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M ODE R N L U X U R Y

TM

THE BRIGHT STUFF!

200 W HUBBARD ST CHICAGO IL 60654

The Year’s Best Interiors Meet Chicago’s Men of Design Local Lighting Designers Turn It On!

WINTER 2009 $5.95

PLUS: ECO-CHIC 2.0 • ROCKIN’ GLAM IN BUCKTOWN THE FLUFF STUFF • ADVENTURES IN KIDDIELAND DESIGN

PUBLISHER’S NOTE

With the holidays behind us, it’s time to start shaking things up in the new year. I’ve been with Modern Luxury for some time, and I could not be more thrilled about taking the publishing helm here at CS Interiors. It’s a move that’s particularly fitting timewise, considering that while most people are headed to the gym for a short-lived January fitness regime, my wife and I are headed to the Mart for tile, fi xtures and hand-woven rugs. We’re launching a top-to-bottom makeover in our own Andersonville home, starting right now: sleek, new appliances by Wolf and LUKE GIBSON PUBLISHER Subzero from the Westye Group; eye-popping new colors for almost every room (with guidance from Colori’s Michelle Herzog); and a few pieces of well-chosen furniture from Haute Living. It’s understandable, then, that this issue of CS Interiors is especially inspiring on a personal level: page after page of luxurious—but still incredibly comfortable—interiors that I want to magically cut and paste right into my own abode. The stunning single-family manse that Kara Mann designed for a young couple strikes the perfect balance between high-style and livability (although we’d be more likely to deck out the basement as a kids’ playroom than a pool table-centric bachelor pad, however tempting the latter sounds). Also in this issue, I got scores of ideas about local innovative lighting possibilities, cool kids’ rooms, bathroom sinks beyond my wildest imagination (thanks to Luca Lanzetta’s new Antonio Lupi showroom), and art that shows off this city’s vast urban landscapes. I hope you find as much inspiration in these pages as I do. Happy New Year! LGIBSON@MODERNLUXURY.COM

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WINTER 2009

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EDITOR’S WINTER 2009

I know, I know. The financial news is grim and getting grimmer, especially after the holiday boom that never quite boomed. Is this really the time to be touting the fabulosity of a threefigure piece of furniture or the first coming of the next “It” designer? Strangely, yes. Your house (assuming MEGHAN McEWEN EDITOR-IN-CHIEF you’re not trying to sell it) is the one thing that might just keep you grounded, while the unemployment rate rises, the stock market dips, and our untouchable Chicago housing market shows the gnarly signs of—isn’t it time we admit it?—a slowdown. So take the cue. Slow down. Retreat inward. Spend the next few freezing winter months tucked inside your very own beautiful home, where sanctuary, sanity and inspiration are buzzwords to live by. Perhaps we can all learn a little something from Kara Mann’s glass manse stunner. From a massive white box, she creates the ultimate party house without giving an inch in the style and comfort departments. Thoughtful and incredibly functional details (like liquid-resistant fabrics) remind us that good design needs to champion livability. The same can be said about all the homeowners featured this month, from Leo Burnett’s global chief creative officer Mark Tutssel, whose Patrizio Fradianidesigned seventh-floor spread is a local respite from an impossibly busy travel and work schedule, to Jason Ballew, whose converted church abode has been transformed into an uber-cozy sanctuary for good design. Luca Lanzetti (one of our featured Men of Design, along with Ballew and three others) gives us a sneak peek into some recent projects and obsessions, while Jill Stalowicz, the ecoentrepreneur behind online venture Feel More Human, proffers products and ideas for tricking out a small, meaningful space. They are some of the city’s real-deal design devotees, and we owe them a whopping thank-you. For taking our minds off, if only momentarily, the what-ifs of the topsy-turvy financial markets—and all the stress that comes with them. For turning homes into something more than depressing real estate statistics. For keeping us excited—even in the face of daily headlines extolling the contrary—about design and its transformative potential. And, of course, for making this magazine worth reading every quarter. Enjoy! MMCEWEN@MODERNLUXURY.COM

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PHOTO BY LIZA BERKOFF

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DEPARTMENTS

CONTENTS 20

PUBLISHER’S NOTE EDITOR’S NOTE CONTRIBUTORS HOME FRONT NOW! The people, places and things you’ve got to know now TRENDS! The royal decree in this season’s décor? Empire-

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chic is back! ART A group of artists cast the streets of Chicago as their muse TRENDS! It’s here! The season’s smashed hits of home design DESIGN Chicago’s hottest lighting designers fl ip the switch on uber-cool wattage DESIGN A brother-sister salvage act gives new life to old wood TRENDS! Forget the winter blues. We’ve got the goods on feelgood yellow

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ON THE COVER PHOTOGRAPHY: Tony Soluri STYLING: D. Graham Kostic HAIR & MAKEUP: Lisa Trunda using Nars at Ford Artists MODEL: Amelia Pool at Ford PHOTOGRAPHER’S ASSISTANT: Tim Nurczyk FASHION ASSISTANT: Isaiah Freeman-Schub Gold fringe dress, $8,700, by Roberto Cavalli at Saks Fifth Avenue, 312.944.6500. Patent and metallic leather Lola sandal, $895, at Yves Saint Laurent, 312.751.8995.

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DESIGN A group of design-minded Chicagoans ditches the

commute and perfects the art of the live/work ideal TRENDS! Calling all cable addicts! Snuggle up to the ultimate in knit chic PEOPLE Internet eco-priestess Jill Stalowicz dishes the dirt on sustainable home design PEOPLE Oh, baby! Nursery rooms that officially graduate from cute to cool TRENDS! Getting down with the latest in pillow talk CULTURE A facelifted, Renzo Piano-perfected Art Institute prepares for takeoff TRENDS! The great lace race weaves its way into a new home groove WEEKENDER Los Angeles makes a play for top-design status. We’ve got the goods on the city’s best new haunts

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INTERIOR MONOLOGUE Designer Deirdre Jordan perfects her

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X MARKS THE SPOT Designer Patrizio Fradiani plays it cool and collectible in a minimalist River North spread MANN POWER Kara Mann glams up a Bucktown behemoth. The result? A rockin’ good time ALL ACCESS FAB! Here it is: The ultimate guide to the best interiors of the year LAUNCH PADS Looking for the alpha-ville goods? Chicago’s top male designers and their to-die-for digs

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Publishers of CS magazine

ANN Y. SONG Creative & Fashion Director

SPENCER BECK Editorial Director

MEGHAN MCEWEN Editor-in-Chief ALEXANDRIA ABRAMIANMOTT National Home Editor Editorial Editors-at-Large Style Editor Fashion Assistant Editorial Assistant Group Managing Editor Associate Managing Editor Contributing Writers & Editors

Editorial Intern Design Managing Art Director Group Art Director Art Director Photo Editor Designers Contributing Photographers

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CONNIE DUFNER, GILLIAN FLYNN D. GRAHAM KOSTIC ISAIAH FREEMANSCHUB AMANDA GORDON ELA SATHERN EMILY HOWALD KELLY AIGLON, NATALIE BOGAN, THOMAS CONNORS, VICKI CRAIN, LISA CREGAN, ERIN ENSIGN, EMILY FIFFER, LINDSEY GLADSTONE, CHANTAL GORDON, TATE GUNNERSON, CARLA JORDAN, REBECCA MAZZEI LISA SHAMES, LISA SKOLNIK, KERSTEN WEHDE, WENDY WONG MEGAN ZOTIS

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MICHAEL R. LIPSON Chief Operating Officer

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ANN Y. SONG Vice President Creative & Fashion Director LOUIS F. DELONE Group Publisher, Southwest Division

Modern Luxury Regional Sales Offices Atlanta 3340 Peachtree Rd., N.E., Suite 1425 Atlanta, GA 30326 404.443.0004 Contact: Paige Smith

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To subscribe: www.modernluxury.com | To contact an editor: calendar@modernluxury.com | To contact an editor: letterstoeditor@modernluxury.com     :  .  ,   | : .. | : .. ©   , ,   

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Publishers of CS magazine

JOHN CARROLL President & Group Publisher LUKE GIBSON Publisher Sales Associate Publisher Midwest Director, National Accounts Senior Account Director Senior Account Manager, Print and Digital Media Account Executives Marketing Director of Marketing Senior Events and Projects Manager Special Promotions and Events Manager Sales and Marketing Coordinator National Sales and Marketing Senior Vice President Group Publisher Brides Vice President Jewelry & Watches Senior Account Director Senior Account Executive Advertising Director Account Director Vice President Marketing Vice President of Strategic Partnerships Marketing Manager Sales Assistant Production Director of Production Production Manager (Design) Designers Production Manager (Account Services) Associate Production Managers Account Coordinators Senior Special Sections Coordinator Video Coordinator Copywriter Printing & Prepress Director of Print Procurement Digital Imaging Manager Senior Digital Imaging Specialists Digital Imaging Specialist Creative Services Project Manager Art Directors Designer Circulation & Distribution Director of Circulation Distribution Manager Circulation Manager Circulation Coordinator Distribution Coordinators Technology Director of MIS Director of IT Web Developer IT Coordinator additional IT services provided by Digital Senior Vice President, Corporate & Digital Sales Senior Director, Digital Marketing Director of Digital Project Management Senior Manager, Digital Marketing Web Systems Manager Finance Senior Vice President, Finance Director of Corporate & Business Development Controller Sales Administration Director Credit Manager Assistant Credit Manager Sales Administrator Billing Supervisor Accounts Payable Specialist Collections Specialists Administration Manager of Human Resources Executive Assistant to Owner/CEO Corporate Receptionists

MATTHEW CARROLL Managing Director HOWARD A. SIMS JULIE MONTIETH BETH LEWIS, JENNIFER POLACHEK NICK VAN SICKLEN NATALIE DUELL, COURTNEY HILDENBRAND, CHRISTIAN POPPERT, CARLY SCHROEDER JULIE SELAKOVICH SAMANTHA SAIFER KRISTIN LAMPRECHT ELISE SCHMITT NICOLE MAGGIO KNABLE AMY ALLEN DEBORAH TAUBER ANTONIO SARDINAS MICHELLE ROSS DAVID BAER ERIN POLLARD MARA KLOIBER KELLY BERG CHANDRA COOKS TAYLOR STERN MEG EULBERG TIM BOYER JOHN FRAUENHOLTZ, CHARLES GRIESER, ERIN QUINN JOCELYN FULLER KARI GROTA, JAMES MASTRO TOREY ADKINS, TASIAH AUDINO, BETH GAMMONLEY, LIZ SCHWAGER, JACKIE ZUNIGA ROBYN GADLIN HEATHER KORTAN MARQUITA HARRIS SEAN BERTRAM DOUG RINGWALD SARAH GILLMORE, DOUG KISELA JOE LEKAS BECKY STARR JEN KUROKI, JAMIE NUZBACH, ROBIN WALDMAN JOSHUA NATHANSON ERIC HOLDEN HECTOR GALVEZ MIKE PETRE AMANDA SPIELMAN SANTOS ARGUETA, SALVADOR GALVEZ JEFF LEISEGANG SCOTT BROOKMAN DEVIN STETLER ISAAC RUBIO MAC M.D. SEAN LEE COMBS KATHRYN HO MATT NAKANO BRIANNE JONES MARC GOLDSTEIN JOHN PIETROLUNGO NANCY JO SAM CHANG KRISTY ANGELLOTTI BETSI ADLER MIKE EISENBERG CHRIS BALDERRAMA BRYAN TURNER ALYSON SCHULTZ ROBIN ASQUITH, ERICA HOWARD, MATT YABS MISHELE BALDWIN ELIZABETH RYAN VICKI CRAIN, CANDACE WALKER

MODERN LUXURY

MICHAEL B. KONG Chief Executive Officer

STEPHEN W. KONG Vice Chairman & Group Publisher SPENCER BECK Editorial Director

JOHN CARROLL President, Eastern Division & Group Publisher

MEDIA, LLC

ALAN KLEIN President, Western Division & Group Publisher

JEFFREY D. GOLDSTEIN Chief Financial Officer & Chief Digital Officer Modern Luxury Regional Sales Offices

MICHAEL R. LIPSON Chief Operating Officer

ANN Y. SONG Vice President Creative & Fashion Director

LOUIS F. DELONE Group Publisher, Southwest Division

Atlanta 3340 Peachtree Rd., N.E., Suite 1425 Atlanta, GA 30326 404.443.0004 Contact: Paige Smith

Chicago 200 W. Hubbard St. Chicago, IL 60654 312.274.2500 Contact: John Carroll

Dallas 2828 Routh St., Suite 350 Dallas, TX 75201 214.880.0003 Contact: Lindsay Jacaman

Hawaii 2155 Kalakaua Ave., Suite 701 Honolulu, HI 96815 808.924.6622 Contact: William A. Moore III

Houston 2700 Post Oak Blvd., Suite 350 Houston, TX 77056 713.622.1116 Contact: Louis F. DeLone

Los Angeles 5455 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 1412 Los Angeles, CA 90036 323.930.9400 Contact: Alan Klein

Miami 3930 N.E. 2nd Ave., Suite 201 Miami, FL 33137 305.341.2799 Contact: Leslie Wolfson

New York 7 W. 51st St., 8th Floor New York, NY 10019 212.582.4440 Contact: Stephen W. Kong

Orange County 3200 Bristol St., Suite 150 Costa Mesa, CA 92626 714.557.2700 Contact: Chris Gialanella

San Diego 1055 F Street San Diego, CA 92101 619.849.6677 Contact: Dina Grant

San Francisco 243 Vallejo St. San Francisco, CA 94111 415.398.2800 Contact: Steven Dinkelspiel

Washington, DC 927 15th St. N.W. Washington, DC 20005 202.408.5665 Contact: Peter Abrahams

ABC membership applied for

To subscribe: www.modernluxury.com | To submit calendar events: calendar@modernluxury.com | To contact an editor: letterstoeditor@modernluxury.com     :  .  ,   | : .. | : .. ©   , ,   

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CONTRIBUTORS WINTER 2009 1.

3.

5.

2.

4.

6.

In this month’s issue, writer LISA CREGAN (1) tackled a handful of the city’s brightest: Kara Mann, Deirdre Jordan (who she calls a Renaissance Woman), and the product design brothers behind Streng Design. Then there’s lighting consultant Casey Penry: “I went to his apartment thinking that this was going to be a tough assignment,” Cregan says. “I was so wrong. Casey and the great Lukas Machnik have spot-lit, lamp-lit and kelvined their way to a really swank bachelor pad.” (2) honed her trained eye on the evolving world of kiddie design for this issue—a natural fit for the national editor of DailyCandy Kids and the mom of almost oneyear-old Nora. “Kids don’t have to be doomed to a life of bunnies and duckies anymore,” she affi rms. Gladstone, who hosted The Shopping Detective on the Fine Living Channel, has also contributed to T Magazine and Allure. LINDSEY GLADSTONE

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A disciple to the local design scene, Strange Closets blogger TATE GUNNERSON (3) catches up with sibling duo Aaron and Megan Pahmier from Kindling. “It was fascinating to watch them interact,” he says. “They have that easy familiarity that comes only after a lifetime of humiliating each other.” Check out strangeclosets.com for his cult finds and house tours. “For anyone who has kids, is pregnant, or even thinking of becoming pregnant, I suggest they beat a hasty path to Hadley,” says KATRINA WITTKAMP (4), who has two children of her own. She shot the owners’ portrait for this issue’s story about good kiddie design. “Basically, they had to rearrange the entire store—in Prada heels.” Inspired, Wittkamp dashed out to make her own Prada shoe purchase the following week. Former photo editor at the Chicago Tribune, Wittkamp is now a go-to photographer for local magazines, including Modern Luxury’s CS.

SAVERIO TRUGLIA (5) photographed the siblings and design duo behind Kindling, Aaron and Meghan Pahmier. “Unlike my siblings, brothers and sisters can be generally genial, even kind towards each other,” notes Truglia, who has contributed to Fast Company, Rolling Stone, Spin, Newsweek and Time.

“I was weaned on architectural lighting,” says CS Interiors regular BOB COSCARELLI (6). This issue’s story about lighting designers was a perfect fit for the photographer, who worked with seminal architectural photographer Bill Hedrich at just 20 years old, after dropping out of college to pursue his dream. Coscarelli was particularly enraptured by Lucy Slivinski’s studio. “I loved the constantly in-f lux nature of her space and her work. Even with the chaos and parts around, her peaceful nature really came through.”

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During his years of managing cult fave breakfast spot M Henry, Daniel Malone has pursued a secret side interest with equal vigor: scouring estate sales, small-town antique shops and flea markets for the rare and funky home gem. As his well-curated apartment filled up, friends advised Malone to reap the bounty of his efforts. “If I had a dollar for every person who told me I should open a store, I would have had the money to open years ago,” says Malone. While some of his treasures initially need a little TLC, no one can spot an unpolished gem better than Malone, who recently transformed a ‘30s-era dolly into the base of a coffee table. Finally taking the plunge, Malone picked the burgeoning design district for his boutique, where he artfully mixes shabby-chic, mid-century modern and handmade accessories. A rustic ceramic rooster ornament perfectly complements a long and low-slung mid-century sofa in slate-blue. And you’ll find plenty of wire locket baskets, rustic wooden toolboxes, enamel cookware and matte-finish pottery. 5634 N. Clark St., 773.506.0406. –Tate Gunnerson

HAND-PICKED! Daniel Malone carefully collected all the goodies for his new home shop, Roost.

EDITED BY MEGHAN MCEWEN

SEEN AND HERD

ANIMAL RIGHT! Andrew Peerless’ Herd table.

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MATERIAL GIRL: Fabric whiz Jessica Jones with her upbeat prints.

FABRIC CADABRA The 32-year-old behind the much-blogged-about Jessica Jones Fabrics has added new color-popping collections to the namesake fabric line that debuted last year with the Modern Flora collection and sold out almost immediately. “They’re so optimistic!” says Jessica Jones of the eight new upholstery-weight designs. Amid today’s anxious headlines, Jones has obviously struck a chord with smile-inducing prints like “Sunflower” and “Fireworks”—and at smile-worthy prices, too ($13.45 per yard). Armed with a refreshing design objective—to be “fun, exciting and bright”—there’s no doubt about it: mission accomplished. Her fabrics are a hit from Belgium to Alaska, and she just added zippy woven jacquard ribbon to match many of her prints. Got inspiration? Show off your finished project in the Flickr photo gallery on her popular DIY blog, How About Orange (howaboutorange.blogspot. com). After all, a little optimism is always worth sharing. Available at jcarolinecreative.com. –Lisa Cregan

ROOST PHOTO BY TATE GUNNERSON

When 29-year-old PR exec-turned-design student Andrew Peerless decided to explore whether a piece of furniture could frame a scene, the result was bucolic-pasture-meets-contemporary-cool. His Herd table, named for the six cow legs that pass through the table’s wood grain oval shape, is one of the quirkiest (in a good way) pieces we’ve seen in a while. “There’s only so much you can do with changing the form of furniture,” Peerless says, “but you can change its intention.” So why cows? “It’s an interesting motif that people relate to, especially in the Midwest. I like taking things traditionally considered mundane and elevating them.” While the Herd table isn’t for sale (it was a class project for Peerless, who is currently finishing his Master’s in Design at the School of the Art Institute), it’s definitely worth keeping tabs on this up-and-comer at andrew-peerless.com. –Erin Ensign

POSTER CHILD Anyone who has outgrown the Wicker Park bar-hopping circuit (pregnancy and kids have that effect) will relish the latest scene growing on Division Street: a kid art boom that goes head-to-head cool with any hipster dive bar. Threadless Kids, an outpost of the online shop that traffics in tees and hoodies, has taken their most popular user-submitted designs and printed them on heavy cardstock (posters, $35). And a partnership with Blik wall stickers means fresh designs without the commitment of wallpaper ($35-$65 a set). 1905 W. Division St., 773.688.7042. If you like the idea of DIY but lack the skills, head to the back room of Renegade Handmade. What the little space lacks in size, it makes up for in variety. Choose from large hand screened band posters from locals like Jay Ryan’s The Bird Machine and the small alphabet series by Strawberry Luna. 1924 W. Division St., 773.277.2707.

SUSTAINABLE-CHIC: The MoSS show.

Q&A WITH AN ECO-CURATOR Former fashion writer Jessa Brinkmeyer has been garnering her own press with Pivot, the super-hip West Loop eco-fashion boutique. Recently, the sartorial queen of green made an impressive foray into the design scene with the three-day Museum of Sustainable Style (MoSS), featuring local design in fashion, furniture and accessories.

Known for its hipster threads, Penelope’s also carries a small collection of hard-to-fi nd prints from Shinzi Katoh, a Japanese artist and children's book illustrator. Katoh’s designs are considered to be zakka, which translates to “things that make people feel happy” (posters, $38). 1913 W. Division St., 773.395.2351. Still haven’t found what you're looking for? Try Grow, a modern kids’ boutique specializing in eco-aware products. Our pick: Local design group Binth's Numbers and Alphabet prints, both destined to become modern classics (posters, $55 and $85). 1943 W. Division St., 773.489.0009. –Lindsey Gladstone

Favorite design discovery from MoSS: Aaron Pahmier's coffee table made from reclaimed gymnasium seating.

Plans for more MoSS-like exhibits? Maybe a history of the eco-fashion movement or sustainable design, or diagramming out the production of organic cotton. I have a lot of ideas. Maybe one day I’ll actually have my museum. Home design products at Pivot: One of the newest designers I’m selling is Cardboard Designs: coasters, vases, votive holders. Best design tip: Refinished vintage furniture is something I always love to see in homes, which is why I love, love the store Post 27 (1819 W. Grand). And there are a lot of great blogs like Treehugger, Inhabitat and Ecofabulous. What’s on your earth-friendly wish list? I’m dying to have a smart car. Sustainable design = expensive. Myth? Eco-friendly fabrics and fair labor production are often more expensive. As more organic textiles become available, then prices will come down. But I think that people are going to need to realize that there is a price behind that $14.99 shirt at H&M. Someone else is paying that price, and in a much greater way. –EE

THE NEW COOL From top: Hip kids get wall art to match with Binth’s Numbers poster and the Funkalicious print from Threadless.

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BEDDING DOWN: The new At Home in the City.

NICE LEGS!

PLAYING TETRA: Evan Lewis’ gorgeous new table.

“It’s no secret I love curvilinear geometry and 18th-century French furniture,” says long-adored Chicago designer Evan Lewis, whose metal pieces combine a workmanship that mirrors the painstaking craft of classic cabinetmakers with an unmistakably contemporary sensibility. While he’s produced a few modern pieces, it wasn’t until this summer that he really found himself enjoying the challenge of leaving Louis XVI behind. “I had a client looking for a buffet table, something really clean and slick. She pushed me pretty hard out of my comfort zone into designing a table for her that was completely asymmetrical—all straight lines, really sort of Spartan and geometric. I came up with this thing for her, reluctantly, but when I got it all made, I was really intrigued with it.” So much so that he’s adapted the piece as a dining table he’s christened Tetra. An almost Constructivist object fashioned from steel bars that are given a hand-applied patina, this glass-topped stunner will form the basis of a whole new line. 3368 N. Elson Ave., 773.539.0402. –Thomas Connors

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First Branca, then Del Piero. And now interior designer Susan Fredman solidifies the trend by opening her own home boutique. Known for her nature-inspired Lake Michigan design business, Fredman brings her getawayinspired vibe downtown with At Home in the City. And homey it is. Set up as a loft—complete with a kitchen (which doubles as the checkout counter), dining room, living room, bath and bedroom—the eco-friendly shop packs every inch in comforts for the luxe life. Sensuous bedding and linens, private-label candles and Swarovski crystal-embellished pillows are just the beginning. When it comes to furniture, don’t miss the hollow tree stump stools or the Bon Bon ottoman, which is covered in wool looping. Need some help making your own home look a little bit more like theirs? You can book a design consultation through their gift registry. 350 W. Erie St., 312.587.8150, susanfredmanathome.com. –Vicki Crain

COLLABORATION STATION It isn’t often that competitors collaborate, but when Chicago salvage king Stewart Gannen (owner of Architectural Artifacts) heard his friends Eric Nordstrom and Michael LaPorta of Urban Remains were opening a new store, he wanted a piece of the action. The result is their new Bucktown offspring, Mongo Home (named after the slang term for objects that are retrieved and reused). A departure from the brimming, warehouse-like spaces of its parents, Mongo features similarly pedigreed items (Daniel Burnham elevator doors, twin glass fragment pendant lights from London’s Playboy Club) arranged with unique objets d’art, all cleaned up and placed in carefully constructed vignettes, which Nordstrom says makes the store more approachable. “It’s a starting point for people to explore their own creativity for their own setting.” Gannen says his main intention for Mongo was just to have fun. “That was the only goal. And, of course, to see if Michael and Eric and I could play well together.” 1753 N. Damen Ave., 773.486.6200. –EE

SALVAGE-CHIC: Mongo’s new, highly curated interior.

MONGO PHOTOS BY GREG GILLIS

HOME FRONT NOW!

RETAIL THERAPY

SHAKE ‘N’ BAKER Forget everything you thought you knew about Baker, the buttoned-down authority on high-end home goods. These days, the company has found its funkier side, and is adding all sorts of can’t-miss hits to the mix. Case (goods) in point: The just-launched collection of Tony Duquette-designed furniture and accessories. Look for an assortment of 19 knockout pieces by the late designer that seem to put classic lines on mind-bending hallucinogens. How about his Organic Baroque chair, which channels Gaudi with its every swerve, or the otherwordly Terrapin Lamp with its gilded tortoise-like lines and spiky crest? Ottomans, lighting, seating and category-defying curios make up the madness. And then there’s Baker’s new Studio collection that skews decidedly young, hip and exotic with fresh twists on traditional. Our picks? The high-gloss lacquered Moroccan Stand occasional table and the head-turning Beau Hall Chair. We’re calling them heirlooms for the eccentric. Available at Baker, 825 Chicago Ave., 312.733.0353. –Alexandria Abramian-Mott

THE NEW BAKER Clockwise from top: Tony Duqettedesigned Organic Baroque Chair and Biomorpic Console Table with Baker Studio’s Beau Hall Chair.

DERIAN PHOTO BY TATE GUNNERSON

DERIAN TO BE DIFFERENT Shortly after a much-ballyhooed Target stint, New York demigod of decoupage John Derian augments his ephemera-inspired line of plates, platters and paperweights with a new furniture collection. Considering Derian’s reputation for taking nature into otherworldly territory, the hype is understandable. What shape, size and insect-patterned sofas will the fl ight-of-fancy artist debut? Th ink again. Anyone lucky enough to have made their way into his impossibly quaint boutique in New York’s East Village won’t be shocked: a diminutive TUFT STUFF: The darling of decoupage goes loveseat, camelback sofa and a tufted trad with his new furniture line. field bench all have a tastefully wellworn, antique-y feel, sure to fit right into a wide range of living room styles. The color scheme of oyster and flax linen (from a Belgium mill) is mild, but on the inside, he brings out the green guns: Derian partnered with LA-based Cisco and used soy-based foam, nontoxic glues and FSC-certified domestic maple woods. Available exclusively in Chicago at Jayson Home & Garden, 1885 N. Clybourn Ave., 773.248.8180. –TG

TREND ALERT! Goodbye, holiday pop-up shop! The store-within-a-store (or “SWAS”) is the latest concept shop to take root in the new year. While Macy’s State Street has long trumpeted big-name chain SWAS outposts like FAO Schwarz, the recent crop is trending from ho-hum to high-home-fashion. Just a couple months ago, Dot Spot arrived at I.D. Chicago, which dedicated a welldesigned slice of floor space to BluDot—the Milwaukee-based outfit responsible for clean-lined faves like the Buttercup rocker (below). And rumor has it a Tom Dixon store-within-a-store is coming to town soon. Based on the British design god’s existing SWAS—at New York’s Moss and L.A.’s Twentieth—it promises to be designophile-worthy. –Amanda Gordon SPOT-ON! BluDot’s store-within-a-store display at I.D. Chicago.

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HOME FRONT NOW!

GRAY AREA: A stack of Persephone books.

SHELF LIFE

Let’s face it: for die-hard design addicts, there is no better way to judge a book than by its cover. And now, a whole slew of drop-dead jackets gives new reason to get officially hooked on classics. For monotone maniacs, London-based Persephone Books (persephonebooks.co.uk) is like manna from heaven. All of their titles—a modest collection of past and present women authors—have the same plain gray jackets and cream-colored title labels. Think of them as the literary equivalent of a Jil Sanders’ suit, but with a surprise lining: all of the tomes come with vintage “end papers” inside the quiet covers. Looking to add some pop to your library? How about a few feet of paperback Melville House fiction (mhpbooks.com)? From Gogol to Twain and Balzac, past and present fiction titles all have the same black-and-white font treatment. But it’s the uber-cool, solid background colors, ranging from bubblegum pink to cool green mint, that make the books look like literary paint chips. Who could resist? Which isn’t to discount classic bookwormchic. Go-to jacket designer Coralie Bockford-Smith recently designed a 10-volume Penguin set (penguinclassics.com) set that begs for a cashmere cardigan and a roaring fireplace. Her hardcover, nature-inspired images, done with a stunning matte foil technique, may tempt you to redesigning an entire room around them. And who would we be to judge? –AAM

POP TOMES! Melville House’s candy-colored fiction.

LOFTY GOOD LOOKS: The LCD-lit bar at w xyz.

FLYING HIGH Budget hotels are usually synonymous with synthetic bedding and nailed-to-the-wall art—especially here in the U.S. Aloft, a brandnew, high-design, low-cost chain by Starwood Properties (the folks behind the W) touched down last July at O’Hare Airport and defies the polyester promise of most affordable options. Guest rooms breaks convention with hipster-approved, loftlike spaces, featuring high-tech TVs with surround sound and iPod hookup and sleek platform beds with ingeniously designed headboards that pull quadruple duty as closet storage, coffee station and art display. Your in-transit, out-of-town friends can thank New York designer David Rockwell, who aimed to encourage socializing among guests. Think open, industrial-chic spaces like the sunken living room lobby (dubbed re:mix) that opens to an outdoor patio, and the swanky cocktail lounge w xyz, boasting a crushed glass bar top backlit with colored LCD lights; concrete floors; and flat-panel TVs displaying cool, atmospheric videos. With four more Chicago locations to come (look for a Millennium Park location early next year), locals will be able to enjoy high style on the fly—no travel guest required. Rooms start at $89. alofthotels.com. –EE

FIRESIDE CHATS: Take pre-flight conversation outside at Aloft.

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“Advancing the Art of your Kitchen and Bath”

Resin Buddha banks, $18, at urbanoutfi tters.com, 20 State St., 312.269.9919.

HOME FRONT TRENDS! BY ALEXANDRIA ABRAMIAN-MOTT

Supon Phornirunlit’s acrylic Queen Clock, $49.95, at nakeddecor.com.

THE EMPIRE STRIKES FAB Who says the sun has set on imperial chic? We found the latest in ruling-class cool that infuses the classics with a decidedly mod lineage. So whether your tastes run Occidental (clock your next teatime with the Queen of England) or Oriental (unleash your inner Fu dog with CB2 bookends), we’ve got the goods. Still castle-challenged? Not to worry. These dynastic fi nds will work just as well in a sprawling fortress as in a minion-size studio.

Francesco Binfare’s Lycra and leather Gran Khan sofa, $19,770, at mossonline.com.

Hella Jongerius’ ius tin-glazed Pyramids Pyra of Makkum, kkum price ric upon request, e uest, at a mossonline.com.

CB2’s Resin Fu Dog bookends, $49.95, at 3757 N. Lincoln Ave., 773.755.3900.

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HOME FRONT ART BY REBECCA MAZZEI

STREET CRED Who wants a clichéd skyline stretching across the living room? These urban landscape artists take the craft to new heights The art of capturing the urban landscape— pointing and clicking in the direction of a stoic skyscraper or honing in on a vibrant street scene—isn’t exactly a new idea here in Chicago. In fact, the city has a pioneering tradition of urban landscape photography, beginning with the 1930s launch of the New Bauhaus, and extending through its later incarnation as the Institute of Design under the guidance of such storied teachers as Harry Callahan and Nathan Lerner. But some emerging talents—photographers and painters alike—are having a go at the genre, showcasing new techniques and provocative perspectives that have designers, dealers, critics, collectors and even a buyer at CB2 (a la Matthew Lew’s colorful Sears Tower prints) scrambling for their share of scenic cityscapes. The trend is bending toward CTA tracks lit phosphorescent green or electrical wires glistening like tinsel in the sunlight. This new work provides a poetic visual counterpunch to clichéd urban imagery. The city is not merely an experimental palette for abstraction, nor is it a backdrop for narrative action. Quite the contrary. It is the main character—a complicated, fragile and elusive being. “There are certain images that pop into everyone’s mind when they think of the variety of urban landscapes that exist,” says photographer Phil Dembinski. “I enjoy the challenge of making these generic locations become places of importance.” The landscapes Dembinski chooses to photograph imply different possibilities. He

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POINT AND CLIQUE From top: Phil Dembinski’s photograph, “Morning Encounter;” photo of the Ashland underpass by Ryan Baehr, “Ashland;” Dave Jordano’s “Evening Storm;” Lower Right: Ryan Baehr’s “Trade.”

believes the importance of the landscape is to provide what he calls “a preface or remnants of drama.” In “Back Alley Disturbance,” Dembinski exploits the tension that exists in our own backyard. A young woman peeks suspiciously out a window, staring at something below her balcony, beyond the picture frame. The claustrophobic crowd of stacked brownstone apartments intensifies the unseen source of anxiety in the scene. Painter Karen Perl is after shifting, transitional moments. She paints—and repaints and then paints again—the same street corner, say Western and Clybourn or Touhy and Western in Rogers Park, until she feels the matter is settled. She’s been at it for a few decades. “I want to paint the emotional connection, that nostalgic feeling,” Perl says. “I like the way you can manipulate a painting to make a scene a little more magical.” Lately, she’s wandered into unfamiliar territory, trying to get at her personal emotional response—what “turns her on.” Her landscapes of beautiful brick buildings are veiled by a fog of gray paint like faintly recalled images obscured by the haze of a dim memory. Andy Covington, who recently relocated to Portland, captures Chicago like no other. For his “Havens” project, a photo series of iconic homes in northwest Indiana, he climbed on top of his van and altered linear perspective to give the optical illusion of looking at eye level. The result is an image of a real home that looks like a dollhouse, a version of the American Dream that you could imagine holding in your own hands. He captures one Chicago factory the same way, fitting a behemoth inside a snow globe. While Covington’s urban scenes seem to shrink big buildings that loom over the landscape, David Schalliol can distill evidence of centuries in a single shot. His “Isolated Building Series” presents solitary row houses and storefronts once surrounded by neighbors. The potency of the image lies in what is absent from the frame. When taken in together, his images string together a persuasive historical narrative.

“A friend of mine said someone told her this work was so depressing she couldn’t put it on her wall. ‘I don’t want to see that when I wake up or make coffee,’ she had said. My friend responded, ‘So much of my life is not confronting those issues; home should be a place where we’re reflecting on the broader world. I don’t want to forget when I’m comfortable that the city goes on; life goes on. This is one way of reflecting on that.’” We’re not talking about commanding panoramic views of the skyline at twilight. “I’m thinking about the basic details of daily life that have otherwise lost meaning,” Schalliol says. “I want to recapture meaning, a connection.” The recent romance with urban landscape art is perhaps a response to all the time we spent absorbed within a virtual reality; one that leaves little to hold on to. In such a climate, pictures of the city remind us that we’re all connected. They bring us closer to each other.

ALTERED LANDSCAPE From top: One of Andy Covington’s dollhouse-like images, “Haven #12,” Matthew Lew’s “Chicago Summer;” Wayne Cable’s “Ogden Bridge.”

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HOME FRONT TRENDS! BY WENDY WONG

SMASHED! Calling all things shattered, slumped and smashed. And, no, we’re not talking slightly rough around the edges, either. This season, designers are crushing—literally—on all things crinkled, beat up and burnt to a crisp. Afraid to get totally smashed? Dip a toe into the trend with a credenza made of fire-scorched, lake-salvaged wood or dive in headfirst with designer Dror Benshetrit’s broken Phases Martini glass that’s been completely wrecked and pieced back together again. And why not get totally wasted with John Brauer’s crumpled Bin Bin trash cans, which resemble those balled up paper wads that get tossed inside them? If you’re not quite ready to explain dropping triple digits on a pre-broken vase, opt for a dimpled Dent pitcher and cup set all processed in an eco-friendly, windpowered electric furnace. Just remember, this doesn’t give you permission to knock over your granny’s beloved Tiffany vase. But if you do, at least now you can glue it back together and call it avant-garde. Clockwise from top: Dror Benshetrit’s white Phases Martini glass, $245, at Elements, 741 N. Wells, 312-642-6574. Rob Zinn’s fire-scorched Douglas Fir Burnt credenza, $7,500, at blankblank.net. Smoky Dent pitcher and cups by Justin Parker for Esque, $224, at www.branchhome.com. Essey of Denmark crushed red Bin Bin wastebasket by John Brauer, $54, at nova68.com. Dror Benshetrit’s porcelain Vase of Phases, $120-$325, at Elements, 741 N. Wells, 312-642-6574.

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HOME FRONT DESIGN BY THOMAS CONNORS PHOTOGRAPHY BY BOB COSCARELLI

MR. LIGHT: Steven Haulenbeek.

BRIGHT LIGHTS

Four local luminaries shed some serious wattage on the current state of lighting design. The result? Absolutely brilliant “If you set out to design a lamp, all you’re going to come up with is a lamp,” suggests designer Steven Haulenbeek, who recently moved back to Chicago from Atlanta (where he relocated for a six-month gig at the prominent Formation Design Group a year and a half ago). “I’d never have come up with some of the things I did if I based my ideas in a common typology.” A former sculptor and SAIC design grad, Haulenbeek’s eye for form and delight in industrial materials make for innovative lighting designs that are as much about ideas as they are physical objects. One of his cleverest gestures to date is a piece made from hundreds of cable ties. Cleverer yet, he didn’t actually make these lamps and sell them; just a “how-to” manual for two bucks. His intention was to get consumers to appreciate the idea of the handmade object. “I was working at Luminaire at the time and people would come in and pick up a handmade accessory of some sort and there’d be some “flaw” they didn’t like and they’d complain and want a discount. So I started thinking about how the consumer could become part of the process.”

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Haulenbeek’s adventures in lighting include the much-photographed Cumulous Light Canopy, a pendant constellation of photographers’ umbrellas, and the seemingly endless shapes of his Alternate Light Forms, steel wire frames sprayed with a flexible, plastic polymer web-coat, the same material used in George Nelson’s Bubble lamps. While at SAIC (where he now teaches Intro to Designed Objects), Haulenbeek teamed up with fellow students Jason Chernak and Bryan Metzdorf to form an underground design collaborative, the Mighty Bearcats (the group behind the Skin bud vase made from soft, flexible heat shrink tubing, still available at Willow). Recently, the trio developed a minimalist pendant light using the same material. On his own, he’s developing a line of “epic” chandeliers for current employer Holly Hunt, while outfitting the Pilsen neighborhood hangout Simone’s with a constellation of modular light fi xtures fashioned from vacuum-formed plastic. Like Isamu Noguchi, a big-name sculptor who also investigated light with sculptural form, Lucy Slivinski’s work leads her from creating objects of

MIRAGE CHANDELIER PHOTOS BY JAMES PRINTZ; MARY BROGGER’S SCONCES COURTESY OF ARTIST

Clockwise from left: “Mirage” chandelier; a pair of Mary Brogger’s twisted-wire sconces; detail of Shireen Bishop’s “Mirage” chandelier; and Lucy Slivinski amid pieces of her lighting-sculpture.

salvaged wood and wire to devising lighted shapes that can be incorporated into everyday interior environments. “I’m a sculptor and this is an extension of my sculpture,” she says, referring to the big, gourd-like chandelier created from strips of rattan, which hangs over a disparate collection of stone and wood objects in the window of Michael Del Piero Good Design. “I’m exploring it in a similar way that I explore anything that I do in my studio.” At 4 feet high and 3.5 feet across at its widest point, the highly tactile piece possesses that aspect peculiar to large-format sculpture—the ability to make one very aware of one’s own body in space. And depending on how closely Slivinski weaves her material, the light from the incandescent globe inside falls either directly downward, or seeps through the interstices to suffuse a space with a nearly prismatic illumination. “Lucy’s pieces are organic, natural, and one of kind,” notes Del Piero. “They’re pieces of art to me, instead of lighting.” Shireen Bishop studied fiber arts as an undergraduate at the University of Washington and that background is evident in the voluptuous drape of the Mirage chandelier she’s fashioned as an architecture student at the School

of the Art Institute. The result of a yearlong class exploring the nature of light, the piece was exhibited with other SAIC student work at the Fabbrica del Vapore in Milan during FuoriSalone 2008. There’s an almost couture effect in Bishop’s artful manipulation of her material—simple aluminum ball chain—and an admirable audacity in the scale of the piece, which hangs nearly 7 feet from the ceiling. And it’s not just through its material and size that this chandelier inhabits space. The shadows it casts on floors and walls—loopy, gnarly patterns that read like something under a microscope—give the piece a presence that is greater than the sum of its parts. “I have a very difficult time conceiving of things as just objects that live in the world without considering their environment,” says Bishop. “It was important to me that this piece really relate to the space around it.” (Available by contacting the designer at shireen.bishop@gmail.com.) Artist Mary Brogger has landed some ace gigs. “Stream,” her wall piece comprised of cut sheet metal embedded in plaster, is one of the highly visible art works that enliven the Park Hyatt Hotel lobby. And her Haymarket Memorial on Desplaines Street is a hard-to-miss monumental figurative work in bronze. While she’s done some fairly straightforward lighting fi xtures over the years, her heart is in those works that stem most directly from her sculptural explorations. “These come out of the development of a conceptual idea that has run throughout my work for years, using the inherent quality of the material as the basis of the object,” says Brogger, “as well as an old craft tradition of twisting wire to make tree forms.” Seemingly naturalistic but not slavishly representational (don’t expect bark patterns on these brass beauties), Brogger’s pieces may fool the mind but they don’t fool the eye. Our heads “see” branches, but even a quick glance reveals that what we’re looking at is twisted wire in all its marvelous malleability. Illusion, if fleeting. marybrogger.com.

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HOME FRONT DESIGN BY TATE GUNNERSON PHOTOGRAPHY BY SAVERIO TRUGLIA

SCRAP ARTISTS

A sibling design duo carves a cool home accessory biz with found wood

SWEET SALVATION From top: Brother-andsister design duo Aaron and Megan Pahmier; twig bud vases.

When Kindling cofounders Megan and Aaron Pahmier debuted their modern line of rustic home accessories made from recycled wood at last summer’s outdoor Renegade Craft Festival, “a crazy monsoon” put a damper on the turnout. The brother-and-sister design duo, who strive to make arty, handmade goods entirely from scrap wood, found a silver lining in the record-setting rains that flooded basements, shut down O’Hare Airport and drenched the outdoor fair: a fresh batch of felled tree material to fuel their work.

“THE STORY REALLY MAKES IT,” SAYS AARON. “AN OBJECT IS JUST AN OBJECT UNLESS YOU HAVE A STORY FOR IT.” The Pahmiers make no attempt to disguise the natural origins of their work, adding an organic charm to the results. A large twig mounted on a geometric wood base is a photo tree with small slots cut in the branches to show off photos. “Geometric shapes seem to be floating around in the collective subconscious of the art world,” explains Megan of the faceted base, a consistent shape throughout the collection. Small chunks of wood are cut and sanded into angular, smooth objects, like cubist-inspired votive holders and wooden rocks, then often coated in white enamel for a clean, contemporary look. The idea of Kindling sprouted when Megan, a painter, sculptor and freelance art teacher, realized she could use wood scraps from her brother’s furniture design business, Green Sawn (sold at Post 27 and Green Home Chicago), as raw material, simultaneously reducing waste and making extra money. “I wound up doing a whole series based on his scrap wood,” says Megan. When her pieces turned out better than

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she had imagined—creatively arranged geometric blocks of painted wood for the walls—a home accessory collaboration seemed like a natural fit. And when discarded furniture scraps can’t keep up with creative output, the Pahmiers climb into their black Toyota 4Runner to cruise the alleys for discarded lumber or wood furniture that can be repurposed. During one expedition, the Kindling collaborative hit the mother lode: an old telephone pole made from primo white cedar that had been cut down and left for trash. After a lingering police car moved on, the siblings sprang into action: Aaron fi red up the chainsaw while Megan kept watch. The only evidence was a giant pile of sawdust. Two weeks later the stumps had been transformed into primitive stools and planters, which later sold at Andersonville’s Scout. “The story really makes it,” says Aaron. “An object is just an object unless you have a story for it.” Take their latest source: oak 4-by-4s salvaged from their grandpa’s farm. Previously used to build bins for newly harvested corn to dry, the well-worn planks have been revived as another chapter in their inspired design collaboration. When it comes to selling, it’s no wonder they gravitate toward Etsy, the popular Web site dedicated to independent artists and designers. “Sustainability is written into Etsy’s DNA,” says Aaron. “People who shop there understand that it’s the antithesis of mass production.”

Sellarsbook Yellow wool rug, at therugcompany.info.

HOME FRONT TRENDS!

Fanning Flora Shade, $88, at Anthropologie, 1120 N. State St., 312.255.1848.

Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec’s Facett armchair, starting at $2,300, at Ligne Roset, 440 N. Wells, 312.222.9300.

BY ALYSSA LELAND

Hella Jongerius’ Bonanza Jug Bird stopper, $9,800, at mossonline.com.

YELLOW PAGED! The yellow light may mean slow down and prepare to stop on the road, but in our book, the can’t-miss color is now going full speed ahead. So get ready to hightail it toward citrus tones of all stripes this year. And whether you’re looking for a small punch of the stuff (say, in the form of groovy bathroom decals and a knockout lamp by French designer Francois Azambourg) or want to upgrade the lemon tones to a larger role (how ‘bout Ligne Roset’s citrus-fresh armchair that begs for a book and a glass of wine?), we’re betting big on yellow as the fastest cure for the winter blues.

Michel Ducaroy’s Togo sofa, starting at $3,650, at Ligne Roset, 440 N. Wells, 312.222.9300.

Suzanne Sharp’s Chiesa & Ponti. pillows, at therugcompany.info.

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Francois Azambourg’s crumpled metal hanging lamp, price upon request, at Luminaire.

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HOME FRONT DESIGN BY THOMAS CONNORS PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANTHONY TAHLIER

THE CITY’S SHORTEST COMMUTE Sandro and Suhail are singular-name sensations at the top of their field with one work-live address. But the similarities end there

THE ARTFUL LODGER Clockwise from top: Sandro in his living space; the art-filled hallway of Sandro’s home; the living room; artifacts and skulls from Sandro’s collection.

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Like a lot of people, in-demand and single-name sensations Sandro— who creates arresting, well-known images for big-time clients like Nike, Adidas and Cadillac—can’t begin his day without a cup of coffee. After whipping up an espresso in his sleek-as-a-machine kitchen, he gets in a morning workout in his home gym before heading off to work. But here’s the clincher: The trip from house to office is just 25 steps. Jealous? While most of us are fighting traffic, Sandro simply puts one foot in front of the other and in seconds, he’s downstairs in his humming studio, a former commercial building he bought 18 years ago and rehabbed to fab. And with 5,000 square feet of studio space on the ground level and an equally roomy residence above, he has no excuse for not making it into work every day. Well, almost. “It does seem that living here and no longer commuting, I tend to be later to work,” he admits. With its vaulted ceiling supported by mammoth trusses, a jungle of high-tech equipment, and exposed brick walls displaying large, colorpopping prints of all sorts of folks (from actor John Malkovich to the unrenowned young boxers who make up Sandro’s upcoming book, Blood Brothers), the studio is clearly all about the work. There’s an office with a view of the park and a big open kitchen directly across ...

E X T R A O R D I NA RY C A B I N ET RY

N E F F O F C H I CAG O Avant-Garde Contemporary Design to Classic Traditional Cabinetry

The Merchandise Mart Plaza • Suite 144 • Chicago, I L 60654 P: 312.467.9585 www.Neff-of-Chicago.com

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... from the street entrance. “It’s a great space for creativity. You come in here and you want to do something great,’ says Sandro. “We don’t sit. We’re constantly producing imagery here.” While he thrives on the frenzy, Sandro retreats periodically to the quiet of his minimalist home, packed with photography books and appointed with works by Robert Mapplethorpe, Eugene Von Bruenchenhein, Joel-Peter Witkin, Wesley Kimler and Tony Fitzpatrick. “I’ll come up here to have lunch, get away from the phones, take a nap. And then I go back and may continue into the night shooting or editing. I am dearly in love with the work that I do. The biggest problem I have is turning off my mind from creating new images. Up here I can forget. And other people’s artworks inspire me to do other things I hope to do one day, like writing poetry, or painting. It’s not a place to escape, just a place to give my mind a little bit of a rest.” On the fl ip side of living and working from the same space: Giving the mind a rest seems unheard of to Suhail, the London-born architect/ designer whose cosmopolitan adventurousness has shaped such animated restaurants as the exotic Tizzi Melloul and the highly theatrical De La Costa. “When you have your own business, you have to work around the clock to sustain it. If someone calls me at 10 at night, I can get things sent off by midnight. My clients like the idea that they can call me anytime. I can switch off if I need to, but the fact is, I’m only as good as my last project and I have to make sure I’m on top of everything.” Suhail was one of the fi rst tenants in the gargantuan, Westtown industrial building he moved into 12 years ago. The neighborhood was not exactly well-heeled at the time, and clients were sometimes skittish about taking a meeting there. But once they did, they found themselves contained within Suhail’s highly styled office. These days, the neighborhood is less off-putting and Suhail has downsized from 3,000 square ...

“WHEN YOU HAVE YOUR OWN BUSINESS, YOU HAVE TO WORK AROUND THE CLOCK TO SUSTAIN IT. IF SOMEONE CALLS ME AT 10 AT NIGHT, I CAN GET THINGS SENT OFF BY MIDNIGHT.”

WORKING FOR A LIVING: Sandro finds a work-home balance with an upstairs living space (above) and a first-floor studio, decorated with his own photography.

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> WINTER 2009

... feet to 1,800. “The fi rst studio space I had was a showcase. That’s OK when you’re starting out. You want to showcase your talents in your space because you don’t have that body of work out there. Fortunately I have enough out there now that’s been documented that I can tell people, ‘Go to my Web site and if you’re interested, call me.’ It’s taken me 15 years to get to a point where I know what I’m doing and that doesn’t have to be reflected in what I wear or drive or sit in. It’s more about content.” Th at philosophy is reflected in the designer’s digs, an almost monastic area with a compact living/dining area immediately adjacent to his work space, where battered sample books and Post-it packed folders lay every which way. Save for an old black and white portrait of his father, the most notably decorative item is the huge panel of industrial soundproofi ng that lines the wall behind his steel-topped work table—and that’s there for function, not form. “I think a lot of times when people see a big, showy office, they feel threatened. The last thing I want is for clients to feel threatened. Since this environment is more relaxed, it’s much easier for me to work with them.” So it seems, as he’s never short of clients, which currently include Moto restaurant and Studio 2650, a boutique on Devon Avenue specializing in Southeast Asian wedding dresses.

“WHEN PEOPLE SEE A BIG, SHOWY OFFICE, THEY FEEL THREATENED. THE LAST THING I WANT IS FOR CLIENTS TO FEEL THREATENED. SINCE THIS ENVIRONMENT IS SO RELAXED, IT’S EASIER FOR ME TO WORK WITH THEM.”

DESIGN DEPOT Clockwise from above: Suhail tinkers with a piece of sculpture in his workshop; his dining area pulls double duty as a makeshift conference room; the steel-topped work station is Suhal’s design central.

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> WINTER 2009

1cab][Tc`\Wbc`SZWUVbW\UO\ROQQSaa]`WSa DWaWb]c`aV]e`]][Ob!!$&<3Zab]\/dS\cS1VWQOU]%%!#!'"  SdO\ZSeWaW\QQ][

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HOME FRONT TRENDS! BY MEGHAN MCEWEN

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KNIT WITS! Baby, it’s cold outside—just-right weather for sink-in yarns, felted wool and cable-knit cozies, sure to heat up the design scene as well as your tootsies. Known for their luxe approach to knitwear, Lutz & Patmos brings their fashion sense home with a line of ultra-soft—and doubly chic—cable pillow covers at West Elm. And if that’s not enough to convince you to jump on the cable car, Christien Meindertsma’s wooly numbers ought to do the trick. Forget the conventional afghan: her oversized poufs with wide, chain-stitch knits made with extra-large needles, make the ultimate stool, footrest or sculptural scene-stealer. And while you’re at it, might as well get a nifty homemade cozy for your frothy fireside bev. It’s going to be a long winter.

6.

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> WINTER 2009

1. Lutz & Patmos cable pillow covers for West Elm, $39 each, westelm.com. 2. Gomitolo knit clock by Carlo and Benedetta Tamborini for Diamantini Domeniconi, diamantinidomeniconi.com. 3. Flocks Pouf by Christien Meindertsma, $800, $1600 Design Within Reach, 10 E. Ohio St. 4. Felted wool Dot Vase, $138, supermarkethq.com. 5. Knitware ceramic vase by Brooklyn-based Alyssa Ettinger, $120, alyssaettinger.com. 6. Debbie Gaskin drink cozy, $3, roseandradish.com.

urban design 1901 N. Clybourn Ave, Suite 100 | Chicago, IL 60614 p. 773.388.2900 | f. 773.388.2916 www.boconcept.us

DORM BEFORE FUNCTION Below: Both of these hard-to-find pieces are by Denver-based designers DoubleButter. “They have such a classic design, but it feels updated. That solid wood side chair is slightly reminiscent of a school chair—dorm room freshman year—but more modern,” says Stalowicz. “They’re sturdy pieces of furniture you’ll have forever.”

BAG, YOU’RE IT!

COMPOUND INTEREST “I love this little thing,” says Stalowicz of these adorable, quirky Bankabanks ($12), designed by Chicago-based David Sultana and his wife. “He always wanted something a bit more designed for his dresser—a place to put change.” As for Stalowicz? Not quite as functional, but no less important: “It makes me smile.”

Above: The Um Tote ($115), which is made from factory excess felt, scores big points by folding completely flat when unzipped. It’s an important space-saving detail for Stalowicz, whose apartment (below) is “small and long.” She uses lobster-red chairs to play off neutral, muted colors of the exposed brick, creating a mini dining area.

HOME FRONT PEOPLE

SOUNDING OFF! According to Stalowicz, everything that goes into the Vers iPod Alarm Clock ($199) takes the environment into consideration. “Finally, an alternative to the Bose speakers,” she says. “And the sound is incredible. The guys did not skimp on the sound quality in order to make this sustainable.”

BY KELLY AIGLON PHOTOGRAPHY BY DANE TASHIMA

’NET WORTH

High priestess of eco-chic Jill Stalowicz gives a top-fave tour of her platinum design hits

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showers”). It’s here, at her 1,000-square-foot unit in an 1895 building in River West, where she puts many of the site’s items into a thoughtful, highly livable context. All clean lines and organic shapes, the furniture—a tufted sofa from Gus Modern, a floating media unit from Mash Studio—mixes effortlessly with telltale personal effects, like portraits she drew of her favorite authors, which hang in the living room, to a motorcycle helmet. “I always tell people to make edited choices, invest in pieces you love, and surround yourself with objects that have stories and relevance,” says Stalowicz. Other simple design and living tips? She has tons of them. And judging from the success of the site—which now draws some 50,000 visitors a month—it’s clear that people are listening.

DETAILS MATTER! Above: Stalowicz uses hanging fabric panels by Inhabit as a soft room divider that “doesn’t interrupt the lighting or feel too heavy.” Below: The Vitamin Urban Gnomes ($100) are fun conversation starters. “It’s a thoughtful detail, not a random coffee table book. My aesthetic is about surrounding yourself with things that tell a story–that make you feel like you.”

STYLING BY PHILLIP HERMAN, PRODUCT SHOTS COURTESY OF FEEL MORE HUMAN

Jill Stalowicz knows how to send a message. This former New Yorker did merchandising for DKNY and was a branding specialist for Procter & Gamble, Miller and Coke before launching the fast-growing FeelMoreHuman.com. Just check out her impeccably modern home furnishings e-store, and you’ll understand her mission in mere minutes. “I was looking for a way to give access to smart, inspiring design and also provide easy ways to live a healthier, greener life,” she says. And without being preachy to boot. About half the products are eco-friendly, but Stalowicz hopes to increase that number. “I want to put pressure on designers and manufacturers to produce more [green] items. But it’s not going to happen overnight,” she says. So, for now, she advises people to simply “do better today than you did yesterday”—a call to action that’s become the site’s unofficial tagline. And it’s a mantra she lives by at home, too (although her “eco-sin is taking long

every object tells a story and once heard we can be moved . . .

FROM WONDER TO

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HOME FRONT PEOPLE BY LINDSEY GLADSTONE PHOTOGRAPHY BY KATRAINA WITTKAMP

CRIB SHEETS! Bugaboo or Bjorn? Disney or Noguchi? Four local kids’ design experts sound off on what’s hot—and what’s not—in babeland MODERN LOVE

FAVE CRIB OR BED? Anything by Netto Collection. Specifically, the Moderne crib. CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT: Binkies. SHOULD LIVE WITHOUT: Clutter. With kids it adds up very quickly. ADULT FURNITURE THAT WORKS FOR KIDS: Lighting from the adult side of design like a Noguchi table lamp. FURNITURE THAT WORKS FOREVER:

Many of our changing tables convert to cabinets that can be used for audio equipment or even a mini-bar down the road (not for the kids, obviously). WORTH THE INVESTMENT: A crib. After all,

SMALLVILLE: Maribeth and Dean Marshall at Hadley.

they will use it day and night. Plus, it will be handed down to the next child or converted into a toddler bed. You could be looking at it for close to a decade. DESIGN INSPIRATION: Christian Liaigre and John Pawson. YOUR STYLE IN THREE WORDS: Less is more. PROUDEST MOMENT? The birth of our children. DESIGN SECRET: Limit your color palette. WHAT’S HOT: Family time. UP NEXT: Baby hammocks from Miyo and Hushamok. FAVE CHILDREN’S BOOK: Where the Wild Things Are. hadleybaby.com.

STATE OF THE ART With an MFA in Installation Art from the School of the Art Institute, it’s no surprise that Jennifer Talbot’s b.delicious interiors are environmental and interactive. Th is über-

crafter—and mom of two—designs knockout nurseries and super-fun, functional kids’ rooms. Curtains that double as a puppet theater and hand-felted mobiles that stand on their own as sculpture, anyone? FAVE CRIB OR BED: The Sparrow by Ouef in gray. BEST TIP: Keep it simple and clean. The clutter will come in time. CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT: Good-looking storage. SHOULD LIVE WITHOUT: An old-school rocking chair. You just won’t use it. ADULT FURNITURE THAT WORKS FOR KIDS: Vintage nightstands. They tend to

be smaller in scale and provide nice contrast. FURNITURE THAT WORKS FOREVER: A dresser. Which means don’t buy for trend and make sure it’s made of a quality wood. WORTH THE INVESTMENT: A really good mattress. FAVE DESIGN MOTIF: Modern nature. DESIGN INSPIRATION: A morning walk. A pod that fell from a tree. The less I look at other people’s work, the purer my own design is. YOUR STYLE IN THREE WORDS: Whimsical, modern, colorful. DESIGN SECRET: The Discount Fabric Warehouse in Pilsen and Colori Paint Gallery on North Avenue. WHAT’S HOT: Robots and peacocks. UP NEXT: Birdhouses and globes. Th ings that are genderneutral. bdelicious.com.

A LAND BEFORE NOD

BABY STYLE: Jennifer Talbot’s designs: a felt tree with a peek-a-boo bird and an adorable nursery with a handmade mobile.

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For 10 years Southport moms flocked to Elizabeth Marie for its cutesy mix of kids décor and gifts. But then last year, owner Elizabeth Black decided to shutter the shop and concentrate on her out-of-the-box interior ... design biz.

JENNIFER TALBOT’S PHOTOS BY AMY BRASWELL

Shopping for their children, Dean and Maribeth Marshall struggled to fi nd furniture and accessories that were both aesthetically pleasing and functional (and didn’t scream “baby on board”). With backgrounds in design and fashion (he managed a high-end residential showroom at the Mart; she is the general manager at Prada), they knew exactly what they were looking for. And you can fi nd it at Hadley, their ultra-modern Lincoln Park children’s boutique.

MAX I N E SNIDER CLASSIC MODERN FURNITURE

D AV I D S U T H E R L A N D

NEW YORK

AINSWORTH-NOAH

AT L A N TA

LOS ANGELES TOWN

DENVER

H O L L Y H U N T LT D

CHICAGO

MIAMI

W W W. M A X I N E S N I D E R I N C . C O M

SHOW N: 6 0 " AVIGNON DINING TABLE WITH SUNBURST WALNUT TOP AND SAVANNAH DINING CHAIR

PRETTY IN PINK From top: Stacy Bankier and Emily Kopp in a sweet, feminine nursery of their design; fun, cheery and clean-lined kids’ rooms by Elizabeth Black.

ADVICE FROM THE PROS: “DON’T MAKE EVERYTHING MATCH,” SAY SNUG HOME’S KOPP AND BANKIER. “ALL OF YOUR PINKS DON’T HAVE TO BE THE SAME SHADE.”

IT STARTS AT HOME Emily Kopp and Stacy Bankier met at camp when they were 10 years old. As adults, their love of antiquing and homemade accessories reconnected them. Six years later, their Snug

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Home has evolved from handmade photo albums to full-service nursery design, including custom bedding, shopping trips and rearranging what you already have to delightful effect. FAVE CRIB OR BED? One that’s personalized with old family quilts and vintage fabrics. BEST TIP:

Don’t make everything match. It’s OK if your woods clash. All of your pinks don’t have to be the same shade. CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT: Great storage to hide the clutter and keep you organized. SHOULD LIVE WITHOUT: A wipe warmer. ADULT FURNITURE THAT WORKS FOR KIDS: A dresser. Don’t let anyone sell you a changing table. You don’t need it. You can put a changing pad on any dresser. WORTH THE INVESTMENT: Quality crib bedding (our bedding can be slipcovered and is machine washable!). FAVE DESIGN MOTIF: Polka dots and stripes as neutrals. DESIGN INSPIRATION: Our mothers taught us to use the family heirlooms that were already in our homes. YOUR STYLE IN THREE WORDS: Functional, personal, vintage. DESIGN SECRET: Etsy. com. WHAT’S HOT: Containers of all kinds. Vintage boxes, milk crates. They make great gifts. FAVE CHILDREN’S BOOK: Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs. snughomeinteriors.com.

ELIZABETH BLACK’S PHOTOS BY TIM WALTERS

... FAVE CRIB OR BED: A custom-made Swedish bed with high sides and a secret compartment just the right size for hiding a matchbox car. BEST TIP: Dimmer switches. CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT: Gorgeous antique lighting fi xtures. The little kiddo is lying in bed, staring at the ceiling. SHOULD LIVE WITHOUT: Fluorescent tubing. ADULT FURNITURE THAT WORKS FOR KIDS: An oversized reading chair. FURNITURE THAT WORKS FOREVER: A well-chosen bed frame. WORTH THE INVESTMENT: 100 percent wool carpeting. DESIGN INSPIRATION: The interests of a child. YOUR STYLE IN THREE WORDS: Comfortable, timeless, elegant. PROUDEST MOMENT: Watching a child discover and respond to a fi nished room. DESIGN SECRET: The Sweden Shop on Foster Avenue. WHAT’S HOT? Everything mod. UP NEXT: All of the things I had in my shop 10 years ago. After all, design is cyclical. Oh, and less tchotchkes. Parents are paring it down to only what’s needed. elizabethmarieonline.com.

ASSEMBLAGE

Elegance Revisited

Assemblage Ltd. • 121 N Jefferson Street • Chicago, Illinois 60661 Telephone 312.234.9200 • Fax 312.234.9884 • www.assemblageltd.com Open 10 TO 6 Tuesday Through Saturday, Or By Appointment

HOME FRONT TRENDS!

Jonathan Adler Collage Pillow, $125, Jonathan Adler, 676 N. Wabash Ave., 312.274.9920.

BY CARLA JORDAN

Graffi ti Pillow by Unison Home, $52, at Post 27, 1819 W. Grand Ave., 312.829.6122. Dan Marty’s British flag pillows, $425–$725, at danmartydesign.com.

GETTING DOWN Time for some serious pillow talk. Nothing changes up the look of a room faster than a bundle of puff. Warm hues, punchy patterns and must-touch textures dominate this winter’s look. Groovy guru Paul Smith gets in on the puff y stuff with a new collection for the Rug Company while Dan Marty raises a big design flag with a just-unfurled collection of Union Jack, ensign and signal flag pillows. Fling a few about or pile ’em high—these fluff y numbers are anything but lightweights on the fashion front.

Isola Bella’s pillow, $58, at Anthropologie, 1120 N. State St., 312.255.1848.

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> WINTER 2009

Paul Smith’s Birdie Blossom pillow, $450, at therugcompany.info.

interior design services + home furnishings boutique 1914 N Damen Chicago 11–6 Tues–Sat 12–5 Sun michaeldelpiero.com 773 772 3000

HOME FRONT CULTURE

THE CURE: Design curator Zoë Ryan.

BY THOMAS CONNORS

DEBUT DESIGN: Piano’s Modern Wing will feature world-class design collections.

DESIGN STAR ON THE RISE

The Art Institute ups the edge factor with their new Modern Wing, a sexed-up student gallery and hot, young design curator from London Nothing symbolizes the Art Institute quite like the lions that flank its Michigan Avenue entrance. But come May, those felines are going to find themselves sharing pride of place with the museum’s spanking-new Modern Wing, designed by Italian starchitect Renzo Piano. With two entrances on Monroe Street and access via a sky bridge connected to Millennium Park, Piano’s design (likened to a flying carpet) gives the Art Institute a whole new, utterly up-to-date physical identity. A series of serenely simple, glass-walled pavilions bookended with Indiana limestone,

WINDOW SHOPPING: “Department Store” in action.

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the $300 million, 264,000-square-foot addition makes the Art Institute the second largest museum in the country, after New York’s Metropolitan Museum. Bigger as better? That’s a resounding “yes,” especially when the extra 65,000 square feet of gallery space allows for more modern and contemporary art, photography, architecture and design than ever before. Piano is the brain behind the wildly famous Centre Pompidou in Paris (with Richard Rogers) and the Los Angeles County Museum, and the art-friendly outcome should be expected: These collections have never looked better.

BRIGHT YOUNG THINGS The School of the Art Institute (SAIC) has some nice new digs, too: the Sullivan Galleries, 32,000 square feet of exhibition space in the old Carson Pirie Scott store on State Street. Under the direction of Mary Jane Jacob, SAIC professor and newly named executive director of exhibitions, the gallery has already proven to be a venue for edgy, thought-provoking shows, most recently with “Department Store,” in which 130 retail display cases fi lled with effects and fetishes of both students and civilians migrated through the space based on a range of variables, including the phases of the moon. Th at’s not like looking at a Monet. But as Jacob says, “Our job is to cultivate dialogue. We’re curators of discourse.”

Mandate you were given when you took this gig: I was brought on specifically to build the holdings of objects and works in contemporary design, 1950s to the present. And when I say design, I mean everything from graphics to transportation.

What have you nabbed so far? A really broad spectrum of things. Ron Arad’s “Rover Car Chair” from 1981. The Valentine typewriter that Ettore Sottsass did for Olivetti. The Cheetah Flexfoot, the prosthesis used by champion sprinter Oscar Pistorius. And the work of a local designer, Scott Wilson, who has worked for Motorola and Nike. We have the special edition watches he made for Lance Armstrong.

What shows do you have in the works? We’re opening in May with highlights of the collection. After that, we’re working on a solo show of Konstantin Grcic, an industrial designer from Munich. Th is will be his fi rst retrospective in the states, although I’m focused on the last four or five years of his work because he’s sort of changed direction, working with new technologies and new production methods. He’s a very significant designer, and I’m thrilled we’re able to do this.

PHOTOS OF THE MODERN WING BY MARK DODDATO; DEPARTMENT STORE PHOTO COURTESY OF THE SCHOOL OF THE ART INSTITUTE OF CHICAGO, PHOTO BY DANNY HSU; PHOTO OF ZOE RYAN BY MONICA CASTIGLIONI

ART HOUSED

The city’s serious designophiles are downright giddy about one particular aspect of the Modern Wing: a proper design department, where Londoner Zoë Ryan recently assumed the post of the newly created Neville Bryan curator of design. Previously with New York’s Van Alen Institute, the 31-year-old design star is ready to make her forward-thinking mark. We check in.

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HOME FRONT TRENDS!

HELLO DOILY! This season, the lacy look gets a well-woven overhaul that takes granny’s doily armchair covers smack into the cat-walking moment. Alexander McQueen, Prada and Stella McCartney all competed in the great-lace race this past season, and now the frill-seeking hits home. Look for everything from out-of-the-box, Goth-inspired dinner plates to Marcel Wanders’ Crochet occasional table and even a collection of metal-hammered, lacy-looking tableware. Want to shed some serious light on the situation? Opt for Louis Poulsen’s Collage pendant, the ultimate update on an age-old style that’s gone totally cool.

BY NATALIE BOGAN

1. Bob’s Your Uncle’s gothic dinner plates, $36 for a set of four, at greenergrassdesign.com. 2. Stainless steel lace candy plate, $79, at metalaceart.com. 3. Sandra Bautista’s Bracelaces, $40 each, at charlesandmarie.com. 4. Fabian Seibert’s stainless steel Lady de Lacy bracelet, $135, at cooperhewittshop.org. 5. Alexander McQueen’s fall 2008 collection. 6. Marcel Wanders for Moooi’s Crochet table, $1,448, at Luminaire. 7. Gold thread Honey Mood bowl, $80, at metalaceart.com.

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HOME FRONT WEEK ENDER BY CHANTAL GORDON

TOAST OF THE LEFT-COAST! Beyond-cool hotels, shops and clubs: L.A.’s design scene is white-hot—and getting hotter THE LAYOVER: CUSTOM HOTEL King-size bunk-beds? So last year. Introducing the latest shock-value factor in L.A.’s hotel arsenal: the mechanical horse! Obsidian-black and a throwback to the dime-operated breed, it lives in room 1212 of Custom Hotel. A mile away from LAX, it is the nabe’s only hip alternative to Sheraton’s megacorporate ilk. Formerly the Furama hotel, the Custom’s charcoal building is by architect Welton Beckett (CV: Capitol Records building) and the interior is the vision of hotelier Avi Brosh, who pipes in subtle forms of sexiness throughout. It begins at the check-in counter where the circular, neon “chandelier” reads “Noctis somnus nobis is nox” (“Sleep with us tonight” in Latin). Also in the lobby: a flock of life-sized toy sheep. And then there’s the pink duct tape in the mini-bar. At the must-see Sunday pool parties, a Mid -Century-flavored “stadium sundeck” rises up four levels, allowing hipsters to recline Caligula-style amid a samba soundtrack. Au revoir, cabanas!

OUT-CELEBING THE CELEBS: THOMPSON BEVERLY HILLS Designed by Dodd Mitchell alum Christian Schulz, the new Thompson

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Beverly Hills is a bit like wandering around Tom Ford’s brain. Think of it as the place where sex, mod and organic intersect: Upstairs, reflective black steel walls suggest bondage-grade patent leather. Floor-to-ceiling Steven Klein photographs bookend the halls, and textural wood and travertine reign throughout. Can ho-hum Beverly Hills handle it?! “[Hotelier] Jason Pomeranc and I saw this as an opportunity to inject this sleepy city with a shot of adrenaline,” says Schulz. Downstairs, sushi— and hot waiters in Jenni Kayne- and Rachel Zoe-designed uniforms— await at Bond Street.

JUMPING THE POND: THE LONDON WEST HOLLYWOOD How’s this for a new pre-pool ritual? Line up to use an upside-down shower, then jump on a flat disk that sends water shooting up from below. Welcome to the London West Hollywood, where the rooftop packs enough greenery for a game of tipsy, late-night croquet, and overlooks a topiary garden a few levels below. If the top floor evokes Brit quirk then the rest of the London is pure Old Hollywood glam. Designed by David Collins and just off the Sunset Strip, the hotel lobby displays a series of dizzying fi rst-floor mirrors inspired by vintage Cartier watches, and a gaggle of chic gold leather sofas. Meanwhile at Gordon Ramsay’s new restaurant, Moschino-clad socialites put down their iPhones long enough to nibble on quail egg and wagyu, as mixed-metallic light fi xtures hover overhead like sexy spaceships. Turndown includes a whimsical informational card about cricket. “The lighting is inspired by George Hurrell, who photographed Joan Crawford and Greta Garbo,” says Collins. “I was very ...

THOMPSON BEVERLY HILLS AND CUSTOM HOTEL PHOTOS BY DAVID WALDORF; ALL OTHER PHOTOS COURTESY OF HOTELS

SLUMBER PAR-TAY Clockwise from left: The seductive hallway at Thompson Beverly Hills; the bar at London West Hollywood; Custom Hotel’s poolside stadium lounging.

ROOMS WITH A VIEWPOINT From top: A room at the hotly anticipated SLS Beverly Hills; the Sunset Marquis gives a facelift to its famed in-hotel recording studio.

conscious of the fact that, in Hollywood, you really are only as good as your lighting—or your last movie.”

...

GOING UP! MEET THE NEW LOBBYISTS... Type As in need of a tone-up before bedding down? Book one of the “fitness suites” at SLS Hotel at Beverly Hills, and you can work out without being seen. (But doesn’t that defeat the purpose?) The whimsical hotel brand, SLS, brings some of the biggest names in the design biz into its brand-new venue. Philippe Starck is designing the 297-room, seven-story, stark-white compound, located along Restaurant Row on La Cienega, just south of the Beverly Center. José Andrés, the most famous Spanish chef in America, helms the indoor/outdoor tapas restaurant, Blanca y Roja. And irreverent objet-aholic Murray Moss transforms the lobby “gift shop” into an interactive gallery space where art and retail therapy coalesce. The $230 million project—four years in the making—is neither in L.A.’s traditional luxury-hotel ‘hood (Beverly Hills) nor in its hip boutique suite stretch (Sunset Strip). In fact, some might argue that its spot—a full city block on the site of the former Le Meridien—is still a bit of no man’s land plagued by strip malls, cut-rate salons and party supply outlets, a far cry from Barneys and Spago. But with this many on-site attractions, who cares? Check out The Closet, a semi-private dining room fashioned after a woman’s boudoir; Saam, an ultra-exclusive gastronome haven for 40; Andrés-approved roving carts serving up caviar and cotton candy; even palm readers—you name it, they’ve got it. Even Moss and partner Franklin Getchell’s retail space conjures a stroll through a marketplace—albeit one with vitrines showcasing everything from 5-foot scale models of the Titanic and a $50,000 Swarovski crystal chandelier to Fornasetti scarves and porcelain birds. Just don’t go looking for toothpaste and newspapers.

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Meanwhile, currently inciting Prius gridlock in Westwood: the new Hotel Palomar. The Cheryl Rowley-designed property combines realdeal green features (in-room recycling bins, hybrid Lexus car service) with exuberant design (animal-print robes, faux snakeskin). And don’t miss the in-room yoga TV! At the Huntley Hotel in Santa Monica, it’s all about the installation of 300 ceramic piranhas that jut from the lobby wall, silently— and ironically—observing the scenesters vying to get upstairs to hot spot Penthouse. Unlike the alfresco rooftops of S.D., this closed-in version has Thomas Schoos’ signature glam settees and a bar that’s sharply curved for gratuitous eye contact.

THE NEXT TOP REMODEL Got time to kill before drinks at the Whiskey? Record a demo! In the wake of its unprecedented renovation, West Hollywood’s Sunset Marquis has added 40 new villa suites—plus a revamp of its legendary recording studio (a Madge fave), which now mixes up-to-date toys with vintage equipment. Check out the new restaurant and spa (with furniture designed by Porsche), plus the two-story Presidential Villa, which boasts three hand-tiled fireplaces and a dining room for 10 with twin Schonbek Swarovski crystal chandeliers dangling overhead. Philippe Starck’s erstwhile calling card, Mondrian, has a new mastermind. Benjamin Noriega Ortiz brings serious mojo to the West Hollywood hotel’s $40 million remodel, and his inspirations range from Gaudí’s Park Güell bench in Barcelona to, you know, Coney Island. The surrealist theme translates into a Lucite indoor loveseat swing and a “mushroom-inspired” concierge desk. And who said image overhauls were just for starlets? This month, Santa Monica’s Art Deco icon, Hotel Shangri-La (known for its Mario Testinoapproved gritty glamour) is set to complete its $30 million ...

WHATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S GROWING AT CITY ESCAPE

The winter months can be quite dreary without a little green in your home. Bring some life indoors this season with a Bromeliad. These easy-to-maintain plants can be found in every shade of the color spectrum and range in size from small, compact plants to as tall as three feet! Or try the ever-popular Palm plant for a tropical feel. Once they are established in an indoor setting, they are relatively maintenance-free, requiring nothing more than a little water and a lot of sun. And from our team here at City Escape , we would like to thank all of the loyal friends and clients who have made 2008 such a successful year! The relationships we have built with all of you have helped us to grow and further our dream of creating an oasis in the city. From all of us at City Escape, we wish you peace and prosperity in the new year, and look forward to seeing you in 2009!

3022 W. LAKE STREET CHICAGO, IL 60612 | 773.638.2000 | WWW.CITYESCAPE.BIZ

... renovation. Built in 1939 in the Streamline Moderne style, it will boast 17 new rooms, an elevated pool, and requisite rooftop lounge. In Santa Monica, standbys Casa del Mar and Shutters on the Beach are bringing new design and foodie cred to their eateries. While Shutters remains (trust fund) kid-friendly—the concierge can shut down Disneyland if needed, and, oh, there’s a rumored Lohan ban—its re-opened One Pico showcases re-imagined Italian in an airy, Michael S. Smith-designed space topped with antique boat hulls. Exec chef Michael Reardon also holds court at Casa del Mar’s Catch restaurant, where the crudo alone is worth the trip. For those penciling in poolside deal-making, there is a new HQ: Peninsula Beverly Hills’ $4-mil Roof Garden, another Rowley job. Panoramic views? Check. “Living wall” packed with jasmine and other hot horticulture? Check. Bells-and-whistles bidet? Check. And the rooftop spa is home to the cult-followed Oxygen Facial, a pre-red carpet must.

MOD MEN (AND WOMEN) AT WORK: NOTNEUTRAL It’s pretty near impossible to miss notNeutral’s lacy metal latticework glittering from its Larchmont storefront. But don’t settle for just the façade. Inside, one of L.A.’s best design collaborations—between designers Mark Rios, Julie Smith-Clementi, Frank Clementi and Robert Hale—melds into one sophisticated take on modern design. Bright, shiny

functionalism reigns in this studio, with a lineup of goods that ranges from colorful, outdoorsy tin garden stakes and bold DIY tree wall decals (complete with birds, bugs, and leaves) to area rugs with serious ‘tude. This eccentric one-stop shop is prime for homemakers with big ideas seeking a partner in crime.

DESIGN MECCA, PART DEUX: THE MOSS EFFECT Call it mecca for design junkies. Ever since Moss opened its Left Coast outpost on Melrose Avenue between Marc Jacobs and Theory, designers and civilians alike have flocked to its gallery-channeling walls. Inside, a visual feast of always-changing furniture, art and accessories keeps Moss madness alive and well. Look for delectables such as Maarten Baas’ singed Steinway, Tord Boontje’s glittering Swarovski chandeliers and Campana Brothers’ Teddy Bear chair. Wacked out? Weird? Or just plain wonderful? All of the above. Founder Murray Moss continues to blur the line between museum and shop, and Angelenos can’t get enough.

BOONTJE JUMPING AT ARTECNICA Visit Artecnica and you’ll fi nd an artistry in the everyday. In its 3,380-square-foot space, the store’s Design with Conscience collection features eco-friendly materials and production that promote social responsibility and sustainability. But the true star of the recently opened showroom is none other than Netherlands design giant Tord Boontje. Check out his ethereal lighting, fanciful Until Dawn curtains, and Flora floating mirrored steel sculptures.

HIGH-STYLE TILE: BISAZZA A tile store as must-stop design stop? Yep. Some of the very biggest names in the design biz—Jaime Hayon, Patricia Urquiola, Studio Job—have worked with the Italian glass tile manufacturer. So when L.A. landed one of the world’s few Bisazza showrooms, design junkies flocked to its rooms, where room after room struts its singular stuff. Located on Melrose Avenue, just a skip from Moss, this is where big visions get taken to the wall. And the ceiling. And the floor. And pretty much any other surface that you’re looking to take to the beyond with the tiny tiles that make huge impact. Floor-to-ceiling, gold-on-gold herringbone, anyone?

CUTTING EDGE COOL From top: notNeutral’s shop/design studio; tiles at Bisazza; the Moss showroom on Melrose.

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SELF PORTRAIT WITH VERTIGO, CHARCOAL, INK, PENCIL, 38 X 50

WWW.FRANCINETURK.COM

18 EAST CULLERTON • CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60616 • 312.674.1818

ADV ERT ISEMENT

The Merchandise Mart Design Center celebrated its Ones to Watch cocktail reception on Thursday, October 2, recognizing three up-and-coming designers in the Christopher Michiels, Colleen Kinder and Bryan Bilczewski

Chicago design community. The three winners, Bryan Bilczewski, Colleen Kinder and Christopher Michiels sipped on fabulous, signature Mojitos, provided by Rubi Rey Rum and Artisan Cellar, while mingling with more than 100 of Chicago’s designers, showrooms and industry leaders. Representatives from the Design Center’s acclaimed showrooms were also in attendance, including Nancy Corzine, Avery Boardman and Vervain/Fabricut/S. Harris. Winners received a Tiffany tape measure, a certificate for their achievement and a year’s membership to the Designer Portfolio program. The Library, also known as the designer lounge on the 15th Floor of The Merchandise Mart, served as the perfect backdrop for the evening with expansive views overlooking downtown Chicago. The Ones to Watch reception is held during Design Chicago, a two-day market featuring renowned keynote speakers, innovative seminars and presentations of the showrooms’ latest collections. PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID SAMPSON

The Library at The Merchandise Mart

Jenna Billups, Tamara Slavick, Megan Fogel and Nicole Martinez

Roger Evans

Nicole Calas

Jeannie Balsam and Rosalinda Pegnato

Cocktails provided by Rubi Rey Rum

DECOR COUTURE DIVINE HOT BLING-BLING CHIC ECO ELEGANCE DECADENCE PALETTE SMART CLEAN TIMELESS REFINED PRIVATE THREE-DIMENSIONAL BEHIND-THE-SCENES GLASS GORGEOUS REVEALING ARCHITECTS EXHIBITION SHEEN PAVILION PENDANT CLASSIC SHOW-OFF HOME DESIGN FABULOUS STAINLESS STEEL SEXY GARDEN EXCLUSIVE STRUCTURAL REDUX LIMITED-EDITION ECO HOUSE MODERN CHIC ATTITUDE COOL INNOVATION DIVINE TRAVEL ENVIRONS GLASS EXOTIC EXCLUSIVE SMART FURNITURE MYSTERY WANDERLUST CLEAN CLASSIC SPACE JET SET TEMPTATIONS DIVINE REFINED VINTAGE CONTEMPORARY CHIC ROOFTOP TEXTURE SMART WALLPAPER TRAVEL MOUTH-WATERING CLASSIC LANDSCAPE COOL CLASSIC DECOR CHIC GORGEOUS DESIGN WINTER 2009

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X MARKS THE SPOT! Leo Burnett’s worldwide chief creative officer, Mark Tutssel, ditches the cornices and turrets of his native London spread to take a modernist Chicago flat to the max BY MEGHAN MCEWEN | PHOTOGRAPHY BY TONY SOLURI

Seeing the inside of a person’s home is a little like getting inside their head. And in the case of Mark Tutssel—worldwide chief creative officer of Leo Burnett—that’s one hot ticket to genius (and not a thing like Mad Men might have you believe). A talent-attracting Brit who has been with the Chicago-based advertising agency for the past eight years, Tutssel jokes that he “spends more time in the air than on the floor.” Tired of corporate housing and the hotel circuit, he wanted a place to call home while working from the Chicago headquarters. If that sounds vague, make no mistake: A guy who leads an ace team of thousands of creatives from more than 94 offices across the world knows exactly what he wants. In this case, it was something very diff erent from his beyond-stately period family home in London. Working with local designer Patrizio Fradiani, Tutssel and interior designer wife Julie traded in the classic marble fi replaces, cornices and turrets of their ultra-formal 1819 spread— situated on the second oldest road in the U.K., next to the Queen’s house and overlooking the Royal Park—for a pristine modern fl at every bit a modern-day antidote.

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“He’s a very trusting and intuitive person,” says Fradiani about his busy client. “Th ings just speak to him.” And that’s exactly what happened when Tutssel paid a visit to one of the modernist units in Ranquist Development’s sleek glass-and-steel building on Superior during his lunch break. He decided in fi ve minutes fl at to put in an off er. “I liked the structure and the quality of the design. It’s an impressive-looking building. As a human being [living in London] I’m used to walking into rooms that have height,” says Tutssel about the uncharacteristically high ceilings. “The rest was an open canvas in terms of possibility. I was drawn to the clean, crisp lines of the space.” They devised a neutral color palette of whites and taupes—including beautiful, muddy-colored concrete floors, all cracked and earthy—to brave the way for the real vista: unbeatable, in-your-face city views.

TRANSPARENT MOTIFS: Designed by Miller|Hull Partnership for Ranquist Development, this nine-story mid-rise in River North mimics the structural façade of the John Hancock, winning an AIA Award in 2007.

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With floor-to-ceiling windows along two perpendicular walls, we’re not talking just any view. Rather than hover ominously between land and sky (like the John Hancock, whose stoic, x-bracing structure it mimics), this ninestory building is grounded. Tutssel didn’t want to live above the city; he wanted to live in it. And the panorama from his seventh-floor perch gives him just that. “In most high-rises, that’s still parking garages,” says Fradiani. “Here, the city is in your house. You’re looking at the rooftops, cars, streets, people walking by—and that draws you into the urban experience.” When it came to outfitting the interior, the two fastidious detail-sticklers fi rst launched a customized cosmetic makeover only a crack

team of perfectionists could detect afterwards. Standard doors were replaced with oversized, sliding glass panels; mechanical vents were reconfi gured to disappear; and Fradiani designed an architectural composition around the fi replace. “I like when things are related to each other,” Fradiani says. Not surprisingly, Tutssel was drawn to Fradiani’s attention to detail and decidedly cerebral approach to design. The two routinely engaged in a creative tango of sorts, going back and forth about comfort versus clean lines, aesthetic perfection versus functionality, and the sum of individual pieces as part of the whole. “I’m interested in really thoughtful design—stuff that serves a purpose,” says

Left: The living area functions as a room within a room, starring the Egg Chair (Luminaire), which provides the perfect reading nook. Taccia lamp by Flos is one of Fradiani’s all-time favorites; Mart side chairs by Antonio Citterio for B&B Italia (Luminaire); and “Smoke” coffee tables by Cappellini (Luminaire). Obama “Hope” print by Shepard Fairey (original first-run print). Above: The glass curtain wall gives the dining room a spectacular backdrop. The Beam table by Porro (Luminaire) softens the shape of the room. Foscarini’s Twiggy lamp is a bold take on the classic Arco.

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;I grew up on the Mediterranean, and I miss the ocean very much. [This piece] is a lovely way to wake up in the city and see the ocean... and through such an artistic lens.â&#x20AC;?

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Opposite page: Photograph by Doug Fogelson and Knoll’s Swan chair pop in Tutssel’s neutral bedroom. Above: At the end of the long, cleanlined hallway, Tutssel’s bedroom boasts another floor-to-ceiling view. Right: The floating shelves by Porro have a glassy, ethereal feel—and can display anything from art and sculpture to plants. Sculpture by Richard MacDonald.

Tutssel. “I think a lot of design gets in the way of functionality. At the end of the day, it’s a home and needs to be enjoyed.” Ultimately, their discourse elevated the designer-client connection, and the results speak for themselves. Varying shades of orange color—like the iconic Egg Chair and bending Foscarini lamp—unexpectedly pop from a serene and minimal designscape. “I was open-minded,” says Tutssel, who believes in letting the designer do his job—and do it well. “Patrizio had a very clear concept. I liked that concise articulation of what he was trying to create... And he’s unwavering. He creates quite a compelling argument,” he laughs. And in Tutssel’s line of work, these are qualities to be admired. “Every piece he has chosen for my home is for a reason. It all works

as a jigsaw puzzle.” But rest assured that Tutssel was involved in selecting every single piece of furniture, always test-driving for comfort. “I wanted to have an active part in it,” he says. “Otherwise, they’re just objects.” When it comes to his art collection, he yields less to collaboration, honoring instead his own internal dialogue and personal attachments. Take the sculptor Richard MacDonald, whom he discovered on a family trip to Laguna and has been collecting ever since. A set of famous rock posters (The Grateful Dead, The Who and Jimi Hendricks) signed by artist Rick Griffi n nod to his quirky interests, while a limited-edition Obama poster reflects his connection to Chicago and a specific, meaningful moment in time. And that seemingly random piece of

religious iconography that doesn’t look a bit like any of his other artwork but somehow works perfectly for reasons you can’t explain? Tutssel bought the gilt-framed painting of the Virgin of Guadalupe in a small village outside Mexico City. “We were walking down a cobbled street, and I just happened to look through a window, and I saw this old lady painting in this beautiful, openplan courtyard with a huge vine wrapping itself down a beautiful yellow-ochre wall,” he reminisces. “She was painting that painting, which is obviously the most religious icon in Mexico. And she paints with 24-karat paint. I walked in, and I fell in love.” There’s no doubt about it: Tutssel understands the sell of a well-told story. “Creativity is the currency of life,” he says. And indeed, for him it is.

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MANN POWER From big and bare to posh and ready to party, designer Kara Mann glams out a Bucktown behemoth BY LISA CREGAN | PHOTOGRAPHY BY TONY SOLURI

“Everybody needs a little rock ‘n’ roll in their life.” Th at’s Kara Mann’s description of the creative muse that guided her work on a Bucktown dream house. And judging by the roaring success of her three-year-old firm, Kara Mann Design, with projects resonating as strongly with the onrushing tide of fi rst-time homeowners as they do with adamantly-stillcool baby boomers, she’s onto something. In this project, a 6,500-square-foot modern manse owned by a bona fide Gen-Y-er, Al Goldstein, and his fiancée, Anna Fridman, the design is resolutely hip, but the comfort runs deep and luxurious. The couple was well into the blueprint stage with Environs Development when the design/build fi rm’s architects pulled out

STREET CRED: In the living room, soaring ceilings and the bustling Bucktown sidewalk get cozied up with silvery soft roman shades. Mann used a Gucci armchair and Tai Ping rug to “bring your eye down to earth,” while a Dennis & Leen woven bench “is a great classic shape juxtaposed against all the modern architecture.”

Mann’s portfolio. “It fit our taste exactly,” says Goldstein. “Very modern, new and different.” Mann says she was just as excited about the fit. “Al gave us the opportunity here to do what Karl Lagerfeld did for Chanel: Use edgy fabrics and materials to reinvent beautiful, classic silhouettes in a very modern way.” The mutual appreciation fest didn’t mean Mann had a no-brainer design job though– not with the architectural monkey wrench Goldstein threw at her. “I like to live with lots of space, very open and sleek,” says Goldstein. Translation: He wanted double-height ceilings and wide-open landscapes with little structure to delineate spaces. “People who walk in are typically taken aback by the openness,” says Goldstein of the space, where light penetrates every corner. Add the fact that both Goldstein and Fridman are avowed clutter-phobes (“I don’t like architectural detail,” says Goldstein, “and Anna hates little things around”) and Mann was facing a fivestar design challenge. “We felt strongly that the sheer volume had to be brought down to human scale,” says Jennie Bishop, a senior

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designer at Kara Mann Design. “Th at was our fi rst mission.” The design team began by suggesting a rich palette of pearly grays, biscuit tones and shades of brown that Mann calls “bittersweet chocolate to charcoal.” Those colors both anchor the soaring, open floor plan and warm things up. “I tend toward dark colors in general,” says Mann, pointing to the living room’s four in-your-face, oversized club chairs. “I like the richness, the tension of things like acid-y green throw pillows against dark chairs. Bits of drama, hits of color among the monochromic, are always where it’s at for me.” The four living room chairs are also a good

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example of Mann’s fl air for creating theater from functionality. “Th is arrangement is very, very sexy,” says Mann of the symmetrical cluster. “No sofas mean people have to get closer—maybe you have to sit on your boyfriend’s lap.” Who knew four chairs could hide so much sensuality? Furthering the mood, the fi rst-floor windows are sheathed in gauzy roman shades shot through with a bit of metallic thread (“very glam,” Mann notes approvingly). Seen through these sparkling gossamer shades, Bucktown’s bustling sidewalks come into soft focus like a romantic urban moviescape. Everything here—from the graphic living

Above: “We took the kitchen’s shimmer, the glass tile, all the way up... to lend softness to the architecture,” says Mann. Urban Archaeology’s Glass Sticks tile with custom color by Kara Mann Design; large woven pendant lights by Moooi; BDDW stools; and paintings by Jeff Zimmermann. Opposite page: “I wanted this family room to read ‘lounge,’ says Mann. Coffee table from Jayson Home & Garden, and Heart painting by Jeff Zimmermann. Opposite bottom: “The bedroom palette is lighter, more ethereal,” says Mann, who used various shades of gray throughout the space. Mohair throw blanket by Susan Chalom; linens from Muse Group Ltd. Artwork is part of a series of paintings on plywood in gold frames by Jeff Zimmermann.

“There are three full bars here. One in the butler’s pantry, one in the basement and another one on the roof deck by the hot tub.” (Of course, there’s a hot tub.) WINTER 2009 <

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room rug to the huge woven bench Mann calls “one of my favorite things on earth” to the Jean de Merry chandelier that floats above the dining room table like some spiny sea creature—is meant to be loose-limbed and provocative, not perfect and serious. Take the groovy white faux-fur rug she chose for the master bedroom. “I say forget the bed, I’d just curl up right here on this rug,” laughs Mann, who doesn’t really seem to be kidding, “Seriously, the beauty of these rooms is that even though the furniture placement is formal, it’s used in a casual way.” Goldstein and Fridman can confi rm that. “We had a little party last weekend,” Al reports, “around 150 people just hanging out. Th at’s the advantage of having a big house.”

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The disconnect between ‘big house’ and ‘twenty-something owner’ was another challenge for the designers, however. Mann and Co. had to wrap their minds around creating beautiful spaces, like the hard-working kitchen with its golden glass-tile walls and lovely black orb pendant lights, while making sure that the rooms matched the contours of Generation Facebook. “There are three full bars here,” reports Goldstein, laughing. “One in the butler’s pantry, one in the basement and another one on the roof deck by the hot tub.” (Of course, there’s a hot tub.) Bishop notes that all-male activities are restricted to the basement (home theater, pool table, ping-pong) but she says the designers were still careful to make the whole house “beer-friendly,” a quality not

typically found on a decorator’s checklist. “Al should have put it in our contract!” laughs Mann. Conscious of making items durable so parties could flow throughout the house, fabrics were treated to be more resilient and allow the couple to really live in the space. Not surprisingly, the house’s suave good looks totally wow the young crowd that likes

to gather here, but the results were spectacular enough that they even swayed the staunchest traditionalist involved with the project— Goldstein’s dad, Boris. “He came to every design meeting,” says Bishop, “mostly afraid that Al would wind up with a cold white box, but Boris pretty quickly realized that’s not what we do.” No cold, no white, no box.

Above: Dining chairs from Artistic Frame “are classic shapes made a bit funky and younger with their backs done in that cool Bergamo ikat-ish fabric,” says Mann. The Ring Pop paintings on either side of the enormous Casamidy mirror “have a subtitle of ‘Starter Bling,’” says artist Jeff Zimmermann. The Jean de Merry chandelier is available through Kara Mann. Opposite page: Mann in one of the comfy, oversized living room chairs she designed and upholstered in Pollack’s Poly/Viscose Tonal Stripe.

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DESIGN SPECIAL

ALL-ACCESS FAB!

Chicago’s rising talent takes it to the streets with out-of-the-box interiors

BEST BEER HALL

BY THOMAS CONNORS, EMILY FIFFER, AMANDA GORDON AND MEGHAN MCEWEN

THE PUBLICAN

EXTREME MAKEOVER: The Blackstone Hotel.

The Publican is Avec and Blackbird’s sister restaurant, so it makes sense that Thomas Schlesser had a hand in its design. Or rather, the hand. Schlesser conceived everything in the modern-day, refi ned beer hall: the solid walnut, communal-style racetrack table and custom ladder-back chairs. He even handpicked the antiques in the restrooms. But the highlight— literally—is the abstract lighting above the grand table. Schlesser clustered several circular, frosted, glass-and-brass brasserie globe lights in order to create a single illuminating essence. And the bar’s glowing back wall? It’s cleverly lit by hundreds of glowing beer glasses. “The Publican’s design is a celebration of the culture of eating and drinking,” Schlesser relays. Th ree cheers, indeed. 845 W. Fulton Market, 312-733-9555.

GLOBE-TROTTING: The wickedly cool bar, beautiful food, and hanging-globe light display at Publican.

BEST HOTEL RENOVATION

Boutique hotels have always traded on their trendy looks, but the Blackstone (formally a Renaissance Hotel) ups the ante. After a $130 million rehab by Sage Hospitality Resources, this property melds then and now like none other. Designed in 1910 by noted Chicago architect, Benjamin Marshall, and once the inn of choice for everyone from entertainers to presidents, this beaux-arts beauty sports a drop-dead lobby tailor-made for lingering (with handsome millwork, bronze sconces and a wildly striated carpet) and the kind of old-school function rooms (the Crystal Ballroom) that made hotels the venues of choice for shindigs of all stripes. 636 S. Michigan Ave., 312.765.0568.

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PUBLICAN PHOTOS BY ANTHONY TAHLIER

BLACKSTONE HOTEL

SHOESTRING-CHIC: Studio Gang’s community center pops with color and unexpected, cheery design details.

BEST DESIGN FOR A CAUSE

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1. A beautiful bottle selection at Mana Food Bar. 2. The only thing better looking than the space: the food. 3. The planetconscious interior.

BEST GREEN

LAVEZZORIO COMMUNITY CENTER Institutional buildings are rarely welcoming, especially when built on a shoestring. But as Jeanne Gang and her team at Studio Gang Architecture proved here, even a structure spun from a limited palette of donated materials can be animated and engaging. A project of SOS Children’s Villages, a nonprofit agency devoted to training foster parents and reuniting siblings, this concrete-clad community center exudes a sense of possibility with an extra-wide staircase that doubles as seating and a big, bright, multi-purpose room wrapped in windows. 7600 S. Parnell Ave.

Designer Watch: “I love Wakamono’s cute little bar next door. You walk in there, and it’s like 1920s Shanghai with French bentwood chairs and a Chinese bar and old wallpaper from the ’20s. The tables are planks of wood paired with Herman Miller chairs. It’s really beautiful.” —Designer Lukas Machnik

MANA FOOD BAR The vegetarian Mana Food Bar isn’t just good for the heart. Turns out, it’s also good for the planet. Owner Susan Thompson’s husband, Harlan, headed up a local team (with Steven Teichelman and Brandon Hards) to design an earthy, organic and clean-lined space from recycled and reconstituted materials. The uber-sleek food bar, rustically modern tabletops and chairs, and even some of the ceilings come from recycled lumber salvaged from barns and local remodeling jobs. Combined with a clever design approach, the space never reads too rustic: deep blue recycled carpet (from Greenmaker Supply Company) is used to upholster banquettes and create booth cushions, while the nifty ceiling lamps were created from sushi trays. “I love not having to sacrifice aesthetics to work with green materials. Everything is more accessible these days,” says Harlan. “And knowing the story behind an object gives it greater significance.” 1742 W. Division St., 773.342.1742.

BEST MUSEUM

SPERTUS When the Spertus Museum unveiled its new self in 2008, it proved to be the most dynamic public space of all the city’s major museums. The work of Krueck & Sexton Architects, the transparency of its faceted curtain wall is matched by a gleaming white interior. A collection of cleanly incised volumes, the design achieves the sense of monumentality and expectation one wants in a museum, without any of the traditional flourishes or over-the-top contemporary touches. Neutral but not boring, functional without being cold, the lobby and café are crisp and bright, and the well-proportioned galleries are the ideal envelope for exhibitions. 610 S. Michigan Ave., 312.322.1768.

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LET THERE BE WHITE: The Hotel Sax lobby.

BEST CONDO LOBBY

600 N. FAIRBANKS

BEST HOTEL LOBBY

HOTEL SAX There’s no doubt about it: Crimson Lounge’s smoky sexiness is a showstopper. But when it comes to design chops, we prefer the Hotel Sax’s pristine, white-flooded lobby. Taking cues from Versailles and Tiff any’s, the McCartan design team (Colum McCartan and Carmen Koller) put a modern spin on a stately space, playing balloon chairs and can’t-miss red sofas against striking, all-white architectural lines. Custom-designed check-in desks are a contemporary interpretation of elegant department store counters, and a lush red carpet adds intensity, creating a dramatic link to Crimson’s rich, dark interior next door. 329 N. Dearborn St., 312.923.2000.

With its rounded, glass curtain wall running right up to the sidewalk, the lobby of this Helmut Jahn-designed building is both an amenity for the homeowners and a hit of eye candy for the public passing by. The work of interior architect Jennifer Sweas, the sleekly minimal space sports an angular, white sofa by Philippe Starck and Noguchi-channeling chairs from Ligne Roset. With its creamy terrazzo floor, concrete piers and walls painted to look like chocolate suede (and adorned with oversized artworks, including a fourscreen video piece by Lincoln Schatz), Sweas’ lobby serves this luxury tower impeccably, projecting a cosmopolitan ease and laid-back sophistication. 600 N. Fairbanks.

STRIPPED EASE: Clean lines and organic shapes provide a good show for design-minded passersby.

BEST BAR-RAISERS

MILE-HIGH HUB: Affinia raises the roof on skyhigh design.

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The upwardly mobile, nightlife-loving cocktail crew has given rise to a new trend in drinking: rooftop lounges with decidedly clean-lined, modern design. >>First it was ZED451 (designed by New York architect Chris Smith—the guy behind Nobu and Buddakan), where 2,500 square feet opens up to sculptural Magis stools, an oversized mahogany bar and tons of greenery. In the warmer months, trendy young things sip bourbon lemonade from handcrafted wooden futon-style lounges and open-air alcoves carpeted with real grass. >>Next on the high-in-the-sky scene: Affi nia’s 29th-floor C-View by Brazilian designer/architect Arthur Casas, with its lush wall of greenery, no-frills furniture and sweeping views that just don’t stop. >>Most recently, the insideoutside Vertigo Sky Lounge at the Dana Hotel flaunts its stand-apart design features from the 26th floor: Velcroed cushions you can pull off the wall in the Chill Room (which screens classic fi lms like Barbarella and, yep, Vertigo) for the best seat you can fi nd; photos of tattoo art as ceiling panels; and an outdoor fi re pit surrounded by bench seating, heat lamps and cool moon-globe lighting. Between these three uber-oasis venues—and more on the way—cocktailers have an all-access pass to appreciating the best-designed space on our list: the city itself.

AFFINIA PHOTO BY ANTHONY TAHLIER; 600 FAIRBANKS PHOTO BY BRIAN WILLETTE

SKY LOUNGES

BEST SPA MOMENT

TRUMP TOWER Subtle Donald Trump is not. And at his latest endeavor in Chicago, his opulence is all of the over-the-top variety. Love it or hate it, the design commands attention. The 92-floor Magnificent Mile Trump Tower houses a 14-foot Swarovskiencrusted chandelier, after all. And people can’t stop talking about the swanky Sixteen restaurant. But if opulence overload threatens, look no further than the Trump Spa—the whopping 22,000-squarefoot color-neutral oasis, where over-the-top meets less-is-more. Hide out in luxurious privacy and enjoy uninhibited decadence in typical Trump style (can you say “Revitalizing Rubies massage”?). Created by head designer Peter McGinley, the spa’s soothing colors, shapes and amenities complete the effect, while floor-to-ceiling city views never let you forget you’re on top of the world. 401 N. Wabash Ave., trumpchicagohotel.com or 312.588.8000.

Designer Watch: “From the custom wood communal tables to the simple, refined steel and glass exterior doors, Publican’s easy elegance keeps the focus on the food, the company and, of course, the beer!” —Designer Kara Mann

1 BEST NEIGHBORHOOD SHOP

BESS & LOIE

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Using her grandmothers (Bess and Loie) as inspiration, Bess & Loie owner Allyson Holleb designed the charming West Loop handbag and accessory shop from floor to ceiling herself—from the pink-and-purple Mibo Clacket Lane bird wallpaper to the grandiose chaise lounges. She even painted the walls with help from friends and fam. Seamlessly blending kitschy and elegant, the former Eileen Fisher buyer brings out the flavor of her merch with wrought-iron tables from flea markets and oversized gilt mirrors, while exposed brick and vintage family photos add cozy charm. Bess & Loie could have easily become another cute but non-descript neighborhood boutique, but with her personal dash of DIY fab, Holleb has it in the bag. 1015 W. Lake St., 312.226.2247.

FAB BAGS: Owner Allyson Holleb outfi tted her cute shop with killer wallpaper.

BESS & LOIE PHOTO BY MARK DODDATO

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1. Pool with city view. 2. The Spa at Trump. 3. Clean-lined nail stations. 4. The relaxing, candlelit spa lounge.

Designer Watch: “Pavilion was among the first of the pioneers on Damen—and still is today, but with a pared-down, sleeker look. Deborah and Neil revamped the design of the shop earlier in the year to evoke a design gallery. The space is now painted white and is object-oriented, more gallery than store, and their pieces have evolved —Designer Jordana Joseph along with the surroundings.” WINTER 2009 < Interiors 81

BEST RESTAURANT

L20 The first-ever restaurant project of veteran architect Dirk Denison (who is known for prestigious designs like the Culver House and the Pritzker/Hyatt corporate offices) nabbed the Gold Key Grand Prize Award for Excellence in Hospitality Design. His debut into the scene, L2O is a minimalist space with a complex backstory. Denison spent a year and a half custom-designing everything himself, from a grand forest of columns in the entryway to an arresting flower display in a glass vitrine that changes weekly. Same goes for the elegant marble banquettes, a breathtaking onyx alcove, Macassar ebony tables and nearly every other piece of furniture in the over-the-topimpressive space. “I wanted each diner to build their visual memory of their evening around a unique architectural detail,” explains Denison, referring to the ethereal light fi xtures and metal screens unique to each seat. “And to be able to describe where they sat or where they might request to sit on subsequent evenings.” He takes special pride in the leather-clad settees, custom-fabricated here in Chicago, and the Tatami room cushions, both of which have held up in the comfort department for three-hour-plus sittings. For the ultimate private dining experience, Denison built two Tatami rooms using traditional Japanese methods, like wood-to-wood sliding panels and woven reed Tatami mats. Just imagine what happens when you add his design inspiration—chef Laurent Gras’ cuisine—to the equation. 2300 N. Lincoln Park West, 773.868.0002. SLEEK-CHIC: L20’s jawdropping-sleek interior was detailed top-to-bottom by Dirk Denison.

VIOLET HOUR Full disclosure: Violet Hour opened in June of ‘07. But the impeccably designed, Frenchinspired cocktail lounge by Thomas Schlesser (the clean-lined design mind behind Avec and Blackbird) still hasn’t found a worthy competitor for best-in-class title. Once you make it past the raw, paper-covered, signless exterior and the sparse, bare-walled entryway—a teasing antithesis of what’s to come—Schlesser turns up the wow-factor with dramatic floor-to-ceiling velvet curtains and seriously high wing-back chairs in small, intimate groupings to conjure the feeling of a 19th-century social club. Save the parquet floor, nearly the entire space is drenched in a dusky cornflower blue, creating a dark, comfortable and slightly mysterious atmosphere that shows no signs of slowing down anytime soon. We’ll drink to that. 1520 N. Damen Ave., 773.252.1500.

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BAR RAISING: On the other side of the room, Tom Dixonlike, high-back chairs are clustered for privacy.

VIOLET HOUR PHOTO BY MARK DODDATO; L20 PHOTO BY ANTHONY TAHLIER

BEST PRE-PROHIBITION ERA COCKTAIL LOUNGE

BEST PUBLIC DISPLAY OF LOCAL DESIGN

SMART HOME, MSI Design buff s already know about architect and San Fran-based green queen Michelle Kaufmann’s 2,500-square-foot “mkSolaire”; the working exhibit and poster home for ecoliving that stands in the Museum of Science and Industry’s front yard (and ends this month). What you may not know: She also opened the prefab doors to an inspired lot of young, local, green-minded talent, led and curated by Verde Design Studio’s Michele Fitzpatrick. Super-cool tubular Bone Lamps by Materious are made from recycled PVC pipes, and master repurposing genius Ted Harris turns recycled light bulbs into kick-ass chandeliers. An organic Navajo mohair rug by Edward R. Varndell is backed with recycled coffee bean bags; and Terry Karpowicz’s luscious ash table and black walnut desk were both crafted from wood salvaged from fallen trees. “We want our pieces to last a generation, which is far better than having something wind up in a landfi ll,” says Fitzpatrick. Beyond the eco-implications, it’s also a testament to beautiful, innovative green design you can fi nd right here at home. Now that’s smart. Museum of Science and Industry , 773.684.1414, msichicago.org.

BEST PLACE TO KICK BACK

SEPIA

BEST DESIGN INSTALLATION

Somehow, Sepia seems like a ’70s-era rumpus room. And in this case, that’s a good thing. Maybe it’s the overscaled lighting fixtures (the chandelier within a chandelier), or the weird pattern in the seemingly worn linoleum floor. Perhaps it’s the lounge’s lowslung seating and the tall stools and high-backed banquettes in the dining room, all set off against a muted earthy palette. Or maybe it’s just the fact that folks seem to have so much fun here. Designed by Gary Lee Partners, Sepia looks sharp without appearing determinedly chic. Inserted into the shell of an 1890s print shop, its thoughtfully understated décor strikes just the right balance between white tablecloth formality and HIGH-DESIGN: The laid-back conviviality. 123 N. upside-down nestlike fi xture at Sepia. Jeff erson St., 312.441.1920.

CASTE PHOTOS BY GREG GILLIS; SEPIA PHOTO BY ANTHONY TAHLIER

CASTE

CASTE SYSTEMS: Cutting-edgecreative installations rotate.

Since Caste opened its doors a year and a half ago, this already beloved furniture and design gallery has continually outdone its interior with new, seasonal design installations that make the Macy’s holiday windows look like child’s play. Last winter, co-owner Ty Best built a wooden cabin (yes, inspired by the Unabomber Ted Kaczynski’s Montana cabin) inside the store with details to die for (pun intended?), including a little shuttered window, beautiful chair and spindly Christmas tree. And of course, there was the massive, gravity-defying stalactite growing out of the ceiling and the insect-versus-machine installation, starring a giant mosquito mural and wooden bee sculpture made from reclaimed materials. Th is holiday, though, it was all about wax-covered candle tables, carved wooden skulls and eerily brilliant wooden and plaster marionettes, referencing the childlike essence of the holidays with a very adult phenotype. 521 N. Halsted St., 312.432.0717.

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Jason Ballew (seated) and Michael Mork in their clean-linedcozy design pad.

LAUNCH PADS

We tapped Chicago’s top alpha designers to uncover the city’s hottest male rooms BY LISA CREGAN AND MEGHAN MCEWEN | PHOTOS BY BOB COSCARELLI

THE CONVERTS>>>>>>>>>> Anyone who fondly remembers (and desperately misses) Abode—the North Avenue furniture and design cult fave—might very well recognize the interior of Jason Ballew and Michael Mork’s topfloor Bucktown spread. Originally an 1895 church, the sky-lit, 2,100-square-foot space has been painstakingly converted into a sanctuary for good design. And Ballew, who cherry-picked a handful of rarely seen “future classics,” like Espasso’s Esfera chair (white leather with tortoise base), from his pioneering furniture shop, mixes them effortlessly with high design from his new stomping grounds, Luminaire. The result is a thoughtful designscape where clean lines and organic shapes get comfy within the raw, vaulted, chalet-like wood walls. “There’s so much wood and warmth, we can get away with really modern. In a new highrise, where it’s all concrete and glass, it seems too sterile and doesn’t have personality. At least, that’s the risk you take,” says Ballew. “But [our place] is immediately comfortable. It counterbalances anything that might be starkly modern.”

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Regularly inundated with the coolest, most cutting-edge designs, Ballew says it’s often more difficult to make decisions for his own home than someone else’s. Consider that he gets firstclass, extensive education on everything from manufacturing to the history and philosophy of a company (we’re not talking just any company; try design house greats like B&B Italia, Zinota, Edra and Established & Sons) to understand how a design junkie might nod into high-crave desperation. At the very least, the exposure has had an impact on his style—“It’s a little cleaner now, more modern,” he says—and his list of covets is in constant grow mode. But a work in progress is just how it should be, he charges. “You’re never done, or it’s boring.”

TASTE-TESTERS! 1. The LR Modular Chair by 3 Square Design (Brooklyn) —one of the underthe-radar lines Ballew carried at Abode. 2. Black Forest china by Dibbern (lilleashop.com).

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SKI LODGE-CHIC When Ballew and Mork set out four years ago on the great house hunt, the main priority was finding a space that wasn’t cookiecutter. So when they saw these exposed trusses, rafters and beams, it was love at first sight, and they scooped up the last unit in the building. “We knew right away what a special place it is,” says Ballew, who plays up the rustic chalet look with cow and goat hide rugs to complement their modern tastes.

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3. Thanks to clever cantilevering, the Charles Door bed by Antonio Citterio for B&B Italia, available at Luminaire, looks like it’s floating. A dark gray wool fabric, ‘headboards’ in a light gray matte lacquer, drawer boxes in white glossy lacquer. 4. Fruit Bowl No. 4, by Designfenzider (Brooklyn), Luminaire.

5. The Saarinen table from Knoll, paired with Sina chairs, designed by Uwe Fischer for B&B Italia, works perfectly with the exposed wood ceilings. Pendant lights from Bocci’s 14 series are from Luminaire.

TONED UP! Ballew and Mork use a base palette

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of browns, grays and whites—but their place is far from color-neutral. Art, accessories and details pop against larger, toned-down pieces. “I like to mix in color,” says Ballew. “It’s easier to change color in smaller things like accessories.” Case in point: Fresh flowers seem to jump from side tables and artwork draws attention in a big way without being loud.

6. Ada table lamps in the spare bedroom, CB2, $60. 7. & 8. Both paintings on wood are by Lisa Kowalski (lisakowalski.com), whose work hangs at Spring, Green Zebra and Custom House. Ballew, who first fell for her vibrant, abstract paintings at Cafe 28, commissioned the orange piece for the living room.

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FRANCO-STYLE Ballew, who was first bitten by the design bug during a studying stint in France (natch: IM Pei’s pyramid at the Louvre and the Grande Arche de la Défense), continues to draw inspiration from his travels. Most recently, he’s smitten with architecture as close to home as the Mies van der Rohe Farnsworth house in Plano and as far away as the Gerrit Rietveld house in Utrecht, Holland.

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THE ILLUMINATORS >>>>>>>>>>>>> Getting advice from professional lighting consultant Casey Fitzpatrick Penry is a little like flying first class—once you get a taste of the good stuff, it’s nearly impossible to live without. Case in point: the gut redo of Penry’s own apartment in an otherwise standard 1970s vintage high-rise. Aside from the stunning views of the Chicago skyline, it was a pretty unremarkable space before Penry and designer Lukas Machnik got their hands on it. Penry, who spent six years working for Lightology founder Greg Kay, understands the impact the right wattage can wield on interior design. “It’s an art,” he says, before launching into a long dissertation on Kelvins and CRIs. Money quote: “The right Kelvin and a high CRI will not only make your fabrics, art and furniture look better, but it can actually make people look better.” He’s hired. And Machnik (who’s been trumpeted as a design wunderkind in these very pages) not only

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understands all of Penry’s techy lighting jargon, he also knows how to fold his talents into a decorating plan. The two have been collaborating on projects for the past seven years. “Anyone can choose a great fixture, but that’s just the start,” Lukas says. “Casey brings so much depth to my work.” Here in his own home, Penry and Machnik chose to use Parisian floor lamps alongside light fixtures from some of their all-time favorite firms: Flos (for great, iconic design), Artemide (the best task lights), Boyd (beautiful traditional fixtures) and Moooi (cutting-edge good looks). Penry then “layered support lights” into the ceilings, creating different effects by varying the warmth and spread factors of the bulbs. That allowed him to highlight treasures like his Marcel Breuer Wassily chair while fading mundane things like his television into the background. “If the whole room were lit with standard cans,” says Casey, “Lukas’ work would be washed out. Lighting takes your eye on a journey here.” Sign us up. One look around proves it’s a trip worth taking.

LIGHTING STRIKES! Above: In the entry, a gleaming Machnikdesigned lacquer console, a vintage 1960s photograph and artist Harry Allen’s “Bank in the Form of a Pig” are spotlit.

STYLING BY PHILLIP HERMAN

DRAMA KINGS: Casey Fitzpatrick Penry (standing) and designer Lukas Machnik in the living room of Penry’s sky-high penthouse.

GLITTER BUGS The gleaming chrome, glass and white lacquer accents Machnik chose for Penry’s apartment (chandelier, coffee table and “bubble” chairs) are purposely reflective—better for being highlighted by Penry’s meticulous lighting plan. Those materials sparkle against a backdrop of rich matte browns, blacks and a golden hue Machnik calls “cognac.” Penry says the strong. masculine palette fits his aesthetic to a tee. “I told Lukas I wanted it to read ‘classic handsome penthouse.’”

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1. Alessi juicer by Philippe Starck, $85, Luminaire; white ceramic dragon, Jayson Home & Garden. 2. European flea market find. 3. Foscarini’s Bublee light, $1,167, Florense. 4. Mink throw, Ralph Lauren. 5. Vintage Buddhist statue. 6. Marcel Wanders’ Egg Vase, $146, Luminaire. 7. 2097 by Gino Sarfatti for Flos, $2,784; 1970s Milo Bauman chairs, 1stdibbs.com.

decorators don’t get it,” says Penry. “If things aren’t illuminated properly, the whole room is thrown off.” He says the wrong lighting can even have a negative impact on colors. “Your reds or purples might look pink.” And Penry gets crazy when he sees standard can lights punched into a ceiling in a grid pattern. “They do nothing for a room. They just wash over everything and cause your eye to be confused. The difference a lighting guru makes would absolutely amaze you.”

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DETAIL-MANIA “I have an interior design degree from Harrington myself, but I don’t even buy towels or drinking glasses without consulting Lukas,” laughs Penry, stressing the importance of finding a connection with a designer and trusting their vision. “I think everything needs to be consistent for a space to be truly beautiful,” explains Machnik. He admits he goes so far as to insist Penry play only Machnik-approved DVDs on his flat screen TV during parties, “… a black and white Fellini movie like La Dolce Vita adds another wonderful dimension.”

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SLEEK EASY: Luca Lanzetti in the wide-open, minimal space he outfi tted for a client in Lake Point Tower.

THE DRAMATIST >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Known for buzzing around town on his BMW GS1150 Adventure motorcycle, Luca Lanzetti is the business-savvy brain and minimalist Italian tastemaker behind the kitchen showroom Ernestomeda, which he opened almost two years ago in the Merchandise Mart (it was the first one in the United States). Since then, Lanzetti, who recently scored the kitchen design gig for Studio Gang’s high-profile Solstice on the Park, is also training his aesthetic talents on the rest of the home. And with the opening of another showroom this spring—the extremely modern, beyond-sleek Antonio Lupi in the Contemporaine building—and a handful of full-service projects under his belt, he’s well on his way to becoming the consummate curator of beautiful, hard-tofind Italian design lines. Take the 3,400-square-foot Lake Point Tower space he recently kitted out for Lana Dass. It went something like this: After Lanzetti designed Dass’ kitchen—a fluid, stainless steel beauty called the Silverbox—the homeowner was

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so smitten, she wanted Ernestomeda’s Barrique bar on the other end of the long, slender room. “The project just kept growing,” says Lanzetti, who is ultimately responsible for the pristine floors by Graniti Fiandre, the swirling metallic bathroom tiles, the shimmering gold-and-red Bizassa glass mosaic column showstopper in the middle of the room—a perfect visual punch set off by the sweeping vista of sparkling blue water through floor-to-ceiling windows—and almost everything else. “I sent her to Artemide for lighting, and to Haute Living for furniture,” he said. When she came back with a cherry-red Fendi sofa, Lanzetti breathed a sigh of relief. “It’s such a strong focal point. With the kitchen and the column, it’s almost like a triangle. And those points needed to talk.” Spoken like a true Italian design romantic. SITTING PRETTY: Lanzetti owns several leather mesh Arete chairs by Franco Poli for matteograssi (one of the oldest companies in the design biz). Available though Luca Lanzetti, LLC, 312.329.0229.

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CURRENT OBSESSIONS Lanzetti wants this egg-shaped stunner of a sink (3)—the Opium—in his next house (on the ground floor, since it’s 2,000 pounds). “It’s a ‘wow’ statement piece,” he says. “The crossing of art and design that I love.” On that note, Patricia Urquiola’s Dechirer tile (4) from Mutina looks like embroidery but is made of porcelain—and has a beautiful, handmade aesthetic. “Nobody’s talking about this in the U.S.,” he says. “It’s my dream tile.”

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KITCHEN CONFIDENTIAL Lanzetti is the de facto go-to guy for sleek, forward-thinking kitchens from Ernestomeda. The kitchen below (7) is the “Silverbox,” and he floated the center island off the ground with cylindars to correspond—or as Lanzetti says, “to have a conversation with”—the columns throughout the space at Lake Point Tower. And that hanging silver fixture that looks like ubercool lighting? Get ready for this: It’s the hood!

THE SCOOP Lanzetti and his wife, Grace, love Scoop Rosenthal dishes (above). “It’s minimal but has a Japanese feel,” says Lanzetti. “It’s like architecture.”

7. The Silverbox kitchen, designed by Lanzetti, Ernestomeda, 222 Merchandise Mart. 8. Flos Taccia lamp by Achille and Pier Giacomo Castiglioni, $2,558, Lightology, 215 W. Chicago Ave.

2. The Barrique bar, price varies on configuation and finishes, Ernestomeda, 222 Merchandise Mart. 3. Opium sink in Pietra Luna, $25,000, available at Antonio Lupi, 516 N. Wells St. (opening in the spring), antoniolupi. it, 312.479.5632. 4. Dechirer tile by Patricia Urquiola for Mutina, mutina.it. 5. Custom Bisazza mosaic, bisazza. com. Illuminated Dioscuri tables by Michele De Lucchi, price varies by size, from $151 to $530, Artemide, 223 W. Erie St., 6. Red leather, “Eros” sofa by Fendi, Haute Living, 222 W. Kinzie St.

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INSPIRATION For Italian-born Lanzetti, it’s impossible not to be influenced by his roots. Take the Taccia lamp (8), which was designed by the Castiglioni brothers for Flos. “I can find a place for it anywhere,” he laughs. A reminder of his childhood on the Mediterranean coast, Lanzetti appreciates the inspiration behind the design: the fishermen of Italy who used lampadas to attract fish. “I feel a connection to my heritage through this lamp.”

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BROTHER/BROTHER ACT: Daniel and Christopher (seated) Streng in their Garfield Park studio. The twig-like objects strewn about the floor fi t together and can be configured into anything from room dividers to light fi xtures.

THE INDUSTRIALISTS>>>>>>>>>>> Christopher and Daniel Streng have become internationally acclaimed industrial design stars thanks to a lifetime of sibling squabbling. The brothers, cofounders of Chicago-based Streng Design, can laugh (kind of) as they tell about fighting constantly as kids growing up in Wisconsin. “But that process of debating as youngsters actually trained us,” says Daniel. “Now we only focus on design that can stand up to one another’s intense critique.” Christopher, 37, says their staff of 13 designers has become accustomed to he and his brother, 40, heading to a back room for a little “creative discussion” about fine-tuning a design, like the CO7—a slick café chair stripped down to its essence. The pair opened separate design firms when each graduated from the Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design. But to the Kohler execs and Milanese manufacturers who hired them, and the Cooper-Hewitt Design Museum curators who honored them, they were always “The Brothers Streng.” Caving to the inevitable, the two joined

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forces five years ago and a funny thing happened: Their work got even better. “In our case, it seems that one plus one is greater than two,” says Daniel. Streng Design has grown into a powerhouse idea factory, responding to client inquiries with hundreds of concepts at a crack. The Fortune 500 types who hire them usually demand anonymity, but examples of the brothers’ work is as varied as the Ubu stool (intended as an urban socialization experiment until Paris Hilton got her mitts on one) and the Kohler SOK tub (which made the brothers unexpectedly flush when Steve Wynn installed them throughout his casino empire). Lately, the Strengs are agonizing over how to expand their 5,000-square-foot studio without leaving the building—a stimulating mix of artists and musicians. But wherever they end up, they insist their space will stay raw. “Our guys need to be able to spill stuff,” says Daniel. “We’ll get a couple of couches, but it will always be about solving problems. We’re not going to make a place where clients want to hang out and order sushi.”

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CHAIR APPARENT: The Streng-designed Low Chaise (1) is meant to be like “riding sidesaddle, sitting on a motorcycle, or even in a cockpit.” Not above a little humor, they liken it to “somewhere between a lizard and an alien contraption... exquisite good humor captured in plastic.”

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HOME BOY In his own house, Christopher prefers “Modern eclecticism, ” which takes him anywhere from CB2 to local resale shops like Wright, Salvage One and Modern Times. For good design on a budget, he hits favorites Orange Skin (orangeskin.com), Habitat (habitat.co.uk), Muji (muji. com) and Oak Park’s Fly Bird (fly-bird.net).

2 TOP DESIGN The Strengs, who aren’t decorators, designed this Chicago bedroom (2) for Jane Magazine on an $800 budget. The plywood headboard was laser-cut in a “Rococo pattern,” a custom mural was inspired by the owner’s “Russian Futurist poster art,” and the chandelier is “multiple vintage chandeliers combined into one.”

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3. The CO7 armchair in hardwood, walnut or ash, $1,220. 4. One of the “inspiration boards” tacked up around the studio. 5. Ubu stools. 6. CO7 chairs are stripped of excess, reminiscent of Japanese minimalism. Plastic ($420) or aluminum ($1,320). 7. Streng’s Kohler Purist Sink was conceived to imitate the smoothness of stone polished by sheeting water. Available at Lowe’s, starting at $375 (price varies by style).

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7 THINKING SMALL Despite all the awards and success, the Streng brothers are hardly super-serious design snobs. But that doesn’t mean they aren’t always trying to push limits. Up next? “We’re asking ourselves, what is the smallest, lightest, stackable, extremely comfortable, petite but elegant chair we can possibly design?” says Christopher. “Plus, we want it to come flat-packed,” adds Daniel.

STAR SEATING The brightly colored Ubu stool was intended as a modern take on an urban park bench. It was inspired by the large yellow hoops attached to subway gratings all over Milan, meant for chaining up bicycles used as places to sit and gather. “But the CooperHewitt Design Museum, Surface Magazine and Paper Magazine all saw it as a Pop Art design object,” says Christopher. “One night I got a call from a friend who said ‘Turn on Entertainment Tonight right now because Paris Hilton is sitting on your stool.’ That wasn’t exactly my intention.”

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HOUSE PARTY CHICAGO Close-up of the Kara Mann Design table

The Ruder Group table, designed by Gensler

Josh Ingmire & Alison Gramenos

TABLE MATTERS! THE PARTY: Chicagoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s design glitterati came out in droves to help raise money for DIFFAâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the three-day-long event that culminated with Dining by Design. THE VENUE: Designers worked for months to prepare elaborately designed tables, which were fi rst displayed and admired by hundreds of strolling guests, and later, dined around during the gala. THE PLAYERS: Co-chairs Steve Kadlec and Richard Bliss were joined by designers Kara Mann, Jennifer Sweas and Jordana Joseph for a spectacular turnout in style, creativity and generosity.

PHOTOS BY FIG MEDIA

Jennifer Sweas & Colette May

Marshall Erb, Mia Gargiulo & Jordana Joseph

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Keith Potter, Tina Simecek & Justin Colombik

PeerlessImportRug_HBCH0109.indd 1

1/5/09 11:39:46 AM

CONSULTATION DESIGN AND PLANNING SERVICES ASSISTANCE WITH SPACE ORGANIZATION OFFERING CREATIVE SOLUTIONS AND DIRECTION

LESLIE RHODES 773.213.5433 SPACEINTERIORDESIGN@ME.COM

HOUSE PARTY CHICAGO Ambience

MOVIN’ ON DOWNTOWN THE PARTY:

The grand opening of Susan Fredman’s highly anticipated retail store, At Home in the City. THE PLAYERS: The woman of the evening, Susan Fredman, was surrounded by guests, including Shelley Young of Chopping Block, Janet Davies of 190 North and Joe Caminiti of CAI. THE FOOD: Hors d’oeuvres, provided by J and L, included tall, crisp lavasch shards and spiced breadsticks with assorted dips and spreads, but the hit of the evening was the delicious drinks: the cleverly named Fredman Fizzle and the City Sangria, both irresistible tequila cocktails. –MEGAN ZOTIS

Susie Fredman & Shelley Young

Orren & Tina Pickell

Kathy Herbert & Aimee Nemeckay

Matt Caroll & Jill Maremont

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Gary Belmonte & Amanda Zitlin

Joe Caminiti & Lonnie Unger

HOUSE PARTY CHICAGO

Isn’t it time you shook things up

...in the bedroom?

Bedroom designed by Anne Coyle

DREAM ON!

PHOTOS OF GUESTS BY PEGGY VAGENIUS; PHOTO OF ROOM COURTESY OF THE MERCHANDISE MART

THE PARTY: Local designers debuted their room creations at the fourth annual DreamHome preview party, which helped to benefit the University of Chicago’s Cancer Research Foundation. THE VENUE: Inspired by Elle Décor’s Fashion at Home, a house layout showcased nine individual homes within the Merchandise Mart. THE FOOD: While sipping on the signature drink of the evening, a Dream ‘Tini, guests sampled a variety of hors d’oeuvres: mini roasted sirloin of beef sandwiches with arugula and whipped horseradish dressing, and sesame-crusted chicken maki by the Entertaining Company. –MZ

Anne Coyle, Erik W. Kolacz, Keitha A. Brathwaite & Sanjay Singhal

A Luxury Bedroom Design Service John H Brennen III & Margaret Russell

Darl Grooters & Joan Craig

bedroomsbybrynne.com 773-960-8619

HOUSE PARTY CHICAGO Jayson Home & Garden guests

A SNEAK PEEK THE PARTY:

Jayson Home & Garden teamed up with designer Kara Mann to benefit Project Osmosis, a nonprofit organization that educates Chicago’s youth about design. THE VENUE: While sipping Champagne, guests enjoyed a sneak peek of the newly expanded space at Jayson Home & Garden. THE FOOD: Cortes Catering was behind the delicious passed hors d’oeuvres, including cucumber cups served with Thai beef salad and almond, grilled pear, arugula and boursin pizza wedges served with Cabernet Sauvignon Tuscan balsamic reduction. –MZ

Mitch Goltz & Lyndsey Ager

Ashley Fees & Martha Mulholland

PHOTOS BY STUART-RODGERS PHOTOGRAPHY

Janel Laban & Heather Blaha

Colette May & Kara Mann

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> WINTER 2009

Katie Bishop &Jennie Bishop

Daniel Kinkade & Megan Andrew

Hickman Design Associates 312-642-7379

www.hickmaninteriors.com

HickmanInteriors_HBCH0109.indd 1

12/10/08 3:55:17 PM

Luxury is not simply about a designer name or price tag, but real values such as craftmanship, innovation and affordability. Pauline Grace represents all of these elements.

PA ULI NE G R A C E 1414 North Kingsbury Street 312.280.9880 pauline-grace.com

HOUSE PARTY CHICAGO Poliform

EAT, DRINK AND DESIGN

Poliform and CS collaborated to host an evening of Italian delicacies and designs. THE VENUE: Hosted at Poliform’s River North showroom, guests witnessed demonstrations of culinary goodies by Bruno Abate of Follia and Tim Leahy of Rustik in the beautiful Varenna kitchens. THE PLAYERS: CS food editor Lisa Shames played host to mingling foodies THE FOOD: Bruschetta with honey goat cheese, roasted cherry tomatoes and tomatillos with fresh basil were provided by Rustik and Follia. –MZ THE PARTY:

Amy Fatlan & John Carroll

Isabelle Laplant, Clara Matignon & Flavie Ospina

PHOTOS BY FIG MEDIA

Lance Birkhofer, Megan Camarigg, Karisty Kooper, Cody Harper, Chelsea Mergy & Julianne Rogers

Janice Monteith & Sonya Krusic

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> WINTER 2009

Sabinna Guarracino & Rose Anzuree

Mike Torto & Jeremiah Huizenga

HOUSE PARTY CHICAGO

Award-winning Claremont House by Brininstool+Lynch

AND THE AWARD GOES TO… THE PARTY: The

PHOTO OF CLAREMONT HOUSE BY CHRISTOPHER BARRETT, HEDRICH BLESSING PHOTOGRAPHY. PHOTOS OF PEOPLE BY ANNE EVANS.

American Institute of Architects held its 53rd annual Design Excellence Awards. Awards for excellence in architecture and design were announced by Peter Sagal, host of National Public Radio’s “Wait Wait… Don’t Tell Me!” THE VENUE: Held at the Grand Ballroom in Navy Pier, 850 guests kicked off the evening with a cocktail reception sponsored by Kayhan International and then continued with dinner and the awards ceremony. THE FOOD: Chicago Signature Services provided the food, which included a Mediterranean salad with oven-roasted tomatoes, feta cheese, eggplant croutons and lemon basil vinaigrette. That was followed by charcuterie chicken breast stuffed with crispy applewood smoked bacon and vegetable ratatouille, served with a crimini mushroom sauce, calico rice and seasonal vegetables. –MZ

Alli Chapman & Nick Luzietti

Peter Exley & Greg Murphey

Award-winning Leo Burnett interior

Gertrude Lempp Kerbis & Jane Cohen

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UPCOMING E VENTS AND SPECIAL PROMOTIONS

THE CS INTERIORS AGENDA TRENDS & TRADE SECRETS

PRESENTS

JANUARY 31, 12:00PM CARSON PIRIE SCOTT FURNITURE GALLERY 66 ORLAND SQUARE, ORLAND PARK IL 708.873.3256 WWW.CARSONS.COM

1ST ANNIVERSARY ISSUE!

M ODE R N L U X U R Y

Gain a fresh perspective on home décor for 2009 and beyond. Hosted by Luke Gibson, publisher of CS Interiors and Carson Pirie Scott Furniture Gallery, the event begins with hors d’oeuvres at noon, followed by presentations from three industry experts. Afterward, meet one-on-one with the experts to ask your decorating questions. Carson’s is offering $200 off and free delivery with a furniture purchase of $1,000 or more made during the event on Saturday, January 31 at 12:00 pm. Call to make a complimentary reservation.

TM

UP, UP AND AWAY!

Stratospheric Penthouse Style Space-Age Accessories Who’s Designing What Where

A DESIGN FOR LIFE

PLUS:

THRONES GO MOD • CHICAGO’S NEW HOME-CHIC BEAT • THE TAXIDERMY CRAZE • HEATING UP THE GREEN SCENE

BY THE PUBLISHERS OF CS

M ODE R N L U X U R Y

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M ODE R N L U X U R Y

INSIDE!

ARTS & POWER SPECIAL

Ain’t Love Grand? DOWN TO EARTH: GODDESS DRESSES BIG AND SMALL

MEET THE SCHEMERS, DREAMERS, RISK TAKERS, MONEY MAKERS, DIEHARDS, DARLINGS & DIVAS DARING TO RUFFLE FEATHERS IN CHICAGO CULTURE NOW

GIMME SUGAR! COUTURE CAKES WELL GROOMED: CHICAGO’S CHICEST SPOTS FOR COUPLES’ SHOWERS

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DWYANE WADE PLAYS NICE INAUGURAL PREP! DC’S BUZZIEST BEDS GREEN SCENE: ECO-CHIC SHOPPING BRUCE MAU’S VISION QUEST AND ALL THE BIGGEST BASHES!

THE ELYSIAN LANDS IN THE GOLD COAST! MICK JAGGER’S (FIRST) “I DO’S” AND 60 OF THE CITY’S SEXIEST WEDDINGS!

FREDDY RODRIGUEZ

HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS!

2ND ANNIVERSARY ISSUE!

M ODE R N L U X U R Y

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BACK TO COOL

FrontDesk / Chicago / December 2008

CHICAGO

TM

THE MICHAEL DEL PIERO GOOD DESIGN STUDIO 1914 N. DAMEN AVE. 773.772.3000 WWW.MICHAELDELPIERO.COM Presented in three languages—English, French and Spanish—Visions of Design is an inspiring collection that explores why designers chose certain pieces, what type of lifestyle their compositions respond to, and how they came up with the innovative twists that make their designs special. Visionaries from across the United States and Canada unite in this vibrant book, which is divided into four regional chapters. Each of the accomplished interior designers featured in Visions of Design have a defi ned personal aesthetic, and well-versed in creating interiors in a wide array of styles. Visions of Design can be purchased at The Michael Del Piero Good Design Studio.

Chicago

Dining / Nightlife / Shopping / Culture / Maps

CHICAGO PROS PLAY DRESS UP

GET FIT AT THE CITY’S SHARPEST TAILORS DEBON-HEIR LUKE FLYNN’S GREAT ADVENTURE

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Hot Nights in Old San Juan! Check In at the Hautest Hotel Penthouses Life Inside the Chicago Spire Art After Dark and Much, Much More! Published by

Into the Night

82

December 2008 COMPLIMENTARY COPY

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT LUKE GIBSON AT 312.274.2565 OR LGIBSON@MODERNLUXURY.COM

UNCONVENTIONAL COLLAGE SHOW & CHRIS CRITES PAY-TO-PLAY PAINTINGS AT 360SEE JANUARY 16, 6PM-9PM 1924 N. DAMEN AVE. 773.698.6340 WWW.360SEEGALLERY.COM Join 360SEE for their opening of the winter gallery season. The Unconventional Collage Show will include a variety of collage works from both local and national artists and will premiere new works by reused plastic collage artist Virginia Fleck. 360SEE will also exhibit a series of paintings titled Pay-To-Play by Chris Crites addressing the continued corruption in Illinois politics. Crime is not a new subject for Crites; he has been known for his tight four-color mug shot portraits on brown paper bags since 2002. Furniture, functional art, and design objects by gallery-represented artists will also be on display.

TURNING THE TABLES EVAN LEWIS 3368 N. ELSTON AVE. 773.539.0402 WWW.EVANLEWISINC.COM Visit the stunning showroom and prolifi c art studio, Evan Lewis, for a wide array of handmade furniture, mirrors, lighting and accessories in bronze, steel and copper and fi nished with luscious patinas. The latest additions, the Talea and Tetra table collections, are sure to satisfy any winter design cravings. All pieces in the showroom are available to buy and take home directly, or they can be ordered in custom sizes and fi nishes. Parking is available in front of the showroom in the loading zone. Shopping for a beautiful piece for your home has never been easier or more fun!

ANTONIO LUPI

ROMANCING YOUR ROOM . . .

OPENING SPRING 2009 312.479.5632 WWW.ANTONIOLUPICHICAGO.COM

FEBRUARY 7, 1PM-3PM AT HOME IN THE CITY 350 W. ERIE 312.587.8150 WWW.SUSANFREDMAN.COM

Luca Lanzetta, who brought Ernestomeda’s innovative Italian kitchens to Chicago, is now introducing Antonio Lupi, the latest in ultra-luxury Italian bathrooms. Antonio Lupi will open in Spring 2009. Produced near Florence, Italy, these bathrooms echo the region’s artistic status with pieces that are functional works of modern art. Antonio Lupi, 312-479-5632, antoniolupi.it; luca@antoniolupichicago.com.

Join the designers of The Susan Fredman Design Group for an exclusive event to indulge your senses. Learn how to create a romantic Valentine’s Day dinner for two. Preview exclusive tabletop collections and watch a special demonstration of the personal scent line, Zents. With exclusive product offerings and interior design services, this is how living in the city should really be! Please RSVP to jmaremont@susanfredman.com

W W W. M O D E R N L U X U RY . C O M

MODE R N LUXU RY

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S I G N U P T O D A Y W W W. M O D E R N L U X U R Y. C O M

DIFFA’S

DINING BY DESIGN CS Interiors, designed by Jennifer Sweas

In Chicago this past November, DIFFA: Design Industries Foundation Fighting AIDS presented DINING BY DESIGN, where fine design met fine dining in an exceptional mix of fun, fashion, food and flair, all for a fitting cause. DIFFA is one of the largest funders of HIV/AIDS service and education organizations in the United States. Since its founding in 1984, DIFFA has mobilized the immense resources of design communities to provide more than $35 million to hundreds of AIDS organizations nationwide. DINING BY DESIGN is DIFFA’s signature fundraising program and has enjoyed increasing success for over a decade. This year was no different than previous with an all-star cast of local and national designers and sponsors. Held at Chicago’s design mecca—The Merchandise Mart—DIFFA offered sponsorships at gold, silver, bronze and national levels. Designers were then provided with 10-by-10 foot raw spaces to create an intimate dinner setting for 10 design enthusiasts using their installation as a blank canvas. Designers gave true meaning to the idea that “imagination has no limits.” PHOTO CREDIT NATHAN KIRKMAN FOR DIFFA/CHICAGO

Kara Mann Design, designed by Kara Mann Design

DINING BY DESIGN

DIFFAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

S

Kadlec Architecture + Design/Estudio Furnishings, designed by Kadlec Architecture + Design

Hewlett Packard, designed by Vivienne Tam

Leopardo Construction, designed by The John Buck Company with Kehoe Design

GOLD SPONSORSHIP CS INTERIORS, designed by Jennifer Sweas MERCHANDISE MART DESIGN CENTER, designed by Bryan Bilezwski Design KRAVET INC., designed by Kravet Inc.

elit by Stolichnaya, designed by David Rockwell/Rockwell Group

DIFFAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

DINING BY DESIGN

SILVER SPONSORSHIP KARA MANN DESIGN, designed by Kara Mann Design LEOPARDO CONSTRUCTION, designed by The John Buck Company with Kehoe design MARKET SQUARE CHICAGO, designed by Mick Santagio Design ATELIER LAPCHI, designed by Susan Fredman Design Group DESSIN FOURNIR, designed by Dessin Fournir THE RUDER GROUP, designed by Gensler

Janus et Cie, designed by Simeone Deary

Harrington College of Design, designed by Harrington College of Design students

Allsteel, designed by Harley Ellis Devereaux

DINING BY DESIGN

DIFFAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

Haworth, designed by Powell Kleinschmidt

Merchandise Mart Design Center, designed by Bryan Bilezwski Design

SILVER SPONSORSHIP MDC WALLCOVERINGS, designed by Smith & Larkin Interior Design ALLSTEEL, designed by Harley Ellis Devereaux OEC BUSINESS INTERIORS, designed by ISI (Interior Space International) ARTISTIC TILE, designed by Illinois Institute of Arts students MDC WALLCOVERINGS, designed by McDonalds Corporate HERMAN MILLER, designed by Perkins + Will ROOM & BOARD, designed by David Staten

Brintons, designed by VOA

DIFFAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

DINING BY DESIGN

SILVER SPONSORSHIP NORTHWESTERN MEMORIAL HOSPITAL, designed by Sanjay R. Singhal HAWORTH, designed by Powell Kleinschmidt HARRINGTON COLLEGE OF DESIGN, designed by Harrington College of Design students COALESSE, designed by Perkins + Will STEELCASE, INC., designed by RTKL TEKNION LLC, designed by NELSON KADLEC ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN / ESTUDIO FURNISHINGS, designed by Kadlec Architecture + Design DESIGN INC./BILL BRUSS DESIGN, designed by Bill Bruss Design BRINTONS, designed by VOA JANUS ET CIE, designed by Simeone Deary BRADLEY TERRACE OUTDOOR FURNISHINGS / KETTELKAMP & KETTELKAMP ARCHITECTURE, designed by Bradley Terrace Outdoor Furnishings / Kettelkamp & Kettelkamp Architecture

Room & Board, designed by David Staten

The New York Times, designed by Doug Wilson for Design Within Reach

Bradley Terrace Outdoor Furnishings/Kettelkamp & Kettelkamp Architecture, designed by Bradley Terrace Outdoor Furnishings/ Kettelkamp & Kettelkamp Architecture

DINING BY DESIGN

BRONZE SPONSORSHIP DESKS, INC., designed by Desks, Inc. FINISHING CONTRACTORS ASSOCIATION OF CHICAGO, designed by JATC & Faux Design Studio BUKIETY, INC., designed by Bukiety, Inc. GEIGER INTERNATIONAL, designed by Eastlake Studio DIFFA CHICAGO, designed by Randy Heller C N A, designed by Columbia College Chicago students KOROSEAL INTERIOR PRODUCTS, designed by Loebel

DIFFAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

Scholossman Hackl (LSH) VITRA, designed by Ronan + Erwan Bouroullec PREMIERE MUSIC & FILM SYSTEMS, designed by Sally Elstad, Interiors HBF, designed by Gensler Chicago MASLAND CONTRACT, designed by Solomon Cordwell Buenz

Steelcase, Inc., designed by RTKL

Atelier Lapchi, designed by Susan Fredman Design Group

OEC Business Interiors, designed by ISI (Interior Space International)

DIFFAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

DINING BY DESIGN

MDC Wallcoverings, designed by Smith & Larkin Interior Design

Beringer Vineyards, designed by Marc Blackwell

Kravet Inc., designed by Kravet Inc.

Benjamin Moore, designed by David Stark

TABLE HOP & TASTE

DIFFA’S

DIFFA’S DINING BY DESIGN Chicago consists of multiple events over several days. COCKTAILS BY DESIGN kicked off the three-day celebration highlighting libations from Stolichnaya ELIT and wine from Beringer Vineyards. TABLE HOP & TASTE was an opportunity for the public to view the tables while indulging in scrumptious food provided by Chicago’s most notable restaurants and gourmet food purveyors paired with wines from Beringer Vineyards. Participants included Blue Water Grill Chicago, Bull & Bear, Chaise Lounge, Fleming’s Steakhouse & Wine Bar, Japonais, Madame Tartine, more, Prosecco, RL, Rockit Bar & Grill and Sushi X. The finale on Saturday evening was an elaborate seated gala dinner followed by dancing and dessert to mark the end of the celebration. PHOTO CREDIT FIG MEDIA

BROUGHT TO YOU BY

MEDIA SPONSORS

LOCAL SPONSORS

LOCAL MEDIA SPONSORS

For more information visit diffa.org

HOME DESIGN

every kind of antique: Think porcelain bathtubs, mantels, church doors and original stone from historic buildings. 1840 W. Hubbard St.

312.733.0098

ARCHITECTS

or www.salvageone.com

HORN DESIGN ARCHITECTURE

This 23,000-square-foot gallery specializes in antiques and home furnishings

For 25 years, Henry Horn and his team have offered exceptional interior

from China, Southeast Asia and more recently, Hungary and France. A line

architectural design. Focused on close communication with clients and design

of modern furniture made from ancient and reclaimed woods has also been

excellence, their services range from space planning to interior architectural

added and a spectrum of furniture services are available. 330 N. Clark St.

design to contract management. 223 W. Erie St., Ste. 7E 312.943.8404 or

312.755.1266 or www.goldentriangle.biz

THE GOLDEN TRIANGLE

www.h-a.com

URBAN ARCHAEOLOGY When fine, old buildings were demolished, treasured pieces were carefully

ANTIQUES

removed and preserved by Urban Archaeology experts, restoring antique architectural elements and giving them new life. Currently featuring a

ARCHITECTURAL ARTIFACTS

high quality line of lighting, bath accessories, washstands and medicine

Owner Stuart Grannen travels to Europe, handpicking architectural artifacts

cabinets. 222 Merchandise Mart Plz., Ste. 108

that preserve history and enhance homes. Explore the expansive selection

urbanarchaeology.com

312.527.4627 or www.

of more than 2,000 chandeliers, unique garden accessories, stone statues, ornate doors, stained glass and other one-of-a-kind treasures in this 80,000-square-foot space. 4325 N. Ravenswood Ave.

773.348.0622 or

www.architecturalartifacts.com

VINTAGE PINE Co-owners Sallie Miller and Debby Matt travel to France and England, scouring antiques warehouses for treasures to fill their 18,000-squarefoot store. From crystal chandeliers to table linens, garden stoneware and

ASSEMBLAGE

custom furniture, their unique selection is a favorite among designers. 904

This unique store offers a large variety of gorgeous, mid-century antiques.

W. Blackhawk St. 312.943.9303 or www.vintagepine.com

Expect to find seating, tables, wall décor, case pieces, lighting, garden elements, fine art and more. 121 N. Jefferson St.

312.234.9200 or www.

assemblageltd.com

DESIGN CENTERS

CHRISTA’S ANTIQUES

MERCHANDISE MART

Visit this antiques gallery for a collection of rare period furniture. English,

4.2 million gross square feet of space dedicated to retail shops, luxury home

French and American objects fill the store. Christa’s carries bookcases,

boutiques, furnishings showrooms, and a host of community events. As the

armoires, chairs, tables, desks, dressers, mirrors, sculpture, works of art,

world’s largest wholesale design center, The Merchandise Mart is synonymous

lithographs, tapestries and plenty of antique accessories. 217 W. Illinois St.

with high design and luxury goods. 222 Merchandise Mart Plz. 312.527.4141

312.222.2520 or www.christasltd.com

or www.mmart.com

MIKE BELL INC. Mike Bell takes country antiques from the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries

DESIGNERS

and adapts them to a 21st century style of living for a one-of-a-kind look. Buffets, dining furniture, consoles, armoires, mirrors and reproductions are

BEDROOMS BY BRYNNE

all available at this elegant Merchandise Mart showroom. 222 Merchandise

A luxury interior design service for the bedroom, BBB can give your

Mart Plz., Ste. 1869 312.644.6848 or www.mikebellonline.com

bedroom fetching options in design materials, providing furniture, fabrics, wall coverings, lighting, bedding and artifacts from afar. BBB focuses on

PAGODA RED

designing a tasteful and seductive stage—in the bedroom.

Exceptionally well-priced Asian furnishings pack this open loft space

or www.bedroomsbybrynne.com

773.960.8619

including Chinese deco chairs, Nepalese rugs, antique lanterns and a rare collection of 20th-century Chinese advertising posters. Offering customers

FRANK PONTERIO INTERIOR DESIGN

the rarest and most unusual Chinese antique furniture and artifacts. 1714 N.

This full-service interior design firm specializes in residential and commercial

Damen Ave. 773.235.1188 or www.pagodared.com

design. With a penchant for historically influenced modern elegance, owner Frank Ponterio takes the lead in all design work to ensure each client’s

REVIVAL

full satisfaction. Second office in Lake Forest. 440 N. Wells St., Ste. 450

Known as the store for architectural eye-catchers, Revival boasts an array

312.464.1133 or www.frankponterio.com

of vintage and antique objects. From home and garden furniture to lighting and mirrors, every item carries a unique history that becomes a topic of conversation for its owner. 1401 W. Irving Park Rd.

773.248.1211 or www.

rerevival.com

GRACIE VALENTINE DESIGNS This interior lifestyle artist firm has been in the biz for roughly a decade. With an adopted motto for “creating endless possibilities,” their tailored services are equipped to unmask and refine personal taste for

SALVAGE ONE

the best results. 4947 S Washington Park Ct.

Customers flock to this 100,000-square-foot warehouse to sort through a

gracievalentinedesignswi.com

773.891.0502 or www.

selection of artifacts found all over the world. The huge space is stocked with

MARKETPLACE 109

HICKMAN DESIGN ASSOCIATES

floral-print rugs and lavish window treatments.

As principal, Tracy Hickman works closely with clients to accommodate

630.325.3355 or www.marilynakinsinteriors.com

3824 York Rd., Ste. 2B

lifestyles. Her sophisticated, tailored interiors are driven by texture and comfort. From Chicago to South Carolina to the Caymans, Hickman’s

MATTER & ORDER

singular, detailed vision has left beauty in its wake. 900 N. Franklin St., Ste.

Matter and Order’s focus is to unite beauty and functionality to create interior

102 312.642.7379 or www.hickmaninteriors.com

design solutions as unique as their clients. This firm specializes in everything from custom furniture design and fixture selections, to project management.

INTERIORS BY MARY SUSAN

Clients also receive a free consultation. 701 S. Wells 312.330.5025 or www.

Rich design details that reflect beauty, function and comfort mark Mary

matterandorder.com

Susan’s aesthetic. From modern to vintage to Asian and more, she has experience with a vast array of different styles. Also offering art through

MICHAEL DEL PIERO GOOD DESIGN

Mary Vincent Fine Art Gallery. 22 Calendar Ave.

Michael Del Piero’s diverse aesthetic is complemented her meticulous

708.354.5383 or www.

ibmsdesign.com

attention to detail and her strong belief in communicative designer-client relationships. In addition to design services, Del Piero offers furniture,

JESSICA MARGOT DESIGN

antiques, home accessories, textiles and more in her on-site boutique. 1914

Whether it’s a first-time design client or a seasoned vet, Jessica Margot

N. Damen Ave. 773.772.3000 or www.michaeldelpiero.com

works closely with clients from inception to completion, selecting furniture, fabric, color schemes and more. Her international experience in architecture

MICHELLE’S INTERIORS

and design is invaluable in realizing her clients’ visions. 116 W. Illinois St., 5th

Michelle’s Interiors offers specialized residential design in styles ranging

Fl. E. 312.492.8777 or www.jessicamargot.com

from old-world opulence to modern functionality with a knack for clever space planning. In addition, she works directly with architects, builders

KARA MANN DESIGN

and contractors to design couture home furnishings.

With a focus on high-end residential spaces, KMD approaches every project

847.223.2660 or www.michellesinteriors.com

518 Barron Blvd.

as a creative collaboration between design team and client, creating spaces with personality and sophistication. From Southwestern sanctuary to Upper

RJA DESIGN

East Side co-op, KMD produces warm, layered interiors. 119 W. Hubbard St.,

Richard Abrahamson of RJA Design effortlessly balances old with new,

5th Fl. 312.893.7550 or www.karamann.com

intricate with simple, sophisticated with comfortable. His collector’s eye and vast knowledge of the decorative arts lend his interiors timelessness

KARIN HANKE

while modern practicality gives them ease and livability.

This high-end residential interior design firm creates warm, inviting and

630.584.9474 or www.rja-design.com

luxurious spaces throughout the Chicago area and beyond.

600 S. 1st St.

Working

with local artisans, Karin Hanke also produces gorgeous custom furniture

SCOTT ARTHUR YERKEY DESIGN, INC.

and can alter existing pieces to clients’ specifications. 434 Naperville Rd.

From classic to contemporary, Scott Arthur Yerkey offers timeless designs to

630.850.0638 or www.karinhanke.com

clients with diverse tastes, paying close attention to architectural integration. Also offering a gorgeous furniture line featuring clean lines and stylish appeal. 4001 N.

LAKESIDE INTERIORS

Ravenswood Ave., Ste. 301 773.883.0775 or www.scottarthuryerkey.com

The quaint downtown Wilmette boutique offers a stylish mix of eclectic home furnishings and accessories. Full-service interior design is also

SHERRY KOPPEL DESIGN

available, as well as a host of specialized services, including picture hanging,

Sherry Koppel’s background in the fine arts coupled with her world travels

organizing, home staging and more. 1111 Central Ave. 847.512.5045 or www.

has given her an understanding of color and texture and a creative intuition

lakesideinteriors.com

for beautiful and functional interiors. 210 W. Chicago Ave. 312.664.5056 or

www.sherrykoppeldesign.com

LAWRENCE BOEDER INTERIOR DESIGN Boeder and his talented design team create gracious, elegant, upscale and

STACEY COHEN INTERIORS

very comfortable interiors for high-end residences and executive offices. Rich

Stacey

fabrics, jewel-toned color palettes and one-of-a-kind artwork and antiques

showrooms as well as art, antiques and other furnishings both unexpected

characterize his style, while his clients’ individuality always shines through.

and modern. This commercial and residential design firm is also on its way

2241 N. Burling St. 312.613.6640 or www.lawrenceboeder.com

toward becoming LEED a certified business. 360 W. Illinois

Cohen

Interiors

specializes

in

locating

off-the-beaten-path

312.485.4606

or www.stacohen.com

M. GRACE DESIGNS Having earned a permanent place on HGTV’s Designer Portfolio, M. Grace

STUDIO 5440 AT THYBONY

Design mixes the eclectic and elegant with unusual color combinations,

Studio 5440 at Thybony offers full service interior design, space planning,

textures and patterns. The firm excels at enhancing energy efficiency and

color consultations and custom fabrications of draperies, bedding and

conserving natural resources. Second office in Hinsdale. 1813 S. Clark St.

upholstery. Offering inspiration from more than 300 wallpaper books,

312.842.0800 or www.mgracedesigns.com

from European imports to price-conscious offerings.

5440 N. Clark St.

773.561.2275 ext. 15 or www.thybonypaint.com

MARILYN AKINS INTERIORS Marilyn Akins’ interior design aesthetic is an exercise in sensual opulence. Part

STUDIO F

old-world tradition, part refined feminine luxury, her romantic sensibilities

Designer, architect and Italian transplant, Patrizio Fradiani brings his modern

are evident in elegant, four-poster beds, richly patterned wallpapers, large

design sensibility to Chicago. Full of surprise elements, his range of projects

110 MARKETPLACE

Breathing New Life into Vintage Modern Furniture

3061 N. LINCOLN AVENUE, CHICAGO, IL 60657 • 773.868.0844 • WWW.MODLIFEHOME.COM Now open at our new showroom in Lakeview

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ModlifeInc_HBCH0109.indd 1

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1/6/09 2:22:51 PM

de Sede DS - 164

Exclusively at

C O N T E M P O R A R Y L I V I N G E L E VAT E D

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549 N. Wells St, Chicago, IL 60654 312.329.9669 tel

includes old Victorian gut-jobs, sleek penthouses, a Tuscan villa and the first

of furniture, home accessories, lighting, rugs and wall art for every room in

boutique hotel in Champaign, Illinois. 4201 N. Ravenswood Ave., Ste. 103A

the home. Contemporary pieces sourced from all over the world. 5241 N.

773.880.0450 or www.studiof-design.com

Clark St. 773.506.7882 or www.cassona.com

STUDIO G INTERIORS

CLIFF SPENCER

Tracy and Jim Grosspietsch head this dynamic residential design consultancy

Traditional craftsmanship combined with supreme skill make Cliff Spencer’s

firm. Services encompass everything from window treatments, art selection,

custom cabinetry and furniture stand out. Featuring both modern and

and functional space planning to lighting plans, kitchen and bath design, and

traditional designs, Spencer has experience working with traditional and

interior and exterior architectural design. Five Chicagoland locations. 1156

non-traditional species of wood. Website offers good assortment of samples.

Berkshire Ln. 847.550.8580 or www.studioginteriors.com

13435 Beach Ave. 310.823.0112 or www.cliffspencer.net

SUSAN FREDMAN DESIGN GROUP

COPELAND FURNITURE

Designer Susan Fredman and her team of design professionals count client

Using New England craftsmanship, Copeland creates contemporary,

individuality among their biggest inspirations. Maintaining a sense of luxury

hardwood furniture for the bedroom, dinning room and home office. This

while working with many different aesthetics, their interior design services

family owned and operated enterprise has been in business since the early

can include everything from space planning to choosing accessories. 350 W.

1970s.

Erie St., 1st Fl. 312.587.8150 or www.susanfredman.com

copelandfurniture.com

DOORS

Design Studio offers a huge selection of European and domestic furnishings

222 Merchandise Mart Plz., Suite 1683

312.410.9080 or www.

DESIGN STUDIO for the home and office. Characterized by clean lines and monochromatic

THE SLIDING DOOR COMPANY

color schemes the look is one of purist modernism. 40,000 square feet of

Thanks to Sliding Door Co.’s innovative designs, there are more choices than

showroom space in two locations. 225 W. Hubbard St.

ever for contemporary doors and functional walls for the home, loft or office.

www.designstudiofurniture.com

312.527.5272 or

For room dividers, closet doors, sliding walls and swing doors, this is the place. 221 W. Ohio St. 312.494.9494 or www.slidingdoorco.com

DOMICILE FURNITURE A slick, solid selection of urban home décor and lighting options. They carry understated wood chairs, tables and storage units, as well as rounded leather

FURNITURE

and fabric sofas and recliners—quality products that are elegant, durable and comfortable at unparalleled prices. 3701 W. Lunt Ave.

ARTWARE EDITIONS

847.568.1088 or

www.domicilefurniture.com

Owners Rebecca Epstein Kong and Jon Tomlinson offer functional objects and furniture designed by artists. A large selection of everyday furnishings

EUROPEAN FURNITURE WAREHOUSE

is coupled with each artist’s larger vision, resulting in truly unique, visually

A family business that has succeeded for over three generations, outfitting

stunning work. 327 W. 11th St. 212.463.7490 or www.artwareeditions.com

dining and living rooms as well as offering a broad selection of office furniture and outdoor pieces to decorate the entire home. Featuring modern

BAKER

and contemporary European styles. 2145 W. Grand Ave.

Furniture, lighting and accessories ranging from traditional pieces

www.eurofurniture.com

800.243.1955 or

based on 19th century European designs to sophisticated, modern pieces crafted by contemporary designers. Endless upholstery options and

EVAN LEWIS

complimentary in-home design consultant services are available. Showroom

As a sculptor and furniture maker, Evan’s showroom sits next to his studio,

in Merchandise Mart.

825 W. Chicago Ave.

312.733.0353 or www.

where he and his team create one-of-a-kind work. His handmade studio

bakerfurniture.com

furniture is totally unique, and the use of burnished metals give his pieces

BOCONCEPT (CHICAGO)

evanlewisinc.com

a contemporary look.

3368 N. Elston Ave.

773.539.0402 or www.

This international design firm based in Denmark, produces modern design for urban-minded shoppers. They also offer customized, coordinated and

FLEXFORM

affordable options for furniture and home accessories. 1901 N Clybourn Ave

Flexform is one of the most exciting and progressive furniture

773.388.2900 or www.boconcept.us

manufacturers in Italy, with an international reputation for modern design with classic foundations. The furniture range includes armchairs, sofas,

CARSON PIRIE SCOTT FURNITURE GALLERY

tables, chairs and occasional pieces. 445 N. Franklyn St.

Carson Pirie Scott Furniture Gallery stores carry a vast array of home

or www.flexformusa.com

312.379.7900

furnishings, from furniture and bedding to a huge selection of home accessories from top luxury designers including Century, Natuzzi, and

FLORENSE

Martha Stewart. Multiple locations are found throughout the Chicago area

Committed to producing high-quality products with preservation of the

Six locations in Wilmette, Lombard, Schaumburg, Orland

environment and quality of life in mind. One of the largest furniture companies

and beyond.

Park, Vernon Hills and Naperville

or www.carsons.com

in the world, offering products for kitchens, baths, bedrooms, offices, dining rooms, home theatres and more. 300 W. Ontario St.

CASSONA Cosmopolitan, vibrant and serene, this unique store carries a huge selection

112 MARKETPLACE

www.florense.com

312.640.0066 or

Interior Lifestyle Consultation Overall design concepts Excellent Fabrication

Gracie Valentine GRACIEVALENTINEDESIGNS

Interior Lifestyle Artist Firm Where we believe that the possibilities are endless And we help you create endless possibilities for your lifestyle

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Carpet was just the beginning...

CARPET · AREA RUGS · TILE · COUNTERTOPS · HARDWOOD · WINDOW TREATMENTS · CABINETRY · GREEN PRODUCTS

With over 30,000 square feet of showroom between two Chicagoland locations, Lewis Floor & Home is the ideal destination for homeowners, custom home builders, architects, design professionals and commercial businesses. Stop by our Northbrook showroom to view our custom and semi-custom cabinetry now on display in our kitchen and bath gallery and experience the Lewis difference.

Bring in this ad by February 28 to receive 10% off all products. Excludes labor. Not applicable to prior orders. May not be combined with other offers or discounts.

www.lewisfloorandhome.com · 1840 Skokie Boulevard, Northbrook, IL 60062 847.835.2400 · 1455 W. Fullerton, Chicago, IL 60614 773.935.9599

GALLERIA CONCORD

MACY’S

They showcase solid wood furniture handcrafted by skilled artisans around

A 150-year-old American shopping institution, Macy’s has pioneered many of

the globe and kiln-dried to ensure longevity. This process highlights the

the industry’s firsts. Offering a broad selection of items for the bed, bath and

natural distresses in the wood, making no two pieces alike. Also featured are

kitchen, tabletop accessories, home décor, furniture and more. 111 N. State

lighting, Persian carpets, floral and decorative accessories. 1348 W. Concord

St. 312.781.1000 or www.macys.com

Pl. 773.489.9200 or www.galleriaconcord.com

MAXINE SNIDER INC. GEORGE SMITH

Designer Maxine Snider blends elegant, refined style with a modern

George Smith is the manufacturer and purveyor of handmade furniture,

sensibility to produce her eponymous furniture line. Her growing collection

featuring seating and fabrics of the highest quality in both design and

includes beds, seating, storage, and tables, and custom work is available.

craftsmanship. Multiple locations across the country, but Chicago location is

Showroom at Merchandise Mart. 116 W. Illinois St., Ste. 7E

open to trade only. 222 Merchandise Mart Plz., Ste. 1879A 312.464.0242 or

www.maxinesniderinc.com

312.527.4170 or

www.georgesmith.com

MIG AND TIG HAUTE LIVING

Broad selection of made-to-order furniture with a showroom that feels

Owners Jeffery Smith and Tatjana Ozegovic have created a place to display

more like an eclectic boutique. Choose from a seemingly endless variety

the exquisite furniture they find from around the world not readily available

of fabrics to match the extensive selection of sofas and dining, sleeping

in the United States. They’re also the exclusive Chicago retailer for Fendi

and living furniture and décor. 540 N. Wells St.

Casa, Vladimir Kagan, and Piet Boon. 222 W. Kinzie St.

migandtig.com

312.329.9000 or

312.644.8277 or www.

www.haute-living.com

MOBILI MÖBEL HOLLY HUNT

Only the finest contemporary furniture and home accessories - from 40

With showrooms across the United States, design entrepreneur Holly Hunt

different lines around the globe - are presented here. With a focus on the

produces a large collection of furniture, textiles, rugs, lighting and outdoor

European modernist school, expect to find sleek pieces that combine beauty

furniture. The company designs, manufactures and distributes classic,

with function. 549 N. Wells St. 312.329.9669 or www.mobilimobel.com

modern and transitional furnishings.

222 Merchandise Mart Plz., Ste.

1728/1844 312.661.1900 or www.hollyhunt.com

MODLIFE INC

HOME ELEMENT

space and offers double the inventory. Modlife features 20th century

With a mix of contemporary chairs, tables, bedroom suites and accessories,

modern home furnishings, including furniture, art, lighting and pottery/

Home Element features pieces from Natuzzi, Calligaris, Jesse, Bontempi

glass. An eclectic selection of Danish Modern, Mid-Century and Hollywood

This recently relocated showroom is now twice the size of its previous

and more. Also featuring custom floral arrangements, wall art and vases to

Regency styles are also available. 3061 N Lincoln Ave

complement antique and contemporary furniture. 600 N. Michigan Ave.,

or www.modlifehome.com

(773) 868-0844

3rd Fl. 312.787.3358 or www.homeelementfurniture.com

NIEDERMAIER I.D.

With contributing designers such as Nate Berkus, Vicente Wolf and Mark

I.D. features modern furnishings in fine European and American designs. The

Demsky, Neidermaier has evolved into a design powerhouse. Offering the

spare gallery showcases original glass, lighting, crockery, wall coverings, and

utmost professional service to clients, who choose from a stellar collection

furniture in addition to offering a selection of designer eyewear and personal

of fine art and modern furniture. 222 Merchandise Mart Plz., Ste. 1742-43

accessories. 3337 N. Halsted St. 773.755.4343 or www.idchicago.com

312.467.7008 or www.niedermaier.com

K-HAUS

ORANGESKIN

Owner Kiki Luthringshausen and her team offer beautiful interior design

This cutting-edge showroom is a design junkie’s dream. Choose from modern

services, as well as a unique retail store. Featuring custom-made furniture,

furniture and accessories by international design luminaries—count Jasper

original artwork by up-and-coming artists and eclectic, hard-to-find home

Morrison, Karim Rashid, Paola Navone and Marc Newson among them—as

acccessories. 255B Parkway Dr. 847.279.1800 or www.k-haus.com

well as the brightest local talent. Design services available. 223 W. Erie St.,

Ste. 1N 312.335.1033 or www.orangeskin.com

LIGNE ROSET Headquartered in France, Ligne Roset is an historic family-run business

PAULINE GRACE

offering state-of-the-art contemporary furniture by designers such as Didier

Pauline Grace is a high-end contemporary furniture showroom representing

Gomez, Peter Maly and Pascal Mourgue. Find modernist dining tables,

manufacturers from around the world. Featuring a wide selection of

440 N. Wells St.

upholstery, seating, dining and bedroom case goods, wall systems, lighting

armchairs, sofa tables, cabinetry, lighting and textiles.

312.222.9300 or www.lignerosetchicago.com

and accessories with just the right balance of drama and restraint. 1414 N.

Kingsbury St. 312.280.9880 or www.pauline-grace.com

LUMINAIRE Specializing in modern furniture and accessories from the world’s most

PORTERS OF RACINE

renowned designers, Luminaire’s philosophy is to maintain a devout focus on

With 150 years in business, this veteran store keeps loyal customers driving from

design and quality. Many of the lines offered are exclusive. 301 W. Superior

all over to visit their massive shopping destination in Wisconsin, featuring 8,000

St. 312.664.9582 or www.luminaire.com

square feet of distinctive and sometimes hard-to-find furniture from over 20 manufacturers. 301 6th St. 262.633.6363 or www.portersofracine.com

114 MARKETPLACE

Three Decades of RE-IMAGINING We believe unexpected pairings of individuals and ideas yields magic. We are excited to introduce our new retail experience, At Home in the City. Betwen our exclusive product offerings and interior design services, we have re-imagined how living in the city should be: refi ned, luxurious, chic and sexy. Interior design with a point of view; the way you have expected it from us for over thirty years.

Retail Store Now Open Experience Indulgences for Urban Living Wedding registry available

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PRIMITIVE ART WORKS This 31,000-square-foot, four-story Fulton River gallery showcases nonWestern artifacts, sculpture, furniture, textiles, tapestries and jewelry. Owner Glen Joffe and his staff travel to exotic locations around the world and collect rare objects to bring back to their customers. 130 N. Jefferson St.

312.575.9600 or www.beprimitive.com

RAUL CARRASCO Raul Carrasco’s signature line of contemporary classic pieces is characterized by its luxe materials. Look for beds, tables and bookcases in solid oak, end tables made of petrified wood and a host of accessories from Italy, Africa, France and more. 116 W. Hubbard St.

312.527.1900 or

www.raulcarrasco.com

ROCHE-BOBOIS Roche-Bobois envisions and creates furniture that expresses a certain way of celebrating interior design. Designs are luxurious yet comfortable, modern yet timeless—a pared-down elegance tastefully carried out with each and every piece. 222 W. Hubbard St.

312.644.9080 or www.roche-bobois.

com

ROMANN CUSTOM UPHOLSTERY & DESIGN With over 40 years in the business, Romann Custom Upholstery is family-owned and -operated, offering custom-made contemporary and traditional furniture to its clients. The company also redesigns and reupholsters existing pieces. 4217 N. Milwaukee Ave.

773.777.1745 or

www.romann-custom.com

ROOM & BOARD Room & Board offers unique, well-designed furniture from artisans who

where artistry and integrity still matter...

share their passion for creating comfortable, modern designs. The downtown Chicago store boasts three stories of living environments with windows and balconies overlooking the city. 55 E. Ohio St.

ILT Vignocchi isn’t merely products and services, customers and employees. To those of us that proudly call ILT home, it’s so much more. It’s the constant quest for melding artistry into everything we do, it’s an unwavering commitment to integrity and quality, it’s truly caring about each other and our customers, and lastly and most importantly… it’s that certain magical atmosphere Àrst created in 1969 by Harry Vignocchi, my dad. My dad’s father Corrado, a master mason, and his grandfather John, an estate gardener, were Italian immigrants. Nono and Papa John, as I called them, were highly regarded as craftsman. My Nono was the most elegant man I’ve ever met; strong and conÀdent, a meticulous stone mason, a protector of his family and a leader in his community. Pa on the other hand was soft and subtle, a thoughtful spirit, humble always with concern for other’s well being. Together they reÁect the characteristics of great mason and patient gardener, and begin to explain who my father is and what ILT has become – a melting pot of technical skill, strong character and heart. Over the years we have never wavered, it is in our blood.

312.222.0970 or www.

roomandboard.com

VOGUE INTERIORS An eccentric collection of avant garde European furniture design for living rooms, bedrooms, dining and bars, as well as accessories and entertainment centers. Ergonomic designs, bold colors, innovative design and modern comfort come together to striking effect. 201 E. Kensington

Rd. 847.259.3300 or www.voguefurniture.com

WESTWATER PATTERSON Westwater Patterson, located inside the Merchandise Mart, offers a highend selection of furniture for designers with a realm of tastes. Choose from Cache’s antique reproductions or try classic, collectible furniture by Ironies.

222 Merchandise Mart Plz., Ste. 1806

312.644.8890 or www.

westwaterpatterson.com

ZELLA BROWN This eclectic, modern boutique is filled to the brim with funky home accessories and customizable furniture, lighting and rugs. The walls provide inspiration with an ever-changing selection of paintings, mirrors and wallpaper. 1444 N.

Milwaukee Ave. 773.276.1746 or www.zellabrown.com

KITCHEN & BATH ACCENTO ITALIA For over 20 years, Accento Italia has offered Italian kitchens, custom designed

847.487.5200

iltvignocchi.com

info@iltvignocchi.com

116 MARKETPLACE

closet systems, furniture, European-style bathroom vanities, sinks and accent pieces. Pieces are imported directly from Italy. Construction services and complimentary custom kitchen design also available. 3812 N. Elston Ave.

773.279.0050 or www.accentoitalia.com

ADVANTAGE KITCHEN & BATH GALLERY As a premier source for luxury plumbing for the bath and kitchen, decorative hardware and fine kitchen furniture, Advantage Kitchen and Bath boasts a 15,000-square-foot showroom where you can find a unique selection of innovative products from world-renowned designers. 7850 N. Milwaukee

Ave. 888.598.0130 or www.advantagebath.com

ALNO | CHICAGO ALNO kitchens are unmistakable in architecture, function and design. Fusing fashion, function and technology, these luxury designs uplift culinary and home rituals to an extraordinary level. Alno Chicago works with you to create your kitchen to your specifications. 120 W. Hubbard St.

312.595.9500 or

www.alnochicago.com

ANN SACKS TILE & STONE Ann Sacks offers a myriad assortment of all different types of tile, stone and mosaics, allowing customers the opportunity to let their imaginations run wild. Projects are enhanced by Ann Sacksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; fine selection of plumbing and lighting. 222 Merchandise Mart Plz., Ste. 100B

312.923.0919 or www.

annsacks.com

AQUAE SULIS Named after the city where the first natural hot spring occurred, Aquae Sulis has a wide selection of sinks, faucets and fixtures by designers such as Kohler, Basco and Delta. Additional showrooms in Aurora and Glen Ellyn.

2211 N. Elston Ave. 773.772.7272 or www.aquaesulisshowroom.com

CHRISTOPHER PEACOCK CABINETRY Renowned cabinet designer Christopher Peacock offers custom cabinetry in his Merchandise Mart showroom. His high-end pieces are designed and made in the United States, and grace some of the finest homes in the country. 222 Merchandise Mart Plz., Ste. 148

312.321.9500 or www.

peacockcabinetry.com

CULINABLU For over 70 years, this European kitchen company has combined German engineering with contemporary design. Products are built for durability and efficiency, and include cabinetry, worktops, lighting and accessories. 1521 N.

Sedgwick St. 312.867.7040 or www.culinablu.com

DE GIULIO KITCHEN DESIGN Owner Mick de Giulio has gathered an impressive group of architects, interior designers, artisans and craftsmen to create stunning kitchens. Specializing exclusively in kitchen interior architecture, de Giulio has spent nearly 25 years personalizing kitchens for his clients. 222 Merchandise Mart Plz., Ste.

121 312.494.9200 or www.degiulio.org

ERNESTOMEDA CHICAGO Dramatic lighting, free-standing pieces and frosted glass are some of the features Ernestomeda brings to modern kitchen design. Gorgeous woods combined with stainless steel and aluminum create stunning, efficient kitchensâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;both modern and inviting. 222 Merchandise Mart Plz., Ste. 128

312.329.0229 or www.ernestomedachicago.com

225 west ohio street, chicago, illinois 60654 312.467.9590 www.tilegallerychicago.com MARKETPLACE 117

HAUTE LIVING Binova Kitchens at Haute Living has a rich and diversified catalog that repeatedly earns them Italy’s Compasso d’Oro design award for kitchen systems in timeless designs; a perfect fit for Chicago’s residential market. Binova is exclusively available in the United States through Haute Living. 222

W. Kinzie Street 312.329.9000

1 HYDROLOGY Located in Chicago’s design district, Hydrology is the source for designdriven bath and kitchen products. Interior designers, architects, developers, builders and their clients will find a unique destination for the latest selections from the world’s leading design talents. 435 N. LaSalle St. 312.832.9000 or

www.hydrologychicago.com

C2 Paint Yolo Colorhouse

INSIGNIA KITCHEN & BATH DESIGN GROUP Expert renovation and design of kitchens and bathrooms.

Their huge

showroom offers customers the chance to see all design details in one place. In addition to kitchens and bathrooms, they also create gorgeous designs

COLORI PAINT BOUTIQUE

for every room in the home. 1435 S. Barrington Rd. 847.381.7950 or www.

insigniakitchenandbath.com

KOHLER Featuring a comprehensive mix of kitchen and bath merchandise. The store

CHICAGO’S SOURCE FOR ECO-FRIENDLY PAINT &

COLOR CONSULTING SERVICES

features a broad range of styles, colors and faucet finishes. Kohler’s interactive products are completely functional so customers can see the products at work in the store. 222 Merchandise Mart Plz., Ste. 100

312.755.2510 or

www.kohler.com

LEFROY BROOKS Manufactured in England, gorgeous pieces include fixtures for the kitchen and bathroom, showers, bathtubs, toilets, bidets, towel warmers, lighting and more. Products are classic and refined, yet maintain an air of contemporary

COLORI PAINT BOUTIQUE 2243 W. NORTH AVE. CHICAGO, IL 60647 773-252-4923

design.

222 Merchandise Mart Plz., Ste. 149

646.345.8294 or www.

lefroybrooks.com

THE NANZ COMPANY Experts at developing and producing hardware from scratch, The Nanz Company assists clients with selection and specification on custom and

WWW.COLORICHICAGO.COM

readymade hardware, as well as scheduling and coordination of hardware installation on high-end residential projects. 222 Merchandise Mart Plz., Ste.

103 312.527.1300 or www.nanz.com

NEFF KITCHENS NEFF Kitchens offers superior kitchen design and manufacturing with painstaking care. Featuring extraordinary culinary environments with distinctive style, substance and innovation. Stunning contemporary and traditional collections available.

222 Merchandise Mart Plz., Ste. 144

312.467.9585 or www.neffkitchens.com

POGGENPOHL Germany’s oldest furniture brand has always been known as a trendsetter for innovative kitchen design. Spectacular and daring design and the unmistakable form of the company’s own lines have repeatedly won the attention and appreciation of a broad international audience. 222 Merchandise Mart Pl.,

Ste. 138 312.755.9023 or www.poggenpohl.com

POLIFORM Poliform embodies the best of Italian design, with luxury finishes and uncompromising quality. Varenna, the kitchen division of Poliform, is highly sophisticated, with elegant designs that feature timber, stone, glass

118 MARKETPLACE

timeless artistry in and steel. 222 Merchandise Mart Plz., Ste. 110

312.222.8465 or www.

poliformusa.com

lighting

SNAIDERO CHICAGO Snaidero offers luxury Italian cabinetry for kitchens and baths. The company brings European modernism to its showroom through sleek cabinetry. Snaidero offers a wide variety of colors and finishes in contemporary and traditional styling, which provides clients with customizable options. 222

Merchandise Mart Plz., Ste. 140 312.644.6662 or www.snaidero-usa.com

STONE SYSTEMS OF CHICAGO One of 17 fabrication shops in the network, Stone Systems brings a collaboration of companies’ thoughts and innovations to produce the best products and design concepts for kitchen countertops, baths and more, maintaining high standards and product quality. 675 Tower Rd. 847.566.2277

or www.stone-systems.com

STUDIO 41 Studio 41 Home Design Showroom specializes in kitchens, baths, windows, doors and appliances. Find kitchen cabinets, plumbing fixtures, bath accessories, decorative hardware, windows, doors and appliances from one of their five Chicago-area showrooms. 2500 N. Pulaski Rd.

773.235.2500

or www.studiofortyone.com

VALCUCINE With an ergonomic philosophy rooted in respect for man and nature in combination with a design that surpasses current trends, Valcucine offers kitchens that exceed modern expectations. Designs are green friendly and artistically innovative. 222 Merchandise Mart Plz., Ste. 106 312.755.0356 or

www.valcucinechicago.com

VESTA Kitchen and bathroom cabinetry with an emphasis on clean, contemporary design is Vesta’s specialty. The German-based Leicht and America’s own Brentwood, are featured brands. Recently they’ve begun selling EcoSmart fireplaces and sleek Fuego Grills. 1357 W. Concord Pl.

773.252.7300 or

www.vestachicago.com

THE WESTYE GROUP-MIDWEST The Westye Group-Midwest, LLC, is the exclusive distributor of Sub-Zero, Wolf and Best by Broan products for Illinois. User friendly and technologically advanced, all appliances are built for ultimate customer satisfaction. 196

Exchange Blvd. 630.872.5100 or www.thewestyegroup.com

Antiques Exclusive Reproductions Vintage

OTHER/MISC

Vast Showroom

ABT ELECTRONICS & APPLIANCES Abt Electronics has withstood the test of time—and intense competition

Complimentary Parking

from large chain stores—by providing personal service, competitive prices and award-winning installations and repairs. Since 1936 it’s been a leading retailer of quality consumer electronics and appliances. 1200 N. Milwaukee

Ave. 847.967.8830 or www.abt.com

THE BIG PICTURE This home theater store offers a careful selection of handpicked equipment, in a broad range of prices. Sony, Pioneer and Denon are among the many

NEW METAL C R A F T S

top electronics brands you’ll find. 1211 Wilmette Ave 847-256-1882 or www.

thebigpicturestore.com

812 N Wells, Chicago 312 787 6991 www.newmetalcrafts.com MARKETPLACE 119

COLORI CHICAGO Owned by Michelle Quaranta, this Wicker Park paint & design boutique offers in-home & in-store color consultations as well as custom color creations. C2 Premium and other environmentally friendly paint lines are also available.

2243 W. North Ave., Ste. 101 773.252.4923 or www.colorichicago.com

D. POLLACK GLASS & MIRROR With product selection from around the world and unprecedented knowledge, owner Donna Pollack and her attentive staff offer custom shower doors, mirrors, screens, decorative glass and more. Family owned shop with over 90 combined years of glass expertise. 124 N. Cass Ave.

630.969.7177 or

www.dpollackglass.com

DIMEND SCAASI Using only the finest stones, this high-end jewelry retailer offers pieces crafted by international artisans as well as their own luxe line of custom designs. Every setting is made from scratch to fit individual customers’ specifications. Online, real-time consultations available. 5 S. Wabash Ave.,

17th Fl. 888.502.1700 or www.dimendscaasi.com

BATHROOMS KITCHENS DOOR HARDWARE

FABER-CASTELL Since 1761, Faber-Castell has produced extraordinary writing instruments. The Graf von Faber-Castell collection fuses modern technology with classic design, offering pens, pencils, leather goods and desk accessories. Chicago retailers include Greer Fine Paper & Design, Paradise Pen and Razny Jewelers.

9450 Allen Dr. 800.311.8684 or www.graf-von-faber-castell.com

HÄFELE A popular destination for architects, interior and kitchen designers and the woodworking industry. Hafele evolved from a local hardware business to an international company that features furniture fittings, architectural hardware, electronic locking systems and technical hardware.

154 W. Hubbard St.

312.467.2225 or www.hafele.com

KATONAH ARCHITECTURAL HARDWARE Katonah Architectural Hardware offers their exclusive, private line of hardware. Choose from an extensive selection of contemporary or period hardware, while sales representatives assist with everything from selection to installation. Appointments recommended. 222 Merchandise Mart Plz.,

Ste. 149-13 312.670.1313 or www.katonahhardware.com

LEE LUMBER Whether you are looking for custom cabinetry, a certified installer or an architect, Lee Lumber can help. Founded in 1952, it has grown to become the largest lumberyard in Chicago. Second location on the Southside. 2310

N. Lincoln Ave. 773.509.6700 or www.leelumber.com

METRONET SAFE & SOUND

Mon & Thurs: 8am-8pm Tues, Wed & Fri: 8am-5pm Sat: 9am-4pm

Metronet integrates sophisticated electronics into businesses and homes making technology available with user-friendly control. Services include home entertainment systems, remote controls, camera surveillance, security systems, phones, intercoms, window controls, heating and A/C and more. 67

E. Madison St., Ste. 265 312.781.0045 or www.safesound.com

PEERLESS IMPORTED RUGS For 70 years, three generations of the same family have offered decorative

7 8 5 0 N O R T H MILWAUKEE AVENUE N I L E S ILLINOIS

area and traditional Oriental rugs from top national brands. Special needs,

847•965•4444

such as trimming, binding and fringing, can be accommodated in Peerless Rugs’ own workroom.

3033 N. Lincoln Ave.

peerlessrugs.com

advantagebath.com 120 MARKETPLACE

773.525.0296 or www.

WIRED ON BANK LANE Wired on the Bank is a home theater solutions company, offering a multitude of services. Equipment upgrades, sound iWired On Bank Lane is a custom electronics retailer that focuses on true satisfaction and high-end customer service. They offer video, audio and home theater solutions throughout the North Shore and Chicago, using superior products. In-home consultations are also available. 645 N. Bank Lane 847-234-9150

LANDSCAPE AND OUTDOOR CITY ESCAPE GARDEN & DESIGN City Escape offers a comprehensive range of design and build landscape services, creating unique and inviting spaces. A newly opened 16,000 sq. ft. garden and design center is a feast of botanical delights and gorgeous garden accessories. 3022 W. Lake St. 773.638.2000 or www.

cityescape.biz

COUNTYWIDE LANDSCAPING Loyal clientele look to Brian Larsen and his expert team to provide specialized landscape design services. Providing exceptional entrances, driveways, barbeques, water features, putting greens, retaining walls and outdoor accent lighting. 42W891 Beith Rd.

630.365.3412 or www.

countywidelandscaping.com

HEFFERNAN LANDSCAPE DESIGN Recognized for strong, clean geometric lines, Heffernan is a design/build firm. From project inception to installation, their crew creates landscapes in diverse styles that are all marked by beautiful stonework, water features and lush, unusual plantings. 3741 W. Agatite Ave.

773.539.1946 or www.

heffernanlandscapedesign.com

HEYNSSENS+GRASSMAN

Luxurious custom made Àreplace surrounds, backsplashes, walls & more... for residential and commercial spaces Tel:312.421.0624 www.uniquedclay.com

The husband and wife team behind Heynssens+Grasssman has over 20 years of experience in landscape design and construction, creating everything from stunning gardens to custom swimming pools. Bestowed with numerous awards, the firm prides itself on its budget-conscious approach. 580 Old

unique d’ clay

Skokie Rd. 847.360.0440 or www.hglandscape.com

ILT VIGNOCCHI ILT Vignocchi’s landscape architecture and construction artistically transform any commercial or residential property into a graceful and uplifting environment. Inspired by three generations of highly regarded craftsmen, the tradition continues to flourish with their unwavering commitment to integrity, quality and heart. 25865 W. Ivanhoe Rd.

847.487.5200 or www.

iltvignocchi.com

JARDIN DE VILLE Offering a collection of garden furniture and accessories that are artfully crafted and made from the finest materials: aluminum, teak, synthetic wicker, iron and steel. Season after season, customers enjoy outdoor living with their garden pavilions and furnishings. Trade only. 222 Merchandise Mart Plz.,

Ste. 1553 312.755.1414 or www.jardindeville.com

STONE,TILE, GRANITE BIRGER JUELL Birger Juell installs and maintains hand-finished antique reproduction and contemporary floors for both residential and commercial interiors.

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luxurious green Chicago

INTRODUCING

JAUNE

DE

CHROME Specializing in floor designs that draw on centuries-old traditions of European craftsmen, each floor surface is created by hand to the client’s specifications.

222 Merchandise Mart Plz., Ste. 131 312.464.9663 or www.birgerjuell.com

FINE LINE TILE This tile gallery boasts an impressive selection of over 40 different tile and mosaic manufacturers. From seashells to stone, they offer classic and contemporary tiles using traditional and alternative materials. Also featuring accessories for the kitchen and bath. 209 W. Illinois St.

312.670.0300 or

www.finelinetile.com

GRANITE & MARBLE RESOURCES Granite & Marble Resources has been a direct importer of discount luxury kitchen and bath building products for over 30 years. Offering imaginative stone and glass mosaics, as well as a wide range of marble, granite, limestone, travertine and more. 222 Merchandise Mart Plz., Ste. 115

312.670.4400 or

www.maestromosaics.com

LEWIS FLOOR & HOME

2112 CENTRAL STREET EVANSTON, ILLINOIS 60201 847.492.9664

Founded in 1954, this family-owned startup has a stellar reputation serving homeowners, commercial clients and builders with their selection of carpet, laminates, stone, tile and more. Offering customers the finest quality floor coverings at the lowest prices. 1455 W. Fullerton Ave.

HOURS MON-FRI 10 AM - 6 PM SAT 10 AM - 5 PM SUN NOON - 5 PM

WWW.TB L MANNERS.COM

773.935.9599 or

www.lewisfloorandhome.com

MATERIALS MARKETING Materials Marketing is a manufacturer of Dimensional Stone and Architectural Stone—from flooring and moldings to hand-carved fireplaces, kitchen hoods, columns and exterior elements. Choose from limestone, travertine, marbles and finishes. Two additional showrooms in Vernon Hills and Hinsdale. 1234

W. Fulton Market 312.226.0222 or www.mstoneandtile.com

FINE F URNITURE UPHOLSTERY BY KIKI LU THRINGSHAUSEN INTERIOR DESIGN & RETAIL STORE

MONA LISA STONE & TILE, INC. Mona Lisa Stone and Tile is well known by architects, interior designers,

ORIGINAL ARTWORK

builders, contractors and residents alike for having the ability to fulfill every

HOME DÉCOR

need. Offering unique array of stone and decorative tiles, marble, granite, travertine, mosaics, slate and glass. 119 E. Main St.

847.920.1620 or www.

monalisastone.com

MOSAICOS TILE Mosaicos Tile offers custom mosaics, glass tile, Talavera, natural stones, handpainted tiles and other exclusive products. Superb sales associates pay close attention to each project, one at a time, resulting in outstanding customer service. 4948 N. Pulaski Rd. 773.777.8453 or www.mosaicostile.com

PARIS CERAMICS The London-based stone, tile and mosaics company offers an extensive array of ceramic, stone and terra cotta tiles out of its Chicago showroom. The international firm specializes in antique limestone and terra cotta floors reclaimed from castles, châteaux and farmhouses. 222 Merchandise Mart

Plz., Ste. 146 312.467.9830 or www.parisceramics.com

TILE GALLERY The Tile Gallery carries a wide selection of artisan-made tiles, including glass and metal along with exquisite stone mosaics. A broad collection of lighting and fireplaces can also be found. 225 W. Ohio

312.467.9590 or www.

tilegallerychicago.com

UNIQUE D’ CLAY Handmade tiles for fireplace surrounds, backsplashes, walls, hallways,

O N LI N E S T O R E AT

W W W. K  H A U S . C O M

255B Parkway Drive Lincolnshire, Il 60069 847.279.1800

122 MARKETPLACE

centerpieces and more. The partnership of ceramic clays and a wide variety of styles, textures and colors brings out an exquisite result in an extensive collection of simple and elegant designs. 1018 N. Wolcott

312.421.0624 or

www.uniquedclay.com

ART 360SEE Fine art, functional art, furniture and design objects pay equal attention to form, high-design and environmentally sustainable practices at this bi-level Bucktown gallery. 360SEE exhibits contemporary artists and designers, with exclusive representation to Chicago and the nation. 1924 N. Damen Ave.

773.698.6340 or www.360seegallery.com

ALAN KOPPEL GALLERY This River North gallery features an array of international contemporary and modern artists with work from major movements in 20th century American and European art. French and Italian modernist furniture fills the space with character and history. 210 W. Chicago Ave.

312.640.0730 or www.

alankoppel.com

COLLETTI GALLERY Offering one of the world’s finest collections of antique posters and decorative arts, as well as furnishings and artwork from the late 19th to early 20th century. Belle Époque, Art Nouveau, Art Deco and Modern periods are represented. 67 E. Oak St. 312.664.6767 or www.collettigallery.com

FRANCINE TURK She may be famous for her charcoal nude series that was prominently featured in the blockbuster film The Break-Up, but local artist Francine Turk shows off an even larger and equally impressive collection at her inviting South Loop Gallery. 18 E. Cullerton St.

312.674.1818 or www.

francineturk.com

G. R. N’NAMDI GALLERY Father-and-son team George and Jumaane N’Namdi display a large collection of contemporary, abstract art in their West Loop gallery. The gallery itself is designed to increase awareness of abstract art and inspire a new generation of collectors. 110 N. Peoria St.

312.563.9240 or www.

grnnamdigallery.com

LINDA WARREN GALLERY All categories of art have a place side-by-side at Linda Warren Fine Art Gallery.

Conceptual, avant-garde, traditional, primitive, outsider, insider,

schooled and commercial, as well as street art is housed in this modern, beautifully balanced gallery space. 1052 W. Fulton Market 312.432.9500 or

www.lindawarrengallery.com

PACKER SCHOPF GALLERY Packer Schopf Gallery shows contemporary art ranging from photography to comics. The gallery is well known for folk and outsider art. Artworks include Dee Clemente’s autobiographical stories embroidered on hankies and Robert Hovarth’s lacquered paintings of sexy youth. 942 W. Lake St.

312.226.8984 or www.packergallery.com

PRACTICAL ANGLE A huge variety of custom framing options, from mounting and matting to custom corner frames. Choose from over 2,000 different molding choices available in metal, hardwood and designer. Also specializing in framing

MARKETPLACE 123

Distributor of Pratt & Larson, Ken Mason, Dirk Elliot, Oceanside, Mandala, Rocky Mountain, Lunada Bay, McIntyre, Artistic Tile, Saltillo, Mosaics, Leather Tiles, Spanish Tiles, and many, many more... 4948 N. PULASKI CHICAGO, IL. 60630 (773) 777-TILE (8453) WWW.MOSAICOSTILE.COM

mirrors, artwork and shadowboxes. 161 E. Erie St.

312.280.8118 or www.

practicalangle.com

FABRIC, LINEN, BEDDING MUSE GROUP An elegant selection of made-to-order luxury linens for the bed, bath and table, including 1010-thread-count sateen sheets and Italian cashmere throws. A combination of natural fibers, modern design sensibilities and centuriesold craftsmanship create the couture comforts Muse is known for. 300 W.

Hubbard St., Ste. 301 312.595.9604 or www.musegroup.com

GIFTS AND ACCESSORIES BLOOMINGDALE’S HOME STORE This Chicago department store is as much a sight-seeing destination as a home furnishings and accessories haven. The historical setting features everything to accessorize a home, from kitchen and bath products to bedding, china, flatware and furniture. 600 N. Wabash Ave. 312.324.7500

or www.bloomingdales.com

CROSELL & CO. Situated in a quaint cottage, this store features an impressive collection of tabletop items and gorgeous home accessories. An edited selection of options, including exclusive pillows and furniture from the Ankasa line, offer an elegant, eclectic mix of luxe gifts. 1922 N. Damen Ave. 773.252.9010 or

www.crosellandco.com

DESIGN SHOPPE Gifts and unique home accessories such as mirrors and maps used as wall coverings, are available at Design Shoppe. Reupholstery services and an

Unconventional Collage Show & Chris Crites Pay-To-Play paintings

interior design resource center are also available.

2009 N. Fremont St.

773.883.6004 or www.designshoppechicago.com

ELEMENTS Elements’ Jeannine and Toby personally select their own items during frequent buying excursions. The collection includes handcrafted jewelry,

opens 1.16.08

accessories, cashmere scarves, objets d’art and more. The unique items are

reception 6-9pm

often from limited collections, making their selection one of a kind. 741 N.

Wells St. 877.642.6574 or www.elementschicago.com

TABLE MANNERS Owner Holly Stein offers customers a fine selection of tabletop accessories, tablecloths, dinnerware, flatware, home décor and gifts to brighten up any room. A recently expanded website makes shopping at Table Manners even easier. 2112 Central St. 847.492.9664 or www.tblmanners.com

LIGHTING LIGHTOLOGY With over 30 years of lighting experience, owner Greg Kay offers the finest contemporary lighting available. Interior and exterior lighting available, as well as an expert staff to help customers enhance their homes. 215 W.

Chicago Ave. 312.944.1000 or www.lightology.com

NEW METAL CRAFTS For over 75 years, New Metal Crafts has designed, manufactured and

124 MARKETPLACE 1924 N Damen Chicago, Illinois 60647 www.360seegallery.com 773.698.6340

Simply. Fabulous. Design supplied decorative lighting fixtures. In addition to contemporary designs, expect to find an ample collection of vintage and antique fixtures. Custom and restoration services available. 812 N. Wells St.

312.787.6991 or www.

newmetalcrafts.com

REMAINS LIGHTING Offering beautifully restored antique lighting fixtures, as well as an original line of vintage-inspired fixtures. All work is performed under the watchful eye of founder David Calligeros in their New York factory, ensuring that customers receive meticulously crafted fixtures.

222

Merchandise Mart Plz., Ste. 103 312.527.1300 or www.remains.com

REAL ESTATE, BUILDERS & DEVELOPERS THE BRIXTON GROUP This residential real estate development company specializes in flowing, spacious designs and precision-oriented value, developing properties for home buyers. Their approach to outstanding homes artfully integrates classic architecture and interior design with quality craftsmanship and finishes and modern amenities. 106 N. Aberdeen St., Ste. 200

312.226.2424 or www.

thebrixtongroup.com

Michelle’s Interiors, Ltd.

THE CHICAGO SPIRE Shelbourne Development is a global real estate developer and investor with

www.michellesinteriors.com 847.223.2660

worldwide interests. The Chicago Spire promises to redefine the renowned Chicago skyline by 2010 and is considered to be the most significant residential development in the world. 455 N. Cityfront Plaza Dr., Ste. 18

312.516.4800 or www.thechicagospire.com MichellesInteriors_HBCH0109.indd 1

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ENVIRONS DEVELOPMENT Interesting architecture, skilled contruction and savvy development combine in Chicago’s most desirable neighborhoods since 1991. 3060 N. Lincoln Ave.

MAGELLAN DEVELOPMENT GROUP With a portfolio that spans the entire Chicago area and beyond, this accomplished real estate organization continues to develop award-winning properties. Their latest project to grace Chicago is the $4 billion, mixed-use Lakeshore East community. 303 E. Wacker Dr., Ste. 2750 312.642.8869 or

www.magellandevelopment.com

RANQUIST DEVELOPMENT The highly reputable Ranquist Development attracts sophisticated, designminded clients interested in inhabiting innovative, modernist architecture. “Going beyond the ordinary” is a key point reflected in their developments, which consistently tap into fresh ideas, new building materials and distinctive building methods. 2245 W. Huron St.

312.492.1400 or www.

ranquistdevelopment.com

TEN EAST DELAWARE Architect Lucien Lagrange’s Ten East Delaware offers a contemporary classic air that exudes effortless luxury. A combination of classical architecture and dazzling interiors are sure to make these residences the future envy of all their Gold Coast neighbors. 33 W. Delaware Pl.

312.397.1010 or www.

teneastdelaware.com

MARKETPLACE 125

FASH ION | HOM E DESIG N | DI N I NG | TRAVE L

773.665.8170 or www.environsdevelopment.com

S O C I E T Y | G O U R M E T | H E A LT H A N D F I T N E S S | C E L E B R I T Y

to produce luxurious homes. Environs has built over 100 exceptional homes

M ODE R N L U X U R Y

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THE BRIGHT STUFF! The Year’s Best Interiors Meet Chicago’s Men of Design Local Lighting Designers Turn It On!

OBAMA MANIA! THE BARACK BUZZ: 16 Windy City People, Places and Things That Will Rock DC! Obama Art: The Next Big Thing? What the World Really Thinks of Chicago Inauguration Special: 10 Washington Hotspots

+PLUS OUR HEALTH & BEAUTY BLOWOUT: THE HOTTEST NEW WORKOUTS, BEST NEW SPAS, TRENDIEST TREATMENTS AND TOP 10 PRODUCTS OF 2009!

PLUS: ECO-CHIC 2.0 • ROCKIN’ GLAM IN BUCKTOWN • THE FLUFF STUFF ADVENTURES IN KIDDIELAND DESIGN

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CHICAGO PROS PLAY DRESS UP

Ain’t Love Grand?

GET FIT AT THE CITY’S SHARPEST TAILORS DEBON-HEIR LUKE FLYNN’S GREAT ADVENTURE

DOWN TO EARTH: GODDESS DRESSES BIG AND SMALL GIMME SUGAR! COUTURE CAKES WELL GROOMED: CHICAGO’S CHICEST SPOTS FOR COUPLES’ SHOWERS

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+Plus THE ELYSIAN LANDS IN THE GOLD COAST!

Hot Nights in Old San Juan! Check In at the Hautest Hotel Penthouses

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Life Inside the Chicago Spire

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Art After Dark and Much, Much More! Published by

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L U X U RY L I F E ST Y L E I N A M E R I CA WWW.MODE R NLUXU RY.COM

TERRAPIN PROPERTIES Terrapin Properties is an active owner and developer of residential and commercial real estate. Their list includes Chicago residential and commercial real estate, condo and loft development, multi-family high-rise, mid-rise, town home and retail space construction.

217 N. Jefferson St., 5th Fl.

312.466.1500 or www.terrapingroup.com

VETRO President and Chief Architect Thomas Roszak blends modern designs and materials to create unique living spaces that merge aesthetics with functionality. This gorgeous condominium highrise offers exceptional common amenities including a fitness room, sunbathing area, spa centers, and more. Sales Center - 611 S. Wells, 16th Fl.

312.675.0601 or www.

vetrochicago.com

RUGS, CARPET, FLOOR COVERING ATELIER LAPCHI Lapchi holds a pre-eminent position among the world’s finest carpet makers, producing hand-woven custom carpets in the most responsible manner possible. This is Chicago’s exclusive source for Lapchi’s Textile Collection and Texere carpets. The Merchandise Mart, Ste. 6-160

312.321.0900 or

www.lapchi.com

KAREN RANQUIST 312.948.9700

WWW.RANQUISTDEVELOPMENT.COM

WINDOW TREATMENTS DRUMMER DRAPERY SERVICE With a reputation for creating exquisitely detailed window treatments, luxury bedding, and custom upholstery, Eric Drummer has upheld his family’s 36 year tradition of excellence. Typical turnaround is four weeks for drapery, upholstery, and slipcovers. All work done on premises. 1904 Greenwood St.

847.869.8459

REAL ESTATE BROKERS AND AGENTS $1,050,000 $930 assessment

See more details on our website goldcoastresidences.com

ANDREW LEWIS REALTORS Andrew Lewis is recognized as one of the top real estate brokers in the South Loop, particularly with residential properties valued $400k-plus. Andrew has received the Top Residential Producer for both sales exceeding 40 units and outstanding sales exceeding $30 million. 820 S. Michigan Ave.

773.908.9684

COLDWELL BANKER Service dedicated to the luxury home market serving 66 offices throughout

THE PINNACLE 21 E HURON, UNIT 1506 This world-famous designer’s own home features a custom redesign of the original northeast corner unit. Beautiful street and tree top connected views include the St. James Church. 2 br plus den / 2.5 ba / 1,885 sq feet

Chicagoland. For the experience, knowledge and exceptional results you desire, join real estate’s most discerning list of clients at Coldwell Banker. 2215 Sanders

Rd., Ste. 300 888.572.HOME or www.coldwellbankeronline.com

EMILY SACHS WONG An impressive sales record quickly made Emily Sachs Wong a member of Koenig & Strey’s President’s Club. Her sales have continued to skyrocket, offering clients unparalleled real estate options along the lakefront and in Lincoln Park, Bucktown and Wicker Park. 1940 N. Clark St. 312.475.4599 or

www.emilyknowschicago.com

T riciaFoxGroup

For more information, call or text Tricia Fox at 312-446-7373 or email at triciafox@gcchicago.com. Search the full mls and private listings for pre-release luxury offerings at goldcoastresidences.com!

Originators of the luxury home tours by Limo Sundays 12:00-4:00

LIFESTYLE LIVING This recently launched real estate firm is the product of owner Reesa

126 MARKETPLACE

Gorenstein’s real estate expertise. With a primary focus on residential properties, their portfolio includes commericial spaces and rentals. 670 N.

Clark St. 312.972.7895 or www.lifestylelivingproperties.com

ROBERT JOHN ANDERSON Robert John Anderson has 18+ years of experience in Chicago real estate, earning annual honors in the top 1% of Chicago Realtors. Robert maintains his elite status with his unparalleled business savvy, market knowledge & magnetic personality.

1936 W. Division St., 2nd Fl. 312.980.1580 or www.robertjohnanderson.com

SUDLER SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY Since 1927, Sudler Sotheby’s has been recognized for its expertise, integrity and quality in residential brokerage and property management. Their motto “artfully uniting extraordinary properties with extraordinary lives,” distinguishes them as a highly qualified international realty firm. Five Chicagoland offices. 919 N. Michigan Ave., 3rd Fl.

312.751.1717 or www.

sudlersothebysrealty.com

SURMA MORTGAGE Surma Mortgage’s staff of qualified and seasoned personnel guarantees a fresh perspective and a high level of service. Dedication to their customers is their number one priority. 343 W. Erie St., Ste. 410 312.202.0300 or www.

surmamortgage.com

TRICIA FOX GROUP Tricia Fox Group was recently named the #1 team in Keller Williams Nationwide. Specializing in selling luxury downtown residences and providing clients with the highest level of customer service and niche advertising coverage. 676 N.

INTERIORS — RJA DESIGN 116 W ILLINOIS ST SUITE 3-E CHICAGO IL 60654 WWW.RJA-DESIGN.COM 312.822.9474

Michigan Ave., Ste. 3010 312.446.7373 or www.goldcoastresidences.com

CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS CHICAGO AIA Chicago is the second largest chapter in the country, representing the professional interests of architects and allied members who adhere to a code

D.Pollack Glass & Mirror

Three Generations of Quality Service. Beveling our specialty.

of ethics and professional conduct that assures the client of dedication to the highest standards in professional practice. 35 E. Wacker Dr., Ste. 250

312.670.7770 or www.aiachicago.org

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF INTERIOR DESIGNERS

W

e provide an exceptional quality product, up to date in design and technology. Our reputation for quality is based on our custom installation. We attend to details from the beginning to end of each project and educate our client on the differences within our product lines.

A community of people driven by a common love for design and belief that

• Kitchen back splashes-mirrored

interior design is a powerful, multi-faceted profession that can positively

or painted glass.

change lives. Through education, advocacy, community building and

• Custom mirrored walls, ceilings,

outreach, the Society strives to advance the interior design profession. 222

bars, vanity and tub areas.

Merchandise Mart Plz., Ste. 1647 312.467.5080 or www.asidillinois.com

• Beveling our speciality THE ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF ART - CHICAGO/SCHAUMBURG

• Custom mirror doors

Offering creative education in fashion, interior design and the culinary, media

• Table tops 1/4”-3/4” custom

and visual arts. Two campuses in downtown Chicago afford students the

edge work

opportunity to immerse themselves in the city, while a campus in Schaumberg offers a suburban experience. 350 N. Orleans St.

• Sand blasting

312.280.3500 or www.

artinstitutes.edu/chicago

• UltraGlas-molded signed glass

INTERNATIONAL INTERIOR DESIGN ASSOCIATION

• Shower doors: Heavy glass

with patterns & textures

A networking and educational association committed to enhancing quality of life through professional excellence. The Illinois IIDA chapter is a regional resource for knowledge sharing, advocacy, professional education and expansion of interior design markets. 222 Merchandise Mart Plaza, Ste. 13-

500 312.467.1950 or www.iida-ilchap.org

MARKETPLACE 127

OVER 200 FRAMED MIRRORS IN OUR SHOWROOM

Insulated Glass Replacement Double Sealed Unit 10 year Guarantee

doors-custom sizes featuring Ketcham, CR Laurence, & CHMI hinges. 10 Manufactured framed doors: Agalite, Alumax, Basco, Century, Coastal, Cesana, Kohler, Lexus, Maxx and Splendor.

124 North Cass Ave. Westmont, IL 60559 • 630.969.7177 • 630.969.9009 fax

INTERIOR MONOLOGUE BY LISA CREGAN PHOTOGRAPHY BY AARON COREY

LESS IS CORE: Deirdre Jordan in the Holly Hunt showroom, where her furniture is on display.

RESTRAINING ORDERED The “It” girl of far-flung sophistication—furniture designer Deirdre Jordan—brings her low-key glamour to the new Billy Dec restaurant, Sunda Design fi lters through the air of Deirdre Jordan’s office the way old roses perfume a garden—quietly, constantly, sensually. Jordan is designer and cofounder of Chicago-based Troscan Design + Furnishings, a nine-yearold fi rm (named after the Gaelic word for furniture) that’s on a major roll. Recent projects include everything from bespoke designs at Tiff any’s New York to a Shanghai Hyatt, where Jordan collab-ed with über-designer Tony Chi—a 20-foot-long mosaic-tiled reception desk that looks like tortoise shell, anyone?—to Sunda, Billy Dec’s white-hot, about-to-open, Tony Chi-designed restaurant, where Jordan created Shinto shrineinspired chairs. “The backrests are based on a Japanese Torii gate,” she says. But if you really want a peek into her mental cast of curios, look no

farther than her Fulton Street office, which is scattered with enamel boxes (made by her artist mother) showcasing delicate egg-tempera paintings by local artist Rebecca Shore. (“She’s my newest fascination,” says Jordan.) Equally fascinating are the mysterious and undulating sculptures that she’s lovingly tacked to a far wall. “That’s dried glue from our workshop,” laughs Jordan. “They remind me of the patterns you see flying over a delta; they’re so inspiring.” The glue was a gift from her husband and Troscan cofounder, Bob Robinson. “He knew I’d love the random shapes,” says Jordan. “I’m driven by design. It’s really an affl iction I can’t quite turn off.” Now Jordan’s launching a design-driven blog (there will be a link on Troscan’s site) “to get it all out of my system.” We can’t wait.

HOTS: Scandinavian modernist jewelry, Arabia of Finland porcelain, Mata Ortiz pueblo pottery, Japancakes, “shoegazer” music, Philip Glass Etudes, Shipping News albums, “understatement” as a statement, buying local, Laws of Simplicity by John Maeda, Designing Design by Kenya Hara NOTS: Skulls, Uggs—especially pastel!, cell phone bling, conspicuous consumption, “green-washing” as marketing, ironic mustaches.

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Feathered in Olive ©2008 Lapchi, LLC

Photo: Michael Jones

Glass: Esque Studio

Lapchi Carpets are RugMark Certified. Please visit rugmark.org

M O D E R N

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ERNESTOMEDA CHICAGO The Merchandise Mart Suite 128 Chicago, IL 60654 phone (312) 329-0229 www.ernestomedachicago.com info@ernestomedachicago.com

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CS Interiors