiCtures

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Pick up your complimentary pass

FRIDAY OCTOBER 8TH 11AM - 3PM at

Clothing Exchange

140 N. Carrollton Ave.

www.red-themovie.com

WHILE SUPPLIES LAST. Passes are available on a first-come, first served basis. No purchase necessary. Limit one (admit-two) pass per customer. Rated PG-13 for intense sequences of action violence and brief strong language.

IN THEATERS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15th

Jesse Eisenberg and Joseph Mazzello star in The Social Network, the story behind Facebook’s creation by college friends. 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 TAKERS (PG-13) — Skilled crimi-

nals who consistently pull off perfect bank robberies meet their match in a determined detective. AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9

THE TOWN (R) — Ben Affleck,

Rebecca Hall, Jon Hamm, Jeremy Renner and Blake Lively star in Affleck’s drama about a crook who falls for the manager of one of the banks he’s robbed. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14, Prytania

WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS (PG-13) — Michael

Douglass is back as stock trader Gordon Gekko, who is out of prison and looking for a fresh start. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

YOU AGAIN (PG) — In the

comedy starring Kristen Bell, Sigourney Weaver, Jamie Lee Curtis and Betty White, a wedding causes a host of high school rivalries to re-emerge. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

opening Friday MY SOUL TO TAKE (R) — In Wes

Craven’s thriller, a serial killer is on the hunt for the seven children born the day he supposedly died.

special screenings THE BRIDGE ON THE RIVER KWAI (PG) — British prisoners of

war during World War II are instructed to build a bridge to accommodate the BurmaSiam railway that the Allies are secretly planning to destroy. TIckets $5.50. Noon SaturdaySunday and Oct. 13, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 8912787; www.theprytania.com

BRIT WIT — The Big Top screens

British comedies every week. 7 p.m. Tuesday, 3 Ring Circus’ The Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com

CROPSEY (NR) — In the docu-

mentary, two filmmakers delve into a Staten Island urban legend from their childhood that turned out to be true. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 9 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net

DRACULA (NR) — Bela Lugosi plays the titular vampire in the 1931 film. Free admission. 8 p.m. Monday, La Divina Cafe e Gelateria, 621 St. Peter St., 3022692; www.ladivinagelateria.com IT’S A MAD, MAD, MAD, MAD WORLD (G) — An eclectic group

of strangers embarks on a mad-cap pursuit of a large sum of stolen money. Tickets $5.50. Noon Wednesday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 8912787; www.theprytania.com

A MOTHER’S COURAGE: TALKING BACK TO AUTISM (NR) —

Narrated by Kate Winslet, the film follows a woman and her global quest to help her autistic son. Tickets $7 general

admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 7 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net VIEUX CARRE MATINEES —

The Historic New Orleans Collection screens short films on Louisiana history and culture. Visit www.hnoc.org for details. Free admission. 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. TuesdaySaturday, Le Petit Théâtre du Vieux Carré, 616 St. Peter St., 5222081; www.lepetittheatre.com

FilM FesTiVals MISSISSIPPI RIVER 9TH WARD FILM & ARTS FESTIVAL. The

New Orleans Afrikan Film and Arts Festival Project screen films including Spike Lee’s Bamboozled, She’s Gotta Have It, If God is Willing and da Creek Don’t Rise; Haiti Cherie, El Benny and Football Fables. Visit www. neworleansafrikanfilmfest.org for screening times and locations. Tuesday-Sunday. AMC Palace 10 (Hammond), 429-9090; AMC Palace 12 (Clearview), 734-2020; AMC Palace 16 (Westbank), 734-2020; AMC Palace 20 (Elmwood), 734-2020; Canal Place, 363-1117; Chalmette Movies, 277-4778; Entergy IMAX, 581-IMAX; Grand (Slidell), (985) 6411889; Hollywood 9 (Kenner), 464-0990; Hollywood 14 (Covington), (985) 893-3044; Kenner MegaDome, 468-7231; Prytania, 891-2787; Solomon Victory Theater, National World War II Museum, 527-6012 Compiled by Lauren LaBorde

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OPENING ANTENNA GALLERY. 3161 Burgundy St., 957-4255; www.antennagallery. org — “Perceived Dichotomies,” an

installation by Daniel Lauricella, Duane Pitre and Jeanette Bonds, through Nov. 7. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

BYRDIE’S GALLERY. 2422-A St. Claude Ave., www.byrdiesgallery.com —

“David Sinclair Nixon: A Retrospective of One Artist’s Life and Work,” through Nov. 8. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday.

CARROLL GALLERY. Woldenberg Art Center, Newcomb Art Department, Tulane University, 314-2228; www. carrollgallery.tulane.edu — “Adjunct

+1,” a group exhibition featuring Tulane adjunct faculty, through Oct. 27. Opening reception 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Thursday. DU MOIS GALLERY. 4921 Freret St., 818-6032 — “Harvest,” glazed stone-

wear sculpture, acrylic on canvas and oil canvas by Sue Bowers, Jason DuMouchel and Anne McLeod, through Nov. 6. Opening reception 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday. THE FRONT. 4100 St. Claude Ave.; www.nolafront.org — Sumi ink

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ART

drawings by Yoonmi Nam, Jeremy Drummond and Hoang Pham; installation works by emerging artists curated by Dave Greber; multi-channel video installation by Dave Webber; all through Nov. 7. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday.

HOME SPACE GALLERY. 1128 St. Roch Ave. — Gumbo Art Group show fea-

turing works by Bruce Davenport Jr. and others, through Nov. 9. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

SLIDELL CULTURAL CENTER. 2055 Second St., Slidell — “So You Think

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You Can Paint?” works by elected officials and community leaders, through Nov. 12. Opening reception 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday. UNO-ST. CLAUDE GALLERY. 2429 St. Claude Ave. — “Do What I Mean, Not What I Say,” a group exhibition featuring seven artists, through Nov. 7. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

GALLERIES IN THE FRENCH QUARTER

VISIT US AT OUR NEW ADDRESS:

230 Chartres St. OPEN EVERYDAY 230 CHARTRES STREET • 524-4997

1022 GALLERY. 1022 Lowerline St., 3010679; www.1022gallery.blogspot.com — “Vanishing Acts,” mixed media

and oil paintings by Dana Beuhler, Caroline Thomas and Alexandra Adduci, through Saturday.

St., 636-2004 — Artists work on site in all media; watercolors and limited-edition prints by Peter Briant, ongoing.

review Snake Charms

This large exhibition of objects and photographs from Tulane University’s George Hubbard Pepper Native American Archive — available for public viewing for the first time since 1926 — came about almost by accident. Stored for decades in Tulane’s Dinwiddie Hall, it was available only to researchers, which is how Cristin Nunez, a graduate student at the time, came upon it while researching her thesis. Serendipitously, she also was interning with New Orleans Museum of Art (NOMA) curator Paul Tarver, and one thing led to another. While these 150 Navajo and Pueblo artifacts are mostly what one might expect in a Southwest Indian collection, they are enhanced by the effective use of 140 photographs, some taken by ethnologist George Pepper and his associates, depicting the natives of what was still a remote and exotic land a century ago. When the camera was turned on them, it revealed motley characters not unlike Harrison Ford as Indiana Jones. But the most dramatic are the hand-tinted magic lantern slides taken by the itinerant bicycle-riding photographer, Sumner Matteson. Rendered as large prints of ceremonies like the Hopi snake ritual, including a rain dance with live rattlesnakes, they bring the show to life and underscore its otherworldly mystique. Pepper also produced tinted lantern slides, the 19th century’s version of digital images, and his Snake Priest (pictured) was described as “hurrying” because his “captive was restive.” The snake ritual itself featured painted warriors clutching rattlesnakes in their teeth, as seen in Matteson’s dramatic Hopi Maidens Blessing Dancers, Snake Dance Ceremony, and it is actually his photographs that provide the more complete picture of Hopi and other Pueblo Indian life and their close relationship with the mesas where they built their settlements. Pepper did pioneering work among the Navajo, and his portraits of them offer insight into a very different culture, while providing counterpoint to the mysterious Hopi who, then as now, tended to steal the show. — D. Eric Bookhardt

THRU

OCT

24

ANCESTORS AND DESCENDANTS: ANCIENT SOUTHWESTERN AMERICA AT THE DAWN OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY New Orleans Museum of Art, City Park, 658-4100; www.noma.org

ACADEMY GALLERY. 5256 Magazine St., 899-8111 — “Parallel Universes,”

works by Victoria Ryan; works by Jacques Soulas, through Oct. 26.

AG WAGNER STUDIO & GALLERY. 813 Royal St., 561-7440 — Works by

gallery artists; 504 Toys, locally handcrafted toys; both ongoing. ALL IN THE FRAME GALLERY. 2596 Front St., Slidell, (985) 290-1395 —

“Serene Waters, Clear Horizons,” paintings by Annie Strack, ongoing.

3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY. 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp. com — “Use Your Allusion,” works

ANTON HAARDT FOLK GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www. antonart.com — Works by Anton

A GALLERY FOR FINE PHOTOGRAPHY. 241 Chartres St., 568-1313; www. agallery.com — Photographs by Sebastião Salgado, through Jan. 1.

AORTA PROJECTS. Poland Avenue and North Miro Street; www.aortaprojects.blogspot.com — “Blue Fence,” installation by Jennifer Odem,

by Sean Neary and Gabriel Flores, through Oct. 29.

Haardt, Christopher Moses and others.

through December. ARIODANTE GALLERY. 535 Julia St., 524-3233 — Works by Mike Kilgore,

Pam Marquis, Betsy Meyers Green and Michael Eddy, through Oct. 30.

ART GALLERY 818. 818 Royal St., 524-6918 — Paintings, sculpture

and jewelry by local artists Noel Rockmore, Michael Fedor, Xavier de Callatay, Charles Bazzell, Bambi deVille and Ritchie Fitzgerald, ongoing.

ARTHUR ROGER GALLERY. 432 Julia St., 522-1999; www.arthurrogergallery.com — “Willie Birch: Looking Back,” paintings and papier-mache pieces by the artist, through Oct. 30. “Hell Hell Hell/Heaven Heaven Heaven: Encountering Sister Gertrude Morgan & Revelation,” works by Lesley Dill, through Nov. 20. ARTICHOKE GALLERY. 912 Decatur

BERGERON STUDIO & GALLERY. 406 Magazine St., 522-7503; www. bergeronstudio.com — Photographs by Michael P. Smith, Jack Beech, Harriet Blum, Kevin Roberts and others, ongoing. BERTA’S AND MINA’S ANTIQUITIES GALLERY. 4138 Magazine St., 895-6201 — “Second Line: Lifting Our Souls

Up Into Heaven,” works by Nilo and Mina Lanzas; works by Clementine Hunter, Noel Rockmore and others; all ongoing.

BRUNNER GALLERY. 215 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 893-0444; www. brunnergallery.com — “Neither Here Nor There,” works by Diane Hanson; paintings by Michael Secor; both through Sunday. BRYANT GALLERIES. 316 Royal St., 525-5584; www.bryantgalleries.com — Paintings by Dean Mitchell, ongoing. BYRDIE’S GALLERY. 2422-A St. Claude Ave., www.byrdiesgallery.com —

“Redhead Car,” paint on recycled political signs by Devin Meyer, through Wednesday.

CALICHE & PAO GALLERY. 312 Royal St., 588-2846 — Oil paintings by Caliche

and Pao, ongoing.

CALLAN FINE ART. 240 Chartres St., 524-0025; www.callanfineart. com — Works by Eugene de Blass,

Louis Valtat and other artists of the Barbizon, Impressionist and PostImpressionist schools, ongoing.

CANARY GALLERY. 329 Julia St., 388-7746; www.thecanarycollective. com — “Global Log,” paintings

on kitenges by Horton Humble, through November.

CARDINAL GALLERY. 541 Bourbon St., 522-3227 — Exhibition of Italian art-

ists featuring works by Bruno Paoli and Andrea Stella, ongoing.

CARIBBEAN ARTS LTD. 720 Franklin Ave., 943-3858 — The gallery showcases contemporary Haitian and Jamaican art. CAROL ROBINSON GALLERY. 840 Napoleon Ave., 895-6130; www.carolrobinsongallery.com — “Thirty Years in Retrospect,” a group exhibition by featured and gallery artists, through October. CASELL GALLERY. 818 Royal St., 524-0671; www.casellartgallery. com — Pastels by Joaquim Casell;

etchings by Sage; oils by Charles Ward; all ongoing.

COLE PRATT GALLERY. 3800 Magazine St., 891-6789; www.coleprattgallery.com —

“Things Left Unsaid,” acrylic paintings by James Beaman, through October.

COLLECTIVE WORLD ART COMMUNITY. Poydras Center, 650 Poydras St., 339-5237 — Paint-

ings from the Blue Series by Joseph Pearson, ongoing.

COLLINS C. DIBOLL ART GALLERY. Loyola University, Monroe Library, 6363 St. Charles Ave., fourth floor, 861-5456 — “Couples,” portraiture by Carole Leake; “Wonderland,” mixed-media caterpillar paintings and drawings by Tom Strider,

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

through Oct. 21. COUP D’OEIL ART CONSORTIUM. 2033 Magazine St., 7220876; www.coupdoeilartconsortium.com — “Life InVerse,”

paintings by Gustavo Duque, through Oct. 30.

DEITY ARTS OF THE EXTREME ORIENT. 2001 Magazine St., 529-3171; www.deitynola.com — “Parlance?” contemporary

American artist working with the style and subjects of Asian art, through Nov. 7.

D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., 524-3936 — “Dreaming in Clay,” stone-

ware figural works by Mark Chatterley, through Nov. 4.

DUTCH ALLEY ARTIST’S CO-OP GALLERY. 912 N. Peters St., 4129220; www.dutchalleyonline. com — Works by New Orleans

artists, ongoing.

ELLIOTT GALLERY. 540 Royal St., 523-3554; www.elliottgallery. com — Works by gallery artists Coignard, Engel, Papart, Petra, Tobiasse, Schneuer and Yrondi, ongoing. FRAMIN’ PLACE & GALLERY. 3535 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-3311; www.nolaframing.com —

Prints by Tommy Thompson, Phillip Sage, James Michalopoulos and others, ongoing.

FREDRICK GUESS STUDIO. 910 Royal St., 581-4596; www. fredrickguessstudio.com —

Paintings by Fredrick Guess, ongoing.

GALERIE D’ART FRANCAIS. 541 Royal St., 581-6925 — Works by

Todd White, ongoing.

GALERIE PORCHE WEST. 3201 Burgundy St., 947-3880 —

GALERIE ROYALE. 3648 Magazine St., 894-1588; www. galerieroyale.com — “Skating

into the Fall,” works by Jessie Trinchard, Robert Sutton, Mike Klung and Shannon Marie, through October. GALLERIA BELLA. 319 Royal St., 581-5881 — Works by gallery artists, ongoing. GALLERY 421. 421 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 898-5858 — More than 500 pieces

of art by more than 50 artists, ongoing.

GALLERY BIENVENU. 518 Julia St., 525-0518; www.gallerybienvenu.com — Recent sculpture by Pablo Atchugarry, through Nov. 20. THE GARDEN DISTRICT GALLERY. 1332 Washington Ave., 891-3032; www.gardendistrictgallery.com — “Celebrate New Orleans,”

a group exhibition featuring local artists, through Nov. 7.

GEORGE SCHMIDT GALLERY. 626 Julia St., 592-0206; www. georgeschmidt.com — Paintings

by George Schmidt, ongoing.

GRAPHITE GALLERIES. 936 Royal St., 565-3739 — “Sinners and

Saints,” works by Joe Hobbs, ongoing.

GUY LYMAN FINE ART. 3645 Magazine St., 899-4687; www. guylymanfineart.com — “Young, Talented and Still Affordable,” a group exhibition featuring paintings, drawings and sculpture by new artists, through Oct. 28. HAROUNI GALLERY. 829 Royal St., 299-8900 — Paintings by

David Harouni, ongoing.

HENRY HOOD GALLERY. 325 E. Lockwood St., Covington, (985) 789-1832 — “Planting New

Seeds,” handmade paper wall panels and earthenware platters by Ruth Siporski, through Saturday.

— “Knead,” works by Kristian Hansen, Tora Lopez, John Oles and William Murphy, ongoing. KURT E SCHON. 510-520 St. Louis St., 524-5462 — The gallery

specializes in 18th and 19th century European oil paintings by artists from the French Salon and Royal Academy as well as French Impressionists.

L9 CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 539 Caffin Ave., 948-0056 —

“Faces of Treme,” works by Chandra McCormick and Keith Calhoun, ongoing.

LE DESIGNS LLC. 3512 Magazine St., 373-6413 — Paintings by Tucker Fitz Hugh Jr. and Vera Deville Judycki; painted ostrich eggs by Tucker Fitz Hugh Jr.; both through Nov. 27. LE PETIT SALON DE NEW ORLEANS. 906 Royal St., 524-5700 — Paintings by Holly Sarre,

ongoing.

LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia St., 522-5988; www.lemieuxgalleries.com — “Paper Trail,”

works on paper by Paul Ninas, through Oct. 30.

HERIARD-CIMINO GALLERY. 440 Julia St., 525-7300; www. heriardcimino.com — “Between You, Me and Us,” wall sculpture by Carolina Sardi; “Flocked Relics,” flocked pieces and light sculpture by Keith Sonnier, through Oct. 30.

LOUISIANA CRAFTS GUILD. 608 Julia St., 558-6198; www. louisianacrafts.org — Group show featuring works from guild members, ongoing.

ISABELLA’S GALLERY. 3331 Severn Ave., Suite 105, Metairie, 779-3202; www.isabellasgallery. com — Hand-blown works by Marc Rosenbaum; raku by Kate Tonguis and John Davis; all ongoing.

ance in Peace,” mixed-media drawings and watercolors by Asante Salaam, through Oct. 15.

JAMIE HAYES GALLERY. 621 Chartres St., 592-4080; www. jamiehayes.com — New Orleans-style art by Jamie Hayes, ongoing. JEAN BRAGG GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART. 600 Julia St., 895-7375; www.jeanbragg.com — “Au Jazz Hot! New Orleans

in the 1920s,” paintings by Ann Cox Strub, through October.

JON SCHOOLER GALLERY. 8526 Oak St., 865-7032; www. jonschooler.com — “Subliminal WOWs,” paintings by Jon Schooler, ongoing. JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY. 400A Julia St., 522-5471; www. jonathanferraragallery.com —

“I Speak As I Please,” welded, repurposed metal works by David Buckingham; “Other Living Things,” two-dimensional works by Brian Borrello; both through Oct. 30.

JULIE NEILL DESIGNS. 3908 Magazine St., 899-4201; www. julieneill.com — “Facade,”

photographs by Lesley Wells, ongoing.

KAKO GALLERY. 536 Royal St., 565-5445; www.kakogallery. com — Paintings by Don Picou

and Stan Fontaine; “Raku” by Joy Gauss; 3-D wood sculpture by Joe Derr; all ongoing.

KKPROJECTS. 2448 N. Villere St., 415-9880; www.kkprojects.org

NEW HOURS! NOW OPEN

MondaySaturday 11am-10pm

3454 Magazine St. NOLA 504-899-3374

M. FRANCIS GALLERY. 604 S. Julia St., 875-4888; www.mfrancisgallery.com — “Persever-

“Since 1969”

MARTINE CHAISSON GALLERY. 727 Camp St., 427-4759; www. martinechaissongallery.com —

“Niagara,” paintings by Jack Niven, through Nov. 27.

METAIRIE PARK COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL. 300 Park Road, Metairie, 837-5204; www.mpcds.com — “The Unconventional Por-

COUPON

roses

trait,” works by Mark Bercier, David Halliday, Gina Phillips and Alexander Stolin, ongoing.

7

.99

MICHALOPOULOS GALLERY. 617 Bienville St., 558-0505; www. michalopoulos.com — Paint-

4/10 EXPIRES 11/0

ings by James Michalopoulos, ongoing.

ONLY CASH & CARRY PONS. COUPON ANY OTHER COU NOT VALID W/ ENT AT TIME OF PURCHASE. MUST BE PRES

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MICHELLE Y WILLIAMS GALLERY. 835 Julia St., 585-1945; www.michelleywilliams.com —

hydrangea s in stock on ly

Works by Michelle Y. Williams, ongoing.

3

MYSTIC BLUE SIGN SHOP. 2212 Magazine St., 525-4691 — “Twenty-first Century

Lettering Art,” an exhibition of archived hand-lettering, through Oct. 30.

PAGE 45

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PER STEM

EXPIRES 11/04/10 NOT VALID CASH & CARRY ONLY W/ ANY OTH ER COU MUST BE PRE SENT AT TIM PONS. COUPON E OF PURCHA SE.

NEW ORLEANS ARTWORKS. 727 Magazine St., 529-7279 — Works by Dave Lindsley, Mark Waguespack, Imen Djouini, Jonathan Taube, through Oct. 30. NEWCOMB ART GALLERY. Tulane University, Woldenberg Art Center, 314-2406; www. newcombartgallery.com —

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

Photography by Christopher Porche West, ongoing.

GUTHRIE CONTEMPORARY. 3815 Magazine St., 897-2688; www.guthriecontemporary. com — Paintings by Susan Dory; “No Place Like Home,” photographs by Jennifer Shaw; “Nan Iris” by Suk Ja Kang; sculpture by Ingrid Schmid; all through Nov. 5. “Impact,” works by Bernd Haussmann;“Schemata,” works by Susan Dory; both ongoing.

ART

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and national artists, ongoing.

PEARL ART GALLERY. 4421 Magazine St., 228-5840 — Works by Cindy and Drue Hardegree, Erica Dewey, John Womack, Sontina, Lorraine Jones and S. Lee, ongoing. PHOTO WORKS NEW ORLEANS. 521 St. Ann St., 593-9090; www. photoworksneworleans.com —

Photography by Louis Sahuc, ongoing.

POET’S GALLERY. 3113 Magazine St., 899-4100 — “Carnival of

Saints and Souls,” a group exhibition featuring handmade dolls, puppets and photographs, through November.

REINA GALLERY. 4132 Magazine St., 895-0022; www.reinaart. com — “Vintage New Orleans

Artists,” watercolors, etchings and folk art; “Patrons Saints,” works by Shelley Barberot; both ongoing.

layered silkscreen wall installations by Winifred Ross Reilly, through Oct. 14. RHINO CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS COMPANY. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www.rhinocrafts.com — Works by Darrin

and Yolanda Butler, Greg Little, Tress Turner and other New Orleans artists, ongoing.

RIVERSTONE GALLERIES. 719 Royal St., 412-9882; 729 Royal St., 581-3688; Riverwalk, 1 Poydras St., Suite 36, 566-0588; 733 Royal St., 525-9988; www.riverstonegalleries.net — Multimedia

works by Ricardo Lozano, Michael Flohr, Henry Ascencio, Jaline Pol and others, ongoing. ROBERE LORD GALLERY. 2375 Tchoupitoulas St., 267-5802; www.roberelordgallery.com — New paintings by Elsie

Semmes, through Oct. 30.

RODRIGUE STUDIO. 721 Royal St., 581-4244; www.georgerodrigue.com — Works by George Rodrigue, ongoing. ROSETREE GLASS STUDIO & GALLERY. 446 Vallette St., Algiers Point, 366-3602; www. rosetreeglass.com — Hand-

blown glasswork, ongoing.

paintings and stitchings on handmade mini-quilts, through Oct. 30.

SLIDELL ART LEAGUE GALLERY. Historic Slidell Train Depot, 1827 Front St., Suite 201, (985) 8479458 — “Out of the Blue,” a

group exhibition and competition, through Feb. 3. SOREN CHRISTENSEN GALLERY. 400 Julia St., 569-9501; www. sorengallery.com — Ceramic

works by Bradley Sabin and works by William Dunlap, through October.

STELLA JONES GALLERY. Place St. Charles, 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 132, 568-9050 — “The

Edge of Spirit,” drawings and mixed-media sculptures by Donald Locke, through Nov. 27. STEVE MARTIN STUDIO. 624 Julia St., 566-1390; www.stevemartinfineart.com — Contemporary sculpture and paintings by Steve Martin and other Louisiana artists, ongoing. STUDIO BFG. 2627 Desoto St., 942-0200; www.studiobfg. com — “Peel Sessions: First

Installment,” works by Tina Stanley, ongoing.

STUDIO GALLERY. 338 Baronne St., Third Floor, 529-3306 — Works by YA/YA artists, ongoing. TAYLOR BERCIER FINE ART. 233 Chartres St., 527-0072 — “Fever Dreams,” drawings and paintings by Thomas Woodruff, through Oct. 22. THOMAS MANN GALLERY I/O. 1812 Magazine St., 581-2113; www.thomasmann.com — “Robot Invasion,” a group exhibition featuring wearable and sculptural robots, through Nov. 14. “Where’s the Money?” group exhibit interpreting the economy, ongoing. TRIPOLO GALLERY. 401 N. Columbia St., (985) 893-1441 —

Works by Bill Binnings, Robert Cook, Donna Duffy, Scott Ewen, Juli Juneau, Kevin LeBlanc, Ingrid Moses, Gale Ruggiero, Robert Seago and Scott Upton, ongoing.

TROUSER HOUSE. 4105 St. Claude Ave. — “Zine Library,” an exhibit of artist-made magazines, through November. VENUSIAN GARDENS ART GALLERY. 2601 Chartres St., 943-7446; www.venusiangardens.com —

“Luminous Sculpture,” works by

by Betty Petri; “The Solitary Chair,” sculpture by Michael Moreau; both ongoing.

BACCHANAL. 600 Poland Ave., 948-9111 — “Coming Home:

in in e

a

ALVAR LIBRARY. 913 Alvar St., 596-2667 — “Youth,” sculpture

!

SPARE SPACES

Friday, october 15

jason marsalis with beer and wine from Southern eagle diStributor

2005-2009,” photographs by Lee Celano, ongoing.

BELLA NOLA. 4236 Magazine St., 897-9499; www.bellanola.net — Paintings by Mario

Ortiz, ongoing.

BUD’S BROILER. 500 City Park Ave., 486-2559 — Works by

Andrew Bascle, Evelyn Menge and others, ongoing.

CAFE AT THE SQUARE. 500 St. Charles Ave., 304-8345; www. cafeatthesquare.com — On-site

paintings by Al Champagne, through October.

6:00-8:00 P.m. • $10 aT The door • free for ThNoc members • 21 & older

THE HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION  The Williams Research Center

533 Royal Street

( 504 ) 523-4662

www.hnoc.org

CAFE MINH. 4139 Canal St., 4826266 — Photographs by Jim

Thorns, through December.

CAMPBELL’S COFFEE & TEA. 516 S. Tyler St., Covington, (985) 2466992; www.campbellscoffee. com — Multimedia works by

Margaux Hymel, ongoing.

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR. 5535 Tchoupitoulas St., 891-8500; www.dosjefescigarbar.com —

Works by Mario Ortiz, ongoing. DRISCOLL ANTIQUES. 8500 Oak St., 866-7795; www.driscollantiques.com — Works by Sandra

Horstman Roberts, ongoing.

FUEL. 4807 Magazine St., 8955757; www.fuelcoffeehouse. net — Watercolors laminated

onto wood by William Smith, ongoing.

HAZELNUT NEW ORLEANS. 5515 Magazine St., 891-2424; www. hazelnutneworleans.com — Photography by Roy Barloga, ongoing. HI-HO LOUNGE. 2239 St. Claude Ave., 945-4446 — Works by Robin Durand, Brad Edelman, Tara Eden, Eden Gass and others, ongoing. HOTEL LE CIRQUE. 2 Lee Circle, 962-0900; www.hotellecirqueneworleans.com — “Cemetery-

scape 2010,” a photography exhibit by Save Our Cemetaries, through Nov. 3.

INTERIORS AND IMPORTS. 813 Florida St., Mandeville — Paintings by Annie Strack, ongoing. PAGE 47

Guns of the DEA Join local DEA Agents as they showcase weapons they encounter-at home and abroad-as they fight the war on drugs.

Saturday, October 9, 2010, 2pm The Old U.S Mint

Louisiana State Museum 400 Esplanade Ave., New Orleans Free & Open to the Public For more information call (504) 568-8526 Visit us on the web at: www.targetamerica.org

In partnership with: Louisiana State Museum, Louisiana Department of Culture, Recreation and Tourism, Fox 8, Drug Enforcement Administration.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

REYNOLDS-RYAN ART GALLERY. Isidore Newman School, 5333 Danneel St., 896-6369; www. newmanschool.org — Multi-

Sheila Phipps, ongoing.

SIBLEY GALLERY. 3427 Magazine St., 899-8182 — “Unearthed,”

Concerts in the Courtyard

works by Juli Juneau; works from the New Orleans Photo Alliance; both ongoing.

R

ONE SUN GALLERY. 616 Royal St., (800) 501-1151 — Works by local

SHEILA’S FINE ART STUDIO. 1427 N. Johnson St., 473-3363; www. sheilaart.com — Works by

A WORK OF ART GALLERY. 8212 Oak St., 862-5244 — Glass

h

Water media by Janet Gildermaster, ceramic by Lark Smith, acrylic on metal by Gloria Ross, through October.

Genti H2O,” works by Shmuela Padnos, ongoing.

ings by Will Smith, ongoing.

s

OAK STREET GALLERY. 111 N. Oak St., Hammond, (985) 345-0521 —

Travis and Lexi Linde, ongoing.

SALONE DELL’ARTES ARTEMISIA. 3000 Royal St., 481-5113 — “I

Eric Ehlenberger, ongoing. WMSJR. 1061 Camp St., 2999455; www.wmsjr.com — Paint-

R

“Voices Inside: The Form and Function of Baskets,” more than 200 baskets from around the world; “Creative Environs: Art of the Newcomb Pottery”; both through Oct. 17.

RUSTY PELICAN ART. 4031 St. Claude Ave., 218-5727; www.rustypelicanart.com — Works by

T he his T or ic Ne w or l e a N s col l e c TioN Pr e seN T s

o

PAGE 43

ART

45

46

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

PAGE 45 INTERNATIONAL HOUSE. 221 Camp St., 553-9550; www.ihotel. com — Paintings by YA/YA se-

nior guild and alumni, ongoing.

JAX BREWERY. 600 Decatur St., 299-7163 — Works by YA/YA

youth artists, ongoing.

JW MARRIOTT NEW ORLEANS. 614 Canal St., Suite 4, 525-6500; www.marriott.com — Works by

Charlene Insley, ongoing.

LA DIVINA GELATERIA. 3005 Magazine St, 342-2634; www. ladivinagelateria.com — “i genti h2o,” pantings and mixed media by Shmuela Padnos, through October. LIBERTY’S KITCHEN. 422 1/2 S. Broad St., 822-4011 — Paintings on canvas by YA/YA artists, ongoing. LIZANO’S GLASS HAUS. 3400 Cleary Ave., Suite B, Metairie, 4541144 — Fused-glass works by

Paulette Lizano, ongoing.

MCKEOWN’S BOOKS AND DIFFICULT MUSIC. 4737 Tchoupitoulas St., 895-1954 — “The Book of Kells,

Revisited,” encaustic paintings by Patricia Kaschalk, ongoing.

MIMI’S IN THE MARIGNY. 2601 Royal St., 872-9868 — Drawings

and watercolors by Harriet Burbeck, through October.

MOJO COFFEE HOUSE. 1500 Magazine St., 525-2244; www. myspace.com/mojoco — Photographs by Marc Pagani, ongoing.

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE. 5110 Danneel St., 8913381; www.neutralground.org —

Work by local artists, ongoing. NEW ORLEANS CAKE CAFE & BAKERY. 2440 Chartres St., 9430010 — Oil landscapes of the

Ustabes by Will Smith, ongoing.

PEACHES RECORDS. 408 N. Peters St., 282-3322 — “Gospel and

Blues,” photographs by Rita

E n R E sio

F is

Ad

m

!

library with genealogy records.

SOUND CAFÉ. 2700 Chartres St., 947-4477 — Mixed-media paint-

AMISTAD RESEARCH CENTER. 6823 St. Charles Ave., 862-3222 — “Through a Crowd, Bravely:

ings by YA/YA alumnus Gerard Caliste, ongoing.

SURREY’S CAFE & JUICE BAR. 1418 Magazine St., 524-3828; www. surreyscafeandjuicebar.com — Watercolor, pen and ink series of New Orleans landmarks by Will Smith, ongoing. YELLOW MOON BAR. 800 France St., (504) 944-0441; www.yellowmoonbar.com — Mural by Mike Frolich, ongoing.

CALL FOR ARTISTS ART SPILL. The Collective World

Art Community seeks applications for a juried show of artwork and crafts in November. Visit www.collectiveworldartcommuntiy.com for details. Submission deadline is Tuesday. BATON ROUGE GALLERY. The

gallery invites artists of all mediums to apply for membership. Visit www.batonrougegallery. org for details. Submission deadline is Tuesday.

RUBY PRIZE. Southern Rep will award $10,000, a weeklong development workshop during the New Play Bacchanal and a sponsored trip to New York to a female playwright of color. Visit www.southernrep.com for details. Submission deadline is Nov. 1. ZULU SOCIAL AID & PLEASURE CLUB. The group seeks an artist

to design its 2011 poster. Call 610-7072 or visit www.zulusapclub.org for details. Submission deadline is Friday.

MUSEUMS AMERICAN-ITALIAN MUSEUM & RESEARCH LIBRARY. 537 S. Peters St., 522-7294 — Permanent

exhibits of jazz artists, a St. Joseph’s altar replica, the Louisiana Italian-American Sports Hall of Fame and a research

The 50th Anniversary of Public School Desegregation in New Orleans,” an exhibition about the 1960 integration of William Frantz and McDonogh 19 elementary schools, through Dec. 22.

ASHÉ CULTURAL ARTS CENTER. 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org —

“Ashe in Retrospect: 19982008,” photographs by Morris Jones Jr., Eric Waters, Jeffrey Cook and others, ongoing.

BACKSTREET CULTURAL MUSEUM. 1116 St. Claude Ave.; www.backstreetmuseum.org —

Permanent exhibits of Mardi Gras Indian suits, jazz funeral memorabilia and social aid and pleasure club artifacts, ongoing.

CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER. 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www. cacno.org — “Freak Parade,” works by Thomas Woodruff, through Oct. 24. “As We See It: Youth Vision Quilt,” studentcreated quilt with more than 400 patches, ongoing. GEORGE & LEAH MCKENNA MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN ART. 2003 Carondelet St., 5867432; www.themckennamuseum. com — “Synesthesia: A Blending

of the Senses,” works by Carl Joe Williams, through Saturday.

GOSH MUSEUM. 2065 Second St., Slidell, (985) 646-6118 — “Water-

ways to Railways: A Bicentennial Exhibition,” rare photographs and artifacts depicting Slidell’s history, through Jan. 7.

“Mignon Faget: A Life in Art and Design,” textiles, jewelry, prints, linoleum blocks, drawings and glassware by the jewelry designer, through Jan. 2. LONGUE VUE HOUSE AND GARDENS. 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue.com — “Waters

from the Shifting Series,” photographs depicting Louisiana wetlands, swamps, barrier islands and the Gulf of Mexico, through Oct. 26. “Untitled No. 6029,” sculpture by Eric Dallimore, through December.

LOUISIANA CHILDREN’S MUSEUM. 420 Julia St., 523-1357; www.lcm.org — “Mr. Rogers’

Neighborhood: A Hands-On Exhibit”; “Fetch,” a scavenger hunt designed to develop problem-solving skills; “Team Turtle Training Camp,” handson exhibit designed to teach kids how to make healthy choices; all ongoing.

LOUISIANA FILM MUSEUM. Montrel’s Bistro, 1000 N. Peters St., 524-4747; www.louisianafilmmuseum.org — The museum

features props, costumes, video clips, still photographs, posters and other exhibits from major films produced in Louisiana.

LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM. Old U.S. Mint, 400 Esplanade Ave., 568-6968 — “Target America: Opening Eyes to the Damage Drugs Cause,” an interactive exhibit exploring the damaging effects of illegal drugs, through Nov. 24. LOUISIANA SUPREME COURT MUSEUM. Louisiana Supreme Court, 400 Royal St., 310-2149; www.lasc.org — The Supreme

fossils, taxidermy, folk art, kitsch, Americana and more.

Court of Louisiana Historical Society sponsors the museum’s exhibitions of the people and institutions that have contributed to the development of Louisiana law for 300 years.

HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION. 533 Royal St., 5234662; www.hnoc.org — Early

MAIN LIBRARY. 219 Loyola Ave., 529-7323; www.nutrias. org — “Hidden from History:

GREAT AMERICAN ALLIGATOR MUSEUM. 2051 Magazine St., 5235525 — The museum features

Louisiana furniture from the Magnolia Mound Plantation collection, through Dec. 11.

Unknown New Orleanians,” photographs of the city’s working poor, ongoing.

Featuring MICROBREWERY

Pontchartrain Pilsner Bayou Bock Strawberry Ale

Oktoberfest 2010 A Traditional Bavarian FAMILY Event

Register for the Oktoberfest Family Fun Run to benefit KidSense and Angels on Earth Foundation hbb 10-01 heiner brau gambit 9.625x2.569 V 3.indd 1

“Absinthe Visions,” photographs by Damian Hevia, ongoing.

NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM. 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — “Loyal Forces:

The Animals of World War II,” artifacts focusing on animals employed and encountered in the war, through Oct. 17. NEW ORLEANS AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM. 1418 Gov. Nicholls St., 566-1136; www.noaam.com — “Sumpt’n to See, Native Son

SOUTHERN FOOD & BEVERAGE MUSEUM. Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood. org — “New Orleans con Sabor

Comes Home,” paintings by Ted Ellis; “Drapetomania: A Disease Called Freedom,” a collection of artifacts by Derrick Joshua Beard; both through November.

Latino,” an exhibit highlighting the legacy of Latin cuisine in New Orleans, through Nov. 15. “Consider the Oyster,” oyster plates from Jim and Diane Gossen’s private collection; “The Don Effect,” an exhibit based on the Goat and the Road theater and dance production of the same name; both through December. “Acadian to Cajun: Forced Migration to Commercialization,” a multimedia exhibit; “Laissez Faire — Savoir Fare,” the cuisine of Louisiana and New Orleans; “Eating in the White House — America’s Food”; all ongoing.

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma. org — “Scents and Sensibility,”

125 objects covering the history of perfume bottles; “Ancestors and Descendants: Ancient Southwestern America at the Dawn of the Twentieth Century,” photographs, artifacts and archival research from Tulane University’s George Hubbard Pepper Native American Archive; both through Oct. 24. “Residents and Visitors: 20th Century Photographs of Louisiana,” a collaboration with the Historic New Orleans Collection, through March 27. “Peter Carl Faberge and Other Russian Masters,” permanent collection of Faberge objects; “Six Shooters,” photographs from the New Orleans Photo Alliance, both ongoing.

TANGIPAHOA AFRICAN-AMERICAN HERITAGE MUSEUM & BLACK VETERANS ARCHIVES. 1600 Phoenix Square, Hammond, (985) 542-4259; www.africanamericanheritagemuseum. com — The museum exhibits

works that preserve and tell the history of African-American ancestors in Louisiana and also houses the country’s first memorial to black Vietnam War veterans, ongoing.

NEW ORLEANS PHARMACY MUSEUM. 514 Chartres St., 5658027; www.pharmacymuseum. org — Exhibits on 19th-century

pharmacy, medicine and health care, all ongoing.

TEKREMA CENTER FOR ART AND CULTURE. 5640 Burgundy St. —

OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART. 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — “The

Collection of intuitive art from Papa New Guinea, through Nov. 15.

Art of Country Music,” items from the Marty Stuart Collec-

Live Music

WWW.HEINERBRAU.COM

tion, through October. “The Big Spill,” a Center for Southern Craft and Design spotlight exhibition, through Dec. 5. “One Block: A New Orleans Neighborhood Rebuilds,” photographs by Dave Anderson; Paintings by Robert Julian Onderdonk; “Walker Evans’ Louisiana: Photographs from the Collection of Jessica Lange;” “The Michael Brown and Linda Green Collection;” all through Jan. 2. Works from 1956 exhibited at Tenth Street Galleries in New York and new works by Robert Tannen, ongoing.

MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN COCKTAIL. 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.museumoftheamericancocktail.org —

German-Style Catering

BAVARIAN MUSIC MO’ JELLY BLUES BAND Bring Your Own Blankets & Chairs • Rain or Shine! 226 Lockwood Street • Downtown Covington, LA 5:00 - 8:00 p.m., Fri., Oct. 8th ~ 2:00 - 9:00 p.m., Sat., Oct. 9th

Saturday, October 9th • Bogue Falaya Park • 9:00 am go to heinerbrau.com to download a registration form.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

NEOPHOBIA. 2855 Magazine St., 899-2444; www.neophobia-nola.com — Works by Tanner, ongoing.

Posselt, ongoing.

ART

47 9/22/10 4:19 PM

long live

sTage

lunch

Now Open For lunch WedNesdays & Thursdays, in addition to Fridays

2-Course Chef ’s Specials $3 Bloody Marys–Lemon Basil, Chipotle, Bienvenue

l lisTings

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly. com; FAX:483-3116

Get in on the Act

preview

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

TheaTeR ALIENS, IMMIGRANTS AND OTHER EVILDOERS. Shadowbox

Theatre, 2400 St. Claude Ave., 523-7469; www.theshadowboxtheatre.com — José Torres-Tama’s “sci-fi Latino noir” depicts the struggles of immigrants by satirizing their status as “aliens.” Tickets $10 general admission; two tickets for $15. 8 p.m. ThursdaySunday. ALMOST, MAINE. Lower Depths

488-1000 • 900 City Park ave • ralPhsonthePark.Com Dinner Nightly & Sunday Brunch | FREE Valet Parking

Joe Krown on the Piano tues - thurs 5 - 8 P.m. @ the Bar

Theater, Loyola University New Orleans, 6363 St. Charles Ave.; www.loyno.edu — In John Cariani’s play, characters in a remote town experience unexpected romance against the backdrop of a midwinter chill. Tickets $12 general admission, $8 students, seniors and children. 8 p.m. ThursdaySaturday.

THE BEDROOM SUITE NEW DIRECTORS SHOWCASE. Backyard

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

rop gambit - now serve lunch final.indd 1

48

9/30/10 2:27 PM

Join the many New Orleans community groups, families and friends who will share the light of their loved ones lost to drugs and the commitment to carry on their promise.

Washington Artillery Park, New Orleans (Across from Jackson Square)

Events begins at 5:00pm Saturday, October 9, 2010 Music by the Treme Brass Band.

For more information, please call (504) 568-6936 Visit us on the web at: www.targetamerica.org

Ballroom, 3519 St. Claude Ave., 945-9936; www.frontmanshow.com — Short works set in bedrooms showcase four new directors. Plays include Jean Cocteau’s The Human Voice, Lucille Fletcher’s Sorry, Wrong Number, Tennessee Williams’ Talk to Me Like the Rain and Let Me Listen and Jenny Magnus’ The Strange. Tickets $10. 8 p.m. FridaySaturday and Oct. 22-23, 3 p.m. Sunday and Oct. 17.

CHICKEN LITTLE. Le Petit

Théâtre du Vieux Carré, 616 St. Peter St., 522-2081; www. lepetittheatre.com — Ricky Graham puts his spin on the classic story of the sky falling in the children’s production. Tickets $15-$20. 2:30 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. Saturdays, 12:30 p.m. and 2:30 p.m. Sundays through Oct. 17.

HAIRSPRAY. Le Petit Théâtre du

Vieux Carré, 616 St. Peter St., 522-2081; www.lepetittheatre. com — A plump teen gets her dream of dancing on a popular 1962 TV show and tries to use her newfound stardom to racially integrate the program. Tickets start at $31. 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday.

LET FREEDOM SWING! National

Presented by the DEA Educational Foundation in association with the Louisiana State Museum, CSAP and Target America New Orleans, part of the national travelling exhibit, Target America: Opening Eyes to the Damage Drugs Cause.

World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — The musical highlights wartime-era big band and swing music. Visit www. stagedoorcanteen.org for

Tosh Pit Comic Daniel Tosh lets YouTube do most of the work for him on his Comedy Central show Tosh.0, but his biting snark and often politically incorrect riffs are hallmarks of his stand-up routine as well. Ask him to repeat the one about Hurricane Katrina giving New Orleans the bath it needed. He performs at 7:30 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. Friday at the Mahalia Jackson Theater (801 N. Rampart St.; www.mahaliajacksontheater.com). Tickets $47.70 (including fees). — Will Coviello

details. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 1 p.m. Sunday. THE MYSTERY OF IRMA VEP. Le

Chat Noir, 715 St. Charles Ave., 581-5812; www.cabaretlechatnoir.com — Ricky Graham and Varla Jean Merman star in the Charles Ludlam satire. Tickets $29 (includes $5 drink credit). 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 6 p.m. Sunday, 2 p.m. Oct. 24.

PU-PU PLATTER. Candle Factory, 4537 N. Robertson St. — Fifteen shows from the upcoming New Orleans Fringe Festival present short preview performances. Free admission. 8 p.m. Saturday. SCREAM QUEENS: THE MUSICAL. Teatro Wego,

177 Sala Ave., Westwego, 885-2000; www.jpas.org — Bmovie actresses recount their experiences as horror movie stars in the interactive musical comedy. Tickets $20-$30. 7:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday through Oct. 17. TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD. Slidell Little Theatre, 2024 Nellie Drive,

Slidell, (985) 643-0556; www. slidell-slt.org — The theater hosts the stage adaptation of Harper Lee’s novel. Tickets $14 general admission, $7 children. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday through Oct. 17. TOUCH. Elm Theatre, 220 Julia

St., 218-0055; www.elmtheatre. org — A grief-stricken man tries to move on with his life after his wife is raped and murdered. Tickets $20. 7:30 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 6 p.m. Sunday through Oct. 17.

BuRlesque & CaBaReT BURLESQUE BALLROOM. Irvin

Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse, 300 Bourbon St., 553-2270; www. sonesta.com — Trixie Minx stars in the weekly burlesque show featuring the music of Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown. Call 553-2331 for details. 11:50 p.m. Friday.

HELPING NEW ORLEANS ONE STEP AT A TIME!

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

G ar den Di st r ict

stage THE MIDNIGHT REVUE. Starlight

by the Park, 834 N. Rampart St., 561-8939; www.starlightbythepark.com — Marcy Marcell directs a weekly femaleimpersonation jazz cabaret. Call for ticket information. Midnight Friday.

Opera OPERA RETURNS TO BOURBON STREET. The Inn on Bourbon

Hotel, 541 Bourbon St., 5247611; www.innonbourbon. com — The hotel and the New Orleans Opera Association present the free performance by Bon Operatit. 7 p.m. Wednesday.

DaNCe NOLA JITTERBUGS & BELLA BLUE’S BURLESQUE 101. AllWays

Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www.marignytheatre.org — The dance troupes perform. Tickets $15, $20 for both nights’ shows. 9 p.m. Friday-Saturday.

auDitiONs BARBERSHOP HARMONY SOCIETY. Christ the King Lutheran

Church, 1001 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 469-4740; www. ctk-nola.org — The Greater New Orleans Chapter holds new member auditions for its Mardi Gras Chorus. Call 3639001 or visit www.mardigraschorus.org for details. 7:15 p.m. Tuesday.

lege, City Park campus, Orleans Avenue, between City Park Avenue and Navarre Street, 671-5000; www.dcc.edu — The women’s chorus holds weekly auditions for new members. Call 453-0858 or visit www. crescentcitysound.com for details. 7 p.m. Monday.

COmeDy A.S.S.TRONOTS. La Nuit Com-

edy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — Four androids improvise a space voyage based on audience suggestions. Tickets $6. 8:30 p.m. Thursdays. BASED ON REAL LIFE. La Nuit

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The weekly long-form improv comedy show features some guys, a girl and someone named John Stewart. Tickets $6. 8:30 p.m. Saturday. BROWN! IMPROV COMEDY.

Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.

COMEDY CATASTROPHE. Lost

Love Lounge, 2529 Dauphine St., 400-6145 — The bar hosts a free weekly stand-up comedy show. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

COMEDY GUMBEAUX. Howlin’

Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.howlinwolf.com — Local comedians perform, and amateurs take the stage in the open mic portion. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Thursday.

COMEDY OPEN-MIC. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts a weekly open-mic comedy night. (Sign-up time is 10:45 p.m.) Tickets $8. 11 p.m. Friday. COMEDY SPORTZ NOLA. La Nuit

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts a safe-for-all-ages team comedy competition. Tickets $10. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday.

DANIEL TOSH. Mahalia Jackson Theater of the Performing Arts, 1201 St. Peters St., 525-1052; www.acetheatregroup.com — The television host and comedian performs. Tickets $37.50. 7:30 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. Friday. DYKES OF HAZARD. Rubyfruit Jungle, 1135 Decatur St.; www. myspace.com/rubyfruitjunglenola — Kristen Becker hosts a weekly comedy show with live music, sketch comedy, burlesque and more. Admission $5. 9 p.m. Friday. GOD’S BEEN DRINKING. La Nuit

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — Actors improvise a comedy based on audience suggestions. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Friday.

GROUND ZERO COMEDY. The

Maison, 508 Frenchmen St., 309-7137 — The show features local stand-up comedians. Sign-up is 7:30 p.m. Show is 8 p.m. IVAN’S OPEN MIC NIGHT. Rusty Nail, 1100 Constance St., 5255515 — The Rusty Nail hosts a weekly open-mic comedy and music night. 9 p.m. Tuesday. JESSICA HALEM. AllWays

Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www.marignytheatre.org — The comedian performs her “comedy concert” Everybody Likes You. Mandi Turner opens. Tickets $10 in advance, $12 at the door. 9 p.m. Thursday.

LA NUIT STAND-UP OPEN MIC.

La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039

PODIATRY

Freret St., 644-4300; www. nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts an open mic following the God’s Been Drinking show. 11 p.m. Fridays.

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Arms, 209 Decatur St., 525-5525 — Simple Play presents a weekly comedy show. 10 p.m. Thursday.

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MIKE STRECKER. Cutting Edge

Theater at Attractions Salon, 747 Robert Blvd., Slidell, (985) 639-8294 — The stand-up comedian performs. Tickets $17. Saturday.

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MIKE WELDON & DANE FAUCHEAUX. Gut-Buster Comedy

Room, Holiday Inn, 501 N. Hwy. 190, Covington, (800) 4654329; www.holidayinn.com — The stand-up comedians perform. Tickets $15. 9 p.m. Saturday. NATIONAL COMEDY COMPANY.

Yo Mama’s Bar & Grill, 727 St. Peter St., 522-1125 — The interactive improv comedy show features B97 radio personality Stevie G, Lynae LeBlanc, Jay Tombstone, Richard Mayer and others. Call 523-7469 or visit www.nationalcomedycompany.com for details. 10 p.m. Saturdays.

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PERMANENT DAMAGE STANDUP COMEDY. Bullets Sports Bar,

www.nolaartandcraft.com 504.944.7900

2441 A.P. Tureaud Ave., 9484003 — Tony Frederick hosts a stand-up comedy show with professional comedians. Free admission. 8 p.m. Wednesday. ROUNDHOUSE. La Nuit Com-

edy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — Comedians perform a barefoot, long-form improvisation show. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Friday.

SIDNEY’S STAND-UP OPEN MIC. Sidney’s, 1674 Barataria

Blvd., Marrero, 341-0103 — The show features professional, amateur and first-time comics. Free admission. Sign-up is 8 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Thursday. STAND-UP NOLA PRESENTS THE DISGRUNTLED CLOWN. Boom-

town Casino, Boomers Saloon, 4132 Peters Road, Harvey, 3667711; www.boomtownneworleans.com — The comedian performs. Free admission. 8 p.m. Wednesday.

STUPID TIME MACHINE. The

Factory, 8314 Oak St. — The improv group performs a weekly comedy show. Audiences are asked to bring their own chairs. Tickets $1-$6. 8:30 p.m. Tuesday. THINK YOU’RE FUNNY? Carrollton Station, 8140 Willow St., 865-9190; www.carrolltonstation.com — The weekly open-mic comedy showcase is open to all comics. Sign-up is 8:30 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Wednesday.

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CRESCENT CITY SOUND CHORUS. Delgado Community Col-

zeitgeistinc.net — The comedy troupe stars Johnathan Christiansen, Gant Laborde, Ken Lafrance, Bob Murrell and Kelli Rosher. Visit www.brownimprovcomedy.com for details. 10 p.m. Saturday.

49

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

Featured Chefs

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LISTINGS

BE THERE DO THAT

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

FAMILY Tuesday 5 KINDER GARDEN: BACK TO SCHOOL IN THE GARDEN .

Longue Vue House and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 4885488; www.longuevue.com — Children and accompanying adults explore the world of insects through age-appropriate activities. Tickets $12 general admission, $10 members. Call 488-5488 ext. 333 or email lvaughn@longuevue.com for details. 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. TODDLER TIME . Louisiana

Children’s Museum, 420 Julia St., 523-1357; www.lcm.org — The museum hosts special Tuesday and Thursday activities for children ages 3-under and their parents or caregivers. Admission $7.50, free for members. 10 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

Thursday 7 ART ACTIVITIES DURING AFTER HOURS. Ogden Museum of

Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — The Ogden offers art activities for kids during the weekly After Hours concerts. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

ABRACADABRA MAGIC SHOW.

Children’s Castle, 501 Williams Blvd., Kenner, 468-7231 — Irwin Royes, the World’s Smallest Magician, presents a magic show. Admission $5. 11:30 a.m.

EVENTS Tuesday 5 CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Broadway Street

Market, 200 Broadway St., 8615898; www.marketumbrella. org — The weekly market features fresh produce, kettle corn, Green Plate specials and flowers. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. DEALING WITH LOSS. West Jefferson Behavioral Medicine Center, 229 Bellemeade Blvd., Gretna, 391-2440 — The center offers a weekly support group. Call Doreen Fowler for details. 6 p.m. DEPRESSION AND BIPOLAR SUPPORT ALLIANCE . Tulane-

Lakeside Hospital, 4700 South I-10 Service Road West, Metairie — The peer support group meets the first and third

Tuesdays of every month. Visit www.dbsaneworleans.org for details. 7:30 p.m. DIVORCE AND BEYOND.

Counseling Solutions of Catholic Charities, 921 Aris Ave., Metairie, 835-5007 — A licensed clinical social worker helps group participants going through divorce. Call 835-5007 for details.

DOWNTOWN LUNCHTIME SPIRITUALITY SERIES.

Immaculate Conception Jesuit Church, 130 Baronne St., 5291477; www.jesuitchurch.net — Rev. Phoebe Roaf of Trinity Episcopal Church lectures on the topic “All You Need Is Love.” Visit www.loyno.edu/lplc/ downtown for details. Free admission. 12:30 p.m.

ROAD HOME ASSISTANCE . Community Center of St. Bernard, 1107 LeBeau St., Arabi, 281-2512 — Representatives are available at the center to assist homeowners with questions and concerns. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday. TOBACCO CESSATION CLASSES.

St. Tammany Parish Hospital Outpatient Pavilion, 1202 South Tyler St. — The eight-week program provides the tools necessary to becoming tobacco free. Pre-registration is required. Call (985) 898-4581 or email ccorizzo@stph.org for details. 11:30 a.m. Tuesday.

Wednesday 6 COVINGTON FARMERS MARKET. Covington City Hall, 609 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-1873 — The market offers fresh local goods every week. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. FRENCH MARKET FARMERS MARKET. French Market, French

Market Place, between Decatur and N. Peters streets, 522-2621; www.frenchmarket.org — The weekly market offers seasonal produce, seafood, prepared foods, smoothies and more. 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. GET TO KNOW GOD. Lost

& Found Center, 901 Independence St., 344-1234; www.lostandfoundcenter.org — The group meets every week to discuss Bible scripture. 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP. East

Jefferson General Hospital, 4200 Houma Blvd., Metairie, 454-4000; www.ejgh.org — The American Cancer Society sponsors a group for those who have experienced the death of a loved one. Call 456-5000 for details. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

HOW TO RECORD AN ORAL HISTORY. St. Tammany Parish

Library, Covington Branch, 310 W. 21st Ave., Covington, (985) 893-6280; www.sttammany.lib.la.us/covington. html — Benny Bruce presents and explains the process of recording interviews to capture

memories and family history. 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. INFANCY TO INDEPENDENCE .

St. Matthew/Central United Church of Christ, 1333 S. Carrollton Ave., 861-8196; www.stmatthew-nola.org — The parent-child education and support group uses enriching activities in music, art and play. Visit www.infancytoindependence.org for details. 9:30 a.m. to noon Wednesday-Thursday.

LGBT YOUTH PEER SUPPORT GROUP. LGBT Community

Center of New Orleans, 2114 Decatur St.; www.lgbtccno.org — The center provides a support group for 18- to 24-yearolds dealing with the struggles of coming out, sexuality, family and relationships. Email programs@lgbtccno.org for details. 7 p.m. Wednesday.

LUNCHBOX LECTURE . National

World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — The semi-monthly lecture series focuses on an array of World War II-related topics. Call 5281944 ext. 229 for details. Noon.

NEW ORLEANS MEDIA PANEL DISCUSSION SERIES. Louisiana

Humanities Center, 938 Lafayette St., Suite 300, 5234352; www.leh.org — The first installment of the series features Gambit editor Kevin Allman, author Jason Berry and New York Times writer Campbell Robertson discussing “Media and Democracy.” Call 620-2632 or email boyles@leh. org for details. 7 p.m. NEW ORLEANS PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB MEETING .

Harahan Senior Center, 100 Elodie St., 737-3810 — The monthly meeting presents an in-depth discussion of Google. Free admission. Email president@nopc.org or visit www. nopc.org for details. 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

SAVE OUR CEMETERIES CEMETERY TOURS. The group

conducts tours of New Orleans cemeteries. Call 525-3377 for details.

SPEED DATING . W Hotel

(Whiskey Blue), 333 Poydras St., 207-5016 — NOLAdating.com hosts a speed dating event for young professionals. Admission $35. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. TALENT SHOWCASE . Le Roux,

1700 Louisiana Ave. — Masse Media Consulting, KMP and Men of Business host a weekly “You’ve Got Talent” showcase open to all poets, singers, dancers and others. Call 899-4512 for details. General admission $10, performers $5. 9 p.m. to midnight. WEDNESDAY NIGHTS AT JW MARRIOTT. JW Marriott New

Orleans, 614 Canal St., Suite 4, 525-6500; www.marriott.com — The hotel showcases local music and art with spirit tastings and hors d’oeuvres. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

WESTWEGO FARMERS & FISHERIES MARKET. 484 Sala

Ave., Sala Avenue and Fourth Street, Westwego — The market offers organic produce, baked goods, jewelry, art and more, with live music and pony rides. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

alww2museum.org — The museum hosts WWII board and miniatures gaming on the first Thursday of every month. Preregistration required. 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Thursday 7

Constance St., 525-5515 — A portion of drink sales from the event featuring food, a silent auction and a performance by Young Fellaz Brass Band benefits underprivileged women and children. Free admission. 6 p.m. to 10 p.m.

CHANGES. Hey! Cafe, 4332

Magazine St., 891-8682 — The weekly meetings teach focusing, a method of directing attention outside one’s body to effect change. Call 232-9787 for details. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

DRINKING LIBERALLY NEW ORLEANS. Pravda, 1113 Decatur

St. — Progressives meet to share ideas and drink. 7 p.m. FRESH MARKET. Circle Food

Store, 1522 St. Bernard Ave. — The Downtown Neighborhood Market Consortium market features fresh produce, dairy, seafood, baked goods and more. EBT and WIC accepted. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

I HEART SOUTHERN STYLE . The

Factory, 8314 Oak St. — The event featuring vendors selling locally made fashions features music by Megaphone NOLA, DJ Eugene Oubliette and Breton Sound. Visit www.slowsouthernstyle.com for details. Admission $5 in advance, $10 at the door. 8 p.m. to 11 p.m.

I’M EVERY WOMAN . Howlin’ Wolf, 907 S. Peters St., 5229653; www.thehowlinwolf. com — The fundraiser for the New Orleans Women’s Shelter features live music, food, a silent auction and monologues performed by female leaders in New Orleans. Tickets start at $25. 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. IRON RAIL LADIES’ NIGHT. The

Iron Rail, 511 Marigny St., 9480963; www.ironrail.org — Iron Rail offers a weekly creative space for women. Email ladiesnight.ironrail@gmail.com for details. 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. SAFE SEX IN THE BIG EASY.

Private Residence, (call for details) — The event benefitting Planned Parenthood features live music, food, cocktails and an art raffle. Call 899-1447 for details. 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.

SISTAHS MAKING A CHANGE . Ashé Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — The group offers lessons in African dance and more, along with nutrition, health and wellness seminars. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday and Monday. STAIR TUTOR TRAINING . St.

Charles Avenue Presbyterian Church, 1545 State St. — The children’s literacy program trains tutors for the fall semester. Call 899-0820, email elizabeth@scapc.org or visit www. stairnola.org for details. 1:30 p.m to 3:30 p.m.

WARGAMES. National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nation-

WGIRLS NOLA COCKTAILS FOR A CAUSE . Rusty Nail, 1100

Friday 8 ADULT CHILDREN OF ALCOHOLIC/DYSFUNCTIONAL FAMILIES. Fair Grinds

Coffeehouse, 3133 Ponce de Leon Ave., 913-9073; www.fairgrinds.com — The weekly support group meets. Visit www. adultchildren.org for details. 6:15 p.m.

BORDEAUX WINE TASTING . Martin Wine Cellar Deli & Catering, 714 Elmeer Ave., Metairie, 896-7350; www. martinwine.com — The tasting of 17 Bordeaux wines features affordable labels. Admission $30. 6 p.m. HELLUVA HULLABALOO AUCTION & PARTY. Tulane University,

Lavin-Bernick University Center, McAlister Drive, 247-1507 — WVUE anchor and reporter Lee Zurik is the host of the auction benefiting Tulane’s student athletes. Email auction@tulane. edu or visit https://tulane. ejoinme.org/auction for details. Admission $50. 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. TOP CHEF NOLA GALA .

University of New Orleans, Lakefront Campus, Lindy C. Boggs International Conference Center, 2000 Lakeshore Drive — New Orleans chefs create gourmet versions of classic school lunches at the event benefiting New Beginnings Schools Foundation. Visit www. unocharternetwork.net for details. Admission $95 patron party, $75 general admission. 6 p.m patron party, 7 p.m. general admission.

Saturday 9 BROAD STREET BAZAAR . 300 N. Broad St., corner of Bienville Street — The monthly market features health screenings, jewelry, food vendors and more. Call 561-7495 or visit www. broadcommunityconnections. org for details. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. C.G. JUNG SOCIETY OF NEW ORLEANS PROGRAM. Parker

Memorial United Methodist Church, 1130 Nashville Ave., 895-1222 — Jungian analyst Marilyn Marshall presents the workshop “The Kiss and the Longing of the Soul.” Tickets $45 general admission, $35 Society members. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

COAST GUARD HORSES & WWII . National World War II

Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — WWII veteran J.J. Witmeyer presents the lecture in conjunction with the museum’s Loyal Forces: The Animals of WWII exhibit. Free admission. Noon to 1 p.m.

CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Magazine Street

Market, Magazine and Girod streets, 861-5898; www.marketumbrella.org — The weekly market features fresh produce, flowers and food. 8 a.m. to noon. EAGLE WATCH . Fontainebleau

State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — A park ranger leads a viewing of the park’s eagle nest. 3 p.m.

ERACE NEW ORLEANS MEETING .

J. Singleton School, 1924 Philip St., 581-2388 — ERACE meets for its weekly discussion group. Call 866-1163 for details. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

FEAST OF INTERNATIONAL FLAVORS. Private Residence,

(call for details) — International Hospital for Children’s fundraiser features international cuisine from local restaurants, live entertainment and a raffle. Call 251-3264 for details. 7 p.m. to 11 p.m.

GENTILLYFEST. Pontchartrain Park, Press Drive and Prentiss Avenue — The two-day festival features food from local restaurants, children’s activities, free health screenings, an arts and crafts village and music by Kermit Ruffins, Rockin’ Dopsie and others. Free admission. Visit www.gentillyfest.com for details. 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday, noon to 6 p.m. Sunday. GERMAN COAST FARMERS MARKET. Ormond Plantation,

13786 River Road, Destrehan — The market features a wide range of fresh vegetables, fruits, flowers and other items. Visit www.germancoastfarmersmarket.org for details. 8 a.m. to noon. GRETNA FARMERS MARKET.

Gretna Farmers Market, Huey P. Long Avenue, between Third and Fourth streets, Gretna, 362-8661 — The weekly rainor-shine market features more than 30 vendors offering a wide range of fruits, vegetables, meats and flowers. Free admission. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

GUNS OF THE D.E.A. Old U.S. Mint, 400 Esplanade Ave., 568-6990; lsm.crt.state.la.us/ site/mintex.htm — Local Drug Enforcement Administration agents showcase specialized weapons used in drug trade combat in the Gulf and abroad in conjunction with the Mint’s Target America: Opening Eyes to the Damage Drugs Cause exhibit. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. HALLOWEEN MURDER MYSTERY DINNER THEATRE . Magnolia

School Nims Center, 100

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

Saturday 9

EVENTS

PAGE 53

51

a sample of our

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· Truffle Butternut Squash Bisque w/Sage Creme Fraiche salad

· Braised Pork Cheek Salad, Wild Sylvetta Ricola Arugula, Pecorino & Piperacle Vinaigrette entree

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

FRIDAY LUNCH • SAT & SUN BRUNCH • TUES-SUN DINNER

MAND! E D R A L POPU BACK BY All the songs, sass and swing of the 1940s starring eight terrific singers and dancers, Weekends, through November 21. Friday & Saturday Evenings Sunday Brunch Matinee

Dinner Seating 6:00pm – 6:30pm Showtime 8:00pm Dinner & Show: $60 SHOW ONLY: $30

Brunch Seating 11:00am – 11:30pm Showtime 1:00pm Brunch & Show: $55 Balcony Brunch & Show: $50

NÉSDEASY TIN MA WED E

RY LIVE EVE

Take a nostalgic journey with our charming vocal trio and their spirited renditions of 1940s musical classics. Plus a delightful lunch by Chef John Besh and the American Sector restaurant! Every Wednesday through November 24 Buffet Lunch: 12 Noon; Performance: 1:00pm $34 per person, including tax and gratuity

ReseRvations on-line at www.stagedoorcanteen.org or call 504.528.1943 Sponsored in part by LA Office of Entertainment Development and IMLS Magazine Street at Poeyfarre H 504-528-1943 H www.stagedoorcanteen.org

52 WW2-13950_Fall_lineups_1oct_Gambit_4c_ad.indd 1

9/29/10 2:24 PM

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com EVENTS PAGE 51

Central Ave. — The event is an interactive murder mystery dinner benefiting Magnolia School’s Supported Independent Living program. Visit www.murdermysterymagnolia.eventbrite.com for details. Admission $35 (includes dinner and a drink). 6 p.m. HERE FOR LIFE GALA . Sheraton New

Orleans Hotel, 500 Canal St., 5955511; www.sheratonneworleans. com — The event benefitting the Touro Family Birthing Center features a seated dinner and a performance by Irma Thomas. Call 897-8943 or visit www.touro.com/ gala for details. Admission starts at $200. 6 p.m. patron party, 7:30 p.m. general admission.

HORSES AS WORKING ANIMALS.

National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — The NOPD Mounted Patrol presents the lecture in conjunction with the museum’s Loyal Forces: The Animals of WWII exhibit. Free admission. 10 a.m. to noon. MAGAZINE STREET BLUES FESTIVAL .

Uptown, corner of Magazine Street and Napoleon Avenue — The festival features live music from Soul Rebels, The Joe Krown Trio, Honey Island Swamp band and others, as well as food from local restaurants, an artists’ village and children’s activities. 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday.

NATURE: A CLOSER LOOK .

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 6773668 — Park rangers lead a weekly nature hike. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

NATURE’S BEST DEFENSE: CAMOUFLAGE . Fontainebleau State

Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — The program discusses the different forms of camouflage of prey and predators found throughout the park. 11 a.m.

NEW ORLEANS ON TAP. City Park,

1 Palm Drive — The tailgate-style event benefiting the LA/SPCA features live music by Johnny Sketch and the Dirty Notes and 200 beers to taste. Call 762-3307 or email lisa@la-spca.org for details. 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. O WHAT A NIGHT GALA . Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www. ogdenmuseum.org — The Ogden Museum of Southern Art and University of New Orleans’ annual gala honors actress and art collector Jessica Lange and local philanthropist T.G. Solomon and features auctions, food, live music and cocktails. Email sstrachan@ogdenmuseum.org or visit www.ogdenmuseum.org/owan_2010.html for details. 6 p.m. to 11:30 p.m.

& Garden Center, 4421 Jefferson Hwy., Jefferson — LA/SPCA volunteers and counselors facilitate pet adoptions. Call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org for details. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

SPINAL CORD INJURY SUPPORT GROUP. Touro Infirmary, 1401

Foucher St. — The group provides a place to share and find resources for those overcoming injury. Call 8978419 for details. 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.

ST. CLAUDE SANKOFA MARKETPLACE.

Sankofa Marketplace, St. Claude and Caffin avenues — The monthly market features health screenings, children’s activities, a farmers market, art, live music and more. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. UPPER NINTH WARD MARKET.

Frederick Douglass Senior High School, 3820 St. Claude Ave. — The weekly Upper Ninth Ward Farmers Market offers fresh local produce, seafood, bread, cheese and plants. Sponsored by the Downtown Neighborhood Market Consortium. Call 482-5722 or email ggladney@ therenaissanceproject.la for details. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. WRITING WORKSHOP. United

Teachers of New Orleans, 4718 Paris Ave., 304-2160; www.utno.org — Students at the Center, Andover Bread Loaf Writing Workshop and United Teachers of New Orleans offer a free monthly writing workshop for New Orleans public school teachers. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Sunday 10 DIMENSIONS OF LIFE DIALOGUE .

New Orleans Lyceum, 618 City Park Ave., 460-9049; www.lyceumproject.com — The nonreligious, holistic discussion group focuses on human behavior with the goal of finding fulfillment and enlightenment. Call 368-9770 for details. Free. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

DRINK ’N’ DRAW. Circle Bar, 1032 St. Charles Ave., 588-2616 — The weekly event features a live model, happy hour drink specials and art instruction upon request. Call 2999455 for details. Admission $20. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. GAYMAZING RACE . CAN Project Office, 507 Frenchmen St. — The event celebrates the 10th anniversary of the NO/AIDS Task Force’s CAN Project with a French Quarter pub crawl with the chance to compete for prizes. Visit www. noaidstaskforce.org for details. Admission $10. 11 a.m. pre-crawl brunch and registration, noon to 2:30 p.m. pub crawl, 3 p.m. New Orleans Saints game post-party. MAKING STRIDES AGAINST BREAST CANCER . Roosevelt Mall, City Park,

1 Palm Drive — The family-friendly 5K race benefits the American Cancer Society. Call 833-4024 or visit www.makingstridesneworleans.org for details. Registration 7:30 a.m., race 8:30 a.m. NEEDLE JUNKIES. 3 Ring Circus’ The

Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 5692700; www.3rcp.com — The knitting group meets every Sunday. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

PRIMITIVE WOODWORKING . Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 6773668 — Park rangers host a weekly demonstration of woodworking techniques. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

panel of judges and an audience of business professionals, social activists and community members. Visit www.seno-nola.org for details. Application deadline is Oct. 15.

VIEUX CARRE FORBIDDEN HOUSE & GARDEN TOUR . Fredrick Guess

based nonprofit seeks homes still damaged (50 percent or more) by Hurricane Katrina to be rebuilt. Call 942-0444, ext. 244 for details.

Studio, 910 Royal St., 581-4596; www.fredrickguessstudio.com — The Krewe of Armeinius leads the tour of rarely seen private homes and gardens to raise funds for its Carnival ball tableau. The event also features refreshments and a silent auction. Visit www. kreweofarmeinius.org for details. Admission $20 minimum donation. 10:30 a.m.

PROJECT HOMECOMING . The faith-

RIVER OF WORDS COMPETITION . The

Louisiana Center for the Book in the State Library of Louisiana and the Louisiana Writing Project conduct a poetry and art contest for children 5-19. Visit www.riverofwords.org/ contest/index.html for details. Submission deadline is Dec. 1.

Monday 11

CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS

CBT GROUP. Counseling Solutions of Catholic Charities, 921 Aris Ave., Metairie, 835-5007 — A licensed clinical social worker facilitates a 12-week Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) group for depression. Call for details.

AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY.

TOASTMASTERS MEETING . Milton H. Latter Memorial Library, 5120 St. Charles Ave. — New Orleans Toastmasters Club hosts an open weekly meeting (excepting holidays) to hone the skills of speaking, listening and thinking. Call 251-8600 or visit www.notoast234. freetoasthost.org for details. 6 p.m. UNITED NONPROFITS OF GREATER NEW ORLEANS. Nonprofit Central,

1824 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 895-2361; www.nonprofit-central. org — Nonprofit Central hosts a weekly meeting for all leaders of nonprofit groups. 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS INTERNATIONAL SONGWRITING CONTEST. Open to amateurs and

professionals, the competition is judged by music industry stars and awards more than $150,000 in cash and prizes. Visit www.songwritingcompetition.com for details. Submission deadline is Wednesday.

JOAN OF ARC STUDENT CONTEST.

The Krewe de Jeanne d’Arc invites French-speaking women ages 16 to 19 to apply to lead the krewe’s parade and represent the krewe in media opportunities and other events. Email stjoankrewe@yahoo. com or visit stjoankrewe.blogspot. com for details. Application deadline is Nov. 1.

LOUISIANA LEGISLATIVE WOMEN’S CAUCUS FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP. The founda-

tion awards $500 Educational Advancement Opportunity scholarships to young women in Louisiana. Visit www.llwc.louisiana.gov for details. Application deadline is Dec. 1.

LOUISIANA YEAR OF THE SONG 2010 SONG CONTEST. The con-

test winner receives a two-day session with songwriter Jim McCormick. Visit www.nosongfest. com/song+contest for details. Application deadline is Oct. 15.

PITCHNOLA . The November compe-

tition gives teams of local entrepreneurs the chance to pitch ideas to a

American Cancer Society, 2605 River Road, Westwego, 833-4024 or (800) ACS-2345; www.cancer.org — The American Cancer Society needs volunteers for upcoming events and to facilitate patient service programs. Opportunities are available with Relay for Life, Look Good … Feel Better, Hope Lodge, Man to Man, Road to Recovery, Hope Gala and more. Call for information. BAYOU REBIRTH WETLANDS EDUCATION. Bayou Rebirth seeks

volunteers for wetlands planting projects, nursery maintenance and other duties. Visit www.bayourebirth.org for details. BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS VOLUNTEERS. Big Brothers Big

Sisters of Southeast Louisiana, 2626 Canal St., Suite 203, 309-7304 or (877) 500-7304; www.bbbssela. org — Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southeast Louisiana needs volunteers to serve as mentors to area children. A volunteer meets two to three times a month with his or her Little Brother or Sister. You can play games, watch movies, bake cookies, play sports or plan any other outings you both would enjoy. Call for information.

CASA NEW ORLEANS. The organization seeks volunteer Court Appointed Special Advocates to represent abused and neglected children in New Orleans. Thorough training and support is provided. Call Mike Madej at 522-1962 ext. 213 or email mmadej@casaneworleans. org for details. EDGAR DEGAS FOUNDATION. The

nonprofit seeks volunteers to contribute to the development of the foundation. Call 821-5009 or email info@degashouse.com for details.

More than just great food...

6

book your holiday parties private dining now areas

HANDSON NEW ORLEANS. The

corporate parties rehearsal dinners business meetings

group holds orientations to connect locals with available volunteer opportunities in New Orleans. Call 483-7041 ext. 107 or email cho@ handsonneworleans.org for details.

LOUISIANA SPCA VOLUNTEERS.

Dorothy Dorsett Brown LA/SPCA Campus, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd., Algiers, 368-5191; www.la-spca.org — The Louisiana SPCA seeks volunteers to work with the animals and help with special events, education and more. Volunteers must be at PAGE 55

Call Our Special Events Planner Gift Certificates Available

mon-fri 9am-5pm

504.581.1103 or

504.525.4790 tommysneworleans.com

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

NATIVE NOW. Longue Vue House and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue.com — The program explores native plants and discusses their habitat, biodiversity and the ecological impact of gardening with native species. Call 488-5488 ext. 401 or email hschackai@longuevue.com for details. Free admission. 9 a.m. to 10 a.m.

PET ADOPTIONS. Jefferson Feed, Pet

53

54

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com EVENTS

PAGE 53

least 18 years old and complete a volunteer orientation to work directly with animals. Call or email Ginger Morvant at ginger@la-spca.org for details. LOWERNINE.ORG VOLUNTEERS.

Lowernine.org seeks volunteers to help renovate homes in the Lower 9th Ward. Visit www. lowernine.org or email lauren@ lowernine.org for details. MEAL DELIVERY VOLUNTEERS.

Jefferson Council on Aging seeks volunteers to deliver meals to homebound adults. Gas/mileage expenses will be reimbursed. Call Gail at 8885880 for details. NEW ORLEANS FRINGE THEATER FESTIVAL. The festival

seeks volunteers for a variety of activities including distributing flyers, working with venues, selling and taking tickets, festival breakdown and cleanup. The festival is Nov. 17-21. Email ramona@nofringe.org for details.

SENIOR COMPANION VOLUNTEERS. New Orleans

Council on Aging, Annex Conference Room, 2475 Canal St., 821-4121; www.nocoa.org — The council seeks senior volunteers to assist with personal and other daily tasks to help seniors live independently. Call for details.

TEEN SUICIDE PREVENTION.

The Teen Suicide Prevention Program seeks volunteers to help teach middle- and upperschool New Orleans students. Call 831-8475 for details.

WORDS Gold Mine Saloon, 705 Dauphine St., 568-0745; www. goldminesaloon.net — The 17 Poets! series hosts a weekly poetry reading. An open mic follows. Free admission. 8 p.m. Thursday.

ANDREW BURSTEIN & NANCY ISENBERG . Octavia Books, 513

Octavia St., 899-7323 — The authors sign Madison and Jefferson. 6 p.m. Friday. BARNES & NOBLE JR . Barnes

& Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 455-5135 — The bookstore hosts regular free reading events for kids. Call for schedule information. COOKBOOKS & COCKTAILS SERIES. Kitchen Witch

Cookbooks Shop, 631 Toulouse St., 528-8382 — The group meets weekly to discuss classic New Orleans cookbooks. 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Friday.

DINKY TAO POETRY. Molly’s at

the Market, 1107 Decatur St., 525-5169; www.mollysatthemarket.net — The bar hosts a weekly free poetry reading with open mic. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

FAIR GRINDS POETRY EVENT.

Fair Grinds Coffeehouse, 3133 Ponce de Leon Ave., 913-9073;

nagelateria.com — The cafe invites writers to read their work. All styles welcome. 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. Wednesday.

GRACE BAUER . Garden District

1135 Decatur St.; www.myspace.com/rubyfruitjunglenola — AR Productions presents a weekly spoken-word and music event. Admission $5. 7 p.m. Tuesday.

Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The author signs and discusses Los Angeles Classic Desserts. 5:30 p.m. Thursday.

PASS IT ON . Red Star Gallery, 2513 Bayou Road — The gallery hosts a weekly spoken word and music event. Admission $5. 9 p.m. Saturday.

LATTER LIBRARY BOOK SALE .

American Book Stop, 7056 Read Blvd., 243-2436 — The author signs Her-Story: Revelations. 6 p.m. Friday.

LAURA LIPPMAN . Maple Street

Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www.maplestreetbookshop.com — The author signs and discusses I’d Know You Anywhere. 1 p.m. Saturday.

LINDA YASNYI . Maple Street Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www.maplestreetbookshop.com — The author signs Misadventures of a New Orleans Girl. 1 p.m. Saturday. LOCAL WRITERS’ GROUP.

Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 455-5135 — The weekly group discusses and critiques fellow members’ writing. All genres welcome. 7:30 p.m. Monday.

MAPLE LEAF READING SERIES. Maple Leaf Bar, 8316 Oak St., 866-9359; www.mapleleafbar.com — The weekly reading series presents featured writers followed by an open mic. Free admission. 3 p.m. Sunday. MAPLE STREET BOOKS BOOK CLUB. Maple Street Book Shop,

7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www.maplestreetbookshop. com — The group discusses Robert Goolrick’s A Reliable Wife. 6 p.m. Tuesday. MID-CITY WRITERS GROUP.

Prose writers meet to read and critique original work. Email midcity.writers@gmail. com for details. Tuesday.

NANCY HARRIS. Maple Leaf

Bar, 8316 Oak St., 866-9359; www.mapleleafbar.com — The author reads her poems to commemorate the Alvar Branch Library’s 31 years of literary readings at the bar. 3 p.m. Saturday.

OPEN MIC POETRY & SPOKEN WORD. Yellow Moon Bar, 800

France St., (504) 944-0441; www.yellowmoonbar.com — Loren Murrell hosts a weekly poetry and spoken-word night with free food. Free admission. 8:30 p.m. Wednesday.

OPEN MIC POETRY JAM . La

Divina Gelateria, 621 St. Peter St., 302-2692; www.ladivi-

La f S q ay e ua tte re

OUTLOUD! Rubyfruit Jungle,

JAN BOZARTH . Octavia Books, 513 Octavia St., 899-7323 — The author signs and reads from The Fairy Godmother Academy: Zally’s Book. 2 p.m. Saturday.

Latter Library Carriage House, 5120 St. Charles Ave., 596-2625; www.nutrias.org — Friends of New Orleans Public Library holds its regular book sale. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

PRESENTS

PAULETTE JONES. Afro-

F r e e Fa l l c o n c e r t s e r i e s 2010 lineup september 15 september 22

anders osborne cowboy mouth

plus creole string beans

PLATO’S “SYMPOSIUM”.

Milton H. Latter Memorial Library, 5120 St. Charles Ave. — The New Orleans Lyceum hosts a reading of Plato’s Symposium the first and third Wednesdays of the month. Call 473-7194 for details. 6:30 p.m. to 7:50 p.m.

POETRY MEETING . New Orleans Poetry Forum, 257 Bonnabel Blvd., Metairie, 835-8472 — The forum holds workshops every Wednesday. 8 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. SANDY WARREN . Community

Book Center, 2523 Bayou Road, 948-7323; www. communitybookcenter. com — The author signs Art Blakey: Cookin’ and Jammin. 7 p.m. Friday. The author also appears at A Tisket A Tasket New Orleans Books & Gifts (910 Decatur St., 524-8482) 10:30 a.m. Saturday, Louisiana Music Factory (210 Decatur St., 586-1094; www.louisianamusicfactory.com) 4 p.m. Saturday, Maple Leaf Bar (8316 Oak St., 866-9359; www. mapleleafbar.com) 3 p.m. Sunday and Garden District Book Shop (The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266) 5:30 p.m. Monday.

SCIENCE FICTION BOOK CLUB. Octavia Books, 513 Octavia St., 899-7323 — The group discusses Gene Wolfe’s The Island of Dr. Death and Other Stories. 10:30 a.m. Saturday. SPOKEN WORD. Ebony Square, 4215 Magazine St., 343-2406 — The center hosts a weekly spoken-word, music and open-mic event. Tickets $7 general admission, $5 students. 11 p.m. Friday. TAO POETRY. Neutral Ground Coffeehouse, 5110 Danneel St., 891-3381; www.neutralground.org — The coffeehouse hosts a weekly poetry reading. 9 p.m. Wednesday. UNIVERSES. Craige Cultural Center, 1800 Newton St., Algiers — The center hosts a weekly spoken-word, music and open-mic event. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Sunday. For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.

harvestthemusic.org

sponsors

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

17 POETS! LITERARY SERIES.

www.fairgrinds.com — Jenna Mae hosts poets and spokenword readers on the second, fourth and fifth Sunday of each month. 8 p.m.

s ay d s ne P M d e W 5:00

55

A wine, spirits, food & music event benefiting The Big Easy Awards Foundation

OVER 200 WINES GOURMET CUISINE AND

Select Brands PRESENT

8TH ANNUAL

5Fifty5

Mondo

Byblos

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Ruth's Chris Steak House

Frenier Landing

The Red Maple

Mike’s On The Avenue

Salu Small Plates & Wine Bar

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

PARTICIPATING WINE DISTRIBUTORS Avenue Wines • Paul Bologna Fine Wines Doerries International • International Wine & Spirits • Live Oak Wine & Spirits

56

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THURSDAY OCTOBER 21 6–9PM City Park Pavilion of the Two Sisters RAFFLE TO WIN 200 bottle wine collection $5/ticket or $20 for 6 tickets

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$60 IN ADVANCE | $70 AT THE DOOR $50 PER PERSON FOR GROUPS OF 6 OR MORE PURCHASED BY OCT 8

Limited Availability | CALL 483-3129

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Email Ian McNulty at imcnulty@cox.net. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <THE TAVERN NEXT DOOR > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >Chef John Harris opened Bouligny Tavern (3641 Magazine St., 895-1636) in the newly renovated building next to his restau< < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <PUTTING < < < < < < <EVERYTHING < < < < < < < < < <ON < < <THE < < < TABLE < < < < < < < < < < < < < <rant Lilette. Designed as a wine bar serving small plates, the tavern’s menu includes gourmet bar snacks like sliced Spanish meats and fries with aioli, and some dishes that would be at home on Lilette’s appetizer list, such as Gouda beignets, fried WHAT gnocchi, duck confit and crostini with marrow and garlic. Mondo

am

B

WHERE

900 Harrison Ave., 224-2633; www.mondoneworleans.com WHEN

Dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sun., weekday lunch coming soon HOW MUCH

Moderate

RESERVATIONS

Accepted for five or more

WHAT WORKS

Any dish with roasted pork

WHAT DOESN'T

Some dishes are small; too few wines by the glass

CHECK, PLEASE

Unique, refreshingly different spin on casual comfort food

X MARKS THE BISTREAUX

Michael Farrell, the chef at Le Meritage in the Maison Dupuy Hotel, has reworked the hotel’s bar space into a restaurant called Bistreaux (1001 Toulouse St., 586-8000; www.maisondupuy.com/bistreaux.htm). While the concept at Le Meritage is wine pairings suggested for each course, Bistreaux has a more conventional approach and casual vibe. The menu ranges from jambalaya to roasted chicken to short rib po-boys to pizzas. Bistreaux doubles as a piano lounge.

five 5 IN

FIVE SPOTS FOR GERMAN FEASTS DEUTSCHES HAUS

200 S. GALVEZ ST., 522-8014 www.deutscheshaus.org

The biggest and best local Oktoberfest runs Fridays and Saturdays until Oct. 23.

HEINER BRAU

226 E. LOCKWOOD ST., COVINGTON, (985) 893-2884 www.heinerbrau.com

The German-born owner of this microbrewery hosts a public festival Oct. 8 and 9.

MIDDENDORF’S SEAFOOD RESTAURANT 30160 HWY. 51, AKERS, (985) 386-6666 www.middendorfsrestaurant.com

Mondeaux

SUSAN SPICER THINKS GLOBALLY, COOKS LOCALLY. B Y I A N M C N U LT Y

C

PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

room are finished with lots of bare wood and calming colors, though both spaces get very loud when Mondo is crowded. This is a weeknight restaurant or a spot for Friday dinner when you’re not up for a momentous event. It’s difficult to coordinate any particular cravings with such a global selection. But the care and creativity on the moderately priced menu are plain to see, and that’s Mondo’s real appeal. For instance, mint pepper jelly seemed to ooze from the broiled, herbaceous meat of the lamb mentioned above. My favorite dish is the redfish with “muddy waters” sauce, a tribute to the long-gone Uglesich’s Restaurant. The sauce has the look and texture of a thick meuniere, but gets salty zing from discreet additions of anchovy and jalapeno. A wood oven visible from the dining room issues small pizzas with interesting toppings like rapini or salami made locally at Butcher. The dough has good character, too. It’s chewy yet light, though I like my pies crisper and more bubbled than these have been. Spicer’s cooks use the oven to slow-roast pork, so while Lakeview sleeps, the makings for the brunch menu’s excellent pork migas take shape. Portions are modest for most dishes, which is another way Mondo differs from traditional neighborhood restaurants. I wouldn’t expect leftovers here, but I do count on more creative comfort cooking when I inevitably return to this exciting new place.

A special menu features German dishes every Wednesday and Thursday until Nov. 11.

VEGA TAPAS CAFE

2051 METAIRIE ROAD, METAIRIE, 836-2007 www.vegatapascafe.com

A monthlong “Fiesta Octobre” menu features German dishes served tapas style.

JÄGER HAUS

833 CONTI ST., 525-9200 www.jager-haus.com

It always feels like Oktoberfest at this small, authentic German cafe.

Questions? Email winediva1@earthlink.net.

2008 Salviano Turlo Red UMBRIA, ITALY / $17 RETAIL

The gently rolling hills of Italy’s Umbria region allow grapes to enjoy perfect sunlight exposure. The Salviano estate surrounds Lake Corbara and benefits from the flow of the Tiber River. This wine is 50 percent Sangiovese, 30 percent Cabernet Sauvignon and 20 percent Merlot — making it a Super Tuscan-style blend from a neighboring region. Red and black berries combine with plum on the palate, earth on the nose and spices on the finish. Drink it with stuffed artichokes, veal dishes, rosemary chicken, lasagna and other pasta dishes. Buy it at: Elio’s Wine Warehouse and Acquistapace’s Covington Supermarket. Drink it at: A Mano, Ristorante del Porto and Caesar’s Deli. — Brenda Maitland

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

hef Susan Spicer intended her new Lakeview restaurant Mondo to be a casual neighborhood place, but she’s following her own eclectic tastes to make sure it’s far from the local norm. Working with chef du cuisine Cindy Crosbie and sous chef Paul Schel, she’s created a unique mix of updated Louisiana standards and dishes from all corners of the world, as referenced in the restaurant’s Italian name. At first, this approach seemed aimless. On an initial visit, a round of appetizers filled our table with an international jumble: hot and sour soup, melted Gorgonzola spread on ciabatta toast, buckwheat noodles in peanut sauce and a plate of darkly fried hominy, a bar snack that here is akin to CornNuts in need of salt. But as we progressed — to the braised duck leg with Chinese seasoning; smoky, Latin-style pork roast; small, deftly done lamb T-bones; and baked polenta covered with spinach and garlic — the meal became an unfettered romp of creatively wrought comfort food. After a few visits, we regarded a sequence moving from ceviche to homey roasted chicken to a flan-like, fruit-covered flaugnarde crepe as the unorthodox but expected Mondo meal. Spicer practices some of this genre jumping at Bayona, her first and far more ambitious restaurant. But Mondo is not the Bayona of Lakeview, and those who come here expecting that are bound to be disappointed. This is a family-oriented place with a kids’ menu. The attractive bar and dining

At Mondo, chef Susan Spicer and her staff get creative with a wide array of cuisines.

57

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<

YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT >>>>>>>>>

>>>> <<< <<<<< >>>>>>>>> <<< >> <<

Credit cards. $$

LAKEVIEW BREW COFFEE CAFE — 5606 Canal Blvd., 483-7001 — This casual cafe offers gourmet coffees and a wide range of pastries and desserts baked in house, plus a menu of specialty sandwiches and salads. Breakfast is available all day on weekends. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Out > > >2 >Eat > >is>an > >index > > >of> Gambit > > > > >contract > > > > >advertisers. > > > > > > >Unless > > > >noted, > > > >addresses > > > > > >are > >for > >New > > >Orleans. > > > > > > > > > PARKVIEW CAFE AT CITY PARK — City Dollar signs represent the average cost of a dinner entree: $ — under $10; $$ — $11 to $20; $$$ — $21 or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax 483-3116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

�� � � 

����

RICCOBONO’S PANOLA STREET CAFE —

7801 Panola St., 314-1810 — Specialties include crabcakes Benedict — two crabcakes and poached eggs topped with hollandaise sauce and potatoes — and the Sausalito omelet with spinach, mushrooms, shallots and mozzarella. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily. Credit cards. $

AMERICAN CONTEMPORARY

5 Fifty 5 — 555 Canal St., 553-5638;

69455 Hwy 59

www.555canal.com — New Orleans dishes and Americana favorites take an elegant turn in dishes such as the lobster mac and cheese, combining lobster meat, elbow macaroni and mascarpone, boursin and white cheddar cheeses. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

Abita Springs 985-809-6313

Sunday Champagne Brunch Buffet from 8am-2pm

Monday-Thursday 8am-9pm, Fri & Sat 8am-10pm, Sun 8am-8pm

HOUR 4-6

p

m

H

PY P A

ST. JAMES CHEESE — 5004 Prytania St.,

899-4737; www.stjamescheese.com — The cheese shop offers more than 100 varieties of cheese from around the world. A small menu includes creative sandwiches, salads and specials. The Radette cheese sandwich includes house-made pastrami and spicy pickles on rye. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

BAYONA — 430 Dauphine St., 525-4455; www.bayona.com — House favorites on Chef Susan Spicer’s menu include sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce and the appetizer of grilled shrimp with black-bean cake and coriander sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

TED’S FROSTOP — 3100 Calhoun St., 8613615 — The signature Lot-o-Burger is as good as ever, or try the castle burgers. Fried seafood and plate lunches provide square meals, as do the sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

A

W Slidell

985-649-6211

Rated as one of the top restaurants in Slidell according to “Talk of the Town.”

 � � ��

58

1 DRINKS ARE 2 for

525 Hwy 190

TERRAZU — 201 St. Charles Ave., 287-

0877 — Located in Place St. Charles, Terrazu serves coffee drinks and a menu of soups, salads and sandwiches. The Terrazu salad is topped with boiled shrimp, hearts of palm and avocado. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $

ONE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE — 8132 Hampson St., 301-9061; www.one-sl. com — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes like char-grilled oysters topped with Roquefort cheese and a red wine vinaigrette, seared scallops with roasted garlic and shiitake polenta cakes and a memorable cochon de lait. Reservations recommended. Lunch Thu.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

BAR & GRILL DINO’S BAR & GRILL — 1128 Tchoupi-

Monday-Thursday 7am-9pm, Fri & Sat 7am-10pm, Sun 8am-4pm

toulas St., 558-0900 — Dino’s kitchen serves burgers, chicken tenders, salads and wraps. Happy hour is from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards and checks. $

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

THE GREEN GODDESS — 307 Exchange Alley, 301-3347; www.greengoddessnola. com — Chef Chris DeBarr’s contemporary cooking combines classic techniques, exotic ingredients and culinary wit. At lunch, Big Cactus Chilaquiles feature poached eggs on homemade tortillas with salsa verde, queso fresca and nopalitos. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Thu.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

LL

OR YAKONLI DER ON NE OLA @

MI

.CO

M

DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS

starting from $5.50

LUNCH:sun-fri 11am-2:30pm DINNER: mon-thurs 5pm-10pm fri 5pm-10:30pm SATURDAY 3:30pm-10:30pm SUNDAY 12 noon-10:30pm 1403 st. charles ave. new orleans 504.410.9997 www.japanesebistro.com security guard on duty

Park, 1 Palm Drive, 483-9474 — Located in the old Casino Building, the cafe serves gourmet coffee, sandwiches, salads and ice cream till early evening. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

RENDON INN BAR & GRILL — 4501 Eve St., 826-5605 — Try appetizers such as spinach and artichoke dip, hot wings or fried pickles. Off the grill there are burgers, chicken sandwiches or cheese quesadillas. Other options include salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

THE RIVERSHACK TAVERN — 3449 River Road, 834-4938; www.therivershacktavern.com — This bar and music spot offers a menu of burgers, sandwiches overflowing with deli meats and changing lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ ZACHARY’S BY THE LAKE — 7224 Pontchartrain Blvd., 872-9832; www. zacharysbythelake.com — Zachary’s serves seafood platters, po-boys, salads, barbecue shrimp and more. Jumbo Gulf shrimp with cane syrup are wrapped in bacon, fried crispy and served with pickled okra salad. No

VINE & DINE — 141 Delaronde St., 3611402; www.vine-dine.com — The cafe serves cheese boards and charcuterie plates with pate and cured meats. There also is a menu of sandwiches, quesadillas, bruschettas, salads and dips. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CHINESE CHINA ROSE — 3501 N. Arnoult Road.,

reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BARBECUE ABITA BAR-B-Q — 69399 Hwy. 59, Abita

Springs, (985) 892-0205 — Slow-cooked brisket and pork are specialty at this Northshore smokehouse. The half-slab rib plate contains six ribs served with a choice of two sides. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

WALKER’S BAR-B-QUE — 10828 Hayne

Blvd., 281-8227; www.cochondelaitpoboys.com — The makers of the Jazz Fest cochon de lait po-boy serve pork, ribs, chicken and more. The family feast includes a half-slab of ribs, half a chicken, half a pound of brisket, pork and sausage, two side orders, bread and sauce. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Saturday. Cash only. $

CAFE CAFE FRERET — 7329 Freret St., 861-

7890; www.cafefreret.com — The cafe serves breakfast itemes like the Freret Egg Sandwich with scrambled

At Marigny Brasserie (640 Frenchmen St., 945-4472; www.marignybrasserie. com), eggs Atchafalaya feature poached eggs on creamed spinach topped with hollandaise and crawfish tails. PHOTO BY SUSAN SNEE eggs, cheese and bacon or sausage served on toasted white or wheat bread or an English muffin.Signature sandwiches include the Chef’s Voodoo Burger, muffuletta and Cuban po-boy. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Fri.-Wed., dinner Mon.Wed., Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ ELIZABETH’S RESTAURANT — 601 Gallier

St., 944-9272; www.elizabeths-restaurant.com — Signature praline bacon sweetens brunch at this Bywater spot. Dinner brings options like fish and scallop specials. Also enjoy homemade desserts. No reservations. Lunch Tue.Fri., dinner Tue.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun.

Metairie, 887-3295 — China Rose offers many Chinese seafood specialties. The Lomi Lomi combines jumbo shrimp, pineapple and water chestnuts wrapped in bacon, fries them golden brown and serves them on a bed of sautéed vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

FIVE HAPPINESS — 3511 S. Carrollton

Ave., 482-3935 — The large menu at Five Happiness offers a range of dishes from wonton soup to sizzling seafood combinations served on a hot plate to sizzling Go-Ba to lo mein dishes. Delivery and banquest facilities available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

JUNG’S GOLDEN DRAGON — 3009

Magazine St., 891-8280; www.jungsgoldendragon2.com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, Thai and Korean cuisine. Chinese specialties include Mandarin, Szechuan and Hunan dishes. Grand Marnier shrimp are lightly battered and served with Grand Marnier sauce, broccoli and pecans. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

THREE HAPPINESS — 1900 Lafayette St.,

PAGE 60

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

59

Bringing you quality, consistency and value since 1971.

OUT2EAT of ways, including curries and tandoori. Vegetarian options are available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

page 58 

Now open 7 days a week in Mandeville LUNCH : Mon - Fri 11-2pm DiNNER: Mon -Thu 5-930pm Fri & Sat 5-10pm · Sun 1130a - 930p 600 N. Causeway, Mandeville 2100 N. Morrison, Hammond

985/626-4476

985/345-6789

spanish food PUERCO FRITO - $9.90 pork fajitas - $8.00 Ropa vieja - $7.75

Suite 4, Gretna, 368-1355; www.threehappiness.com — Three Happiness serves Chinese and Vietnames dishes and dim sum specials on weekends. Westlake duck features tender duck with snow peas, corn, straw mushrooms and napa cabbage. Vietnamese crepes are served with pork and shrimp. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

ITALIAN BACCO — 310 Chartres St., 522-2426;

www.bacco.com — Bacco blends Italian and contemporary Creole cuisine. Chef Chris Montero artfully prepares homemade pastas and fresh seafood, including lobster and shrimp ravioli. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

TREY YUEN CUISINE OF CHINA — 600 N.

Causeway Approach., Mandeville, (985) 626-4476; 2100 N. Morrison Blvd., Hammond, (985) 345-6789; www.tryyuen. com — House specialties include fried soft-shell crab topped with Tong Cho sauce, and Cantonese-style stir-fried alligator and mushrooms in oyster sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

RICCOBONO’S PEPPERMILL RESTAURANT — 3524 Severn Ave., Metairie, 455-2266

— This Italian-style eatery serves New Orleans favorites like stuffed crabs with jumbo lump crabmeat with spaghetti bordelaise and trout meuniere with brabant potatoes. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TONY MANDINA’S RESTAURANT — 1915

COFFEE/DESSERT

Pratt St., Gretna, 362-2010; www.tonymandinas.com — Tony Mandina’s serves Italian and Creole cuisine. Dishes include pasta, veal parmigiana, veal Bordelasie and specialties like shrimp Mandina and battered eggplant topped with shrimp and crabmeat in cream sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

ANTOINE’S ANNEX — 513 Royal St., 581-

4422; www.antoines.com — The Annex is a coffee shop serving pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. The Royal Street salad features baby spinach and mixed lettuces with carrots, red onion, red peppers, grapes, olives, walnuts and raspberry vinaigrette. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ BEN ’N JERRY’S — 3500 Veterans Me-

JAPANESE

morial Blvd., Metairie, 887-5656 — Ben ’n Jerry’s offers rich ice creams in signature flavors, ice cream cakes, frozen drinks, fruit smoothies and sundaes. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CREOLE

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713 St.

60

IE FR

Louis St., 581-4422; www.antoines. com — The city’s oldest restaurant offers a glimpse of what 19th century French Creole dining might have been like, with a labyrinthine series of dining rooms. Signature dishes include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

D

ST K E N IC a! H C Americ in

BE

AUSTIN’S RESTAURANT — 5101 W. Es-

2401 St. Ann Street, New Orleans, LA 70119 Monday-Saturday 11am-3pm 504-822-9503 NOW ACCEPTING ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS

planade Ave., Metairie, 888-5533; www. austinsno.com — Austin’s cooks hearty Creole and Italian dishes like stuffed soft-shell crab and veal Austin, which is crowned with crabmeat. No reservations. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ GUMBO SHOP — 640 St. Peter St., 525-

1486; www.gumboshop.com — Gumbo and New Orleans classics such as crawfish etouffee dominate the menu. Their spicy flavors meld into a dish that represents the city’s best and redefines comfort food. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ LE CITRON BISTRO — 1539 Religious

St., 566-9051; www.le-citronbistro. com — Located in a historic building, the quaint bistro serves starters like chicken and andouille gumbo and fried frogs legs. Entrees include choices like fried chicken, Gulf fish and burgers. Reservations accepted. Dinner Wed.Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

MR. ED’S CREOLE GRILLE— 5241

CATERING

COMBO SPECIAL

Sandwich Platter House Salad + Assorted Dessert Platter $11.85 per person

PLACE ST. CHARLES 201 ST. CHARLES AVE.

Mon-Fri 7am-2pm • Free Delivery 522-8198 • www.steves-diner.com

Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 889-7992; www.mredsno.com — Mr. Ed’s offers seafood dishes and some Italian accents. Try shrimp beignets with sweet chili glaze or creamy blue crab dip. Eggplant Vincent is a fried eggplant cup filled with crawfish and shrimp and served with pasta. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000 N. Peters

St., 524-4747 — This casual restaurant

KYOTO — 4920 Prytania St., 891-3644

serves Creole favorites. The menu includes crawfish etouffee, boiled crawfish, red beans and rice and bread pudding for dessert. Outdoor seating is adjacent to Dutch Alley and the French Market. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

Antonio Bologna enjoys a slice of the house specialty at Venezia (134 N. Carrollton Ave., 488-7991; www.venezianeworleans.com). PHOTO BY susan snee

DELI KOSHER CAJUN NEW YORK DELI & GROCERY — 3519 Severn Ave., Metairie, 888-

2010; www.koshercajun.com — This New York-style deli specializes in sandwiches, including corned beef and pastrami that come straight from the Bronx. No reservations. Lunch Sun.Thu., dinner Mon.-Thu. Credit cards. $

MARTIN WINE CELLAR — 714 Elmeer Ave., Metairie , 896-7350; www.martinwine.com — Sandwiches piled high with cold cuts, salads, hot sandwiches, soups and lunch specials are available at the deli counter. The Cedric features chicken breast, spinach, Swiss, tomatoes and red onions on seven-grain bread. No reservations. Lunch daily. Credit cards. $

DINER STEVE’S DINER — 201 St. Charles Ave., 522-

8198 — Located in the Place St. Charles food court, Steve’s serves hot breakfasts until 10 a.m. Lunch features sandwiches, salads and hot plate lunches such as fried catfish and baked chicken Parmesan. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $

FRENCH MARTINIQUE BISTRO — 5908 Magazine

St., 891-8495; www.martiniquebistro. com — This French bistro has both a cozy dining room and a pretty courtyard. Try dishes such as Steen’scured duck breast with satsuma and ginger demi-glace and stone-ground goat cheese grits. Reservations

recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GOURMET TO GO BREAUX MART — 315 E. Judge Perez,

Chalmette, 262-0750; 605 Lapalco Blvd., Gretna, 433-0333; 2904 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-5565; 9647 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 737-8146; www.breauxmart. com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux” as well as weekday specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

INDIAN JULIE’S LITTLE INDIA KITCHEN AT SCHIRO’S — 2483 Royal St., 944-6666; www.

schiroscafe.com — The cafe offers homemade Indian dishes prepared with freshly ground herbs and spices. Selections include chicken, lamb or shrimp curry or vegetarian saag paneer. Schiro’s also serves New Orleans cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NIRVANA INDIAN CUISINE — 4308 Magazine St., 894-9797 — Serving mostly northern Indian cuisine, the restaurant’s extensive menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TAJ MAHAL INDIAN CUISINE — 923-C

Metairie Road, Metairie, 836-6859 — The traditional menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety

— Kyoto’s sushi chefs prepare rolls, sashimi and salads. “Box” sushi is a favorite, with more than 25 rolls. Reservations recommended for parties of six or more. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

MIKIMOTO — 3301 S. Carrollton Ave.,

488-1881; www.mikimotosushi.com — Sushi choices include new and old favorites, both raw and cooked. The South Carrollton roll includes tuna tataki, avocado and snow crab. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Delivery available. Credit cards. $$

MIYAKO JAPANESE SEAFOOD & STEAKHOUSE — 1403 St. Charles Ave., 410-9997;

www.japanesebistro.com — Miyako offers a full range of Japanese cuisine, with specialties from the sushi or hibachi menus, chicken, beef or seafood teriyaki, and tempura. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ ROCK-N-SAKE — 823 Fulton St., 581-7253;

www.rocknsake.com — Rock-n-Sake serves traditional Japanese cuisine with some creative twists. There’s a wide selection of sushi, sashimi and rolls or spicy gyoza soup, pan-fried soba noodles with chicken or seafood and teriyaki dishes. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

LOUISIANA CONTEMPORARY ATCHAFALAYA RESTAURANT — 901

Louisiana Ave., 891-9626; www. cafeatchafalaya.com — Atchafalaya serves creative contemporary Creole cooking. Shrimp and grits feature head-on Gulf shrimp in a smoked tomato and andouille broth over creamy grits. There’s a Bloody Mary bar at brunch. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$ BOMBAY CLUB — 830 Conti St., 5860972; www.thebombayclub.com — Mull the menu at this French Quarter hideaway while sipping a well made

page 62

MAGIC IN THE MOONLIGHT FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2010 • 7:00 P.M. ON THE MAIN AXIS OF THE BOTANICAL GARDEN

Menu by Certified Master Chef James Corwell of Le Foret Premiere Showing of Botanical Garden Fall Festival: Special Exhibits by Artists and Landscape Architects Patrons Only Champagne Reception from 6:00pm to 7:00pm

Patron levels start at $250 • Al Fresco Dinner starts at $150 A full-sized reproduction of the Enrique Alferez sculpture Reclining Nude will be auctioned at the event.

Pay online at garden.neworleanscitypark.com CLICK ON SPECIAL EVENTS

In the event of inclement weather, the dinner will be held in the Pavilion of the Two Sisters. New Orleans Botanical Garden Foundation is recognized as a 501(c)(3) organization by the Internal Revenue Service and is eligible to receive tax-deductible contributions.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

An Al Fresco Dinner Fête

61

Full service restaurant with night time entertainment from Tue-Sat.

Happy

page 58

Late night

entertainment greaT For birThdayS, bAcheLoRette from 4-6pm pARtieS, reTireMenTS, where all drinks are AnniveRSARieS, or any reaSon To have a good TiMe!!

Hour

OUT2EAT

2 for 1

158 S. Military Road, Slidell, LA 985-646-1728 Mon 11am-9pm • Tue-Thur 11am-12am (midnight) • Fri & Sat 11am-2am • Sun 11am-8pm

martini. The duck duet pairs confit leg with pepper-seared breast with black currant reduction. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

MILA — 817 Common St., 412-

2580; www.milaneworleans.com — MiLA takes a fresh approach to Southern and New Orleans cooking, focusing on local produce and refined techniques. Try New Orleans barbecue lobster with lemon confit and fresh thyme. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri. dinner Mon.-Sat. $$$

RALPH’S ON THE PARK — 900

CALLING FOR NOMINATIONS

City Park Ave., 488-1000; www. ralphsonthepark.com — Popular dishes include baked oysters Ralph, turtle soup and the Niman Ranch New York strip. There also are brunch specials. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ 752 Tchoupitoulas St., 525-4790 — Tommy’s Wine Bar offers cheese and charcuterie plates as well as a menu of appetizers and salads from the neighboring kitchen of Tommy’s Cuisine. No reservations. Lite dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

TOMMY’S WINE BAR —

MEDITERRANEAN/ MIDDLE EASTERN

The November 2nd issue will spotlight local New Orleanians for their distinction and accomplishments in the metropolitan area.

40 Under 40, c/o Gambit Attn: Kandace Graves, 3923 Bienville Street, New Orleans, LA 70119 or fax to: 504.483.3116 or email to: kandaceg@gambitweekly.com NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE. DEADLINE FOR SUGGESTIONS IS OCTOBER 7.

K• 2 EE

4

St., 587-3756; www.attikineworleans.com — Attiki features a range of Mediterranean cuisine including entrees of beef kebabs and chicken shawarma. Reservations recommended. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $$ PYRAMIDS CAFE — 3151 Calhoun

St., 861-9602 — Diners will find authentic, healthy and fresh Mediterranean cuisine featuring such favorites as sharwarma prepared on a rotisserie. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEXICAN & SOUTHWESTERN CARLOS MENCIA’S MAGGIE RITAS MEXICAN BAR & GRILL — 200

Magazine St., 595-3211; www.maggieritas.com — Mexican favorites include sizzling fajita platters, quesdillas, enchiladas and a menu of margaritas. There also are Latin American dishes, paella and fried ice cream for dessert. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

COUNTRY FLAME — 620 Iberville St., 522-1138 — Country Flame serves a mix of popular Mexican and Cuban dishes. Come in for fajitas, pressed Cuban sandwiches made with hickory-smoked pork and char-broiled steaks or pork chops. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

HOURS DAY • 7

YS A W DA

62

Tell us about their background, accomplishments and future plans, and be sure to include their exact birth date and any other information you think might be useful. If you know someone who fits these requirements, please send your nominations to:

A

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

NOMINEES MUST MEET THE FOLLOWING REQUIREMENTS: • must be 39 years of age or younger • live in the New Orleans area • be worthy of distinction • elected officials are not eligible.

ATTIKI BAR & GRILL — 230 Decatur

Totally retro 50’s diner complete with a full soda fountain menu & all your favorite classic diner favorites.

2244 Veterans Memorial Blvd. Suite A • Kenner • 468-2187

JUAN’S FLYING BURRITO — 2018 Magazine St., 569-0000; 4724 S.Carrollton Ave. 486-9550; www. juansflyingburrito.com — This wallet-friendly restaurant offers new takes on Mexican-inspired cooking. It’s known for its mealand-a-half-size signature burritos. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ NACHO MAMA’S MEXICAN GRILL — 3242 Magazine St., 899-0031;

1000 S. Clearview Pkwy., Harahan, 736-1188; www.nachomamasmexicangrill.com — These taquerias serve Mexican favorites such as portobello mushroom fajitas and chile rellenos. There are happy hour margaritas on weekdays and daily drink specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SANTA FE — 3201 Esplanade Ave., 948-0077 — This casual cafe serves creative takes on Southwestern cuisine. Fried green tomatoes are topped with grilled jumbo shrimp and roasted chili remoulade and capers. Outdoor seating is available. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MUSIC AND FOOD GAZEBO CAFE — 1018 Decatur St., 525-8899; www.gazebocafenola. com — The Gazebo features a mix of Cajun and Creole dishes and ice cream daquiris. The New Orleans sampler rounds up jambalaya, red beans and rice and gumbo. Other options include salads, seafood po-boys and burgers. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ HOUSE OF BLUES — 225 Decatur

St., 310-4999; www.hob.com/ neworleans — Try the pan-seared Voodoo Shrimp with rosemary cornbread. The buffet-style gospel brunch features local and regional groups. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

THE MARKET CAFE — 1000 Deca-

tur St., 527-5000; www.marketcafenola.com — Dine indoors or out on seafood either fried for platters or po-boys or highlighted in dishes such as crawfish pie, crawfish etouffee or shrimp Creole. Sandwich options include muffulettas, Philly steaks on poboy bread and gyros in pita bread. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — 626 Frenchmen St., 949-0696; www. snugjazz.com — Traditional Creole and Cajun fare pepper the menu along with newer creations such as the fish Marigny, topped with Gulf shrimp in a Creole cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

NEIGHBORHOOD GOTT GOURMET CAFE — 3100

Magazine St., 373-6579; www. gottgourmetcafe.com — Gott Gourmet’s menu of creative dishes and sandwiches includes a cochon de lait po-boy made with pulled pork, homecooked Dr. Pepper-honey-baked ham, pickles, Gruyere cheese, anchohoney coleslaw and honey mustard-chile mayo. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Fri. Credit cards. $

LIUZZA’S RESTAURANT & BAR —

3636 Bienville St., 482-9120; www. liuzzas.com — This neighborhood favorite serves casual Creole and Italian fare. The Frenchuletta is a muffuletta on French bread served hot. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $$

MR. ED’S RESTAURANT — 910

W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 4633030; 1001 Live Oak St., Metairie, 838-0022 — Popular dishes include seafood-stuffed bell peppers loaded with shrimp,

crawfish and crabmeat, topped with buttered breadcrumbs. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

RAJUN CAJUN CAFE — 5209 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 8835513; www.rajuncajuncafe.com — The cafe serves soups, salads, po-boys, muffulettas, seafood plates and a few entree platters. Daily specials include items such as breaded pork chops on Wednesdays and seafood options on Friday. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

PIZZA MARKS TWAIN’S PIZZA LANDING — 2035 Metairie Road, Metairie,

832-8032; www.marktwainspizza.com — Disembark at Mark Twain’s for salads, po-boys and pies like the Italian pizza with salami, tomato, artichoke, sausage and basil. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NONNA MIA CAFE & PIZZERIA — 3125 Esplanade Ave., 948-1717

— Nonna Mia uses homemade dough for pizza served by the slice or whole pie and offers salads, pasta dishes and panini. Gourmet pies are topped with ingredients like pancetta, roasted eggplant, portobello mushrooms and prosciutto. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

REGINELLI’S — 741 State St., 8991414; 817 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 712-6868; 874 Harrison Ave., 488-0133; 3244 Magazine St. 8957272; 5608 Citrus Blvd., Harahan, 818-0111; www.reginellis.com — This New Orleans original offers a range of pizzas, sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ R&O’S RESTAURANT — 216 Old

Hammond Hwy., 831-1248 — R&O’s offers a mix of pizza and Creole and Italian seafood dishes. There’s everything from seafood gumbo and stuffed artichokes to po-boys and muffulettas. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $

SLICE PIZZERIA — 1513 St. Charles Ave., 525-7437; 5538 Magazine St., 897-4800 — Neapolitan-style pizza rules, but you can buy pizza by the slice and add or subtract toppings as you choose. There are also a full coffee bar, Italian sodas and organic teas. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ THEO’S NEIGHBORHOOD PIZZA —

4218 Magazine St., 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., 302-1133; www.theospizza.com — There is a wide variety of specialty pies or build your own from the selection of more than two-dozen toppings. Also serving salads and sandwiches. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

WIT’S INN — 141 N. Carrollton Ave., 486-1600 — This Mid-City bar and restaurant features pizzas, calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers for snacking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SANDWICHES & PO-BOYS MAGAZINE PO-BOY SHOP — 2368 Magazine St., 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of po-boys filled with everything from fried seafood to corned beef to hot sau-

n!

pe wO

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

No

BIG SCREEN TV'S FOR ALL BLACK & GOLD AND LSU GAMES Fridays-COLLEGE NIGHT

$1 DRAFT • $1 JAGERMEISTER Saturdays - $3 U CALL IT with DJ's Dine outside - Nicest Courtyard in the city!

LIVE MUSIC ON WEEKENDS

437 Esplanade Ave • 504.252.4800

Thursdays at Twilight Garden Concert Series

THIS WEEK’S PERFORMANCE

sage to veal. There are breakfast burritos in the morning and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Cash only. $

MAHONY’S PO-BOY SHOP — 3454

Magazine St., 899-3374; www. mahonyspoboys.com — Mahoney’s serves traditional favorites and original po-boys like the Peacemaker, which is filled with fried oysters, bacon and cheddar cheese. There are daily lunch specials as well. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PARKWAY BAKERY AND TAVERN — 538 N. Hagen Ave., 482-3047 —

Parkway serves juicy roast beef po-boys, hot sausage po-boys, fried seafood and more. No reservations. Kitchen open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $ SAMMY’S PO-BOYS & CATERING — 901 Veterans Memorial

SEAFOOD JACK DEMPSEY’S — 738 Poland

Ave., 943-9914 — The Jack Dempsey seafood platter serves a training-table feast of gumbo, shrimp, oysters, catfish, redfish and crawfish pies, plus two side items. Other dishes include broiled redfish and fried soft-shell crab. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat. and dinner Wed.Sat. Credit cards. $$ LA COTE BRASSERIE — 700

Tchoupitoulas St., 613-2350; www. lacotebrasserie.com — This stylish restaurant in the Renaissance New Orleans Arts Hotel serves an array of raw and cooked seafood. Tabasco and Steen’s Cane Syrup glazed salmon is served with shrimp mirliton ragout. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

MARIGNY BRASSERIE — 640

Frenchmen St., 945-4472; www. marignybrasserie.com — Marigny Brasserie serves breakfast items

RED FISH GRILL — 115 Bourbon St.,

598-1200; www.redfishgrill.com — Seafood creations by Executive Chef Gregg Collier dominate a menu peppered with favorites like hickory-grilled redfish, pecancrusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SOUL WILLIE MAE’S SCOTCH HOUSE —

2401 St. Ann St., 822-9503 — Willie Mae Seaton’s landmark restaurant is run by her granddaughter and serves her renowned fried chicken. There are also changing daily specials. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat. Cash only. $$

STEAKHOUSE RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE —

Harrah’s Hotel, 525 Fulton St., 587-7099; 3633 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 888-3600; www.ruthschris.com — Ruth’s top-quality steaks are broiled in 1,800-degree ovens and arrive at the table sizzling. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

TAPAS/SPANISH GALVEZ RESTAURANT — 914 N. Peters St., 595-3400; www.galvezrestaurant.com — Located at the former site of Bella Luna, Galvez offers tapas, paella and a Spanishaccented bouillabaisse. Besides seafood, entrees include grilled Black Angus sirloin and roasted chicken. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

MIMI’S IN THE MARIGNY — 2601 Royal St., 872-9868 — The decadant Mushroom Manchego Toast is a favorite here. Or enjoy hot and cold tapas dishes ranging from grilled marinated artichokes to calamari. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ VEGA TAPAS CAFE — 2051 Metarie

Road, 836-2007; www.vegatapascafe.com — Vega’s mix of hot and

Get a sweet start on the morning with pastries and baked goods at Antoine’s Annex (513 Royal St., 581-4422; www. antoines.com). cold tapas dishes includes a salad of lump crabmeat on arugula with blood orange vinaigrette, seared tuna with avocado and tomato relish, braised pork empanadillos, steamed mussels and shrimp with tomatoes and garlic in caper-basil cream. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

John Rankin OCTOBER 7 @ the Pavilion of Two Sisters NEW ORLEANS BOTANICAL GARDEN CITY PARK

Gates Open 5PM-8PM · Performance 6PM

Adults = $8 / Children 5-12 = $4 Children 4 & Under = FREE

EST 1994

1501 Metairie Rd 834.9773 3218 Magazine St. 894.1233 2020 Veterans Blvd 837.9777 Lakeside Shopping Center 830.7333

(504) 483-9488

www.neworleanscitypark.com

DENTAL CLEANING SPECIAL

VOTED ONE OF THE BEST MEDITERRANEAN RESTAURANTS ACCORDING TO GAMBIT READERS

PARKWAY FOR

VIETNAMESE AUGUST MOON — 3635 Prytania

St., 899-5129; www.moonnola. com — August Moon serves a mix of Vietnamese and Chinese cuisine. There are spring rolls and pho soup as well as many popular Chinese dishes and vegetarian options. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PHO HOA RESTAURANT — 1308

Manhattan Blvd., 302-2094 — Pho Hoa serves staple Vietnamese dishes including beef broth soups, vermicelli bowls, rice dishes and banh mi sandwiches. Bo kho is a popular beef stew. Appetizers include fried egg rols, crab rangoons and rice paper spring rolls. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

PHO NOLA — 3320 Transconti-

nental Drive, Metairie, 941-7690; www.pho-nola.com — Pho NOLA serves spring rolls and egg rolls, noodle soups, rice and vermicelli dishes and po-boys. Beverages include boba teas, milk teas, coffee drinks and smoothies. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PHO TAU BAY RESTAURANT — 113 Westbank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, 368-9846 — You’ll find classic Vietnamese beef broth and noodle soups, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, shrimp spring rolls with peanut sauce and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Wed. & Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

Magazine Location

For more information call

89

$

*

(reg. $132)

includes comprehensive exam (#0150), x-rays (#274), cleaning (#1110) or panorex (#330)

PO’BOYS!

*NEW PATIENTS ONLY — EXPIRES 10/17/10

DR. GLENN SCHMIDT • DR. MITCHELL PIERCE DR. STEPHEN DELAHOUSSAYE FAMILY DENTISTRY Call For An Appointment

UPTOWN KENNER

(504)

Now available at 2 locations!

8025 Maple St. @ Carrollton · 861-9044 www.uptownsmiles.com 1942 Williams Blvd., Suite 8 · 469-9648 www.kennersmiles.com

482-3047 D AVA ELIVE IL A RY BLE y ! r Eve ay

STEAKT Wednesd12.50 NZI. FGILEHT W/2 SIDES • $

8O

7329 FRERET • 861-7890

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

Blvd., Metairie, 835-0916; www. sammyspoboys.com — Sammy’s offers a wide array of po-boys and wraps. The house-cooked bottom round beef in gravy is a specialty. The menu also includes salads, seafood platters, a few Italian dishes and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner daily. Credit cards. $

like Cajun eggs Bendict. The lunch and dinner menus include fried seafood po-boys and a host of Italian dishes. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

(1 block off Broadway)

Now Accepting NOLA Bucks!

63

NOLA MARKETPLACE CRISTINA’S

MR. HENRY

CLEANING SERVICE Let me help you with your

Custom Tailor • Expert Fitter WE BEAT ALL COMPETITORS!

cleaning needs

After Construction Cleaning Residential & Commercial Licensed & Bonded

232-5554 or 831-0606 3 TON 410 FREON REPLACEMENT SYSTEM

your body. your mind. your life.

$3690

INSTALLED

12 months same as cash

Superior Aire, Inc. 465-0688

LAKEVIEW CLEANING SERVICE Residential • Commercial

Susana Palma

AFTER CONSTRUCTION CLEANING

until Nov. 30th

10 year compressor

Expert on Difficult Alterations Alterations • Remodeling Ladies’ and Men’s Wear At the Corner of St. Charles 1619 Jackson Avenue New Orleans, LA 70130 Phone: 523-5023

including

13 Seer

YOUR GUIDE TO: MERCHANDISE • SERVICES • EVENTS ANNOUNCEMENTS • AND MORE

Group TRX classes

Light/General Housekeeping • Heavy Duty Cleaning Summer Cleaning • Supplies Provided

8422 Oak St. NOLA 985-640-2648

504-250-0884 • 504-286-5868 Fully Insured & Bonded

www.TransformNOLA.com

Locally owned & serving New Orleans area for 19 years

Allow me to cook & entertain in your home this season

www.cougarinstincts.com Photo by Abby Photo, LLC.

MrHappyfeet’s Dance Club! GRAND OPENING!

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

Saturday Night Dance • Oct. 9th

64

featuring a wide selection of dance music 7pm - Free Dance Lesson 8-11pm - Dance (504) 432-5429 NO COVER • BYOL Set Ups Provided 8308 Lafitte Ct. Chalmette SMOKE FREE MrHappyfeetsDanceClub.com

Enjoy a career as a New Orleans Taxi Driver NEW ORLEANS TAXI SCHOOL

is now recruiting and hiring Free training and test preparation

Photo Restoration • DVD Photo Slideshow with Music Video Tape to DVD Conversion Professional Video Editing • On-Site Presentation Available

NOW ENROLLING

view samples at:

Call 504-821-6227

www.slideshowmd.com Maria 504.430.0533

Darin 504.722.6005

3001 Conti St., New Orleans, LA 70119

CLASSIFIEDS PETS

AUTOMOTIVE

483-3100 • Fax: 483-3153 3923 Bienville St. New Orleans, LA 70119 Mon.-Fri. 8:30 a.m.- 5:30 p.m.

classadv@gambitweekly.com CASH, CHECK OR MAJOR CREDIT CARD

Online: When you place ad in The Gambit’s Classifieds it also appears on our website, www.bestofneworleans.com Free Ads: Private party ads for

merchandise for sale valued under $100 (price must be in ad) or ads for pets found/lost. No phone calls. Please fax or email.

Deadlines:

• For all Line Ads - Thurs. @ 5 p.m. • For all Display Ads - Wed. @ 5 p.m. NOTE: Ad cancellations and charges for all display ads must be made by Wednesday at 5pm prior to the coming weeks insertion. Ad cancellations and changes for all line ads must be made by Thursday at noon prior to the coming weeks insertion. Please proof you first as insertion that appears for errors. The Gambit only takes responsibility for the first incorrect insertion.

PET ADOPTIONS

AUTOMOTIVE

Kit Kit

FORD FOCUS ‘05 4d xe Sport model. Fully loaded, 40K mi. $200 down, take over pmts of $88/mo w/ warranty. Call 504-836-9801, 24 hours.

KIT KAT, Muted Gray Tabby, appx. 7 mos old, Vet, Ck/Vacs/Spay/ Rescue/Litter Trained Super Sweet Lap Cat, Rescue (504) 460-0136

Lollipop and Jellybean

16wk old sweet playful kittens with personality plus, spayed/neutered ,shots, microchip. rescue 504 462-1968

AUTOS UNDER $1000 2004 NISSAN SENTRA SPEC V

Runs but does need work! NO Drivers side airbag. It has a few dents & dings,l but overall body in good shape. Current on inspection & tags. Would be great for parts or project car! Must sell $750. Call (504) 676-8943

MOPEDS/SCOOTERS ELECTRIC SCOOTER

Heavy Duty Mongoose Pro M200. 2” wheels. ad seat. Throttle & hand brakes. Max speed 15 mph. Two 12-volt quick rechargeable w/ smart Charger. Mint cond. $100. Call (504) 288-6843

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT MIND-BODY-FITNESS

Maxine

small terrier mix very sweet female, 7 yrs old ,loves cats and dogs, rescue 504 462-1968

Princess Leila

Alicia Whittington

Theraputic Body Work SPECIAL

1 HOUR

$50

Swedish & Deep Tissue

60/90/120 Minutes Available Appts

9am-9pm • M - F Nice Ridgelake Dr. Location

solid white 5yr old female cat , very loving and talkative spayed ,shots ,rescue 504 462-1968 ANNOUNCEMENTS

LA Lic# 520

call

601.303.7979

Weekly tails

A Touch of

Aloha

massage & body work

pain management & relaxation • Lomi Lomi - 90 minutes • Neuromuscular Therapy • Deep Tissue • Swedish • Providing Therapeutic Massage/Non Sexual

Employment Special Rates

2 WEEKS GET 1 WEEK

BUY

FREE Advertise in

market PLACE Gambit’s weekly guide to Services, Events, Merchandise, Announcements, etc. for as little as $50

2209 LaPalco Blvd

www.atouchofaloha.massageplanet.com Member of BBB

LICENSED MASSAGE A BODY BLISS MASSAGE

Jeannie LMT #3783-01. Flexible appointments. Uptown Studio or Hotel out calls. 504.894.8856 (uptown)

BODYWERKS MASSAGE

Bodywerks Massage by Marilyn Tapper La. License #2771. Uptown Studio. 504-782-1452.

polly

MERCHANDISE

Kennel #A11412104

ART/POSTERS ART COLLECTION

Vintage Photography, Tribal Art, Glass & Ceramics. Call Michael, (504) 913-2872

BYWATER BODYWORKS

Swedish, deep tissue, therapeutic. Flex appts, in/out calls, OHP/student discounts, gift cert. $65/hr, $75/ 1 1/2hr. LA Lic# 1763 Mark. 259-7278

RELAX RELAX RELAX

Swedish massage by strong hands. Call Jack at 453-9161. La lic #0076.

MASSAGE BY JAMIE

SW/DT or Gen Relaxation.Safe, priv & quiet location. Awesome work. $60/hr & $95/1.5hr. 8am-9pm. 504-2311774. LA#509

FURNITURE/ACCESSORIES $125 Full/Double Size Mattress Set, still in original plastic, unopened. We can deliver. (504) 846-5122 $295 Brand New Iron Queen Bed with mattress set, all new. Can deliver. (504) 952-8403 King Pillowtop Mattress, NEW!!! ONLY $199. Can deliver. (504) 846-5122 NEW Pub Height Table Set all wood, still boxed. Delivery available. $325 (504) 846-5122 Queen Mattress Set $149 Still in wrapper. Will deliver. (504) 846-5122

rusty

Kennel #A10771759

Rusty is a 1-year-old, neutered, orange tabby DSH who has been at the shelter since June! He’s a lounger and a lover and is more than ready to go to his new home. To meet Rusty or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. To look for a lost pet come to the Louisiana SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), Mon-Sat. 9-5, Sun. 12-5 or call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

Polly is a 9-month-old, spayed, Puggle/Lab mix. She’s a bit timid with new friends, enjoys playing with mellow dogs and is learning to walk on a leash. To meet Polly or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191.

La Lic #2983

504-258-3389

For Rent &

ADOPTIONS ADOPT At-home mom, loving professional dad, strong family values await precious 1st baby. Expenses paid. Joe & Sandy 1-800-861-4080 Loving couple dreams of adopting your newborn. We’ll give secure future, family, endless love. Sara & Mike (888)391-5061. Expenses paid. PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293

DATING SERVICE. Long-term/ShortTerm Relationships, FREE-2-TRY! 1-877-722-0087 Exchange/Browse Personal Mesaages 1-866-362-1311. Live adult casual conversations 1-877599-8753. Meet pn chat-lines. Local Singles 1-888-869-0491 (18+) New!! Talk Live!! 1-866-362-1311

Woodland Oaks Center

Real Estate

GAIN NATIONAL EXPOSURE. Reach over 5 million young, educated readers for only $995 by advertising in 110 weekly newspapers like this one. Call Jason at 202-289-8484. This is not a job offer. HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-800-532-6546 Ext. 97 http:// www.continentalacademy.com

65

reaL esTaTe

SHOWCaSe NEW ORLEANS

4526 A St. Ann $239K Great views of City Park & perfect deck in rear to view Endymion Parade. Spacious 1 br/1.5 ba totally renov. post-Katrina. Wd flrs, hi ceils, stainless steel apps. 1089 square feet.

922-24 Dauphine $900K 4 unit French Quarter multi-family. 3457 sqft total. Great Quarter location! Parking.

Paula Bowler • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 • www.frenchquarterrealty.com

FRENCH QUARTER

GENTILLY

FRENCH QUARTER CONDOS 929 Dumaine STARTING AT $99,000 G. Geoffrey Lutz Owner/Agent 482-8760

5542 Charlotte Dr. $99,500 Slab Ranch - 3 BR, 2 BA Partially renov + Guest Cottage 504-568-1359

REAL ESTATE CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

JEFFERSON PARISH WHEELCHAIR FRIENDLY COTTAGE

Roomy 2B/1b $149,900. Wood floors, covered ramp and porch. Near Airline @ Transcontinental. Zoned C2. Nice fenced yard w/ sprinkler lines. Call Raisa Galper 610-7415 or Mary Beth Arceneaux 913-6891, of Prudential Gardner Realtors, 4509 Veterans, Metairie,La., USA, 504-887-7878 (licensed in La.)

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

METAIRIE 2511 Metairie Lawn

#318. Renov’t 2 BR/2 BA unit with W/D & fridge. Great cond & floorplan. $149,500. Call to see! SHARON DEMAREST, Cell: 504-250-6497. Visit my website: www.sharrondemarest. com to view pics.

LAKEVIEW/LAKESHORE GETAWAY EVERYDAY!

Nice loft bths w/view of lake/marina. 40ft cov slip, granite kit. $279K. Jennifer 504-250-9930 lanasa.com HGI Realty 504-207-7575

Lakefront Harborview Condo 2br, 2ba w/lake view 139K . . . 2834706 www.datakik.com/423

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT CONDO FOR SALE

1 Blk off St. Charles. 2/2, wd flrs, appls & w/d incl., grnite cntrtps & ss appl. OS pkng. $179,900 Darlene, Hera Realty 504-914-6352

LOTS/ACREAGE LAND LIQUIDATION

20 Acres $0 Down $99/mo. ONLY $12,900 near growing El Paso, Texas, Guaranteed Owner Financing, NO CREDIT CHECKS! Money back Guarantee. FREE Map/Pictures. 800755-8953

UPTOWN

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

VACATION RENTALS

WAREHOUSE SPACE STARTING AT

VAIL - SKI IN, SKI OUT

Luxury Condo. Avail: Nov 13 - 20, 20 -27, 28-4. Call (504) 669-8851

GENERAL REAL ESTATE 1317 St. Phillip

2.5 blks frm qrt. across prk. hrdwd flr, ceil fans, eat-in-kitch, Bd,Liv, Ba, wtr pd, w/d hkp 504-482-6004. ALL AREAS - HOUSES FOR RENT. Browse thousands of rental listings with photos and maps. Advertise your rental home for FREE! Visit: http:// www.RealRentals.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

66

INCLUDING UTILITIES

CALL 899-RENT

899-RENT HARAHAN/RIVER RIDGE

Rent or Lease or Lease to Buy, 1BR, 1-1/2 BA, jacuzzi, Elec & TV incld, prkg. 24 hr Concierge Service. $1050/mo - 914-882-1212

High end 1-4BR. Near ferry, clean, many x-tras, hrdwd flrs, cen a/h, no dogs, no sec 8, some O/S prkng $750$1200/mo. 504-362-7487

BROADMOOR CLOSE TO UNIVERSITIES

Lg 1 br, furn kit, new cer tile/refin wd flrs, lots of windows, ceil fans, w/d, off st pkg. $800/mo. Louis, 874-3195

CARROLLTON 1302 Burdette at Plum

METAIRIE 2805 Wytchwood Dr.

1Bd/1Ba Lafreniere Pk. CA/H. D/W. Crpt/wd flr. Frig&Stv. W/D hkups. Ref. Please. $625/mo+dep. 504-250-2151

3012 14th Street

Newly renov 2 br, 1.5 ba TH, w/d hkp, furn kit w/dw, c a/h, patio. No pets. No Sec.8 $750/mo. 504-833-1197.

BEVERLY GARDEN NR LAKE

3 br/2 ba, 1 stry brk, liv/din comb, blt-in kit/den, cen a/h, w/d hkp, gar, fnc yd. 1900 sf. $1700. 858-2744

LUXURY APTS

3 BR, 2 full baths, LR, DR, kit, w&d hkups, faux fireplace, fans, blinds. No pets. $900/mo. 504-443-2280

HOWARD SCHMALZ & ASSOCIATES REAL ESTATE Call Bert: 504-581-2804

3701 Tchoupitoulas

METAIRIE TOWERS

ALGIERS POINT

Nice area. 3br/1bat. Brick. All appls, New carpet, granite. Fenced yd. Yd maintained. $1200/mo + dep. No section 8. No smoking. 504-874-0599

1, 2, 3 & 4 ROOM OFFICES STARTING AT $695

1212 Brockenbrough Ct. Lg 2 bd, 1bth, furn kit, w/d hkps, off st pkg. $600. Mo + dep. 834-3465.

HISTORIC ALGIERS POINT

9804 JOEL AVE

COMMERCIAL RENTALS

GARDEN DISTRICT

$795 CALL

OLD METAIRIE CONVENIENT LOCATION

Office/Warehouse

6 Blocks to Tulane, 1BD/1Ba. Water/ Gas Pd. Frigde, Stov. W/D. $650 Claude 884-2466

7941 NELSON

Upper duplex, 2 brm, 1 bath, os pkng. $1150/mo. 251-2188 or 813-7782

CITY PARK/BAYOU ST. JOHN FURNISHED EFFICIENCY

Renovated, util included,w/ dishwash, hdwd flrs, ceil fans, hi-spd net, cable. $715/mo all inclus: 231-1087

LARGE STUDIO

20x25’ , bath & sep kit. Priv balcony. Gated community. Near Fairgrounds. No pets, no smoking. $650/mo. Call 504-615-1716.

ESPLANADE RIDGE 2509 GOV NICHOLLS

800 sq.ft Charming shotgun. furn kit, w/d, tile, cen a/h, off stpkg, fenced yd. $600/mo + dep. Call 827-5548

FRENCH QUARTER/ FAUBOURG MARIGNY 1103 ROYAL ST

$900

Unit A, 1br, 1ba, cen a/h, Jacuzzi tub, w/d, water incl. Furnished. $1700/mo. Call for appt, 504-952-3131.

2800 N. Rampart

1726 St. Charles

1/1 "Avenue Living"

$800

Brand New Triplex. 2 BDRM/ 1 BA Each Unit. Corner Lot. $850-$1100/month. Email realtorbev7045@gmail.com.

CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATE Very bright 1br/1ba apt, LR, new kit w/ice maker & front balcony. First flr consists of 2 lrg rms & bath suitable for office or gallery. W/d, working fireplace $1200/mo, 504-529-3222

521 ROYAL STREET

Luxurious 2BR, 2.5BA, LR/DR. Elevator. Modern kit & baths. W/D, wd flrs & carpeted bdrms. 2000’, terrace. No pets. $2800/mo. Prestige Properties, 504-884-1925.

IRISH CHANNEL

2BR w/Balcony

1/2 BlOCK TO MAGAZINE

Furn Rms, Prefer Nght wrkrs. 1&2 BDRs w hdwd/crpt flrs. $175/wk to 900/mo +depst. 504-202-0381,504738-2492.

LAKEVIEW/LAKESHORE Beautiful Lakeview Apt

1/BR Studio,Furnished, Util. Pd. W/D, Alrm. OFS pking. $1550 + Dep.Crdt Chck. No Pets/smkers.504- 442-5709.

OPAL ST

Newly renov’t. 2BR/1BA. Granite cntps, hdwd flrs. W&D, sec sys. $1000/mo., water incl. Dep req. 504615-2424.

2340 Dauphine Street

(504) 944-3605

RESIDENTIAL RENTALS 2715 ST. CHARLES-2 bd/ 1.5 ba $3000 524 DAUPHINE-1 bd/ 1.5 ba $2850 1301 N. RAMPART-1 bd/ 1.5 ba $2000 1205 ST. CHARLES-1 bd/ 1ba $1800 4721 MAGAZINE - Comm.

$1700

3724 TULANE-4 bd/ 2 ba $1200

CALL FOR MORE LISTINGS!

MID CITY

GENTILLY

2BD/1BA, Single House. Priv. Bkyrd. Kitch w/ dishwasher. W/D. Pets negot. $850+Deposit. 504-231-2283.

Newly Renovated

3BD/2BA Granite Count. High ceil. Wd flrs. Cent.A/C. W/D. Water pd. $1500+depo. 504- 638-1977

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT 1 BR EFFTY CLOSE UNIV

Furn effy w/lr, a/h unit, ceil fans, wd/ tile flrs, w/d onsite. Clara by Nashville. Avl Nov. $550. 895-0016.

1629 TOLEDANO #102

1730 NAPOLEON AVE

Across from fairgrounds. 2 br, 1 ba, 1200 sf, wd flrs, appls, cen a/h, w/d. $1300/mo. Soniat Realty 220-1022.

LARGE 2 BR, 1 BA APT

Newly renov, new appls, cen a/h, w/d, alarm, fncd yd, off st prkg, priv entrance, $875+util. 504-283-8450.

1 br apt, living rm, furn kit, wd flrs, hi ceil, a/c units. util incl. 1 blk St Charles. No pets. 443-4488

2218 GENERAL PERSHING

3 br, 1 ba apt, lr, dr, furn kit, cen a/h, w/d, cble & wtr incl. Close to univ & stcar. Call Cindy, 236-3278.

Wayne • Nicole • Sam • Josh • Jennifer • Brett • Robert • George • Baxter

504-949-5400 911 N Derbigny

1/1 newly renov singl shotgun hse $525

830 St Philip “G”

1/1 Hi Ceils,Lg Balc,Prkng,Exc Loc

1125 N Rampart “3”

1/1 Lots Nat Light, walk-in closet, Exc Loc $700

1104 Music “A”

1/1 Freshly painted,Lots Nat Light,Hi Ceils $585

1438 Chartres

Studio Renov in great location

Betw Gen Taylor & Austerlitz Sts. Newly remodeled 1 BR, wtr pd, cen a/h, appls incld. $650/mo. 504-508-1436

4419 St. Charles Ave.

2 BR, 2 BA lux condo, huge balcony, water paid, $2800/mo. 504-236-6896 see website @ www.balconycondo.com

$1995

EMPLOYMENT $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Earn Extra income assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! CALL OUR LIVE OPERATORS NOW! 1-800-405-7619 ext. 2450 http://www. easywork-greatpay.com

NIGHT DRIVERS

12 Hr. shifts. Dedicated & Local. Free Health Ins. & Benefits. CDL-A w/ Hazmat, Tanker End., TWIC Card & 1 yr TT Exp Required. 888-380-5516

7535 JEANNETTE ST

1BR/1BA, appls, elec, wtr, int/cbl, incld. Nr Lusher schl, yr lse, dep rqd. No smkr/pet. $850/mo. 219-1422

Hosts, Cooks & Cashiers

802 FERN ST

For its French Quarter location.

Cor Maple. Hist bldg. 2 br, new renov, ss & gran kit, track llights, w/d, cen a/h, cov balc, all appls. $1250. 723-0001. Renov, furnished kitchen, new appls, cen air/heat, w/d. EFFC/$495. 3BDRM/$800 • Call 504-250-9010

GREAT EFFICIENCY!

One person studio. Near TU Univ. $580/mo net + dep. All utilities pd. 866-7837

PETS WELCOME!!!

4830 CHESTNUT. 1 bdrm, furn kit, cen a/h, wood floors, hi ceil, w/d hkps, ceil fans, pvt bkyd. $825/mo. ASC Real Estate. Call between 10am & 4pm. 504-439-2481.

Prestige Garden District Location

Compl renov duplex, just steps to mag. 2 Bd/1.5 Ba, den, kitchen, refrig. w/ ice maker, stove w. micro hd, d/w, w/d, cA/H. ceiling fans, hrdwd flrs, exposed brick, 24/ hr sec. Sorry no smkrs/pets. $1875. 891-8977

UPTOWN/ GARDEN DISTRICT

1, 2 & 3

BEDROOMS AVAILABLE CALL

899-RENT WAREHOUSE DISTRICT BAKERY CONDO GATED

Cozy 1 br, All applian. granite counters, hdwd flrs, pool, workout area. w/d, No pets. $975. 455-6245.

Applicants must have 2 yrs experience. A leader in guaranteed renewal insurance, is

EXPANDING ITS SALES FORCE

To learn more about a career with Aflac, please fax a resume to 504-889-9571 or call Erin at 504-508-5050 to schedule an interview. ENTERTAINMENT MOVIE EXTRAS. Earn up to $150 Per Day. To stand in backgrounds of major films. Experience not required. CALL NOW! 1-888-664-4621

TEACHERS/INSTRUCTORS GYMNASTICS ACADEMY

Coaches needed for Gymnastic & Tumbling classes. PT schedule is avail & flexible. For more info: 884-0907

POSITIONS WANTED WILL DO PRIVATE SITTING

I’m a Cert. CNA w/CPR card. Will do diets, light meals, etc. 8 &12 hr shifts. Please call (504) 427-1445, if not home, pls leave msg.

VOLUNTEER

RENTALS TO SHARE

1128 Decatur A

2/2 renovated FQ apt w/BALCONY!! $1850

448 Julia Unit #219

1/1 furn,Utils Cable/WiFi included $1950

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Findyour roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com.

552 Metairie lawn

3/2 Corner lot WD/DW Parking Pets OK $1400

CANAL ST - 1 ROOM

739 ½ Gov Nicholls

1/1 Util included, furn., great loc!

$950

409 Rosa “A”

2/1 Utili inc, parking & big yard

$950

1704 Napoleon

1/1 spacious, hi ceils, 2 small side balcs $800

632 Gallier

2/1 all the amenities! w/d&crtyrd.

712 St. Philip

1/1 Grndflraptw/beautcommoncrtyrd!$1700

715 Royal H

1/1 cozy 125 sqft in the heart of the FQ $700

REAL ESTATE

232 Decatur #3A

1/1 Furnished, balc w/ grt views! $1950

Call 483-3100

Very, very clean. Great n’hood, 6 mo rent agreement. $140/wk, incl wtr & elec. 282-7296. NO CALLS AFT 7PM

To Advertise in

$900

Apply at 724 Iberville Street Mon – Thurs 2 – 4 PM

in the Greater New Orleans area. We need YOU to join our team to help us grow.

$1995 $750

Now Hiring

AGENTS & SALES

g g

Offers Volunteer Opportunities. Make a difference in the lives of the terminally ill & their families. Services include: friendly visits to patients & their families, provide rest time to caretaker, bereavement & office assistance. School service hours avail. Call Volunteer Coordinator @ 504-818-2723 #3016

To Advertise in

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > OCTOBER 05 > 2010

French Quarter Realty

1022 Toulouse “BC22’ 2/2 Pkng,Pvt Balcs,Ingnd Pool

3915 Annunciation St.

930 JACKSON, near Mag.

2604 Palmyra St.

1/1, $900/mo. Wd flrs, ss appl, stone cntrtps. OS pkng, crtyd. Angela, 504432-1034 Keller Wiiliams.

1730 GENTILLY BLVD

4810 St Charles Ave, 2 BR/2BA-Upper, 2000 sf, furn kit, wd flrs, w/d, no pets/ smkrs. $2000/mo. 504-899-4259

g

427 ESPLANADE APT/OFFICE

CLASSIFIEDS EMPLOYMENT

REAL ESTATE

Call (504) 483-3100

SAVE A

PIGGY’S

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WITH

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