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radius vol. 3 no. 2 2011

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ALUMNI MAGAZINE

The Doctors PSA Challenge

From Haiti to Franklin Pierce Channeling passion into purpose

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EDITOR Patricia Garrity ALUMNI RELATIONS DIRECTOR Shirley English-Whitman G’07 CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Doug DeBiase, Shirley English-Whitman G’07, Kimberly Faiella ‘11, Patricia Garrity, Alison Harper ‘11, Matthew Janik, Michelle Marrone, Nancy McComish

COMMENTS Address all comments to: Pierce Radius Editor Marketing and Communications Franklin Pierce University 40 University Drive Rindge, NH 03461 or e-mail PierceRadiusEditor@franklinpierce.edu

DESIGN Ryan E. Hulse ‘09 and G‘11 ASSISTANT DESIGNERS Ann Lafond, Kyle Todd ‘12 CHANGE OF ADDRESS Contact Alumni Relations Phone: 877.372.2586 e-mail: alumni@franklinpierce.edu

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ON THE COVER PSA Challenge I Care team shoots on rooftop location. Photo by Kristen Nevious

PHOTOGRAPHY, Carole Brasili, Andrea Borden ‘12 Ryan E. Hulse ‘09 and G‘11, Ann Lafond

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From the President

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Straight talk from Franklin Pierce’s ‘big personality’

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The Doctors PSA Challenge

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Student profile: Kimberly Faiella

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Faculty profile: Heather Tullio

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From Haiti to Franklin Pierce

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Reflections: An Oral History

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In the news

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Channeling passion into purpose

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Ravens Athletics

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Class notes

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In memoriam

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Franklin Pierce is turning 50!!!

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Message from the Alumni Association President

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Your generous support makes it all possible

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Refer a student

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You can make a difference

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Message from President James F. Birge

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n a few short weeks, Franklin Pierce University will send another class of graduates into the world prepared for exciting careers, advanced study and public service. I know we do an extraordinary job of helping students to prepare for post graduate life because I have the great privilege of seeing the interactions between students and faculty, the academic work students produce and the service commitments they make to Monadnock region communities.

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This issue of Radius, as others do, will provide you with a snapshot of what I am fortunate enough to see on a daily basis—a thriving academic community preparing students to be leaders of conscience. During a brief visit I paid to Andrew Scher ’88 last fall, Andrew suggested we host a competition for students to produce a public service announcement video that would build awareness about health issues for young people. Andrew’s suggestion led to a collaborative film project that included faculty, students, staff and local community members working together to produce five PSAs on health issues. In this issue, you will get to see the work that went into that project and how Professor of Mass Communication Heather Tullio led the project. You also will be excited by reading about two of our current students, Kimberly Faiella and Lauren L’Heureux. Kimberly is a senior who has been guided toward success by her faculty advisors who note she is hardworking, organized and determined—all common traits of a Franklin Pierce education. Lauren’s story will bring you to tears, as it did me. It is a beautiful story that highlights the love of family and the tenacity of a student athlete. Finally, no issue of Radius is complete without highlighting one of our alumni, and the spotlight is on Bob Van Dyke ‘72 and his wife Kathy and their commitment to help others who face challenges in their lives. Their attention of late is on Marcfel Laloy, a student from Haiti who needed a sponsor so that he could enroll in Franklin Pierce after his school in Haiti was destroyed by the earthquake last year. If while reading this issue of Radius you find yourself longing for the days when you were a student at Pierce, give in to that longing and return to see us. One of the best examples of the outcomes of a Franklin Pierce education we can provide for our students is to share with them your stories of success. So come back to Franklin Pierce, share your journey with current students and see what I get to see every day—a small but mighty university thriving amid the beauty of New Hampshire.

Ex Umbris ad Lucem,

James F. Birge, President SPRIN G

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Alumni profile: Andrew Scher ’88 By Shirley English-Whitman G’07

Straight talk from Franklin Pierce’s ‘big personality’

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rom rural Rindge, N.H. to the glitz and glamour of Hollywood, Calif., Emmy award winning producer Andrew Scher’s journey to success has been nothing short of amazing. A Jersey boy and self-proclaimed “big personality,” Scher came to Franklin Pierce for a campus tour in 1983 and never looked back. He remembers being impressed that students, faculty and staff took the time to greet him during his tour. “Here I was this guy from New York and everyone is saying hello to me.” He knew then that this is where he wanted to be. He got involved in the radio station hosting as many as four shows at one time. He participated in theatre, and when the TV station started, he was the play-by-play announcer for the basketball team. “Franklin Pierce gave me the opportunity to try different things. When you are given an opportunity you’ve got to go after it,” says Scher. “Without those opportunities, I probably wouldn’t be doing what I am doing today.” After college Scher worked his way up from being a production assistant driving over 130 miles each day to clean out the bottom of popcorn machines to producing one of the most successful daytime talk shows on network television, The Doctors. He credits Franklin Pierce with giving him “every tool to learn as much as I possibly could so that when I went out into the real world I had a taste of what it would be like. I got the opportunity to do as much as I wanted to do to gain the experience that I wanted to gain.” Scher is also a family man. He speaks fondly of his relationship with his father who he says never wanted him to go to Los Angeles. His dad was diagnosed with lung cancer and went through four years of chemotherapy. Scher says, “I just didn’t understand any of it.” Six months after his dad passed away, Scher was called for an interview for a show

called The Doctors. “Maybe this is dad’s way of blessing my dream,” Scher thought. During the interview, he learned that the show was about presenting medical information in a way that would help people understand what is going on in their bodies. “I don’t want anyone to go through what I just went through,” thought Scher. A few weeks later, as he was turning into the cemetery to visit his dad, the phone rang. The creators of The Doctors were calling to offer him the job. The offer was for a 13-week commitment and three years later, he is the executive producer of an Emmy awardwinning show. Scher calls his time at Franklin Pierce “the best four years of my life. Because of the love and support that I had from Franklin Pierce, I am able to live my dream.” This is what compelled him to come back to Pierce to offer his experience and advice to current students. “You’re in a rat race,” says Scher to a current Franklin Pierce mass communication student. He doesn’t want Franklin Pierce graduates to get lost in one of the most competitive, toughest fields where having a thick skin is not optional. He tells students to produce demo reels and resumes that will stand out from the typical 50 he and other producers receive every day. “What you are about to do is the most important job – that is to impress me,” declares Scher. Students and alumni would be wise to take this straight advice from our tenacious ‘big personality’ graduate who worked his way up to the top of his field. Scher is challenging Franklin Pierce University students to create a public service announcement (The Doctors PSA Challenge) which will be viewed during a spring episode of The Doctors. Read more about this unique opportunity in the cover story beginning on page 4 of this magazine.

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The Doctors PSA Challenge By Patricia Garrity

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ndrew Scher, Franklin Pierce class of ’88, challenged Franklin Pierce students from all majors to create an outstanding 30 second public service announcement (PSA). Scher, executive producer of the Emmy winning daytime show, The Doctors, believes his experience producing short films as a student led to his success in Hollywood. He wants today’s Franklin Pierce students to have a similar experience. “When we met with Andrew Scher he mentioned that one of the defining moments of his Pierce education was when he was able to produce a short film,” related President James Birge. “He began to talk about that type of opportunity being available to current students and wondered how he could use his success as an executive producer to help make this happen. As the conversation went on, he arrived at the idea of hosting a competition among students to produce a PSA on health issues and he would have The Doctors judge the productions. And Voila! We had a project!” A public service announcement is a short message produced on film, video or audio highlighting a health, safety or educational issue. They are an effective way of encouraging audiences to do something and also raise awareness of an issue. Students were excited about the opportunity. “This was yet another amazing opportunity presented to students of Franklin Pierce University,” said mass communication major Erica Tomaszewski ’12. “I could not imagine letting this once in a lifetime chance pass me by.” Her teammate, Alex Terrill ’12, agreed and added “Film is my passion, so why not?” Students wrote scripts in pairs and were encouraged to work with a partner from a different major. They also had the freedom to decide on the subject of the PSA and many of the choices held great meaning for the students. “My hope for our PSA is that people will realize that cardiac arrest can happen to anyone at anytime,” said Dan Champigny ‘13, a biology major, who chose the importance of knowing CPR as his PSA subject. “People are under the false assumption that cardiac arrest can only happen to people with heart conditions, the elderly or obese people. This is very wrong. I want people to see my PSA and say ‘Wow, that was really moving. I could really help someone if I know CPR.’ “

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Meet the teams of the challenge

Suicide Prevention Team (L-R): Chris Blauvelt, Nicholas Felix, Robert Valente, Kimberly Faiella, actor Zac Clark and Professor Heather Tullio

Kimberly Faiella ’11, a marketing major, also chose a subject close to home - suicide prevention. “I knew a few people in high school that committed suicide and it was just a terrible experience,” says Faiella. “To create a PSA that even one person might see that helps them change their mind and stops all of the pain their friends and family will go through after is all the reason to win this competition. There is nothing worth losing your life over and people need to realize that.”

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Tomaszewski’s team originally focused on suicide but after developing their script further decided that it was more important to focus on how precious life is. “Our group really wanted our PSA to strike a chord with people who are busy with the day-to-day and may not know how much they mean to others,” said Tomaszewski. “It’s about showing someone who is in a tough situation in life that ‘you care’,” added Terrill. Cyberbullying is a hot topic now but James Connelly’s ’12 team decided to highlight in-school bullying as they think it gets overlooked. “Our audience is the bullies and the message is that what you say and do in school sticks with these victims of bullying even when they are not in school,” said Connelly. Professor Heather Tullio played a key role in this project along with faculty from many disciplines including biology professors Susan Arruda and Thomas Bennett, theatre professor Nancy Stone, sociology professor Doug Challenger and mass communication professors Andrea Bergstrom, Paul Bush and Kristen Nevious. “I saw this as an opportunity for students in the Medical Club and was excited about the prospect of the students being able to show their knowledge, do some research into the subject matter and get creative,” said Bennett. “It was a chance for the students to be educators about important topics.” Bush was impressed with the professionalism and tenacity of the students on his team. “They kept at it hour after hour and the whole time they were talking about how they could set up even better shots. Their enthusiasm never flagged.” Participating in this project was a challenge for some of the non-mass communication majors. “Being a biology major, I was in the dark for most of the PSA Challenge,” said Champigny. “I’ve never worked with a camera before, so many of the terms and procedures were a blur to me. I concentrated on working with the actors as best as I could. I truly have a great appreciation for mass communication majors now. It

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Bullying Team (L-R): Eric Taverna, Mike Davies, James Connelly, Nick Caramico and actor Joe Wiley (front)

CPR Team (L-R): Dan Champigny, Jonathan Navarro, David Pierce and Tyler Visgilio

is phenomenal the message that can be created with good actors, a good camera person and editor.”

submissions. They selected five storyboards to be produced and these 10 students were paired with 10 writers to have 20 students produce the PSAs in January.

Even though some of the groups went into the challenge with higher levels of experience, it was a very positive and collaborative effort. “Those groups did not guard that (competitive) edge jealously,” said Nevious. “In fact, they went out of their way to help the less experienced students. No one let the ultimate goal – a trip to The Doctors to air their PSA – get in the way of their professional approach to the challenge.”

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All Franklin Pierce students were invited to participate in Stage 2 (except those students whose scripts were selected). At this stage, students could be considered for the role of camera person or editor for one of the scripts. Each team of two students could choose one or two scripts to create storyboards and production plans. They could also consult with the script writers at this time if they wanted to. A storyboard visually tells the story panel by panel, similar to a comic book. Students had to identify what characters were in each frame, how they were moving, any time lapse between frames, whether the frame should be a close up shot, medium shot or long shot and the motion of the camera. Information and examples for creating storyboards, a production plan and samples were available to the students. A group of five professors received the storyboards (without student names on them) and were very impressed by the creativity, good details and strong messages for health and safety contained in all of the

Actor auditions, Stage 3, were held the first few weeks in December. All Franklin Pierce students were invited to participate (except those students who had already been selected) and many faculty and staff also participated at this stage. Ultimately, 48 actors were involved; six local middle school children, six local high school children, five Franklin Pierce faculty and staff, 14 Franklin Pierce students and 17 community actors, ranging in age from four months to over 65. The production crew was on the set for Stage 4. The production teams consisted of the producer, director, camera person and editor. Filming occurred during the winter break over an eight-day period. It was a lot of hard work with long hours but the results were worth it. “It was such an overwhelming feeling of joy after we finished,” said Faiella. All five teams helped each other out during the eight days of filming, editing and critiquing. “The first viewing of the rough cuts was probably the most surprising part of the process,” said Bennett. “The PSAs really grabbed the viewers and told the story incredibly well.” All projects were filmed, edited and the completed PSAs were shipped off to Los Angeles in February to The Doctors for review. The response was overwhelmingly positive. “The PSAs produced by your teams were outstanding,” said Scher. “I was genuinely impressed with the quality of all five submissions.” It took several

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Cyberbullying Team (L-R): Front row: actor Matt Jones, Kevin Murphy. Back row: Frank Martino, Brett Isaacson, actor Casey Williams, Liz Squire and actor Ryan Dintaman

I Care Team (L-R): President Birge, Logan Mack, Erica Tomaszewski, Alex Terrill, Zach Bylaska-Davies and Professor Heather Tullio

meetings with producers and The Doctors to narrow it down to three finalists. The Doctors chose the three they believed most promising and provided detailed feedback to these groups. The groups moving forward were Bullying, Suicide Prevention and I Care. The three chosen PSAs were revised then sent to The Doctors again.

much they learned through that process – I could see their skills and attention to detail increasing by the hour. The PSA Challenge was also a wonderful experience for the local school children who acted in the PSAs. Six middle school children acted in the Bullying PSA, and six high school students acted in the CPR PSA. Nicolette LaPrade, a Rindge teenager, wants to become an actor or director and was cast in both of these videos. Her mother Lisa commented on what an amazing opportunity this was for her daughter, “This is one of those things that could change lives.”

Regardless of which PSA was chosen, these students are all winners and this experience has helped many of them grow and learn in ways they may never have anticipated. “What I have learned about myself through this challenge is that I can do anything I set my mind to,” said Champigny. Connelly learned a similar lesson, “The group I worked with could overcome any obstacles during the process of any shoot.” Faiella learned that she is “more passionate about this subject (suicide) than I thought.” She wants to learn more about ‘Help’ hotlines and how to volunteer. It was truly a collaborative community effort with faculty mentors working hand in hand with the students, reference librarians available to help research statistics, facts and numbers, Franklin Pierce community members serving as actors and providing locations for shooting, and the challenge originating from an alumnus – Andrew Scher. Champigny complimented the faculty as being outstanding, especially Professor Tullio. “She was so accommodating and helpful at every point of the competition,” said Champigny. “Without her, our PSA would not nearly have been as well done as it is.”

On March 22, an event was held to honor all the actors and local community members who were involved in the PSA Challenge. Scher attended via Skype and announced the winning team at the end of the event. “The team that I thought gave the best execution, shot it the best, edited the best and had the best creativity and the winner that will be coming to Hollywood are the producers of I Care.” The members of the I Care team will travel to LA to appear on The Doctors TV Show and present their PSA to a national audience this spring. All three of the final videos will appear on The Doctors Web site. Stay tuned to the Franklin Pierce University Web site for updates on this exciting project.

Professor Tullio observed, “It was great to see how much effort the production teams put into the PSAs and how

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Student profile: Kimberly Faiella’s on the road to success! By Alison Harper ‘11

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t’s a wonderful feeling when you know where you want to go in life and have a plan to get there.

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Kimberly Faiella is an energetic marketing major from Sandwich, Mass. on Cape Cod. When she started looking at colleges, Franklin Pierce was definitely on her radar. It was the perfect distance from home - not too far but not too close; her cousin was already a student here, and the coincidental timing of her acceptance letter and scholarship. “The day a good friend of mine passed away was the day I received my acceptance letter and not to mention a very nice academic scholarship. I took it as a sign,” said Faiella. Faiella had made her career choice long before arriving at Pierce: public relations. It was an easy decision to major in marketing with a dual minor in advertising and media studies. To enhance her resume and gain some valuable hands-on experience, she interned with Cape Cod Baseball League’s Bourne Braves over the summer of 2010. Rumors of sitting in an office doing nothing of much importance worried her at first but the experience was much better than expected. “We were involved in absolutely everything and I got to see how a baseball team was managed, marketed and operated first-hand,” Faiella said. She is currently working on the marketing, public relations and fundraising for the Bourne Braves next season. Faiella has excelled in classes. She credits her two advisors and a very helpful mentor from the Office of Career Planning and Placement. Dr. Jason Little and Dr. Andrea Bergstrom have guided her through academic challenges and these two advisors could not be more pleased with Faiella’s work in the classroom. “Kimberly is dedicated, hardworking, reliable, organized, determined and a team player,” says Little. “She has been an active participant in the classroom, has a positive attitude and is very much focused on a career in marketing.” With

the help of these two professors and Rosemary Nichols, director of Career Planning and Placement, she has been successful in all of her courses and internships, and is on the right path to a great career. In addition to succeeding in her classes and field work, Faiella is starting a public relations club on the Rindge campus with fellow marketing major and classmate, Alison Harper. The two have a few faculty members onboard already and are on to the next step. “We feel that students could really benefit from a public relations club on campus, especially those in the marketing or mass communication programs and those interested in public relations. We want to reach out to both internal and external institutions and organizations,” says Faiella, who approached Harper about the idea early in the fall semester. They hope to get the club started this year and find underclassmen to keep it going next year. In her free time, Faiella thoroughly enjoys participating in community service projects. She has been part of Relay for Life during her sophomore, junior and senior years. She says, “It’s such a great cause and so much fun to be involved in. Every year you feel like you have really accomplished something by giving back to cancer research. I am looking forward to this year’s relay.” Faiella has already started raising money for the upcoming March event. Thanks to a tremendous amount of self-motivation and support from Franklin Pierce faculty and staff, Faiella has a running start on her public relations career. She has completed a successful internship, currently works as a student assistant in the Office of Marketing and Communications at Franklin Pierce and recently participated in The Doctors PSA Challenge. Read more about this unique opportunity in the cover story beginning on page 4 of this magazine.

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Faculty profile: Heather Tullio Building confidence one student at a time. By Patricia Garrity and Alison Harper ‘11

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rofessor Heather Tullio can teach with high def, old school or film. “It doesn’t really matter to me what I teach with,” says Tullio. “The basics that I’m teaching are still the same.” Constantly changing technology hasn’t fazed this associate professor of mass communication at all. “You could give me a 20-year-old VHS camera and I could teach with it,” says Tullio. “What are more important than the equipment to me are the story telling, the character development and the students expressing their ideas.” Tullio started her teaching career at Franklin Pierce in the fall semester of 2003. The fact that Franklin Pierce happened to be in the same area where she grew up was no coincidence. She had been all over the country and now that she had her own family, she wanted to settle in the location where she spent her childhood. So when she was offered a position at Franklin Pierce, it seemed to be the perfect fit. “I was thrilled to be back so close to family and I really liked the small liberal arts college,” recalls Tullio. Tullio, who holds a Master of Fine Arts in Computer Art and Animation, enjoys teaching her passion for media to her open-minded students. “What I love about our students is that they’re friendly and open to feedback and suggestions.” She is also the advisor to the TV station on campus where she works closely with students on scripts and projects. “I like that my classes are small and hands-on,” says Tullio. “Students are taking them because they want to and that brings a lot of enthusiasm to the classroom.” In addition to building their skills, Tullio works hard to build students’ self-confidence. She wants them to be competitive when they go out into the job world. “They have to believe in themselves or they can’t sell themselves in a job interview,” says Tullio.

One recent graduate she is particularly proud of is Marcus Banks ’10, who she said is a perfect example of Franklin Pierce’s idea of inspiring mentored self-discovery. He was passionate about being here although some problems delayed his progress. Tullio was his mentor and helped him build confidence and get beyond these problems. He succeeded and after interning at the NBA, he was offered a job there and has recently been accepted into New York Law School. He has nothing but good things to say about his mentor. “Professor Tullio is a great addition to Franklin Pierce University,” says Banks. “She’s a very down-to-earth advisor/professor and she’s always there for her students regardless of how busy she is.” The most valuable thing she teaches her students is teamwork and communication. “Communicating with each other, working well with your team, encouraging, supporting and helping each other is the kind of stuff that is going to be applicable to whatever field students go into whether it’s media production or not,” says Tullio. “The equipment is always changing but these disciplines will last a lifetime.” She is committed to her students and the opportunities that Franklin Pierce allows her to share with them. She says, “One of the great things about Franklin Pierce is you can be a big fish in a small pond; you can take on leadership opportunities, you can do great things and we will help you and support you.” She has recently played a lead role and devoted a lot of her time and effort to The Doctors PSA Challenge project. Read more about this unique opportunity in the cover story beginning on page 4 of this magazine.

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From Haiti to Franklin Pierce By Nancy McComish

Marcfel Laloy ‘12

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o those who know Bob and Kathy Van Dyke, when it comes to helping others, no one is surprised by the efforts they will make. Even the Van Dykes themselves don’t find their generosity and care for those in need anything particularly remarkable. But it is. This quiet and unassuming pair met, as Bob puts it, “the one time I set foot in the library” at Franklin Pierce back in 1971. Bob went on to graduate from Franklin Pierce with a degree in business in 1972 while Kathy transferred to Keene State to complete her teaching degree. Nearly 40 years and six children later, the Van Dykes have built a life and family that make service to others and giving as natural as the beating of their very kind hearts. This particular story begins with Kathy’s long-time wish to travel to Haiti. In October 2008 the opportunity came to go on a medical missionary trip with the Monadnock Bible Conference. Kathy spent ten days in Port-au-Prince helping the medical teams. It was during this time that she met Marcfel Laloy. A student studying applied linguistics at the Universite d’Etat d’Haiti, Marc was one of four interpreters for the medical teams. A few days before she was to return to New Hampshire, Kathy

noticed Marc seemed uncharacteristically down. She asked him if something was wrong and he told her that his mother had passed away not long ago. She told him she would be his mother now. It was a promise she meant to keep. When the earthquake struck on Jan. 12, 2010, Kathy tried to reach Marc but couldn’t get through. There was no communication from Marc for a week and she thought he was gone. On Jan. 19, Marc found a cyber café and was able to send Kathy an e-mail and let her know he was okay. On the day the earthquake struck, Marc was scheduled to meet with his dean about the linguistics project he was planning to conduct in the Dominican Republic. He never made it to the meeting. He was running late, still at home only a few minutes before the meeting was set to begin, and aware that he would never get across the city in time. He decided he would have to reschedule the meeting. Less than 30 minutes later, the earthquake struck and everything around him collapsed. The campus building where he would have been for his meeting was completely destroyed and the dean perished in the rubble. Kathy knew they needed to get Marc out of Haiti but there was so much confusion and chaos in the weeks following

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(L to R) Marcfel Laloy, Kathy Van Dyke, Robert Van Dyke, and Dr. James F. Birge

the earthquake, accomplishing this wasn’t going to be easy. Marc would need a visa to come to the U.S. and since he was a university student already, a student visa seemed to be a good way to go. Bob remembered reading about Franklin Pierce taking in university students from New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina so he immediately thought of his alma mater. The Van Dykes contacted Franklin Pierce President James Birge and within two days, Marc was accepted and a scholarship package was in place. “The Franklin Pierce community was eager to help Marc and quickly mobilized on his behalf,” said Birge. “We ask our students to be global citizens and this is one way we can do this as an institution.” Months of paperwork followed but with the help of Susan Oehlschlaeger, director of International Student Services, and friends in the U.S. and in Haiti, Marc was able to get to the Dominican Republic and then eventually the U.S. and finally Rindge, N.H.

Dykes home. After graduation, anticipated for January 2012, Marc would like to go back to Haiti and help his country by working with orphans and the elderly. He’d also like to start his own video production company in Haiti one day. Wherever his life journey takes him next, it’s obvious he will always have a home with the Van Dyke family and the Franklin Pierce community.

Today, Marc is adjusting to the New England climate, learning to drive in snow, and enjoying his classes as a mass communication major. The Van Dyke’s love having Marc stay with them and describe him as the easiest and most respectful of house guests. He’s brought new foods and tastes along with new friends from other cultures to the Van

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n the fall of 2007 the project to capture the stories of local elderly residents in Keene was finally underway. The Keene Public Library initiated Reflections: An Oral History of the Monadnock Region, and soon created an advisory group to collect, preserve and share the memories with the community. The result: five detailed one-hour documentaries outlining major events that shaped the Monadnock Region over the twentieth century. The five documentaries that make up the Reflections project include The Hurricane of 1938; Trolleys, Trains, and Flyers: Rail Travel in the Monadnock Region; Pisgah: A Place Apart; The Cheshire County Complex: Farm, Nursing Home, Jail; and Flannels to Fuses: Textile Mills in the Monadnock Region. “One of the themes that runs through all five films is community; each film traces the transformations, tensions and challenges facing local communities over the course of the twentieth century,” said Professor Melinda Jetté. Six of our very own Franklin Pierce community members played an active role in this project: John Harris, executive director of the Monadnock Institute, Melinda Jette, assistant professor of history, Franklin Pierce graduate Alex DiCicco (music and environmental science) and current Franklin Pierce seniors, Cory Atkinson (anthropology and public history), Maribeth Côté (history and public history) and Cara Tamiso (anthropology and public history). Harris co-wrote the scripts for the first four of the films and Jetté co-wrote the script for the final film. Atkinson, an intern, conducted archival research for all five films, assisted by Côté and Tamiso for the film on the Cheshire Country Complex. Alumnus DiCicco composed and produced the musical scores for all five films. “This project has helped local residents understand the community they currently live in, and the historical changes over the past century that have shaped the way things are now,” said Professor Jetté about the project. Once each film was completed, the Keene Public Library hosted a premiere of the documentary at the Colonial Theater in Keene. Cheshire TV also aired the documentaries on its public access channel, and DVD copies of the films were sold at the premiere and at local bookstores. In all, more than 800 individuals attended the five premieres. In addition, all of the forty participants interviewed for the films received copies of their fulllength interviews and each of the documentaries in the series. The revenue from sales after project costs will

go towards the Historical Society of Cheshire County, Keene State College and the Monadnock Institute at Franklin Pierce University. After the final film premiere, members of the Franklin Pierce community wrote a scholarly detailed proposal to the Oral History Association and received an invitation to present their work at the national conference in Atlanta. In addition, the Reflections project was selected to receive the 2010 Elizabeth B. Mason Small Project Award. “The committee was deeply impressed by the high quality of this regional oral history project, the adherence to professional oral history methodology, the effective use of story circles, the broad range of active community partners, the project’s ability to produce five documentary films on a modest budget, and the successful efforts in making these films accessible to regional residents through the presentation of those films in a local movie house, broadcast through public access television and DVD distribution,” said Michael Frisch, president of the Oral History Association. “In sum, this was a well-conceived, well-executed regional oral history project that made highly effective use of its available resources.” ”The Oral History Conference in Atlanta provided a remarkable opportunity for Franklin Pierce students to interact with professionals,” stated Harris. “The benefits for an undergraduate student at a professional conference were numerous,” said Atkinson. “Not only was I able to gain valuable presentation experience in front of professionals, I was able to listen to their opinions and learn from them about doing successful research projects.” Based on the success of the Reflections project, and with the assistance of Professor Douglas Challenger, the Monadnock Institute has developed a new documentary studies certificate to be offered at Franklin Pierce on the Rindge campus beginning in the fall of 2011. The documentary studies certificate, like the Reflections project and the public history minor which is also offered on the Rindge campus, is designed to involve the community and encourage student-faculty collaboration. Interdisciplinary opportunities and community partnerships like these exemplify the core mission of the Monadnock Institute of Nature, Place and Culture and the other academic centers at Franklin Pierce University.

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In

the news

Lloyd Astmann, class of '69, named chairman of the board of trustees

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Pierce students stay active and beat the winter blues

Lloyd H. Astmann of Paramus, N.J. and Wellington, Fla., a Franklin Pierce University trustee and class of 1969 graduate, and the managing partner of NHA Realty, LLC, a New Jersey based commercial real estate holding company, has been named chairman of the board of trustees for Franklin Pierce University, President James F. Birge announced. “I am excited about Mr. Astmann’s leadership of the board of trustees and that he is the first alumnus to serve as the chair,” said Dr. Birge. “Lloyd’s commitment to his alma mater is remarkable and noteworthy. He is an exemplar of board leadership and I am confident that his term as chair will contribute to our thriving academic community.” “Franklin Pierce was there to help and guide me when I needed it most,” says Astmann. “It has been rewarding, fun and educational staying involved in and working with the institution for all these years. I feel blessed, privileged and honored to be able to serve as board chair and look forward to giving back and making a difference at Franklin Pierce through working with my fellow trustees, the administration and, of course, the alumni body.” In other recent board news, the University Board of Trustees is proud to announce the election of new members to the board: Patricia Lang Barry of Rindge, N.H., B. Jay Cooper of Alexandria, Va., Carleen Farrell ’71 of Arlington, Mass., Paul Goyette ’94 of Bedford, N.H., George Kidd Jr. of Hancock, N.H., Jean D’Meza Leuner of Orlando, Fla. and Susan Pimentel of Hanover, N.H.

While the winter cold means snowbound doldrums on many college campuses, Doug Carty subscribes to the remedy often touted by experts: “Stay active, get some light and spend time with others,” as the best way to beat the winter blues. Carty, director of campus recreation at Franklin Pierce University, has actively implemented these three helpful points in a popular program of winter recreation to help students at the Rindge, N.H. school embrace and get the most from the colder months. He and his colleagues have developed a series of onand off-campus activities—turning the University’s most prime real estate into a winter terrain park, building a tropical beach for an up-all-night event, and sending students on weekly recreation trips—that get students out of the dorms and into outdoor pursuits that have proven to be a successful way to beat the winter doldrums that affect so many undergrads at colleges in wintry climates. The recreation staff and a team of students at Franklin Pierce build a large “terrain park” in the center of campus (on the sweeping hillside directly in front of the president’s office) each winter for snow-board stunts, ski tricks and grinding. “We carve the terrain park out

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of huge piles of snow, we install rails, build jumps and organize a day-long competition, with t-shirts, lift tickets and other prizes,” Carty says. “We’ll have music and some hot chocolate for skiers and riders.”

Professor Lawson constructed camera obscura with ETA class

President James Birge says he doesn’t mind having his scenic vista replaced by a student terrain park for a few months. “On the contrary, I look forward to seeing that part of campus take on a new life as a gathering point and center of activity in winter,” he says. “It’s great to see our very talented students enjoying our beautiful campus and having so much fun taking part in the skiing and riding events, and their classmates who turn out to watch and cheer them on.” Franklin Pierce University’s 1200-acre lakeside campus is perfect for outdoor recreation, year-round. Winter activities include ice skating, cross-country skiing, snow shoeing and other activities … but some of the sports organized by Carty are somewhat atypical. One of the students’ favorites: “When the lake freezes solid, we organize snow-kiting and participants are pulled along the ice on skis or a snow board using the power of wind and a very large kite,” he explains. The University’s weekly winter outdoor adventure program, open to all students, organizes weekend activities—and transportation to them using the University’s shuttle vans—across New England. “Everyone seems to have a great time, and just about everyone’s asleep during the van ride back to campus.” Carty, who has a degree in outdoor recreation also organizes a series of on-campus activities for students during the winter months. “My job is to keep students active,” he says, “and to provide some ideas and guidance to help them tap their ideas and channel their energy in a fun and positive way.” This includes an annual up-all-night event, dubbed “The Cure for Cabin Fever,” which takes place in February. The event utilizes the University’s 72,000-square foot air frame facility for a different warm-weather theme each year. The brightly illuminated building was transformed into a beach paradise from 8 p.m. until 2 a.m. “We used a tropical theme,” Carty says, “trucking in tons of sand for a beach, setting up palm trees, mechanical sharks, beach volleyball and other fun summer-style activities… even some tropical animals from New England Reptile Distributors,” he says. “The students love it!”

Associate Professor of Theater Arts Robert Lawson worked on an unusual project with his experiencing the arts class. They researched what a camera obscura is and how to construct one. The camera obscura was built on Tuesdays and Thursdays during Lawson’s hour and fifteen minute long class period. The project started with some basic research beginning with the eye and how it works. The class then put some information together about what the term “obscura” means. They researched the histories of film and photography and finally learned how to construct the camera. Check out the camera obscura on the Web at: www.pierceobscura.net

Introducing the next ‘Barbara Walters’: Arikka Knights! It’s no wonder to anyone who knows Arikka Knights ’08, with her pleasant personality and successful background in public speaking, that she would win the title of Miss Maine this past June and go on to compete in the Miss America Pageant in January 2011. But this accomplishment did come as a surprise to the 2008 Fitzwater Medallion winning Knights. “I went in thinking, ‘whatever happens, happens,’” she said. However, it didn’t shock her many Pierce friends and large family. “Arikka is one of the most amazing people I have ever met,” says friend and fellow Pierce alumna, Michaela Sullivan. “She is so talented, so nice, so educated, so passionate and caring.”

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In

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Knights was born and raised in a small town, Chester, Maine, surrounded by her family with whom she is incredibly close. Her mother, Wanda Knights, introduced her to pageant life at the age of five. “My mom was always shy growing up and she didn’t want me to be like that.” The pageants served her well in developing confidence and excellent public speaking skills bringing her closer to her dream of someday becoming Miss America. When she was here at Franklin Pierce University, she was involved in student government, volunteer activities and another passion of hers: being part of the media. Since she was very little she wanted to be “the next Barbara Walters.” She was very active from the get-go in the Pierce Media Group, participating in all the different media positions. She interviewed, reported, wrote articles, edited and produced.

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Her hard work and dedication paid off. During her senior year, she was awarded a medallion for Leadership in Public Communication and she graduated magna cum laude. She made a lasting impression in the classroom. “She was very upbeat, positive and always had a smile,” says Jason Little, associate professor of marketing. “I think her positive energy in class motivated others and added to the spirit of learning.” Perhaps the most admirable quality about Arikka is her determination. She has never given up on her dream, even after becoming runner-up for Miss Maine in 2007. More notably, she did not give up after her mother, her number one fan, passed away in 2006 from acute myelogenous leukemia. Her closest friends admire her perseverance. “After her mom passed away, she was so strong and realized her mom would have wanted her to continue school and her dreams of going to the Miss America pageant,” says Sullivan. Knights is currently working full-time for the Social Security Administration (SSA) in Maine and hopes to become the National Public Affairs Director for the SSA after she earns her masters in public affairs.

New grant helps launch program to assist underserved rural populations of N.H. & Vermont Franklin Pierce University has received a $536,640 grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to help fund the University’s new master of physician assistant studies program—a program established in November of 2009 with the explicit goal of serving the rural and underserved communities of Vermont and central and northern New Hampshire. According to Lisa Walker, director of the master in physician assistant studies (M.P.A.S.) program at Franklin Pierce University, the new program’s location at the University’s West Lebanon, N.H. graduate & professional studies center, is critical to the mission of the program. “With no physician assistant program in Vermont and the only New Hampshire P.A. program being in the southern tier of the state, the location of this program in the west central region of New Hampshire and only seven miles from the Vermont border makes it ideally situated to meet these needs,” she said. “Through student-volunteer initiatives, community engagement, rural elementary education programs and other projects, Franklin Pierce University enjoys a deep tradition of serving rural communities in New England,” said Dr. James Birge, president of Franklin Pierce. “We are committed to helping those residents in rural areas of New Hampshire and Vermont gain better access to medical care, and I applaud the directors of this program in their successful work to secure support for this important initiative.” The new program’s first cohort of 23 students includes 11 Vermonters and six students with ties to New Hampshire. The project’s primary goal is to increase opportunities for students to participate in clinical experiences in rural and underserved communities. For more information about Franklin Pierce University’s master of physician assistant studies program go to www.franklinpierce.edu/mpas.

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Goodby takes us back 12,000 years ago in Keene, N.H.

Currey named special assistant to the president for west valley initiatives Franklin Pierce University is pleased to announce the addition of Dr. William C. Currey as special assistant to the president for west valley initiatives at our Arizona campus.

Dr. Robert G. Goodby, an expert on ancient archaeology, took us back to the Paleoindian period 12,000 years ago in his archaeological excavation of the Tenant Swamp Site in Keene, N.H. Goodby’s excavations took place at the new Keene Middle School between the months of May and June 2010. This expedition led to finding four concentrations of artifacts, each representing an individual household, from the end of the last ice age, roughly 12,000 years before present time. Stone tools, plant remains and burned animal bones shed light on household organization, economy and technology, and reveal social networks that extended hundreds of miles across northern New England. The Tenant Swamp Site is one of the two oldest sites in Cheshire County and represents the beginning of human occupancy in the Monadnock region. Goodby is an associate professor of anthropology and has done archaeological research in New Hampshire, Massachusetts and Rhode Island. He is an author of more than 100 technical reports on New England prehistoric archaeology, past president of the New Hampshire Archeological Society and an executive board member of the Monadnock Institute of Nature, Place and Culture.

Dr. Currey brings more than 25 years of experience in higher education operations to this position. Most recently, he has held the position of chief operations officer and operations compliance consultant with West Coast Ultrasound Institute where he was responsible for all of the fiscal and day-to-day operations of the institute including driving performance measures and insuring best practices and key learning at the institute’s three locations. Prior to that, he has worked in a variety of positions including vice president of academic affairs and provost with vast experience as chief operations and compliance officer. At Franklin Pierce, Dr. Currey will coordinate, direct and implement programs and projects that support the academic and economic development of the University in the West Valley of greater Phoenix, Ariz. He will create an infrastructure for expanding current and emerging academic programs, build effective working relationships with business, civic and education leaders in the West Valley and develop short and long-term economic and community development plans for the Arizona campus. In announcing the appointment, Franklin Pierce University President Dr. James Birge said, “Dr. Currey brings a wealth of higher education academic and economic development experience to Franklin Pierce University and we are very pleased to have him leading our Arizona initiatives. Bill will play a central role as we expand our presence in the West Valley through additional academic programs, the development of a larger facility, and new relationships with municipalities and businesses.” Dr. William Currey holds a doctorate in economics from London University, U.K. and earned his master’s in business administration and bachelor’s in accounting and computer science.

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In

the news Temple Grandin movie wins seven Emmy awards

Temple Grandin stole the spotlight at the Emmys, standing up right in the middle of the awards show again and again, smiling far wider than the Hollywood stars beside her. She is not a movie star, but an HBO biopic about her life has thrust her into the spotlight. Long before her life made it to the small screen, Grandin became an inspiration to so many. Everything changed for Grandin when she was able to see in the animals at her aunt’s ranch what most of us could not. She noticed little things like how a horse's ears moved in the direction they were looking. That scene and her inspiring life thereafter came to the forefront in the HBO film “Temple Grandin” which won seven Emmy awards. Actress Claire Danes portrays Grandin in the film and said, "She was one of the first people to challenge these completely absurd and very accepted theories of autism. Autism was meant to be the product of a frigid mother.”

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Grandin graduated with honors from Franklin Pierce College in 1970. She went on to get a master’s and doctorate degree in animal science. She is a renowned scientist, credited with single-handedly campaigning the humane treatment of livestock.

President Birge elected to the board of directors for the New England Council President James F. Birge was recently elected to the Board of Directors for the New England Council, the nation’s oldest regional business organization dedicated to promoting economic development and a high quality of life in the sixstate region.

The New England Council is an alliance of businesses, academic and health institutions, and public and private organizations throughout New England dedicated to identifying and supporting federal public policies and articulating the voice of its membership regionally and nationally on important issues facing New England. The New England Council is also committed to working with public and private sector leaders across the region and in Washington through educational programs and forums for information exchange. For more information on The New England Council go to http:// newenglandcouncil.com.

Students get inside look at “Columbine” Dr. Donna Decker’s introduction to creative nonfiction class recently read Dave Cullen’s novel Columbine, a New York Times Best Seller about the tragedy at Columbine High School. However, her class went beyond the typical class discussion. They were able to meet Cullen in their very own classroom via Skype. He only does one or two Skype sessions a year with schools and they were one of the two this year; the pioneering Skype session with an author on the Rindge campus. For a full hour, the students asked him questions about his writing process, characters in the book and his own judgments that never made it into print. The classroom was alive with everyone focused on the same 10 characters and the same horrifying events as if they had all been there. Cullen had been there as a reporter and students had been there too because Cullen’s representation of the events of that tragic day renders the atrocity palpable. According to Decker, Skyping with Cullen was a great experience for the entire class and even “better than Oprah’s Book Club.” Cullen was generous with his advice for young writers and was able to give the students an inside view of the world to which they aspire.

“The New England Council’s many initiatives over the years serve to make the region an excellent place to live, work and do business,” said Dr. Birge. “I am pleased to bring to the board my insights on higher education, research and good business practices.”

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Channeling passion into purpose T h e p h y s i c i a n a s s i s t a n t p ro g r a m c e l e b r a t e s a h i s t o r i c m i l e s t o n e

By Michelle Marrone

“Men make history, and not the other way around. In periods where there is no leadership, society stands still. Progress occurs when courageous, skillful leaders seize the opportunity to change things for the better.” – Harry S. Truman

“It’s been an interesting journey,” says Lisa Walker, academic director of the master of physician assistant studies (M.P.A.S.) program at Franklin Pierce University. “There have been so many mountains to climb in launching this program, I wondered if this day would ever come.”

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The master of physician assistant studies began just over a year ago at our Lebanon, N.H. center. It is only the second such program in New Hampshire and it is the only program in close proximity to Vermont which currently has no M.P.A.S. programs available to residents.

In 2003, as a natural extension of our mission to prepare leaders of conscience, the University adopted the doctor of physical therapy program, the first in a series of health-related degrees established to educate future health care professionals. Since that time, Franklin Pierce has added an R.N. to B.S. program, an M.B.A. in health administration, and a master of science in nursing leadership or nursing education. In 2009, the master of physician assistant studies program became the newest addition to this distinguished list.

On Dec. 15, 2010, the physician assistant program honored its inaugural class and the University with the first White Coat Ceremony in our 49 year history. This ceremony marks an important milestone in the program’s and University’s growth.

A physician assistant (P.A.) is a health care professional licensed to practice medicine with the supervision and in collaboration with a board certified physician. P.A.s conduct physical exams, diagnose and treat illnesses, order and interpret tests, counsel on preventive health

Rite of Passage The White Coat Ceremony is a tradition within the medical profession that marks a student’s transition from classroom to clinical studies. During the ceremony, students are robed in the short white jackets they will wear during their clinical rotations. Once all students have been robed, the group recites the Physician Assistant’s Oath impressing upon them their responsibilities as caring and compassionate health care providers and the importance of the physician assistant-patient relationship. w w w

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care, assist in surgery and write prescriptions. Physician assistants must complete graduate level study in a program accredited by the Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant (ARC-PA). After graduation, physician assistants must pass a national certification examination and recertify every six years. While trained as general practitioners, P.A.s have the opportunity and flexibility to specialize in different areas similar to physicians. Franklin Pierce’s master of physician assistant studies was created with the goal of educating students from rural and under served communities, particularly those in Vermont and New Hampshire, and returning them as skilled and compassionate clinicians to practice in these same communities. In selecting the program location, the University chose our Lebanon, N.H. center to best accommodate our student population and the communities they are choosing to serve, as well as the educational resources and opportunities available at nearby Dartmouth Medical School and DartmouthHitchcock Medical Center.

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“Starting any new program is a tremendous undertaking,” says Lisa Walker. “The financial and resource commitment alone can be overwhelming, especially for a smaller institution. But in starting this program, there were significant personal and professional investments from faculty, staff and community supporters – contributions that were truly selfless and at times, miraculous.”

Inaugural Class The P.A. program’s inaugural class brought together an interesting and diverse group of students, most pursuing their master of physician assistant studies degree as preparation for a second (or third) career. In fact, the average age for these students was above the national average of 27-years-old. Many students held healthrelated jobs prior to joining the program, such as EMTs and medical researchers, but there is also a financial planner, police officer and a few with Ph.D. degrees. The majority of students are from rural New Hampshire and Vermont, but the program drew students from all over the U.S. To participate in this 27-month, full-time day program, many students left established careers to dedicate their lives to practicing medicine. Woven through their life stories, you’ll find several common threads: a passion for medicine; a commitment to their rural communities and community service and; a desire to build and lend support to life-giving endeavors.

Passion and Commitment Joshua Rosenblum “For the past nine years, I have been chief of Stratton Mountain Rescue, a part-time police officer in Winhall, Vt. and a full-time ski bum. I realized at age 30 that I needed to do more with my life than ski all day. Being an EMT and with my background serving people in need, pursuing a career as a physician assistant was a logical next step for me. Even though I grew up in New York City, I knew I wanted to stay in Vermont and practice rural medicine. As I was finishing all the prerequisite courses to enter a P.A. program and researching schools, I became aware of the developing program at Franklin Pierce. I was looking at Yale, Quinnapiac and other schools, but just didn’t want to move to Connecticut. Being able to stay in this area to pursue my degree has been a huge plus for me. It’s been a great experience. It’s exciting to be part of a new program, to help build something. The classes are small and filled with very motivated, Type A personalities. Everyone has the same motivation and direction, and we really all get along very well and support each other. It is a lot of hard work, but we recognize it’s necessary hard work as we move toward our goal. I wouldn’t want anyone taking care of me who wasn’t willing to work this hard in a P.A. program, so I’m dedicated to it.”

“Our program is very studentcentered. Students are nurtured to become the best possible practitioners. Faculty and staff model the way we would want them to treat patients, believing that competent and compassionate P.A. educators create competent and compassionate P.A. providers.” – Lisa Walker, Program Director

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These physician assistant students share a passion and commitment to serve others.

Sean O’Brien, Class President

Rebecca Dumont

“Before entering the P.A. program, I worked full-time in UVM’s Department of surgery as a senior research coordinator, parttime in Vermont as the assistant medical examiner investigating suspicious deaths and as an EMT on the weekends. It’s been a long process for me to get here, but I’ve wanted a career practicing medicine since my early days in college and at age 40, I’m pursuing my dream.

“I came to Franklin Pierce University’s P.A. program after finishing my bachelor’s degree at the University of Vermont. I majored in biology and minored in chemistry knowing I wanted a career in medicine. While I was finishing my undergraduate degree, I spent time shadowing a physician assistant to be sure this is what I wanted to do and applied to the Franklin Pierce program.

What drew me to Franklin Pierce’s program was that it was starting out with a blank slate; it was an opportunity for me not only to pursue my P.A. degree, but to contribute to the building of the program. Lisa Walker, the program director, faculty and staff were open to developing a student government and incorporating student input into all the developing facets of the program. This collaborative leadership style has built a strong sense of community within the class.

I love being able to be at home and learn in the place I plan to practice. I am incredibly busy all the time, but I’m doing what I love every day. I’ve learned a tremendous amount about myself and what I’m capable of over the last year. I’ve gone from having that little voice inside my head say, ‘How are you ever going to do this?’ to ‘I can absolutely do this.’

Collectively, the class has reached out to the community to provide health information and services, working in concert with local health care organizations. As individuals and as an organization, Franklin Pierce’s P.A. Class of 2012 is already investing in the health and wellbeing of this community. For me, this past year has not only been an incredible learning experience, but a great opportunity to be part of something bigger.”

I’m not the typical P.A. student, having come to the program just after receiving my undergraduate degree. The students in this program have given up wonderful careers to commit to P.A. school and the profession. Our common bond is our passion for medicine and community service, even though we have come from so many different backgrounds. I’ve felt the constant support of students, faculty and staff over the past year and I believe that support will continue long after the program ends for me.”

Improving the Lives of Others During the White Coat Ceremony, Dr. James Birge, president of Franklin Pierce University, spoke of the rich tradition embraced in the ceremony and the achievements of the program and students. Birge commented, “I want to acknowledge not only the individual accomplishments of our students and faculty, but the continued fulfillment of the University’s mission to educate leaders of conscience who go out into our communities and work to improve the lives of others.” Whether it’s in helping students channel their passion into purpose or in recognizing their contributions to the common good, as we approach the University’s 50th anniversary, let us take a moment to reflect with pride on our continued commitment and accomplishment of educating leaders of conscience.

For more information on the master of physician assistant studies program, go to franklinpierce.edu/mpas

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Pierce athletics receives top game environment award By Doug DeBiase

The event was promoted throughout the summer, as the department produced a humorous video showing Rocky working out and getting in shape for his beginningof-the-year debut. It was shown on the department’s official Web site (http://athletics.franklinpierce.edu) and throughout various outlets on campus. The video was viewed nearly 2,000 times throughout the summer and early fall as interest grew leading up to the event.

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he Franklin Pierce University Department of Athletics was recognized on Jan. 14 with the “Game Environment” Award of Excellence for the Northeast-10 Conference. The announcement was made at the NCAA Convention in San Antonio, Texas as the national organization announced the winners from 10 Division II conferences. By winning the award, Franklin Pierce received $500 to go towards adding more features to its in-game promotions. It marks the second-straight year Franklin Pierce was honored with this award. The University won the inaugural accolade at last year’s NCAA Convention in Atlanta. The Athletics Department earned the honor this year for its production of the 2010-11 Pierce Pride Kickoff Weekend, which was held this past fall, Sept. 4 at Sodexo Field in Rindge, N.H. The event, which featured carnival food and games, was held around a triple-header of exciting soccer action. Throughout the afternoon, the campus and local community was treated to a barbeque, games and prizes, and free ice cream. The day was capped at halftime of the men’s soccer match, as the department debuted its new “Rocky the Raven II” mascot, which drew a loud ovation from the more than 1,000 fans in attendance. Immediately following the match, a post-game fireworks show lit up the sky, courtesy of Atlas Pyrotechnics. The event also received tremendous support from Sodexo, the University’s food service provider, and the Office of Student Involvement.

There have been other exciting events held on the Franklin Pierce campus this fall and early winter, including Pierce Pride events for the men’s and women’s soccer teams, the volleyball team, the field hockey team and the men’s and women’s basketball teams. At each of those events, the department gave away free items to 150 students, including dry-erase boards, chapsticks, food, stadium mugs and much more. While attending those games, students and fans from the local community have seen some of the nation’s top Division II teams, including the men’s soccer program, which was ranked No. 1 in the nation for more than a month and won the Northeast-10 Conference championship. The women’s soccer team was ranked nationally throughout the season and advanced to the program’s 19th-consecutive NCAA Tournament. The field hockey team produced one of the finest seasons in program history and earned a trip to the NE-10 tournament. The women’s basketball program has been ranked among the nation’s top 25 for most of the season, while the men’s basketball squad has taken on some of the nation’s top competition in the always competitive Northeast-10. The volleyball program also continued to grow this past fall and improved upon its win total from the previous season. The exciting game environment at Franklin Pierce is made possible because of all the outstanding support from the fans. Without their excitement and dedication of coming to the games, these in-game initiatives would not be possible. Franklin Pierce boasts one of the most enthusiastic crowds (student and community) in all of the Northeast-10 Conference, and all of the school’s student-athletes and coaches appreciate the support they receive.

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Everyday heroes extraordinary siblings from an ordinary family By Matthew Janik

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auren L’Heureux could be any one of the hundreds of young women playing college field hockey in New England. Through three seasons in Rindge, she had three goals and one assist for seven points. She has played in a majority of the Ravens games over the course of her career, but hasn’t started in many of them. She gets named to the Northeast-10 Conference Weekly Honor Roll every now and again. She is a two-time All-Academic Squad selection by the National Field Hockey Coaches Association and is well on her way to a third in 2010. She carries a grade-point average north of 3.60 while majoring in biology. Like any of the hundreds of student-athletes at Franklin Pierce, she balances the athletic needs of practice and games with the academic needs of study hall and homework. She spends the winters trudging to class under a New Hampshire sky that at times can seem eternally gray. But then you ask her about her brother, her eyes light up. Colin L’Heureux could be the younger brother of any one of those hundreds of young women playing college field hockey in New England. Endlessly supportive, he almost never misses a game. “He thinks he knows everything; he thinks he owns this school,” said Lauren. “I’m like ‘Colin, you don’t even go here!’” He’s just like any other loving little brother whose older sister plays field hockey in college. Except for all that time in the hospital. Colin had his first MRI when he was 18 months old after his parents noticed he had not begun crawling when they expected him to. He was diagnosed with Neurofibromatosis type I (NF-1). NF-1 is a genetic disorder which affects the nervous system. Though associated with learning difficulties, vision problems and epilepsy, the most visible effect of NF-1 is the growth of tumors. While they are usually benign abnormal growths on nerve endings, between eight and 12 percent of NF-1 patients develop cancerous growths.

Colin will always have to take anti-seizure medicine and has had four surgeries to remove tumors. The first was when he was in fourth grade in October of 2003, when he had a craniotomy to remove a tumor from his parietal lobe. The tumor was benign. The second and third surgeries were over the summer of 2010. One was in June, when a tumor was partially removed from his brain stem. Again, the tumor was benign, and it continues to be monitored, because it could always grow back. The next surgery was on July 23, 2010, to remove an eight-centimeter tumor from his wrist. The biopsy on that one came back malignant. The tumor was cancerous. “The one on his wrist looked like a fist was just in there,” said Lauren. “It was huge, it was hard to the touch. At the pace it grew, the doctors had already told us that the test will probably come back malignant, that the biopsy will probably be cancerous.” “My family kind of had time to adjust to that. Like, even though we still hoped and prayed that it wouldn’t be, we kind of had to face reality on that one.” The surgery was successful and the tumor was completely removed. Colin has had monthly MRIs ever since, because the cancer could always come back. So, all the time in the hospital and the operations have certainly given Colin an experience different from what most people will ever face. However, just the same as any other teenage boy, he still found ways to manipulate his big sister. “I spoiled the crap out of him this summer,” said Lauren. “I made bets with him that I would be sure he wasn’t going to win. But, he’d do something to win and I’d have to take him out to dinner, or take him out for a Blizzard, or do something like that. This kid can eat like there’s no tomorrow, so I pretty much screwed

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really slow and he’s really groggy and he comes up: ‘Is that my baseball?’” “First thing! Not ‘Hi Lauren, nice to see you,’ just: ‘Is that my baseball?’” “Yes, it’s your baseball.” “Where’s T.J.’s signature?” Though Colin loves his baseball, he is, first and foremost, Ravens field hockey’s biggest fan.

up on that.” Also like any other guy his age, Colin likes baseball. No, check that, Colin LOVES baseball.

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Colin has grown to idolize T.J. Ferguson, a junior pitcher on the Franklin Pierce baseball team. T.J. spent this past summer pitching with the Keene Swamp Bats of the New England Collegiate Baseball League. The L’Heureux family hails from Sanford, Maine, which fields the Sanford Mainers, another team in the NECBL. Colin was excited to meet T.J. when the Swamp Bats came to Sanford in June. Unfortunately, the way it worked out, Colin was still in the hospital recovering from his brain stem surgery.

“Colin could care less about anything else,” said Lauren. “This fall the thing he was most concerned about was missing my field hockey games. He wasn’t concerned about ‘oh my God, the tumor in my arm that is massive is cancerous and could affect my whole body.’ No, he was worried about coming to Franklin Pierce field hockey games and seeing those who he considers his sisters: he’s in love with Dee, Kim [Jaksina], K-Nort [lacrosse player Kristen Norton], Beth, McKay, Jordan [Baillargeon] and Sim [Kayla Simeone]. He loves them all and that’s what he was most concerned about.” The fourth and most-recent surgery came during the Thanksgiving break. Colin had to have surgery to remove tumors from the same wrist that had been operated on over the summer. In addition, two of his lymph nodes had enlarged and were removed as a precaution to attempt to limit the opportunities for cancer to spread throughout his body.

“He was very upset and I told him I would take him to Keene when the Mainers went there,” said Lauren. However, the Mainers made the return trip to visit the Swamp Bats on July 23, which wound up being the date of Colin’s wrist surgery. The two eventually met this fall at one of Lauren’s field hockey games. When Keene visited Sanford, T.J. had all his fellow Swamp Bats sign a baseball for Colin and gave it to Lauren to deliver. When she came home after the game, Colin had just gotten home from the hospital, ahead of schedule. “When I came home, I walked into the house and I was holding it,” said Lauren. “He gets up and he’s walking

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The surgery on his wrist wound up far more complicated than anticipated, as it took over six hours to complete. The tumor had swelled and wrapped itself around the median nerve. Doctors had to remove 7.5 centimeters of his median nerve to extract the entire tumor. Furthermore, a tumor had developed on the ends of the tendons which had been cut during Colin’s surgery. It required still further incisions in his hand to remove. All of this on the day before Thanksgiving was all but certain to juggle the family’s plans for the holiday. “My dad told me that Colin was going to be in a lot of pain and that they probably weren’t going to make it home for Thanksgiving,” said Lauren. “I was ready to make the drive up. There was no way we weren’t spending Thanksgiving together.” True to his past form though, Colin began his recovery ahead of schedule and was out of the hospital before Thanksgiving. The holiday dinner would be home in Sanford after all. One thing though: Lauren was the only one back in Sanford to prepare it. “So, the next thing my dad said to me [after saying that Colin was on his way home] was ‘You ready to cook the bird?’” Oh boy. “My dad, in anticipation of complications, had already made the potatoes and stuffing,” noted Lauren. “All I had to do was wrestle with the turkey to get it out of the packaging, take the plastic ring around the legs off and season it.” Colin came home groggy from all the medications during and after the surgery, but perked up once he dug into the Thanksgiving feast. “And he said ‘I did a good job cooking the turkey’,” said Lauren. “That’s all that really mattered to me.” The word “hero” gets thrown around an awful lot, especially in a sports setting. Players who score big goals or hit long home runs or shoot clutch threepointers are labeled heroes by the media and looked up to by countless kids across the country. If anything, sports tends to dilute the idea of the hero.

But, when you hear Lauren call Colin her hero, you know there’s nothing but sincerity behind it. “He makes me smile and I’m so proud of him and how he moves from one thing to the next,” said Lauren. “He is always looking forward and never lets anything slow him down. Sometimes he drives me crazy, but he always makes me smile. I’d be lost without him.” Colin refuses to let surgery onto the short list of things that can slow him down. That resilience is certainly on the long list of ways he inspires and impresses both his family and others. “He’s had two brain surgeries now and was home within a matter of days after both of them,” added Lauren. “I couldn’t believe it. He’s an animal.” Behind every student-athlete is a story. Sometimes they give you perspective and show you where that student-athlete comes from. Sometimes they show teenagers who have matured beyond their years by growing up in under-privileged circumstances. Sometimes they remind you why we spend so much time watching so many games to begin with. Sometimes, they leave you with a little brother who’s a hero to his big sister and a big sister who had to help save Thanksgiving. Sometimes, they leave you with new heroes. “I don’t think I could go through half the stuff he goes through,” said Lauren. “No way.” “No way.”

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MEN’S TENNIS

The men’s soccer team won the Northeast-10 Conference championship during the fall and was ranked No. 1 in the nation for more than a month. The Ravens advanced to the regional finals of Super Region I in the NCAA Division II Tournament. Tom Reilly was named the NE-10 and Daktronics East Region Player of the Year, while also earning numerous first-team AllAmerica honors. Paul Latif, Diego Tabares, Vinny Papageorgiou and Shaliek Dawkins each earned at least one All-America honor as well. Shaun Taylor was named the Most Outstanding Player of the conference championship after he scored the game-winning goal in the title match. Dawkins and Taylor were joined by Jeff Hay, as the three competed in the NEISL All-Star Game in late December. The team was led by second-year head coach Craig Stewart, who was named the NE-10 coach of the year.

Junior Ben Brewer powered to a 6-2, 6-4 win at first singles against Assumption on Oct. 9, while freshman Pat Gilhuly picked up a three-set win at second singles.

WOMEN’S SOCCER

The team put together one of its best seasons by qualifying for the Northeast-10 tournament. The nine wins matched the second-highest mark in program history, and the Ravens finished above .500 in Northeast-10 play for the first time since 2000. Two Ravens set program records, including Tia Levins, who set a single-season record for goals scored with 12. Goalkeeper Brittany Nyzio became the school’s career leader in wins (16) and moved into a tie for the career lead in shutouts (7). Kimberly Jaksina was named to the All-Northeast-10 First-Team, while Jordan Baillargeon and Levins were placed on the conference’s second-team. Baillargeon, along with Kayla Simeone, competed in the FHCA North/South Senior All-Star Game in Louisville.

The team advanced to the Northeast-10 Conference championship match and ultimately qualified for the program’s 19th-consecutive NCAA Tournament – a Division II record. Amanda Panaro ranked fifth nationally in goals with 20, while also leading the NE-10 in goals, goals per game, points, points per game and gamewinning goals. She was named a First-Team All-Northeast-10 selection, while also earning multiple All-America honors. Shona Franklin and Kelly Weygand were also named to the conference’s first-team, while also gaining at least one All-America, respectively. GOLF The team was led by junior co-captain B.J. Powers, who had five top-10 finishes during the fall, including winning the individual title at the SNHU Penmen. The Ravens carded a score of 304 during the first day of the Northeast Intercollegiate Championship to sit in third place. The round was the team’s lowest score in the past five years. CROSS COUNTRY The team placed third at the Rivier Invitational on Sept. 24, and placed fourth at the Jim Sheehan Classic on Sept. 10.

WOMEN’S TENNIS Freshman Natasha McCarthy rolled to a 6-1, 6-1 victory at second singles against Assumption on Oct. 9. Junior Drew Alexander powered to a 6-2, 6-1 victory at fifth singles in the same match. MEN’S AND WOMEN’S ROWING The men’s team competed in a pair of events this fall, including the Head of the Fish on Oct. 27. The 2-man team of Dan Forget and Tristan Pagliari finished second in their event. FIELD HOCKEY

VOLLEYBALL The team improved upon its win total from the 2009 season under head coach Stephanie Dragan. Chelsie Kohout became the school’s alltime leader in digs with 1,905. Kohout also led the Northeast-10 in that category and was placed on the conference’s second-team. Lauren Miller, who ranked 28th nationally in aces per set, was named to the NE-10 All-Rookie Team. Christina Calderon, who returned for her senior campaign after four years away from the program, tallied the 1,000th kill of her career.

FALL SPORTS UPDATE

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MEN’S SOCCER

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c l a s s . n o t e s 1967

1980

1996

Hugh Fiore Jr. retired in October 2010 after 37 years in the retail automobile business. Hugh owned his own business for 23 years. His wife of 38 years, Anne, also retired after 20 years of being a teacher. They live in Sarasota, Fla., and summer in Bristol, R.I.

Nino Zamero leads an active life with hard work and moderate play. Among his many interests are watching sporting events including European and local soccer leagues, sailing, socializing with friends and studying world history. He reports that thanks to Facebook he is able to reconnect and reignite old friendships.

Leah Daws works and lives in Livingston, Mont. with her children Quinn, 4, and Amelia, 1. “Thanks to Facebook I have been able to reconnect with old Pierce friends!”

1969 Mary Jane (MJ) Sheldon-McKenzie is living on Sebec Lake in Bowerbank, Maine. Sebec is a pristine lake with great views, fishing, boating, etc. She says that since they are the only full-timers on their road of three houses, they got to name it (McKenzie Road). MJ has worked with Dr. Charles Burger for over 10 years. She says, “I’m loving my life here in the Central Highlands of Maine.”

1971 Don Moisen retired after a 31 year career with the US Department of Defense Schools overseas. He spent four years teaching on Okinawa and the rest in mainland Japan, Tokyo and Yokohama. Don is now retired in Palm Springs, Calif. and Bangkok, Thailand. He is busy renovating his Bangkok condo in the heart of the city. After graduating from Franklin Pierce, he earned his masters from Boston University. Allan Stegeman accepted the position of Transportation Manager at New Country BMW in Hartford in January 2010. Allan and his wife are the proud parents/ grandparents of three daughters and three grandchildren, the latest arriving in June 2010.

1977 David Porro is staying happy and in shape through ballroom dancing. Mary Ann (Maggie) Zadorozny is looking forward to retiring from the National Park Service in five years. “Lets start playing now, FPC Pals.”

1982 Robin Picard is currently working and living in the Boston area after participating in two missions with Doctors Without Borders in Kenya and Sudan. She spends weekends at her home in Fitzwilliam. Her daughter, Emily, was married on Oct. 2, 2010 at Fleur de Lis in Fitzwilliam with some FPC people in attendance. Don Pyke, class of 1981, was the dj for the event!

1985 Kent LaGasse recently retired from United States Army Medical Service.

1991 Cathylyn (Cattaneo) Helmar is the mother of two teenagers, Cassandra, 16, and Christopher, 15, and loving every minute of it! Work is good too! Hope to see the Class of 1991 for our 20th reunion in 2011. It will always be FPC to me.

1995 Erik Barone has just finished building a new house in Branford, Conn. where he lives with his wife of nine years, Kristine, two year old son, Chase, and six year old daughter, Erika. Erik has worked at ESPN for 13 years. Kimberly Guberman was promoted to corporate education liaison at Albertus Magnus College School of New Dimensions. Steve Jackson has published a textbook chapter in Communication Technology Update, finished production on an Internet movie “The Disrupted Gears” and, with a group of students, on a low cost quick turn around social media production “Socialize Wise.”

Carl Gamberdella ‘96 and Lisa (Ackerson) Hayes ‘96 were married on Aug.16, 2010. They have a blended family of four children: Olivia Hayes (10), Abigail Gamberdella (9), Eric Hayes (8) and Nicholas Gamberdella (5).

1997 Marty Cusick welcomed his second child, son Dylan James Cusick, born April 4, 2010.

1999 On a brilliant October day on the Champlain Islands of Vermont, Erin Haney married Gregory DeVries. The ceremony was very participatory with singing, readings and a big hand-holding circle. The couple danced the night away with friends and family from across the country. Erin and Greg live in Colchester, Vt. and are building a garden, planning for chickens and growing mushrooms. Ian Shiff ‘99 is currently running for La Mesa City Council.

2000 Andrew Francke was promoted from senior designer to creative team lead after two years of designing awardwinning automotive Web sites at Dealer. com in Burlington, Vt. He and wife Stacy recently celebrated their first anniversary and live in a new home near Lake Champlain in Milton, Vt. Kevin Green was married on Sept. 20, 2008 to his wife Heather. Franklin Pierce alumni in attendance were Greg Austin ‘99, Colleen McKinnon ‘99, Ryan Haskell ‘01, Justin Lacroix ‘02 and Rob Bligh ‘02. The couple lives in Framingham, Mass. with their two basset hounds, Clyde and Daphne. Kevin was promoted to vice president, marketing and social media at Digital Influence Group in Waltham, Mass. in June 2010.

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in.memoriam 2002 James Sartell completed his master’s degree in criminal justice from Boston University in September 2010.

2003 Jeremy Beach is currently studying Bronze/Iron Age nomads from Mongolia in anticipation of earning his Ph.D. in anthropology from Purdue University. Jacqueline McDunnah moved back to Connecticut, left teaching special education to rejoin the corporate world. She was hired as director of marketing and dealer relations which has proven to be very rewarding and a challenge. She enjoys the fast pace and working with so many different types of people.

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G. Andrew Bucci is engaged to Sarah Dumphrey. Elizabeth Lois Haffty and Matthew Polin were married on July 17 at St. Augustin’s Church in Newport, R.I. The reception was held at Ocean Cliff. The couple met while working together at MEDITECH in 2005. Liz is currently working on her masters degree in health care information/ informatics and is employed as advanced clinical systems analyst at Caritas Christi Health Care System. Jennifer Melnyk is currently building a start-up office in Parsippany, N.J. for Execu|Search. Execu|Search is a staffing firm that places people in jobs across the tri-state area. Jennifer is completing her masters and running her own start-up business selling classic cars.

2005 Sarah (Stevens) Leonard and her husband Allen welcomed their second son Caden Allen Leonard on Sept. 6, 2010. He joins his older brother, Brody Adrian Leonard, who was born on Nov. 20, 2008.

Justin McCoubry recently started as an event producer with Art of the Event - producing & designing a variety corporate and social events around New England. He also freelance directs theater at various colleges in the Boston area.

2006 Jessica Gale-Tanner and husband Ben Tanner welcomed a son, Cory Matthew Tanner, on Jan. 10, 2010 at Cheshire Medical Center in Keene. In June, Ben was promoted to assistant store manager at the Hannaford in Keene. Jessica is busy raising Cory and working from home as a Stampin’ Up! Independent Demonstrator. She also does freelance graphic design and photography. Kelly (Gross) Hebert gave birth to baby boy, Gabe Michael Hebert, on May 14, 2010.

Colleen S. Brooks CGPS Alumna ‘98 Dec. 2, 2010 Gordon Herbert Jr. Rindge Alumnus ‘96 Dec. 18, 2010 John “Jack” Maguire CGPS Alumnus ‘98 Dec. 26, 2010 Eugene H. Owens Rindge Alumnus ‘83 Sept. 21, 2010 Robert Paul CGPS Alumnus ‘80 Oct. 1, 2010

Andrew Van Ness is the sports reporter for WTSN in Dover, N.H.

2007 Allison Smith finished two years of service with AmeriCorps in Boston. She was accepted into Wheelock College’s graduate program for her masters in organizational leadership. She is now working with a few other FPC alums at FIRST.

2008 Nicole Kedaroe recently received her M.F.A. in dance performance and choreography from Smith College. She is now dancing and performing professionally and teaching at Springfield College.

2010 Adam Kierstead is currently working at the UNH School of Law (formerly Franklin Pierce Law Center) as multimedia coordinator and recently married Amanda St. Peters.

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Franklin Pierce is Turning 50!!!

needs you! Let us know about your achievements, life’s adventures, and what you’ve been doing since graduation. Please keep the following guidelines in mind when submitting news: • News should be of reasonable length and not more than 50 words. Please do not send entire letters, articles or press releases as they will not be reprinted. • A class note must be submitted by the alum who is the subject of the note. If a class note is submitted by someone other than the subject of the note, the subject of the note will be contacted for his/her permission before the information is printed. • When submitting wedding photos, please identify people by first and last names and class year. We check their class year but do not ask for permission to publish from each alum. • Engagement news, birth announcements and photos will be printed. News of impending weddings and/or births are not published. • E-mail addresses and Web sites will be printed as long as it is not promotional in nature. Submit your class notes for the next issue by Aug. 31, 2011 at franklinpierce.edu/alumni, click “Update your Information.”

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ark your calendar for one of the biggest celebrations in the history of Franklin Pierce University. On Sept. 28 to Oct. 1, 2012, we will kick off an entire year of celebration to honor 50 years of your alma mater. Rick Falconi ’69 has been named by President James F. Birge as chair of the 50th Anniversary Planning Committee. The committee of alumni, faculty and staff of the University is currently working on plans for this year-long celebration. The planning committee needs your assistance in creating a display of photographs and memorabilia as well as collecting stories that showcase the rich history and tradition of the first 50 years of Franklin Pierce. The University archive has some photographs and memorabilia but more items are needed, particularly items that highlight significant events and campus life throughout the five decades. If you have pictures, posters, theatre programs, flags, videos, slides or other items of interest that you would like to donate or loan for display purposes during the 50th anniversary celebration, now is the time to contact the Alumni Relations office at 1.877.372.2586 or alumni@franklinpierce.edu for details. Any items donated will be permanently archived at the University in accordance with University policy. Any items loaned will be cataloged and returned at the loaner’s expense at the end of the anniversary year. The story of Franklin Pierce would be incomplete without your chapter. We want to hear your story detailing the impact that the University has had on your life, family and career. Stories collected may be used in print publications, on the Web or other collateral materials as determined by the University. To share your story, contact the Alumni Relations office at 1.877.372.2586 or alumni@franklinpierce.edu. If you would like more information about the plans for the 50th Anniversary Celebration, please contact the committee chairman, Rick Falconi '69, at 50thanniversary@franklinpierce.edu or the Alumni Relations Office at 1.877.372.2586. Thank you.

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Message from the Alumni Association President

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n my time as an alumni volunteer and board member I've had opportunities to meet and talk with fellow Franklin Pierce alumni. The one recurring theme is how committed we all are to our alma mater and what a special place it holds in our hearts. It’s because of this commitment that you are not shy about giving me constructive, positive and sincere feedback on how the Alumni Association can better serve and engage alumni. Anytime I have such a conversation with an alumna, I encourage that alum to get involved, volunteer in whatever capacity possible. That's the challenge I issue to you today - if you don't like what you see do something about it; get involved! Our Alumni Association works best with a broadly representative group of engaged alumni working towards the common goal of strengthening the ties between one another and our alma mater. We all benefit from a strong Alumni Association and I encourage you to get involved. Don’t stand on the sidelines, hoping that someone else will act. Run for a position on the Alumni Association Board of Directors, serve on a committee, work with the alumni chapter in your area to plan and promote events, or serve as a mentor to a current student. Your Alumni Association needs your help, are you willing to answer the call? With Alumni PRIDE,

Joe Davis ‘89 Alumni Association President

Alumni Weekend 2011 F r i d ay , S e p t . 3 0

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Celebrating Reunion Class Years 1966

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1976

1981

1986

1991

1996

2001

2006

2011

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Return

Reconnect

Remember

Review the schedule of events and register online at www.franklinpierce.edu/alumni

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Your generous support makes it all possible By Dale Wheeler

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n today’s very competitive higher education market, Franklin Pierce University expends considerable effort and resources to provide the highest possible quality education for both our current students and for those who will be considering our institution in the future. Providing much-needed scholarships, supporting a highly qualified faculty, maintaining and enhancing classrooms and dorms, and enabling continued success for our athletic program is an expensive yet rewarding endeavor. The generous annual support of thousands of parents, alumni, friends and organizations is essential to keep Franklin Pierce University healthy and moving forward. Our University offers the Franklin Pierce Annual Fund as the primary means for our supporters to join together in partnership with our institution. Annual Fund gifts directly impact our students by providing scholarships, enhancing academic programs, and funding campus improvements. An important component of the Annual Fund effort is our Phonathon, which is held each fall and spring. We assemble a team of between 30 to 40 Franklin Pierce students, each of whom make calls to connect with our supporters, encouraging them to either renew their prior support or to become the newest member of our family of supporters. Our callers are not professional solicitors but real-life students who are happy to share their story with every contact they make.

“The phonathon has taken me in a direction I have never quite been in before. It has been great to meet and interact one-on-one with friends and family of the college who care about its future as much as I do. I have learned valuable skills that I can take with me for future jobs. I have enjoyed reaching out to people, and it is just so great to see such positive participation from so many alumni and friends. I have learned the importance of the Annual Fund, how it contributes to the advancement of the University, and I look forward to contributing as an alumni.” -Michelle Barbeau ‘11 When you receive a call from a member of the Franklin Pierce Phonathon team, we encourage you to: 1-answer the phone, 2-talk with our student caller and 3-consider making or renewing your annual pledge of support. If you have moved or recently changed phone numbers or e-mails, please update us by one of these methods: Visit www.franklinpierce.edu/alumni/info_update.htm or call 877.372.2586 To make a contribution to the Franklin Pierce Annual Fund visit www.franklinpierce.edu/giving or call 603.899.4030 Thank you for your support of our University. Every day, our students see the benefits that are the result of Annual Fund contributions just like yours.

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Refer a student to Franklin Pierce University

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here are over 18,000 Franklin Pierce University alumni living in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and in over 50 countries throughout the world. Think of it, almost anywhere you go you have a chance of meeting someone with whom you share a most unique story. It is a story worth sharing and we'd like to ask you to tell it to any high school student thinking about college. Tell it to those whom you feel may be a good match for Franklin Pierce University. These prospective students may be your own or those of a friend, neighbor, co-worker or relative. All you need to do is fill out the coupon and give it to that prospective student to send in with their application for admission. Franklin Pierce will waive the $40 application fee as a courtesy to both you and the student. Who knows the value of a Franklin Pierce education better than you? You have enjoyed the personal attention of professors and the extraordinary opportunities that Franklin Pierce provides to its students. Your referral will allow us to introduce a new generation of students to the academic leadership, stimulating and rewarding coursework, interesting faculty, meaningful relationships with other students and a world of new opportunities. Thank you for helping to tell the story of Franklin Pierce University.

New Hampshire 6,778

Washington 65 Montana 15 Oregon 33

Idaho 10

Nevada 41

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Wyoming 4

Utah 19

California 325

Nebraska 8 Colorado 139

New Mexico 32

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Kansas 15 Oklahoma 11

Wisconsin 26 Iowa 16

Missouri 24

Texas 22

Ohio 22

Kentucky 23 Tennesse 60

Arkansas 11

Alabama 23

Massachusetts 3,360 Rhode Island 282 Connecticut 1,119 New Jersey 675 Delaware 31 Maryland 171 District of Columbia 20

New York 1,124

Michigan 38

Indiana Illinois 35 66

M.S. 5

Hawaii 16

Maine 700

Vermont 369

Minnesota 34

South Dakota 2

Pennsylvania 287 W.V. Virginia 11 211

North Carolina 234 South Carolina 77 Georgia 113

Louisiana 17 Florida 711

Alaska 9

Geographic Distribution of Alumni

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Arizona 124

North Dakota 1

As of February 2010

USA Aruba Australia Austria Bahamas Belgium Belize Bermuda Canada China Dominican Republic Egypt England Finland France

17,775 1 3 2 11 1 1 9 25 1 4 2 20 12 1

Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Haiti Hong Kong Indonesia Ireland Israel Jamaica Japan Korea Luxembourg Malaysia Netherlands

11 1 2 1 1 1 1 6 1 1 37 2 1 1 4

Northern Ireland Norway Panama Peru Philippines Poland Rwanda Saudi Arabia Scotland Serbia Singapore South Korea Spain Sweden Switzerland

1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 4 5 1 1 3 8 1

Thailand Turkey Ukraine United Kingdom West Indies Total 217

5 6 4 3 1

AE American Samoa Puerto Rico Virgin Islands Total 17

8 1 5 3

Grand Total 18,009

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Each year, gifts to the Franklin Pierce Annual Fund provide: • Financial assistance to our students. • Enhancement to our academic programs. • Assistance to our athletic programs. • Funding for extra curricular activities.

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• Campus development.

Please consider donating to the Annual Fund today! For more info, or to make a gift, call: 603.899.4030, e-mail: development@franklinpierce.edu, or visit www.franklinpierce.edu/giving 40 University Drive, Rindge, NH 03461

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FRANKLIN PIERCE UNIVERSITY 40 UNIVERSITY DRIVE RINDGE, NEW HAMPSHIRE 03461

NON-PROFIT US POSTAGE PAID FRANKLIN PIERCE UNIVERSITY

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Pierce Radius - Spring 2011