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N a v i g a t or Rural Oregon’s Guide to Saving Money by Saving Resources

T A B L E O F C O N T E N TS

Letter from the Governor

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About FCA and the Plimsoll

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Letter from FCA

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How to Use This Book

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Energy

Tax + Incentive Programs Federal Oregon Grants + Loans Energy Trust of Oregon Programs Community Opportunities Table of Local Utility Incentives Conservation + Efficiency

Renewables

Water Water Programs Glossary Do the Math Worksheet Index of Websites

06 — 71 06 06 11 13 16 22 26

Heating + Cooling........ 28 Duct Sealing + Insulating........ 31 Insulation........ 33 Windows, Doors + Skylights........ 35 Caulking + Weatherstripping........ 37 Lighting........ 38 Appliances........ 40 Hot Water Heaters........ 42

28 — 43 44 — 68 Solar Photovoltaic (PV)........ 46 Solar Hot Water........ 50 72 — 77 Passive Solar Space Heatings........ 54 72 Small-scale Wind Energy........ 56 Small-scale Hydroelectric Systems........ 60 77 Local Conservation Resources........ 62 79 Geothermal Energy Systems........ 64 80 Biomass Energy Systems........ 68

DISCLAIMER

Melinda Hannigan Winter Load, 2005

The Navigator has been created to help Oregon residents, small businesses, and farms quickly reference all the incentive programs available for energy and water savings. We have provided information resources, but it is important for you to double check information so that you have all the necessary and most up-to-date information possible. Be sure to call first and save all paperwork and receipts to qualify for incentives. The Navigator does not in any way constitute a guarantee or warranty of any energy efficiency or renewable technology measure or any possible energy savings or generation that might result from such measures. Nor does The Navigator guarantee that every home, business, or farm will qualify for the programs listed in this book. FCA is not liable for any risk or injury associated with the program implementation.

Theodore R. Kulongoski Governor Dear Fellow Oregonian: I am pleased to recommend: The Navigator: Rural Oregon’s Guide to Saving Money By Saving Resources for your use. Rural Oregonians are in many ways the people most concerned with and affected by our resource-strained economy. This publication highlights innovative approaches to helping solve water and energy resource shortages that citizens across our state face every day.

As energy costs continue to rise and demands on our current water resource accelerate, we will need to make the most of these valuable resources and manage them as efficiently and inventively as possible. The Navigator will prove an invaluable resource to thousands of people working to grow their businesses, and their families. Oregon state government and our regional partners provide incentives to manage resources wisely. Programs like the Business Energy Tax Credit, the Residential Energy Tax Credit, and the State Home Oil Weatherization program are all in place to encourage Oregonians to make upgrade investments by offsetting to some degree the initial costs. But as you know, these programs only work when they are accessed and used. By using the tools and information outlined in this book, you can make the most of the tax credits, rebates, grants, low-interest loans, and additional incentive programs that are available from your state government and regional partners. I am grateful to the Farmers Conservation Alliance for providing this valuable resource. Sincerely,

THEODORE R. KULONGOSKI Governor

L e t t e r f ro m t h e g ov e r n o r

Both rural and urban Oregonians will benefit from its use. Now is the time for all of us to examine our energy and water resource use and to manage these resources efficiently. Managing resources wisely, in addition to saving money, will help us strengthen Oregon homes, farms, businesses and the entire state economy.

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a b out f c a Farmers Conservation Alliance (FCA) is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization with a mission to develop resource solutions for rural communities. In 2006, with two staff members and a vision of social entrepreneurship, FCA brought to market its first technology, the Farmers Screen. Created by the Farmers Irrigation District, the Farmers Screen is an innovative fish screening technology that allows farmers to divert water from a river without harming fish or trapping debris; therefore, saving farmers thousands of dollars annually in reduced operation and maintenance costs, protecting the lives of fish and providing an opportunity for environmentally-friendly, small-scale hydroelectric projects. With more than 150,000 unscreened diversions in the Northwest alone, the Farmers Screen is an exciting opportunity to protect millions of fish and save farmers millions of dollars in reduced operation and maintenance costs. FCA was licensed the patented technology with the responsibility for developing and implementing a strategy to market, maximizing screen revenue and using profits for the common good of rural communities. Therefore, FCA is focused on green technologies, education programs and community solutions that benefit both the environment and agriculture and result in saving

people money, conserving resources and maintaining quality of life. In addition to the Farmers Screen and The Navigator, some of FCA’s other projects include: •

FCA Hydro: research and development of the potential for fish-friendly, small-scale hydro projects on currently diverted water.

Ag Efficiencies: supporting landowners and irrigation districts in finding partners and funding to implement projects that will save energy and water as well as dollars.

Rural Roots: celebration of the rural leaders making great environmental and economic contributions to their communities.

In the next ten years, FCA is working to install 750 Farmers Screens, convert 7,500 cubic feet per second to fish friendly diversions, support the production of 200 megawatts of environmentally friendly, communityscale energy, restore 2500 miles of rivers for fish habitat and passage, save communities $2,500,000 in avoided energy and water associated costs, and invest more than $2,500,000 in social entrepreneurs.

t h e pl im sol l The plimsoll, FCA’s mark, is the symbol traditionally found painted on the side of ships to indicate the maximum safe load for any ship under varied sea conditions. Inspired by the plimsoll and the life of its creator Samuel Plimsoll, FCA uses this symbol as a representation of our organization’s goal of finding balance between fish and farm, urban and rural, agriculture and environmentalism, nonprofit and private industry. Like the plimsoll that balances a ship’s draft and freeboard, FCA hopes to demonstrate that by being respectful of potentially opposing viewpoints, a better outcome will be achieved for all.

l e tte r f r o m f c a

Many of these farmers were searching for a way to reduce their resource use since growing our food, conveying irrigation water, or driving to distant grocery stores uses significant amounts of energy and water and, ultimately, costs a lot of money. Our state and federal governments have many programs to help people improve energy efficiency, make the transition to renewable energy, and conserve water. However, due to limited budgets and low population densities, little outreach is done in rural communities where energy use per capita is the highest and holds the greatest potential for individual savings. As we stood in these farmers’ fields and talked about the great programs like the BETC (page 12) or EQIP (page 24), we knew we needed some type of guide where we would be able to circle a program description and say, “This program is for solar panels. It will save you a lot of money. Call Joe at Oregon Department of Energy. He will point you in the right direction.” But that tool didn’t exist. Embracing the vision of a previous Navigator, first designed and published by Hood River Energy Partners in 2004, and because FCA invests its profits in solutions that benefit both the environment and agriculture, we decided to write an expanded Navigator. We also decided that if we were to create The Navigator for FCA’s partners and clients, why not provide this information to all rural Oregonians? Two years later, after thousands of hours and dozens of drafts, we present to you The Navigator : a guide for understanding the tax credits and incentives that will help you save money by saving resources. Our goal in creating The Navigator is to complement all of the other resources currently available, not duplicate them. For those who haven’t seen those other resources, here’s a quick summary: Unplug it. Turn it off. Use less. Recycle. We also decided not to write about transportation. This is in large part due to the fact that there are now well-publicized incentives through car dealerships. What makes The Navigator unique is that it outlines the more than sixty programs that help homeowners, business owners, and farmers save money and resources. To do this,

we made the list of tax credit and incentive programs as easy to use and applicable to your situation as possible. Therefore, the programs are described in general, and then again more specifically for each area of conservation and power generation. In addition, we created tables of local utility programs that reference contact information and what opportunities they provide. We also created “Do the Math” sections to demonstrate how the listed programs can actually save you money in both the short and longterm. We compiled a glossary, a list of acronyms and a quick guide to energy terms to decode the sometimes confusing lingo. Also, through the process of developing The Navigator, we learned that having a comprehensive guide was needed throughout the state, not just in rural areas. Since FCA’s charter is to do work for rural communities, we have printed a first run of 25,000 copies to distribute mostly throughout rural Oregon. However, to expand our distribution, save money, and reduce paper use, we created an online version of The Navigator so that all Oregonians can view and print this guide: thenavigator.org. Looking forward, we know that even with all of our research there might be other programs that should be included and programs that have since changed. If you know of information that should be in The Navigator, please let us know. Suggestions, recommendations, and ideas are all very much appreciated and may be sent to info@ fcasolutions.org with the subject line of “Navigator.” Most importantly, we want to thank all the amazing people who have made these programs a reality. The fact that we could compile nearly 80 pages of resource conservation incentives is exceptional in itself. These people serve as a beautiful reminder of how great our state and country are, especially when a group of citizens decides to take action. We hope you find The Navigator educational and truly useful.

Julie Davies O’Shea Executive Director, FCA

A B O U T F CA

We decided to write The Navigator, a guide to incentive programs that help save money by saving resources, after meeting with hundreds of landowners throughout rural Oregon to talk about installing a fish screen on their water diversions – our primary reason for being in business.

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ho w to use th i s b o o k HOW TO NAVIGATE: The Navigator is a reference guide to federal, state, and local incentive programs that support energy efficiency upgrades, water conservation, and renewable energy system installations for Oregon homes, farms, and small businesses. As an index, it is not intended to be read from cover to cover, but rather to be flipped through, for quickly referencing programs and information sources. We have indexed all incentive programs using a simple key: HOME — Incentive programs that support projects in your HOME.

BUSINESS — Incentive programs that support projects for your small BUSINESS.

FARM — Incentive programs that support projects on the FARM.

COMMUNITY — Incentive programs that support projects in your COMMUNITY.

be f or e you b e gi n LIST OF ACRONYMS: The following acronyms are used throughout The Navigator: ASHRAE: American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers ASTM: American Society for Testing and Materials BETC: Business Energy Tax Credit CAP: Community Action Partnership CFLs: Compact Fluorescent Lamps CREBS: Clean Renewable Energy Bonds CREP: Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program CRP: Conservation Reserve Program CSP: Conservation Stewardship Program DSIRE: Database of State Incentives for Renewables & Efficiency EEM: Energy Efficient Mortgages EF: Energy Factor EPA: Environmental Protection Agency EQIP: Environmental Quality Incentives Program FHA: Federal Housing Administration HER: Home Energy Rating: provides a standard measurement of your home’s energy efficiency HSPF: Heating Seasonal Performance Factor IECC: International Energy Conservation Code ITC: Investment Tax Credit LEDs: Light Emitting Diodes

LEED CS: Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design for Core and Shell LEED NC: Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design for New Construction MACRS: Modified Accelerated Cost-Recovery System MEF: Modified Energy Factor NRCS: Natural Resources Conservation Service ODOE: Oregon Department of Energy PTC: Production Tax Credit PV: Photovoltaic RC&D: Resource Conservation & Development programs REAP: Rural Energy for America Program REPI: Renewable Energy Production Incentive RESNET: Residential Energy Services Network RETC: Residential Energy Tax Credit SELP: Oregon’s Small Scale Energy Loan Program SHOW: State Home Oil Weatherization Program SWCD: Soil and Water Conservation Districts USGBC: U.S. Green Building Council USDA: U.S. Department of Agriculture VA: Veteran’s Affairs VAPG: Value-Added Producer Grant WHIP: Wildlife Habitat Incentives Program WWD: Waste and Water Disposal

b a s i c c o n c e pts

Joule (J): A unit of energy (measuring energy, work, or heat) derived from the International System of Units (SI). Watt (W): The basic measurement unit of electric power, a watt describes the rate at which energy is used (the rate of 1 joule of energy per second). A watt is not a packet of power but the actual rate at which electricity is being turned into power. Just as when you say that you are driving your car at a speed of 25 miles per hour, it doesn’t mean you’ve actually driven 25 miles or have been in your car for an hour, the number of watts just means you are using energy at a certain rate. A typical incandescent light bulb converts energy into light at a rate of 40 watts (a “speed” of 40 joules per second). Watt Hour (Wh): The measurement unit of electrical energy equal to 1 watt of power supplied to, or taken from, an electric circuit continuously for one hour. Kilowatt (kW): One thousand watts. (1 kW= 1000 W) Kilowatt Hour (kWh): A kilowatt hour is equal to the energy of 1,000 watts (1kW) working for an hour. Returning to the driving your car analogy, in this case, it’s like saying you are driving 25 miles IN an hour – meaning that you have driven for an hour and traveled 25 miles. If you use one thousand watts of power in one hour you have used a kilowatt hour (kWh). Your electric utility bills you by the kilowatt-hour. Megawatt (MW): One million watts. (1MW = 1,000,000 W) One megawatt of energy can provide enough electricity for about 800 households. Megawatt Hour (MWh): A megawatt hour is equal to one megawatts acting for one hour. A single megawatt hour is equal to 1000 kWh.

UNDERSTANDING PAYBACK: How to calculate your potential savings Throughout The Navigator, we’ve provided examples of how to calculate potential savings for certain energy efficiency upgrades and for the installation of a new renewable energy system. The purpose of these calculations is to demonstrate the up-front costs, long-term savings, and ultimate net costs before you begin. The process is simple: we take into account the initial projected up-front costs for a given project, subtract all applicable incentives from the sum (the order of subtraction varies for each program and incentive type), and then factor the payback period and/or the money saved over a certain period of time to reflect that project’s potential net cost. Calculation examples appear in the Conservation/ Efficiency Chapter and in the Introduction to Renewables Chapter. We’ve also included a blank worksheet at the end of this book that you can pull out, photocopy, and use over and over again to work through this equation for any number of projects you might consider. LOCAL UTILITY INCENTIVE PROGRAM TABLES (Pages 26-27 and 62) We surveyed energy efficiency and renewable energy incentives offered by utilities in Oregon. Use these tables to find your local utility. Red circles in the tables indicate that a given utility offers incentives for the project type listed at the top of each column. Use the phone and website information listed to contact those utilities directly for program details before you begin any work on a project. This will help ensure that your project will qualify for all available incentives and will also ensure that you are using the most up-to-date information. GLOSSARY OF TERMS A comprehensive glossary of terms appears on pages 7778 at the end of this book. ABOUT WEBSITES + URLs The purpose of The Navigator is to help you save money by saving resources, and, as they say, time is money. To save you time spent online doing research, we have found specific web pages relevant to each individual topic and assigned each one a new, shortened URL address (like Navigator1.notlong. com). If you need the exact URL, there is a complete index of the actual (long) addresses on page 80 at the end of this book.

h ow to u s e t h i s b o o k

UNDERSTANDING UNITS OF ENERGY AND RATES OF POWER What, exactly, is a watt? And what’s the difference between a Kilowatt and a Kilowatt Hour? It’s helpful to be familiar with these terms when you are trying to find ways that you could save money by saving energy, but it is also critically important when you are trying to determine potential savings through investments in resource efficiency and/or renewable energy technologies. Here is a quick key to these essential terms to keep in mind as you use The Navigator:

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Nergy

06 in t r od u C tion t o t a x credits In an effort to encourage investments in energy efficiency and renewable technologies, the federal government and the State of Oregon have developed numerous incentive programs including tax credits to help homeowners and businesses begin saving money and resources. In February 2009, Congress and the Obama Administration passed the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA), legislation which greatly extended and expanded the incentives available for making energy efficiency and renewable energy investments. The following sections outline the numerous state and federal tax credits, deductions, exclusions, and depreciations available to support energy efficiency and

renewable energy investments for the home, farm, and business. Tax credits are a direct, dollar-for-dollar offset of your tax liability. Deductions and exclusions reduce the amount of your Adjusted Gross Income and can help to reduce your tax liability. Depreciations can help reduce the taxable value of your property. For each tax program, specific energy efficiency upgrades or renewable energy projects eligible for incentives are listed and indexed with page numbers providing more detailed program information. Web addresses are also listed for sites that provide information with details about any necessary equipment qualifications, tax-credit certified contractor lists, and important deadlines.

fed er a l ta x c r e d i t s RESIDENTIAL ENERGY EFFICIENCY TAX CREDIT This federal tax credit applies to improvements you make to increase your home’s efficiency. This includes improvements to your home’s “envelope,” which includes qualifying insulation, exterior windows and doors, skylights, and some roofing systems. You can also apply this credit to purchases you make for qualified energy efficient heating, cooling, and water heating equipment. This 30% tax credit, with a maximum credit of $1,500, applies to purchases and improvements made between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2010. The IRS outlines the specific improvements and models that qualify for this credit. Be sure you know exactly what will qualify before you begin.

To claim this credit See pages

Use IRS form 5965. Download at Navigate1.notlong.com. 31-37 for building envelope improvements that qualify for this credit. 28-30 and 42-43 for qualifying heating, cooling, and water heating equipment.

RESIDENTIAL RENEWABLE ENERGY TAX CREDIT This tax credit provides incentives for homeowners to invest in small-scale renewable energy systems and equipment. This credit applies to solar electric, solar water heating, fuel cells, small wind energy, and geothermal heat pump systems. This 30% tax credit applies to expenditures made from January 1, 2006 through December 31, 2016. For expenditures made before January 1, 2009, there is a 30% tax credit with a maximum of $2,000 to $4,000 depending on the technology (for more details, go to: Navigate1. notlong.com. There is no credit limit for expenditures made after that date, with the exception of fuel cell systems, which qualify for a credit of up to $500 per 0.5kW, regardless of the installation date. This program allows you to carry over remaining credit to the next tax year if your total credit exceeds your federal tax liability. For this and all incentive programs, familiarize yourself with program requirements before making investments in a particular system. IMPORTANT! If you receive additional funding (which is non-taxable) for your system, you must exclude that amount from you total expenditures when claiming this credit. To claim this credit See pages

Use IRS form 5965. Download at Navigate1.notlong.com. 44-68 for more information on these renewable energy technologies and examples of your money-saving potential. See pages 28-43 for information about energy conservation subsidies available in Oregon.

RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSERVATION SUBSIDY EXCLUSION Personal & Corporate Any energy conservation subsidies provided by public utilities are nontaxable income. The IRS Code states, “Gross income shall not include the value of any subsidy provided (directly or indirectly) by a public utility to a customer for the purchase or installation of any energy conservation measure.� If you are considering using this provision for rebates you plan to receive on any renewable energy system, first consult your tax preparer to be sure all requirements and qualifications are met.

See pages

44-68 for more information on residential scale renewable energy systems. See the tables on pages 26-27 and 62 for subsidies and rebates available in your area.

ALTERNATIVE FUEL INFRASTRUCTURE TAX CREDIT This federal tax credit is available for up to 30% of the cost of installing alternative fueling equipment for natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, hydrogen, electricity, E85, or diesel fuel blends containing a minimum of 20% biodiesel. The maximum credit for installing alternative fueling equipment at home for your own use is $1,000. The maximum credit for a business is $30,000. If you are a fuel station owner and you install alternative fueling equipment at multiple sites, you are allowed to use the credit for each location. Equipment that you put into service between January 1, 2006 and December 1, 2010 is eligible. Hydrogen fueling property is eligible through 2014.

To claim this credit

Use IRS form 8911. Download at Navigate2.notlong.com.

NOTE: Incentive programs and specific incentive dollar amounts may change at any time.

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Federal Tax credits c o n t i n u ed BUSINESS ENERGY INVESTMENT TAX CREDIT (ITC) This business tax credit covers up to 30% of expenditures for eligible solar energy and fuel cell equipment, with no maximum credit limit. There is a $4,000 credit limit on small-scale wind turbines installed after October 3, 2008. Geothermal systems, micro turbines, and combined heat and power systems can qualify for a credit equal to 10% of expenditures, with no maximum credit limit.

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Each technology must meet specific requirements to be eligible for the credit. There are special restrictions on fuel cells, small wind turbines, geothermal systems, and combined heat and power systems placed in service before October 3, 2008 so be sure to check the most updated details from the IRS at: irs.gov.

To claim this credit See pages

Use IRS form 3468. Download at Navigate3.notlong.com. 44-68 for more information on renewable energy systems.

ENERGY EFFICIENT COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS TAX DEDUCTION This tax deduction is available to owners of new or existing buildings who install new energy efficient interior lighting, building envelope improvements, heating or cooling, ventilation, or hot water systems that reduce the building’s total energy costs. The tax deduction is up to $1.80 per square foot. In some cases, non-owner tenants may also be eligible for the deduction if they make construction expenditures. Any improvements made must reduce a building’s energy costs by 50% or more in comparison to the minimum American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) standards. For more information go to: ashrae.org/. Deductions are taken in the year the construction is completed.

See pages

28-43 for some examples of qualifying improvements.

ENERGY EFFICIENT NEW HOMES TAX CREDIT for Home Builders This tax credit is available to commercial home builders for up to $2,000 for each qualified home constructed and certified to reduce heating and cooling energy consumption by 50% relative to the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) standard (available at: energycodes.gov/) and meet minimum efficiency standards established by the Department of Energy (available at: www1.eere.energy. gov/buildings/). To qualify for this tax credit, 20% of the increased energy efficiency must result from building envelope components. Manufactured homes that meet the same requirements and conform to Federal Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards are also eligible for a $2,000 credit. A lower credit of $1,000 is available to builders of manufactured homes if the homes conform to Federal Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards, reduce energy consumption by 30% relative to the IECC standard, and have at least one-third of the reductions resulting from building envelope component improvements. Alternatively, manufactured homes that meet Energy STAR® Labeled Home Requirements will also qualify for this credit.

To claim this credit See pages

Use IRS form 8908. Download at Navigate129.notlong.com. 28-43 for more information on energy efficiency in the home.

RENEWABLE ELECTRICITY PRODUCTION TAX CREDIT (PTC) This corporate tax credit provides producers of energy from landfill gas, wind, biomass, hydroelectric, geothermal electric, municipal solid waste, hydrokinetic power, anaerobic digestion, small hydroelectric, tidal, wave, and ocean thermal systems with a per kilowatt hour tax credit. The amount of the credit depends on the type of technology employed and the number of years the system has been in service. The credit is 2.1¢/kWh for wind, closed-loop biomass, and geothermal systems and 1.0¢/kWh for other eligible technologies including open-loop biomass and hydropower, along with several other forms of biomass technology, for the first 10 years of operation. New wind systems must be placed in service by December 12, 2012 to qualify for this tax credit. All other renewable energy systems must be placed in service by December 31, 2013. The tax credit may also be reduced or completely eliminated depending on other types of credits (like the Business Energy Tax Credit, outlined above) that you may claim. Recent updates allow facilities that qualify for this tax credit to opt instead to take the Federal Business Energy Investment Tax Credit (ITC) or an equivalent cash grant from the U.S. Department of Treasury. To learn more about the restrictions associated with this tax credit, contact IRS Telephone Assistance for Businesses at 1-800-829-4933. See pages

44-68 for more information on renewable energy technologies.

MODIFIED ACCELERATED COST-RECOVERY SYSTEM (MACRS) and BONUS DEPRECIATION This federal program helps businesses recover investments in certain types of property through depreciation deductions. Solar, wind, geothermal, biomass, fuel cells, micro turbines, and solar hybrid lighting technologies are all potentially eligible for accelerated depreciation. Systems acquired and placed in service during 2008 or 2009 tax years also qualify for an additional 50% bonus depreciation, if certain criteria are satisfied. To see if you qualify for this cost-recovery and depreciation program, review the information and instructions provided in IRS Publication 946, Instructions for Form 4562, and use IRS Form 4562 to apply.

To claim this credit

Use IRS form 4562. Download at Navigate4.notlong.com.

SMALL ETHANOL PRODUCER TAX CREDIT This tax credit is available to small-scale ethanol producers (defined as those producing no more than 60 million gallons per year). Producers may qualify for a non-refundable federal income tax credit equal to $0.10 per gallon produced for the first 15 million gallons. That’s up to $1.5 million federal income tax credit annually for production of at least 15 million gallons. To qualify for this tax credit, first register with the IRS using IRS form 637 (download at Navigate5. notlong.com), Application for Registration (for Certain Excise Tax Activities), and then use IRS form 6478 to claim the credit.

To claim this credit

Use IRS form 6478. Download at Navigate6.notlong.com.

NOTE: Incentive programs and specific incentive dollar amounts may change at any time.

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Federal Tax credits c o n t i n u ed SMALL AGRI-BIODIESEL PRODUCER TAX CREDIT This credit is available to producers of agri-biodiesel that produce no more than 60 million gallons per year. The credit is available in the amount of $0.10 per gallon for the first 15 million gallons produced in a tax year. This credit is currently set to expire December 31, 2009 unless extended.

To claim this credit

Use IRS form 6478. Download at Navigate6.notlong.com.

BIODIESEL INCOME TAX CREDIT This tax credit is available to both sellers and buyers of pure, unblended biodiesel (B100), agri-biodiesel or pure biodiesel made from other sources in the amount of $1.00 per gallon sold/used in trade or business. A certificate from the biodiesel (B100) producer or importer that identifies the fuel as biodiesel or agribiodiesel is required to confirm that the fuel is properly registered with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and that it meets the requirements of American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) specification D6751. To learn more about the regulatory requirements for biodiesel producers, go to: (Navigate7.notlong.com).

To claim this credit

Use IRS form 8864, Biodiesel and Renewable Diesel Fuels Credit. Download at Navigate8.notlong.com.

The Navigator is focused on ways to save money by saving resources in the home, small business, or on the farm. Vehicle and fuel efficiency also play a major role in helping to save both energy and money but are not the focus of this book. Numerous incentives are available, namely the Alternative Motor Vehicle Credit, which supports the purchase of new: 1) advanced lean burn technology vehicles 2) qualified hybrid vehicles 3) qualified alternative fuel vehicles 4) qualified fuel cell vehicles and 5) qualified plug-in electric drive motor vehicles To claim this credit Use IRS form 8910. Download at Navigate125.notlong.com.

OREGON ta x c r ed i t s RESIDENTIAL ENERGY TAX CREDIT (RETC) This tax credit provides incentives for investments in renewable energy systems, energy efficient appliances, and qualifying duct systems, air-source heat pump systems, condensing furnaces and boilers, and alternative fuel vehicles. Renewable energy technologies qualifying for this credit include Photovoltaic (PV) systems, fuel cells, solar space and water heating systems, wind-powered mechanical systems, solar spa and pool heating systems, closed-loop geothermal systems for space or water heating, and electricity producing wind turbine systems. Energy efficiency improvement credits apply to investments in qualifying appliances, performance-tested duct systems (up to $250), qualifying air-source heat pumps (maximum $300-$500), and qualifying condensing furnaces and boilers. Qualifying heat pumps and furnaces connected to a performance-tested duct system are eligible for an additional tax credit of $150. A $750 tax credit is available for the purchase of alternative fuel vehicles that operate on electricity, natural gas, methanol, propane, or hydrogen. The installation of a home charging or fueling system, combined with the vehicle tax credit, could earn you up to $1,500 in credits.

Go to: Navigate10.notlong.com for the most updated list of tax credit-qualifying appliances for more information on alternative fuel vehicles.

See pages

44-68 for more information on qualifying renewable energy technologies and pages 40-41 for more details on energy efficient appliances.

RENEWABLE ENERGY SYSTEMS EXEMPTION This Oregon state property tax exemption is available for the installation of qualifying renewable energy systems (including solar, geothermal, wind, water, fuel cell or methane gas systems) for the purpose of heating, cooling or generating electricity. The added value to your property from the installation cannot be included in the assessment of your property’s value for tax purposes.

See pages

44-68 for more information on renewable energy technologies.

TAX CREDIT FOR RENEWABLE ENERGY EQUIPMENT MANUFACTURERS This tax credit is available for up to 50% of the construction costs of a manufacturing facility for renewable energy systems, and includes the costs of the building, excavation, machinery, and equipment used primarily for the manufacturing of renewable energy systems. Prior to beginning construction a business must apply to the Oregon Department of Energy for preliminary certification. The maximum credit allowed is $20 million. Contact the Oregon Department of Energy at (503) 378-4040 for more information.

NOTE: Incentive programs and specific incentive dollar amounts may change at any time.

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For more information about Oregon’s Residential Energy Tax Credit including instructions, forms, and Oregon Department of Energy certified contractors, go to the program’s web pages at: Navigate9. notlong.com.

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oregon tax credits c o n t i n u ed BUSINESS ENERGY TAX CREDIT (BETC) The state tax credit encourages business investment in energy efficiency, renewable energy projects, sustainable buildings, recycling, and alternative fuels. There is a maximum $20 million tax credit available for renewable energy and high-efficiency combined heat and power facilities. All other facilities are eligible for a 35% tax credit of up to $10 million. The 50% tax credit is taken at 10% a year over 5 years. The 35% tax credit is taken at 10% per year the first two years and 5% a year the last 3 years. Any unused credit can be carried forward for up to eight years. Businesses with eligible project costs of $20,000 or less can take the tax credit in one year.

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A Pass-Through option enables non-profit organizations, schools, governmental agencies, tribes, and other entities and businesses with or without tax liability to transfer their tax credit for their eligible project to a partner with a tax liability. For more information and details about BETC-qualifying energy efficiency and renewable energy investments, visit the BETC page on the Oregon Department of Energy Conservation Division’s website at: Navigate11.notlong.com, or you may call the Department of Energy directly at (503) 378-4040. Any Oregon business may qualify for the credit, but this is a comprehensive program with specific technical requirements that must be met for each different kind of project.

In general terms, here are the kinds of projects that could qualify for the BETC:

Energy Efficiency Projects: conservation, horizontal-axis washer and lighting projects.

Home builders: High performance homes and home builder installed renewable energy facilities.

Renewable Energy Projects: High efficiency combined heat and power projects, renewable energy resource equipment manufacturing facilities, renewable energy resource generation projects, solar photovoltaic (PV) projects, and solar thermal projects.

Rentals: Rental dwelling weatherization and new premium efficiency appliances purchased for and installed in rental dwellings.

Transportation Projects: Alternative fuel infrastructure projects, alternative fuel vehicles, efficient truck technology, 2009 International SmartWay Trucks, hybrid vehicles, and transportation and telework projects.

Fuel Cell Projects: See website for specifics.

Recycling Projects: For projects that develop new markets for recycled materials or that recycle materials not currently required by law.

Sustainable Buildings: Oregonians who build a sustainable commercial building are eligible for the credit, which is based on the square footage of the building rather than the comparably increased costs of the project above standard building practices or code. The building must either meet an established U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED™) standard or be rated by a comparable program approved by the Oregon Department of Energy. See pages

44-68 for more information on renewable energy technologies.

NOTE: Incentive programs and specific incentive dollar amounts may change at any time.

grant s + l oa n s Numerous grants and low-interest loans are available to help fund new energy efficiency upgrades as well as the purchase and installation of new renewable energy systems. Both grants and loans can help you with up-front costs for implementing new projects, but grants are particularly valuable since you don’t have to pay them back. In comparison to tax credits and utility rebate programs, the process for securing a grant or a loan can take more time, planning, and paper work. However, the incentives can be pretty significant and in some cases can even offset 100% of the project costs.

Farmers and landowners should make themselves especially familiar with the grant programs offered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resource Conservation Service (UDSA NRCS) and USDA Rural Development (USDA RD), listed on page 73. Home owners and business owners with smaller commercial buildings can take advantage of the new federal Renewable Energy Grants program (below), Energy Efficient Mortgages (page 14) and Oregon’s Small Scale Energy Loan Program (SELP) (page 15).

This federal grant program is available to qualifying farms and businesses for 30% of qualifying equipment (for grant purposes, the IRS refers to this as “property”) for the following installations: solar PV electric, solar water heating, fuel cells, small wind turbines, geothermal heat pumps, micro turbines, and combined heat and power systems. There are maximum grant amounts of $1,500 per 0.5 kW for fuel cell property, and $200 per kW for qualified micro turbine property, and up to 10% of the cost of combined heat and power systems less than 50MW. Qualified wind energy, closed-loop biomass, open-loop biomass, geothermal energy, landfill gas, trash, hydropower, and marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy facilities are also eligible for this grant program. For more details and information about this program go to: Navigate12.notlong.com. Note: This new grant program may be utilized in lieu of the federal business energy investment tax credit (ITC) (see page 8) or the federal renewable electricity production tax credit (PTC) (see page 9) for new installations.

special thanks to The preparation of The Navigator was funded in part with a grant from the Oregon Economic Development Program Fund, made available through the United States Forest Service, through Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Act appropriation and administered by the State of Oregon Economic Development Department and Mid-Columbia Economic Development District.

ENERG Y | g r a n ts + l o a n s

RENEWABLE ENERGY GRANTS

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grants + loans co n t i n u ed ENERGY EFFICIENT MORTGAGES (EEM) An Energy Efficient Mortgage allows you to capitalize home energy efficiency improvements in the appraisal of your home and allows estimated monthly energy savings to be added to your income for loan qualification purposes. To qualify for the program, a Home Energy Rating (HER) is generally required. The HER provides a standard measurement of your home’s energy efficiency. Ratings are used for both new and existing homes and involve an on-site inspection by a professional RESNET-certified home energy rater, where data are collected about your home’s insulation levels, door and window efficiency, wall-to-window ratios, heating and cooling system efficiency (this includes checking for air and duct leakage), water heating systems, and the solar orientation of the home. These data are used to assign your home an HER score between 1 and 100 (1 indicates better energy efficiency). An estimate of your home’s energy costs will also be provided, which can help prioritize future energy saving improvements. The Residential Energy Services Network’s (RESNET) website has comprehensive information about this program as well as links to information on the EEM programs supported by the FHA, VA, EPA, Fannie Mae, and Freddie Mac. Go to: Navigate13.notlong.com.

n o tes

USDA RURAL ENERGY FOR AMERICA PROGRAM (REAP) This program provides grants and loan guarantees for small rural businesses and agricultural producers who make energy efficiency improvements or invest in renewable energy systems. Eligible projects include energy efficiency, wind, solar, biomass, geothermal, anaerobic digesters, microhydro and hydrogen derived from biomass or water using wind, solar, or geothermal energy sources. This program applies to large and small-scale projects with grants covering up to 25% of a project’s total cost. In combination with loan guarantees, this program could cover up to 75% of project costs. The loan guarantees have a maximum of $25 million. Small grants of $20,000 or less are especially favored. This program is funded to $55 million for fiscal year 2009, $60 million for FY 2010, and $70 million each for FY 2011 and 2012. According to the Database of State Incentives for Renewables & Efficiency (DSIRE), “a minimum of 20% of the funds available for these incentives will be dedicated to grants of $20,000 or less.” For full details on the USDA REAP program in Oregon, including how to apply and contact information for program staff in the Rural Development Office, go to: Navigate15.notlong.com.

See pages

44-68 for renewable energy systems and pages 26-43 for energy efficiency improvements that may be eligible for REAP funding.

This program provides fixed rate low interest loans to individuals, businesses, schools, cities, counties, special districts, state and federal agencies, public corporations, cooperatives, tribes, non-profits for energy conservation, and renewable energy resource development projects in Oregon. Eligible projects include air and duct system improvements, home and building weatherization, energy efficiency upgrades in lighting and appliances, solar active or passive heating, and wind power projects. Energy Loan Program loan officers and technical experts will be happy to discuss your project with you. Call the loan program at 1.800.221.8035 or visit Navigate55.notlong.com.

See pages

28-68 for examples of projects that may be eligible for SELP loan funding.

OREGON LOW-INCOME WEATHERIZATION ASSISTANCE PROGRAM This program provides funding for home weatherization projects for households at or below 60% of Oregon’s median income of $28,431 (according to 2007 U.S. Census Bureau data). The programs are administered through local community based organizations, including CAP agencies, Senior Centers, Housing Authorities and Tribes and can help implement certain energy efficiency improvements. For more information on the types of assistance available and how to apply, contact Dan Elliott, Weatherization Assistance Program Coordinator, at 503.986.2016 or by e-mail at Dan.Elliott@hcs.state. or.us. You can also learn more at the Oregon Housing and Community Services website: Navigate16. notlong.com.

NOTE: Incentive programs and specific incentive dollar amounts may change at any time.

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SMALL-SCALE ENERGY LOAN PROGRAM (SELP)

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Oreg on SHOW p r o gr a m Oregon State Home Oil Weatherization Program (SHOW) Weatherization rebates of up to $500 are available to Oregon homeowners and renters who heat their homes with oil, wood, propane, kerosene, or butane. Homeowners who conduct their own energy audits may apply for cash rebates for installed weatherization and heating upgrades. The rebates can help offset up to 25% of the costs for such measures as insulation, weather stripping and caulking, blower-door assisted air sealing, water heater insulation, programmable thermostats, replacement oil burners or furnace with 80% or more efficiency, qualifying above-ground oil tanks, replacement windows, insulated exterior doors, and up to 100% (up to $100) of the cost to perform a blower door test with a contractor certified by the Oregon Department of Energy. The Oregon Department of Energy administers the SHOW program. Full details, instructions, and downloadable forms are available on the program website at: Navigate44. notlong.com, or you can call directly at 1-800-221-8035 to request information by mail.

ENERGY TRUST OF OREGON PROGRAMS Energy Trust of Oregon provides numerous programs to help Oregonians save money through energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. These programs are available to Oregon customers of Pacific Power, Portland General Electric, NW Natural, and Cascade Natural Gas, who pay a public purpose charge on their utility bills. To qualify for many of the programs, a qualified contractor must be used to ensure that certain standards are met. Energy Trust’s website provides a regularly updated list of trade ally contractors who are licensed, insured and trained in the latest energy efficiency standards and offerings from Energy Trust. These contractors may also provide help in completing Energy Trust forms needed to receive cash incentives on qualifying improvements. For a list of contractors go to: Navigate17.notlong.com. In addition, the website offers a list of retailers (by zip code) that carry Energy STAR® products. The website also features a Home Energy Analyzer calculator that can help homeowners identify ways to save money by saving energy. Details online at: Navigate18.notlong.com.

CASH INCENTIVES FOR ENERGY STAR® Lighting and Appliances Energy Trust of Oregon provides cash back incentives for the purchase of select Energy STAR® appliances, including a $50 cash incentive for the purchase of a premium efficiency refrigerator or freezer, a $30 cash incentive for recycling an old fridge or freezer, and $100 cash back for the purchase of an Energy Star clothes washer. Plus, Energy Trust offers $30 cash for recycling an old fridge or freezer. Check the Energy Trust website, Navigate18.notlong.com, for a list of qualifying items and be sure to also check the tables on pages 26-27 for more incentives that may be offered by your local utility. Many of these purchases also qualify for an Oregon Residential Energy Tax Credit (see page 11 for details).

NOTE: Incentive programs and specific incentive dollar amounts may change at any time.

Energy trust of Oregon LIMITED TIME INCENTIVE OFFERS

Check out what might fit your timeline from their list online at: Navigate21.notlong.com

HOME ENERGY REVIEW Oregon customers of Portland General Electric, Pacific Power, NW Natural and Cascade Natural Gas primarily heating their homes with electricity or natural gas are eligible to receive a Home Energy Review which is required for eligibility in several Energy Trust programs. During this one-hour review, an energy advisor will walk through your home and create an energy-saving action plan. Customers can schedule a free Home Energy Review on Energy Trust’s website at: Navigate20.notlong. com or by calling 1-866-368-7878 Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

HOME PERFORMANCE WITH ENERGY STAR® assessment A Home Performance with Energy STAR® Assessment is a more intensive inspection of your home’s energy performance, conducted by a Building Performance Institute-certified trade ally contractor. Review fees vary by contractor, but participants will receive a customized energy and cost-saving action plan, identifying which improvements will cut long-term energy costs—calculating energy savings to the dollar—and how they’ll enhance the comfort of your home. For more information, call 1-866-368-7878 or visit EnergyTrust.org/hp.

CASH INCENTIVES FOR HOME IMPROVEMENTS Cash incentives are available for residential energy efficiency upgrades for Oregon customers of Portland General Electric, Pacific Power, NW Natural and Cascade Natural Gas. These upgrades include weatherization, heating and cooling, water heating, purchase and installation of Energy STAR® appliances and renewable energy systems installations like solar electric. Multi-family homeowners and property managers can also benefit from these incentives. Visit Energy Trust’s website at: Navigate22.notlong.com for complete details. Also, be sure to check your local utility’s listing in the tables on pages 26-27 for more home improvement incentives that may be available.

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Energy Trust has several limited time offers and promotions available.

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energy trust of oregon programs c o n t i n u ed RESIDENTIAL SOLAR ELECTRIC incentive Cash incentives of up to $10,000 are available to Oregon customers of Pacific Power or Portland General Electric for the installation of new residential solar electric systems installed by a contractor from their trade ally network. This incentive may be combined with the Oregon Residential Energy Tax Credit (page 11) and the Federal Residential Renewable Energy Tax Credit (page 7) for additional savings. Energy Trust and Umpqua Bank have also created GreenStreet Lending to provide low-interest-financing options that further encourage your move to solar. Visit the Energy Trust website for more information at Navigate23.notlong.com. Contact GreenStreet Lending directly at 1-866-790-2121 or go to GreenStreetLoan.com.

SOLAR WATER HEATING / solar pool heating incentives Energy Trust offers cash incentives to Oregon customers of Pacific Power, Portland General Electric, NW Natural and Cascade Natural Gas who install solar water heating systems or solar pool heating systems by one of Energy Trust’s qualified trade ally contractors. Both residential and commercial hot water and pool heating projects can qualify. Homeowners can receive up to $1,500 and incentives for businesses average about 10-15% of the total project cost. For details, check their website at: Navigate32.notlong.com, or call them directly at 1-866-368-7878.

COMMERCIAL SOLAR ELECTRIC incentive Oregon commercial and industrial customers of Pacific Power and Portland General Electric can receive Energy Trust incentives for installing solar electric systems through one of Energy Trust’s trade ally contractors. Incentives are available for both standard, multi-site and non-profit and government installations. Incentives vary based on the size of the installation and the local utility. To learn more about special rules and limitations and to verify how the program will work for your farm or business, call Energy Trust directly at 1-866-368-7878 or visit the program website at: Navigate24. notlong.com.

ENERGY efficient NEW HOMES incentives This program provides financial incentives to builders who build an energy efficient home above Oregon code. This incentive may be combined with the state and federal tax credits described on pages 6-8 and 11-12 for additional incentives. Rebate amounts for the home itself range from $450 - $1,000. Incentive amounts are subject to change at any time, so be sure to contact Energy Trust directly for the latest information and all the necessary application forms and up-front requirements. Learn more about the new homes program at: Navigate25.notlong.com.

NOTE: Incentive programs and specific incentive dollar amounts may change at any time.

MULTIFAMILY HOME ENERGY SOLUTIONS Cash incentives are available to owners and managers of multifamily properties of five units or larger who improve the energy efficiency of those properties. Incentives are offered for certain high efficiency models of clothes washers, high efficiency common area lighting systems, duct insulation, efficient exterior doors, custom incentives for high efficiency natural gas boilers, upgrades to high efficiency natural gas furnaces, qualified high efficiency heat pumps, insulation for attics, walls and floors, refrigerator recycling, certain energy efficient models of water heaters, and certain qualified high efficiency windows.

production EFFICIENCY incentives The Production Efficiency program from Energy Trust pays cash incentives to rural Oregon customers of Portland General Electric and Pacific Power who invest in energy efficiency upgrades such as lighting, irrigation equipment, pumps, and motors. Energy Trust also provides technical assistance and incentives for wastewater treatment facilities. For more information go to: Navigate126.notlong.com.

BUSINESS ENERGY EFFICIENCY incentives for Existing Buildings Cash incentives and technical assistance are available to Oregon commercial, agricultural, and institutional customers of Portland General Electric, Pacific Power, NW Natural Gas or Cascade Natural Gas who improve the energy efficiency of an existing facility in Oregon. Energy Trust offers Standard Incentives of up to $500,000 per site, per year on qualifying equipment and Custom Incentives for equipment and projects that save energy using equipment not on the Standard Incentive list. Energy Trust will provide guidance, a certified list of trade ally contractors, installation and project management, and post-installation inspections (for projects over $5,000). Contact Energy Trust directly to discuss your project at 1-877-510-6800 or email buildings@energytrust.org. For details go to: Navigate49.notlong.com.

ENERG Y | e n e r g y t r u s t o f o r e g o n p ro g r a m s

Call the Multifamily Home Energy Solution program directly at 1-866-311-1822 for details and to begin the application process. For more information go to: Navigate60.notlong.com.

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energy trust of oregon programs c o n t i n u ed BUSINESS ENERGY EFFICIENCY incentives for New Buildings Cash incentives are available for energy modeling, commissioning, and high-efficiency equipment for commercial new construction or major renovations of commercial or industrial buildings. These incentives are offered through four different program tracks: • • • •

Standard Track: provides cash incentives for purchasing and installing energy efficient equipment. Energy STAR® Track: offers incentives to eligible new building projects that use the Environmental Protection Agency’s national energy performance rating system to achieve the Energy Star building performance certification. Custom Track: provides incentives for building systems that result in energy savings as compared to a code minimum building of the same type and occupancy. USGBC LEED® NC and LEED® CS Track: provides incentives for projects that receive certification from the US Green Building Council LEED® NC and LEED® CS program.

Contact Energy Trust directly to discuss your project by calling 1-877-467-0930 or via email at newbuildings@energytrust.org. See the program details on Energy Trust’s website at: Navigate30.notlong.com.

SMALL WIND INCENTIVEs Energy Trust incentives, combined with state and federal tax credits, make it possible to offset as much as 50% of the cost of a new small wind turbine. These systems, when combined with net metering, provide an attractive return on investment for rural residents living in sufficiently windy areas. To be eligible, you must be an Oregon customer of Portland General Electric or Pacific Power, and your small wind turbine system must generate electricity and be connected to the local electric utility grid. Homeowners can receive up to $35,000 (lesser of: $4,500 per meter of rotor diameter, or $4,500 per rated kilowatt of the wind turbine), and businesses can receive up to $60,000 (Lesser of: $3,750 per meter of rotor diameter, or $4,000 per rated kilowatt of the wind turbine). Energy Trust staff can help evaluate your site to determine feasibility and direct you to their list of approved small wind trade ally contractors that can help you through the complete process. For complete details, visit the program website at: Navigate31.notlong.com, and call Energy Trust at 1-866-368-7878.

ENERGY TRUST UNSOLICITED PROPOSALS/ Emerging Technologies/ Demonstration Projects This Open Solicitation Program supports renewable energy projects that do not already have the support of another Energy Trust incentive program. There is no maximum funding limit for projects, but the total available each year is expected to be about $2 million, and the budget is expected to fund 4-6 projects each year. Program funding is available primarily to small-scale hydro projects and to encourage communities that have already conducted project feasibility studies to submit proposals for funding. In 2009, the program will co-fund nine new feasibility studies, fund two small geothermal projects, and set aside funding for a demonstration project. Plans are in the works to expand efforts to assist Energy Trust customers in applying for other sources of project or feasibility study funding such as the Oregon Economic and Community Development Division’s Renewable Energy Feasibility Fund and USDA grants. For more information go to: Navigate19.notlong.com.

NOTE: Incentive programs and specific incentive dollar amounts may change at any time.

Building a brighter future for Oregon The Oregon Department of Energy can help you invest in renewable energy projects, conservation projects, irrigation projects, sustainable buildings, premium efficiency appliances and heating systems and more. Check out Oregon Energy Tax Credits and State Energy Loan Program for homes, businesses, and non-profits at www.oregon.gov/energy or call our office at 1-800-221-8035.

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community opportunities: Energy+water The following programs are intended to help support investments in energy efficiency upgrades, renewable energy systems, and water supply and wastewater system restoration projects at the community level. Instead of focusing on individual homes and businesses, these programs encourage citizen involvement in helping communities save money and energy as a whole. Each program is different and is available to specific community sectors. In general, however, the following programs include cash incentives, tax credits, grants, and bonds for schools, libraries, community centers, rural and nonprofit electric cooperatives, some small businesses, and state and tribal governments. Be sure to read each program carefully to check for eligibility requirements.

RENEWABLE ENERGY PRODUCTION INCENTIVE (REPI) Federal cash incentives are available to not-for-profit electrical cooperatives, public utilities, state governments, Indian Tribal governments or a political subdivision, and the Native Corporations that produce and sell electricity with a new qualifying renewable energy facility. Incentives of 1.5 cents per kilowatt-hour for the first 10-year period of their operation are available. Qualifying systems include solar, wind, geothermal (with restrictions), biomass (with restrictions), landfill gas, livestock methane, or ocean (including tidal, wave, current, and thermal) generation technologies and fuel cells using hydrogen derived from eligible biomass facilities. For details go to: Navigate33.notlong.com.

CLEAN RENEWABLE ENERGY BONDS (CREBS) These renewable bonds are available to help Local, State, and Tribal Governments, Municipal Utilities, and Rural Electric Cooperatives in financing new renewable energy projects. For more information visit: Navigate34.notlong.com.

TRIBAL ENERGY PROGRAM GRANT This federal grant program through the U.S. Department of Energy provides education, training, and financial and technical assistance to tribes for the evaluation and development of renewable energy resources. For more information, visit the program website at: Navigate37.notlong.com or contact program manager Lizana Pierce at the Golden Field Office by calling (303) 275-4727, email lizana.pierce@go.doe. gov, or in writing to: Lizana Pierce/U.S. Department of Energy Golden Field Office, 1617 Cole Boulevard, MS 1501, Golden, CO 80401

NOTE: Incentive programs and specific incentive dollar amounts may change at any time.

WATER AND WASTE DISPOSAL (WWD) GUARANTEED LOANS This USDA Rural Development program provides guaranteed loans for restoring a deteriorating water supply or to improve, enlarge, or modify a water facility or inadequate waste facility. This loan guarantee is available to public entities such as municipalities, counties, and towns with a population of 10,000 or less as well as Indian tribes, special districts, and nonprofits. Priority is given to public entities in areas with less than 5,500 people and areas with low-income communities. There are no limits to the loan sizes, and interest rates are negotiated with the lender (such as banks and savings and loan associations). The USDA must complete an environmental review for eligibility.

WATER AND WASTE DISPOSAL (WWD) DIRECT LOANS AND GRANTS Direct loans and grants are available through USDA Rural Development to help improve water and waste disposal facilities in areas with populations of 10,000. They are also available to Indian tribes, special districts, and nonprofits with the legal authority to borrow and repay loans. Priority is given to public entities in areas with less than 5,500 people and areas with low-income communities. Grants are available for up to 75% of eligible improvement costs. Interest rates for loans are set periodically and current rate information is available through Oregon’s Rural Development office at 503-414-3300. For more information about this program, visit the USDA Rural Development Oregon water and environmental programs page at: Navigate38.notlong.com.

USDA RURAL development community facilities (CF) Program This program provides loans and grants to rural schools, local, state and tribal governments to help fund energy efficiency improvements and renewable energy systems. See page 71 for more program information and visit their website at: Navigate35.notlong.com.

ENERG Y | c o m m u n i t y o p p o rt u n i t i e s

For more information about this program, visit the USDA Rural Development Oregon water and environmental programs page at: Navigate38.notlong.com.

23 RURAL ENERGY SELF-SUFFICIENCY INITIATIVE This grant program, included in the 2008 Farm Bill but not yet activated, will provides financial assistance to rural communities improving energy self-sufficiency. Grants may be available for up to 50% of project cost to support energy use assessments, improve energy efficiency, and to install community-wide renewable energy systems. For more information about this grant program, visit the updated USDA energy efficiency and renewable energy programs page at: Navigate39.notlong.com.

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community c o nt inu ed VALUE-ADDED PRODUCER GRANT (VAPG) This USDA Rural Development Program provides grants for planning or working capital to agricultural producers, agricultural producer groups, and farm and ranch cooperatives that produce bio-based products from their agricultural commodities. This grant is available for the development of marketing strategies and business plans for these agricultural commodities, including vegetables, flowers, grains, livestock and poultry. It also assists with on-farm renewable energy projects. To learn more about bio-based products go to: Navigate40.notlong.com. For more information about program requirements, refer to the program information page available at: Navigate41.notlong.com.

BONNEVILLE ENVIRONMENTAL FOUNDATION (BEF) Renewable Energy Grants for Communities These renewable energy grants are available to libraries, recreation centers, civic centers, town halls and environmental learning centers among others for the installation of highly visible and educational renewable energy projects. BEF is currently updating its review criteria for these grants, and, in the meantime, directing applicants to use the Solar 4R Schools grant information and application forms to apply. See below for the Solar 4R Schools grant information or go to: Navigate36.notlong.com.

BONNEVILLE ENVIRONMENTAL FOUNDATION “Solar 4R Schools” Grants This grant program is available to any school in Oregon for the installation of small-scale solar energy systems. This program seeks to increase the visibility of renewable energy and provides a photovoltaic system, monitoring equipment, and a renewable energy curriculum. Students can access the monitoring data on school computers and learn about renewable energy. For details and more information about how to apply, go to: Navigate36.notlong.com.

OREGON BUSINESS ENERGY TAX CREDIT (BETC) PASS-THROUGH OPTION The Oregon BETC (see page 12 for introductory details) includes a Pass-Through Option that allows a project owner with or without tax liability (non-profits, tribes, schools, special districts, and governmental agencies) to give their tax credit for the project to a project partner in return for a lump-sum cash payment upon completion of the project, calculated using the pass-through rate. The pass-through rate is set by the Oregon Department of Energy, so be sure to check the current rate when you file your Pass-Through Agreement. Visit ODE’s BETC Pass-Through page for details and to download necessary forms at: Navigate42. notlong.com. NOTE: Incentive programs and specific incentive dollar amounts may change at any time.

ENERGY TRUST COMMUNITY PROGRAMS Energy Trust of Oregon serves Oregon communities with a wide range of programs for energy efficiency and renewable resources. For details, visit the program’s website at: Navigate43.notlong.com or call 1.866.368.7878 and see pages 16-20 for more information.

Funding is available to schools and local and state governments with projects that use renewable energy technologies in established applications or existing commercial technologies in new applications. These projects should be replicable in other locations and demonstrate value to new renewable energy market areas once beyond the research and development phase. For more information about this program, click on the Energy Trust Open Solicitation Program at: Navigate19.notlong.com.

notes

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ENERGY TRUST OPEN SOLICITATION PROGRAM

25

Idaho Power Company

208 / 388 . 2200

Blachly-Lane Electric Cooperative

541 / 688 . 8711

Central Electric Cooperative

541 / 548 . 2144

Consumers Power

541 / 929 . 3124

Coos-Curry Electric Cooperative, Inc.

541 / 332 . 3931

Douglas Electric Cooperative

541 / 673 . 6616

Lane Electric Cooperative

541 / 484 . 1151

Midstate Electric Cooperative, Inc.

800 / 722 . 7219

Salem Electric

503 / 362 . 3601

Umatilla Electric Cooperative

800 / 452 . 2273

West Oregon Electric Coop, Inc.

503 / 429 . 3021

Oregon Trail Electric Cooperative

541 / 523 . 3616

Hood River Electric Cooperative

541 / 354 . 1233

Wasco Electric Cooperative

541 / 296 . 5051

Surprise Valley Electric Cooperative

541 / 947 . 2368

Columbia Basin Cooperative

541 / 676 . 9146

Harney Electric Cooperative

541 / 573 . 2061

Columbia Power Cooperative

541 / 934 . 2311

Columbia Rural Electric (WA)

509 / 382 . 2578

Central Lincoln PUD

541 / 265 . 3211

Columbia River PUD

503 / 397 . 1844

Emerald PUD

541 / 746 . 1583

Tillamook PUD

503 / 842 . 2535

Clatskanie PUD

503 / 728 . 2163

Northern Wasco PUD

541 / 296 . 2226

City of Ashland Electric Dept.

541 / 488 . 5357

City of Bandon

541 / 347 . 2437

Eugene Water & Electric Board

541 / 484 . 2411

McMinnville Water & Light

503 / 472 . 6158

Springfield Utility Board

541 / 746 . 8451

Canby Utility Board

503 / 266 . 4021

Forest Grove Light & Power

503 / 992 . 3250

Milton-Freewater Light & Power

541 / 938 . 556

City of Monmouth

503 / 838 . 3526

City of Drain

541 / 836 . 2417

City of Cascade Locks

541 / 374 . 8484

Hermiston Energy Services

541 / 289 . 2000

Peoples Utility Districts (PUD)

Water Heater

503 / 813 . 7407

Wood/Pellet Stoves

503 / 464 . 7777 

Pacific Power (PacificCorp)

Gas Fireplace

Portland General Electric (PGE)

Boiler

888 / 522 . 1130

Furnace

Cascade Natural Gas

Heat Pump

503 / 226 . 4211

HVAC

NW Natural

AC

800 / 227 . 9187

Prog. Thermostat

Natural Gas

Avista

Heating + cooling

phone number

C o o p e r at i v e E l e c t r i c U t i l i t i e s

Organization name

Investor-Owned Electric Utilities

Each utility’s incentive programs are unique, with their own application processes and requirements. Each utility’s incentive programs may change at any time. At press time, these were the programs available. Before you do anything, call your utility provider to confirm that these incentives are still available, and that more have not recently been added.

M u ni c i pa l E l e c t r i c U t i l i t i e s

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loc a l util it ies in c e n tive s

note — See Pages 16-20 — Energy Trust Incentives For NW Natural Gas, Cascade Natural Gas, Portland General Electric, and Pacific Power supported programs.

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ncentives ,

27

FREE Low-Flow Showerhead

FREE CFL(S)!

Irrigation Efficiency

Biomass

Geothermal

Hydro

Wind

Solar Hot Water

Solar PV

renewable energy

Doors

Windows

Insulation

Air Sealing

Duct Sealing

weatherization

Freezer

Dishwasher

Clothes Washer

Refrigerator

Lighting

energy Efficiency

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28 CONSERVATION AND EFFICIENCY The first step to saving money by saving resources, whether it’s in your home, your business, or on the farm, is to consider how much energy your home or building is using, and potentially wasting. Evaluating how efficiently your home or building uses energy makes it easier to decide which improvements will provide you with the greatest return on your investment in terms of both immediate energy savings as well as long-term reduction in energy consumption. The most effective way to evaluate energy efficiency is through an energy audit or review. Many energy efficiency improvements cost little to no money, are investments that you may need to make already, or are relatively simple to complete in addition to making your home or building more comfortable year-round.

A home energy audit is not required for every federal and state tax credit, rebate, or other incentive listed in The Navigator, but it is a requirement for some programs. A home energy audit completed by a certified professional will take less of your time and yield a more thorough and detailed report. Contact your local utility or see the tables on pages 26-27 to learn about free or incentivized energy audit programs. A do-it-yourself home energy audit is an option, although if you do conduct one yourself, you may not qualify for certain tax credit and other incentive programs. If you are interested in conducting your own home energy audit, go to: Navigate45.notlong. com.

HEATING + COOLING h a r d wa r e Heating and cooling account for about 56% of the energy use in a typical U.S. home, which together makes them the largest energy expense for most households. Energy efficiency upgrades to your heating and cooling system are the key to taking the biggest chunks out of your energy bill. However, it’s important to remember that no matter how efficient your heating and cooling systems are, if your building’s “envelope” is not well sealed and insulated, your home will continue to waste energy and money. There are numerous heating and cooling technologies now available that are extremely energy efficient. These technologies will save you money in the long run through reduced utility bills. In addition, the up-front costs of these highly efficient systems can be reduced through the numerous tax credits, rebates, and other incentives available.

Incentives In addition to the following programs, be sure to check the local utility tables on pages 26-27. NOTE: Incentive programs and specific incentive dollar amounts may change at any time.

business + farm owners!

Some energy efficiency upgrades can be financed by Energy Efficient Mortgages (EEMs) program. For more information about this program, go to page 14 or go to Navigate15.notlong.com.

Federal Residential Energy Efficiency Tax Credit Furnaces, boilers, heat pumps, and air conditioners may qualify for this tax credit. The credit amount is 30% of the total expense, including labor, to install the new equipment. The maximum amount of homeowner credit for all improvements combined is $1,500 for equipment purchased during the two-year period of 2009 and 2010.

See website See page

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Oregon Residential Energy Tax Credit Premium efficiency boilers, heat pumps, central air conditioning systems, furnaces, airhandlers, groundsource heat pumps, wood and pettet stoves, and heat recovery systems may qualify for this credit. The credit amount is based on the energy saved and the cost of the system. Complete details are given at the website listed below. Pre-application and certification is required from the Oregon Department of Energy.

See website See page

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Oregon Business Energy Tax Credit (BETC) HVAC upgrades and heat recovery systems can qualify for the BETC. Your new system must either be 10% more efficient than your old system or, if in a new building, must reduce energy use by at least 10% compared to a similar building. For these kinds of upgrades, the BETC tax credit is 35% of the incremental (or additional) costs of making the project exceed energy code or standard industry practice. New construction projects must have a basic payback of 1 to 15 years. Be sure to review the full BETC program description on page 12 for details on a pass-through option.

See website See page

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ENERG Y | c o n s e r vat i o n : h e at i n g a n d c o o l i n g

The USDA Rural Development’s REAP program on page 15 for grant and loan opportunities to finance efficiency upgrades.

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HEATING + COOLING hardware c o n t i n u ed Energy Trust Business Energy Efficiency incentives for Existing Buildings Furnaces, boilers, heat pumps, and air conditioners can qualify for Energy Trust incentives. Incentives vary by size, model, and type of equipment purchased. Check the website for application forms and details. In general, incentive amounts are:

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• • • • •

Air Conditioner Units: $120 - $495 Heat pumps: $100 - $4000, varies by type and size HVAC Unit Heaters: $1.50/kBtu/hr Radiant Heating: $6.50/kBtu/hr Boilers: $4.00/kBtu/hr See website See page

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Energy Trust Energy Star® New Home incentives Furnaces, heat pumps, and water heaters can qualify for this rebate. The incentive is paid to the homebuilder. Incentive amounts are: • • •

Water Heater: $200 Gas Furnaces: $150-$300 Heat Pumps: $150-$300 depending on HSPF

For application forms and equipment requirement details, visit the website below.

See website See page

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Energy Trust Home Energy Solutions Furnaces, boilers, heat pumps can qualify for this rebate. Incentive amounts are: • • • • • •

Gas Boiler: up to $200 Boiler Pipe Insulation: $0.50 per linear foot Direct Vent Gas Fireplace: up to $70 Direct Vent Gas Heater: up to $100 Gas Furnace: $150 Heat Pumps: $150 - $400, depending on efficiency and previous heating system

Check the website for equipment requirements and application forms.

See website See pages

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NOTE: Incentive programs and specific incentive dollar amounts may change at any time.

DUCT SEALING AND INSULATING

Again, you do not need a contractor for an energy efficiency project to qualify for the Oregon SHOW program rebates (see page 16), but you do need one to qualify for the Oregon Residential Energy Tax Credit, which can offset 25% of the cost of the work, up to $250 (see page 11).

Incentives In addition to the following programs, be sure to check the local utility tables on pages 26-27.

Federal Energy Efficient Commercial Buildings Tax Deduction Duct sealing projects qualify for this corporate tax deduction. The deduction amount can be up to $1.80 per square foot when you install systems that reduce the building’s total energy and power cost by 50% or more in comparison to a building meeting minimum requirements set by ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2001. Energy savings must be calculated using qualified computer software approved by the IRS.

See website See page

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Oregon Residential Energy Tax Credit Duct insulation does not qualify for The Oregon Residential Tax Credit, but duct sealing or the installation of a new premium efficiency duct system does. This tax credit is for 25% of the cost of the project, up to $250. Work must be performed by an Oregon Department of Energy tax credit certified technician.

See website

See page

For program information, go to: Navigate53.notlong.com and for the list of ODOE certified technicians at Navigate54.notlong.com. 11

Oregon Business Energy Tax Credit (BETC) Duct sealing qualifies for the BETC. Your retrofit must either make your system 10% more efficient than your old system or, if in a new building, reduce energy use by at least 10% compared to a similar building. For these kinds of upgrades, the BETC tax credit is 35% of the incremental (or additional) costs of making the project exceed energy code or standard industry practice. New construction projects must have a basic payback of 1 to 15 years. Be sure to review the full BETC program listing on page 12 for details on a pass-through option.

See website See page

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ENERG Y | c o n s e r vat i o n : d uc t s e a l i n g & i n s ul at i o n

A typical house with any forced air heating or cooling system loses 20 to 25% of its conditioned air through holes, leaks and poor connections in its duct system. That’s at least 20% more of your money that you could keep in pocket each month. Sealing leaks and insulating duct systems is the very first thing any homeowner should do to begin saving money. An energy efficient heating and cooling system will also deliver a better monetary return if it’s working in an energy efficient home or building. Taking advantage of tax credits and other incentives will enable you to make these changes to realize maximum energy efficiency in your home.

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DUCT SEALING AND INSULATING c o n t i n u ed Oregon State Home Oil Weatherization Program (SHOW) Homeowners and renters that heat with oil, wood, propane, kerosene, or butane are eligible to receive cash rebates for weatherization projects, including duct insulation and blower-door test assisted air sealing. The incentive for duct insulation is 25% of the total cost up to a maximum rebate of $500. For sealing it’s 25% of the total cost up to a maximum rebate of $500 when you have the work done by a contractor certified by the Oregon Department of Energy.

See website See page

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Oregon Small-Scale Energy Loan Program (SELP) Duct sealing projects can qualify for loan financing through the SELP program. Loans can be as small as $20,000 or as large as $20 million. Terms can range from five to twenty years or longer and are based on the type of project, the amount of energy saved, and other financial considerations. Interest rates are based on bond rates and are fixed for the full term of each loan.

See website See page

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Energy Trust Home Energy Solutions for Existing Homes Oregon customers of Portland General Electric, Pacific Power, NW Natural, and Cascade Natural Gas can qualify for a cash rebate on duct testing ($50), duct sealing (up to $400), and duct insulation for 50% of the cost, up to $100.

See website

See pages

Navigate56.notlong.com (for duct insulation incentive details) Navigate47.notlong.com (for duct testing and sealing incentive details) 16-17

Energy Trust Multi-Family Home Energy Solutions Multi-family properties of five units or larger that are serviced by Portland General Electric, Pacific Power, NW Natural, and Cascade Natural Gas can receive a cash incentive for duct testing ($50), duct sealing (up to $400), and duct insulation for 50% of the cost, up to $100.

See website See page

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NOTE: Incentive programs and specific incentive dollar amounts may change at any time.

INSULATION A typical home not only loses energy through leaky ducts and windows but also through gaps in insulation in attics, floors, and walls. In addition, more energy can be lost due to the inefficiency of an insulation material itself. Once you’ve sealed air leaks throughout your home or building, it makes sense to improve insulation. Insulation’s R-value is a measure of its resistance to heat flow. The higher the R-value, the more efficient the insulation. Your attic should be insulated to a minimum R-value of R-38, R-21 in the knee walls. Walls in heated areas of the home should be insulated to at least R-13 and those in unheated areas should be at R-21. Floors and crawl spaces should be insulated to least R-25. Seal and then insulate ducts to achieve at least R-8 and insulate water pipes to R-3. R-values are important since there are often minimum R-value requirements to qualify for many energy efficiency tax credits and incentives. Visit the U.S. Department of Energy website for more information about how to determine your home’s R-values and your potential savings at: Navigate124.notlong.com. You need to be aware of your home’s current R-values before you begin any improvements since the amount of improvement up to the R-values listed above will affect the weatherization tax credit and incentive amounts for which you may qualify. Be sure to read about any program(s) for which you plan to apply before making any improvements so that you can be sure to qualify by meeting all necessary requirements. In addition to the following programs, be sure to check the local utility tables on pages 26-27.

Federal Energy Efficient Commercial Buildings Tax Deduction Building insulation projects qualify for this corporate tax deduction. The deduction amount can be up to $1.80 per square foot when you install systems that reduce the building’s total energy and power cost by 50% or more in comparison to a building meeting minimum requirements set by ASHRAE Standard 90.12001. Energy savings must be calculated using qualified computer software approved by the IRS.

See website See page

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Federal Residential Energy Efficiency Tax Credit Building insulation is one of several types of projects that can qualify for this personal tax credit. The credit is for 30% of the cost of your project, and, if you take this credit for other eligible projects, the maximum credit allowed for all projects combined is $1,500.

See website See page

Download IRS Form 5695 at this address: Navigate1.notlong.com. 6

Oregon Business Energy Tax Credit (BETC) Building insulation qualifies for the BETC. Your insulation retrofit must make your system either 10% more efficient than your old system or, if in a new building, reduce energy use by at least 10% compared to a similar building. For these kinds of upgrades, the BETC tax credit is 35% of the incremental additional costs of making the project exceed energy code or standard industry practice. New construction projects must have a basic payback of 1 to 15 years. Be sure to review the full BETC program listing on page 12 for details on a pass-through option.

See website See page

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ENERG Y | c o n s e r vat i o n : i n s ul at i o n

Incentives

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INSULATion co nt inu ed Oregon Small-Scale Energy Loan Program (SELP) Building insulation projects can qualify for low-interest loan financing through the SELP program. Loans can be as small as $20,000 or as large as $20 million. Terms can range from five to twenty years or longer and are based on the type of project, the amount of energy saved, and other financial considerations. Interest rates are based on bond rates and are fixed for the full term of each loan.

See website See page

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Energy Trust Business Energy Efficiency incentives for Existing Buildings Commercial utility customers who are served by Portland General Electric, Pacific Power, NW Natural, and Cascade Natural Gas can take advantage of cash rebates of $0.20 per square foot for building insulation projects.

See website See page

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Energy Trust Home Energy Solutions for Existing Homes Utility customers eligible for Energy Trust incentives can qualify for a cash rebate on building insulation projects of $0.25 per square foot for the ceiling and attic, $0.45 per square foot for the floors, and $0.30 per square foot for the wall insulation.

See website See pages

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Energy Trust Multi-Family Home Energy Solutions Oregon multi-family properties of five units or larger that are served by Portland General Electric, Pacific Power, NW Natural, and Cascade Natural Gas can receive a cash incentive for building insulation of $0.25 per square foot for the ceiling and attic, $0.45 per square foot for the floors, and $0.30 per square foot for the wall insulation.

See website See page

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NOTE: Incentive programs and specific incentive dollar amounts may change at any time.

Oregon State Home Oil Weatherization Program (SHOW) Homeowners and renters who heat with oil, wood, propane, kerosene, or butane are eligible to receive cash rebates for weatherization projects, including building insulation. The rebate amount is 25% of the total cost up to a maximum rebate of $500. See website See page

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WINDOWS, DOORS + SKYLIGHTS The efficiency of your windows and doors can significantly affect your home’s heating and cooling energy costs. When they are efficient and correctly sealed, they can dramatically reduce energy needs and, as a result, your energy bills. When they are leaky or uninsulated, they can dramatically increase monthly utility bills. Windows alone can account for as much as 10 to 15% of a typical utility bill. The latest window designs and technologies such as low-e or argon gas windows are extremely efficient. Upgrading to Energy STAR®-rated windows and installing insulated exterior doors can provide big savings over the long term. Since it is not always ideal to completely replace existing windows, there are several easy steps you can take to make them more efficient. These include adding storm windows, applying caulking and weather-stripping, and using window treatments or other coverings (such as overhangs) to insulate windows on winter nights and to provide shade on hot summer days. To learn more about improving existing windows without replacement, go to: Navigate61.notlong.com.

Incentives In addition to the following programs, be sure to check the local utility tables on pages 26-27.

FEDERAL RESIDENTIAL ENERGY EFFICIENCY TAX CREDIT Window and exterior door upgrade projects can qualify for this tax credit. The credit amount is 30% of the total expense, including labor, to install the new equipment. The maximum amount of homeowner credit for all improvements combined is $1,500 for equipment purchased during the two-year period of 2009 and 2010.

See website See page

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Federal Energy Efficient Commercial Buildings Tax Deduction Window and exterior door upgrade projects qualify for this corporate tax deduction. The deduction amount can be up to $1.80 per square foot when installing systems that reduce the building’s total energy and power cost by 50% or more in comparison to a building meeting minimum requirements set by ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2001. Energy savings must be calculated using qualified computer software approved by the IRS.

See website See page

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ENERG Y | c o n s e r vat i o n : w i n d ow s , d o o r s + s k yl i g h ts

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WINDOWS, DOORS + SKYLIGHTS c o n t i n u ed Oregon Small-Scale Energy Loan Program (SELP) Window and door upgrade projects can qualify for low-interest loan financing through the SELP program. Loans can be as small as $20,000 or as large as $20 million. Terms can range from five to twenty years or longer and are based on the type of project, the amount of energy saved, and other financial considerations. Interest rates are based on bond rates and are fixed for the full term of each loan depending on the loan term and availability of funds.

See website See page

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Energy Trust Home Energy Solutions for Existing Homes Oregon utility customers of Portland General Electric, Pacific Power, NW Natural, and Cascade Natural Gas can qualify for a cash rebate on window upgrade installations of $2.25 per square foot, when they are also installing a second energy saving measure.

See website See pages

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Energy Trust Multi-Family Home Energy Solutions Multi-family properties of five units or larger serviced by Portland General Electric, Pacific Power, NW Natural, and Cascade Natural Gas can receive a cash incentive for window upgrade installations of $1.50 to $3.00 per square foot, depending on U-value, glazing and type of heating, and $25 for exterior doors.

See website See page

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Oregon State Home Oil Weatherization Program (SHOW) Homeowners and renters who heat with oil, wood, propane, kerosene, or butane are eligible to receive cash rebates for weatherization projects, including the installation of new windows and doors. The incentive is a 25% rebate for the total cost of the replacement windows or insulated exterior doors, up to $150.00.

See website See page

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NOTE: Incentive programs and specific incentive dollar amounts may change at any time.

Caulking and weather-stripping are a great way to quickly help insulate your home, reduce utility bills, and improve your home’s comfort. This fairly simple improvement will also generally pay for itself in energy savings in less than one year. However, although it’s ideal to seal and insulate your home’s “envelope,” you want to be careful about not making your home too airtight. Be sure to consider your home’s or building’s ventilation system since proper ventilation helps control moisture and prevent buildup of indoor air pollutants.

Incentives In addition to the following programs, be sure to check the local utility tables on pages 26-27 for rebates and cash incentives for air sealing projects.

Oregon Small-Scale Energy Loan Program (SELP) Caulking and weather-stripping projects can qualify for loan financing through the SELP program. Loans can be as small as $20,000 or as large as $20 million. Terms can range from five to twenty years or longer and are based on the type of project, the amount of energy saved, and other financial considerations. Interest rates are based on bond rates and are fixed for the full term of each loan.

See website See pages

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Oregon State Home Oil Weatherization Program (SHOW) Homeowners and renters who heat with oil, wood, propane, kerosene, or butane are eligible to receive cash rebates for weatherization projects, including caulking and weather-stripping. The incentive is a 25% rebate for the total cost of the replacement windows or insulated exterior doors up to $150.00.

See website See page

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Oregon Business Energy Tax Credit (BETC) Caulking and weather-stripping projects can qualify for the BETC. Your retrofit must make your system either 10% more efficient than your old system or, if in a new building, reduce energy use by at least 10% compared to a similar building. For these kinds of upgrades, the BETC tax credit is 35% of the additional costs of making the project exceed energy code or standard industry practice. New construction projects must have a simple payback of 1 to 15 years. Be sure to review the full BETC program listing on page 12 for details on a pass-through option.

See website See page

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Federal Energy Efficient Commercial Buildings Tax Deduction Caulking and weather-stripping projects qualify for this corporate tax deduction. The deduction amount can be up to $1.80 per square foot when you install systems that reduce the building’s total energy and power cost by 50% or more in comparison to a building meeting minimum requirements set by ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2001. Energy savings must be calculated using qualified computer software approved by the IRS.

See website See page

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ENERG Y | c o n s e r vat i o n : c a ul k i n g & w e at h e r s t r i p p i n g

CAULKING + WEATHERSTRIPPING

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lightING One of the simplest ways to begin saving money right away is to replace older incandescent light bulbs with compact fluorescent bulbs (CFLs) or light emitting diode (LED) bulbs. They are both extremely energy efficient and long lasting, more than paying for themselves in reduced energy bills over the life of the bulb. While both bulbs do cost more money up front than regular incandescent bulbs, you’ll use at least 75% less energy to light your home. Plus, many local utilities in Oregon will give you CFLs for free (see the table on pages 26-27 for more information). In addition there are energy efficient light fixtures that also qualify for several cash incentives. There are benefits and limitations to both CFLs and LED bulbs. CFLs and LED bulbs are beneficial because they are long lasting and remain much cooler than incandescent bulbs when turned on. The primary limitation to CFLs involves concerns about how to properly dispose of old CFLs due to the small amount of mercury they contain. LEDs are becoming more versatile for use in the home with new styles and colors. For more information about how to properly recycle CFLs, go to: Navigate130.notlong.com or call your local utility, hardware store, pharmacy, or building supply store to see if they accept and recycle expired CFLs. Most Home Depot and Ikea outlets accept old CFLs for recycling. To learn more about recycling centers and your options for CFLs, enter your zip code at this helpful website: Earth911.com.

Incentives In addition to the following programs, be sure to check the local utility tables on pages 26-27 for rebates and cash incentives to upgrade your building’s lighting fixtures and lighting control systems.

Energy Trust Multi-Family Home Energy Savings Oregon multi-family properties of five units or larger that are serviced by Portland General Electric, Pacific Power, NW Natural and Cascade Natural Gas can receive a cash incentives for common area lighting upgrades. The incentive amount varies widely depending on the type of light fixture. Call 1-866311-1822 or download the PDF list from the web page below.

See website See page

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Federal Energy Efficient Commercial Buildings Tax Deduction Lighting upgrade projects can qualify for this corporate tax deduction. The deduction amount can be up to $1.80 per square foot when you install systems that reduce the building’s total energy and power cost by 50% or more in comparison to a building meeting minimum requirements set by ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2001. Energy savings must be calculated using qualified computer software approved by the IRS.

See website See page

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Oregon Business Energy Tax Credit (BETC) Lighting upgrade projects can qualify for the BETC. Your retrofit must make your system either 25% more efficient than your old system or, if in a new building, reduce energy use by at least 10% compared to a similar building. For these kinds of upgrades, the BETC tax credit is 35% of the additional costs of making the project exceed energy code or standard industry practice. New construction projects must have a basic payback of 1 to 15 years. Be sure to review the full BETC program listing on page 12 for details on a pass-through option.

See website See page

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Oregon Small-Scale Energy Loan Program (SELP) Lighting upgrade projects can qualify for loan financing through the SELP program. Loans can be as small as $20,000 or as large as $20 million. Terms can range from five to twenty years or longer and are based on the type of project, the amount of energy saved, and other financial considerations. Interest rates are based on bond rates and are fixed for the full term of each loan.

See website See page

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Energy Trust Business Energy Efficiency incentives for Existing Buildings

See website See page

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Energy Trust Business Energy Efficiency incentives Commercial utility customers of Portland General Electric, Pacific Power, NW Natural, and Cascade Natural Gas can qualify for commercial new construction or major renovation projects for energy modeling, commissioning and high-efficiency equipment, including lighting systems. These incentives range from $30,000 per project for the ENERGY STAR速 track, $100,000 for the Standard track, $300,000 for the USGBC LEED NC or CS Track, or up to $365,000 per project for the Custom Track.

See website See pages

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Energy Trust Production Efficiency incentives Industrial, agricultural, manufacturing, and water/wastewater treatment facilities that are Portland General Electric and Pacific Power utility customers and contribute to the public purpose charge are eligible for cash incentives for lighting and lighting control/sensor systems.

See website See page

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NOTE: Incentive programs and specific incentive dollar amounts may change at any time.

ENERG Y | c o n s e r vat i o n : l i g h t i n g

Commercial utility customers eligible for Energy Trust incentives can qualify for cash rebates for lighting fixture upgrades and lighting controls from $10 to $75 per new fixture depending on type.

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APPLIANCES Appliances account for about 20% of the monthly energy bill in the average U.S. household. The U.S. Department of Energy estimates that about 40% of all appliance-related electricity used in the home is consumed while appliances are actually turned off since appliances continue to draw energy even when they are not in use. By simply unplugging, or plugging small appliances into power strips that can cut the flow of electricity when they’re not in use, you can save about $100 a year. In addition, upgrading old appliances could dramatically reduce energy costs. Extremely energy efficient appliances, including Energy STAR® appliances such as dishwashers, clothes washers, and refrigerators are available. If you are considering upgrading any of your appliances this year, there are many incentives available to help offset both purchase and installation costs. In addition, many energy efficient or Energy STAR® small appliances are available with additional retailer incentives. Check the Energy STAR® program website to learn more about the latest rebate and incentive offers just by entering your zip code. Go to: Navigate66.notlong.com.

SAMPLE CALCULATIONS: For a step-by-step guide to determining the payback period on new energy efficient appliances, refer to the worksheet on page 79. There are several factors that can influence the ultimate payback period for a purchase such as interest paid on loans and maintenance and repair costs. Those additional costs have not been factored into the following example, which is presented to give you a simple idea of how potential costs and savings might pencil out. Assumptions: A project’s payback period and the ultimate return on investment will be influenced

by the amount of energy you currently consume, your utility company, and the project details itself. For this example, let’s say the project is for a family of four. They are customers of Pacific Power, use about 12,000 kWh per year, and currently pay a rate of $0.0841 per kWh. *Energy costs calculated for this example neither differentiate between the type of electricity, such as gas or oil, nor factor in the cost of water in annual operation cost.

1 Calculate Net Cost of Project a. Premium efficient clothes washer........................................................................................$500 b. Premium efficient dishwasher..............................................................................................$545 c. Premium efficient refrigerator...........................................................................................$1,100 Gross Cost of Project: 2 Calculate Total Incentives a. b.

Energy Trust Home Energy Solutions for Existing Homes Program: $100 rebate for clothes washer; $50 for qualifying refrigerator; $30 for recycling old refrigerator Oregon Residential Energy Tax Credit: $180 (clothes washer); $80 (for dishwasher); $90 (for refrigerator)

Total Incentives:

Net Cost of Project:

(Total Incentives of $530 subtracted from Gross Cost of Project of $2,145.00)

3 Calculated Payback Period a. Annual kWh savings (25 kWh (for the clothes washer); 77 kWh (for the dishwasher); 934 kWh (for the refrigerator).................................................................................. 1,036 kWh b. Annual cost savings (1,036 kWh x $0.0841)......................................................

= 18.5 year payback Net Cost of Project

Annual Cost Savings

Incentives In addition to the following programs, be sure to check the local utility tables on pages 26-27 for rebates and cash incentives to upgrade your appliances.

Oregon Residential Energy Tax Credit Clothes washers, dishwashers, and refrigerators can qualify for this tax credit. The credit amount is based upon the energy savings and cost of the equipment.

See website See page

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Clothes washers, refrigerators, and freezers can qualify for this incentive. Incentive amounts are: • • •

$75 to $100 for clothes washers, depending on the model’s Modified Energy Factor (MEF) for new Energy Star clothes washers purchased before December 31, 2009. Note: not all Energy Star labeled clothes washers qualify. Be sure to check the list before you buy. $50 cash back on premium efficiency Energy STAR® qualified refrigerators and freezers Note: not all Energy STAR® labeled clothes washers qualify. Be sure to check the list before you buy. $30 cash for recycling your old refrigerator or freezer with Energy Trust. See website See pages

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Energy Trust Multi-Family Home Energy solutions Multi-family properties of five units or larger serviced by Pacific Power, Portland General Electric, NW Natural, and Cascade Natural Gas can receive a cash incentive for qualified Energy Star clothes washers and refrigerator recycling. Note: not all Energy Star labeled clothes washers qualify. Be sure to check their list before you buy. The incentive amounts are: • • • •

Residential clothes washers: $100 per washer. Commercial clothes washers with electric hot water: $300 per washer. Commercial clothes washers with gas hot water: $200 per washer. $30 cash back for recycling old refrigerators with Energy Trust. See website See page

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Energy Trust Business Energy Efficiency incentive for Existing Buildings Clothes washers and dryers, dishwashers, refrigerators, freezers, and other food service and commercial kitchen equipment can qualify for Energy Trust rebates. Incentives range from $45 to $1,000 per appliance, depending on type. Check the website for application forms and details.

See website See pages

Navigate27.notlong.com 16 and 19 NOTE: Incentive programs and specific incentive dollar amounts may change at any time.

ENERG Y | c o n s e r vat i o n : APP L IAN C ES

Energy Trust Home Energy Solutions

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HOT WATER HEATERS Water heating is one of the most significant energy uses in the home, accounting for about 14% to 25% of the energy consumed in the home. Ensuring your water heater and the first 6 feet of pipe leading from it are well insulated is the least expensive way to make the most of your current water heater. Many local utility companies in Oregon will give you an insulating blanket for your water heater for free. The costs of upgrading to a newer, more efficient model can be partially offset by taking advantage of all available tax credits, rebates, and incentives.

Note Before you make your final decision on water heater upgrade purchases, look at the solar water heating technologies available and their supporting rebates, tax credits, and other cash incentives on pages 50-53. If you are eligible for Energy Trust incentives, be sure to check out their Solar Water Heating Buy-Down Program (details on page 18).

Incentives In addition to the following programs, be sure to check the local utility tables on pages 26-27 for rebates and cash incentives to upgrade your water heater.

Oregon Residential Energy Tax Credit Premium efficiency water heaters, solar water heaters (see page 50), and wastewater heat recovery systems qualify for this personal tax credit. The credit amount is based on the energy savings and cost of the equipment.

See website See page

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Oregon Small-Scale Energy Loan Program (SELP) Water heaters and water heating system efficiency upgrades can qualify for loan financing through the SELP program. Loans can be as small as $20,000 or as large as $20 million. Terms can range from five to twenty years or longer and are based on the type of project, the amount of energy saved, and other financial considerations. Interest rates are based on bond rates and are fixed for the full term of each loan.

See website See page

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Energy Trust Home Energy Solutions for Existing Homes High-efficiency water heaters and solar water heaters can qualify for Energy Trust incentives. Incentives range from $35 to $1,500 per water heater, depending on type. Check the website for application forms and details.

See website

See pages

Navigate70.notlong.com (for electric water heater) Navigate71.notlong.com (for solar water heaters) 17-18

Energy Trust Multi-Family Home Energy Savings Program Multi-family properties of five units or larger that are serviced by Portland General Electric, Pacific Power, NW Natural, and Cascade Natural Gas can receive a cash incentive for energy efficient water heaters. Incentive amounts vary by water heater type. Call 866-311-1822 for details and visit the website. See website See page

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Federal Energy Efficient Commercial Buildings Tax Deduction Water heater upgrades can qualify for this corporate tax deduction. The deduction amount can be up to $1.80 per square foot of the building when you install systems that reduce the building’s total energy and power cost by 50% or more in comparison to a building meeting minimum requirements set by ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2001. Energy savings must be calculated using qualified computer software approved by the IRS.

See website See page

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Energy Trust Business Energy Efficiency incentives for Existing Buildings Water heating system upgrades and solar water heating systems (see page 50) can qualify for Energy Trust rebates. Call 1-877–510–6800 and check the website for application forms and details. For commercial solar hot water systems, the incentive amounts are: • •

PGE/Pacific Power customers using electric water heating: $0.40 per first-year kWh savings up to 35% of the project cost. NW Natural/Cascade customers using gas water heating: $6.00 per first-year kWh savings up to 35% of the project cost. See website See page

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Energy Trust Energy efficient New Homes incentives Home builders who are eligible for Energy Trust incentives can receive cash rebates of $200 per water heater for gas water heaters with a minimum of 0.81 efficiency.

See website See page

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NOTE: Incentive programs and specific incentive dollar amounts may change at any time.

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44 I n t r od u c tion t o ren ewab l es Renewable energy technologies utilizing solar, wind, wave, and biomass resources hold huge potential for Oregon’s economy through new jobs and greater energy security with wind farms, solar arrays, and large-scale biomass facilities. There is also great potential for renewable technologies to produce energy at the small-scale and residential level. Not only are there numerous incentive programs like tax credits, rebates, and financing options to help Oregon homeowners, businesses, and farms invest in their own renewable energy systems (see also pages 26-27), but there is also potential for long-term savings through renewable energy generation. For examples of renewable energy system installation projects in Oregon demonstrating the savings potential, review ODA’s Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency document at: Navigate74.notlong.com. This chapter outlines several renewable energy technologies: what they are, how they work,

and how to get started. Brief guidelines are provided to help readers understand which technologies are most appropriate for specific locations and circumstances, thereby ensuring the best return on any investment over the long term. Since each technology has a variety of incentives to make it more affordable to invest in small-scale energy generation, page numbers to corresponding incentive programs are listed throughout this chapter. Most renewable energy projects require the assistance of professionals for both planning and installation. A professional contractor who is tax-credit certified with the State of Oregon is the best resource for determining which technologies are appropriate for your needs and also for ensuring that your project will qualify for tax credits and other incentives. The State website provides the most current lists of tax-credit certified technicians for each kind of renewable energy system. Links to these web pages are listed throughout this chapter.

a b out net m e t e r i n g In general terms, net metering allows utility customers who install renewable energy systems (such as solar or wind power) to essentially “sell” this generated power back to the utility at the wholesale rate. However, savings to the utility customer occur through reduced utility bills. This is due to the fact that a building’s electric meter runs forward when you are using electricity and backward when a renewable energy system is generating surplus electricity. Thus, your utility bill is ultimately reduced to the net amount of power used and charged. Oregon’s net metering law requires utility companies to provide this special billing arrangement. Over a typical billing-cycle period, customers only pay for the net amount of electricity used from a utility over and above the amount of electricity generated by the renewable energy system. However, few utilities will pay you for the energy generated beyond that which you use, so be sure to check in advance if you are

fir st e a sy ste ps

1 Conduct a Home Energy Review. 2 Make necessary improvements in energy efficiency. 3 Research which renewable energy technologies that will work for your home, farm, or business. A contractor can help you determine your best options.

4 Contact a tax-credit certified professional to help guide you through the process.

planning to invest in a high-capacity system. See the local utility tables on pages 26-27 for more information about net metering availability and other local utility incentives.

Although the design and installation process for each renewable energy technology system is very different, there are several steps that are important to take when planning any investment. It is first important to know both how much energy your home, your farm, or your business use every month as well as the potential energy that might be saved through energy efficiency. The easiest way to do this is through a Home Energy Review or Home Energy Audit. Making up-front energy efficiency improvements before installing a renewable energy technology will dramatically improve the short and long-term return on your investment. After making improvements in energy efficiency, think about the kind of renewable energy technology that might work for your home, farm, or business. The following sections provide brief descriptions, but, for more in-depth information of the different types of renewable energy systems outlined in this chapter, visit the U.S. Department of Energy’s Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) program website at: Navigate75.notlong.com. Next, in order to make sure that a residential project will qualify for the Oregon Department of Energy tax credits, rebates, and other incentives listed on pages 26-27, it is important to contact a tax credit certified technician. More information is available at the Oregon Department of Energy website at: Navigate76. notlong.com. Energy Trust’s incentives generally require work to be completed by a trade ally contractor. Updated lists are available at: Navigate77.notlong.com.

a bo ut pe r m its Once you’ve found an appropriate contractor and before you begin any construction or installation you will need the required permits from your city or county building department. The contractor should be able to guide you through the permitting process. It is likely that you will at least need a building and electrical permit before changes can legally be made to your property. Costs accrued during the permitting process are typically assessed in the overall cost of the installation, thereby figuring into any tax credit or incentive. The permitting process is an important step in ensuring that the system will be safe, perform as expected, and be eligible for incentives. Typically, a building or electrical inspector will need to make sure that everything is operating correctly after installation. In addition, your utility company may require an inspection in order to set up a net metering arrangement.

ENERG Y | r e n ewa bl e s

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SOLAR PHOTOVOLTAIC (PV) Oregon is well suited for solar electric energy, with many areas receiving about as much sun as the national average. Solar electric energy is generated through photovoltaic (PV) panels, which can provide an alternative source of power in both urban and rural areas. Solar PV systems can be connected to the power grid, thereby enabling users to sign up for net metering (see page 44) or the users can be “off-grid,” in locations including rural farms and homesteads where it can be difficult and expensive to get electricity through conventional power lines.

How Solar PV Works Photovoltaic panels or modules are composed of silicon layers that absorb sunlight. Energy from the absorbed light causes a reaction that generates electrical currents that flow directly from the PV panels. This electricity is then stored in a battery bank for household use. The household power needs are then drawn out of the stored battery power, and the PV panels recharge the batteries when their charge drops below a certain level.

First Steps To Solar (PV) Electric After you have completed the steps outlined in the BEFORE YOU START section on page 45, you then want to consider your location to determine if your property gets enough direct sun to make a solar investment worthwhile. In addition, it’s important to note the amount of available space that is in direct sun through most of the day. At the very least, you’ll need about 50 square feet of roof surface to install the smallest PV panel available. Both the size and angle of the roofline will influence a solar collector’s potential performance. Solar modules can also be installed at ground level under the right circumstances. Download the Oregon Department of Energy’s Solar Site Assessment and Sun Chart flyer for more technical information at: Navigate78.notlong.com. Research solar PV systems and determine the type of system in which you are most interested. The Oregon Department of Energy’s “Oregon Solar Electric Guide” gives a great introduction to available systems and is available free via download at: Navigate79.notlong.com. Now you are ready to call a solar company for a site visit and an initial bid. Visit the Oregon Department of Energy’s website for a list of tax-credit certified solar technicians. Download the up-to-date list at: Navigate80.notlong.com.

Incentives continued on page 48 In addition to the following programs, be sure to check the local utility tables on pages 26-27.

Federal Residential Renewable Energy Tax Credit Photovoltaic systems can qualify for this federal personal tax credit. The tax credit is for 30% of the total cost to purchase and install a new solar electric system for your home (or a residential building you own). For solar electric systems placed in service before 2009, the maximum tax credit is $2,000. For systems placed in service after 2008, there is no maximum credit amount.

See website See page

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Oregon Residential Energy Tax Credit New photovoltaic systems can qualify for this personal tax credit for $3 per watt of energy generation up to $6,000 over a four-year period (a maximum of $1,500 per year). Unused credits may be carried forward for five years. An Oregon tax-credit certified solar PV technician must verify your system for qualification. Call 1-800-221-8035, or visit the website below for a current list of certified technicians.

See website See page

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do the math Sample Calculations

Assumptions A project’s payback period and then ultimate return on investment will be influenced by the amount of energy you currently consume, your utility company, and the project details itself. For this example, let’s say the project is for a family of four. They are customers of Pacific Power, use about 12,000 kWh per year, and currently pay a rate of $0.0841 per kWh.

1 Calculate Net Cost of Project

a. Equipment and components costs for a 2KW solar PV system...............................$18,000

b. Installation costs..................................................................................................................$2,000

Gross Cost of Project:

2 Calculate Total Incentives

a. Energy Trust Rebate...........................................................................................................$4,000

b. Federal Residential Renewable Energy Tax Credit........................................................$6,000

c. Oregon Residential Energy Tax Credit............................................................................$6,000

Total Incentives:

Net Cost of Project:

(Total Incentives of $16,000 subtracted from Gross Cost of Project of $20,000)

3 Calculated Payback Period

a. Annual kWh savings................................................................................................... 2,000 kWh

b. Annual cost savings (2,000 kWh x $0.0841)......................................................

Net Cost of Project

Annual Cost Savings

Payback Period = 23.8 years

NOTE: Incentive programs and specific incentive dollar amounts may change at any time.

ENERG Y | r e n ewa bl e s : s o l a r p h o tovo lta i c

For a step-by-step guide to determining your project’s payback period, refer to the worksheet on page 79. There are several factors that can influence a project’s ultimate payback period such as interest paid on loans and maintenance and repair costs. Those additional costs have not been factored into the following example, which is presented to give you a simple idea of how potential costs and savings might pencil out.

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SOLAR PHOTOVOLTAIC (PV) c o n t i n u ed Energy Efficient Mortgages (EEM) + Energy Improvement Mortgages (EIM) New photovoltaic systems, along with a few other solar technologies, are eligible for financing through an Energy Efficient Mortgage or an Energy Improvement Mortgage. The amount of financing depends on the type of mortgage and the underwriting agency (FHA, HUD, VA, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac). For example, the FHA allows lenders to add up to 100% of energy efficiency improvements to an existing mortgage loan by insuring a loan of up to 5% of a home’s appraised value with certain restrictions. The VA insures EEMs to be used in conjunction with VA loans, and, for these, homebuyers may borrow up to $6,000 if the projected energy savings are greater than the increase in mortgage payments.

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See website See page

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Oregon Small-Scale Energy Loan Program (SELP) Photovoltaic systems can qualify for loan financing through the SELP program. Loans can be as small as $20,000 or as large as $20 million. Terms can range from five to twenty years or longer and are based on the type of project, the amount of energy saved, and other financial considerations. Interest rates are based on bond rates and are fixed for the full term of each loan.

See website See page

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Business Energy Investment Tax Credit (ITC) Photovoltaic systems can qualify for this corporate tax credit. The amount of the credit is 30% of the total project cost with no maximum limit. After December 31, 2016, this amount will revert back to 10% of the total project cost.

See website See page Note

Navigate82.notlong.com 8 See also the U.S. Department of Treasury Renewable Energy Grants

Oregon Business Energy Tax Credit (BETC) Photovoltaic systems are eligible for this corporate tax credit. The credit amount is 50% of the eligible project costs, distributed over 5 years (10% per year). However, if your total eligible project costs are less than $20,000 you may take the entire credit in one year. See page 12 for details on carry-over provisions and pass-through options.

See website See page

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Modified Accelerated Cost-Recovery System (MACRS) + Bonus Depreciation Photovoltaic systems are eligible for this corporate depreciation deduction. In general terms, this program gives solar and other renewable energy property a five-year property class life for depreciation. (This means that your system’s value, for tax purposes, decreases by 20% of the purchase price each year for 5 years. On the sixth year, is has no taxable value.) For more information on the federal MACRS, see IRS Publication 946. Use IRS Form 4562. See website See page

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Energy Trust Solar Electric Cash Incentives Oregon utility customers of Pacific Power and Portland General Electric can take advantage of cash incentives to offset some of the costs of installing new photovoltaic systems. The systems must be grid-connected, net-metered, pre-approved, and installed by an approved Energy Trust solar trade ally contractor. The incentive amounts vary depending on the utility and customer type (residential, industrial, or governmental, for example). For residential solar electric systems, the incentive is $2.00 per watt up to a maximum incentive of $20,000 for Pacific Power customers and $2.25 per watt up to $20,000 for Portland General Electric customers.

See website See pages

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USDA Rural Energy for America Program (REAP) Grants and Loan Guarantees Photovoltaic systems are eligible for grant funding or loan guarantees through this program. Agricultural producers and rural small businesses are eligible to apply for grant funding and/or loan guarantees to purchase renewable energy systems (including systems that can be used to produce and sell electricity), make energy efficiency improvements, and conduct relevant feasibility studies. Grants are limited to 25% of the project’s total cost. The maximum loan guarantee is $25 million. The combined amount of a grant and loan guarantee cannot exceed 75% of the total project cost.

See website See page

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U.S. Department of Treasury Renewable Energy Grants Photovoltaic systems are eligible for grant funding through this program. The grant amount is 30% of the property cost for solar systems. At the date of this printing, the U.S. Department of Treasury had not yet released guidelines and was not yet accepting applications. The guidelines release date will be late Spring 2009.

See website See page

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ENERG Y | r e n ewa bl e s : s o l a r p h o tovo lta i c

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SOLAR HOT water The typical Oregon household with electric hot water heaters can save about $150 a year by installing a solar hot water heating system. Currently, more than 17,000 Oregon households are already using solar hot water heaters. These systems are extremely efficient and have a relatively quick payback period, particularly if you take advantage of all the tax credits, rebates, and other incentives available.

How Solar Hot Water Works Solar hot water systems are typically composed of solar collectors and storage tanks. Unlike PV panels, solar collectors do not convert the sun’s energy into electricity, but rather pre-heat your home’s hot water supply, thereby reducing the energy required to heat water.

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There are several different kinds of solar hot water systems, including “open loop,” where the domestic water itself is directly heated, and “closed loop,” where a heat-transfer fluid is heated by the collector and the heat exchanged with the domestic hot water. Some systems are “active,” using moving parts such as pumps and valves, and while others are “passive,” using no mechanical or moving parts. Active systems are generally more efficient, but also more expensive, while passive systems are typically more reliable and longer lasting, but not as efficient. A tax credit certified technician is a good resource to help determine which system will work best for your building (visit the ODE website at: Navigate9.notlong.com).

First Steps to Solar Hot Water After you have completed the steps outlined in the BEFORE YOU START section on page 45 and determined that your property gets enough direct sun to make a solar investment worthwhile you’ll want to make several more assessments. The right solar hot water model and system size will be determined by how much water your household uses on average throughout the year, your geographical location, and the number of people living in your house (you’ll need a small 50 to 60 gallon storage tank for 1 to 3 people). For active systems, the size of the solar storage tank increases with the size of the collector – typically 1.5 gallons per square foot of collector. For roof-mounted systems, you’ll need at least 20 square feet for a family of two (plus an additional 12 to14 square feet per person) for a standard solar hot water system for a family. To help speed up the process, gather your water bills for the past year and make a note of the total gallons used. Then make a note of the approximate available square footage of your roof surfaces. Also note the possible locations available for a water storage tank on your property. Next, take a look at the available technologies and try to get a rough idea of the kind of system that might work best for your building. A tax credit certified technician will be able to help you make the final decision and choose a solar hot water system that will work best for your needs, but it’s also a good idea to have a general understanding of what’s out there. The U.S. Department of Energy’s solar hot water heating section of their website is a great place to start your research. Follow the “Selecting a New Water Heater” link on the water heating page: Navigate84.notlong.com. Visit the Oregon Department of Energy’s website for a list of tax credit certified technicians. Download the up-to-date list at: Navigate80.notlong.com.

Solar Hot Water Incentives continued on page 52 In addition to the following programs, be sure to check the local utility tables on pages 26-27.

Oregon Residential Energy Tax Credit Solar water heating systems qualify for this personal tax credit. The credit amount is $0.60 per kWh saved during the first year, up to $1,500, and limited to 50% of the total system cost. An Oregon taxcredit certified solar technician must verify that your system qualifies. Download the application form, technician list, and other requirements at the website below.

See website See page

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do the math Sample Calculations For a step-by-step guide to determining your project’s payback period, refer to the worksheet on page 79. There are several factors that can influence a project’s ultimate payback period such as interest paid on loans and maintenance and repair costs. Those additional costs have not been factored into the following example, which is presented to give you a simple idea of how potential costs and savings might pencil out. A project’s payback period and then ultimate return on investment will be influenced by the amount of energy you currently consume, your utility company, and the project details itself. For this example, let’s say the project is for a family of four. They are customers of Pacific Power, use about 12,000 kWh per year, and currently pay a rate of $0.0841 per kWh.

1 Calculate Net Cost of Project

a. Preparation, solar water heating equipment, and component costs...........................$7,500

b. Installation costs..................................................................................................................$1,000

Gross Cost of Project:

2 Calculate Total Incentives

a. Energy Trust incentive at ($0.40/kWh of 1st year savings - estimated 3,400 kWh)........$1,360

b. Federal Residential Renewable Energy Tax Credit (30% of net cost after rebate)..........$2,142

c. Oregon Residential Energy Tax Credit............................................................................$1,500 ($0.60/kWh 1st year savings up to $1,500)

Total Incentives:

Net Cost of Project:

(Total Incentives of $5,002 subtracted from Gross Cost of Project of $8,500)

3 Calculated Payback Period

a. Annual kWh savings (with average wind speeds just under 10 mph)............................. 3,400 kWh

b. Annual cost savings (3,400 kWh x $0.0841)...............................................

Net Cost of Project

Annual Cost Savings

Payback Period = 12.23 years

NOTE: Incentive programs and specific incentive dollar amounts may change at any time.

ENERG Y | r e n ewa bl e s : s o l a r h o t wat e r

Assumptions

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SOLAR hot water c o n t i n u ed Federal Residential Renewable Energy Tax Credit Solar water heating systems may qualify for this federal personal tax credit. The tax credit is for 30% of the total cost to purchase and install a new solar electric system for your home (or a residential building you own). For solar electric systems placed in service on or before December 31, 2008, the maximum tax credit is $2,000. For systems placed in service on or after January 1, 2009, there is no maximum credit amount.

See website See page

Download IRS Form 5965 at Navigate1.notlong.com 7

Energy Efficient Mortgages (EEM) + Energy Improvement Mortgages (EIM) Solar water heating systems are eligible for financing through an Energy Efficient Mortgage or an Energy Improvement Mortgage. The amount of financing depends on the type of mortgage and the underwriting agency (FHA, HUD, VA, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac). For example, the FHA allows lenders to add up to 100% of energy efficiency improvements to an existing mortgage loan by insuring a loan of up to 5% of a home’s appraised value (with certain restrictions). The VA insures EEMs to be used in conjunction with VA loans, and, for these, homebuyers may borrow up to $6,000 if the projected energy savings are greater than the increase in mortgage payments.

See website See page

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USDA Rural Energy for America Program (REAP) Grants and Loan Guarantees Solar water heating systems are eligible for grant funding or loan guarantees through this program. Agricultural producers and rural small businesses are eligible to apply for grant funding or loan guarantees to purchase renewable energy systems (including systems that can be used to produce and sell electricity), make energy efficiency improvements, and conduct relevant feasibility studies. Grants are limited to 25% of the project’s total cost. The maximum loan guarantee is $25 million. The combined amount of a grant and loan guarantee cannot exceed 75% of the total project cost.

See website See page

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Energy Trust Solar water + pool heating Cash Incentives Utility customers of Pacific Power, Portland General Electric, NW Natural, and Cascade Natural Gas can take advantage of this program to offset some of the costs of installing new solar water heating and solar pool heating systems. The incentive amounts vary by applicant, (for example residential, business, or farm) water heating fuel, and electric or gas utility, with maximum incentives of $1,500 for residential solar water heaters; $1,000 for residential pool heating; 35% of system cost for commercial customers.

See website See page

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Modified Accelerated Cost-Recovery System (MACRS) + Bonus Depreciation Solar hot water heating systems are eligible for this corporate depreciation deduction. In general terms, this program gives solar and other renewable energy projects a five-year property class life for depreciation. (This means that your system’s value, for tax purposes, decreases by 20% of the purchase price each year for 5 years. On the sixth year, it has no taxable value.) For more information on the federal MACRS, see IRS Publication 946. Use IRS Form 4562.

See website See page

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Solar water heating systems may qualify for this corporate tax credit. The amount of the credit is 30% of the total project cost, with no maximum limit. After December 31, 2016, however, this amount will revert back to 10% of the total project cost.

See website See page Note

Navigate82.notlong.com 8 See the U.S. Department of Treasury Renewable Energy Grants below

Oregon Business Energy Tax Credit (BETC) Solar water heating systems are eligible for this corporate tax credit. The credit amount is 50% of the eligible project costs, distributed over 5 years (10% per year). However, if your total eligible project costs are less than $20,000, you may take the entire credit in one year. See page 12 for details on carry-over provisions and pass-through options.

See website See page

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U.S. Department of Treasury Renewable Energy Grants Solar water heating systems are eligible for grant funding through this program. The grant amount is 30% of the property cost for solar systems. At the date of this printing, the U.S. Department of Treasury had not yet released guidelines and was not yet accepting applications. For the latest updates, go to the website listed below.

See website See page

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Oregon Small-Scale Energy Loan Program (SELP) Solar water heating systems can qualify for loan financing through the SELP program. Loans can be as small as $20,000 or as large as $20 million. Terms can range from five to twenty years or longer and are based on the type of project, the amount of energy saved, and other financial considerations. Interest rates are based on bond rates and are fixed for the full term of each loan.

See website See page

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ENERG Y | r e n ewa bl e s : s o l a r h o t wat e r

Business Energy Investment Tax Credit (ITC)

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passive solar space heating Most homes generally use a certain amount of natural sunlight to meet lighting and heating needs. Passive solar design maximizes solar heat gain in winter and minimizes it in summer to regulate a home or building’s temperature. Design elements can reduce heating and cooling energy bills and improve indoor comfort without the use of mechanical devices, pumps, or fans to move solar heat.

How Passive Solar Heating Works Some general concepts of passive solar design include lots of south facing windows, and thermal mass (heat-absorbing materials like tile and brick) in the winter months, and overhangs or deciduous trees to limit sun exposure in the summer. You can apply passive solar design techniques most easily when designing a new home. However, existing buildings can be adapted or “retro-fitted” to passively collect and store solar heat. For more information about the principles of passive solar design, go to: Navigate86.notlong.com.

First Steps To Solar Space Heating After you have completed the steps outlined in the BEFORE YOU START section (on page 45), the next step is to assess your home’s solar exposure. Depending on how long you’ve lived in your home, you might have observed the sun’s movement throughout the seasons. It is important to note where the sun is located relative to your house on the solstices when the sun is at its lowest angle (December 21) and its highest angle (June 21). There are many varied steps you can take to achieve optimal passive solar design. No matter what you decide to do, however, keep several principles in mind: 1) The more southern exposure your home has, the more light and heat you will gain. Exposure to the east can capture morning sun, while orientation to the west will catch late afternoon sun. 2) Maintaining minimal exposure to the north, particularly in the winter months, is important to reduce the effects of low sunlight (shade) and prevailing winds. This may involve planting evergreens along the north side to help insulate north-facing windows, or even relocating north-facing windows. 3) Thermal mass allows heat from the sun to be absorbed during the daylight hours and then released into the building at night. The right thermal mass will prevent overheating during the summer and avoid cold conditions during the winter. Tax credits for passive solar improvements are available for things like additional south-facing windows and the addition of awnings for minimizing solar gain. For more details about passive solar principles, visit: Navigate87.notlong.com. You could also potentially receive the federal Residential Energy Efficiency Tax Credit for up to 30% (up to $1,500 in 2009 and 2010) of the costs of building envelope or weatherization improvements that contribute to passive solar design including insulation materials and systems designed to reduce a home’s heat loss or gain, exterior doors and windows (including skylights), and pigmented metal roofs designed to reduce heat gain, and asphalt roofs with appropriate cooling granules. For more information, go to: Navigate1.notlong.com. For more tax credits information, go to: Navigate87.notlong.com. To learn if you might qualify, contact the Oregon Department of Energy at (503) 378-4040 or by email at energyweb.incoming@state.or.us.

Solar Space Heating Incentives In addition to the following programs, be sure to check the local utility tables on pages 26-27.

NOTE: Incentive programs and specific incentive dollar amounts may change at any time.

DID YOU KNOW? Partially heating a home with solar energy is not difficult in Oregon. If done correctly the home will use 20 to 50 percent less energy during summer months.

Oregon Residential Energy Tax Credit Passive solar space heating systems qualify for this personal tax credit. The credit amount is $0.60 per kWh saved during the first year, up to $1,500, and limited to 50% of the total system cost. Check the website below for a list of requirements and links to download the application form. Also, contact the Oregon Department of Energy directly at: (503) 378-4040 or by email at energyweb. incoming@state.or.us.

See website See page

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Energy Efficient Mortgages (EEM) + Energy Improvement Mortgages (EIM) Passive solar space heating systems are eligible for financing through an Energy Efficient Mortgage or an Energy Improvement Mortgage. The amount of financing depends on the type of mortgage and the underwriting agency (FHA, HUD, VA, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac).

See website See page

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oregon business Energy Tax Credit (betc) Passive solar space heating systems are eligible for this corporate tax credit. This business energy tax credit is available for building features that use solar energy to reduce heating, cooling, and lighting energy by 20%. Program materials are under development. Contact Oregon Department of Energy for more information at (800) 221-8035.

See website See page

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the heating season and remain cool during the

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small-scale wind energy Oregon has abundant wind energy resources. This is evident by the growth of Oregon’s wind industry and large-scale wind farms. However, there is also ample opportunity for small-scale wind energy investments with residential wind turbines for homeowners, businesses, and farms. Depending on a home’s or building’s location and wind resource potential, the installation of a small-scale wind turbine could significantly lower electricity bills. While harnessing the wind for power isn’t a new idea, the current technology is highly reliable and efficiently converts wind energy into electricity, typically ranging in electrical output capacity from 500 watts up to 20 kilowatts (a typical domestic size is 1 to 6 kW). Like other forms of small-scale renewable energy, wind turbines can be either connected to the grid, allowing users to take advantage of net metering (see page 44) or can be off-grid, allowing users to make direct use (or storage) of power.

First Steps to Wind Energy After you have completed the steps outlined in the BEFORE YOU START section on page 45, you’ll need to determine if wind is a viable option for your property. A small-scale wind turbine might be a good investment if some of these conditions apply to your property: •

• •

• •

Does your property have a good wind resource? You will need a minimum of 10 mph average annual wind speed. If you are a customer of Portland General Electric or Pacific Power, you can call Erin Johnston at 503-459-4075 to find out if your property meets this criterion. Also visit: Navigate89.notlong.com for more resource information. Is your home or building located on at least one acre of land? Do your local zoning codes or covenants allow wind turbines? Although they vary in size, turbines are generally mounted 60-100 feet off the ground (depending on the wind capacity of the site) and may have blades 10-25 feet in diameter. Contact your local planning office or Home Owners Association for more information. Is your average monthly electricity bill $150 or more? Is your property in a remote area without easy access to utility lines? Wind energy may be an economical option to help you avoid the expense of getting power lines extended to your building from the closest utility lines. However, in order to qualify for Energy Trust incentives, your wind turbine must be connected to the grid and be within 1,500 feet of a utility’s electricity meter. Are you comfortable with long-term investments?

Once you’ve determined that a wind turbine might be a viable option, you are ready to start thinking about sizing and pricing wind systems. The next move is to contact a tax-credit certified contractor approved by your local utility and Energy Trust to ensure that your project will qualify for all the rebates and incentives available. Small wind energy systems typically cost $3,000 - $5,000 for every kilowatt of generating capacity. Larger systems with an 80’ tower, batteries, and inverter typically range $25,000 - $60,000 for a 3-10kW turbine. Payback time depends on the system you choose, the real wind resource on your site, electricity costs in your area, and how you will use your wind system. If you have a consistent wind resource at your site, have a net metering billing agreement with your utility and take advantage of state and federal tax credits, loan financing, and other incentives like those provided by Energy Trust, your investment payback might be just a few years. Keep in mind that to qualify for incentives, your system must meet certain requirements. For example, only PGE, Pacific Power, Cascade Natural Gas, and NW Natural customers can receive Energy Trust incentives, and those systems must meet the following criteria: 1) Be located on a property at least one acre in size 2) Be located within 1,500 feet of a utility’s electrical meter, and 3) Experience average wind speeds of at least 10 mph. For more information go to: Navigate31.notlong.com. Landowners who wish to work with a commercial wind developer on their land should first visit the following webpage for more information: Navigate90.notlong.com. While small-scale wind energy systems in Oregon will vary greatly in size, capacity, and cost, it’s relatively easy to calculate potential savings. For some examples about the feasibility and short and long-term savings of several small-scale wind systems across Oregon, go to the ODA’s Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency document at: Navigate74.notlong.com. Wind energy systems are eligible for Modified Accelerated Cost-Recovery System (MACRS) + Bonus Depreciation (see page 9).

do the math

For a step-by-step guide to determining your project’s payback period, refer to the worksheet on page 79. There are several factors that can influence a project’s ultimate payback period such as interest paid on loans and maintenance and repair costs. Those additional costs have not been factored into the following example, which is presented to give you a simple idea of how potential costs and savings might pencil out.

Assumptions A project’s payback period and then ultimate return on investment will be influenced by the amount of energy you currently consume, your utility company, and the project details itself. For this example, let’s say the project is for a family of four. They are customers of Pacific Power, use about 12,000 kWh per year, and currently pay a rate of $0.0841 per kWh.

1 Calculate Net Cost of Project

a. Preparation, wind turbine, and component costs........................................................$35,000

b. Installation costs..................................................................................................................$5,000

Gross Cost of Project:

2 Calculate Total Incentives

a. Energy Trust rebate (at $4,500 per rated kW).................................................................$22,500

b. Federal Residential Renewable Energy Tax Credit (30% of net cost after rebate)..........$5,250

c. Oregon Residential Energy Tax Credit............................................................................$6,000 ($1,500 per year for 4 years up to $6,000 or $2/kWh saved in the 1st year)

Total Incentives:

Net Cost of Project:

(Total Incentives of $33,750 subtracted from Gross Cost of Project of $40,000)

3 Calculated Payback Period

a. Annual kWh savings (with average wind speeds just under 10 mph)............................. 8,300 kWh

b. Annual cost savings (8,300 kWh x $0.0841)...............................................

Net Cost of Project

Annual Cost Savings

Payback Period = 8.9 years

NOTE: Incentive programs and specific incentive dollar amounts may change at any time.

ENERG Y | r e n ewa bl e s : s m a ll - s c a l e w i n d e n e r g y

Sample Calculations

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small-scale wind energy c o n t i n u ed Business Energy Investment Tax Credit (ITC) Wind energy systems can qualify for this corporate tax credit. The amount of the credit is 30% of the total project cost, with no maximum limit. After December 31, 2016, however, this amount will revert back to 10% of the total project cost.

See website See page Note

Navigate3.notlong.com 8 See also the U.S. Department of Treasury Renewable Energy Grants

Oregon Residential Energy Tax Credit (RETC) Solar water heating systems qualify for this personal tax credit. The credit amount is $0.60 per kWh saved during the first year, up to $1,500, and limited to 50% of the total system cost. An Oregon taxcredit certified solar technician must verify that your system qualifies. Download the application form, technician list, and other requirements at the website below.

See website See page

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Oregon Business Energy Tax Credit (BETC) Wind energy systems are eligible for this corporate tax credit. Your wind energy system must replace at least 10% of the electricity your building or business currently uses. The credit amount is 50% of the eligible project costs, distributed over 5 years (10% per year). However, if your total eligible project costs are less than $20,000, you may take the entire credit in one year. See page 12 for details on carry-over provisions and pass-through options.

See website See page

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SMALL WIND INCENTIVEs Energy Trust incentives, combined with state and federal tax credits, make it possible to offset as much as 50% of the cost of a new small wind turbine. To be eligible, you must be an Oregon customer of Portland General Electric or Pacific Power, and your small wind turbine system must generate electricity and be connected to the local electric utility grid. For complete details, visit the program website at: Navigate31.notlong.com, and call Energy Trust at 1-866-368-7878.

See pages

16-19

NOTE: Incentive programs and specific incentive dollar amounts may change at any time.

Federal Residential Renewable Energy Tax Credit Residential scale wind energy systems can qualify for this federal personal tax credit. The tax credit is for 30% of the total cost to purchase and install a new wind energy system for your home (or a residential building you own).

See website See page

Download IRS Form 5965 at: Navigate1.notlong.com 7

U.S. Department of Treasury Renewable Energy Grants Wind energy systems are eligible for grant funding through this program. The grant amount is 30% of the property cost for wind systems. At the date of this printing, the U.S. Department of Treasury had not yet released guidelines and was not yet accepting applications. For the most updated information, visit the website listed below.

See website See page

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Federal Renewable Electricity Production Tax Credit (PTC) Commercial and industrial taxpayers who produce and sell electricity with wind and several other renewable energy technologies can take advantage of this federal corporate tax credit. For wind, the credit is 2.1 cents per KWh. Read instructions for IRS Form 8835 for details.

See website See page

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USDA Rural Energy for America Program (REAP) Grants and Loan Guarantees Wind energy systems are eligible for grant funding or loan guarantees through this program. Agricultural producers and rural small businesses are eligible to apply for grant funding or loan guarantees to purchase renewable energy systems (including systems that can be used to produce and sell electricity), make energy efficiency improvements, and conduct relevant feasibility studies. Grants are limited to 25% of the project’s total cost. The maximum loan guarantee is $25 million and the combined amount of a grant and loan guarantee cannot exceed 75% of the total project cost.

See website See page

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ENERG Y | r e n ewa bl e s : s m a ll - s c a l e w i n d e n e r g y

For wind power systems placed in service on or before December 31, 2008, the maximum tax credit is $4,000. For systems placed in service on or after January 1, 2009 there is no maximum credit amount.

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SMALL-SCALE HYDROELECTRIC SYSTEMS If you have flowing water on your property, with consistent flow and sufficient elevation change, you might be able to use a micro-hydropower system to generate your own electricity. There are numerous opportunities to use hydropower for energy without dams. Micro-hydropower uses turbines to generate power in a similar manner to the way wind turbines generate power from the kinetic energy of wind. A 10-kilowatt system is generally sufficient to power a large home, small commercial building or small farm.

First Steps to Small-Scale Hydroelectric Systems Your very first step in planning a micro-hydropower system is to contact your local State of Oregon Water Resources Department (OWRD) watermaster to determine which water regulations might affect your project and which permits you’ll need. Go to Navigate94.notlong.com for an OWRD directory of regional field offices and watermasters. Your District’s watermaster should be able to inform you about how best to proceed with your project and direct you to all necessary contacts. To learn more about how to get started with a micro-hydropower system and about water use regulations or permit information, visit the Oregon Department of Energy Renewable Resources department at Navigate95.notlong.com. Note: Energy Trust of Oregon is currently working on a guide to permitting processes that will be available in Fall 2009. To determine the potential of a micro-hydropower system in watts, you will need to know the vertical distance in feet from the proposed diversion to the proposed micro-turbine site and the stream’s flow (the quantity of flowing water) in cubic feet per second (cfs) over the entire proposed period of operation. The most accurate way to determine the vertical distance and flow (particularly if you have not done it before) is to have a professional survey of your site. The Oregon Department of Energy Renewable Resources page at Navigate96.notlong.com has a list of advisory contacts to help you determine your micro-hydropower potential. However, if you choose to determine the vertical distance and flow, there are several helpful online resources at Navigate95.notlong.com and Navigate97.notlong.com. You can also visit EERE’s website and follow the steps for the do-it-yourself (with a friend) “Hose-Tube Method” at Navigate98.notlong.com. For more in-depth information about calculating potential power output from a micro-hydropower system, you can visit Energy Trust’s website at Navigate99.notlong.com.

USDA Rural Energy for America Program (REAP) Hydroelectric systems are eligible for grant funding or loan guarantees through this program. Agricultural producers and rural small businesses are eligible to apply for grant funding and/or loan guarantees to purchase renewable energy systems (including systems that can be used to produce and sell electricity), make energy efficiency improvements, and conduct relevant feasibility studies. Grants are limited to 25% of the project’s total cost. The maximum loan guarantee is $25 million. The combined amount of a grant and loan guarantee cannot exceed 75% of the total project cost.

See website See page

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Business Energy Investment Tax Credit (ITC) Hydroelectric systems may qualify for this Federal corporate tax credit. The amount of the credit is 10% of the total project cost, with no maximum limit.

See website See page Note

Navigate3.notlong.com 8 See also the U.S. Department of Treasury Renewable Energy Grants

Oregon Small-Scale Energy Loan Program (SELP) Small hydroelectric systems can qualify for loan financing through the SELP program. Loans can be as small as $20,000 or as large as $20 million. Terms can range from five to twenty years or longer and are based on the type of project, the amount of energy saved, and other financial considerations. Interest rates are based on bond rates and are fixed for the full term of each loan. See website See page

Navigate55.notlong.com 15

Oregon Business Energy Tax Credit (BETC) Hydroelectric systems are eligible for this corporate tax credit. Your hydro system must replace at least 10% of the electricity your building or business currently uses. The credit amount is 50% of the eligible project costs, distributed over 5 years (10% per year). However, if your total eligible project costs are less than $20,000, you may take the entire credit in one year. See page 12 for details on carry-over provisions and pass-through options..

See website See page

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Federal Renewable Electricity Production Tax Credit (PTC) Commercial and industrial taxpayers who produce and sell electricity with hydroelectric, hydrokinetic, and several other renewable energy technologies can take advantage of this federal corporate tax credit. For hydro, the credit is 2.1 cents per kWh. Read instructions for IRS Form 8835 for details.

See website See page

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U.S. Department of Treasury Renewable Energy Grants Hydroelectric systems are eligible for grant funding through this program. The grant amount is 30% of the equipment that is part of a qualified facility and 10% of all other property. At the date of this printing, the U.S. Department of Treasury had not yet released guidelines and was not yet accepting applications. For the most updated information, visit the website listed below.

See website See page

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NOTE: Incentive programs and specific incentive dollar amounts may change at any time.

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Your local OSU Extension office, Watershed Council, Resource Conservation and Development (RC&D) office, Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) and Soil and Water Conservation District (SWCD) can be your best resource for information and assistance in planning any energy or water efficiency project.

Oregon State University Extension Services County Office Directory extension.oregonstate.edu/locations.php

Network of Oregon Watershed Councils Watershed Council Directory

r e s o u r c e c o n s e r vat i o n & D e v e l o p m e n t

Cascade Pacific RC&D Serving Benton, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Marion and Polk Counties Columbia - Blue Mountain RC&D Serving Gilliam, Grant, Morrow, Umatilla and Wheeler counties

phone number 541 / 737 . 2713

541 / 737 . 2713

541 / 967 . 5925 ext 4

541 / 278 . 8049 ext 7

Eagle Cap RC&D Serving Baker, Union, and Wallowa counties

541 / 963 . 4178 ext 3

Northwest Oregon RC&D Serving Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Multnomah, Tillamook, Washington, and Yamhill counties

503 / 648 . 3174 ext 6

Ore-Cal RC&D Serving Klamath, Lake, Siskiyou counties

530 / 667 . 4247 ext 2

Southeast Oregon RC&D Serving Malheur and Harney counties

541 / 889 . 2588 ext 101

Southwest Oregon RC&D 541 / 476 . 5906 Serving Coos, Curry, Douglas, Jackson and Josephine counties Wy’East RC&D Serving Crook, Deschutes, Hood River, Jefferson, Sherman and Wasco Counties

541 / 296 . 2391 ext 117

s o i l a n d wat e r c o n s e r vat i o n d i s t r i c t S

Watershed Councils

extension offices

Organization name

COUNTY or swcd name

phone number

Baker Valley

541 / 523 . 7121

Benton bentonswcd.org

541 / 753 . 7208

Burnt River

541 / 523 . 7121

Clackamas conservationdistrict.org

503 / 655 . 3144

Clatsop clatsopswcd.org

503 / 325 . 4571

Columbia columbiaswcd.com

503 / 397 . 4555

Coos coosswcd.oacd.org

541 / 396 . 6879

Crook County

541 / 447 . 3548

Curry County currywatersheds.org

541 / 247 . 2755

Deschutes

541 / 923 . 2204

Douglas douglasswcd.org

541 / 957 . 5061

Eagle Valley

541 / 523 . 7121

East Multnomah emswcd.org

503 / 222 . SOIL

Ft. Rock-Silver Lake

541 / 947 . 5855

Gilliam geocities.com/gilliamcountyswcd

541 / 384 . 2672

Grant

541 / 575 . 0135

Harney

541 / 573 . 5010

Hood River hoodriverswcd.org

541 / 386 . 4588

Illinois Valley

541 / 592 . 3731

Jackson jswcd.org

541 / 734 . 3143

Jefferson

541 / 923 . 4358

Josephine

541 / 474 . 6840

Keating

541 / 523 . 7121

Klamath klamathswcd.org

541 / 883 . 6932

Lakeview

541 / 947 . 5855

Lincoln midcoastpartners.org

541 / 265 . 2631

Linn linnswcd.oacd.org

541 / 926 . 2483

Malheur County

541 / 889 . 2588

Marion marionswcd.net

503 / 391 . 9927

Monument

541 / 934 . 2141

Morrow

541 / 676 . 5452

Polk polkswcd.org

503 / 623 . 9680

Sherman County sherman.oacd.org

541 / 565 . 3216

Siuslaw siuslawswcd.org

541 / 997 . 1272

Tillamook County

503 / 842 . 2240

Tualatin swcd.net

503 / 648 . 3174

Umatilla County umatillacountyswcd.com

541 / 276 . 8131

Umpqua

541 / 271 . 2611

Union

541 / 963 . 0724

Upper Willamette SWCD (Formerly East Lane) 541 / 465 . 6436 Wallowa

NRCS offices

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loc al con servatio n re s o u rc e s

Locate your NRCS office through the online directory at: Navigate127.notlong.com

541 / 426 . 4588

Wasco wasco.oacd.org

541 / 296 . 6178

West Multnomah westmultconserv.org

503 / 238 . 4775

Wheeler

541 / 468 . 2990

Yamhill yamhillswcd.org

503 / 472 . 1474

a n in novative fish sc reening so lut i o n Farmers need water to grow crops. To get this water, farmers must maintain a water delivery system that can transport water from a river or lake to their farm. Since these systems travel through rugged terrain for many miles, farmers and agencies have spent decades trying to figure out a screening technology that keeps fish, sticks, and leaves from coming into the canals, clogging the system, and preventing the flow of water. While maintaining these systems is costly for farmers, it has proven to be an equally large problem for fish. In search of a way to reduce their costs, protect fish and keep their own canals free of debris, the farmers of the Farmers Irrigation District in Hood River, Oregon spent ten years developing the Farmers Screen. Having received state and federal agency approval for the technology, the farmers patented their unique screening device. To honor the collaborative effort of farmers, agencies and nonprofits that supported the screen’s success, the technology is licensed to the Farmers Conservation Alliance (FCA) with the condition that profits be used for the united benefit of fish, farms and families. With more than 150,000 unscreened diversions in the Northwest alone, the Farmers Screen is an exciting opportunity to protect millions of fish and save farmers millions of dollars in reduced operation and maintenance costs.

th e farmers sc reen

office 14 oak street, suite 302 . hood river . oregon . 97031

telephone 541.716.6085

website www.farmerscreen.org

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geothermal energy systems Geothermal energy, essentially, is heat from within the earth that can be transferred through steam and hot water to heat or cool buildings or generate electricity. Geothermal energy can be used directly through hot water from springs or geothermal reservoirs, through electric generation from hot water or steam, or with geothermal, or “groundsource,” heat pumps. Ground-source heat pumps can be used on a residential scale to utilize the near constant temperature of certain layers of the Earth (50°F to 70°F depending on geographic location) for exchanging hot or cool air or water between your home and the earth as needed for heating and cooling..

How Geothermal Works Geothermal energy can be used on both large and small scales. At the residential scale, ground-source heat pumps or dual-source heat pumps (which combine air-source and ground-source heat pumps) can be used to exchange warm or cool air or water to heat and cool buildings. Both of these types of heat pumps are extremely quiet, long-lasting, low maintenance, and extremely energy efficient. Ground-source heat pumps use a buried ground loop, which transfers heat to or from the ground into a building to provide space heating or cooling. There are three main components to a ground-source heat pump system including the buried pipe systems through which the heat exchange process takes place, the heat pump itself, and the heat distribution system. A contractor can help you determine what will work best for your property. In order to qualify for the Oregon Residential Energy Tax Credit, your ground-source heat pump must be a closed-loop design and meet certain performance criteria. For more details, see the Oregon Department of Energy geothermal page at Navigate101.notlong.com. Due to the variety of options available, a qualified contractor is the best source to help you determine the appropriate configuration for the resources on your site. For a list of tax-credit certified contractors go to Navigate102.notlong.com.

First Steps to Geothermal After you have completed the steps outlined in the BEFORE YOU START section on page 45, you first want to consider if 1) your property is located in an area preferable for a ground-source installation and 2) you have enough space outside your home for the ground loop system. You’ll also have to determine if the ground is suitable for digging a trench or borehole for the buried loop system. To quickly determine if your property might have geothermal potential, review the Oregon Department of Energy’s map at Navigate103.notlong.com. Both the type of system you choose as well as the type of fuel that the ground or dual-source heat pump will replace will influence the payback time on your investment. Proper equipment sizing is based your home’s energy efficiency level and will also affect your payback period. Contractors will size your heat pump based on your home’s or building’s energy efficiency as assessed by the efficiency values of your windows, duct systems, and insulation, among other things. Essentially, the more efficient your home, the smaller size heat pump you will need, which can minimize up-front costs. A Home Energy Rating (HER) or energy audit is a great way to learn about improving your home’s energy efficiency, thereby improving the return on a ground-source heat pump investment. Since Oregon has such geothermal energy potential, there are numerous products and accredited contractors specializing in ground-source heat pump installation. For more information go to Navigate102.notlong.com.

Geothermal Incentives continued on page 66 In addition to the following programs, be sure to check the local utility tables on pages 26-27.

do the math sample calculations

Assumptions A project’s payback period and then ultimate return on investment will be influenced by the amount of energy you currently consume, your utility company, and the project details itself. For this example, let’s say the project is for a family of four. They are customers of Pacific Power, use about 12,000 kWh per year, and currently pay a rate of $0.0841 per kWh.

1 Calculate Net Cost of Project

a. Ground-source heat pump and component costs.........................................................$7,000

b. Installation costs..................................................................................................................$2,000

Gross Cost of Project:

2 Calculate Total Incentives

a. Federal Residential Renewable Energy Tax Credit (30% of net cost)............................$3,000

b. Oregon Residential Energy Tax Credit...............................................................................$750

Total Incentives:

Net Cost of Project: (Total Incentives of $3,750.00 subtracted from Gross Cost of Project of $9,000)

3 Calculated Payback Period

a. Annual kWh savings................................................................................................... 5,400 kWh

b. Annual cost savings (5,400 kWh x $0.0841)......................................................

Net Cost of Project

Annual Cost Savings

Payback Period = 11.6 years

NOTE: Incentive programs and specific incentive dollar amounts may change at any time.

ENERG Y | r e n ewa bl e s : g e o t h e r m a l e n e r g y

For a step-by-step guide to determining your project’s payback period, refer to the worksheet on page 79. There are several factors that can influence a project’s ultimate payback period such as interest paid on loans and maintenance and repair costs. Those additional costs have not been factored into the following example, which is presented to give you a simple idea of how potential costs and savings might pencil out.

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geothermal c o nt in u ed Federal Residential Renewable Energy Tax Credit Geothermal (or ground-source) heat pumps may qualify for this federal personal tax credit. The tax credit is for 30% of the total cost to purchase and install a new geothermal heat pump system for your home (or a residential building you own). Ground-source heat pump systems placed in service on or before December 31, 2008 have a maximum tax credit limit of $2,000. There is no maximum tax credit amount for systems placed in service on or after January 1, 2009.

See website See page

Download instructions for IRS Form 5965 at Navigate1.notlong.com 7

Oregon Residential Energy Tax Credit Ground-source heat pumps qualify for this personal tax credit. Your system must be closed loop, meet a specific performance rating, and be installed by a tax-credit certified geothermal technician (see the website below for the link to a list of technicians). The tax credit is $600 to $900 depending on the system size. Other requirements and specifications are outlined in the application form.

See website See page

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USDA Rural Energy for America Program (REAP) Geothermal electric systems and geothermal heat pumps are eligible for grant funding or loan guarantees through this program. Agricultural producers and rural small businesses are eligible to apply for grant funding or loan guarantees to purchase renewable energy systems (including systems that may be used to produce and sell electricity), make energy efficiency improvements, and conduct relevant feasibility studies. Grants are limited to 25% of the project’s total cost. The maximum loan guarantee is $25 million. The combined amount of a grant and loan guarantee cannot exceed 75% of the total project cost.

See website See page

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Oregon Business Energy Tax Credit (BETC) Geothermal electric systems and geothermal heat pumps are eligible for this corporate tax credit. Your geothermal system must replace at least 10% of the electricity your building or business currently uses. The credit amount is 50% of the eligible project costs, distributed over 5 years (10% per year). However, if your total eligible project costs are less than $20,000, you may take the entire credit in one year. See page 12 for details on carry-over provisions and pass-through options..

See website See page

Navigate100.notlong.com 12

NOTE: Incentive programs and specific incentive dollar amounts may change at any time.

Energy Trust Production Efficiency Industrial, agricultural, manufacturing, and water/wastewater treatment facilities that are Portland General Electric, Pacific Power, NW Natural, or Cascade Natural Gas utility customers, and that contribute to the public purpose charge, are eligible for cash rebates for geothermal heat pump systems. Download the Production Efficiency program brochure from the website below and call them at 503.445.7643 to learn more.

See website See page

Navigate65.notlong.com 19

Business Energy Investment Tax Credit (ITC)

See website See page Note

Navigate3.notlong.com 8 See also the U.S. Department of Treasury Renewable Energy Grants

U.S. Department of Treasury Renewable Energy Grants Geothermal electric systems and geothermal heat pumps are eligible for grant funding through this program. The grant amount is 30% for a qualified facility or 10% of the equipment. At the date of this printing, the U.S. Department of Treasury had not yet released guidelines and was not yet accepting applications. For the most updated information, visit the website listed below.

See website See page

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Federal Renewable Electricity Production Tax Credit (PTC) Commercial and industrial tax payers who produce and sell electricity with geothermal electric systems, and several other renewable energy technologies, can take advantage of this federal corporate tax credit. For geothermal electric, the credit is 2.1 cents per KWh. Read instructions for IRS Form 8835 for details.

See website See page

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ENERG Y | r e n ewa bl e s : g e o t h e r m a l

Geothermal electric systems, geothermal heat pumps, and direct-use geothermal systems may qualify for this Federal corporate tax credit. The amount of the credit is 10% of the total project cost, with no maximum limit.

67 Energy Trust geothermal incentives Geothermal heat pumps may qualify for this incentive. The incentive amount is $150 to $300 depending on the efficiency rating of your system. For application forms and equipment requirement details, visit the website listed below. Ground-source heat pumps can qualify for Energy Trust rebates. The incentive amount is $300 to $3,000 depending on system size. Check the website for details.

See website See pages

Navigate50.notlong.com / Navigate27.notlong.com 16-19

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biomass energy SYSTEMS Biomass is a very general term that refers to organic materials produced by plants or animals. Biomass contains energy that can be utilized through various conversion processes. There are two major methods of converting the stored energy in biomass into a usable form of energy for human enterprises: conversion of the biomass into a liquid or gaseous fuel, and incineration of the biomass to produce heat to drive a turbine or to heat buildings. As with most forms of energy generation, biomass energy production occurs at both the industrial scale and at the individual home or business scale. Biomass can produce an array of biofuels including: biodiesel, ethanol, and methane. Each biofuel type has advantages and disadvantages and each are useful for specific applications. Production of biofuels can be accomplished at both the individual user and the industrial scale. Biofuel production can be a great option for agricultural producers who may have both a waste stream that can be utilized and a need for the fuel produced. There are many methods to utilize the energy stored in biomass through direct combustion. The most common and oldest method is through burning wood in a woodstove or fireplace. Today, there are many new systems that either utilize waste products, or more efficiently utilize the energy stored in the biomass. At the individual home scale, wood pellets are one of the most common and efficient methods of utilizing biomass. At the industrial scale, combustion of biomass is used to produce both heat and power. There are many different types of systems that work well for specific feed stocks and heat or power requirements. Biomass utilization can become very complicated and obtaining help from an expert is advised. Whether you are already using wood products, or if you’re planning to develop a residential-scale biomass fuel operation, new tax credits and other incentives could make your biomass project possible.

First Steps To Biomass After you have completed the steps outlined in the BEFORE YOU START section on page 45, you might consider the use of biomass in some capacity at your home. Biomass can be a great option for agricultural producers since they typically have the space and “waste” materials available and can use the fuel they produce for their own needs.

Biomass Incentives In addition to the following programs, be sure to check the local utility tables on pages 26-27.

Federal Residential Renewable Energy Tax Credit Stoves that use a qualified biomass fuel can qualify for this tax credit. The credit amount is 30% of the total expense to install the new equipment, including labor. The maximum amount of homeowner credit for all improvements combined is $1,500 for equipment purchased during the two-year period of 2009 and 2010.

See website See page

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NOTE: Incentive programs and specific incentive dollar amounts may change at any time.

Oregon Residential Energy Tax Credit Premium efficiency biomass combustion devices qualify for this personal tax credit. The credit amount is $0.40 per kWh saved in first year up to $300 or 25% of the cost, whichever is less. See website See page

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Energy Trust biopower incentives Energy Trust of Oregon helps fund projects across Oregon that convert wastes into fuel to generate clean, renewable power.

See website See page

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Oregon Small-Scale Energy Loan Program (SELP) Biomass systems can qualify for low-interest loan financing through the SELP program. Loans can be as small as $20,000 or as large as $20 million. Terms can range from five to twenty years or longer and are based on the type of project, the amount of energy saved, and other financial considerations. Interest rates are based on bond rates and are fixed for the full term of each loan.

See website See page

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Oregon Business Energy Tax Credit (BETC) Biomass systems are eligible for this corporate tax credit. The credit amount is 50% of the eligible project costs, distributed over 5 years (10% per year). However, if your total eligible project costs are less than $20,000, you may take the entire credit in one year. See page 12 for details on carry-over provisions and pass-through options.

See website See page

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Business Energy Investment Tax Credit (ITC) Biomass systems can qualify for this Federal corporate tax credit. The amount of the credit is 10% of the total project cost, with no maximum limit.

See website Note See page

Navigate3.notlong.com See also the U.S. Department of Treasury Renewable Energy Grants 8

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biomass c o nt inued Modified Accelerated Cost-Recovery System (MACRS) and Bonus Depreciation Biomass systems, along with several other renewable energy technologies, are eligible for this corporate depreciation deduction. In general terms, this program gives biomass and other renewable energy property a five-year property class life for depreciation. (This means that your system’s value, for tax purposes, decreases by 20% of the purchase price each year for 5 years. On the sixth year, it has no taxable value.) For more information on the federal MACRS, see IRS Publication 946. Use IRS Form 4562.

See website See page

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U.S. Department of Treasury Renewable Energy Grants Biomass systems are eligible for grant funding through this program. The grant amount is 30% of the cost to install a qualified facility or 10% of the property. At the date of this printing, the U.S. Department of Treasury had not yet released guidelines and was not yet accepting applications. For the most updated information, visit the website listed below.

See website See page

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Federal Renewable Electricity Production Tax Credit (PTC) Commercial and industrial taxpayers who produce and sell electricity with biomass may take advantage of this federal corporate tax credit. For biomass derived from agricultural livestock waste there is a minimum capacity system size requirement of 150 kW. For closed-loop biomass, the credit is 2.1 cents per kWh. Read instructions for IRS Form 8835 for details.

See website See page

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USDA Rural Energy for America Program (REAP) Grants and Loan Guarantees Biomass systems, along with several other renewable energy technologies, are eligible for grant funding or loan guarantees through this program. Agricultural producers and rural small businesses are eligible to apply for grant funding or loan guarantees to purchase renewable energy systems (including systems that may be used to produce and sell electricity), make energy efficiency improvements, and conduct relevant feasibility studies. Grants are limited to 25% of the project’s total cost. The maximum loan guarantee is $25 million. The combined amount of a grant and loan guarantee cannot exceed 75% of the total project cost.

See website See page

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NOTE: Incentive programs and specific incentive dollar amounts may change at any time.

www.ruraloregon.biz

Leading the Rural Recovery

in support of rural business and energy development Z

Renewable Energy. We offer grants and loan guarantees to farmers and rural small businesses for renewable energy projects.

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Energy Efficiency. We offer grants and loan guarantees to farmers and rural small businesses for energy efficiency improvements.

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Commercial Loan Guarantees. We guarantee bank loans to all types of rural businesses.

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Revolving Loan Funds. We fund local loan programs that lend directly to rural businesses.

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Technical Assistance Grants. We fund nonprofit and public initiatives that support private business development with business counseling, workforce development, technical assistance, and strategic planning.

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Value-Added Agriculture. We offer matching grants to farmers and agricultural groups for value-added agricultural projects.

For more information, visit our web site: www.rurdev.usda.gov/or/rbs.htm or visit your local USDA Service Center, or call us at 503-414-3366.

Building cooperative financial partnerships with rural Oregonians

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72 in c e nt i ve s + prog ra ms Water conservation and water use efficiency can play a valuable role in saving money for homes, businesses, and farms. By conserving water, households and businesses can reduce not only water consumption bills but also water heating bills, which generally account for 14% 20% of energy bills. You may have heard about rainwater harvesting and greywater reuse as great ways to conserve water. However, one of the simplest ways to conserve water is through upgrades to water-using appliances and water heating equipment, which can have short payback periods due to savings on your water and electricity bills. In addition, the purchase and installation of new, high-efficiency waterusing appliances can be supported by several incentive programs. Although water heating is one of the more substantial utility costs for homes, businesses, and other buildings, irrigation is also costly for farms and residential irrigation water users since it is one of the most energy-intensive practices, typically requiring electricity to power pumps and motors. For irrigators using individual pumps, water conservation can result in greatly decreased pumping costs. Just like homes and businesses, farms and agricultural operations can implement improvements with minimal cost through efficient equipment and best practices. These improvements

include ensuring that pumps, motors, and other irrigation-related equipment are in good condition and are working efficiently. High efficiency pumps and flow control pressure regulators can reduce the amount of energy consumed while maximizing the irrigation water being used. In addition, irrigation scheduling methods and techniques can benefit crops as well as conserve water. The National Sustainable Agriculture Information Service is a great resource for more information about best practices for irrigation. Review their Energy Saving Tips for Irrigators publication at Navigate128.notlong.com. More information and assistance is available through local Soil and Water Conservation Districts, Resource Conservation & Development Councils, and local Natural Resource Conservation Service offices (see page 62). This chapter of the Navigator focuses on programs that support water conservation and water use efficiency upgrades for homes, farms, and businesses. Most of the watersaving projects supported by these programs will have the dual effect of also saving energy. Be sure to check the Energy chapter for more incentives that you may be eligible for and to determine which are complementary to the programs listed below.

tax credit programs Tax credits for water conservation apply primarily to the purchase of energy efficient appliances, including items like water efficient faucets, clothes washers, and dishwashers as well as low-flow and dual flush toilets. Go to pages 28-43 for descriptions of these Federal and Oregon state tax credit opportunities.

grants + loans ENERGY TRUST OF OREGON Energy Trust provides cash incentives to irrigators that are served by Portland General Electric or Pacific Power based on the estimated annual savings realized with improved irrigation equipment. Incentives are available for variable frequency drives, drip irrigation systems, and linear/pivot systems. Improvements must be completed by an Energy Trust irrigation trade ally contractor to qualify for the incentives.

OREGON WATERSHED ENHANCEMENT BOARD (OWEB) Small Grant Program This grant program helps support landowners with up to $10,000 for improving water quality and quantity on their properties through restoration improvements including planting native plants and reducing sedimentation. For more information about this program, go to Navigate108.notlong.com.

USDA rural energy for america PROGRAM (REAP) Microhydro systems and energy-saving irrigation equipment upgrades may be eligible for grant funding or loan guarantees through REAP. See the full program description on page 15. Navigate15.notlong.com.

USDA programs There are many programs available through USDA’s Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), USDA Rural Development, and the Farm Services Agency (FSA) to support landowners and communities in improving land and water quality and quantity. The programs listed below include incentives for water conservation. For a complete index of programs that also support things like conservation easements and forest and wetland improvements, visit the USDA website at Navigate109.notlong.com.

CONSERVATION RESERVE PROGRAM (CRP) Through this program, eligible farmers can receive technical and financial assistance and annual rental payments for converting highly erodible cropland or other environmentally sensitive acreage to vegetative cover, both of which address water quality and quantity. The Farm Services Agency administers the program with technical support provided by NRCS, USDA’s Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service, and your local Soil and Water Conservation District, among others. For more information about CRP, contact the Oregon FSA at (503) 692-6830 or go to Navigate111.notlong.com.

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For more details and a complete list of the updated incentives available, go to Navigate105.notlong.com. An updated trade ally contractor directory is available at Navigate106.notlong.com. For more information, go to page 16.

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USDA programs c o n t i n u ed ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY INCENTIVES PROGRAM (EQIP) This NRCS program provides financial and technical assistance to help landowners and agricultural operators implement plans to improve water quality, conserve ground and surface water, reduce soil erosion from cropland and forestland, and improve grazing lands. Eligible projects include such things as irrigation and water management, grazing, nutrient, and pest control management, as well as forest management, erosion control and wildlife habitat enhancement. EQIP is now available to beginning, limited-resource, and socially disadvantaged farmers and ranchers with more cost-share incentive. EQIP provides payments of up to 75% of incurred costs of certain conservation practices and activities. Applications for EQIP are accepted year-round. Funding cutoff dates are announced locally, usually once a year. In addition, special EQIP sign-ups are periodically announced, such as the Organic EQIP Initiative for organic operations and those transitioning to organic production. For more information about this program, go to Navigate112. notlong.com.

CONSERVATION STEWARDSHIP PROGRAM (CSP) This NRCS program provides financial and technical assistance to agricultural producers and landowners for the conservation and enhancement of soil, water, air, and other natural resources on their land in a manner that exceeds minimum conservation standards. CSP payments will be provided for installing and adopting additional conservation activities and improving, maintaining, and managing existing activities. For more information about this program, go to Navigate114.notlong.com.

WILDLIFE HABITAT INCENTIVES PROGRAM (WHIP) This NRCS program in the Cooperative Conservation Partnership Initiative (CCPI) provides both technical and cost-share assistance for landowners to make improvements in wildlife habitat on private land. In Oregon, the WHIP program emphasizes restoration of upland and aquatic habitats, enhancement and restoration of habitats for threatened and endangered plant and animal species, and those habitats and species that have been identified as high priorities in Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife’s Comprehensive Wildlife Conservation Strategy. WHIP funds a variety of practices, such as juniper removal, stream bank stabilization, fish passage, forest stand improvement, riparian buffers, brush management, range planting and more. For more information about this program, go to Navigate115.notlong.com.

special thanks to The preparation of The Navigator was funded in part by a Rural Business Enterprise Grant (RBEG) from USDA Rural Development. The RBEG program provides grants for technical assistance, training, and other activities that support the development of small and emerging businesses in rural areas. To learn more, go to: www.ruralOregon.biz. For energy programs: www.energy.ruralOregon.biz. Or contact: Business & Cooperative Programs, USDA Rural Development, Oregon State Office 1201 NE Lloyd Blvd., Ste. 801, Portland, OR 97232 • 503-414-3366

local utility rebates + incentives COLUMBIA RURAL ELECTRIC ASSOCIATION (CREA) CREA provides sprinkler equipment rebates for irrigators through the BPA’s energy efficiency program. Rebates are available for the installation of new energy and water efficient sprinklers, pivots, and pump motor equipment and for the repair and retrofitting of existing irrigation systems. Each equipment component has measurable annual kWh savings listed in parentheses with each rebate.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

$3 rebate for new flow controlling type nozzle for impact sprinklers (provides savings of 20kWh/year) $3.75 rebate for rebuilt or new impact sprinkler (20kWh/year savings) and $0.25 per new nozzle for impact sprinkler $4 rebate for new rotating type sprinkler replacing impact sprinklers (40kWh/year savings) $1 rebate for new gasket for wheel-lines, hand-lines, or portable mainline (30kWh/year savings) $4 rebate for new low-pressure regulators and new rotating sprinklers for replacement of lowpressure sprinklers. Entire pivot must be upgraded (20kWh/year savings) $2 for new multiple configuration nozzles for low-pressure pivot sprinklers (20kWh/year savings) $3 for new multi-trajectory sprays that replace impact sprinklers (25kWh/year savings) $1 for new multi-trajectory sprays that replace low-pressure sprinklers (10kWh/year savings) $1 for new drains for wheel-lines, hand-lines, or pivots (30kWh/year savings) $6 for new hubs for wheel-lines. Entire wheel line must be upgraded. (40kWh/year savings) $1 for new “goose neck” elbow for drop tubes (20kWh/year savings) $3 for new drop tubes for low-pressure pivot sprinklers 3 ft. in length (20 kWh/year) $125 rebate for new center pivot base boot gasket (850kWh/year savings) $8 rebate for cut and pipe press repair of leaking hand lines, wheel-lines, and portable mainline (60kWh/year savings) 75¢ for rebuilt or new wheel-line leveler

OREGON TRAIL ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE (OTEC): Irrigation Sprinkler Pump Motor Program OTEC offers rebates to customers for installing approved irrigation measures to save energy and water. Rebates range from $55 to $5,600 and are specifically offered for the replacement of a standard efficiency pump motor with a premium efficiency pump motor. For more information, go to Navigate118.notlong.com.

energy trust of oregon: Irrigation Initiative Program This incentive program provides pump efficiency testing and up to 30% financial incentives for efficiencyimproving equipment repairs and replacements. For more information, go to Navigate121.notlong.com.

NOTE: Incentive programs and specific incentive dollar amounts may change at any time.

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Rebates are available for:

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local utilities... c o n t i n u ed MIDSTATE ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE Midstate Electric Cooperative provides sprinkler equipment rebates for irrigators to improve the energy and water efficiency of their irrigation systems with improved equipment. The following rebates are available: • • • • • • • • •

$3 for flow-controlling nozzles (20kWh/year savings) $4 for rebuilt or new brass sprinklers (40 kWh/year savings) $3 for rotating sprinklers replacing impact sprinklers (40 kWh/year savings) $1 for each new gasket for wheel lines, hand lines, or the mainline (30kWh/year savings) $6 for low-pressure regulators for updated pivot sprinklers (40 kWh/year savings) $2 for multiple configuration nozzles for low-pressure pivot sprinklers (20 kWh/year savings) $1 for new “goose-neck” elbow for drop tubes (20 kWh/year savings) $3 for new drop tube for low-pressure pivot sprinklers (20 kWh/year savings) $125 for new Center Pivot Boot Gasket (853 kWh/year savings)

In addition, reimbursement for premium efficiency pump motors is available from $300 to $4,600 depending on the horsepower and estimated kWh savings per year of each pump. For more information about this program and various requirements, go to Navigate117.notlong.com.

IDAHO POWER: Irrigation Efficiency Rewards Program + Irrigation Peak Rewards Program The Irrigation Efficiency Rewards Program provides irrigation customers with financial incentives to improve the efficiency of their irrigation systems. Incentives are available for retrofitting existing systems and for new irrigation systems. For more information, go to Navigate119.notlong.com. The Irrigation Peak Rewards Program is available to irrigation customers who operate pumps totaling at least 75 horsepower fed by a single metered service. An electronic timer is used to turn off irrigation pumps during peak energy hours (4 and 8 p.m.) during June, July, and August to reduce energy demand at times when maximum irrigation and air conditioning loads coincide. Credits are based on the number of days per week irrigators choose to have service interrupted: • $2.01 per kWh of monthly billing for one day per week • $3.36 per kWh of monthly billing for two days per week • $4.36 per kWh of monthly billing for three days per week For more information, go to Navigate120.notlong.com.

glossary Agri-biodiesel: fuel derived from the oils of things like corn, soybeans, sunflower seeds, cottonseeds, canola, crambe, rapeseeds, safflowers, flaxseeds, rice bran, mustard seeds, and camelina, and from animal fats. ASHRAE Standards: The American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers set criteria for highly energy efficient appliances and heating and cooling systems. For more information, go to: Navigate132. notlong.com. Biomass: Organic material used as a renewable energy source. Biofuels: Liquid fuels and blending components produced from biomass and feedstocks. Btu (British Thermal Unit): A unit of energy used to describe power, it has largely been replaced in the U.S. with the joule (J). The Btu is still used as a measure of agricultural energy production. A Btu is equal to 1055.05585 J, whereas 1kW= 3,413 Btus per hour (Btu/h). Closed-loop biomass (see Biomass; Open-loop biomass): A biomass product planted exclusively for use at a qualified facility as an energy resource. Evacuated Tube: In a solar thermal collector, an absorber tube, which is contained in an evacuated glass cylinder, through which collector fluids flow. Fuel Cells: One or more cells capable of generating an electrical current by converting the chemical energy of a fuel directly into electrical energy. Fuel cells differ from conventional electrical cells in that the active materials such as fuel and oxygen are not contained within the cell but are supplied from outside. Generation (Electricity): The process of producing electric energy from other forms of energy; also, the amount of electric energy produced, expressed in watthours (Wh). Geothermal Energy: As used at electric power plants, hot water or steam extracted from geothermal reservoirs in the Earth’s crust that is supplied to steam turbines at electric power plants to drive generators to produce electricity. Greywater Reuse: Refers to the reuse of water drained from baths, showers, washing machines, and sinks (excluding toilet wastewater or “blackwater”) for irrigation and other water conservation applications. Greywater is usually high in varying nutrients (such as nitrogen or phosphorus) and is, therefore, great for irrigation but best filtered for use on edible plants. Hydrokinetic: Refers to the energy inherent in fluid motion (such as the motion of water) or the forces which produce or affect such motions. Inverter: Also referred to as DC-to-AC converters, inverters transform Direct Current (DC) electricity stored in a battery bank (generated from a small-scale renewable energy system, for example) into Alternating Current (AC) electricity for power use. Inverters can be either on- or off-grid depending on power needs. Joule (J): A unit of energy (measuring energy, work, or heat) derived from the International System of Units (SI). Kilowatt (kW): One thousand watts of electricity (1 kW= 1000 W). (See Watt). Kilowatt Hour (kWh): A kilowatt hour is equal to the energy of 1,000 watts (1kW) working for an hour. Low-e: A film or coating put on energy efficient windows and skylights to reduce the conductivity of heat (see U-value) and can be designed to allow for high solar gain, moderate solar gain, or low solar gain. Megawatt (MW): One million watts of electricity (1MW = 1,000,000 W). One megawatt of energy can provide enough electricity for about 800 households. Megawatt Hour (MWh): A megawatt hour is equal to one megawatt acting for one hour. A single megawatt hour is equal to 1000 kWh. Methane: A colorless, flammable, odorless hydrocarbon gas (CH4) which is the major component of natural gas. It is also an important source of hydrogen in various industrial processes. Methane is a greenhouse gas. Micro-hydropower: A small-scale renewable energy technology that harnesses the movement of water to generate electricity.

g l o s s a ry

Hydropower: A form of renewable energy that harnesses the movement of water to generate electricity.

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Glossa r y c o nt in u ed Net Metering: Arrangement that permits a facility (using a meter that reads inflows and outflows of electricity) to sell any excess power it generates above its load requirement back to the electrical grid to offset consumption. Non-refundable (tax credit): A tax credit that cannot reduce the amount of tax owed to less than zero. In other words, if the amount of tax owed to the IRS (before credits) is $400, and a non-refundable tax credit is available for $500, the taxpayer would not be able to receive the extra $100 in credit from the IRS. Open-loop biomass (see Closed-loop biomass): Any agricultural livestock waste nutrients; nonhazardous, cellulosic, or plant-based waste material used as an energy source. Passive Solar: A system in which solar energy alone is used for the transfer of thermal energy. Pumps, blowers, or other heat transfer devices that use energy other than solar are not used in a passive solar system. Peak Watt: A manufacturer’s unit indicating the amount of power a photovoltaic cell or module will produce at standard test conditions (normally 1,000 watts per square meter at 25 degrees Celsius). Photovoltaic (PV) Cell: An electronic device consisting of layers of semiconductor materials fabricated to form a junction (adjacent layers of materials with different electronic characteristics) and electrical contacts, capable of converting light directly into electricity (direct current). Photovoltaic (PV) Module: An integrated assembly of interconnected photovoltaic cells designed to deliver a selected level of working voltage and current at its output terminals, packaged for protection against environment degradation, and suited for incorporation in photovoltaic power systems. R-value (see U-Value): Measures a material’s (such as building insulation) resistance to thermal conductivity or heat loss/transfer. The higher the R-value, the higher the thermal resistance, which is desirable for a material such as home insulation. Rainwater Harvesting: Refers to the collection and storage of rain (in a barrel at the bottom of a downspout, for example) from rooftops and gutter systems to be used for non-potable purposes such as irrigating lawns, washing cars, or flushing toilets. Renewable Energy Resources: Energy resources that are naturally replenishing. These resources are virtually inexhaustible but limited in the amount of energy they can produce per unit of time. Renewable energy resources include: biomass, hydro, geothermal, solar, wind, ocean thermal, wave action, and tidal action. Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS): A legislative or rule mandate requiring that renewable energy provide a certain percentage of total energy generation. Solar Energy: The radiant energy of the sun, which can be converted into other forms of energy, such as heat or electricity. Solar Thermal Collector: A device designed to receive solar radiation and convert it into thermal energy. Normally, a solar thermal collector includes a frame, glazing, and an absorber, together with the appropriate insulation. Heat collected by a solar thermal collector can be used immediately or stored for later use. Turbine: A rotary machine for generating mechanical power from the energy of a stream of fluid (such as water, steam, or hot gas). Turbines convert the kinetic (extra energy due to movement) energy of fluids to mechanical energy or a mixture of the two. U-value (see R-value): The inverse of the R-value, the U-value is a measure of how well a material conducts heat (by the rate of transfer through a given material). Watt (Electric): The electrical unit of power. The rate of energy transfer equivalent to 1 ampere of electric current flowing under a pressure of 1 volt at unity power factor. Watt (Thermal): A unit of power in the metric system, expressed in terms of energy per second, equal to the work done at a rate of 1 joule per second. Watthour (Wh): The electrical energy unit of measure equal to 1 watt of power supplied to, or taken from, an electric circuit steadily for 1 hour. Wind energy: Energy present in wind motion that can be converted to mechanical energy for driving pumps, mills, and electric power generators. Wind pushes against sails, vanes, or blades that radiate from a central rotating shaft.

C a l c u l a t i n g yo u r Po t e n t i a l S a v i n g s wo r k s h e e t This sheet is meant to serve as a general outline for calculating the potential savings associated with an energy efficiency or renewable energy project. You can tear out this sheet and/or make blank copies for multiple use on any planned project. Name/Type of project Year of installation date

2

Calculate your current electricity costs

You must know this to determine eligibility and amount of certain incentives.

a. Find total energy consumption (in kWh) average for past 1 to 3 years (available from your utility or calculated from utility bills) b. Find total energy cost (in dollars) average for past 1 to 3 years (available from your utility or calculated from utility bills)

Calculate Total Net Cost of Project

a. Total preparation costs (Home Energy Audit or Review, testing, site evaluation for renewable energy installations, etc.) b. Total equipment costs (include all components purchased, rented or leased) c. Total installation costs (include labor, permitting, equipment rental, etc.)* d. Estimated repair/maintenance/purchased warranty costs (over the life of equipment) e. Interest costs of any loan financing** * Check incentive programs for contractor certification requirements. (i.e. Energy Trust Trade Ally, Oregon State tax credit certified technician) ** Check the terms of your loan financing to determine interest rate variability and factor any increases/decreases over time. 3

Calculate Total Incentives a. Rebates b. Federal Tax Credits (applied to costs after rebates) c. State Tax Credits d. Grants

kWh

1a 1b

$

2a

$

2b

$

2c

$

2d

$

2e

$ section 2

$ TOTAL

3a

$

3b

$

3c

$

3d

$ section 3

$ TOTAL this is your potential gross cost....................................................... $ initial CASH Subtract (Section 3 Total) from (Section 2 Total) 4

Calculate Payback Period a. Calculate potential annual savings from project (in kWh) (from contractor, retail vendor, installer, etc.) b. Calculate potential annual savings from project (in dollars) (from contractor, retail vendor, installer, etc.)

kWh

4a 4b

$

annual savings

This is your payback period in years.......................................... Divide (Gross Cost) by dollar amount of annual savings (4b). Your payback period may be shorter if your utility compensates for any surplus electricity generated and sold through your net metering agreement.

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ABOUT WEBSITES AND URLs: Below is a complete index of the actual web addresses referenced in The Navigator. Navigate1.notlong.com 1 http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f5695.pdf 2 http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f8911.pdf 3 http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f3468.pdf 4 http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f4562.pdf 5 http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f637.pdf 6 http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f6478.pdf 7 http://www.epa.gov/oms/renewablefuels/420b07019.pdf 8 http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f8864.pdf 9 http://egov.oregon.gov/ENERGY/CONS/RES/RETC.shtml 10 http://egov.oregon.gov/ENERGY/CONS/RES/tax/appliances.shtml 11 http://egov.oregon.gov/ENERGY/CONS/BUS/BETC.shtml 12 http://www.treas.gov/recovery/ 13 http://www.resnet.us/ratings/mortgages/default.htm 14 http://www.resnet.us/directory/raters.aspx 15 http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/or/reap.htm 16 http://www.ohcs.oregon.gov/OHCS/SOS_Low_Income_Weatherization_ Assistance_Oregon.shtml 17 http://energytrust.org/residential/existinghomes/ta_list/index.php 18 http://energytrust.org/residential/es/products/index.html 19 http://energytrust.org/grants/up.html 20 http://energytrust.org/residential/existinghomes/review.php 21 http://energytrust.org/residential/promotions.html 22 http://energytrust.org/residential/existinghomes/incentives.html 23 http://energytrust.org/solar/residential/provide.html 24 http://energytrust.org/solar/commercial/standard.php 25 http://energytrust.org/residential/es/nh/index.html 26 http://energytrust.org/mf/windows.html 27 http://energytrust.org/existingbuildings/standard.html 28 http://energytrust.org/existingbuildings/custom.html 29 http://energytrust.org/solar/index.html 30 http://energytrust.org/newbuildings/index.html 31 http://energytrust.org/wind/small/ 32 http://energytrust.org/solar/water/index.html 33 http://apps1.eere.energy.gov/repi/ 34 http://www.irs.gov/irb/2007-14_IRB/ar17.html 35 http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/rbs/busp/bprogs.htm 36 http://www.b-e-f.org/grants/renew_intro.shtm 37 http://apps1.eere.energy.gov/tribalenergy/ 38 http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/or/wep.htm 39 http://www.ers.usda.gov/FarmBill/2008/Titles/TitleIXEnergy.htm 40 http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/rbs/biomass/biomass.htm 41 http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/rd/nofas/ 42 http://www.oregon.gov/ENERGY/CONS/BUS/tax/pass-through.shtml 43 http://energytrust.org/solar/commercial/nonp_gov.php 44 http://egov.oregon.gov/ENERGY/CONS/RES/weather/weahome.shtml 45 http://www1.eere.energy.gov/consumer/tips/home_energy.html 46 http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=products.pr_tax_credits 47 http://www.oregon.gov/ENERGY/CONS/RES/tax/HVAC.shtml 48 http://www.oregon.gov/ENERGY/CONS/BUS/tax/BETC-Efficiency.shtml 49 http://www.energytrust.org/existingbuildings/index.html 50 http://www.energytrust.org/residential/es/nh/incentives.html 51 http://www.energytrust.org/residential/existinghomes/index.html 52 http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=products.pr_tax_credits#s8 53 http://egov.oregon.gov/ENERGY/CONS/RES/tax/HVAC-Ducts.shtml 54 egov.oregon.gov/energy/cons/res/tax/docs/ducts_HP_techs.pdf 55 http://egov.oregon.gov/ENERGY/LOANS/selphm.shtml 56 http://energytrust.org/residential/existinghomes/ductinsulation.html 57 http://energytrust.org/residential/existinghomes/ductsealing.html 58 http://energytrust.org/mf/incentives.html 59 http://energytrust.org/residential/existinghomes/insulation.html 60 http://www.energytrust.org/mf/index.html 61 http://www1.eere.energy.gov/consumer/tips/windows.html 62 http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=products.pr_tax_credits 63 http://energytrust.org/residential/existinghomes/windows.html 64 http://www.energytrust.org/mf/lighting.html

Navigate65.notlong.com 65 http://energytrust.org/pe/index.html 66 http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?fuseaction=rebate.rebate_locator 67 http://www.energytrust.org/residential/es/products/promotions_sitf.html 68 http://energytrust.org/mf/washers.html 69 http://egov.oregon.gov/ENERGY/CONS/RES/tax/waterheaters.shtml 70 http://energytrust.org/residential/existinghomes/waterheater.html 71 http://energytrust.org/solar/water/index.html 72 http://energytrust.org/mf/waterheaters.html 73 http://energytrust.org/mf/waterheaters.html 74 oregon.gov/ODA/docs/pdf/energyandag.pdf 75 http://energysavers.gov/renewable_energy/ 76 http://egov.oregon.gov/ENERGY/CONS/RES/RETC.shtml 77 http://energytrust.org/TA/index.html 78 oregon.gov/energy/renew/solar/docs/sunchart.pdf 79 http://egov.oregon.gov/ENERGY/RENEW/Solar/PV.shtml 80 oregon.gov/energy/cons/res/tax/docs/solar_techs.pdf 81 http://egov.oregon.gov/ENERGY/CONS/BUS/tax/BETC-Renewables.shtml#Solar_Projects 82 http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f3468.pdf 83 http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/rbs/busp/9006grant.htm 84 http://energysavers.gov/your_home/water_heating/ 85 http://egov.oregon.gov/ENERGY/RENEW/Solar/Support-RETC.shtml 86 oregon.gov/energy/renew/solar/docs/solarspaceheatingsunchart.pdf 87 http://www.oregon.gov/ENERGY/RENEW/Solar/Space.shtml 88 http://egov.oregon.gov/ENERGY/RENEW/Solar/Support-BETC.shtml 89 http://www1.eere.energy.gov/windandhydro/ 90 http://egov.oregon.gov/ENERGY/RENEW/Wind/windinfo.shtml 91 http://egov.oregon.gov/ENERGY/CONS/RES/tax/wind.shtml 92 egov.oregon.gov/energy/cons/bus/docs/renew.pdf 93 irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f8835.pdf 94 http://www.wrd.state.or.us/OWRD/offices.shtml 95 http://egov.oregon.gov/ENERGY/RENEW/Hydro/Hydro_index.shtml 96 http://www.oregon.gov/ENERGY/RENEW/Hydro/Hydro_index.shtml#Advisors 97 http://www.homepower.com/basics/hydro/ 98 http://www.energysavers.gov/your_home/electricity/index.cfm/mytopic=11080 99 energytrust.org/hydro/pdf/introtohydro.pdf 100 http://www.oregon.gov/ENERGY/CONS/BUS/tax/BETC-Renewables.shtml#renewable_energy_ resource_generation_projects 101 http://www.oregon.gov/ENERGY/RENEW/Geothermal/GSHP.shtml 102 http://www.oregon.gov/ENERGY/CONS/RES/tax/docs/GeoCont.pdf 103 geothermal.id.doe.gov/maps/or.pdf 104 http://www.oregon.gov/ENERGY/CONS/RES/tax/HVAC-Biomass.shtml 105 nergytrust.org/pe/irrigation_BR_0811.pdf 106 http://energytrust.org/pe/ta_list/index.php?s_txtRegion=&s_txtService=IR 108 http://www.oregon.gov/OWEB/GRANTS/smgrant_main.shtml 109 http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/programs/ 111 http://www.fsa.usda.gov/FSA/webapp?area=home&subject=copr&topic=crp 112 http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/programs/eqip/ 114 http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/programs/new_csp/csp.html 115 http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/programs/whip/ 117 http://www.midstateelectric.coop/ProductsAndServices/Irrigationprog/ IrrigEEfficiencyProgram/default.aspx 118 http://www.otec.coop/agriculturalprograms.aspx 119 http://www.idahopower.com/EnergyEfficiency/Irrigation/Programs/ EfficiencyRewards/default.cfm 120 http://www.idahopower.com/EnergyEfficiency/Irrigation/Programs/PeakRewards/default.cfm 121 http://www.pacificpower.net/Navigation/Navigation914.html 122 http://www.afdc.energy.gov/afdc/progs/view_ind_fed.php/afdc/396/0 124 http://www1.eere.energy.gov/consumer/tips/insulation.html 125 http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f8910.pdf 126 http://www.energytrust.org/pe/index.html 127 http://www.or.nrcs.usda.gov/contact/basindir.htm 128 http://www.attra.ncat.org 129 http://www.irs.gov.pub/irs-pdf/f8908.pdf 130 http://www.energytrust.org/residential/es/products/cfl_recycling.html 131 http://www.energytrust.org/bio/index.html 132 http://www.ashrae.org/technology/page/548

ABOUT THE ARTIST Painter Melinda Hannigan has shown her work in galleries and museums throughout the United States and Europe. An exhibition of her work called “Scratching the Surface: Exploring the works of Melinda Hannigan” was held at the Columbia River Maritime Museum in 2005–06. Her paintings were used extensively in the documentary “Sweet Crude,” a film about the oil industry, pollution, and social protest in the Niger Delta, Nigeria. The 2008 publication of the book Women of the Sea included a chapter about Melinda and her art. Melinda is often asked to speak and has been featured on Oregon Public Radio. She was an Artist in Residence in Ireland in 2007. In 2009, The Rocky Neck Art Colony has awarded Melinda one of only three artist’s residencies. Ms. Hannigan’s original 2005 painting, Winter Load, featured on the cover, hangs in the Yasui Building in Hood River, Oregon. It is used here with the permission of the artist and its owners, Maui and Jan Meyer. See more of Melinda’s work at: www.melindahannigan.com. SPECIAL THANKS TO Maggie Gulick and Genevieve Scholl-Erdmann whose endless researching, copywriting, and editing made The Navigator what it is today. Jan Meyer for making The Navigator a visual masterpiece. Melinda Hannigan for use of her stunning artwork. Jerry Bryan for his spiritual counsel and amazing editing skills. Amanda Remington, Jessica Metta, and the Oregon Investment Board; Jeff Deiss of USDA Rural Development; Ann Grim, Joe Colello, and Evan Elias of Oregon Department of Energy; for their advice and support. Bill Fashing, Carolyn Meece, Merlin Berg, Brad Miller, Hannah Hacker, Betsy Kauffman, Kim Crossman, Jed Jorgensen, Mark Cherniak, Barbara Briggs, Jill Rees, Dave Dishman, Bill White, and Mark Ellsworth for advice and editing support. The Navigator is brought to you through the generous support of the Oregon Investment Board, Mid-Columbia Economic Development District, USDA Rural Development through a Rural Business Enterprise Grant, and the Oregon Department of Energy. Special thanks to Farmers Irrigation District of Hood River, Oregon, without whose progressive vision of community, The Navigator and FCA would not exist. FCA Staff: Julie Davies O’Shea, Les Perkins, Dan Kleinsmith, Roy Slayton, Genevieve SchollErdmann, Jer Camarata, and Maggie Gulick. FCA Board: Maui Meyer, Tim Annala, Sandi Borowy, and Fritz Von Lubken. SUPPORT THE NAVIGATOR If you would like to send a donation or letter of support to expand FCA’s efforts in the future, we would gladly accept them. Please send your check or letter of support to: FCA, The Navigator, 14 Oak Street, Suite 302, Hood River, OR 97031. Upon receipt, we will gladly send you confirmation for tax purposes. © 2009 THE NAVIGATOR Produced and published by: Farmers Conservation Alliance (FCA) address 14 Oak Street, Suite 302, Hood River, OR 97031 telephone 541.716.6085 email info@fcasolutions.org websites fcasolutions.org • farmerscreen.org • rootofsustainability.org FCA is an equal opportunity provider.

Melinda Hannigan Winter Load, 2005


The Navigator: Rural Oregon's Guide to Saving Money By Saving Resources