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tupelo Greater

March 2011

a lifestyle magazine for northeast mississippi

magazine

Wedding Register

2011

A night at the

Junior Auxiliary Charity Ball free

Luxury Homes of Greater Tupelo

Now you can read Greater Tupelo Magazine online. Visit our new website: tupelomag.com

Greater Tupelo Magazine

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from the

editor

Welcome to our spring bridal edition of Greater Tupelo Magazine. Of course, we have regular stuff included, but the brides are the showcase of this edition and we have some beautiful weddings to show you. I am proud to say we have our new website online. The new link is tupelomag.com. Please take an opportunity and give it a look. We think you’ll like it. We have our virtual magazine up there, so it is now available for everyone to read. A special thank you goes out to all our advertisers. Without them, we would not be able to provide our readers this magazine freely. It’s very important that you let them know you saw their ad in Greater Tupelo Magazine and please patronize them whenever possible. Thank you so much for picking up this copy of our magazine, and remember, your comments and suggestions are always welcome. May God continue to Bless our wonderful city. Wesley Wells

Greater Tupelo Magazine: “Created by Tupelo people for Tupelo people!”

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contents cover:

Wedding Register march 2011

2011

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inside this issue: 10 Tupelo Weddings.................................................... 11 Letter from the editor.........................................

Twenty Years of Success: Downtown Tupelo’s Future Is Looking Brighter Every Day.................................................

44 tupelo dining guide................................................ 46 The Great American Grill...................................... 47 Romie’s Barbeque opens new location............... 48 March is Colon Cancer Awareness Month........ 50 Something Old, Something New........................... 52 the art of sharing a meal..................................... 54 taste of tupelo....................................................... 55 gum tree museum blue tie affair......................... 56 spirit kicks off new year with biggest loser... 57 junior auxiliary charity ball............................... 58

Inside Luxury Homes:

Luxury Homes of Greater Tupelo

64

671 Highland Circle.........................

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3108 Plantation Circle.....................

Greater Tupelo Magazine

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tupelo Greater

march 2011

Published By Legend Publishing Company

magazine

Publisher Wesley Wells Photography Stephanie Rhea | Wesley Wells | Katie Hendricks Graphic Design Fran Sherman Advertising Sales Meghan Ray | Wesley Wells Contributing Writers Cristal Cody | Michael Harrelson | Patricia Neely-Dorsey | Wesley Wells

on the cover

Emily Grace Nunnelee and Morris King “Trey” Thompson, III Photography by Stephanie Rhea Greater Tupelo Magazine is published bi-monthly by Legend Publishing Company, Copyright 2010, Legend Publishing Company. Reproduction without written consent from the publisher is strictly prohibited. GTM is not responsible for unsolicited materials. We welcome your comments. Letters to the editor should be mailed to: Greater Tupelo Magazine P.O. Box 1388 | Tupelo, MS 38802 „

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Want to keep up with lifestyles in Tupelo and Northeast Mississippi? Subscribe to Greater Tupelo Magazine. Get two full years (12 issues) of Greater Tupelo Magazine for just $35, or you can get a one-year subscription (6 issues) for $20. Just fill out the form below and send your check or money order to the address above or subscribe online at: www.tupelomag.com

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photos courtesy stephanie rhea photography

tupelo areaweddings

Emily Grace Nunnelee and Morris King “Trey” Thompson, III

E

mily Grace Nunnelee and Morris King “Trey” Thompson, III were married at six o’clock in the evening August 21, 2010 at Calvary Baptist Church in Tupelo. The bride’s parents are Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Alan Nunnelee of Tupelo. The groom is the son of The Right Reverend and Mrs. Morris King Thompson, Jr. of New Orleans, Louisiana.

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tupelo areaweddings

The bride is the granddaughter of Mrs. Patricia Reed Bedells and Mr. Philip Dring Bedells of Clinton and Mr. and Mrs. Pat Thomas Nunnelee of Tupelo. The groom is the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Morris King Thompson of Jackson, the late Mrs. Jean Walters Thompson, and the late Mr. and Mrs. Warren Lyon Roper. Dr. Bryant Barnes, the bride’s former pastor at Calvary, performed the double-ring ceremony. Nuptial music was provided by Kyle Young, Kara Young, Maegan Bedells, and a trio of violins, The Fiddlers Three. Her two brothers joined the violin with guitar and mandolin to play the bride’s processional of “Be Thou My Vision.” The sanctuary was filled with urns of white hydrangeas, gladiolas, lilies, daisies, bells of Ireland and roses. Given in marriage by her father, the bride wore a bridal gown of white re-embroidered Alencon lace embellished with crystals and pearls. It featured a sweetheart neckline and dropped waistline from which the full A-line skirt cascaded into a chapel length scalloped train. She wore a veil made by her grandmother that featured crystals edging the entire veil and attached to a comb of cascading crystals. The bride carried a hand tied bouquet of white roses, hydrangeas and calla lilies. She was adorned with a beautiful diamond bracelet given to her as a gift from her parents and a pair of antique earrings once worn by her grandmother. Attending the bride as her matron of honor was her sisterin-law, Kemily Weimer Nunnelee. Chelsea Ruth Hussey served as maid of honor while the groom’s sister, Virginia Grace Thompson, Casey Garland Smith, April Michelle Windham and Natalie Blair Bullard accompanied her as bridesmaids. The bridesmaids wore knee length hydrangea blue dresses of polished cotton and carried bouquets of calla lilies wrapped in white organza ribbon.

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Some of the bride’s cousins were involved in the ceremony. Cecelia Clinton and Sarah Grace Clinton were flower girls. Sydney Bedells served as the bride’s proxy and read scripture. Patrick Givens also read scripture. Peyton Givens, Piper Givens and Bari Kaitlyn Bedells were program attendants. Natalie Bedells and Isabelle Moseley, cousin of the groom, kept the guest registries. Brittany Kolb and Paige Prisock, the bride’s Delta Gamma little sisters, were at the entry to give each Delta Gamma a cream rose and have them escorted to a reserved section for all of her sorority sisters. The groom’s father Morris King Thompson, Ju-

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tupelo areaweddings

nior, served as best man. The groomsmen included Drew Austin Grimm, William Marshall Jones, Sebron Lee Miller, and the bride’s brothers, Nathan Daniel Nunnelee and Reed Thomas Nunnelee. Ushers included Matthew Tyler Nunnelee, Clarke Richardson Wise, Joseph Adam Threet and Nicholas Edward Papas. The groom’s attendants wore traditional black formalwear and had miniature calla lilies as boutonnieres. Following the ceremony, a reception was held in the BancorpSouth Arena. Guests were entertained by the music of The Kathryn Stallins Band and enjoyed a delicious buffet meal catered by Rita Robinson. Favorite selections of the meal included roasted pork tenderloin, creamed potato bar, chilled asparagus, marinated tomatoes, chilled marinated zucchini and hot yeast rolls. Also a “South of the Mason Dixon Line” menu of southern fried chicken tenders, ham dainties, crawfish dip, potato salad, pecan praline cheese dip and black-eyed pea salad. Of course sweet tea was served along with ice cold fresh fruit slushes and the bride’s number one request, Snow Cones. Florist Susan Phillips of Susan’s Flowers beautifully accessorized each table with blooms in shades of white, light blue and apple green arranged in silver and crystal containers of varying sizes. On Friday, the bride treated her attendants to a morning at Belle Ame’ Salon for manicures and pedicures. After-

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wards, in keeping with the casual spa theme, her aunts hosted a luncheon at Old Venice Pizza Company. That evening the groom’s parents hosted an elegant dinner at Park Heights Restaurant. During the dinner many members of the two families as well as the wedding party spoke warmly of the couple and toasted them with much happiness. On Saturday morning the groom treated his attendants to a round of golf at Big Oaks Golf Club. The bride and her attendants were guests at a “pajama breakfast” at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Jeff Hamm, Jr. Also hosting was Mrs. Laura Hamm Gullett, a childhood friend of the bride. After honeymooning in Georgia at The Cloister, the couple is at home in Starkville, Mississippi, where they are both employed at the University. GT

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photos courtesy stephanie rhea photography

tupelo areaweddings

Katese Lashun Black and Martice Lavar Rutherford

H

Katese Lashun Black and Martice Lavar Rutherford were united in marriage on October 2, 2010, at five o clock in the evening at Fairpark in downtown Tupelo, MS. Bro. Jeffery Bohanna officiated the outside ceremony. igh school sweethearts

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tupelo areaweddings The bride is the daughter of the late Mr. Henry T. Storey and Ms. Dorothy J. Black of Ripley, MS. The groom is the son of Mr. James McDonald and Mrs. Jhonnie Rutherford of Ripley, MS. Matron of Honor was Mrs. Ayla Black Ware, niece of the bride; maid of honor, Omotola Petgrave, best friend of the bride; Bridesmaids were Tracey Barnett, Dominic Edgeston, Brittany Rogers, Cheronda Rutherford , Karrye Pippin , and Brittaney Tate. They wore strapless floor length taffeta gowns in burnt orange with a chocolate brown sash, and carried bouquets of burnt orange roses and orange calla lilies. Honorary Bridesmaids were Sharon Black Gregory, Gwendolyn Morgan, Kizzie Rutherford, Fulanda Morrow, Ashley Clark, Leondria Brown, Rachel Ann Chandler, Michelle Jones, Carissa Jamison, and Jade

Adams. Christin Gates, Tamaria Bolton, Jameshia Graves, Kyra McDonald, Jazmine Walker, Rachel Jenkins, and Courtney Jones. Derrick Tate served as best man. Groomsmen were Demico Black, Lamont Carroll, Larry Gillard, Akeem Lockett, Justin Luster, and James Lewis Rutherford. The bride’s niece, Alexis Morgan, and groom’s nephew, Fred Hamer, served as Jr. Bridesmaid and Jr. Groomsmen, respectively. Kyree Rutherford, nephew of the groom, served as ring bearer, and Paris Morgan, niece of the bride, as flower girl. The ushers were Lenell Black and Sammie Lee Rutherford. The bride escorted by her brother, Terrence Black, wore a taffeta designer gown in ivory. The fitted mermaid

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style gown featured a sweetheart neckline with silver beading and threadwork along the bodice. The dropped waistline met a flowed skirt and covered buttons complimented the back of the gown. Her birdcage veil was detailed with silver beading and tiny pearls and fashioned with a white feather. She carried a bouquet of white roses and baby white hydrangea, with white feather extensions. Nuptial music was provided by Walter Cunningham, saxophonist, and Eddie Goliday, Jr., pianist. The vocalists were Justin Crosby and Karrye Pippin. A rooftop reception at Park Heights followed the ceremony where the bride was serenaded by her sorority sisters of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. Entertainment was provided by Walter Cunningham, saxophonist, and DJ Keith Jones. Sarah Needham Knight, owner of Blissful Creations and good friend to the couple, proved her talents in providing ceremony and reception decor and floral arrangements. Cakes were provided by Sharon Reynolds of Pontotoc, MS. After a honeymoon in Ochos Rios, Jamaica, the couple makes their home in Saltillo, MS. Katese is a registered nurse at NMMC and Martice is employed by Ashley Furniture Company. GT

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photos courtesy marty pettit photography

tupelo areaweddings

Casey Elizabeth Conley and Derik Steele Graves

C

asey Elizabeth

Conley and Derik Steele Graves were united in Holy Matrimony on August 7, 2010 at 6:30 in the evening. Brother Bill Blount officiated the outdoor ceremony held at the home of the bride’s parents in Houlka, Mississippi.

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The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Conley of Houlka; she is the granddaughter of the late Gena Bolton of Fulton, the late Hershal Stone of Wauchula, Florida and the late Ida Mae Conley of Tullahoma, Tennessee. The groom is the son of Donna Graves of Amory and Bob Graves of Dennison, Texas. He is the grandson of the late Mepsene and Don Hardy of Red Bank, Mississippi and the late Mable Colburn of Amory and Bob and Wanda Graves Senior of Sherman, Texas. Escorted by her father, the bride entered a 40’x40’ tent provided by Event Rental of Pontotoc, whose unique design transformed the space into a beautiful wedding chapel. The walls were abundantly adorned with Bells of Ireland, hydrangea, white lilies, and arrangements of gladiolas, blue delphinium, and green and white roses designed by DB Florist of Saltillo. Wedding guests were seated in pews handcrafted locally by the Amish. Cream-colored silk lanterns hung from the trees, lining the pathway leading to a gazebo on the beautifully landscaped property. Casey was breathtaking as she floated down the aisle in an ivory

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chiffon A-line gown. The bodice of this stunning creation was lavishly beaded with crystals and pearls and featured a sunburst pleated skirt, adding a very dramatic flare. For her headpiece Casey chose an organza mesh flower, accented with pearls and feathers to compliment her gown. She carried a bouquet of white hydrangeas, white calla lilies and white roses, hand tied with ivory ribbon, and her great-grandmother’s handkerchief, following the tradition of having something “old.” To accompany seating of the guests, the bride and groom chose the song “Feels like Home” played and sung by Kit Thorn, daughter of singer/songwriter Paul Thorn. The bride came down the aisle to “Forever” by Ben Harper. The couple recited their own vows during the ceremony. Matron of Honor was the bride’s sister, Leslie Posey of Tupelo. Alyssa Tidwell of Amory served as Maid of Honor. Bridesmaids were Madison Posey, niece of the bride; Leslie George, Emily Morris, and Amanda Ponders, all of Tupelo. Flower girl and ring bearer were Chloe and Colby mills, niece and nephew of the groom. The attendants wore short cotton sateen dresses in a beautiful champagne color. Two necklines were featured – jewel and strapless, both with pleated skirts. They carried bouquets of orange gerbera daisies. The groom’s brother, Joey Mills of Amory served as best man. Groomsmen were Brandon Morris of Tupelo; Benjamin Scott, Mark Benedict, Matthew Brown, and Chris Herring, all of Amory. Serving as ushers were Taylor Posey of Tupelo and Robert Weisenfels of Dixon, Tennessee, nephew and cousin of the bride. Following the ceremony, a reception was held at the bride’s parents’ home, where a DVD was shown featuring Casey and Derik’s lives set to an acoustic version of Rod Stewart’s “Forever Young.” The DVD was produced by and presented to the couple by the bride’s aunt, Cindy Ray of Crestview, Florida. Guests also enjoyed dancing to music by the band “Busted Screen Door” and were treated to a barbecue by Flying Pig Catering of Waverly, Tennessee. To commemorate the occasion, beautiful heart-shaped fans engraved with the names of the wedding party, custom huggies and sunglasses were presented to wedding attendees. The couple’s rehearsal dinner was hosted by the groom’s family and held at Hancock House in Okolona. A delicious array of food was provided by Hanks Catering of Columbus and served buffet-style while background music was performed by Kit Thorn, who also sang at the ceremony. On the weekend prior to the wedding a bachelor party was held at the bride’s parents’ vacation home on Kentucky Lake in Tennessee, where the men enjoyed boating and other water activities and ended their weekend with a skydiving adventure. During the same weekend the bachelorette and her close friends enjoyed the attractions in nearby Nashville. The couple was honored with a luau-style shower the week before the wedding, hosted by friends of the groom’s family. After honeymooning in the Bahamas, the couple will reside in Starkville, where Casey is finishing her education at Mississippi State University and Derik is employed by CKB Appraisal in Tupelo. GT

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Greater

tupelo magazine

TuPelo’s ToP 20 Young PRofessionals If you know of a young professional who is making a difference in Tupelo, please let us know. We want to recognize them for their dedication. Requirements: 1. Nominee must be 21-40 years of age. 2. Nominee must be a full-time employee – students are not eligible. 3. Nominees must work in Tupelo/Lee County. Please fill out the form below and return by August 31, 2011 to: Legend Publishing, P.O. Box 1388, Tupelo, MS, 38802 or by email to tupelotop20@tupelomag. com or fax to: 662-840-4903. You may use up to one additional sheet to complete the nomination. Nominations will be judged by an independent panel and winners notified by September 15, 2011. Winners will be featured in the October, 2011 edition of Greater Tupelo Magazine and honored at a luncheon. Name of nominee: ____________________________________________________________________________________ Phone Number:_______________________________________________________________________________________ Mailing Address__________________________________________________________State:_________Zip: _____________ Email_____________________________________________________________________________________________ Place of employment and job title: _________________________________________________________________________ Nominated by: (provide name and contact info)________________________________________________________________ Summary of Nominee’s Work Experience:_____________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________ Summary of Nominee’s Community Involvement:________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________ Summary of Nominees Recognitions/Honors/Awards:_____________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________

tupelo areaweddings

Cristin Rebecca Lindsey and Robert Michael McCoy

C

photos courtesy katie hendricks

ristin

Rebecca

Lindsey Robert Michael

and

McCoy were married at six o’clock in the evening July 10, 2010, at Bethel Baptist Church in Dorsey, Mississippi. The bride’s parents are Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Lindsey of Mooreville, MS. The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Tony DeVargas of Dallas, TX and Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Goodman of Duncan, South Carolina.

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tupelo areaweddings The bride is the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Johnny Kimble of Nettleton and the late Delmer Johnson and the late Mr. and Mrs. Reid Lindsey. The groom is the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Robert McCoy of Okolona, Mrs. Rose DeVargas of Atlanta, GA. Mr. and Mrs. James Goodman of Duncan, SC and Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Harmon of Duncan, SC. Dr. Martin Jameson performed the ceremony. Given in marriage by her father, the bride wore a diamond white Angelique design with silky taffeta and pewter bead work on the bodice and train. Attending the bride as her matron of honor was her sister Leslie Farris. Bridesmaids were Alex Goodman, sister of the groom, April Reich, friend of the bride, Charla Johnson, cousin of the bride, Georgia Goodman, sister of the groom, Andrea Cottongin, friend of the bride, and Erica Freeman, cousin of the bride. The bridesmaids were dressed in a mid-calf length, Tiffany blue, chiffon dress from the Mori Lee collection by Madeline Gardner. They carried a bouquet filled with a variety of beautiful, exotic, tropical flowers, all carefully hand tied by the bride. Emma Farris and Denver McCoy, nieces of the bride and groom, were the flower girls. Maverick and Maddox Farris, Nephews of the bride were the ring bearers. Reed Aldridge served as best man. The groomsmen were Jonathon Yant, friend of the groom, Trent Kelly, friend of the groom, Randy Earnest friend of the groom, Chris McCoy, brother of the groom, Andy Boren, friend of the groom, and Jason Farris, brides’ brother-in-law. The ushers were Bryson Whitmon, Griff Loftis, Gary Johnson, and Austin Williams, all friends of the groom. Program attendants were Jessica and Anna Catherine Steele, cousins of the groom. The guest book attendant was Tiffany Nanney, friend of the bride. Meredith Farris directed the wedding, and the bride’s aunt, Sharon Lindsey decorated the reception area. Following the ceremony, the wedding party was escorted to the church’s Christian Outreach Center where guests enjoyed a deliciously catered buffet provided by an array of the bride’s and groom’s family members. On Friday evening, following rehearsal, the wedding party and closest family and friends were invited to an elegant rehearsal dinner, overlooking the Tombigbee River, hosted by the groom’s father, at the Jamie L. Whitten Center in Fulton, MS. After the beautiful dinner, guests were invited to share special moments experienced with the bride and groom. Many funny moments and tears of happiness were shared. A wedding day lunch was given by the groom’s mother and stepfather. After honeymooning in Destin, Florida the couple now resides in Mooreville, Mississippi. GT

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Laura Hamm and Foster Gullett

A

proposal that began in

Greece

culminated

with the celebration and blessing of marriage for

photos courtesy stephanie rhea photography

Laura Elizabeth Hamm and William Foster Gullett at 6 p.m. on May 22, 2010, at Calvary Baptist Church in Tupelo, Mississippi. Reverend Nathan Tircuit and Dr. David Eldridge officiated.

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tupelo areaweddings The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Jefferson Hamm, Jr. of Tupelo. She is the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Jefferson Hamm, Sr. of Jackson, the late Mr. and Mrs. James Harper Wailes, Jr. and the late Mr. William Richard Meadors, both of Greenwood. The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. William Lawrence Gullett, III of Starkville. He is the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Dumont Hill of Becker, and the late Mr. and Mrs. William Lawrence Gullett of Booneville. Escorted by her father and given in marriage by her parents, the bride entered the sanctuary to a favorite hymn, “Crown Hymn Him With Many Crowns”. Laura was radiant in a strapless ivory empire gown of reembroidered Alencon lace featuring beaded accents and an empire bodice created by Spanish designer Pronovias complimented by her cathedral length silk illusion veil and her mother ‘s pearl jewelry. She carried a classic nosegay of roses, gardenias, and arabacium of

green to white hues with ruscus and geranium leaf. Leslie Hamm served her sister as maid of honor. Bridesmaids were Meredith Beeman, Sara Fletcher, Lydia Rice, Katerina Pappas, Allyson Basden, Megan Hopkins, Rebekah Davis, Elizabeth Gullett, Libbie Thomas, and Joy Powell. The bridesmaids carried nosegays of Italian roses and blue thistle that highlighted their sapphire blue one-shouldered empire silk chiffon gowns. The flower girl was Abbey Quinn. The bride’s proxy was Kelli Lennon. Program attendants were Meredith Lee, Rachel Lee, and Rebecca Page. Bill Gullett served his son as the best man. Groomsmen were Lt. Allen Arant, Joseph Chen, Jeff Hamm III, Lan Holloway, John Harrelson, Ben Lewis, Lt. Brian Page, Aaron Prentice, Jonathan Prudhomme, and usher Adam Haver. Kirby Quinn served as ring bearer. Nuptial music was presented by pianist Reeann Lee, organist Matt Chisholm, guitarist Martin Lee, violinist Amelia Ward, and vocalists Allyson Basden and Garrett Wood. Stephanie Rhea Photography captured the couple’s memorable day, while Tracy Proc-

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tor created the perfect atmosphere for the sacred ceremony and festive reception. Cakes by Rita created the delicious bride and grooms cakes. On the day of the wedding, friends hosted a “Pajama Bridesmaid Brunch” at the home of Dr. and Mrs. Martin Lee. The groom’s parents honored the couple the night before the vows with a rehearsal dinner on the rooftop of Park Heights. After the ceremony, parents of the bride hosted a reception at the Tupelo Country Club which included a Tuscan menu featuring the bride’s favorite treat…gelato! The wedding cake was a five-tiered strawberry cake with butter cream frosting. The groom’s chocolate ganache cake, fashioned as stacked luggage, was embellished with edible luggage tags that gave a hint of the courtship of the couple. Guests were entertained by The King Beez from Memphis, Tennessee. Following a honeymoon to the island of Sicily and Florence, Italy, the couple is at home in Oxford. The bride is attending the University of Mississippi’s School of Law, and the groom is associated with Century Construction of Tupelo. GT

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Maria Boereo and Matt Legge December 4, 2010

photos courtesy stF Studios

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Sarah Beth Moore and Matt McCarter September 18, 2010

photos courtesy stF Studios

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tupelo areaweddings

Stacy Morris and Jason Collins June 12, 2010

photos courtesy stF Studios

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tupelo areaweddings

Kristin Williams and Josh Logan June 12, 2010

photos courtesy stF Studios

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tupelo areaweddings

Jacquie Woodruff and Jonathan McAlister August 28, 2010

photos courtesy stF Studios

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tupelodevelopment

ChiliFest on Broadway

twenty years of success

downtown Tupelo’s future is looking brighter every day By Michael Harrelson

M

Street U.S.A. When the Uptown Tupelo Association, the forerunner to the DTMSA, opened its doors in January of 1991, there was but a single restaurant in the 47-block area of downtown. Although 87 percent occupied at the time, it had become a predominately financial and governmental district, with a retail contingent representing just 25 percent of the mix. ain

Many retail fixtures had closed or else moved to higher trafficked areas of the city, leaving some community leaders to question whether downtown could even be saved, much less witness a revival with the potential to remake the very heart of the city. Today, however, as DTMSA marks its 20th anniversary as a catalyst for the redevelopment of the downtown sector, the success of the northeast Mississippi affiliate of the Mississippi

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Main Street Association is evident in a food and beverage presence that now boasts 11 restaurants. It’s equally apparent in a long list of new downtown development projects as well, including a gleaming new city hall and the arrival of a prestigious Hilton hotel to the Fairpark district. Bucking a modern trend that has seen retail businesses abandoning downtown areas for the suburbs and malls, new shops and boutiques are coming back to the central city, in-

East Main Street 1991

cluding recent additions and expansions such as Yellow Love Birds boutique, Ladybug’s maternity shop, Presley’s Flowers, Luxe Boutique, Voe’s lady’s specialty shop and the Caron Gallery, featuring an array of artistic mediums from jewelry to paintings to textiles. One recent concert performance by Country artists Rascal Flats at the BancorpSouth Arena drew a sellout crowd of 8,200 to downtown, recalling the glory days of the 1950s when favorite son Elvis Presley performed for local audiences at the Mississippi-Alabama Fair and Dairy Show. As DTMSA Executive Director Debbie Brangenberg views the progress of the organization whose first baby steps were centered around determining the impact that the new BancorpSouth Conference Center would have on downtown Tupelo, success was no foregone conclusion in the beginning. “We had our naysayers,” she recalls. “But in the end, it has all been worth the efforts of organizations such as the Community Development Foundation, the city of Tupelo and CREATE, the non-profit think tank and philanthropic arm of the Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal, that helped us convince the Mississippi Main Street Association that we had the kind of community support necessary for our initial designation as a Mississippi main street community.” Overall, Brangenberg says the DTMSA has been the driving force behind some $44 million in public investment in the downtown area that has, in turn, leveraged some $88 million in new construction and improvements. She adds that while some of the improvements, such as the new city hall and adjacent public park, are obvious to anyone who has paid a recent visit to downtown Tupelo, others are more subtle. “We had to make some adjustments,” she recalls. “Turning a downtown area into a destination that is attractive for locals and others to visit meant studying details such as where entrances to parking lots were located, and making changes to turn lanes on streets so that traffic would move efficiently and not cause congestion.” Yet for all the considerable progress charted thus far, including a 16 percent increase in ad valorem taxes since 1996 and a new visitor’s center for the Mississippi Hills Heritage Alliance planned for the near future, Brangenberg says the public hasn’t seen anything yet when it comes to the impact that DTMSA will have on the future of the city and the region.

East MainStreet 2007

“The acquisition of the fairgrounds and its redevelopment has doubled the size of downtown already,” Brangenberg says. But yet to come, she adds, is the realization of a downtown entertainment district that will further change the face of the central business district. “We have been successful on so many fronts, but we are still working on the entertainment district. There is new legislation that gives us some additional development tools for designing an entertainment district that encompasses the area all the way from downtown to the Elvis Presley birthplace.” Designated only a few months ago, the new state mandates offer tax and other incentives for new construction or the adapted reuse of older, existing buildings and structures. “It has to be a facility that sells a ticket, a movie theater, a concert hall. We believe this new legislation will spur private sector investments.” Along with buildings and infrastructure, the resurgence of downtown Tupelo also can be measured in the increased number of visitors and locals who come to work, play, and now, even live in the city center, Brangenberg says. “We are seeing a lot of our young people come back to Tupelo to live and work. We’ve had an influx of new residents who like a downtown environment and a walk able neighborhood. We already have a few attached condominiums in Fairpark, and there are plans to build a new house in the area to generate new interest in residential construction.” To Brangenberg, there’s no question that the King of rock ‘n’ roll put Tupelo on the map, so to speak, for the world, but she is justly proud of what the Downtown Tupelo Main Street Association has done in the past two decades to keep it there. “Wherever they are in the world, people know that Tupelo is the birthplace of Elvis Presley. But there are lots of other attractions that are of interest to people once they get here. “We have done our homework. We are currently in the process of revamping the farmer’s market, and I am also proud to say that Tupelo was chosen as only community in the nation to be awarded a pilot project in place-making by the prestigious Project for Public Spaces in New York City, and the National Trust Main Street Center in Washington D.C.” GT

Debbie Brangenberg

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Greater Tupelo Dining

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tupelofood

the great American grill I

t’s an ordinary weekday in the city and time for a meal. The dining room of the

Great American Grill Restaurant, in the Hilton Garden Inn, is filling up quickly. Before the midday rush and a flood of patrons from a group meeting next door in the Conference Center, Executive Chef, Joshua Simpson, spoke about what he does and what he loves: FOOD.

at the Hilton Garden Inn. Guests, he says, regularly give Joshua, who is originally from Mississippi, and recently menu suggestions which are taken into consideration and chosen as one of Tupelo’s Top 20 under 40 Young Profesoften incorporated into the menu rotation. The main menu sionals, came to the Hilton Garden from San Francisco in September 2006. Joshua concedes that the cultures of Tupelo changes about every six months and there are the daily and San Francisco are like day and night and admits that he specials. The top selling special, Joshua says, is the Spicy BLT, a super size sandwich with hot mayo, a fried green tomato, misses the ready availability of fresh produce, especially fish fresh red tomatoes and thick sliced bacon. Simpson’s favorand seafood, which often has to be specially ordered here. ite menu items are the pasta purses, which are “like an old He, now, frequents the Farmer’s Market in town for produce and admits that he really loves the small town feel of Tupelo. timey handbag”. One half has red sauce and the other half “In San Francisco, he says, you just get lost in the has white sauce and seasoned with basil and pesto, he explained. crowd”. Other than the ever popular Sunday Brunch, the Cooking and creating in the kitchen is his pasbusiest days seem to be Wednesdays and Thurssion. days. “I couldn’t see myself doing anything else,” he notes. “It’s always changing and always interestSimpson says the restaurant has a variety of dignitaries stop by to eat. “The mayor comes in a lot and ing.” Simpson explains that although everyone in many of the judges are frequent customers.” he says. his family cooks, his main inspiration came from his There is certainly wide variety of offering for any grandmother. taste. From entrees to delectable desserts, the Hilton “One of my earliest memories is of being on a chair at the stove, cooking with my grandmother.” Garden’s Great American Grill truly offers up the Joshua Simpson Simpson loves using his creativity and expertise Great American Meal! GT

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tupelofood Pulled pork barbeque sandwich with baked beans and curly fries

Romie’s Barbeque opens new location in Downtown Tupelo 48

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Romie’s rib plate with sweet potato fries and Cole slaw

R

ob Lesley didn’t know exactly what to expect when he decided to move his barbeque business from its location to the former

South Green Street

Rib Cage building on Troy Street. A Month later, Lesley is all smiles. He says business has been

much better than anticipated and he only expects it to keep getting better.

“It was a very good move for us,” Lesley said as he looked over his lunch crowd. This place is fit for a barbeque business to go into. We just love the building and we love the location.” Romie’s opened at its new location the middle of February and offers a variety of dishes. But barbeque dishes are the main portion of the menu. Pulled pork and ribs are the standard, but there’s a variety of other sandwiches and salads. Other sandwiches on the menu include: pulled chicken, smoke pork loin, smoked bologna, beef slaw dog, smoke sausage, hamburgers, fried green tomato BLT, club, chicken salad and Cuban sandwich.

There is an array of appetizers to kick off a meal. There is the steak stick snack with homes fries, fried dill pickles, fried green tomatoes, chips and dip, wings, among a few others. Romie’s is known for its homemade desserts, which include banana pudding, lemon crunch and hot fudge brownie with ice cream. Lesley says people just don’t come in for the barbeque. “We are selling a lot of the menu items, not just barbeque,” Lesley says. “The downtown crowd has been great. It’s been way above my expectations.” Romie’s Barbeque is open Monday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to midnight. GT

Delicious barbeque nachos make a great appetizer

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tupelohealth

preventive screening is best defense

March is Colon Cancer Awareness Month By Stephen T. Amann

C

olorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death despite our technology and access to health care. Colon

75 percent of all new cases of colon cancer can occur in people with no known predisposing factors for the disease. There are generally no early symptoms to warn of the illness. Incidence increases with age, beginning around age 40. Racial differences in survival have been observed: African-American men and women diagnosed with colorectal cancer have a nearly 50% greater probability of dying of the disease.

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cancer affects men and women equally. About

March 2011

Colorectal cancer begins with no symptoms at all.

Because of the growing awareness and increased use of colon cancer screening, the incidence and overall mortality rates have finally decreased, after having consistently increased over the past few decades. However, there is still a long way to go. Despite the convincing evidence supporting colon cancer screening, it is estimated slightly more than half of the Americans considered at risk have been screened.

Colorectal cancer begins with no symptoms at all. Generally, a polyp (benign growth in the colon) forms and over time becomes a cancer. Not all polyp types are a risk for colon cancer. Adenomatous polyps are the dangerous type. Hyperplastic polyps are not a risk factor for cancer. The time period a polyp takes to change to cancer is variable but generally measured in years. As these changes occur, there can be some warning signs. These include rectal bleeding and blood in your stool (bright red, black, or very dark); a change in bowel movements, especially in the shape of the stool (e.g., narrow like a pencil); cramping pain in your lower abdomen or frequent gas pains; and discomfort in or the frequent urge to move your bowels when there is no stool present. Weight loss without dieting and constant fatigue can also occur.

Facts to remember:

• Men and women are considered to be average risk for colon cancer if they are age 50 or older and have no high risk factors. They should get screening testing done starting at age 50. African-Americans should start at age 45. • High-risk factors include a family history of either colorectal cancer or adenomatous polyps, especially if below age 60, a personal history of adenomatous polyps or inflammatory bowel disease. Also, a family history of multiple cancers, involving the breast, ovary, uterus and other organs increases risk. If you are high risk, then screening should start at age 40 or sooner. Check with your physician for the time to start. The best way to screen for colon cancer is with a test called a colonoscopy. This endoscopic test evaluates the entire colon with a video scope. The main advantage of colonoscopy over other screening tests is that any polyps found can be removed during the same comfortable and safe procedure. Some sedation is used, and a colon cleansing prep is required the day before. If the test is normal, the next screening colon exam is generally recommended in 10 years. Another screening options is flexible sigmoidoscopy (a shorter endoscopic test) and ACBE (barium enema X-ray) – these tests are used together to evaluate the en-

tire colon. Minimal discomfort is noted as they are performed while awake. A colon cleansing prep is required. Unfortunately, these tests can only detect polyps or cancer. If a lesion is noted, then a colonoscopy is recommended so the area can be treated. If these tests are normal, the next screening exams are recommended in five years. Fecal occult blood tests can be done annually, even with new at-home testing, and if positive a colonoscopy is recommended. CT scan colography is another way to evaluate the colon, and if any lesions are suspected, a colonoscopy is recommended. Take note of these lifestyle recommendations to decrease your risk for colon cancer: • Red meat intake is associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer, though the reasons are unclear. • Though the evidence is mixed, a high fiber diet appears to reduce colorectal cancer risk and has other benefits to the gastrointestinal system. • Whole fruits and vegetables are protective against colorectal cancer. • Calcium supplements, in the presence of adequate levels of vitamin D, help protect against colorectal cancer. • With the exception of calcium and folate, there is little reason to recommend supplements (e.g., anti-oxidant vitamins, trace metals). • Smoking increases colorectal cancer risk, in addition to the numerous other reasons to avoid smoking. • Alcohol increases the risk of colorectal cancer, particularly in the presence of low folate levels. • Physical activity reduces risk while obesity increases it; the interaction between diet-exercise-obesity and colorectal cancer is complex. Take the time to discuss with your primary health care provider or local gastroenterologist about colon cancer and screening options. Gastroenterologists are medical specialists with extensive training in diseases of the digestive tract and endoscopy. Unfortunately, in the early stage of colon cancer when it is most curable, there are frequently no symptoms. Screening is the only way to find polyps or the precursors of colon cancer. If the polyp is removed, it cannot develop into cancer and colon cancer has been prevented. Make a choice to be proactive in your health care and when appropriate, obtain colon cancer screening! GT

About the Author: Stephen T. Amann, M.D., F.A.C.G., serves as medical director for the Center for Digestive Health on North Mississippi Medical Center’s campus in Tupelo. For more information, visit tupelogi.com.

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tupelohealth

something old, something new

B

elieve it or not, smiling can actually cause some people great anxiety.

Especially when you have to smile for a large For instance, a bride or groom on their wedding day. They have to smile in front of everyone they know (and don’t know)... for an entire day. Not only that, they also have to smile for hundreds (maybe thousands) of pictures taken of them…for an entire day. group of people for an extended period of time and you are not comfortable or confident with your smile.

A smile is the single most impressive aspect of a person’s face. So, it’s not surprising to find out that many brides are now adding “fixing their smile” to the top of their wedding list, realizing that this too is an important factor in looking and feeling great on their big day. It’s not just about getting a new, beautiful smile for your big day though. It’s about taking the first step to having a healthy, beautiful smile for the rest of your life. Reality TV shows, such as Bridalplasty, will make you think that you must go to extremes to look your best, but actually, orthodontists can greatly enhance your smile, appearance and subsequent self-confidence. Harmony between the

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dominant features of a face - the smile with its components (teeth, gums, and lips) along with the eyes and facial frame – creates a proportional face. Specialists in the dental profession are dealing with two out of the three dominant features of the face and they can greatly improve your smile and facial frame with orthodontics. With the advancements that have been made in orthodontic treatment, you could go through full treatment during your engagement period and have a beautiful, new smile in time for your big day. Better yet, you could actually be wearing braces on your wedding day without anyone even knowing!

It’s Your Day... Orthodontists have addressed the appearance concerns of adult patients by providing treatment options with clear aligners, smaller braces, and tooth-colored braces. The days of the “metal mouth” with metal bands on all the teeth are over! Braces can now be discrete or even “invisible” if desired. Time concerns have also been addressed with technological advances that result in less patient time required and more efficient tooth movement achieved. The convenience of fewer office visits to the orthodontist, shorter appointments and reduced treatment time is very appealing to many adult patients. As an orthodontist, I am continuously rewarded through sharing my patients’ joy of being transformed from embarrassment and self-consciousness about their smile to being grateful to have experienced a boost in self-esteem and selfconfidence. Seeing patients excited to smile and experiencing an enhanced personality never gets old. GT

About the Author: John Russell, III, DMD, PA Invisalign® Certified Provide  

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tupelogiving

a meal

the art of sharing

By Patricia Neely-Dorsey

M

Conner Adcock , owner of McCullough Steel Products and the 1717 Bath and Kitchen Design Showroom, simply started out with a traditional, southern gesture of hospitality and kindness of cooking a few meals for a couple of friends whose husbands had been in the hospital. That act of kindness and generosity blossomed into what has now become a highly anticipated monthly gathering of friends over a shared meal. This regularly scheduled event of food, fellowship and fun is something that she and her friends eagerly look forward to. ary

“We just laugh and talk and enjoy each other’s company.” Adcock stated. The gathering is held at her 1717 Bath and Kitchen Design Showroom, located at 1717 McCullough Boulevard, which opened in 2008. “It has a fully equipped and fully functioning kitchen, so it is perfect for cooking and serving meals,” Adcock explained. “We have had luncheons here in the past for our customers and clients which, went over very well. “ Usually scheduled on a Tuesday night, the first dinner for the group was held in November.

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“We are just starting out and everything is very casual. It’s just a time for us to have fun, visit and try different foods.” Adcock said. “We have had a ‘Breakfast at Suppertime’ dinner, a Chili dinner, and a Ham with all the fixings dinner, so far.” Up until now, Adcock has done all of the cooking, but there are plans to start rotating the meals among the friends. There are also plans to possibly expand the dinners, in the future, to include customers of the business and more friends. GT

tupeloscene

tasteoftupelo Amanda Collums, Dena Kimbrell, Susan Duffie-Morgan

Andy Creely and Taylor Sanders

Barbara Taylor and Carman Jones

Christy Todd, Emily Roberts, and Blair Curtis

Dick and Myra Guyton

Guy and Amy McCoy

Heather Adams and Pyar Brazile with Sugar Rush Bakery

Kara Penny and Linda

Kelsey Carruth and Harrison Campeae

mckinnons parents

Tommy and Idell Crump

Kristie and Mark Stevens

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tupeloscene

gumtreemuseum blue tie affair

Christina Dorough and Manny Hernandez

Debra and Rud Robison

Glenda and John Burk

Hellen and Mark Monts

Deepika and Dr. Jay Dey

Jean Laney and Virginia Chambers

Kit Stafford

Lucy Gaines and Brenda Hilbun

Russell and Kit Stafford

Tiffany Von Hiltgen and Morris McCain

Wanda and George Dent

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spirit kicks with off new year Biggest Loser N

Mississippi Medical Center’s Spirit of Women kicked off 2011 with “Small Steps. Big Changes” featuring Helen Phillips, winner of the seventh season competition on NBC’s hit show “The Biggest Loser.” orth

At 48 years old, Phillips went from a size 22 to a size 2 and lost 54.47 percent of her body weight-breaking all The Biggest Loser’s past six seasons’ records for age and percentage of weight loss. Phillips told the audience it’s never too late to change, claiming, “You can change your life even in the middle of it.” The evening included shopping with various vendors, health information and a shoe fashion show by Belk.

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tupeloscene

Junior Auxiliary

charityball

Chris Johnson and Anita Burleson

Lee Byars and Henry Daniels

Dr. Brad and Kelly Roberts

Lucia Randle, Tommy Green, and Karen Alvarez

Jenny Farrah and Paige Hammond

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Cori and Bill Dickerson

Madonna Collins, Cotton, Hellen Adair

Sara Katherine Blankenship

Gay Ramsey, Leslie and Greg Burks

Molly and Hilry Woodruff

Gary Kirkpatrick and Shannon Greenhill

Elizabeth and

David Gable

Rhonda Brazzill, Stephanie Lindsey, Cheryl Foster

Richard and Karen Alvarez and Lucia Randle and Richard Tucker

Ann and Larry Betts

Rick and Kathy Beasly

Josh and Mary Megan Mabus

Shirley Bennett, Danyel Filgo, and Angie Pettigo

Brent and Jenny Farrah and Keith Sanders and Paige Hammond

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671 Highland Circle Ă&#x; Tupelo, MS T his extraordinary home is located off W est J ackson S treet in one of the city ’ s oldest and most respected communities . I t is a two story brick home with three bedrooms and two full baths . I t has

2,896

square feet and

also has a basement .

T his beautiful $355,000.

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home is priced to sell at

Luxury Homes of Greater Tupelo

Ă&#x; March 2011

RIGHT: The beautiful and spacious kitchen is updated and equipped with a dishwasher, disposal, microwave, range and refrigerator.

ABOVE: The back yard is a New Orleans style courtyard with beautiful scenery. The home also backs up to a private neighborhood park.

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LEFT: The wine cellar/wet bar is a unique bonus with the home and is the perfect place to relax.

BELOW: The sunroom is beautiful and will take your breath away with its custom window treatments.

ABOVE: The master bedroom is beautifully designed and very spacious.

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Luxury Homes of Greater Tupelo

3108 Plantation Circle Tupelo, MS Ă&#x; T his beautiful family home , located in the M ount V ernon P lantation , is designed for both elegance and comfort . I t has 4,678 square feet with four bedrooms , two bonus rooms , a study , and will easily accommodate a growing family . T his home offers a spacious sunroom with brick flooring , laundry rooms in both the upstairs and downstairs for your convenience .

H ardwood flooring covers the entire first floor . T he E nglish garden in back is perfect for relax and play . S urround sound is built in throughout the home , inside and out .

March 2011

T his beautiful $524,900.

home is priced to sell at

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LRFT: Living area is very spacious. Open great room offers a double-sided fireplace with gas logs and hardwood flooring.

LEFT: The Spacious study allows plenty of privacy and relaxation. It is also equipped with stunning built-ins.

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Luxury Homes of Greater Tupelo

BELOW: Sweet dreams are happening in the child’s room. It is nice and large with ample closet and storage space.

Ă&#x;

March 2011

ABOVE:The Spacious study allows plenty of privacy and relaxation. It is also equipped with stunning built-ins.

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It’s Good to Know. When you perform more heart surgeries than any other hospital in the state, you touch a lot of lives. And that gets people talking. When they hear they can get some of the best heart and vascular care right down the street, they are glad to know who to trust. North Mississippi Medical Center. It’s good to know.

1-800-THE DESK (1-800-843-3375) | www.nmhs.net/heart_institute.php | Tupelo, MS HeartVasc_7.25x9.75_FIN.indd 1

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