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PIERCE

vol. 2 no. 2 2010

ALUMNI MAGAZINE

Fueling the fire for sustainability Franklin Pierce hosts 45th commencement Coming of age: Graduate study at Rindge

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EDITOR Patricia Garrity ALUMNI RELATIONS DIRECTOR Shirley English-Whitman G’07 CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Doug DeBiase, Shirley English-Whitman G’07, Patricia Garrity, Matthew Janik, Michelle Marrone, Abbie Tumbleson ‘10

DESIGN Ryan E. Hulse ‘09 CHANGE OF ADDRESS Contact Alumni Relations Phone: 877.372.2586 e-mail: alumni@franklinpierce.edu

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COMMENTS Address all comments to: Pierce Radius Editor Marketing and Communications Franklin Pierce University 40 University Drive Rindge, NH 03461 or e-mail PierceRadiusEditor@franklinpierce.edu

PHOTOGRAPHY, Ryan E. Hulse ‘09, Ann Lafond, Abbie Tumbleson ’10

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From the President

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Fueling the fire for sustainability

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Sy Montgomery brings environmental awareness

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Natalya is Famous!!!. . .Well, almost!

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The indispensible triangle of global citizenship

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Memories of Januaries in Schruns, Austria

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Alumni Profile: Kristen Costa Francoeur ‘05

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Coming of age: Graduate study at Rindge

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Congratulations Class of 2010

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In the News

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Ravens Athletics

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Class Notes

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In Memoriam

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Alumni in Action

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From the President of the Alumni Association

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Alumni and Reunion Weekend 2010

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Upcoming Events

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Refer a Student

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Dr. Birge tours the new wood pellet heating system.

Message from James F. Birge, President

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reetings from the shores of Pearly Pond and the base of Grand Monadnock!

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Our location, situated between these two geographic markers of southwestern New Hampshire, provides us with a variety of metaphors to describe a Franklin Pierce University education. In this issue of Radius, you can read about, and see photos of the 2010 graduates of Franklin Pierce University as they set sail for new horizons and climb to new peaks. It is always exciting to see the enthusiasm of these new alumni and to be humbled by their idealism and goals. Also in this issue, you will read about Debra Picchi and Tom Desrosiers in the faculty profile section and their work and support of our students who seek out new learning experiences around the globe. Debra and Tom’s efforts to expose our students to new lands and new cultures highlight the importance of an education for the 21st century. You will also read in this issue about Kristen Costa Francoeur ’05 who has climbed the career path to become the Assistant Curator at the Newport Restoration Foundation as a result of the influence of Professor Donna Decker. Equally exciting is the story of our recent M.B.A. graduate, Ben Rosenfeld ’10, who has accepted the Director of Basketball Operations position at Loyola Marymount University in California. Each of these articles reveals the great work of our faculty and the spirit of our students to explore and succeed. As always, you can catch up on the whereabouts and adventures of your classmates in the class notes section.

And don’t forget to order your copy of the recently published Alumni directory by contacting Shirley EnglishWhitman at 603.899.1131 or engliss@franklinpierce.edu. I am sure you will be pleased with the activities at your alma mater that we have highlighted in this issue of Radius. Please do not hesitate to send us your comments about the publication and your ideas for future issues. Better yet, if you have not been to the Rindge campus in recent years, please stop by and visit us so that you can tell us your ideas in person and so that we can show you the many changes to the Rindge campus and share news of Franklin Pierce University’s other campuses in Concord, Goodyear, Lebanon, Manchester and Portsmouth. Finally, as I have written before, in order to offer the kinds of activities that make us a learning community, we rely upon our friends and benefactors to support us. Now, more than ever, Franklin Pierce University needs your support. We have not increased tuition for the 2010-2011 academic year in order to help families afford a Franklin Pierce University education. Please consider helping us to assist these families by making a contribution to one of our scholarship funds. Just as you may have been aided by a scholarship that someone else funded, today’s students need your help. Warmly, James F. Birge President

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Fueling the fire for sustainability at Franklin Pierce By Abbie Tumbleson ‘10

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ith predictions that green, initiatives are not simply fads or trends, Franklin Pierce is doing our part to improve sustainability efforts. The Sustainability Council was formed by Doug Lear, Director of Facilities, and Catherine Koning, Professor of environmental science. The Rindge campus has transformed and saved expenses by converting areas on campus to be heated by wood pellets. The ECO Club actively participates with the campus, and community events, such as Earth Week, are running strong. Michelle Comeau was appointed as Franklin Pierce University’s first sustainability coordinator in 2009 and is also a member of the Rindge Energy Commission. Along with her husband and three children, Comeau is a recent addition to the Town of Rindge. “I moved to the Monadnock area almost 20 years ago, but to Rindge just last year,” she says. “I have found such a great environment in which to raise a family. Beyond my career studies of rivers and their inhabitants, teaching students about global change and global environmental issues, and now embarking on the task of upholding the University’s mission of environmental sustainability, I have found the most unbelievable of classrooms: Rindge forests, wetlands, lakes and rivers, which enrich my children’s awareness of self and love for the world they live in.”

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Professor Koning also focuses on the local landscape as a source of her interest in sustainability issues at Franklin Pierce. “I’m ‘imprinted’ on the New England landscape, so the first time I saw Pearly Pond and the hills around it, I was hooked.” According to Koning, “Sustainability is important everywhere, but at Franklin Pierce we have the advantage of being able to immerse ourselves in the natural resources around us – this offers a deep understanding of the connection between human actions and the natural world.” Hiking, swimming, watching wildlife, snowshoeing through the back country, etc., allows us to observe the creatures with whom we share the Earth, and see how they react to human disturbance. Many people in the Franklin Pierce community share these views. As a result, the University has recently added an academic program, the Sustainability Certificate, to its offerings. This certificate program will begin in fall 2010

Top: Professor Catherine Koning Bottom: Professor Michelle Comeau

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and students can enroll as freshmen. The new certificate and the program are structured similarly to others on campus including the Global Leadership Certificate and the Women in Leadership Certificate Program. The certificate program was launched under the Green Earth Initiative getting students from every major involved with aspects of sustainability. Comeau said, “They will have an edge in whatever field they go into by having a sustainability background, that being not necessarily an environmental theme.” The program will be tailored to students’ interests and will focus on hands-on projects that will not only coincide with their major, but will also teach them the importance of considering social, racial and environmental justice in “green” projects. Possible projects might focus on aspects of green building design, incentives or persuasive ideas to convince people to use less electricity, carpooling, options for a campus farm, “eco-art”, sustainably-harvested wood products from Franklin Pierce University forests, landscaping with native plants, local and organic foods, etc. The curriculum will start off with a freshman seminar class and end with a capstone course during senior year.

In between, students will take three courses that are already offered here, which weave environmental or sustainability themes into the course. Select professors and courses have been designated, involving many different majors at Franklin Pierce. The Council recently completed the Climate Action Plan, which is a combination of all the different activities on campus and calculated the University’s greenhouse gas and carbon footprint, according to Comeau. The projected plan will reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 58 percent by 2020. Future plans may include the formation of more positions like the Sustainability Coordinator. The ECO Club is looking to have Eco Rangers, environmental Community Assistants for the dorms. They would like to keep increasing education through a sustainability trail, which would give people who come to campus a better look at what Franklin Pierce has accomplished for sustainability, including transitioning to wood pellets, buildings being built to be Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certified, and future options for retrofitting structures on campus to be more efficient.

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Comeau shared an exciting list of pilot programs and future ideas: “We want to implement the use of smart strips, for example. Smart strips are similar to typical power strips but they only go on at certain times because they are on a timer and you can control different aspects of what parts you have on.” She said, “For example, your alarm clock stays on all the time, but your lights can turn off if you program it. We are looking for funding for more smart strips to do a pilot program with the freshmen. Based on a study that another university has done, it saved them $72,000/year, and reduces a ridiculous amount of carbon emissions.” Other initiatives already in progress include our food service provider, Sodexo, purchasing more local foods, and our University departments purchasing recycled materials or Energy Star appliances. Many Franklin Pierce employees have been looking into rideshare programs. This year’s graduating class processed in gowns made from recycled plastic bottles which can be reused or recycled again. Franklin Pierce University and the Town of Rindge continue to forge a better relationship through collaborating

in their sustainability efforts. “We are connecting with the town, which has been a great experience,” said Comeau. A new community garden with all organic locally grown food plots has been established by the Energy Commission of Rindge, facilitated by Commission member, John McCracken. It also acts as a place where donated food can be grown. The University plans to buy a plot for Franklin Pierce students to cultivate pumpkins for the fall. With the future comes many positive changes and opportunities for the sustainability programs at Franklin Pierce. The University has recently added an M.B.A. in Energy and Sustainability Studies to its offerings. This M.B.A. allows students to concentrate their business studies on topics of far-reaching societal importance – sustainability, corporate social responsibility, climate change, energy production and consumption, and business as an agent for social change. These efforts further demonstrate the University’s core mission of developing leaders of conscience who go out into their communities around the world and make them a better place to live.

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Sy Montgomery brings

environmental awareness to Franklin Pierce By Abbie Tumbleson ’10

Sy Montgomery with Professor Catherine Koning

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y Montgomery spoke at the College at Rindge on April 21 to a packed audience in Pierce Hall about the world we all inhabit. She was a featured speaker during Franklin Pierce University’s Earth Week events.

were the southern hairy-nosed wombats native to the region. According to Montgomery, every cent spent with the organization is a tax write-off and people can earn credits toward college degrees through Earthwatch.

Montgomery is a prominent New England writer who has published 15 books for adults and children about our relationships with the natural world. Animals and indigenous native cultures have been some of her greatest teachers. “When the student is ready the teacher will appear,” said Montgomery, referencing a Buddhist saying.

After traveling around, pitching a tent, and living with emus, Montgomery and her husband, Howard Mansfield, moved to New Hampshire. She said, “It (New Hampshire) is still 90 percent forested and still has about 90 percent of its wetlands.”

She led the audience on her writing journey from researching a book 10,000 feet up in Rwanda to stepping into a limestone pit full of 18,000 snakes in Manitoba, Canada years later for a children’s book. Her passion for animals and conservation were strong themes throughout the presentation and radiate throughout her career. Growing up in the 1950s and 1960s witnessing new environmental consequences such as pollution, deforestation and overpopulation, she decided to bring attention to them by becoming a writer. “Humans are sharing the world and destroying it unwittingly,” she said. Montgomery started out as a newspaper reporter five years after taking some time off to visit Southern Australia. She fell madly in love with the Outback while conducting fieldwork and research. She was introduced to the organization Earthwatch Institute, which, according to their Web site, “engages people worldwide in scientific field research and education to promote the understanding and action necessary for a sustainable environment.” Her teachers in Australia

Like one of her heroines, Jane Goodall, Montgomery has helped the world understand animals, their families and their natural world. “We are capable of great commitment bringing endangered species back. We can prevent these species from declining,” she said. Her hope is that the kinds of books she writes and the work being done at Franklin Pierce University will help change the world. According to Montgomery, we share 40 percent of our genetics with a daisy, and we cannot live without each other. “This is what will remind us that the great green breathing world is the real world. This is what will remind us it’s our home,” said Montgomery. Montgomery was the winner of the 2009 New England Independent Booksellers Association Nonfiction Award, the 2010 Children’s Book Guild Nonfiction Award and is a friend of Professor Catherine Koning and Franklin Pierce University and has collaborated with our mass communication department in the past.

Abbie Tumbleson ’10 graduated Summa Cum Laude with a Bachelor of Arts in Mass Communication. She has been a student staff member in the Franklin Pierce Marketing Office and a contributing writer to this publication as well as others. She also served as Arts & Entertainment Editor of the Pierce Arrow and has completed an internship, freelanced and written stories for the Monadnock Ledger Transcript, the Northern New England Review, Monadnock Living Magazine and The Exchange. You can contact this aspiring writer at tumblesonabbie@yahoo.com.

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Student Profile: Natalya Waye ‘10

Natalya is Famous!!! . . . Well, almost! By Patricia Garrity

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ith her effervescent personality and enthusiasm overflowing as she speaks, it’s not hard to get interested in her recent project. This documentarian is serious. This was not just a class project for credit. This is her passion. A native of Shrewsbury, Mass., Natalya Waye ‘10 knew back in high school that she wanted to be in video production. “I spent so many afternoons working with my father on projects for our local public access station and that is where I truly fell in love with media,” says Waye. “I knew that I wanted a school with media production, that I wanted to stay in New England and that I wanted to go to a smaller school. Franklin Pierce was the perfect fit.” She started in right away as an active member of FPTV (Franklin Pierce Television) within her first weeks on campus and has been involved ever since. “From a teacher's point of view, Natalya is the ideal student -eager to learn, enthusiastic for the work we do, strongly principled, an excellent speaker, and an attentive listener. It's been a privilege to work with her," says Professor Richard Roth. Waye just graduated from Franklin Pierce with a major in mass communications and a dual concentration in media production and media studies and has already left her mark both on Pierce and on the real world. Her recent documentary, “Art for Water,” has not only hit the Internet on YouTube but she was also recently invited to premiere the film at the Hynes Convention Center in Boston as part of their Down:2: Earth Sustainable Living Expo. So what is this documentary which has captured the passions of such an enthusiastic young woman about? She says, “It’s about how a small university in New Hampshire, Franklin Pierce University, came together as an institution to work towards one common goal. This goal being to create awareness about the water crisis by using multiple disciplines in the school such as dance, film, business, sciences, etc. During the process of creating awareness throughout the University, it spread through the campus, to the surrounding community and is continuing to grow today.” She tells this story through interviews with both faculty and students.

“Well I knew going into my senior year that I wanted to do a documentary, but I wasn’t sure what I was going to do,” says Waye. “Joni Doherty (professor) and Christine Destrempes, the artist in residence, came into our advanced media production class, taught by Dr. Richard Roth. They wanted a student to document the process of Art for Water. This program works to have a community or school come together with a common goal of creating awareness about topics related to the environment. It was such an exciting program. The thing that I enjoyed most was seeing the process of the Art for Water and my documentary both coming together.” She credits the close relationships she has made on campus; something that she says is unique to Franklin Pierce, with helping her to become who she is today. “The sense of community and individuality that is created here is what I value most,” says Waye. “They encourage you to be yourself. It is really my family.” While at Pierce, she completed two internships, one at the public access station in her hometown and the other at Yankee Publishing in Dublin, N.H. “Both of these internships gave me such amazing field experience,” she says. “I wasn’t just running and getting coffee, I was working hands on with editing, preproduction, etc.” She has definitely found her passion and credits her experience at Pierce with helping to make that happen. “I think a big part of honing my skills was the supportive environment at Franklin Pierce and I am forever grateful,” says Waye. Keep your eye out for Natalya Waye, she is sure to make her mark.

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Faculty Profile: The indispensible triangle of global citizenship By Patricia Garrity

Picchi and Desrosiers in Egypt

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sk Dr. Debra Picchi, Professor of anthropology and Coordinator of the global citizenship certificate program, what is the most valuable thing she teaches her students and she will say “the cross-cultural perspective; that there are different ways of doing the same things in each society and that can be respected. That’s my big meta message for every course.”

generation as they work to develop relationships with global partners. “Language learning, cultural study and international travel, that triangle, is indispensible with the creation of what we call a global citizen,” says Picchi. “International travel is a good way to learn that there are other ways of doing things and everyone doesn’t think the same way,” says Desrosiers.

Never in the history of the world has there been more international travel, commerce and communication than there is today. And yet most of us are totally unaware of the many similarities that bind us together. What is always highlighted are the misconceptions, prejudices and politics. Born in Japan and schooled in Germany, she is no stranger to travel and to the benefits gained from these experiences.

“Global citizens are interested in both their travels and making a difference in the world,” adds Desrosiers. They recalled an anthropology student, Alison Knox, who after she graduated joined the Peace Corps and went to Zimbabwe and then went to Geneva and worked for the U.N. She later came back to Franklin Pierce to share her story with current students. “This is a small place in a rural area and these students do extraordinary things,” said Picchi.

Picchi came to Franklin Pierce in 1982 because it had a small but very viable anthropology department. “I knew I would have the potential for making a real contribution,” said Picchi. “This was important to me as opposed to getting a job at a large university where there would be a large number of anthropologists and I would be lost in a crowd.” Tom Desrosiers came to Franklin Pierce right out of grad school and was a faculty member until 1969, and then worked in a number of different offices including enrollment, academics and admissions. Like Picchi, Desrosiers is both comfortable and fond of traveling having attended boarding school in French-speaking Canada at a young age and having led January trips to Austria during the 1971 to 1975 years at Pierce. See the excerpt on the following page, Memories of Januaries in Schruns Austria, and read the entire story online. Both Picchi and Desrosiers agree that global citizenship is going to become a more vital skill for the next

Picchi and Desrosiers do more than just talk about the importance of a study abroad experience. They started the study abroad scholarship because during this past year and a half, with this recession, they saw interest in study abroad decrease because students were saying that they just couldn’t afford it. They wanted to encourage and support people who really had an interest but could not go abroad. “We’re hoping to expand on that in coming years to make more scholarship money available,” said Picchi. “If the student wants to travel, the scholarship makes the difference,” says Desrosiers. Picchi sums up her feelings about teaching Franklin Pierce students with, “In general, this is a story that repeats itself again and again - meeting a student their freshman year and watching them over the next four years just blossom,” says Picchi. “It’s an amazing transformation to see. That happens a lot and I think it’s a source of pride for the faculty and staff to work with the students here.”

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Memories of Januaries in Schruns, Austria 1971-1975

By Thomas Desrosiers

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hose of you who joined me on the charter flights in Decembers of 1971 through 1975 on our way to a month of living in the beautiful town of Schruns, Austria, take out your diaries and scrapbook, relive the excitement and share your memories and your photos! In the Fall of 2008, I revisited the Montafon Valley and stayed at Hotel Both. The valley is still exquisite with more lifts and breathtaking vistas. The MontafonerBahn (the little red and yellow train) still winds it’s way along the river Ill from Bludenz to Schruns. The Fohrenberger Brewery in Bludenz still brews its wonderful beer and the town of Schruns remains charming and friendly.

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I took the HochYoch lift to the restaurant at the top. Remember Senigrat, the single chair that went up the steep and narrow peak? The deck of the restaurant looks out over the valley. You can see the tops of the trails we skied down to the middle station and some years to the valley floor. Hang gliders were flying down to the town, landing in the field near the main road to Gashurn. The Hotel Taube with its outdoor dining area remains the same, but the pension Golmerblick, where many of us stayed, has been replaced with shops and a new hotel above. St Joseph’s Krankenhaus, the small hospital opposite the Golmerblick, is now a juvenile center. No more instant medical attention two minutes from the bottom of the lift. I hope some of these glimpses of places we enjoyed prompt you to read the longer article available online at www.franklinpierce.edu/academics/studyabroad and the alumni pages. Digitize some of your photos and share them by sending them to the Pierce Radius editor at PierceRadiusEditor@franklinpierce.edu.

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Alumni Profile: Kristen Costa Francoeur ‘05 By Shirley English-Whitman G’07

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risten Costa Francoeur ’05 is doing exactly what she wants to do; exactly what she loves to do; exactly what she found was her passion when she came to Franklin Pierce.

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After graduating from Pierce and receiving her Master of Arts in Public Humanities from Brown University, Francoeur began working as the Assistant Curator at Newport Restoration Foundation. Founded in 1968 by Doris Duke, its purpose is to preserve, interpret and maintain landscape and objects reflecting Aquidneck Island’s 18th- and 19th- century architectural culture. As assistant curator, Francoeur sets up exhibits, educates tour guides and develops educational programs at Rough Point, Duke’s Newport mansion, Samuel Whitehorne House, a Federal style mansion and museum of Newport furniture, and Prescott Farm, a colonial history site. Francoeur’s journey to Franklin Pierce began after receiving a brochure in the mail. Her interest, piqued by the promise and diversity of the American Studies degree, she came for a tour, fell in love with the campus and by Christmas break of her senior year in high school, she was accepted into her first (and only) choice school. “Franklin Pierce really gives you a chance to find yourself, spread your wings and figure out what you want to do in life,” Francoeur says. “The whole humanities department was my backbone. What I learned from the professors and in the classroom really helped nurture my interest in museums.” Her women in leadership experience with a women studies minor and women in leadership certificate taught

her about herself and what her strengths were, and later working as a woman in a professional field, gave her more of an understanding of how everyone fits together – how the world works. “This is a very all encompassing certificate,” said Francoeur. Finding her voice also earned Francoeur a Fitzwater Medallion for her work as a public historian in 2005. “For the most part, the interpersonal communications and the ability to work with professors right off the bat was something that definitely prepared me to work in a professional environment,” said Francoeur. Francoeur credits Professor Donna Decker (college writing) with helping her find her voice. She says that she never thought she was a good writer. A high school English teacher told her not to do any job that involved writing. In college writing “they said, we’ll teach you where to put the commas but your ideas are wonderful.” That affirmation set the stage for a successful graduate school experience and a career that includes researching, writing and presenting professional papers on topics such as: “Halls of Fame: Where History and Fame Collide,” panel discussion at American Association of Museums Conference, Denver, Colo., April 2008, and “Ethnic Communities and Historic Preservation,” panel presentation at Rhode Island State Preservation Conference, Providence, R.I., April 2008. “It (Franklin Pierce) is a place where the community really supports you and when you contribute to it, it supports you more,” Francoeur says. “I feel like I am coming to visit family when I come back here. I am truly blessed. “

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Coming of age: Graduate study at Rindge

By Michelle Marrone

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n the University’s forty-eight year history, the Rindge campus has been home to many traditional undergraduate students – arriving full of promise, departing with new proficiencies and limitless potential. The University’s College of Graduate & Professional Studies began offering graduate level study at satellite campuses in 1973. In 2009, the accelerated M.B.A. in Leadership at Rindge was offered as a fifth year program to graduating Franklin Pierce seniors and recent college graduates in the local area, a coming of age for the Rindge campus. “The timing was right,” says Mary Farrell, Acting Dean of the College of Graduate & Professional Studies. “Our graduating seniors were heading into a challenging economy and one of the worst job markets in years. The accelerated M.B.A. in Leadership at Rindge offered students an excellent opportunity to continue their education and enter the workforce a year later with added credentials.” The popularity of “4+1” programs at colleges and universities throughout the U.S. has never been more apparent. “Prospective students and their parents are asking me personally if Franklin Pierce University will provide programs to educate their children through graduate study,”

commented Dr. James F. Birge, University President, “and we are actively investigating opportunities to fill this growing student demand.” Based on the success of the M.B.A. launch, the University expanded graduate study on the Rindge campus in June 2010 to include two new accelerated master’s programs: the accelerated Master of Science in Information Technology Management and the accelerated Master of Education in General Special Education with Learning Disabilities. “The new accelerated graduate degree programs at Rindge are golden opportunities for motivated students,” says Linda Quimby, Franklin Pierce’s Director of Undergraduate Admissions at Rindge. “Students are looking for these programs and often making decisions about where they will pursue their undergraduate degree based on the added opportunity for a fifth year of graduate study.” Graduate study at the Rindge campus fulfills the University’s mission to cultivate and graduate active, engaged lifelong learners and leaders of conscience. The transition marks a coming of age for the Rindge campus, a new era of possibilities and opportunities for Franklin Pierce students, faculty and alumni.

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Ben Rosenfeld, MBA ’10 shares his own coming-of-age experience as a student in the first M.B.A. class at Rindge. B.S., University of Massachusetts at Amherst M.B.A., Franklin Pierce University Career Goal: Athletic Director

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ressed for success with an air of quiet confidence, Ben Rosenfeld M.B.A. ’10 reflects on a year of academic success and personal growth having recently completed his M.B.A. in Leadership at Rindge. “I loved the program and feel very fortunate to have been a part of the inaugural class.”

The accelerated program not only challenged Rosenfeld academically, but required him to develop disciplined work habits and time management skills. “As much as I value the education I received at Pierce, completing my degree in one year and working as a graduate assistant with the men’s basketball team demanded that I learn quickly to multitask and be very disciplined in managing my time,” said Rosenfeld. “Developing these life skills was an added benefit.”

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“My M.B.A. program was quite a change,” said Rosenfeld. “Being a small graduate class at Rindge and moving through the program as a cohesive group, we bonded quickly. The M.B.A. classes are taught in an open forum, so the coursework required us to constantly engage each other in discussions and projects. We would feed off each others ideas and experiences, learning as much from each other as we did from our professors.”

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Rosenfeld received his B.S. in Sport Management from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst in 2006 and was accustomed to large lecture halls and limited class interaction.

“When I look back over the last year, what impresses me

most is how much my classmates and I have matured,” said Rosenfeld. “We’ve all have come a long way in a very short time. I’ve developed lasting friendships with students, staff and faculty that I’ll carry with me long after graduation, so Pierce will always be a part of my life.” Success: Congratulations are in order. Rosenfeld accepted the Director of Basketball Operations position at Loyola Marymount University in California prior to graduation and is now preparing for his move to Southern California.

“I loved the program and feel very fortunate to have been a part of the inaugural class.” - Ben Rosenfeld, MBA ’10

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Accelerated Graduate Programs at Rindge Master of Business Administration in Leadership

by a 16-week internship in the fall. Courses are delivered in a hybrid or 100% online format.

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This degree is solidly based on “best practices” research and action-based learning experiences to help graduates become caring and supportive teachers in a standards-based environment.

he Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) in Leadership prepares graduates to assume leadership roles and positions of influence in business organizations and their communities. The program focuses on developing advanced quantitative and qualitative skills in the areas of accounting, finance, marketing, human resource management, organizational behavior, business strategy and leadership.

For complete information, go to franklinpierce.edu/education or contact Deborah Jameson at jamesond@franklinpierce.edu.

Designed as a 12-month program, students begin classes in June and complete their course of study the following May.

Master of Science in Information Technology Management

The M.B.A. in Leadership at Rindge is a tremendously versatile degree that provides graduates the opportunity to excel in many areas of business, government and community affairs.

he Master of Science in Information Technology Management (M.S. in I.T.M.) offers the best of business management and technology education to graduate technology professionals with strong leadership and management skills.

For complete information, go to franklinpierce.edu/mbaleadership or contact Edward French at frenched@franklinpierce.edu.

Master of Education in General Special Education with Learning Disabilities (with or without Certification)

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s more and more school systems require teachers to have a master’s degree, Franklin Pierce’s M.Ed. program offers students the unique opportunity to complete their graduate degree in just 12 to 18 months. The M.Ed. degree without certification is offered as a 12-month program from June to May. It is designed for individuals who have earned a baccalaureate degree and are already certified or for those not certified, but who desire an advanced degree in Special Education in order to work in other types of related settings which do not require certification. For those undergraduates that majored in other content areas and are not certified to teach, or those who want additional certification in special education, the M.Ed. and Teacher Certification is offered as an 18-month program with classes June to May followed

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Business management courses focus on developing a depth of knowledge in finance, economics, and organizational behavior, as well as leadership and communication skills. The technical portion of the program offers state-of-the-art learning focused on information technology and computer networking concepts.

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Designed as a 12-month program, students begin classes in June and complete their course of study the following May. The M.S. in I.T.M. prepares graduates to expertly manage the practical problems encountered daily within the technology industry and to advance into leadership positions in their chosen field. For complete information, go to franklinpierce.edu/msitm or contact Maria Garcia at garciam@franklinpierce.edu.

Franklin Pierce University offers a variety of graduate and doctoral degree programs at locations throughout New Hampshire and in Goodyear, Ariz. For a list of all the University’s graduate study programs, go to franklinpierce.edu/graduate. Update: September starts are available for all programs. Contact us for more information.

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Congratulations Class of 2010

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Franklin Pierce University hosts 45th commencement

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ranklin Pierce University celebrated its forty-fifth commencement on Saturday, May 15 on the Rindge, N.H. campus. A total of 614 students participated, with 47 students receiving doctoral degrees, 73 students receiving master’s degrees, 463 students receiving bachelor’s degrees and 31 students earning associate degrees. The ceremony included the presentation of two honorary degrees. Honorary degree recipients were Franklin Pierce University Chairman of the Board Dr. Zeddie Bowen, currently serving in his 6th year as Chair, and Patricia Lang Barry, Rindge Selectwoman who has worked to support a strong campus and community relationship. Bowen is the former vice president and provost of the University of Richmond, a position he held for 16

years. He is currently a facilitator for the Association of Governing Boards (AGB) specializing in board development and assessment, academic affairs and planning workshops. Bowen has played an active role in the creation of two distinctive and successful educational consortia: the Associated Colleges of the South, whose members include the premier liberal art colleges in the South; and the Associated New American Colleges, whose members include the top comprehensive universities in the nation. As a consultant and workshop facilitator specializing in academic vision and curriculum, academic governance, institutional mission and board development, he has worked with numerous academic institutions and has had an ongoing positive relationship with Franklin Pierce University for many

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years leading the way to university status in 2007. Bowen received his B.A. from Johns Hopkins University and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Harvard University. Lang Barry first moved to the Rindge community at the age of 13 years old and has worked in a number of different positions in the human services, education and hospitality fields; and is currently an English teacher at Conant High School. She has served as a Selectman for the Town of Rindge for the past five years and has supported the University and the Community in her participation on the Town/Gown committee, her written testimony on behalf of the University during the NH House of Representative’s Education Committee hearing on HB1400 and her efforts to help other town officials understand the benefits of having Franklin Pierce University located in Rindge. She resides in the Town of Rindge with her husband and four daughters. “In my first year at Franklin Pierce, it has been one of my top priorities to work to better the relationship that the

University has with the Town of Rindge,” states Dr. James F. Birge, President. “Patricia Lang Barry has become a true friend and supporter of the University just as she has always been the same for the Town of Rindge. She has worked in collaboration with me to help build a community committed to the betterment of both the Town and the University. She values the contributions made by our students, staff and faculty to the area community. Patricia leads by example in offering support to the University as a wonderful citizen and neighbor.” “Zeddie Bowen has been a stabilizing force for the University particularly during these difficult economic times,” says Birge. “His efforts are often behind the scenes but the impact of these have been far-reaching and enduring such as recent expansions on campus and our transition to university status. The University has been fortunate to be the recipient of his efforts and guidance over these years.”

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In

the

News

U.S. Mint launched Franklin Pierce Presidential $1 coin

Candy Crowley and Andrew Scher selected for Fitzwater Honors

16 The host of CNN’s “State of the Union” and senior politi-

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cal correspondent, Candy Crowley, and the executive President Birge and Joan Woodhead, President of the Pierce Brigade, pose with a replica of the Pierce coin.

The United States Mint released the new presidential

producer of “The Doctors,” Andrew Scher ’88, received the 2010 Marlin Fitzwater Medallions for Leadership in Public Communication in ceremonies this spring.

$1 coin honoring former President Franklin Pierce at the

Crowley and Scher received the awards in the 7th annual

Pierce Manse in Concord, N.H. on May 20 in front of a

presentation to honor individuals who have made signifi-

crowd of over one thousand. The Pierce Brigade and

cant contributions to public discourse in the spirit of a

Franklin Pierce University cohosted the event and invited

healthy democracy. The award reflects the mission of the

the public, including New Hampshire school children, to

Fitzwater Center for Communication: to educate lead-

Pierce’s historic home for the ceremony and celebration.

ers of conscience in public communication by engaging

President James F. Birge served as master of ceremonies

intellects, challenging perspectives and teaching skills

for the event.

in a state-of-the-art facility in Rindge, N.H. The award

This is the fourteenth coin in the presidential series issued by the U.S. Mint.

is named for Marlin Fitzwater, former press secretary to presidents Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush. Fitzwater is a Franklin Pierce trustee and serves on the Fitzwater Center Advisory Board. He made the formal presentation to Crowley and Scher.

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Fitzwater Medallion honoree Candy Crowley played a pivotal role in CNN’s American Votes 2008 coverage as a member of the Peabody Award-winning

New video profiles tell student stories

“Best Political Team on Television,” traveling to both

The essence of Franklin Pierce University is best

conventions and every debate along the campaign

reflected in our students’ own stories of academic

trail. It was during this period that she encountered

accomplishment and personal transformation. Our small

Fitzwater Center students as they covered the New

University has long been known for its nurturing

Hampshire Primary. Among her most vivid memories as

environment, which can help students discover their

a reporter, Crowley counts the aftermath of Hurricane

hidden potential, fall in love with a field of study, and

Katrina in the Gulf Coast; the impeachment trial of Presi-

develop greater self-awareness, confidence and compe-

dent Clinton; Election Night 2000; ceremonies marking

tence as citizens of the world. These lessons last a life-

the 40th anniversary of D-Day on the beaches of Nor-

time. Watch these videos, created by Professors Doug

mandy; Ronald Reagan’s trips to China, Bitburg and Ber-

Challenger and John Harris, featured on the home page

gen-Belsen; the night the United States bombed Libya;

of our Web site.

and the terrorist bombing of the U.S. Marine barracks in

Also in the News section of our Web site you can see our

Beirut.

new TV commercial which previewed on CBS College

Fitzwater Medallion honoree Andrew Scher ’88 is one of

Sports in February during our Women’s basketball game

the executive producers of the #1 new syndicated talk

against Bentley College. The 30-second video, created

show, “The Doctors,” distributed by CBS Television Dis-

by Professor Douglas Challenger, highlights the beautiful

tribution and earning a Daytime Emmy nomination after

Rindge campus and learning opportunities both inside

its first season. Prior to joining “The Doctors,” Scher was

and outside the classroom around the theme of “A Liberal

a senior producer at “Dr. Phil.” Scher graduated from

Arts Education for the 21st Century.” This theme is also

Franklin Pierce University with a bachelor’s degree in

reflected in the video featuring our President, James F.

Communications.

Birge. You can view this video on the President’s Web page, www.franklinpierce.edu/about/president_birge.htm.

Fitzwater Medallions for contributions to the public discourse were awarded to two graduating seniors, Robbie Michaelson of Brookline, N.H. and Bailey Gaffney of Manakin Sabot, Va., as well as high school English and journalism teacher Gordon Lang of Kingswood Regional High School in Wolfboro, N.H.

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In

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News

University celebrated the inauguration of its fourth president

The Art for Water Project

On April 17th, Franklin Pierce University inaugurated its

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fourth president, James F. Birge, during a ceremony on

Franklin Pierce presented the Art for Water Project in

the main campus in Rindge, N.H. Delegates from over

honor of World Water Day. The River of Consumption

40 academic institutions attended the event along with

installation, made of recycled water bottles and created

Franklin Pierce University students, alumni, staff and

by Franklin Pierce honors students, was facilitated by

faculty, community members and honored guests.

Christine Destrempes, who was an Artist-in-Residence

The first annual Showcase of Academic Excellence, “Engaged in Learning and Service,” was the centerpiece of the week-long inaugural celebration. The Showcase

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featured Franklin Pierce student presentations, performances and poster sessions. Student work ran the gamut from academic papers on poet Christina Rossetti to performances from medieval musical groups to

at the University last fall. This installation served as a set for Water Dance, choreographed by Wendy Dwyer with an original score created by Lou Bunk and students from the Computer Music course. Another performance included a piece choreographed by instructor Addy Gannett to music created by Franklin Pierce students.

nature photography exhibits to business plans to bolster

Both performances included Dream Angus, a retelling

local economies. The University community also partici-

of a Celtic myth by Renee Beauregard, English major;

pated in community service initiatives, including Alumni

illustrations of Dream Angus by sixteen graphic arts

National Community Service Days, and many other

students; and eight short films for water created by

events celebrating the inauguration of the University’s

mass communication students. Faculty from the ameri-

fourth president.

can studies, dance, environmental sciences, graphic

Dr. Birge’s commitment to the success of our students and our contributions to the community are demonstrated in the theme of his inauguration. “You can find successful Franklin Pierce graduates in the fields of

communication, marketing, music and mass communication programs who assisted with the project include Lou Bunk, Rob Diercks, Joni Doherty, Wendy Dwyer, Jason Little, Catherine Owen Koning and Heather Tullio.

health care, education, mass communication and busi-

To learn more about the Art for Water project, see the

ness, among others, and living in communities around

documentary by Natalya Waye in the News and Events

our region and the world. These students’ successes

section of the home page and read her story on page 7

began at Franklin Pierce University: An education for the

of this magazine.

21st century,” said Birge.

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University announces tuition freeze for upcoming academic year

University names new Provost Franklin Pierce University named Dr. Kim Mooney

At a time when colleges and universities across the coun-

as Provost and Vice Presi-

try are preparing to announce tuition increases, Franklin

dent for Academic Affairs

Pierce University is freezing tuition for the 2010-11 aca-

in December 2009. Dr.

demic year for the undergraduate College at Rindge.

Mooney,

a

member

“In addition to freezing tuition,” said Dr. James Birge,

of the Class of 1983,

“the University has maintained its commitment to offer-

has served the Frank-

ing extremely generous financial aid that will be awarded

lin

to students with University scholarships and grants bud-

as the Interim Provost

geted at nearly $18 million.”

and Vice President for

“At Franklin Pierce University we recognize that during these uncertain economic times, families have questions about whether or not a private college education is possible,” said Kenneth Ferreira, Executive Director of the Office of Student Financial Services. “We are taking deliberate steps to ensure that the quality and distinctive private education that is only offered at Franklin Pierce

Pierce

community

Academic Affairs since August 2008, and as the Acting President from January through June 2009. During this time, Dr. Mooney has offered her keen insight and guidance as the University community faced a number of key organizational opportunities including new University leadership, a successful NEASC accreditation review process and the expansion of

University remains within all students’ reach.”

several academic programs.

For 2010-11, Franklin Pierce will offer financial aid in the

In announcing the appointment, President Birge said,

form of grants or scholarships to every student accepted into the undergraduate College at Rindge, according to Ferreira. “We are proud to offer awards at the time of admission that range from a maximum of $17,000 to a minimum of $7,500 based on admission criteria alone,”

“The skills Dr. Mooney has developed as an academician, her keen intuition demonstrated over the last several months as an academic and institutional leader, and her experience as an alumna and trustee of Franklin Pierce make her an ideal Provost for the University and a valued

he said.

colleague for me.”

The University has pursued a number of cost-cutting

Dr. Mooney has shared a long history with the University

initiatives in recent months to save money and to help make the tuition freeze possible. They include the installation of new state-of-the-art biomass thermal heating units using locally-sourced wood pellet fuel.

beginning in 1979 when she first arrived on campus as a freshman. For the past seven years, Dr. Mooney continued her commitment to her alma mater in her role as trustee of the University. “The opportunity to work with President Birge and to serve my alma mater at this exciting juncture in its history is a unique honor,” said Dr. Mooney.

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ATHLETICS Jose Macias Gaining Conference, Regional & National Honors for the Baseball Team -By Matthew Janik

Northeast-10 Conference Pitcher of the Year and earned a spot on the All-Northeast-10 First Team. Macias was a two-time Northeast-10 Pitcher of the Week selection and was named to the College Baseball Foundation/Diamond Sports weekly National All-Star Lineup on March 23. He is also one of six finalists for the inaugural Ping!Baseball Tino Martinez Division II Player of the Year award.

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unior right-hander Jose Macias (Bronx, N.Y.) of the No. 22/24 nationally ranked and NCAA East Region champion Franklin Pierce University baseball team was named National Collegiate Baseball Writers Association East Region Pitcher of the Year on May 18, as announced by the NCBWA. Macias was also named to the All-East Region First Team, along with sophomore catcher Mike Dowd (East Bridgewater, Mass.) and senior right fielder Phil Hendricks (Pittsfield, Maine). In addition, junior third baseman Derek Ingui (Sterling, Mass.) was selected to the NCBWA All-East Region Second Team. The awards make Macias a unanimous East Region Pitcher of the Year and All-East Region First Team selection, as he also collected accolades from both Daktronics and the American Baseball Coaches Association. Earlier this spring, Macias was named

Macias has been one of the best pitchers in the country, let alone the East Region, in his first season on the mound after playing shortstop last year for the Ravens. Through May 9, his 1.08 earned-run average was good for second in the country. At the last nationwide statistics update, Macias was also fourth in the nation in strikeouts per nine innings (12.48) and strikeouts (104) and fifth in hits allowed per nine innings (4.92). His then-8-1 record tied him for 41st in the country in wins. Currently, Macias leads the Northeast-10 in earned-run average (0.96) and strikeouts (110), is tied for first in wins (9) and ranks fourth in opposing batting average (.164, 49-for-298). One of his highlights of the year came on March 15 in Florida, when he threw a no-hitter with 12 strikeouts against Saint Michael’s. The no-hitter was part of a streak of 16.2 innings without allowing a hit for Macias, which is believed to be a program record. Six times this year he struck out 10 or more batters, including a season-high 13 against Saint Anselm on March 25. On May 13, he threw eight innings, allowed just one unearned run and struck out six to lead Franklin Pierce to an 8-1 win over C.W. Post in its first game of the NCAA Championship East Regional before coming back to throw the final 1.2 innings to finish off the fifth NCAA Regional title in program history.

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Leedham Caps Amazing Career With Three National Player-of-the-Year Awards and Being Selected by the Connecticut Sun in the WNBA Draft By Doug DiBiase

10, as she has staked her claim to having one of the finest careers, not just in Division II, but across all divisions in women’s college basketball history. She led Division II in scoring this season at 26.9 points per game, while also ranking second in steals at 4.2 thefts per outing. Leedham became the all-time leading scorer at the NCAA Division II level in early-March as she dropped in a career-high tying 39 points in a Northeast-10 Tournament semifinal win over Bentley. She concluded her career with 3,050 points, which is fifth most all-time across all divisions in women’s college basketball, ahead of former legends such as Cheryl Miller and Chamique Holdsclaw. Leedham collected 459 steals during her career, which is the seventh most in Division II history. She is the only player at the Division ll level to rank among the top-10 in career scoring and steals.

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ranklin Pierce University women’s basketball senior standout Johannah Leedham (Ellesmere Port, England) had a phenomenal finish to her amazing collegiate career when she was selected by the Connecticut Sun with the 27th overall pick in the third round of the 2010 WNBA Draft on April 8. It was the latest honor for Leedham in a two-week span, which also saw her named the national player of the year by three agencies (State Farm/WBCA, Daktronics and Women’s Division II Bulletin). It was the first WNBA draft selection in Franklin Pierce history, as the women’s basketball program has seen its share of firsts over the past three seasons. Leedham will return to her home country of England and will compete with the British National Team for the next calendar year as the squad looks to lock up a spot in the 2012 Summer Olympics in London. She will then most likely try out with the Sun in the spring of 2011. Leedham had a spectacular senior season in 2009-

In addition to all the honors and career marks listed above, Leedham broke several other records this season, including the Northeast-10 men’s & women’s basketball career scoring record, the NE-10 career field goals made record, the NE-10 career steals record, the NE-10 career free throws made record, and the school-record for career scoring. Leedham helped guide Franklin Pierce to a 32-2 record during the 2009-10 season and a berth in the NCAA Division II Final Four in St. Joseph’s, Mo. The Ravens advanced to Missouri after winning their third-consecutive East Regional title. Franklin Pierce opened this season with 23-straight wins and earned the program’s first-ever No. 1 national ranking back on Jan. 5 in the USA Today/ESPN WBCA Division II Top-25 Poll. The 32 wins this year were a school record for victories in a single season. Franklin Pierce also won the Northeast-10 Conference regular season and tournament titles for the second time in as many seasons.

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Baseball Makes It Five NCAA Regional Titles in Program History -By Matthew Janik

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unior third baseman Derek Ingui (Sterling, Mass.) went 3-for-3 with three doubles and scored three runs on May 16, as the No. 22/24 nationally ranked Franklin Pierce University baseball team claimed the fifth NCAA Regional title in program history with a 6-3 win over No. 14/26 Southern Connecticut State in the final game of the NCAA Championship East Regional at Yale Field. Earlier in the day, Franklin Pierce posted a 2-1 victory over SCSU to force the decisive final game.

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With the wins, Franklin Pierce (41-15-1) advanced to the NCAA Championship Finals, also known as the Division II College World Series, at the USA Baseball National Training Complex in Cary, N.C. on May 22-29. Senior right fielder Phil Hendricks (Pittsfield, Maine) was named the East Regional’s Most Valuable Player and was joined on the All-Tournament Team by five other Ravens: Isaac Wenrich (Westlawn, Pa.), Cody Kauffman (Blue Bell, Pa.), Ingui, Mike Munoz (Bronx, N.Y.) and Heath Wasylow (Rehoboth, Mass.). In the final game of the tournament, Southern Connecticut State opened the scoring with a run in the bottom of the fourth inning. However, Franklin Pierce would answer with three runs in the top of the fifth and two in the sixth to jump to a 5-1 lead. In the fifth, Kauffman drove in a run with a single through the middle and Wenrich lifted a sacrifice fly to left before Hendricks pulled a double down the left-field line to make it a three-run inning. In the sixth, Ingui pushed a one-out double into the gap in right-center before freshman shortstop Dan Kemp (Sturbridge, Mass.) worked a walk and Kauffman beat out an infield single to load the bases. Sophomore catcher

Mike Dowd (East Bridgewater, Mass.) provided the inning’s big blow with a two-run single to center to give the Ravens a 5-1 lead. Franklin Pierce added a run on an eighth-inning single to left-center by Kauffman to push the lead as high as 6-1 before Southern Connecticut State closed the gap to 6-3 with two runs in the bottom half of the eighth. However, junior right-hander Jose Macias (Bronx, N.Y.) would get a pair of groundouts to end the further threat in the eighth and worked around a one-out double in the ninth to give the Ravens their fifth regional championship. Junior right-hander Rob Nicholas (Southborough, Mass.) started on the mound and picked up the win (5-1) for Franklin Pierce. Over 6.1 innings, he allowed just one run on eight hits, walked two and struck out five. In the first game of the day, Franklin Pierce utilized a seven-inning performance by graduate student righthander Sean Keeler (Cazenovia, N.Y.) to force the final game of the tournament. Keeler allowed one run on six hits, walked one and struck out five to post the win (3-1), while sophomore right-hander T.J. Ferguson (Westmoreland, N.H.) preserved the 2-1 victory with his second save of the season. The offense in the game for the Ravens came courtesy of a sixth-inning single by junior designated hitter Eric Pearson (Webster, N.H.) and a seventh-inning sacrifice fly by Munoz. Ferguson and freshman right-hander Rob Blanc (Sandy Hook, Conn.) teamed in the eighth inning to escape a bases-loaded, no-out jam while allowing only one run. The wins gave Franklin Pierce 40-plus wins for the fourth time in program history.

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u p d at e s WOMEN’S BASKETBALL The women’s basketball team advanced to the NCAA Division II Final Four after claiming the East Regional championship and a win over Arkansas Tech in the Elite Eight. It marked the program’s third-consecutive trip to the Elite Eight. The semifinal matchup against Fort Lewis was broadcast live on national television on ESPNU, marking the second time this season the Ravens appeared in front of the national cameras. The squad finished with a 32-2 overall record (program record for most wins in a single season) and won the Northeast-10 title. Junior guard Cynthia Gaudet was named to the NE-10 Third-Team, while Steve Hancock was named the conference’s coach of the year. Leedham and Gaudet were also recognized for their work in the classroom. Gaudet was named to the ESPN The Magazine Academic All-District I FirstTeam, while Leedham was a second-team Academic All-American and won the NE-10 Women’s Basketball Academic Excellence Award. MEN’S BASKETBALL The men’s basketball team got off to its best start in 17 years before youthful mistakes hampered the team throughout the middle portion of the season. However, the team bonded together in the late stages of the campaign and remained in playoff contention heading into the final night of the regular season. The team’s biggest win during the late-season surge was a spectacular 72-70 triumph at 10th-ranked Bentley on Feb. 20. Junior guard Kinard Dozier hit a driving layup with just one second

remaining to lift the Ravens to victory. Following the season, Dozier was named to the NE-10 Third-Team, while freshman guard Eric JeanGuillaume was named to the conference’s all-rookie team.

during the season and earned a spot on the Northeast-10 Second-Team for her efforts. Lauren Stille became the school record holder for career goals and points.

ICE HOCKEY

MEN’S & WOMEN’S ROWING

The ice hockey team put together the finest season in program history as it set school records for most overall wins (7) and Northeast-10 triumphs (4) in one campaign. The squad also hosted a conference playoff game for the second-consecutive season. Freshman forward Roscoe Sweeney was named the NE-10’s Rookie of the Year, while sophomore forward Anthony Chighisola earned a spot on the conference’s first-team. MEN’S LACROSSE Under first-year head coach Rick Senatore, the men’s lacrosse program put together the best single season in program history as it set school records for most overall wins (5) and conference victories (2). The Ravens went a solid 4-3 at home in Sodexo Field and finished the season ranked fifth in the New England Regional Poll (the highest ranking in program history). Freshman defender Ben McDannell was named to the Northeast-10 All-Rookie Team. WOMEN’S LACROSSE The women’s lacrosse program finished the regular season strong by winning three of its final five games to remain in contention for a playoff spot heading into the final week of the regular season. Junior attack Jordan Baillargeon was one of the top players in the conference

off an impressive 5-4 win over Assumption. BASEBALL The baseball team had yet another strong season in 2010 as it claimed the NCAA East Regional title for the fifth time in program history. The regional triumph allowed the Ravens to advance to the 2010 NCAA Division II College World Series in Cary, N.C. Franklin Pierce won the regional by winning a pair of games over Southern Connecticut State on Championship Sunday in the Tournament. Following the regular season, several Ravens garnered multiple awards. In addition to Jose Macias’ impressive accolades, which were listed in the previous story, second baseman Cody Kauffman and catcher Mike Dowd were named to the 2010 Rawlings East Region Gold Glove Team. Outfielders Phil Hendricks and Nick LaCroix were named to the ABCA All-East Region First-Team. Third baseman and team co-captain Derek Ingui was named to the ESPN The Magazine Academic AllDistrict I First-Team. Ingui also earned a spot on the Daktronics All-East Region First-Team.

The men’s and women’ rowing teams had a solid season as well, especially the men’s squad. The men’s varsity-four team, including Ian Randall at the stroke, Dan Forget at the three, Pat Brosnan at the two, Brett Dicrescenzo at the bow and Zach Goodman at the cox, finished either first or second in each of the first four races of the spring. The men’s squad opened the spring schedule on March 27 with a first-place finish at the Amherst College Tri-Race in Massachusetts. MEN’S & WOMEN’S TENNIS After a tough fall season, the men’s and women’s tennis teams rebounded to achieve success in the spring schedule. The women won a pair of matches over Pace on Feb. 14 and in the season finale at American International on April 18. The men’s squad picked up a win at Assumption on April 10.

GOLF

SOFTBALL

The golf team recorded three top-five finishes during the spring season. Freshman Ian Landry had a strong spring season as he finished in the top-15 of the individual standings in each of the four tournaments he competed in, including a ninth place finish in the Blazers Invitational back on April 30. The squad was led by three senior captains, Brandon Weiner, Peter Panopoulos and Derek Flodin.

The softball team rebounded from a trying 2009 season and put together a solid 2010 campaign, which saw the Ravens raise their win total from five wins to 15. Franklin Pierce notched 10 conference wins this season and remained in the playoff race until late in the season. The Ravens concluded the season on May 1 with a three-run rally in the bottom of the seventh inning to pull w w w

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c l a s s . n o t e s 1966 John T. Burke, Jr. has been employed by the Federal Bureau of Investigation 1966 to 1998, State Street Bank - Boston 1999 to 2000 and American Legal Resources, Inc., Boston, Mass., President, 2000 to 2004. John is currently the owner of American Legal Investigative Services, Boston, Mass. He has a son, Tom, and a daughter, Sarah and two grandchildren, Hannah and Caitlyn Burke.

1968 James Calvet married Susan Staples ‘68 in 1968. James received his Ph.D. from the University of Connecticut in 1975 and began working at the University of Kansas Medical Center in 1981. Fred Dietrich retired after 42 years as a Science Teacher in New York City.

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Holly O’Neill recently moved into senior housing in Newton. She received her B.S. degree in Business Administration with a minor in Management from Caldwell College in 1988 while working full-time. She retired from the corporate and retail world after 40 years.

1969 Kenneth Abramczyk retired as Commissioner of Mental Health/Aging for Oneida County, N.Y. Where are Jerry, Dick, Ken and Bob? Ira Wruble retired from the dry cleaning business in Memphis, Tenn. Ira has two grandchildren, Zack and Lorelai. His daughter lives in Andover, Mass., and his son lives in Boca Raton, Fla.

as coach basketball. Szklarz currently resides in Leicester, Mass.

1971

Elizabeth Evans worked many years as a medical technologist in Wilmington, Mass. She is currently disabled.

After retiring from the banking industry in 2001, Martin Brynildsen has been a substitute teacher in his local school district. His interests include baseball, music (especially classical, classic jazz and R&B), various devotional, liturgical and educational endeavors in the church, and enjoying family (especially five grandchildren, ages 10 years to 8 months).

1978

Vincent Lucrezi retired two years ago due to health problems, but he is doing well today. Vincent is starting to enjoy retirement and has moved to the Pinelands of South Jersey. He enjoys reading the Franklin Pierce University Radius. Shoutout~ I would like to give a shout out to my buddy Paul Cavazzoni and want him to get in touch with me! Also “hey” to all “the Kubabas.”

Gregg Woolston recently accepted the position of Wine District Manager for the Hudson Valley with Southern Wine & Spirits of NY. Gregg previously held a management position with this company in the Capital District. He has moved to the town of West Park in scenic Ulster County.

Richard Schwartz graduated with a B.A. in Liberal Arts. After graduating, Richard attained an A.S. in Radiological Sciences at United Hospital, Port Chester N.Y. He spent thirty-three years as a Radiological Technologist at various facilities. His daughter, Darian, is a Stock Broker at the NYSE and his daughter, Jylian, is an Account Executive in Manhttan in the manufacture of designer sweaters. His wife, Randee, is a retired fifth grade teacher in the Yonkers School System.

Dr. Gale Kamen has recently published a book entitled The Status, Survival, and Dilemma of a Female Dalit Cobbler of India (September 2009).

Sharon Lyn (Bornstein) Stein after an almost five year journey, obtained her Doctorate in Education in Educational Leadership with an emphasis in the Visual and Performing Arts in October 2009. Sharons wants to thank her family and friends for their unwavering encouragement and support and especially her husband Stan for his love and strength.

Joseph Wzorek retired from UPS after 17 years of service.

1973

Bob Szklarz is a two time member of the New England Basketball Hall of Fame. After his time at Franklin Pierce, Szklarz went on to teach English for 35 years at Worcester Vocational School as well

Robert Henssler has been married for forty years to Marilyn Thompson. They have two sons - Robert Jr. and Nathan and four grandchildren Maddie - 11, Kohl - 6, Addison 2 and Lauryn - 6 weeks.

1970

1975

Richard Paul states that son Tim is returning to Franklin Pierce University in the fall 2010. This summer Tim will be driving an F2000 Championship Series car across the eastern U.S. and Canada in his rookie year as a professional race car driver. Look us up at the races! www. F2000Championshipseries.com

1981 Kevin Yagger says that his son Eric is a sophomore at the University of Houston studying business. Kevin’s daughter Sara will graduate high school in June of 2010 and be off to nursing school. For Kevin, 2011 will mark 30 years since graduating FPC! What a wild ride it’s been since then.

1983 Edward Meredith states that after graduating from Pierce he went into the commercial real estate and construction field. He married Gayle Matthei in 1985. He retired to raise his daughter Aleigh. In 2000, they were blessed with twin boys Teddy (Edward B. Meredith, III.) and Harry Francia Meredith. Currently, he is creating another real estate business, building a home and attending classes at night at Bloomfield College to obtain a Certificate in Product and Inventory Management (CPIM). Last summer, he attended Rutgers University and obtained a graduate certificate in Supply Chain Management. Congratulations Kim Mooney on your recent advancement! Love to hear from 83’ers. Best to all!

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1990 Michael Schwartz has been happily married to his wife Karen for almost 12 years.

1992 Holly (Gannoe) Shoemaker married Major James Shoemaker, III in Jackson, Miss. in April 2009. They currently live Alexandria, Va. and work in Washington, D.C. Holly has kept active as a runner and triathlete and after a cancer diagnosis of Melanoma in 2005, Holly created a running program for Cancer Survivors called CANCER to 5K (www.cancerto5k. com) with the Ulman Cancer Fund for Young Adults. This past November, Holly finished her first IRONMAN-distance triathlon at the Beach2Battleship Full Triathlon in Wilmington, N.C. Holly & Jim keep very busy with work, triathlons, running, cycling, volunteering and are enjoying a full life in the D.C. Metro Area.

1994 David Stewart states that after working in the areas of retail, non-profit and financial services, he is returning to his art roots as he begins research into video/ film production and more specifically, video editing. David has been making his own videos for the last year and a half and has enjoyed it so much that he wants do it as a career or a side career.

1995 Beth Morse currently manages three teams within sears.com’s Des Moines center and enjoys her job. Beth has started writing again and hopes someday to be able to say “that I have been published.”

1998 Richard E. Clark, Esq. has been practicing law in Portsmouth, N.H. His general practice is in divorce, injury,

criminal and estate planning law. He was recently appointed to the Newburyport District Court as a contract defense attorney on behalf of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Richard is licensed in N.H. and Mass. and is married with a growing family. Michael Lee is approaching his 10 year anniversary at Siemens. He has served in various IT management roles throughout his tenure. Dawn (Corts) Mikkelsen states that great things have come her way in the last couple of years. On May 17, 2008, she married her wonderful husband Eric. “Who knew that a Yankees fan could fall in love with a Red Sox fan?!” She is also the proud momma of Jacob Ryan who was born on February 18, 2008. She says that it is a true blessing to be a stay-athome mom. Ronald G. Pressoir is currently working at Walt Disney World Theme Parks and Resorts. He is also taking online classes thru the Art Institute of Pittsburg to earn a degree in Photography.

1999 Wendy Bergeron opened her first exhibit on February 5, 2010 entitled “Treasures of the American Independence Museum”. The exhibit is at the Portsmouth Athenaeum and runs until April 24.

2000 Erica McArthur has been married for nine years and has two boys ages six and four. She owns her own graphic design business. Erica is the Coordinator for the Hardwick Area Community Coalition. Francisca Moses has two sons in college. One son is attending Penn State and the other is attending Georgetown University. One is graduating this summer and the other will graduate in December 2010. Lee-Ann (Di Nardo) Surprenant moved to Oregon in July 2009 and is awaiting her Oregon nursing license. This move was prompted by her husband’s change in jobs.

2001 Amanda (Cochran) Taylor’s daughter, Daphne Mae Gregoire, was born in June 2009.

2002 Marci (Prinz) Hart, after working as an art teacher for four years, was promoted to Department Chair of the North Branford Public Schools Visual Arts.

2004 Christine (Sala) Clemmer married Sean Clemmer on September 5, 2009. Cassandra DuClau married Russell duCharme on April 25, 2009 at Trinity Episcopal Church, North Scituate, R.I. The attendants were, Matron of Honor, Amanda DuClau (sister-in-law of the bride), Stacey Barden, Laura duCharme (sister of the groom), Lindsey Suarez (sister of the groom) and Catherine Galdauskas ‘04, Best Man, Ross Buente, Jonnathon DuClau (brother of the bride, Jeremy Gaudette, Matthew Betchy and Adam Hohler (cousin of the groom). The couple honeymooned in Lincoln, N.H. Marylyn Gainan is engaged to Jason Wamback and a September 2010 wedding is planned.

2006 Charles Crawford, Jr. was married in the fall of 2009 and has been working at Old Dominion University for a year and half. Charles received the employee of the month for the month of January 2009 from the Division of Student Affairs.

2007 Zachary Adams and Rachel Glick were married on August 22, 2009 in Salem, Mass. Zachary currently enrolled in the 2010 class of the Reading Hospital School of Health Sciences Paramedic Program. Thomas Albrecht started at Pierce in 1980 and left in February 1984. Thomas came back to Pierce in 2005 online and finished in 2007. As luck would have it, he graduated with the last class of Franklin Pierce College. He states, “We all sat in

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in.memoriam the sun and walked across the stage and we all got sun burned. 27 years to graduate must be some kind of record.” Thomas and wife Lisa have three kids, two girls and one boy. Life has been good so far.

2008 Molly Joseph is currently a volunteer through City Year Louisiana, working full-time as an academic interventionist in a public elementary school in Baton Rouge.

2009 Jeff Babitts is a staff member in the Youth Program for Royal Caribbean Cruise Lines. Currently Jeff is working on the Freedom of the Seas based out San Juan, Puerto Rico.

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Theresa Cromwell is a 1984 graduate from Londonderry High School. She holds an Associate Degree in Paralegal Studies from Quincy College. A single mom of six sons, she put her career on hold for a while to focus on raising her children, Sean, 24, Raymond, 23, Corey, 22, William, 14, Isaiah, 11, and Dylan, 9. Theresa volunteers for several organizations, loves to garden and was accepted into the UNH cooperative extension Master Garden program. Her career goals are to work in the forensic field and to have a calmer side with gardening/landscaping.

Millie Astmann Friend of the University Jan. 17, 2010

George Hanna Former Trustee Sept. 16, 2009

Lisa (Weidner) Aylward ‘82 John Hulten April 23, 2010 Beloved husband of Charlene (Linzer) Hulten ‘69 Ramona Brooks ‘84 May 23, 2010 March 8, 2010 Nathanial Kennedy ‘02 Sept. 28, 2009 Brice Friedman ‘96 March 15, 2010 John Loori Friend of the University Doris Haddock and Honorary Degree Friend of the University Recipient and Honorary Degree Oct. 9, 2009 Recipient March 9, 2010

Wilma Mankiller Friend of the University April 6, 2010 Anne-Marie Mekdsy ‘92 Oct. 20, 2009 Paul Sayrs ‘72 April 27, 2009 Frederick Walsh Former Faculty/Staff Dec. 26, 2009 Ernest Winske ‘72 Oct. 4, 2009

c l a s s . n o t e s needs you!

Let us know about your achievements, life’s adventures, and what you’ve been doing since graduation. Please keep the following guidelines in mind when submitting news: • News should be of reasonable length and not more than 50 words. Please do not send entire letters, articles or press releases as they will not be reprinted. • A class note must be submitted by the alum who is the subject of the note. If a class note is submitted by someone other than the subject of the note, the subject of the note will be contacted for his/her permission before the information is printed. • When submitting wedding photos, please identify people first and last names and class year. We check their class year but do not ask for permission to publish from each alum. • Engagement news, birth announcements and photos will be printed. News of impending weddings and/or births are not published. • E-mail addresses and Web sites will be printed as long as it is not promotional in nature. Submit your class notes for the next issue by Aug. 31, 2010 at franklinpierce.edu/alumni, click “Update your Information.”

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Alumni in Action Connecticut alumni “Save the Sound” by planting dune grass.

During the weekend of April 9 to 11, Franklin Pierce University alumni across the country participated in the first National Alumni Day of Service.

New York City alumni and friends packing groceries at a food pantry

North Carolina alumni cooking breakfast at a veteran’s resource center

Rhode Island alumni cleaning up the Blackstone River Park

27 New Jersey alumni and friends working with Habitat for Humanity

Massachusetts alumni and friends working at the Charles River

New Hampshire alumni at New Hampshire Food Bank in Manchester

Massachusetts alumnus working at the Southborough Historical Society

Arizona alumni feed the need to read by collecting over 2,700 books for elementary school children.

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Message from the Alumni Association President Joe Davis ‘89, “This past year the Alumni Association has taken on many initiatives aimed at providing new ways for you to connect/reconnect with your alma mater. Last summer, we launched the Official Franklin Pierce Alumni Association Group on Facebook. Over 600 alumni have joined and reconnected with the University. If you are a member of Facebook, join today. This is a great way to read news about Pierce, reconnect with your lost alumni friends and find out about events. You can also provide feedback and get involved in planning events in your area. In early September, we hosted the first Ravens Remember events across the country. Coinciding with the return to school, these events brought alumni together to reminisce about their time at Pierce. The schedule for the second annual Ravens Remember events is in this issue. In April, we sponsored the first national alumni day of service in conjunction with the inauguration of our new president Dr. James F. Birge. Pierce alumni organized community service projects events in Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New York, North Carolina, California and Arizona. The organizations we helped were very appreciative and hope we’ll come back. Participating alumni had a great time and are looking forward to next year’s events.

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These are only a few of the exciting things going on within your Alumni Association. We hope to see you at an event soon. To learn more go to www.franklinpierce.edu/alumni.”

Alumni Association Board of Directors 2010-2011

Kimberley (Lewis) Riley ‘83

New Jersey:

Paul M. Read ’94

Joseph Davis ‘89

Patrick Tracy ‘98

Gayle (Hamilton) Tirpok ‘90 Regina Bonito ‘05

President

Eric M. Ellis ’06

Adam N. Grill ’89

Tara (Pietraszuk) Shollenberger ‘04

Elaine Graham ‘04

Vice President for External Relations

Christopher DeGeorge ’04

Rhode Island:

Pamela Sanderson ’98, G’08

Remi Francoeur ‘04 Kristen Francoeur ‘05

Ulysses Shields G’02 Vice President for Academic Relations

Richard Falconi ‘69

Valerie Kenney ’91 G’05

New York:

S. California: Chapter/Region Chairs

Sharon Lyn Stein ‘71

Parliamentarian

Connecticut:

Kyle R. Provost ‘05

Andrea Beaudette ‘00 Kristi Brooks ’05, G’09

Join your Alumni Association Board of Directors at the annual Alumni Leadership Retreat held on the Rindge Campus on July 10 and 11, 2010. Contact alumni@ franklinpierce.edu for details.

Membership and Bylaws Committee Chair and

Alumni and Reunion Weekend Committee Chair

David B. Groder ‘66 Ray Shank ‘69 Marcy (Pollock) Fink ‘73 Arthur Fink ‘72

Massachusetts: Joyce (Loughlin) Bastille ‘91

New Hampshire: Melissa Conway ‘98 Kurt Muhlfelder ‘82

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Alumni and Reunion Weekend 2010

Friday, Oct. 22 – Sunday, Oct. 24 Celebrating milestone reunion years ending in 5 & 0

Friday, Oct. 22 • Meet and Mingle

• Reunion Celebration with “Hot Vance” (‘80’s cover band)

Saturday, Oct. 23 • Reunion Lunches • Family Barbeque • Alumni Athletic Events • Evening of Excellence

o Alumni Participation - Melissa Conway '98

o Leader of Conscience - Andrew Cohen '73

o Outstanding Service - Jean St. Pierre

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• Reunion Celebration with “The Nines”

Sunday, Oct. 24 • Farewell Brunch

• Alumni Association Board of Directors Meeting

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Upcoming Events and Save the Dates July 10 - 11

September 11

Alumni Leadership Retreat and

Florida Ravens Remember

Association Board of Directors Meeting Rindge

Seasons 52 ~ Boca Raton

July 19

September 16

21st Annual Golf Tournament

New York City Ravens Remember

Townsend Ridge Country Club

PS450 ~ NYC

September 1

September 19

Rhode Island Ravens Remember

New Jersey Ravens Remember

Location TBD

Location TBD

September 2

September 23

Massachusetts Ravens Remember

New Hampshire Ravens Remember

Bell in Hand Tavern ~ Boston

The Black Brimmer ~ Manchester

September 4

A Ravens Remember event is being planned in Texas as well. Watch the Web site for details.

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October 22-24 September 8 & 9

Alumni and Reunion Weekend 2010

Connecticut Ravens Remember Location TBD

October 23 Annual Meeting of the Alumni Association

Southern California Ravens Remember Tommy Nolan’s ~Toluca Lake

Please provide us with your most current e-mail address as events, locations, times and dates are announced electronically and can change. Watch your e-mail or visit www.franklinpierce.edu/alumni online for the latest updates. Questions, comments or concerns? Alumni Relations 877.372.2586 or alumni@franklinpierce.edu News to share? Submit your news at www.franklinpierce.edu/alumni - click on “Update Your Information”

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2009 Winners: Alumni Participation Henry Ellis ‘69 Outstanding Service Dr. James Maybury Leader of Conscience L. James Santerre ‘66

Submit your nominations for Alumni awards Nominations Sought for Alumni Awards The office of Alumni Relations seeks nominations for the 2012 Alumni Participation, Leader of Conscience and Outstanding Service Awards. Please call 877.372.2586 or e-mail alumni @franklinpierce.edu for details. A brief description of the criteria for each award follows. Please visit the Web site for more information and list of past recipients.

Alumni Participation Award Criteria Presented to an alumnus/a whose participation in alumni activities is worthy of recognition. The recipient will have demonstrated characteristics of leadership, creativity and commitment that have had a positive effect on the advancement of alumni relations at the University.

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Outstanding Service to the Franklin Pierce Community Award Criteria Presented to an individual who has provided exemplary service to Franklin Pierce University. The nominee will have demonstrated strong characteristics of leadership, commitment and influence on programs and/or activities at the University. Recipients may be selected from past or present members of the faculty, staff, administration, alumni or friends of the University.

Leader of Conscience Award Criteria Consistent with the goals of Franklin Pierce University Statement of Institutional Vision, the alumni Leader of Conscience Award is presented to an alum who demonstrates high levels of intellect and character. This individual is balanced in weighing options, decisive in pursuing a chosen course, open to new ideas, seeking always to improve upon the current condition, careful in the judgment of others, gentle in the care of souls they influence, and inspirational and nurturing of similar qualities in others.

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Refer a Student to Franklin Pierce University

T

here are over 18,000 Franklin Pierce University alumni living in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and in over 50 countries throughout the world. Think of it, almost anywhere you go you have a chance of meeting someone with whom you share a most unique story. It is a story worth sharing, and we'd like to ask you to tell it to any high school student thinking about college. Tell it to those whom you feel may be a good match for Franklin Pierce University. These prospective students may be your own or those of a friend, neighbor, co-worker or relative. All you need to do is fill out the coupon and give it to that prospective student to send in with their application for admission. Franklin Pierce will waive the $40 application fee as a courtesy to both you and the student. Who knows the value of a Franklin Pierce education better than you? You have enjoyed the personal attention of professors and the extraordinary opportunities that Franklin Pierce provides to its students. Your referral will allow us to introduce a new generation of students to the academic leadership, stimulating and rewarding coursework, interesting faculty, meaningful relationships with other students and a world of new opportunities. Thank you for helping to tell the story of Franklin Pierce University.

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Geographic Distribution of Alumni As of February 2010

USA Aruba Australia Austria Bahamas Belgium Belize Bermuda Canada China Dominican Rep. Egypt England Finland France

17,775 1 3 2 11 1 1 9 25 1 4 2 20 12 1

Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Haiti Hong Kong Indonesia Ireland Israel Jamaica Japan Korea Luxembourg Malaysia Netherlands

11 1 2 1 1 1 1 6 1 1 37 2 1 1 4

Northern Ireland Norway Panama Peru Philippines Poland Rwanda Saudi Arabia Scotland Serbia Singapore South Korea Spain Sweden Switzerland

1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 4 5 1 1 3 8 1

Thailand Turkey Ukraine United Kingdom West Indies 1 Total 217

5 6 4 3

AE American Samoa Puerto Rico 5 Virgin Islands Total 17

8 1 3

Grand Total 18,009

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Each year, gifts to the Franklin Pierce Annual Fund provide: • Financial assistance to our students. • Enhancement to our academic programs. • Assistance to our athletic programs. • Funding for extra curricular activities. • Campus development.

Please consider donating to the Annual Fund today! For more info, or to make a gift, contact:

John Forbes - 603.899.4021 or Chris Ialuna - 603.899.4103 40 University Drive, Rindge, NH 03461 w w w

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FRANKLIN PIERCE UNIVERSITY 40 UNIVERSITY DRIVE RINDGE, NEW HAMPSHIRE 03461

NON-PROFIT US POSTAGE PAID FRANKLIN PIERCE UNIVERSITY

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M A G A Z I N E


Pierce Radius - Summer 2010