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OF NEW ORLEANS

G A M B I T > V O L U M E 31 > N U M B E R 3 8 > S E P T E M B E R 21 > 2 010

.COM

THE RACE FOR LT. GOVERNOR

9

DUANE EDDY & THE PONDEROSA STOMP

37

VELVEETA ELVIS

CUE

65

HOME + FASHION MAGAZINE {P UL L OU T}

BULLETIN BOARD CLASSIFIEDS

VOTED

NEW

BEST BAR DECOR BEST NEIGHBORHOOD BAR BEST MOJITO 5535 Magazine St.

• Interested in a Health Care Career? • Come Volunteer in our “Hands- On” program • Earn Service Hours • Assist our staff in caring for our patients

504-818-2723 ext. 3016

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

Ask for Volunteer Coordinator

02

A GREAT PLACE TO DO YOGA WILD LOTUS YOGA - Named “Best Place to Take a Yoga Class” 7 yrs in a row by Gambit Readers”. www.wildlotusyoga.com 899-0047 DWI - Traffic Tickets? Don’t go to court without an attorney! You can afford an attorney. Call Attorney Eugene Redmann, 504-834-6430 Buying MIGNON FAGET Jewelry Rolex & Diamond Engagement Rings, CHRIS’ Fine Jewelry 3304 W. Esplanade Ave, Met. Call 504-833-2556 BELLY DANCING CLASSES FUN, FANTASTIC & ALWAYS SASSY 7 wk sessions start, Wed 10/6. Beg: 6-7pm, Open Level 7:10-8:10pm. Instructor Betty Karam, jdkaram@tulane.edu 897-0432 or meryl@nojcc.org 897-0143.

Zoom Teeth Whitening For a Whiter Brighter Smile

SPECIAL FEE

$295 Justin Ansel D.D.S Family Dentistry

Procedure done in one office visit

4400 Trenton Street Suite I Metairie, LA 70006

Take home trays included

(504) 455-3362

Touch-up syringe (ADA #9972)

4 HOUR FITNESS PACKAGE

DENTAL CLEANING SPECIAL

MAT PILATES • TRIO REFORMER $O N LY T R X C L A S S • 1 dAY B O OT C A M P

55

Salire Charity Boot Camp

Susan G. Komen, LSPCA and Desire Street Ministry

5 WEEK FITNESS BOOT CAMP

- NEW ORLEANS CAMPS START 9/20 & 9/21 - METAIRIE CAMP STARTS 9/28

• 3 LOCATIONS: - INdOOR Metairie (AM) - City Park (AM & PM) - Audubon Park (AM)

FALL 5 WEEK SPECIAL 15 $

120 12 SESSIONS/MONTH

504.821.4896 www.salirefitness.com

89

$

*

(reg. $132)

includes comprehensive exam (#0150), x-rays (#274), cleaning (#1110) or panorex (#330) *NEW PATIENTS ONLY — EXPIRES 10/03/10

DR. GLENN SCHMIDT • DR. MITCHELL PIERCE DR. STEPHEN DELAHOUSSAYE FAMILY DENTISTRY Call For An Appointment

UPTOWN KENNER

Now available at 2 locations!

8025 Maple St. @ Carrollton · 861-9044 www.uptownsmiles.com 1942 Williams Blvd., Suite 8 · 469-9648 www.kennersmiles.com

Cooking with a Cougar Wine Tasting and Book Signing, Sept. 24th, 5:00-8:00pm, The Creole Grill, 5241 Veterans Blvd. N.O. TAXI SCHOOL Now recruiting & enrolling. See our ad in today’s paper. 504-821-6227

www.bootcampneworleans.com

SALIRE - PERSONAL TRAINING

PRIVATE - MAT & EQUIPMENT PILATES SERVICES - $15 TRX CLASSES

BANKRUPTCIES & WILLS DIVORCE from $350 + costs DWI & TRAFFIC TULANE AVE LAW CENTER Stein, Glaser, Smith and Assoc 2735 Tulane Ave (across fr Criminal Courts) (504) 822-4488 Free Consultation & Parking YOGA 108 NEW ORLEANS LLC Introductory Offer: $29/month WWW.YOGA-108.NET 1-866-YOGA-108 GET A POWERFUL RESUME! Evening & weekend appointments. GRANT COOPER, Certified Resume Writer CareerPro N.O. 861-0400 • Metairie 861-8882

Camp Swan 2010 • November 19, 20, 21 •

Camp Swan is a three-day, two-night camp for children age 7-12 who have lost a parent, sibling, or other significant person in their life. The camp combines art, music, individual and group therapies so that so that the need of each child can be addressed. Through these therapeutic experiences the children learn how to have a proper outlet for their feelings of sadness. The Camp takes place at beautiful Bayou Segnette and will take place November 19th, 20th, 21st, 2010. The Camp is sponsored by Canon Hospice and the Akula Foundation. The Camp is free of charge. We are currently accepting applications for volunteers and for children to participate in the camp.

For information, contact Sue may at 504-818-2723 x 3012.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2010

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2010

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2010

7:00p m–8:30p m LITTLE RIVER BAND 9:30p m–11:00p m REO SPEEDWAGON

5:00p m–6:30p m 7:30p m–9:00p m 10p m–11:30p m

3:00p m–4:30p m AMANDA SHAW & THE CUTE GUYS 5:00p m–6:30p m THE CHARLIE DANIELS BAND 7:30p m– 9:00p m BLAKE SHELTON

MAIN STAGE WEST JEFFERSON MEDICAL CENTER & MAGIC 101.9 GRETNA FEST STAGE: CRESCENT CROWN & MILLER® LIGHT & BAYOU 95.7

5:00p m–6:30p m 8:00p m–9:30p m

THE VETTES SISTER HAZEL

MARKET STAGE: FIRST NBC & IESI & BOOMTOWN® CASINO

4:30p m–6:00p m BRUCE DAIGREPONT CAJUN BAND 6:30p m–8:00p m GAL HOLIDAY & THE HONKY TONK REVUE 8:30p m–10:00p m DOUG KERSHAW RIVERFRONT STAGE:

ZATARAIN’S & BANNER CHEVROLET & JEFFERSON CONVENTION

4:30p m–6:00p m 6:30p m–8:00p m 8:15p m–9:15p m

AL LIL FATS JACKSON BAG OF DONUTS LOUIS PRIMA JR.

OLD POST OFFICE STAGE: FIRST BANK AND TRUST & AT&T & ENTERGY

MAIN STAGE WEST JEFFERSON MEDICAL CENTER & MAGIC 101.9

THE RADIATORS

THE TEMPTATIONS REVIEW FEAT. DENNIS EDWARDS

THE DOOBIE BROTHERS

GRETNA FEST STAGE: CRESCENT CROWN & MILLER® LIGHT & BAYOU 95.7

4:00p m–5:30p m MYNAMEISJOHNMICHAEL 6:00p m–7:30p m DASH RIP ROCK 8:30p m–10:00p m SOUL ASYLUM

3:30p m–5:00p m THE WISEGUYS 6:00p m–7:30p m JOHNNY SKETCH & THE DIRTY NOTES 8:30p m–10:00p m BONERAMA

4:00p m– 5:30p m WAYNE TOUPS & ZYDECAJUN 6:00p m–7:30p m TROMBONE SHORTY & ORLEANS AVENUE 8:00p m–9:15p m IRMA THOMAS

MARKET STAGE: FIRST NBC & IESI & BOOMTOWN® CASINO

BOBBY LENERO THE YAT PAC

R. SCULLY & ROUGH 7 BIG SAM’S FUNKY NATION LOS LOBOS

MARKET STAGE: FIRST NBC & IESI & BOOMTOWN® CASINO

RIVERFRONT STAGE:

RIVERFRONT STAGE:

2:00p m–3:30p m 4:00p m–5:30p m 6:30p m–8:00p m

2:00p m–3:30p m 4:00p m–5:30p m 6:00p m–7:30p m

THE TOPCATS BUCKTOWN ALLSTARS THE FRANKIE FORD SHOW

2:00p m–2:45p m 3:00p m–4:30p m 5:00p m–6:30p m 7:00p m–8:30p m

ABDULLA THE TENT MAKER ALEX McMURRAY BAND PAUL SANCHEZ ROLLIN ROAD SHOW

2:00p m–3:30p m 4:00p m–5:30p m 6:00p m–7:30p m

JUNIOR & SUMPTIN SNEAKY BIG AL CARSON

4:30p m–6:30p m 4:30p m–6:30p m

KIRK JOSEPH’S 504 BRASS BAND

2:30p m–4:00p m 4:30p m–6:00p m 6:30p m–8:00p m

BOBBY LENERO CARLO DITTA THE YAT PAC

ZATARAIN’S & BANNER CHEVROLET & JEFFERSON CONVENTION

KIM CARSON KYLE TURLEY BAND LUTHER KENT

FESTIVAL GROUNDS

5:00p m–7:00p m 5:30p m–7:30p m

ALGIERS BRASS BAND

4:00p m–5:30p m 6:00p m–7:30p m 8:00p m–9:00p m

BOBBY LENERO THE YAT PAC LOUIE PRIMA JR.

THE WILD MAGNOLIA MARDI GRAS INDIANS

ITALIAN VILLAGE: OMNI BANK & COX COMMUNICATIONS®

15 Daily Admission $40 Weekend Pass

$

TICKETS ONLINE AT

www.gretnafest.com

ZATARAIN’S & BANNER CHEVROLET & JEFFERSON CONVENTION

OLD POST OFFICE STAGE: FIRST BANK AND TRUST & AT&T & ENTERGY

CHUBBY CARRIER & THE BAYOU SWAMP BAND

FIRST STREET STAGE: PEOPLE’S HEALTH & HARVEY GULF MARINE & IBERIABANK TOMMY MCCLAIN, WILLIE TEE & THE CYPRESS BAND

FESTIVAL GROUNDS

CREOLE WILD WEST MARDI GRAS INDIANS

ITALIAN VILLAGE: OMNI BANK & COX COMMUNICATIONS®

October 1, 2 & 3 2010

FREE PEDESTRIAN FERRY SHUTTLE FROM CANAL ST.

Free Parking At 3rd & Derbigny Free Parking & Shuttle: From Oakwood Shopping Center (Westbank Expressway) From Westside Shopping Center (Stumpf Blvd. & Westbank Expressway) Carnival Rides | Arts & Crafts | Over 100 Food items

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

6:00p m–7:30p m 8:00p m–9:30p m

GRETNA FEST STAGE: CRESCENT CROWN & MILLER® LIGHT & BAYOU 95.7

2:30p m–3:30p m 4:30p m–6:00p m 6:30p m–8:00p m

4:00p m–6:00p m JIMMY THIBODEAUX BAND OLD POST OFFICE STAGE: 6:30p m–8:00p m VIEUX CARRE FEAT. RACHEL FLEETWOOD FIRST BANK AND TRUST & AT&T & ENTERGY 9:00p m–10:30p m CREOLE STRING BEANS 3:00p m–4:30p m BENNY GRUNCH & THE BUNCH 5:00p m–6:30p m CHICKEN ON THE BONE FIRST STREET STAGE: PEOPLE’S HEALTH & HARVEY GULF MARINE & IBERIABANK 7:00p m–8:30p m AARON FORET 4:00p m–5:30p m AUSTIN SICARD & THE MEDICS 9:00p m–10:30p m SHAMARR ALLEN 6:00p m–7:30p m SKEETER THOMASSIE’S SWAMP POP ALLSTARS FIRST STREET STAGE: 8:00p m–9:30p m DANNY ALEXANDER BLUES BAND PEOPLE’S HEALTH & HARVEY GULF MARINE & IBERIABANK 3:00p m– 4:30p m CLARK KNIGHTEN & 4X4 CONNECTION BAND FESTIVAL GROUNDS 5:30p m–7:00p m RYAN FORET & THE FORET TRADITION 5:00p m–7:00p m STORYVILLE STOMPERS BRASS BAND 8:00p m–9:30p m LITTLE FREDDIE KING 5:30p m–7:30p m CREOLE WILD WEST MARDI GRAS INDIANS ITALIAN VILLAGE: OMNI BANK & COX COMMUNICATIONS®

MAIN STAGE WEST JEFFERSON MEDICAL CENTER & MAGIC 101.9

03

>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>> > <<<<<<<<< >>>>>>> > <<<<<<<

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

>>>>>>

contents

NEW ARRIVALS

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>

CHECK IT OUT

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 3923 BIENVILLE ST., NEW ORLEANS, L A 70119 < < < < <(504) < < <486-5900 <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > >OPERATING > > > > > HOURS > > > >: 8:30 > > A>.M. > >TO>5>:30> P.M. > MON.-FRI.

SEPTEMBER 21, 2010 · VOLUME 31 · NUMBER 38

PUBLISHER MARGO DUBOS COATS IN COLORS > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > DIRECTOR > > > > > >MARK > > >KARCHER > PARTY DRESSES • FRENCH PANTS< < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <ADMINISTRATIVE <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< BRIDAL GOWNS • FAUX FUR > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >EDITORIAL >FAX: > > 483-3116 > > > > |>response@gambitweekly.com >>>>>>>>>> SWEATERS & CARDIGANS

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

< < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < NEWS <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< EDITOR KEVIN ALLMAN > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Cover > > > >Story > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >19 > > > > > >MANAGING > > > > > >EDITOR > > > >KANDACE > POWER GRAVES

8131 HAMPSON • 866.9666 OPEN TILL 8PM THURS.

a great place to watch the games! 10 TVs, NFL PACKAGE, ½ Price Bud Light Pitchers, $10 Corona Buckets & FREE SAUZA SHOTS

Where dey at? A look at some of the people who made Saints-related news last year. Also: This year’s best Black and Gold fan shirts

Commentary

7

Blake Pontchartrain

8

News

9

Step One: Admitting you have a problem New Orleans know-it-all

The Secretary of State, a country singer and a Republican kingpin are among the candidates for lieutenant governor

19

PRODUCTION >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Bouquets & Brickbats

9

C’est What?

9

PRODUCTION DIRECTOR DORA SISON SPECIAL PROJECTS DESIGNER SHERIE DELACROIX-ALFARO GRAPHIC DESIGNERS LINDSAY WEISS, LYN BRANTLEY, BRITT BENOIT PRE-PRESS COORDINATOR MEREDITH LAPRÉ INTERN MARK WAGUESPACK

Scuttlebutt

9

DISPLAY ADVERTISING >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> FAX: 483-3159 | displayadv@gambitweekly.com

Shop Talk

17

This week’s heroes and zeroes Gambit’s Web poll

MAKE NACHO MAMA'S YOUR HOME FOR THE BLACK & GOLD + YOUR FAVORITE COLLEGE FOOTBALL TEAM!

From their lips to your ears Sammy’s Po-Boys

VIEWS Chris Rose / Rose-Colored Glasses

15

Clancy DuBos / Politics

16

Raising ’canes: Rose on hysterical meteorology On the firing of Dr. Tim Ryan

ARTS&ENTERTAINMENT

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

37

04

A&E News

37

Gambit Picks

37

Noah Bonaparte Pais / On the Record

41

Film Feature

48

Cuisine

65

Pioneers of rock ‘n’ roll headline Ponderosa Stomp’s celebration of the obscure Best bets for your busy week

Waking up to Wintersleep

GENTILLY: NOW OPEN 6325 Elysian Fields Ave. 286-1805 UPTOWN ELMWOOD 3242 Magazine 1000 S Clearview 899- 0031 736-1188

Special screenings at the Ponderosa Stomp

Ian McNulty on the Kingfish Grille 5 in Five: 5 superlative shrimp remoulades Brenda Maitland’s Wine of the Week

The Puzzle Page

11am-10pm Sun - Thurs · 11am-11pm Fri & Sat

www.nachomamasmexicangrill.com

cheer up a friend ROSES

$6.50 / DZ cash & carry

62

PULL-

837-6400

SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE MARY LOU NOONAN 483-3122 ········maryloun@gambitweekly.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES CARRIE MICKEY 483-3121 ·········carriem@gambitweekly.com SARAH BEARDEN 483-3124 ········sarahb@gambitweekly.com

MARKETING>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

MUSIC

43

ART

55

EVENTS

59

STAGE

51 57

CLASSIFIEDS Market Place

72

Mind / Body / Spirit

73

Weekly Tails

Employment

[OFF VETERANS ]

CLASSIFIEDS >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 483-3100 FAX: 483-3153 | classadv@gambitweekly.com

MARKETING DIRECTOR

Real Estate / Rentals

815 FOCIS STREET

78

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR SANDY STEIN BRONDUM 483-3150 ········sandys@gambitweekly.com ADVERTISING ADMINISTRATOR MICHELE SLONSKI 483-3140········micheles@gambitweekly.com ADVERTISING COORDINATOR CHRISTIN JOHNSON 483-3138 ········christinj@gambitweekly.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE JILL GIEGER 483-3131 ·········jillg@gambitweekly.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES JEFFREY PIZZO 483-3145 ········jeffp@gambitweekly.com LINDA LACHIN 483-3142 ········lindal@gambitweekly.com ABBY SHEFFIELD 483-3141·········abbys@gambitweekly.com AMY WENDEL 483-3146········amyw@gambitweekly.com JENNIFER MACKEY 483-3143 ········jenniferm@gambitweekly.com MEGAN MICALE 483-3144········meganm@gambitweekly.com NORTHSHORE ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE CRISTY NEWTON ········ cristyn@gambitweekly.com INTERN SARAH SOLOMON

GAMBITGUIDE FILM

OUT

POLITICAL EDITOR CLANCY DUBOS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR WILL COVIELLO SPECIAL SECTIONS EDITOR MISSY WILKINSON STAFF WRITER ALEX WOODWARD EDITORIAL ASSISTANT LAUREN LABORDE listingsedit@gambitweekly.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS JEREMY ALFORD, D. ERIC BOOKHARDT, BRENDA MAITLAND, IAN McNULTY, NOAH BONAPARTE PAIS, CHRIS ROSE, DALT WONK CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER CHERYL GERBER INTERNS NICOLE CARROLL, MORGAN RIBERA

COVER DESIGN BY DORA SISON

COVER PHOTO BY JONATHAN BACHMAN

73 74 75

JEANNE EXNICIOS FOSTER

BUSINESS >>>>> billing inquiries: (504) 483-3135 CONTROLLER GARY DIGIOVANNI ASSISTANT CONTROLLER MAUREEN TREGRE CREDIT OFFICER MJ AVILES OPERATIONS & EVENTS >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> OPERATIONS & EVENTS DIRECTOR LAURA CARROLL ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT CAROL STEADMAN WEBSITE >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> WEB SITE MANAGER

MARIA BOUÉ

Gambit Communications, Inc. CHAIRMAN CLANCY DUBOS PRESIDENT & CEO MARGO DUBOS Gambit (ISSN 1089-3520) is published weekly by Gambit Communications, Inc., 3923 Bienville St., New Orleans, LA 70119. We cannot be held responsible for the return of unsolicited manuscripts even if accompanied by a SASE. All material published in The Gambit is copyrighted: Copyright 2010 Gambit Communications, Inc. All rights reserved.

LOBSTER Night

DON’T MISS

with salad and a side dish, $25

SPECIAL PERFORMANCE

EVERY THURSDAY!

SAMIRA EVANS

& Her First in N.O. post Katrina

RES E RVATI ON S R E C O MMENDED

THURS., SEPT. 23

FINAL NIGHT IS THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 23RD

COOLINARY SPECIAL

1ST

COURSE CHOOSE ONE

2ND

COURSE CHOOSE ONE

3RD

COURSE CHOOSE ONE

WED • THUR • SUN 5-10PM FRI • SAT 5-7PM

APPLE,BRIE & WALNUT SALAD

ENGLISH STOUT Braised Beef Shepherd’s Pie with Horseradish Mashed Potatoes

SOUP DU JOUR

JOIN THE BOMBAY CLUB THIS SUMMER,

3 COURSES FOR $25!

FRIED CALAMARI

CURRY & CITRUS STEAMED MUSSELS

ENGLISH STYLE FISH & CHIPS

CREOLE CARLBONARA LINGUINE

BAKED STUFFED LOUISIANA SHRIMP

with Fresh Cut Fries & Apple-Jalapeño Tartar Sauce

Chicken, Andouille, Asparagus, Garlic, Cream & Cheese

stuffed with Crabmeat, $30 with Sautéed Spinach and Choron Sauce

PRALINE CRÈME BRULEE

ASSORTED ICE CREAM

Beer Tasting & LSU Tailgate to raise money for the Louisiana SPCA

BREAD PUDDING

Subject to availability • Not available with any other promotions No substitutions, please

Saturday Oct. 9, 2010

830 Conti Street | New Orleans, LA 70112 504.586.0972 | 1.800.699.7711 Validated Parking Available (Corner of Iberville & Dauphine)

2 PM-6 PM

47-510 Guillermoprieto Ad Gambit:Layout 1 8/19/10 1:26 PM Page 1

THE NEW NARCO-CULTURE A lecture on Mexico’s drug trade and its imprint on popular culture by one of the most prestigious journalists in the Americas.

Alma Guillermoprieto Wednesday, September 22 7:30 p.m. Nunemaker Auditorium Free and open to the public. Co-sponsored by the Loyola University Mexico Program and the Department of English For more information, contact Uriel Quesada at 865-3686 or e-mail uquesada@loyno.edu

www.loyno.edu/clacs

FREE AD

S MIS

ION

New Orleans City Park in front of NOMA at the Big Lake area

Sketch & The Dirty Notes MUSIC Johnny Over 200 ACTIVITIES different kinds of beer with Beer Samples starting at $1, Around the World Beer Run, Live Music, LA/SPCA Adoptions, Food, Win a Game Worn Saints Jersey raffle. www.neworleansontap.org

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

Loyola University New Orleans Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies presents

05

THE BEST AND

THE WÜRSTE

featuring Helmut Fricker and

traditional German cuisine.

OKTOBERFEST IS BACK! September 27 - October 3, 2010

German Lunch Buffet, 11:30am-2pm in the Veranda | MON – FRI German Menu & Happy Hour in Pete’s Pub | MON – FRI Oktoberfest Outdoors | THURS and FRI, 4-9pm in the Pan American Plaza

Wine Tastings

German Tailgate, 9am-1pm Pan American Plaza before the game | SUN German Sunday Brunch, 10:30am-3pm in the Veranda | SUN

Every Thursday & Friday • 5:30-7:30pm Wine Sense Seminar: Rich Man, Poor Man Wednesday, September 22 - Call for reservations 3700 Orleans Avenue in the Shops at the American Can Company

504.483.6314 • www.cbwines.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

444 SAINT CHARLES AVE. • INTERCONTINENTALNOLA.COM • (504) 525-5566

06

REAL MEN WATCH FOOTBALL OUTDOORS! REALLY! JOIN US AT MUSICAL LEGENDS PARK/CAFE BEIGNET

Celebrate the rebuilding of New Orleans with a

Special Edition Save NOLA Anniversary Shirt

$20

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Football Under the Stars!

A portion of all proceeds will be donated to Gambit's Big Easy

FOOTBALL PRE-GAME & GAME SHOW 2 LARGE SCREEN TVS POPCORN • LIGHT FOOD MENU COLD BEER • FULL BAR

Foundation. The Big Easy Foun-

available for purchase

the performing arts to the culture

dation is a 501 C-3 non-profit organization created to fund projects and programs that acknowledge the importance of and economy of the New Orleans

EVERY MONDAY NIGHT SEASON GAME

area. The Foundation supports activities that nurture talented

NO COVER • TONS OF FUN

youth, offer continuing education to professionals, and otherwise improve and enhance the future of the performing arts in our region.

311 BOURBON ST.

www.cafebeignet.com

Organic cotton and recycled polyester T-shirt; perfect fit; knitted imperfectly to create a vintage feel.

cOmmentary

thinking out loud

Step One

S

cies, programs and deterrents. Area Catholic high schools all but ignored our inquiries. Most wouldn’t even respond anonymously to the same questions from the local archdiocese on our behalf — despite a personal request to do so from Archbishop Gregory Aymond. Eleven schools did not even return our calls. Worst of all, several nonpublic schools admitted privately that they feared discussing their drug policies and programs because of how they might be perceived in the highly competitive local secondary school market. In other words, they were more concerned about their image (i.e., not being seen as “the drug school”) than they were about the welfare of their students. That’s pathetic — and irresponsible. It reminds us of the early days of AIDS, when squeamishness about openly discussing sexual activity and condom use trumped public health

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Any school that’s reluctant to discuss its drug abuse policies should set off alarm bells among parents. concerns and unnecessarily exposed more people to HIV. Robyn Dewhirst, director of assessment and early intervention at the Council of Alcohol and Drug Abuse for Greater New Orleans, isn’t squeamish at all about discussing the resurgence of heroin. Here’s her message to parents: “Kids aren’t as afraid of heroin as they once were. The impression is that smoking it is no big deal, and the fear of becoming a proverbial junkie is just not there.” Is that clear enough? Smack is back, folks. Young people know it. Parents know that drugs wax and wane in popularity, but they never completely go away. The best weapon against drugs is education. Here’s a news flash for the principals and school boards who won’t discuss their drug policies and programs: You have a problem. Step One is admitting it.

9625

PILATES EXPRESS

Speed up your workout with the NOAC 45 minute lunchtime pilates express group class. Our Master Pilates instructors’ attention to detail and powerful knowledge of core competencies will have you relaxed, refreshed, and back to work in no time.

Everything you want and more at the NOAC. For more on what we offer, call 525-2375 or visit us at 222 N. Rampart today. Free Parking.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

tep One is admitting you have a problem.” So goes the adage of many 12-step programs, from Alcoholics Anonymous to Narcotics Anonymous. Translation: You can’t take action against chemical dependency unless you first admit you’re chemically dependent. For last week’s cover story, “Heroin: It’s Cheap, It’s Deadly, and Teens Think It’s No Big Deal,” Gambit contacted more than 20 local high schools to discuss their drug abuse policies in light of recent overdose deaths involving heroin, which is making a comeback in a cheaper and more lethal form — among teens. We contacted public, private and Catholic high schools, asking the same questions: Were they aware of any heroin use by students? How many drug-related expulsions had they made in the last year? What policies and programs did they have in place concerning student drug abuse? Many of the answers were disheartening — because many of the schools simply refused to discuss the issue. Even some schools that had posted written drug policies on their websites declined to discuss specifics on the record. If the schools’ intentions were not to alarm parents, they should have taken the opposite approach. Parents know their teenagers are exposed to drugs, in and out of school settings, and they should expect schools to have a forthright, explicit approach to the topic. Any school that’s reluctant to discuss its drug abuse policies should set off alarm bells among parents. Young people have experimented with drugs and alcohol for generations, and heroin isn’t new to the drug scene. What is new is its availability and lethality. According to local drug experts and criminologists, today’s kids aren’t taking the old needle-and-spoon route to the drug; they’re snorting it or smoking it, often in conjunction with prescription medications. Worse yet, a heroin high has become cheaper than one from pot or cocaine. A $20 “20-bag” is enough to get a new user loaded for days. And whether it’s snorted or injected, heroin still ranks among the most addictive street drugs out there — and it’s often more potent than other illegal drugs. In a five-week period in 2008, heroin killed seven New Orleanians between the ages of 16 and 27, including a Lusher High School student named Maddy Prevost. Lusher principal Kathy Reidlinger spoke to us about the school’s proactive educational efforts, as did Dr. Timothy Rusniak of Benjamin Franklin High School. Sadly, those were the only two public schools willing to discuss the subject openly. A few private schools spoke on the record, but elsewhere the silence was deafening. The Orleans Parish School Board and the Algiers Charter Schools Association declined to speak about their drug poli-

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DEAR ALICE, Morphy was born in New Orleans in 1837, and at the age of 21 in 1858, he defeated chess master Adolf Anderssen of Germany, considered the world’s leading chess champion in the mid-1800s. The victory not only drew attention in Morphy’s hometown of New Orleans, but nationwide. According to Mel Leavitt’s book Great Characters of New Orleans, the young chess prodigy’s victory was significant because it was hailed as a sign the American intellect was emerging, especially in the eyes of British society, which considered the United States a backwater. Author and physician Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr. proclaimed Morphy a “triumph of the American intellect” who showed that Americans had learned to “outrun, outsail, outfight … and checkmate all the rest of Creation.” According to his family, Morphy learned chess at an early age by watching his uncle and father, who were members of the New Orleans Chess Club. Morphy was considered a prodigy by age 9, and at 12, in 1850, he twice defeated Hungarian chess master Johann Lowenthal, who was visiting New Orleans. Morphy gave up chess while he went to college, receiving a law degree in 1857 at what is now Tulane University. Because he was too young to practice law, he took up chess again to fill his time, accepting an invitation to the First American Chess Con-gress in New York City, where he beat all his opponents. During his stay in New York, Morphy played more than 261 games of chess, winning 87 of the 100 regular matches for which statistics were kept. Shortly after returning to New Orleans, he reluctantly agreed to attend an international chess tournament in England and stayed on to win matches across Europe, sometimes playing blindfolded or participating in several games at a time, finally defeating Anderssen in Paris. After the match, Anderssen reportedly wrote, “Morphy is too strong for any living player to hope to win more than a game here and there.” Before Morphy returned to New Orleans, he challenged anyone in the world to play him for any amount of money and offered a pawn advantage (generally considered a winning advantage). He got no takers and returned to Louisiana to live with his family in

Paul Morphy became a world chess champion at 21, then retired from public play shortly after his victory.

a mansion that today houses Brennan’s Restaurant. He also retired from playing chess publicly, saying during a speech in New York: “Chess has never been and never can be aught but recreation. It should not be indulged in to the detriment of other and more serious avocations.” Morphy served under Confederate Gen. Pierre Beauregard during the Civil War, then opened a law practice that later failed. After that, he reportedly spent much time walking around the French Quarter and experienced periodic bouts of irrationality, sometimes talking to imaginary people. He became convinced there was a conspiracy to kill him and would only eat food prepared by his mother or sister. After one of his long walks on July 10, 1884, Morphy got into a cold bath. His mother later found him dead. At age 47, Morphy died of “brain congestion” or a stroke, the same thing that killed his father in 1856. Morphy is buried in St. Louis Cemetery No. 1, not far from Marie Laveau’s tomb. For additional information about Morphy, read Michael Tisserand’s story, “Paul Morphy’s Shaky Shadow” (Gambit cover story, Oct. 3, 2006), and Ronnie Virgets’ “Chairman of the Board” (News & Views, May 6, 2008).

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> CHRIS ROSE CLANCY DUBOS < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < KNOWLEDGE < < < < < < < < < < <IS < <POWER <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< 15 16 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

scuttle Butt

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“Oil at least two inches thick was found Sunday night and Monday morning about a mile beneath the surface. Under it was a layer of dead shrimp and other small animals, said University of Georgia researcher Samantha Joye, speaking from the helm of a research vessel in the Gulf. The latest findings show that while the federal government initially proclaimed much of the spilled oil gone, now it’s not so clear. … Government scientists acknowledge they’ve not done enough to look for oil in the obscure corners of the Gulf’s bottom, but promise to do a better job.” — The Associated Press’ Cain Burdeau and Seth Borenstein, Sept. 13

The Motley Crew For No. 2 A COUNTRY MUSIC STAR, A WEALTHY YOUNG ATTORNEY, A PARTY BOSS, THREE ELECTED OFFICIALS AND A PAIR OF POLITICAL ROOKIES ARE FIGHTING HARD TO BECOME YOUR NEXT LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR.

TEA TOTALING

BY JEREMY ALFORD

I

served as “acting governor” Secretary of State when then-Gov. Henry Clay Jay Dardenne is Warmoth was injured in a boatthe early fronting accident. Dunn later died runner in the race in office and was replaced by for lieutenant Pinchback, whom history credgovernor. its with being Louisiana’s (and America’s) first black governor. In 1988, Paul Hardy became the first Republican to hold the office since Reconstruction. In 1992, Melinda Schwegmann became the first woman elected to the office. In 2004, Kathleen Blanco became one of the few lieutenant governors to win an election as governor. And, earlier this year, Gov. Bobby Jindal tried to abolish the office altogether. The normally compliant legislature would hear nothing of it. Today, Louisiana’s lieutenant governor presides over the state Department of Culture, Recreation and Tourism. While the history of the office is clear, voters will decide its future on Oct. 2 as eight candidates are vying to wait in the wings as Bobby Jindal plots his Big Move. IN HIS OFFICE OFF ESSEN LANE, LOCATED BEHIND THE State Archives in Baton Rouge, Secretary of State Jay

PAGE 11

c'est what? SHOULD THE CITY MAKE THE PROPOSED CHARTER CHANGE TO PUT NORD INTO THE HANDS OF A PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP?

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11% not sure

Vote on “c’est what?” on bestofneworleans.com THIS WEEK’S QUESTION

Do you believe Gov. Bobby Jindal when he says he has no interest in leaving the governorship to run for higher office?

PAGE 10

BoUQuets

THIS WEEK’S HEROES AND ZEROES

The Patrick F. Taylor Science & Technology Academy, a public school in Jefferson, was named a National Blue Ribbon School by the U.S. Department of Education on Sept. 9. It was one of 304 schools across the nation to receive the honor — and the only one in metro New Orleans. The distinction is accorded to schools that are either academically superior or demonstrate dramatic test score gains. The academy will be honored at a ceremony in Washington, D.C., in November.

The Youth Rescue Initiative (YRI)

collected “gently used” school uniforms for middle school and high school students and on Sept. 13 donated 215 blue blazers at a ceremony at the Miller-McCoy Academy for Mathematics and Business in eastern New Orleans. The response from the public was so successful that the YRI plans to make its “Blue Blazer Drive” an annual event.

The NO/AIDS Walk,

the annual walkathon for the NO/AIDS Task Force, took to the streets of Uptown on Sept. 12 with what the group estimated was 3,500 walkers — “probably the biggest year we’ve had post-Katrina,” according to the group’s communications manager T.J. Rogers. At press time, the fundraising tally for the day was approximately $160,000, but Rogers said matching donations and late checks were still being counted.

Business Insider,

an online magazine, published a list of “10 American Cities That Are Dead Forever,” which included New Orleans alongside troubled manufacturing centers like Flint, Mich., and Allentown, Pa. The article, which carried no byline, used 2006 population statistics to bolster its claim. We agree with City Council President Arnie Fielkow, who wrote, “I truly have to wonder what in the world the authors of this index are thinking and if they have been to New Orleans recently.”

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

t all started back in 1845. That’s when Louisiana’s ruling class realized that the state’s original 1812 constitution, patterned in a pinch after Kentucky’s charter, wasn’t a good fit. Popular sentiment at the time favored a more democratic form of government, one with a clear line of succession to the governor. Thus the office of lieutenant governor was created. Under the new constitution of 1845, Trasimon Landry of Donaldsonville, a war hero and slave owner, won the election to be Louisiana’s first lieutenant governor. He almost became governor on the spot when Isaac Johnson, a Democrat who won the governor’s race, came under fire from Whig Party leaders for allegedly taking an improper oath. The Whigs argued that Johnson was not legally governor, so the oath was given a second time. (President Barack Obama had to be sworn in twice last year for similar reasons.) In 1865, a lieutenant governor finally inherited the top spot in Louisiana when James Madison Wells became governor upon the resignation of then-Gov. Michael Hahn, who spent most of his time in office pining for Washington, D.C. (Sound familiar?) Hahn won a seat in the U.S. Senate. Today, political theories abound that Gov. Bobby Jindal won’t serve two full terms — he’ll either land a spot on the 2012 GOP national ticket or run against Mary Landrieu for U.S. Senate in 2014 — which makes this year’s special election for lieutenant governor, in effect, a race for governor. Louisiana has a long and colorful history of No. 2’s, some of whom ascended to the Mansion. In 1868, Oscar J. Dunn became Louisiana’s first elected African-American lieutenant governor. Something known as the “Custom House Conspiracy” suggests that Dunn — and not P.B.S. Pinchback — was in fact the first African-American to serve as governor in the United States. Dunn briefly

The recent upset victories of Delaware Senate candidate Christine O’Donnell and New York gubernatorial candidate Carl Paladino were two notches in the belt of the Tea Party, which had backed both against traditional GOP opponents. It left us wondering: Which candidates in the Louisiana lieutenant governor’s race consider themselves Tea Party members or allies, either formally or informally? State Republican Party chairman Roger Villere Jr. was the only enthusiastic yes; attorney Caroline Fayard, the only unqualified no. Most of the others fell in between. Secretary of State Jay Dardenne, a Republican and the consensus frontrunner, called himself an “informal member,” saying he agreed with the Tea Party’s message of fiscal responsibility, a position echoed by St. Tammany Parish president Kevin Davis. State Sen. Butch Gautreaux said he has attended some Tea Party events, but that many Tea Party “issues have been laid down in Louisiana in black and white, with no gray.” Nevertheless, he was the only candidate at press time to have signed on to the North Central Louisiana Tea Party Patriots’ pledge to support the Constitution “as explained in the Federalist Papers” and to “conduct myself personally and professionally in a moral and socially appropriate manner.” (U.S. Sen. David Vitter had also signed the pledge, which we assume

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Dardenne walks over to a shelf and grabs a dated, fading blue-and-white box. He lifts the lid and slowly pulls out an oversized bottle of Hadacol, the infamous snake-oil mixture popularized by the late Cajun state Sen. Dudley “Coozan Dud” LeBlanc. Dardenne looks wistfully at his collector’s item, perhaps thinking of the many anecdotes about LeBlanc and other Louisiana political legends. One of his favorites involves a forgotten episode of Groucho Marx’s radio show. When the mustachioed one asked LeBlanc, his guest, during the program what Hadacol was good for, LeBlanc’s response was humorous and revealing. “It was good for $5.5 million for me last year,” he told Marx. Dardenne sometimes uses that line in a presentation titled “Why Louisiana Ain’t Mississippi,” a colorful look at Louisiana’s culture, demography, history, music and politics. He gives similar talks, but the PowerPoint presentation on Louisiana’s uniqueness, created in 2005, is his crown jewel. He’s even formed a company, WLAM, to guide the venture. He gets $2,500 per appearance. Dardenne, who maintains a home and small law practice in Baton Rouge where he specializes in mitigations, is gunning to become Louisiana’s next lieutenant governor. So far, he’s the frontrunner. “I love this job and it’s absolutely suited for me. But the lieutenant governor’s job is suited for me, too,” Dardenne says. “I have a background in marketing and journalism. Promoting tourism and selling Louisiana is very suited to my interests.” If elected lieutenant governor, Dardenne says he would continue to place a spotlight on New Orleans — and maintain an office here — as former lieutenant governor and now Mayor Mitch Landrieu did, even though other parts of the state often complain they’re being overlooked in the state’s state marketing plans. “I don’t think there’s any question that New Orleans is the gateway to Louisiana. It’s a key asset to marketing Louisiana nationally,” he says. “But I think I can do a better job of molding all parts of the state in a way that helps dissolve some of the tension that sometimes exists between New Orleans and the rest of the state.” As to whether he would keep the satellite New Orleans office open as lieutenant governor, an on-again, off-again policy issue over the years, Dardenne told Gambit last week he would definitely keep the office open. All of the other candidates interviewed for this story agreed with that idea. StAte GOP CHAIRMAN ROGeR VILLere’s hands are always doing something. page 12

scuttlebutt

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release touting the improvements. In the statement, he noted, “I am heartened by the increasing number of New Orleanians who are satisfied by the overall performance of our police department, and enthusiastically thank those officers and staff who have helped to make this difference; but, clearly we have much work to do.” The poll, which was conducted by phone by Wilson Research Strategies Aug. 24-26 — three months into Serpas’ tenure — surveyed 600 adults spread equally across the NOPD’s eight districts. — Allman

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The New Orleans Food Policy Advisory Committee last week announced eight recommendations to improve food quality in New Orleans schools. The committee, launched in 2007 by the New Orleans City Council, issued a report (“Stepping Up to the Plate: Transforming School Food in New Orleans”) hoping to New Orleans Police Superintendant lower Louisiana’s obesity and hunger rates Ronal Serpas says he’s pleased resiand improve nutrition in school meals. dents are more confident in the police One in five children in the state is at risk of force, but there is still lots of room for hunger, and a similar number are obese. The improvement. most served meals in New Orleans schools PHOTO By CHERyL GERBER (chicken nuggets, pizza, hamburgers) aren’t helping. The committee calls for whole grains, fresh (not processed) fruits and vegetables, applies only prospectively.) lean proteins and eliminating soft drinks. Country-music star Sammy Kershaw said, “We cannot have a healthy city without “I’m a conservative,” but added he admired healthy kids,” says Ashley Graham, committee much about the Tea Party, particularly how it co-chair and Louisiana director of Share Our makes “young folks pay attention to politics.” Strength, a national organization working to The weekend before, several of the candieliminate child hunger. dates had been actively bidding for Tea Party Recommendations include increasing federal support. Dardenne, Davis and Villere had reimbursement rates for free and reducedappeared at a Sept. 11 Tea Party gathering in price meals, which would give low-income Mandeville (along with Vitter), where the keychildren better access to healthy foods in place note speaker was Jerome Corsi, author of the of current school lunch programs. Eightybook Obama Nation. Corsi has spoken in the four percent of New Orleans school children past about his beliefs that 9/11 was an “inside (about 32,000 kids) currently qualify for free job” and that President Barack Obama has “a or reduced-price lunches. “They still deserve false, fake birth certificate” because he was not a high quality meal, every day,” says New Orborn in the United States. (Dardenne, Davis and leans College Prep Charter School founder and Villere all said they did not hear much of Corsi’s director Ben Kleban. Mandeville speech.) Other recommendations include locally One day later, Kershaw appeared at a sourcing school meals, ensuring schools serve Tea Party gathering in St. Louis, where an breakfast, lunch and snacks that go beyond the estimated 10,000 people gathered under the USDA’s outdated minimum nutrition standards city’s famous arch and Kershaw serenaded the (established in 1995), and calling on the city crowd with some Lynyrd Skynyrd covers. — and schools to update kitchen equipment so Kevin Allman they can serve students fresh, nutritious meals. The committee says the Recovery School Cop perCeption District and Orleans Parish Public Schools New Orleanians are slightly more satisfied should assess the kitchen needs of schools. by the performance of the New Orleans Police That may require a plumbing and budgetary Department (NOPD) than they were a year ago. overhaul, Graham admits. The committee also That was the result of a poll released by the recommends that schools develop enrichment activities such as trips to farmers markets and New Orleans Crimefighting Coalition, an umcooking classes. Donna Covato, FPAC co-chair brella group for 25 civic organizations. When and executive director of the Edible Schoolthe poll was taken last year, only 33 percent of yard, says if kids are engaged and “part of the respondents said they were “very” or “someprocess — if they grow it and cook it — they’re what” satisfied by the NOPD, while 62 percent going to eat it.” — Alex Woodward were unsatisfied. This year, the satisfactory rate reached 50 percent, while the unsatisfactory rate dipped to 42 percent. ClariFiCation On specific questions, respondents were In last week’s cover story (“Heroin,” Sept. most dissatisfied with NOPD’s ability to get 14), we reported that former heroin user Arun drugs off the streets (2009: 75 percent; 2010: Rahman completed a seven-month drug reha63 percent), but were happiest with the bilitation in Baton Rouge, a program that cost enforcement of traffic laws (2009: 34 percent; $36,000. Rahman’s mother, Zeenat Rasheed, 2010: 35 percent — a statistically insignificant tells us that Rahman completed his particular difference). program in four months and that the family NOPD Superintendent Ronal Serpas, who’s only spent $18,000 out of pocket; the remainknown to love statistics, quickly issued a press der was covered under a work-study program.

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One moment they’re twisting a plastic cup of frozen coffee; the next they’re folding and unfolding a straw wrapper. They’re small, pale hands, smooth to the shake. They’re the kind of hands that know how to avoid thorns on a rose, where to place baby’s breath and how many colors can be crammed into a spring bouquet. They’re the hands behind Villere’s Florist in Metairie. “I worked as a florist during the Easter of 1965, and I really needed a job at the time. It just took,” Villere says after arriving a half-hour late for an interview at PJ’s Coffee downtown — and only slightly remorseful that he wouldn’t be in his regular seat for the New Orleans Saints’ season opener that afternoon. “I liked flowers and I liked plants. I’ve grown orchids since I was 11 and was the youngest member of the New Orleans Orchid Society.” Villere is no political rookie, however. In 1989, he ran in a special election for the state House District 81 seat, an election won by former Klansman and neoNazi David Duke. Asked if he agrees with Duke philosophically, Villere mulled his response before answering. “I don’t know what his political philosophy is now, but back then he was just telling people want they wanted to hear,” Villere says. “He was a great speaker. He said all the right things.” Detractors contend the party chairman should be helping raise money for Republican candidates and working to get them elected, not challenging them. Villere also could have an advantage if he were to seek the party’s official endorsement. “It’s not something I’m pushing for right now. We have multiple Republican candidates in the race,” he says. “But I’m not saying I won’t at some point.” Dardenne, the most recognizable Republican in the race, says Villere’s campaign hasn’t impacted his efforts yet. He takes no position on whether Villere should relinquish the GOP chair and says no state law prohibits him from running. “That’s his call,” Dardenne says. “He has a right to run.” Villere says there’s no conflict of interest — and little difference between his party incumbency and Dardenne’s official incumbency. “Jay Dardenne is also the commissioner of elections. He’s actually certifying elections,” Villere says. “I don’t see why one should be allowed and not the other.” Nonetheless, Villere has hired a deputy chairman to pick up the slack and made sure the interview for this story was conducted nowhere near the party’s Baton Rouge headquarters. If Villere is abusing his position — and we’re not saying he is — it’s difficult to see how he’s benefiting. His

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endorsements so far have been underwhelming, even among Republicans: the Lafayette Tea Party, Tea Party of Louisiana, Jefferson Parish Republican Executive Committee, the Rapides GOP executive committee and the Jefferson Chamber of Commerce’s political action committee. The Tea Party seems a cornerstone of his strategy; he told Gambit last week he couldn’t count the number of Tea Party events at which he has appeared. Dardenne, a Baton Rouge native, is keeping pace. He has the backing of the parish executive committees from Ascension, East Baton Rouge and Orleans, plus endorsements from the Greater New Orleans Republicans and the Southeastern Louisiana University College Republicans. Polling and fundraising have been a challenge for Villere. He’s in single digits in most surveys and has about $12,000 in his campaign kitty — less than anyone else in the race. Dardenne, by contrast, has $747,000 in the bank as of the last official tally.

EVERYONE iN THE RACE iS HOPiNG TO garner enough undecided voters to get a spot in the runoff. To say the undeclared portion of the electorate is prominent might be an understatement. An August poll by Clarus Research Group of Washington, D.C., for WWL-TV had the undecided factor at 47 percent. A recent survey by Southern media and Opinion Research of Baton Rouge pegged it at 40 percent. Both polls suggest that a pair of Republicans are positioned to secure the runoff spots: Dardenne, who polled in the mid-20s, and country musi-

cian Sammy Kershaw of Lafayette, who held at about 15 percent in each poll. The election is now less than three weeks away. On their campaign websites, fayard and Villere point to a new poll released last week showing a surge in support for their efforts. The CmS automated telephone survey yielded 16 percent for Dardenne, 13 percent for Kershaw, 11 percent for fayard and 9 percent for Villere, according to results originally posted on www.LaNewsLink.com. Automated surveys are considered less reliable, however. Still, every survey makes Kershaw, who did not return calls requesting an interview, the wild card in this race. Elsewhere, Villere will have to get past Dardenne among Republicans and conservatives. fayard and Gautreaux, meanwhile, will be fighting it out for the Democratic base in New Orleans and other urban areas. As for frontrunner Dardenne, the possibility of one day being governor has nagged at him since he was student body president at Louisiana State University. Back then, friends jokingly encouraged his political career; but now it’s part of every serious discussion about Louisiana’s political future. Publicly, Dardenne dismisses talk about being governor — just as Jindal waves off questions about his obvious national ambitions. As is often the case in politics, though, less is more. The less Jindal says about his ultimate ambitions, the more just about everyone believes he lusts for national office. And that makes the Oct. 2 primary for lieutenant governor a lot more than a race about culture, recreation and tourism. For a Web-only story on the other candidates in the lieutenant governor’s race, visit www.bestofneworleans.com. Jeremy Alford is a freelance journalist based in Baton Rouge. You can reach him through his website at www.jeremyalford. com.

Call for NomiNatioNs: 40 UNder 40 Gambit is looking for the best and brightest area residents under 40 years old to be honored in our annual “40 Under 40” issue. Please help us identify this year’s honorees. Nominations should include the name and age of the nominee (birth dates are appreciated), a contact number and email address for them, their occupation, any community organizations or volunteer groups they support, and why they are a good candidate for this honor. Also include your name and phone number. There is no minimum age requirement. You can nominate as many people as you feel deserve the honor. Elected officials are not eligible. Submit your nomination in writing to Kandace Power Graves at kandaceg@ gambitweekly.com or fax to 483-3116. Deadline for submissions is Oct. 7. Winners will be announced in the Nov. 2 issue of Gambit.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

WHiLE THE UNDECiDED fACTOR LOOmS heavily over the lieutenant governor’s race, the two leading Democrats with money and/or name recognition are beginning to make the contest a little more interesting. Two polls released last month showed that close to half of all likely voters had no idea who they would support in the Oct. 2 open primary. Anything can happen under such conditions. Just ask New Orleans attorney Caroline fayard, who at age 32 has become a Democratic heavy hitter practically overnight. While she carries a wellknown last name among behind-thescenes players — her father, noted plaintiff trial lawyer Calvin fayard of Denham Springs, is a major donor on the state and national levels — fayard came into her own earlier this month after a New York City meet-and-greet hosted by former President Bill Clinton. She also went on TV with a splashy ad after Labor Day. The ad is in regular rotation in major markets. in it, she slams “career politicians” and markets herself as a “new leader.” Hers will certainly be a message of change. “i believe it is time for a younger generation to take responsibility for the future of our state as well as our country,” fayard says. Campaign finance records show fayard has dumped $300,000 of personal cash into her campaign, but they reveal another $200,000 in individual contributions collected so far this year as well — not including the Clinton fundraiser. The other Democrat who has been making waves in the race is state Sen. Butch Gautreaux of morgan City. Last week, he benefitted from a fundraiser at White Oak Plantation in Baton Rouge, co-hosted by chef John folse, former Gov.

Kathleen Blanco and others. He’s making some serious moves to consolidate traditional Democratic support, despite fayard’s family connections. The AfL-CiO threw its support behind Gautreaux early on, and he recently scored endorsements from the parish party organizations in Orleans and Jefferson. Gautreaux has loaned his campaign $25,000 and collected more than $87,000 in individual donations in recent months. fayard has $445,000 in the bank to Gautreaux’s $40,000, as of the latest campaign finance reports, but Gautreaux has already sunk significant money into a statewide media buy and was among the first contenders on the air with a television commercial. Gautreaux’s TV ad focuses on his main campaign theme: his call for BP to create a marketing fund to “repair the damage to Louisiana’s image” caused by the oil disaster. He says holding BP accountable for repairing the state’s image strikes at the heart of the lieutenant governor’s role in tourism. He adds that the $100 million or so that BP has spent on repairing its own image shows the oil giant has the cash to pony up. “if they can spend millions on propaganda, they can pay to fix the problem they created,” Gautreaux says. “We need to stand up for our state and put Louisiana first.”

to stabilize the heel

13

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

CHRIS

rose

ROSE-COLORED GLASSES Contact Chris Rose at chrisrose504@gmail.com.

Raising Canes

A

says, advanced satellite tracking systems, the emotional fragility of emergency preparedness officials in the postK era, and the compliant media conspire to “scare the bejesus out of us!” he says. “It’s already difficult enough to sleep at night — fear of crime, fear of bedbugs — but now we have to fear another hurricane that ‘might’ hit us in two weeks? The governor is doing promos urging us to ‘get a game plan!’ We can’t let our guard down! We’re all gonna die!” Like I said, Breck has a tendency toward excitability. And it’s a shame about that bedbug thing. Little TMI there, Bobby Boy! But he is onto something. On the day I write this story — Sept. 15 — the home page of nola.com, The Times-Picayune website, has these three headlines, one atop the other: “Tropical Storm Karl expected to reach Yucatan Peninsula overnight.” “Hurricane Igor, a Category 4 storm, continues to strengthen.” “Hurricane Julia intensifies to Category 2.” Says Breck: “The headline should read: Three named storms at once with zero chance of coming here.” Instead, we get these super-cool, uber-tech, satellite images shot from thousands of miles above the planet that show the merest formations of little, tiny cloud whorls, kind of like cosmic ultrasound photos of Mother Earth proudly showing off her newest spawn, conceived off the west coast of Africa, still six weeks from North America but DETERMINED TO KILL EVERYONE IN NEW ORLEANS. But it’s not just a local phenom we’re talking about. As I write this, the home page for msn.com says: “Storms Look Scary ... Even From Space,” accompanied by those same Mother Earth ultrasound photos. And this text: “To keep track of these scary storms in the days ahead, click into the Weather section and check out our whiz-bang Hurricane Tracker. And for a quick primer on hurricane science, take a spin through our ‘Birth of a Hurricane’ interactive.” Whiz-bang indeed! With all due respect to God and Bob Breck, what I’d like to know is: Where the hell is Nash Roberts with his Magic Markers and his wipeboard? And just what the hell does he have to say about all this?

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

colleague of mine recently reached out to me, begging me to write a column about a topic close to his heart. He presented his concerns — fears, really — in a clearly agitated state of mind and implored: “For the love of God. ... Put some sense into it, Chris!” When a situation — any situation — has deteriorated to such a degree that someone thinks I can serve as a plausible arbiter of clearmindedness, then we do indeed have a crisis on our hands. So, with all due respect to God and Bob Breck, I’ll give it a try. It was Breck who wrote the email. The veteran meteorologist from Fox 8 News is a-dither, aroused, annoyed, fevered, ruffled and distraught. Which is saying a lot. Because, if you’ve ever seen his broadcasts, you know he can be an excitable chap with on-air delivery styles that range from animated to jittery — and all the whistle stops in between. And that’s on a slow news day. So if Bob Breck thinks someone is overreacting, well, then. Well then, indeed. (In the interest of full disclosure, I should mention that I perform some contractual services for WVUE-TV, Breck’s employer, but I’m not sure that’s relevant to the matter at hand.) The issue here is hurricanes. Well, sort of. It’s not really the storms themselves, but the relatively new means by which we — as a nation of 24/7 news cycle, technologically-obsessed, information junkies — track, monitor, follow, fixate and otherwise preoccupy ourselves with where they are, where they’re going and when they’ll get there, a science as imprecise as, and (oddly, ironically) as seasonal, as figuring out what Brett Favre’s plans are each fall. And that gives me the metaphor I am looking for. Full-blown hurricanes — and even your Everyday Joe tropical storms — have morphed from flash-inthe-pan, Whoa, Nellie! meteorological phenomena that burst onto and off the scene in two or three news cycles into something resembling a professional sports season: starting somewhere in the vague Deep South, irrelevant in the opening weeks, starting slow, dragging on two weeks too long and, in the end, generally turning out to be a bust, a colossal waste of everybody’s time. Really, they should just call every storm Hurricane Brett. “Years ago, we didn’t track them for two weeks,” Breck points out. Now, he

15

clancy dubos

politics Follow Clancy on Twitter @clancygambit.

Lsu's official Arrogance he headline in the morning paper summed it up well: “LSU fires Ryan as UNO chancellor.” Tim Ryan was sacked by the good ol’ boys of the LSU System because he refused, as he put it, to play the game with LSU staff. In a follow-up interview with Gambit, Ryan said his departure had its roots in the days after Hurricane Katrina, when certain people at LSU wanted to use the storm as an excuse to clip UNO’s wings — or even shut it down. “I was told specifically to fire most of our faculty and staff by [LSU System attorney] Ray Lamonica, using force majeure as the excuse to void their contracts,” Ryan said. “I said it would destroy the university for decades. I told Mr. Lamonica that we could get federal funds to stay open. His response was, ‘If you think you’re going to get federal funds, you’re just stupid.’ “I think that was the first step in the process that led to today.” Ryan adds that Lamonica “actively tried to do things to make sure that he was right. He tried to keep us from getting federal funds.” The deposed chancellor concluded

T

by saying, “In the LSU system, you can’t buck Ray Lamonica.” Ryan’s story rings true for several reasons. What happened to UNO after Katrina reflected a larger pattern by some — not nearly all — in the Baton Rouge area to “pilfer” the best parts of New Orleans after the storm. There was open talk — even an official movement called “10/12” (denoting the I-10 and I-12 corridors around New Orleans) — of moving everything worth saving out of the city. The LSU Medical School in New Orleans was part of the equation. Thankfully, those ideas went nowhere. But in that context, Ryan’s claims resonate. LSU officials deny forcing Ryan out. They say Ryan offered to resign and his resignation was accepted “in a reasoned, wellthought-out manner,” according to LSU spokesman Charles Zewe. Technically, Ryan did offer to resign, but it was couched in a recent letter in which he laid out requests for help from LSU officials. He says he was effectively forced to resign. I believe the former chancellor’s version of events, but I must disclose that I’m a UNO alum. I was a student there when

UNO, under founding Chancellor Homer Hitt, had to fight almost daily to establish and maintain itself as a university — and not the proverbial redheaded stepchild of LSU. What happened to Ryan is merely the latest chapter in an old, ongoing story of LSU’s arrogance and heavy-handedness. This much is certain: Ryan was proved right. UNO got federal funds and made

What happened to Ryan is merely the latest chapter in an old, ongoing story.

it through the year. In fact, it was one of the few local institutions that did not shut down completely after the storm. I’ve written before of LSU’s official arrogance — specifically, how LSU overplayed its hand in dealing with Tulane, local residents, lawmakers and others regarding the new medical complex in Mid-City. Gov. Bobby Jindal, to his credit, stepped in several times to trim LSU’s sails — and those of system President John Lombardi, who has installed himself as the new interim chancellor of UNO. Talk about heavy-handed. Lombardi met with UNO students last Friday; we’ll see if he can calm things down. If UNO’s fortunes don’t improve soon, Jindal should step in — again — to remind LSU who’s in charge. No doubt some at LSU are laughing up their sleeves. But, come next spring, when lawmakers return to Baton Rouge to discuss severe cuts to higher education, those same LSU mullahs might notice that the Speaker of the House and the President of the Senate are both UNO grads. Payback is a bitch.

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Dressed for Success wo hours before Sammy’s Po-Boys and Catering (901 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 835-0916; www.sammyspoboys.com) opens for the day, owner Shelley Flick and kitchen manager Jason Burke are in the kitchen cooking up a batch of gravy. “I boil my roast (beef) fresh every single week,” Flick says. “We slice it when it’s done. I make my gravy fresh, every week, from the stock. I buy almost nothing that’s already made.” The items she does buy for Sammy’s, however, are all local. “Our shrimp are (from) Louisiana; all of our seafood we try to keep here,” Flick says. “All of our produce is from the French Market. We use [Louisiana] stuff.” Flick and her sister Ashley bought Sammy’s Po-Boys in 2005 and moved from the original location in Bucktown to its current home on Veterans Memorial Boulevard. Flick says what sets Sammy’s apart Kitchen manager Jason Burke from other po-boy shops is simple: “Our food tastes better.” Burke adds that and owner Shelley Flick take Sammy’s also offers competitive prices. “Hands down, we have the best prices,” pride in their po-boys dressed he says. “We’ve compared.” with made-from-scratch gravy. Sammy’s offers an extensive menu for lunch and dinner. In addition to a long list of po-boy varieties, the menu includes appetizers, salads, wraps, gumbo and meat and seafood platters. Sammy’s also provides catering for parties. Flick says receiving customer feedback is her favorite part of running Sammy’s. “They’ll call after they eat here, or they’ll get a to-go order [and say], ‘That was the best whatever I’ve had, and I can’t wait to have it again,’” she says. Burke adds, “It gives a great sense of pride and meaning to what you’re doing.” “We’re here to serve people,” Flick says, “and (to see) that they’re enjoying what we’re doing — that’s the most rewarding thing.”

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

Pre K - 5th Grades

AUCOIN HART JEWELERS (1525 Metairie Road, Metairie, 834-9999; www.aucoinhart.com) is raffling off an 18-karat gold fleur de lis pendant encrusted with more than 300 black, gold and white diamonds. Raffle tickets for the pendant, which is valued at more than $10,000, are on sale at Aucoin Hart Jewelers for $20, or six for $100. Proceeds benefit Sean Payton’s Pay it Forward Foundation. Payton will name the winner Saturday, Sept. 25, at 3 p.m. at the store.

17

are you ready for a good time?

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

then get ready for a good time. Because this is a good time.

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18 V4_46467.1_9.625x10.833_4c_Ad.indd 1

9/16/10 3:22 PM

as 2010

saints mania

gets underway,

we checked in with some

saints-related folks who made headlines

in 2009.

DEY AT? BY ALEJANDRO DE LOS RIOS

photos by jonathan bachman

[ The Saint turned Brown ] mong the many advantages the 2010 New Orleans Saints possess is their roster, which is almost the same as 2009’s — almost. One notable exception is Scott Fujita, who signed a three-year, $14 million deal with the Cleveland Browns in the offseason. Stat-wise, Fujita was never the flashiest player, though he was always reliable. He graduated from the University of California at Berkeley with a bachelor’s degree in political science and a master’s in education. His schooling and unique upbringing (Fujita was adopted by a Japanese-American father and white mother, and his father’s family was interned during World War II) has influenced his worldview. Last season, Fujita made headlines when he spoke out in support of abortion rights and gay marriage. “I want to stand up for equal rights for everybody,” Fujita told Gambit by phone while he prepared for the Browns’ regular season opener. Fujita’s willingness to take a stand on controversial issues made him a media go-to guy as the Saints made their Super Bowl run last winter. “All of us have a unique

A

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

SCOTT FUJITA

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

Who Dat fashion on parade, from body paint to Mexican wrestling masks. Not pictured (bottom right): The Unknown Who Dat, whose arrival in New Orleans turned sour when the Saints suffered their first loss of the season to the Dallas Cowboys.

20

opportunity to use our NFL careers as a platform,” he says, adding that short football careers make the window of opportunity to speak out very small. Aside from equal marriage rights (which Fujita says is “a human rights issue more than anything else”) and abortion rights, Fujita also has dedicated himself to children’s issues and breast cancer awareness (his mother is a twotime survivor). Fujita also told us he looks forward to playing again in the Superdome. “Every time I changed teams, I played the team I left the next year,” he says. “It’s always fun to play with all your old friends, and I can’t say enough about how much I enjoyed New Orleans.”

THE “UNKNOWN WHO DAT” [ The fan who backfired ] f all the characters associated with the Saints’ Super Bowl run, none was more confounding than the man known as the Unknown Who Dat — Maryland resident Bill Harris, who was captured by television cameras while the Saints were trailing the Washington Redskins last year in Week 12. With the team’s undefeated record looking like it was going to disappear, Harris stood among Redskins’ fans

O

disheveled, looking soaking wet (despite no rain that day) and still hopeful for a Saints victory. Harris caught the eye of Louisiana State University football blogger Terrance Donnels, who put out a Twitter call for Harris’ identity to be revealed: “Mr. Mojo was smiling even when we were losing! Dude rocks!” That tweet spawned the Twitter handle “unknownwhodat” and the website www.findtheunknownwhodat.com. New Orleanian Jarrett Allen launched both with the sole purpose of finding the Unknown Who Dat. Soon there was a 9,000-member Facebook page. National websites like ESPN, Deadspin and The Sporting Blog featured the story, the latter calling Harris “amusing, because he appears to be a little bit crazy.” T-shirts were printed: “Unknown Who Dat For Mayor.” Eventually, Harris became aware of his Internet fame and Who Dats from all over pitched in money to get him to the Louisiana Superdome. His arrival in New Orleans (in which he strutted through Louis Armstrong International Airport screaming “Doctor Who Dat is in the house!”) was covered by local news stations and The Times-Picayune. But it all went downhill the next day, when Harris, after a long day of interviews (and seemingly feeling no pain), cheerfully flipped off the camera and dropped an F-bomb on live local news. That

night, the Saints fell to the Cowboys — hard — ruining their season-long winning streak. The good-luck guy had become a jinx, and New Orleans wanted to forget the Unknown Who Dat as quickly as possible. There hasn’t been a tweet since December 2009, the last one promising a recap of Harris’ weekend in New Orleans. The tribute website has gone offline. His Facebook fan page has continued to post Saints news, but administrator Kellye Slatton says she doesn’t know what has become of the Unknown Who Dat. But after the Saints’ loss to Dallas, no one dares bring him back to find out.

THE YOUTUBE TV-SHOOTER [ Never bet against the Saints ] emember that YouTube video? A man says he made a wager that if the Saints beat the Redskins, everyone he knew could come by his house and shoot out his TV. The bettor was Wayne Spring of rural Albany, La., a pessimistic Saints fan who believed his team was cursed, and that if its winning streak would end, it would be brought about by “the sorriest team out there.” Spring recalls going online while the Saints trailed the Redskins to “rile up” his friends by say-

R

page 24

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

Back by Popular Demand

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

How you wore your Saints fleur-de-lis was a matter of personal taste: painted on your face, shaved into your head or on a ‘Datman’ T-shirt.

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ing his TV was safe. Then, in overtime, the Black and Gold surged to victory. Before he could even get home, Spring’s friends were telling him they were on their way to his house to shoot his TV. Spring arrived just in time to videotape his 60-inch plasma television being carried onto his lawn and his own brother striking first blood with a .500-caliber Magnum revolver. “I figured if the TV is already ruined, we might as well set up a firing line,” Spring says. Boy, did they. Eight men with shotguns, rifles and handguns unloaded on the television. Spring even joined in, which was capped off by one friend donning a Saints helmet and running headlong into the set. “I went to bed and the next day my son woke me up and told me that the video had 25,000 views,” he says. “I thought the YouTube counter must be broken.” Spring’s video had gone viral overnight. He got his first interview request from a news station in Baton Rouge, followed by the Associated Press requesting to put his video on the wire. Ten minutes later, he was a bona fide Internet celebrity, fielding calls from CBS, NBC, FOX News and even a radio station in New Zealand. One call came from the cable network TruTV, which bought rights to air the video on a show called Loonies in the Boonies. Spring used that money to buy a new TV and he’s made more videos, which he claims “are downright hilarious” and will be released in upcoming

weeks. And there may be a sequel. With Spring’s TV shootout hovering at just over 900,000 hits, he’s made a new bet: If that video doesn’t reach a million views by the end of this season, he’s going to let his friends shoot up his new TV.

NFL VS. NOLA [ Who owns Who Dat? ] few weeks before the Super Bowl, the NFL sent cease-and-desist letters to local apparel merchants Storyville and Fleurty Girl, insisting they not use the term “Who Dat” on their clothing. The fan outrage and backlash was swift. “It’s just common lexicon, not just for the people of New Orleans but the state and beyond,” says Storyville owner Josh Harvey. Louisiana Sens. David Vitter and Mary Landrieu urged the NFL to back down, and the league made a hasty retreat. But the saga continues, because when the NFL claimed the copyright against local merchandisers, so did brothers Sal and Steve Monistere, New Orleans natives who own Who Dat Inc., a name they patented in the mid-1980s, and last week they served their own cease-and-desist letters against Storyville and Fleurty Girl. This letter cites Louisiana Attorney General Buddy Caldwell’s position that, while NFL does not own the rights to “Who Dat,” the fleur de lis or the colors black and gold, the state of Louisiana has no opinion on

A

what party owns the phrase. The Monisteres’ attorney, Brandon Frank, told Gambit the brothers would not comment on the ongoing litigation, but did release an email statement from the Monisteres which reads, in part: “We do not want to see Who Dat fall into the hands of ‘The Big Boys’ from New York City. If it did, Who Dat would be homogenized and would no longer be homespun. We will fight to the death to keep Who Dat ‘Naturally New Orleans.’” The only thing that’s certain is that Harvey says he and other retailers will continue producing Who Dat merchandise until a court rules otherwise. “We were never going to stop anyway,” Harvey says. “Just on principle, no matter where this goes, you can’t stop selling ‘Who Dat’ stuff. It’s about the fans that stood up and said ‘Hell, no’ to the NFL.” Lauren Thom, the clothing merchant known as “Fleurty Girl,” says while she was initially scared by litigation, it may be the best thing that’s happened to her. “I had people lining out the door who had never heard of my shop before,” she says. “I would not have been able to open a second store if it wasn’t for this.” Fleurty Girl’s popularity even ensured that Thom would have legal representation when a lawyer offered his services in exchange for a “Who Dat” shirt. page 26

NOTE TO DESIGNER: THIS SHOULD BE A CHART WITH ‘OLD DAT’ IN ONE COLUMN AND ‘NEW DAT’ IN THE OTHER, LIKE AN ‘IN AND OUT’ LIST — KA

OLDDat WHAT’S CLASSY AND WHAT’S PASSE IN 2010.

2009 was the year everything changed for the Saints — and everything changed for the fans, too. As the team gears up for Lombardi II: Super Bowl Boogaloo, we look back at what’s fresh — and what’s not so much.

NEWDat

OLD DAT

Pregame partying under the I-10 Schwegmann bags Saints buoying spirits after Katrina The promise of Buddy D in a dress Mike Ditka’s cigars Ricky Williams drama Trash talk on SportsCenter U2 and Green Day in the Dome

Nachos in the Dome Kicking Brett Favre’s ass Hourlong pregame shows Monday morning quarterbacking on WWL-AM Kyle Turley needing anger management “Jesus Christ couldn’t turn them [the Saints] around.” — Diana Ditka

Pregame partying in Champions Square Super Bowl rings Saints buoying spirits after the BP oil disaster The reality of Bobby H in a dress Sean Payton’s Juicy Fruit Pierre Thomas getting the job done Trash talk on Twitter Taylor Swift and Dave Matthews on Decatur Street Gambit’s one-of-a-kind collectible Ernie and Antoinette K-Doe Pillow of Certain Saints Victory (all rights reserved) Galatoire’s shrimp remoulade in Champions Square ... why mess with a good thing? Round-the-clock pregame shows Monday morning quarterbacking at CanalStreetChronicles.com Kyle Turley recording Anger Management BREESUS IS MY HOMEBOY T-shirts

Reggie Bush finds the Lord giveth

Reggie Bush finds the Lord taketh away

Going to Bourbon Street to get drunk with random strangers after the fourth quarter

Going to Bourbon Street to hug random strangers after the fourth quarter

“Playoffs? Playoffs! Playoffs?!” — Jim Mora “Yeah, well, wait ’till next year.”

“Get ready to party with the Lombardi!” — Jim Henderson “I can’t wait ’till next year!”

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

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    Thom says she isn’t in favor of striking some sort of licensing deal  with Who Dat Inc. “Let us have our moment,” she says. “We’re fans;  it’s the fans’ saying and we’re using our creativity as artists.” She’s asking fans who agree with her position to wear black and gold ribbons  of support to home games.     Other local merchants are still churning out Who Dat merchandise  (Zapp’s even makes ‘Who Dat’ potato chips) and Storyville and other  merchants have come out with new lines for the 2010 season.     But the unexpected consequence of the NFL’s suit is that it seemed  to open a Pandora’s box of litigation. Not only is the Monistere brothers’ suit against the NFL working its way through New York’s federal  courts,  but there’s  also  a  suit  by a  St. Bernard  cafe  called  “Who Dat  Yat Chat” against Who Dat Inc. The restaurant, which claims it wants  nothing to do with the Saints, has made the most daring claim of all:  Nobody owns the phrase “Who Dat.”     Just another way of saying we all do.

YING YANG TWINS [ Crunk Yankers ] hat a difference a year makes. In 2008, proper Uptown  ladies probably thought “crunk” was the sound your car  makes  when  it  hits  a  pothole  on  Magazine  Street.  By  2009, they were standing up in the Dome with 70,000 others singing  along to the Ying Yang Twins’ “(Halftime) Stand Up and Get Crunk.”     The YY Twins, who hailed from Atlanta (home of the Falcons — the  Falcons!), had a few rap hits over the years, the first of which was “Get  Low,” performed with Lil Jon. They originally recorded “Stand Up and  Get  Crunk”  in  2004,  but  it  didn’t  become  a  Black  and  Gold  anthem  until early in the 2009 season, when the team began playing it after  each Saints touchdown, igniting frenzied dancing in the Dome, even  among those who couldn’t define Dirty South on a bet.      As  the  year  went  on,  the  song  became  a  popular  ringtone,  rose  toward the top of the Amazon and iTunes rap singles charts and was  the subject of a number of popular YouTube remixes. The Twins (Kaine  and  D’Roc)  made  an  amusing  appearance  on  WDSU-TV  with  sports  anchor Keli Fulton, in which they seemed preternaturally (one might  say Snoop Doggedly) relaxed. The song even made it into the Madden NFL 11  videogame,  featuring  Drew  Brees  on  the  cover,  and  they  performed it live during the Lombardi Gras victory parade — of all places,  on the steps of Gallier Hall.     Will we still be as eager to get crunk during the 2010 season? Or will  a  new  anthem  emerge?  The  Ying  Yang  Twins  aren’t  waiting  around  to find out if they’re a one-hit Saints wonder; in June, they released a  new album, Gumbo. 

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Social

BY LAUREN LABORDE

Studies

NEW ORLEANS SCHOOLS ENGAGE STUDENTS WITH SOCIAL MEDIA AND TECHNOLOGY. igh school gossip and bullying used to remain relatively confined to scrawled insults on bathroom stalls, snotty taunts and comments and notes passed during class. Not any more. Today’s social networking sites can be valuable tools but also are venues for clique warfare and can pose problems for students in the realms of personal privacy and reputation. “Back in the day, we used a slam book, but the Internet is not just restricted to your group of friends,” says Ashley Hasselman, director of public relations, marketing and Members of the De La Salle High School Student Council update the school’s communications for De La Salle Facebook page with information about school activities. High School. PHOTO COURTESY OF DE LA SALLE HIGH SCHOOL Facebook wall posts and Twitter updates are the “slam books” today’s high school students use. Unlike a addressing the use of social media. notebook of unkind remarks left in “We’re trying to let the students express themselves, someone’s locker, however, what’s posted on these sites but we are also making sure the school is represented — which have become increasingly public — have the in the best way,” Hasselman says. potential to reach far beyond classroom cliques. The policy touches on another problem students “You don’t have to look much farther than the news encounter online: protecting their reputation and that to know that (students) run into problems when they of their schools. Newman students are taught to manifail to understand the Internet is both immediate and fest the school’s values of honesty, kindness, respect public,” says Roger Hibbert, communications manager and responsibility in life, Hibbert says, and the same at Isidore Newman School. goes with their online personas, which is why the High school administrators are aware of these issues, school stresses that what is posted on the Internet has but they also are seizing the opportunity to include immediate, and often permanent, effects. Hasselman social networking sites and other forms of technology echoes the sentiment: “It’s not like sending an email to in the classroom to better relate to students. your friends.” Sister Camille Anne Campbell, principal of Mount To keep parents informed about the dangers to Carmel Academy, says the school became aware of the which teen Internet users are susceptible, the schools potential problems of social networking about six years offer programs featuring presentations from experts. ago, when students started reporting instances of cyber Mount Carmel has hosted presentations from FBI repbullying. resentatives, and a federal prosecutor for the U.S. “It’s the new disembodied discourse the telephone Attorney’s office has spoken to parents of Newman used to be,” she says. “It’s easy (for it) to become (a place students. Newman also has a committee charged with for) bullying because you don’t see the hurt in the eyes, keeping the school updated on the rapidly changing and you don’t see the tears.” face of social media, but ultimately, Hibbert says, the The all-girls Catholic high school doesn’t have a spekey to safely navigating the Internet lies with teens’ cific policy prohibiting social media, but bullying in any decisions. form is not allowed, she says. Other schools handle “In many families, the children are experts in technolsocial media similarly, placing their use under the purogy, so it is impossible for parents to always know what view of handbook policies on behavior, since social their children are doing online,” he says. “So the better media has become a regular form of communication for advice would be to talk to your children and encourstudents, but De La Salle is writing a policy specifically

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

H

28

age them to act responsibly and safely, to make smart choices wherever they are.” Although social media use can pose some dangers to students, sites like Facebook have become an integral part of people’s lives. “We do realize social networking is where it’s going to be,” Campbell says. “It’s where people find each other.” Instead of focusing on social networking as a distraction or a danger, these schools are using the tools to engage students. Student Council members at De La Salle are in charge of maintaining a Facebook page students can check to keep up to date on school events such as football games, pep rallies and special “dressdown” days. The site is mostly shared among students, but eventually the coed Catholic high school wants to have a Facebook page geared more for the public. “I definitely think Facebook has a place,” Hasselman says. “What’s happening in corporate America in how they’re utilizing Facebook is starting to trickle down to school use.” Newman also has Facebook and Twitter pages to keep students and the community updated about school events. At Mount Carmel, teachers use blogs and Wikis (websites that allos various users in different locations to add and edit content easily) in the classroom to relate to students as well as teach them how to use the Internet in the most constructive way. “One of the big challenges is to teach students to evaluate Internet resources,” Campbell says. “How do you determine if this is legitimate or truthful or some kind of bogus thing?” Newman uses Ning.com, a website that allows users to create custom social networks, in the classroom to facilitate discussion and collaboration among students. The website includes all the typical features of social networking sites — such as video, photo and chatting features all in one place — but it provides a more restricted network for safety and a smaller focus. “It really takes some of the fun stuff from Facebook and adds it to the classroom,” Hibbert says. He points out that social media and technology in general have the potential to enhance instruction, providing the example of an English teacher whose class writes responses on a class blog. “Instead of just having a question asked in class and one raised hand, you have everyone responding, and it multiplies the perspective.” McDonogh 35 High School and Bethune Elementary School recently embraced the notion that technology can provide teachers a unique opportunity to relate to students. Not only have the schools integrated blogs and social media into their classrooms, but they also have interactive dry-erase boards, laptops and handheld remote controls students can use to respond to teachers’ questions. “A big thing is that this technology is really allowing students to take ownership of their learning,” says Elizabeth Paushter, a spokeswoman for the technology initiatives at McDonogh 35 and Bethune. She says using technology in the classroom creates “project-based learning” instead of a more linear style of instruction in which students simply take notes during lectures. “You’ll find students are no longer hiding in the back and not doing their work,” she says. “They’re excited about their learning more than I’ve ever seen before.” These schools agree that if educators can harness the power of social media and technology for its positive qualities, students can benefit from it. “I wish there was a way we could have kids and adults use it for the good it could do,” Campbell says. “They can bring the whole world into Mt. Carmel Academy using the Internet and its resources, but there’s also a world you don’t want (to allow) into your life.”

Open HOuse THursday, OcTOber 14

3:00-7:00 pM

Educating Young Catholic Women in the Carmelite Tradition

Top 50 catholic High school in the united states (twice recognized)

a blue ribbon school of excellence 7027 Milne Boulevard • New Orleans, LA 70124-2395 administrative Office: 504.288.7626 e-mail: admissions@mcacubs.org www.mcacubs.org Mount Carmel Academy does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, creed, national or ethnic origin in the administration of its educational policies. MCA Ad Gambit Sept 2010.indd 1

8/25/10 10:53:26 AM

October 7, 21 December 9

PRE-K – 4 TOURS

8:30 -10:00am GRADES 5 – 12 OPEN HOUSES

4:00 -6:00pm

Louise S. McGehee October 14

November 4, 18 January 13, 27 January 20

RSVP at (504) 561-1224.

SCHOOL · FOUNDED 1912

Louise S. McGehee School is open to all qualified girls regardless of race, religion, national or ethnic origin.

www.mcgeheeschool.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

ADMISSION OPEN HOUSES & TOURS

29

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BEST GRAMMAR SCHOOLS

OPEN HOUSE

FOR PARENTS OF PROSPECTIVE NEW STUDENTS ENTERING PRE-KINDERGARTEN - 7TH GRADE

TUESDAY OCTOBER 12, 2010 4:30P.M. – 7:00P.M.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CALL THE ADMISSIONS DIRECTOR AT 861-1466

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Holy Name of Jesus School admits all qualified students regardless of race, religion or ethnicity.

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

VOTED ONE OF THE TOP 3

2010-11 Open Houses We invite you to visit our campuses to learn why you’ll love charter schools, too. Go to www.eastbankcollaborative.com to see video introductions to all our schools and direct links to their websites for downloadable student applications.

Audubon Charter School

Lower School: (PK3-3)

428 Broadway St., New Orleans, LA 70118 Phone: (504) 324-7100

Upper School: (4-8)

719 S. Carrollton Ave., New Orleans, LA 70118 Phone: (504) 324-7110 www.auduboncharter.com

Join us for our Open House TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9 • 6 PM

Benjamin Franklin High School (9-12)

2001 Leon C. Simon Dr., New Orleans, LA 70122 Phone: (504) 286-2610 • www.benfranklinhighschool.org

Einstein Elementary Charter (PK-8) New OrleaNs’ COeduCatiONal CathOliC high sChOOl

Hynes Charter School (Gifted PK, K-8)

5300 St. Charles Avenue, New Orleans, LA 70115 (504) 895-5717 | delasallenola.com

DLS_Gambit092010.indd 1

5100 Cannes St., New Orleans, LA 70129 Phone: (504) 324-7450 • www.einsteincharter.org

3774 Gentilly, New Orleans, LA 70122 Phone: (504) 324-7160 • www.hynesschool.org 9/15/10 11:00:49 AM

1400 Camp St., New Orleans, LA 70130 (504) 654-1088 • www.isl-edu.org

Lake Forest Elementary Charter (Gifted PK, K-8)

“Forming young men for life”

Please call school for details

applications accepted year round

Jan. 13 & 20 8:30 a.m.

applications accepted 1/5/11-3/4/11

Oct. 23, 10:00 a.m. Oct. 28, 6:00 p.m. Kinder applications accepted 10/25/10-2/3/11 Gr. 1-8 applications accepted 10/25/10-3/25/11

Oct. 11 8:45 a.m.-10:30 a.m.

Lusher Charter

Grades K-1 Grades 2-5

Middle/High School: (6-12) 5624 Freret, New Orleans, LA 70115 Phone: (504) 304-3960 www.lusherschool.org

Moton Charter School (PK-7)

6800 Chef Menteur Hwy., New Orleans, LA 70126 Phone: (504) 245-4400 • www.eastbankcollaborative.com/moton.html

Brother Martin High School does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin in the administration of its educational policies.

applications accepted 10/1/10-1/21/11

applications accepted 10/4/10- 12/10/10

7315 Willow St., New Orleans, LA 70118 Phone: (504) 862-5110

Thursday, November 11 • 6 to 9 p.m.

Oct. 14

6:00-8:00 p.m.

12000 Hayne Blvd.. New Orleans, LA 70128 Phone: (504) 826-7140 • www.lakeforestelementarycharter.com

Lower School: (K-5)

Join us for OPEN HOUSE

applications accepted 10/20/10-1/13/11

New Orleans Charter Science (9-12) and Math High School 5625 Loyola Ave., New Orleans, LA 70115 Phone: (504) 324-7061 • www.noscihigh.com

Warren Easton Charter High School (9-12) 3019 Canal St., New Orleans, LA 70119 Phone: (504) 324-7400 • www.warreneastoncharterhigh.org

Nov. 10

9:00 a.m.

Nov. 12

9:00 a.m.

Grades 6-12

Oct. 28

6:00 p.m.

applications accepted 10/1/10-12/3/10

Please call school for details year round school

Nov. 17 6:00-7:30 p.m.

applications accepted 1/17/11-4/1/11

Dec. 2

5:00-7:00 p.m.

applications accepted 11/29/10-3/1/11

Eastbank Collaborative of Charter Schools/School Leadership Center 2021 Lakeshore Drive, Suite 414, New Orleans, LA 70122 • www.slc-gno.org The ECCS and its member schools do not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin in the administration of educational policy.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

Brother Martin High School

International School of Louisiana (K-8)

School visits by appointment only

31

Toddler-2 through 12th grades A CLOSER LOOK AT WHY Mater Campus

Rosary Campus

Tuesday Tours: Oct. 5, 12, 26 & Nov. 9; 8:30-11 am Open House: Oct. 20, 4:30 pm

Open House: Wed., Nov. 3, 4:30 pm

4301 St. Charles Avenue Little Hearts - Grade 4

4521 St. Charles Avenue Grades 5-12

For tour information, please call the Admission Office at 269-1213

www.ashrosary.org

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

The Academy of the Sacred Heart is a Catholic, college preparatory, ISAS school for girls. It admits qualified students regardless of race, color, religious preference, national or ethnic origin.

32

INFANT CENTRE (2 MONTHS) - PRE-SCHOOL THRU GRADE 8

Stuart Hall

School for Boys

Leaders for Life Private Tours Available • Open House October 21st at 8:30am

ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE CALL NOW TO SCHEDULE YOUR PRIVATE TOUR OF OUR 12 ACRE COUNTRY CAMPUS!

www.ardencahillacademy.com

Nursery - Seventh Grade 2032 S. Carrollton Avenue, New Orleans, LA 70118 (504)861-1954 - www.stuarthall.org

ARDEN CAHILL IS OPEN TO ALL QUALIFIED CHILDREN REGARDLESS OF RACE, RELIGION, NATIONAL OR ETHNIC ORIGIN.

Financial Aid Available • Stuart Hall is open to all qualified students regardless of race, national origin or religious belief.

Centrally Located on the West Bank

3101 WALL BLVD. • GRETNA, LA 70056 • 504.392.0902

Jesuit High School presents an entertaining and enlightening… Now Accepting Applications for Pre-K to Grade 12 For more information or to schedule a personal tour call (504) 736-9917

BLUE & WHITE

FRIDAY NIGHT [FOR BOYS IN GRADES 4-8]

FRIDAY OcTOBER 8, 2010

225 Green Acres Road Metairie, LA 70003-2484 (504) 733-0353 www.stmsaints.com

7–9 PM AUDITORIUM–GYM–cAFETERIA carrollton & Banks

Participants may be dropped off in the school yard (use Banks Street entrance).

Sign up today for this fun event on Jesuit’s web site: www.jesuitnola.org.

St. Martin’s Episcopal School, a coed, prekindergarten through grade 12 independent school, does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, gender, disability, religion, national or ethnic origin.

and there’s no other school like ours. Please come see for yourself.

Open House Thursday, October 28 Thursday, November 4 Thursday, November 11 10 am-2 pm

ST. GEORGE’S

EPISCOPAL SCHOOL Nursery - 8th Grade Tours Available. No Appointment Necessary. 923 Napoleon Avenue 891-5509 www.stgeorgesepiscopal.com

St. George’s Episcopal School does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

There’s no other child like yours

33

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

34

ACADEMY of OUR LADY propel to new heights

accomplished In a warm family environment, girls reach their highest potential.

OPEN HOUSE

presentations at 5,6 and 7pm or visit www.theacademyofourlady.org 537 Avenue D, Marrero, Louisiana 70072 Academy of Our Lady does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin in the administration of its policies.

COLLEGE

CLASSES BEGINNING SOON! DAY & NIGHT CLASSES

TRAINING FOR: • Medical Assistant • Dental Assistant • Medical Office Specialist • Phlebotomy • LPN • EKG

MAIN CAMPUS COVINGTON | 985-892-6651 SLIDELL BRANCH | 985-643-7730 Financial Aid to those who qualify | WIA Approved

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

DELTA

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CELEBRATE! CELEBRATE!

The Grand Opening of the Bay St. Louis Little Theatre After total destruction by Hurricane Katrina, The Little Theatre returns. Located in the primary set of the movie “This Property is Condemned.”

Friday, October 1st

Saturday, October 2nd

Starts 6:30pm Gala featuring teenage stars from the movie Jon Provost and Mary Badham $40/person or $75/couple

Book signings by Jon Provost and Kathleen Koch Tours of the new Theatre Evening outdoor showing of “This Property is Condemned” Free to the Community

outdoor music concert

Wine & Music

Larry Garner

The Master of Lower Mississippi Delta Blues played with lots of soul.

SATURDAY

SEPTEMBER 25 6:30PM - 9PM GATES OPEN@ 5:30PM

For information, call 228-864-2882 www.bsllt.org

ADMISSION: $10/person

81250 Hwy. 1082 • just north of Covington, LA.

For more info & schedule: www.pontchartrainvineyards.com 985-892-9742 JATR Monk Gambit 09.15.10_Layout 1 15/09/2010 13:53 Page 1

JAZZ AT THE RAT

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

Lagniappe

36

PRESENTS

cbride jesse m y b d e host

K n o m s u o i n pm o 0 0 l : 8 e 3@ th

usic m e h t

of

er 2 b m e t ter p n e e s c , y k c a i d n s r n-be i thur v a l e h t n ller i e k s h t a r r de rsity e v i n u e n OMB ic tula NEWC A N E e publ o th open t d n a free

T U LL E G E COL

a lagniappe presentation sponsored by the newcomb-tulane college office of cocurricular programs. more info: 504-865-5728 or college.tulane.edu/jazzrat.html

FREE LIVE MUSIC

>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << MUSIC FILM ART STAGE >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE YOU GO << <<<<<<<<<< << 41 48 55 57 >> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << THE >> >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>> << <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> > << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< < SEP BEETHOVEN EMPEROR >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

EVENTS

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CUISINE

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7:30 p.m. Fri., Sept. 24 First Baptist Church, 16333 Hwy. 1085, Covington; 8 p.m. Sat., Sept. 25 Mahalia Jackson Theater, 801 N. Rampart St., 523-6530; www.lpomusic.com

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Carlos Miguel Prieto (pictured) conducts acclaimed guest pianist Jorge Federico Osorio and the Louisiana Philharmonic Symphony in a season opening presentation of classics, including Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 5, Handel’s Music for Royal Fireworks and more. Tickets $15-$95.

CHINESE ACROBATS AND FOLK ORCHESTRA 24 8 p.m. Fri., Sept. 24; 4 p.m. Sat., Sept. 25 Tulane University, McAlister Auditorium, 613-4727; www.brownpapertickets.com SEP

A touring company of Chinese acrobats and an accompanying folk orchestra visit Tulane for a couple of performances. The acrobatic show presents a wide array of feats of strength, contortion and balance. The Chinese Folk Music Orchestra has toured extensively in the United States. Tickets $20-$50.

JOHN SCOFIELD AND THE PIETY STREET BAND 25 10 p.m. Saturday Tipitina’s, 501 Napoleon Ave., 899-4206; www.tipitinas.com SEP

THE NINTH ANNUAL PONDEROSA STOMP RETURNS AS ROCK’S OFFICIAL TOAST TO ITS UNSUNG STARS. BY ALEX WOODWARD emphis music institutions Sun and Stax records are enshrined in that city’s museums. Compare that to New Orleans, where musical holy places like Cosimo Matassa’s J&M Studios is now split into laundromats and homes, and legendary hotspots like the Dew Drop Inn and Club Tijuana have been left to the ravages of time. New Orleans, however, has a living history shrine. The annual Ponderosa Stomp — celebrating the one-hit torchbearers of blues, R&B and rock ’n’ roll of the 1950s, ’60s and ’70s — presents living legends, both on stage and in museums. The music festival has expanded to exhibitions and ongoing programming through partnerships with the Louisiana State Museum and Louisiana Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, and it has established a national reputation via concert showcases at New York City’s Lincoln Center. All of the concerts, interviews and oral history presentations help “preserve the music and enhance the legacy” of the artists, says Stomp founder Ira Padnos. In 2002, Stomp founders the Mystic Knights of the Mau Mau went from presenting one-off rock ’n’ roll shows at Circle Bar to hosting several nights of programming during Jazz Fest weekends. Those annual showcases — the authority and the final word on rock ’n’ roll’s obscure heroes — moved to a midweek event and now debut as a stand-alone,

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A San Francisco band that went from 1950s-style rock to punk precursor, the Flamin’ Groovies performed at the 2009 Ponderosa Stomp, and several members return for a showcase at One Eyed Jacks on Sunday. PHOTO BY JACOB BLICKENSTAFF

Ponderosa Stomp SEPT. 24-25 WWW.PONDEROSASTOMP.COM

COCOROSIE WITH SISSY 27 NOBBY 9:30 p.m. Monday Republic, 828 S. Peters St., 528-8282; www.republicnola.com SEP

After four albums on Touch and Go, nouveau French nymphs Sierra and Bianca Casady jumped to Sub Pop for May’s Grey Oceans, a waking dream visited by a weird cabaret of stage-show orchestration and electro beats. Opening is bounce rapper Sissy Nobby, whose ridiculously riled-up “Beat It Out the Frame” tops the shortlist for best NOLA club popper of 2009. Tickets $15 advance purchase, $18 at the door.

Ponderosa Stomp Concerts 7 P.M.-2:30 A.M. FRI.-SAT. HOUSE OF BLUES, 225 DECATUR ST., 310-4999; WWW.HOB. COM Ponderosa Stomp Music Conference NOON-5 P.M. FRI.-SAT. LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM, CABILDO, ARSENAL ROOM, 751 CHARTRES ST.

Cabot-tat Cabot tat for Humanity BY WILL COVIELLO

Vermont’s Cabot Creamery Cooperative is supplying the cheese and enlisting chef John Folse to create a worldrecord 2,100 pound batch of mac and cheese. A $5 souvenir bowl gets you all the pasta you can eat, and there’s music by jazz vocalist Samirah Evans (a former New Orleanian and current Vermonter). Festivities are from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thursday at Fulton Square (Lafayette Street at South Peters Street). Proceeds benefit Habitat for Humanity.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

Stomping Grounds

The zigzag career of jazz guitarist John Scofield moves like an improvisational solo: backing Chet Baker and Charles Mingus in the 1970s, flanking Miles Davis in the 1980s and bringing virtuosic flair and vocal tone to solo fusion records in the 1990s-2000s. Captured here, 2009’s Piety Street (Emarcy) features Jon Cleary, George Porter Jr. and Terence Higgins. 3Pc. Spicy opens. Tickets $20.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

page 37

EDDY, KNOWN FOR HIS SONGWRIT ing partnership with Lee Hazlewood and late-’50s instrumental hits like “Rebel Rouser” and “Shazam!,” never thought his songs would last this long. (He’s now a Rock and Roll Hall of Famer, and the recent recipient of MOJO magazine’s 2010 MOJO Icon Award.) “We never knew in those days, and you never know in these days, if (a hit record) might be your last, the next one might not click, or the public might not like it,” he says. “But I was lucky. I had a string of them. “From Elvis forward, that was good music, and we were looked down upon by the establishment, as it were, and by a lot of older folks at the time who just didn’t get it. But the kids got it. I remember they used to say, ‘Rock ’n’ roll will never last.’ Well, here we are 50 years later, plus, and I’m still working.” The Stomp carries an “Unsung Heroes” tagline (also the name of an accompanying exhibit at the Louisiana State Museum), celebrating the footnotes of rock history who never got their due or who deserve an-

other listen. “They’re given a chance, one, to revitalize their career, but also to have that second blaze of glory,” Padnos says. “And that’s hard, because a lot of artists never got that opportunity the first time around.” That goes especially for Louisiana musicians on the bill who never got the lion’s share but may have influenced others who went on to become greats. The Stomp plucks directly from the source, gathering artists like Joe Clay, a rockabilly and swamp pop star whose last gig was driving a school bus in Gretna. Clay’s Ed Sullivan appearance (backing Elvis) was canceled, the Vik Records label dropped him, and his supergroup (with Dr. John, among others) never recorded — but he left a few hits like “16 Chicks” and “Ducktail.” This year the Stomp also features Bert Miller and Doug Ardoin, founders of Eunice, La.’s The Boogie Kings, as well as Tommy Brown, the blues player who coined the phrase “I ain’t lyin’!”, and 94-year-old Honeyboy Edwards, one of the last living links to the Delta blues — which, Padnos says, raises the question of whether his heroes, many approaching 80 and beyond, are fit to play. And then there are artists who, if not physically retired from their instruments, are retired spiritually from the “devil’s music.” “We’ve had artists — blues singers, soul singers — who’ve converted to God and only sing gospel,” Padnos says. “Billy Emerson, who recorded for Sun, James ‘Sugar Boy’ Crawford — it’s sometimes challenging. Although you love their music, you have to be respectful with their decision.” At previous Stomps, Gatemouth Moore, a Natchez, Miss., bluesman and revivalist preacher, decided he could perform some of his secular material, Padnos says, but Crawford was adamant he would only perform gospel. “And we said that was OK. We realized how important ‘Sugar Boy’ was in New Orleans rhythm and blues.” Getting the legends to break out of their shells and step back into the spotlight often produces priceless moments — for instance, Link Wray, just months before his death in 2005, kissing the feet of Elvis’ guitarist Scottie Moore, saying “You’re my idol,” or Dead Kennedys bassist Klaus Fluoride backing the Legendary Stardust Cowboy in 2009. Eddy says he’s sticking with his early instrumental material, but he won’t be jumping onstage with other performers. “I don’t want to mess up anybody else’s show,” he says, laughing. “I have enough trouble getting through my own. … I’ve got an album here by Sugar Pie DeSanto that I’ve had for decades. I’d like to see her in person, if I get the chance.”

FIND OUT WHY THE 1ST CITY COURT JUDGE RACE IS IMPORTANT TO YOU: for instance, this court handles almost all evictions in New Orleans.

FOR MORE INFORMATION GO TO: www.markgonzaleznola.com

MAKE IT KNOWN. MAKE IT AVAILABLE. MAKE IT EASY. The Election for this Office is October 2, 2010.

NEW ORLEANS ARENA UPCOMING EVENTS HANK WILLIAMS, JR. ROWDY FRIENDS 2010 FRI., SEPT. 24 @ 7:00 PM ........................................

NICKELBACK TUES., OCT. 12 @ 6:00 PM ................................................

SESAME STREET LIVE 1-2-3 IMAGINE WITH ELMO & FRIENDS WED., OCT. 20 - SAT., OCT. 23 VISIT NEWORLEANSARENA.COM FOR SHOWTIMES AND INFO ...............................................

2010-2011 HORNETS SCHEDULE RELEASED VISIT NEWORLEANSARENA.COM FOR A LIST OF HOME GAMES THIS SEASON

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

“destination” event in September. Other events include film screenings (see “Rock and Rolling,” p. 48), a record show, an art gallery expo and more. This year’s concerts — held at the House of Blues (Sept. 23-24) — feature another round of rock’s quiet legends, from “Surfin’ Bird” proto-punk group The Trashmen and Stax soul singer (and Wu-Tang Clan sample source) Wendy René, to Chess R&B singer Sugar Pie DeSanto and the “King of Twang” himself, guitar man Duane Eddy. While the Stomp continues to grow and “formalize,” Padnos says the concerts still offer their celebrated raw, garage-rock energy and intimacy. “We still try to keep it the ol’ time rock ’n’ roll house party — the artists and performers still connect in a way that makes it special, like a family reunion,” Padnos says. “It’s always a challenge as events get bigger to keep the personality of the event. (We’ll) control the growth of the Stomp so it doesn’t lose the vitality and spirit behind it.” That includes keeping a roster of handpicked favorites, selected by that core group of music fans — kicking back a few beers while listening to records in someone’s living room — that established the Stomp in 2002. “It’s been branded and it’s doing its job of letting people know the story behind the music,” Padnos says. “When they come to it, they’re going to go home knowing about the music and having seen some great performances, often by people they never knew about.”

Tickets can be purchased at www.ticketmaster.com, all Ticketmaster Outlets, the New Orleans Arena Box Office, or charge by phone at 1-800-745-3000.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

noah

BONAPARTE PAIS

ON THE RECORD

Jet Set WINTERSLEEP’S TOUR LANDS IN NEW ORLEANS

S

intended to be a demo. It just ended up sounding perfect. “[Night Sky] was done in Halifax, and it was our first time with Tony. We were a little bit green, a little bit nervous.

Happy

Hour

Late night

entertainment GREAT FOR BIRTHDAYS, BACHELORETTE PARTIES, RETIREMENTS , ANNIVERSARIES, OR ANY REASON TO HAVE A GOOD TIME!!

f ro m 4 - 6 p m where all drinks are

2 for 1 SEPT. 23RD • 8PM

Harvey Jesus SEPT. 24TH • 10PM Maybe not as ready as we Wintersleep is should’ve been. logging a lot of Songs were being miles in support of written during its new album. the recording: PHOTO BY DUSTIN ‘Oblivion’ was a RABIN guitar part that we turned into a full song in a day.” For New Inheritors, the band flew to Montreal with a plan, leaving Doogan to work his sonic magic on songs such as the title track, which began life as a heavier cut and ended up the album’s chiming levity, despite lyrics like “New inheritors of earth/ You overestimate your worth.” “There wasn’t an acoustic guitar part,” Murphy says. “We ended up scrapping it and going with something more rootsy to bring out the vocal parts.” Playing New Orleans four days after touching down in Richmond, the band’s jet lag may just be wearing off during the sound check at Republic. Murphy, whose last stop here was derailed by a breakdown in the French Quarter, hopes to see more of the city this time — before shipping out to Birmingham for a show the next day. “I feel like I’ve experienced more on that new David Simon show, Treme,” he says. “I feel like I know it a little more than I’ve actually experienced it. I really like The Wire. We’re super hooked on that, and we watched all the episodes of Treme, too.”

SEPT

Hold Steady with Wintersleep 9 P.M. FRIDAY

24

REPUBLIC, 828 S. PETERS ST., 528-8282; WWW.REPUBLICNOLA.COM TICKETS $15 ADVANCE PURCHASE, $18 AT THE DOOR

Grunge Factory SEPT. 25TH • 10PM

Band Camp SEPT. 30TH • 8PM

Kyle Turley Band & the Saintsations

U S AT

RDA

Y

30 OCT.

BAG OF DONUTS

158 S. Military Road Slidell, LA 985-646-1728 Mon 11am-9pm Tue-Thur 11am-12am (midnight) Fri & Sat 11am-2am • Sun 11am-8pm

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

ometime after midnight on Saturday, Sept. 18, Wintersleep finished a gig in Aarau, Switzerland, its last stop on an extended tour through Western Europe. Forty-two hours later, the Halifax, Nova Scotia, band took the stage again — 4,200 miles away, in Richmond, Va. The obvious question: Who offended the booking agent? “It’s crazy,” says singer/ guitarist Paul Murphy with a laugh, speaking from Germany two days before embarking on the globetrotting jaunt. “We play and fly out the next day. From [Washington, D.C.] we have to drive to Virginia. It’s pretty nuts. … The night before (Switzerland), we play in Hamburg. The drive the next day is like 10 hours.” The gauntlet is nothing new for the group, which took breakthrough third LP Welcome to the Night Sky on the road for more than 600 dates since its release in 2007, many in Europe. The current tour is the first in support of May follow-up New Inheritors (Tom Kotter). In the time between the two releases, Wintersleep seemed poised to follow Canadian rock archetypes Arcade Fire, Wolf Parade and Broken Social Scene, winning the 2008 Juno (Canada’s Grammy) for Best New Group and opening shows for Paul McCartney, the Rolling Stones and Pearl Jam. But this new release, despite being by far the band’s best work, breaks rank, abandoning for the most part the insistent, soaring choruses of previous releases in favor of more a cerebral, orchestral, intimate sound. Opener “Experience the Jewel” could be mid-period Neil Young strung out on strings, its impact coming in the rests between stabbing notes; “Terrible Man,” with Murphy’s pinched delivery riding driving guitars and drums, beats latter-day R.E.M. at its own game; and “Blood Collection,” the LP’s most lingering memory, blossoms from brooding mid-tempo filler to broken pop mantelpiece within the song’s first minute. “That one came together quickly,” Murphy says, comparing studio sessions for New Inheritors and Night Sky with producer Tony Doogan (Belle and Sebastian, Mountain Goats), who helmed both records. “[‘Blood Collection’] was the first one we finished. It was initially

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N Ue Ve zz

Ja New

O rle aN s

P

M re

Ie

r

THURSDAY

SATURDAY

SHAMARR

GLEN DAVID

September 23

September 25

ALLEN

BRaSS BaND JaM

EVERY SATURDAY AT MIDNIGHT

2010

SEPT

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

CoMe PLaY WiTH US!

ANDREWS Play HOUR

EVERY WEDS. THURS. FRI. 5-8pm

Monday 20, 27

BOB FreNCH and the OrIGINal TUXeDO Jazz BaND

Tuesday 21, 28

JasON MarsalIs

wednesday 22, 29

Burlesque Ballroom starring

TRiXiE MiNX

EVERY FRIDAY AT MIDNIGHT

Thursday 23, 30 sHaMarr alleN

Friday 24

leON “KID CHOCOlaTe” BrOwN

saturday 25

GleN DaVID aNDrews

IrVIN MaYFIelD and the NOJO JaM

irvinmayfield.com For more information: IMJazzPlayhouse 300 Bourbon Street • New Orleans • 504.553.2299 • www.sonesta.com

LISTINGS

STICK THIS IN YOUR EAR

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com; FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

All show times p.m. unless otherwise noted.

Tuesday 21

Wednesday 22

Thursday 23

3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY — Kylesa, Torche, Haarp, 7 61 BLUES HIGHWAY — Blues Jam feat. Wardell Williams & the Blues Hwy. Band, 8 BACCHANAL — Jazz Lab feat. Jesse Morrow, 7:30 BANKS STREET BAR — Major Bacon, 9 BAYOU PARK BAR — Lynn Drury, 10 BEACH HOUSE — Poppa Stoppa Oldies Band, 8 BIG AL’S SALOON — Jumpin’ Johnny Sansone Blues Party, 7 BLUE NILE — Khris Royal & Dark Matter, 10; Gravity A (upstairs), 11 BMC — Domenic, 7; Rue Fiya, 9:30 CANDLELIGHT LOUNGE — Treme Brass Band, 9 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Ven Pa’Ca, 8 CIRCLE BAR — Jim O. & the No Shows feat. Mama Go-Go, 6; Geraniums, 10 D.B.A. — Tin Men, 7; Walter “Wolfman” Washington & the Roadmasters, 10 DECKBAR & GRILLE — Blues & Beyond Jam feat. John Lisi & Delta Funk, 8 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Bob Andrews, 9:30 HOUSE OF BLUES — Mike Posner, 7 HOWLIN’ WOLF — Flyleaf, Story of the Year, 9 KRAZY KORNER — Death by Orgasm Rock ’n’ Roll Band LACAVA’S SPORTS BAR — Crossfire, 9 LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Frank Fairbanks, 4:30 & 9 THE MAISON — Jerry Jumonville & the Jump City Band, 6 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Russell Batiste, 10 MOJO STATION — Ed Wills, Blues for Sale, 8 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Mark Saucier, 9 OLD FIREMEN’S HALL — Two Piece & a Biscuit feat. Brandon Foret, Allan Maxwell & Brian Melancon, 7:30 OLD OPERA HOUSE — Vibe, 8:30 PRESERVATION HALL — 726 Jazz Band, 8 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Delfeayo Marsalis & Uptown Jazz Orchestra, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Loose Marbles, 6; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10 TROPICAL ISLE BAYOU CLUB — Can’t Hardly Play Boys, 5; T’Canaille, 9 TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Damien Louviere, 5 & 9 YUKI IZAKAYA — By and By, 8

12 BAR — Vincent, 6; Treme Brass Band, 9 61 BLUES HIGHWAY — Will Work for Whiskey, 4 ALLWAYS LOUNGE — Big Freedia, Airnadette, 10 BACCHANAL — Courtyard Kings, 7; Vincent Marini, 9:30 BANKS STREET BAR — Dave Jordan & the Neighborhood Improvement Association, 10 BAYOU PARK BAR — Ron Hotstream, 9 BEACH HOUSE — Beach House All-Stars, 8 THE BEACH — Chicken on the Bone, 7 BIG AL’S SALOON — Danny Alexander’s Blues Jam, 8 BMC — Low-Stress Quintet, 7; J.P. Carmody & the Micro Brues, 10 BOMBAY CLUB — Samirah Evans, 8 BOOMTOWN CASINO — Chris LeBlanc, 8:30 CARROLLTON STATION — Jimmy Robinson’s Musicworks feat. Mark Mullins, 9 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Junk Shot, 8 CIRCLE BAR — Sam and Boone, 6; Dives, Dummy Dumpster, 10 COLUMNS HOTEL — Freddy Omar, 8 D.B.A. — Jon Cleary, 7; Ponderosa Stomp presents Hip Drop, 10 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Loren Pickford, 9:30 HI-HO LOUNGE — Stooges Brass Band, 9:30 HOUSE OF BLUES — Frontiers Journey Tribute, 8 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Roman Skakun, 5; Shamarr Allen, 8 KERRY IRISH PUB — Lynn Drury, 9 KRAZY KORNER — Death by Orgasm Rock ’n’ Roll Band; Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraiser, 4 LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Al Hebert, 4:30; Frank Fairbanks Duo, 9 MAPLE LEAF BAR — The Trio, 10 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Chris Perkins, 8; Delta King, 9; Biff Rose, 10 OLD POINT BAR — Kim Carson, 9 PRESERVATION HALL — New Birth Brass Band, 8 REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — Bassik feat. Datsik, DJ Quickie Mart, Shanook, 11 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Chris Ardoin, 8:30 SATURN BAR — Unstoppable Death Machines, Outdoorsmen, Dongles, Hissy Fits, 10 SING SING CLUB — John Lisi, 9 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Rob Wagner Trio, 8 & 10 SPECKLED-T’S & AFTER DARK — Harvey Jesus, 8 PAGE 45

s Entertainment Serie CYRIL NEVILLE & NEVILLUTION Saturday, September 25 • 9:30pm

Boomerssm

WEDNESDAYS COMEDY • 8pm

SEP 22 Jayson Cross

SEP 29 Alysia Wood

OCT 6 The Disgruntled Clown

OCT 13

Tracie Kanaan “The Princess of Parodies”

THURSDAYS LIVE MUSIC • 9:30pm LADIES NIGHT • Budweiser specials all night. Ladies enjoy 2-for-1 mixed drink specials

SEP 23 Chris LeBlanc

SEP 30 Foret Tradition

OCT 7 Video DJ

OCT 14 Video DJ

FRIDAYS 9:30pm

38 Special • 7:30 & 9:30pm SEP 24 (Tickets start at $25) OCT 8 Private Event

OCT 1 Video DJ OCT 15 Private Event

SATURDAYS VARIETY • 9:30pm

SEP 25

Cyril Neville & Nevillution

OCT 9 BJ Thomas

OCT 2 Video DJ Kathleen Madigan OCT 16 (Tickets start at $25)

2010 Winner “Best place to go dancing” Boomers

Where the Locals Party, Play... and Win! boomtownneworleans.com • 504.366.7711 4132 Peters Road, Harvey, LA 70058 Must be 21. Entertainment start times may vary. Shows are subject to change. ©2010 Pinnacle Entertainment, Inc. All rights reserved.

GAMBLING PROBLEM? 877.770.STOP

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

BACCHANAL — Mark Weliky, 7:30 BAYOU PARK BAR — Parishioners, 10 BLUE NILE — John Madere Group, 10 BMC — Lynn Drury, 7; Cindy Scott, 9:30 CAFE NEGRIL — John Lisi & Delta Funk, 7; Glen David Andrews, 9:30 CARROLLTON STATION — Notes & Quotes Songwriters Night feat. Ron Hotstream, 8:30 CHICKIE WAH WAH — John Mooney, 8 D.B.A. — New Orleans Cottonmouth Kings, 9 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Tom Hook, 9:30 DRAGON’S DEN — Climate Change, 10 HOSTEL NEW ORLEANS — Soul School feat. Elliot Luv & the Abney Effect, 8 HOUSE OF BLUES — Black Keys, Whigs, 8 HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Big Busk: A Night of Burlesque & Live Music, 9 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Jason Marsalis, 8 LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Marc Stone, 4:30; Rainmakers, 9 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Rebirth Brass Band, 10 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Tom Henehan, 8; Paul Boquet, 9 OLD OPERA HOUSE — Charlie Cuccia & Old No. 7 Band, 7 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Paula & the Pontiacs, 8:30 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Thelonious Monk Institute Ensemble, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Smokin’ Time Jazz Club, 6; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 10 TROPICAL ISLE BAYOU CLUB — Waylon Thibodeaux, 5; Danny T & the Blue Crawfish Band, 9 TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Frank Fairbanks, 5; Damien Louviere, 9 TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Rainmakers, 1; Cruz Missiles, 5; Radio Active, 9 WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Kirk Branch, 6 YUKI IZAKAYA — Norbert Slama Trio, 8

MUSIC

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FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 24 8:00 - 11:00 PM

AUDUBON AQUARIUM OF THE AMERICAS

Tickets begin at $35 Join us for an unforgettable evening as we celebrate the

Aquarium’s 20th Birthday!

Wine and beer samples from more than 20 bars

New Orleans cuisine from more than 25 local restaurants Silent Auction

Live Entertainment

All food & drinks are included in ticket price. Proceeds benefit Audubon’s Louisiana Marine and Sea Turtle Rescue Program

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

AudubonInstitute.org/scalesandales or (504) 861-5107

44

Y at RDA U T A S Y! ONL Saturday, September 25 • 9am-3pm 3923 Bienville Street Multi-family garage sale including furniture, art, designer clothes, jewelry, and more!

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com PAGE 43 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Miss Sophie Lee, 6; New Orleans Moonshiners, 10 STEAMBOAT NATCHEZ — Dukes of Dixieland Band, 6 TIPITINA’S — Dappa Live feat. Y. Luck & Elliot Luv, 9 TROPICAL ISLE BAYOU CLUB — Waylon Thibodeaux, 5 TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Mark Barrett, 4; Can’t Hardly Play Boys, 9 TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Mark Penton, 1; Cruz Missiles, 5; Late As Usual, 9 VAUGHAN’S — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 8:30 YUKI IZAKAYA — Norbert Slama Trio, 8

Friday 24

The Black Album PHOTO BY JAMES CARNEY

In case their increasingly heady music didn’t give it away, singer/ guitarist Dan Auerbach and drummer Patrick Carney gave May LP Brothers (Nonesuch), their sixth as the Black Keys, all the hallmarks of a classic: a Muscle Shoals address, a minimally maximal album cover that simply reads, in vintage Cooper Black font and badass Howlin’ Wolf fashion, “This is an album by the Black Keys. The name of this album is Brothers.” As for the tunes, they take all of two bars to live up to the branding. “Everlasting Light” kicks open the doors, spins the shades and speckles the band’s typically blackened blues with R&B disco-ball sparkle, with Auerbach trembling, “Let me be your everlasting light” in a tremendous shoo-wah falsetto as Carney stamps out a perpetuating eight-count engine. That’s basically the whole song, and it’s so fresh and funky — so Black Keys, yet so not — that the arrival of “Next Girl,” as ferocious a kiss-off blues piece as any the pair has written (“My next girl, she’ll be nothin’ like my ex girl”), feels at first like a letdown. But for every “Cross Road” signpost, there’s a skulking slow jam like “The Only One” (another ’70s falsetto slayer) or psych-tinged twinge like “Howlin’ For You,” an openly sheepish ode to pursuit couched in Wolf’s clothing. The Whigs open. Tickets $34.50. — Noah Bonaparte Pais

SEPT

21

Black Keys with the Whigs 8 p.m. Tuesday House of Blues, 225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www.hob.com

Louviere, 5; Foot & Friends, 5 KRAZY KORNER — Death by Orgasm Rock ’n’ Roll Band, 8:30; Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraiser, LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Piano Bob, 7; Big Chief Monk Boudreaux, 11 LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Dwight Breland, 4:30; Frank Fairbanks Duo, 9 LOUISIANA MUSIC FACTORY — Alabama Slim, 3; Dash Rip Rock, 4; Trashmen, 5 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Johnny Sketch & the Dirty Notes, 10 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Daniel Black, 7; Tom Hehehan, 8; Maxwell Eaton, 10 OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1; Vibe, 8:30 OLD POINT BAR — Space Heaters, 9:30 ONE EYED JACKS — Sun Hotel CD release, Caddywhompus, Eastern Sea, 9 PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Masters feat. Lars Edegran, 8 REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — Hold Steady, Wintersleep, 8 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Mixed Nuts, 9:30 SING SING CLUB — John Lisi, 9 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Ellis Marsalis Trio, 8 & 10 SOUTHPORT HALL — Bottoms Up, 10 SPECKLED-T’S & AFTER DARK — Grunge Factory, 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; New Orleans Cottonmouth Kings, 10 ST. ROCH TAVERN — The Way, 9 STEAMBOAT NATCHEZ — Dukes of Dixieland Band, 6 TIPITINA’S — Rebirth Brass Band, Revivalists, 10 TOMMY’S WINE BAR — Tommy’s Latin Jazz Band feat. Matthew Shilling, 9 TOOLOULA’S — PsydeFX, 9 TROPICAL ISLE BAYOU CLUB — Can’t Hardly Play Boys, 1; Waylon Thibodeaux, 5; T’Canaille, 9 TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Captain Leo, 1; Mark Barrett, 5; Can’t Hardly Play Boys, 9 TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Butch Fields Band, 1; Cruz Missiles, 5; Late As Usual, 9 WHISKEY DIX — Blues Frenzy, 9

Saturday 25 12 BAR — Rex Gregory Trio, 6; Jake Eckert Band, 9 3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY — 3 Ring Circus Arts Education Center Membership Drive & Fundraiser feat. Sarah Quintana, Helen Gillet, Dirty Bourbon River Show, 8 APPLE BARREL — Peter Orr, 7 BABYLON LOUNGE — Among the Missing, 10

BACCHANAL — Gypsy Swing Club, 8 BAD MONKEY — Unnaturals, Pests, 10 BANKS STREET BAR — Kevin O’Day & James Andrews Allstars, 10 BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Armand St. Martin, 7 BAYOU PARK BAR — Kim Carson, 10 BLACKSTAR — ReRooted feat. Blue, Artistik Approach, 7 BLUE NILE — Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 7 BMC — New Orleans Jazz Series, 3; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 6:30; Benny Turner & Real Blues, 9:30; One Mind Brass Band, 12:30 a.m. BOMBAY CLUB — Phillip Manuel Quartet, 9:30 BOOMTOWN CASINO — Cyril Neville & Nevolution, 9:30 CARROLLTON STATION — Jason Schell Band CD release, 9 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Malcolm Holcombe, 9 CIRCLE BAR — Jazzholes, 6; Lovey Dovies, Secrets, Ponykiller, 10 COLUMNS HOTEL — Andy Rogers & Guest, 8 D.B.A. — John Boutte, 8; Lost Bayou Ramblers, 11 DECKBAR & GRILLE — Miche & MixMavens, 8 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — John Carey CD release, 10 DRAGON’S DEN — Social Victim, 10 HARRAH’S CASINO (HARRAH’S THEATRE) — Starship feat. Mickey Thomas, 7 & 10 HERMES BAR — Sasha Masakowski, 9:30 & 11 HI-HO LOUNGE — Vockah Redu, Skate Night, DJ Bees Knees, 10 HOUSE OF BLUES — Ponderosa Stomp feat. Duane Eddy, Sugar Pie Desanto and others, 7 HOWLIN’ WOLF — Pepper, Shwayze, 9 HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — TheHipChick Benefit for Stephanie Pawlak feat. DJ Slick, 6; New Grass Country Club, 9 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Glen David Andrews, 8; Kinfolk Jazz Band, midnight KERRY IRISH PUB — Speed the Mule feat. Paul Tobin, 5 KOENJI HOUSE — Kowloon Walled City, Batillus, Thou, 7 KRAZY KORNER — Death by Orgasm Rock ’n’ Roll Band; Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraiser, Sundays LAFITTE’S BLACKSMITH SHOP — Mike Hood, 9 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — 007, 11 LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Jason Bishop, 4:30; Frank Fairbanks Duo, 9 LOUISIANA MUSIC FACTORY — Louisiana Hellbenders, 3; John Carey & Piano Bob, 4; Jenny Dee & the Deelinquents feat. LaLa Brooks, 5 THE MAISON — Dance in da Pants!!!, Rabbit, Autotomii, 10 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Good Enough For Good Times feat. Gravy, 10 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Lilli Lewis, 8; Badura, 9; Christina Perez Trio, 10; Luke Wade, 11 OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1; Vibe, 8:30 OLD POINT BAR — Mike Burkhart &

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Monday 27 APPLE BARREL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sam Cammarata, 8 BACCHANAL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jonathan Freilich, 7:30 BANKS STREET BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Razputina Love Child, 9 BJâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LOUNGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; King James & the Special Men, 10 BMC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Fun in the Pocket feat. Mayumi Shara & Reinaldo, 6; Smoky Greenwellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Monday Night Blues Jam, 9:30 CHICKIE WAH WAH â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jimmy Robinson & Cranston Clements, 7 CIRCLE BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Carol Cleveland Sings, Roar, Native America, 10 COLUMNS HOTEL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; David Doucet, 8 D.B.A. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Glen David Andrews, 9 DONNAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BAR & GRILL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Les Getrex & the Blues All-Star Band, 9 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; John Fohl, 9:30 DRAGONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S DEN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Domenic, 10 HI-HO LOUNGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Blue Grass Pickinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Party, 8 IRVIN MAYFIELDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Bob French & the Original Tuxedo Jazz Band, 8 KERRY IRISH PUB â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Kim Carson, 9 LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Marc Stone, 4:30; Jason Bishop, 9 MAPLE LEAF BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Papa Grows Funk, 10 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Dave Maleckar, 9; Genial Orleanians, 10 OLD POINT BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brent Walsh Trio, 8 PRESERVATION HALL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Preservation Hall Jazz Band feat. William Smith, 8 REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; CocoRosie, 9:30 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Charmaine Neville Band, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brett Richardson, 4; Dominic Grillo & the Frenchmen Street AllStars, 6; Jazz Vipers, 10 ST. ROCH TAVERN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Washboard Lissa Orchestra, 7

bestofneworleans.com

MUSIC

STEAMBOAT NATCHEZ — Dukes of Dixieland Band, 6 TROPICAL ISLE BAYOU CLUB — Waylon Thibodeaux, 5; T’Canaille, 9 TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Butch Fields, 5; Can’t Hardly Play Boys, 9 TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Damien Louviere, 1; Big Feets, 5; Rhythm & Rain, 9 WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Kirk Branch, 6

classical/concerts CELEBRATION CHURCH — 2001 Airline Drive,

Metairie; www.celebrationchurch.org — Fri: Deluge Band, 7 COMMUNITY BOOK CENTER — 2523 Bayou Road, 948-7323; www.communitybookcenter.com — Fri: Healing Humanity Series presents Ras Chemash Lamed feat. Carl LeBlanc & Tirik Hassan, 7 DER RATHSKELLER — Tulane University, Lavin Bernick Center, McAlister Drive — Thu: Jazz at the Rat presents The Music of Thelonious Monk, 8 HAVEN METHODIST CHURCH — 1238 Joliet St. — Sun: Tony Bazley’s Gospel Extravaganza feat. James “Sugar Boy” Crawford, Jo “Cool” Davis and others, 3 HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION — 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www.hnoc.org — Fri: Tim Laughlin, 6 LAFAYETTE SQUARE — 601 S. Maestri Place, 581-1039 — Wed: Harvest the Music Concert Series presents Cowboy Mouth, Creole String Beans, 5 MAHALIA JACKSON THEATER OF THE PERFORMING ARTS — 1201 St. Peters St.,

525-1052; www.acetheatregroup.com — Sat: Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra presents Opening Night: Beethoven Emperor, 7:15

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART — City Park,

1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www. noma.org — Wed: Faubourg Quartet, 6:30 NOCCA|RIVERFRONT LUPIN HALL — 2800 Chartres St., 940-2787; www.nocca.com — Fri: Singularity feat. Joel Harrison, 8 OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART — 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — Thu: Ogden After Hours presents Henry Gray, 6 PAVILION OF THE TWO SISTERS — City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 482-4888 — Thu: Twilight in the Garden Concert Series presents Panorama Jazz Band, 6 PONTCHARTRAIN VINEYARDS — 81250 Hwy. 1082 (Old Military Road), Bush, (985) 8929742; www.pontchartrainvineyards.com — Sat: Jazz ’n the Vines presents Larry Garner, 6:30 ST. JOSEPH ABBEY CHURCH — 75376 River Road, St. Benedict, (985) 892-1800; www. sjasc.edu — Sun: New Orleans Musica da Camera, 3 STAGE DOOR CANTEEN AT THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM — 945 Magazine St., 528-1944 — Wed: Victory Belles, 1 TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH — 1329 Jackson

Ave., 522-0276; www.trinitynola.com — Tue: Trinity Artists Series presents Organ & Labyrinth, 6; Thu: Evensong Choir, 6:30; Sun: Tommy Sancton Quintet, 5; Mon: Taize, 6

For complete listings, visit www. bestofneworleans.com.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — 916 N. Peters St., 589-4841; www.nps.gov/jazz/index.htm — Wed: Bill Malchow, noon; Sat: New Orleans Racketmakers, 11 a.m.

47

FILM

FEATURE

A ROOM WITH A VIEW

Rock and Rolling THE PONDEROSA STOMP’S SECRET HISTORY OF MUSIC ON FILM. BY WILL COVIELLO efore handheld video cams and iPhones ushered in an age of instantaneous recording, capturing footage of a concert or filming an interview required no small effort. And for filmmakers, no small expense. Les Blank almost missed some of the best moments in Hot Pepper, his documentary about zydeco legend Clifton Chenier, because he was at the end of his supply of 16 mm film, and he feared the remaining stock had been exposed or compromised. “Clifton finally let loose at a dance when I was almost out of film,” Blank says. “I shot several of these little 100-foot rolls, and I recorded the soundtrack, so I was able to patch it together.” Because arrangements with other filmmakers never resulted in any money, Chenier was not a cooperative subject, Blank says. He frequently skipped arranged

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from Acadiana, bluesmen from Texas, fiddlers from Appalachia and even a pianist from Oklahoma who sued him twice over screenings of one film (which will be discreetly shown at 3:30 p.m. Saturday in accordance with terms agreed upon with the subject). Organized by Ogden Museum of Southern Art film curator Madeleine Molyneaux, the Clandestine Celluloid portion of the Ponderosa Stomp (see “Stomping Grounds,” p. 37) unseals some extremely rare concert footage, interviews and documentaries at One Eyed Jacks. There also are highlights from past Stomp concerts featuring the legends of early rock ’n’ roll. Following are some of the scheduled films. Visit www.ponderosastomp.com for a full schedule.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

Directed by Les Blank 1:30 p.m. Friday

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@

3029 veterans blvd | 504.841.3332

interviews and shows he told Blank he’d play. He did, however, give Blank one day in which he drove him to his regular haunts around Lafayette and took the filmmaker to meet his 108-year-old grandmother. Some of the tensions seem palpable in a scene at a roadside stop, where Chenier drinks a beer and chats with others hanging out at the shop. But the film is a very warm and at times vivid portrait of life around Lafayette in the early 1970s. There’s great footage of Chenier singing, “I Am a Hog For You” (“I’m a hog for you baby/ I am gonna root around your door/ I’m gonna keep rooting all night till you love me some more”). It wasn’t the only time Blank had difficulties working with a subject, but he’s been able to craft many excellent documentaries about performers including Cajun, Creole and zydeco musicians

Filmmaker and Tulane graduate Les Blank shot a couple of films about Frenchspeaking black musicians in Acadiana in the early 1970s. Dry Wood chronicled Bois Sec Ardoin and Canray Fontenot. Here he screens Hot Pepper, his profile of Clifton Chenier. In the late 1980s, Blank returned to Acadiana to film J’ai Ete Au Bal/I Went to the Dance, which is an excellent documentary about Cajun and Creole musical traditions. Blank will screen 30 minutes of performances by Cajun and zydeco musicians that were not included in the documentary.

TEEN-A-GO-GO

Directed by Melissa Kirkendall 1:30 p.m. Saturday The British Invasion messed with Texas, especially Fort Worth. Teen-A-Go-Go is about the wave of Beatles-influenced bands that cropped up in the mid-1960s. Texas teens shed their 10-gallon hats and took to mod-looks, moptop haircuts, tight suits and names like The Elite, The Jades, The Vipers, The Novas and The Kandy Kanes. They filled dry clubs like the TeenA-Go-Go to dance to the new sound, and many bands recorded 45s that aired on local radio. But none of the groups made it big, and Fort Worth remained a garage rocker’s town in spite of an abundance of talent. The film revisits the scene with entertaining archival footage, and band members reminisce about the relatively innocuous wave of teen rebellion.

Les Blank’s Hot Pepper captures zydeco king Clifton Chenier and brother Cleveland Chenier.

IT’S WHAT’S HAPPENING, BABY Originally aired on CBS-TV Noon Saturday

This rarely shown made-for-TV show originally aired in 1965 as a promotion for President Lyndon Johnson’s Opportunity Office. DJ Murray the K introduces superstars of the era including Johnny Mathis, Tom Jones, Smokey Robinson and the Miracles, The Drifters, Ray Charles, the Ronettes and many other rock and Motown stars. Some lip synching in musicvideo-like shoots is poor, but it’s an amusing time capsule with the young Bill Cosby telling jokes and talking about education and job opportunities. And Herman from The Munsters makes a goofy appearance trying to dance at a beach party before also making a job pitch.

OUTTAKES FROM BAYOU MAHARAJAH Directed by Lily Keber 11 a.m. Friday

Lily Keber is working on a documentary about legendary New Orleans pianist the late James Booker. She’ll preview footage from her interview tapes with Dr. John, Bunny Matthews, friends of Booker and others, as well as footage from European concerts, two of which have never been screened before. She expects to release the film in spring 2012.

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All the songs, sass and swing of the 1940s starring eight terrific singers and dancers, Weekends, September 10 – November 21. Friday & Saturday Evenings @ 8:00pm Sunday Matinee@ 1:00pm Dinner & Show: $60 Brunch & Show: $55 Dinner Seating 6:00pm – 6:30pm SHOW ONLY: $30

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FILM

LISTINGS

A ROOM WITH A VIEW

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

NOW SHOWING ALPHA AND OMEGA (PG)—

Two wolves with conflicting personalities get stuck together on a journey to find their way home. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 THE AMERICAN (R) — George Clooney stars as an assassin who retreats to the Italian countryside, but danger soon follows him. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 ANIMAL KINGDOM (R) — A 17-year-old navigates survival amid the Melbourne, Austria underworld and criminal family in which he was raised. Canal Place CAIRO TIME (PG) — A fashion

editor meeting her husband in Cairo becomes acquainted with his friend while her husband is delayed. Prytania DEVIL (PG-13) — A group of

EASY A (PG-13) — In the comedy inspired by The Scarlet Letter, a high school student’s reputation takes a hit when she pretends to lose her virginity to a friend. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 EAT PRAY LOVE (PG-13) — Julia Roberts stars in the film adaptation of Elizabeth Gilbert’s memoir about finding herself through a journey around the world. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand THE EXPENDABLES (R) — A

group of mercenaries is hired to infiltrate a South American country and overthrow its ruthless dictator. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

THE EXTRA MAN (R) — A young

writer in New York rents a room in the apartment of an eccentric man who works as a social escort for the wealthy widows of Manhattan. Chalmette Movies

GOING THE DISTANCE (R) —

After a summer fling, two people (Drew Barrymore and Justin Long) attempt a longdistance relationship when one of them returns home to New York. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, Grand, Hollywood 14

I’M STILL HERE (NR) — The

pseudo-documentary follows actor Joaquin Phoenix as he retires from the business to pursue a hip-hop career. AMC Palace 20 INCEPTION (PG-13) — A thief (Leonardo DiCaprio) skilled at extracting secrets from deep within the subconscious gets a chance at redemption. AMC Palace 20 THE LAST EXORCISM (PG-13) —

In Eli Roth’s horror film, true evil awaits a reverend on a Louisiana farm where he will conduct and document his final exorcism. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 LOTTERY TICKET (PG-13) —

Rapper Bow Wow plays a lottery winner who has to keep quiet about his good fortune in the days before he can cash in his ticket. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand

MACHETE (R) — Danny Trejo, Jessica Alba, Robert De Niro, Michelle Rodriguez and Lindsay Lohan star in the action film about an ex-federale who disguises himself as a day laborer.AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand NANNY MCPHEE RETURNS (PG) — The sequel to the 2006

film finds the magical nanny taking on five mischievous charges. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 16, Grand, Hollywood 14

THE OTHER GUYS (PG-13) —

Two mediocre cops (Will Ferrell and Mark Wahlberg) stumble into a case that gives them a chance to prove their worth. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 14 RESIDENT EVIL: AFTERLIFE (R) —

Milla Jovovich returns as Alice, a survivor in a world ravaged by a virus infection. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 THE SWITCH (PG-13) — A single

woman (Jennifer Aniston) conceives via artificial insemination and seven years later, she discovers her neurotic best friend (Jason Bateman) may have switched his sperm with the donor’s at the last minute. AMC Palace 20, Hollywood 14

TAKERS (PG-13) — A group of

skilled criminals that consistently pulls off perfect bank robberies meets its match in a determined detective. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

“A NEW STYLE OF“ ” ”

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THE TOWN (R) — Ben Affleck,

Rebecca Hall, Jon Hamm, Jeremy Renner and Blake Lively star in Affleck’s drama about a crook who falls for the manager of one of the banks he’s robbed. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

OPENING FRIDAY WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS (PG-13) — Michael

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Douglass is back as the stock trader Gordon Gekko, who is out of prison and looking for a fresh start.

SPECIAL SCREENINGS CHITTY CHITTY BANG BANG (NR) — An eccentric inventor

(Dick Van Dyke) struggling to support himself and his family creates a magical car. Tickets $5.50. Noon Wednesday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com

CROPSEY (NR) — In the docu-

mentary, two filmmakers delve into a Staten Island urban legend from their childhood that turned out to be true. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 9 p.m. Tuesday-Sunday, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

FILM AND DINNER SERIES —

The museum screens Feeding the Soul at Jones Valley Urban Farm, Cud, and The Who Farm, and Zea’s Rotisserie and Grill offers free appetizers to attendees. Free with museum admission. 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday, Southern Food & Beverage Museum, Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www. southernfood.org THE MAN WHO KNEW TOO MUCH (NR) — Alfred

Hitchcock’s film stars James Stewart and Doris Day as a family that accidentally stumbles into an assassination plot while vacationing in Morocco. Tickets $5.50. Noon SaturdaySunday and Sept. 29, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 8912787; www.theprytania.com

COLUMBIA PICTURES PRESENTS A GARY SANCHEZ PRODUCTION “THE VIRGINITY HIT” COEXECUTIVE MATT BENNETT ZACK PEARLMAN PRODUCER AMY HOBBY PRODUCER OWEN BURKE PRODUCED BY WILL FERRELL ADAM McKAY CHRIS HENCHY PETER PRINCIPATO PAUL YOUNG WRITTEN AND DIRECTED BY ANDREW GURLAND & HUCK BOTKO

MONTY PYTHON AND THE HOLY GRAIL (PG) — The clas-

sic British comedy spoofs King Arthur’s quest to find the Holy Grail. Tickets $8. Midnight Friday-Saturday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www. theprytania.com

LOCAL LISTINGS FOR STARTS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 24 CHECK THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES

PAGE 53

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

people are trapped in an elevator, and one of them is the devil in M. Night Shyamalan’s horror film. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

GET LOW (PG-13)— A cranky old recluse decides to have a funeral for himself while he’s still alive. AMC Palace 20, Canal Place

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FILM

LISTINGS

A ROOM WITH A VIEW

PAGE 51

“At Last: A

review Satan Island

Perhaps like a stereotype, there’s some kernel of truth to every urban legend. Cropsey explores the intersection of a popular myth and an unnerving true crime story. The name Cropsey refers to an insane man who lives in the woods and snatches children, a folk tale chronically repeated and embellished. It plays on leering and crude paranoia about mental illness and urban decay. Filmmakers Joshua Zeman and Barbara Brancaccio grew up on Staten Island, which had an abundance of both. They make the point that New York’s least known borough was a dumping ground both for city garbage, at the Fresh Kills landfill, and mentally ill, at the Willowbrook State School. The massive institution was an abysmally run warehouse of neglect and misery, exposed on TV by a young Geraldo Rivera and shuttered in 1987. Fact and fiction met somewhere in the woods surrounding Willowbrook, where Andre Rand, who had worked inside, sometimes lived. Rand himself had suffered from mental illness, and he was a suspect in the disappearance of several children in the 1980s. He was convicted of kidnapping but not murdering 7-year-old Jennifer Schweiger, meaning he would eventually be released from jail. There was no solid evidence connecting him to the murder, though police and volunteers combed the woods and tunnels around the facility for years. Some people interviewed in the film suspect there were others involved, or that Rand was a kidnapper working on someone else’s behalf. And she was just one of the missing children. The movie is driven by the filmmakers’ attempts to get Rand to tell his side of the story from jail, and they maintain a frequent correspondence with him. One wants to hear anything that would help resolve the unanswered questions, and it is a gripping true horror tale. Much of the discussion of Rand’s case and the missing children comes via narration over images of the dilapidated and vandalized Willowbrook institution, with slow pans over rusted gurneys and junk left in the woods, easily feeding any rush to judgement or fear of the dark you wish to entertain. The discussion of cults and satanic activity also comes with unsubstantiated rumors and charges by people who don’t want to be photographed. It’s easy to see how the legend of Cropsey is perpetuated and how fragile the community can seem, even with Rand in jail. The hype about him may be unfair, but no one can comfortably believe this is the end of Cropsey. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students/seniors, $5 Zeitgeist members. — Will Coviello

21

teen Comedy Adults will

Love

Linda Barnard, TORONTO STAR

that too.”

CROPSEY 9 p.m. Tue.-Sun. Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

MY FRIEND, OSCAR (NR) — The theater hosts a screening of the locally made film about the friendship between a quirky 12-year-old girl and a 23-year-old disabled man to benefit Lusher High School’s media arts program. Tickets $10. 7 p.m. Sunday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 8912787; www.theprytania.com NATIONAL LAMPOON’S ANIMAL HOUSE (R) — John

Belushi stars in the college comedy about a misfit fraternity that challenges school administrators. Free admission. 8 p.m. Monday, La Divina Cafe e Gelateria, 621 St. Peter St., 302-2692; www.ladivinagelateria.com

SALT OF THIS SEA (NR) — An

American-born Palestinian woman fulfills her dream of returning to Israel to discover her roots. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 7 p.m. Tuesday-Sunday, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd.,

827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net TAR CREEK (NR) — The League

of Women Voters and Sierra Club screen the documentary about the stretch of Oklahoma that has been profoundly damaged by zinc and lead mining. Admission is free, but donations are accepted. 7 p.m. Thursday, Audubon Zoo, Dominion Auditorium, 6500 Magazine St. UNDER THESE SAME STARS: THE CÉLADON AFFAIR (NR) — The film follows a relation-

ship between a mixed-race hunter and a slave woman. A Q&A with the filmmakers follows the screenings. Tickets $5. 9:30 a.m. and 1 p.m. Saturday, Historic New Orleans Collection, 533 Royal St., 5234662; www.hnoc.org

FILM FESTIVALS JAMFEST INTERNATIONAL INDEPENDENT FILM FESTIVAL — Festival screenings include

I Ran Against Us, You People, The Buck Johnson Story,

Dynamite Swine, Animal Drill, Up and Down, The Cortége and others. Visit www. strawberryjam.org for details. Tickets $10 general admission, $5 children 12 and under, free for Southeastern Louisiana University students. FridaySaturday, Hammond Regional Arts Center, 217 E. Thomas St., Hammond, (985) 542-7113 AMC Palace 10 (Hammond), 429-9090; AMC Palace 12 (Clearview), 734-2020; AMC Palace 16 (Westbank), 734-2020; AMC Palace 20 (Elmwood), 734-2020; Canal Place, 363-1117; Chalmette Movies, 277-4778; Entergy IMAX, 581-IMAX; Grand (Slidell), (985) 641-1889; Hollywood 9 (Kenner), 464-0990; Hollywood 14 (Covington), (985) 893-3044; Kenner MegaDome, 468-7231; Prytania, 891-2787; Solomon Victory Theater, National World War II Museum, 5276012

Compiled by Lauren LaBorde

SCREEN GEMS PRESENTS AN OLIVE BRIDGE ENTERTAINMENT PRODUCTION A WILL GLUCK FILM “EASY A” PENN BADGLEY AMANDA BYNES THOMAS HADEN CHURCH PATRICIA CLARKSON CHALKA STANLEY TUCCI CAM GIGANDET LISA KUDROW MALCOLMWRITTEN MCDOWELL ALY MIDIRECTED PRODUCED BY ZANNE DEVINE WILL GLUCK BY BERT V. ROYAL BY WILL GLUCK CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

SEPT

Smart

53

4.729" X 10.5" (1/2 PG V) TUE 9/21 NEW ORLEANS GAMBIT WEEKLY (SUB AD)

A Monthly Open Air Festival of Creativity in Palmer Park Presented by the Arts Council of New Orleans

A vibrant market featuring original handmade art from the region’s best visual artists.

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Plus live music, creative activities for kids, and foods to satisfy every craving.

LAST SATURDAY OF EVERY MONTH IN PALMER PARK!

St. Charles Streetcar 175th Birthday Party, Charmaine Neville & the Pfister Sisters! For more information, please call 504-523-1465 or visit www.artscouncilofneworleans.org

Featuring new work by the region’s top artists:

Additional Sponsors Include:

lisTings

WHaT yOU see is WHaT yOU geT

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

Opening PK GALLERY. 938 Royal St —

“Wall of Sound: Art From the Stomp,” paintings by Shmuela Padnos and prints on paper by Ian Dunlop, through Sept. 29. Opening reception 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday.

galleries 1022 GALLERY. 1022 Lowerline St., 301-0679; www.1022gallery.blogspot.com — “Vanishing Acts,” mixed media and oil paintings by Dana Beuhler, Caroline Thomas and Alexandra Adduci, through Oct. 9. 3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY. 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com — “The Lines

Are Drawn,” photographs and drawings by Libby Nevinger and John Deal, through Sept. 28.

ACADEMY GALLERY. 5256 Magazine St., 899-8111 — Annual

faculty exhibition, through Sept. 28.

AG WAGNER STUDIO & GALLERY. 813 Royal St., 561-7440 — Works

by gallery artists; 504 Toys, locally handcrafted toys; both ongoing.

ANTENNA GALLERY. 3161 Burgundy St., 957-4255; www.antennagallery.org — “Crime Scene

NOLA,” a group exhibition featuring photographs by five artists, through Sunday.

ANTON HAARDT FOLK GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www.antonart.com — Works

by Anton Haardt, Christopher Moses and others.

AORTA PROJECTS. Poland Avenue and North Miro Street, www.aortaprojects.blogspot.com — “Blue

Fence,” installation by Jennifer Odem, through December.

ARIODANTE GALLERY. 535 Julia St., 524-3233 — Paintings by Amy

Archinal, jewelry by Debra Villa and new works by Julie Breaux, all through September.

ART GALLERY 818. 818 Royal St., 524-6918 — Paintings, sculpture

and jewelry by local artists Noel Rockmore, Michael Fedor, Xavier de Callatay, Charles Bazzell, Bambi deVille and Ritchie Fitzgerald, ongoing.

ARTICHOKE GALLERY. 912 Decatur St., 636-2004 — Artists work on site in all media; watercolors and limited-edition prints by Peter Briant, ongoing. BARRISTER’S GALLERY. 2331 St.

Claude Ave., 525-2767; www. barristersgallery.com — “From Start to Finish,” works by Maxx Sizeler, through Oct. 2.

review

BERGERON STUDIO & GALLERY. 406 Magazine St., 522-7503; www.bergeronstudio.com —

Photographs by Michael P. Smith, Jack Beech, Harriet Blum, Kevin Roberts and others, ongoing. BERTA’S AND MINA’S ANTIQUITIES GALLERY. 4138 Magazine St., 895-6201 — “Second Line: Lift-

ing Our Souls Up Into Heaven,” works by Nilo and Mina Lanzas; works by Clementine Hunter, Noel Rockmore and others; all ongoing.

BRUNNER GALLERY. 215 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 893-0444; www.brunnergallery.com — “Neither Here Nor There,” works by Diane Hanson; paintings by Michael Secor; both through Oct. 10. BRYANT GALLERIES. 316 Royal St., 525-5584; www.bryantgalleries.com — Paintings by Dean Mitchell, ongoing. BYRDIE’S GALLERY. 2422-A St. Claude Ave., www.byrdiesgallery. com — “Redhead Car,” paint on

recycled political signs by Devin Meyer, through Oct. 6.

CALICHE & PAO GALLERY. 312 Royal St., 588-2846 — Oil paintings

by Caliche and Pao, ongoing.

CALLAN FINE ART. 240 Chartres St., 524-0025; www.callanfineart. com — Works by Eugene de

Blass, Louis Valtat and other artists of the Barbizon, Impressionist and Post-Impressionist schools, ongoing.

CANARY GALLERY. 329 Julia St., 388-7746; www.thecanarycollective.com — “Let Them Eat

Crude,” acrylic paintings by Tony Nozero, through September.

CARDINAL GALLERY. 541 Bourbon St., 522-3227 — Exhibition of Ital-

ian artists featuring works by Bruno Paoli and Andrea Stella, ongoing.

CARIBBEAN ARTS LTD. 720 Franklin Ave., 943-3858 — The gallery

showcases contemporary Haitian and Jamaican art.

CAROL ROBINSON GALLERY. 840 Napoleon Ave., 895-6130; www. carolrobinsongallery.com — “Quiet Light,” new works on oil by Masahiro Arai, through Sept. 28. CARROLL GALLERY. Woldenberg Art Center, Newcomb Art Department, Tulane University, 314-2228; www.carrollgallery.tulane.edu — “Sources of Inspiration,” works by Tulane Studio Art faculty, through Friday. Closing reception 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday. CASELL GALLERY. 818 Royal St., 524-0671; www.casellartgallery. com — Pastels by Joaquim

Casell; etchings by Sage; oils by Charles Ward; all ongoing.

COLE PRATT GALLERY. 3800 Magazine St., 891-6789; www. coleprattgallery.com — A group

exhibition featuring works

photographs by Jayme Kalal, woodwork by Jesse Stolzfus, through Saturday.

The Center— piece Can— not Hold William Butler Yeats’ poem “Sailing to Byzantium” is a whimsical rumination on old age infused with many mythic references. This Good Children expo extrapolates those themes into a meditation on human frailty, tackiness, weird aquariums, beginnings, ends and erratic interludes. Multiple Lines of Idylle Colors by Bryan Guidry and Philippe Landry is a leaning tower of kitsch, a totem of bric-a-brac shelves bristling with plaster saints, elves, busts of Elvis, Jesus, you name it, accompanied by an endless sound loop distilled from a minimal snippet of Wagner’s Siegfried Idyll. The result is a kind of aesthetic mulch, a thrift-store Götterdämmerung. Show curator Adrian Price’s mixed-media mural extends the “love in the ruins” theme with passionate scenes on the floor of a domestic interior devolving into a mass-media afterimage of pop-cultural memory. Minka Stoyanova’s Flee depicts a unicorn-headed majorette bursting through concrete walls, a gesture of mythic renewal in the form of an equine Wonder Woman. Jeremy Pelt’s Cool Water is a cologne-scented aquarium radiating a deadly golden glow inspired by Yeats’ desire to be reincarnated as a hammered gold bauble. Colorfully related works by Jessica Bizer, Rachel Jones and Sophie Lvoff round out this eloquently improbable expo. The adjacent New Orleans Mountain Project explores what mountains might mean to New Orleans. Curated by Serbo-Croatian New Orleans resident Srdjan Loncar, it features works like Icelandic artist Bjarki Bragason’s anti-mountain manifesto, a flat horizontal line bounded by two poems — a notion echoed by local artist Robert Tannen’s assertion that mountains ascend horizontally in the linear form of levees, or the inverted form of lakes and swamps. Baltimore artist Alyssa Dennis proposes a mountain of organic gardens for those who lack access to vegetables, and Chilean artist Sebastian Preece espouses a “geography of books” to elevate the imagination and penetrate the limits of knowledge. Now all we have to do is get the Corps of Engineers to pay for it. — D. Eric Bookhardt

THRU OCT

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sailing To Byzantium: group show inspired by William Butler Yeats new Orleans Mountain project: group show inspired by Mountains Good Children Gallery, 4037 St. Claude Ave., 616-7427; www.goodchildrengallery.com

by Barbara Brainard, Denyce Celentano and Stephen Strickland, through Sunday. COLLECTIVE WORLD ART COMMUNITY. Poydras Center, 650 Poydras St., 339-5237 — Paintings

from the Blue Series by Joseph Pearson, ongoing.

COLLINS C. DIBOLL ART GALLERY. Loyola University, Monroe Library, 6363 St. Charles Ave.,

fourth floor, 861-5456 — “Couples,” portraiture by Carole Leake; “Wonderland,” mixedmedia caterpillar paintings and drawings by Tom Strider, through Oct. 21. COUP D’OEIL ART CONSORTIUM. 2033 Magazine St., 722-0876; www.coupdoeilartconsortium. com — “Mouth Environment,”

metalwork by Rachel David,

D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., 524-3936 — “Singing Over the Bones,”

ceramics by Beverly Morris, through September.

DU MOIS GALLERY. 4921 Freret St., 818-6032 — “Whimsy,” works by

Denise Gallagher, Amy Glisan and Brandon Zeringue, through Oct. 2.

DUTCH ALLEY ARTIST’S CO-OP GALLERY. 912 N. Peters St., 4129220; www.dutchalleyonline. com — Works by New Orleans

artists, ongoing.

ELLIOTT GALLERY. 540 Royal St., 523-3554; www.elliottgallery. com — Works by gallery artists

Coignard, Engel, Papart, Petra, Tobiasse, Schneuer and Yrondi, ongoing.

ESOM GALLERY. 3935 Magazine St., (225) 202-6405 — Works by Tony Mose, Alex Harvie, Dennis Hargroder and Lou DeAngelo, through Tuesday. FRAMIN’ PLACE & GALLERY. 3535 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-3311; www.nolaframing.com — Prints

by Tommy Thompson, Phillip Sage, James Michalopoulos and others, ongoing. FREDRICK GUESS STUDIO. 910 Royal St., 581-4596; www.fredrickguessstudio.com — Paintings by

Fredrick Guess, ongoing.

THE FRONT. 4100 St. Claude Ave.; www.nolafront.org — “Discon-

nect,” self-portraits by Elizabeth Acevedo; “Postcards from New Orleans,” a group photography exhibition by UNO graduates; collage by Jules Buck Jones; works by Matt Rebholz and Julie Doucet; all through Oct. 3. GALERIE D’ART FRANCAIS. 541 Royal St., 581-6925 — Works by

Todd White, ongoing.

GALERIE PORCHE WEST. 3201 Burgundy St., 947-3880 — Pho-

tography by Christopher Porche West, ongoing. GALLERIA BELLA. 319 Royal St., 581-5881 — Works by gallery artists, ongoing. GALLERY 421. 421 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 8985858 — “It’s Dat Time Again,” Saints-themed mixed media by Theresa DeMelo; “A Country Life,” paintings by Glenda Kinnison-Smith; both through September. More than 500 pieces of art by more than 50 artists, ongoing. GALLERY BIENVENU. 518 Julia St., 525-0518; www.gallerybienvenu. com — “The Wrench Series,” incised paintings by Mitchell Lonas, through Saturday. THE GARDEN DISTRICT GALLERY. 1332 Washington Ave., 891-3032; www.gardendistrictgallery. com — “Treasures of the Gulf,”

a group exhibition featuring more than 12 artists, through Sunday.

GEORGE SCHMIDT GALLERY. 626 Julia St., 592-0206; www. georgeschmidt.com — Paintings

by George Schmidt, ongoing. GOOD CHILDREN GALLERY. 4037 St. Claude Ave., 616-7427; www. goodchildrengallery.com — “Sailing to Byzantium,” a group exhibition curated by Adrian Price; “New Orleans Mountain Project,” a group exhibition curated by Srdjan Loncar; both through Oct. 3. GRAPHITE GALLERIES. 936 Royal St., 565-3739 — “Sinners and

Saints,” works by Joe Hobbs, ongoing.

GUTHRIE CONTEMPORARY. 3815 Magazine St., 897-2688; www. guthriecontemporary.com — “Schemata,” works by Susan Dory, ongoing. GUY LYMAN FINE ART. 3645 Magazine St., 899-4687; www. guylymanfineart.com — “Young, Talented and Still Affordable,” a group exhibition featuring paintings, drawings and sculpture by new artists, through Oct. 28. HAROUNI GALLERY. 829 Royal St., 299-8900 — Paintings by David

Harouni, ongoing.

HENRY HOOD GALLERY. 325 E. Lockwood St., Covington, (985) 789-1832 — “Planting New

Seeds,” handmade paper wall panels and earthenware platters by Ruth Siporski, through Oct. 9.

HOME SPACE GALLERY. 1128 St. Roch Ave. — Push Pin Show, an

exhibition featuring New Orleans Photo Alliance members, through Oct. 3. ISAAC DELGADO FINE ARTS GALLERY. Isaac Delgado Hall, third floor, 615 City Park Ave., 3616620 — “The Call of the Alluvial

Empire,” new works by Gina Phillips, through September.

ISABELLA’S GALLERY. 3331 Severn Ave., Suite 105, Metairie, 779-3202; www.isabellasgallery. com — Hand-blown works by Marc Rosenbaum; raku by Kate Tonguis and John Davis; all ongoing. JAMIE HAYES GALLERY. 621 Chartres St., 592-4080; www.jamiehayes.com — New Orleans-style art by Jamie Hayes, ongoing. JEAN BRAGG GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART. 600 Julia St., 895-7375; www.jeanbragg.com — “I Saw in Louisiana a Live Oak

Growing,” a group exhibition, through September.

JON SCHOOLER GALLERY. 8526 Oak St., 865-7032; www. jonschooler.com — “Subliminal WOWs,” paintings by Jon Schooler, ongoing. JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY. 400A Julia St., 522-5471; www. jonathanferraragallery.com —

“2010 No Dead Artists,” a juried exhibition featuring artists from around the country, through Sept. 28.

JULIE NEILL DESIGNS. 3908 Magazine St., 899-4201; www. julieneill.com — “Facade,”

photographs by Lesley Wells, ongoing.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

ALL IN THE FRAME GALLERY. 2596 Front St., Slidell, (985) 2901395 — “Serene Waters, Clear Horizons,” paintings by Annie Strack, ongoing.

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KAKO GALLERY. 536 Royal St., 5655445; www.kakogallery.com — New

paintings by Don Picou and Stan Fontaine; “Raku” by Joy Gauss; 3-D wood sculpture by Joe Derr; all ongoing.

KKPROJECTS. 2448 N. Villere St., 415-9880; www.kkprojects.org —

“Knead,” works by Kristian Hansen, Tora Lopez, John Oles and William Murphy, ongoing.

KURT E SCHON. 510-520 St. Louis St., 524-5462 — The gallery specializes

in 18th and 19th century European oil paintings by artists from the French Salon and Royal Academy as well as French Impressionists. L9 CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 539 Caffin Ave., 948-0056 — “Faces of Treme,” works by Chandra McCormick and Keith Calhoun, ongoing. LE PETIT SALON DE NEW ORLEANS. 906 Royal St., 524-5700 — New

paintings by Holly Sarre, ongoing. LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia St., 5225988; www.lemieuxgalleries.com —

“Anting,” paintings and pastels by Jesse Poimboeuf, through Saturday.

LOUISIANA CRAFTS GUILD. 608 Julia St., 558-6198; www.louisianacrafts. org — Group show featuring works

from guild members, ongoing.

M. FRANCIS GALLERY. 604 S. Julia St., 875-4888; www.mfrancisgallery. com — “Perseverance in Peace,”

recent mixed-media drawings and watercolors by Asante Salaam, through Oct. 15.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

MARTINE CHAISSON GALLERY. 727 Camp St., 427-4759; www.martinechaissongallery.com — “Fanciful Fauna,” oil on canvas by Hunt Slonem, through Saturday.

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NEW ORLEANS GLASSWORKS & PRINTMAKING STUDIO. 727 Magazine St., 529-7277; www.neworleansglassworks.com — “A Culinary

Extravaganza: The Sweet Sounds of Satchmo and the Sugarfoot Stomp,” works by Chad Gilchrist, Lisa Liggett, Melissa Clark and Cathy DeYoung, through September.

NEWCOMB ART GALLERY. Tulane University, Woldenberg Art Center, 314-2406; www.newcombartgallery. com — “Voices Inside: The Form

and Function of Baskets,” more than 200 baskets from around the world; “Creative Environs: Art of the Newcomb Pottery”; both through Oct. 17.

OCTAVIA ART GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www.octaviaartgallery.com — “Simultaneous Horizons,” mixed-media and acrylic works by Edith Moseley and Brad Robertson, through Sept. 28. ONE SUN GALLERY. 616 Royal St., (800) 501-1151 — Works by local and national artists, ongoing.

EST 1994

1501 Metairie Rd 834.9773 3218 Magazine St. 894.1233 2020 Veterans Blvd 837.9777 Lakeside Shopping Center 830.7333

PEARL ART GALLERY. 4421 Magazine St., 228-5840 — Works by Cindy and

Drue Hardegree, Erica Dewey, John Womack, Sontina, Lorraine Jones and S. Lee, ongoing.

PHOTO WORKS NEW ORLEANS. 521 St. Ann St., 593-9090; www.photoworksneworleans.com — Photography by

Louis Sahuc, ongoing.

Magazine Location

VOTED ONE OF THE BEST MEDITERRANEAN RESTAURANTS ACCORDING TO GAMBIT READERS

POET’S GALLERY. 3113 Magazine St., 899-4100 — “Southern Life After

Death,” a group exhibition featur-

What you see is What you get ing five artists depicting afterlife in various mediums, through September. REINA GALLERY. 4132 Magazine St., 895-0022; www.reinaart.com —

“Vintage New Orleans Artists,” watercolors, etchings and folk art; “Patrons Saints,” works by Shelley Barberot; both ongoing.

REYNOLDS-RYAN ART GALLERY. Isidore Newman School, 5333 Danneel St., 896-6369; www.newmanschool. org — Multi-layered silkscreen wall

installations by Winifred Ross Reilly, through Oct. 14. RHINO CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS COMPANY. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www.rhinocrafts.com — Works by

Darrin and Yolanda Butler, Greg Little, Tress Turner and other New Orleans artists, ongoing.

RIVERSTONE GALLERIES. 719 Royal St., 412-9882; 729 Royal St., 581-3688; Riverwalk, 1 Poydras St., Suite 36, 5660588; 733 Royal St., 525-9988; www. riverstonegalleries.net — Multimedia

works by Ricardo Lozano, Michael Flohr, Henry Ascencio, Jaline Pol and others, ongoing. SLIDELL ART LEAGUE GALLERY. Historic Slidell Train Depot, 1827 Front St., Suite 201, (985) 847-9458 — “Out

of the Blue,” a group exhibition and competition, through Feb. 3. SOREN CHRISTENSEN GALLERY. 400 Julia St., 569-9501; www.sorengallery. com — New works by David Lapin; works on paper by Harry Paul Ally and Mark Willems; “A Decade ...” works by Tony Hernandez; new ceramic works by Dana Chapman and Evelyn Jordan; all through September. ST. TAMMANY ART ASSOCIATION. 320 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-8650; www.sttammanyart. org — “Sid Fuhrmann 1890-1963:

A Breath of St. Tammany,” an exhibit honoring the contributions of the Covington cultural founder, through Oct. 1. STELLA JONES GALLERY. Place St. Charles, 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 132, 568-9050 — “Melting Lines,”

works by Murielle White, through Monday. TAYLOR BERCIER FINE ART. 233 Chartres St., 527-0072 — “Fever Dreams,”

drawings and paintings by Thomas Woodruff, through Oct. 22. TRIPOLO GALLERY. 401 N. Columbia St., Covington (985) 893-1441 —

Works by Bill Binnings, Robert Cook, Donna Duffy, Scott Ewen, Juli Juneau, Kevin LeBlanc, Ingrid Moses, Gale Ruggiero, Robert Seago and Scott Upton, ongoing.

UNO-ST. CLAUDE GALLERY. 2429 St. Claude Ave. — “Abstraction Now,”

a group exhibition featuring Dawn Dedeaux, Jessica Bizer, Ariya Martin and others, through Oct. 3.

Call for artists ART SPILL. The Collective World Art

Community seeks applications for a juried show of artwork and crafts in November. Visit www.collectiveworldartcommuntiy.com for details. Submission deadline is Oct. 5.

BATON ROUGE GALLERY. The gallery

invites artists of all mediums to apply for membership. Visit www. batonrougegallery.org for details. Submission deadline Oct. 5.

MIDDLE EAST FILM FESTIVAL. The fes-

tival seeks film submissions, as well as Arab, Persian or Middle Eastern musicians, multimedia installations and performance pieces, for the November event. Visit www. nolamideastfilmfest.blogspot.com for details. Submission deadline is Sept. 30.

ZULU SOCIAL AID & PLEASURE CLUB.

The group seeks an artist to design its 2011 poster. Call 610-7072 or visit www.zulusapclub.org for details. Submission deadline is Oct. 8.

museums AMERICAN-ITALIAN MUSEUM & RESEARCH LIBRARY. 537 S. Peters St., 522-7294 — Permanent exhibits of

jazz artists, a St. Joseph’s altar replica, the Louisiana Italian-American Sports Hall of Fame and a research library with genealogy records. AMISTAD RESEARCH CENTER. Tilton Hall, Tulane University, 6823 St. Charles Ave., 865-5535 — “Tom Dent:

A Heavy Trip Through the South,” an exhibition highlighting the New Orleans poet, playwright and historian, through September.

ASHÉ CULTURAL ARTS CENTER. 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — “Ashe in Retrospect: 1998-2008,” photographs by Morris Jones Jr., Eric Waters, Jeffrey Cook and others, ongoing. BACKSTREET CULTURAL MUSEUM. 1116 St. Claude Ave., 522-4806; www. backstreetmuseum.org — Permanent exhibits of Mardi Gras Indian suits, jazz funeral memorabilia and social aid and pleasure club artifacts, ongoing. CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER. 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www.cacno.org — “Freak Parade,” works by Thomas Woodruff, through Oct. 24. “As We See It: Youth Vision Quilt,” studentcreated quilt with more than 400 patches, ongoing. GEORGE & LEAH MCKENNA MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN ART. 2003 Carondelet St., 586-7432; www.themckennamuseum.com — “Synesthe-

sia: A Blending of the Senses,” new works by Carl Joe Williams, through Oct. 9. GOSH MUSEUM. 2065 Second St., Slidell, (985) 646-6118 — “Water-

ways to Railways: A Bicentennial Exhibition,” rare photographs and artifacts depicting Slidell’s history, through Jan. 7. HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION. 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www. hnoc.org — Early Louisiana furniture

from the Magnolia Mound Plantation collection, through Dec. 11.

LONGUE VUE HOUSE AND GARDENS. 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www. longuevue.com — “Untitled No. 6029,” sculpture by Eric Dallimore, through December. “Deepwater Horizon Response,” a conceptual installation by Mitchell Gaudet about the BP oil disaster, through September.

LOUISIANA CHILDREN’S MUSEUM. 420 Julia St., 523-1357; www.lcm.org — “Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood: A

Hands-On Exhibit”; “Fetch,” a scavenger hunt designed to develop problem-solving skills; “Team Turtle Training Camp,” hands-on exhibit designed to teach kids how to make healthy choices; all ongoing.

LOUISIANA FILM MUSEUM. Montrel’s Bistro, 1000 N. Peters St., 524-4747; www.louisianafilmmuseum.org — The museum features

props, costumes, video clips, still photographs, posters and other exhibits from major films produced in Louisiana.

LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM. Old U.S. Mint, 400 Esplanade Ave., 568-6968 — “Target America: Opening Eyes to the Damage Drugs Cause,” an interactive exhibit exploring the damaging effects of illegal drugs, through Nov. 24. MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN COCKTAIL. 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.museumoftheamericancocktail.org — “Absinthe

Visions,” photographs by Damian Hevia, ongoing.

NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM. 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — “Loyal Forces: The Animals of World War II,” artifacts focusing on animals employed and encountered in the war, through Oct. 17. NEW ORLEANS AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM. 1418 Gov. Nicholls St., 5661136; www.noaam.com — “Sumpt’n

to See, Native Son Comes Home,” paintings by Ted Ellis; “Drapetomania: A Disease Called Freedom,” a collection of artifacts by Derrick Joshua Beard; both through November. NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma.org — “Scents and

Sensibility,” 125 objects covering the history of perfume bottles; “Ancestors and Descendants: Ancient Southwestern America at the Dawn of the Twentieth Century,” photographs, artifacts and archival research from Tulane University’s George Hubbard Pepper Native American Archive; both through Oct. 24, and more.

OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART. 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www. ogdenmuseum.org — “One Block:

A New Orleans Neighborhood Rebuilds,” photographs by Dave Anderson, through Jan. 2. “The Art of Country Music,” items from the Marty Stuart Collection, through October, and more. SOUTHERN FOOD & BEVERAGE MUSEUM. Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood.org — “New Or-

leans con Sabor Latino,” an exhibit highlighting the legacy of Latin cuisine in New Orleans, through Nov. 15. “Consider the Oyster,” oyster plates from Jim and Diane Gossen’s private collection, and more.

TEKREMA CENTER FOR ART AND CULTURE. 5640 Burgundy St., 247-2612 — Collection of intuit art from Papa

New Guinea, through Nov. 15.

For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.

GET in on THE AcT

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com; FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

TheaTeR 504. Anthony Bean Community

Theater, 1333 S. Carrollton Ave., 862-7529; www.anthonybeantheater.com — Anthony Bean’s original hip-hop musical tells the story of young people’s role in New Orleans’ recovery. Tickets $20 general admission, $18 students and seniors. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday.

ABOUT TIME. Cutting Edge

Theater, Attractions Salon, 747 Robert Blvd., Slidell, (985) 639-8294; www.cuttingedgetheater.com — An elderly couple spends the day in their kitchen talking about everything, including what it means to share a life together. Tickets $17. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday through Oct. 2.

ALIENS, IMMIGRANTS AND OTHER EVILDOERS. Shadowbox

Theatre, 2400 St. Claude Ave., 523-7469; www.theshadowboxtheatre.com — José Torres-Tama’s “sci-fi Latino noir” performance depicts the struggles of immigrants through satire Tickets $10 general admission; two tickets for $15. 8 p.m. Thursday-Sunday through Oct. 10. CHINESE CULTURAL EXCHANGE ACROBAT & ORCHESTRA SHOW.

CURTAINS. Rivertown Repertory

Theatre, 325 Minor St., Kenner, 468-7221 — After a stage actress is killed during her curtain call, a detective moonlighting as a musical theater fan tries to solve the mystery and save the show. Tickets $35 general admission, $33 seniors and students, $17 children ages 6 to 12. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2:30 p.m. Sunday, then 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 2:30 p.m. Sunday through Oct. 3. A FEW GOOD MEN. Playmakers

Theater, 19106 Playmakers Road (off Lee Road), Covington, (985) 893-1671; www.playmakersinc. com — Aaron Sorkin’s play follows the trial of two Marines for complicity in the death of a soldier. Tickets $15 general admission, $10 students. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday.

HAIRSPRAY. Le Petit Théâtre du

Vieux Carré, 616 St. Peter St., 5222081; www.lepetittheatre.com — A plump teen gets her dream of dancing on a popular 1962 TV show and tries to use her newfound stardom to racially integrate the program. Tickets

start at $31. 8 p.m. ThursdaySaturday, 2 p.m. Sunday through Oct. 10.

BuRlesque & CaBaReT

review

LET FREEDOM SWING! National

World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — The musical highlights wartime-era big band and swing music. Visit www.stagedoorcanteen.org for details. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 1 p.m. Sunday. THE MADWOMAN OF CHAILLOT.

AllWays Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www.marignytheatre.org — Cripple Creek Theatre Company presents Jean Giraudoux’s comedy with live music by Ratty Scurvics. Tickets $10. 8 p.m. Friday-Sunday.

PETITE ROUGE: A CAJUN RED RIDING HOOD. Teatro Wego, 177

Sala Ave., Westwego, 885-2000; www.jpas.org — The musical is the story of Little Red Riding Hood set in the Louisiana swamps and bayous. Tickets $25 general admission, $20 students and seniors, $15 children 12 and under. 7:30 p.m. Friday, 2 p.m. Saturday-Sunday through Oct. 3. REASONS TO BE PRETTY. Ac-

tor’s Theatre of New Orleans, WTIX-FM Building, second floor, 4539 N. I-10 Service Road, Metairie, 456-4111 — A man and his friends confront the value of physical beauty when his offhand comments about his girlfriend’s lackluster looks get back to her. Tickets $20 general admission, $18 students and seniors. 7:30 p.m. ThursdaySaturday.

SLAM. Le Chat Noir, 715 St.

Charles Ave., 581-5812; www. cabaretlechatnoir.com — Poets and actors compete in the open mic monologue and poetry slam. Tickets $10. 7:30 p.m. Wednesday.

THE UNACQUAINTED. Ashé Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — Pamela Davis-Noland’s play is a modern day retelling of the story of Jesus Christ. 8 p.m. FridaySaturday, 5 p.m. Sunday. Tickets $25 general admission, $20 in advance, $15 students. WONDER OF THE WORLD.

Delgado Community College, Isaac Delgado Hall, Drama Hall, third floor, 616-6066; www.dcc. edu — In David Lindsay-Abaire’s play, a woman flees to Niagra Falls after discovering her husband’s sexual fetish involving Barbie doll heads. Tickets $10 general admission, $8 Delgado students, faculty and staff. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturay, 7 p.m. Sunday through Oct. 3. ZOMBIE TOWN: A DOCUMENTARY PLAY. Le Chat Noir, 715 St.

Charles Ave., 581-5812; www. cabaretlechatnoir.com — The mockumentary follows a San Francisco theater troupe that travels to the site of a zombie attack to interview survivors. Tickets $10. 11 p.m. Saturday.

dr. Feelgood As the title of In The Next Room (or the Vibrator Play) suggests, playwright Sarah Ruhl is not the least bit shy about the raciness of the subject. Director Aimée Hayes teases out a flurry of entertainingly awkward moments as well, but the work is a smart exploration of intimacy, and rousing performances by the entire cast make it an exciting opening to Southern Rep’s season. A funny reference to a barbaric demonstration — Thomas Edison’s electrocution of an elephant at Coney Island on Jan. 4, 1903 — offers the only clue to exactly when the play is set. Dr. Givings (Shad Willingham) is both a physician and an inventor, having created an electronic vibrating device to treat women for hysteria. In the medical office in his home, he and his nurse assistant Annie (Morrey McElroy) bring patients to a state of “paroxysm,” helping them relieve stress and release “juices” bottled up in their lower abdomens. He is helping usher in a modern age of technology, innovation and self-discovery. The other room on the split stage is the Givings’ living room, where Ms. Givings (Katherine McClain) chats with the various patients seeking relief, including an artist (Clint Johnson) who also seems to be suffering from hysteria. The doctor otherwise keeps his practice separate from his marriage. He wouldn’t think of crossing the ethical line of treating his own wife, but he views her in clinical terms anyway. They have a baby, and he doesn’t believe his wife’s milk is sufficient, so they hire a wet nurse to care for the infant. What most of the people in the play actually suffer from is the suffocating mores of the Victorian-era. It’s hard to imagine how people came to be so estranged from their own bodies and desires, and the play considers some alternatives to the constraints of traditional marriage. Mr. Daldry (Jason Kirkpatrick) brings his wife Sabrina (Lucy Faust) for treatment, afraid she’ll never bear him children. The painter’s complications include being bothered by bright light so much he could lose the ability to pursue his creative passions. And Dr. Givings seems incapable of diagnosing let alone applying his scientific mind to the emotional gap between himself and his wife. The naïvete about what Givings’ therapy actually does versus the patients’ desire for fulfilling relationships is pushed to the point of high farce. The mechanics of both repression and release are smart and funny. Ruhl’s play is as compassionate as it is cleverly written. It gets punny at times, but never wincingly bad. By the time the wet nurse (Kesha Bullard) unloads some rage and grief, it’s both a stunning moment and a bit overdue. The play’s climax, however, seems a bit rushed, though it manages both to surprise and satisfy. Among the many fine performances are Johnson’s expressive artist, Bullard in her moments of candor, Willingham for his assured and pompous Dr. Givings, Faust for the awakening Sabrina, and McClain for her excitable character. — Will Coviello

THRU SEPT

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in the next Room (or the Vibrator Play) 8 p.m. Thu.-Sat.; 3 p.m. Sun. Southern Rep, The Shops at Canal Place, third floor, 365 Canal St., 522-6545; www.southernrep.com Tickets $29-$35

BURLESQUE BALLROOM. Irvin

Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse, 300 Bourbon St., 553-2270; www. sonesta.com — Trixie Minx stars in the weekly burlesque show featuring the music of Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown. Call 553-2331 for details. 11:50 p.m. Friday.

DOWN THE HATCH: A CABARET IN TWO COCKTAILS. Le Chat

Noir, 715 St. Charles Ave., 5815812; www.cabaretlechatnoir. com — Bob Edes Jr., Elizabeth Pearce and Jim Walpole tell the story of New Orleans through its signature cocktails. Tickets $20 (includes cocktail tastings). 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 6 p.m. Sunday. THE MIDNIGHT REVUE. Starlight

by the Park, 834 N. Rampart St., 561-8939; www.starlightbythepark.com — Marcy Marcell directs a weekly female-impersonation jazz cabaret. Call for ticket information. Midnight Friday.

RICKY GRAHAM’S 2010 RENEW REVUE. Le Chat Noir, 715 St.

Charles Ave., 581-5812; www. cabaretlechatnoir.com — The cabaret show celebrates life in New Orleans. Tickets $32 (includes $5 drink credit). 8 p.m. Monday.

audiTions BARBERSHOP HARMONY SOCIETY. Christ the King Lutheran

Church, 1001 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 469-4740; www.ctknola.org — The Greater New Orleans Chapter holds new member auditions for its Mardi Gras Chorus. Call 363-9001 or visit www.mardigraschorus.org for details. 7:15 p.m. Tuesday. CRESCENT CITY SOUND CHORUS.

Delgado Community College, City Park campus, Orleans Avenue, between City Park Avenue and Navarre Street, 671-5000; www.dcc.edu — The women’s chorus holds weekly auditions for new members. Call 4530858 or visit www.crescentcitysound.com for details. 7 p.m. Monday.

Comedy A.S.S.TRONOTS. La Nuit Comedy

Theater, 5039 Freret St., 6444300; www.nolacomedy.com — Four androids improvise a space voyage based on audience suggestions. Tickets $6. 8:30 p.m. Thursdays.

BASED ON REAL LIFE. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — The weekly long-form improv comedy show features some guys, a girl and someone named John Stewart. Tickets $6. 8:30 p.m. Saturday. BROWN! IMPROV COMEDY.

Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle

Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net — The comedy troupe stars Johnathan Christiansen, Gant Laborde, Ken Lafrance, Bob Murrell and Kelli Rosher. 10 p.m. Saturday. COMEDY CATASTROPHE. Lost

Love Lounge, 2529 Dauphine St., 400-6145 — The bar hosts a free stand-up comedy show. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

COMEDY GUMBEAUX. Howlin’ Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.howlinwolf.com — Local comedians perform, and amateurs take the open-mic. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Thursday. DYKES OF HAZARD. Rubyfruit Jungle, 1135 Decatur St., 571-1863; www.rubyfruit-jungle.com — Kristen Becker hosts a show with live music, sketch comedy, burlesque and more. Admission $5. 9 p.m. Friday. GOD’S BEEN DRINKING. La Nuit

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — Actors improvise a comedy based on audience suggestions. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Friday.

GROUND ZERO COMEDY. The Maison, 508 Frenchmen St., 3097137 — The show features local stand-up comedians. Sign-up is 7:30 p.m. Show is 8 p.m. IVAN’S OPEN MIC NIGHT. Rusty Nail, 1100 Constance St., 5255515 — The Rusty Nail hosts a weekly open-mic comedy and music night. 9 p.m. Tuesday. LAUGH OUT LOUD. Tarantula Arms, 209 Decatur St., 525-5525 — Simple Play presents a weekly comedy show. 10 p.m. Thursday. NATIONAL COMEDY COMPANY.

Yo Mama’s Bar & Grill, 727 St. Peter St., 522-1125 — The interactive improv show features B97 radio personality Stevie G and others. Call 523-7469 or visit www.nationalcomedycompany.com for details. 10 p.m. Saturdays. ROUNDHOUSE. La Nuit Comedy

Theater, 5039 Freret St., 6444300; www.nolacomedy.com — Comedians perform a barefoot improvisation show. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Fridays.

STAND UP NOLA PRESENTS JAYSON CROSS. Boomtown

Casino, Boomers Saloon, 4132 Peters Road, Harvey, 366-7711; www.boomtownneworleans. com — The stand-up comedian performs. Free admission. 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. Wednesday. STUPID TIME MACHINE. The Factory, 8314 Oak St — The improv group performs a weekly comedy show. Tickets $1-$6. 8:30 p.m. Tuesday. THINK YOU’RE FUNNY? Carrollton Station, 8140 Willow St., 8659190; www.carrolltonstation. com — All comics are welcome at the open-mic. Sign-up is 8:30 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Wednesday. For complete listings, visit www. bestofneworleans.com.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

Tulane University, McAlister Auditorium, 529-3000; www. tulane.edu — A traditional Chinese acrobatic troupe performs to live music from a folk orchestra. Tickets $30-$50. 8 p.m. Friday, 4 p.m. Saturday.

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LISTINGS

BE THERE DO THAT

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

FAMILY Tuesday 21 KINDER GARDEN: BACK TO SCHOOL IN THE GARDEN .

Longue Vue House and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue. com — Children and accompanying adults explore the world of insects through ageappropriate activities. Tickets $12 general admission, $10 members. Call 488-5488 ext. 333 or email lvaughn@longuevue.com for details. 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. START WITH ART. Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www. ogdenmuseum.org — Parents and children 18 months to 5 years old experience music and art in a museum setting to nurture rhythm, movement and self-expression. Call 539-9608, or email kbarron@ ogdenmuseum.org for details. Tickets $120 general admission, $100 members, $15 dropin fee. 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.

EVENTS

spotlight Faculty and Fiction

The proliferation of university writing programs maintains a steady place for authors of fiction on campus. For students, that may also offer another link between their surroundings and the pages they study. Judy Kahn describes that relationship as a source of inspiration for the new collection of stories she co-edited, The Best of LSU Fiction. LSU has been home in one way or another (faculty, student, etc.) to a wide array of popular writers, from the literary giants Robert Penn Warren (All the King’s Men) and Walker Percy (The Moviegoer) to short story writers Peter Taylor and Jean Stafford to Rebecca Weils (Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood) and Andrei Codrescu. It also includes young and emerging writers who teach at the school. There are entries for more than 20 writers with brief bios on their relationship to the university and short works. The reading and signing at Garden District Book Shop features contributors Allen Wier and Moira Crone and editors Kahn and Nolde Alexius. — Will Coviello

SEPT

25

TODDLER TIME . Louisiana

Thursday 23 ART ACTIVITIES DURING AFTER HOURS. Ogden Museum of

Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — The Ogden offers art activities for kids during the weekly After Hours concerts. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Saturday 25 BREAKFAST WITH THE OTTERS.

Audubon Aquarium of the Americas, 1 Canal St., (800) 774-7394; www.auduboninstitute.org — Children and their families have breakfast, make otter crafts and hear from Audubon experts about the aquarium’s otters. Pre-registration is required. Tickets $32 general admission, $22 members. 8 a.m to 10 a.m.

MOTHER GOOSE ON THE LOOSE . Children’s Castle, 501

Williams Blvd., Kenner, 4687231 — The Port-A-Puppet players introduce the audience to a cast of storybook characters. Admission $5. 11:30 a.m.

PARTY 4 PEDS. Ochsner Pediatric Facility, 1215 Jefferson Hwy. — The event targeted at combatting child obesity features football and cheerleading clinics, rock wall climbing, craft stations, obstacle courses and inflatables, entertainment and healthy food options. Call 842-7113 or visit www.ochsner.org/p4p for details. Admission starts at $25. 1 p.m. patron party, 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. general admission.

EVENTS Tuesday 21 CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Broadway Street

Market, 200 Broadway St., 861-5898; www.marketumbrella.org — The weekly market features fresh produce, kettle corn, Green Plate specials and flowers. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. DEALING WITH LOSS. West

Jefferson Behavioral Medicine Center, 229 Bellemeade Blvd., Gretna, 391-2440 — The center offers a weekly support group. Call Doreen Fowler for details. 6 p.m. DEPRESSION AND BIPOLAR SUPPORT ALLIANCE . Tulane-

Lakeside Hospital, 4700 South I-10 Service Road West, Metairie — The peer

support group meets the first and third Tuesdays of every month. Visit www. dbsaneworleans.org for details. 7:30 p.m. DIVORCE AND BEYOND.

Counseling Solutions of Catholic Charities, 921 Aris Ave., Metairie, 835-5007 — A licensed clinical social worker helps group participants going through divorce. Call 835-5007 for details. ROAD HOME ASSISTANCE . Community Center of St. Bernard, 1107 LeBeau St., Arabi, 281-2512 — Representatives are available at the center to assist homeowners with questions and concerns. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday. TOBACCO CESSATION CLASSES.

St. Tammany Parish Hospital Outpatient Pavilion, 1202 South Tyler Street — The eight-week program provides the tools necessary to becoming tobacco free. Pre-registration is required. Call (985) 898-4581 or email ccorizzo@stph.org for details. 11:30 a.m. Tuesday.

Wednesday 22 COVINGTON FARMERS MARKET. Covington City

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Children’s Museum, 420 Julia St., 523-1357; www.lcm. org — The museum hosts special Tuesday and Thursday activities for children ages 3-under and their parents or caregivers. Admission $7.50, free for members. 10 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

The Best of LSU Fiction 1 p.m.-3 p.m. Saturday Garden District Book Shop, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266; www.gardendistrictbookshop.com

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LISTINGS

BE THERE DO THAT

PAGE 59

The market offers fresh local goods every week. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. DECORATIVE ARTS & DESIGN SERIES: FURNISHING THE OUTDOOR ROOM . Longue

Vue House and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue.com — Design experts discuss how to furnish and accessorize outdoor spaces. Call 4885488 ext. 320 or email jgick@ longuevue.com for details. Free admission. 10 a.m to noon.

FRENCH MARKET FARMERS MARKET. French Market,

French Market Place, between Decatur and N. Peters streets, 522-2621; www.frenchmarket. org — The weekly market offers seasonal produce, seafood, prepared foods, smoothies and more. 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. GET TO KNOW GOD. Lost & Found Center, 901 Independence St., 344-1234; www.lostandfoundcenter. org — The group meets every week to discuss Bible scripture. 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP. East

Jefferson General Hospital, 4200 Houma Blvd., Metairie, 454-4000; www.ejgh.org — The American Cancer Society sponsors a group for those who have experienced the death of a loved one. Call 4565000 for details. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

INFANCY TO INDEPENDENCE .

MODEL GREEN HOUSE . 409

Andry St., between Douglass Street and the levee; www. globalgreen.org/neworleans — Global Green provides tours of its model green house, which uses renewable energy from solar panels and other sources. Call 525-2121 or visit the website for details. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday and Friday, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday.

SAVE OUR CEMETERIES CEMETERY TOURS. The group

conducts tours of New Orleans cemeteries. Call 5253377 for details.

TALENT SHOWCASE . Le Roux,

1700 Louisiana Ave. — Masse Media Consulting, KMP and Men of Business host a weekly “You’ve Got Talent” showcase open to all poets, singers, dancers and others. Call 899-4512 for details. General admission $10, performers $5. 9 p.m. to midnight.

TASTINGS AT THE TRACK: OLD WORLD WINES. Fair Grounds

Race Course & Slots, 1751 Gentilly Blvd., 943-1415; www. fairgroundsracecourse.com — The wine-tasting event features more than 25 choices from a variety of producers. Admission $25. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. WEDNESDAY NIGHTS AT JW MARRIOTT. JW Marriott New

Orleans, 614 Canal St., Suite 4, 525-6500; www.marriott. com — The hotel showcases local music and art with spirit tastings and hors d’oeuvres. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

WESTWEGO FARMERS & FISHERIES MARKET. 484 Sala

Ave., Sala Avenue and Fourth Street, Westwego — The market offers organic produce, baked goods, jewelry, art and more, with live music and pony rides. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

WORLD’S LARGEST KING CAKE .

Louisiana Superdome, 1500 Poydras St., 587-3663; www. superdome.com — Haydel’s Bakery and the New Orleans Saints team up to break the Guinness World Record for largest king cake to benefit Susan G. Komen for the Cure. The event also features music, prize giveaways and a chance to sample the cake. Noon to 3 p.m.

Thursday 23 ALVAR CHESS. Alvar Library,

913 Alvar St., 596-2667 — Library guests can play chess with expert player Bernard Parun Jr. 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

BELLY DANCING 101 FOR CANCER SURVIVORS OPEN HOUSE . St. Tammany Parish

Hospital Outpatient Pavilion, 1202 South Tyler Street — The hospital host an information session for an upcoming belly dancing class emphasizing gentle movement and appreciation for one’s body. 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. CHANGES. Hey! Cafe, 4332

Magazine St., 891-8682; www. heycafe.biz — The weekly meetings teach focusing, a method of directing attention outside one’s body to effect change. Call 232-9787 for details. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

EATVENTFUL . Ralph’s on the Park, 900 City Park Ave., 4881000; www.ralphsonthepark. com — The event is an opportunity to network and socialize while enjoying food and drink specials. Visit www. eatventful.com for details. Admission $5 (includes gift bag). 6 p.m. FRESH MARKET. Circle Food

Store, 1522 St. Bernard Ave. — The Downtown Neighborhood Market Consortium market features fresh produce, dairy, seafood, baked goods and more. EBT and WIC accepted. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

GIRL TALK . Ochsner Medical

Center Kenner, 180 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner — The topic of the monthly series on women’s health issues is heart health. Call 464-8506 for details. 6 p.m. to 7 p.m.

IRON RAIL LADIES’ NIGHT.

The Iron Rail, 511 Marigny St., 948-0963; www.ironrail.org — Iron Rail offers a weekly creative space for women. Email ladiesnight.ironrail@ gmail.com for details. 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. KREWE OF CHEWBACCHUS MEET & GREET SOCIAL . 3

Ring Circus’ The Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 5692700; www.3rcp.com — The Carnival krewe of Star Wars enthusiasts provides an opportunity to join at the event also featuring live music. Free admission. 6 p.m.

NEW ORLEANS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE LUNCHEON .

Marriott Hotel, 555 Canal St., 581-1000; www.ices.org — The quarterly luncheon series features police superintendent Ronal Serpas, who will speak about safety and how it relates to new business and employment opportunities. Call 799-4260 or email sphoenix@neworleanschamber.org for details. Tickets $50 general admission, $40 Chamber members. 11 a.m.

PRELUDE LAUNCH PARTY. Davenport Lounge, RitzCarlton, 921 Canal St., 5241331; www.ritzcarlton.com — The Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra’s new organization that allows young professionals to join for a discounted price hosts a party with live music from LPO musicians and Jeremy Davenport. Visit www. lpomusic.com/prelude for details. 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. RENOVATOR’S HAPPY HOUR .

Mid-City, 501 S Rendon St., www.prcno.org — The event features a tour of Mid-City homes in various stages of renovation. Call 581-7032 or prc@prcno.org for details. Tickets $7 general admission, $5 Preservation Resource Center members. 6 p.m.

SISTAHS MAKING A CHANGE . Ashé Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — The group offers lessons in African dance and more, along with nutrition, health and wellness seminars. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday and Monday.

Friday 24 ACTION AGAINST ADDICTION: HEALTH THROUGH UNDERSTANDING . Celebration

Church, 2001 Airline Drive, Metairie; www.celebrationchurch.org — Experts in the field of addiction and recovery lead the educational forum. Email lynn.weigel@ arrno.org for details. 7:45 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. PAGE 63

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EVENTS

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LISTINGS

BE THERE DO THAT

PAGE 61 GOLDEN TASSEL GALA .

Pontchartrain Center, 4545 Williams Blvd., Kenner, 465-9985; www.pontchartraincenter.com — The gala benefiting Jefferson Dollars for Scholars features auctions, food, entertainment by Vince Vance and the Valiants and a ballroom dancing exhibition. Call 831-1565 or visit www.jeffersondollarsforscholars.org for details. Admission starts at $75. 6:30 p.m. patron party, 7:30 p.m. gala.

LOVE IN THE GARDEN . Sydney

and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden, New Orleans Museum of Art, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, City Park, 6584100; www.noma.org — The event celebrates local artists with live music, drinks and food from local restaurants. Visit www.noma.org/lovetickets.html or call 658-4121 for details. Tickets $100, $85 members for patron party; $60, $50 members general admission. 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. patron party, 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. general admission.

REVERSE SUPPLIER DIVERSITY EXPO. Audubon Tea Room,

6500 Magazine St. — The event is an opportunity for minority and women-owned businesses to learn about procurement practices and contracting opportunities at Audubon Nature Institute. Call 212-5225 or email challiwill@ auuduboninstitute.org for details. Admission $10. 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. STORMIN’ OF THE SAZERAC .

THINK PINK . The Chicory, 610

S. Peters St. — The benefit celebrates the inaugural season of Girls on the Run New Orleans, a nonprofit youth development program, with food, drinks and live music by Gal Holiday and the Honky Tonk Revue. Call 908-1904 for details. Admission $50 (includes open bar and food). 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

TRANSPLANT RESOURCE CENTER GOLF TOURNAMENT.

Lakewood Golf Club, 4801 Gen. DeGaulle Drive, 373-5926 — The tournament benefits the center, which helps to ease the financial burden of transplantation. Call 988-2686 or email info@transplantresourcecenter.org for details. Admission starts at $125. 12:30 p.m. UNDERSTANDING THE EFFECTS OF HURRICANE KATRINA ON THE MENTAL HEALTH COMMUNITY. University of

New Orleans (Lindy C. Boggs

International Conference Center), 2045 Lakeshore Drive — The seminar discusses the effect of Hurricane Katrina and the BP oil disaster on the city’s mental health clinicians. Visit www.farfundprojectnola.com for details. Free admission. Noon to 5 p.m. WHERE Y’HAT. Dutch Alley, Near French Market, on North Peters Street — The party and fashion show features raffles and giveaways, craft making, live music and a hat contest. Call 522-2621 ext. 205 for details. 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Saturday 25 ARTS MARKET OF NEW ORLEANS. Palmer Park, South

Claiborne and Carrollton avenues, 523-1465; www. artscouncilofneworleans.org — The Arts Council of New Orleans presents the monthly market featuring art and live music. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. AWESOME LADIES OF DISTINCTION . The program

that mentors girls ages 2 to 17 through health and fitness education holds try-outs and registration. Admission $5. Call 348-3992 or email awesomeladies@aol.com for details. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

BIRD SEARCH . FairviewRiverside State Park, 119 Fairview Drive, Madisonville — The site ranger leads a walk in search of the marsh birds, songbirds, and raptors that frequent the park. 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. CEMETERY CLEAN-UP. Save Our

Cemeteries and Hands On New Orleans lead clean-ups at various cemeteries. Call 5253377 or visit www.handsonneworleans.org for details. 9 a.m. to noon.

CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Magazine Street

Market, Magazine and Girod streets, 861-5898; www. marketumbrella.org — The weekly market features fresh produce, flowers and food. 8 a.m. to noon. DAUGHTERS OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE PUB NIGHT. Palm

Court Jazz Cafe, 1204 Decatur St., 525-0200; www. palmcourtcafe.com — The philanthropic organization’s fundraiser features live music, British food and drink, an auction and games. Preregistration is required. Call 367-4116 or visit www.dbeinla. org for details. Admission $55. 6:30 p.m.

EAGLE WATCH . Fontainebleau

State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — A park ranger leads a viewing of the park’s eagle nest. 3 p.m.

ERACE NEW ORLEANS MEETING . J. Singleton School,

1924 Philip St., 581-2388 — ERACE meets for its weekly discussion group. Call 8661163 for details. 10 a.m. to

11:30 a.m. FONTAINEBLEAU HISTORY TOUR . Fontainebleau State

Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — The session discusses the history of the park, as well as the life of Bernard de Marigny and his influence on Louisiana’s history. 11 a.m.

GERMAN COAST FARMERS MARKET. Ormond Plantation,

13786 River Road, Destrehan — The market features a wide range of fresh vegetables, fruits, flowers and other items. Visit www.germancoastfarmersmarket.org for details. 8 a.m. to noon. GREAT WAKE UP RACE . Abita Springs Trailhead Pavilion, 22049 Main St., Mandeville — The 1-mile and 5K run/ walks benefit the Southeast Louisiana Hospital in Mandeville. Call (985) 6266455 or visit www.selh.org for details. Admission $15 adults day of race, $12 children; $12 adults in advance, $10 children. 8 a.m. GRETNA FARMERS MARKET.

Gretna Farmers Market, Huey P. Long Avenue, between Third and Fourth streets, Gretna, 362-8661 — The weekly rain-or-shine market features more than 30 vendors offering a wide range of fruits, vegetables, meats and flowers. Free admission. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

G.W. FINS DEMONSTRATION.

Southern Food & Beverage Museum, Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www. southernfood.org — Chef Tenney Flynn prepares four different types of gulf fish four different ways, using only six ingredients. Free with museum admission. 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.

HOMEBUYER TRAINING CLASSES. Lower 9th Ward

NENA, 1120 Lamanche St., 3736483; www.9thwardnena. org — The weekly class provides assistance to New Orleans-area residents interested in purchasing a home. Pre-registration required. Call 373-6483 or email info@9thwardnena.org for details. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. MARVELS OF THE MARSH . Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Participants examine the unique brackish marsh and collect fish and other marine life. 3 p.m. MEET THE CURATORS. National

World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — Guests can meet the museum staff behind designing and creating the exhibit Loyal Forces: The Animals of WWII. Free admission. Noon to 1 p.m.

NATURE: A CLOSER LOOK .

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

Sazerac Bar, The Roosevelt New Orleans, 123 Baronne St., 648-1200; www.therooseveltneworleans.com — The event commemorates the 61st anniversary of women being admitted to the bar with a 1940s costume contest, hat modeling and a special ladiesonly lunch. Call 648-5486 for details. Noon.

EVENTS

Fontainebleau State Park,

63

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LISTINGS

67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers lead a weekly nature hike. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. PET ADOPTIONS. Clearview

Shopping Center, 4436 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 482-1890 — LA/SPCA counselors and volunteers facilitate pet adoptions. Call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org for details. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

PILATES IN THE GARDEN . Besthoff

Sculpture Garden, City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 488-2631; www.noma.org — The East Jefferson Wellness Center hosts a pilates session. Admission $5, free for NOMA and Wellness Center members. 8 a.m. to 9 a.m.

RENAISSANCE MARKETPLACE OF EASTERN NEW ORLEANS.

NO CHICKEN DANCES NO LEIDERHOSEN Just the best & freshest German beeryou can buy, unless you travel to Germany Rare, small brewery German Lagers Unpasturized German Lagers that are only served at the Pub.

6:30pm Every Friday We tap a Anstich keg

(Cask Lager from tiny little farmhouse breweries)

Must be 21 to enter. The beer bar on the balcony opens at 6pm & all NFL games.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

STONE, BROOKLYN EXCLUSIVES, HARPOON EXCLUSIVES, NOLA, DIEU DE CIEL, NORTHCOAST

64

The Avenue Pub 1732 St. Charles Ave.

MI

Renaissance Marketplace, 5700 Read Blvd. — The market offers cuisine from area restaurants, shopping, arts and crafts, children’s activities and more. 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. REROOTED. Blackstar, 3211 Gen.

Mayer Ave. — The traveling art and music event features artwork displays, an art and jewelry trunk show and live music. Email sylvesiphne@gmail.com for details. Admission $5. 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. SMITHSONIAN MUSEUM DAY. Local

museums open free of charge in the spirit of the free-admission policy of the Smithsonian Institution’s Washington, D.C. museums. Visit www.smithsonianmag.com/museumday for participating museums.

STAIR TUTOR TRAINING . Rayne

Memorial United Methodist Church, 3900 St. Charles Ave., 899-3431 — The children’s literacy program trains tutors for the fall semester. Call 899-0820, email elizabeth@scapc.org or visit www. stairnola.org for details. 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

UPPER NINTH WARD MARKET. Frederick Douglass Senior High School, 3820 St. Claude Ave. — The weekly Upper Ninth Ward Farmers Market offers fresh local produce, seafood, bread, cheese and plants. Sponsored by the Downtown Neighborhood Market Consortium. Call 482-5722 or email ggladney@ therenaissanceproject.la for details. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

OR

YAKONLI DER ON NE OLA @ .CO M

DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS

starting from $5.50

LUNCH:sun-fri 11am-2:30pm DINNER: mon-thurs 5pm-10pm fri 5pm-10:30pm SATURDAY 3:30pm-10:30pm SUNDAY 12 noon-10:30pm 1403 st. charles ave. new orleans 504.410.9997 www.japanesebistro.com security guard on duty

WALK TO DEFEAT ALS. Zephyr Field, 6000 Airline Drive, Metairie, 734-5155; www.zephyrsbaseball. com — The walk benefits the ALS Association’s efforts in the New Orleans area. Visit www.walktodefeatals.org for details. 9 a.m. WYES ST. CHARLES MANSIONS, MONUMENTS AND MEMORIES STREETCAR TOUR. Latter Memorial

Library, 5120 St. Charles Ave., 5962625; www.nutrias.org — The part streetcar, part walking tour features access to houses, businesses, churches, schools and synagogues through Uptown and the Garden District. Call 486-5511 or visit wyes. org for details. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Sunday 26 DIMENSIONS OF LIFE DIALOGUE .

New Orleans Lyceum, 618 City Park Ave., 460-9049; www.lyceumproject.com — The nonreligious, holistic discussion group focuses on

BE THERE DO THAT human behavior with the goal of finding fulfillment and enlightenment. Call 368-9770 for details. Free. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. DRINK ’N’ DRAW. Circle Bar, 1032 St. Charles Ave., 588-2616 — The weekly event features a live model, happy hour drink specials and art instruction upon request. Call 2999455 for details. Admission $20. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. NEEDLE JUNKIES. 3 Ring Circus’ The

Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 5692700; www.3rcp.com — The knitting group meets every Sunday. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

PRIMITIVE WOODWORKING .

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 6773668 — Park rangers host a weekly demonstration of woodworking techniques. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Monday 27 CBT GROUP. Counseling Solutions

of Catholic Charities, 921 Aris Ave., Metairie, 835-5007 — A licensed clinical social worker facilitates a 12-week Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) group for depression. Call for details. DEEPWATER HORIZON BLOWOUT LECTURE SERIES. Tulane Law School,

Weinmann Hall, Room 110, TLS Moot Court Room, 6329 Freret St. — The law school’s lecture series about the technical, scientific and policy issues related to the BP oil disaster is open to students and the general public. Email fwootten@ tulane.edu for details. 4 p.m. to 5:15 p.m. MOUNT CARMEL ACADEMY GOLF CLASSIC . English Turn Country Club,

3201 Rue Parc Fontaine, 392-6590 — A dinner and awards ceremony follows the 21st annual event. Call 288-7626 ext. 126 or visit www. mcacubs.org for details. 11:30 a.m.

MOUSTAPHA BANGOURA . St. Mary’s Academy and the Sisters of the Holy Family, 6901 Chef Menteur Hwy., 245-0200 — The master dancer and choreographer presents special African dance and drum classes. Call 906-9497 or email nfungolasibo@msn.com for details. Admission $15 per class, $25 two classes, $10 per group of 10 or more. 6:30 p.m. Monday and 7 p.m. Sept. 28. TOASTMASTERS MEETING . Milton H. Latter Memorial Library, 5120 St. Charles Ave. — New Orleans Toastmasters Club hosts an open weekly meeting (excepting holidays) to hone the skills of speaking, listening and thinking. Call 251-8600 or visit www.notoast234. freetoasthost.org for details. 6 p.m. UNITED NONPROFITS OF GREATER NEW ORLEANS. Nonprofit Central,

1824 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 895-2361; www.nonprofit-central. org — Nonprofit Central hosts a weekly meeting for all leaders of nonprofit groups. 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS INTERNATIONAL SONGWRITING CONTEST. Open to amateurs and

professionals, the competition is

judged by music industry stars and awards more than $150,000 in cash and prizes. Visit www.songwritingcompetition.com for details. Submission deadline is Oct. 6. JOAN OF ARC STUDENT CONTEST.

The Krewe de Jeanne d’Arc invites French-speaking women ages 16 to 19 to apply to lead the krewe’s parade and represent the krewe in media opportunities and other events. Email stjoankrewe@yahoo. com or visit stjoankrewe.blogspot. com for details. Application deadline is Nov. 1.

LOUISIANA LEGISLATIVE WOMEN’S CAUCUS FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP. The founda-

tion awards $500 Educational Advancement Opportunity scholarships to young women in Louisiana. Visit www.llwc.louisiana.gov for details. Application deadline is Dec. 1.

LOUISIANA YEAR OF THE SONG 2010 SONG CONTEST. The contest

winner receives a two-day writing session with songwriter Jim McCormick. Visit www.nosongfest. com/song+contest for details. Application deadline is Oct. 15. NEW ORLEANS WRITING INSTITUTE .

The Arts Council of New Orleans hosts a fiction- and creative nonfiction-writing workshop taught by James Nolan. The workshop starts Wednesday. Call 522-5934 or email jnolan77@bellsouth.net for details. PROJECT HOMECOMING . The faith-

based nonprofit seeks homes still damaged (50 percent or more) by Hurricane Katrina to be rebuilt. Call 942-0444 ext. 244 for details.

JEAN REDMANN . Garden District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The author signs and discusses Water Mark. 11:30 a.m. Saturday. JEWELL PARKER RHODES. Octavia

Books, 513 Octavia St., 899-7323 — The author signs and reads from Ninth Ward. 4 p.m. Monday.

LOCAL WRITERS’ GROUP. Barnes &

Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 455-5135 — The weekly group discusses and critiques fellow members’ writing. All genres welcome. 7:30 p.m. Monday.

MAPLE LEAF READING SERIES. Maple Leaf Bar, 8316 Oak St., 866-9359; www.mapleleafbar.com — The weekly reading series presents featured writers followed by an open mic. Free admission. 3 p.m. Sunday. MID-CITY WRITERS GROUP. Prose

writers meet to read and critique original work. Email midcity.writers@gmail.com for details. Tuesday.

NATASHA TRETHEWEY. Octavia

Books, 513 Octavia St., 899-7323 — The author signs and reads from Beyond Katrina. 6 p.m. Wednesday.

OPEN MIC POETRY & SPOKEN WORD. Yellow Moon Bar, 800 France St., 944-0441; www.yellowmoonbar. com — Loren Murrell hosts a weekly poetry and spoken-word night with free food. Free admission. 8:30 p.m. Wednesday. OPEN MIC POETRY JAM . La Divina

WORDS

Cafe e Gelateria, 621 St. Peter St., 302-2692; www.ladivinagelateria. com — The cafe invites writers to read their work. All styles welcome. 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. Wednesday.

17 POETS! LITERARY SERIES. Gold

OUTLOUD! Rubyfruit Jungle, 1135

Mine Saloon, 705 Dauphine St., 568-0745; www.goldminesaloon. net — The 17 Poets! series hosts a weekly poetry reading. An open mic follows. Free admission. 8 p.m. Thursday.

ANDREI CODRESCU. Octavia Books,

513 Octavia St., 899-7323 — The author signs and reads from The Poetry Lesson. 6 p.m. Thursday. The author also appears at the Gold Mine Saloon (705 Dauphine St., 568-0745; www.goldminesaloon. net) 7 p.m. Saturday. “BEST OF LSU FICTION”. Garden

District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — Nolde Alexius and other contributors discuss and sign the book. 1 p.m. Saturday.

COOKBOOKS & COCKTAILS SERIES. Kitchen Witch Cook Books Shop, 631 Toulouse St., 528-8382 — The group meets weekly to discuss classic New Orleans cookbooks. 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Friday. DAVID ROWE . Verna Press Studio,

1120 Spain St. — The poet signs and reads from Unsolicited Poems. 7 p.m. Wednesday.

FAIR GRINDS POETRY EVENT. Fair

Grinds Coffeehouse, 3133 Ponce de Leon Ave., 913-9073; www. fairgrinds.com — Jenna Mae hosts poets and spoken word readers on the second, fourth and fifth Sunday of each month. 8 p.m.

Decatur St., 571-1863; www.rubyfruit-jungle.com — AR Productions presents a weekly spoken-word and music event. Admission $5. 7 p.m. Tuesday.

PASS IT ON . Red Star Gallery, 2513 Bayou Road — The gallery hosts a weekly spoken word and music event. Admission $5. 9 p.m. Saturday. POETRY MEETING . New Orleans Poetry Forum, 257 Bonnabel Blvd., Metairie, 835-8472 — The forum holds workshops every Wednesday. 8 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. SARAH K. INMAN. Garden District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The author signs and discusses The Least Resistance. 5:30 p.m. Thursday. SHERYL WUDUNN . Nunemaker

Auditorium, Monroe Hall, Loyola University New Orleans, 6363 St. Charles Ave.; www.loyno. edu — The author discusses Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide. 7 p.m. Thursday.

SPOKEN WORD. Ebony Square, 4215 Magazine St., 343-2406 — The center hosts a weekly spoken-word, music and open-mic event. Tickets $7 general admission, $5 students. 11 p.m. Friday.

For complete listings, visit www. bestofneworleans.com.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Email Ian McNulty at imcnulty@cox.net. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <CatCh Now Salú > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >The same team of chefs and restaurateurs behind the shortlived seafood restaurant Catch is back with a tapas-style < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < puttINg < < < < < < < <everythINg < < < < < < < < < <oN < < <the < < < table < < < < < < < < < < < < < <venture at the same address. salú (3226 Magazine St., 371-5958) takes its cues from a variety of Mediterranean and Latin American cuisines for a menu of small plates like scallops with couscous, skirt steak with watercress, ceviche with chips and a salad with stuffed medjool dates. Salú is part of the restaurant group that includes Byblos restaurants, Gumbo Shop and Camellia Grill.

am

B

war hawkS aS Early BirdS

the American sector (945 Magazine St., 528-1940; www.american-sector.com), chef John Besh’s homage to Americana, is busiest at lunchtime, thanks to traffic inside the National World War II Museum. But through the end of September there’s an early-bird offer intended to stretch that afternoon rush into dinner. On weekdays between 4 p.m. and 6:30 p.m., the American Sector serves a three-course menu for $23 with plenty of choices. Museum admission is not required.

five 5 IN

FiVe Renditions oF shRiMP ReMoulAde

ARnAud’s RestAuRAnt 813 BiEnvillE st., 523-5433 www.arnauds.com

The signature shrimp Arnaud sets the standard.

Velveeta Elvis

A locAl Author trIes hIs hANd At clAssIc sANdwIches. b y I A N m c N u lt y

T

ham and cheese creation also draped with Mornay. Landry’s “weenie panini” will be familiar to those who experienced the pepper weiner po-boy, a scrappy mess of wieners and chili that once was a fixture at Domilise’s. Eclipsing that exercise in excess is the Velvet Elvis, a special which belongs to the national trend of increasingly extreme burgers. The patty is cradled between two grilled cheese sandwiches, each filled with Velveeta and crumbled bacon. I tried the double (that’s two burgers, three sandwiches), which I could not even begin to eat in the conventional way. I toppled it, after which it looked like a basket of beef, toast and cheese. The kitchen also will assemble a triple (three burgers, four sandwiches), which sounds more like a way to satisfy a dare than an appetite. The short list of salads is straightforward, but the fries are standouts. Cut in house, fried once and then fried a second time to order, they’re spotted with parsley, garlic and salt, and they glisten with butter. “Kingfish” is a nickname for Huey P. Long, whose mug adorns this restaurant’s logo, but inevitably some patrons walk in expecting to find a seafood house. I wish there was more seafood, if only to see what this creative kitchen would do with fried shrimp or grilled tuna. As it stands now, there’s a soft-shell crab coated in ultra-crispy panko on ciabatta. It’s small compared to a po-boy, but it’s also only $8, which is the priciest item on the regular menu. In the land of the po-boy, Kingfish Grille has memorable sandwiches that cover the spectrum.

1413 UppErlinE st., 891-9822 www.upperline.com

Cornell Landy presents Kingfish Grille’s triple velvet Elvis burger.

The restaurant created the modern classic: shrimp remoulade over fried green tomatoes.

photo ChEryL GErbEr

MAhony’s Po-Boy shoP 3454 MagazinE st., 899-3374 www.mahonyspoboys.com

See above, and turn it into a po-boy with grilled shrimp.

MAndinA’s RestAuRAnt

3800 Canal st., 482-9179 www.mandinasrestaurant.com

WHAT

Kingfish Grille WHERE

The Creole classic goes casual; try spooning it onto the garlic bread.

500 Lafayette St., Gretna, 309-0680

Austin’s RestAuRAnt

WHEN

Fried eggplant and shrimp remoulade are stacked as a napoleon.

Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat.

5101 W. EsplanadE avE., MEtairiE, 888-5533 www.austinsno.com

HOW MUCH

Inexpensive

RESERVATIONS

Questions? Email winediva1@earthlink.net.

Not accepted

WHAT WORKS

Anything with pork, fantastic frites WHAT DOESN’T

Phone-in orders are difficult

CHECK PLEASE

Famous sandwiches treated to local creativity

2005 Paul Garaudet Monthelie

Burgundy, France / $28-$30 rEtail

The village of Monthelie is situated in the heart of Burgundy’s Cote de Beaune, nestled between Meursault, renowned for white wines, and Volnay, creator of stunning reds. Its wines are not nearly as well known as those of its famous neighbors, yet the Pinot Noirs of Monthelie are subtly elegant and much less expensive. This value-priced Paul Garaudet Burgundy is packed with cherry and strawberry overtones and offers a long finish. Open an hour or two before serving. Enjoy it with grilled meats, tuna, salmon, fowl or game. Buy it at: Swirl Wines, The Wine Seller and Bacchanal. drink it at: Bayona, Herbsaint, Dick & Jenny’s and Emeril’s Delmonico. — Brenda Maitland

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

he menu at Kingfish Grille reads like an honor roll of specialty sandwiches developed elsewhere, yet at each turn, the sandwich shop in Old Gretna finds ways to make them its own. The Cuban sandwich features the traditional ingredients (ham, roasted pork, pickles, mustard and Swiss) but adds the masterstroke of juices from the pork’s roasting pan and deploys the mystically light, crisp loaves from Dong Phuong Oriental Bakery, bread that seems to make anything stuffed inside it taste better. Caramelized onions and roasted red peppers enhance the Philly cheese steak in the same bread. And while the “Hu Dat,” the Kingfish riff on the banh mi, is not quite the equal of the genuine articles served at Vietnamese restaurants nearby, its filling of pulled pork soaked by more of that roasting-pan gravy gives it unique appeal. These handheld hybrids are the work of Cornell Landry, a New Orleans native who managed Bourbon Street nightclubs before a stint catering for film crews. In 2009, he penned the book Goodnight NOLA, a local takeoff on the children’s classic Goodnight Moon, and he used his royalties to help start Kingfish Grille last fall. Landry lives in Gretna, and he’s friendly with the owners of other casual restaurants there, so rather than compete with their renditions of traditional New Orleans dishes, he devised a menu unlike anywhere else in town. Landry turned to Louisville, Ky., for that city’s famous “hot brown,” an open-face sandwich made with bubbling-hot Mornay sauce over sliced turkey. From the French he borrowed the croque monsieur, a baked

uPPeRline RestAuRAnt

65

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

> > > > > consistency > > > > > > > > and > > >value >>>>>>>>>>>> Bringing you quality, < <since < < < <1971. <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<



You are what You eat >>>>>>>>>

>>>> <<< <<<<< >>>>>>>>> <<< >> <<

leans.com — China Orchid serves a wide array of dishes including soups, fried rice, egg foo young, lo mein and more. Empress chow mein, mango shrimp or chicken, and triple dragon with shrimp, chicken and beef are specialties. Delivery available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

< < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < CHINA ROSE — 3501 N. Arnoult Road., > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Out > > >2 >Eat > >is>an > >index > > >of> Gambit > > > > >contract > > > > >advertisers. > > > > > > >Unless > > > >noted, > > > >addresses > > > > > >are > >for > >New > > >Orleans. > > > > > > > > > Metairie, 887-3295 — China Rose of-

Now open 7 days a week in Mandeville LUNCH : Mon - Fri 11-2pm DiNNER: Mon -Thu 5-930pm Fri & Sat 5-10pm · Sun 1130a - 930p

Dollar signs represent the average cost of a dinner entree: $ — under $10; $$ — $11 to $20; $$$ — $21 or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax 483-3116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

600 N. Causeway, Mandeville 2100 N. Morrison, Hammond

985/626-4476

985/345-6789

spanish food PUERCO FRITO - $9.90 pork fajitas - $8.00 Ropa vieja - $7.75

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

PARKWAY

66

FOR

PO’BOYS! (504)

482-3047

AMERICAN CON— TEMPORARY 5 Fifty 5 — 555 Canal St., 553-5638;

www.555canal.com — New Orleans dishes and Americana favorites take an elegant turn in dishes such as the lobster mac and cheese, combining lobster meat, elbow macaroni and mascarpone, boursin and white cheddar cheeses. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

BAYONA — 430 Dauphine St., 525-4455;

www.bayona.com — House favorites on Chef Susan Spicer’s menu include sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce and the appetizer of grilled shrimp with black-bean cake and coriander sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

THE GREEN GODDESS — 307 Exchange Alley, 301-3347; www.greengoddessnola. com — Chef Chris DeBarr’s contemporary cooking combines classic techniques, exotic ingredients and culinary wit. At lunch, Big Cactus Chilaquiles feature poached eggs on homemade tortillas with salsa verde, queso fresca and nopalitos. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Thu.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

ONE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE — 8132

Hampson St., 301-9061; www.one-sl. com — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes like char-grilled oysters topped with Roquefort cheese and a red wine vinaigrette, seared scallops with roasted garlic and shiitake polenta cakes and a memorable cochon de lait. Reservations recommended. Lunch Thu.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

BAR & GRILL THE CLUBHOUSE BAR & GRILL — 4617

Sanford St., Metairie, 883-5905 — Clubhouse offers burgers and sandwiches. The black and blue burger is stuffed with blue cheese and blackened on the grill. Or try the blackened chicken Caesar wrap. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

DINO’S BAR & GRILL — 1128 Tchoupitoulas St., 558-0900 — Dino’s kitchen serves burgers, chicken tenders, salads and wraps. Happy hour is from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards and checks. $

JIGGERS — 1645 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metaire, 828-3555 — Enjoy daily specials like red and beans rice with a pork chop on Mondays or order burgers, salads and wraps from the regular menu. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

RENDON INN BAR & GRILL — 4501 Eve St., 826-5605 — Try appetizers such as spinach and artichoke dip, hot wings or fried pickles. Off the grill there are burgers, chicken sandwiches or cheese quesadillas. Other options include salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

THE RIVERSHACK TAVERN — 3449 River

Road, 834-4938; www.therivershacktavern.com — This bar and music spot offers a menu of burgers, sandwiches overflowing with deli meats and changing lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

ZACHARY’S BY THE LAKE — 7224

Pontchartrain Blvd., 872-9832; www. zacharysbythelake.com — Zachary’s serves seafood platters, po-boys, salads, barbecue shrimp and more. Jumbo Gulf shrimp with cane syrup are wrapped in bacon, fried crispy and served with pickled okra salad. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BARBECUE ABITA BAR-B-Q — 69399 Hwy. 59, Abita

Springs, (985) 892-0205 — Slow-cooked brisket and pork are specialty at this Northshore smokehouse. The half-slab rib plate contains six ribs served with a choice of two sides. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

WALKER’S BAR-B-QUE — 10828 Hayne

Blvd., 281-8227; www.cochondelaitpoboys.com — The makers of the Jazz Fest cochon de lait po-boy serve pork, ribs, chicken and more. The family feast includes a half-slab of ribs, half a chicken, half a pound of brisket, pork and sausage, two side orders, bread and sauce. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Saturday. Cash only. $

BREWPUB CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — 527 Decatur St., 522-0571; www.crescentcitybrewhouse.com — This French Quarter brewhouse serves baked oysters, salads and crabcakes stand alongside grilled strip steaks, crispy duck and tender brewhouse ribs. Beers change seasonally. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

CAFE

CAFE FRERET — 7329 Freret St., 861-

7890; www.cafefreret.com — The cafe serves breakfast itemes like the Freret Egg Sandwich with scrambled eggs, cheese and bacon or sausage served on toasted white or wheat bread or an English muffin.Signature sandwiches include the Chef’s Voodoo Burger, muffuletta and Cuban po-boy. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Fri.-Wed., dinner Mon.-Wed., Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ ELIZABETH’S RESTAURANT — 601 Gallier

St., 944-9272; www.elizabeths-restaurant.com — Signature praline bacon sweetens brunch at this Bywater spot. Dinner brings options like fish and scallop specials. Also enjoy homemade desserts. No reservations. Lunch Tue.Fri., dinner Tue.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

LAFITTE’S CAFE — 6325 Elysian Fields Ave., 284-7878; www.lafittescafe.com — Lafitte’s serves wraps with a wide selection of fillings, burgers and patty

melts, salads, sandwiches and baked potatoes. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

LAKEVIEW BREW COFFEE CAFE — 5606

Canal Blvd., 483-7001 — This casual cafe offers gourmet coffees and a wide range of pastries and desserts baked in house, plus a menu of specialty sandwiches and salads. Breakfast is available all day on weekends. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PARKVIEW CAFE AT CITY PARK — City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 483-9474 — Located in the old Casino Building, the cafe serves gourmet coffee, sandwiches, salads and ice cream till early evening. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $ RICCOBONO’S PANOLA STREET CAFE —

7801 Panola St., 314-1810 — Specialties include crabcakes Benedict — two crabcakes and poached eggs topped with hollandaise sauce and potatoes — and the Sausalito omelet with spinach, mushrooms, shallots and mozzarella. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily. Credit cards. $

THE RUBY SLIPPER CAFE — 139 N. Cortez St., 309-5531; www.therubyslippercafe. net — This casual cafe offers breakfast options such as two eggs with sausage or applewood-smoke bacon or barbecued shrimp and grits. Lunch options include burgers, sandwiches, salads and changing specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Tue.-Fri., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $

ST. JAMES CHEESE — 5004 Prytania St., 899-4737; www.stjamescheese.com — The cheese shop offers more than 100 varieties of cheese from around the world. A small menu includes creative sandwiches, salads and specials. The Radette cheese sandwich includes house-made pastrami and spicy pickles on rye. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

TED’S FROSTOP — 3100 Calhoun St., 8613615 — The signature Lot-o-Burger is as good as ever, or try the castle burgers. Fried seafood and plate lunches provide square meals, as do the sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

TERRAZU — 201 St. Charles Ave., 287-

0877 — Located in Place St. Charles, Terrazu serves coffee drinks and a menu of soups, salads and sandwiches. The Terrazu salad is topped with boiled shrimp, hearts of palm and avocado. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $

VINE & DINE — 141 Delaronde St., 361-

1402; www.vine-dine.com — The cafe serves cheese boards and charcuterie plates with pate and cured meats. There also is a menu of sandwiches, quesadillas, bruschettas, salads and dips. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

fers many Chinese seafood specialties. The Lomi Lomi combines jumbo shrimp, pineapple and water chestnuts wrapped in bacon, fries them golden brown and serves them on a bed of sautéed vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

FIVE HAPPINESS — 3511 S. Carrollton

Ave., 482-3935 — The large menu at Five Happiness offers a range of dishes from wonton soup to sizzling seafood combinations served on a hot plate to sizzling Go-Ba to lo mein dishes. Delivery and banquest facilities available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

JUNG’S GOLDEN DRAGON — 3009

Magazine St., 891-8280; www.jungsgoldendragon2.com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, Thai and Korean cuisine. Chinese specialties include Mandarin, Szechuan and Hunan dishes. Grand Marnier shrimp are lightly battered and served with Grand Marnier sauce, broccoli and pecans. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

THREE HAPPINESS — 1900 Lafayette St.,

Suite 4, Gretna, 368-1355; www.threehappiness.com — Three Happiness serves Chinese and Vietnames dishes and dim sum specials on weekends. Westlake duck features tender duck with snow peas, corn, straw mushrooms and napa cabbage. Vietnamese crepes are served with pork and shrimp. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TREY YUEN CUISINE OF CHINA — 600 N.

Causeway Approach., Mandeville, (985) 626-4476; 2100 N. Morrison Blvd., Hammond, (985) 345-6789; www.tryyuen. com — House specialties include fried soft-shell crab topped with Tong Cho sauce, and Cantonese-style stir-fried alligator and mushrooms in oyster sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

COFFEE/DESSERT ANTOINE’S ANNEX — 513 Royal St., 581-

4422; www.antoines.com — The Annex is a coffee shop serving pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. The Royal Street salad features baby spinach and mixed lettuces with carrots, red onion, red peppers, grapes, olives, walnuts and raspberry vinaigrette. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ BEN ’N JERRY’S — 3500 Veterans Me-

morial Blvd., Metairie, 887-5656 — Ben ’n Jerry’s offers rich ice creams in signature flavors, ice cream cakes, frozen drinks, fruit smoothies and sundaes. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SAL’S SNO-BALL STAND — 1823 Metai-

rie Road, Metairie, 666-1823 — Enjoy something cold and sweet from this 50-year-old business, which offers an assortment of flavored sno-balls, softserve ice cream, malts, banana splits or ice cream cones dipped in chocolate. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Cash only. $

CREOLE CHINESE CHINA ORCHID — 702 S. Carrollton Ave.,

865-1428;

wwww.chinaorchidnewor-

ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713 St. Louis

St., 581-4422; www.antoines.com — The city’s oldest restaurant offers a glimpse

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OUT2EAT of what 19th century French Creole dining might have been like, with a labyrinthine series of dining rooms. Signature dishes include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner MonSat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ AUSTIN’S RESTAURANT — 5101 W.

Esplanade Ave., Metairie, 888-5533; www.austinsno.com — Austin’s cooks hearty Creole and Italian dishes like stuffed soft-shell crab and veal Austin, which is crowned with crabmeat. No reservations. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

GUMBO SHOP — 640 St. Peter St., 525-1486; www.gumboshop.com — Gumbo and New Orleans classics such as crawfish etouffee dominate the menu. Their spicy flavors meld into a dish that represents the city’s best and redefines comfort food. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ LE CITRON BISTRO — 1539 Religious

St., 566-9051; www.le-citronbistro. com — Located in a historic building, the quaint bistro serves starters like chicken and andouille gumbo and fried frogs legs. Entrees include choices like fried chicken, Gulf fish and burgers. Reservations accepted. Dinner Wed.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

MR. ED’S CREOLE GRILLE— 5241 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 889-7992; www.mredsno.com — Mr. Ed’s offers seafood dishes and some Italian accents. Try shrimp beignets with sweet chili glaze or creamy blue crab dip. Eggplant Vincent is a fried eggplant cup filled with crawfish and shrimp and served with pasta. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

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MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000 N. Peters St., 524-4747 — This casual restaurant serves Creole favorites. The menu includes crawfish etouffee, boiled crawfish, red beans and rice and bread pudding for dessert. Outdoor seating is adjacent to Dutch Alley and the French Market. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

DELI KOSHER CAJUN NEW YORK DELI & GROCERY — 3519 Severn Ave.,

Metairie, 888-2010; www.koshercajun.com — This New York-style deli specializes in sandwiches, including corned beef and pastrami that come straight from the Bronx. No reservations. Lunch Sun.-Thu., dinner Mon.-Thu. Credit cards. $

MARTIN WINE CELLAR — 714 Elmeer Ave., Metairie , 896-7350; www. martinwine.com — Sandwiches piled high with cold cuts, salads, hot sandwiches, soups and lunch specials are available at the deli counter. The Cedric features chicken breast, spinach, Swiss, tomatoes and red onions on seven-grain bread. No reservations. Lunch daily. Credit cards. $

DINER DOT’S DINER — 2239 Willliams Blvd.,

Kenner, 441-5600; 4150 Jefferson Hwy., Jefferson, 833-9349; 6633 Airline Drive, Metairie, 734-0301; 10701 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 7389678; 12179 Hwy. 90, Luling, (985) 785-6836 — Burgers, eggs with bacon, grits and biscuits, fruit pies and daily specials are the pillars of Dot’s menu. Breakfast, lunch and dinner are served all day long. No reservations. Hours vary by location. Credit cards. $

STEVE’S DINER — 201 St. Charles Ave.,

522-8198 — Located in the Place St. Charles food court, Steve’s serves hot breakfasts until 10 a.m. Lunch features sandwiches, salads and hot plate lunches such as fried catfish and baked chicken Parmesan. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $

FRENCH MARTINIQUE BISTRO — 5908 Mag-

azine St., 891-8495; www.martiniquebistro.com — This French bistro has both a cozy dining room and a pretty courtyard. Try dishes such as Steen’s-cured duck breast with satsuma and ginger demi-glace and stone-ground goat cheese grits. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GOURMET TO GO BREAUX MART — 315 E. Judge Perez,

Chalmette, 262-0750; 605 Lapalco Blvd., Gretna, 433-0333; 2904 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-5565; 9647 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 737-8146; www.breauxmart.com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux” as well as weekday specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

INDIAN JULIE’S LITTLE INDIA KITCHEN AT SCHIRO’S — 2483 Royal St., 944-

6666; www.schiroscafe.com — The cafe offers homemade Indian dishes prepared with freshly ground herbs and spices. Selections include chicken, lamb or shrimp curry or vegetarian saag paneer. Schiro’s also serves New Orleans cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NIRVANA INDIAN CUISINE — 4308

Magazine St., 894-9797 — Serving mostly northern Indian cuisine, the restaurant’s extensive menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TAJ MAHAL INDIAN CUISINE — 923-

C Metairie Road, Metairie, 836-6859 — The traditional menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways, including curries and tandoori. Vegetarian options are available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

ITALIAN ANDREA’S NORTHERN ITALIAN SEAFOOD RESTAURANT — 3100 N.

19th St., Metairie, 834-8583; www. andreasrestaurant.com — Chefowner Andrea Apuzzo’s specialties of the house include Trota Bayou la Fourche — speckled trout served with lump crabmeat in a lemoncream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ BACCO — 310 Chartres St., 522-2426;

www.bacco.com — Bacco blends Italian and contemporary Creole cuisine. Chef Chris Montero artfully prepares homemade pastas and fresh seafood, including lobster and shrimp ravioli. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

CAFE DIBLASI — 1801 Stumpf Blvd.,

Gretna, 361-3106; www.cafediblasi. com — For casual Italian dining, head to Cafe DiBlasi for pan-fried

veal topped with lump crabmeat and lemon cream sauce or a traditional veal shank osso buco served with rich brown sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ RICCOBONO’S PEPPERMILL RESTAURANT — 3524 Severn Ave., Metairie,

455-2266 — This Italian-style eatery serves New Orleans favorites like stuffed crabs with jumbo lump crabmeat with spaghetti bordelaise and trout meuniere with brabant potatoes. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TONY MANDINA’S RESTAURANT — 1915 Pratt St., Gretna, 362-2010;

www.tonymandinas.com — Tony Mandina’s serves Italian and Creole cuisine. Dishes include pasta, veal parmigiana, veal Bordelasie and specialties like shrimp Mandina and battered eggplant topped with shrimp and crabmeat in cream sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

JAPANESE KYOTO — 4920 Prytania St., 891-

3644 — Kyoto’s sushi chefs prepare rolls, sashimi and salads. “Box” sushi is a favorite, with more than 25 rolls. Reservations recommended for parties of six or more. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

MIKIMOTO — 3301 S. Carrollton Ave., 488-1881; www.mikimotosushi. com — Sushi choices include new and old favorites, both raw and cooked. The South Carrollton roll includes tuna tataki, avocado and snow crab. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Delivery available. Credit cards. $$ MIYAKO JAPANESE SEAFOOD &

STEAKHOUSE — 1403 St. Charles Ave., 410-9997; www.japanesebistro.com — Miyako offers a full range of Japanese cuisine, with specialties from the sushi or hibachi menus, chicken, beef or seafood teriyaki, and tempura. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

ROCK-N-SAKE — 823 Fulton St., 5817253; www.rocknsake.com — Rockn-Sake serves traditional Japanese cuisine with some creative twists. There’s a wide selection of sushi, sashimi and rolls or spicy gyoza soup, pan-fried soba noodles with chicken or seafood and teriyaki dishes. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

LATIN AMERICAN LA MACARENA PUPSERIA & LATIN CAFE — 8120 Hampson St., 862-

5252 — Enjoy Latin home cooking in a quaint and festive cafe. Try the namesake Salvadoran pupusas, stuffed cornmeal disks, as well as a wide selection of tapas dishes and vegan options. Latin-style brunch is served on weekends. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Cash only. $$

LOUISIANA CON— TEMPORARY ATCHAFALAYA RESTAURANT —

901 Louisiana Ave., 891-9626; www.cafeatchafalaya.com — Atchafalaya serves creative contemporary Creole cooking. Shrimp and grits feature head-on Gulf shrimp in a smoked tomato

and andouille broth over creamy grits. There’s a Bloody Mary bar at brunch. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$ BOMBAY CLUB — 830 Conti St., 586-0972; www.thebombayclub. com — Mull the menu at this French Quarter hideaway while sipping a well made martini. The duck duet pairs confit leg with pepper-seared breast with black currant reduction. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, latenight Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

MILA — 817 Common St., 412-2580;

www.milaneworleans.com — MiLA takes a fresh approach to Southern and New Orleans cooking, focusing on local produce and refined techniques. Try New Orleans barbecue lobster with lemon confit and fresh thyme. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri. dinner Mon.-Sat. $$$ RALPH’S ON THE PARK — 900

City Park Ave., 488-1000; www. ralphsonthepark.com — Popular dishes include baked oysters Ralph, turtle soup and the Niman Ranch New York strip. There also are brunch specials. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

TOMMY’S WINE BAR — 752 Tchoupitoulas St., 525-4790 — Tommy’s

Wine Bar offers cheese and charcuterie plates as well as a menu of appetizers and salads from the neighboring kitchen of Tommy’s Cuisine. No reservations. Lite dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEDITERRA— NEAN/MIDDLE EASTERN ATTIKI BAR & GRILL — 230 Decatur

St., 587-3756; www.attikineworleans.com — Attiki features a range of Mediterranean cuisine including entrees of beef kebabs and chicken shawarma. Reservations recommended. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $$

PYRAMIDS CAFE — 3151 Calhoun St., 861-9602 — Diners will find authentic, healthy and fresh Mediterranean cuisine featuring such favorites as sharwarma prepared on a rotisserie. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEXICAN & SOUTHWESTERN CARLOS MENCIA’S MAGGIE RITAS MEXICAN BAR & GRILL — 200

Magazine St., 595-3211; www.maggieritas.com — Mexican favorites

Owner Desi Vega presents a Caprese salad at Mr. Johns Steak House (2111 St. Charles Ave., 679-7697; www.mrjohnssteakhouse.com). PHOTO BY susan snee include sizzling fajita platters, quesdillas, enchiladas and a menu of margaritas. There also are Latin American dishes, paella and fried ice cream for dessert. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ COUNTRY FLAME — 620 Iberville St.,

522-1138 — Country Flame serves a mix of popular Mexican and Cuban dishes. Come in for fajitas, pressed Cuban sandwiches made with hickory-smoked pork and char-broiled steaks or pork chops. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

JUAN’S FLYING BURRITO — 2018

Magazine St., 569-0000; 4724 S.Carrollton Ave. 486-9550; www. juansflyingburrito.com — This wallet-friendly restaurant offers new takes on Mexican-inspired

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OUT2EAT cooking. It’s known for its mealand-a-half-size signature burritos. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ NACHO MAMA’S MEXICAN GRILL —

3242 Magazine St., 899-0031; 1000 S. Clearview Pkwy., Harahan, 7361188; www.nachomamasmexicangrill.com — These taquerias serve Mexican favorites such as portobello mushroom fajitas and chile rellenos. There are happy hour margaritas on weekdays and daily drink specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SANTE FE — 3201 Esplanade Ave., 948-0077 — Dine indoors or out at this comfortable Southwestern cafe. Chicken Maximilian is a baked chicken breast roulade with Anaheim peppers, chorizo and Asiago cheese. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ TOMATILLO’S — 437 Esplanade

Ave., 945-9997 — Enjoy combinations like Tomatillo’s Fiesta, which includes a taco, tamale and enchilada served with rice and beans. There are many margarita options. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MUSIC AND FOOD GAZEBO CAFE — 1018 Decatur St.,

525-8899; www.gazebocafenola. com — The Gazebo features a mix of Cajun and Creole dishes and ice cream daquiris. The New Orleans sampler rounds up jambalaya, red beans and rice and gumbo. Other options include salads, seafood poboys and burgers. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

HOUSE OF BLUES — 225 Decatur St.,

70

310-4999; www.hob.com/neworleans — Try the pan-seared Voodoo Shrimp with rosemary cornbread. The buffet-style gospel brunch features local and regional groups. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ THE MARKET CAFE — 1000 Decatur

St., 527-5000; www.marketcafenola.com — Dine indoors or out on seafood either fried for platters or po-boys or highlighted in dishes such as crawfish pie, crawfish etouffee or shrimp Creole. Sandwich options include muffulettas, Philly steaks on po-boy bread and gyros in pita bread. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — 626

Frenchmen St., 949-0696; www.

snugjazz.com — Traditional Creole and Cajun fare pepper the menu along with newer creations such as the fish Marigny, topped with Gulf shrimp in a Creole cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

NEIGHBORHOOD GOTT GOURMET CAFE — 3100 Magazine St., 373-6579; www.gottgourmetcafe.com — Gott Gourmet’s menu of creative dishes and sandwiches includes a cochon de lait po-boy made with pulled pork, homecooked Dr. Pepper-honeybaked ham, pickles, Gruyere cheese, ancho-honey coleslaw and honey mustard-chile mayo. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Fri. Credit cards. $

LIUZZA’S RESTAURANT 7 BAR — 3636 Bienville St., 482-9120; www.liuzzas. com — This neighborhood favorite serves casual Creole and Italian fare. The Frenchuletta is a muffuletta on French bread served hot. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $$

MR. ED’S RESTAURANT — 910 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 463-3030; 1001 Live Oak St., Metairie, 838-0022 — Popular dishes include seafoodstuffed bell peppers loaded with shrimp, crawfish and crabmeat, topped with buttered breadcrumbs. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ RAJUN CAJUN CAFE — 5209 W.

Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 883-5513; www.rajuncajuncafe.com — The cafe serves soups, salads, po-boys, muffulettas, seafood plates and a few entree platters. Daily specials include items such as breaded pork chops on Wednesdays and seafood options on Friday. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

PIZZA MARKS TWAIN’S PIZZA LANDING —

2035 Metairie Road, Metairie, 8328032; www.marktwainspizza.com — Disembark at Mark Twain’s for salads, po-boys and pies like the Italian pizza with salami, tomato, artichoke, sausage and basil. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ NONNA MIA CAFE & PIZZERIA — 3125

Esplanade Ave., 948-1717 — Nonna Mia uses homemade dough for pizza served by the slice or whole pie and offers salads, pasta dishes

and panini. Gourmet pies are topped with ingredients like pancetta, roasted eggplant, portobello mushrooms and prosciutto. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ POMPEII PIZZERIA — 1068 Magazine

St., 708-4213; www.pompeiipizzeria. com — The barbecue bacon cheeseburger pizza features ground beef, applewood-smoked bacon, onions and smoky barbecue sauce. The Beaurantula is a Philly cheese steak loaded with vegetables and ranch dressing. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $ REGINELLI’S — 741 State St., 899-

1414; 817 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 712-6868; 874 Harrison Ave., 4880133; 3244 Magazine St. 895-7272; 5608 Citrus Blvd., Harahan, 818-0111; www.reginellis.com — This New Orleans original offers a range of pizzas, sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

R&O’S RESTAURANT — 216 Old Hammond Hwy., 831-1248 — R&O’s offers a mix of pizza and Creole and Italian seafood dishes. There’s everything from seafood gumbo and stuffed artichokes to po-boys and muffulettas. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, dinner Wed.Sun. Credit cards. $

SLICE PIZZERIA — 1513 St. Charles Ave., 525-7437; 5538 Magazine St., 897-4800 — Neapolitan-style pizza rules, but you can buy pizza by the slice and add or subtract toppings as you choose. There are also a full coffee bar, Italian sodas and organic teas. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ THEO’S NEIGHBORHOOD PIZZA —

4218 Magazine St., 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., 302-1133; www.theospizza.com — There is a wide variety of specialty pies or build your own from the selection of more than two-dozen toppings. Also serving salads and sandwiches. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

WIT’S INN — 141 N. Carrollton Ave., 486-1600 — This Mid-City bar and restaurant features pizzas, calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers for snacking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

from a long list of po-boys filled with everything from fried seafood to corned beef to hot sausage to veal. There are breakfast burritos in the morning and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Cash only. $

MAHONY’S PO-BOY SHOP — 3454 Magazine St., 899-3374; www.mahonyspoboys.com — Mahoney’s serves traditional favorites and original po-boys like the Peacemaker, which is filled with fried oysters, bacon and cheddar cheese. There are daily lunch specials as well. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PARKWAY BAKERY AND TAVERN — 538 N. Hagen Ave., 482-3047 —

Parkway serves juicy roast beef po-boys, hot sausage po-boys, fried seafood and more. No reservations. Kitchen open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $ SAMMY’S PO-BOYS & CATERING — 901 Veterans Memorial Blvd.,

Metairie, 835-0916; www.sammyspoboys.com — Sammy’s offers a wide array of po-boys and wraps. The house-cooked bottom round beef in gravy is a specialty. The menu also includes salads, seafood platters, a few Italian dishes and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner daily. Credit cards. $

MAGAZINE PO-BOY SHOP — 2368

Magazine St., 522-3107 — Choose

MARIGNY BRASSERIE — 640 Frenchmen St., 945-4472; www. marignybrasserie.com — Marigny Brasserie serves breakfast items like Cajun eggs Bendict. The lunch and dinner menus include fried seafood po-boys and a host of Italian dishes. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ RED FISH GRILL — 115 Bourbon St.,

598-1200; www.redfishgrill.com — Seafood creations by Executive Chef Gregg Collier dominate a menu peppered with favorites like hickory-grilled redfish, pecancrusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SOUL WILLIE MAE’S SCOTCH HOUSE —

2401 St. Ann St., 822-9503 — Willie Mae Seaton’s landmark restaurant is run by her granddaughter and serves her renowned fried chicken. There are also changing daily specials. No reservations. Lunch Mon.Sat. Cash only. $$

WALL STREET DISCOUNT MEAT MAR-

KET — 445 Wall Blvd., 393-1800 — The deli section at this meat market includes a variety of sandwiches and po-boys with fillings of seafood, cold cuts or hot sausage, plus hot wings, fried chicken platters and seafood platters. There are egg sandwiches or platters for breakfast. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SEAFOOD JACK DEMPSEY’S — 738 Poland Ave.,

943-9914 — The Jack Dempsey seafood platter serves a trainingtable feast of gumbo, shrimp, oysters, catfish, redfish and crawfish pies, plus two side items. Other dishes include broiled redfish and fried soft-shell crab. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat. and dinner Wed.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ COTE BRASSERIE — 700 Tchoupitoulas St., 613-2350; www. lacotebrasserie.com — This stylish restaurant in the Renaissance New Orleans Arts Hotel serves an array of raw and cooked seafood. Tabasco and Steen’s Cane LA

SANDWICHES & PO-BOYS

Syrup glazed salmon is served with shrimp mirliton ragout. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

STEAKHOUSE N’TINI’S — 2891 Hwy. 190, Suite D, Mandeville, (985) 626-5566; www. ntinis.com — Enjoy steaks, seafood, daily specials and martinis in a relaxed ambience. Entree choices include filets, rib-eyes, baby back ribs, tuna steaks, fried seafood platters and more. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE — Har-

rah’s Hotel, 525 Fulton St., 587-7099; 3633 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 888-3600; www.ruthschris.com — Ruth’s top-quality steaks are broiled in 1,800-degree ovens and arrive at the table sizzling. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

TAPAS/SPANISH GALVEZ RESTAURANT — 914 N. Pe-

ters St., 595-3400; www.galvezrestaurant.com — Located at the former site of Bella Luna, Galvez offers tapas, paella and a Spanish-accent-

ed bouillabaisse. Besides seafood, entrees include grilled Black Angus sirloin and roasted chicken. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$ MIMI’S IN THE MARIGNY — 2601

Royal St., 872-9868 — The decadant Mushroom Manchego Toast is a favorite here. Or enjoy hot and cold tapas dishes ranging from grilled marinated artichokes to calamari. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner and latenight Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

VEGA TAPAS CAFE — 2051 Metarie Road, 836-2007; www.vegatapascafe.com — Vega’s mix of hot and cold tapas dishes includes a salad of lump crabmeat on arugula with blood orange vinaigrette, seared tuna with avocado and tomato relish, braised pork empanadillos, steamed mussels and shrimp with tomatoes and garlic in caper-basil cream. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

VIETNAMESE AUGUST MOON — 3635 Prytania

St., 899-5129; www.moonnola.com — August Moon serves a mix of Vietnamese and Chinese cuisine. There are spring rolls and pho soup as well as many popular Chinese dishes and vegetarian options. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PHO HOA RESTAURANT — 1308 Manhattan Blvd., 302-2094 — Pho Hoa serves staple Vietnamese dishes including beef broth soups, vermicelli bowls, rice dishes and banh mi sandwiches. Bo kho is a popular beef stew. Appetizers include fried egg rols, crab rangoons and rice paper spring rolls. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $ PHO NOLA — 3320 Transcontinental

Drive, Metairie, 941-7690; www. pho-nola.com — Pho NOLA serves spring rolls and egg rolls, noodle soups, rice and vermicelli dishes and po-boys. Beverages include boba teas, milk teas, coffee drinks and smoothies. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PHO TAU BAY RESTAURANT — 113 Westbank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, 368-9846 — You’ll find classic Vietnamese beef broth and noodle soups, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, shrimp spring rolls with peanut sauce and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Wed. & Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

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72

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CLASSIFIEDS 483-3100 • Fax: 483-3153 3923 Bienville St. New Orleans, LA 70119 Mon.-Fri. 8:30 a.m.- 5:30 p.m.

classadv@gambitweekly.com CASH, CHECK OR MAJOR CREDIT CARD

Online: When you place ad in The Gambit’s Classifieds it also appears on our website, www.bestofneworleans.com Free Ads: Private party ads for

merchandise for sale valued under $100 (price must be in ad) or ads for pets found/lost. No phone calls. Please fax or email.

Deadlines:

• For all Line Ads - Thurs. @ 5 p.m. • For all Display Ads - Wed. @ 5 p.m. NOTE: Ad cancellations and charges for all display ads must be made by Wednesday at 5pm prior to the coming weeks insertion. Ad cancellations and changes for all line ads must be made by Thursday at noon prior to the coming weeks insertion. Please proof you first as insertion that appears for errors. The Gambit only takes responsibility for the first incorrect insertion.

AUTOMOTIVE

PETS

AUTOMOTIVE

PET ADOPTIONS

05 Ford focus

MOPEDS/SCOOTERS

A Touch of

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massage & body work

pain management & relaxation • Lomi Lomi - 90 minutes • Neuromuscular Therapy • Deep Tissue • Swedish • Providing Therapeutic Massage/Non Sexual

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Real Estate Employment

BODYWERKS MASSAGE

2 WEEKS GET 1 WEEK

BUY

FREE Advertise in

market PLACE

Jeannie LMT #3783-01. Flexible appointments. Uptown Studio or Hotel out calls. 504.894.8856 (uptown) Bodywerks Massage by Marilyn Tapper La. License #2771. Uptown Studio. 504-782-1452.

BODY HEAVEN Stressed Out? Tense? A Thai massage increases your flexibility & relaxes you. Also Cert. in Deep Tissue & Swedish & Hot Stone Reflexology Incalls LA #3182. Call Kevin

solid white 5yr old female cat , very loving and talkative spayed ,shots ,rescue 504 462-1968

PETS FOR SALE Boston Terrior AKC

5mo male fully train blk/brindle/wh fixed cuddly top family pet 504-5597654

CHIHUAHUAS

AKC 1 M, 2 F, chocolate, 1st shots, vet checked, $400. 504-459-5307

YORKIES AND MALTESE

504-453-4844

AKC. pups and young adults. show/ pet. all sizes teacup and regular 504737-1234

Massage By Jamie

LA#509

SW/DT or Gen Relaxation. Safe, private & quiet location. Awesome work. $60/hr & $95/1.5hr 8am-9pm

Weekly Tails

504-231-1774

Simon is a 1 ½ year--old, neutered, Terrier mix. He walks nicely on a leash, gives kisses and would love to go on long walks with his new family. To meet Simon or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191.

MERCHANDISE

BYWATER BODYWORKS

Swedish, deep tissue, therapeutic. Flex appts, in/out calls, OHP/student discounts, gift cert. $65/hr, $75/ 1 1/2hr. LA Lic# 1763 Mark. 259-7278

RELAX RELAX RELAX

Swedish massage by strong hands. Call Jack at 453-9161. La lic #0076.

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Try my Streching Techniques 60/90/2 hour sessions

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call

Gambit’s weekly guide to Services, Events, Merchandise, Announcements, etc. for as little as $50

Princess Leila

601.303.7979 Appts M - F

• 9am-9pm

ART/POSTERS ART COLLECTION

Vintage Photography, Tribal Art, Glass & Ceramics. Call Michael, (504) 913-2872

JIM LEISURE PAINTING

Original 3 x 5’ painting by Jim Leisure of St. Germain. Absolutely gorgeous! Paid $6000, asking $5000. Call 985290-2230.

simon

Kennel #A11319383

FURNITURE/ACCESSORIES $125 Full/Double Size Mattress Set, still in original plastic, unopened. We can deliver. (504) 846-5122 $295 Brand New Iron Queen Bed with mattress set, all new. Can deliver. (504) 952-8403 King Pillowtop Mattress, NEW!!! ONLY $199. Can deliver. (504) 846-5122 NEW Pub Height Table Set all wood, still boxed. Delivery available. $325 (504) 846-5122 Queen Mattress Set $149 Still in wrapper. Will deliver. (504) 846-5122

monkey

Kennel #A11305909

Monkey is a 3-month-old, spayed, orange tabby DSH. She loves to jump, play with her toys and snuggle before an afternoon nap. To meet Monkey or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/ SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. To look for a lost pet come to the Louisiana SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), Mon-Sat. 9-5, Sun. 12-5 or call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

LICENSED MASSAGE A BODY BLISS MASSAGE

Special Rates

small terrier mix very sweet female, 7 yrs old ,loves cats and dogs, rescue 504 462-1968 NICK, PIT/BEAGLE MIX, 50# Sweetheart. Young, great companion and loves everything,VetCk/Vacs/Neut./ Hsbkn /microchip/Rescue. (504) 460-0136.

ELECTRIC SCOOTER

MIND-BODY-FITNESS

Seeking honest female 25-45. for companionship. Don’t be shy. Call 756-1456.

Maxine

Mustang Boss 302 Asking $5700, all original, unrestored, mail me for pics at bref75t@msn.com / 225-341-3076.

www.atouchofaloha.massageplanet.com Member of BBB

For Rent &

16wk old sweet playful kittens with personality plus, spayed/neutered ,shots, microchip. rescue 504 462-1968

1970 Ford

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT

Nice Italian Guy

Lollipop and Jellybean

4d xe Sport model. fully load 40k miles $200 down take over payments $88/m w/warranty 504-836-9801 24hrs

Heavy Duty Mongoose Pro M200. 2” wheels. ad seat. Throttle & hand brakes. Max speed 15 mph. Two 12-volt quick rechargeable w/ smart Charger. Mint cond. $100. Call (504) 288-6843

ANNOUNCEMENTS

73

reaL esTaTe

SHOWCaSe NEW ORLEANS

4526 A St. Ann $239K 922-24 Dauphine $900K Great views of City Park & 4 unit French Quarter multiperfect deck in rear to view Endymion Parade. Spacious 1 family. 3457 sqft total. Great Quarter location! Parking. br/1.5 ba totally renov. postKatrina. Wd flrs, hi ceils, stainless steel apps. 1089 square feet.

829 St. Roch Ave. $149K 1 bdrm, 1 ba, furn kit incl dishwasher, w/d, cen a/h, shed, rear yard. Excellent condition. Motivated seller!

Paula Bowler • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 • www.frenchquarterrealty.com

GENTILLY

FRENCH QUARTER

UPTOWN

5542 Charlotte Dr. $99,500 Slab Ranch - 3 BR, 2 BA Partially renov + Guest Cottage 504-568-1359

FRENCH QUARTER CONDOS 929 Dumaine STARTING AT $99,000 G. Geoffrey Lutz Owner/Agent 482-8760

901 Aline Street $199k Beautiful, renov. 2 bedroom, 1 bath condo in buidling w/ just 2 units! Private & spacious. this lower unit lives very comfortably! Parking. Colette Meister • Re/Max Complete 504-220-1762 cell

GENERAL REAL ESTATE

COMMERCIAL RENTALS

REAL ESTATE CLASSIFIEDS

HOWARD SCHMALZ & ASSOCIATES REAL ESTATE Call Bert: 504-581-2804

4811 Constance

2/1 “Uptown Apartment”

1726 St. Charles

1/1 "Avenue Living"

$800

1303 Ursulines

1/1 "Near French Quarter"

$650

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

METAIRIE 2511 Metairie Lawn

#318. Renov’t 2 BR/2 BA unit with W/D & fridge. Great cond & floorplan. $149,500. Call to see! SHARON DEMAREST, Cell: 504-250-6497. Visit my website: www.sharrondemarest. com to view pics.

$1100 LAKEVIEW/LAKESHORE Lakefront Harborview Condo 2br, 2ba w/lake view 139K . . . 2834706 www.datakik.com/423

Southern Spirit REALTY, LLC

would like to welcome

Kimic Clay

Real Estate Professional

Serving

130 O.K. Ave

metropolitan area

216 West

New Orleans 504-352-1558

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT 1 Blk off St. Charles. 2/2, wd flrs, appls & w/d incl., grnite cntrtps & ss appl. OS pkng. $179,900 Darlene, Hera Realty 504-914-6352

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

GENERAL REAL ESTATE 1317 St. Phillip

2.5 blks frm qrt. across prk. hrdwd flr, ceil fans, eat-in-kitch, Bd,Liv, Ba, wtr pd, w/d hkp 504-482-6004. ALL AREAS - HOUSES FOR RENT. Browse thousands of rental listings with photos and maps. Advertise your rental home for FREE! Visit: http:// www.RealRentals.com

2bd/1ba apt in Harahan, 1000 sqft, prking, laundry, water paid $725 Call Terrence w/ Latter & Blum 450-9003

9804 JOEL AVE

Nice area. 3br/1bat. Brick. All appls, New carpet, granite. Fenced yd. Yd maintained. $1200/mo + dep. No section 8. No smoking. 504-874-0599

For Sale 550 Aris Ave. 3 Bed/2 BA, New Price! $227,500 3701 Tulane Ave. 3 parcels. Call for info. 3615-21 Banks St. 3 parcels. Call for info.

Colleen Mooney, agent 504-236-7765 Vallon Real Estate 504-486-5437 To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

HISTORIC ALGIERS POINT

High end 1-4BR. Near ferry, clean, many x-tras, hrdwd flrs, cen a/h, no dogs, no sec 8, some O/S prkng $750$1200/mo. 504-362-7487

CITY PARK/BAYOU ST. JOHN FURNISHED EFFICIENCY

Renovated, util included,w/ dishwash, hdwd flrs, ceil fans, hi-spd net, cable. $715/mo all inclus: 231-1087

DOWNTOWN METAIRIE 2805 Wytchwood Dr.

1Bd/1Ba Lafreniere Pk. CA/H. D/W. Crpt/wd flr. Frig&Stv. W/D hkups. Ref. Please. $625/mo+dep. 504-250-2151

3012 14th Street

Newly renov 2 br, 1.5 ba TH, w/d hkp, furn kit w/dw, c a/h, patio. No pets. No Sec.8 $750/mo. 504-833-1197.

A HIDDEN GEM

Chic seclusion in the heart of Metairie. All new 1 br fr $660 & 1 br + study fr $795. Furn corporate avail. 780-1706 www.orrislaneapts.com

BEVERLY GARDEN NR LAKE

3 br/2 ba, 1 stry brk, liv/din comb, blt-in kit/den, cen a/h, w/d hkp, gar, fnc yd. 1900 sf. $1700. 858-2744

FOR RENT OR SALE

For rent 1201 CanalDSt. te 1 Bed/1BA. ren$1500/Mo

Rent or Lease or Lease to Buy, 1BR, 1-1/2 BA, jacuzzi, Elec & TV incld, prkg. 24 hr Concierge Service. $1050/mo - 914-882-1212

ALGIERS POINT HARAHAN/RIVER RIDGE

the entire

CONDO FOR SALE

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

Office space, 460 sf 1/2 bath, renov, CCTV, 24 hr access, parking in front, side & rear. $460/mo. 504-250-7676

Great Fam Home 4 br, 2 ba, liv rm, furn kit, cen a/h, w/d, Pets ok. garage. $1500/mo. 504-430-9903.

slidellkim@yahoo.com

74

3108 CLEARY AVE CLEARY BUILDING

METAIRIE TOWERS

2511 Metairie Lawn. 2BR/2BA, w/d, pool, security. Rent $950/mo. Sale $145,000. Call 427-1087

LUXURY APTS

2 BR, 1 1/2BA, LR, DR, kit, w&d hkups, faux fireplace, fans, blinds. No pets. $750/mo. 504-443-2280

OLD METAIRIE CONVENIENT LOCATION

1212 Brockenbrough Ct. Lg 2 bd, 1bth, furn kit, w/d hkps, off st pkg. $600. Mo + dep. 834-3465.

1 Bedroom Furnished Condo

Fully furnished 1 bed/1 bath condo in Warehouse District. Top floor unit with views of pool, courtyard, and city skyline. Loft with desk. Rent includes electric, cable, Internet, pool, gym, w/d. Secure building close to French Quarter, street car, parade route. $1500/mo. Call Bonnie at Soniat Realty, 504-488-8988.

EASTERN NEW ORLEANS 4619 BUNDY RD

Single brick home, 3BR, 2 baths, patio, fenced yard, off st prkg,off Chef Menteur Hwy. $950+dep. 504-433-9394

FRENCH QUARTER/ FAUBOURG MARIGNY 1103 ROYAL ST

Unit A, 1br, 1ba, cen a/h, Jacuzzi tub, w/d, water incl. Furnished. $1700/mo. Call for appt, 504-952-3131.

1835 BURGUNDY - LWR Studio Studio, wd/cer flrs, Alcove kit, clst, a/c, fans, w/d on premises, no pets, low cost utils, $575+dep+lse. 504908-5210

2800 N. Rampart

Brand New Triplex. 2 BDRM/ 1 BA Each Unit. Corner Lot. $850-$1100/month. Email realtorbev7045@gmail.com.

427 ESPLANADE APT/OFFICE Very bright 1br/1ba apt, LR, new kit w/ice maker & front balcony. First flr consists of 2 lrg rms & bath suitable for office or gallery. W/d, working fireplace $1200/mo, 504-529-3222

630 ST. PHILIP

Efficiency, $650. No pets. 269-9629 or cell # 458-6509.

CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATE 521 ROYAL STREET

Luxurious 2BR, 2.5BA, LR/DR. Elevator. Modern kit & baths. W/D, wd flrs & carpeted bdrms. 2000’, terrace. No pets. $2800/mo. Prestige Properties, 504-884-1925.

FRENCH QUARTER LOFT

1226 Chartres. 1 bdrm apt, Carpet, pool, laundry room, security gate. No pets. $900/mo Mike, 919-4583.

IRISH CHANNEL

2BR w/Balcony

1/2 BlOCK TO MAGAZINE

Furn Rms, Prefer Nght wrkrs. 1&2 BDRs w hdwd/crpt flrs. $175/wk to 900/mo +depst. 504-202-0381,504738-2492.

LAKEVIEW/LAKESHORE BOATHOUSE

Nice loft w/cath ceil, full kit, view of marina & lake. 40 ft cov’d slip. $1700. Jennifer 504-250-9930/HGI Realty 504-207-7575

(504) 944-3605

RESIDENTIAL RENTALS

AMAZING RENOVATION

226 S Scott. Gutted/total renov upr apt. 2 br,1 ba 1.5 blk fr Canal St. Hdwd flrs, cer tile, w/d, blt-in appl, sec sys. $1200/mo/dep. Avl 8/1. 504-4555411.

Large Studio w/Balcony 1201 CHARTRES #16 - 3bd/2.5ba $3000

Lovely 600 sq ft, wd flr, lots of windows full kit, w/d No pets. water incl $675 504-835-9099 avl aug 31

524 DAUPHINE-1 bd/ 1.5 ba $2850 4721 MAGAZINE - Comm.

$1700

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT 1 BR EFFTY CLOSE UNIV

1301 N. RAMPART-1 bd/ 1.5 ba $1500

Furn effy w/lr, a/h unit, ceil fans, wd/ tile flrs, w/d onsite. Clara by Nashville. Avl Oct. $550. 895-0016.

CALL FOR MORE LISTINGS!

1629 TOLEDANO #102

GENTILLY

1/1, $900/mo. Wd flrs, ss appl, stone cntrtps. OS pkng, crtyd. Angela, 504432-1034 Keller Wiiliams.

1711 Second St

1730 Gentilly Blvd.

Across from fairgrounds. 2b/1b 1200 sq. ft. Wd flrs, appls, cent a/h, w/d 1300/mo Soniat Realty 220-1022

LARGE 2 BR, 1 BA APT

Newly renov, new appls, cen a/h, w/d, alarm, fncd yd, off st prkg, priv entrance, $875+util. 504-283-8450.

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE

1 blk to St. Charles, Renov’t 3rd fl loft, lots of windows, fur kit, w/d on site $650. 895-4726 or 261-7611.

1730 NAPOLEON AVE

1 br apt, living rm, furn kit, wd flrs, hi ceil, a/c units. util incl. 1 blk St Charles. No pets. 443-4488

2840 State St.

3b/2b Single Cottage. lr, dr, funr kit. C a/h w/d. hard wood flrs ceil fans $1850. 899-7657.

French Quarter Realty Wayne • Nicole • Sam • Josh • Jennifer • Brett • Robert • George • Baxter

504-949-5400 911 N Derbigny

1/1 newly renov singl shotgun hse $525

830 St Philip “G”

1/1 Hi Ceils, Lg Balc, Prkng, Exc Loc

1125 N Rampart “3”

1/1 Lots Nat Light, walk-in closet, Exc Loc $700

1104 Music “A”

1/1 Freshly painted,Lots Nat Light,Hi Ceils $585

$1995

1022 Toulouse “BC22’ 2/2 Pkng,Pvt Balcs,Ingnd Pool

$1995

829 Ursulines #1

1/1 furnished w/wifi, tile floors

$950

833 Ursulines #5

1/1 Lotsofwindows,newcarpet,crtyrd $1050

1438 Chartres

Studio Renov in great location

2 bdrms, hdwd floors, ceiling fans, A/H, w/d hkps, small bk yard. Wtr pd. $800/mo+dep • 897-9885, 256-3644

3915 Annunciation St.

Betw Gen Taylor & Austerlitz Sts. Newly remodeled 1 BR, wtr pd, cen a/h, appls incld. $650/mo. 504-508-1436

4419 St. Charles Ave.

$750

448 Julia Unit #219

1/1 furn,Utils Cable/WiFi included $1950

552 Metairie lawn

3/2 Corner lot WD/DW Parking Pets OK $1400

835 St Louis

2/2 Central heat w/d ctyd

$1600

7535 JEANNETTE ST

1BR/1BA, appls, elec, wtr, int/cbl, incld. Nr Lusher schl, yr lse, dep rqd. No smkr/pet. $850/mo. 219-1422

802 FERN

Cor Maple. Hist bldg. 2 br, new renov, ss & gran kit, track llights, w/d, cen a/h, cov balc, all appls. $1250. 723-0001.

930 JACKSON, near Mag.

Renov, furnished kitchen, new appls, cen air/heat, w/d. EFFC/$495. 3BDRM/$800 • Call 504-250-9010

941 Royal

1 br loft fully furn, pool, w/d onsite, shared balc, no pets. $1250/mo/dep. 504-236-5757, FQRental.com

GARDEN DISTRICT

1/2 dbl, 2 rms & furn kit, w/d avail, c-a/h, crtyd. Camp & Toledano Sts. No Dogs please. $650/mo. 319-0531.

GREAT EFFICIENCY!

One person studio. Near TU Univ. $580/mo net + dep. All utilities pd. 866-7837

ON AUDUBON PARK / 2 BR

2 ba, upr, furn kit, d/w, hdwd flrs, cen a/h, c-fans, sec, hkps, prchs, nr univs/ st car, wtr pd, no smkrs, $1900 • 897-3539, 723-2726 cell.

PETS WELCOME!!!

4830 CHESTNUT. 1 bdrm, furn kit, cen a/h, wood floors, hi ceil, w/d hkps, ceil fans, pvt bkyd. $825/mo. ASC Real Estate. Call between 10am & 4pm. 504-439-2481.

Prestige Garden District Location

Compl renov duplex, just steps to mag. 2 Bd/1.5 Ba, den, kitchen, refrig. w/ ice maker, stove w. micro hd, d/w, w/d, cA/H. ceiling fans, hrdwd flrs, exposed brick, 24/ hr sec. Sorry no smkrs/pets. $1875. 891-8977

I’m a Cert. CNA w/CPR card. Will do diets, light meals, etc. 8 &12 hr shifts. Please call (504) 427-1445, if not home, pls leave msg.

A leader in guaranteed renewal insurance, is

VOLUNTEER

EXPANDING ITS SALES FORCE in the Greater New Orleans area. We need YOU to join our team to help us grow.

To learn more about a career with Aflac, please fax a resume to 504-889-9571 or call Erin at 504-508-5050 to schedule an interview.

Chef Chip Flanagan seeks

PRIVATE PARTY CHEF & SOUS CHEF

Offers Volunteer Opportunities. Make a difference in the lives of the terminally ill & their families. Services include: friendly visits to patients & their families, provide rest time to caretaker, bereavement & office assistance. School service hours avail. Call Volunteer Coordinator @ 504-818-2723 #3016

Each candidate must have: 4-yrs experience including 1-yr mgmt in fine dining; Culinary Arts Degree a +. Private Party Chef must have banquet or highend hotel experience. Competitive salary, bonus, insurance, 401-K, dining discount, gym, & more Apply in person Mon – Fri • 2pm – 4:00 pm 900 City Park Ave or hr@neworleans-food.com

CLERICAL

Receptionist We are seeking dynamic receptionist oriented individuals with great communications and Typing skills needed to work on behalf of company. This service representative will earn up to $2000 monthly any job experience needed.

Email us at resume_j.holdings@w.cn if interested. MEDICAL Full Time Exper. Med. Asst

Busy Metaire Obgyn practice. Competitive Salary/Benefits. Email resume to lwscmgr@bellsouth.net.

#1 NAPOLEON 1 BR/1BA, laund. $650/mo. #2 S. JOHNSON NEAR CLAIBORNE 2BR/1BA, Double, w/d hkkps, $875/mo. 891-2420

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RENTALS TO SHARE

715 Royal H

1/1 cozy 125 sqft in the heart of the FQ $700

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

Call (504) 483-3100

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75

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

24/7 Friendly Customer Care 1(888) 634.2628 18+ ©2010 PC LLC

76

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

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PUZZLE PAGE CLASSIFIEDS

We wish you were here...

open house • 9/19/2010 • 1-3pm neW LIsTInG

It's time to rediscover the Mississippi Gulf Coast!

3506 AnnunCIATIon CHARMING UPTOWN VICTORIAN. Well maintained Historic cottage. Beautiful heart of pine floors. 12’ ceilings, gorgeous cypress mantles, plenty of closet/ storage space. Central A/C, wide porch, established garden & huge backyard. Excellent location & a great value! $285,000

Come be a part of our revitalization. Opportunities abound! We know Coastal Living and we want you to experience what make the Mississippi Gulf Coast so unique. Latter & Blum Coastal Living has more than 20 Realtors ready to serve you. Call today for a complete list of Mississippi Gulf Coast available properties. Toll Free 800-215-4111 Office 228-867-4111

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

www.Latter-Blum.com

78

John Schaff Owner/Broker

MICHAEL ZAROU abr, gri, srs

(504) 895-4663

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cell: email: mzarou@latterblum.com

CLASSIFIEDS Explore HAUNTED NEW ORLEANS www.HauntedHistoryTours.com 504-861-2727

URBANSUBURBANSOLARSALES.COM

BULLETIN BOARD TOO

Thursdays at Twilight Garden Concert Series

888-316-7029

THIS WEEK’S PERFORMANCE

$95 Full/Double Size Mattress Set, still in original plastic, unopened. We can deliver. (504) 846-5122

Panorama Jazz Band

$295 Brand New Iron Bed with mattress set, all new. Can deliver. (504) 952-8403 NEW Pub Height Table Set all wood, still boxed. Delivery available. (504) 846-5122 Queen Mattress Set $115 Still in wrapper. Will deliver. (504) 846-5122 Queen Pillowtop Mattress, NEW!!! ONLY $129. Can deliver. (504) 846-5122

Klezmer meets Traditional Jazz

SEPTEMBER 23 @ the Pavilion of Two Sisters NEW ORLEANS BOTANICAL GARDEN CITY PARK

Gates Open 5PM-8PM · Performance 6PM

Adults = $8 / Children 5-12 = $4 Children 4 & Under = FREE

For more information call

(504) 483-9488

www.neworleanscitypark.com

PUBLIC AUCTION

Thursday, September 23rd @ 10AM Restaurant Equipment Auction • 101 Magnolia St in Slidell

Hobart Hanging Scale • Meat Saws • Hobart 110v Table Top Meat Grinder • Lincoln Pizza Oven • (3) Hobart Meat Slicers • Scale • 4' S/S Hood • Oven Proofer Combo • Hobart Steamer • Deli Cases • Hot Tables w/Dry Well • Open Top Island Case Freezer or Cooler • Double Head Ice Machine w/Bin • Produce Carts • Flash Bake Oven • Slicer Stand • Display Stands • Sandwich Prep Table • Welbilt Mixer • (2) Impinger Conveyor Pizza Ovens • Wine Racks • Large Stainless Table w/Steam Wells • Bar Stools • Chairs • Tables • Patio Furniture & More! 10% Buyers Premium applies. Some items subject to confirmation ServCorp Int’l Inc. • B. Mutz, 1467-10 • (800) 340-2185 • www.servcorpii.com

Enjoy a career as a New Orleans Taxi Driver Mind • Body • Spirit NEW ORLEANS TAXI SCHOOL

TO ADVERTISE, CALL 483.3100

is now recruiting and hiring

NOW ENROLLING Call 504-821-6227

3001 Conti St., New Orleans, LA 70119

“Professional training in mixology and casino dealing”

Dealingschool.com • 1-800-Bartend

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > SEPTEMBER 21 > 2010

Free training and test preparation

79

WE I ZE L A I C E SP P IN GROUS EVENT

Regular classes:

Every Tuesday, Wednesday & Thursday in September & October from 7-9 p.m.

Mom's Day Out, Kids Paint Free:

Saturday, September 25th, October 2nd & October 16th from 2-4 p.m.

PRE-SKETCHED CANVASES NO DRAWING REQUIRED!

5200 VETERANS BLVD METAIRIE, LA • 70006 (NEAR TRANSCONTINENTAL)

CALL NOW FOR RESERVATIONS: (504) 455-4413

www.PaintItParty.com


Gambit New Orleans- September 21, 2010