Issuu on Google+

A Revolução Americana E A Revolução Francesa

As Revoluções Americana e Francesa

Declaração de Independência .................................................................. 3 Declaração dos Direitos do Homem e do Cidadão................................... 6 Free Americay ........................................................................................... 9 Yankee Doodle........................................................................................ 10 Ah! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira!........................................................................... 12 La Carmagnole ........................................................................................ 14 Chant de guerre pour l'armée du Rhin ou "La Marseillaise".................. 17

2

As Revoluções Americana e Francesa

Declaração de Independência 4 de Julho de 1776 The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen united States of America When in the Course of human events it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation. We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. — That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, — That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security. — Such has been the patient sufferance of these Colonies; and such is now the necessity which constrains them to alter their former Systems of Government. The history of the present King of Great Britain is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations, all having in direct object the establishment of an absolute Tyranny over these States. To prove this, let Facts be submitted to a candid world. He has refused his Assent to Laws, the most wholesome and necessary for the public good. He has forbidden his Governors to pass Laws of immediate and pressing importance, unless suspended in their operation till his Assent should be obtained; and when so suspended, he has utterly neglected to attend to them. He has refused to pass other Laws for the accommodation of large districts of people, unless those people would relinquish the right of Representation in the Legislature, a right inestimable to them and formidable to tyrants only. He has called together legislative bodies at places unusual, uncomfortable, and distant from the depository of their Public Records, for the sole purpose of fatiguing them into compliance with his measures. He has dissolved Representative Houses repeatedly, for opposing with manly firmness his invasions on the rights of the people.

3

As Revoluçþes Americana e Francesa

He has refused for a long time, after such dissolutions, to cause others to be elected, whereby the Legislative Powers, incapable of Annihilation, have returned to the People at large for their exercise; the State remaining in the mean time exposed to all the dangers of invasion from without, and convulsions within. He has endeavoured to prevent the population of these States; for that purpose obstructing the Laws for Naturalization of Foreigners; refusing to pass others to encourage their migrations hither, and raising the conditions of new Appropriations of Lands. He has obstructed the Administration of Justice by refusing his Assent to Laws for establishing Judiciary Powers. He has made Judges dependent on his Will alone for the tenure of their offices, and the amount and payment of their salaries. He has erected a multitude of New Offices, and sent hither swarms of Officers to harass our people and eat out their substance. He has kept among us, in times of peace, Standing Armies without the Consent of our legislatures. He has affected to render the Military independent of and superior to the Civil Power. He has combined with others to subject us to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution, and unacknowledged by our laws; giving his Assent to their Acts of pretended Legislation: For quartering large bodies of armed troops among us: For protecting them, by a mock Trial from punishment for any Murders which they should commit on the Inhabitants of these States: For cutting off our Trade with all parts of the world: For imposing Taxes on us without our Consent: For depriving us in many cases, of the benefit of Trial by Jury: For transporting us beyond Seas to be tried for pretended offences: For abolishing the free System of English Laws in a neighbouring Province, establishing therein an Arbitrary government, and enlarging its Boundaries so as to render it at once an example and fit instrument for introducing the same absolute rule into these Colonies For taking away our Charters, abolishing our most valuable Laws and altering fundamentally the Forms of our Governments: For suspending our own Legislatures, and declaring themselves invested with power to legislate for us in all cases whatsoever. He has abdicated Government here, by declaring us out of his Protection and waging War against us. He has plundered our seas, ravaged our coasts, burnt our towns, and destroyed the lives of our people. He is at this time transporting large Armies of foreign Mercenaries to compleat the works of death, desolation, and tyranny, already begun with circumstances of Cruelty & Perfidy scarcely paralleled in the most barbarous ages, and totally unworthy the Head of a civilized nation. He has constrained our fellow Citizens taken Captive on the high Seas to bear Arms against their Country, to become the executioners of their friends and Brethren, or to fall themselves by their Hands. He has excited domestic insurrections amongst us, and has endeavoured to bring on the inhabitants of our frontiers, the merciless Indian Savages whose known rule of warfare, is an undistinguished destruction of all ages, sexes and conditions. In every stage of these Oppressions We have Petitioned for Redress in the most humble terms: Our repeated Petitions have been answered only by repeated injury. A Prince, 4

As Revoluções Americana e Francesa

whose character is thus marked by every act which may define a Tyrant, is unfit to be the ruler of a free people. Nor have We been wanting in attentions to our British brethren. We have warned them from time to time of attempts by their legislature to extend an unwarrantable jurisdiction over us. We have reminded them of the circumstances of our emigration and settlement here. We have appealed to their native justice and magnanimity, and we have conjured them by the ties of our common kindred to disavow these usurpations, which would inevitably interrupt our connections and correspondence. They too have been deaf to the voice of justice and of consanguinity. We must, therefore, acquiesce in the necessity, which denounces our Separation, and hold them, as we hold the rest of mankind, Enemies in War, in Peace Friends. We, therefore, the Representatives of the united States of America, in General Congress, Assembled, appealing to the Supreme Judge of the world for the rectitude of our intentions, do, in the Name, and by Authority of the good People of these Colonies, solemnly publish and declare, That these united Colonies are, and of Right ought to be Free and Independent States, that they are Absolved from all Allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to be totally dissolved; and that as Free and Independent States, they have full Power to levy War, conclude Peace, contract Alliances, establish Commerce, and to do all other Acts and Things which Independent States may of right do. — And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of Divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes, and our sacred Honor. — John Hancock New Hampshire: Josiah Bartlett, William Whipple, Matthew Thornton Massachusetts: John Hancock, Samuel Adams, John Adams, Robert Treat Paine, Elbridge Gerry Rhode Island: Stephen Hopkins, William Ellery Connecticut: Roger Sherman, Samuel Huntington, William Williams, Oliver Wolcott New York: William Floyd, Philip Livingston, Francis Lewis, Lewis Morris New Jersey: Richard Stockton, John Witherspoon, Francis Hopkinson, John Hart, Abraham Clark Pennsylvania: Robert Morris, Benjamin Rush, Benjamin Franklin, John Morton, George Clymer, James Smith, George Taylor, James Wilson, George Ross Delaware: Caesar Rodney, George Read, Thomas McKean

5

As Revoluções Americana e Francesa

Declaração dos Direitos do Homem e do Cidadão 26 de Agosto de 1789 Les Représentants du Peuple Français, constitués en Assemblée Nationale, considérant que l'ignorance, l'oubli ou le mépris des droits de l'Homme sont les seules causes des malheurs publics et de la corruption des Gouvernements, ont résolu d'exposer, dans une Déclaration solennelle, les droits naturels, inaliénables et sacrés de l'Homme, afin que cette Déclaration, constamment présente à tous les Membres du corps social, leur rappelle sans cesse leurs droits et leurs devoirs ; afin que leurs actes du pouvoir législatif, et ceux du pouvoir exécutif, pouvant être à chaque instant comparés avec le but de toute institution politique, en soient plus respectés; afin que les réclamations des citoyens, fondées désormais sur des principes simples et incontestables, tournent toujours au maintien de la Constitution et au bonheur de tous. En conséquence, l'Assemblée Nationale reconnaît et déclare, en présence et sous les auspices de l'Etre suprême, les droits suivants de l'Homme et du Citoyen. Art. 1er. Les hommes naissent et demeurent libres et égaux en droits. Les distinctions sociales ne peuvent être fondées que sur l'utilité commune. Art. 2. Le but de toute association politique est la conservation des droits naturels et imprescriptibles de l'Homme. Ces droits sont la liberté, la propriété, la sûreté, et la résistance à l'oppression. Art. 3. Le principe de toute Souveraineté réside essentiellement dans la Nation. Nul corps, nul individu ne peut exercer d'autorité qui n'en émane expressément. Art. 4. La liberté consiste à pouvoir faire tout ce qui ne nuit pas à autrui : ainsi, l'exercice des droits naturels de chaque homme n'a de bornes que celles qui assurent aux autres Membres de la Société la jouissance de ces mêmes droits. Ces bornes ne peuvent être déterminées que par la Loi. Art. 5. -

6

As Revoluções Americana e Francesa

La Loi n'a le droit de défendre que les actions nuisibles à la Société. Tout ce qui n'est pas défendu par la Loi ne peut être empêché, et nul ne peut être contraint à faire ce qu'elle n'ordonne pas. Art. 6. La Loi est l'expression de la volonté générale. Tous les Citoyens ont droit de concourir personnellement, ou par leurs Représentants, à sa formation. Elle doit être la même pour tous, soit qu'elle protège, soit qu'elle punisse. Tous les Citoyens étant égaux à ses yeux sont également admissibles à toutes dignités, places et emplois publics, selon leur capacité, et sans autre distinction que celle de leurs vertus et de leurs talents. Art. 7. – Nul homme ne peut être accusé, arrêté ni détenu que dans les cas déterminés par la Loi, et selon les formes qu'elle a prescrites. Ceux qui sollicitent, expédient, exécutent ou font exécuter des ordres arbitraires, doivent être punis ; mais tout citoyen appelé ou saisi en vertu de la Loi doit obéir à l'instant : il se rend coupable par la résistance. Art. 8. La Loi ne doit établir que des peines strictement et évidemment nécessaires, et nul ne peut être puni qu'en vertu d'une Loi établie et promulguée antérieurement au délit, et légalement appliquée. Art. 9. Tout homme étant présumé innocent jusqu'à ce qu'il ait été déclaré coupable, s'il est jugé indispensable de l'arrêter, toute rigueur qui ne serait pas nécessaire pour s'assurer de sa personne doit être sévèrement réprimée par la loi. Art. 10. Nul ne doit être inquiété pour ses opinions, même religieuses, pourvu que leur manifestation ne trouble pas l'ordre public établi par la Loi. Art. 11. La libre communication des pensées et des opinions est un des droits les plus précieux de l'Homme : tout Citoyen peut donc parler, écrire, imprimer librement, sauf à répondre de l'abus de cette liberté dans les cas déterminés par la Loi. Art. 12. La garantie des droits de l'Homme et du Citoyen nécessite une force publique : cette force est donc instituée pour l'avantage de tous, et non pour l'utilité particulière de ceux auxquels elle est confiée. Art. 13. Pour l'entretien de la force publique, et pour les dépenses d'administration, une contribution commune est indispensable : elle doit être également répartie entre tous les citoyens, en raison de leurs facultés. Art. 14. Tous les Citoyens ont le droit de constater, par eux-mêmes ou par leurs représentants, la nécessité de la contribution publique, de la consentir librement, d'en suivre l'emploi, et d'en déterminer la quotité, l'assiette, le recouvrement et la durée.

7

As Revoluções Americana e Francesa

Art. 15. La Société a le droit de demander compte à tout Agent public de son administration. Art. 16. Toute Société dans laquelle la garantie des Droits n'est pas assurée, ni la séparation des Pouvoirs déterminée, n'a point de Constitution. Art. 17. La propriété étant un droit inviolable et sacré, nul ne peut en être privé, si ce n'est lorsque la nécessité publique, légalement constatée, l'exige évidemment, et sous la condition d'une juste et préalable indemnité.

8

As Revoluçþes Americana e Francesa

Free Americay Joseph Warren

That Seat of Science Athens, and Earth's great Mistress Rome, Where now are all their Glories, we scarce can find their Tomb; Then guard your Rights, Americans! nor stoop to lawless Sway, Oppose, oppose, oppose, oppose, -- my brave America. Proud Albion bow'd to Caesar, and num'rous Lords before, To Picts, to Danes, to Normans, and many Masters more; But we can boast Americans! we never fell a Prey; Huzza, huzza, huzza, huzza, for brave America. We led fair Freedom hither, when lo the Desart smil'd, A paradise of pleasure, was open'd in the Wild; Your Harvest, bold Americans! no power shall snatch away, Huzza, huzza, huzza, huzza, for brave America. Torn from a World of Tyrants, beneath this western Sky, We form'd a new Dominion, a Land of liberty; The World shall own their masters here, then hasten on the Day, Huzza, huzza, huzza, huzza, for brave America. God bless this maiden Climate, and thro' her vast Domain, Let Hosts of Heroes cluster, who scorn to wear a Chain; And blast the venal Sycophant, who dares our Rights betray. Preserve, preserve, preserve, preserve my brave America. Lift up your Heads my Heroes! and swear with proud Disdain, The Wretch that would enslave you, Shall spread his Snares in vain; Should Europe empty all her force, wou'd meet them in Array, And shout, and shout, and shout, and shout, for brave America! Some future Day shall crown us, the Masters of the Main, And giving Laws and Freedom, to subject France and Spain; When all the Isles o'er Ocean spread shall tremble and obey, Their Lords, their Lords, their Lords, their Lords of brave America.

9

As Revoluçþes Americana e Francesa

Yankee Doodle Father and I went down to camp, Along with Captain Gooding; And there we saw the men and boys, As thick as hasty pudding. Yankee doodle, keep it up, Yankee doodle dandy; Mind the musie and the step, And with the girls be handy. There was Captain Washington Upon a slapping stallion, A-giving orders to his men, I guess there was a million. And then the feathers on his hat, They looked so' tarnal fin-a, I wanted pockily to get To give to my Jemima. And then we saw a swamping gun, Large as a log of maple; Upon a deuced little cart, A load for father's cattle. And every time they shoot it off, It takes a horn of powder; It makes a noise like father's gun, Only a nation louder. I went as nigh to one myself, As' Siah's underpinning; And father went as nigh agin, I thought the deuce was in him. We saw a little barrel, too, The heads were made of leather; They knocked upon it with little clubs, And called the folks together. And there they'd fife away like fun, And play on cornstalk fiddles, And some had ribbons red as blood, All bound around their middles. The troopers, too, would gallop up And fire right in our faces; 10

As Revoluçþes Americana e Francesa

It scared me almost to death To see them run such races. Uncle Sam came there to change Some pancakes and some onions, For' lasses cake to carry home To give his wife and young ones. But I can't tell half I see They kept up such a smother; So I took my hat off, made a bow, And scampered home to mother. Cousin Simon grew so bold, I thought he would have cocked it; It scared me so I streaked it off, And hung by father's pocket. And there I saw a pumpkin shell, As big as mother's basin; And every time they touched it off, They scampered like the nation. Yankee doodle, keep it up, Yankee doodle dandy; Mind the music and the step, And with the girls be handy

11

As Revoluções Americana e Francesa

Ah! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira! Paroles de Ladré, musique de Bécourt

Ah ! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira, Le peuple en ce jour sans cesse répète, Ah ! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira, Malgré les mutins tout réussira. Nos ennemis confus en restent là Et nous allons chanter alléluia ! Ah ! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira, Quand Boileau jadis du clergé parla Comme un prophète il a prédit cela. En chantant ma chansonnette Avec plaisir on dira: Ah ! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira! Ah ! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira, Suivant les maximes de l’évangile Ah ! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira, Du législateur tout s’accomplira. Celui qui s’élève on l’abaissera Celui qui s’abaisse on l’élèvera. Ah ! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira, Le vrai catéchisme nous instruira Et l’affreux fanatisme s’éteindra. Pour être à la loi docile Tout Français s’exercera. Ah ! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira! Ah ! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira! Pierette et Margot chantent la guinguette Ah ! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira! Réjouissons-nous, le bon temps viendra! Le peuple français jadis à quia, L'aristocrate dit : mea cilpa! Ah ! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira! Le clergé regrette le bien qu'il a, Par justice, la nation l'aura. Par le prudent Lafayette, Tout le monde s'apaisera. Ah ! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira! Ah ! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira! Par les flambeaux de l'auguste assemblée, Ah ! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira! Le peuple armé toujours se gardera. 12

As Revoluções Americana e Francesa

Le vrai d'avec le faux l'on connaîtra, Le citoyen pour le bien soutiendra. Ah ! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira! Quand l'aristocrate protestera, Le bon citoyen au nez lui rira, Sans avoir l'âme troublée, Toujours le plus fort sera. Ah ! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira! Ah ! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira! Petits comme grands sont soldtas dans l'âme, Ah ! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira! Pendant la guerre aucun ne trahira. Avec coeur tout bon français combattra, S'il voit du louche, hardiment parlera. Ah ! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira! Lafayette dit : "Vienne qui voudra!" Sans craindre ni feu, ni flamme, le français toujours vaincra! Ah ! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira! Paroles anonymes ajoutées plus tard: Ah ! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira! Les aristocrates à la lanterne, Ah ! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira! Les aristocrates, on les pendra! Et quand on les aura tous pendus, On leur fich'ra la pelle au cul.

13

As Revoluções Americana e Francesa

La Carmagnole I Madame Veto avait promis (bis) De faire égorger tout Paris (bis) Mais son coup a manqué, Grâce à nos canonniers. R1 Dansons la Carmagnole, Vive le son, vive le son. Dansons la Carmagnole, Vive le son du canon ! II Monsieur Veto avait promis (bis) D’être fidèle à sa patrie (bis) Mais il y a manqué. Ne faisons plus quartier. R1 III Antoinette avait résolu (bis) De nous fair’ tomber sur le cul, (bis) Mais son coup a manqué. Elle a le nez cassé. R1 IV Son mari se croyant vainqueur, (bis) Connaissait peu notre valeur, (bis) Va Louis, gros paour, Du Temple, dans la tour. R1 V Les Suisses avaient tous promis (bis) Qu’ils feraient feu sur nos amis (bis) Mais comme ils ont sauté, Comme ils ont tous dansé. R2 Chantons notre victoire, Vive le son, vive le son. Chantons notre victoire, Vive le son du canon ! 14

As Revoluções Americana e Francesa

VI Quand Antoinette vit la tour (bis) Elle voulut faire demi-tour. (bis) Elle avait mal au coeur De se voir sans honneur. R1 VII Lorsque Louis vit fossoyer (bis) A ceux qu’il voyait travailler (bis) Il disait que pour peu Il était dans ce lieu. R1 VIII Le patriote a pour amis (bis) Tous les bonnes gens du pays (bis) Mais ils se soutiendront Tous au son des canons. R1 IX L’aristocrate a pour amis (bis) Tous les royalist’s à Paris, (bis) Ils vous les soutiendront Tout comm’ de vrais poltrons. R1 X La gendarm’rie avait promis (bis) Qu’elle soutiendrait la patrie, (bis) Mais ils n’ont pas manqué Au son du canonnier. R1 XI Amis, restons toujours unis, (bis) Ne craignons pas nos ennemis. (bis) S’ils vienn’nt nous attaquer, Nous les ferons sauter. R1 XII Oui, je suis sans-culotte, moi, (bis) 15

As Revoluções Americana e Francesa

En dépit des amis du roi, (bis) Vive les Marseillais, Les Bretons et nos lois. R1 XIII Oui, nous nous souviendrons toujours (bis) Des sans-culottes des faubourgs. (bis) A leur santé buvons. Vivent ces bons lurons. R1

16

As Revoluções Americana e Francesa

Chant de guerre pour l'armée du Rhin ou "La Marseillaise" 1792 : Rouget de Lisle Allons enfants de la Patrie, Le jour de gloire est arrivé ! Contre nous de la tyrannie, L'étendard sanglant est levé, (bis) Entendez-vous dans les campagnes Mugir ces féroces soldats ? Ils viennent jusque dans vos bras Egorger vos fils, vos compagnes ! Refrain : Aux armes, citoyens, Formez vos bataillons, Marchons, marchons ! Qu'un sang impur Abreuve nos sillons ! Que veut cette horde d'esclaves, De traîtres, de rois conjurés ? Pour qui ces ignobles entraves, Ces fers dès longtemps préparés ? (bis) Français, pour nous, ah ! quel outrage Quels transports il doit exciter ! C'est nous qu'on ose méditer De rendre à l'antique esclavage ! Refrain Quoi ! des cohortes étrangères Feraient la loi dans nos foyers ! Quoi ! ces phalanges mercenaires Terrasseraient nos fiers guerriers ! (bis) Grand Dieu ! par des mains enchaînées Nos fronts sous le joug se ploieraient De vils despotes deviendraient Les maîtres de nos destinées ! Refrain Tremblez, tyrans et vous perfides L'opprobre de tous les partis, Tremblez ! vos projets parricides Vont enfin recevoir leurs prix ! (bis) Tout est soldat pour vous combattre, S'ils tombent, nos jeunes héros, 17

As Revoluções Americana e Francesa

La terre en produit de nouveaux, Contre vous tout prets à se battre ! Refrain Français, en guerriers magnanimes, Portez ou retenez vos coups ! Epargnez ces tristes victimes, A regret s'armant contre nous. (bis) Mais ces despotes sanguinaires, Mais ces complices de Bouillé, Tous ces tigres qui, sans pitié, Déchirent le sein de leur mère ! Refrain Amour sacré de la Patrie, Conduis, soutiens nos bras vengeurs Liberté, Liberté chérie, Combats avec tes défenseurs ! (bis) Sous nos drapeaux que la victoire Accoure à tes mâles accents, Que tes ennemis expirants Voient ton triomphe et notre gloire ! Refrain Nous entrerons dans la carrière Quand nos aînés n'y seront plus, Nous y trouverons leur poussière Et la trace de leurs vertus (bis) Bien moins jaloux de leur survivre Que de partager leur cercueil, Nous aurons le sublime orgueil De les venger ou de les suivre Refrain

18


Revolução Americana e Francesa