Issuu on Google+

REMEMBERING COCO ROBICHEAUX PAGE 13

BEST

OF NEW ORLEANS

G A M B I T > V O L U M E 3 2 > N U M B E R 49 > D E C E M B E R 6 > 2 011

.COM

|

SNAPS UP FOR PHOTONOLA PAGE 45

BULLETIN BOARD “COLORS OF HEALTH” By Jane Murdock A Fantasy Tale for Children To Encourage Healthy Eating & Exercise See HOLIDAY HELPERS On the Inside Back Cover in this week’s Gambit

INTERESTED IN THE HEALTH CARE FIELD AS A CAREER? Volunteer in our hands on program providing extra hands at the bedside. Work along side our exp. CNA’s. Volunteer time is an asset on your resume.

504-818-2723 ext. 3016 Ask for Volunteer Coordinator

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES ON THE NORTHSHORE ASK FOR RENEE 985-626-3051

Olister's Napoleon Room

CLASSIFIEDS

Buying MIGNON FAGET JEWELRY Rolex, Diamond Rings, Gold & Broken Jewelry CHRIS’S Fine Jewelry 3304 W. Esplanade Ave., Metairie Call 504-833-2556 A GREAT PLACE TO DO YOGA WILD LOTUS YOGA - Named “Best Place to Take a Yoga Class” 9 yrs in a row by Gambit Readers”. www.wildlotusyoga.com 899-0047 ON-SITE MAC HELP Let I-Net Media, Inc. help you get the most out of your Mac. 504-259-2542 or westendmac@mac.com DWI - Traffic Tickets? Don’t go to court without an attorney! You can afford an attorney. Call Attorney Eugene Redmann, 504-834-6430 GET A POWERFUL RESUME You Can Get a Better Job! GRANT COOPER, Certified Resume Writer CareerPro N.O. 861-0400 Metairie 861-8882

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

02

Let us show you how your non-profit organization can participate in bingo fundraising without any financial risk

Burn Twice the Calories in Half the Time with Kettlebells!

AIKIDO The Japanese Martial Art of Power & Movement. 2134 Magazine St., 3rd fl. 561-0123 Adults/children www.aikidoneworleans.org YOGA 108 NEW ORLEANS LLC Hottest Yoga in Town WWW.YOGA-108.NET 8229 Oak St. Call: 1-866-YOGA-108

www.alternativebodysolutionsllc.com Learn PROPER kettlebell from Louisiana’s ONLY Art of Strength Certified Kettlebell Instructor!

OLD NEW ORLEANS LANDMARKS As Drawn by Charles E. Ruello

Festival of Lessons and Carols

NOW CASTING

Mr. Paul Wattigny, Organist

This service was first performed at King’s College, Cambridge on Christmas Eve 1918. The service will be by candlelight, accompanied by organ. Reception will follow in the rectory 724 Camp Street • New Orleans • (504) 525-4413 Security will be provided

SPANISH CUSTOM HOUSE

Available at

The Historic New Orleans Collection Gift Shop www.hnoc.org

533 Royal St., New Orleans

‘TIS THE SEASON FOR UNWANTED WEIGHT GAIN DON’T BE NAUGHTY, BE NICE ... TO YOURSELF JOIN US NOW & GET FIT!

ONLY $99 4 Weeks (Unlimited/mo.)

MIX & MATCH CAMPS TO ATTEND 5 DAYS/WEEK

• City Park 5:30 am • City Park 5:45 am • City Park 6:00 pm

4631 W. Napoleon Ave • 454-8193 www.napoleonroom.com

STARTS DEC. 16/17

MAGICAL MAIDS

Saturday Camp ONLY $40

City Park 9:00 am (3 remaining)

STARTED DEC. 3

RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL • ONE TIME CLEANING • WEEKLY/BI-WEEKLY • MOVE-IN/OUT • ALL SUPPLIES PROVIDED • WE PROVIDE SERVERS & BARTENDERS FOR PRIVATE PARTIES & WEDDINGS

COLD & RAIN DAYS ... NO WORRIES Offering INDOOR Locations

New Orleans - (504)

(30, 45, 60 MIN PERSONAL TRAINING)

$10 OFF for 1st Time Customers MENTION THIS AD!!!

(Minimum 2 hours)

15% OFF GIFT CERTIFICATES*

712-0303 Northshore - (985)

674-2900

www.mymagicalmaids.com In business since 1995 QUALITY GUARANTEED

Licensed & Bonded

4209 MAGAZINE STREET *(ENDS DEC. 15TH)

CALL TODAY

504-812-6973

$20,000 HOME MAKEOVER SHOW

Sunday, Dec. 11, 2011 at 7:30 p.m. St. Patrick’s Chamber Choir will perform a service of lessons and carols accompanied by organ.

BINGO SCHEDULE

SUN: 7:30 MON & TUES: NOON & 7:30 WED: 7:30 THURS: NOON & 7:30 FRI: NOON, 7:30, 10:30 SAT: NOON, 2:30, 7:30, 10:30

PET SITTER Dog Walking - Poop Patrol. Insured & Bonded Just give me a call and I’ll be there before you can say “woof”. 504-391-9406 SUZETTE’S...... FOR ROMANCE! See our ad in today’s “HOLIDAY HELPERS” section for your Holiday Shopping!!

504.821.4896

www.bootcampneworleans.com www.salirefitness.com 4209 Magazine St.

Eric Stromer and Oprah’s former Executive Producer Ellen Rakieten, are now casting families with ugly or over-the-top-outdated homes.

plus! Hoarder OR theme HOUSES are a super

www.homemakeovercasting.com email Andrew.Scott@rrstaff.com

>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>> > <<<<<<<<< >>>>>>> > <<<<<<<

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

>>>>>>

contents

Cocktails & Holiday Shopping

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>

CHECK IT OUT

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 3923 BIENVILLE ST., NEW ORLEANS, L A 70119 < < < < <(504) < < <486-5900 <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > >OPERATING > > > > > HOURS > > > >: 8:30 > > A.M. > > >TO>5>:30> P.M. > MON.-FRI.

DECEMBER 6, 2011 · VOLUME 32 · NUMBER 49

MARGO DUBOS Every Thursday through Christmas> > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >PUBLISHER >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> ADMINISTRATIVE DIRECTOR MARK KARCHER <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< 4pm-8pm

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Enjoy champagne cocktails, sweet treats> > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >EDITORIAL FAX: 483-3116 | response@gambitweekly.com < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < NEWS&VIEWS <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< and let our staff help you select the perfect > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Cover > > > >Story > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > 15 > > > > > >EDITOR > > > > KEVIN > > > >ALLMAN >>> MANAGING EDITOR KANDACE POWER GRAVES gifts for everyone on your list!

Happy Holidays! 8131 Hampson Street

New Orleans (504) 866-9666

SHOE LUST HANDBAG ENVY

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

The Gambit Interview: Orleans Parish District Attorney Leon Cannizzaro

7

Blake Pontchartrain

8

Another attempt to stanch the bleeding The New Orleans know-it-all

News

Debunking the eating-local myths Remembering Coco Robicheaux

Bouquets & Brickbats

This week’s heroes and zeroes

15

Born Comfort Boots

Commentary

9 13 9

C’est What?

9

Scuttlebutt

9

Gambit’s Web poll From their lips to your ears

GIFTS&SHOPPING



 04

1

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 06 > 2011

45

for home or office



A&E News

45

Gambit Picks

45

Best bets for your busy week

Cuisine

Review: Lunch at K-Paul’s Louisiana Kitchen 5 in Five: Five doses of citrus flavor Wine of the Week Scuttlebites: Food news in brief

The Puzzle Page

c u sto m d e s i g n s e r v i c e s r o o m m a k e ov e r s

1

33

PhotoNOLA says cheese with a group show

11 1

1 h o l i day d e c o1 r at i n g

Fashion Gift Guide

ARTS&ENTERTAINMENT

FEETFIRSTSTORES.COM

LuLu Belle design

31

Stuff your stocking with style

Mon-Sat 10-6 | Sun 12:30-5

1

Shoptalk

Tommy’s Wine Bar and Cuisine

FRENCH QUARTER 526 ROYAL ST. 569-0005



MUSIC LISTINGS

PREVIEW: Black Tusk

FILM LISTINGS

PREVIEW: New Orleans Middle East Film Festival

ART LISTINGS

REVIEW: Dale Chihuly and Tom Kincaid

STAGE LISTINGS

REVIEW: Crimes of the Heart REVIEW: South Pacific

Shopping in a Winter Wonderland www.wearablevegetables.com shop online fresh humor daily. guy gifts. girl gifts. pet gifts. Shop 5701 Crawford @ Edwards • Elmwood Mon-Sat 10-6

504-731-1027

© 2011, wearable vegetables, all rights reserved, this is a parody.

71 71 71 72

86

GAMBITGUIDE

4 2 1 2 m a g a z i n e s t. 504.655.7579

71

EVENTS LISTINGS

47 47 52 53 54 54 61 61 62

65 PREVIEW: Second line for Coco Robicheaux 66

CLASSIFIEDS Market Place

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS LINDSAY WEISS, LYN BRANTLEY, BRITT BENOIT, MARK WAGUESPACK PRE-PRESS COORDINATOR GEORGIA DODGE DISPLAY ADVERTISING >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> FAX: 483-3159 | displayadv@gambitweekly.com ADVERTISING DIRECTOR SANDY STEIN BRONDUM 483-3150 ········sandys@gambitweekly.com ADVERTISING ADMINISTRATOR MICHELE SLONSKI 483-3140········micheles@gambitweekly.com ADVERTISING COORDINATOR CHRISTIN JOHNSON 483-3138 ········christinj@gambitweekly.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE JILL GIEGER 483-3131 ·········jillg@gambitweekly.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES JEFFREY PIZZO 483-3145 ········jeffp@gambitweekly.com LINDA LACHIN 483-3142 ········lindal@gambitweekly.com ABBY SHEFFIELD 483-3141·········abbys@gambitweekly.com AMY WENDEL 483-3146········amyw@gambitweekly.com MEGAN MICALE 483-3144········meganm@gambitweekly.com STACY GAUTREAU 483-3143 ········stacyg@gambitweekly.com MARKETING>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> MARKETING DIRECTOR

JEANNE EXNICIOS FOSTER

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 483-3100

CLASSIFIEDS FAX: 483-3153 | classadv@gambitweekly.com

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING DIRECTOR SHERRY SNYDER 483-3122 ········sherrys@gambitweekly.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE CARRIE MICKEY 483-3121 ·········carriem@gambitweekly.com BUSINESS >>>>> billing inquiries: (504) 483-3135 CONTROLLER GARY DIGIOVANNI ASSISTANT CONTROLLER MAUREEN TREGRE CREDIT OFFICER MJ AVILES OPERATIONS & EVENTS >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

79

Gambit Communications, Inc.

Employment

81

COVER PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER COVER DESIGN BY DORA SISON

DORA SISON

SPECIAL PROJECTS DESIGNER SHERIE DELACROIX-ALFARO

OPERATIONS & EVENTS DIRECTOR LAURA CARROLL

79

Real Estate / Rentals

PRODUCTION >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> PRODUCTION DIRECTOR

78

Weekly Tails

Mind / Body / Spirit

INTERN ALEXANDRA PENCE

WEB & CLASSIFIEDS DESIGNER MARIA BOUÉ

Clancy DuBos has the week off.

UPTOWN 4119 MAGAZINE ST. 899-6800

POLITICAL EDITOR CLANCY DUBOS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR WILL COVIELLO SPECIAL SECTIONS EDITOR MISSY WILKINSON STAFF WRITERS ALEX WOODWARD, CHARLES MALDONADO EDITORIAL ASSISTANT LAUREN LABORDE listingsedit@gambitweekly.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS JEREMY ALFORD, D. ERIC BOOKHARDT, RED COTTON, ALEJANDRO DE LOS RIOS, MEG FARRIS, BRENDA MAITLAND, IAN McNULTY, NOAH BONAPARTE PAIS, DALT WONK CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER CHERYL GERBER

82

OPERATIONS & EVENTS ASSISTANT RACHEL BARRIOS

CHAIRMAN CLANCY DUBOS PRESIDENT & CEO MARGO DUBOS Gambit (ISSN 1089-3520) is published weekly by Gambit Communications, Inc., 3923 Bienville St., New Orleans, LA 70119. We cannot be held responsible for the return of unsolicited manuscripts even if accompanied by a SASE. All material published in Gambit is copyrighted: Copyright 2011 Gambit Communications, Inc. All rights reserved.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

05

06

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

commentary

thinking out loud

Stanching the Bloodshed

D

and the Garden District) and the Seventh District (eastern New Orleans). Based on Milwaukee’s experience, what should New Orleanians expect? Frankly, it depends on how you read those results. When Milwaukee’s Homicide Review Commission began in 2005, that city saw 122 homicides. By 2008, there were only 71 homicides — a decrease of nearly half in three years. That was Milwaukee’s lowest total in more than 20 years. How much of this was due to the work of the Homicide Review Commission? Impossible to say, but it should be noted that after hitting bottom in 2008, the trend began reversing itself. By 2010, there were 94 homicides in Milwaukee, 22 more than the year before. This year, Milwaukee surpassed the total number of its 2010 homicides in October, just as New Orleans did in November of this year. At a minimum, it’s plain that crime is both a local and a national problem.

S a n t a ’s s l e i g h t h r o u g h the wild west

clothes + accessories 7732 maple 865 . mon - sat 10-6

Despite its pervasiveness, we should never give up hope and never stop working to reduce crime.

Despite its pervasiveness, we should never give up hope and never stop working to reduce violent crime. Consider New York’s experience. In 1990, New York’s five boroughs saw a record 2,245 murders. Last year, they saw a small fraction of that number. Moreover, the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reports show the nation’s murder rate decreased nearly 17.5 percent from 2006 through 2010. Unfortunately, New Orleans is bucking that positive national trend. The mayor is right to look elsewhere for ideas that work. Some have rolled their eyes at yet another commission to stanch the bloodshed in New Orleans’ streets — there have, of course, been so many initiatives before — but Landrieu and Serpas would rightly face harsher criticism had they done nothing instead.

9625

JUMPSTART YOUR WINTER WORKOUT. The NOAC offers individual personal training sessions that can amp up your new year workout, customize your diet, and invigorate your fitness plan. Come train with our Nationally Certified and degreed trainers and jumpstart YOUR workout!

Everything you want and more at the NOAC. For more on what we offer, call 525-2375 or visit us at 222 N. Rampart today. Free Parking.

www.neworleansathleticclub.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

uring the recent Thanksgiving weekend, there was one thing New Orleans wasn’t thankful for: the stubborn murder rate, which showed no sign of abating. Before the end of November, New Orleans tied, then surpassed, the number of total killings the city saw in 2010. By Nov. 27, the city reached 178 murders — three more than the year before — with more than a month to go before year’s end. This is bad news not only for the city, but also for New Orleans Police Department (NOPD) Chief Ronal Serpas, who has seen some success in knocking down rates of other crimes. Earlier this year, he stated a goal of reducing murders in the city this year by five percent, a number so unambitious we chided him for it in this space. Sadly, a five percent reduction in killings would now be welcome news. This year’s spike in bloodshed has been reminiscent of the post-Katrina years of 2006 and 2007, when the official homicide rate jumped from 161 to 209. That spike came at a time when the city’s population was considerably smaller than it was before the storm — and even smaller than it is now — leaving those who had returned to the city dismayed that New Orleans was once again headed in the wrong direction. In late November, Mayor Mitch Landrieu announced his latest initiatives, the Strategic Command to Reduce Murders and Task Force One, both to be overseen by Criminal Justice Commissioner James Carter. Those initiatives are the latest components of the “SOS NOLA: Saving Our Sons” campaign that Landrieu unveiled in September. Both should be seen as hopeful developments. Task Force One is primarily an information-sharing mechanism between local, state and national crime fighting officials. This is a much-needed step, because the databases among the various agencies involved are not always able to be crossreferenced easily. At a time when manpower is an issue, the use of technology to enhance police coverage and focus crime fighters’ efforts is indeed welcome. The Strategic Command to Reduce Murders is more comprehensive. It’s based on a program launched in 2005 in Milwaukee, where it’s called the Homicide Review Commission. Landrieu touted the Wisconsin commission’s results in his announcement of the New Orleans version. The program has five “action teams,” with members ranging from mayoral staffers and cops to social services agencies and people in the business community. The commission will initially focus on the three NOPD districts with the most murders: the Fifth District (Bywater, Marigny and the Ninth Ward), the Sixth District (Central City, the Irish Channel

yee haw! Rudolph leads

07

Antiques & Interiors wholesale to the public. over 12,000 square feet of european antiques.

& decorators alike 300 Jefferson Highway(A cr oss fr om Lowe’s)

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

healthy meat:

08

rack & leg of lamb

Organic raised, grass fed, No hormones or antibiotics. Served as a rack, kabob or plate over vegetables or humus.

order your’s for the holiday dinner

7724 Maple St. • 504.314.0010 w w w. B a B y l o n C a f e . B i z Sun-wed 11a.m. - 9p.m. | ThurS-SaT 11a.m.-10p.m.

PONTCHARTRAIN™

NEW ORLEANS KNOW-IT-ALL

Questions for Blake: askblake@gambitweekly.com

HEY BLAKE, I HAVE ALWAYS BEEN CURIOUS ABOUT THE HISTORY OF PARK ISLAND, THE NEAT RESIDENTIAL RETREAT NESTLED IN THE MIDDLE OF BAYOU ST. JOHN. IS IT MAN-MADE, AND IF SO WHO WAS THE ORIGINAL DEVELOPER? LANE

New Orleans 504.231.3397 www.dopantiques.com

Stop By for The healthiest dining experience

blake

Miss Claudia’s

VINTAGE CLOTHING & COSTUMES

4204 MAGAZINE STREET · 897-6310 BUY • SELL • TRADE

DEAR LANE, The connection of Bayou St. John with Lake Pontchartrain was a major factor when the French chose to settle here because the bayou, with a fairly short trip overland, connected the lake to the Mississippi River. But when New Orleans founder Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne, Sieur de Bienville and company made their way up Bayou St. John, Park Island didn’t even exist. Navigation was difficult, and a sharp curve in the bayou kept filling up with sand and branches. The point acquired the nicknames “the Devil’s Elbow” and “the Devil’s Slough” from the frustrated men who tried to navigate the waterway. In the mid-1800s, action was taken to make the bayou easier to navigate. On the east side of Park Island is a narrow channel, the original bed of the bayou. Plans were to excavate land on the west side of the bayou, thereby making a deeper channel that would be easier to navigate. Digging began in 1861 but stopped when attention turned to the Civil War. After the war, work started up again, and the bayou was straightened. The island was formed from the soil dug up for the new channel. In 1859, the island was given to New Orleans surveyor Claude Jules Allou d’Hemecourt for his excellent work, and the island was called Isle d’Hemecourt. Born in France in 1819, d’Hemecourt came to New Orleans with his family in 1831 and acquired a reputation as an outstanding surveyor. In 1866, d’Hemecourt sold the island to James Joseph Demoruelle, whose family maintained ownership until 1905. Called Demoruelle Island during this time, it was used for hunting and later a city dump. During the first half of the 20th century, Bayou St. John underwent many changes. It was used less as an industrial waterway and became a haven for

recreational boathouses, small shipyards and squatters. In 1952 Demoruelle Island was briefly owned by a law firm of five partners who considered dividing the island into five huge plots on which they would each build a house. Instead they sold it to a corporate buyer. We first heard about the new project to create an exclusive residential area in 1953 when it was revealed that the island in Bayou St. John would be developed into residential sites selling for $18,000 each. The unique settlement overlooking City

Former mayor Ray Nagin put his Park Island home up for sale last month for $729,000.

Park would have 24 lots facing the water, four interior lots and a bridge to access the properties. The corporation that subdivided the island was called Park Island Inc., and its officers were Joseph Schiro, Livingston S. Hiern and Jacques Fortier. The lots were 80-by-140 feet, except for one, a triangular lot 290 feet long with a private driveway. Although the road to the island now begins at St. Bernard Avenue, the original plan was to build a bridge from Wisner Boulevard, which runs between the bayou and New Orleans City Park, but park authorities objected. The first houses were built in 1957, and the last in 1973. Several of the houses were designed by renowned New Orleans architect Albert Ledner. One in particular is called the “ashtray house” because of an architectural feature that incorporates 1,200 amber ashtrays. This house belongs to former Mayor Ray Nagin, who has put it on the market for $729,000 — and that includes an air-conditioned garage.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < KNOWLEDGE < < < < < < < < < < <IS < <POWER <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < QUOTES OF THE WEEK > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > “One of the real changes that comes when you start runon <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< < < < < < < < ning > > > >for > > >President > > > > > > >—> >as > >opposed > > > > > > >to> >being > > > >an > > >analyst >> Fox — is I have to actually know what I’m talking about.” — >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < Presidential candidate Newt Gingrich, joking with a crowd in

scuttle Butt

South Carolina on Nov. 29.

“Under normal circumstances, Gingrich would have some real problems with the social-conservative community. But these aren’t normal circumstances.” — Tony Perkins, former Louisiana state representative and current head of the Family Research Council, explaining his support for Gingrich in the 2012 presidential election. Gingrich, who is in his third marriage, has admitted to carrying on an affair with his current wife, Callista, while still married to his second wife, Marianne — and doing so while leading the impeachment of former President Bill Clinton, whom the GOP lambasted as immoral. In 2009, Perkins told MSNBC, “I think all public servants need to be faithful to their vows of marriage. I can’t imagine why voters would think politicians would be faithful to them if they’re not faithful to their spouse.”

No, Local is Still Good A LOOK AT THE FIVE BIGGEST MYTHS PEOPLE USE TO TRASH THE LOCAL-FOOD MOVEMENT — AND WHY THEY’RE WRONG. BY JILL RICHARDSON

t’s become predictable. At regular intervals, someone, somewhere, will decide it’s time to write another article “debunking” the local food movement. The latest installment is by Steve Sexton, posted on the Freakonomics blog (www.freakonomics.com — which also treated us to a previous post called “Do We Really Need a Few Billion Locavores?”) And we must not forget the leading anti-locavore, James McWilliams, who gave us “The Locavore Myth” and similar articles. But if you enjoy the flavor of organic heirloom tomatoes, fresh-picked from the farm, here’s how to read these articles without feeling guilty that your love of local food is harming the planet and starving people in the Global South.

I

Myth 1: People who eat local eat the same diet as those who don’t.

BIODISTRICT IMPACT MEASURED IN BILLIONS — RICHARDSON

While California is the largest producer of peaches in the U.S., the Gulf South produces plenty of its own. In Louisiana, it’s the town of Ruston, east of Shreveport, that provides many of the peaches for local peach lovers. the New Zealand lamb. With similar production methods and a correspondingly similar carbon footprint, the major difference between the two would be the oil required to ship the New Zealand lamb halfway across the world. Myth 2: The only reason for eating local is reducing “food miles.” Often anti-locavore arguments, such as the one above from McWilliams, are predicated on the notion that locavores only eat local to reduce food miles — the

The overall economic impact of the BioDistrict in downtown New Orleans will be well over $6 billion in terms of infrastructure investments, new and “saved” jobs, personal earnings and tax collections, according to LSU economist James Richardson, who also is a member of the Louisiana Revenue Estimating Conference. Richardson’s projections are contained in a report completPAGE 11

c'est what? HOW DO YOU RANK NOPD SUPERINTENDENT RONAL SERPAS’ PERFORMANCE IN 2011?

24% good

29% satisfactory

47% poor

Vote on “c’est what?” on bestofneworleans.com THIS WEEK’S QUESTION

What do you think of the new lighting system on the Superdome?

PAGE 10

BoUQuets Hotel Monteleone

THIS WEEK’S HEROES AND ZEROES

is donating more than $15,000 to Operation Homefront Louisiana, which provides emergency services to military families. The hotel raised the money at its Nov. 13 tailgating party, which featured eight New Orleans chefs. Homefront is hosting a Christmas food drive for families with enlisted service members; find the organization’s current needs and drive information on its website (www.operationhomefront.net).

United Way of Southeast Louisiana

teamed with GMC, the National Football League and volunteers from the New Orleans Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base to build a “Healthy Kids Zone” at Eddie Gatto Playground in Gentilly. The build project on Nov. 29 was part of GMC and United Way’s Monday Night Football Tour and NFL’s Play 60, which aims to get 1.9 million kids involved in active play by 2018.

Dillard University Choir

was selected to perform in the East Wing of the White House on Dec. 9 for presidential guests viewing holiday decorations. Directed by S. Carver Davenport, the choir will perform traditional and contemporary arrangements. In a university statement, Davenport said, “I am truly blessed to be the choir director for such wonderful young people who are passionate about cultivating their voices and their performances.”

Lil’ Boosie

was sentenced to eight years in state prison last week following a guilty plea for conspiring to smuggle codeine, Ecstasy and marijuana into the Louisiana State Penitentiary at Angola and the Dixon Correctional Institute in Jackson, La. The Baton Rouge rapper is in the middle of a four-year sentence for drug possession. He’s due back in court April 30, 2012 — to face a first-degree murder charge.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

A favorite anti-locavore argument is that eating local does not reduce oil usage or carbon emissions. Now, if locavores were munching on locally produced Big Macs and other highly processed foods as the rest of the mainstream food system does, this argument might be correct. But that’s not the case. James McWilliams likes to use the example of a study on lamb which shows that eating New Zealand lamb in London actually has a smaller carbon footprint than lamb from the U.K. The New Zealand lamb is raised on pasture, and even when you factor in the carbon emissions from shipping, it is still friendlier to the environment than grain-fed factory farmed U.K. lamb. Well, sure. Only no self-respecting London locavore would dream of eating grain-fed, factory farmed lamb. He or she would find a local farmer raising lamb on pasture instead. Now compare the carbon footprint of that to

“As the great philosopher Emeril Lagasse said: Kick it up a notch.” — Presidential candidate Herman Cain in Ohio on Nov. 30, signaling his campaign would continue despite charges that he, too, had an extramarital affair.

09

news

views

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

page 9

10

number of miles the food traveled from farm to fork — and the reason they do that is to reduce carbon emissions. Since modern shipping methods are relatively efficient, it is then easy to prove that it’s very efficient to transport a truckload or train car full of fresh peaches from California around the rest of the U.S., compared to the efficiency of driving a relatively small quantity of peaches to and from a farmers market. No doubt one can come up with numbers showing that, per pound of peach, transporting large quantities of peaches across the country uses less oil than transporting smaller quantities shorter distances. But that assumes this is the only benefit to eating local, and it isn’t. For one thing, who picked the California peaches? Probably migrant laborers. How were they treated? How were they paid? Probably poorly. What was sprayed on those peaches? In 2004, more than 100 different pesticides were used in California peaches, including highly toxic ones like methyl bromide, paraquat, chlorpyrifos and carbaryl. This totaled 468,804 pounds of pesticides used on peaches in California alone that year. How about water usage? What is the rationale of growing the majority of the nation’s fruit in a state that does not have enough water without heavy irrigation (and also lacks the necessary abundance of water to accomplish all that irrigation)? A farm with healthy soil will also produce healthier — and more flavorful — food. Your body is wired up to desire flavorful fruits and vegetables because they are better for you. And when you eat out at a restaurant that serves local food, often the chef can work together with local farms so the farmers plant the specific varieties of fruits and vegetables that the chef wants to serve. One last reason for eating local is the relationship that one forms within one’s community, and the economic multiplier effect that occurs within the community when one buys local. This extends beyond just food to other goods as well. When you spend your money locally, it enriches your community. When you buy from a large grocery chain, some of your money goes to pay the clerk who checked you out and the manager who oversees that clerk, but the rest goes to the grocery store’s corporate headquarters, to the truckers, the warehouses, and to the farm that grew your food, far away from where you live. What’s more, when you buy from the same local farmers each week, you build relationships with those who grew your food. Myth 3: Growing food locally is inefficient. This is the latest tirade against eating

local: “comparative advantage,” which argues it makes the most sense to grow Alabama’s potatoes in Idaho, where potato yields far exceed those in Alabama. This depends on your idea of efficiency. Idaho is no doubt growing Russet Burbank potatoes, the kind used in French fries. These are large, high-yielding potatoes, especially when — as described by writer Michael Pollan — they “have been doused with so much pesticide that their leaves wear a dull white chemical bloom and the soil they’re rooted in is a lifeless gray powder.” In The Botany of Desire, Pollan describes how an Idaho farmer with 3,000 acres grows potatoes (and nothing but potatoes!). He begins with a soil fumigant, then herbicide. Then he plants his potatoes, using an insecticide as he does. Next, another herbicide — and so on. For “efficiency” he applies these pesticides by adding them to the water in his irrigation system, water that is then returned to its source, a local river. He also has a crop-dusting plane spray the plants every two weeks, and he applies 10 doses of chemical fertilizer. (With all of these chemicals, the farmer told Pollan he won’t eat his own potatoes. He grows a special, chemical-free plot of spuds near his house for his own consumption.) Altogether, in a good year, an Idaho potato farmer will spend $1,950 per acre in order to net $2,000 per acre. Efficient? Perhaps the Alabama potato farmers who are achieving much lower yields than they might in Idaho are using the same business model. If so, they are bad businesspeople, as it would require a lot of costly inputs to produce less of a commodity that is sold by the pound, and they would make rather little money for their trouble. But if any of them subscribe to the locavore model of farming and eating, then this will not be the case. Hopefully, the Alabama farmers forgo the costly inputs, so that the money earned from the potatoes after their harvest is their own. Potatoes, after all, require little soil fertility. In the Andes, where potatoes were first domesticated, a farmer named Juan Cayo grows potatoes at the end of a four-year rotation on his fields near Lake Titicaca. First, he grow fava beans, which infuse the soil with nitrogen. For the next two years, he grows grains (barley and oats), which use up most of the nitrogen in the soil. Last, he grows potatoes, which are happy enough to grow using whatever fertility is leftover. Crop rotation also serves to deal with the nematodes and insects that the Idaho farmer sprayed for. If any pests find the potato crop and begin to breed, they will have a bad surprise when, the next year, a different crop is sown in that field and they suddenly have no food. Some of them might find where the farmer is

now growing this year’s potatoes, but it will take them time to get there. For the bugs that do arrive, there are a number of organic strategies. Least efficient, but always an option, is picking the bugs off by hand. Better yet, a farmer can provide habitat for insects or birds that prey on the pest or spray Bacillus thuringiensis, a bacterium that naturally kills insects. Last, an organic farmer growing for a local market will plant a number of potato varieties, not just one. The reasons for growing several varieties are many. Some varieties may be best for baking, others for mashed potatoes, and still others for frying. One variety might taste the best or yield the most but lacks natural resistance to a fungal disease, whereas another variety with mediocre yields does naturally resist the disease. Some varieties mature faster than others, allowing the farmer to harvest and sell potatoes all season long. And if all of the potatoes fail, the farmer is also growing a number of other crops in addition to potatoes. In short, agrobiodiversity — growing diverse varieties and diverse species — provides insurance. Myth 4: We can’t feed a growing population on local (organic) food. This is the biggest whopper of all. The recent Freakonomics article states: “From roughly 1940 to 1990, the world’s farmers doubled their output to accommodate a doubling of the world population. And they did it on a shrinking base of cropland. Agricultural productivity can continue to grow, but not by turning back the clock. Local foods may have a place in the market. But they should stand on their own, and local food consumers should understand that they aren’t necessarily buying something that helps the planet, and it may hurt the poor.” This argument ignores the vast expanses of land planted with entirely unnecessary crops for feeding the world. No doubt we need some cotton, sugar, and corn, etc. But the amount of land under these crops, which are then used to produce biofuels, processed foods, factory-farmed meat, paper, clothing, and industrial inputs, is immense, wasteful, and largely (although not entirely) unnecessary. And grain-fed meat, as pointed out so many years ago by Frances Moore Lappé in Diet for a Small Planet, is a wasteful use of calories compared to feeding grain directly to people. If we care about feeding the world while using fewer resources, switching to pasture-raised meat — and less of it per person in the developed world — is a must. Doing so would likely improve our health as a nation at the same time. Myth 5: Eating local (organic) food is elitist.

In the United States, where processed food is artificially cheap and many people eat what they can afford to buy at the expense of their health, local food is a luxury. For those who do not grow their own food, and especially for those who want to eat in restaurants or buy from a grocery store, local and organic food is expensive. But let’s reframe the issue. Instead of asking for cheaper (but unhealthy and environmentally destructive) food, let’s ask for living wages so that anyone who works full time can support their family and feed them well. Let’s ask for an expanded middle class instead of a growing gap between rich and poor. We must also note that outside of the United States and Europe, this equation is different. For peasants, local, organic food is cheap and low-risk. Going back to the example of potatoes, in the Andes, a farmer might grow 50 varieties of potatoes. Some varieties cannot be eaten directly because they are bitter or spicy, and they are instead freeze-dried using traditional methods and stored for years as a hedge against years with a bad crop. Likewise, the Andes are home to more than 3,000 varieties of quinoa. A few animals are kept to eat items that humans cannot eat and to serve as a sort of insurance — a literal “piggy bank.” When income is needed, the farmer can sell a pig or a cow. Farmers grow different varieties and different crops at different altitudes: llamas (for meat) and alpacas (for fiber) in the highest areas, then potatoes, quinoa and other tubers and grains a little lower, then corn, and citrus and vegetables at lower altitudes. They have done this since pre-Incan times. Farmers from the lowlands trade crops with farmers from the highlands. This sort of agriculture is not unique to the Andes (although the crops and the use of different altitudes is). Using these methods, farmers can avoid going into debt and can protect their families against bad years. Hopefully, if one variety of a crop fails, another does not. Rare is the year when every single crop fails — and should that happen, farmers have stores of preserved food from years past and can even subsist on weeds and wild plants and animals. For the billions of peasants in the world, purchased, processed foods are elitist, not local, organic foods. Next time you read a column that tells you your love of fresh, flavorful, healthy local foods is elitist, inefficient, or contributing to world hunger, feel free to shred that article and put it in your compost pile — then continue enjoying your delicious Green Zebra and Brandywine tomatoes with a little bit of extra virgin olive oil, homegrown basil and sea salt without the slightest bit of guilt.

scuttlebutt

page 9

The BudgeT, Approved

The New Orleans City Council unanimously approved a $497 million city

operating budget for 2012 last Thursday, Dec. 1 — the legal deadline for adopting a budget. Next year’s municipal spending plan is nearly $2 million higher than the one Mayor Mitch Landrieu proposed in October. The additional money reflects hopes for an anticipated $1.8 million in state reimbursements to the city for casino support services — even though Gov. Bobby Jindal vetoed a state appropriation for that very purpose last summer. Otherwise, the council made only a few changes to the mayor’s budget proposal, which called for five to 10 percent across-the-board cuts for all departments except police, fire and the New Orleans Recreation Department. Most changes increased spending for non-police public safety programs. The NOPD’s proposed $119 million budget (up $10 million from this year) was cut by $500,000. That money was transferred to the Orleans Parish District Attorney’s office to be used for witness protection — still less than the $1.2 million increase DA Leon Cannizzaro said his office needs to maintain its current operations. The council also voted to increase the Orleans Parish Sheriff’s Office’s budget by $200,000 to pay for its electronic monitoring program. The Public Defender’s office, meanwhile, saw a boost of $475,000. Noticeably absent from the council’s list of upward public safety adjustments was the budget for New Orleans Municipal Court. The court will be forced to take on thousands of additional cases next year as all state misdemeanors will be transferred there from Orleans Parish Criminal District Court — on top of the 30,000-plus cases it heard this year. Included in those additional cases are municipal domestic violence cases. Despite taking on a much larger workload, Municipal Court’s budget will be cut by nearly $300,000 next year, from $2.8 million to just over $2.5 million. Landrieu’s proposed 25 percent cut to the City Planning Commission, a major point of contention during budget hearings, was rolled back. Council members voted to pay for six new planners for the City Planning Commission, representing a $440,000 increase. Likewise, the Department of Public Works got $18.1 million, $300,000 above the mayor’s proposal, for additional pothole removal crews (though the city will not make up the $4 million the department will lose in federal grants next year). The largest single departmental adjustment, however, went to City Council itself. The Council rejected Landrieu’s proposed $750,000 cut and instead allocated itself a $100,000 net increase above the 2011 budget, for a total council budget of $9.95 million. — Charles Maldonado

TRAFFIC TICKETS ALCOHOL-RELATED OFFENSES EXPUNGEMENTS

ANN R. BAEHR ATTORNEY AT LAW

(504) 835-9248 3231 N. I-10 Service Rd • Metairie, LA 70002 I can help to Prevent Increased Insurance Premiums, Protect Your Driving & Criminal Record, Affordable Fees. (EXCLUDING

COSTS)

811 Conti Street

504-523-8619

Mon-Sun 10am-6am www.erinrosebar.com

New Orleans

Bowl

Saturday, Dec. 17 • 8pm Wake Up & Live Specials Every Day • 10AM-2PM Hi-Life Specials • Mon-Thurs • Midnight-2am

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

ed last month for BioDistrict New Orleans (www.biodistrictneworleans.org). The report measures the economic impact of the district’s construction phase, which will be most intense in the first five years but will continue up to 20 years, as well as the impact of ongoing operations once the district’s component institutions are up and running. Richardson’s study estimates total “investment” during the first five years will be more than $1.6 billion — not including major equipment purchases — with a total of more than $3.3 billion in economic impact during that same period. That $3.3 billion includes more than 7,000 jobs a year (most of them in construction) and more than $1.1 billion in personal earnings. New state and local tax collections will reach $140 million or more during those same five years, he estimates. “The construction activity in the first three to four years will create a noticeable surge in the economy,” Richardson writes, adding that the cash infusion will come both from public as well as private sources. The first five years will see most of the public investment, he writes, with private and institutional investment following in years 6 through 20. In years 6 through 20, Richardson estimates total “estimated business activity” related to the construction phase at more than $3.2 billion, sustaining more than 2,000 jobs per year and personal earnings between $426 million a year and $650 million a year. Once the district is operational, the economic impact will be even more significant, according to Richardson. “Direct jobs are expected to grow from 8,800 in year 5 to over 21,000 direct jobs in year 20, an increase of over 12,000 jobs. Overall direct and indirect job growth is estimated at over 22,600 new jobs due to the development of the BioDistrict from year 5 to year 20.” Richardson estimates total jobs — saved and new — will exceed 36,000 by year 20. The total economic impact of construction and operations, he says, will mean nearly $2.6 billion in annual personal earnings by year 20 and more than $330 million in local and state tax collections. On a final note, Richardson wrote that he believes his estimates are somewhat conservative. (On the state Revenue Estimating Conference, he is typically the most conservative member in terms of forecasting revenues.) “We did not project the same growth pattern for New Orleans as have occurred in other medical districts,” the report states, “but this is not to say that this higher level of growth cannot be obtained.” — Clancy DuBos

11

ONE STOP SHOP

ATTENTION:

Now Open in Two Locations! MEET THE TITLE LADY.

The Title & Insurance has been owned and operated by Connie Arbour for 10 years. As a Notary Public and Louisiana Public Tag Agent, she has been meeting the needs of the community for over 20 years. This Christian based business is happy to serve anyone.

• TITLE TRANSFERS • LICENSE PLATES

NO WAIT SPECIALTY COMMERCIAL HANDICAP

EAST 9382 CHEF MENTEUR HWY., NOLA 504-241-7510 • 504-241-7272 FAX - 504-241-3732

• INSURANCE

AUTO, HOME, FLOOD & RENTERS

• NOTARY PUBLIC ON SITE

DA PARISH 1910 E. JUDGE PEREZ DR CHALMETTE, LA 70043 • 504-279-5005 FAX - 504-279-5008

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

www.thetitlelady.org

12

r i c e m i l l n o w

l o f t s

o p e n

A buil ding of br eat ht aking o r iginalit y . C ap ti va t i n g r i ver v i e ws . Insp ired street a r t . Sublime o pen s pac e. Ar ch i t e ct u r al art i fa ct s . Hospit ality s er v ic es . A joy ful t r ibut e t o c r e a t i v i t y a n d b e a u ty. 0 1-03 bed r oo ms | 75 0 -2 1 0 0 s q f t | $ 1 6 0 0 - $ 4 0 0 0 5 22 m ontegut @ c har t r es in t he by wat er 5 0 4.300.1 130 ricem illl of ts.c o m

neWs

vieWs

Losing Coco

Smokey quartz ring - $980 Turquoise & diamond ring - $2,020 Turquoise & diamond earrings - $1,680 Sterling silver & 18k gold chain - $1,800

RemembeRing musician and FRenchmen stReet FixtuRe coco Robicheaux, who died nov. 25. by maRk Fol se

W

him with a stick.” Robicheaux had ridden his bicycle to the Apple Barrel with friends Leigh and Jim Crawford, who went into the deli across the street while Robicheaux headed for the bar. He sat down and greeted Shaw with a friendly kiss. Shaw said she turned around to mix Robicheaux’s usual drink — Sauza Reposado tequila, shaken over ice — and when she turned back around, she saw Robicheaux slumped over the bar before he fell to the barroom floor. Robicheaux’s roommate, fellow musician John Williams, was playing when he collapsed. He and his drummer rushed over, searching for a pulse. They found one, briefly, and then it was gone. An ambulance arrived to take him to Tulane Medical Center, but those at the Apple Barrel say it came too late to save him. “I was holding him when he passed,” Williams says. Word spread quickly up and down Frenchmen Street and over the Internet. That night, the bar was packed with musicians and friends. “I couldn’t name them all. That night was such a blur of just trying to keep up with orders,“ Furlong says. On the following Monday, the bar was quiet, the New Orleans Saints game ignored on the small corner television. Montoya and Williams were scheduled to perform during halftime and after the game. Williams, who said he was not ready to talk — “I’ll call you tomorrow” — sat at a table near the door nursing a draft beer. A handful of regulars stopping in, paused at his table a moment for a few words or a hug. Furlong told of a call from Robicheaux on the previous Tuesday, wishing him a happy Thanksgiving. “I knew him pretty well, but would never expect a call like that,” he says, adding that several of the musicians with whom Robicheaux had played in the past, as they visited the Barrel to mourn with friends and pay their respects, told a similar story of an unexpected call. When Robicheaux ended the call, “He said, ‘Goodbye, Douglas,’ in a very final way,” which Furlong found strange. “Losing Jimmy May and Kenny Holladay really hit Coco hard,” Furlong adds. (Holladay, another musician and Frenchmen Street regular, died of cancer the month before.) Montoya, at the end of the bar, nods in agreement. “I just think he was ready to go see Jimmy and play with Kenny.” A Dec. 12 second line and concert have been scheduled to honor Coco Robicheaux. For details, see Events listings on page 65.

RetroFITZ

Insulation + Home Weatherization Your Home Weatherization Specialist Lower Utility Costs!

Call Today For Your Free Consultation

(504) 444-6994

Qualify for federal tax credits and much more Open and Closed Cell Foam • Blown-In Cellulose Lapollo Licensed Airtight Applicator

retro-fitz.com

Fully Licensed & Insured

Authorized Weatherization Contractor

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

hen news of the death of local blues and spiritual icon Coco Robicheaux went viral on the Internet Nov. 25, some said his last words were, “I’m home.” Bartender Sara Shaw at the Apple Barrel bar on Frenchmen Street, who attended to him in his last moments, as well as the patrons seated next to him when he collapsed, remember them as “The next round is on me.” Either would fit. The Barrel is a cramped space with a single unisex bathroom, walls covered with dollars and photographs, its best feature a mural of musicians behind the stage. There is a tricky step up to the bar that often trips up drunk tourists, and there are never enough ashtrays for the mostly-smoking crowd. The stage is one narrow end of the room, at ground level, with no amplification. The tip bucket is an old spittoon atop a barstool patrons must pass to get in or out. It was Robicheaux’s favorite bar — that Quarter Rat second living room, a place many tourists miss — where everyone is a friend or a tolerated eccentric. “Sometimes he would pop in and out all day; [other times] he would come in mid-afternoon and stay all evening,” says bartender and friend J.D. Furlong. Among Robicheaux’s best friends was Jimmy May, another artist and bartender there, who died in September 2009. Years ago, Apple Barrel owner Liz Montoya saw Robicheaux at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival, and asked him one night what it would take for him to play the Barrel. Make me an offer, Robicheaux told her, and so began a 10-year Saturday night gig. That long run ended in an argument one night — a tequila-fueled misunderstanding, according to Furlong — between May and the owner. May quit and Robicheaux followed his friend, moving his regular Saturday night gig up the street to Check Point Charlie, but he never stopped coming to the Barrel. A photograph of Robicheaux on one wall bears a Hitler mustache added by Robicheaux himself. “He asked for a pen … and said someone was going to do it, so it might as well be him,” Furlong says. A set of caricatures that lines the stairs going up to Adolfo’s restaurant above the bar includes one of Robicheaux. Robicheaux had just returned from a week-long Thanksgiving visit with his daughter and granddaughter in Atlanta when he walked into the Apple Barrel Friday night. “He adored that child,” Montoya said. “He tried to quit smoking cigars once after she started imitating

13

COVER STORY

we are

PLAYING by the Orleans Parish District Attorney Leon Cannizzaro says his office is getting a bum rap for mistakes made by his predecessors — but he admits that lapses in turning over ‘Brady material’ to defense lawyers undermines public confidence in the system. I N T E R V I E W B Y K E V I N A L L M A N & C L A N C Y D u B O S | P H OTO S BY C H ERY L G ER B ER

T

he day after Leon Cannizzaro was elected district attorney in Orleans Parish, two ranking prosecutors from the office showed up at his home with some bad news: Attorneys for John Thompson, who was convicted of armed robbery and murder (in separate cases) in 1985, had won a huge legal judgment against the DA’s office. The judgment came after a prosecutor made a deathbed confession that he had deliberately

withheld evidence favorable to Thompson in the armed robbery case. Such favorable information, known as “Brady material” after a U.S. Supreme Court case by the same name, must be given to defense lawyers — or a conviction can be overturned. Thompson spent 18 years in jail — 14 of them on death row — for the subsequent murder conviction. He won a new trial and was acquitted of the murder charge in 2003. He then sued the page 17

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

RULES

15

WHAT IS THE DIAGNOSTIC IMAGING SERVICES ADVANTAGE? IT’S PROVIDING HIGH QUALITY MEDICAL IMAGING THAT DOES NOT COST AN ARM AND A LEG!

AVOID AN IMAGING EXAM AT A HOSPITAL-OWNED CENTER AVOID HELPING TO COVER THEIR HIGH HOSPITAL OVERHEAD COSTS GET EXACTLY WHAT YOU NEED FOR EXACTLY WHAT IT’S WORTH What if you could have the same screening or diagnostic test for substantially less money – potentially thousands less?

YOUR MONEY IS LEFT TO SPEND ON BETTER THINGS Why choose Diagnostic Imaging Services? Ask patients who came to us for the very first time in 2011: “This facility and staff was the friendliest, cleanest clinic I have ever visited in the New Orleans area.” “I just want to say thank you for having such a wonderful staff. I was very, very satisfied!” “The staff is very polite and caring. I would recommend to others.” “I made sure to tell all my friends and family how wonderful the staff is. I have never felt that comfortable getting a mammogram done before.”

MRI | CT | PET/CT | Nuclear Medicine| Digital X-Ray | Interventional Studies Mammography | DEXA | Ultrasound| Breast MRI | Breast Biopsy | Cyst Aspiration | Therapeutic & Swedish Massage Exams performed by registered technologists adhering to the highest level of mandated quality standards

Patient Financial Services: 504-459-3220 | Patient Scheduling: 504-883-5999

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

Visit www.disnola.com to schedule an appointment or to request more information

16

for every 250 save $50 you spend $

Instant savings applies to full priced Baseline and @work styles only. Offer valid November 25 through December 31, 2011.

Thank you for shopping locally. View our Christmas Catalogue at Rapps.com & wrap up your shopping today

3250 Severn Ave. @ 17th St. | 885-6536 | www.rapps.com

COVER STORY PAGE 15

controversy undermines public confidence in his office and in the entire criminal justice system. This Wednesday, Dec. 7, Cannizzaro is expected to testify in Orleans Parish Criminal District Court Judge Julian Parker’s courtroom in response to a subpoena in yet another post-conviction Brady hearing, this one involving a defendant convicted last year for a 2008 murder. At issue is information about an alleged deal given a jailhouse snitch who testified against Jamaal Tucker. Defense lawyers were not given information about the deal until after the trial. Cannizzaro says he’s not fighting the subpoena. Last week, Cannizzaro sat down with Gambit to discuss these cases, their impact on his office’s effectiveness, and how he hopes to overcome the damage that’s been done to the reputation of the office. gambit The topic of “Brady material” is very much in the news these days because of some high-profile cases alleging that New Orleans prosecutors withheld evidence that should have been turned over to defense lawyers. What is your definition of Brady material? LEON CANNIZZARO In the United States Supreme Court decision of Brady v. Maryland, the Court said if a prosecutor is in possession of information that exculpates or in any way assists the defendant in a criminal proceeding, it is his or

DOGGIE DAYCARE, BOARDING, GROOMING & MORE MONDAY – FRIDAY 6-8 SATURDAY & SUNDAY 7-7 4920 TCHOUPITOULAS ST. 218-4098

DOGGIE DAYCARE & GROOMING MONDAY – FRIDAY 6:30-7:30 617 S. CLAIBORNE AVE. 304-3844

NOW OPEN

WWW.CANINECONNECTIONNOLA.COM

Jefferson loves Canine Connection

because he gets to play with all his dog friends he has made over the last five and a half years.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

DA’s office and won a judgment that, with interest, had grown to a staggering $14 million. Cannizzaro appealed the Thompson case all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court and ultimately prevailed, but Thompson was a harbinger of other explosive “Brady cases.” Michael Anderson, who was convicted for the 2006 murders of five teenagers, got a new trial because prosecutors discovered a videotaped interview with a key witness after his trial. The video shows the witness making inconsistent statements as to what she saw — and clearly it should have been found and turned over to defense lawyers before the trial. Cannizzaro ordered the tape turned over to defense lawyers immediately, but he was pilloried in the press for not finding the tape sooner. In a deal to avoid a potential death sentence, Anderson has since pleaded “no contest” to five counts of manslaughter and awaits sentencing; he maintains his innocence. Last month, Cannizzaro’s office argued yet another Brady case before an increasingly hostile U.S. Supreme Court. The High Court has not yet ruled in the latest case, involving defendant Juan Smith, who was convicted of murdering five people in a 1995 home invasion. Smith now seeks a new trial. Cannizzaro says there is no allegation of intentional hiding of evidence in the Smith case, but he readily admits that every new Brady

SUNDAY 12-5 • MON-SAT 10-6

324-4727

17

‘If we have

Holiday Catering and

To-Go Menu For All Your Entertaining Needs Chef Shane Pritchett

HOUSE-SMOKED

NEW ORLEANS

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

3115 MAGAZINE 899-9555

18

Whole Turkeys Half- & Whole-Chickens Sausages, Bacon, Brisket, Corned Beef Pulled Pork & St. Louis-style Ribs House-Smoked Cheeses by the Pound & Platter

SHANEMADE Biscuits, Jams, BBQ Sauces

924 ROYAL 525-6211

Classic Sides, Soups & Dressings By the Pint & Quart

BATON ROUGE

Bar-B-Que Boxed Dinners To-Go

711 JEFFERSON HWY.

For 4 to 12 people

SHANEMADE

Cookies, Pies, Cakes

AND MUCH, MUCH MORE!!! Please place orders in advance Christmas orders must be placed by noon Friday, December 23, for pick-up on Saturday, December 24 by 2 pm

FAT HEN GROCER Y

7457 St. Charles Avenue

(504) 266-2921

Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK www.fathengrill.com

BRADY OR EXCULPATORY INFORMATION, it is our obligation to make defense

counsel aware of that. If we are satisfying that obligation,then

I DON’T SEE IT AS BEING NECESSARY TO GIVE THEM OUR ENTIRE FILE.’ her obligation to turn it over. The original Brady decision required that exculpatory information be turned over if there was a request by the defense for that information. Since then, the Supreme Court has said the defense does not have to request information that is helpful to the defense; the prosecutor has to turn that information over if he is merely aware of it. If he has it in his file, he must make that available to defense counsel. So it puts an affirmative duty on the prosecutor to disclose? CANNIZZARO Correct. Not only information that he has that is of assistance to the defense, but also information that could impeach prosecution witnesses. If there is information that would assist the defense because it would impeach a prosecution witness’ testimony, the government has a responsibility to turn that over. Another example would be if the prosecution has a witness who got a plea bargain — some leniency in his case or a recommendation of leniency with regard to sentencing of a defendant in that case. That information, too, must be turned over to defense counsel. The Brady rule has been extended

by other cases since then. Those cases have essentially extended the prosecution’s Brady obligation not only to give to the defense information which is helpful or which could assist the defense in his case, but now they also require the state to look to other sources. For instance, if a law enforcement agency learned information which is not necessarily going to be turned over [to the DA] in a police report, it’s the prosecutor’s responsibility to go to that law enforcement official and demand information that may be contained in his notes or other internal documents, to search for information that may be of assistance to the defense counsel — and to turn it over. One of the public’s big misunderstandings about Brady is that it has come to mean “intentional misconduct” on the part of the prosecutor. But the Supreme Court has recognized that a prosecutor can be in good faith in not turning over information — and it would still be a violation of the rules of Brady. So even an inadvertent failure to disclose could get a case overturned? CANNIZZARO No question about that. The issue is not whether the prosecutor is in good faith or not. The courts look simply to whether

apparel shoes jewelry

COVER STORY

Given that extremely high burden and the broad scope of the duty placed upon you, why not just adopt a policy of “open discovery” and give defense lawyers everything in your file — as many other DAs in Louisiana do? CANNIZZARO Part of the problem

with the open discovery rule is that right now, in our particular circum-

stances, we have to worry about the safety of witnesses and the safety of victims. If we were to turn over information to defense counsel with the names and the addresses and phone numbers of the witnesses or victims in non-homicide cases, what we have unfortunately seen in Criminal District Court is that in some circumstances those witnesses have been intimidated, physically harmed or have been prevented from coming into court and testifying. I just do not believe right now in Orleans Parish it is a good thing for me to make available to defense counsel all of the names and the information concerning the witnesses and the victims in these sorts of cases. Aren’t defendants, at some point, entitled to get the names of witnesses? CANNIZZARO They are not entitled.

We have argued this issue in front of the Louisiana Supreme Court, that obviously when the case goes in front of a jury for the jury to determine someone’s guilt or innocence, obviously [the witnesses] have to come forward. We certainly have to let [defense lawyers] know, if it’s exculpatory information, the substance [of a witness’ testimony]. If a witness is going to be called and they’re going to give some contradictory information, we have to let defense counsel be made aware of that. But to turn over their names and their addresses and information personal to them, in my opinion, causes a great risk of harm to those individuals. What if you redacted the witnesses’ names and addresses and gave defense lawyers everything else? CANNIZZARO Well, right now the

law in Louisiana is that we are not obligated to engage in open file discovery.

We understand the law doesn’t require it. But given the temperature out there in Orleans Parish and the difficulties your office is encountering because of what is perceived to be a pattern of extensive, and even egregious, Brady violations, and given the lack of confidence in the system, why not just turn everything over? Have you even considered that policy? CANNIZZARO In some cases, we do turn over the entire file. In some cases the defense lawyer has exactly what the prosecutors have. In cases involving violence, in cases involving murders, attempted murders, armed robberies, rapes — in those sorts of

Now on Magazine!

4223 MAGAZINE STREET (504) 872-9230 | facebook.com/ryeclothing Monday-Saturday 10-6 | Sunday 12-5

SPRAY-FOAM & BLOW-IN CELLULOSE

COLD HOUSE? COLD FLOORS? CAN’T HEAT YOUR HOUSE?

$

4,000

“CHEF MADE, MAW-MAW INSPIRED”

TAX CREDITS & INCENTIVES

•attics •subflooring •walls •renovations •new and old homes •old insulation removal

FREE ESTIMATES

Federal Tax Credit Expires Dec. 31st!!

504-255-5165 mrgreenj.com A New Orleans, LA Co.

Come Try Our

WEEKLY THROWBACK COCKTAIL! 3454 Magazine St. NOLA • 504-899-3374 Hours: Mon-Sat 11am-10pm

COMPLETE FOREIGN CAR CARE, REPAIR & BODY WORK

PREPARE YOUR

VEHICLE FOR HOLIDAY

TRAVELS

››››› BUMPER-TO-BUMPER MAINTENANCE ‹‹‹‹‹ · COOLING SYSTEM · WINTERIZE · OIL CHANGE · TIRES · WIPERS/WASHER · FUEL INJECTION SYSTEM · BRAKE SYSTEM

501 S. CARROLLTON · RIVER ROAD AT CARROLLTON · WWW.MYUPTOWNAUTO.COM

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

or not this information would have been of a helpful, exculpatory nature to the defense counsel — and the information would have to be relevant, something that would make a difference in the outcome of the trial. In some cases the Supreme Court has said, in effect, we find this information is certainly exculpatory, but it is not relevant or material because when we look at the totality of the circumstances … we do not believe that this evidence would have made a difference in the outcome. And in some cases, even though the information might not have been disclosed, the Supreme Court will say, in fashioning a remedy, that it is not necessarily material or relevant to the ultimate issue of guilt or innocence. … My duty as a prosecutor is to turn the evidence over, not necessarily upon request, but upon my learning of any Brady material. And again, the Supreme Court has even expanded that responsibility. Our obligation goes to not only looking to our file — what the police have given us — but also going to law enforcement officials and asking them, “Even in the documents or the information you may have, even in the notes you have made in conducting this investigation, is there any exculpatory information? Is there any contradictory information that you have in your notes or your data that is not contained in the report that you have given us?” So it is simply our obligation. If we misstate the obligation or we are incorrect in our analysis of [Brady] information or incorrect in not turning over that information, then we’re incorrect at our peril. There have been instances where the defense requested that the police report or the DA’s file be turned over to the judge for what we call an in camera [“in chambers,” or private] inspection. And if the judge reviews the information and says, “I do not find there to be any Brady or exculpatory information in the file, and therefore I do not order that this be turned over to the defense counsel,” if an appellate court sees it differently, then we still suffer for that error or overlooking of that particular information.

19

COVER STORY

OPEN MON - SAT BREAKFAST & LUNCH

Green Parrot Nursery

201 Nashville Ave • New Orleans, LA (504) 894-1100

Christmas Trees have arrived! Boxwood, Frasier, Pine and Magnolia garland available

7716 Maple St. • 504.304.6025

PAGE 23

G ott Gour met Cafe uses the fre s h

m ake all of our signature recipes dail y.

now is the Juan Smith case. That’s a very good example of a case where I cannot say that there was any intentional misconduct on the prosecutor’s part because he gave his total file to the district court judge — not once, but twice. And on the second occasion, the judge had a four day hearing to determine whether or not that information was in fact exculpatory to the defendant. On both occasions, the district court judge felt that that information was not Brady material. That decision was upheld by the 4th Circuit Court of Appeal. That decision also was upheld by our Louisiana Supreme Court. So you’ve had a number of judges who have looked at that issue and felt that that was not a Brady violation. Now, bear in mind, that makes no difference to the United States Supreme Court. They certainly may find that the judges were wrong … and reverse this second degree murder conviction. That [Juan Smith case] was a situation where the argument has been that maybe there very clearly was a Brady violation. But was there intentional misconduct? I certainly can’t say from the perspective of the prosecutor that he was intentionally wrong, as you can certainly point to in the Thompson case. Can I say right now that there was a pattern? There have been some

Special Holiday Hours 7 days 9am-7pm www.greenparrotnursery.com

swapboutique.com

s make s d r a C t if t G liday Gif great Ho our new Come try u items & 11am-9pm daily men list! Tue-Fri Sat-Sun 8am-5pm e in w w ne Weekend Breakfast Sat-Sun

3100 Magazine St. • 504-373-6579 www.gottgourmetcafe.com

Great Stocking Stuffers! A selection of tested and tasty Cajun and New Orleans recipes from famous kitchens, as handy as a deck of cards!

deckomeals.com

d e dressings, sauces and meats to

CANNIZZARO The Thompson case is obviously the most egregious case that we have seen in the DA’s office since I have been there. It threatened the very survival of this office because of the ramifications of the multimillion dollar judgment that the office was exposed to on the day that I took office. The case that is in front of the United States Supreme Court right

3717 VETERANS BLVD · METAIRIE · 888-4141

N E X T TO BARN E S & NOBLE

canal street bistro

OPEN

11AM-TIL

@ Eco cafE

now serving world cuisine by chef guillermo peters 3903 canal St

(cornEr of n. Scott)

Mid-city, nEw orlEanS

482.1225

EcocafEno.coM

MAKE THIS HOLIDAY SEASON GRAND GIVE GRAND ISLE GIFT CERTIFICATES

575 Convention Center Blvd.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

In your opinion, was there a pattern of Brady violations in the DA’s office before you took over?

PURPLE, GREEN & GOLD NUTCRACKER

m es t ingredients available for our home a

Much of the information that is contained in the file they have the right to request and receive upon filing of the necessary discovery motions. Discovery rules have been expanded greatly to allow defense lawyers to pretty much learn just about everything about our case that they need to know in order to prepare themselves for trial. They certainly have the right to engage in preliminary hearings where they can listen to what the witnesses will say about what other witnesses will talk about. They have the right to obtain all of the scientific evidence that we have and will present. And they certainly have the right to obtain Brady information, information that assists them in defending the case. But open file discovery, I guess the big concern that we have with that at present … is that witnesses and victims do not want to get involved in the criminal justice system. And for us to say we are going to turn that information over to defense counsel, in my opinion, would place them in a great risk of harm. I think they would lose all confidence, and I think we lose a great deal of credibility if something were to happen to them. We’re going to give the defendants everything that they are entitled to with regard to exculpatory information. But I do not want to [turn over entire files] at the risk of losing the victim or the essential witness.

Fulton St. at Lafayette 504.520.8530 | grandislerestaurant.com

21

#8 - Gambit - 12/6/11

COVER STORY PAGE 21

‘Can I say right now that

THERE WAS A PATTERN? There have been some

ADD SOME FUN TO YOUR SCHEDULE!

[bad] cases.

But whether it’s a pattern of

DELIBERATE INDIFFERENCE, I just can’t say that.’

[bad] cases. But whether it’s a pattern of deliberate indifference, I just can’t say that because I don’t think I’ve seen enough so far. … We’re talking about [cases] that took place in the ’80s and one that took place in the late ’90s.

CANNIZZARO I don’t think you can say that because you see other cases coming out of Orleans Parish. I don’t think you can say it’s an isolated case. It was certainly the most egregious. Thompson was wronged. There was a rogue prosecutor involved in the Thompson case. Thompson was convicted of an attempted armed robbery when the assistant district attorney responsible for prosecuting that case intentionally withheld evidence that exonerated him from that charge. That is not something anyone condones.

And at the U.S. Supreme Court level you won the Thompson case, at least in terms of saving your office a pile of money. But Justice [Ruth Bader] Ginsburg wrote a scathing dissent in that case, and a lot of people are looking at that dissent now in light of the Juan Smith case, which is pending before the same U.S. Supreme Court. Knowing about Justice Ginsburg’s dissent, and after hearing some harsh questions during oral argument in the Smith case, do you feel that you

CANNIZZARO Well, in the Smith case we had been through the district court on two occasions. On both occasions the judgments of the district court judge had been upheld by the intermediate appellate court and the Louisiana Supreme Court. And I think as Justice [Antonin] Scalia stated during the oral arguments [in the Smith case], the issue is not whether or not the information should have been turned over to defense counsel. In this case it was a witness indicating at some earlier time that he was not able to make an identification of anyone, and later coming back and saying he could identify someone. And the statement that he could not make an identification was not turned over to defense counsel. There is no question that that is impeaching information that should have been turned over. But I think the question now goes to what is the remedy. There is a Brady violation, but should the defendant be entitled to a new trial? I think that from the Supreme Court’s perspective, they now have to look at the totality of the circumstances,

BETTER THAN EZRA Friday, December 30 8pm Purchase tickets online at harrahs.com or call Ticketmaster at 1-800-745-3000.

Harrah’s reserves the right to change, cancel or amend entertainment at any time. Facebook is a registered trademark of Facebook, Inc. Twitter is a registered trademark of Twitter, Inc. Must be 21 or older to enter casino and to gamble. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® ©2011, Caesars License Company, LLC.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

So would you argue that Thompson was an isolated case?

took a bit of a risk in taking the Smith case all the way up, that maybe you should have conceded and given him a new trial rather than risk setting some new precedent or getting an adverse ruling — or finding that there’s now a pattern of Brady violations in your office?

23

COVER STORY

‘I spoke to a

MOTHER WHOSE SON WAS SHOT something like

SEVEN TIMES, and he survived. And the mother comes in and says,

“I DON’T WANT MY BOY TESTIFYING.”’

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

the entire record, to determine whether or not there is a basis for upholding that conviction. If they find that the Brady violation was relevant and material, then they will reverse the conviction and order a new trial. If they find that it was not relevant or not material, that the withholding was not prejudicial, then they will affirm the conviction.

24

So this is a very narrow case. And if you lose you’re hoping for a narrow decision. But you do run the risk of a broader decision. CANNIZZARO There is no doubt that

when we’re in front of the United States Supreme Court they can certainly revise the entire decision with regard to Brady. We’re well aware of that. … Every time we go in front of the United States Supreme Court, we run that risk. What’s your office’s policy with regard to teaching your assistants how to handle Brady obligations? CANNIZZARO When an assistant DA gets hired, one of the first things we do is give him or her a copy of the relevant cases. We ask them to familiarize themselves with that material. We also have booklets that are available to them where they can look at all of the cases that have come out surrounding this. Every year we provide at least two sessions of Brady instruction by our assistants. We talk about specific case scenarios.

Did that happen when you were an assistant DA under Harry Connick? CANNIZZARO No. It was not that extensive. We were aware of the obligations, but it was not as extensive. It’s drilled into them today because it’s part of their obligation.

What’s your policy on disciplining assistant DAs who commit Brady violations? CANNIZZARO If we caught someone doing something as egregious as what happened in the Thompson case, they would obviously be terminated immediately, and we would take all steps to prosecute the person or persons responsible for hiding that sort of information. We are trying to reform the criminal justice system. And the way that we have to reform this system is people have to have confidence in what we’re doing in Criminal District Court. They have to have confidence in this process. Obviously by these violations, by people not believing that the prosecutors are playing fair, that certainly affects the ability of the law enforcement official to do his job. I think it certainly affects our ability to get convictions, and I think ultimately society suffers as a result. I’ve talked to a number of witnesses. I’ve talked to family members of witnesses and victims. I spoke to a mother whose son was shot something like seven times, and he survived. And the mother comes in and says, “I don’t want my boy testifying. … I’m afraid. I’m afraid that if he testifies, even if you get a

conviction, nothing’s going to happen at the end of the day to the bad guy, that he in all likelihood is going to be back out on the streets, and then my son has to run the rest of his life looking over his shoulder. I just don’t have confidence in the justice system.” That doesn’t just mean me. That means the [New Orleans] Police Department. That means our office. That means the criminal justice system, the members of the judiciary. That is what, in my opinion, a Brady violation, a Thompson case, does to our office. Look, it does me absolutely no good to cheat in order to get a conviction. I have a responsibility to get constitutional and legal convictions. It does me no good to go out and cheat to get a conviction because, although it might be good at the outset, the truth always comes out in the long run. In regard to the Michael Anderson case, where the defendant was originally charged with murdering five people, you recently wrote to The TimesPicayune saying that your office voluntarily turned over the controversial DA’s videotape of a witness’ inconsistent statements as soon as it turned up. But wasn’t the information on that tape — that is, the fact that the witness had made inconsistent statements — wasn’t that the Brady material? And was that information turned over in a timely fashion, regardless of whether there was a tape to back it up? CANNIZZARO Yes, and if you check the cross-examination of that witness, you will see that every aspect that she was impeached on by defense counsel was contained in that tape statement.

So you’re saying they already had the relevant information? CANNIZZARO There’s no question about it. Now, look, I’m not going to scream sour grapes. We lost that issue. We argued that issue, and we lost that issue. But again, I think it’s important to note there was no desire and no intent to hide that information.

What was your reaction when the videotape finally landed on your desk in the Anderson case? CANNIZZARO I’m sitting at my desk. They walk in. And they come in and they tell me we’ve got some bad news. They said they found a tape of this witness who had testified for us. And they said we have a taped statement that we did not give to defense counsel prior to the trial. Initially I’m devastated. I’m crushed because I knew what went into the Michael Anderson case. I remember the

Friday night before that case got started. We’re sitting in a conference room around the table. We were all pitching in. And these discussions were going on Friday night, Saturday, Sunday. … And everyone was focused. We were trying to put as many thoughts and ideas together as we could, trying to cram as much information into the prosecutors’ heads as we could. And it was a close case. … It was a good win for what I thought was a very young office. So, yeah, I was devastated. I was crushed … and they explained to me where the thing was found. The tape was in a box with some other material that was not related to the case. And it was just discovered when it was moved. It was in, like, a pile of boxes … where no one would have had any idea about the tape and where it was. We were hurt by that. But the first thing we did was give it to defense counsel. I said, “Give it to the defense attorney. Don’t delay, don’t hesitate. Go give that tape to the defense attorneys right now, immediately.” Was the trial over at that point? CANNIZZARO Yes, it was over with. We gave them [the tape] so that it would assist them in their motion for a new trial.

On another Brady front, in the Jamaal Tucker case, which is currently pending, you have been subpoenaed to appear this week in Judge Julian Parker’s courtroom. Do you have some idea of what you’re going to be asked or what allegations are being made? CANNIZZARO Because this case is an open case, I’m limited as to what I can discuss. I think that the issue in the Tucker case is going to be a narrow issue. The subpoena was requested by defense counsel, and the judge is simply performing a ministerial function in issuing the subpoena. You know, we’re not filing any motions to quash the subpoena. I’m going to go and I’m going to answer the questions they pose to me with regard to this.

Has it crossed your mind since this subpoena came that perhaps this was some cosmic payback for the memo that you wrote to Attorney General Buddy Caldwell about the Criminal Court judges in an unrelated case — one in which you recused yourself but still outlined a possible case for indicting some of them? CANNIZZARO All I can say is you’d have to ask the judge that.

Do you have any regrets about putting that memo in writing as opposed PAGE 26

A GREAT HOLIDAY GIFT!

PAGE 24

‘IF WE CAUGHT

SOMEONE doing something as egregious as what happened

IN THE

THOMPSON

CASE,

they would obviously be

4 easy Ways to Purchase Tickets! CLICK:

CALL:

Ticketmaster.com

800-982-ARTS

IN PERSON:

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 06 > 2011

Mahalia Jackson Theater Box Office & all Ticketmaster Outlets

26

GROUPS (15+): 504-287-0372

IMMEDIATELY, and we would take all steps to

PROSECUTE THE PERSON OR PERSONS

RESPONSIBLE.’ to maybe just making a phone call? And did you ever think that it would be put into the public record somewhere in open court?

MARCH 14 – APRIL 15 MAHALIA JACKSON THEATER lionking.com Tickets subject to applicable service charges. Performance prices, dates, times and cast are subject to change without notice. Single-ticket purchases limited to 8 tickets per person. Other restrictions may apply. ©DISNEY

NEW ORLEANS / C M Y K 7.166"” X 8.083”

TERMINATED

88723 / JR. PAGE / THE GAMBIT RUN DATE: TUESDAY, DECEMBER 6

TWAS DA NIGHT BEFORE CHRISTMAS

www.beanstalkkids.net 504.887.5437 • 7024 Veterans Blvd.

CANNIZZARO I have been criticized a lot for that letter. And everyone’s entitled to their opinion. But I want somebody to tell me what would have been the more prudent course of conduct. What is it that the district attorney should do if someone presents to him evidence of wrongdoing? The Metropolitan Crime Commission sat down with me, with my first assistant. Another individual involved with the Metropolitan Crime Commission sat down and spoke with us. We see the reports aired by one of the television stations. We’re given information. And then we’re asked what are we going to do about it.

#30 - Gambit - 11/29/11

COVER STORY We go to ethics counsel outside of our office, independent ethics counsel. I have no secrets about who it was. We go to [former Judiciary Commission attorney] Steve Scheckman, a person who’s very well respected in this particular field. We sit down with him and say, “You tell me what you think I should do, but please put it in writing.” He puts it in writing in a three-page letter and says, “Although legally I believe you can handle this case, I think as far as what is in the best interest of the criminal justice system, you [should] pass this onto the attorney general.” Nobody would fault you for your recusal, but why outline a possible indictment in writing if you’re not going to handle the case? CANNIZZARO OK. Let me go as

Everything you’ve talked about relates to building confidence in the legal system. What do you say to New Orleanians who have lost faith in that system now because of the bad publicity about Brady violations in your office? CANNIZZARO I would say that I am aware of my Brady responsibilities. I’m aware of my obligations. And I am working extremely hard with the young men and women in that office to restore confidence in this community. Restoring confidence means we are not going in there and cheating in cases. We are playing by the rules. The people of this city have got to give this office an opportunity. They’ve got to give us a chance. You’ve given other district attorneys in this community a chance. Give us an opportunity to go out and show that we can do it better, that we can get the convictions and we can get them fairly. And I think that there has been some demonstration of that up to this point. I know that perception sometimes is reality, and we have to turn the perception around. I think if you look at numbers, at what this office is doing, some of the numbers are off the charts as far as the number of cases we’ve accepted, the number of convictions we’ve obtained, especially with regard to violent crimes. And the length of sentences that people have received, they exceed the numbers of previous administrations. So we’re doing the things we have to do to get the bad guys off the street and hopefully keep them off the street. But it’s about people having confidence in our system. There was a tremendous disconnect between our office and the Police Department [when I took office]. One of the first things we did was reached out to the Police Department to reestablish that relationship. How did we do that? With crimes of violence, we sent investigators to the scene along with an assistant DA and a case manager. Every homicide scene since February of 2009 we’ve had that group of three people from our office who have been out on the scene. But we do more than that. Every week our first assistant, our chief of screening, and our screener who may be responsible for handling a particular homicide, rape, or gun charge meet with the police. We meet with those officers and the officers’ supervisors, trying to create a better work-

THURSDAYS JAZZ R&B HAPPY HOUR 6pm – 9pm

12/8: BRW 12/15: Angela Bell 12/22: Michael Baptiste 12/29: Real Love

REAL LOVE

FRIDAYS TOP 40 FRIDAYS 9pm – 11pm

12/9: The Wiseguys 12/16: Vieux Carrè 12/23: Bucktown All-Stars 12/30: Four Unplugged

THE WISEGUYS

FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS 11PM

10PM

Mixing It Up with House Spin Masters. Plus The Ladies of Masquerade ®.

DJ ROB NICE

DJ HEKTIK

DJ SPIN

SUNDAYS SUNDAY NIGHT DANCE PARTY 7pm – 11pm

DJ CAPTAIN CHARLES

NO COVER CHARGE • Half off bottle service Thursdays & Fridays in Ultra Lounge. • Free self parking with bottle service. • To reserve bottle service in Ultra Lounge, call 504.533.6139.

PRESENTED BY

Harrah’s reserves the right to change, cancel, or amend entertainment at any time. Drinks specials are subject to availability and valid at Harrah’s New Orleans only. Facebook is a registered trademark of Facebook, Inc. Twitter is a registered trademark of Twitter, Inc. Must have valid ID and Total Rewards® card. Subject to availability. Harrah’s reserves the right to change, cancel, or amend this promotion at any time. Additional restrictions may apply. Valid at Harrah’s New Orleans only. Must be 21 or older to enter casino and to gamble. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700. ©2011, Caesars License Company, LLC.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

to why it’s in writing. We go to meet with Buddy Caldwell. … We explained what the issue was. I’m not apologizing for the fact that it’s a five-page letter. We talked about three issues. We asked the attorney general, you investigate this. I have to recuse myself. You do what you think is right. I know the argument has been, “You called the judges criminal.” I never called anybody a criminal. I simply asked the attorney general, “You investigate these allegations. These are allegations that have been made to me.” I think that’s my responsibility. Did I hurt somebody’s feelings? Yeah, I hurt their feelings. Look, if I’m going to reform the criminal justice system, I’ve got to do what I think is right in each and every instance. And if we place people like police officers or DAs or even judges on a pedestal such that they’re above the law or above reproach, then the reform efforts are over with. I think at the end of the day, regardless of what the attorney general does with regard to this, I think our system will become stronger. I think it will fortify the criminal justice system. I also believe that letter was never, ever intended to be made public. That letter was from one prosecutorial agency to another prosecutorial agency. It’s the same situation as if a police officer were to give me a report in a murder case or any egregious case. I read the report. The only time anyone knows the contents of that report is if that report results in an indictment or a bill of information being filed. And the reason for that is because you do not want to sully anyone’s reputation by putting out a document if the charge proves to be baseless or there is no basis in fact for

that charge. … So I don’t apologize for the letter.

27 V1_60854.32_4.729x10.833_4c_Ad.indd 1

11/30/11 3:15 PM

COVER STORY

SPARKLE COLLECTION IN STERLING

“WHERE THE UNUSUAL IS COMMONPLACE.” 5101 W. ESPLANADE AVE., METAIRIE, LA 70006 504-885-4956 • 800-222-4956

‘RESTORING CONFIDENCE means we are

NOT

going in there and

CHEATING IN CASES. We are

LOCAL GRILL SPECIALISTS CLC LICENSED LSU AND WHO DAT 24QT. “FAN POTS” W/ BASKET

Order at Fanpots.com or call 504.943.0853

PLAYING by the

RULES.’

2626 Music Street

(1 block off Florida, between Elysian Fields & Franklin Ave.)

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

www.adgasneworleans.com • 504-943-0853

28

“Merry Mondays” December 5, 12, 19   SAVE an extra 15%   Restaurant Supplies    ● Showroom Open to the Public 

ing relationship, to see to it that if there are any problems with a case, that we learn about the problems as a group. … So there is tremendous coordination. And we’re getting the numbers. You’ve got to have faith in us. You’ve got to step up, and you’ve got to get involved. If you see something that’s not right, if you’re a victim or a witness, you have to let the police know about it. You have to give us a chance to work with them. If you’re afraid, you have to come and talk to us. You have to let us know about that. You know, I’m very proud of the fact that the people who have come forward and worked with us, we haven’t lost anybody. Our Victim/ Witness Unit has certainly been there to help people who have come forward and given us information about cases. We haven’t lost anyone. The only people who have been harmed have been people who have spurned the assistance — “I don’t need it. I’m all right. I can survive this on my own.” Those are the only people that have really been affected because they’ve allowed themselves to stay out there and not take the offers of security that we have made available. You’ve said your office can’t protect every family member of everybody that testifies. CANNIZZARO Correct.

But when the public sees how easily their family members can be done in, in something like the Curtis Matthews murder, what can you tell the public to make them want to testify? CANNIZZARO I would urge them to give this system a chance, to give this process a chance. You know, [Curtis Matthews’ brother] John Matthews was shot, I think it was seven or eight times in his own home prior to his testifying against Telly Hankton. And as a result of that shooting, he came forth and testified not once, but twice. He had a greater resolve, in my opinion, to show Telly Hankton and people of his ilk that you are not going to influence me, you are not going to intimidate me and run me away from doing what is the right thing. To me, he was a hero in that case. That’s what this is all about. This is about making the city of New Orleans a better place for everyone involved. And we can’t do it unless the community is going to get involved and going to participate. They have to give us a chance. I think so many things become better for this city. I think the economy becomes better. I think the education system becomes better. I think it all becomes better if we resolve crime, especially violent crime that is literally killing our future and killing our hopes in the city of New Orleans.

This holiday season, shop local, shop NOLA on Magazine Street!

Support mom & pops in our community! Check Out Our Daily Prize Give-Aways Online through Christmas Eve! VISIT WWW.MAGAZINESTREET.COM

Banking 3 Bankruptcy 3 Business & Commercial Litigation 3 Business Law 3 Business Negotiations 3 Corporate Law 3 Creditor Rights & Commercial Collections 3 Criminal Law & Defense 3 Estate Planning / Taxation 3 Franchising Gaming Law & Regulation 3 General Civil Litigation 3 Healthcare Law & Regulation 3 Individual, Business & Corporate Taxation 3 Insurance Claims 3 Labor & Employment Law 3 Matrimonial, Divorce & Family Law 3 Medical Malpractice & Casualty Defense 3 Personal Injury & Wrongful Death 3 Real Estate & Land Use Development 3 Successions

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

At Chehardy Sherman, we have a passion for law and a penchant for details. As one of Louisianaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s premiere legal teams, we offer vast experience and the ability to manage an array of legal issues. Consider our experienced consultation to help you resolve complicated issues with both skill and imagination.

29

NOW & FOREVER

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

from $4,500

30

1525 METAIRIE ROAD | 504.834.9999 | MONDAY-SATURDAY 10-6 | THURSDAY 10-8 | AUCOINHART.COM

C H OC OL AT E

GRIL OPE L LAT N E!

The Perfect Holiday Gift - One Size Fits All ! Gift Baskets Party Trays Corporate Gifts Holiday Gifts

LUNCH SPECIALS Monday-Friday 11am-2pm

5707 Magazine St. 504.269.5707 www.BlueFrogChocolates.com

LIVE MUSIC

Friday & Saturday Nights!

NO COVER AT ALL!!! Check website for listings.

3449 River Rd. (at Shrewsbury in Jefferson Parish) • 834-4938 • www.therivershacktavern.com

sHTo P aLK

BY LINDSEY DARNELL

SHOPPING NEWS BY MISSY WILKINSON

Vine Dining n 2003, chef Milton Prudence left one New Orleans dining institution to create, along with owner Tommy Andrade, what is becoming another institution. “Milton Prudence was the chef at Galatoire’s for a long time and has been with us since we opened the door,” says Will Lloyd, assistant general manager at Tommy’s Cuisine (746 Tchoupitoulas St., 581-1103 www.tommysneworleans.com). “He’s one of the best Creole chefs in New Orleans.” Epicures will delight in Prudence’s menu, which includes entrees like lightly battered and fried soft-shell crab served over linguini in a Reggiano crawfish sauce. “We’re famous for our oysters,” Lloyd says. “One of our specialties is the Oysters Trio.” This appetizer is a sampler of a half dozen oysters, including oysters Tommy (baked with Romano cheese, pancetta and roasted red pepper), oysters Rockefeller (cooked with spinach, fresh herbs and herbsaint) and oysters Bienville (prepared with crawfish, shrimp and fresh herbs). The restaurant’s ambience matches the rich and savory dishes. Featuring soft lighting and wood paneling, the warm but expansive space includes a restaurant and private rooms and is capable of accommodating 300 guests. Tommy’s Wine Bar is adjacent to the dining space. “We can have six private dinners going on at one time, and we often do,” Lloyd says. “There’s a separate entrance to the wine bar, but (the bar and the restaurant) actually connect. You can order everything off Tommy’s Cuisine at the wine bar.” The wine bar offers 55 wines by the glass and 150 bottles, as well

The “Green Light District,” which is located in the 2000-2100 blocks of Magazine Street and includes businesses BRANCH OUT, CANOPY, GREEN SERENE, JACKSON RESTAURANT, SPRUCE, UNIQUE PRODUCTS and ZUKA BABY, holds a shopping event from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 8. There will be live music by Miss Mec & Belizaire, Christmas trees on display, raffles, sales, free snacks and pictures with Santa.

I

as a selection of cheeses and Tommy’s Wine Bar features pates. Thanks to a high-tech 150 wines and live piano pouring system, every glass music on weeknights. tastes like it came from a freshly opened bottle. “We have a Cruvinet, the first wine pouring system of its type,” says Lloyd, a certified sommelier. “It actually pulls nitrogen out of the air and pumps it into the bottle to preserve the wine for up to six weeks.” Tommy’s has a piano player on weeknights and bands on weekends, so oenophiles can enjoy live music as they savor the wine and the atmosphere. “On Friday night, we have a jazz band, and on Saturday night we have a Latin band,” Lloyd says. “The wine bar is really gorgeous — lots of space, the leather seating, the art work. It’s beautiful. It really is one of the hidden gems in the city.”

New Orleans-based T-shirt company SHULTZILLA (www.shultzilla.com) celebrates its two-year anniversary. Now through Dec. 19, enter promo code HAPPYBDAY at checkout to receive a 20 percent discount.

MERRIMENT ON MAGAZINE ST.

fragrance products Hawaian Gardenia with other white flowers

All proceeds from sales of RAISING CANE’S (citywide; www.raisingcanes.com) plush Labrador retriever benefit local pet welfare groups. Visit any store location to purchase the toy. Last year, Raising Cane’s raised more than $25,000 from sales of the limited-edition plush puppy.

Find the perfect gift

EVERY SATURDAY ENJOY A WARM CHRISTMAS COCKTAIL COMPLIMENTARY TO CUSTOMERS

for

her...

liNgerie rOBeS PJs SliPPerS The perfect gift for everyone on your list. As seen in Elle, W, Architectural Digest, Vanity Fair & many more.

HEMLINE M E TA I R I E

gifctates

certifiilable ava

GIVE THE GIFT THAT WILL FILL THEIR BELLIES JOEY K’S GIFT CERTIFICATES

605 METAIR IE ROAD MON - SAT 10A M - 6PM

504-309-8778

Open Sundays in December 12-4pm

Open Mon-Sat 11am-9pm

(504)322-2931 • bra fitting available

701 Metairie rd • Old Metairie Village

3001 Magazine St. · 891-0997 www.joeyksrestaurant.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

kai

THE RITZ-CARLTON (921 Canal St., 524-1331; www.ritzcarlton.com) and MARRIOTT HOTELS OF NEW ORLEANS (citywide; www.marriott.com) have partnered with homeless shelter OZANAM INN for a toy drive. Visit driveway donation boxes at the hotels now through Friday, Dec. 9 to drop off new, unwrapped toys and winter clothes.

31

tis the S E AS O N

to C ELE BR ATE

REVEILLON MENU

we ma

ke

houSe c a llS

824 Gravier St.

525.3961

Special Holiday HourS mon-fri 9am-5:30pm Sat 10am-3pm www.worldoftime.com

5 COURSES · $ 58 / PERSON OFFERING NOW THROUGH DEC. 30TH

first course FOIE GRAS CRÈME BRULEE BOWFIN CAVIAR, SHAVED ASPARAGUS GRIBICHE

soup course TURTLE SOUP amontillado sherry

OYSTER-LEEK BISQUE

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

salad course ROASTED BEETS maytag blue cheese, cranberry-french walnut vinaigrette

WINTER SPINACH satsuma supremes, chevre, meyer lemon crème fraiche

entrees CRISPY DUCK CONFIT cherry-port wine gastrique, goat cheese grits

NOISETTES OF PORK TENDERLOIN GRILLADES duck boudin

RABBIT & HOUSEMADE TASSO “TOURTIÈRE” root vegetable, crimini

dessert POT DE CRÈME café brulôt

BAKED ALASKA peppermint ice cream & gingerbread

5908 MAGAZINE STREET (CORNER OF MAGAZINE & ELEONORE) 891-8495 · WWW.MARTINIQUEBISTRO.COM FRIDAY LUNCH • SAT & SUN BRUNCH • TUES-SUN DINNER

32

JoSef Hirzinger

European Master Watch & Clock Maker

fashion GIFT GUIDE 1

FROCKS AND FINDS FOR THE FASHIONISTA ON YOUR LIST

BY MARY CROSS

2

3

Sexy black lace detailing makes this emerald frock more appropriate for Vixen than Blitzen, $365 at Hemline (605 Metairie Road, Metairie, 309-8778; 609 Chartres St., 592-0242; 3308 Magazine St., 269-4005; www.shophemline.com).

2 you can LEAVE YOUR HAT ON

This vintage polka-dot cloche hat stands out as a unique, cute way to cover up, $49.99 at Prima Donna’s Closet (927 Royal St., 875-4437; 1206 St. Charles Ave., 5253327; 3213 17th St., Metairie, 835-1120; www.primadonnascloset.com).

3 ICE is NICE

Jack Frost has nothing on this ice: Diamonds sparkle inside and outside of these hoop earrings, $995 to $9,995 at Boudreaux’s Jewelers (701 Metairie Road, Metairie, 831-2602; 4550 Hwy. 22, Mandeville, 626-1666; www.boudreauxsjewelers.com).

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

1 VIXEN in LACE

PAGE 34

33

8110 HAMPSON STREET IN THE RIVERBEND

504.265.8018 MO N - SAT O P E N E A RLY - O P E N L ATE B Y A P P O I N T M E N T & WA L K I N S

HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE DECEMBER 7TH 7PM-9PM

10% OFF GIFT CERTIFICATES & ALL BOUTIQUE ITEMS

FACIALS | MASSAGES MICRODERMABRASION BODY TREATMENTS | WAXING MANICURES | PEDICURES MAKE-UP APPLICATION & LESSONS

20% OFF & FREE GIFT

MAKE-UP | THREADING

FOR GUESTS WHO PURCHASE OUR 5 STEP SKIN MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

ORGANIC SPRAY TANNING LASH TINTING

WHILE SUPPLIES LAST G IF T CE RTIFICATE S AVA ILA BLE

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

Attorney at Law

STEPHANIE M. QUINLAN DONNA KAY BERGER

THE ROSEVALLY FAMILY

Adoption Services

SLM CONSULTING, LLC

LYNNE H. NEITZSCHMAN, PH.D., NCC

EMILY PENNEBAKER

35

36

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

PHOTONOLA OPENS EYE-POPPING EXHIBITS

MUSIC: BLACK TUSK PAGE 47 ART: DALE CHIHULY & TOM KINCAID PAGE 54 CUISINE: LUNCH AT K-PAUL’S PAGE 71

PAGE

CLICKPIX 45

N O C P’

Park & walk through 12 glorious acres with lights and exhibits at every turn within City Park’s Botanical Garden, Storyland and Amusement Park!

25 A

NEW EXHIBITS & CROWD FAVORITES

Experience & enjoy one of the nation’s most unique month-long festival of lights! This beloved tradition attracted more than 122,000 visitors in 2010.

• “Who Dat Tree” • “Buggin Out” • The LOVE DOVES • Animated Water Exhibits in the Lagoons

• “Dripping Snow” • Victoria the Unicorn • Toyland • Life-Sized Nativity • AND MORE!

Plus:

Open nightly Dec. 2nd through Jan. 1st OPEN CHRISTMAS NIGHT!

Synthetic ICE-SKATING RINK, nightly musical entertainment, photos with Santa, Gift Village, full service holiday café, animated laser show and a gazillion lights!

Holiday Hours:

For further information or to purchase tickets, call 504-483-9415 or visit

(Closed Dec. 24th and Dec. 31st)

Friday evenings: 6:00 – 11:00pm Saturday evenings: 6:00 – 11:00pm

www.celebrationintheoaks.com

Admission: $7.00 per person (children under three are free)

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

st s Pa son ut! a O Se old S

44

Thursday, December 22 • 7 P.M. Friday, December 23 • 2 & 7 P.M. Tulane’s Dixon Hall

Last Year’s Smash Hit Returns!

S Y A D I L O H E H RIN G IN T

!

– JA N UA RY 4 NOVEMBER 25

Celebrating our 30th Anniversary with us is New Orleans theatre treasure

Becky Allen!

Appearing in a special guest role as Mother Ginger, Becky makes her ballet debut!

Tickets on sale now! DFB Office: 888-0931 Ticketmaster.com

DeltaFestivalBallet.com • Joseph Giacobbe & Maria Giacobbe, Artistic Directors

The songs, the style, the spirit of the holidays in an all-new musical delight starring our charming vocal trio. Matinees and evening performances, with delightful dining by Chef John Besh and The American Sector restaurant. Come jingle all the way!

Friday & Saturday Evenings with complimentary wine Show Only

$60 $30

Sunday Champagne Matinee

$60

Weekday Buffet Matinee

$40

Details and reservations at 504-528-1943 or visit www.stagedoorcanteen.org

LOCATED ON ANDREW HIGGINS DRIVE BETWEEN CAMP AND MAGAZINE STREETS WW2-14702_Holiday_Qtrpg_GambitAd_Week1.indd 3

11/16/11 12:04 PM

>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << MUSIC >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE YOU GO << <<<<<<<<<< << 47 >> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << THE >> >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>> << <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> > << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< < >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

FILM

52

ART

54

STAGE

61

EVENTS

65

Michael Blackson & Brian Posehn

PhotoNOLA DEC. 3-13 WWW.PHOTONOLA.ORG

Charlotte Diem is presenting pictures from her Virgin Queens show at PhotoNOLA’s portfolio review.

Photogenic PHOTONOLA PRESENTS A CITYWIDE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL. BY WILL COVIELLO

T

to find pockets of mostly older Jewish people (survivors of the Soviet regime more than Nazism), but instead she found small but strong communities maintaining their traditions. Since 2004, she has traveled to Ukraine several times to photograph different communities, and she’ll return a week after PhotoNOLA. At the festival, she has a solo show at Antenna Gallery, and she will give a talk at Martine Chaisson Gallery (3 p.m. Saturday). The top award from the 2010 portfolio review went to Jungeun Lee, a native of South Korea and resident of Dallas, who is working on several series of photos dedicated to South Korean women forced into sex slavery by invading Japanese armies during World War II. The pictures feature ghostly images of traditional women’s clothing and other mementos signifying their silent suffering. She’s presenting a suite of works from several projects at NOPA’s home gallery (1111 St. Mary St.) and she’ll participate in a panel discussion on photographing war at the Contemporary Arts Center (6 p.m. Sunday). The list of PhotoNOLA exhibitions includes the shows by last year’s review honorees as well as exhibitions curated for the 2011 event and other concurrent shows, including some for the art biennial Prospect.2 and the Josephine Sacabo show at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art. The diverse array of subject matter ranges from the 1926 survey of Louisiana plantations by Robert Tebbs, presented at the Presbytere, to the erotic works of celebrity portrait photographer Michael Grecco, presented at Larry Flynt’s Hustler Club. The festival’s official gala and benefit party is Friday, and there are artist talks and workshops throughout the week. Visit the website (www.photonola.org) for a full list of events and preview of photographers’ work.

Evan Christopher Album Release

71

DEC

7+ 9

DEC

8

PHOTO BY JIM MCGUIRE

Third in his Clarinet Road series, the latest release from Evan Christopher features French and France-based players paying respects to both Sidney Bechet’s last tangos in Paris and the repatriated Francophiles in Christopher’s Django a la Creole. Tickets $15. 8 p.m. & 10 p.m. Thursday. Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro, 626 Frenchmen St., 949-0696; www.snugjazz.com

Romeo & Juliet

DEC

818

Love blossoms at the New Orleans Museum of Art as the NOLA Project presents Romeo and Juliet. The young lovers defy their feuding families as the action swirls around the audience in the Great Hall. The show follows a popular NOLA Project production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream in the sculpture garden. Tickets $24, $12 NOMA members/ students/standing room. 7:30 p.m. Thu. and Sat.-Sun. NOMA, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma. eventbrite.com

Vox and the Hound Survive the barrage of “Kevin!” shrieks and Christmas sweaters at Republic’s Home Alone Throwback and your reward is a blistering set from local quintet Vox and the Hound, whose versatile pop/rock acumen suits anything from ebullient originals to kitschy covers. Tickets $5. 11 p.m. Friday. Republic, 828 S. Peters St., 528-8282; www. republicnola.com

DEC

9

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

he New Orleans Photo Alliance (NOPA) formed in the wake of Hurricane Katrina and the levee failures when photographers flocked to the city to document the disaster, its aftermath and rebuilding. “All these newspapers and magazines from all over the world were sending photographers,” says NOPA organizer Jennifer Shaw. “Local photographers were like, ‘Hey, look at us, we’re here!’” With the growth of the group’s annual photography festival PhotoNOLA, photographers are coming here now for exposure and professional development. The alliance now has more than 400 members, and the festival includes artist talks, workshops and more than 45 shows across the city. Loli Kantor, a Texas-based photographer, participated in the professional portfolio review last year, was awarded a prize by the review panel and returns this year with a solo show. “I had gone to Fotofest in Houston and Photolucida in Portland (Ore.), and people told me I should go to New Orleans,” Kantor says. Professional photographers who sign up for the portfolio review workshop get individual feedback from photographers, gallery and museum curators and other professionals who work with documentary and art photography. The public can meet and view the work of the 65 photographers enrolled in this year’s review at the free Photowalk (5 p.m.-7 p.m. Saturday) at the International House Hotel. Last year, Kantor presented photos from her exploration of surviving Jewish communities in Ukraine. The daughter of Polish Holocaust survivors, she expected

Howlin’ Wolf welcomes two touring comics this week. Heavy metal nerd Brian Posehn (pictured) is best known for Mr. Show, The Sarah Silverman Program and his stand-up work. Self-described “African King of Comedy” Michael Blackson is the West Africanborn, Def Jam comedy spin on Yakov Smirnoff. Andie Coll and Bill Dykes also perform with Posehn. Blackson: 9 p.m. Wed. Tickets $25. Posehn: 9 p.m. Fri. Tickets $15 in advance, $17 at the door. Howlin’ Wolf, 907 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf.com

CUISINE

45

GRAND OPENING WEEKEND AT THE JOY THEATER. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 29 AT 8PM

IRMA THOMAS & LANCE ELLIS

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30 AT 9PM

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

THE SOUL REBELS & CYRIL NEVILLE’S TRIBE 13

46

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 31 AT 9PM

KERMIT RUFFINS AND THE BARBECUE SWINGERS

PLUS SPECIAL GUEST BIG SAM’S FUNKY NATION

TICKETS AVAILABLE THROUGH AT 1-800-745-3000 OR AT THE BOX OFFICE. Snap and join us on Facebook!

1200 Canal Street • New Orleans, LA 70112 www.TheJoyTheater.com

LISTINGS

STICK THIS IN YOUR EAR

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly. com; FAX:483-3116

MUSIC

Showcasing Local Music

preview

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

MON 12/5

Papa Grows Funk

-No Cover

TUE 12/6

Rebirth Brass Band

Zagat Rated

WED 12/7

Electric Yat String Quartet

Live Music Nightly

VOTED All show times p.m. unless otherwise noted.

Tuesday 6

WED 12/7 PATRICK COOPER THUR 12/8 THE ASHMEN FRI 12/9 KIM CARSON BETH PATTERSON SAT 12/10 SPEED THE MULE

BANKS STREET BAR — Michael Matthews & Friends, 10

BLUE NILE — Michael Zerang, 10 BMC — Mikey B3 Organ Combo, 5; Romy Kaye & the Brent Walsh Trio, 8; Lagniappe Brass Band, 11

SAT 12/10

CHECKPOINT CHARLIE — Jeff Ruby, 11

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Band in a Pocket, 6

CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — Bart Ramsey, 6:30 COLUMNS HOTEL — John Rankin, 8

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Street Beat, 6 D.B.A. — Treme Brass Band, 9

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Cristina Perez, 9:30 THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

FUNKY PIRATE — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30

HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — Wood Brothers, Seth Walker, 8 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Jason Marsalis, 8

THE MAISON — Magnitude, 6; Gregory Agid Quartet, 9 MAISON DUPUY HOTEL — Aaron Lopez-Barrantes, 6 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Rebirth Brass Band, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Funkin’ the Pocket feat. Mayumi Shara, 6; Meghan Stewart & the Reboppers, 9:30

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Cameron Dupuy, 7; Brohn Giant, 8; Wolfy Lonesone, 9; Matthew Browning, 10 OLD POINT BAR — Josh Garrett & the Bottom Line, 8

ONE EYED JACKS — Little Maker Ensemble, King Rey, Damien Louviere Band, 9 PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall-Stars feat. Shannon Powell, 8 SIBERIA — Dick Delicious & the Tasty Testicles, Donkey Puncher, Hot Coke Sex, 10

SUN 12/11 BETH PATTERSON MON 12/12 KIM CARSON

Black Tusk

Squint at the Savannah shenanigans in Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil and New Orleanians get the distinct impression of home. The musical analog lies in the tourist towns’ hard-rock cachets: Cup an ear toward coastal Georgia’s swamp-metal waders and even longtime NOLA expats will miss their go-cups and Eyehategods a little less. Savannah can’t match New Orleans for heavy metal heritage — outside Scandinavia, few cities can — but the oppressive climates, relative isolation and undeniable crazy of both has bred some of the most thrillingly skin-peeling American music of the past three decades. We have Phil Anselmo’s Housecore imprint; they have Hyperrealist, launching pad for the thickly lysergic Kylesa, the gothically melodic Baroness and the unyielding power trio Black Tusk, whose fourth blowtorched LP, October release Set the Dial (Relapse), fuses the throat-throttled fury of hardcore punk, the quicksilver riffs of speed metal and the seismic, queasy low end of stoner rock. It’s like three ass-kickings for the price of one. Kyng and MonstrO open. Call for ticket information. — Noah Bonaparte Pais

DEC

12

Black Tusk 10 p.m. Monday Siberia, 2227 St. Claude Ave., 265-8855

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Matt Lemler Quartet, 8 & 10

Wednesday 7

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Smokin’ Time Jazz Club, 6; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 10

12 BAR — Brass-A-Holics, 9

STAGE DOOR CANTEEN AT THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM — Victory Belles Holiday Show, 12 WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Kirk Branch, 6 YUKI IZAKAYA — Sombras Brilhantes, 8

ANNUAL BEATLES TRIBUTE w/RITES OF PASSAGE 9PM 8PM 9PM

331 Decatur St. • 527-5954

FRI 12/9

Big Sam’s Funky Nation

SAT 12/10

TBA

Trio featuring SUN Joe JoeKrown Krown SUN Russell batiste Trio & Walter 12/11 feat. Russell Batiste & Walter Washington 3/13 “Wolfman” Wolfman Washington

New Orleans Best Every Night! 8316 Oak Street · New Orleans 70118

(504) 866-9359

www.kerryirishpub.com

Nothing Beats a Classic! If you are looking for the classic comfort food you will find it at Ted’s Frostop on Claiborne at Calhoun. Our Menu features the always famous Loto Burger, shakes, fries, breakfast and much more – even New Orleans Beignets are coming soon!

www.themapleleafbar.com

TUE COMEDY NIGHT 8:30PM 12/6 WITH JACKIE JENKINS

WED BRASS-A-HOLICS 9PM

12/7 BECOMING A NEW ORLEANS TRADITION

THU YO JIMBO, ERIKA FLOWERS, 12/8

FRI

See You Soon! Ice cold mug

of original

tbeer Frostop Ruorcohase!

BANKS STREET BAR — Micah McKee’s Songwriters Showcase, 9; Major Bacon, 10:30

with a p

h 12-31-2011

Valid throug

BIG AL’S DECKBAR SEAFOOD & BLUES — Oscar & the Blues Cats, 8

12/9

AND

NAUGHTY PROFESSOR 10PM

LIQUID PEACE REVOLUTION, MICCAH GROSSMAN, OLIVVER AND NAUGHTY PROFESSOR 8PM

SAT JON LISI & DELTA FUNK 10PM

12/10

SUN IN THE REDZONE

12/11

BMC — A.C.E., 5; Blues4sale, 8; Deja Vu Brass Band, 11 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Meschiya Lake & Tom McDermott, 8

THU The Trio featuring 12/8 Johnny V, George Porter Jr & Special Guests

W/ JOHN FOURCADE & MITCH GIBBS 3-6PM

608 FULTON STREET 504-861-3615

www.tedsfrostop.com

NEW ORLEANS • 504-212-6476 WWW.12BARNOLA.COM

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

HOUSE OF BLUES — Big Sean, Cyhi the Prynce, Shawn Chrystopher, 9

9PM 9PM 5PM 9PM 5PM

47

Thursday, 8th at 8PM

MUSIC

LISTINGS

CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — George Keys, 6:30 COLUMNS HOTEL — Ricardo Crespo, 8

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Street Beat, 6 D.B.A. — Tin Men, 7; Walter “Wolfman” Washington & the Roadmasters, 10

TREME NIGHT FEATURING New Orleans’ Premier Jazz Venue

JAMES ANDREWS

WWOZ NEW YEAR’S EVE

DECEMBER 2011

LIVE JAZZ 7 NIGHTS A WEEk • 8PM MON-SAT • 7PM SUNDAYS

LIVE BROADCAST TO THE WORLD

SATURDAY, DEC. 31ST

7:30PM Dinner | 10PM Concert FEATURING

IRVIN MAYFIELD & THE JAZZ PLAYHOUSE REVUE PLUS SPECIAL

GUESTS

Hors d’oeuvres and five course gourmet dinner with superb wine pairings followed by an exclusive performance by the Playhouse Revue and midnight champagne toast, broadcasted to the world by WWOZ TO RESERVE TICKETS OR FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 504.553.2299 irvinmayfield.com

For schedule updates follow us on:

IMJazzPlayhouse

SUNDAY 7PM TYLER’S REVISITED FEATURING 4, 11, 18 GERMAINE BAZZLE & PAUL LONGSTRETH 25 GLEN DAVID ANDREWS MONDAY 8PM GERALD FRENCH 5, 12, 19, 26 THE ORIGINAL TUXEDO JAZZ BAND TUESDAY 15, 22, 29 WEDNESDAY 7, 14, 21, 28

8PM

THURSDAY 8, 15, 22, 29 FRIDAY 9, 16, 23, 30 SATURDAY 17, 24 10 24

8PM

JASON MARSALIS 8PM Grammy Award-Winning

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S NOJO FEATURING SPECIAL GUESTS

JAM

$15 Cover

TREME NIGHT FEATURING JAMES ANDREWS 8PM

LEON “kID CHOCOLATE” BROWN 8PM

SHANNON POWELL DON VAPPIE QUARTET CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION

300 BOURBON STREET • NEW ORLEANS 504.553.2299 • WWW.SONESTA.COM

DIXON HALL, TULANE UNIVERSITY — Han-SetzerFinckel Piano Trio, 8

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Bob Andrews, 9:30 EAST BANK REGIONAL LIBRARY — Giselle Bonfaire, 7 THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

FUNKY PIRATE — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30 HOUSE OF BLUES — Bringin’ Down the House Musical Competition, 6 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S I CLUB — Mia Borders, 8

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Kipori Woods, 5; Irvin Mayfield’s NOJO Jam, 8 THE MAISON — Reeal, 6; Upstarts, 9; Mario Abney Quartet (upstairs), 10

MAISON DUPUY HOTEL — Aaron Lopez-Barrantes, 6

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Electric Yat String Quartet, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Blues Frenzy, 6; Romy Kaye & Brent Walsh Trio, 9:30

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lars Edegran & Topsy Chapman feat. Palm Court Jazz Band & Tom Sancton, 8

48

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Band feat. Mark Braud, 8

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Rocky’s Hot Fox Trot Orchestra, 8:30

SIBERIA — Oak, Ilsa, Nemain, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Delfeayo Marsalis & the Uptown Jazz Orchestra, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Orleans 6, 6; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10 ST. ROCH TAVERN — JD Hill & the Jammers, 7

THREE MUSES — Monty Banks, 4:30; Davis Rogan, 7 VASO — Rebirth Brass Band, 9 VICTORY — Sombras Brilhantes, 7:30

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Larry Sieberth, 6

Thursday 8 12 BAR — Yojimbo, Erika Flowers, Naughty Professor, 10 BABYLON LOUNGE — Swinging Jewels feat. Charlie Cuccia, Thomas McDonald & Joey Cat, 9

BANKS STREET BAR — Kenny Triche, 8; Dave Jordan, 10

BMC — Soula Billy Swamp Boogie Band, 5; Chapter: SOUL, 8; Eric Gordon & the Lazy Boys, 11 BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Tom McDermott & Aurora Nealand, 8

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Thomas Johnson & the People, Andrew Duhon & the Lonesome Crows, 9

CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — George Keys, 6:30 COLUMNS HOTEL — Fredy Omar, 8

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Street Beat, 6

DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 5:30 D.B.A. — Jon Cleary, 7; Jake Eckert, 10 DIXON HALL, TULANE UNIVERSITY — Nicholas Payton Trio, 7

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Todd Duke, 9:30 THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

FUNKY PIRATE — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S I CLUB — Mem Shannon, 8

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Roman Skakun, 5; James Andrews, 8 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Soul Rebels, 11

THE MAISON — Those Peaches, 5; Ramblin’ Letters, 7; Ashton & the Big Easy Brawlers Brass Band, 10 MAPLE LEAF BAR — The Trio, 10 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Peter Novelli, 6 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Buddy Mann, 9

OLD POINT BAR — Blues Frenzy, 6:30; Kim Carson, 9 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Crescent City Joymakers feat. Tim Laughlin & Duke Heitger, 8

PRESERVATION HALL — Paulin Brothers Brass Band, 8 RAY’S — Bobby Love Band, 6

REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — Partners-N-Crime, 5th Ward Weebie, Choppa, DJ Jubilee, Mr. Ghetto, 10th Ward Buck, Rusty Lazer, 11 RIVERSHACK TAVERN — The Arrival, 8

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Nathan & the Zydeco Cha-Chas, 8:30

SATURN BAR — Alex McMurray feat. Sage Maas, 10 SIBERIA — Inquisition, Grave Ritual, Demonic Destruction, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Evan Christopher CD release, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Miss Sophie Lee, 6; Smoking Time Jazz

Club, 10

STAGE DOOR CANTEEN AT THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM — Victory Belles Holiday Show, 12 THREE MUSES — Tom McDermott, 4:30; Luke Winslow-King, 7:30

TIPITINA’S — He’s My Brother She’s my Sister, Empress Hotel, 9

VAUGHAN’S — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 8:30

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Larry Sieberth, 6

Friday 9 12 BAR — Liquid Peace Revolution, Miccah Grossman, Olivver, Naughty Professor, 8

BANKS STREET BAR — Hannah KB Band, Natalie Mae & Her Unturned Tricks, Wasted Lives feat. Alexandra Scott, 9 BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Philip Melancon, 8

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE LOUNGE — Frank Williams Jr. & Friends feat. Bobby Love, 8 BMC — El DeOrazio & Friends, 3; Peter Novelli, 6; Dana Abbot Band, 9; Lagniappe Brass Band, 12:30 a.m. BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Honey Pots, 8

CAFE PRYTANIA — Sun Hotel, Country Club, 9

CARROLLTON STATION — Jimmy Robinson, John Rankin & Phil DeGruy, 9 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Pfister Sisters, 5:30; Jimbo Mathus & Tri-State Coalition, 9:30

CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — Amanda Walker, 6:30 COLUMNS HOTEL — Alex Bachari Trio, 5

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Street Beat, 6 THE CYPRESS — Precursor CD Release feat. Man Vs. Machine, Iridescence, 7 D.B.A. — Soul Rebels Brass Band, 11

DEW DROP SOCIAL AND BENEVOLENT HALL — Banu Gibson, 6:30

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Eric Traub Trio, 10

DRAGON’S DEN — Pallbearers, Split Lips, Sci-Fi Zeros, Riffs, 9 EMERIL’S DELMONICO — Bob Andrews, 7

FUNKY PIRATE — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30 GALVEZ RESTAURANT — Campbell Perkins, 6:30

GREEN ROOM — Syllable 7, Stagecoach Bandits, 10

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — PAGE 50

MUSIC

LISTINGS

PAGE 48

The Breton Sound, Chase McCloud, 10

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S I CLUB — Little Freddie King, 8

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Tom Worrell, 5; Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown, 8

JOEY K’S RESTAURANT — Maryflynn’s Prohibition Jazz & Blues, 5

JUJU BAG CAFE AND BARBER SALON — Michaela Harrison, Todd Duke, 7:30

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Dave Reis, 7; Cha Wa, 11

THE MAISON — Those Peaches, 5; Kristina Morales, 7; Los Po-Boy-Citos, 10; Yojimbo, 12 a.m. MAPLE LEAF BAR — Big Sam’s Funky Nation, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Bryce Eastwood, 4; Meschiya Lake, 7; Fredy Omar con su Banda, 10:30 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — High Ground Drifters, 7; John Parker, 10

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

50

RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Brandon Foret, 9:30

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Levee Dawgs, Iguanas, 9:30

SIBERIA — Night of 1000 Contests,Cave, EXU, Rhodes!!, Rusty Lazer, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Ellis Marsalis Quartet, 8 & 10

Sleeper Sofa $99

Complete Bunk Bed

C/F Liquidators Canal Furniture

• • • •

$159

home office restaurant hotel

next to the post office at 501 North Jeff Davis in Mid City 504-482-6851 | Mon-Sat:10am-5pm

BANKS STREET BAR — Blues Frenzy, 10

BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Philip Melancon, 8

BMC — Andre Bouvier, 3; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Jazz Band, 6; Revealers, 9; Ashton & the Big Easy Brawlers Brass Band, 12 a.m. BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Royal Rounders, 8

CARROLLTON STATION — Daria & the Hip Drops, Jenn Howard & Crazy McGee, 9:30 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Charlie Wooton Project, 10

CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — Amanda Walker, 6:30 COLUMNS HOTEL — Andy Rogers, 9

D.B.A. — John Boutte, 7; Little Freddie King, 11

REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — Vox & the Hound, 11

Big Daddy Queen Set $269

BABYLON LOUNGE — Babapalooza Tribute Show feat. Mighty Joe Young, Hairspray Queens, Pearl Jam Tribute Band, 10

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Clive Wilson & Palm Court Jazz Band, 8

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Masters feat. Leroy Jones, 8

Sofa Sleeper & Chair $199

ATCHAFALAYA — Atchafalaya All Stars, 11 a.m.

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Street Beat, 6

PELICAN CLUB — Sanford Hinderlie, 7

WE BUY AND SELL

12 BAR — John Lisi & Delta Funk, 10

OLD POINT BAR — Rick Trolsen, 5; -ish, 9:30 ONE EYED JACKS — Trumpets Not Guns feat. Davi Jay, Bourbon Street the Band & Glen David Andrews, 9

traditional • contemporar y • vintage

Saturday 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 6:30; New Orleans Cotton Mouth Kings, 10

STAGE DOOR CANTEEN AT THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM — Victory Belles Holiday Show, 6; Victory Belles Holiday Show, 8

THREE MUSES — Raphael Bas, 4; Donald “Mad Dog” Waits Trio, 6:30; Glen David Andrews, 10 TIPITINA’S — Johnny Sketch & the Dirty Notes 10th Anniversary Soiree, Flow Tribe, 10

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Larry Sieberth, 6; Anais St. John, 9

THE CYPRESS — Born Of Osiris, Veil of Maya, Carnifex, Structures, Betraying the Martyrs, 7

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Tom Fitzpatrick, 10 EMERIL’S DELMONICO — Bob Andrews, 7

FUNKY PIRATE — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30 GALVEZ RESTAURANT — Campbell Perkins, 6:30

HOUSE OF BLUES — Robert Earl Keen, 9

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S I CLUB — Big Sam & Friends, 8 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Don Vappie Quartet, 8; Deja Vu Brass Band, 12 a.m.

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Joe Krown Trio, 11

LOUISIANA MUSIC FACTORY — Creole String Beans, 2; Ellis Marsalis, 3; Chris Thomas King, 4 THE MAISON — Magnitude, 7; Debauche, 10; Lagniappe Brass Band, 12 a.m.

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Mumbles, 1; Kristina Morales, 4; Eudora Evans & Deep Soul, 7:30; Soula Billy Swamp Boogie Band, 11 MULATE’S CAJUN RESTAURANT — Bayou DeVille, 7

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — April Dawn, 8; Patrick Godbey Band, 9

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ & HERITAGE CENTER — Treme Creole Gumbo Festival feat. Rebirth Brass Band, Glen David Andrews, Treme Brass Band, Shannon Powell, 11 a.m. OLD POINT BAR — Robbie Taylor Three, 9; Dash Rip Rock, 10

ONE EYED JACKS — Lost Bayou Ramblers, 9 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lionel Ferbos & Palm Court Jazz Band, 8

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Band, 8 RITZ-CARLTON — Catherine Anderson, 1 RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Coldshot, 10

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — New Orleans Latin Jazz Festival, 9:30 SIBERIA — Midnight Ghost Train, A Hanging, Bad Grass, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Jacqui Naylor, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Meghan Stewart & the Reboppers, 3; Panorama Jazz Band, 6; Jazz Vipers, 10

THREE MUSES — Bottoms Up Blues Gang, 6:30; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10 TIPITINA’S — Anders Osborne feat. Luther Dickinson, Billy Iuso, 10

TOMMY’S WINE BAR — Julio & Caesar, 10

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Larry Sieberth, 6; Anais St. John, 9

Sunday 11 ATCHAFALAYA — Sam & Boone, 11 a.m. BANKS STREET BAR — Royal Rounders, 9

BMC — Soula Billy Swamp Boogie Band, 3; Kipori Woods, 6; Andy J. Forest, 9

BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Some Like it Hot, 11 a.m.; Raphael Bas, Norbert Slama & Jack Fine, 8 CAFE RANI — Courtyard Kings, 11 a.m. CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — Amanda Walker, 6:30 COLUMNS HOTEL — Chip WIlson, 11 a.m.

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Street Beat, 6 THE CYPRESS — Children’s Hospital Toy Drive Concert feat. Awaken December, Keep Me Dreaming, Awaken the City, To Crown A King, Dodging Cathrine, Carpe Diem, 7 D.B.A. — Palmetto Bug Stompers, 7; Rory Danger & the Danger Dangers, 10

FINNEGAN’S EASY — Robin Clabby, Chris Alford, Erik Golson & Nick O’Gara, 12:30

FUNKY PIRATE — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

HOMEDALE INN — Sunday Night Live Jam Session feat. Homedale Boys, 7 HOUSE OF BLUES — Sunday Gospel Brunch, 10 a.m.

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Hot 8 Brass Band, 9

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Germaine Bazzle & Paul Longstreth, 7

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Guzas, 10:30 LE PAVILLON HOTEL — Philip Melancon, 8:30 a.m. MADIGAN’S — Anderson/ Easley Project, 9

THE MAISON — Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Jazz Band, 7; Deja Vu Brass Band, 10 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Joe Krown Trio feat. Russell Batiste & Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Tom McDermott & Kevin Clark, 11 a.m.; Ricardo Crespo, 3:30; Javier Olondo & AsheSon, 7 MULATE’S CAJUN RESTAURANT — Bayou DeVille, 7 OLD POINT BAR — Craig Paddock, 3:30

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Sunday Night Swingsters feat. Lucien Barbarin & Mark Braud, 8 PRESERVATION HALL — St. Peter Street All-Stars feat. Lars Edegran, 8

RITZ-CARLTON — Armand St. Martin, 10:30 a.m.; Catherine Anderson, 2

SIBERIA — Fat Stupid Ugly People CD release feat. The Goot, Toxic Rott, Chronic Death Slug, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Jason Marsalis Vibes Quartet, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Rights of Swing, 3; Ben Polcer & the Grinders, 6; Pat Casey, 10

ST. CHARLES TAVERN — Maryflynn’s Prohibition Jazz & Blues, 10 a.m. STAGE DOOR CANTEEN AT THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM — Victory Belles Holiday Show, 11 a.m. THREE MUSES — Debbie Davis, 7

TIPITINA’S — Sunday Music Workshop feat. Johnny Vidacovich, Peter Harris & Josh Starkman, 1; Cajun Fais Do Do feat. Bruce Daigrepont Band, 5:30

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Mario Abney Quartet, 6

Monday 12 APPLE BARREL — Sam

BANKS STREET BAR — N’awlins Johnnys, 9 BJ’S LOUNGE — King James & the Special Men, 10 BMC — Lil Red & Big Bad, 6; Smoky Greenwell’s Blues Jam, 9

CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — Steve Monroe, 6:30 COLUMNS HOTEL — David Doucet, 8

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Street Beat, 6 D.B.A. — Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 6; Glen David Andrews, 9

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — John Fohl, 9:30 DRAGON’S DEN — Former Thieves, Heat Dust, Choy Wolf, 10

THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

GREEN ROOM — Todd Lemoine, 10 IRISH HOUSE — West Cork, 7

CHURCH — 4401 Seventh St.,

Marrero, 341-9516; www. icchurchparish.org — Sun: Jefferson Chorale, 4 THE INN ON BOURBON — 541 Bourbon St., 524-7611; www. innonbourbon.com — Wed: An Evening of Holiday Music feat. Bon Operatit! & NORDC/Crescent City Lights Youth Theater vocalists, Wed., 7 LAKEVIEW PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH — 5914 Canal Blvd.,

482-7892; www.lpcno.org — Sun: Sunset Sundays Concert Series feat. Tanya & Dorise, 5

Tchoupitoulas St., 8951954 — Sat: An Evening of Difficult Music No. 36 presents South Chamber feat. Will Thompson, Justin Peake, Simon Lott, Joe Evans, 8

MAISON DUPUY HOTEL — Aaron Lopez-Barrantes, 6

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — The Session, 9:30

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Uke Joint, 7; Adrian Bourgeois, 9 OLD POINT BAR — Brent Walsh Jazz Trio feat. Romy Kaye, 7 PRESERVATION HALL — St. Peter Street Playboys feat. Mark Braud, 8

RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Dave Jordan, 7

SIBERIA — Black Tusk, Monstro, Kyng, Nemesis Destroyer, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Charmaine Neville & Friends, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Dominic Grillo & the Frenchmen Street AllStars, 6; Jazz Vipers, 10 THREE MUSES — Rick Trolsen, 7

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Kirk Branch, 6

classical/ concerts FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH —

8121 Airline Hwy., Metairie — Thu: Jefferson Chorale, 7:30

HOLY NAME OF MARY CHURCH — 400 Verret St., Algiers, 362-5511 — Sun: Musica da Camera & Vox Feminae, 3 IMMACULATE CONCEPTION

LUNCH!! OPEN 11AM-TIL

TO GO ORDERS: 265-8090

BELLY DANCER

Every Fri & Sat Night

HAPPY HOUR

M-F 3-6pm

FOOD SERVED TIL 1AM

Daily Martini Specials

BURGERS · SANDWICHES SALADS · WINGS · ETC...

230 DECATUR

326 N. JEFF DAVIS

504-587-3756

11AM-4AM DAILY

504.302.9357

www.attikineworleans.com

MCKEOWN’S BOOKS AND DIFFICULT MUSIC — 4737

NORTHSHORE HARBOR CENTER — 100 Harbor

MAT & NADDIE’S RESTAURANT — Courtyard Kings, 7

GARDEN

experience the mediterranean

Drive, Mandeville, (985) 6265225 — Sat: Greater New Orleans Youth Orchestras Fall Concert, 3

NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH — 1807 Lasalle St., 523-5935;

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Papa Grows Funk, 10

BEER

Attiki

bar & grill

MANDEVILLE HIGH SCHOOL AUDITORIUM — 1 Skipper

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Gerald French & the Original Tuxedo Jazz Band, 8 THE MAISON — Royal Roses, 6:30; New Orleans Super Jam, 9:30

BAYOU

www.newhopeno.org — Sun: Love Alive Mass Choir, New Hope Mass Choir & Historic Second Choir, 4:30

Center Blvd., Slidell, (985) 7813650 — Wed: U.S. Marine Forces Reserve Toys for Tots Concert, 7:30

OUR LADY OF GOOD COUNSEL — 1307 Louisiana Ave., 8911906 — Sun: Garden District Christmas Concert feat. Phyllis Treigle, Kirk Redmann, Melissa Brocato, Kevin Rouchell & Brian Morgan, 4 ST. LOUIS CATHEDRAL — Jackson Square — Mon: Annual Christmas Concert feat. Phillip Manuel, Shades of Praise Gospel Choir, 6

ST. PATRICK’S CATHOLIC CHURCH — 724 Camp St., 525-

4413; www.oldstpatricks.org — Sun: Festival of Lessons & Carols feat. St. Patrick’s Chamber Choir, 7:30

ST. TIMOTHY ON THE NORTHSHORE — 335 Asbury

Drive, Mandeville, (985) 626-3307 — Sun: Annual Christmas Concert feat. St. Timothy Choir, Sean Pollock, Ebony Preston & Larnelle Harris, 3 & 7 TEMPLE SINAI — 6227 St. Charles Ave., 861-3693; www. templesinaino.org — Sun: A Festival of Choirs, 2 TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH — 1329 Jackson Ave., 522-

0276; www.trinitynola.com — Tue: Organ & Labyrinth Organ Recital feat. Albinas Prizgintas, 6; Thu: McGehee School Concert Choir Christmas program, 7; Sat: New Orleans Black Chorale Christmas concert, 7; Sun: Messiah Sing Along feat. Albinas Prizgintas, 5

3-6pm DAILY • happy hour

12oz RIBeYe + sIDes $12 everyday

$2 monDAYs gAme RentAls • PBR PInts jameSon ShotS

FRIDAY • 12/9• 9 pm

Stereohype

sAtuRDAY • 12/10 • 10pm

dj & danCe ConteStS EVERY SUNDAY • 8pm-2Am

karaoke

F o o tB A l l

On 10’ Big SCReen & 30 FlAt scReens

holiday parties BookIng now

4133 S. Carrollton ave ( @ T u l a n e ) 301-0938

S H a M R O C K Pa R T Y. C O M

the rusty nail’s

R 5 YERA RY A s E Anniv pARt12Y/22! thursday •

8pM - tiLL

s featuring mia border & drink specials

DARTS • POOL • DARTS • POOL MON: FREE POOL 6-10pm WED: Blues Jam Night 8-11pm THURS: Steak Night 6pm-till FRI:

Fish Fry Night • 4-8PM

SAT:

Karaoke - Starts at 9PM

SUN: Happy Hour ALL DAY 1100 Constance St. NOLA

HAPPY HOUR • MON-FRI • 3-7PM

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

ROOSEVELT HOTEL (BLUE ROOM) — James Rivers Movement, 11 a.m.

Cammarata, 8

MUSIC

525-5515 • therustynail.biz

Parking Available • Enter/Exit Calliope

51

FILM

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

NOW SHOWING ARTHUR CHRISTMAS (PG) —

The 3-D computer animated film follows Santa Claus’ son Arthur, who must deliver an important present before Christmas morning. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 BEYOND ALL BOUNDARIES (NR) — The museum screens a 4-D

film, bringing audiences into battle using archival footage and special effects. National World War II Museum Solomon Victory Theater

THE DESCENDANTS (R) — In

Alexander Payne’s (Sideways) movie, a recently widowed father (George Clooney) tries to reconnect with his daughters while in Hawaii. AMC Palace 20, Canal Place HAPPY FEET 2 (PG) — The danc-

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

ing CGI penguins are back for a sequel. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

HIGHER GROUND (R) — Vera Farmiga directs and stars in the drama depicting a woman’s lifelong struggle with her faith. Chalmette Movies HUGO (PG) — Martin

Scorsese’s family-friendly film is a fantasy/adventure about an orphan who lives inside the walls of a magical train station in 1930s Paris. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14, Prytania

HURRICANE ON THE BAYOU (NR) — The film tells the story

of Hurricane Katrina and the impact that Louisiana’s disappearing wetlands has on hurricane protection. Entergy IMAX

IDES OF MARCH (R) — In the

political thriller based on an acclaimed play by Beau Willimon, Ryan Gosling plays a staffer who is introduced to the dark side of politics while working on a presidential campaign. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand

IMMORTALS (R) — Zeus choos-

es a mortal man to lead the fight against King Hyperion (Mickey Rourke). AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9

IN TIME (PG-13) — Justin

Timberlake stars in the sci-fi

52

A ROOM WITH A VIEW

thriller about a world where everyone is programmed to die at age 25. AMC Palace 20 J. EDGAR (PG) — Clint

Eastwood directs Leonardo DiCaprio in a candid look at the life of the FBI director, who harbored many of his own secrets. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 JACK AND JILL (PG) — A man’s twin sister visits him and refuses to leave in the comedy starring Adam Sandler, who plays both twins. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 MIDNIGHT IN PARIS (PG) — In the Woody Allen film, a dissatisfied screenwriter and aspiring novelist (Owen Wilson) finds himself travelling back in time to the Jazz Age while touring Paris at night. AMC Palace 20 MONEYBALL (PG-13) — Brad

Pitt plays Billy Beane, the general manager of the Oakland Athletics who changed the way the team evaluated players. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand THE MUPPETS (PG) — Some

fans (Amy Adams and Jason Segel) team up with the Muppets to save their old theater from a greedy oil tycoon (Chris Cooper). AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 MY WEEK WITH MARILYN (R) — A portrait of Marilyn

Monroe (Michelle Williams) at the peak of her fame is framed through the account of a 23-year-old’s weeklong romance with the star. Canal Place

PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 3 (R) —

The latest installment of the night vision-horror franchise takes place before the other two films, when the main protagonists were children dealing with supernatural occurrences. AMC Palace 10 POLAR EXPRESS 3-D (PG) — Robert Zemeckis’ 2004

animated adventure based on the classic children’s book returns to IMAX. Entergy IMAX

PUSS IN BOOTS (PG) — The

popular character from the Shrek series gets his own bigscreen adventure. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

TOWER HEIST (PG-13) — When staff members from a Manhattan high-rise become victims of a Ponzi scheme, the group plots to pull off a heist to get their money back. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 14

THE TWILIGHT SAGA: BREAKING DAWN, PART 1 (PG-13) — The

mythical creature romance series nears its end with the first part of the conclusion. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

UNDER THE SEA 3-D (G) — Jim Carrey narrates the documentary exploring the Great Barrier Reef. Entergy IMAX A VERY HAROLD AND KUMAR CHRISTMAS (R) — The stoner

romp is back with more hijinx and Neil Patrick Harris cameos. AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20 WEEKEND (R) — In the quiet British indie, two men meet at a gay bar and spend the next few days together. Chalmette Movies

OPENING FRIDAY NEW YEAR’S EVE (PG-13) — The romantic comedy’s star-studded cast includes Michelle Pfeiffer, Sarah Jessica Parker, Hilary Swank, Ashton Kutcher, Lea Michele and many others. THE SITTER (R) — Jonah Hill is a reluctant babysitter who doesn’t know what he’s getting into when he takes on three challenging charges.

SPECIAL SCREENINGS AKIRA (R) — Katsuhiro

Otomo’s 1988 cult classic is a sci-fi anime depicting a dystopian Tokyo in 2019. Tickets $8. Midnight Friday-Saturday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www. theprytania.com

THE BANK DICK (NR) — In the

1940 comedy, W. C. Fields stars as a person who trips a bank robber and ends up a security guard as a result. Free admission. 7:30 p.m. Monday, La Divina Gelateria, 621 St. Peter St., 302-2692; www.ladivinagelateria.com

BRIT WIT — The Big Top

screens British comedies every week. 7 p.m. Tuesday, 3 Ring Circus’ The Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com

HOLIDAY INN (NR) — Irvin Berlin’s 1942 musical stars Bing Crosby and Fred Astaire and features the song “White Christmas.” Tickets $5.50. Noon Saturday-Sunday and Dec. 13, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www. theprytania.com IN PURGATORY (NR) — In

the thriller filmed in New Orleans, a detective killed on the job comes back to bring the culprit to justice. 7 p.m. Wednesday-Thursday, Chalmette Movies, 8700 W. Judge Perez Drive, 304-9992

FILM

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

preview New Orleans Middle East Film Festival

DEC

9-18

New Orleans Middle East Film Festival Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

MACHINE GUN PREACHER (R) — Gerard Butler stars as

a former drug dealer who becomes an unexpected savior to kidnapped and orphaned children in Sudan. Tickets $6.50 for New Orleans Film Society members, $8.50 general admission. 7:30 p.m Tuesday, Chalmette Movies, 8700 W. Judge Perez Drive, 304-9992

SCUMBAG CINEMA FILM SERIES— The gallery screens

Hated: GG Allin and the Murder Junkies, Todd Phillips’ documentary about of punk rock musician GG Allin, and Straight to Hell, Alex Cox’s 1987 homage to spaghetti Westerns featuring a cast of rock stars. Free admission. 9 p.m. Wednesday, Antenna Gallery, 3161 Burgundy St., 957-4255;

www.press-street.com

FILM FESTIVALS NEW ORLEANS MIDDLE EAST FILM FESTIVAL — The festival

includes features and documentaries from across the Middle East on a range of political and cultural subjects, plus an art exhibition of children’s drawings from Gaza. Visit the website for the full schedule and other details. Daily through Dec. 18, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net AMC Palace 10 (Hammond), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 12 (Clearview), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 16 (Westbank), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 20 (Elmwood), (888) 262-

4386; Canal Place, 363-1117; Chalmette Movies, 304-9992; Entergy IMAX, 581-IMAX; Grand (Slidell), (985) 6411889; Hollywood 9 (Kenner), 464-0990; Hollywood 14 (Covington), (985) 893-3044; Kenner MegaDome, 468-7231; Prytania, 891-2787; Solomon Victory Theater, National World War II Museum, 5276012 Compiled by Lauren LaBorde Scan for movie times.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

The New Orleans Middle East Film Festival shows an array of award-winning and politically significant films from Egypt, Iran, Turkey and other Middle Eastern nations. The festival includes features and documentaries and is not limited to political topics, but a couple of the notable focuses in the 2011 slate of films are the Arab Spring uprising in Egpyt, political repression in Iran and life in Gaza. The opening night feature is This is Not a Film, credited to Iranian filmmakers Jafar Panahi and Mojtaba Mirtahmasb. Panahi was arrested by the Iranian government and convicted of colluding to commit crimes against the republic for his intentions to make a film about Iran’s 2009 election, which was won by President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. He was sentenced to six years in prison and banned from filmmaking for 20 years. While appealing his case, he and Mirtahmasb made a film inside his home, deftly describing his situation indirectly via filmed conversations with his lawyer and imagining a film he would make if cleared of the charges. The film was smuggled out of the country on a USB drive hidden in a cake, and it screened at the Cannes Film Festival. There are several films about the uprising in Egypt. Visiting filmmaker Ahmad Abdallah brings two films about cultural change. Heliopolis (screens Thursday, Dec. 15) chronicles personal longing and simmering frustration in a neighborhood designed to be a modern government district in the ancient city of Cairo. In the feature Microphone (pictured; screens Saturday, Dec. 17), Khaled (Khaled Abol Naga) returns to Alexandria after years abroad to find that his girlfriend is no longer interested and there’s a thriving and unruly underground culture, burgeoning with a new wave of hiphop, rock, graffiti, skateboarders and art. It was completed in 2010, and many called it a harbinger of the youth unrest that bubbled up in the January 2011 uprisings. Also screening is 18 Days (Friday, Dec. 16), a collection of short films by Egyptian directors (including Abdallah) about the Jan. 25 revolution. Documentaries include Dubai: A City of Dreams about the immense disparity between the nation’s oil wealth and the foreign laborers used to build its architectural marvels. Woman (Friday, Dec. 16) is Ziad H. Hamzeh’s profile of Nobel Prize nominee Bouthaina Shaaban, a Syrian woman who has fought for Arab women’s rights. On view during the festival is A Children’s View from Gaza, a show of artwork by children living in Gaza that was supposed to show at the Oakland Museum of Children’s Art but was cancelled due to political pressure. For a full schedule, visit www.zeitgeistinc.net. — Will Coviello

53

ART

inexpensive men’s gifts from $30

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

ART EVENTS DESCOURS. Architects and artists created 15 installations in “hidden” locations around the city for the New Orleans chapter of the American Institute of Architects’ annual event. Visit www.descours. us for details. Installations are open 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. nightly through Sunday. PHOTONOLA. The New Orleans Photo Alliance’s annual festival includes a gala and auction, photography exhibition openings, workshops, book signings, lectures, portfolio reviews and more. Visit www. photonola.org for the full schedule and other details. Thursday-Sunday. PROSPECT.2. Dan Cameron’s art biennial features works by 27 local, national and international artists on display in traditional and alternative venues. Visit www.prospectneworleans.org for details. Through Jan. 29.

OPENING

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

A GALLERY FOR FINE PHOTOGRAPHY. 241 Chartres St., 568-1313; www.agallery.com — “Oyeme Con Los Ojos,” pho-

tographs by Josephine Sacabo for PhotoNOLA, through Jan. 11. Opening reception 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., artist’s talk 7 p.m. at Historic New Orleans Collection (410 Chartres St.) Friday.

ALVAR LIBRARY. 913 Alvar St., 596-2667 — “No Trespassing,”

photographs by Meg Turner for PhotoNOLA, through Jan. 4. Opening reception 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Sunday.

May we suggest:

Skin Care Products

Cufflinks

Shaving Cream

Watches

Luggage

Ties

Shaving Equipment

Bow Ties

Colognes

ANTENNA GALLERY. 3161 Burgundy St., 957-4255; www. press-street.com — “There Was

a Forest: Jewish Life in Eastern Europe Today,” photographs by Loli Kantor for PhotoNOLA, through Jan. 8. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

BARRISTER’S GALLERY. 2331 St. Claude Ave., 525-2767; www.barristersgallery.com — “Vaginas,”

mixed-media sculpture by Clifton Webb, through Jan. 4. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. BIG BUNNY FINE ART. 332 Exchange Alley, 309-2444; www. lineartgallery.com — “New Orleans Walls,” photographs by Marie-Dominique Verdier for PhotoNOLA, through Jan. 3. Opening reception 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday. COUP D’OEIL ART CONSORTIUM. 2033 Magazine St., 722-0876; www.coupdoeilartconsortium.com — “Babel,”

photographs by Miriam

54

WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET

review Mixed-media photographs and glass sculpture at Arthur Roger Gallery

In December, New Orleans is brimming with art events including Prospect.2, photo shows at PhotoNOLA’s array of gallery shows and the architecture expo DesCours, presented by the local chapter of the American Institute of Architects. It’s a bit much. Among the photography shows, Arthur Roger Gallery got a jump start with Ted Kincaid’s archaic looking land, sea and sky scenes resembling 19th century “wet-plate” photographs, a process prized for its poetic imperfections, but Kincaid’s work is mostly digital. Here the landscapes are dramatically otherworldly, as if some 19th century romantic artist like Alfred Bierstadt had suffered many darkroom mishaps but still got some occasionally inspired results. The same goes for maritime scenes with ghostly sailing ships traversing preternaturally foggy seas, some studded with icebergs, and all somehow imbued with the patina of the ages. Open Sea 719 depicts a schooner in a pea soup fog, a ghost ship out of Coleridge — only here the albatross has already fled as it drifts toward an iceberg. Even hints of dry ice don’t mar its musty Victorian charm; it’s like something the ancient mariner himself might have dreamed up in a Laudanum trance. I especially liked the moon pictures. Lunar 4321 (pictured) suggests a triumph of Victorian science, a futurist vision from a distant past like those circa 1902 Georges Melies movies about moon travel. Imbued with the elegant lucidity of a more romantic time, Kincaid’s elemental otherworldliness complements Dale Chihuly’s extravagant baroque glass concoctions in the adjacent gallery, decorative fantasies of impossible biological or marine life rendered vitreous as if by elfin magicians in faraway places. In an odd twist, Chihuly’s twisted baroque confections are seemingly echoed in Kourtney Keller’s kinetic, mirror-glass found-object sculptures at the Home Space Gallery, only these glittering, rotating, science fiction structures — like miniasteroids from a disco ball universe — may have originated in the far reaches of Bywater instead. — D. Eric Bookhardt

THRU DEC

24

Every Doubt That Holds You There: Mixed-media photographs by Ted Kincaid White: Glass sculpture by Dale Chihuly Arthur Roger Gallery, 432 Julia St., 5221999; www.arthurrogergallery.com

bestofneworleans.com ART Waterman for PhotoNOLA, through Jan. 7. Opening reception 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday. CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE. 527 Decatur St., 522-0571; www.crescentcitybrewhouse.com —

“Currents,” the New Orleans Photo Alliance members showcase for PhotoNOLA, through Jan. 2. Opening reception 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Thursday. DU MOIS GALLERY. 4921 Freret St., 818-6032 — “Faded/Fated Fairytales,” photographs

by Laura D’Alessandro for PhotoNOLA; “Vestiges,” mixed-media by Don Feis; “Sugarplum,” paintings by Amy Glisan; all through Jan. 7. Opening reception 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday.

THE FRONT. 4100 St. Claude Ave.; www.nolafront.org — “I vs. I,” works by Alex Podesta;

works by Morgana King & Jonathan Traviesa; “In Search of the Cajun Prairie,” works by Megan Roniger; “Special Ellipse,” works by Francoise Gamma & Rollin Leonard; all through Jan. 8. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday.

GEORGE & LEAH MCKENNA MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN ART. 2003 Carondelet St., 586-7432; www.themckennamuseum.com — “African Wisdom in Image and Proverb,”

photographs by Betty Press for PhotoNOLA; “Becoming Home,” photographs by Mariana Sheppard and Nakeya Brown for PhotoNOLA; both through Jan. 21. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

GRAPHITE GALLERIES. 936 Royal St., 565-3739 —

“An Underwater Odyssey,” photographs by Christy Lee Rogers for PhotoNOLA, through Jan. 4. Opening reception 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Friday.

HOMESPACE GALLERY. 1128 St. Roch Ave., (917) 584-9867 — “Tintype,” photographs by Euphus Ruth, Jenny Sampson, S. Gayle Stevens and Bruce Schultz for PhotoNOLA, through Jan. 8. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM. 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum. org — “Infamy: December 1941,” oral histories, artifacts and images focusing on the attack on Pearl Harbor, through Feb. 19. Opening Wednesday.

SIDEARM GALLERY. 1122 St. Roch Ave., 218-8379; www.sidearmgallery.org — “New Orleans Radical Faerie Art Show,” a group exhibition featuring photographs, fashion, sculptural video and paintings. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. ST. JOE LOFTS ARTISTS COMMUNITY. 923 Constance St., 982-5638; www.stjoelofts.com — “Art

Two Ways,” photography for PhotoNOLA and a variety show featuring spoken word, music, dance and comedy, 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday.

UPTOWN POPUP ART GALLERY. 7835 Maple St. — Photographs by Scott Domanski, Emily Ardoin, Anthony Schoenecker, Annie Peyton and Ishita Sharma, through Dec. 30. Opening reception 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday. WILLIAMS RESEARCH CENTER. Historic New Orleans Collection, 410 Chartres St., 523-4662; www.hnoc.org — “In Katrina’s Wake: Restoring a Sense of Place,” photographs by Stephen Wilkes for PhotoNOLA, through March 3. Opening Thursday.

GALLERIES 1022 GALLERY. 1022 Lowerline St., 301-0679; www.1022gallery.blogspot.com — “Urban Appeal: The Art of Graffiti,” through Jan. 14. “The Velvet Underground Railroad: A Psychedelic Slave Trade,” mixed media by the Bourghog Guild, through Jan. 14. PAGE 57

this holiday season

we pay your taxes Happy Holidays from

Shop Local! VOLUNTEER TRADITIONS

HEADQUARTERS LOUISIANA PRIDE

8119-21 Oak Street • 504-866-9944

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

NEW ORLEANS PHOTO ALLIANCE. 1111 St. Mary St., 610-4899; www.neworleansphotoalliance. blogspot.com — “Silenced Suffering: The Comfort Women Project,” photographs by Jungeun Lee for PhotoNOLA, through Jan. 29. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

55

LISTINGS

WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET

PAGE 55 3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY. 1638 Clio St., 5692700; www.3rcp.com — “@

Phonography: Dialogue in the Wireless Age,” a group exhibition of phone camera photographs for PhotoNOLA, through December. 811 HOWARD GALLERY. 811 Howard Ave., 524-3872; www. francoalessandrini.net — “ID,

Picture Identification,” portraits by Franco Alessandrini, through December. 9TH STREET STUDIO. 1029 9th St., 899-6686; www.9th-streetstudio.com — “One: A Collaboration Between Paint & Metal,” works by Alexis Walter and Rachael Adamiak, through Dec. 30. A GALLERY FOR FINE PHOTOGRAPHY. 241 Chartres St., 568-1313; www.agallery.com —

Photogravures by Josephine Sacabo, through December.

ALL IN THE FRAME GALLERY. 2596 Front St., Slidell, (985) 2901395 — “Serene Waters, Clear Horizons,” paintings by Annie Strack, ongoing. ANTON HAARDT GALLERY. 2858 Magazine St., 309-4249; www. antonart.com — Works by Anton Haardt, Christopher Moses and others, ongoing. ARIODANTE GALLERY. 535 Julia St., 524-3233 — Paintings

by Myra Williamson Wirtz; jewelry by Erica Walker; photographic collages by Stirling Barrett; both through Dec. 30. ART GALLERY 818. 818 Royal St., 524-6918 — Paint-

ART HOUSE ON THE LEVEE. 4725 Dauphine St., 247-8894 — “Art By Committee,” an interactive exhibit by Robert Tannen for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29. ARTHUR ROGER GALLERY. 432 Julia St., 522-1999; www.arthurrogergallery.com — “White,” works by Dale Chihuly; “Every Doubt That Holds You Here,” photographs by Ted Kincaid; both through Dec. 24. ATELIER-MAGASIN. 3954 Magazine St. — Wood and metal sculptures by Kelly Guidry; photographs by Amy James; portraits by Clay Judice Jr.; paintings by George Marks; all ongoing. THE BEAUTY SHOP. 3828 Dryades St. — Works by Rebecca

Rebouche, ongoing.

BERGERON STUDIO & GALLERY. 406 Magazine St., 522-7503; www.bergeronstudio.com — Photographs by Michael P. Smith, Jack Beech, Harriet Blum, Kevin Roberts and others, ongoing. BERTA’S AND MINA’S ANTIQUITIES GALLERY. 4138 Magazine

St., 895-6201 — “Louisiana! United We Stand to Save Our Wetlands,” works by Nilo and Mina Lanzas; works by Clementine Hunter, Noel Rockmore and others; all ongoing. BRYANT GALLERIES. 316 Royal St., 525-5584; www.bryantgalleries.com — Paintings by Dean Mitchell, ongoing. CAFE BABY. 237 Chartres St., 3104004; www.markbercier.com —

Paintings and works on paper by Mark Bercier, ongoing. CALLAN FINE ART. 240 Chartres St., 524-0025; www. callanfineart.com — Works

by Eugene de Blass, Louis Valtat and other artists of the Barbizon, Impressionist and Post-Impressionist schools, ongoing.

CARDINAL GALLERY. 541 Bourbon St., 522-3227 — Exhibition

of Italian artists featuring works by Bruno Paoli and Andrea Stella, ongoing.

CARIBBEAN ARTS LTD. 720 Franklin Ave., 943-3858 — The gallery showcases contemporary Haitian and Jamaican art. CAROL ROBINSON GALLERY. 840 Napoleon Ave., 895-6130; www.carolrobinsongallery.com — Christmas group exhibition

featuring Christina Goodman, Jere Allen, David Goodman, Mary Hardy, Beverly Dennis, Sandra Bershell and gallery artists, through December.

CASELL GALLERY. 818 Royal St., 524-0671; www.casellartgallery. com — Pastels by Joaquim

Casell; etchings by Sage; oils by Charles Ward; all ongoing.

COLE PRATT GALLERY. 3800 Magazine St., 891-6789; www. coleprattgallery.com — Ab-

stract mixed-media paintings by Randy Asprodites; “The Sugar Mill Sessions,” photography of New Iberia sugar mills by David Armentor; both through December.

COLLECTIVE WORLD ART COMMUNITY. Poydras Center, 650 Poydras St., 339-5237; www. collectiveworldartcommunity. com — Paintings from the

Blue Series by Joseph Pearson, ongoing.

COLLINS C. DIBOLL ART GALLERY. Loyola University, Monroe Library, 6363 St. Charles Ave., fourth floor, 861-5456 — Mixed

media by Avish Khebrehzadeh, through Jan. 29.

COURTYARD GALLERY. 1129 Decatur St., 330-0134; www. woodartandmarketing.com —

Hand-carved woodworks by Daniel Garcia, ongoing.

D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., 5243936 — “The Bull and the Dream,” figurative stone and wood sculptures by Thomas Glover W. and Marianne Lerbs, through Feb. 3. ELLIOTT GALLERY. 540 Royal St., 523-3554; www.elliottgallery. com — Works by gallery artists Coignard, Engel, Papart, Petra, Tobiasse, Schneuer and Yrondi,

ongoing. FLEXSPACE.2. 638 Clouet St. — “After You’ve Been Burned by Hot Soup You Blow in Your Yogurt: The Guantanamo Project,” multimedia works by Margot Herster, through Saturday. FREDRICK GUESS STUDIO. 910 Royal St., 581-4596; www. fredrickguessstudio.com —

Paintings by Fredrick Guess, ongoing.

GALERIE D’ART FRANCAIS. 541 Royal St., 581-6925 — Works by

Todd White, ongoing.

GALERIE ROYALE. 3648 Magazine St., 894-1588; www.galerieroyale.com — Mixed media

on canvas and metal by Mike Klung, through December.

GALLERIA BELLA. 319 Royal St., 581-5881 — Works by gallery artists, ongoing. GALLERY BIENVENU. 518 Julia St., 525-0518; www.gallerybienvenu.com — “Moving in Colors,” sculpture by Key-Sook Geum, through Jan. 26. GALLERY VERIDITAS. 3822 Magazine St., 267-5991; www. gvnola.com — “In the Spirit of Shozo,” a retrospective exhibition of paintings by Shozo Nagano, through December. GRAPHITE GALLERIES. 936 Royal St., 565-3739 — “Sinners and

Saints,” works by Joe Hobbs; works by Christy Lee Rogers; both ongoing.

GUTHRIE CONTEMPORARY. 3815 Magazine St., 897-2688; www. guthriecontemporary.com — Photo-based abstractions by Rodolfo Choperena for PhotoNOLA, through Jan. 15. GUY LYMAN FINE ART. 3645 Magazine St., 899-4687; www. guylymanfineart.com — Mixed media with mechanical light sculptures by Jimmy Block, ongoing. ISAAC DELGADO FINE ARTS GALLERY. Delgado Community College, Isaac Delgado Hall, third floor, 615 City Park Ave., 361-6620 — “Below Sea Level,”

a panoramic video installation by Pawel Wojtasik for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29.

ISABELLA’S GALLERY. 3331 Severn Ave., Suite 105, Metairie, 7793202; www.isabellasgallery.com — Hand-blown glass works by Marc Rosenbaum; raku by Kate Tonguis and John Davis; all ongoing. JACK GALLERY. 900 Royal St., 588-1777 — Paintings, litho-

graphs and other works by Tom Everhart, Gordon Parks, Al Hirschfeld, Stanley Mouse, Anja, Patrick McDonnell and other artists, ongoing.

JEAN BRAGG GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART. 600 Julia St., 895-7375; www.jeanbragg. com — “Sites and Sights

Scene,” oil paintings by Leslie Dudley, through December. “The Painter on An Extended Voyage,” paintings by Bernard Beneito, through Jan. 29. PAGE 59

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

ings, sculpture and jewelry by local artists Noel Rockmore, Michael Fedor, Xavier de Callatay, Charles Bazzell, Bambi deVille and Ritchie Fitzgerald, ongoing.

ART

57

Is the Summer too hot for you? Cool off with our Vietnamese fresh SPRING ROLLS & VERMICELLI SALAD to fill you up. Also, our CHINESE & VEGETARIAN dishes will cure that Summer time hunger.

LUNCH SPECIALS starting at $5.45

Daily soup or Salad with your lunch for only $1.95 DINE IN • TAKE OUT CATERING • DELIVERY 3635 Prytania St.

(at Amelia)

NOLA 70115

(504)899-5129 For full Menu please visit our web site:

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

www.moonnola.com

58

VIETNAMESE FRESH SPRING ROLLS $6.95

HOLIDAY PARTY

PARADISE RESERVE OUR PRIVATE VENUE OR ASK ABOUT CATERING PACKAGES

WE’RE OPEN CHRISTMAS EVE LUNCH & DINNER

CHRISTMAS DAY DINNER ONLY NEW YEAR’S EVE LUNCH & DINNER NEW YEAR’S DAY LUNCH & DINNER NIRVANA GIFT CERTIFICATES MAKE GREAT STOCKING STUFFERS

4308 MAGAZINE ST • 894-9797 OPEN TUESDAY-SUNDAY LUNCH: 11:30AM-2:30PM DINNER: 5:30-10:30PM

Serving the Greater N.O. Area since 1982

T h e 6 T h A n n uA l F e s T i vA l o F P h o T o g r A P h y i n n e w o r l e A n s

December 2011

Exhibitions

K

Gala

K

Photowalk

lEcturEs K workshoPs K anD morE

photonola.org Visit us onlinE for a comPlEtE list of EVEnts Exhibitions, maP, auction PrEViEw & aDDitional information

An annual Festival of Photography presented by the Photo New Orleans Alliance

LISTINGS

WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET

PAGE 57 JIMMY MAC POP-UP GALLERY. 802 Elysian Fields Ave. — “Mud-

colors,” mixed media on canvas by Jimmy Mac, through Jan. 1.

JON SCHOOLER GALLERY. 8526 Oak St., 865-7032; www. jonschooler.com — “Subliminal WOWs,” paintings by Jon Schooler, ongoing. JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY. 400A Julia St., 522-5471; www. jonathanferraragallery.com —

“P.2 Projects,” a group exhibition curated in conjunction with Prospect.2, through Jan. 21.

JULIE NEILL DESIGNS. 3908 Magazine St., 899-4201; www. julieneill.com — “Facade,”

photographs by Lesley Wells, ongoing.

KAKO GALLERY. 536 Royal St., 565-5445; www.kakogallery.com — Paintings by Don Picou and

Stan Fontaine; “Raku” by Joy Gauss; 3-D wood sculpture by Joe Derr; all ongoing.

KEN KIRSCHMAN ARTSPACE. NOCCA Riverfront, 2800 Chartres St. — “Off the Beaten Path: Vio-

lence, Women, and Art,” a touring group exhibit curated by Art Works for Change, through Dec. 16.

L9 CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 539 Caffin Ave., 948-0056 — “Faces

of Treme,” works by Chandra McCormick and Keith Calhoun, ongoing. LE PETIT SALON DE NEW ORLEANS. 906 Royal St., 524-5700 — Paintings by Holly Sarre,

ongoing.

LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia St., 522-5988; www.lemieuxgalleries.com — “Louisiana’s

LIVE ART STUDIO. 4207 Dumaine St., 484-7245 — “Sunflowers,”

hand-painted silk wall hangings by Ray Cole; watercolors by Sean Friloux; “A 30-Year Retrospective of Photography,” photographs by Eliot Kamenitz; “Delta Dogs,” clay sculpture by Larone Hudson; all through Jan. 4. LOUISIANA CRAFTS GUILD. 608 Julia St., 558-6198; www.louisianacrafts.org — Group show featuring works from guild members, ongoing. MALLORY PAGE STUDIO. 614 Julia St.; www.mallorypage.com — Paintings by Mallory Page, ongoing. MARTINE CHAISSON GALLERY. 727 Camp St., 304-7942; www. martinechaissongallery.com — “Stamina in the Dream House,” oil paintings and sculpture by Elizabeth Fox, through Jan. 28. MICHELLE Y WILLIAMS GALLERY. 835 Julia St., 585-1945; www.michelleywilliams.com — Works by

Michelle Y. Williams, ongoing.

NEW ORLEANS GLASSWORKS & PRINTMAKING STUDIO. 727 Magazine St., 529-7277; www. neworleansglassworks.com —

Sandblasted photographs by Drake Fuller; kiln-fired sculpture by Michele McManus; glass jewelry by Jane Block; all through Dec. 30. NEW ORLEANS HEALING CENTER. 2372 St. Claude Ave., 948-9961; www.neworleanshealingcenter. org — Works by Keith Duncan

for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29. NEWCOMB ART GALLERY. Woldenberg Art Center, Tulane University, 865-5328; www. newcombartgallery.tulane. edu — Works by Nick Cave and

Joyce J. Scott for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29.

OAK STREET GALLERY. 111 N. Oak St., Hammond, (985) 345-0521 — Hammond Art Guild Holiday Show and Sale, through Dec. 14. OCTAVIA ART GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www. octaviaartgallery.com — “For the Love of Flowers,” photographs by Elizabeth Kleinveld for PhotoNOLA, through Jan. 14. PEARL ART GALLERY. 4421 Magazine St., 228-5840 — Works by Cindy and Drue Hardegree, Erica Dewey, John Womack, Sontina, Lorraine Jones and S. Lee, ongoing. PETER O’NEILL STUDIOS. 721 Royal St., 527-0703; www. oneillgallery.com — Works by Peter O’Neill, ongoing. PHOTO WORKS NEW ORLEANS. 521 St. Ann St., 593-9090; www. photoworksneworleans.com — Photography by Louis Sahuc, ongoing. PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER. 923 Tchoupitoulas St., 5817032; www.prcno.org — “Penn

Station: A Distant View,” largescale photographs by Becca Fitzpatrick, through January. REINA GALLERY. 4132 Magazine St., 895-0022; www.reinaart. com — “Vintage New Orleans

Artists,” watercolors, etchings and folk art; “Patron Saints,” works by Shelley Barberot; both ongoing.

RHINO CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS GALLERY. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www.rhinocrafts.com — Works by gallery members

Maria Fromich, Betsy MeyersGreen, Linda Rosamano, Sharad Mulchand and others, ongoing.

RIVERSTONE GALLERIES. 719 Royal St., 412-9882; 729 Royal St., 581-3688; Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 36, 566-0588; 733 Royal St., 525-9988; www. riverstonegalleries.net — Multi-

media works by Ricardo Lozano, Michael Flohr, Henry Ascencio, Jaline Pol and others, ongoing. RUSTY PELICAN ART. 4031 St. Claude Ave., 218-5727; www. rustypelicanart.com — Works by

Travis and Lexi Linde, ongoing.

SALONE DELL’ARTES ARTEMISIA. 3000 Royal St., 481-5113 — “I

group photography exhibition, through December.

NOW HIRING Exceptional Talent

SHEILA’S FINE ART STUDIO. 1427 N. Johnson St., 473-3363; www. sheilaart.com — Works by Sheila

Phipps, ongoing.

SLIDELL CULTURAL CENTER. Slidell City Hall, 2055 Second St., (985) 646-4375 — “Andy Warhol: Ce-

lebrities,” 15 silkscreened works by the artist, through Dec. 16. SOREN CHRISTENSEN GALLERY. 400 Julia St., 569-9501; www. sorengallery.com — “Home & Away,” photographs by Jack Kotz for PhotoNOLA, through Dec. 30.

STAPLE GOODS. 1340 St. Roch Ave., 908-7331; www.postmedium.org/staplegoods — “Fresh Produce,” works by Thomasine Bartlett, Aaron Collier, Robyn Denny, William DePauw, Daniel Kelly, Anne Nelson, Laura Richens and Cynthia Scott, through Jan. 8. STELLA JONES GALLERY. Place St. Charles, 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 132, 568-9050 — “Maha-

lia: Queen of Gospel Music,” a group exhibition of works inspired by Mahalia Jackson, through Jan. 6.

STEVE MARTIN STUDIO. 624 Julia St., 566-1390; www.stevemartinfineart.com — Contemporary sculpture and paintings by Steve Martin and other artists, ongoing. STUDIO BFG. 2627 Desoto St., 942-0200; www.studiobfg.com — “Peel Sessions: First Install-

DO YOU HAVE WHAT IT TAKES TO PLAY ON OUR FIELD? THEN COME TO OPEN TRYOUTS! SATELLITE EMPLOYMENT OFFICE LOCATED AT 600 FULTON STREET MONDAY – SATURDAY 9AM – 5PM UNTIL DECEMBER 23 Visit HarrahsNewOrleans.com/Mannings to learn more. Must be 21 or older to apply.

V2_63637.3_4.729x5.333_4c_Ad.indd 1

12/2/11 12:31 PM

ment,” works by Tina Stanley, ongoing.

T-LOT. 1940 St Claude Ave., (865) 567-9766; www.t-lot.tumblr. com — “Parallel Play,” a group

exhibition featuring works on paper, architectural installations, sculpture and performance, through January.

THOMAS MANN GALLERY I/O. 1812 Magazine St., 581-2113; www. thomasmann.com — “Where’s the Money?” group exhibit interpreting the economy, ongoing. TRIPOLO GALLERY. 401 N. Columbia St., (985) 893-1441 — Works by Bill Binnings, Robert Cook, Donna Duffy, Scott Ewen, Juli Juneau, Kevin LeBlanc, Ingrid Moses, Gale Ruggiero, Robert Seago and Scott Upton, ongoing. UNO-ST. CLAUDE GALLERY. 2429 St. Claude Ave. — Works by Ivan Vezzoli for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29. WMSJR. 1061 Camp St., 299-9455; www.wmsjr.com — Paintings by Will Smith, ongoing. A WORK OF ART GALLERY. 8212 Oak St., 862-5244 — Glass works

by Juli Juneau; photographs from the New Orleans Photo Alliance; both ongoing.

Genti H2O,” works by Shmuela Padnos, ongoing.

CALL FOR ARTISTS

SCOTT EDWARDS PHOTOGRAPHY GALLERY. 2109 Decatur St., 6100581 — “Burlesque Exposed,” a

BRIDGE HOUSE/GRACE HOUSE RECYCLED FASHION SHOW.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

Landscape and Grass Roots,” works by Philip Gould, through December.

ART

Designers are needed for an PAGE 60

59

ART

LISTINGS

PAGE 59

event in which participants re-purpose clothing found in the Bridge House thrift store for a Project Runway-style fashion competition. Orientation for interested designers is at 6 p.m. Wednesday. Call 821-7134 or visit www. bridgehouse.org for details. MONUMENTAL. Antenna Gallery, 3161 Burgundy St., 957-4255; www.press-street.com — Antenna

seeks proposals for imaginative reinterpretations of 19th- and early 20th-century New Orleans monuments for a show in February. Submissions deadline is Dec. 15, and there is a $15 entry fee. Email info@press-street.com for details.

MUSEUMS 1850 HOUSE. 523 St. Ann St., 568- 6968 — Works by Sophie Calle for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29. AMISTAD RESEARCH CENTER. 6823 St. Charles Ave., 862-3222 — “The Revolution Will Not Be...

:’ Print Culture of the Civil Rights Movement,” posters, broadsides, newsletters, flyers and similar ephemera that chronicled the Civil Rights Movement, through Dec. 22.

CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER. 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www.cacno.org — “NOLA Now Part I: Swagger for a Lost Magnificence;” Prospect.2 show featuring Jonas Dahlberg, George Dunbar, Karl Haendel and others; both through Jan. 29. “As We See It: Youth Vision Quilt,” student-created quilt with more than 400 patches, ongoing. HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION. 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www.hnoc.org — “The 18th Star: Treasures From 200 Years of Louisiana Statehood;” “Goddess Fortuna and Her Dunces in an Effort to Make Sense of it All,” outdoor installation by Dawn Dedeaux for Prospect.2; both through Jan. 29. LONGUE VUE HOUSE AND GARDENS. 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue.com —

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

“Audubon’s Absence,” ecological artworks by Brandon Ballengee, through January.

60

LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM PRESBYTERE. 751 Chartres St., 568-6968; www.lsm.crt.state.la.us — “The Louisiana Plantation Photos of Robert Tebbs,” 60 gelatin silver prints by the architecture photographer, through November 2012. NEW ORLEANS AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM. 1418 Gov. Nicholls St., 566-1136; www.noaam.com — Works by Lorraine O’Grady for Prospect.2,

through Jan. 29.

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma.org —

“NOMA 100: Gifts for the Second Century,” an exhibition with works by Anish Kapoor, Keith Sonnier, Matthew Barney, Jasper Johns, Sol LeWitt, Kathe Kollwitz, and Gabrielle Münter, through Jan. 22. Works by Bruce Davenport Jr., Nicole Eisenman, An-My Le and Jennifer Steinkamp for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29. NEW ORLEANS PHARMACY MUSEUM. 514 Chartres St., 565-8027; www.pharmacymuseum. org — Exhibits about 19th-century pharmacy, medicine and health care, all ongoing. OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART. 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — “Art

Christmas on a Budget! Guiltless Shopping! 8204 Oak Street 861-0159 Mon-Sat · 10-6

of the Cup: Functional Comfort,” cups by more than 50 artists presented by the Center for Southern Craft and Design, through Dec. 18. Photographs from the museum’s permanent collection; works by George Valentine Dureau; both through Jan. 3. “Ersy: Architect of Dreams;” “Oyeme Con Los Ojos,” photographs by Josephine Sacabo, through Jan. 8. Works by Ashton Ramsay for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29.

OLD U.S. MINT. 400 Esplanade Ave., 568-6990; lsm.crt.state.la.us/site/mintex.htm — Works by William Eggleston and Ragnar Kjartansson for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29.

LISTINGS

GET IN ON THE ACT

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly. com; FAX:483-3116

nEw ExpandEd hourS

STAGE

now open every day

review

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

7am-3pm

THEATER THE BOYS IN THE BAND.

Shadowbox Theatre, 2400 St. Claude Ave., 298-8676; www. theshadowboxtheatre.com — Mart Crowley’s groundbreaking drama, considered to be the first “gay play,” centers around a birthday party in a Manhattan apartment that turns nasty as the guests become inebriated. Tickets $15. 7:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday and 4 p.m. Sunday. A CHRISTMAS CAROL: THE WHOLE STORY. Actor’s Theatre

of New Orleans, WTIX-FM Building, second floor, 4539 N. I-10 Service Road, Metairie, 456-4111 — A 19-year holiday tradition at the theater, Rene J.F. Piazza re-imagines Dickens’ classic as a screwball comedy with a cast of eccentric characters. Tickets $20 general admission, $18 students and seniors. 7:30 p.m. ThursdaySaturday, 2:30 p.m. Sunday, through Dec. 23.

THE EIGHT: THE REINDEER MONOLOGUES. Mid-City Arts

Theater, 3540 Toulouse St., 4881460 — Reindeer tell sordid tales of sex, lies and Santa. Tickets $25. 7:30 p.m. TuesdayWednesday, then MondayWednesday through Dec. 21.

GRENADINE MCGUNKLE’S DOUBLE-WIDE CHRISTMAS. One

Eyed Jacks, 615 Toulouse St., 569-8361; www.oneeyedjacks. net — The signature Running With Scissors holiday romp revolves around hijinks at a trailer park Christmas eve potluck. Call 606-9903 for reservations. General admission $20. 7 p.m. Friday-Saturday through Dec. 24. HISTRIONICS. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 6444300; www.nolacomedy. com — In Thomas Bernhard’s comedy, things go from bad to worse when a veteran actor performs for an unenthusiastic audience in a dance hall in rural Austria. Call 812-7612 or email leorednoses@gmail. com for reservations. Tickets $13. 8:45 p.m. Friday-Saturday through Dec. 17. ROMEO AND JULIET. New

Orleans Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle,

Boiled and baked daily. bagels • schmears bagel sandwiches • salads iced coffee •iced tea

Crimes of the Heart Beth Henley’s 1979 Pulitzer Prize-winner, Crimes of the Heart, recently presented by Actors Theatre of New Orleans, is billed as a Southern Gothic farce. The protagonists are the three Magrath sisters from the small town of Hazelhurst, Miss. Lenny Magrath (Taryn Vinet) enters the kitchen of her grandfather’s house, places a birthday candle on a cookie and sings “Happy birthday to me.” Her celebration is interrupted by cousin Chick Boyle (Amanda Francis), who’s upset because the newspapers are reporting that sister Babe Magrath (Greta Trosclair) shot her rich husband Zachary, who is recovering in the hospital. Babe is released on bail and refuses to say why she shot her spouse. Skeletons start falling out of the closet and it’s revealed the sisters’ mother hung herself after her husband left her. The third sister, Meg (Rachel de Jonge), arrives from California, where she’s been trying to launch a singing career. She fled to California after a cataclysmic hurricane (changed to Katrina in this production), because she persuaded her lover Doc Porter (Jeffrey Ramirez) not to evacuate and he was severely injured during the storm. After considerable probing, Babe admits she’s trying to protect a young black man with whom she had an affair. She hires a lawyer, Barnette Lloyd (Kyle Woods), who has a grudge against Zachary and wants to use the case as a way to ruin his political career. Zachary’s sister was suspicious of Babe, however, and hired a private detective, who snapped revealing photos of Babe and her lover, compromising the defense and the budding romance between Babe and the lawyer. The drama is more comic soap opera than Gothic farce, and complications abound. It turns out that Zachary had come home unexpectedly and discovered the tryst. The highest (or lowest point) of farce comes when Babe despairs and contemplates killing herself like her mother did. Are we to take this as reality or goofy humor? We are somewhere between Tennessee Williams and the Marx Brothers. The cast, under Chelle Duke’s direction, kept up a full head of steam. — Dalt Wonk 658-4100; www.noma.org — The performers use the space of NOMA’s Great Hall in the NOLA Project’s interactive production of the Shakespeare tragedy. Visit www.noma. eventbrite.com for reservations. Tickets $12 NOMA members, $12 university students, $24 general admission. 7:30 p.m. Thursday and SaturdaySunday through Dec. 18.

THE SANTALAND DIARIES.

Mid-City Arts Theater, 3540 Toulouse St., 488-1460 — A.J. Allegra performs the one-man show based on David Sedaris’ Holidays on Ice. Tickets $20. 8 p.m. Friday, Dec. 16 and 22, 3 p.m. Sunday.

SHUT UP, YOU’RE FAT. Cafe

Istanbul, New Orleans Healing Center, 2372 St. Claude Ave.; PAGE 62

3138 magazine st (Enter on 9th Street)

504.309.7557 Check for specials on Facebook & Twitter. See full menu at: artzbagelz.com

755 TCHOUPITOULAS ST | 504-527-0942 SUN-THU 5:30PM-10PM | FRI & SAT 5:30PM-11PM

B Christmas Eve B

starters

PRE FIXE FOUR COURSE DINNER

68

$

PERSON

Choice of SOUP/APPETIZER, SALAD, ENTREE and DESSERT Dinner hours 5-10pm | Call for Reservations Á la carte menu also available Christmas Eve.

COURTYARD SEATING AVAILABLE RESERVATIONS AVAILABLE | PLEASE CALL FOR PRIVATE PARTIES

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

A CHRISTMAS CAROL. Playmakers Theater, 19106 Playmakers Road (off Lee Road), Covington, (985) 893-1671; www. playmakersinc.com — Adolfo Rodriguez directs Doris Baizley’s adaptation of the Charles Dickens tale. Tickets $8. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday.

holiday gift cards make great stocking stuffers!

61

STAGE

LISTINGS

GET IN ON THE ACT

PAGE 61

www.neworleanshealingcenter.org — Nancy Hartman uses “olfactory enhancement” in her one-woman show recounting everything from her days performing with Penn and Teller to escaping life as an Orange County housewife. Tickets $10. 8 p.m. TuesdayWednesday, then MondayWednesday through Dec. 14.

review

SYLVIA CELEBRATES THE SEASONS. Cutting Edge Theater at

Attractions Salon, 747 Robert Blvd., Slidell, (985) 290-0760; www.cuttingedgeproductions. org — Brian Fontenot, Sara Pagonas and Sally McKellip’s holiday variety show includes musical numbers and comedy skits. Tickets $18.50. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday.

TORCH SONG TRILOGY. AllWays

JOIN

FOR A CHANCE TO WIN GREAT PRIZES BY PLEDGING TO SHOP LOCAL

Stuff Your Stocking Gift Set

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

$50 Gift Cer tificate to The Shop at the Historic New Orleans Collection

62

$50 Gift Cer tificate to The Bridal Boutique by Mae Me $25 Gift Cer tificate to SWAP Alexa Pulitzer's King Gator cups from Gentry A free Pure Barre class A freshwater pearl and sterling lariat necklace with a pair of freshwater pearl and sterling earrings from Wellington Jewelry

Thank you to the following businesses for supporting our Shop Local Campaign:

Take a break from the big box stores and online shopping and support the Greater New Orleans economy this holiday season by shopping at locally owned businesses. VISIT: bestofneworleans.com and pledge to spend a minimum of $100 at locally owned businesses and you will be entered to win one of our fabulous gift sets.

*No purchase necessary to win. Chances of winning based on number of entries

Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www.theallwayslounge.com — Harvey Fierstein’s three-act play focuses on different stages in the life of Arnold, a Jewish drag queen living in New York City in the late 1970s and 1980s. Tickets $15. 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday.

BURLESQUE & CABARET BURLESQUE BALLROOM. Irvin

Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse, 300 Bourbon St., 553-2270; www. sonesta.com — Trixie Minx stars in the weekly burlesque show featuring the music of Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown. Call 553-2331 for details. 11:50 p.m. Friday.

SLOW BURN BURLESQUE.

Howlin’ Wolf, 907 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf. com — The burlesque troupe presents “Jesus’ Big Birthday Burlesque Bash.” Tickets $15 general admission, $20 VIP seating. 11 p.m. Saturday. TEMPTATION: A BURLESQUE TRIBUTE TO TOM WAITS. Hi-Ho

Lounge, 2239 St. Claude Ave., 945-4446; www.hiholounge. net — The Storyville Starlettes burlesque troupe performs with live music by Joe Carroll and the Big Light. Visit www. storyvillestarlettes.weebly. com for details. Tickets $10. 11 p.m. Friday.

DANCE BALLET HYSELL’S THE NUTCRACKER. Louis J. Roussel

Performance Hall, Loyola University New Orleans, 6363 St. Charles Ave., 865-2074; www.montage.loyno.edu — Eleanor and Ian Carney star in the production. Call 897-5505 for reservations. Tickets $10 children, $18 general admission. 7:30 p.m. Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday. THE NUTCRACKER SUITE. Dixon Hall, Tulane University, 6823 St. Charles Ave., 865-5000 — The production features participants from the NORDC/NOBA Center For Dance’s programs

South Pacific Although it failed to live up to the near-unanimous praise of the 2008 Broadway revival, the touring production of Rodgers & Hammerstein’s South Pacific, which had a recent run at the Mahalia Jackson Theater, is a solid show that delivers on its signature songbook. The musical is set at a U.S. Navy base during World War II, where the daffy American nurse Nellie Forbush (Katie Reid) has fallen for the wealthy French expat Emile de Becque (Marcelo Guzzo), who has a few secrets — mainly two Polynesian love children and a murder rap. Nellie tries to forget him in the audience favorite “I’m Gonna Wash That Man Right Outta My Hair,” which Reid carries with bright buoyancy against a weak supporting cast. With his deep, rich baritone, Guzzo handled Emile’s songs adeptly, but his acting and accent were clunky (his opera background is perhaps to blame for his stiff stage presence). Also at the base, we find an L-and-R interchanging, cartoonish Asian stereotype of the first order in the scheming Bloody Mary (played by Cathy Foy-Mahi, who is bewitching during “Bali Ha’i”), a pack of goofy sailors and Lt. Joseph Cable (Shane Donovan), whose Princeton education didn’t prepare him for the emotional predicament in which he finds himself. The lighting was effective, creating lovely tropical sunsets and feathery clouds. But no amount of Broadway standards and pretty set pieces could expedite the first act, which at an hour and 40 minutes left many audience members less than enchanted as intermission neared. — Lauren LaBorde for youth and senior citizens along with students from NOBA’s after-school programs. Free admission. 4 p.m. Sunday. RIVER REGION BALLET’S THE NUTCRACKER. Destrehan High

School, 1 Wildcat Lane, Destrehan — River Region Ballet presents the Tchaikovsky classic. A special children’s performance (3 p.m. Saturday) features a meet-and-greet with the cast members. Call 202-7706 or email riverregionballet@cox. net for details. Tickets $10 children’s performance, $20 general admission. 7:30 p.m. Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday.

FAMILY JUNGLE BOOK. Teatro Wego, 177 Sala Ave., Westwego, 885-2000;

www.jpas.org — Children from the JPAS’ Theatre Kids! program perform in a musical adaptation of the Disney film. Tickets $18 general admission, $15 students/seniors, $10 children. 7:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. THE PECAN CRACKER. Southern

Rep Theater, The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 522-6545; www.southernrep.com — Ricky Graham, Sean Patterson, Mandy Zirkenbach and Jefferson Turner’s musical is a New Orleans twist on The Nutcracker with buttermilk drops, a cockroach army, dancing alligators and snowflakes in City Park. Tickets $25. 7:30 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday through Dec. 23. PAGE 64

STAGE

LISTINGS

PAGE 62

COMEDY BRIAN POSEHN. Howlin’ Wolf, 907 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf.com — The actor, writer and stand-up comedian performs. Tickets $15. 10 p.m. Friday. COMEDY CATASTROPHE. Lost Love Lounge,

2529 Dauphine St., 944-0099; www. lostlovelounge.com — The bar hosts a free weekly stand-up comedy show. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

COMEDY GUMBEAUX. Howlin’ Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www. thehowlinwolf.com — Local comedians perform, and amateurs take the stage in the open mic portion. 8 p.m. Thursday. COMEDY SPORTZ. La Nuit Comedy Theater,

5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts a safe-forall-ages team comedy competition. Tickets $10. 7 p.m. Saturday.

GOD’S BEEN DRINKING. La Nuit Comedy

Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www. nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts the long-form improv comedy show. Tickets $10. 8:30 p.m. Friday.

GROUND ZERO COMEDY. The Maison, 508 Frenchmen St., 371-5543; www.maisonfrenchmen.com — The show features local stand-up comedians. Sign-up is 7:30 p.m.; show is 8 p.m. Friday. IVAN’S OPEN MIC NIGHT. Rusty Nail, 1100 Constance St., 525-5515; www.therustynail. org — The Rusty Nail hosts a weekly open-mic comedy and music night. 9 p.m. Tuesday. LADIES OF COMEDY NIGHT. Rocky & Carlo’s Restaurant and Bar, 613 W. St. Bernard Hwy., Chalmette, 279-8323; www.rockyandcarlos. com — Comedians Becky Allen, Jodi Borrello and Rhonda Bordelon perform. Tickets $15. 8 p.m. Friday.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

LAUGH IT OFF COMEDY NIGHT. Cafe Roma,

64

1101 N. Causeway Blvd., Metairie — Comedians Jodi Borrello, Leon Blanda and James Cusimano perform. Tickets $15. 10 p.m. Saturday.

LAUGH OUT LOUD. Bootleggers Bar and Grille, 209 Decatur St., 525-1087 — Simple Play presents a weekly comedy show. 10 p.m. Thursday. MICHAEL BLACKSON. Howlin’ Wolf, 907 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf. com — The stand-up comedian known as the “African King of Comedy” performs. Tickets $25. 8 p.m. Wednesday.

MEXICAN & CUBAN FOOD

NATIONAL COMEDY COMPANY. Yo Mama’s Bar & Grill, 727 St. Peter St., 522-1125 — The audience interactive comedy show features live local music. Call 523-7469 or visit www.nationalcomedycompany.com for tickets. Tickets $8 online, $15 at the door. 10 p.m. Saturday.

OPEN AT 9AM TUES-SAT FOR BRUNCH

3-6PM on gamedays

COME TRY OUR BLACKBERRY JALAPENO SMOKED RIBS

Best Fajitas in Town!

PUERCO FRITO - $10.50 ROPA VIEJA - $8.15 Come Have Lunch With Me!

COUNTRY FLAME

620 IBERVILLE STREET • 522.1138 OPEN EVERYDAY ‘TIL 8:30PM

OPEN MIC STAND-UP. La Nuit Comedy

happy hour

3701 IBERVILLE STREET • NOLA 70119 504.488.6582 • KATIESINMIDCITY.COM MON.11AM-3PM • TUES-THURS.11AM-9PM FRI-SAT.11AM-10PM • SUN BRUNCH. 9AM-3PM

Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www. nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts the free open mic. 11 p.m. Friday.

Let the Season of Giving Bring Joy to Sushi Lovers. • GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE •

900 FRENCHMEN · 943-9433 8550 PONCHARTRAIN BLVD. 267-3263

WWW.WASABINOLA.COM

PERMANENT DAMAGE STAND-UP COMEDY.

Bullets Sports Bar, 2441 A.P. Tureaud Ave., 948-4003 — Tony Frederick hosts the open mic comedy show. 8 p.m. Wednesday.

SIDNEY’S STAND-UP OPEN MIC. Sidney’s, 1674

Barataria Blvd., Marrero, 341-0103 — The show features professional, amateur and first-time comics. Free admission. Sign-up is 8 p.m. Show starts 9 p.m. Thursday.

THINK YOU’RE FUNNY? Carrollton Station, 8140 Willow St., 865-9190; www.carrolltonstation.com — The weekly open-mic comedy showcase is open to all comics. Sign-up is 8:30 p.m. Show starts 9 p.m. Wednesday.

LISTINGS

BE THERE DO THAT

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

FAMILY Saturday 3 CHILDREN’S ART WORKSHOP.

Rhino Contemporary Crafts Gallery, The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www.rhinocrafts. com — Sabine Chadborn, Natalie Nichols and other gallery artists lead children in making edible gingerbread houses. Reservations are recommended. Email artboxrhino@gmail.com. Admission $5. 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. CHILDREN’S HOLIDAY TEA WITH PAPA NOEL. Creole Queen

Paddlewheel Boat, Spanish Plaza, 529-4567; www.creolequeen.com — The cruise features appearances from holiday characters, storytelling, children’s activities and a traditional tea service. Reservations are required. Tickets $49 general admission, $34 children under 12. Boarding at 1:30 p.m., cruise 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.

FAMILY CHRISTMAS SINGALONG. Slidell Little Theatre,

FAMILY TEA WITH SANTA.

Longue Vue House and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue. com — The holiday celebration includes caroling, crafts, photos with Santa and refreshments. Reservations are recommended. Call 2934722 or email lvaughn@ longuevue.com for details. Admission $15-$30. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. GNGERBREAD HOUSE BUILDING WORKSHOP. Red

Fish Grill, 115 Bourbon St., 5981200; www.redfishgrill.com — Chef Michael Gottlieb leads the workshop for children of all ages. Pre-registration is required. Call 598-1200 for details. Admission $50. 9:30 a.m. check-in, 10 a.m. to noon workshop.

EVENTS Tuesday 6 C. G. JUNG SOCIETY OF NEW ORLEANS PROGRAM. Parker

Memorial United Methodist Church, 1130 Nashville Ave., 895-1222 — Susan Welsh and Diane Lease are the guests at the meeting. Admission free

for members, $10 nonmembers. 7:30 p.m. DOWNTOWN LUNCHTIME SPIRITUALITY SERIES.

Immaculate Conception Jesuit Church, 130 Baronne St., 529-1477; www.jesuitchurch. net — Nolan Rollins, president and CEO of the Urban League of Greater New Orleans, discusses “Spirituality Through the Books That Guide Our Lives.” Visit www.loyno.edu/ lplc/downtown for details. Free admission. 12:30 p.m.

TEA ON TUESDAY. Longue

Vue House and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue.com — Denise Dussom, co-owner of Vom Fass New Orleans, discusses vinegars, oils and cordials. A traditional tea service follows. Reservations required. Call 293-4722 or email lvaughn@longuevue. com for details. Admission $30 members, $35 nonmembers. 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Wednesday 7 GREG BRIGHT LECTURE. New

Orleans Public Library, Martin Luther King Branch, 1611 Caffin Ave., 529-READ; www. nutrias.org — Bright, who was wrongfully convicted in 1975 of second-degree murder and sentenced to life without parole, discusses his story and the current work of Innocence Project New Orleans. 9 a.m.

THE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON WORLD WAR II: FROM PEARL HARBOR TO GUADALCANAL. National

World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — Leading World War II historians discuss a variety of topics related to the first phases of the war in the Pacific. Email conferences@nationalww2museum.org for details. Wednesday-Friday. OCHSNER HELLO HEALTH SEMINAR. Andrea’s

Restaurant, 3100 19th St., Metairie, 834-8583; www. andreasrestaurant.com — Podiatrist Dana Bolton discusses heel pain. Call (866) 624-7637 for details. Admission $15. 6 p.m.

PEARL HARBOR DAY 70TH ANNIVERSARY COMMEMORATION . National

World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum. org — The museum hosts a day of programming to commemorate the attacks on Pearl Harbor, including a tour of the museum’s D-Days in the Pacific exhibit, a Q&A session with the curators of the new exhibit Infamy: December 1941, a book signing with Col. Glenn D. Frazier and more. Call 528-1944 ext. 229 for details. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. RESEARCHING NOTARIAL RECORDS FROM THE COLONIAL

PERIOD TO TODAY. Clerk of Civil District Court Notarial Archives, 1340 Poydras St., Suite 500, 568-8577; www. orleanscdc.com — The seminar teaches attendees how to use notarial records to conduct a title search and discover the history of a property. Admission is free, but space is limited. Call 680-9604 for details. 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Thursday 8 THE BARMAN’S FUND EVENT. Johnny White’s, 733 St. Peter St. — The local chapter of the organization consists of bartenders who donate their tips to the fund, which goes toward goods for local charities. Stephanie Steward is the bartender for this night’s event. Email thebarmansfundnola@gmail.com for details. 3 p.m. to 9 p.m.

HUNK-A-CLAUS 2012 HOLIDAY CALENDAR PARTY

CHRISTMAS TOUR OF HOMES.

St. Bernard Parish Volunteers for Family & Community presents a tour of homes in Historic Old Arabi, with refreshments, a Christmas boutique and live music. Call 738-1663 or 301-3630for details. Admission $15 at the event. 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. JUST SAY YAYA . Mardi Gras

World’s River City Ballroom, 1380 Port of New Orleans Place, 361-7821 — The arts and professional enrichment program’s fundraiser features a market of holiday gifts by YAYA artists and performances by Honey Island Swamp Band and Charmaine Neville. Visit www.yayainc.com for details. Admission $30. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

MAHALIA JACKSON CENTENNIAL PLUS ONE CELEBRATION . First NBC

Bank, 201 Baronne St. — Irma Thomas performs at the Early Childhood and Family Learning Foundation’s fundraiser, which also features drinks and cocktail fare from local restaurants. Call 523-1193 or email plandrieu@cox.net for details. Admission $250 per couple. 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. MUSICARES DENTAL CLINIC . New Orleans Musicians’ Union Hall, 2401 Esplanade Ave. — Free dental clinic for musicians. Call 877-626-2748 to schedule an appointment. 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. PHOTOGALA BENEFIT PARTY & AUCTION . Musee Conti

Wax Museum, 917 Conti St. — The New Orleans Photo Alliance’s event includes food, drinks, live entertainment by Meschiya Lake and the Little Big Horns, an auction and raffles. Visit www.photonola. org/photogala for details. Admission $20 in advance, $25 at the door. 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.

SISTAHS MAKING A CHANGE .

Ashe Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 9 AT 9PM IN MASQUERADE® With emcee Mike Theis

THE WISEGUYS LIVE IN CONCERT

Warm up to the City’s Hottest Heroes! Purchase a signed copy of the NOFF 2012 calendar for the perfect holiday stocking-stuffer! Come enjoy special holiday treats, great prizes and more!

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

2024 Nellie Drive, Slidell, (985) 641-0324; www.slidelllittletheatre.org — Guests can sing along to holiday tunes at the event also including pictures with Santa and raffles. Free admission. 2 p.m.

EVENTS

65

EVENTS

LISTINGS

Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac. org — The group offers lessons in African dance and more, along with nutrition, health and wellness seminars. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday and Monday.

BE THERE DO THAT PHOTONOLA LECTURE.

spotlight Coco Robicheaux memorial second-line parade and concert

“WHY CLAY SHAW STILL MATTERS” LECTURE . Louisiana State Museum

3 full bars • 10:30-til 738 Toulouse St. • 523-5530 VISIT OUR WEBSITE

www.originaldungeon.com

Santa's Sack

Cabildo, 701 Chartres St., 568-6968; www.lsm.crt.state.la.us — Alecia Long, associate professor of history at Louisiana State University, discusses the New Orleans businessman who was the only person charged and tried in one of the conspiracies alleged in the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. Free admission. 6 p.m.

Friday 9 THE BARMAN’S FUND EVENT. Butcher, 930 Tchoupitoulas St., 588-7675; www.cochonbutcher. com — The local chapter of the organization consists of bartenders who donate their tips to the fund, which goes toward goods for local charities. Marla Posey is the bartender for this night’s event. Email thebarmansfundnola@gmail.com for details. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

BLACK NATIVITY FESTIVAL. All Souls Episcopal Church, St. Claude and Caffin avenues — The festival includes family activities and a performance of the Langston Hughes’ production that uses gospel music to tell the story of the Nativity. Tickets $15 general admission, $10 seniors and children 12 and under. 3 p.m. festival activities, 7 p.m. Nativity production. FridaySaturday.

66

BYE BYE HURRICANE SEASON PARTY. Eiffel Society, 2040 St. Charles Ave., 525-2951; www.eiffelsociety.com — Glen David Andrews, Katarina Visnevska and DJs perform at Evacuteer.org’s party that helps fund the organization’s efforts for the next hurricane season. Admission $20. 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. HAUTE & HANDMADE: A SHOWCASE OF SOUTHERN CONTEMPORARY COUTURE. Ogden Museum of

6047 MAGAZINE ST. 899-4223

tropical isle® HOME OF THE Hand Grenade® -Sold Only At-

435, 600, 610, 721, 727 Bourbon St.

New Orleans’ Most Powerful Drink! Live Entertainment Nightly

Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 5399600; www.ogdenmuseum. org — The fashion show features Alabama Chanin and local designers Amanda Deleon, Kerry Fitts, Grayson Gold, Lorna Leedy, Andrea Loest and Rebecca Rebouche. Chanin hosts a design workshop from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday (admission $149. Register at www. alabamachanin.com/workshop/ two-hour-workshops). Fashion show admission $10 museum members, $12 nonmembers, $5 children 17 and under. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday.

HOLIDAY ON THE BOULEVARD. Ashe

Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — The center hosts the indoor holiday marketplace and festival with music by Rebirth Brass Band, Mia Borders and Donald Harrison Jr. Free admission. 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Friday, noon to 8:30 p.m. Saturday, 1 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Sunday.

WAYNE GONZALES LECTURE. New Orleans Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100;

Family, friends and fans of Coco Robicheaux, beloved local musician and ever familiar face on Frenchmen Street, will commemorate and celebrate his life with a second-line parade and concert on Monday, Dec. 12. Robicheaux died Nov. 25. Born Curtis Arceneaux in California, he spent much of his life in Louisiana, took the name Coco Robicheaux, and became known as both a visual artist and musician. He created the bust of Professor Longhair that sits inside Tipitina’s. Robicheaux played blues guitar, sang in his signature gravelly voice and frequently invoked Voodoo images and spirituality. He released Spiritland, his first full album, in 1994, and several more followed, including Revelator in 2010. The second line will begin on Frenchmen Street in the Faubourg Marigny at 3:30 p.m. and the Treme Brass Band will lead the procession through the Marigny and French Quarter. The parade will conclude at the House of Blues at roughly 6 p.m. and there will be a free concert featuring Glen David Andrews, Walter “Wolfman” Washington, Honey Island Swamp Band, John Mooney, J. Monque’D, Irene Sage and others. Free admission. — Will Coviello

DEC

12

Coco Robicheaux memorial second-line parade and concert 3:30 p.m. Monday Frenchmen Street and House of Blues, 225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www.hob.com

www.noma.org — Gonzales, whose solo exhibition is on display at the museum, presents a lecture along with curator Miranda Lash. 6 p.m. XMAS IN TATOOINE. 3 Ring Circus’ The Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com — The Intergalactic Krewe Of Chewbacchus hosts the holiday party with an art auction, music by Green Demons and Eat a Happy Holidick and more. Admission $10. 9 p.m. to midnight.

Saturday 10 BROAD STREET BAZAAR . 300 N.

Broad St., corner of Bienville Street — The monthly market features health screenings, jewelry, food vendors and more. Call 561-7495 or visit www.broadcommunityconnections.org for details. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

FREE CEMETERY TOURS. St. Louis Cemetery No. 1, Basin Street at St. Louis Street, 482-5065 — Volunteer guides provide free tours of the historic cemetery to Louisiana residents (visitors must provide identification). Email edprofno@aol.com for details. 10 a.m. to noon. HOLIDAY BAZAAR. Greek Orthodox

Cathedral of the Holy Trinity,

1200 Robert E. Lee Blvd., 957-7201 — Cathedral Montessori School hosts a market of goods from local vendors. Visit www.facebook.com/ cathedralmontessorischool for details. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. LOUISIANA RENAISSANCE FESTIVAL.

Louisiana Renaissance Festival, 46468 River Road, Hammond, www.larf.org — The festival harkens back to the 16th century with educational demonstrations, games and rides, more than 100 artisans, performances and more. Admission $14.95. 9:45 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday-Sunday.

NOEL A MANDEVILLE . Old Mandeville, various locations — The holiday festival features Revellion Dinners at area restaurants, an arts and crafts fair, food vendors, a holiday pet parade and a traditional holiday parade, and more. Visit www.noelamandeville. com for details. Free admission. 9 a.m. Saturday-Sunday. OCH HOLIDAY ART MARKET.

Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc. net — Fefe Byram and Harvey Castle perform at the market with food, locally made art and crafts, activities and more. Visit www. ochartmarket.com for details. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Free admission.

Contemporary Arts Center, 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www.cacno. org — Andy Adams, creator of FlakPhoto, discusses online publishing, social media and community collaboration in the digital age. Visit www.photonola.org for details. Noon to 1 p.m. PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER HOLIDAY HOME TOUR & PATRON PARTY. Trinity Episcopal Church,

1329 Jackson Ave., 522-0276; www. trinitynola.com — The tour features a glimpse at seven Garden District homes, as well as food and a holiday boutique. There is a patron party Friday at the Belfort Mansion (2618 St. Charles Ave.). Visit www.prcno.org for details. Patron party admission starts at $135; home tour admission $30 PRC members in advance, $35 nonmembers in advance, $40 day of event. Patron party 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m., home tour 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Saturday-Sunday.

RYAN TRECARTIN & LIZZIE FITCH. The

Front, 4100 St. Claude Ave.; www. nolafront.org — The gallery hosts a Q&A-style lecture with the artists. Free admission. 5 p.m. SAME GENDER LOVING/GAY MEN OF COLOR MEETING . CC’s Coffeehouse,

2800 Esplanade Ave. — The group meets on the second and fourth Saturday of each month for discussions. Email kj0040@aol.com for details. 7 p.m.

ST. BERNARD SEAFOOD & FARMERS MARKET. Aycock Barn, 409 Aycock

St., Arabi — The market showcases fresh seafood, local produce, jams and preserves, baked goods, crafts, live entertainment, children’s activities and more. Call 355-4442 or visit www.visitstbernard.com for details. 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays.

ST. TAMMANY ART ASSOCIATION HOLIDAY ART MARKET. St.

Tammany Art Association, 320 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-8650; www.sttammanyart.org — The art sale benefits local artists and programming at the STAA. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. TREME CREOLE GUMBO FESTIVAL . New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Center, 1225 N. Rampart St., 5586100; www.jazzandheritage.org — New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Foundation presents the free festival with live music by Rebirth Brass Band, Glen David Andrews and more, plus a holiday bazaar and gumbos made by local restaurants. 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Sunday 11 ART IN THE ALLEY. Dutch Alley, Near

French Market, on North Peters Street — The weekly market features artists offering hand-made artwork including paintings, photography, mixed media and more. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

INTRODUCTION TO JUDAISM.

Temple Sinai, 6227 St. Charles Ave., 861-3693; www.templesinaino.org — Rabbi Edward Cohn leads a free class for those seeking information about Judaism or considering conversion. Reservations are recommended. 9 a.m. Sundays. Through Feb. 26.

Jefferson teachers believe that all children deserve a high-quality education. But we can’t do it alone.

The most powerful path to reform is true collaboration among teachers, administrators, parents and policymakers. STAND WITH US as partners in our fight for: • the same high level of education services for ALL students; • small class sizes; • a rich curriculum that includes art and music; and • real-world education beyond teaching to the test. Find out more about our Vision for Change and sign our pledge to Stand with Jefferson Teachers.

www.StandWithJefferson.org

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

Let’s work together to make sure our public schools provide a great learning environment that will prepare every student to succeed in the classroom and beyond.

67

EVENTS

LISTINGS

ITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S YOURS, TAKE IT HOLIDAY ART SWAP. Hi-Ho Lounge,

2239 St. Claude Ave., 9454446; www.hiholounge. net â&#x20AC;&#x201D; NoLa Rising, a group that distributes free artwork to people in New Orleans, hosts an event where a toy donation to the Marine Corps Toys for Tots program can be exchanged for a piece of art. Email nolarising504@gmail. com for details or to donate artwork. Noon. PHOTONOLA PICTURING WAR PANEL DISCUSSION.

Saturday

December 10th

2nd Saturday Each Month 10am - 4pm Local Art and Artists

on the Riverfront in Madisonville

madisonvilleartmarket.com

Contemporary Arts Center, 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www.cacno. org â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Photographers Ashley Gilbertson, Sebastiano Tomada Piccolomini and Jungeun Lee discuss the role of photography in documenting the effects of conflicts and their aftermath. Visit www.photonola.com for details. Free admission. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. PRIMITIVE WOODWORKING.

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Park rangers host a weekly demonstration of woodworking techniques. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Monday 12

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

STAY ON YOUR FEET: FALL PREVENTION SERIES. Touro

68

Infirmary, 1401 Foucher St. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Touro Physical and Occupational Therapists hosts a three-week series to help older adults prevent falls that can lead to serious injuries and early death. Preregistration is required. Call 897-8500 for details. Free admission. 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.

UNITED NONPROFITS OF GREATER NEW ORLEANS.

Mignon Faget Trunk Show

Goodwill Training Center, 3400 Tulane Ave. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Nonprofit Central hosts a weekly meeting for all leaders of nonprofit groups. Email susan_unp@yahoo.com for details. 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.

Saturday, December 10 10 a.m.â&#x20AC;&#x201C;4 p.m. 533 Royal Street

OPERATION REACH

WORDS

17 POETS! LITERARY & PERFORMANCE SERIES. Gold

The Shop

aT The ColleCTion Give gifts inspired by our city MeMber appreCiaTion day THNOC members save 20% on in-store purchases December 10!

A52 56@A<?60 ;2D <?92.;@ 0<9920A6<;  The Williams Research Center

"

?\fNY @a_RRa

In the French Quarter

"! " !##

www.hnoc.org

@5<= 5<B?@'

AbR`QNfÂŻ@Nab_QNf &'  NZÂŻ!'  ]Z @b[QNf '  NZÂŻ!'  ]Z

Mine Saloon, 705 Dauphine St., 568-0745; www.goldminesaloon.net â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Writers James Nolan and Martha McFerren sign and read from their books. An open mic hosted by Jimmy Ross follows. Visit www.17poets.com for details. 7:30 p.m. Thursday. 1718 READING SERIES. Columns Hotel, 3811 St. Charles Ave., 899-9308; www.thecolumns. com â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The reading event features Mark Yakich, followed by a student reading. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Tuesday. BRYAN BATT. Roosevelt Hotel,

123 Baronne St., 648-1200 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The actor and author signs Big, Easy Style: Creating

BE THERE DO THAT

Rooms You Love to Live In. 4 p.m. Saturday. CATHERINE CAMPANELLA . Maple Street Book Shop at Bayou St. John, 3141 Ponce de Leon St.; www.maplestreetbookshop.com â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The author discusses and signs New Orleans City Parks at the grand opening of the storeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new location. 5 p.m. Saturday. CHRISTOPHER SCHABERG & MARK YAKICH . Octavia Books,

513 Octavia St., 899-7323 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The authors sign and read from Checking In/Checking Out. 6 p.m. Thursday.

music event. Admission $6. 9 p.m. Saturdays. PHOTONOLA BOOK SIGNING . Williams Research Center, Historic New Orleans Collection, 410 Chartres St., 523-4662; www.hnoc.org â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Photographers Shannon Brinkman, Ashley Gilbertson, Loli Kantor, Deborah Luster, James A. Reeves, Josephine Sacabo, Jennifer Shaw and Mary Virginia Swanson sign their recent publications. Visit www.photonola.org for details. 5 p.m. Friday.

COOKBOOK CLUB. Garden

ROBYN WALENSKY. Maple

DAVID SEDARIS. Garden

Octavia Books, 513 Octavia St., 899-7323 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The group discusses Robert Heinleinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Farnhamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Freehold. 10:30 a.m. Saturday.

District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Kathleen Flinn discusses and signs The Kitchen Counter Cooking School at the meeting. Guests are encouraged to bring food, although it is not required. 6 p.m. Thursday. District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The author signs Squirrel Seeks Chipmunk. 6:30 p.m. Tuesday.

DON SAWYER . Maple Street Book Shop, New Orleans Healing Center, 2372 St. Claude Ave., 304-7115; www. maplestreetbookshop. com â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The author signs from and reads The Lunch Bag Chronicles. 5:30 p.m. Wednesday. FAIR GRINDS POETRY EVENT.

Fair Grinds Coffeehouse, 3133 Ponce de Leon Ave., 913-9073; www.fairgrinds.com â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jenna Mae hosts poets and spokenword readers on the second, fourth and fifth Sunday of each month. 8 p.m.

FIRST TUESDAY BOOK CLUB.

Maple Street Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www. maplestreetbookshop.com â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The group discusses Kate Atkinsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Case Histories. 6 p.m. Tuesday.

FR. JEROME LE DOUX. 1850 House, 523 St. Ann St., 5686968 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The author signs War of the Pews: A Personal Account of St. Augustine Church in New Orleans. Noon Saturday and Sunday. JAMES NOLAN . Barnes &

Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 455-5135 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The author signs and reads from Higher Ground. 4 p.m. Saturday.

KEITH SPERA . Louisiana Music

Factory, 210 Decatur St., 5861094; www.louisianamusicfactory.com â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The author signs Groove, Interrupted. 3 p.m. Saturday. PASS IT ON . George & Leah

McKenna Museum of African American Art, 2003 Carondelet St., 586-7432; www.themckennamuseum.com â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Poet Gian â&#x20AC;&#x153;G-Persepectâ&#x20AC;? Smith and Alphonse â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bobbyâ&#x20AC;? Smith host a weekly spoken-word and

Street Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www. maplestreetbookshop.com â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The author signs Beautiful Life? The CSI Behind the Casey Anthony Trial. 6 p.m. Friday.

SCIENCE FICTION BOOK CLUB.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;SOMETHING IN THE WATERâ&#x20AC;? BOOK EVENT. Maple Street

Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www.maplestreetbookshop.com â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The store hosts several authors from the short story compilation including James Nolan, Tim Gautreaux and John Biguenet. 6 p.m. Thursday.

SPOKEN WORD. Ebony Square, 4215 Magazine St. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The center hosts a weekly spokenword, music and open-mic event. Tickets $7 general admission, $5 students. 11 p.m. Friday. TAO POETRY. Neutral Ground Coffeehouse, 5110 Danneel St., 891-3381; www.neutralground.org â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The coffeehouse hosts a weekly poetry reading. 9 p.m. Wednesday. TOM FITZMORRIS & PEGGY SCOTT LABORDE . Roosevelt

Hotel, 123 Baronne St., 6481200 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The authors sign Lost Restaurants of New Orleans. 6:30 p.m. Thursday. The authors also appear at Maple Street Book Shop (7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www. maplestreetbookshop.com) 4 p.m. Saturday.

TROY GILBERT & KENNETH HOLDITCH . Roosevelt Hotel,

123 Baronne St., 648-1200 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The authors sign Dinner With Tennessee Williams. 5:30 p.m. Tuesday. WRITING INSTITUTE OF THE ARTS COUNCIL BOOKSIGNING .

Garden District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; James Nolan, Richard Deichmann, Carolyn Perry, Sally Foreman and other writers sign their books. 5:30 p.m. Wednesday.

JOIN

FOR A CHANCE TO WIN GREAT PRIZES BY PLEDGING TO SHOP LOCAL

Something for Everyone Gift Set

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

$50 Gif t Certificate to The Shop at the Historic New Orlea ns Collection

70

$30 Gif t Certificate to www.trucolorsapparel.com $25 Gif t Certificate Hemline Metairie $50 Gif t Certificate to Sabai Jewelry $25 Gif t Certificate to UA L A free Pure Barre class

Thank you to the following businesses for supporting our Shop Local Campaign:

Take a break from the big box stores and online shopping and support the Greater New Orleans economy this holiday season by shopping at locally owned businesses. VISIT: bestofneworleans.com and pledge to spend a minimum of $100 at locally owned businesses and you will be entered to win one of our fabulous gift sets.

*No purchase necessary to win. Chances of winning based on number of entries

december 10th & 11th 9am - dusk in the heart of old mandeville

free & open to the public 6 BLOCKS OF GIROD STREET WILL BECOME A HOLIDAY PARADISE. Sample the finest specialties by Louisianaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best chefs & famed regional crafts by artists from around the state.

3 stages of entertainment

plus holiday pet & childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s photos SATURDAY DEC 10TH

2-3pm . holiday pet promenade Dress your pet in their finest Santa & Grinch outfits & parade them down Girod St. $10 entry. All fees go to benefit St Tammany Humane Society.

4pm . traditional holiday parade Featuring Marching Groups, the Marines, Hugo, the Honeybees, the Hornets Drum Corp, and Papa Noel. 4-5:15pm . winter on the water - Holiday Entertainment 5:15pm . lighting of the oaks followed by a Boat Parade SUNDAY DEC 11TH

7:30am . running of the reindeer - Mingle 8:30am . jingle start Northshore Roller Derby Ladies chase runners dressed in Santa wear.

2-5pm . historic home tour 6 classic & historic Old Mandeville homes will be at their holiday finest. Sunday tour $25 each or 2 for $40

4:30pm . a new orleans christmas carol Featuring Ellis Marsalis. Free concert at the Mandeville Trail

for more detailed info go to www.noelamandeville.com friend us on facebook at www.facebook.com/noelamandeville1

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Email Ian McNulty at imcnulty@cox.net. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <ALMOST EVERYTHING >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>A > new deli called Mr. Everything Cafe (400 S. Broad St., 2184990) is bringing needed options for casual meals to the stretch < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <PUTTING < < < < < < <EVERYTHING < < < < < < < < < <ON < < <THE < < < TABLE < < < < < < < < < < < < < <of Broad Street near New Orleans Municipal Court. It’s a franchise location of a restaurant by the same name in Atlanta, and its specialties are subs, salads and stir-fried rice dishes topped WHAT with choices from grilled chicken to salmon to veggie burger. K-Paul’s Louisiana Mr. Everything serves lunch and dinner daily. Kitchen

am

B

WHERE

416 Chartres St., 596-2530; www.chefpaul.com WHEN

Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Mon.-Sat. HOW MUCH

Inexpensive (lunch) RESERVSATIONS

Not accepted (lunch) WHAT WORKS

Deep flavors, diverse offerings WHAT DOESN'T

Dishes sometimes get lost in a multitude of components CHECK PLEASE

Lunch adds another layer to a French Quarter icon

CHEESE BORED?

Wine and cheese is the go-to pairing, but two classes scheduled this week at St. James Cheese Co. (5004 Prytania St., 8994737; www.stjamescheese.com) expand the options a bit. On Wednesday, Dec. 7, local chocolatier Cheryl Scripter of Bittersweet Confections explores pairings of chocolate, cheese and Champagne, and on Thursday, Dec. 8, Cristiano Creminelli of the national producer Creminelli Fine Meats pairs salami and charcuterie with cheese and Italian wines from Swirl Wine Market. The chocolate class is $40, the meat class is $30, and both begin at 7 p.m. Call St. James Cheese Co. for reservations.

five 5 IN

Five Doses Of Citrus Flavor

COCHON

930 TCHOUPITOULAS ST., 588-2123 www.cochonrestaurant.com

Mushroom and beef jerky salad is topped with fried lemon slices.

IRIS

321 N. PETERS ST., 299-3944 www.irisneworleans.com

Grapefruit butter complements seared scallops and Asian greens.

PATOIS

K-Rations

K-PAUL’S DIGS INTO ITS HISTORY FOR A BARGAIN LUNCH. BY IAN MCNULTY

R

PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

by an upscale kitchen with no freezer and lots of hands-on technique. Lemon and anchovies practically leap from the dressing for Caesar salad (which is sometimes topped with fried chicken tossed with garlic butter). There might be Cajun-style smothered beef masquerading as beef Stroganoff, the meat cut from the same tenderloins used at dinner, the house-baked roll ready to sop up the gravy, the divider plate holding discreet portions of steamed vegetables netted under caramelized onions. As on the dinner menu, lunch dishes can travel far from traditional Louisiana fare. I didn’t expect to find Brunswick stew on Chartres Street, nor a shrimp curry or a rice noodle salad, but they made excellent lunches. The penchant for excess that can sometimes muddle K-Paul’s dinner menu often turns up at lunch, too. For instance, a recent “fried sunken eggplant pirogue,” filled with pork in marchand de vin sauce, could have been deconstructed into two or three separate dishes. The best choices are usually the most straightforward, albeit with a few distinguishing touches. White beans came with a chicken cutlet that, under its crisp coating, still carried the aroma of the smoker it visited before the fryer. The lunchtime format channels some of the spirit of today’s pop-up trend — featuring restaurants within restaurants and unorthodox but delicious food finds. But with such a long history and deep roster of recipes, K-Paul’s can claim this lunch twist as something all its own.

6078 LAUREL ST., 895-9441 www.patoisnola.com

The porcini-crusted pork chop is served with local kumquat reduction.

RUE 127

127 N. CARROLLTON AVE., 483-1571 www.rue127.com

An orange emulsion accompanies scallops with mushrooms and fennel.

YE OLDE COLLEGE INN

3000 S. CARROLLTON AVE., 866-3683 www.collegeinn1933.com

Grilled oranges top roasted duck with honey barbecue sauce.

Questions? Email winediva1@earthlink.net.

2009 Evohe Garnacha Vinas Viejas

Aragon, Spain / $13 Retail Garnacha grapes, Spain’s most widely planted red varietal, were sourced from 65- to 80-yearold vines in the Vino de la Tierra appellation and the Bajo Aragon subregion for this wine. To retain the freshness and exuberance of the fruit, the juice touched no oak and spent no time in the cellar following fermentation. The result is a vibrant wine with fruit-forward flavors, good acidity, well-integrated tannins and a satisfying finish. Expect aromas of red berries, blueberries and floral and herbal notes. On the palate, taste black plum, raspberry, currant and a pleasing minerality with hints of anise and kirsch. Drink it with tapas, barbecue, pork chops, chicken, sausages and grilled vegetables. Buy it at: Cork & Bottle. Drink it at: Redemption, K-Paul’s Louisiana Kitchen, Emeril’s, Muriel’s Jackson Square and Louisiana Pizza Kitchen at the French Market. — Brenda Maitland

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

un a restaurant for a few decades and you’ll see some ideas come and go. After some time, you might even see some ideas come back. That’s how lunch service returned to K-Paul’s Louisiana Kitchen in 2009 — in time for the famous restaurant’s 30th anniversary. From just a few days a week initially, lunch service has expanded to five days and has become one of the great and unheralded deals for a midday meal in the French Quarter. Executive chef Paul Miller, who has worked with chef and proprietor Paul Prudhomme since his tenure at Commander’s Palace in the 1970s, says the restaurant resumed lunch partially in response to the poor national economy and its impact on tourism business. It’s also a throwback to the early days of the restaurant, when it sold po-boys, plate lunches and butcher shop meats from a second-floor operation called K-Paul’s Louisiana Grocery. Today, K-Paul’s promotes lunch as “deli-style,” essentially turning its ground-floor dining room into a wide-ranging Cajun-accented cafeteria. The menu changes weekly and most main dishes cost between $10 and $12. Diners order at the bar, seat themselves and a short time later a server hollers their name and delivers a tray. Everything is served on paper or plastic, and even condiments come in single-serve packets. This may reduce staffing, but it does seem an awful waste with the restaurant’s dinnerware and dishwashing station sitting idle. The plates may be disposable, but most of the meals on them are keepers. This is lunch fare done

Chef Paul Miller presents lunch items at K-Paul’s Louisiana Kitchen.

71

T:2.281”

CUISINE

Scuttlebites

menu Christmas Brunch

Smoked Salmon Spread w/ Pumpernickel Bread · Grillades · Cheese Grits · Ham & Havarti Quiche · Cinnamon Streusel Coffee Cake

Appetizers/Soup

sizzling gift that keeps on giving. Get 10% back in bonus cards for gift card purchases of $250 or more.

Metairie • New Orleans • Biloxi Available at participating locations & at ruthschris.com. Offer valid 11/14 –12/31/11.

Main Fare

Herb Roasted Turkey · Turkey Breast · Deep Fried Turkey w/ Cajun Seasoning · Savory Turkey Hash · Beef Tenderloin w/ Marchand de Vin Sauce · Bourbon & Brown Sugar Glazed Spiral Sliced Ham · Cornish Game Hen w/ Cranberry & Thyme · Herb Crusted Pork Loin

T:10.833”

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

a

Cheese Straws · Roasted & Seasoned Mammoth Pecan Halves · Grilled Asparagus Wrapped w/ Proscuitto & Boursin · Mini Crabcakes w/ Watercress & Chive Aioli · Grilled Duck Breast Brochettes · Praline & Apple Baked Brie én Crôute w/ Crackers · Lump Crabmeat Dip · Oyster Patties · Spinach Salad w/ Blue Cheese, Cranberries & Walnuts · Lobster & Cognac Bisque · Seafood Gumbo

Side Dishes

Turkey Gravy · Marchand de Vin Sauce · Cranberry Conserve · Oyster Dressing · Cornbread Sausage & Pecan Dressing · Crawfish Dressing · Sausage, Herb, & Sourdough Bread Stuffing · Potatoes au Gratin · Sweet Potato Crunch · Spinach Casserole · Petit Pois w/ Caramelized Onions & Bacon · Seafood Stuffed Mirliton Casserole · Wild Rice Pilaf w/ Cranberries, Sausage & Almonds · Okra, Tomato & Corn Casserole · Green Beans w/ Shallot & Pecans · Buttermilk Mashed Potatoes

Desserts

Bûche de Noël · Red Velvet Cake · Chocolate Peppermint Cake · Genoise Layer Cake w/ Rum Syrup & Whipped Cream · Amaretto Cheesecake · White Chocolate Bread Pudding · Chocolate Mousse Cake · Pecan Pie · Apple Walnut Crumble Pie · Palm Beach Brownies · Key Lime Squares

Last day to place Christmas orders is Monday, Dec. 19th Orders may be picked up on Saturday, December 24th, between 10am – 4pm

5701 Magazine Street

899-7303

72

www.gotocheznous.com

ALL THE NEWS THAT’S FIT TO EAT. BY IAN MCNULTY

RICH IN PO-BOYS

A unique pleasure of the Oak Street Po-Boy Festival is the chance to sample lots of different twists and novel combinations inside the po-boy loaf. The festival’s official judges seemed to agree, based on their picks for the event’s 2011 awards. “Best of Fest” went to WOW Wingery’s (citywide; www.wowcafe. com) Shanghai shrimp po-boy, and winners in other categories included a bread pudding po-boy from Saltwater Grill (710 S. Carrollton Ave., 324-6640; www.saltwatergrillnola.com); Thaistyle pork on a donut from Blue Dot Donuts (4301 Canal St., 218-4866; www. bluedotdonuts.com); fried chicken with ham and Swiss from Sammy’s Food Service & Deli (3000 Elysian Fields Ave., 947-0675; www.sammysfood.com); and shrimp remoulade from Ridge Deli and Bistro (1827 Hickory Ave., Suite E, Harahan, 305-4195; www.ridgebistro. com). The Redfish Grill’s (115 Bourbon St., 598-1200; www.redfishgrill.com) oyster po-boy was the lone traditionalist in the winner’s circle. The festival roster listed more than 40 restaurants and caterers participating this year, but Oak Street businesses also set up booths outside their doors to serve the crowds. Chiba (8312 Oak St., phone n.a.; www.chiba-nola.com), a new Japanese restaurant under construction, served panko-crusted oyster po-boys dressed with daikon radish, wasabi mayo and sheets of crisp lettuce. Perhaps the most unusual po-boy I tried came from Z’otz Cafe (8210 Oak St., 861-2224), which served the vegetarian barbecue jackfruit po-boy. While I wasn’t able to sample even close to the full range represented at the festival, some indulgent eating turned up other unique entries. I particularly liked the pate po-boy with pickled vegetables from One Restaurant & Lounge (8132 Hampson St., 301-9061; www.one-sl.com). Another standout was the rabbit salad from Mahony’s Po-boy Shop (3454 Magazine St., 8993374; www.mahonyspoboys.com), done in the style of chicken salad with big chunks of meat, herbs, pecans and pickled onions. Here’s to keeping the creative po-boy juices flowing like gravy.

MEATLESS IN THE MARIGNY

Feelings Cafe (2600 Chartres St., 9452222; www.feelingscafe.com) usually serves a Creole menu full of meat and seafood, but the Marigny restaurant has branched out lately. The latest twist is an all-vegan holiday dinner planned

for Wednesday, Dec. 7, from local freelance chef and caterer Anne Churchill. The meal is called the “Vegan Festivals of Light,” and it begins with a selection of hors d’oeuvres in Feelings Cafe’s courtyard and moves on to four courses of dishes like Sri Lankan borscht and hearts of palm stuffed with marrow beans and cashew cheese puree. Churchill isn’t a vegan herself, but she says she finds special inspiration in this style of cooking. She’s had plenty of recent opportunities to explore it. Earlier this year, she was the vegan chef for cast members of Glee Live, a touring concert based on the popular TV show. “It’s easy to make something taste great when you’re using pork fat, but it’s a little more challenging to get an interesting, satisfying meal without using animals and I like that challenge,” she says. Churchill hosted a similar vegan dinner at Feelings in October and future editions may be on the calendar soon. Wednesday’s dinner costs $60, plus tax and tip, with wine pairings available for another $20. Seatings are at 6 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. Call Feelings Cafe for reservations.

TOUR OF BESH RESTAURANTS AT CAFE HOPE

Young people who graduate from the hospitality industry-training program at Cafe Hope (1101 Barataria Blvd., Marrero, 347-0772; www.cafehope.org) go on to work at restaurants across the area. This Friday, Dec. 9, six high-profile examples of those restaurants are coming to Cafe Hope for a special benefit for this nonprofit. The Besh Restaurant Group (www. chefjohnbesh.com) has partnered with the cafe for the event, where guests will find dishes from Restaurant August, Luke, American Sector, La Provence, Domenica and Borgne, the forthcoming restaurant chef John Besh plans to open in the new Hyatt Regency hotel with chef Brian Landry, formerly of Galatoire’s. Dinner begins at 7:30 p.m. and the $150 ticket includes a copy of Besh’s latest cookbook My Family Table. A patron party begins an hour earlier and tickets for this cost $250 each. Call 310-6865 or get tickets online at www.donate. ccano.org/CafeHope. An affiliated ministry of Catholic Charities, Cafe Hope uses the full-service restaurant format to offer life skills and career-building training to young adults who want to make a new start. It serves weekday lunch and offers catering services.

>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>> <<<<<<< >>>>>>> <<<<<<<< >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

>>>>>

YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>

<<<<

TRY OUR CHEF SPECIALS <<< <<<<< > > > > > > > > > • Sizzling jumbo Shrimp • Stuffed ChineSe <<< eggplant • CriSpy ginger Shrimp >> • ChiCken almond < < • CriSpy beef with CruSt with

blaCk pepper & onion < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < • jumbo SCallop with > > > > > > > > Out > > >2 >Eat > >is>an > >index > > >of> Gambit > > > > >contract > > > > >advertisers. > > > > > > >Unless > > > >noted, > > > >addresses > > > > > >are > >for > >New > > >Orleans. > > > > > > > > > aSparaguS & baby Corn Dollar signs represent the average cost of a dinner entree: $ — under $10; $$ — $11 to $20; $$$ — $21 or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax 483-3116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

lemon SauCe

open Christmas eve & Christmas day

we deliver

G i f t c e rti f i c ate s m a k e G r e at G i f t s ! 3605 South Carrollton ave. Mon-Thurs 11am-10pm • Fri & Sat 11am-11pm • Sun 11am-10pm

reServationS / take-out 482-3935 • www.fivehappineSS.Com

AMERICAN O’HENRY’S FOOD & SPIRITS — 634

S. Carrollton Ave., 866-9741; 8859 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Kenner, 461-9840; www.ohenrys.com — The menu includes burgers, steaks, ribs, pasta, fried seafood, salads and more. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BAR & GRILL BAYOU BEER GARDEN — 326 N.

Jefferson Davis Pwky., 302-9357 — Head to Bayou Beer Garden for a 10-oz. Bayou burger served on a sesame bun. No reservations. Lunch and dinner, late-night Fri.Sat. Credit cards. $

DINO’S BAR & GRILL — 1128

Tchoupitoulas St., 558-0900 — Dino’s kitchen serves burgers, chicken tenders, salads and wraps. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards and checks. $

THE RIVERSHACK TAVERN — 3449 River Road, 834-4938; www. therivershacktavern.com — This bar offers burgers, sandwiches and changing lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

ZADDIE’S TAVERN — 1200 Jeffer-

son Hwy., Jefferson, 832-0830 — Zaddie’s serves burgers, alligator sausage, boudin, tamales and meat or crawfish pies. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $

BARBECUE BOO KOO BBQ — 3701 Banks

St., 202-4741; www.bookoobbq. com — The Boo Koo burger is a ground brisket patty topped with pepper Jack cheese, boudin and sweet chile aioli. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., latenight Fri.-Sat. Cash only. $

SAUCY’S BBQ GRILL — 3244

Severn Ave., Metairie, 322-2544; www.saucysbbqgrill.com — Saucy’s serves slow-smoked St. Louis-style pork ribs, pulled pork, brisket, smoked sausage and grilled or jerk chicken. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

BREWPUB CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — 527

Decatur St., 522-0571; www.crescentcitybrewhouse.com — Live jazz and German-style beers complement creative cooking at

BURGERS BEACHCORNER BAR & GRILL —

4905 Canal St., 488-7357; www. beachcornerbarandgrill.com — Top a 10-oz. Beach burger with cheddar, blue, Swiss or pepper Jack cheese, mushrooms or hickory sauce. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ BUD’S BROILER — Citywide; www. budsbroiler.com — Bud’s Broiler is known for charcoal-broiled burgers topped with hickoryamoked sauce. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $

CAFE

CARIBBEAN MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — 437

Esplanade Ave., 252-4800; www. mojitosnola.com — Caribbean mac and cheese pie is made with chunks of lobster, tomatoes, scallions, garlic and creamy cheese sauce and is served over a bed of spicy corn maque choux. Reservations accepted. Lunch, dinner and late-night Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

CHINESE CHINA ORCHID — 704 S. Carrollton

Ave., 865-1428; www.chinaorchidneworleans.com — This longtime Riverbend restaurant offers a wide array of Chinese dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

CAFE FRERET — 7329 Freret St.,

FIVE HAPPINESS — 3511 S. Carroll-

CANAL STREET BISTRO & ECO CAFE — 3903 Canal St., 561-6585; www.

JUNG’S GOLDEN DRAGON — 3009 Magazine St., 891-8280; www. jungsgoldendragon2.com — Chinese specialties include Mandarin, Szechuan and Hunan dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

861-7890; www.cafefreret. com — Signature sandwiches include the Chef’s Voodoo Burger, muffuletta and Cuban po-boy. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Fri.-Wed., dinner Mon.Wed., Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

ecocafeno.com — The veggie club, is layered with Swiss, tomatoes, onions, cucumbers, spinach and baby pickles. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ GOTT GOURMET CAFE — 3100

Magazine St., 373-6579; www. gottgourmetcafe.com — This cafe serves salads, sandwiches, Chicago-style hot dogs, burgers and more. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

LAKEVIEW BREW COFFEE CAFE —

5606 Canal Blvd., 483-7001 — This cafe offers gourmet coffees and a wide range of pastries and desserts, plus sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PARKVIEW CAFE AT CITY PARK —

City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 483-9474 — The cafe serves gourmet coffee, sandwiches, salads and ice cream till early evening. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

PRAVDA — 1113 Decatur St., 5811112; www.pravdaofnola.com — Pravda is known for Soviet kitsch, and the kitchen offers pierogies, beef empanadas, curry shrimp salad and more. No reservations. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

VINE & DINE — 141 Delaronde St., 361-1402; www.vine-dine.com — The cafe serves cheese boards, charcuterie plates, sandwiches, quesadillas, bruschettas, salads and dips. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

ton Ave., 482-3935 — The large menu offers a range of dishes from wonton soup to sizzling seafood combinations served on a hot plate to sizzling Go-Ba to lo mein dishes. Delivery available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

TREY YUEN CUISINE OF CHINA — 600 N. Causeway Approach.,

Mandeville, (985) 626-4476; 2100 N. Morrison Blvd., Hammond, (985) 345-6789; www.tryyuen. com — House specialties include fried soft-shell crab topped with Tong Cho sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

COFFEE/ DESSERT ANTOINE’S ANNEX — 513 Royal St.,

581-4422; www.antoines.com — The Annex is a coffee shop serving pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

KUPCAKE FACTORY — 800 Metairie Road, Metairie, 267-4990; 819 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 4648884; 6233 S. Claiborne Ave., 2673328; www.thekupcakefactory. com — The Fat Elvis is made with banana cake and topped with peanut butter frosting. No reservations. Hours vary by location. Credit cards. $

MAURICE FRENCH PASTRIES — 3501 Hessmer Ave., Metairie, 885-1526; 4949 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 455-0830; www.mauricefrenchpastries.com — Choose from an array French baked goods, specialty cakes and pies. No reservations. Hessmer Avenue: break-

WE DO TAKE OUT, DELIVERY & CATERING SERVING HEALTHY, LOW CALORIE,NO MSG & MICROBIOTIC COOKING

CELEBRATE THE HOLIDAYS WITH US

FEATURING PEKING DUCK 2012 CHINA TRIP NOW ACCEPTING DEPOSIT AWARDED #1 BY NEW ORLEANS MAG. AND HIGHLY RECOMMENDED BY GAMBIT

3009 Magazine St. Uptown • 891.8280 SUN - THURS 11 AM - 10 PM • FRI & SAT - 11 AM - 11 PM

WWW.JUNGSGOLDENDRAGON2.COM

Sit Back & Let RED GRAVY Do All The Work! LET US CATER YOUR HOLIDAY HOME, OR OFFICE EVENTS.

THIS LITTLE ITALIAN GIRL IS OPEN TO CATERING MENUS. BRING HOME THE TASTE OF ITALY FROM MY FAMILY TO YOURS WE NOW DELIVER IN THE CBD & FRENCH QUARTER VISIT US AT WWW.REDGRAVYCAFE.COM • 504-561-8822 • 504-561-8844 M & F 6 : 3 0 A . M . - 3 P . M . • S a t . B r u n c h 9 A . M . - 2 P . M . • 1 2 5 C A M P S T.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

SHAMROCK BAR & GRILL — 4133 S. Carrollton Ave., 301-0938 — Shamrock serves burgers, shrimp or roast beef po-boys, Reuben sandwiches, cheese sticks and fries with cheese or gravy. No reservations. Dinner and late night daily. Credit cards. $

this brewpub. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

73

Out2Eat

Call 522-9897

www.theoriginalleakspecialist.com Good thru 6/1/12

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

The best kept secret in New Orleans

74

JUST ARRIVED!

Large Selection of Frasier Fir, Poinsetta & Rosemary Trees 1135 PRESS ST. @ NEW ORLEANS

fast and lunch Mon.-Sat. West Napoleon: breakfast and lunch Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PINKBERRY — 300 Canal St.; 5601

Magazine St., 899-4260; www. pinkberry.com — Pinkberry offers frozen yogurt with an array of wet and dry topping choices including caramel, honey, fruit purees, various chocolates and nuts and more. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CONtEMPORaRY 2900 ST. CLAUDE

(504) 947-7554

5 Fifty 5 — 555 Canal St., 553-5638;

www.555canal.com — New Orleans dishes and Americana favorites take an elegant turn in dishes such as the lobster mac and cheese. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ BAYONA — 430 Dauphine St.,

525-4455; www.bayona.com — House favorites on Chef Susan Spicer’s menu include sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ OAK — 8118 Oak St., 302-1485;

www.oaknola.com — Gulf shrimp fill tacos assembled in house-made corn tortillas with pickled vegetables, avocado and lime crema. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

ONE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE —

8132 Hampson St., 301-9061; www. one-sl.com — Try char-grilled oys-

Chef Susan Spicer presents a dish at her French Quarter restaurant Bayona (430 Dauphine St., 525-4455; www.bayona.com). photo By cheryl GerBer

ters topped with blue cheese and red wine vinaigrette. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CREOLE ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713 St.

DELI CG’S CAFE AT THE RUSTY NAIL — 1100 Constance St., 722-3168;

www.therustynail.biz — CG’s offers a menu of sandwiches. No reservations. Dinner and latenight Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $

Louis St., 581-4422; www.antoines. com — The city’s oldest restaurant offers signature dishes like oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

KOSHER CAJUN NEW YORK DELI & GROCERY — 3519 Severn Ave.,

GUMBO SHOP — 640 St. Peter

MARTIN WINE CELLAR — 714 El-

St., 525-1486; www.gumboshop. com — Gumbo and New Orleans classics such as crawfish etouffee dominate the menu. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000 N.

Peters St., 524-4747 — The menu includes crawfish etouffee, boiled crawfish, red beans and rice and bread pudding for dessert. Outdoor seating available. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

Metairie, 888-2010; www.koshercajun.com — This New York-style deli specializes in sandwiches, including corned beef and pastrami. No reservations. Lunch Sun.-Thu., dinner Mon.-Thu. Credit cards. $

meer Ave., Metairie , 896-7350; www.martinwine.com — The wine emporium offers gourmet sandwiches and deli items. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Fri., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

FRENCH FLAMING TORCH — 737 Octavia St.,

895-0900; www.flamingtorchnola.com — Chef Nathan Gile’s menu includes pan-seared Maine diver scallops with chimichurri sauce and smoked bacon and

bestofneworleans.com

corn hash. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

MARTINIQUE BISTRO — 5908 Magazine St., 8918495; www.martiniquebistro.com — Try dishes such as Steen’s-cured duck breast with satsuma and ginger demi-glace and stone-ground goat cheese grits. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

STRESSED FOR THE HOLIDAYS?

GOURMET TO GO

GET A RELAXING MASSAGE TODAY

BREAUX MART — 315 E. Judge Perez, Chalmette,

262-0750; 605 Lapalco Blvd., Gretna, 433-0333; 2904 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-5565; 9647 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 737-8146; www.breauxmart.com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux.” No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

INDIAN JULIE’S LITTLE INDIA KITCHEN AT SCHIRO’S —

2483 Royal St., 944-6666; www.schiroscafe.com — The cafe offers chicken, lamb or shrimp curry or vindaloo and vegetarian saag paneer. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $

3613 Magazine Street 504.899.8055

www.glam504.com · info@glam504.com

“Since 1969”

NIRVANA INDIAN CUISINE — 4308 Magazine St., 894-9797 — Serving mostly northern Indian cuisine, the menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ TAJ MAHAL INDIAN CUISINE — 923-C Metairie

Road, Metairie, 836-6859 — The traditional menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways, including curries and tandoori. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

ITALIAN ANDREA’S RESTAURANT — 3100 N. 19th St., Metairie 834-8583; www.andreasrestaurant. com — Chef/owner Andrea Apuzzo’s specialties include speckled trout royale which is topped with lump crabmeat and lemon-cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ CAFE GIOVANNI — 117 Decatur St., 529-2154;

MOSCA’S — 4137 Hwy. 90 W., Westwego, 436-

8950; www.moscasrestaurant.com — Popular dishes include shrimp Mosca, chicken a la grande and baked oysters made with breadcrumps and Italian seasonings. Reservations accepted. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $$$

RED GRAVY — 125 Camp St., 561-8844; www.redgravycafe.com — At lunch, try meatballs, lasagna and other Italian specialties, panini, wraps, soups and salads. Reservations accepted for large parties. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

RICCOBONO’S PEPPERMILL RESTAURANT — 3524

Severn Ave., Metairie, 455-2266 — This eatery serves New Orleans favorites like stuffed crabs with jumbo lump crabmeat with spaghetti bordelaise and trout meuniere. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Wed.Sun. Credit cards. $$

fresh mistletoe

5

99 bunch with bow

$

while supplies last

EXPIRES 1/6/12

CASH & CARRY ONLY NOT VALID W/ ANY OTHER COUPONS. COUPON MUST BE PRESENT AT TIME OF PURCHASE.

COUPON

roses in stock colors $ 99 no red

7

DZN

EXPIRES 1/6/12

CASH & CARRY ONLY NOT VALID W/ ANY OTHER COUPONS. COUPON MUST BE PRESENT AT TIME OF PURCHASE.

METAIRIE 750 MARTIN BEHRMAN AVE (504) 833-3716 COVINGTON 1415 N. HWY 190 | (985) 809-9101 VISIT US ON

WWW.VILLERESFLORIST.COM

W/ PURCHASE OF BUNDLED TANNING PACKAGE | EXPIRES 12/31/11

gift certificates available

2246 FLORIDA AVE. • KENNER • CORNER OF W. NAPOLEAN & WILLIAMS BLVD. (504) 464-4688 • fit4lifenola@gmail.com

$ We Buy Any $ GOLD, SILVER, or PLATINUM • Broken or Unwanted Jewelry • Sterling Silverware & Plates • Gold & Silver Bars • Gold & Silver Coins • Diamonds • Rolex

MOBILE GOLD BUYERS

Call

504-858-GOLD

(4653)

1517 St. Charles Mon-Fri 10 to 6 Sat 11 to 4 www.TheMobileGoldBuyers.com

breakfast, lunch, dinner & late-night

CheCk OuT Our neW

menu iTemS! buy 1 get 1 free

alligator corn dog

dine in only. limit 1 coupon per table. can not be combined with any other offer. expires 12/31/11

For local delivery please call:

504 373 6439 Sunday - WedneSday 7am-10pm ThurSday - SaTurday 7am-laTe

620 Conti St. new Orleans, la 70130

VINCENT’S ITALIAN CUISINE — 4411 Chastant St.,

Metairie, 885-2984; 7839 St. Charles Ave., 8669313; www.vincentsitaliancuisine.com — Bracialoni is baked veal stuffed with artichoke hearts, bacon, garlic and Parmesan cheese and topped with red sauce. Reservations accepted. Chastant Street: lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. St. Charles Avenue: lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

JAPANESE KYOTO — 4920 Prytania St., 891-3644 — Kyoto’s chefs prepare rolls, sashimi and salads. “Box” sushi is a favorite, with more than 25 rolls. Reservations recommended for large parties. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

MIKIMOTO — 3301 S. Carrollton Ave., 488-1881; www.mikimotosushi.com — The South Carrollton roll includes tuna tataki, avocado and snow crab. Reservations accepted for large parties.

Our Boneless Stuffed Chicken is an easy dinner to prepare after a busy day of holiday shopping. Gift Certificates and Gift Boxes Available 5618 JEFFERSON HWY · HARAHAN, LA 70123 Located near Jefferson and Edwards

Monday - Saturday 9am-6pm [504] 733-0901 • w w w.emmettsmeats.com

Isabella’s Gallery Available at both Isabella’s Gallery locations:

3331 Severn in Metairie ~ 504-779-3202 1901 Manhattan on the Westbank ~ 504-304-4861 www.isabellasgallery.com www.facebook.com/isabellasgallery

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

www.cafegiovanni.com — Chef Duke LoCicero serves inventive Italian cuisine and Italian accented contemporary Louisiana cooking. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

COUPON

FREE

1 HOUR MASSAGE

75

Out2Eat Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Delivery available. Credit cards. $$ MIYAKO JAPANESE SEAFOOD & STEAKHOUSE — 1403 St. Charles

Ave., 410-9997; www.japanesebistro.com — Miyako serves specialties from the sushi or hibachi menus, chicken, beef or seafood teriyaki, and tempura. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ ROCK-N-SAKE — 823 Fulton St., 581-

7253; www.rocknsake.com — Rockn-Sake serves traditional Japanese cuisine with some creative twists. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ WASABI SUSHI — 900 Frenchmen

St., 943-9433; 8550 Pontchartrain Blvd., 267-3263; www.wasabinola. com — The Assassin roll bundles tuna, snow crab and avocado in seaweed and tops it with barbecued eel, tuna, eel sauce and wasabi tobiko. No reservations. Frenchmen Street: Lunch Mon.Sat., dinner daily. Pontchartrain Boulevard: lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$

LOuISIaNa BOMBAY CLUB — 830 Conti St., 586-0972; www.thebombayclub. com — The duck duet pairs confit leg with pepper-seared breast with black currant reduction. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

BOUCHE — 840 Tchoupitoulas St.,

76

267-7485; www.bouchenola.com — This wine bar serves dishes like tasso truffle mac and cheese with three cheeses and Mornay sauce, baby spinach salad with Maytag blue cheese and bacon lardons. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

MILA — 817 Common St., 412-2580;

www.milaneworleans.com — Try New Orleans barbecue lobster with lemon confit and fresh thyme. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri. dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$$

RALPH’S ON THE PARK — 900 City

Park Ave., 488-1000; www.ralphsonthepark.com — Popular dishes include baked oysters Ralph, turtle soup and the Niman Ranch New York strip. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

TOMAS BISTRO — 755 Tchoupitou-

las St., 527-0942 — Tomas serves dishes like Louisiana quail stuffed with applewood-smoked bacon dirty popcorn rice, Swiss chard and Madeira sauce. No reservations. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ TOMMY’S WINE BAR — 752 Tchoupitoulas St., 525-4790 — Tommy’s Wine Bar offers cheese and charcuterie plates as well as appetizers and salads from the neighboring Tommy’s Cuisine. No reservations. Lite dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MIDDLE EaStERN ATTIKI BAR & GRILL — 230 Decatur

St., 587-3756; www.attikineworleans.com — Attiki features a

range of Mediterranean cuisine including entrees of beef kebabs and chicken shawarma. Reservations recommended. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $$ BABYLON CAFE — 7724 Maple St., 314-0010; www.babyloncafe. biz —The Babylon platter includes stuffed grape leaves, hummus, kibbeh, rice and one choice of meat. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

PYRAMIDS CAFE — 3151 Calhoun St.,

861-9602 — Diners will find authentic Mediterranean favorites such as sharwarma prepared on a rotisserie. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEXICaN COUNTRY FLAME — 620 Iberville St.,

522-1138 — Country Flame serves a mix of Mexican and Cuban dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

LUCY’S RETIRED SURFERS’ BAR & RESTAURANT — 701 Tchoupitoulas

St., 523-8995; www.lucysretiredsurders.com — This surf shack serves California-Mexican cuisine and the bar has a menu of tropical cocktails. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily, late night Thu.Sat. Credit cards. $$

NACHO MAMA’S MEXICAN GRILL —

3242 Magazine St., 899-0031; 1000 S. Clearview Pkwy., Harahan, 7361188; www.nachomamasmexicangrill.com — These taquerias serve Mexican favorites such as portobello mushroom fajitas and chile

rellenos. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ SANTA FE — 3201 Esplanade Ave., 948-0077 — Bolinos de Bacalau are fish cakes made with salted codfish, mashed potatoes, cilantro, lemon juice, green onions and egg, served with aioli. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.Sun. Credit cards. $$

MuSIC aND FOOD GAZEBO CAFE — 1018 Decatur St.,

525-8899; www.gazebocafenola. com — The New Orleans sampler rounds up jambalaya, red beans and rice and gumbo. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

HOUSE OF BLUES — 225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www.hob.com/neworleans — Try the pan-seared Voodoo Shrimp with rosemary cornbread. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ THE MARKET CAFE — 1000 Decatur St., 527-5000; www.marketcafenola.com — Dine on fried seafood platters, po-boys, crawfish etouffee or shrimp Creole. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ SIBERIA — 2227 St. Claude Ave., 265-

8855 — This music clubs serves dishes like fish and chips, spicy hot wings, tacos and more. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — 626 Frenchmen St., 949-0696; www.

Allan Hornbrook serves a couple of sandwiches at Parran’s Po-Boys (3939 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 885-3416). photo Cheryl Gerber

l rt ra its ma le e d ed S b Fe cr gy aila r v x ta ne s a E e d at an eb R

Fun Frescoes Under The

Concert Series SpONSOred bY: Gordon

HOLIDAY SHOW WITH BECKY ALLEN, CHRIS WECKLEIN & HARRY MAYRONNE Wed., december 14, 2011 • 6pm-8pm

mArGIe pereZ, Wed., January 11, 2012 IrISH ceLebrATION, creSceNT cITY ceLTIc bANd pLUS THe mcTeGGArT IrISH dANcerS, Wed., march 14, 2012

Tickets $10 (includes 3 complimentary beverages) • Secure parking Available

biersch • The boondock Saint

Stalphonsusneworleans.org • saintalphonsus1@gmail.com

*ConCert SerieS Free w/ $25 MeMberShip

FOSA IN SUppOrT OF ST. ALpHONSUS cHUrcH

2025 constance Street

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

snugjazz.com — Try mewer creations such as the fish Marigny, topped with Gulf shrimp in Creole cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

NEIGHBORHOOD ARTZ BAGELZ — 3138 Magzine St.,

309-7557; www.artzbagelz.com — Artz bakes bagels in house and options include onion, garlic, honey whole wheat, cinnamon-raisin and others. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ BRAXTON’S RESTAURANT — 636 Franklin St., Gretna, 301-3166; www. braxtonsnola.com — Braxton’s serves a mix of salads, po-boys, deli sandwiches and entrees. Reservations accepted. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ KATIE’S RESTAURANT — 3701 Iberville St., 488-6582; www.katiesinmidcity.com — Try the Cajun Cuban with roasted pork, grilled ham, cheese and pickles pressed on buttered bread. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, Dinner Tue.Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ OLIVE BRANCH CAFE — 1995 Barataria Blvd., Marrero, 348-2008; 3700 Orleans Ave., 302-1220; 5145 Gen. de Gaulle Drive, 393-1107; www.olivebranchcafe.com — Chicken and artichoke pasta is tossed with penne in garlic and olive oil. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

PIZZA MARKS TWAIN’S PIZZA LANDING —

2035 Metairie Road, Metairie, 8328032; www.marktwainspizza.com — Choose from salads, po-boys and pizzas like the Italian with salami, artichoke, sausage and basil. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

SANDWICHES DRESS IT — 535 Gravier St., 571-7561

— Get gourmet burgers and sandwiches dressed to order. Reservations accepted for large parties. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

NEW YORK PIZZA — 4418 Magazine

St., 891-2376; www.newyorkpizzanola.com — The Big Apple pie is loaded with pepperoni, Canadian bacon, onions, mushrooms, black olives, green peppers, Italian sausage and minced garlic. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

MAGAZINE PO-BOY SHOP — 2368

Magazine St., 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of po-boys filled with everything from fried seafood to corned beef to hot sausage to veal. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Cash only. $

NONNA MIA CAFE & PIZZERIA —

MAHONY’S PO-BOY SHOP — 3454 Magazine St., 899-3374; www.mahonyspoboys.com — The Peacemaker is filled with fried oysters, bacon and cheddar cheese. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $

3125 Esplanade Ave., 948-1717 — Gourmet pies are topped with ingredients like pancetta, roasted eggplant, portobello mushrooms and prosciutto. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ reginellis.com — This New Orleans original offers a range of pizzas, sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

THEO’S NEIGHBORHOOD PIZZA —

WIT’S INN — 141 N. Carrollton Ave., 888-4004 — This Mid-City bar and restaurant features pizzas,

*

(reg. $132)

DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS

*NEW PATIENTS ONLY — EXPIRES 12/18/11

LUNCH:sun-fri 11am-2:30pm DINNER: mon-thurs 5pm-10pm fri 5pm-10:30pm SATURDAY 3:30pm-10:30pm SUNDAY 12 noon-10:30pm 1403 st. charles ave. new orleans 504.410.9997 www.japanesebistro.com security guard on duty

Call For An Appointment

UPTOWN KENNER

O

R YA ONLI DER KO NE NO @ LA. CO M

includes comprehensive exam (#0150), x-rays (#274), cleaning (#1110) or panorex (#330)

DR. GLENN SCHMIDT DR. STEPHEN DELAHOUSSAYE FAMILY DENTISTRY Now available at 2 locations!

8025 Maple St. @ Carrollton · 861-9044 www.uptownsmiles.com 1942 Williams Blvd., Suite 8 · 469-9648 www.kennersmiles.com

Convention Center Blvd., 520-8530; www.grandislerestaurant.com — Grand Isle offers seafood options from raw oysters to lobster St. Malo with combines Maine lobster, shrimp and mussels. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

www.bigmommaschickenandwaffles.com — Hearty combinations inlcude the six-piece: a waffle and six fried wings served crispy or dipped in sauce. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., Lunch daily, dinner Sun. Credit cards. $

JACK DEMPSEY’S — 738 Poland

STEAKHOUSE CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — 322

Magazine St., 522-7902; www.centraarchy.com — The selection of USDA prime beef includes a 40-oz. Porterhouse for two. Reservations recommended. Diner daily. Credit cards. $$$

LA COTE BRASSERIE — 700

CRESCENT CITY STEAKS — 1001 N.

Broad St., 821-3271; www.crescentcitysteaks.com — Order USDA prime beef dry-aged and hand-cut in house. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri. and Sun., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

RED FISH GRILL — 115 Bourbon St.,

Now open 7 days a week in Mandeville LUNCH : Mon - Fri 11-2pm DiNNER: Mon -Thu 5-930pm Fri & Sat 5-10pm · Sun 1130a - 930p 600 N. Causeway, Mandeville 2100 N. Morrison, Hammond

985/626-4476

985/345-6789

D AVA ELIVE IL A RY BLE !

THE

favorites

Po-Boys, Pizzas & Plates

including Seafood Muffeletas, Italian Meatballs, Veal Marsala, Mirliton Casserole, Fettucine Alfredo, Grilled Chicken or Grilled Shrimp Salad, Gumbo and more.

K A E T S MB BO

K

R STEA

TENDE

NESS /GOOD H

W

ENC ON FR AD. BRE

3939 Veterans • 885-3416

(between Cleary Ave & Clearview) Mon-Tues 11-3 • Wed-Thurs 11-7:30 Fri 11-8:30 • Sat 11-8:00 www.parranspoboys.com

Royal St., 872-9868 — Enjoy hot and cold tapas dishes ranging from grilled artichokes to calamari. No Reservations. Dinner and latenight Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

SANTA FE TAPAS — 1327 St. Charles Ave., 304-9915 — Seared jumbo scallops are served with mango and green tomato pico de gallo. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

VIETNAMESE AUGUST MOON — 3635 Prytania

St., 899-5129; www.moonnola.com — Try spring rolls and pho soup as well as many popular Chinese dishes and vegetarian options. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PHO NOLA — 3320 Transcontinental

Drive, Metairie, 941-7690; www. pho-nola.com — Pho NOLA serves spring rolls and egg rolls, noodle soups, rice and vermicelli dishes and po-boys. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PHO TAU BAY RESTAURANT — 113 Westbank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, 368-9846 — Choose from pho, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, shrimp spring rolls with peanut sauce and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.Wed. & Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

Bringing you quality, consistency and value since 1971.

starting from $5.50

serving new orleans'

TAPAS/SPANISH MIMI’S IN THE MARIGNY — 2601

7329 FRERET • 861-7890

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

89

$

SOUL FOOD BIG MOMMA’S CHICKEN AND WAFFLES — 5741 Crowder Blvd., 241-2548;

Tchoupitoulas St., 613-2350; www. lacotebrasserie.com — Tabasco and cane syrup glazed salmon is served with shrimp mirliton ragout. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

MI

DENTAL CLEANING SPECIAL

737-4610 — Check into Village Inn for seasonal boiled seafood or raw oysters. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

SEAFOOD

erans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 885-3416; www.parranspoboy.com — Parran’s offers po-boys, muffulettas, pizzas, burgers, salads, seafood and Creole-Italian entrees. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Thu.-Sat. Credit cards. $

THE STORE — 814 Gravier St., 322-

VILLAGE INN — 9201 Jefferson Hwy.,

GRAND ISLE RESTAURANT — 575

Parkway serves juicy roast beef po-boys, hot sausage po-boys, fried seafood and more. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Wed.Mon. Credit cards. $

PARRAN’S PO-BOYS — 3939 Vet-

4218 Magazine St., 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., 302-1133; www.theospizza. com — Try specialty pies or build your own from two-dozen toppings. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

598-1200; www.redfishgrill.com — Favorites include hickory-grilled redfish, pecan-crusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

TRACEY’S — 2604 Magazine St., 899-2054; www.traceysnola.com — The roast beef po-boy dripping with gravy is the highlight of a menu transplanted from the former Parasol’s. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Cash only. $

Ave., 943-9914 — The Jack Dempsey seafood platter features gumbo, shrimp, oysters, catfish, redfish and crawfish pies, plus two side items. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat. and dinner Wed.Sat. Credit cards. $$

PARKWAY BAKERY AND TAVERN — 538 N. Hagen Ave., 482-3047 —

REGINELLI’S — Citywide; www.

2446; www.thestoreneworleans. com — The Store serves sandwiches, salads and hot plates, and there is a taco bar. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $$

(1 block off Broadway)

Now Accepting NOLA Bucks!

77

CLASSIFIEDS AUTOMOTIVE DOMESTIC AUTOS

WANTED TO PURCHASE

‘09 PT CRUISER $9,995 504-368-5640

CASH FOR CARS

Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com

‘10 CHEVROLET HHR $11,995 Several to Choose From! 504-368-5640

MISCELLANEOUS

‘10 CHEVY COBALT LT $10,995 Several To Choose From! 504-368-5640

AWESOME H2 LIMO

2003 Hummer H2 34’ Limo. White exterior w/gray leather interior. Seating for 16- 18 passengers. After market rims & tires, also comes with stock H2 rims & rims. 78K miles. Call (985) 232-9115.

IMPORTED AUTOS ‘06 LEXUS IS 250 $18,995 504-368-5640

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT

‘09 ACURA TSX $21,995 Call 504-368-5640

COUNSELING/THERAPY

‘10 HONDA CIVIC

$15,995 Several to Choose From! 504-368-5640

ALTERNATE CHOICES

Suffering from Alcohol/Substance Abuse, Anxiety or Depression that may be related to the upcoming holidays? Contact us about our programs/ services that may begin a New path for you & your family. 504-888-8600 www.newfreedom.info

‘10 KIA OPTIMA $11,995 504-368-5640

‘10 VOLVO S40 $18,995 504-368-5640

DANCE

‘11 HYUNDAI SONATA $16,977 504-368-5640

NEW ORLEANS DANCE ACADEMY

SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES ‘08 VW TOURAG V8 $22,995 Call 504-368-5640

HEALING ARTS

‘88 JEEP

GRAND WAGONEER Runs good. No rust on body. 180K miles. $3000. Call 504-393-9202.

Classical Ballet for children & adults. Home of Ballet Hysell, Koenka, Fiesta Flamengo, D’project. 5956 Magazine St. 504-891-0038 nodanceacademy@ aol.com

Weekly Tails

BODY & FOOT MASSAGE Open 7 days - 10am-10pm Jasmine Health Spa 614 Causeway, Metairie 504-273-7676 Chnese Health Spa 2424 Williams Blvd Suite S Kenner - 504-305-5177

Mocha is a 5-month-old, spayed, Dachshund mix whose family had to give her up due to moving. She’s a playful gal, who loves toys & treats, and resembles a smooth cup of hot chocolate. To meet Mocha or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/ SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191.

HEALTH/FITNESS $49/MO BOOTCAMPS

& Weight Management Program Enroll now for January Classes Bonnebal Boat Launch & Park 994-3822 - www.trainertogonola.com

LICENSED MASSAGE

STRESS? PAIN?

Relax with a massage. Amazing Hands by Patrick. LMT Lic 4005. 504-717-2577 www.amazinghands.us

NOTICE

Massage therapists are required to be licensed with the State of Louisiana and must include the license number in their ads.

A BODY BLISS MASSAGE

Jeannie LMT #3783-01. Flexible appointments. Uptown Studio or Hotel out calls. 504.894.8856 (uptown)

BYWATER BODYWORKS

Swedish, deep tissue, therapeutic. Flex appts, in/out calls, OHP/student discounts, gift cert. $65/hr, $75/ 1 1/2hr. LA Lic# 1763 Mark. 259-7278

MOCHA Kennel #A13603868

YOGA/MEDITATION/PILATES AUDUBON YOGA STUDIO

Ivengar Yoga, Level 1 - 3 Free classes for new students Jan 7-13 - 511 Octavia St. 504-821-9885; www.audubonyoga. com

MASSAGE EXTRAORDINAIRE

24 yrs exp to give you the ultimate in relaxation. Call Matteo. LA 0022, for your next appt. Metairie area. 504-8320945. No Outcalls

ADELE Kennel #A14242140

QUIET WESTBANK LOC

Adele is a 2-year-old, spayed, DSH with distinct calico markings. She’s an easy-going snuggle-bug who gets along well with dogs and cats. To meet Adele or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/ SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. To look for a lost pet come to the Louisiana SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), Mon-Sat. 9-5, Sun. 12-5 or call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org

Swedish, Relaxing Massage. Hours 9am-6pm, M-F. Sat 10-1pm $70. LA Lic #1910. Sandra, 504-393-0123.

2 YEAR/24,000 Mile Maintenance Agreement for NO EXTRA CHARGE!

Happy Honda Days

1.9 APR For 60 Mos.

25

HWY MPG *

$

LEASE A NEW 2012 HONDA

PILOT LX 2WD

289

or 1.9% for 60 mos.

All Power, 7-Passenger

LEASE FOR 36 MONTHS* Seating and More!

34

HWY MPG *

LEASE A NEW 2012 HONDA

ACCORD LX 4DR

$

199

or 1.9% for 60 mos. Auto, All Power,

LEASE FOR 36 MONTHS* and More!

39

HWY MPG *

$

LEASE A NEW 2012 HONDA

CIVIC LX 4DR

179

or 1.9% for 60 mos. Auto, all Power,

LEASE FOR 36 MONTHS* and More!

1845 WESTBANK EXPWY | MANHATTAN EXIT HARVEY, LA

504-368-5640 • www.SuperiorHonda.net *See dealer for details. 36 mo. lease 12k/yr. WAC thru AHFC. All offers end 12/14/11. *MPG based on 2011 EPA mileage estimates. Use for comparison purposes only. Do not compare to models before 2008. Your actual mileage will vary depending on how you drive & maintain your vehicle. All leases w/$1,999 due at inception plus TT&L.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

SUPERIOR HONDA EXCLUSIVE

79

CLASSIFIEDS SUPERIOR AIRE INC

MERCHANDISE

483-3100 • Fax: 483-3153 3923 Bienville St. New Orleans, LA 70119 Mon.-Fri. 8:30 a.m.- 5:30 p.m.

classadv@gambitweekly.com CASH, CHECK OR MAJOR CREDIT CARD

Online: When you place an ad in Gambit’s Classifieds it also appears on our website, www.bestofneworleans.com Free Ads: Private party ads for

merchandise for sale valued under $100 (price must be in ad) or ads for pets found/lost. No phone calls. Please fax or email.

Deadlines:

CLOTHING SKI JUMPSUIT, NILS

Size 8. Great Looking! Paid over $600. Sell for $100. Call 504-833-2478

FURNITURE/ACCESSORIES $125 Full/Double Size Mattress Set, still in original plastic, unopened. We can deliver. (504) 846-5122 $295 Brand New Iron Queen Bed with mattress set, all new. Can deliver. (504) 952-8403 King Pillowtop Mattress, NEW!!! ONLY $199. Can deliver. (504) 846-5122 NEW Pub Height Table Set all wood, still boxed. Delivery available. $325 (504) 846-5122 Queen Mattress Set $149 Still in wrapper. Will deliver. (504) 846-5122

SPORTS EQUIPMENT SKI JUMPSUIT - NLS

Size 8. Great Looking! Paid over $600. Sell for $100. Call 504-833-2478

LOST/FOUND PETS Looking for Benji

My neighbors found this dog in Luling Wednesday night (11/2) & brought him to Old Metairie because they thought he was lost. My neighbor put him in their shed, but he apparently got out overnight (on Aris between Canal Street & Metairie Road). The rightful owner in Luling was located Thursday morning. The dog is 16 years old! Tan & white; red collar & cataracts in each eye. Please call (504) 256-6553 if you have seen him. This is so heartbreaking!!! Thank you.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

REWARD- LOST

80

ASK ABOUT OUR SPECIAL RATES FOR

Real Estate Rentals &

Employment

(Mid City but could be anywhere by now),Ozzie, male, brown/black stripe (brindle), pit mix, sweet, call him & he will come, hold him &call me asap, Traci 504-975-5971.

PET ADOPTIONS BUTTERCUP

Baby kitten, blk/white & blue eyes. Female. sweet, lovable & playful. Traci - tbkestler@cox.net

COCO

RUBY

NOLA

MARKETPLACE

Chocolate Lab. Young, female mix, super friendly! approx. 12mos,weighs approx. 46lbs. Very trainable, playful with everyone. Puppy energy! Traci tbkestler@cox.net

URGENT! HOME/FOSTER

Very sweet Stafford. Soco - very, very sweet boy. Help asap to get him out of small confinement. Traci - tbkestler@ cox.net

To Advertise in

Gambit’s weekly guide to Services, Events, Merchandise, Announcements, and more for as little as $60

ANNOUNCEMENTS FREE Groceries! Receive $2000 in Grocery Savings! Grocery Stimulus Program provides $2000 savings to participants of shopping survey. ALL MAJOR AND LOCAL supermarkets! Call now 877-301-1691. HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-800-532-6546 Ext. 97 http:// www.continentalacademy.com

CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS With Focus On NOLA’s history, culture, influences, etc. joan34@me.com

REAL ESTATE Call 483-3100

Trane 3 Ton Freon Replacement System, 13 seer, 10 year compressor. $3990 INSTALLED 12 months same as cash 504-465-0688

HOME SERVICES Don’t Replace Your Tub REGLAZE IT

Chip/Spot Repair - Colors Available Clawfoot tubs for sale Southern Refinishing LLC Certified Fiberglass Technician Family Owned & Operated 504-348-1770 southernrefinishing.com

AIR COND/HEATING SAVE $100

AC/HEATING UNIT REPLACEMENT Authentic Air, LLC Air Conditioning & Heating. Lic & Ins . 24/7 Emergency. All Major Brands. 504-421-2647. AuthenticAirLLC.com To Advertise in Call (504) 483-3100

TERMINIX

Home of the $650 Termite Damage Repair Guarantee! WE DO IT ALL... Termites, Roaches, Rats & Ants Too. New Orleans Metro - 504-834-7330 2329 Edenborn, Metairie www.terminixno.com

GENERAL CONTRACTORS PLUMBING

HUSBANDS FOR HIRE CONSTRUCTION

NO JOB TOO BIG OR SMALL Additions, renovations, patios, carpentry, painting, flooring, plumbing, electrical, roofing, fencing & more James Cupp Jr. LA Lic Contractor, mechanical contr, master plumber. 504-401-0343. www.HusbandsForHireConstruction.com

INSULATION AUDUBON SPRAY FOAM INSULATION

Save up to 50% on ac/heat bills; live more comfortably; Improve sound control, reduce your carbon footprint. Roland (Rusty) Cutrer Jr, Owner 504-432-7359 www.audubonsprayfoam.com

LANDSCAPE/HORTICULTURE DELTA SOD

SERVICES

REAL ESTATE PETS

Baby female KITTEN, tortoise, blue eyes. sweet, lovable, playful! Traci tbkestler@cox.net

Advertise in

ADOPTIONS PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293

NEW BOOK CLUB

• For all Line Ads - Thurs. @ 5 p.m. • For all Display Ads - Wed. @ 5 p.m. Note: Ad cancellations and changes for all display ads must be made by Wednesday at 5 pm prior to the next issue date. Ad cancellations and changes for all line ads must be made by Thursday at 5 pm prior to the next issue date. Please proof your first ad insertion to make sure it is correct. Gambit only takes responsibility for the first incorrect insertion.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Certified Grade “A” Turf St. Augustine, Tifway Bermuda Centipede, Zoysia. WE BEAT ALL COMPETITORS! 504-733-0471

FRERET GARDEN CENTER & LANDSCAPING

The Cracked Pot Garden Center

2 mi west of Airport on Airline Hwy 504-466-8813 Fall Landscaping Clean Up Special Free Estimates

PEST CONTROL DELUXE PEST CONTROL

Commercial & Residential Celebrating 50 yrs in New Orleans Great Rates & Service. 504-837-5800 www.deluxepestcontrol.com

Consider the alternative ...

Sewer & Drain Cleaning Specialists Plumbing Repair Specialists New Orleans 504-522-9536. KennerJefferson 504-466-8581. Westbank 504-368-4070. Laplace 985-6520084. Mandeville 985-626-5045. Slidell 985-641-3525. MENTION GAMBIT FOR A DISCOUNT

REMODELING/RENOVATION RHINO SHIELD OF LOUISIANA Never Paint Your Home Again! Free Evaluation * Financing Available 1-877-52-RHINO www.rhinoshieldlouisiana.com

ROOFING GEAUX CONSTRUCTION

“Your Roofing Professional” Shingle roofs, flat roofs, slate roofs, tile roofs, roof repairs, insurance claims. FREE INSPECTIONS. Member BBB & HBA. GAF certified. (504) 810-1100

PROFESSIONAL

10% OFF FALL COLOR CHRISTMAS TREES HAVE ARRIVED We offer: Maintenance, Ladnscaping, Irrigation, Lighting, Christmas Trees, Fleur de Lis Wreaths & Custom Decorating. (504) 895-3022

NEED HELP?

ROOTER MAN

EDITING WORLD’S BEST WRITING HELP

RESEARCH PAPERS - FICTION - ESSAYS 452-3697 or ROBERBRIDE@LIVE.COM

LEGAL SERVICES ATTN: CONDO ASSOCIATIONS Total Condo Problem Analysis Carolyn Aiken Chesnutt Attorney at Law (504) 909-7367

NEED A NOTARY NOW?

SCHOENFELD LAW CORPORATION 24-hr mobile notary services. Successions, Wills, Power of Attorney, etc, We’ll come to you! 504-416-2489

gambit EMPLOYMENT SECTION

Call 483-3100 or fax at 483-3153

®

CLASSIFIEDS EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT

CAREER PREPARATION EARN $75-$200 HOUR

(Now 25% Off), Media Makeup & Airbrush Training. For Ads, TV, Film, Fashion. 1 wk class & Portfolio. AwardMakeUpSchool.com, 310-364-0665

FARM LABOR TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

Brady Bees & Honey, Liberty, Texas has 8 positions for bees & honey; 3 mos. experience required as a beekeeper, may not have have bee, pollen or honey related allergies; must able to obtain clean DL in 30 days following hire; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $10.57 up to $11.52/hr; 3/4 work period guaranteed from 12/31/11 10/31/12. Apply at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order TX3106028.

TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

Daren Fowler Farms, Wheatley, AR, has 4 positions for soybeans & rice; mos. experience required for job duties; must able to obtain clean DL in 30 days following hire; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb; $8.97/ hr; 3/4 work period guaranteed from 1/15/12 - 11/15/12. Apply at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order 291675.

To Advertise in

EMPLOYMENT Call (504) 483-3100

TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

Kiefat Honey Farms, West Columbia. TX has 5 positions for bees & honey; 3 mos. experience required as a beekeeper, may not have have bee, pollen or honey related allergies; must be able to physically lift 65-70 pounds when moving bees and pulling honey; must able to obtain clean DL in 30 days following hire; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $10.57 up to $11.52/hr; 3/4 work period guaranteed from 12/31/11 10/31/12. Apply at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order TX6820108.

TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

Moore’s Honey Farm, Kountze TX has 4 positions for bees & honey; 3 mos. experience required as a beekeeper with references; must able to obtain clean DL in 30 days following hire; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $10.57 depending on location; 3/4 work period guaranteed from 1/17/12 - 11/17/12. Apply at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order TX8163240.

RESTAURANT/HOTEL/BAR

TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

Lambs Honey Farm, Minneapolis, MN has 5 positions for bees & honey; 3 mos. experience required as a beekeeper, may not have have bee, pollen or honey related allergies; must able to obtain clean DL in 30 days following hire; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $10.57 up to $11.52/hr depending on location starting in Jasper, TX; ; 3/4 work period guaranteed from 1/15/12 - 10/31/12. Apply at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order TX6820787.

TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

Liberty Honey Farms, Liberty, TX has 18positions for bees & honey; 3 mos. experience required as a beekeeper, may not have have bee, pollen or honey related allergies; must able to obtain clean DL in 30 days following hire; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $10.57 up to $11.52/hr depending on location; 3/4 work period guaranteed from 1/5/12 - 11/15/12. Apply at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order TX8162335.

Uniform SUperviSor (Belle chasse)

In charge of a Uniform Center with responsibility for directing, coordinating and selling uniforms and accessories to authorized military personnel.

Medical, dental and vision benefits are available upon hire. Please submit your resume via fax: 504-678-2716 or email:

arlinda.metoyer@nexweb.org VOLUNTEER

WIT’S INN Bar & Pizza Kitchen Pizza Maker & Bartender w/ food experience

Apply in person Mon-Fri,1-5pm 141 N. Carrollton Ave. RETAIL gae-tana

Seeking Energetic Sales Associate for Women’s Clothing Store. Must have customer service exp. Fax resume 504865-1272 or gaetanas@bellsouth.net

RETAIL POSITIONS AVAILE

Customer service exp a plus. Dance exp a plus but not req’d. Must be able to work Sat. Mail resume to 3004 Cleary Ave, Met La 70002 or fax: 504-457-0022

Offers Volunteer Opportunities. Make a difference in the lives of the terminally ill & their families. Services include: friendly visits to patients & their families, provide rest time to caretaker, bereavement & office assistance. School service hours avail. Call Volunteer Coordinator @ 504-818-2723 #3016

TRADE/SKILLS EXP. AUTO TECHNICIANS NEEDED

Comp. pay, 401K, pd vac, med/dent avail. Kim’s Chrysler Dodge Jeep Toyota. Send resume to mellisa@ kimsautogroup.com

WORK WANTED WILL BABYSIT FOR YOU

Have 21 years experience. References. Call (504) 559-8907 or (504) 464-9851

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

81

reaL esTaTe

SHOWCaSe CBD/WAREHOUSE DISTRICT

1 RIVER PLACE • $1,149,000 Breathtaking view of the River & Bridge. Wall of windows allows natural light to flow thru. 2BR/2BA condo. Amaz flrpln. 1918 sq ft w/elegant dsgnr details Joy North • Gardner Realtors 504-400-0274 • cocohocke@aol.com

FRENCH QUARTER

922-24 Dauphine St. $875K Four 1 bedroom apartments. Parking for 5+ cars.

FRENCH QUARTER/ FAUBOURG MARIGNY 2231 N. RAMPART- MARIGNY

Free standing cottage w/2 charming porches. Bright open fl plan, hdwd flrs throughout, ss appl, ceramic cntrr & bath. Huge bdrm w/skylights. Secure offst. pkng. $159,000. Robert Armstrong 504-616-3615

Best Value in French Qtr

1020 ESPLANADE #103. Lovely 2 br, 2 ba condo, high ceil in den, sparkling pool, courtyd, fenced pkg. Private attached alley could be dog run. $349K. Lana Sackett, Gardner Realtors, 504-352-4934. www.lanasackett.com

MID-CITY 3924 B CLEVELAND $160K

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

Off Canal & Carrollton. 2br/1ba, CA&H, hdwd flrs, crown molding, ss appliances. Washer/Dryer/Fridge included. (504) 559-1993

82

835 Royal St. $349.5K Great location, secluded hideaway! Spac 2 br, 2 marble tile baths. Small rear balc overlooking garden.

617 Duphine St. $268K Spacious light filled condo. Great floor plan. Fabulous pool and courtyard. Being sold furnished. In the heart of the quarter.

Paula Bowler • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 • www.frenchquarterrealty.com

Million Dollar Club; Gold Award Winner

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

938 Royal St. A $215K Great location for this condo. Perfect for your weekend getaways! Quaint & comfortable. 1 br, great kit & bath.

2123-25 LAUREL ST $270K

Restored 2 unit Creole cottage in Lwr Gard Dist. Walk to Magazine St. Nr CBD. 6BR/2BA, all elec, cen a/h, 2900 sf liv area, porch. 30x158 lot. John, 508-5799.

621-623 9th Street

Lovely Double, Uptown area. 2 bdrm, 1 ba each side, hardwood floors, ceil fans, . $185,000. Call April Gongora, Gardner Realtors, 504-606-0466.

WESTBANK BUYING OR SELLING - CALL ME Barataria Waterfront Property Vacant Lot in English Turn Westbank Dwellings Call Cecelia, 583-2902, Gardner Realtors

ST. BERNARD PARISH 523 Angela, Old Arabi

3 blocks from Marigny. 10 Min from The Quarter. 110 year old home, fully restored, 1200 sq ft, 12’ ceil, orig hdwd flrs, 2 firepl, 2 BR, 2 BA, granite in kit $145K. 504-554-4800

COVINGTON ELEGANT COUNTRY LIVING

Mins. from downtown Covington. Custom European estate on Bogue Falaya River. Main hse 3500 sf, 3 br, 3.5 ba. Guest hse 1000 sf, 2 br, 1 ba. On 4.66 acres. $1,099,000. By Appt. 985-5022882. CovingtonRiverEstate.com.

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

COMMERCIAL RENTALS

KENNER

LOW PRICED OFFICE

Central Met 2909 Division St. Approx 1385sf. $9/sf per yr + electric. Emily Kramer, Corporate Realty, 504-5815005. ekramer@corp-realty.com

1 & 2 Br Apts, 1 Ba, furn. Qn bed, WiFi, Cbl. Pkg.Util Incl. Lndry Fac. Sec Cameras From $1200/mth. 1 mth min. 2200 Pasadena, Met. 504491-1591.

ELMWOOD CONDO

2/2, Appl inc. w&d, walk-in closets, pkng, priv. patio, pool, tennis crts. Earhart - 1 mile. No smokers. $1050, Glenn, 504-450-5634

NEW ORLEANS RIVERFRONT

2 BR, 2.5 BA. Furn, healthclub, pool, parking. All util incl, wifi. Min 1 month. $3000/mo. Also Penthouse $3800/ mo. 781-608-6115.

Private room w/bath & common TV room. No formal kitchen. Cable & utilities paid, $450 - $500/mo. 504737-2068

Beautiful 2 BR, 2 BA, large jacuzzi in master bath, high end appliances incl washer & dryer, pool. $1200/mo. 504-835-1577

1/2 OFF FIRST MONTH OLD METAIRIE SECRET

1 or 2 BR, Sparkling Pool, Bike Path, 12’ x 24’ Liv.Rm, Sep Din, King Master, No Pets, No Sect 8, $699 & $799 . 504-236-5776

ALL NEW - HIDDEN GEM

CHARMING OLD METAIRIE HOME

Renov’t - all new! - near Heart of Metairie. 1 bdrm + bonus room, from $795. Wtr pd., Rsvd pkg,1 car. No smoking/ pets 504-780-1706 orrislaneapts.com

On Elmeer Ave. Approx. 1350 sq. ft. 3BR/1.5BA. Renov’t, SS kit, beautiful hrwd flrs, ceil fans, CA&H. Study area, fenced. $1485 + dep. (504) 554-3844.

FOR RENT OR SALE

METAIRIE TOWERS

2511 Metairie Lawn. 2BR/2BA, w/d, pool, security. Rent $950/mo. Sale $149,000. Call 427-1087

JEFFERSON NEAR OCHSNER

NEAR WMS & W. NAPOLEON

METAIRIE

HARAHAN/RIVER RIDGE

CORPORATE RENTALS New Orleans Area (Metairie) 10 Min to Downtown N.O.

OLD METAIRIE

SPACIOUS MODERN CONDO

1BR, 1-1/2 BA, pool. Elec & cable included, parking. 24 hr Concierge Service, Reduced to $880/mo 914882-1212.

2BR, top quality appl, w/d in unit, granite, lots of closets, balcony, 2513 Pasadena $795/mo, water pd. 504488-RENT. Superior Property Mgmt

To Advertise in

EMPLOYMENT Call (504) 483-3100

Ann de Montluzin Farmer

BROKER

Historic House and Luxury Home Specialist

Motivated Sellers: Wondering what your property is worth? Call me for a FREE CMA (Comparative Market Analysis).

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT PRICED TO SELL NOW

427 ARABELLA Unique sgl. architectually designed interior, 2-3 BR, 2 BA, 2000+ sq ft. Only $385K. 917 RACE Historical 1850’s gem. Beautiful stairway, orig pocket doors, L shaped yd, much more. Call for info. $350K 3655-57 TCHOUPITOULAS Ready to rent, nice dble, lg yd, new roof. $110K. Lois Landry Realty, 504-586-1019

(504) 895-1493 (504) 430-8737

Residential /Commercial Sales and Leasing, Appraisals.

farmeran@gmail.com Licensed in Louisiana for 32 years, building on a real estate heritage since 1905

THE FERNANDEZ HOUSE

927 DAUPHINE STREET $1,895,000 An excellent example of an early creole cottage set in a serene compound. Beautiful courtyard with mature plantings in a classic partere garden. Property consists of the main house, 4 income producing apartments and a large bonus space-- office, workshop, gym, etc. Parking for multiple cars. Great location.

Paula Bowler • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 www.frenchquarterrealty.com

8309 Sycamore Street & 2214 Dante Street

Large executive sized home (5000 sq. ft.) on double lot with gourmet kitchen, chic master bath, huge den, 4 bedrooms, 4.5 baths, sutdio/game room/2nd den and an office plus a six (6) car garage and 3 bedroom/2 bath rental (great tenant at $1575 per month) on an adjacent property. Package Price $ 699,000 Sycamore house may be sold separately for $ 529,000

Michael L. Baker, ABR/M, CRB, HHS President Realty Resources, Inc. 504-523-5555 • cell 504-606-6226

Licensed by the Louisiana Real Estate Commission for more than 28 years with offices in New Orleans, LA 70130

CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATE ALGIERS POINT HISTORIC ALGIERS POINT

High end 1-4BR. Near ferry, clean, many x-tras, hrdwd flrs, cen a/h, no dogs, no sec 8, some O/S prkng $750$1200/mo. 504-362-7487

DOWNTOWN 1329 FRENCHMAN ST.

Living room, 1 BR, kitchen, tile bath. No pets. $500/mo. Call 504-494-0970.

1930 PAINTERS

Real nice 2 bdrms, carport, w/d hkkups, Sect. 8 OK. $800/month. Utilities pd. Nice patio. Call Eddie, (504) 481-1204

ESPLANADE RIDGE 1208 N. GAYOSO

Upper 2 BR, LR, DR, 1 BA, KIT, wood/ ceramic flrs, high ceilings, cen a/h, w/d hkups, no pets. $1050 mo. 432-7955.

FRENCH QUARTER/ FAUBOURG MARIGNY

GENTILLY Beautiful New Renovation

526 DUMAINE

3rd floor efficiency furn’d kit, w&d on premises. $600/mo + dep. No pets. 504-236-5757. fqrental.com.

1 bdrm, private yard. Renov’t 2005. All new finishes & appliances. No pets/ smokers. $625 + deposit & references. Avail 12/1. Call 606-0399

4 BLKS FROM TULANE

927 ST. ANN

Slave Qtr Cottage. 1 BR, tiled bath, cable & water included, 2 patios. No dogs. $995 + deposit. 504-568-1359

HISTORIC VICTORIAN

Renovated, 2 blocks from the Fr. Quarter. 4 bedrooms/4baths, 2 story with courtyard - FANTASTIC! Call Aimee with DEMAND REALTY at 319-0443 or 837-3000.

OFF STREET PARKING

3838 Havana Place. 2 BR, quiet neighborhood, cent air & heat, alarm. granite counters in kit, fenced yd. $1025/mo. Call 504-430-1164

UNIVERSITY AREA 312 BURDETTE ST

1713 BURGUNDY, 1 bd/1 ba, furn kit, all elec, ac, carpet, wtr pd. 1 yr lse. $750 + dep. 949-5518

LAKEFRONT LARGE ATTRACTIVE APT

2BR, 2BA w/ appls, beautiful courtyard setting w/swimming pool, quiet neighborhood. $850/mo. 504-495-6044 or 504-756-7347

MID CITY SMALL OFFICE SPACE

MID CITY - Offstreet parking for one vehicle. Separate entrance. Available Now. Contact Jane, (504) 482-5292

1430 Jackson Ave. 2 bedrooms, 2 baths Rent: $1200. Gated secured parking for one car. Elevator. Living room, dining nook, furnished kitchen, central a/h, patio, water paid. Snappy Jacobs 525-0190

Snappy Jacobs, CCIM Real Estate Management, LLC

5512 Cucullu. Newly renov 2 br 1 ba, lr, din rm, kit w appl w\/d hkups, cent a/h, offst pking, hdwd flors. $1000/ mo. 504-874-4330

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT 1205 ST CHARLES/$1075

Fully Furn’d studio/effy/secure bldg/ gtd pkg/pool/gym/wifi/laundry. Avail 12/1. 985-871-4324, 504-442-0573.

1508 CARONDELET ST- 2 APTS

Studio, newly remodeled kit & ba, hdwd flrs. $750 mo. Huge 2 BR Apt. Bright, spacious,, high ceilings, hdwd flrs, $1100 Both have Cent a/h, laundry facility avail 24 hrs. Walk 1 blk to St. Charles St Car, easy access to I-10, CBD & FQ. No pets/No smokers. 1-888-239-6566. mballier@yahoo.com

NEED HELP? Advertise in

EMPLOYMENT Call 483-3100

GARDEN DISTRICT

1, 2, 3 & 4 ROOM OFFICES STARTING AT $495 INCLUDING UTILITIES

CALL 899-RENT 1510 CARONDELET

Lg 1 BR Apt, 1 blk St. Charles. open floor plan, remodeled kit & bath, laundry facilities on site. $800.1-888239-6566 or mballier@yahoo.com

3222 Napoleon Rooms For Rent

Spacious house, 4 large private bedrooms. Large equipped kitchen, 3 baths, dining room, front porch. Central heat & air $625 each includes all utilities & internet, cable & laundry facilities. No Pets + Deposit 504-376-4676. Grad students welcome.

3452 C CONSTANCE

Combination br, kitch & bth, hi ceil. No pets. $625/mo + dep & lse. 895-6394 or cell 289-9977.

4130 PRYTANIA

1 BR, 2nd flr apt, walk-in closet, hi ceil, a/c, ceil fans, w/d, hdwd flrs. $800/ mo. No pets. MUST SEE! 908-9350, Remax RE Partners 504-888-9900

ST. CHARLES AVE & 6TH

Remodeled, on street car line in Garden District. 1 br, 1 ba, liv rm, kit w/ appl, offst pkg, coin operated w/d. $675/mo. 504-874-4330

WAREHOUSE DISTRICT Furnished 1 Bedroom—1 Bath

Furnished Condo in Warehouse District. Secure building, top floor, end unit. Rent includes utilities, pool, gym, cable, internet. Apt has W/D, stainless steel appliances, central heat/air. Central to to French Quarter, West Bank, Uptown, parade route, streetcar. Loft with desk. Available 11/1. Call Bonnie at Soniat Realty, 504-488-8988. $1600, negotiable.

PENTHOUSE LOFT

Gorgeous penthouse condo on top floor, unbeateable spot in the Arts and Warehouse dist. 2b-2b, Exquisitely furnished, located in a luxurious building, with amenities including : Gym, inground pool, events room, covered garage and 24 security/surveillance. Walk to world class shops,restaurants, night life. Breathtaking views of New Orleans from huge outdoor terrace... a must live in! $4500.00/month Corporative leases are welcome. manageronellc@gmail.com 504-275-7772

RENTALS TO SHARE ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Findyour roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com.

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

83

CLASSIFIEDS PUZZLE PAGE

COOL, CONVENIENT CONDO NEW LISTING

JOHN SCHAFF CRS

(c) 504.343.6683 (O) 504.895.4663

3222 Coliseum 4941 St. Charles 2721 St. Charles 5528 Hurst 1750 St. Charles 1750 St. Charles 20 Anjou 1544 Camp 3915 St. Charles 1544 Camp 1544 Camp 1224 St. Charles 2721 St. Charles

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 06 > 2011

ANSWERS FOR LAST WEEK ON PAGE 80

86

TOO LATE! ..............................$2,495,000 Grand Mansion.......................$2,300,000 (3 bdrm/3.5ba w/pkg) ............$1,579,000 TOO LATE! ..............................$1,300,000 TOO LATE! ................................ $429,000 Commercial ............................. $349,000 (4 bdrm/2 ba w/pkg) ................ $220,000 (2 bdrm/2ba w/pkg) ................. $239,000 TOO LATE!................................. $315,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) ............................ $159,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) ............................ $149,000 (Only 6 Left!)...............starting at $79,000 (efficiency condo)..................... $169,000

4850 MAGAZINE Newly renovated 1bdrm, 1 ba, open floor plan. Beautiful original hardwood floors, 12 ft ceilings, updated kitchen features new range, microwave, dishwasher, granite counters,

(504) 895-4663

cabinets and ceramic tile floor. Bedroom has newly installed pre-finished hardwood floors. On a quiet block of Magazine, close to everything. EASY TO PARK. $145,000


Gambit New Orleans: Dec. 6, 2011