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have a feeling that we have not seen the end of the integration. Upon booting the game, I jumped right into the very first stage. I traverse the staged with ease until I reached some impassable stacks of blue blocks. After standing there for a few seconds, I saw a fingerprint flash across the blocks, enticing me to press it. The blocks were “pushed in” by my finger, allowing me to pass through. Soon, I was drawing paths through the blocks with a swipe of my finger, then frantically switching back to my Sackboy controls to get him through before the blocks shot back out. It has always amazed me how such a slow and floaty platformer can be so frantic, and this just takes it to the next level. Now, as I moved along, I came to another platform that needed to be adjusted for me to pass. But pushing and sliding across it did nothing. Puzzled, I noticed a pink dot appearing on the screen every now and then... a pink dot caused by my finger brushing the rear touch panel. I tried touch the block using the rear touch panel instead, and the block suddenly slid forward. Brilliant. Something as simple as pushing and pulling blocks is made infinitely more satisfying by using the two touch panels in such a simple way. For some reason, I was not expecting LittleBigPlanet to take advantage of these unique control options, much less use them to great effect. But it does, and I August 2012 The developers also provided us with a few tastes of other levels reminiscent of LBP2 to show us that the game can do everything LBP2 can do, with the classic finish line race, and versus mini-game that had you and an opponent trying to take out each other’s tanks with missiles. Online play worked without a hitch, and I spent about a half-hour taking out enemy tanks. Finally, there was a bit of a surprise from a mini-game called “Taplings”. It looked nothing like LittleBigPlanet- more of a cross between Limbo and LocoRoco- and controlled primarily with the touch screen. Just a little taste of what can be done with the powerful Create tools. Speaking of which, creating your own levels will be very familiar for LBP2 veterans. The biggest change is that most of the creating process can now be done with the touch screen- which is the preferred method in most cases except when pin-size precision is needed. Shame that touch screens these days cannot benefit from stylus control. All in all, it looks like LBP Vita is on the right track, and we can’t wait to get our hands on the full version and see what surprises are in store. Let’s take a look at Karting! FANBOLT GAMING DIGITAL MAGAZINE Page 19

FanBolt Gaming Digital Magazine - August 2012

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