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it’s why you shop. Saks Fifth Avenue Allen Edmonds Anthropologie Brooks Brothers BCBGMAXAZRIA French Sole Michael Kors Morton’s The Steakhouse

333 Canal Street | 504.522.9200 | Monday-Saturday 10-7 | Sunday 12-6 | www.theshopsatcanalplace.com The Shops at Canal Place

theshopsatcanal

Sain ts & Angels

a boutique with Heart + Soul

3300 Magazine St. • Suite B (next to Hemline) • Uptown 504 - 570-6649 • Hours: Mon-Sat 10-6 • to see more photos + info a u g u s t. 2 0 1 2 < < <

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TWO GREAT STORES, ONE GREAT LOCATION

Romancing the Stones $19.95 to $32.95

GIFTS • JEWELRY HOME DECOR

Mon - Sat 10-5:30 504-891-6141

Activewear that goes anywhere

DRESS COOL

look

Hot! 504-899-2212

5 5 2 3 M A G A Z I N E (between

Octavia & Joseph)

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contents

20 36 15 25 11 13

august 2012

FASHION

all dolled up Dresses fit for a paper doll

brand yourself

29 33

How fashion can reflect your personal brand

HOME

cue in Carpenter Matthew Holdren’s rustic-meets-minimalist style

built in style

09 39

Deck out your desk.

SHOPPING

neW&cool Cameo roles

What guys Want Man scents

cue Kids School days are here again.

cue tips A new boutique and a toy-delivery service

PERSPECTIVES

froM the editor Fun with fashion

shop dogs NOLA Couture’s Piggy

BEAUTY

35 37

lusterphile Beauty tools

you & iMproVed The estrogen-complexion connection

On the cOver: Photo by ©iStockphoto.com/Julia Savchenko

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Perfect Fit Shoes - The Perfect Fit THIERRY RABOTIN � ARAVON � MBT � MUNRO � LA PLUME � THINK � FINN COMFORT � DREW � BLONDO SANITA CLOGS � COMFORT CLUB � KORK EASE � EARTHIES � ORTHAHEEL � CORDANI � AEROSOLES

New Arrivals for Women & Men Orthaheel Recovery Sandals and Dr. Weil Walker

LIKE US ON

VISIT OUR BLOG

FOLLOW US ON

PERSONALIZED FITTING & CUSTOM ORTHOTICS AVAILABLE

Remember Crescent City Physical Therapy for Treatment of Foot & Ankle Problems For information, call 504-895-0638 or visit www.crescentcitypt.com

Perfect Fit Shoes Unique to New Orleans

Shoe Brands known on East & West Coasts now available in NOLA

Gini Davis, Physical Therapist, Foot/Ankle Specialist - Crescent City Physical Therapy Presenting an outstanding collection of stylish, comfortable shoes for any season (or reason)!

5525 MAGAZINE STREET ( B E T W E E N S P R I N G A N D P R I O R I T I E S • C A D DY C O R N E R F R O M W H O L E F O O D S )

OPEN MON–FRI, 10 AM –6 PM • SAT, 10 AM –5 PM | 504.456.5993 W W W. PE R F EC TF IT S H O E S . N E T 06 CUE

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Come Visit Our

Semiâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Annual

SALE GOING ON NOW!

With Free Valet Parking Available

It Couldn't Be Easier! Pull up on Canal St. and James will take your car from there.

Follow us online: blog.rubensteinsneworleans.com

RUBENSTEINS Canal Street Corner St. Charles Avenue | 504.581.6666 | www.rubensteinsneworleans.com

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Liberto Photography, LLC

Model: Julie Martin

enjoy the games in summer casual from fini. Go Team USA!

• laDies clothinG • airbrush tanninG • event make-up • accessories a beauty boutique

• cosmetics

6250 General Diaz • lakeview • 304-0633 • www.finiboutique.com

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FROM THE EDITOR

ON CUE M I S SY W I L K I N S O N |

PHOTO BY JANINE JOFFE | MAKEUP BY MARIA BARREDA

T

his month, CUE invites you to have a little fun with fashion. You’ll probably want to grab your scissors, glue and cardboard right now, because instead of our usual fashion photo shoot, we whipped up some paper dolls (page 20). In doing so, we join a distinguished lineage of magazines ranging from Good Housekeeping to McCall’s. I grew up cutting out Betsy McCall paper dolls, and poor Betsy is another victim of the digital era, which, in some ways, isn’t as much fun as its print predecessor: You can’t make a collage, decoupage an old trunk or line a birdcage with pixels, and you can’t deface photos of your nemeses without messing up your monitor. (But feel free to give me a mustache and devil horns if you’re reading our print version.) There are lots of ways to engage creatively with print as a medium, and it’s useful to think of fashion and home decor as mediums, too. Carpenter Matthew Holdren (page 15) grapples with salvaged bargeboard as his artistic outlet, and fashion instructors share tips on how to use fashion as a vehicle for projecting your identity (page 36). Something as simple as

summer tone 504.891.5121

735 Octavia St. • New Orleans

www.onetoonepersonaltraining.com

1 block from the Magazine St. Whole Foods Market

WE’VE MOVED!

the wide-brimmed hat on our cover can define a dramatic, noir bombshell persona. And that’s what’s so satisfying about paper dolls: You can decide what you want your doll to convey, snip her out and dress her up. So have at it — or if you’re reading our digital version, find yourself a pretty dress and be your own doll.

MARGO DUBOS | EDITOR

30 MINUTES TWICE PER WEEK

DORA SISON |

EDITORIAL

K A N DAC E P O W E R G R AV ES

PRODUCTION DIRECTOR

MICHELE SLONSKI A DVE RT I SI N G AD M INIS TRATOR 4 8 3 -314 0 micheles@gambitweekly.com

CHRISTIN JOHNSON CON T R I BU T I N G W R I T E RS

L E E C U T R O N E , L I N D S E Y DA R N E L L , M EGA N B R A D E N - P E R RY, N I C O L E C A R R O L L , M EG FA R R I S

AC C O U N T E X E C U T I V E S

INTERN

JILL GIEGER

PRODUCTION

2122 MAGAZINE ST. NOLA 70130

P U BL I S H E R

M A N AG I N G E D I TO R

N I C O L E KO S T E R

( JUST RIGHT NEXT DOOR )

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NEW ORLEANS

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Natural Products for your Sweet Baby

BATON ROUGE

504-596-6540 • WWW.ZUKABABY.COM

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MONDAY-SATURDAY 10-6 • SUNDAY 12-5

S E N I O R ACCOU N T E X ECU T I V E 4 8 3 -313 1 jillg@gambitweekly.com

JEFFREY PIZZO 4 8 3 -3145 jeffp@gambitweekly.com

G R A PH I C D E S I G N E RS

S H E R I E D E L AC R O I X-A L FA R O , L I N D S AY W E I S S , LY N B R A N T L E Y, BRITT BENOIT, MARK WAGUESPACK

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S A N DY S T E I N B R O N D U M

MEGAN MIC ALE 4 8 3 -314 4 meganm@gambitweekly.com

A DV E R T IS I N G D I R EC TOR 4 83 -3150 sandys@gambitweekly.com

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HW +

be stronger. live longer.

g a m b i t ’ s h e a lt h + w e l l n e s s

GAMBIT | 392 3 B I ENV I L L E STR EE T | NE W O R L E A N S , L A 7 0 1 1 9 504 . 4 8 6.5900 | response@gambitweekly.com

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A CAMEO

NEW + COOL

SHOPPING

APPEARANCE FROM CLASSIC TO CUSTOMIZED, THESE ACCESSORIES ARE ALL ABOUT FACE. BY N I C O L E KO S T ER A N D M I S SY W I L K I N S O N

CAMEO CUFF BRACELET, $600 AT GYPSIESANDDEBUTANTES.COM.

ANIMAL CAMEO PENDANTS, $18$38 AT UNIQUE PRODUCTS (2038 MAGAZINE ST., 529-2441; WWW.SHOPGREENNEWORLEANS.COM).

CAMEO RING, $785 AT ROYAL ANTIQUES.

ANTIQUE SARDONYX BROOCH, $2,900 AT ROYAL ANTIQUES (309 ROYAL ST., 524-7033; WWW.ROYALANTIQUES.COM).

CUSTOM EMBROIDERED AUDREY HEPBURN CHAIR BY SARAH ASHLEY LONGSHORE, $2,000-$3,200 AT LONGSHORE STUDIO GALLERY (4848 MAGAZINE ST., 458-5500; WWW.ASHLEYLONGSHORE.COM). PHOTO BY MICHAEL SMITH. a u g u s t. 2 0 1 2 < < <

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Never pay more for a beautiful floor.

CARRARA WHITE MARBLE STARTING AT

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D E S I G N G A L L E R Y 2801 MAGAZINE STREET N E W O R L E A N S, L A 7 0 1 1 5 504.891.3005

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TILE - WOOD - STONE - GLASS - DECORATIVES - FLOORS - WALLS

SHOPPING

W H AT G U Y S W A N T

THE

ES-SCENT-TIAL

MALE Wrapped in black wax, Demon in the Dark soap refreshes with spearmint and peppermint and stimulates with apple juice, $7.95 for a 3.5-ounce bar at Lush (407 Decatur St., 525-0730; Lakeside Shopping Center, 3301 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 841-0640; www.lushusa.com).

Tarragon, lavender, sandalwood and spearmint blend in Lush’s Dirty body spray for a fragrance reminiscent of a barber shop, $19.95 at Lush.

SPRAYS, SCENTS, SOAPS AND SCRUBS SMELL SWEET IN THE SUMMER HEAT BY M EG A N B R A D EN - P ER RY

Moonshine cologne bears the slogan “Repeal Her Prohibitions” and has notes of black pepper, tobacco, leather and gin, $75 at Vernon (2049 Magazine St., 309-5929; www.vernonclothing.com).

Keig is a sweet and citrusy herbal scent by Castle Forbes, $95 at Aidan Gill (550 Fulton St., 566-4903; 2026 Magazine St., 587-9090; www.aidangillformen.com).

Celebrate old-school New Orleans culture with House of the Rising Sun (yellow) and Absinthe (green) soaps by Sweet Olive Soap Works, $5.25 each at Branch Out (2022 Magazine St., 371-5913; www.branchoutshop.com).

For the guy on the go, NOLA Gent cleansing sugar scrub combines shea butter and ground bamboo to exfoliate and moisturize, $21.99 at Lakeside Shopping Center (3301 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 835-1777; www. noflareonline.com).

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CHET POURCIAU DESIGN 3652 Magazine Street

New Orleans LA 70115

504-522-CHET(2438)

chetpourciaudesign.com

INVITES YOU TO

WHITE NOW S AT U R D AY, A U G U S T 4 . 6 - 9 P. M . F E AT U R I N G T H E W O R K O F K E V I N K L I N E Catch Chet Chat on Saturdays @ 5:30 p.m. on WLAE-TV with NEW Episodes @ 9:00 p.m. the 3rd Wednesday of each month Also, watch Chet on WVUE Fox 8 on Tuesdays @ 12:30 p.m. & Fridays @ 8:15 a.m. @chetpourciau

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“Chet Chat” by Chet Pourciau Design

HOLDREN BUILT HIS FIRST WORKSHOP FROM THE REMNANTS OF SALVAGED HOMES. PHOTO BY VALORIE POLMER

CUE IN

HOME

PERSONALITY CARPENTER MAT THEW HOLDREN TAKES HIS INSPIR ATION FROM THE CIT Y HE LIVES IN AND THE WOOD HE SHAPES.

BY N I C O L E KOS T ER | PH OTOS BY AU B R E Y EDWA R DS a u g u s t. 2 0 1 2 < < <

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HOME

CUE IN LEFT: HOldreN CreATed THIS CUSTOM CAbINeTry FrOM SAlVAged WINdOWS. BELOW: SAlVAged HArdWAre SerVeS AS A dOOr PUll.

rom ornate corbels to intricate brackets, the woodwork decorating New Orleans homes is a thing of beauty. One can spend a whole day strolling by double shotguns with candy-colored doors and shutters or riding the St. Charles Avenue streetcar and watching mansions slide by like images in a flipbook. Matthew Holdren, a carpenter and woodworker who creates one-of-a-kind designs from salvaged material, has observed that many homes feature unique woodwork which makes them stand out from their counterparts. “I love wooden houses,” Holdren says. “It’s amazing that each house was redecorated over time by different people. [I] really break down and think about how much skill and artistry went into creating these homes and the decorative woodwork, which stands out the most.” The son of a carpenter (his father) and an antiques store owner (his mother), Holdren grew up in Vermont. “My mother is very much into Country Living magazine and all that kind of aesthetic,” says Holdren, who became a carpenter at age 17. His furniture echoes the simple, country life characteristic of his home up North, which is countered by Holdren’s minimal, even sleek design aesthetic. Playing on the idea of old versus new has always been on Holdren’s mind. He moved to Philadelphia after a few years of college. “I was a carpenter there, and I was in a band in my early 20s,” Holdren says. “In between touring I would work on the side.” For the past three years, he has built his business one piece at a time. “When I came down here, I was working Uptown restoring historical

F

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SHOP OUR SALE NOW 50-75% OFF

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COUTURE STYLE, REALISTIC PRICING The Market @ Chenier • 1901 Highway 190 • Suite 24 • Mandeville 985.674.6994 • www.oliviercouture.com • info@oliviercouture.com a u g u s t. 2 0 1 2 < < <

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HOME

CUE IN RIGHT: HOLDREN IN THE BEDROOM ABOVE HIS SHOP. PHOTO BY VALORIE POLMER. BELOW: BUILT FOR THE GREEN PROJECT’S FURNITURE COMPETITION, THIS HEART PINE ROCKER FEATURES A WOVEN COPPER SEAT AND PORCELAIN DOORKNOBS ON THE ARM RESTS.

BELOW: KEYHOLE PENDANT LAMPS CRAFTED FROM BRASS DOOR PLATES.

homes,” he says. “I needed a piece of furniture for my room, and I built it. And then I built one for a friend, and it just kind of took off from there.” Dining room tables, desks and chairs comprise the menagerie of pieces in his Uptown shop, though soon he will move to a new location in Bywater. Holdren spends his days and nights scavenging salvage yards and city Dumpsters for materials. “The more serious you get about your business, the more you always have to be thinking about your future and making sure you have a good supply,” Holdren says. “I’m always keeping an inventory in the back of my mind. [I’m] always looking for materials.” He frequents The Green Project, where employees keep him in mind when new materials come in. “The salvage places have more specific, specialty items that are hard for me to find in Dumpsters or get from contractors,” Holdren says. Each of Holdren’s pieces incorporates reclaimed materials. Recently, he completed a pantry in a Garden District home. The entire wall of asymmetric cabinets was made from old windows he cut and measured by hand. “I made my own model, and I figured out a way to interlock them and make it like a mixed puzzle piece work,” Holdren says. “I used reclaimed flooring and old closet boards on the outside.” The pantry wall was a combination of his ideas and his clients’. “They showed me a Dutch designer’s work, and we came up with an idea together,” Holdren says. “I do a lot of back-and-forth projects like this where the client kind of has a vision but they want me to push forward

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with my aesthetic as well.” For the past three years Holdren has entered the Salvations contest held by The Green Project at The Shops at Canal Place. This year he won Best in Show for his A-Line chair. The design consists of just a plank of wood with no arms. “My chairs are my most artistic and sculptural pieces. There I can be the most creative,” Holdren says. The Aubrey chair has the same modern feel as the A-line chair, but the addition of arms and one other item make it stand out: Holdren used an old burlap coffee sack to cover the back of the chair. “I got about 400 of those sacks from a demo contractor,” he says. “They came out of the original French Market coffee factory in the Warehouse District.” Holdren says the Aubrey chair is emblematic of “this ongoing struggle of my love for country living and rustic furniture — where I started from — versus my love for modernism. I’m continually working toward that.” For Holdren, the more minimal the piece, the more modern it looks. Most of Holdren’s business comes from etsy. com, a retail website where artists sell their work. A friend of his recommended he sell a dresser on the site, and then sales caught on. “For sure the Internet and technology have helped me,” Holdren says. “I get about 75 percent of my business from Etsy. I’ll get clients from all over the country. It’s been a blessing.” Holdren was a craft vendor at the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival this year, selling out all

CUE IN

HOME

LEFT: THE A-LINE CHAIR IS MADE OF BARGEBOARD. BELOW: A SIX-FOOT WOODEN GUN MADE FOR ARTIST SKYLAR FEIN.

There is a skill to working with reclaimed materials. You really have to respect and understand the material you’re working with.” THIS BAR DOUBLES AS A KITCHEN ISLAND.

of his chairs. “That is an extreme amount of advertising and exposure,” he says. “It’s like three years of free advertising and a constant flow of people coming through.” In preparation for Jazz Fest, he set aside two weeks to build chairs and make a mock-up of his booth. The booth was reflective of Holdren and the material he used, which won him the Best Display award. The best part about the experience was meeting other artists and getting feedback from all the people, Holdren says. “I don’t get to meet a lot of my clients. You’re in your shop, you’re doing your work and you don’t know what people are going to think of your work. And then to be in an environment where you have a constant flow of people coming through saying ‘Oh, I like the way this chair feels on my back,’ or ‘I feel like this seat could be a little longer’ is very rewarding.” Other highlights on Holdren’s resume include the design of two Magazine Street stores: Defend New Orleans and Friend are both outfitted with his shelves, case, tables and counters. This line of work calls for serious dedication, Holdren says. Working long hours doing physical labor can be hard, but a sense of passion lessens the burden. “I really love what I’m doing and admire the material that I use, where it came from,” Holdren says. “I love to tell that story and history of each piece.” The distinct flaws in reclaimed material imbue each piece of furniture with its own personality. “Every piece is going to be different no matter what, and each piece of wood has its own character and irregularities,” he says. “There is a skill to working with reclaimed materials. You really have to respect and understand the material you’re working with.”

LEFT: MATTHEW HOLDREN FLANKED BY THE TOOLS OF HIS TRADE.

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A LIVING

DOLL GET ALL DOLLED UP IN FLIRTY FROCKS BY NICOLE KOSTER

ANNALISE FULL-SKIRTED, BELTED DRESS, $122 AT A GIRL IS A GUN (6010 MAGAZINE ST., 891-4475; WWW.AGIRLISAGUN.COM).

BETTY DRESS BY TO THE NINES, $179 AT POP CITY MAGAZINE STREET (3109 MAGAZINE ST., 8954102; WWW.POPCITYNOLA.COM).

JESSICA SIMPSON DRESS, $128 AT HEMLINE MAGAZINE STREET (3308 MAGAZINE ST., 269-4005; WWW.SHOPHEMLINE.COM).

NICOLE MILLER MAXI DRESS, $137 AT HEMLINE MAGAZINE STREET.

GINGHAM SWING DRESS WITH HALTER, $92 AT A GIRL IS A GUN.

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CORAL DRESS WITH PETER PAN COLLAR, $85 AT LOLA BOUTIQUE (622 S. CARROLLTON AVE., 301-9410).

BLUE SHIFT DRESS WITH RUCHING, $25 AT ARMOIRE (4222 MAGAZINE ST., SUITE A, 304-3537; WWW.ARMOIREBOUTIQUE.COM).

CYNTHIA ROWLEY DRESS, $79.99 AT UNITED APPAREL LIQUIDATORS (518 CHARTRES ST., 301-4437; WWW.SHOPUAL.COM)

WRAP DRESS BY TO THE NINES, $179 AT POP CITY MAGAZINE STREET.

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Just in time for lazy afternoons at the pool, our acrylic “crystal” from Italy.

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HomE

BUILT IN STYLE

office

SpacE

built-in desks use space efficiently and help boost productivity.

BY LEE CuTrONE

ver tried to work from home only to become distracted by the disheveled stack of papers in front of you or the thousand other things that need to be done around the house? A built-in workspace that’s attractive and wellorganized can add to your home’s value while boosting your day-to-day productivity. “The No. 1 thing I suggest is that you have a space that isn’t part of another room,” says Kay Morrison, owner of The Occasional Wife, which sells Elfa desk components. “People often work out of their kitchen or they don’t use their home office because [it’s located] in a part of the house where nobody goes. You need to know the space is for work and you should keep it close to where you gather so you’ll utilize it.” Morrison directs clients to choose a space near the kitchen rather than in it so they can be close to the center of activity but still have a modicum of privacy. An unused nook, such as a recessed area between windows, also works well. Morrison advises clients to begin with a consultation when planning their built-in desks. At Bluebag, a local design, delivery and installation service for IKEA products, customers can design their own spaces or work with Bluebag’s architects and design consultants for a flat rate. “People who come to us are usually familiar with IKEA products,” says Bluebag owner Mehmet Ergelen. “But if you’re designing a home office or kitchen, you’re probably going to require our assistance.” Because IKEA’s modular product lines are made to be combined, there’s no shortage of design permutations. The company’s streamlined, minimalist style is well-suited to homeowners who want a less-is-more look. “A lot of the demand is driven by technology, which is making paper obsolete,” Ergelen says. Instead of bookshelves and cabinets, Ergelen’s clients tend to opt for features like mobile peds — small storage units that fit beneath the desk — and inconspicuous cable management accessories like desk-top boxes and shelves. Elfa and IKEA desk components can be used freestanding or built-in. But built-in desks do have a big advantage: They make the most of small spaces by utilizing vertical square footage. “In

e

wallpaper and accessories liven up a work space and tie it in to the rest of the home’s decor. photo courtesy of containerstore.com.

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vintage-inspired women's clothing & accessories for work, play, night, day sizes XS–2X

Open noon to six every day but Sunday. 6010 Magazine Street (near State Street) New Orleans • (504) 891-GIRL (4475)

agirlisagun.com

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BUILT IN STYLE

HOME

PAGE 25

Organizing Tips From Mehmet Ergelen and Kay Morrison

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

U-shaped desks take advantage of corner spaces and help define multiple work zones. Consider using items outside of their classification. Kitchen cabinetry can work equally well in an office space. Look for pieces with hidden cable outlets and rear compartments for keeping cables organized and out of sight. Place task lamps opposite your writing hand to avoid shadows. Decorative overlays like those available through myoverlays.com can be used to personalize your space. Keep your desk clean. Make a cleaning checklist to remind yourself of your weekly home office cleaning. If you have a small desk, keep bulkier items like computer towers and printers on the floor or on a small side table. Prioritize desk accessories by keeping items like pens and memo pads at close range. Keep less frequently used items in a drawer.

ELFA DESK COMPONENTS, AVAILABLE AT THE OCCASIONAL WIFE, CAN BE USED FOR FREESTANDING OR BUILT-IN WORK AREAS. PHOTO COURTESY OF CONTAINERSTORE.COM.

You can take that decorative flair that you have in every other room of the house and bring it to your office.”

New Orleans, storage space is so limited,” Morrison says. “Many times we suggest the only way to go is up.” Elfa components are made to pop out at any time, so they can be added or taken away as needs change. They also can be taken apart when a client moves. For creative inspiration, Ergelen refers homeowners to several websites: IKEAhackers.net, where IKEA customers post their projects, and Panyl.com for a panoply of colorful and monochromatic ideas. Morrison stresses that a built-in workspace ought to be as visually pleasing as it is functional. “[Built-in] products are not dull and drab anymore,” she says. “You can take that decorative flair that you have in every other room of

the house and bring it to your office. There are so many fun products. Make it an extension of your house. It can be just as pretty as your living room.” To personalize your desk’s look and tie your work area in with the rest of your decor, use patterned wallpaper behind the shelves, bring in a fashionable chair or light fixture, and accessorize with vases, boxes and mementos. If disorganization becomes a problem again, there’s a fix for that too. “We hope we create a functional and organized system so that it’s easy to follow through and keep it that way,” says Morrison, who has many clients who use her organizational services on a regular basis. “But we can also go back and tweak it to keep it that way.”

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SHOPPING

CUE K I D S

BACK TO

A plaid shirt, $48, and dark denim jeans, $70, can be dressed up or down and worn during any season, both at Pippen Lane (2929 Magazine St., 269-0106; www.pippenlane.com).

COOL

CHIC CLOTHES AND STYLISH SUPPLIES MAKE BACK TO SCHOOL AS EASY AS ABC, 123. BY M EG A N B R A D EN - P ER RY

Insulated, machine-washable lunchboxes made of heavy-duty nylon might last until college, $34 at Pippen Lane.

Junior fashionistas will love decorating their lockers with magnetic accessories like these flowers, $7.99, bins, $11.99, wallpaper, $22.99, and chandeliers, $29.99; all at Magic Box Toys (5508 Magazine St., 899-0117; www.magicboxneworleans.com).

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Uptown and Old Metairie SWAP BOUTIQUE has every designer label you can think of, in one little shop. Including: Gucci, Cynthia Steffe, Theory, Rebecca Taylor, Marc Jacobs, Chloe. Great deals. Every day.

designer

consignment gnment clothes • bags • accessories

visit us to shop or consign 7716 maple

street and 115 metairie road 504.304.6025 • swapboutique.com

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Even stuffed with a fleece blanket and pillow, this bag fits easily into a preschoolerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cubby, $36 at Angelique Kids (5519 Magazine St., 899-8992; www.angeliquekids.com).

A snazzy retro print makes this shirt a standout for boys, $30 at Angelique Kids.

CUE K I D S

SHOPPING

Make homework more fun with pens by Cupcakes & Cartwheels, $4 each at Angelique Kids.

This floral dress, $39, looks cute solo or paired with pink leggings, $24, both at Angelique Kids.

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New Orleans Gambit Weekly - 1/4 Pg CUE - 4.42” x 5.33”

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of

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CUE TIPS

SHOPPING

SPARK UP BY N I C O L E KO S T ER

FRIENDSHIP BRACELETS BY GYPSIES & DEBUTANTES, $44 EACH AT HATTIE SPARKS.

hile attending graduate school in art history at Tulane University, Texas native Hattie Collins Moll dreamed of opening a retail shop. Four months ago, she created Hattie Sparks (714 Adams St., 304-5975; www.hattiesparks. com), a boutique specializing in goods by independent Southern designers like Jolie & Elizabeth and Ellen L Jewelry. “I saw a niche in the retail market here,” Moll says. “This store is just an accumulation of all my passions: shopping, interior design and meeting new people.” The shop carries dresses, jeans, tops, accessories and art. There are home accessories like embroidered pillows by Jonathan Adler and locally made candles and mugs. “I got into interior design while I was in college, so having more home items is something I want to improve on in the store,” Moll says. Every other Friday there is a “payday discount, since lots of people are paid on Fridays,” she says. From 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday and Friday, July 19-20, the store hosts a trunk show with The Blues Jean Bar. “It’s important to keep money in the city economy,” Moll says. “I’ve built relationships with customers, designers and people in the community. I get girls who come in from (ages) 17 to 70.”

W

HATTIE SPARKS CARRIES GOODS BY MANY INDEPENDENT, LOCAL DESIGNERS.

TOY STORY hen Melissa Bossola Beese’s first son was born 14 weeks prematurely, she was plunged into a crash course in children’s developmental milestones. “I was never allowed to buy the same toys other parents (bought),” Beese says. “Kids born three-and-a-half months premature aren’t supposed to be able to do half of what other kids do. So I worked through sensory development issues and really learned about milestones.” Beese applied that knowledge when starting Little Pnuts (267-0873; http://littlepnuts.com), a subscription-based toy program. Enrolled parents receive a box of three to five toys every three months, and each package is geared toward the child’s stage of development. “They’re eco-friendly, non-battery-operated toys that focus on cause and effect, helping a child learn through play, imagination and creativity,” she says. “We want to get kids back into imagining and creating an environment with a toy.” Plans start at $25 a month, and the majority of the toys are hand-assembled and made with natural materials. “These are toys that I and my husband grew up with, (made by) family-owned European companies that have been around for centuries,” Beese says. “We’ve sent packages to people, and we got word back (from a mother): She said as soon as the box was open, her child could not stop playing with them. She says they’re amazing, brilliant and beautiful toys.” A California native, Beese moved to New Orleans in 2009. In addition to basing her business in the city, she also works with nonprofit Lighthouse for the Blind and plants a tree with every Little Pnuts subscription. “We’re trying to bring business back to New Orleans and bring a better earth for our children,” she says. “We want to be able to provide for others and be socially aware. It’s important to have those fundamentals for our children.”

BY M I S SY W I L K I N S O N

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SUBSCRIPTION TOY SERVICE LITTLE PNUTS DELIVERS HANDMADE TOYS THAT PROMOTE A CHILD’S BRAIN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT. a u g u s t. 2 0 1 2 < < <

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SALE STARTS J ULY 17- 21

SUMMER

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We accept appliances, cabinets, furniture, building materials, lighting and more. All Donations are tax deductible and, we offer free, easy pick-up! Call 504.943.2240

50-70% OFF SELECT I TEMS

All proceeds from the ReStore go to support the New Orleans Habitat for Humanity.

714 Adams Street 504.304.5975 ( B E H I N D S TA R B U C K S AT M A P L E )

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GO GO

LUSTERPHILE

BEAUTY

GADGET GLAM

GET GORGEOUS WITH THESE GIZMOS. BY LINDSEY DARNELL

Olay Professional Pro-X Advanced Cleansing System Olay’s Professional Pro-X Advanced Cleansing System is light in the hand and on the pocketbook. The Pro-X features a two-speed micro-massage brush that rotates to extract dirt and exfoliate. The kit comes with a fragrancefree, micro-bead cleanser that works with the rotating motion to polish skin. After 60 seconds, skin is clean and ready to absorb a moisturizer — $29.99 at Rite Aid (citywide; www.riteaid.com).

ANSR: Beam

NuFace Trinity The NuFace Trinity handheld toning device uses microcurrents to tone facial muscles, increase circulation and promote elastin and collagen production. “As we age, our (facial) muscles either elongate or shorten just like any other muscles in the body,” says NuFace founder Carol Cole. “By stimulating the muscles, the microcurrent … actually tones the face, making it appear more lifted, without surgery.” Equipped with a timer, a skin sensor and a rechargeable battery, the instrument also helps beauty products penetrate beyond the skin’s surface. The head is removable, allowing users to alternate attachable LED therapy. Prior to use, NuFace gel primer should be applied to the treatment area to ensure suitable conductivity — $325 at Earthsavers (Lakeside Shopping Annex, 3301 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Suite 140, Metairie, 835-0225; 3414 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, 985-674-1133; 5501 Magazine St., 899-8555; www.earthsaversonline.com).

ANSR’s Beam blue-and-red light-emitting LEDs treat blemishes and promote skin healing. Recommended for individuals with mild to moderate acne or aging concerns like fine lines and wrinkles, the two-in-one light therapy treatment begins beneath the skin, unlike topical creams. Blue LEDs eradicate acne-causing bacteria while red LEDs minimize redness, improve texture and tone, and diminish the appearance of pores, fine lines and wrinkles — $170 at The Woodhouse Day Spa (4030 Canal St., 482-6652; www.neworleans.woodhousespas.com).

ANSR: Sole Manually pumicing heels can be exhausting. The Sole by ANSR is an easy-to-operate callus remover with a rechargeable motor and a polishing plate, which painlessly removes rough patches. Prepare feet by soaking them in warm water, then glide the cordless device in a circular direction over trouble spots and finish with moisturizer. With regular use for 10 minutes a day, feet no longer will feel like scratchy hooves — $120 at The Woodhouse Day Spa. a u g u s t. 2 0 1 2 < < <

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BranD

feature

fa s h i o n

How to cultivate your own personal style and develop a personal brand

AWARENESS

(ARA) - Look at Kate Middleton, Johnny Depp or Lady Gaga. Whether classic, wacky or sometimes just bizarre, their styles say volumes about who they are, and your style can do the same for you. Personal style is a brand that “communicates who you are without saying a word,” says Michael Watson, fashion instructor at The Art Institute of Charlotte, N.C. Fashion instructors from Art Institutes schools offer tips that will put you well on your way to cultivating a style that is uniquely you.

1. What is your lifestyle? “Establishing and understanding your lifestyle is the biggest step to developing your own personal style,” Watson says. “The more people understand who they are and what they value, will dictate fit, fabrications and different looks in terms of cut.” In order to really understand your lifestyle and key values, Watson recommends asking yourself who you are and what you value; writing down the key points about who you are; and deciding what you want people to know about you: Are you an innovator? Are you creative? Julie Crawley, fashion instructor at The New England Institute of Art, says, “It extends beyond style. What are your hobbies and interests?” She says a good place to start is online. Sites like polyvore. com, olioboard.com or Pinterest allow people to pull images together on mood boards and see what appeals to them. She recommends taking an inventory of not only your closet, but also your home.

2. What is your body type and skin tone? Determine your body type and skin tone. “Everybody’s different,” Watson says. “Everybody’s got different levels of red, blue and yellow undertones to their skin.” Understanding these will help “make sure the personal style is reflected the best on that individual,” he says.

3. Create a signature pieCe or look Think Jackie Kennedy’s iconic suits and sunglasses or Coco Chanel’s understated style with multistrand pearls. These ladies created memorable signature looks. Whether you are a minimalist or carry a specific style of bag, “people will remember this aspect, and it shows who you are,” Watson says. When creating your own signature look, Crawley also recommends finding a designer you like. “When you find out what appeals to you, find out which retailers sell what you’re looking for and stick with that brand,” she says.

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4. there’s no room for Clutter Cleaning out your closet and gathering together items to donate to charity can be a daunting task. But it can also be one that reaps rewards, including removing clutter and making space for items that better reflect your personal style. Watson and Crawley say this is an important step. “Go through your closet and purge — get rid of things that don’t fit,” Watson says. Crawley agrees. “If you don’t like it, haven’t worn it in a year, or aren’t excited to put it on, don’t keep it,” she says.

5. put your knoWledge to Work When shopping Crawley says having a distinct personal style will help make you a more educated and astute shopper. In the current economy, retailers aren’t buying as much, and they know which brands are going to sell, Crawley says. Consumers are also scaling back, making better decisions and buying less.

wHen building your wardrobe, tHink about wHicH colors work best witH your skin tone.

Watson says when shopping, ask yourself the following questions: “Does it fit into my lifestyle?” and “Is it appropriate for my body and skin type?” If the answers are yes, buy it. “Understanding who you are becomes a factor in your decision-making,” she says.

6. don’t fall viCtim to trends Trends are one trap that can derail your style. According to Watson, consumers fear they are missing out on something and there is a “misconception that if it is a trend, you have to adopt it.” He says at any time there are seven to 10 strong fashion trends happening, and you don’t have to participate in all of them. “Understand that you can pick and choose from the trends,” he says. “You can just take a piece from the trend, instead of adopting the whole look.” A great example would be a bag that incorporates the trend.

YOU & IMPROVED

BEAUTY

THE BLOOM

OF YOUTH BY MEG FARRIS

strogen protects women from bone fractures, breast cancer and other diseases — and it’s responsible for a glowing, youthful complexion, too. While controversy regarding the safety of hormone replacement therapy is ongoing, there are now nonprescription creams containing plant estrogens, or phytoestrogens. Creators of the creams say they are safe, effective ways to reduce wrinkles and thicken the skin. “We’ve known for a very long time that estrogens are very good for the aging of the skin,” says dermatologist Dr. Mary Lupo. “It prevents it. It helps reverse it.” Prior to menopause, ovaries make estrogen, progesterone and testosterone — hormones important to every cell in the body, including skin cells. Estrogen production and skin collagen levels peak when a woman is in her mid-20s. “Certainly estrogen is very important as your skin ages,” says dermatologist Dr. Patricia Farris. “When a woman’s estrogen drops out, they begin to break down collagen at a fairly rapid rate of about 2 percent per year. If you go with hormone replacement or supplement that estrogen, that collagen breakdown diminishes.” Gynecologist Dr. Rebecca Booth and her sister Cecil Booth, a veteran in the beauty industry, have created VENeffect (www.veneffect.com), a nonprescription skin care line containing plant estrogens. “The phytoestrogens are naturally anti-inflammatory. They are antioxidants,” Cecil says. “They come from some of the healthiest foods that you eat, so they are generally thought of as little miracle ingredients.” In Rebecca’s book, The Venus Week, she explains that estrogen levels soar just prior to ovulation, creating attractive skin, high energy and mood, a sharper brain and decreased appetite. She says there are more estrogen receptors in the facial skin than on breast and thigh skin. “That’s simply because Mother Nature again wants us to reflect our aesthetic in our face, and so much of the aesthetic is wrapped around fertility,” Rebecca says. “So a women actually does receive that gift of a glow.” The Booth sisters say women can use VENeffect products to boost estrogen beginning in their late 20s, when levels of the hormone begin to decline, and continuing through their menopausal years. The Booths say studies and tests on their patients using VENeffect show it works and is safe. Unlike prescription creams, VENeffect’s plantbased estrogen cream brightens the skin, hitting receptors in two layers, and can be used by all women. However, other hormone doctors say plant estrogen is not nearly as effective as the human estrogen in prescription creams like Estrace and Premarin. Actress Suzanne Somers, 65, has said hormone therapy is her secret to remaining young-looking. “I

E

THE VENEFFECT SKINCARE LINE, AVAILABLE ONLINE OR AT NEIMAN MARCUS, UTILIZES NONPRESCRIPTION, PLANT-BASED ESTROGEN TO RESTORE SKIN’S YOUTHFUL APPEARANCE.

call it restoration versus deterioration,” Somers says. “(Hormone therapy) puts back what we lost in the aging process.” However, controversy surrounding hormone replacement therapy led many women to stop taking prescription hormones after menopause. That’s when dermatologists began seeing women’s skin become dry, wrinkled and thin — fast. Now, doctors are reconsidering the importance of “body identical,” nonoral hormones for health and beauty, especially when it comes to the skin. “I’m a big proponent of all-over estrogen because you get benefits,” says Dr. Shane French, an obstetrician and gynecologist at Ochsner. Studies published by the International and European Menopause Societies find post-menopausal women on hormones experience many health benefits, including lower rates of heart disease, belly fat, dementia, stroke and diabetes. They also live longer, with a 40 percent reduction in dying early from any cause. “There is a minimal increased risk of breast can

cer associated with estrogen therapy on a long-term basis, but there are also studies that show it actually helps with breast cancer as far as preventing it,” French says. Doctors still disagree about hormone replacement, but Mother Nature makes it clear that estrogen has anti-aging properties — and not just on the face. “It (affects) the skin on your hands, the skin on your feet,” French says. Dermatologists point out that estrogen creams are not a substitute for the numberone wrinkle fighter, prescription retinoids such as Retin-A, Renova, Tazorac and Differin. But the topical treatments can be used together. “The (VENeffect line) is a higher platform to raise awareness through something that is safe and effective, and an easy way to help give women understanding that hormones are not their enemy,” Rebecca says. Look for Meg Farris’ Medical Watch reports weeknights on WWL-TV Channel 4 and anytime on wwltv.com. a u g u s t. 2 0 1 2 < < <

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pERspECTIVEs

shop dogs

Piggy

TExT AND PHOTOS By

NICOLE CARROLL

my

favorite things ... bow TIEs bElly Rubs ChEEsE playIng wITh my CousIn fInn papER

nside a Garden District skating rink-turned-shopping center, a French bulldog puppy gnaws anything he can get his mouth on. “He’s still teething,” owner Cecile Hardy says of Piggy, the newest family member of NOLA Couture (The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., Suite 6, 319-5959; www.nolacouture.com). Hardy initially thought a French bulldog living in New Orleans should have a quintessentially French name. But visitors often commented on how much the pup resembled a little pig. Hardy, whose own nickname happens to be Piggy, worried that if she bequeathed the name to the pup, she’d lose it for herself. She tried to find a different name, and NOLA Couture held a naming contest which produced suggestions like Pomme Frite, Cochon and Pierre. None of the names stuck, and Hardy no longer could deny her dog’s swine-like features and mannerisms. “He’s 100 percent, totally just like a little pig. It’s a character-driven name,” says Hardy, who thinks Piggy’s name may cause an identity crisis down the road. “A couple of my mom’s friends … both said to me, ‘Oh, what are you going to do when he finds out he’s not really a pig?’” Hardy says, laughing. “They’re like, ‘Well, start looking for a dog therapist.’” Because he’s still a puppy, Piggy spends a fair amount of his day sleeping. But he loves to play and entertain visitors from neighboring shops, some of whom visit multiple times a day. Like most dogs, he loves a good belly rub. “He’ll put his head down on the ground and stick his

I

little booty in the air, and just kind of halfway turn over so you can get right to his belly,” Hardy says. “And he smiles when you pet him on his belly.” Hardy opened NOLA Couture in August 2006 in an effort to be a part of New Orleans’ recovery from Hurricane Katrina and the levee failures. She wanted to highlight New Orleans culture with accessories featuring whimsical local motifs like oysters, second lines and fleurs-de-lis. She used the profits to contribute to rebuilding efforts, including those of the Audubon Zoo. NOLA Couture creates accessories for men and women, including ties, hats, ID cases and tote bags as well as collars for dogs. The line is always growing. “We listen to our customers, and they tell us, like, ‘We want beach towels,’” Hardy says. “So now we have beach towels in development.” NOLA Couture products are sold at Perlis, Feet First and other local stores, but their appeal extends beyond the city limits. The line can be found in stores throughout much of the South and along the Eastern seaboard, as far north as Nantucket. In addition to signature New Orleans designs, NOLA Couture has a variety of coastal designs that have a more universal. “We have a new nautical tie that’s actually a Lake Pontchartrain tie, with the lighthouse that’s back at Lake Ponchartrain,” Hardy says. “But stores all up and down the East Coast buy it because it’s a nautical-themed tie. So while we tie it back to New Orleans, other people see it as things that they like, too.” a u g u s t. 2 0 1 2 < < <

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Please Visit Our New Showroom!

1818 Veterans Blvd. Metairie, LA 70005

Next to First American Bank on the corner of Bonnabel & Veterans Blvd. Now Open on Saturday • 9am-12pm

nordickitchens.com • 504.888.2300 • fax: 504.888.1911


Cue August 2012