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THE INTERNATIONAL CLUB FOR

ROLLS-ROYCE & BENTLEY OWNERS

Desk Diary 2009

                                                                  

              

    

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Rolls-Royce Owners’ Club 191 Hempt Road Mechanicsburg, PA 17050 November 2008 Dear Members & Enthusiasts, Your club is happy to send you the 2009 edition of the Rolls-Royce Owners’ Club Desk Diary, a wonderful, no-cost benefit to all, thanks to our sponsors and advertisers. This year we have an article on our annual meet in Williamsburg, and others on the Phantom II, the Amelia Island concours, celebrity Rolls-Royces and Bentleys, the Arizona Copperstate 1000 rally, the du Ponts’ automobiles in “Chateau Country,” Rolls-Royce and Bentley stamps and toys, and Rolls-Royce and Bentley restoration shops. Several of these articles are wonderful contributions by our members. And again we have a profile of a member who uses his proper motor car as a daily driver. We also have fascinating “lifestyle” and travel articles, covering such subjects as Las Vegas, Slow Food, touring in El Salvador, the market in Western art, and the exciting city of Toronto, the site of our 2010 Annual Meet. Be sure to complete your diary by participating in next year’s exciting tours, technical seminars, and our Annual Meet in New Orleans! You’ll see old friends, make new ones, and see North America at a relaxing and enjoyable pace while enjoying our beautiful automobiles. Some of the events scheduled for 2009 are: Feb. 20-21: Winter Board Meeting, Mesa, Arizona May 3-9: Shenandoah Spring Tour, Virginia June 15-21: 58th Annual Meet, New Orleans, Louisiana Autumn: Fall Tour, Route 66, Illinois For the latest information on upcoming activities and technical seminars please check our Web site at www.RROC.org. Enjoy the 2009 RROC Desk Diary, and have happy and safe motoring,

C`SZ_2;R^Vd Robin A. James President, RROC

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CONTENTS

DEPARTMENTS

This Is How We Roll

President’s Letter...........................................11

Celebrity Rolls-Royces and Bentleys ...........46

2009 Diary ....................................................193

by Jan Tegler

Introducing ..................................................305 5-Star Index .................................................320

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Where Old Rolls-Royce and Bentley Cars Go to Live ........................52 by R. Pierce Reid

Four Centuries of British Style....................20 by Philip C. Brooks

TOURING Florida’s Best Kept Secret

What’s New at the Factories

The 13th Annual Amelia Island

A year of evolution........................................28

Concours d’Elegance, March 7-9, 2008........62

by Philip C. Brooks

by Larry S. Glenn

Sir Henry’s Final Masterpiece

At the Edge ....................................................70

Or How Glenn Ford Pushed

Dreams and reality converge in South Africa

a Button and Won the War ..........................34

by Jesse Scaccia

by Philip C. Brooks

Viva Las Vegas! ..............................................81 by J.R. Wilson

Passionate Pursuit Ric Simpson’s Rolls-Royces ..........................42 by Barbara Stahura

El Salvador’s Emergence ..............................88 by David A. Brown

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ENJOY RESPONSIBLY

RICHARD HENNESSY THE ULTIMATE COGNAC DESTINATION

CONTENTS

Toronto: No Second City ............................100

Sleuthing San Francisco

by Edie Jarolim

The Chinese New Year’s Treasure Hunt ....150

Color Wheel

by Vera Marie Badertscher

The art world circles its wagons

The du Ponts’ Automobiles

in Miami Beach ............................................106

in Chateau Country ....................................156

by Eric Tegler

by Vera Marie Badertscher

Rally of Dreams

Return of the Green Fairy ..........................164

Arizona’s Copperstate 1000........................116

by Craig Collins

by Craig Collins

Multi-family Offices

THE FINER THINGS

Taking the complexity out

Collecting on a Grand Scale

of family money management ..................172

Proper motor cars stamps and toys

by Henry Kenyon

from the Leo Pascal Collection ..................126 by Paul Pascal Slow Food Life at a snail’s pace ....................................134 by Andrea Rademan Spirit of the West

Celebrating the Everyday Bounty .............176 by Claudia Jannone You Gotta Be You Identity theft is a fast growing crime, but you can protect yourself ..........188 by Laura Spinale

The market is ripe for lovers of historical and contemporary Western art .................142 by Kirsten Ott 15

49&0-7,)67 Ross W. Jobson and Peter M. Antell

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THE INTERNATIONAL CLUB FOR ROLLS-ROYCE & BENTLEY OWNERS

Editor Rhonda Carpenter

Editorial Director Charles Oldham chuck.oldham@faircount.com

Assistant Editors Iwalani Kahikina Mike J. Tully

Consulting Editor Philip C. Brooks Project Editor Ana E. Lopez

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Director of Information Services John Madden

Chief Operations Officer

john.madden@faircount.com

Lawrence W. Roberts lawrence.roberts@faircount.com

Administrative Assistants Gabrielle Rams, Aisha Shazer

Assistant General Manager Design and Production

Feature Writers Vera Marie Badertscher David A. Brown Philip C. Brooks Craig Collins Larry S. Glenn Claudia Jannone Edie Jarolim Henry Kenyon Kirsten Ott Paul Pascal Andrea Rademan R. Pierce Reid Jesse Scaccia Laura Spinale Barbara Stahura Eric Tegler Jan Tegler J.R. Wilson

49&0-7,-2+%2(1%6/)8-2+

Rebecca Laborde Daniel Mrgan Lorena Noya Kenia Y. Perez Production Assistant Lindsey Brooks

Robin Jobson robin.jobson@faircount.com

Alexis Vars Contributing Photographers Larry S. Glenn Will Brewster

north american headquarters 701 N. West Shore Blvd.

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©Copyright Faircount LLC, 2009. All rights reserved. Reproduction of editorial content in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. Neither Faircount LLC, Inc. nor Rolls-Royce Owners’ Club, Inc., assume responsibility for the advertisements, nor any representation made therein, nor the quality or deliverability of the products themselves. The 2009 Rolls-Royce Owners’ Club Desk Diary does not imply endorsement by Rolls-Royce Motor Cars, Ltd., or Bentley Motors Ltd. Printed in the United States of America.

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Four Centuries of British Style Written by Philip C. Brooks Photos by Larry S. Glenn

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our centuries ago an expedition of three small ships came from England and landed in the New World, at what is now Jamestown, Virginia. Last June, a rather larger expedition of nearly 1,000 people, all devotees of two particular examples of British style, brought 250 examples of that culture to Williamsburg and Jamestown, Virginia. The Rolls-Royce Owners’ Club had come to town for its 57th Annual Meet. The Club first came to Williamsburg and Jamestown in 1963. We came back in 1968 and again in 1978, and after 30 long years, it seemed appropriate to visit Williamsburg and Jamestown again. The two places had changed a good deal since our last visit. Williamsburg had added many more programs for visitors, especially the “Revolutionary City” street theatre, stretching over two days. The Williamsburg Lodge, our meet hotel in 1968, had been completely rebuilt and expanded into a major, elegant convention hotel. Duke of Gloucester Street was completely closed to traffic, and although it meant that we could no longer drive our cars along that lovely road, it also meant that we could feel the 18th century even more. Jamestown, though, had been literally rediscovered. For more than 100 years, people had thought that the original Jamestown fort and settlement had washed into the James River. However, in the early 1990s, archaeologists had followed a hunch and had found the fort. The fort had been threesided, with a circular bastion at each corner, and all but one bastion was still on land and buried not too

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far below the topsoil. Amazing find after amazing find had been unearthed. We now knew a great deal more about the Jamestown expedition and about life and people in the little settlement. A new Archaearium displayed a vast number of the artifacts that had been found, along with reproductions of three bodies and interpretations of who they were and how they had died. One of them may well have been Christopher Newport, the first leader of the expedition. When the Club had been to Williamsburg and Jamestown in years gone by, there were replicas of the three ships at the recreated village next to the original site. This year there were three new replicas of the original ships, and what had been Jamestown Festival Park had grown into Jamestown Settlement, complete with a world-class museum depicting the English, American Indian, and African civilizations of 1607. As the discoveries at Jamestown had broadened, so had our understanding of the world and the people in it. Times had indeed changed in 30 years, let alone the 45 years since our first meet in Williamsburg. The emphasis on our Anglo-American heritage was still much in evidence, from the English flags flying on the ships to the exquisite early Georgian architecture of the Governor’s Palace, and from the carriages on Duke of Gloucester Street to the 250 Rolls-Royces and Bentleys that inhabited the town for a few days. This is, after all, the place where England established its first permanent foothold in the New World; where British colonial society reached a pinnacle of elegance and sophistication; where brilliant colonial leaders tried so hard to preserve British liberties from encroachment; where the House of Burgesses adopted Virginia’s Declaration of Independence prior to July 4, 1776; where our new nation finally achieved victory at Yorktown; where Winston Churchill visited shortly after the end of World War II; and where Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II has visited twice in the past 50 years. The “Historic Area� of Jamestown, Williamsburg, and

The Duke is a great Rolls-Royce enthusiast, and we were delighted that he could participate in sharing our common heritage by sending his letter. 21

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Yorktown represent vividly the evolution of Anglo-American relations and American civil society over the past 400 years. We tried to do our part by bringing a wonderful assemblage of Rolls-Royces and Bentleys to Williamsburg. The cars ranged from a 1913 Silver Ghost tourer to a 2008 Phantom sedan and from a 1924 3-Litre tourer to a 2008 Brooklands coupĂŠ. Most appropriately, we enjoyed welcoming 15 Springfield Silver Ghosts and Phantom Is, along with two left-hand-drive Phantom IIs with Brewster bodies and a Wraith with an Inskip body. These cars vividly portrayed the special relationship between Great Britain and America, being as they were a wonderful combination of both cultures. One has to say, though, that the owners of all these magnificent machines were more interested in driving them than in just speculating on their cultural heritage! We were also happy to include in the Meet Book a gracious welcoming letter from HRH the Duke of Gloucester. The Duke is a great Rolls-Royce enthusiast, and we were delighted that he could participate in sharing our common heritage by sending his letter. We also thought it appropriate for this meet, given that the main street of Colonial Williamsburg is Duke of Gloucester Street. Registration for the meet went very smoothly, thanks to the hard work of Ann Marie Nash and her dedicated crew. Because Colonial Williamsburg had doublebooked both the Colony Room and the registration area for Saturday, the first day of the meet, registration that day was something of a challenge. Ann Marie and her team handled it all with great aplomb. The vendors were delayed getting into the Colony Room to set up their stalls until late Saturday, but with the

help of several Chesapeake Region volunteers, they were able to do a lot in a short time. Along with the Meet Book and a driving tours book handed out at registration, a special publication was given: Cars of the Meet, compiled by Brad Zemcik, which described every car at the meet and illustrated most of them. This was a fascinating and very useful book, and Brad is to be commended for volunteering to do the book and then doing it so beautifully. Driving and preserving the cars was what the meet was really all about, along with taking advantage of the fascinating places to visit in and around Williamsburg. And drive we did. We enjoyed breakfast runs on successive mornings to a state park overlooking the York River, to the waterfront at Yorktown by way of the Colonial Parkway, and to a restaurant overlooking the Chickahominy River. Speaking of the “special relationship,� it was both great fun and an honor to lead the breakfast run to Yorktown in our 25/30, a sports limousine originally owned by a London businessman and his American wife, who was Buffalo Bill’s granddaughter. Local residents and other tourists loved seeing our cars go by on these breakfast runs; one local friend still talks about what a thrill it was to see us on the Colonial Parkway, especially since he had had no idea that we would be there. We also staged driving tours to Yorktown Battlefield, the Williamsburg Winery, Bacon’s Castle, and Smith’s Fort across the James from Jamestown, the Army Transportation Museum at Fort Eustis, and two of the great colonial plantations along the James River. Those who had to do a 100-mile drive before having a car judged had two choices: driving up and down the Colonial Parkway

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between Yorktown and Jamestown for four laps, or taking a winding route up to Hanover Tavern and back following the routes that Washington and Rochambeau followed in 1781 when they surrounded Cornwallis at Yorktown. These driving tours gave members a chance to see American historical sites dating from 1666 to the present day but mainly concentrated on the colonial era. Martin Davenport, Fred and Anne Ward, Tim Younes, and the meet chairs had a good time planning these tours, and we were happy that they were so well-attended. In addition to the driving tours, we offered a bus tour to Jamestown, taking in both the historic site of the town and Jamestown Settlement, and to Yorktown Battlefield, both of which were very popular. Many people also took the bus tours to the Virginia Air and Space Museum at Hampton and to the Mariner’s Museum and the Virginia Living Museum, both at Newport News. Fred Ward led two walking tours of the campus of William & Mary, which got rave reviews from the participants. Walking tours of Colonial Williamsburg and behind-the-scenes tours of the Williamsburg Inn were also popular, as were afternoon teas. A particularly interesting tour was to the Conservation Labs of Colonial Williamsburg, where we had an extraordinary chance to see how conservators work on different kinds of objects and to learn about the ethics of conservation – a significant topic for those who restore cars for a hobby.

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The Rolls-Royce Owners’ Club

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AUTOFOCUS

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We offered more than 30 technical seminars and keynote lectures, covering a wide variety of topics and all models of Rolls-Royce and Bentley. Some of these lectures were more historical in nature, appealing to members who wanted something other than gearhead talks: “Rolls-Royce in Hollywood,” “Godspeed – a Sail to Commemorate America’s 400th Anniversary,” and “Lady Dovedale Chooses Her New Coachwork” were very popular, and Tom Clarke’s Rolls-Royce Foundation lecture, “Charles Rolls: Hidden Depths,” was fascinating. We tried to offer technical seminars that were a little different, ranging from what tires to use to what oils to use, with stops along the way for rejuvenating paint finishes, the chauffeur’s school at Rolls-Royce, and overdrive applications. The seminars seemed to be particularly well-attended this year, reflecting the planning work of Glenn Goldburn, Tim Younes, and the three meet chairs. In addition, Cortes Pauls put on a skeet and trap shooting contest at the Williamsburg meet, as he has at prior meets. This event was held at

the Conservation Park of Virginia, a countryside location west of Williamsburg, and it was a sellout event. There were many first-time shooters attending, and the ladies did particularly well in the contests, as did the shooters from overseas. The main dinners at an annual meet are always popular, and this year they were no exception. Fred and Anne Ward planned all three dinners to perfection. The opening dinner, “A Night in Virginia,” was sponsored by Bentley Motors. Patrick Henry repeated the main part of his “Give me liberty or give me death!” speech. Then we had a re-enactment of the British surrender at Yorktown, with Richard Charlesworth of Bentley Motors playing the part of American Major General Benjamin Lincoln and Fred Ward playing the part of British General Charles O’Hara. All the main actors came down onto the lawn by the Lodge’s Virginia Room in new Bentleys. The actors and many of our members were dressed in colonial attire, lending a note of almost-authenticity to the proceedings. (I’m not so sure about the authenticity of my

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costume, however!) After this hilarious beginning, we repaired to the Lodge for a sumptuous dinner. The Rolls-Royce dinner, “Dinner with the Washingtons,” was held in the Oval Garden across from the Lodge, with cocktails in the Sunken Garden preceding the dinner. During the cocktail hour and dinner, a silent auction was held in the Rockefeller Building between the two gardens; here were auctioned a wonderful selection of Rolls-Royce and Bentley parts and memorabilia. The auction raised more than $8,000 for the Rolls-Royce Foundation. Peggy Ware and her helpers, along with Bob and Shirley Shaffner, did a superb job running the silent auction. Again, period costumes abounded, striking a note of colonial elegance. The final awards banquet was held in the Virginia Room and was a great success. V-P Awards Woody Richey romped through the awards announcements with his usual élan. Most members had abandoned colonial dress by this point, but the assemblage remained elegant. The cars at the drive-by that followed in front of the Lodge were

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even more elegant, being the first place and senior award winners. They seemed to be, and were, the descendants of the colonial coaches we had seen all week on Duke of Gloucester Street. Society dinners have become more and more popular over the years, and Sue and I, as coordinators of the dinners, tried this year to ensure that each dinner was at an attractive spot and had a little something extra. The Silver Ghost dinner featured a talk by Phil May, who wrote Twenty Silver Ghosts, the book that featured Melbourne Brindle’s illustrations. The Phantom I and Phantom II dinner was a cookout at the nearby country club. The Phantom III dinner was at the King’s Arms Tavern; Mark Tuttle had worked with us to make sure that dinner was perfect, and though he tragically died just before the meet, we all made sure that the dinner went off as successfully as he had wished. The Modern Car Society held an elegant affair at the restaurant at Kingsmill-on-the-James. The Silver Cloud and S dinner was at the Woodlands Conference Center and featured entertainment by Three Jolly Coachmen, a local group dedicated to preserving the music of the Kingston Trio. The Bentley Extravaganza was a joint dinner for the Bentley Drivers Club, the Derby Bentley Society, and all Bentley enthusiasts; held at Two Rivers Country Club, it featured dancing to an excellent local combo. All of the dinners were reported to be very enjoyable, and some were memorable. Judging this year was held on the grounds of Bassett Hall, the Williamsburg home of Mr. and Mrs. John D. Rockefeller Jr., who were the ones behind the Colonial Williamsburg restoration for so many

years. The grounds are lovely, and we were able to get all the cars on the fields and nicely displayed, as well as a tent for the breakfast and lunch, and another tent where corporate sponsors gave away drinks and facials and offered raffle tickets. Cortes Pauls was in charge of the judging field; he and his small team are to be commended for a very smooth production. The sponsors’ tent was mobbed most of the time, as it provided a welcome respite from the very hot and sunny weather that day. The breakfast that was offered this year on the field proved to be very popular, as people could get on the field early with their cars and then have breakfast. Seeing group after group of magnificent cars, some of which had not appeared before, was a thrill. Though the weather turned so hot that we were all off the field by 3 p.m., the day was a spectacular wind-up to a delightful week. Sue, Andy Diem, and I, the meet co-chairs, are very grateful to all of you who attended the

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Annual Meet. From what we have been told, you all had a wonderful time, and that made all our efforts worthwhile. We thank you all for coming, we thank the sponsors for their generous support, and we particularly thank all our volunteers for their superb efforts in making this week such fun.

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What’s New at the Factories Written by Philip C. Brooks

2008

is a year in which we are seeing both Rolls-Royce Motor Cars and Bentley Motors going from strength to strength, evolving their product lines, selling more of all models, expanding dealer networks worldwide, and moving in new directions. It is now some 10 years since we first heard that Vickers had put Rolls-Royce Motors on the block, so to speak, and six years since the two brands really separated. After that very messy splitting of the brands, it was difficult to imagine that both BMW and Volkswagen would be able to produce very world-class and yet very British cars quickly and successfully. Yet that is exactly what has

happened. Both of the new parent firms recognized early on the heritage and the character of what they had just acquired, decided to build upon the foundation that was there, and took astute and positive steps to preserve the best of what had gone before and still head in new directions. The degree to which they have succeeded is remarkable. Rolls-Royce has, in a very short time, built a new factory in Chichester, a new location, has recruited an extremely able and talented workforce, and has introduced new models. Starting with the Phantom sedan, with its traditional radiator coupled to radically different front-end styling and a body design reminiscent

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A year of evolution

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As a result of this careful development and marketing, Rolls-Royce Motor Cars enjoyed sales in 2007 of 1,010 cars worldwide, a very impressive total considering the cost of the cars. Sales in 2007 were up 25 percent worldwide, and the Phantom Convertible model comprised 25 percent of 2007 sales. The Phantom Extended Wheelbase accounted for 25 percent of Phantom sedan sales worldwide, with major sales in Asia. Forty percent of total sales were in North America, and growth was startlingly good in the United Arab Emirates and China. The factory now has 80 dealerships worldwide. BMW has taken a wise course in developing the Rolls-Royce brand; these new cars dominate their part of the automotive market even more than the Corniche did in years gone by. Not content with that, Rolls-Royce made very public announcements that they are developing a new, smaller Rolls-Royce sedan. The car, code-named “RR4,” is slated to be introduced in 2010. The factory cleverly announced the development of this car at the major auto shows early in 2008, then released a couple of teasing if not startling design sketches, ones which caused eyebrows to be raised in wonderment. Not long after, the factory released a three-quarter front photo of a prototype car, and that looked as if the car would indeed be a Rolls-Royce … as redefined by the Phantom, which has preceded it. Very few details were available as of this writing, other than to say that a new engine was under development for the car. It seems as if we will indeed, and shortly, have a big Rolls-Royce and a little Rolls-Royce once again. One imagines that Sir Henry probably would approve. And one expects that the international buying public will approve, what with four models of Phantom and who knows how many models of the small Rolls-Royce from which to choose.

overall of the Silver Cloud, Rolls-Royce Motor Cars then developed the Phantom Extended Wheelbase sedan and offered both cars with a nearly infinite variety of options under their “Bespoke” program. They then introduced the Phantom Convertible for 2007, an exciting car with hints of yachts and great touring cars of the 1920s. In 2008, they followed up with the new Phantom Coupé, a higher performance and more driver-oriented motorcar. Both of these cars had been introduced to us as experimental cars using the old Derby experimental code designation of “EX,” thus “EX100” for the convertible and “EX101” for the coupe, all of which honored the heritage of Rolls-Royce and left enthusiasts drooling.

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1959, turning that engine into a source of awesome performance. They built two state limousines, the first for Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II to celebrate her 50th anniversary on the throne; we hear that the second one is also now in the Royal Mews. Crewe would, of course, accept orders for more such motor cars. The factory then resurrected the Azure convertible, making it even lovelier and more powerful than before. In 2007, they announced the very limited production Brooklands coupe in the Arnage line, a car at least as high performance and driver-oriented as the Phantom Coupé. This lineup gives the prospective Bentley purchaser six different models from which to choose, plus a host of options through Mulliner. Such development of models has made Bentley enormously successful. In 2007, the factory sold 10,014 cars worldwide, and their overall profits went up by nearly 14 percent. New dealerships opened up all around the world, and sales increases quickly followed. A branch of Bentley Marbella was opened in Seville; that dealership is owned by C. de Salamanca and managed by José Carlos de Salamanca. And yes, that is the same firm and same family as Carlos de Salamanca, Royce’s great friend and longtime dealer. Traditions carry forward. Just to keep things moving along, the factory announced the Continental GT Speed option, with significantly increased performance and a rather more vertical grille, both in the coupe and in the Flying Spur. And while they announced a limit to the number of Brooklands coupes they would build, the cars have sold

At Crewe, Bentley Motors has done equally amazing things, if not more so, in a few short years. Bentley went back into grand prix racing, with the avowed goal of winning Le Mans once again; as we all know, they did so after an absence of 73 years. Having proved conclusively that Bentley was back on the scene, they withdrew from racing. (But the diehards among us keep hoping. …) Bentley brought back the Continental name and feel, with a very exciting GT coupe that became an international favorite almost overnight. Then they brought back the Continental Flying Spur four-door sedan, then they introduced the Continental GTC convertible. All of these cars had new engines, running gear, platforms, and body designs, yet they managed to capture the grand touring element of Bentley’s heritage going back to 1921. Bentley Motors kept developing the big Arnage sedan, with its wonderful V-8 engine that had been built at Crewe since

30

-QEKIWGSYVXIW]SJ&IRXPI]1SXSVW0MQMXIH

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DYf]g\h\Yh\ci[\h" 5h`Ugh UWcjYhYX\caYcbh\YWcUghµk]h\fccaZcfmcifZUjcf]hYh\]b[g" Award-winning architecture captures spectacular ocean views of the California Riviera—the famed coast between Laguna Beach and Newport Beach. Remarkable designs of 6,675 to 7,532 square feet showcase grand outdoor living areas that reflect their coastal surroundings. And of course, there’s the stunning collector’s garage and other special spaces that you’ve longed for. Choose any other address? Perish the thought.

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AN ESTATE COLLECTION AT CRYSTAL COVE BY STANDARD PACIFIC HOMES

:,(.3(::5,>769;*6(:;*( ‹:(3,:.(33,9@/6<9:!465+(@74¶74;<,:+(@¶:<5+(@(4¶74 Prices, plans and terms are effective date of publication and subject to change without notice. All square footage is approximate. Models shown do not reflect racial preference. Softscape, hardscape, landscape and other items featured in and around the model homes are decorator suggestions and not included in the purchase price. The Tides is included in an Assessment District and a Community Facilities District, with associations supported by its residents, which maintain common areas and facilities for a monthly fee. Crystal Cove is a planned community developed by Irvine Community Development Company, LLC, an affiliate of The Irvine Company. Ask your Sales Counselor for details.

exits.

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so quickly that one wonders if they will raise that limit. Clearly, Bentley Motors is taking all the right steps to dominate its growing share of the luxury highperformance car market. Bentley has gone further, too, announcing that it is embracing a long-range environmental strategy for its cars. Stringent fuel-management revisions will be made to existing engines very shortly. New engines will be developed to be in place by 2012. Engines will be able to use biofuels. Bentley Motors is determined to reduce the carbon footprint of their cars as much as possible, and they are charting a course that may put them in the forefront of such efforts in the automotive world. Finally, two announcements were made during 2008 that tend to symbolize, for this writer at least, that the two companies are honoring their heritage particularly well. Bentley Roma announced that it was sponsoring “The Jewel that is Europe” vintage car rally, a two-day event from Rome to the Gulf of Naples, in June 2008. Seven vintage (lower case) Bentleys were to participate: a 4-1/4 Vanden Plas tourer, a Mark VI Cresta, two R-type Continentals, an S.1 Flying Spur, and two S-type Continentals. Thus does Bentley recognize even more of their heritage. And Rolls-Royce Motor Cars announced that in August it would sponsor outdoor performances of Toad of Toad Hall, A.A. Milne’s play adapted from Kenneth Grahame’s The Wind in the Willows. The performances were to be given in the gardens surrounding the factory by the Chichester Festival Youth Theatre. Mr. Toad can make murmuring noises about “a motor car” once again, though it remains to be seen whether he will say “a proper motor car!”

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Sir Henryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Final Masterpiece Or

How Glenn Ford Pushed a Button and Won the War Written by Philip C. Brooks Photos by Larry S. Glenn

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he occupation of France was getting worse. Julio Desnoyerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sister, ChiChi, had just been shot by the Gestapo for her part in the Paris Resistance. Julio, a wealthy Argentinean playboy in Paris, had secretly joined the Resistance himself. Julio decided to visit his German first cousin, Heinrich von Hartrott, an SS officer stationed at a base outside Paris. His car had a radio signaling device built into it, which connected to an RAF radio frequency. When Julioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s chauffeur, also a Resistance member, pulled Julioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s car up to Heinrichâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s headquarters, Julio pressed the cigarette lighter button in the carâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rear quarter panel. That sent a signal to the RAF, giving the precise location of the base, and the bombers swept in and destroyed the German base. Julio, played by Glenn Ford, gave his life for freedom. Luckily, the car survived the making of the film The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse in 1962 and is alive and well in England today. Because of this final scene in the movie, the car became one of the stars of the film. This car was 74MY, a 1934 Rolls-Royce Phantom II Continental, and the first Phantom II Continental chassis fitted with the H.R. Owen/Gurney Nutting sedanca coupĂŠ

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body. With its close-coupled two-door body, the roof opening only over the front seats, its large, almost separate trunk mounted on the rear, and a spare tire mounted vertically aft of the trunk, this black masterpiece epitomized the height of elegance in the 1930s. It was a breathtaking design in 1934 and remains so to this day. Its Phantom II Continental chassis was Sir Henry Royceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s final masterpiece. When World War I was over, Derby resumed into production with the Silver Ghost, a car that had gained immortal fame in the Arabian deserts

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with T.E. Lawrence. A new factory was built to capture the North American market, and the Silver Ghost went into production in Springfield, Massachusetts, as well as in Derby. By 1922, it was obvious that the days of the Ghost were numbered; the car had been manufactured since 1906, and its development possibilities had nearly peaked. Derby introduced the new, smaller, owner-driver Twenty in late 1922, and at the same time, Royce started to design a new car to replace the Silver Ghost. Declining Ghost sales in the United Kingdom made a replacement necessary, and soon. In 1925, the new car was introduced to the motoring world: It was called the â&#x20AC;&#x153;New Phantom,â&#x20AC;? later to be known as the Phantom I. There had been only three years to develop this new model. What Royce was able to do was

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to develop a new engine and place it in what was essentially an evolution of the last Silver Ghost chassis. The new engine was a great improvement over the Ghost engine. While the Ghost engine was 7,428 cc with a side valve design, the Phantom engine was 7,668 cc with a pushrod-operated overhead valve design. Design improvements included a new head, and these improvements and the new valve arrangement permitted the new engine to have a rev. limit of 2,750 rpm instead of the old limit of 2,250 rpm. The increase in brake horsepower was about 33 percent, according to factory literature. The car had the fourwheel brake and servo system that had been introduced late in the production run of the Silver Ghost. All in all, the Phantom I was a more modern car all around, and the Springfield Phantom I even had the Bijur centralized chassis lubrication system. 3,501 Phantom Is were produced in the two factories, from 1925 through 1929 at Derby and 1926 through 1931 at Springfield. However, while 2,258 Phantom Is were built at Derby between 1925 and 1929, 2,940 Twenties were built between late 1922 and 1929. The smaller

car, which had been designed with both a new engine and a new chassis, was at least as popular as the bigger car if not more so. It was obvious to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Paâ&#x20AC;? Royce and his design staff that a new chassis would be needed for the Phantom I; the evolved Silver Ghost chassis that had been used for the car was really only an interim step. The design team began work on a replacement for the Phantom I in 1927 and had engineering drawings ready for production by March 1928. Into these drawings, Royce and his personal staff of six designers poured all the lessons they had learned from the Silver Ghost, the New Phantom, and the Twenty. They kept improving the Phantom engine design, of course, but for the new car, they designed a chassis that was like a larger version of the Twentyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. The new chassis had half-elliptic springs all around, unlike the Phantom Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s front half-elliptic and rear cantilever spring system. The frame was lower, giving the car a lower center of gravity and a more modern appearance. These advancements gave the car much better handling. In addition, the chassis

36

enjoyed the Bijur centralized lubrication system, a new hypoid rear axle, and an exposed drive shaft. The engine and gearbox were now joined together as a rigid unit, rather than as two separate units as before. The engine was fitted with a turbolated head and was made with lighter and stiffer parts where possible. The Autovac was coupled to a separate vacuum pump for constant flow. The engine, referred to during development as the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Super Sportsâ&#x20AC;? engine, had a maximum running speed of 3,500 rpm, up 750 rpm from the Phantom I. Other minor refinements were made, all of which produced a faster, lower, better-handling car. Depending on coachwork, the standard 150-inch chassis model had an average top speed of 80 to 90 mph, and the short 144-inch chassis version had an average top end of 85 to 95 mph. In the late 1930s, Rolls-Royce issued a famous printed â&#x20AC;&#x153;Warningâ&#x20AC;? about continuous speeds on the new German autobahns, and they advised owners of this model Phantom that a maximum continuous running speed was 70 to 75 mph. That is a remarkable top cruising speed for a big heavy car that was designed in 1927-28. The new car was considered extraordinary by owners and the motoring press when it was introduced in 1929 and in the years to come. It was the last car designed by Henry Royce: It was the Phantom II. Royce always liked cars with â&#x20AC;&#x153;a bit of fizz,â&#x20AC;? as he put it, and he hated cars with vast heavy bodies. He had tried to develop a high-performance car in the 1920s, creating four experimental cars with light open bodies. These cars were 10-, 15-, 16-, and 17EX, all very racy tourers, referred to in the factory as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sports Phantoms.â&#x20AC;? The sales department was not interested in such cars at all, nor was the public in general. Ivan Evernden, of Royceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s design team, wrote, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The sporting youngsters would have been glad to have such a car, but they were not the ones with the money to pay for it.â&#x20AC;? Drawing on experience with the Sports Phantoms, the factory-built 18EX, the first Phantom II

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experimental chassis, a car that had a Barker body built to Royceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s specification and for his use in France. The body was a four-seat close-coupled saloon, with the body mounted on a subframe attached to the chassis, rear seats well forward of the rear axle, lightweight construction and appearance, flared front wings, the steering column at a lower rake, and a spare tire mounted in the rear for better weight distribution. The car was built on the standard 150-inch chassis. 18EX had excellent performance, and Royce liked it so much that he used it at his winter home on the Riviera for the next three years. The overall concept of 18EX was exactly what Royce liked, but he still wanted more â&#x20AC;&#x153;fizz,â&#x20AC;? so he came up with the idea of building this sort of close-coupled lightweight sporting saloon on the short 144-inch chassis in order to reach his goal. Royce assigned Evernden to design such a car, and he did: 26EX, a personal, high-performance automobile with a small and very attractive saloon body by Barker. The body was finished in pale saxe-blue, over which was applied a coat of artificial pearl lacquer made of finely ground herring scales mixed into the clear lacquer. The pale blue glistened through the pearl lacquer. The interior was in the same pale blue, even to the faintly blue tinted sycamore woodwork. Royce was delighted with this masterpiece. The sales department in Conduit Street remained uninterested, so Royce contacted his great friend, the Madrid Rolls-Royce dealer Don Carlos de Salamanca,

and said that Evernden would bring the car to Salamancaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s villa at Biarritz to see what he thought of it. Don Carlos was â&#x20AC;&#x153;enchantedâ&#x20AC;? with the car, according to Evernden, and immediately entered it for the Grand Concours dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Elegance Automobile, which was about to take place. The car not only stole the show, it received the Grand Prix dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Honneur. Orders and inquiries started to come in rapidly, and the car was left with Don Carlos to continue a publicity tour on the Continent. Evernden came home on the train, and when he went up to London the next week, he was astonished to find that the sales department had already announced the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Phantom II Continental Touring Saloon,â&#x20AC;? had prepared a four-page brochure with pictures of the car at the Concours, and had set a price of ÂŁ2,850 for the car. Quite an about-face for the sales department! The Phantom II Continental seized the imagination of the motoring public then and has a firm hold on the hearts of classic car enthusiasts to this day. Orders came in regularly for the Continental all the way to the end of production in 1935. The concept of such a car remained active, and there was one Phantom III Continental built as an experimental car. It could be argued that all the qualities of the Phantom II Continental, when added to streamlined coachwork, led to the Mark V Bentley Corniche. The Bentley Continental â&#x20AC;&#x153;Flying Spurâ&#x20AC;? four-door close-coupled saloon of 1957 again embodied the concept of the Phantom II Continental. Today, the

37

A movement of historical significance in

    

   

Montblanc watchmaking

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Bentley Continental Flying Spur does the same thing. The concept was more than a success of the moment in 1930. This leads into the question of what a Phantom II Continental actually was, a question not unlike how many angels can dance on the head of a pin. Evernden wrote, “The company had no written specification to define a car which would bear this title [Continental]. Royce and I, together with others at West Wittering and at Derby, had a very clear specification for the car, but we never wrote it down.” Based on Evernden’s writings and a detailed examination of factory records by Ray Gentile in the late 1970s, it appears that there was a Continental style-body and also a Continental chassis. A Continental-style body was a close-coupled fourpassenger saloon, with the rear seat well forward of the rear axle, a low center of gravity, lightweight construction, a low steering column rake, springs and shock absorbers developed for high-speed touring, provision for carrying luggage for touring, and weight distribution arranged to keep the rear axle on the road.

The Phantom II Continental chassis has been the subject of great debate over the years; people have ascribed as many as 14 elements to the correct specification for a Continental chassis. It turns out that there were many variations in combinations of these elements when it came to the factory’s labeling a chassis as a “Continental” chassis. Gentile feels that there were only two elements that truly defined a Continental chassis, those being the 144inch wheelbase and the stiffer five leaf springs; all other features were applied too inconsistently. That being so, Gentile believes that the correct number of short-chassis Phantom II Continentals produced was 281. This total does not include four standard 150-inch chassis that are often described as Continentals, nor does it include seven other standard-chassis cars for which the chassis cards carry details similar to those listed on the four that are often counted. As it happens, there were many different bodies originally fitted to Phantom II Continental chassis, including limousines, a variety of differently described saloons, coupés, cabriolets, dropheads,

39

sedanca coupes, roadsters, and even 13 sedanca de villes. Very few cars were built on the Phantom II Continental chassis conforming to the original body specification that Royce, Evernden, and the design team had in mind. 74MY, the car used in The Four Horsemen, was typical of this confusion: It was built on a Phantom II Continental chassis, but it has an Owen Gurney Nutting sedanca coupé body. Angels dancing on the head of a pin, indeed! As has always been the case with Rolls-Royce products, the Phantom II and the Continental were continually improved mechanically. Changes were continually made to the engine and chassis. The result was a car that, by 1935, was a great deal more modern than it had been in 1930. The later cars were modern enough that one could order a radio in them! The difference in the way a 1930 Phantom II drives as compared to a 1935 model is startling; the later model feels smoother, handles better, and is more nimble. For such a large car, the performance through the gears is remarkable. The late Phantom II, and especially the Continental, is a delightful road car today. Because the Springfield factory couldn’t afford to retool to build the Phantom II, Derby made two batches of left-hand drive Phantom IIs, the AJS and AMS series (“A” for “American”). Most of these cars came to North America, most received Brewster bodies, a few had Continental chassis, and all were magnificent. I got to know several Rolls-Royces in the late 1950s and early 1960s, but the first one I got to work on was a late Phantom II Continental, a Barker sports saloon. A friend with the University

photo: M. Marcato - Verona, Italy

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of Kansas museums in Lawrence, Russ Camp, had purchased 103SK from â&#x20AC;&#x153;Buntyâ&#x20AC;? Scott-Moncrieff, who advertised himself as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Purveyor of Motor Cars to the Nobility and Gentry since 1927.â&#x20AC;? Bunty represented the car as being in excellent original condition. Russ had the car shipped to New Orleans and planned to drive her home from there. When he got to Kenner, Louisiana, steam started to pour out around the bonnet, and water seemed to spray everywhere. Russ pulled into a gas station to ask for help, but the station owner said no one could help because the president had been shot and they were all glued to the radio: It was November 22, 1963. Russ and the gas station owner pushed the car across the road to a junkyard and arranged to store her there until Russ could come back to get her. The following February, Russ, a friend, and I drove to Kenner in Russâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 1958 Oldsmobile with the idea of towing 103SK home with a towbar. The towbar didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t allow the Rolls-Royce to track well, and by the time we got to Baton Rouge, we were concerned. Another gas station owner came to the rescue, arranging for us to borrow his friendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s trailer, which

was designed to carry a Model T and really wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t big enough for our job. Nonetheless, we loaded the Continental onto the trailer and headed north. We drove up into Arkansas and the Ozark Mountains, where we hit a bad snowstorm. We carried on through the mountains, with forward visibility not good and rear visibility confined to seeing the enormous radiator of the Phantom II towering over us, covered in snow. Eventually we got out of the Ozarks and into central Missouri, then headed for Kansas. When we got to Lawrence, the weather was fairly warm and sunny, though the two cars and we were filthy. We investigated what had happened to cause the serious water leak in the Continental. We found that at some time, a stud holding the rocker shaft had evidently fractured, with the end screwing into the head having to be drilled out. Whoever had done the work had filled the hole, drilled and tapped for a new stud, and missed lining up the hole by a tiny fraction. That fractional difference was enough to allow the new stud to work loose, allowing the water in the water jacket to shoot out. Russ found a good machine shop

41

in Lawrence and they got the head sorted out; we reinstalled it and checked over everything mechanical, and we put the car back on the road. 103SK basically was in fine original condition, with her black paint and grey leather in remarkably good shape. She turned out to be a great car to drive and one that was still practical as a daily driver; I loved driving her. It was through this experience that I found out how magnificent a piece of engineering Sir Henry had created and what a joy a Rolls-Royce could be to work on. 103SK was restored some years later by Dr. Leland Speer, a Kansas City RROC member, and now she seems to be back in England. I wish that she were in our garage, though! By the time the late Phantom IIs were built, Sir Henry was dead. His final car was still being produced and was a better performer than ever. His concept of a close-coupled, low-slung, tightly sprung, short-chassis sports saloon with â&#x20AC;&#x153;a bit of fizzâ&#x20AC;? in it was still valid, as witness the numbers of such cars bodied by Barker during the last two years of production. That concept, much evolved over 70-plus years, is still valid today: Royceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s overall idea is much in evidence when one looks at current production from Crewe. We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see many Phantom IIs or Continentals now. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a shame, for they are still wonderful road cars. They are some of the most handsome cars, and often the most beautiful cars, that the factory produced. They are Royceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s final masterpiece, and they should be seen more often. When you do see one, or if you watch The Four Horsemen, it would be appropriate to stand in tribute to Sir Henry.

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Passionate Pursuit Ric Simpson’s Rolls-Royces Written by Barbara Stahura

the lawn at 4 p.m. At 5, his 12-inch signal cannon would be wheeled out so he could fire it toward Lake Erie and the former colonies. The resulting boom would “shake the ground in the neighborhood,” he recalls. One year, re-enactors dressed as soldiers from the War of 1812 marched to the party and fired muzzleloading long rifles in the same direction. After September 11, though, he put a halt to the parties. Besides, he started wondering, “What if I blow off my own hand?” Simpson has been chairman of the Modern Car Society, is a videographer for the Rolls-Royce Owners’ Club and the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Club, and is a self-described “photographer of some degree.” Then there are the automobiles. Simpson’s interest in fine automobiles is probably in his blood. It began with his father, who owned a string of Cords. A Web site for Cord enthusiasts claims that Simpson was brought home from the maternity hospital in a Cord. It also displays a 1941 photo of then-6-year-old Simpson peering out the tiny double window above the trunk of his dad’s Cord Westchester sedan. His father presented him with a Cord on his 16th birthday, although he remembers, “I totaled it immediately.” He bought his current Cord, a 1936 supercharged convertible, in 1959, and restored it well enough to win second place at a Cord convention. After that, “I drove it normally all over the place.” Not surprisingly, Simpson has maintained this Cord very well over the years. A friend of his does

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most of the work – nearly 3,500 hours over three years, according to Simpson. But that was time well spent: In 2008, at the time of this writing, the Cord had been accepted in the Concours d’Elegance in Pebble Beach, California. “It’s an honor beyond belief,” says Simpson. “This car is a potential threat for best car there, in show or in class. It’s a wow car, almost perfect in every detail.” To attend, he planned to drive it 10,000 miles from Fort Erie to Seattle and then to Pebble Beach. Then he would motor home via Indiana, to attend the Auburn Cord Duesenberg meet in late August.

03:)%8*-6786-() Simpson was introduced to Rolls-Royce automobiles in 1972, on his second trip to England. There, he met an engineer named Leonard Taylor at a Cord meet. During a conversation, Simpson mentioned that, yes, he did own a Cord but, no, not a Rolls-Royce. “We must rectify that immediately!” Taylor declared, and took the Canadian visitor for a ride in his new Phantom. Next, he treated Simpson to a ride in his 1951 Silver Wraith. Simpson was entranced. As it turned out, Taylor knew of a Rolls-Royce for sale “in the colonies,” and asked Simpson if he wanted to purchase it for £2,500. The car was in New Jersey, owned by a member of the Rolls-Royce Owners’ Club Simpson already knew.

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ic Simpson loves Rolls-Royce automobiles so much that he once told his wife Sondra, “I’m getting on in years and I like Rolls-Royces, so I want the finest one I can afford. We can mortgage the house, and when I die, you can sell the car and pay off the mortgage.” Now, that’s car-love. But Simpson, 73, is a man passionate about many things. A retired high school math teacher, he lives in Fort Erie, Ontario, just a dozen miles from Niagara Falls. He’s an opera lover who encouraged his students to love it too, often buying them tickets so they could attend performances. One year, he purchased 5,000 tickets. He also used to direct Gilbert and Sullivan operettas. He is a bibliophile with a particular fascination for “mostly mysteries and science fiction from the Victorian age.” He has traveled to Britain about 50 times, often as a tour director with students in tow, and he has an abiding interest in player pianos or pianolas, particularly player grands, which “have a lot more mechanism in them and play with feeling, and require special rolls to play,” he says. His own piano is a restored Weber, technically a “reproducing grand,” that requires no human manual control to produce the illusion of a live musical performance. “Some great people made piano rolls” in the player-piano heyday, he explains, “even Mendelssohn.” For years, Simpson used to host a party every May on the Sunday closest to Queen Victoria’s birthday, a Canadian holiday, and invite dozens of his American friends. He would hold high tea on

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“I cancelled the rest of my trip and went home,” Simpson recalls. “I was the owner of a Rolls-Royce. I couldn’t buy postcards now.” Sadly, someone else beat him to it. So Simpson did not buy his first Rolls until another trip to England, two years later and with a group of students. “I took that car and never looked back,” he says. “That car has done more for me than anything else I could have done.” That particular automobile was a 1947 Park Ward Silver Wraith Sports Saloon, serial number WCB5. It’s black. “The queen painted hers in the royal colors of black and garnet,” Simpson says. His second Rolls-Royce was a 1967 Silver Shadow that was a quarter-century old when he purchased it. When it blew a head gasket shortly thereafter, he went back to driving the Park Ward. He attempted to drive that one to a national meet “but the wheel bearings were gone,” he explains. He made it home but then retired the Park Ward for restoration in 1992. It had 500,000 miles on it. But those half-million miles have some wonderful stories to tell, many of which began with Simpson’s interest in player pianos. In 1974, he attended a party in Buffalo, New York, and was chatting with the man who had restored his player piano. The man thought Simpson might be interested in seeing something related. So, says Simpson, “He took me into downtown Buffalo – it was grim, boarded up – and we went down an alley and rang a doorbell. It was 3 a.m.” Inside the building, which was a decrepit theater, they walked through the darkness to the center front row of the balcony. The man left him there, sitting “in total blackness,” and asked him to wait. Before too long, a few lights on the stage came on, and a huge Wurlitzer organ began rising out of the stage. The man was sitting on the bench, playing a thunderous version of “A Mighty Fortress Is Our God.”

He would hold high tea on the lawn at 4 p.m. At 5, his 12-inch signal cannon would be wheeled out so he could fire it toward Lake Erie and the former colonies. “I’m crying my eyes out,” says Simpson. “It was thrilling! And the city wanted to make this theater into a parking lot!” The man and others at the theater that night asked Simpson if he would like to help with the restoration of Shea’s Buffalo Theater, which was soon to be officially listed as a national historic site, and today is called Shea’s Performing Arts Center. His response was to come back the following Saturday with 30 of his students. They helped begin the process of bringing the theater back to its 1920s glory. Patterned after European opera houses, the 3,200seat venue was built as a movie palace and vaudeville stage. Its original antique furnishings were designed by Marshall Field in Chicago and Tiffany in New York City. At the time, it was considered the finest movie palace between those two cities. “We shoveled out garbage, only to find rooms,” Simpson says. “Behind plaster, we found Czechoslovakian crystal chandeliers, and the kids polished them. We washed plaster statues with Bon Ami®.” Finally, two years after Simpson sat in the darkness, the theater re-opened. He was asked to pick up one of the evening’s entertainers at the airport the evening before – George Burns, who was about 80 at the time. (The other opening-night entertainer was Cab Calloway, along with an upcoming young singer, Natalie Cole.) Burns was traveling with Irving Fine, who had been Jack Benny’s manager. “Where did the theater get the Rolls?” Fine asked. “It’s mine,” answered Simpson. Burns said he had one, too. At 11 p.m. that night, the temporary chauffeur, who knew he “was sitting in greatness” in

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the company of Burns and Fine, took them to a local restaurant for eggs. The next evening, some of Simpson’s students who had helped with the restoration were theater ushers. “One of them lit George’s cigar before he went on stage,” Simpson says. To Simpson’s mind though, the most famous celebrity he ever chauffeured in the Silver Wraith was Vladimir Horowitz, who played sold-out concerts at Kleinhan’s Music Hall in Buffalo for three nights in 1978. Simpson looked after “Maestro” for those days. A few hours of chaos ensued when it was thought the Maestro’s Steinway had been lost in transit, but it was found and delivered in time. During his private rehearsal, Horowitz asked Simpson to sit beside him and turn the pages of music. “I cried, it was so beautiful,” he recalls. The night of the concert, Simpson ferried Maestro, his wife, Vonda (daughter of Arturo Toscanini), their housekeeper, and the chief technician of Steinway & Sons to the theater. In 1998, Simpson went to the Rolls-Royce Annual Meet in Newport in “an ordinary car,” where he saw the new Volkswagen-built Rolls-Royces and Bentleys. That’s when he came home and informed Sondra he was willing to mortgage the house to have a more modern model. By pure luck, he says, soon afterward he saw an ad in a Toronto newspaper for a 1990 Silver Spirit II for sale at A & K Used Cars. “With a name like that, the confidence is overwhelming,” he says with a laugh. But with a little work, the car turned out to be in marvelous condition. He indeed mortgaged his house to buy it. And, “the A & K guy was delightful,” he adds.

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Curious about its provenance, he further investigated. The car had originally been ordered specially in 1977 by a gentleman in Switzerland who happened to be from Saudi Arabia. However, the original dealer would not reveal his name. The Corniche has a wet bar in each door. The crystal decanters and glasses were missing, but Simpson, also an antique collector, figured he could replace them. He thought it was odd that the car would carry alcohol, since â&#x20AC;&#x153;the penalty for public drinking in Saudi Arabia is beheading.â&#x20AC;? He next called the Rolls-Royce Enthusiastsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Club in Britain and was sent all the information they had on the vehicle. The delivery instructions declared that the car must be shipped by boat directly to Riyadh. If the boat should stop in Israel, the shipment would be refused. The ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s signature belonged to a son of King Fahd. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I tore it apart looking for rubies and jewels,â&#x20AC;? he says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;but all I found were two British modern pennies. Was the car in England?â&#x20AC;? The Corniche had come to Canada from Japan in 1995 and was repainted. It had only 24,000 miles on it at the time. Simpson says the original colors were silver and blue â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the Saudi royaltyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s official colors â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and he is having the paint restored to those colors. Simpson then found a way to send a letter to the prince via a friendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s daughter who is married to a Saudi doctor who is the princeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s physician. As of this writing, he hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t yet heard back. If he doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t receive a reply, which is likely, it wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t matter much. Ric Simpson is far too much of an enthusiastic lover of fine automobiles to let such a trifle diminish his enjoyment in owning or driving one of the finest automobiles on the planet.

%46-2')ÂŤ7'362-',) Simpsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most exciting motor car find came only a few years ago. One of his ex-students, who runs a wrecking yard, called him to say a Corniche convertible had been delivered to the yard. Simpson hurried over. The car was not a convertible, but a 1977 twodoor hardtop â&#x20AC;&#x201C; only about 100 of which were made between 1967 and 1978, compared to 5,000 of the convertible model. The car had been stolen from the ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s driveway, vandalized, and not recovered for two months. The insurance company paid, as Simpson says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;$85,000 for a â&#x20AC;&#x2122;77 car in about 2005.â&#x20AC;? The hood ornament was gone, as was all the chrome and all of the hubcaps. The trunk lock had been drilled out. The exhaust system was also gone, but Simpson bought it and took it home at a â&#x20AC;&#x153;very nice price,â&#x20AC;? although restoration and repairs cost a bundle. He later discovered that the engine â&#x20AC;&#x153;had two horns sticking out of it, so it had European specs. This was a very special car.â&#x20AC;?

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This Is How We Roll Celebrity Rolls-Royces & Bentleys Written by Jan Tegler

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et’s face it, just about anyone who owns or drives a Rolls-Royce or Bentley is notable in some way. Simply being seen in an example of either marque, whether comfortably seated in the back or behind the wheel, confers “celebrity” on those lucky enough to enjoy them. That’s because the cars are stars in their own right. On the other hand, the creations of Crewe and Goodwood have always attracted stars. Celebrities of all ranks have been drawn to these iconic machines because of the statement they make. From any perspective – style, engineering, performance, luxury, or even presence – these most-refined cars proudly proclaim that you are “somebody.” And celebrities are as much a part of the story of Rolls-Royce and Bentley as anything. A celebrity is loosely defined as a widely recognized or famous person who commands a high degree of public and media attention. They can be political figures, royalty, stage, movie, radio, or television stars, writers of repute, musicians, athletes, business tycoons, or even people who are famous for nothing more than … being famous. True, some may shy away from the spotlight, but over time, far fewer have been shrinking violets. That’s why, since the advent of the automobile, celebrities have sought vehicles that are equally celebrated – machines that announce their owners wherever they go. For more than a century, Rolls-Royces and Bentleys have done the talking for a huge cross-section of the famous, declaring – to borrow a modern expression – “this is how we roll.”

a passion for the automobile. In 1911, he purchased a magnificent Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost built to exacting specifications. One of its most notable features was to become an icon of the brand: Lord Montagu’s Silver Ghost was the first Rolls-Royce ever equipped with the marque’s “Flying Lady” mascot. The Prince of Wales (Edward VIII) took possession of his first Rolls-Royce, a Barker Limousine, in 1919. A great enthusiast for the marque, he owned 10 examples including a 20hp, Phantom I, and Phantom II. Home-market and European sales aside, no group of royals took to the cars bearing the Flying Lady like the fabulously wealthy maharajas of pre-independence India. Between 1908 and 1947, approximately 800 Rolls-Royces went to British-ruled India to satisfy what was known as the “Maharaja market.” The Maharaja of Patiala, Maharaja Bhupinder Singh, was one of the first to feel the pull and one of the subcontinent’s most famous Rolls-Royce customers. Known as an avid cricketer and extravagant spender, he was married 10 times and had a reported 88 children by his wives and concubines. In 1913, the maharaja had a Silver Ghost Tourer specially built with a body by Mulliner. Not afraid of the price of customization, he spent $400 in contemporary money for a tool roll and $1,000 for jump seats, between which rested a crystal decanter and four matching tumblers. The car still exists and was recently sold at auction for $1.87 million. Such was the Maharaja of Patiala’s addiction to Rolls-Royces that he eventually bought a total of 44 examples, all custom-made. Legend has it that when Roll-Royce sales staff once offended the maharaja by asking the address to which a car would be delivered (presumably so they could help maintain the

1%,%6%.%78313:-)78%67 From the outset, Rolls-Royces set the standard for quality, and for world leaders, nothing but “the best car in the world” would do. Early adopters included blue bloods from across Europe. John Douglas-Scott-Montagu, the first Baron Montagu of Beaulieu, was among the first. A Conservative politician in Britain’s House of Parliament and later, the House of Lords, in the late 19th century and early years of the 20th century, he was also among that adventurous body of Edwardian technophiles who had

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custom model), he responded by having one of Rolls-Royce’s engineers visit the machine in Patiala some weeks after delivery. Called before the maharaja to observe the car, the engineer was stunned to see that it had been converted to haul refuse and was being used to collect trash around the city. Other maharajas collected Rolls-Royces with just as much gusto, amassing large collections. Most were customized one way or another. Maharani (the term for a maharaja’s wife) Sethu Parvati Bai of Travancore equipped her 1933 Rolls-Royce with a stool so that a dwarf could massage her legs while remaining invisible to onlookers. A 1927 Phantom I belonging to Baroda’s (near Gujarat, India) Sayaji Rao Gaekwad III was adorned with 24-karat-gold-plated interior appointments and solid silver door handles. The supremely rich Nizram of Hyderabad had a fleet of more than 50 Rolls-Royces, while the Maharaja of Mysore apparently bought his Rolls-Royces by the sevens. Thereafter, filling an order of seven for the maharaja was known inside the company as “doing a Mysore.” A Western celebrity with a strong connection to India was the famed writer Rudyard Kipling. Born in Bombay but educated in England, the author of works including The Jungle Book, Captains Courageous, Soldiers Three, and Kim, is often referred to as the “Poet of the British Empire.” He was also a pioneer motorist, owning and driving cars from the turn of the 20th century forward. In 1928, he purchased a Rolls-Royce Phantom I, which is on display at Batemans, the Kipling family home in England (now a museum). Fellow author Ernest Hemingway acquired a Roll-Royce just one year later. He then used his 1929 Phantom II Short-Coupled Saloon (33WJ) to tour the United States. During the period, he wrote A Farewell to Arms, The Fifth Column and the First Forty-Nine Stories, and Death in the Afternoon. Hemingway’s Phantom II was customized at his direction

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with beverage, golf, and hunting equipment storage compartments. While Kipling and Hemingway were making their mark in literature, Charlie Chaplin was becoming a silent film legend. Chaplin had a taste for stylish and well-engineered cars and in 1929, ordered a Phantom I with a custom body. He also starred alongside his own Rolls-Royce Springfield Piccadilly roadster in the 1931 film City Lights, playing a tramp who befriends a Rolls-Roycedriving millionaire. Following an evening of wild carousing, they drive home one morning swerving over streets and sidewalks, famously avoiding pedestrians and other cars by inches. Chaplin’s Tramp says to the millionaire, “Be careful how you’re driving,” to which the millionaire responds, “Am I driving?” Clara Bow, another icon of the early motion picture era also owned a 1929 Rolls-Royce. The “It Girl” and Roaring ’20s box-office smash loved speed on four wheels. “I can’t get a car that will drive fast enough,” she once remarked. Bow was often seen behind the wheel of her pale yellow Phantom I Phaeton, flirting with and fleeing from the legions of men who considered her the ultimate sex symbol of the decade. If Rolls-Royces were the personification of fleetfooted grace and class during the 1920s and 1930s, there could have been no more fitting owner for them than Fred Astaire. The most famous dancer of all time owned a 1927 Phantom I Hooper-bodied Sedanca de Ville, a car of which he was so fond that he kept it until 1950, using it in both New York and London. Back in “blighty,” the man often described as “the savior of his country,” Sir Winston Churchill, took ownership of a 1935 Rolls-Royce 20/25 limousine, procuring the car for his long-serving chauffeur,

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Frank Jenner. Churchill employed Jenner to drive him from Chartwell to Westminster and his London home. He also permitted Jenner to use and maintain the vehicle himself, allowing the car to be registered in the chauffeur’s name. “Winnie” continued to make use of the car until 1964, and it was also used to transport VIPs and heads of state such as Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower, Sir Anthony Eden, British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan, and the aforementioned Charlie Chaplin. A Mulliner-bodied 1937 Rolls-Royce Phantom III passed through the hands of two more famous Britons, Geoffrey de Havilland and World War II military leader Gen. Bernard Montgomery. Many more notables owned or used Roll-Royces in the first three decades of the 20th century but comparative newcomer Bentley (founded in 1919) also had its share of acolytes. Just under two years after W.O. Bentley built the first Bentley engine (the 3-liter), the first production Bentley motor car (following three prototypes) to roll out of the original company production facility in Cricklewood, London, was purchased by a celebrity. Wealthy and influential

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playboy Noel van Raalte agreed to buy the maiden example on September 21, 1921. Of course, the famed “Bentley Boys” were all celebrities of a kind, growing in stature as they helped the marque achieve its legendary success in racing at Le Mans and beyond in the late 1920s. Together with millionaire Woolf Barnato (company financier and Bentley chairman), the most well-known of the group were Sir Henry Birkin (professional racing driver), George Duller (champion steeplechase jockey), Glen Kidston (record-breaking aviator), S.C.H. “Sammy” Davis (racing journalist, editor of The Autocar), Baron d’Erlanger (international banker/ playboy), Bernard Rubin (pearl and farming magnate), and Dudley Benjafield (noted bacteriologist/physician).

to have owned more of the company’s cars than any of the other royals, tailoring each to her specific needs. A galaxy of celebrities joined the royal family in partaking of the best motoring has to offer in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s. Naming them all would require a long list indeed, but among them are rock-and-roll pioneers, actors, comedians, movie producers, Las Vegas performers, and the world’s best-known boxer. In the mid-1950s, a 1952 Rolls-Royce Silver Wraith caught the eye of comedian Red Skelton. So fond of it was Skelton that he kept the car until his death in 1997. Actor William Holden fancied the slightly sportier lines of Bentley’s 1957 S.1 Type Continental. Out in Las Vegas, flamboyant pianist and performer Liberace took delivery of one of several Rolls-Royces he would acquire, a 1961 Phantom V with a body by coachbuilder James Young. Liberace had Young cover the car with small, faceted Austrian crystals. As the 1960s progressed, the Beatles’ rise to prominence made it almost inevitable that the legendary group’s members would have their own experiences with the cars of Charles Rolls, Frederick Henry Royce, and W.O. Bentley. John Lennon made waves by purchasing a 1965 Rolls-Royce Phantom V (5VD73) in June of that year. He had a number of modifications made to his Phantom, including a rear seat capable of converting to a double bed and the addition of a Sony televison, a telephone, and a portable refrigerator.

1-(')2896=13:)67 7,%/)67 Today, Britain’s royal family and Rolls-Royce are closely identified with one another. But it wasn’t until the mid-1950s that Queen Elizabeth II began using a Phantom IV as a state limousine. By 1960, Rolls-Royce had succeeded Daimler as the Royal Warrant holder, manufacturing motor cars for the queen. Until recently, the royal family’s state fleet of cars was largely Rolls-Royce and wherever Her Majesty or other members of the family traveled, one of the fleet was sent ahead to the destination to provide service if needed. Princess Margaret is said

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But these changes paled in comparison to the psychedelic paint work with which he had the Rolls-Royce covered in 1967. The move drew the ire of a large portion of the British public, outraged that Lennon would desecrate a symbol of British dignity. Ultimately, Lennon donated the car to the Cooper-Hewitt Museum in New York City as part of a settlement with the IRS. He also carried the psychedelic theme over to his 1956 Bentley S1 Type Touring Saloon, but didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t arouse as much attention with the sporty Bentley. Elvis Presley was an avowed luxury-car fan and finally felt the lure of RollsRoyce in the late 1960s. Strangely, â&#x20AC;&#x153;the Kingâ&#x20AC;? had a proclivity for buying used cars. His 1965 Silver Cloud had already passed through the hands of actor Michael Landon and country music stars Charlie Rich and Charlie McClain. Country music icon Johnny Cash could travel in style while singing â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve Been Everywhereâ&#x20AC;? in his 1970 Rolls-Royce Silver Shadow I stretch limousine. Meanwhile, the man who declared himself â&#x20AC;&#x153;the greatest of all timeâ&#x20AC;? decided it was time to give one of the greatest cars of all time a try. After a run of success that catapulted him to stardom, Muhammad Ali bought a 1964 Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud III. He is said to have driven it frequently around Santa Barbara, California. Sir Elton John has owned several Rolls-Royce and Bentley tourers, including a 1962 Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud III and a 1985 Bentley Continental convertible with a special Mulliner-Park Ward body. Used in the video for Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hit song â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nikita,â&#x20AC;? the Tudor Red car featured identically colored radiator veins and parchment trim piped in red. Another British rocker of the 1970s, Queenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Freddy Mercury, owned a 1974 Rolls-Royce Silver Shadow. Moving up a few notches, one of the greatest male singers of all time made Rolls-Royces a part of his stable. Frank Sinatra owned at least three, including a 1982 Silver Spur limousine â&#x20AC;&#x201C; stretched by 42 inches â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and a 1985 Corniche convertible. Despite his own fame, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Old Blue Eyesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Corniche convertible was certainly less well known than the pink 1979 example owned by Zsa Zsa Gabor. In 1989, the former Miss Hungary and cosmetics entrepreneur made headlines when she was pulled over by police for driving with an expired license, an expired car registration, and having an open container of alcohol in her car. No police were on hand, or at least they kept very quiet, when Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev crashed his Rolls-Royce Silver Shadow one night while driving incognito outside the Kremlin.

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kind of revitalization fresh resources and new blood can bring to such revered organizations. New blood with fresh resources is also an apt way of describing a large segment of the marquesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; modern customers. At home in a world where globalization and the pace of life has reached new heights, todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s celebrities still look to the cars from Crewe and Goodwood when they wish to make a statement. Rolls-Royceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s modern Phantom, launched in 2003, has attracted a fascinating mix of traditional and contemporary clients, many of whom have gone to great lengths to â&#x20AC;&#x153;personalizeâ&#x20AC;? their cars. Rapper 50 Cent (Curtis Jackson) couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wait for Rolls-Royceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s drophead coupe and had his 2006 Phantom modified as a convertible months before the debut of the drophead. Fellow rapper Nelly customized his Phantom with aftermarket wheels and an interior redone completely in mink. More rappers, including Fat Joe and Missy Elliot, favor their own Phantoms. Hip-hop paragon/producer Jay-Z also enjoys a Phantom and presumably the 1959 Silver Cloud II convertible he gifted to his wife Beyonce Knowles for her birthday in 2006. NBA star Shaquille Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neal was one of the first celebrities to adopt the new Phantom as his personal coach. Shaqâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ride features 24-inch superman wheels, carrying through the â&#x20AC;&#x153;man of steelâ&#x20AC;? theme youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll find on the other machines in his fleet. NFL running back Thomas Jones customized his own 2004 Phantom with eye-catching red paint and 24-inch Asanti wheels. Others are just as smitten with the new Phantom but leave the customization to Rolls-Royce itself. Ben Affleck famously purchased a silver Phantom for

78=0);-8,74))(-28,)2);1-00)22-91 Almost a decade into the 21st century, Rolls-Royce and Bentley still sit atop the automotive world. Now backed by BMW Group and Volkswagen respectively, the brands are distinct once more. And both are enjoying a renaissance, the

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walking pace, a consideration for Her Majesty as she spends a lot of time in parades and processions. Celebrities can be collectors, too. Both Jay Leno and Ralph Lauren are well-known for their collections. Leno’s Bentleys include a Speed Six, a dignified 8-liter sedan, and a one-off 1926 roadster with a twin-turbocharged 8-liter Bentley engine built for the Tonight Show host by a group of British craftsmen. Then there’s his 1934 Rolls-Royce Phantom II, modified with a 1,000hp Rolls-Royce Merlin aircraft engine from a World War II fighter. Style-maker Ralph Lauren owns a 1929 4.5-liter Birkin Bentley. The Continental GT, which went on sale in 2003, has been a major hit for the company, attracting contemporary Bentley owners varying from business leaders like Oracle CEO Larry Ellison, who takes to the road in his 2006 Continental Flying Spur, to socialite Paris Hilton. Hilton has made several questionable moves with her Continental GT, including driving with a suspended license in 2007. The car has resonated with famous athletes, too. From the NBA and NFL to major league baseball and the world’s most popular sport, soccer, those who take the field or court for a living love the Continental line. Soccer stars Wayne Rooney, David Beckham, and Steven Gerrard have all taken to Bentley’s stylish GT coupe. With new models set to debut from both brands, including Rolls-Royce’s new RR4 due in 2010, the marques will remain the marquis automobiles for today’s public figures and those of the coming generation. Whether “wafting” along in seclusion or racing past paparazzi, celebrity-owned RollsRoyces and Bentleys will still say to onlookers, “this is how we roll.”

ex-fiancée Jennifer Lopez. Victoria Beckham also bought a silver Phantom for a significant other – in this case, her husband, soccer star David Beckham. The infamous Simon Cowell, one of the celebrity judges from American Idol, ordered a Maybach, but after experiencing one of Rolls-Royce’s new offerings, cancelled the order in favor of a Phantom and 100 EX convertible. Politicians and leaders worldwide are Phantom fans as well. Hassanal Bolkiah Mu’izzaddin Waddaulah, the Sultan of Brunei, is, according to Guinness World Records, the largest collector of RollsRoyces in the world with a fleet believed to be as large as 500. He and his brother are reported to have purchased 12 to 14 bulletproof examples of the latest Phantom. Not to be overlooked is his collection of Bentleys, which the U.K.’s Daily Mail reported in 2007 included 362 cars. Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Al-Saud, the nephew of Saudi King Abdullah, bought an identical pair of new Phantoms, one for himself and one for his bodyguards. Bentley Motors presented the Queen of England with a Bentley limousine as a present for her Golden Jubilee in 2002, marking her 50th year as queen of England. A second Bentley limousine joined the royal fleet soon after. As official state limousines, Bentley designed the cars to travel smoothly even at a

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Where Old Rolls-Royce and Bentley Cars Go to Live Written by R. Pierce Reid

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ome are in high-tech workshops. Some are located in former barns and mills. Some are located in industrial parks and others in bucolic meadows. Some specialize in engines and chassis, others in leather, paint, or wood. But all have a common mission – to service, resurrect, and restore automobiles to the standard set by Rolls-Royce and Bentley. In comparison to the vintage automotive industry as a whole, these businesses form a tiny group – no more than a few dozen shops staffed by a couple of hundred craftspeople. But it is to these shops that cars and their owners make pilgrimages from around the world. They come to these shops because they know the proprietors live by the motto of Henry Royce: Quidvis recte factum quamvis humile praeclarum – whatsoever is rightly done, however humble, is noble. For the owners who truly value their cars for their silence, smoothness, speed, and utter reliability, these are the shops that are sought out from all corners of the world.

8,)=«6)2380-/)38,)6'%67 Every owner of a Rolls-Royce or Bentley car knows that their car is not like other cars. They certainly differ from mass-produced cars in their elaborate mechanical complexity and hand-fitted chassis. While the average car of the 1920s and ‘30s had 5,000 parts, a Rolls-Royce or Bentley chassis has almost 20,000 parts – and this does not include coachwork. A Phantom I carburetor contains almost as many parts as a complete Model A Ford engine! In part, it is this complexity that allows an old Rolls-Royce or Bentley to run and drive even when it’s in appallingly bad condition. Henry Royce, the engineering genius behind the

marque, overbuilt his engines and chassis to such a degree that a worn-out example will keep running (often better than other cars of the era) and appear to be in good shape. But for the owner or restorer, this complexity comes with the challenge of understanding the systems, tolerances, handfitting, and interaction of parts that other car makers never even conceived. For this reason, Rolls-Royce and Bentley cars aren’t even like most of the other fine luxury and sporting automobiles of their day. Alfa Romeo, Bugatti, Duesenberg, Napier, Delahaye, Isotta Fraschini, Mercedes, Maybach, and others all made superlative vehicles and many were in the same league with Rolls-Royce and Bentley. But because each of these high-end companies used their own technologies, approaches, and mechanical solutions to build their cars. So expertise in one marque doesn’t always translate readily to another. Therefore, it is rare that when you visit one of the true Rolls-Royce and Bentley specialists you will find a wide variety of cars in their shops. In fact, many Rolls-Royce and Bentley specialists refine their focus even further, often specializing in pre-1939 cars, early postwar cars (1946-1955), or more modern cars such as Silver Shadow, Bentley T, and its Crewe-built successors. But regardless of focus, all the specialist shops are committed to helping owners restore their cars to the same mechanical standards their creators intended.

8,)=«6)78-00*392(-2&%627 While today’s owners treasure virtually all Rolls-Royce and Bentley cars as valuable collector vehicles, lavishing

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care and attention on them, there were times when an old Rolls-Royce or Bentley was just about worthless. Prior to World War II, many early Rolls-Royce chassis were recycled as delivery vans, fire trucks, hearses, wreckers, and even as stationary engines to run mills and saws. During the war, tens of thousands of early brass-era cars were melted down in scrap drives in England and in the United States. And in the early postwar years, before the “old car” movement got started, a large, thirsty RollsRoyce or Bentley chassis was a liability because you couldn’t get rationed petrol or tires during England’s postwar austerity. At a time when an early Rolls-Royce or Bentley could be bought for as little as $50, maintenance,

service, and even oil changes were not high on many owners’ agendas. True, the old car movement was taking off in America, but as often as not, that was an opportunity for some enterprising used car dealers to shine up some of the “dogs” and ship them to unsuspecting Americans. Some of these prewar cars found sympathetic owners and were correctly restored. Often these were the gems with open touring bodies, racing lines, or interesting histories. Other cars have soldiered on, often in appalling condition – maybe used on Sundays or for short drives – gradually grinding themselves to pieces yet still running. Some went into barns and warehouses where they still turn up very regularly, ripe for recommissioning and, more often than not, mechanical restoration.

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At a time when an early Rolls-Royce or Bentley could be bought for as little as $50, maintenance, service, and even oil changes were not high on many owners’ agendas.

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*631%6',-:)78374%22)6783'2'1%',-2-2+ One thing that today’s specialists have in common is that they service and restore engines, chassis, and even complete automobiles to the highest standards. But there are dozens of steps involved to achieve a superlative restoration, and one of the keys is an in-depth knowledge of the marque. Fortunately for Rolls-Royce and Bentley owners, there are massive historical archives available at the Hunt House in England and, to a lesser degree, at the Rolls-Royce Foundation at the RROC Headquarters in Pennsylvania. All the chassis records, factory blueprints, service bulletins, handbooks, parts books, correspondence, service records, and even photographs of thousands of the cars “as new” are available to the owner and restorer. This information is often sought out by the experts even before a restoration begins. In addition, club publications such as the RROC’s Flying Lady, the RREC Bulletin, the Australian RROC Praeclarum, and the SGA’s Tourer are a wealth of technical knowledge. Visit any Rolls-Royce or Bentley specialist and you will find a library of reference materials that are critical to correctly restoring or rebuilding a particular car. In fact, without these reference materials, serious errors can occur because Rolls-Royce and Bentley frequently performed

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improvements, upgrades, or repairs on vehicles years after they were sold. For example, the company’s experiments in the 1930s with aluminum bearings proved lessthan-satisfactory and these were replaced with traditional “Babbit” metal bearings almost immediately. Yet many cars were never upgraded and still run aluminum bearings (and borrowed time). You can occasionally even find these aluminum bearings for sale by used parts vendors, and some non-specialists have refitted these to engines with disastrous results. Special tools are another hallmark of the specialist. These range from sets of the correct BA and BSF spanners to the hundreds of specialty tools needed to remove castellated nuts, core plugs, harmonic balancers and hubs, and myriad other components. Part of the complexity (and robustness) of Rolls-Royce’s engineering required the use of specialized tools to install and remove particular components. Any attempt to remove some of these parts without the correct tool can result in expensive damage to the mechanism as a whole. It is not unusual for a specialist to have an entire room of special tools, each of which has only one or two applications. Finally, in order to undertake a proper restoration, a specialist needs the right parts. Royce’s cars, fortunately, were designed to last for a long time, so parts are generally rebuildable using new bushings, shafts, bearings, etc. While many mass-produced cars eliminated these parts, Rolls-Royce and Bentley had “wearable” parts designed in. These parts would wear but would protect the critical castings and large components.

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To supply these “wear parts,” there are a number of large parts suppliers, ranging from the company’s own Crewe Spares to specialty companies such as Ristes Motors, Vintage and Auto Rebuilds, and Fiennes Restoration, which produce new parts to the highest standards. Even some of the clubs such as the Bentley Drivers Club and the Silver Ghost Association have undertaken the production of spare parts for their members. And there are a small number of salvage parts companies in the United Kingdom and United States such as Avenue Mailorder, Bensport Spares, Hyperion Parts, and Rudy’s Parts. In addition, a number of restoration specialists have, over the years, amassed large stores of spare

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Now, even the early postwar cars are more than 50 years old, and while some have led charmed lives in the hands of enthusiasts, many more were driven hard or used for weddings and limo services with little concern for proper (and often expensive) maintenance. But whether you own one of the earliest-series Ghosts or a 1980s fuel-injected Corniche convertible, there is a specialist who can ensure that the vehicle is kept fully up to snuff.

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cause apprentices become masters, moving out on their own close to where they learned. “It’s a very small community,” says Dick Frawley, owner of the Frawley Company, a shop in Pennsylvania specializing in the restoration, repair, and service of Rolls-Royce and Bentley cars from Silver Ghost through Silver Shadow. “We’ve been in business for 30 years. In that time, we’ve dealt with several hundred cars and maybe a dozen professionals who know the prewar ones really well. The top shops all have their strengths and cooperate with each other. We pool knowledge and techniques, recommend parts’ suppliers, even loan out one-off specialty tools, which is great for everyone. Our goal is to return cars to the road running their very best. It’s what our customers expect, and deserve.” Not far from the Frawley Company is Tim Jayne, who now runs DennisonJayne Motors. Jayne is a prewar expert who specializes in small horsepower cars and who also is deeply knowledgeable about the Wraith and Phantom III chassis. One of the youngest of the American specialists, Jayne has a thriving practice and regularly teaches classes and seminars.

8,)'6%*871)2 There is no one profile that can be applied to the craftsmen who restore RollsRoyce and Bentley cars. At the level of the true specialist, all tend to be unique individuals and are more often than not highly educated. And all do the work out of a passion for the marque and the enjoyment of the challenges offered by the Rolls-Royce and Bentley’s mechanical complexity. Among the world’s top Rolls-Royce and Bentley specialists are a rocket scientist with a Ph.D; a retired naval aviator; a former dot-com executive; a formerly indentured apprentice; a racecar driver; and a pair of brothers who learned the trade at the Rolls-Royce factory in Crewe. Others apprenticed at established shops and went on to found their own specialty businesses. Some took over established shops. But regardless of background, these individuals represent a core of the Rolls-Royce and Bentley restoration industry. Interestingly, many of the top shops are clustered close together. Sometimes this is because of the complementary nature of the work, but often it is be-

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parts, allowing them to have necessary and critical parts on hand during the restoration of customer cars. During the 1990s, in fact, many of these parts suppliers banded together to form the Rolls-Royce and Bentley Specialists Association (RRBSA), which now has members in the U.K. and the United States. The right to display the RRBSA crest is earned by those companies that have passed a rigorous review of processes, standards, practices, and results. Only companies that have worked on Rolls-Royce and Bentley cars, almost exclusively, for at least five years can apply. Owners looking to have their cars restored and serviced correctly should look for the Specialist Association shield. But even procurement of the correct parts is no guarantee that they will fit on your Rolls-Royce or Bentley car. From the earliest years of the automobile industry, U.S. companies began using mass-production techniques and made millions of parts to absolutely identical dimensions. During the same time period, the British motoring industry relied on craft production, where individual parts were hand-fitted into complete mechanisms by expert “fitters.” Parts that fit on one engine would not necessarily fit on another because each had been filed or lapped or reamed to fit its mate. So for today’s restoration professional, simply having a part is only the first step.

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For decades before moving to its new home in Stowe, Vermont, the Vintage Garage was located in central Massachusetts, not far from the Rolls-Royce factory in Springfield. And in nearby Brookfield, Massachusetts, Sports Classics has served the Rolls-Royce and Bentley community since the 1970s. Owner and principal engineer Bob Jefferson first worked on Rolls-Royce and Bentley cars as an employee of Frank Cooke at the Vintage Garage. But he later went on to set up his own shop, quickly becoming recognized as a top craftsman and expert in restoration and engine building. Over the years, many fine restorations and engines have come from Sports Classics workshops. Farther west, in Ohio, Steve Littin’s Vintage and Auto Rebuilds has rapidly become one of the top names in the United States for restoration work, especially on Silver Ghost engines, chassis, and coachbuilding. Littin worked for many years for a well-known collector before opening his own shop in 2001. Today, they are one of the few Rolls-Royce and Bentley specialty shops able to offer complete restorations under one roof, including coachbuilding, radiators, engines, paint, trimming, and other key specialties. Vintage and

With more than 40 years working on prewar Rolls-Royce and Bentley cars, Billings Cooke is currently one of the most experienced and talented RollsRoyce and Bentley engine builders in the world. His father, Frank Cooke, founded the Vintage Garage during the 1960s. Frank was a prolific author and literally wrote the book on many of the techniques and processes that are still used to restore and maintain the cars. Frank Cooke made tens of thousands of replacement parts at a time when they were no longer available and was the first person outside Rolls-Royce to cast new cylinder heads and blocks. Beginning in his teens, Bill Cooke learned the trade from Frank and from luminaries like the late Ed Lake. After earning his business degree, he served an apprenticeship at Appleyard Rippon in the U.K., further adding to his knowledge of the marque. Today, with Bill Cooke at the helm, the Vintage Garage remains a mecca for prewar cars and their owners. “We are probably best known for our Silver Ghost, Phantom, and vintage Bentley engine and chassis work,” says Bill Cooke. “The precision and attention to detail required is challenging. You are working on a 7-liter engine with tolerances of a Swiss watch. But when we restore an engine, it’s ready to run for decades. We like to say that we are building engines that the owner’s grandchildren will still be driving.”

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sive when we have to fix damage done by others. The worst offenders seem to be ‘race and competition’ shops that owners entrust with their rebuilds. Often, they don’t understand that race engines are built for a single race or season. The skills involved in building a high-output race motor don’t translate well into Rolls-Royce engines that were designed to run smoothly and silently for a lifetime.”

But lest one think that the restoration professionals are all based in the United States, England is home to some of the finest craftsmen and parts manufacturers in the world. One of the most revered restoration facilities in the U.K., if not the world, is P. & A. Wood in Essex, northeast of London. Founded in 1967 by brothers Paul and Andrew Wood, the company not only turns out spectacular restorations, but was chosen by Rolls-Royce Motors to restore AX201, “The Silver Ghost,” a few years ago. In 2001, the company was designated as the only “Official Rolls-Royce and Bentley Heritage Dealers” in recognition of the knowledge and expertise that the company has garnered with early cars. This makes it one of the few dealers worldwide that not only can sell and service brand-new Phantom automobiles, but that can restore and maintain examples dating back to 1904! In addition to its work on Rolls-Royce and Bentley cars, P. & A. Wood is among the world’s leading experts in the restoration of Rolls-Royce piston aero engines. Their engines have been used in rare and valuable flying examples of World War II aircraft. “Our motto, from the beginning, has been ‘attention to detail,’” says Paul Wood. “And with Rolls-Royce and Bentley cars, the details are critical. Everything works in concert to make the whole car smooth, silent, and as reliable as the makers intended. You cannot overlook anything because the whole job is only as strong as the weakest link.” Fiennes Restoration is one of the U.K.’s largest restoration specialists and the company is also the leading manufacturer of prewar Rolls-Royce and Bentley parts in the world. When he founded the company in 1976, Will Fiennes had already earned his Ph.D. from Imperial College in London and was working in the British aerospace industry – a true rocket scientist! During the 1970s, he

Auto Rebuilds also offers nearly 1,500 different parts for Ghost and Phantom chassis. “The restoration and preservation of the Ghosts is one of the most challenging aspects of the profession,” says Littin. “The variations and details that changed during more than 20 years of production require an incredible level of knowledge, and parts can be difficult to find. We recently had to produce a new aluminum crankcase for an early Ghost. It is the heart of the engine, so the complexity of this one casting required hundreds of hours of work to get it right and you just can’t charge the customer for all the time. So it becomes a real commitment.” Also located in Ohio, E.J. Murphy and Company is a father and son operation. E.J. “Butch” Murphy Sr. and Butch Jr. have long kept modern and early postwar cars in top shape for their owners. But in addition to their postwar work, “the Butches” are among the best Phantom II specialists in the world. Along with the Phantom III and Derby Bentley, the Phantom II is among the most complex chassis and engines Rolls-Royce ever built. And some of the best Phantom II chassis restorations have come from this small shop. There are other shops as well, and owners and those in search of quality work on their Rolls-Royce or Bentley should remember that while there are probably 500 shops in the United States that will claim to be able to do a full restoration on your car, there are fewer than a dozen that really know the field. And most of the good shops will gladly share the names of other qualified shops. “Rebuilding a Rolls-Royce or Bentley engine that is old and worn out is generally challenging, but it is straightforward,” says Tim Jayne. “But it gets expen-

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decided to turn his passion for Derby Bentley automobiles into a business and today his company has grown through both customer demand and acquisition of companies such as Coldwell Engineering and Clanfield Restorations, a coachmaking company. Located in a sprawling series of old mill buildings in Little Clanfield, Oxfordshire, Fiennes employs old-world craftsmen in restoration and coachbuilding. But from the 19th century, one quickly steps into the 21st century, as Fiennes is set up with the latest in computer-controlled machining equipment to manufacture new parts to the highest standards. Fiennes’ parts range from highly complex cylinder heads and cylinder blocks down to tiny, machined nuts and bolts, all made to the specifications and standards of Rolls-Royce. “When I first considered a career in Rolls-Royce and Bentley restoration,” says Fiennes, “my university advisors were appalled. Aerospace Ph.D.s weren’t supposed to work on old cars, at least not as careers. But it is an amazingly rewarding career path and in many ways, I am not sure I could have done it without an education in engineering, science, and metallurgy. You don’t have to be an aerospace scientist to work on Rolls-Royce and Bentley cars, but it certainly doesn’t hurt!” But those are just two among a number of companies that is well-established in providing service, restoration, and parts for prewar and for postwar RollsRoyce and Bentley cars. Ristes Motors, Stanley Mann Racing, and others keep the traditions of quality and craftsmanship alive in the U.K. So it is fortunate for today’s owners, collectors, and enthusiasts that a few dedicated professionals have kept alive the skills, techniques, knowledge, parts, and tools needed to ensure that, for vintage Rolls-Royce and Bentley cars, the next century will be as great as the last!

6)%(=*36%238,)6+)2)6%8-32 Today, many Rolls-Royce and Bentley cars grace the floors of museums and collections where they are rarely driven. But as beautiful as their paint and leather may be, it’s not a work of art unless it runs and drives as it should. Without mechanical perfection, no Rolls-Royce or Bentley car is “rightly done.” Fortunately, many more vintage Rolls-Royce and Bentley cars still ply the roads. They are driven to events, on tours, or simply for enjoyment of the owner. With organizations like the SGA and Bentley Drivers Club encouraging long-distance touring, some of these cars are now covering thousands of miles per year. Still more cars are waiting to be discovered in barns or are awaiting restoration and refurbishment after a long, hard life.

The author, R. Pierce Reid, is co-owner of the Vintage Garage and former Vice President Technical, Prewar of the Rolls-Royce Owners’ Club. He has published more than 100 articles on Rolls-Royce and Bentley restoration and is a regular lecturer on transportation history. A retired marketing executive, he now restores Rolls-Royce and Bentley cars full-time at the company’s workshop. He is also a sworn law-enforcement officer and serves his community as a police officer in his hometown of Stowe, Vermont.

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Amelia Island, Florida’s Best Kept Secret The 13th Annual Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance, March 7-9, 2008 Written and photographed by Larry S. Glenn

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f George Washington really did toss a silver dollar across the Potomac River, then he certainly could have sailed one across the intercoastal waterway that separates Florida from Amelia Island. Eight nations have flown their flags over Amelia Island – the most of any city in the United States – giving this small island a rich history, packed full of Southern charm and beauty. Borrowing its name from Princess Amelia, the daughter of King George II of England, Amelia Island ages gracefully at the southern end of the Sea Islands in the Atlantic Ocean, just north of Jacksonville. Geographically, Amelia Island is 24 square miles, but really it’s not very square at all – 2 miles across at its widest point and 12 miles long. Those 12 miles offer the first glimpse of a sandy beach that runs along Florida’s east coast for close to 400 miles into the Florida Keys and serves as a gateway to the Caribbean. Packed into the island’s 24 square miles are Victorian bed and breakfasts, great fishing, boating, hiking, world-class golf, the

occasional margarita, and at the beginning of March for the last 13 years, the Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance. We’ll get to the car show, but first a few highlights of Amelia Island. Guarded on the north end by Fort Clinch and, just to be sure you’re safe, the Ritz-Carlton® toward the south end, there’s always shelter from the storm. The fort was named after Gen. Duncan Clinch, an Army officer who made a name for himself during the Seminole Wars of the 1830s and later served as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from

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Georgia. Building of the fort started in 1847, but due to slow construction it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t finished. Oddly enough, during the Civil War both the Confederate and Union Armies used the fort. It just goes to show that a little bipartisanship goes a long way. The Ritz-Carlton, well, enough said, other than that it sits on the Atlantic Ocean with great views, great amenities, and is the host property for the Amelia Island Concours dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Elegance. The heart of Amelia Island is the town of Fernandina Beach. Its historical district takes up 50 blocks and offers some of the finest Victorian-style homes in the area. Centre Street, the main drag, has the Southern charm of a laid-back country gentleman enjoying fried chicken and sweet tea on a Sunday afternoon. Take a stroll through the historic district, and make sure

Busch â&#x20AC;&#x201C; think Budweiser â&#x20AC;&#x201C; to help with designing the bar decor, which includes inlaid mosaic floors, a tin ceiling, and carved mahogany figurines. Those things can still be found there today. Local folklore says that it was the last bar in Florida to close for Prohibition â&#x20AC;&#x201C; but rumor has it that there was some serious drinking going on that evening, so we may never know. On the other end of the island, manicured lawns and palm trees welcome all to the Ritz-Carlton, site of the Amelia Island Concours dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Elegance. Now in its 13th year, the Concours has come to be one of the premier classic and exotic car events in the United States, and whispers of it being the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pebble Beach of the Eastâ&#x20AC;? can occasionally be heard as you make your way around the show field. It has developed a rich

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On the other end of the island, manicured lawns and palm trees welcome all to the Ritz-Carlton, site of the Amelia Island Concours dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Elegance. to shop and dine as you make your way to the harbor for the sunset across the Amelia River. Located on the last block before the harbor you will find the Palace Saloon, Floridaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s oldest continuously operated drinking establishment. Built in 1878, it was originally a haberdashery, the kind of store where men and errant pirates could buy items such as buttons, ribbon, and the occasional sword. The building was sold in 1903 and the Palace was born. Owner Louis Hirth relied on his good friend Adolphus

history and draws automobiles from far and wide. More than 300 cars spread out into 35 classes make the 10th and 18th fairways of the Ritz-Carltonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Golf Club at Amelia Island a showcase for all things automotive. At the 2008 Concours, the usual suspects of high-end show cars were there: Duesenberg, Packard, Bentley, Rolls-Royce, Mercedes-Benz, Porsche, and Ferrari. There were also some models that the casual reader may not know such as Tatra, A.J. Watson Roadster, Georges

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TOURING

Coral Beach Club, Dawn Beach, St. Maarten

Experience the art of luxury beachfront livingâ&#x20AC;Ś Introducing Coral Beach Club on Dawn Beach, St. Maartenâ&#x20AC;ŚA captivating luxury retreat for complete relaxation of body & soul. IRAT Model A Cabriolet, and a Kissel Kar, just to name a few. There were cars entered from 33 U.S. states, along with Canada and a single car from Italy â&#x20AC;&#x201C; noticeably enough, it was a 1935 Buick. The brainchild of Florida businessman and certified â&#x20AC;&#x153;car guyâ&#x20AC;? Bill Warner, the Concours has, since its inception, given over $1.5 million to Community Hospice of Northeast Florida and the Spina Bifida Association of Florida at Jacksonville. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s much more to the Concours than the Sunday display of cars. On Thursday evening, RollsRoyce Motor Cars held its Winemakerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dinner. This year it was intended to honor and celebrate retired racecar driver Johnny Rutherfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 70th birthday, but due to severe weather in the Midwest, his plane never got off the ground that day. After hearing that he wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be able to make it, there was a collective heavy sigh from the sold-out event. Slowly everyone returned to their dinner conversation of cars, chrome, and carburetors. Friday morning is the beginning of the new car displays. This year Bentley, GM, Jaguar, Lamborghini, Mercedes-Benz, Rolls-Royce, and Spyker brought out the good stuff, their new models. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the proverbial â&#x20AC;&#x153;kid in a candy storeâ&#x20AC;? syndrome, except that some of the candy costs over a million dollars. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

14 Exquisite 2, 3 and 4 bedroom villas, each with a private pool, set directly on Dawn Beach with fantastic views of the ocean and the neighboring island of St. Barths and 7 Townhouses overlooking the picturesque Oyster Pond Marina.

    

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not for the faint of heart or wallet. Over the next three days scheduled activities include: seminars, road tours, test drives, automotive art exhibits, and golf. Around noon on Saturday, RM Auctions holds its annual car auction. This year’s auction was entitled “Automobiles of Amelia Island.” Like a Broadway play, it was standing room only, with another tent needed to accommodate the overflow. For six hours or so, 101 classic, or soon-to-be-classic cars and motorcycles had their moments to shine on stage. When the bidding

$1,760,000) that was specially built for Edsel Ford. This car greeted everyone in the lobby of the Ritz prior to the auction. The other “million-dollar baby” was a 1929 Duesenberg Model J convertible Berline by LeBaron (sold for $1,210,000). Now … a drum roll for the two cars that broke the $2 million mark … a 1931 Duesenberg Model J convertible coupe by Murphy (sold for $2,640,000), the saying, “She’s a real Duesy” summing up this graceful and striking motorcar. The other $2 million car was a 1931 Bentley 8L with Harrison coachwork (sold for $2,200,000).

Like a Broadway play, it was standing room only, with another tent needed to accommodate the overflow. gets serious, the tent breathes with the crowd as everyone inhales and exhales in anticipation of the next nod or wave from a bidder. This year’s auction had that excitement in spades, and total sales of over $15 million made for a good day’s work. Two cars broke the million-dollar barrier. The first was a 1934 Ford Model 40 Special Speedster (sold for

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Out of the 100 8Ls that were built, this is the only Harrison-bodied car. The Bentley, YR5076, actually made an appearance at Pebble Beach in 1989 and then, after having several U.S. owners, it returned to the U.K. in 1995. Those were great cars, but this writer’s favorites were the two BMW Isettas that were on the auction block that day. These little

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guys are commanding big dollars these days and the bidding for them proved it. The Isetta was designed in 1952-53 by Renzo Rivolta, an Italian refrigerator manufacturer. Rumor has it that his design team parked two scooters together and put a refrigerator shell on top of them and the Isetta was born. For a mere $1,100 or so you could own a new Isetta in the mid-1950s; today you would need to pony up $35,000 or more for one. If you go to Amelia for the Concours the auction should be one of the must do things on your list. This year, as in the past, man and machine where honored at the Concours. The machine was the Thomas Flyer; it has the distinction of holding the world record for driving around the world a hundred years ago in 1908, in an event that tested

the then-unproven method of travel. Its manufacturer, Erwin R. Thomas, already had a reputable business building bicycles, and, like Henry Royce, became fascinated with thoughts that someday a carriage would be motorized. Thomas started by attaching one-cylinder gas engines to his bikes, and it was only a matter of time before the vision became a reality. In 1899, a one-cylinder, four-wheeled carriage made its debut and the one cylinder quickly evolved into a four cylinder. Thus the Thomas Flyer was born. Buffalo, New York, was now on the map as an automotive hot spot. The New York Times and Le Matin, a Parisian daily newspaper that was published until 1944, sponsored the race. Their intention was for the race to sell newspapers, but little did they know that the

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event would come to shape the automotive industry as we know it today. It very well may have been the first corporate sponsorship, with gifts of tires, parts, fuel, and, of course, cash. Starting on a cold February day â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Abraham Lincolnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s birthday, in fact â&#x20AC;&#x201C; in New York City, the racers would eventually travel approximately 22,000 miles, with over 13,000 of those miles on land. The word â&#x20AC;&#x153;approximatelyâ&#x20AC;? is used because the speedometer on the Thomas Flyer broke and the crew could only estimate the mileage. Only one crew member completed the entire race â&#x20AC;&#x201C; George Schuster. He held several positions at the Thomas Flyer factory in Buffalo. One of those jobs was chief road tester, which made him just the man for such an arduous task. He drove the winning car down the streets of

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Paris 169 days after leaving Times Square, beating the second-place team by 26 days. On Friday, Schuster’s great-grandson, Jeff Mahl, gave a seminar at the Concours and spoke of his great-grandfather and the trials and tribulations of the “Great Race.” Fourteen Thomas Flyers were assembled for this year’s Concours, and the car that participated in the historic around-the-world race in 1908 was one of them. Now owned by the National Automobile Museum, it was a treat for them to share this amazing piece of our automotive heritage and history with the Concours. Rufus Parnell “Parnelli” Jones raced himself into automotive history as the 1961 Co-Rookie of the Year for the Indianapolis 500, and in 1962 became the first driver to qualify at “Indy” at over 150 miles per hour. Jones added to his already considerable reputation in 1963 when, despite a cracked oil reservoir and a threat from the race officials to be black-flagged, he won the Indianapolis 500. Jones’ racing vitae includes a total of six Indy wins, the Trans-Am Championship in 1970, a couple of grueling Baja 1000 races, and three United States Auto Club championships. As one can see, Jones’ racing accomplishments read like a who’s who in racing and that’s the reason he was this year’s Concours honorary chairman. On Saturday evening, Mercedes-Benz hosted the Gala Dinner in his honor. Jones and other legendary Trans-Am drivers Dan Gurney, Sam Posey, George Follner, and John Morton presented the aptly named seminar “The Legends of Trans-Am.” Finally, it’s show time … Sunday morning has arrived. Cars line up early and as the name Concours d’Elegance implies, there is a grand parade of elegant motorcars arriving and finding their parking spots on the show field. The best seat in the house is at the Hagerty Insurance-sponsored “dawn patrol.” Coffee and doughnuts rewarded the early risers as they watched the up-closeand-personal ritual of the cars entering the field.

This year’s weather was a touch on the chilly side but the patented Florida sunshine arrived mid-morning and warmed us up, with the sweet smell of burning fuel only adding to the experience. If that didn’t get the blood flowing, then the sound of the Trans-Am cars being fired up certainly made everyone take notice and turned a few heads – not to mention the few who covered their ears. In contrast, when one of the Silver Ghosts was started, hardly anyone noticed that the engine was running. It’s quite a tribute to the owners for maintaining the cars in a fashion of which Rolls-Royce founders Henry and Charlie would approve. Judges representing all types of automotive backgrounds descend onto the show field and, with clipboards in hand, they begin deciding which cars will have the honor of being the Best in Class, and, the most coveted award, Best in Show. The 2008 winner was a 1935 Duesenberg J roadster owned by Sam and Emily Mann. In addition to class winners, there were more than 35 corporate awards bestowed on the field; the judges had their work cut out for them and their hands full. From its admittedly humble beginnings, the Amelia Island Concours has grown into a fullfledged, not-to-be-missed, serious car event. There’s something for everyone: the collector, the enthusiast, the aging teenager that’s trying to relive the memories of their youth and the first car they ever owned. It’s hard to imagine a better scene than being on a world-class golf course with a cool breeze prevailing from the Atlantic Ocean surrounded by a collection of world-class automobiles. Well, the only thing better might be making plans to attend next year’s Concours and exploring its beautiful host, Amelia Island. The 2009 Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance is scheduled for March 13-15. Make your plans now for this action packed car weekend and watch out for the pirates buying an occasional sword.

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At the Edge Dreams and reality converge in South Africa Written by Jesse Scaccia

Now this is Africa. You are riding in a topless Hummer-type vehicle. The squawks of wild birds and the growls of unseen wildebeest rise above the engine. The African sky is bright blue with mottles of white. It seems to be twice as big as any sky in America. Three times as big. You are wondering how thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s possible when the driver comes to an abrupt halt. You crane your neck and there they are: two lionesses guarding the intersection. They look like the marble lions of the New York Public Library, except these girls have coats that shine like polished gold and muscles that ripple even while resting. The tour guide slides his finger against the trigger of his elephant gun. Just to be safe, he says. Everyone should keep perfectly still. Just to be safe, he says again. It bears repeating: This is Africa. But thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot more to Africa than lions and elephant guns, and in few places is that more clear than in South Africa. South Africa boasts one of the most beautiful and cosmopolitan cities in the world, Cape Town, and also one of the most historically significant cities in Africa, Johannesburg. Since apartheid ended, South Africa has tried to fashion itself as a model of the contemporary multicultural society. And still, among all this modernity, the tribal drum beat of the Zulu and Xhosa can be found around every corner.

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%&-83*&%'/+6392( 7398,%*6-'%2,-7836= )'3231-'7 The history of South Africa begins with the advent of humanity itself. Evidence of the oldest controlled use of fire, dating back to over 1 million years ago, was found in South Africa at what is now called the Cradle of Humankind, just outside of Johannesburg. For most of the last 400 years, South Africa has been stirred mercilessly in the imperialist cauldron. It has been held by the Bantu; the Dutch and their next evolution, the Boers; the British; Shaka Zulu and his tribe; and the National Party, which held power for some 46 years. Fourteen years ago, South Africa was fi-

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nally returned to its native sons and daughters through democratic elections. Apartheid lasted from 1946 through 1990. During that time, blacks were stripped of their citizenship. Interracial dating, sex, and marriage were illegal. The blacks and “coloureds,” those of mixed race, were forced from their homes into informal settlements known as townships, including the infamous Soweto. Blacks and coloureds were kept uneducated through the Bantu Education Act of 1953. Bantu education trained non-whites for service and labor jobs. Even through the 1970s, spending on white students surpassed spending on nonwhites at a rate of 10 to 1. The end of apartheid began with the election of Frederik Willem de Klerk in 1990. Facing a falling economy, increasingly bloody protests from blacks, and the foundering power of the National Party, de Klerk set to negotiating with the African National Congress, the dominant black party. Nelson Mandela was elected president on May 9, 1994. To a visitor it may, to a degree, feel like apartheid never ended. About 80 percent of the country’s population of 43 million is black. Over half of blacks are unemployed and the vast majority live in the poverty of the townships. Through the essential slave-labor of the apartheid government, the country built a powerful economy that remains strong today. South Africa has the strongest economy in Africa, and the 24th largest in the world. The dollar has continued to gain leverage on South Africa’s currency, the rand, since apartheid. The exchange rate, to the South African economy’s dismay, has gone from a neareven rand-to-dollar exchange in 1980, to a 3.62 rand-to-dollar exchange in 1995, to the current exchange you’ll find today at roughly 7 rand per dollar.

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Hailed as the best city in Africa or the Middle East by Travel + Leisure magazine, Cape Town, the “Mother City,” has breathtaking views at every turn, an interesting layout, and the kind of laid-back locals that will make you feel at home from the first “howzit?” Upon landing at Cape Town International Airport, you’ll notice something: It is completely first world in its amenities, a step above most American regional airports. There will be a line of safe, certified taxis waiting just outside the baggage claim. South Africans have a different standard of conversational propriety than Americans, so few topics will be off limits. Take this opportunity to chat

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“cloth” of fog. With oceans, mountains, and a lovely climate yearround, Cape Town is quietly one of the best outdoor cities in the world, so make sure to bring your wet suit and hiking boots. Table Mountain tends to be littered with tourists, so I recommend taking a mini-cab down Main Road to nearby Devil’s Peak. If you’re an experienced hiker, there is an exhilarating trail up an old waterfall canyon. Be careful of the fog, though. It is cold, wet, and can bring visibility to dangerously low levels. Sitting (some might say worshipping) at the foot of Table Mountain is the city itself. Cape Town is glistening, well organized, and vibrant, a place where you’ll find Xhosa men in business suits speaking in clicks and clucks, and white surf hippies with dreadlocks strolling on the sidewalks. Long Street is the tourist shopping and dining center of the city, and just up the road is the Mount Nelson Hotel, which claims to be the most iconic luxury hotel in Cape Town. It is, but luxury has its price. A suite in the high season can run up to R14.905 (over $2,000) a night, while the lower end rooms go

with your driver about his or her experiences in South Africa. For an enthusiasm-inducing topic of conversation, ask about the 2010 World Cup and watch the driver’s eyes light up like glowing torches. The 30-minute ride from the airport to the city will be a shock to those who have never traveled to a third world country. Just past the airport are the Cape Flats, which include the third largest township in South Africa, Khayelitsha. This is your introduction to the dichotomy of experiencing Cape Town and South Africa: Your imagination and senses burst with wonder at all the beauty just as your heart is breaking from all the poverty. Soon past the townships you’ll get your first sight of Devil’s Peak, and its famous sister, the majestic Table Mountain and its breathtaking

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for the bargain price of just under $1,000/a night (R5.875). After checking in, take a deep breath of crisp African air, maybe have yourself a Castle or Black Label, and then hit the streets. The best shopping in Cape Town takes place at the V & A Waterfront, located in the city, and in the ultra-posh Camps Bay, on the other side of Table Mountain from the city. Both have their charms. The Waterfront has sea lions that romp and bark on the docks, a series of street performers that will have you reaching for your camera over and over, and a movie theater that plays American movies if you get home-

sick. Camps Bay is South Africa’s equivalent to the Hamptons. Physically it is similar to Sausalito in the Bay Area, with its winding main road on the top of a beautiful stretch of coastal cliffs. There are numerous lovely places to shop, eat, and play in Camps Bay. If you’re looking for the tribal death masks and giraffe carvings as proof of your African adventure, the best place to check out is the Green Point Market, next to the new stadium. It is open all day on Sundays. Make sure to check out Me’kasi, a brand of clothing, jewelry, and notebooks made by the enterprising residents of a local home for boys.

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After checking out Cape Town’s natural, civic, and commercial beauty, rent a car and get out of town. Some of the loveliest sections of the area are actually a short drive away. As charming as Cape Townians can be, the most winsome of locals are found at Boulders in picture-perfect Simon’s Town. I’ll give you a hint: They’re little, their skin looks like slicked formal wear, they waddle, and no, they’re not just found in arctic climates. A trip to Cape Town wouldn’t be complete without a stop at Robben Island, the island prison where Nelson Mandela was held. Tours are lead by former inmates of the island, and can often be emotional for tourist and guide alike. For information on tours, visit robben-island.co.za. Speaking of Mandela, the more locals you meet (and believe me, they’ll meet you), the more it will become clear that South Africans share three primary sources of national pride: 1) Nelson Mandela. 2) The 2007 world champion rugby team, the Springboks. 3) The 2010 FIFA World Cup of soccer. Stadiums are being assembled all over the country. Additions are being built to the airports in Johannesburg and Cape Town. There are grand plans to tear down large swaths of the townships (the parts visible from the highway, at least) in favor of more humane conditions.

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7%*%6Now that you’ve experienced Cape Town and its wild inhabitants, it’s time to head north to see the real wildlife of Africa. No trip to the proverbial Dark Continent is complete without a safari. This is where you’ll see the stuff of National Geographic legend: zebras moving in blurred, zigzagging unison; elephant mothers spraying water on elephant babies; and lions who, you can tell by the way they walk, know they are the king of the jungle. The Mabula Game Lodge (reservations@ lodge.mabula.co.za, www.mabula.com) is located about two hours from Johannesburg, deep enough into the bush to feel like you’re, well, out in the bush. The rooms are luxurious while still feeling reasonably “tribal.” Amenities at Mabula include a gym, private helicopter transfers, quad bike safaris, events for kids, and even archery. Mabula claims to be malaria free and,

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It is hard to overstate the importance of the 2010 World Cup to South Africa. Optimists hope that the influx of tourists and rand can help propel South Africa to first-world status. Cynics worry out loud that if both Mandela should die and the games be unsuccessful (or taken away, as has been threatened), South Africa could be propelled into the racial/tribal civil war that has been the fate of so many of its African sisters. Of the 10 stadiums throughout South Africa that will host matches, the crown jewel of the games will be Cape Town’s Green Point Stadium. The stadium sits within walking distance of the Atlantic Ocean and features a stunning view of Table Mountain. FIFA, soccer’s governing committee, requested that the stadium hold 60,000 people for the finals. After the games, the 13,000-person upper tier of the stadium will be removed to make for a more modest stadium.

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GETTING AROUND SOUTH AFRICA 86%-278LIPEWXXMQIQ] 7SYXL%JVMGER KMVPJVMIRHÂŤWFVSXLIVVSHIXLIXVEMRLMW WLSIW[IVIWXSPIR[LMPILI[EWEWPIIT8VEMRWEVIXSFIEZSMHIH 1-2-&978LIWIPSSOPMOIEQM\FIX[IIRQMRMZERWERHWLSVXFYWIW8LIWIEVI WEJIMR'ETI8S[RHYVMRKXLIHE]ERHEVI]SYVFIWXFIXJSVKIXXMRKEVSYRH 1MRMFYWIWPIEZIJVSQEXSTXLIXVEMRWXEXMSRMRHS[RXS[R'ETI8S[R EPSRK %HHIVPI]ERH7XVERHWXVIIXW ERHXLI]XIRHXSGSWXYRHIV6TIVVMHI EFSYX GIRXW &ITVITEVIHXSFIWQEWLIHXLMKLXSXLMKL[MXLPSGEPWERHXSPMWXIR XSJIPPS[TEWWIRKIVWÂŤPSYHLMTLSTQYWMGFYXMXMWEVIEPP]JYRKIRYMRIP] %JVMGERI\TIVMIRGI3RP]VMHIQMRMFYWIWMRFVSEHHE]PMKLXERHRSXEXEPPMR .SLERRIWFYVK 8%<-'%&7%PPMREPPEWEJIFIX1ER]GEFHVMZIVW[MPPVIGSKRM^I]SYEWEXSYVMWX ERH[SRÂŤXXYVRSRXLIQIXIV)MXLIVRIKSXMEXIETVMGIFIJSVILERHSVEWOXLIQ XSXYVRXLIQIXIVSR *0=-2+7SYXL%JVMGEÂŤWEMVTSVXWEVIGSQTPIXIP]QSHIVRERHEWVMWOJVIIEW ER]EMVTSVXMRXLI9RMXIH7XEXIWXLSYKLMXÂŤWFIWXXSOIITZEPYEFPIWWYGL EWGEQIVEWERHNI[IPV]MR]SYVGEVV]SRFEKKEKIEWXLIWIEVIORS[RXS HMWETTIEVFIX[IIRXEOISJJERHPERHMRK8LIVIEVIEJI[EMVPMRIWXLEXVYRGLIET ÂľMKLXWFIX[IIR7SYXL%JVMGEÂŤWQENSVGMXMIW8LIWIMRGPYHI1ERKS Âľ]QERKS GSQ /YPYPE%MV OYPYPEEMVGSQ ERHXMQI XMQIEIVS^E *PMKLXWGERSJXIRFI LEHFIX[IIR7SYXL%JVMGEÂŤWQENSVGMXMIWJSVPIWWXLER6 EFSYX  with minimal luck, you will see all of South Africaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Big 5â&#x20AC;? (lion, leopard, elephant, rhino, and Cape buffalo). Probably the best way to get up close and personal with the animals is to take a safari on horseback. According to our guide, when the animals see a human on horseback they consider us to be extensions of the horse, so they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get spooked. I was able to get within a foul shot of a wild giraffe and her young. Kruger National Park, established in 1898 and with a surface area of 7,580 square miles, features a dizzying array of species, including 336 trees, 49 fish, 34 amphibians, 114 reptiles, 507 birds, and 147 mammals. It is just a four-hour drive from Johannesburg, but for those frequent fliers, three airports adjoin the park. The southern section of the park is serviced by the Kruger Mpumalanga International Airport (KMIA), the central section by Hoedspruit Airport, and the northern section by Phalaborwa Airport. There are so many tours, price ranges, and options at Kruger that it is worth spending some time on the commercial Web site, www.krugerpark.co.za, to determine which excursion best fits your plans.

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TOURING

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If time and/or budget should force you to choose between South Africa’s cities or her countryside, without hesitation choose the Africa of your dreams over the complicated metropolitan Africa of reality.

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.3,%22)7&96+ Ask a resident of Johannesburg what the best thing to see in their city is, and you’re likely to get a curious response: Cape Town. Is that the name of a club? A monument? No, they’ll say. Skip Johannesburg and head to Cape Town, if you know what’s good for you. It’s true that Johannesburg (known as “Jozi” or “Joburg” to locals) offers little in the charm department compared to Cape Town. Its architecture is in the rigid, square style of the 1970s. The city is mostly on flat, arid ground. Its biggest draw for South Africans is the booming economy, but literally every affluent resident lives behind a wall and electrified fence (and possibly protected by guards with machine guns), so the business-class locals can be hard to meet. That said, there are some worthwhile sights in this city that, truth be told, should be little more than a stopover on the way home from safari or Cape Town. Joburg is not a walking city, and the traffic can be a nightmare. You will end up spending a considerable amount of time in your hotel, so choose wisely. Most residents of Johannesburg don’t even spend much time in the actual city, but rather in the plethora of malls that dot the area. For this reason I suggest getting away from the smog, crowding, and crime of the city, and staying farther in the bush.

One lovely option is Aloe Ridge Hotel and Game Reserve, located in a valley in the Cradle of Humankind about 45 minutes from downtown. Aloe Ridge is situated in the middle of a game reserve. Zebras freely roam the pool area among the tourists. My last time at Aloe Ridge I watched a full-grown baboon drink tea from a proper china cup right in the lobby. Take a walk along one of Aloe Ridge’s many hiking trials and you’re liable to hear the roar of a wild lion spill through the valley. A standard room can be had for R600 (under $100) a night, while a suite will cost you R1.100. Visit the Web site, www.aloeridgehotel.com, for details. An affordable option a cab ride away from everything in the city is The Backpacker’s Ritz in the Dunkeld section of Jozi. The Ritz, which is the oldest hostel in Johannesburg, has a fascinating history. The building sits high on a hill and was originally used as a look-out post and soldiers barracks during the Boer Wars. After the wars it became a school to teach Boer doctrine, but when that closed down, the circus moved in. Literally. The downstairs dorms used to be a lion hold. The Ritz is clean and fun, but more importantly, it is safe. In Johannesburg, high security walls and electric fences are a necessity, not a sign of paranoia,

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SOUTH AFRICA GENERAL TIPS 3RI[SVHKSIWEPSRK[E]-R<LSWE [LMGLMWHSQMRERXMR'ETI8S[R  ¨YRNERMŠQIERW¨,S[EVI]SY#Š-R>YPY XLIQSWXWTSOIRPERKYEKISJXLI FPEGOWMR.SLERRIWFYVK ¨OYRNERMŠMWXLIIUYMZEPIRX7E]XLMWSRI[SVH ERH[EXGL]SYVRI[JVMIRHW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

The Westcliff sits high above the city and features one of the few truly beautiful views of the city. See westcliff.co.za for reservations. After your tea, you owe it to yourself (and those that died in the apartheid movement) to visit Soweto, a short drive from the city. A township tour is necessary in order to see how the average South African lives. What youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll find in Soweto (Southwest township) are handmade shacks constructed of tin and scraps of wood. There is a waterspout per neighborhood, bedroom floors are dirt, and bathrooms are communal. The townships depicted in the movie Totsi give a realistic view of life there. The film is recommended viewing before your visit to South Africa. There are many township tours of Soweto available and tour businesses come and go almost on a daily basis, so it is best to ask your hotel concierge for advice on the safest and most knowledgeable guide.

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and the Ritz has both. It is also within walking distance of a number of shops, cinemas, and one of Johannesburgâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best malls. To book, check out the Web site backpackers-ritz.co.za. Dormbeds can be had for as little as R100 (about $14) per night. Another option in town is the Westcliff Hotel, home of the best tea in Joburg. The practice of having afternoon tea is so ingrained in South African culture that even the worst criminals during apartheid were afforded their daily cup.

320=-2%*6-'% South Africa truly has a little bit of everything: luxury and poverty, lions and penguins, and both grand hopes and terrifying fear wrapped in the preparations for the 2010 World Cup. When in South Africa you must be prepared for anything, including the chance to be delighted and amazed.

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Viva Las Vegas! Written by J.R. Wilson

N

owadays, it is not so much, “What happens in Vegas, stays in Vegas,” as what happens in Vegas is whatever you want to happen. Indeed, there is a lot more to Las Vegas than gambling. For the discerning visitor, a trip to Las Vegas can involve a range of activities unequaled anywhere else on Earth: world-class entertainment, shopping, dining, golf, boating, rock climbing, special events (such as the National Finals Rodeo and NASCAR), college basketball, minor league baseball, and ice hockey – and more to Nevada than Vegas (Lake Tahoe, Reno, Laughlin, Grand Canyon tours, and more). It may surprise many visitors to discover they have never actually set foot in the city of Las Vegas; McCarron International Airport, The Strip, the University of Las Vegas, the Las Vegas Convention Center, Lake Mead, Lake Las Vegas – none is actually in the city. In fact, the vast majority of what is routinely called “Las Vegas” is unincorporated Clark County, an area only slightly smaller than the state of New Jersey. For simplicity’s sake, however, all future references to the “city” or “Vegas” will include the greater metropolitan area.

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136)8,%2.9788,)786-4 About three-quarters of all Nevadans live in this expanded Las Vegas, in part, because about 86 percent of all land in the state is owned by the departments of Energy and Defense or designated as state or federal parks. One of the nation’s fastest growing cities for decades, the Greater Las Vegas Metropolitan Area is

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now home to some 2 million people, with a net growth that has remained relatively steady at around 70,000 each year this century. Nevada lies within two deserts – the Mojave in the south, the Great Basin in the north – and is split by numerous mountain ranges. As a result, it is one of the driest and most rugged regions in the nation. Las Vegas, with triple-digit temperatures (and often single-digit humidity) from late spring through early fall, averages only 4.7 inches of rain per year, giving birth to the oft-heard, “But it’s a dry heat.” Even so, Nevada is famous for the scenic beauty and recreational opportunities of Lake Tahoe, near Reno in the north, and Lake Mead, near Las Vegas in the south. Offering boating (including dinner cruises), swimming, fishing, and water skiing on nearly 250 square miles backed up behind the Hoover (aka Boulder) Dam, Lake Mead also is the nation’s largest man-made lake. But water activities are not the state’s only outdoors activities. Nevada also has a number of popular snow skiing resorts, including Diamond Peak and Mount Rose near Tahoe and Mount Charleston, which overlooks Las Vegas and also is a popular hot-weather getaway for horseback riding, trail hiking, picnics, etc. In addition, Red Rock Canyon near Las Vegas is considered one of the top rock-climbing locations in the world, as well as an opportunity to view ancient Indian petroglyphs. Despite being carved out of the desert, Sin City also is a golfer’s paradise, with 78 public and private courses in the Vegas Valley (essentially within 20

or so miles of center-Strip). A dozen famed designers have two or more area courses to their names, including Arnold Palmer, Tom Fazio, Jack Nicklaus, Pete Dye, Jay Morrish, and Robert Trent Jones Jr. Every major resort either owns or has a partnership with a championship-level course, although plans to build over the famed Desert Inn course would leave only one actually on The Strip – the Bali Hai at the south end. If that isn’t enough, an 80-mile drive north on I-15 will take you to Mesquite, which claims five championship golf courses of its own. Or go 100 miles south on I-95 to try Laughlin’s 10 courses – with the bonus of taking a Colorado River tour aboard a replica of a Mississippi River paddleboat, should the daytime heat encourage an early tee time. For most people, however, vacations in Nevada mean the glitter side of Las Vegas. And with good reason, as it is a city built for and devoted to entertaining visitors – currently some 38 million of them each year (and growing), who account for an estimated $6 billion in gambling revenue alone. And they have plenty of places to make their wagers, with nearly 6 million square feet of casino space. Within the actual city of Las Vegas, you begin with the Stratosphere, the only hotel/casino on The Strip inside the city limits and, at 1,149 feet, dominated by the tallest observation tower in the country. While there are no hotel rooms in the tower, it is nonetheless a popular destination for the unequaled view of the entire Vegas Valley and the three thrill rides perched at its peak. The Stratosphere’s

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the south, it is home to more than three dozen hotels – including 16 of the world’s 20 largest and four of the top five. Even the smallest of those 16 – the TI (née Treasure Island) – has nearly 3,000 rooms. And, unlike the “compact” rooms advertised by the largest hotel outside the United States – Malaysia’s First World Hotel – an increasingly large percentage of Vegas “rooms” are actually large suites. But size is not their only claim to fame, as most feature elegant public spaces, from the half-scale Eiffel Tower at Paris to the watershow at Lake Bellagio to the canals of Venice and the streets of New York, New York. All also offer the epitome of luxury accommodations for high rollers or those not averse to spending a few thousand dollars a night for “bed and bath.” These massive hotels – along with a recent trend toward high-rise condominiums near The Strip – also have led to what is being called the “Manhattanization” of Las Vegas. While few buildings reached double-digit floors as late as the 1970s, today Vegas ranks third behind New York City and Chicago in existing, under-construction, or planned skyscrapers (86). The Strip also is home to dozens of shows, from extravaganzas (such as five different Cirque du Soleil® productions, with two more coming) to traditional musical variety (a few still with traditional Vegas showgirls) to headliners (many of whom rarely perform elsewhere) to Broadway transplants Monty Python’s Spamalot at The Wynn and Mamma Mia! (at Mandalay Bay, for example). Despite tickets in the $100-plus range, these shows are extremely popular year-round, so it is best to make reservations well in advance (or be on a first-name basis with a major casino host or high-roller concierge).

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previous claim to the world’s highest roller coaster ended when that feature was closed in 2005. The city also boasts the heavily renovated downtown area, with the Fremont Street Experience light show canopy covering much of a five-block section of Fremont Street that was converted to a hotel/casino-lined pedestrian mall in the 1990s. Although downtown is a distant second to The Strip in attracting visitors, it is about the closest thing to “old Vegas” you will find. While constantly renovated, its 15 hotel/casinos are older than their Strip cousins (the average life of a dozen Strip hotel/casinos imploded since 1993 was 17 years). They also are more compact and easily accessed on foot, but don’t mistake that for small or unworthy – the 1,805-room Golden Nugget, for example, is a AAA Four Diamond hotel. The Strip – a roughly 4-mile section of South Las Vegas Boulevard – is perhaps the most unusual and expensive stretch of real estate in the world (average price per acre: $27 million). From the Stratosphere on the north to the airport runway fence on

;-2)%2((-2) Food has long been associated with Las Vegas, initially for great deals on giant shrimp cocktails,

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massive prime ribs, and cheap, all-you-can-eat buffets. Today, however, nearly every top chef in the world (37 at last count) owns or operates at least one Strip restaurant, alongside dozens native to Las Vegas. Which is not to say you still can’t get a tremendous bargain and excellent meals at numerous buffets, but your choice now runs all the way up to Five-Star and Five-Diamond restaurants where dinner for two can easily reach $500. As a result, Vegas is now ranked by Bon Appétit magazine as among the top five places in the nation to dine – and second only to Barcelona, Spain, on popular travel Web site Travelocity’s Top Ten Gourmet Destinations in the World. Many believe Las Vegas has only just begun to make its mark. That concept gained traction with the opening of Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts, a Las Vegas edition of the famed French school for chefs, which also offers individual classes for those wanting to raise their own kitchen skills a few notches. Las Vegas restaurants also are claiming an increasing number of prestigious awards. In December 2007, Mobil Five-Star ratings were bestowed on Alex at The Wynn and Joël Robuchon at The Mansion at the MGM Grand®, and Four Stars were awarded to Aureole and miX (both at Mandalay Bay), Bellagio’s Picasso and Michael Mina, and both Bradley Ogden and Guy Savoy at Caesars Palace®. Another 33 restaurants received Three-Star ratings, led by seven at The Wynn and five each at The Venetian and Bellagio®. AAA issued 2008 Five-Diamond restaurant awards to Alex, Joël Robuchon, Picasso, and Le Cirque at the Bellagio (only Chicago has more Five Diamond restaurants), and Four Diamonds to another two dozen (second only to New York City in the United States). AAA also rated five Las Vegas hotels with Five Diamonds (Bellagio, Four Seasons, Skylofts at the MGM Grand, The Venetian, and The Wynn), while FourDiamond honors went to another 14 in Greater Las Vegas and two at Lake Las Vegas (about 17 miles from The Strip). Also in 2008, Las Vegas became only the fourth U.S. city with its own Michelin Guide, which debuted by naming Jöel Robuchon to its highest Three-Star rating. Alex, Picasso, and Guy Savoy each earned Two Stars, while 12 others were awarded One-Star ratings out of 127 Las Vegas restaurants reviewed. No doubt adding to those ratings is the city’s growing status as a mecca for wine enthusiasts. Las Vegas boasts more master sommeliers (17) than any other city in America (there are only 167 worldwide), including two at the Bellagio.

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Vegas also likes big – and expensive – collections. The Wine Cellar & Tasting Room at The Rio holds some 50,000 bottles valued at more than $10 million, including an 1800 Madeira from the cellar of Thomas Jefferson. The latest major collection to enter the scene is The Wynn’s inventory of more than 100,000 bottles, including a $50,000 six-liter bottle of 1990 Cristal Champagne. And at the Aureole, 55,000 bottles reside in an environmentally controlled four-story tower, where guests’ orders are retrieved by “Wine Angels,” trained acrobats and gymnasts who scale the tower on cables. The Angels have become a Las Vegas attraction on their own, although the collection – topped by a $42,000 bottle of 1900 Petrus – is the real draw for connoisseurs. If you prefer something a bit harder, Mandalay Bay’s Red Square restaurant offers a private dinner and vodka-tasting inside its vodka freezer (the restaurant provides mink coats for all). Or go the other way with a selection of beers, meats, and sausages imported daily to the Hofbräuhaus, across the street from The Hard Rock Hotel & Ca-

sino just off The Strip on Harmon. The beers are brewed at the original Hofbräuhaus in Munich; the Las Vegas version is an exact duplicate, including hearty German/Bavarian food, music, and a largely German wait-staff.

6)8%-08,)6%4= The Tourist Bureau estimates nearly a quarter of the millions who visit Las Vegas each year come not to gamble, but to shop. And they need not go far to find virtually any world-famous store or brand, often within their hotels.

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Strip hotel. And for the more financially conservative, Vegas also has two huge (but upscale) discount malls; the 130 brand-name stores at Las Vegas Outlet Center, a couple of miles beyond the end of The Strip on South Las Vegas Blvd., and the 150 designer-name stores featured at Las Vegas Premium Outlets near downtown. One favorite stop for shoppers is the Fashion Show Mall, with 250 upscale shops and restaurants, and eight valet stations around its 2 million-square-foot expanse. Just look for the giant metal “Cloud” hovering above The Strip across from The Wynn hotel. Future mega-shopping venues will include three multi-billion-dollar hotelcondo-casino-office-shopping complexes now under construction: City Center (next to Bellagio), Echelon (where the Stardust once stood), and Viva (across from The Orleans just off-Strip on West Tropicana Boulevard.). While the stores do close each night, there are no clocks or windows in Vegas casinos, because gamblers never sleep. But not all the nightlife is at the tables. Nor on The Strip.

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For its 30th anniversary in 1992, Caesars (the name does not mean it belongs to Caesar, but that all its guests are treated like Caesars) introduced the concept of an internal shopping mall. Today the newly renovated and expanded 634,000-square-foot, three-story Forum Shops complex boasts 160 luxury and haute couture shops and boutiques, more than a dozen specialty food shops and restaurants and, reportedly, the highest gross sales per square foot of any mall in America – including Rodeo Drive. You also can browse the shops of Paris or Venice’s St. Mark’s Square (and take a gondola ride down the Main Canal), buy a new or pre-owned luxury car at The Wynn’s Ferrari-Maserati dealership – or a Lamborghini at The Shoppes at the Palazzo – or pick up a new boat at Silverton’s Bass Pro Shop. In short, anything you want and can afford almost certainly has a storefront inside – or near – a

Las Vegas is home to some of the nation’s hottest nightclubs and bars, from the new Stoney’s Rockin’ Country near the Outlet Center, the extremely upscale Tryst at The Wynn, and Pure at Caesars Palace to the favorite hangouts of the (mostly Hollywood) rich and famous: Rain, the Ghost Bar, and the Playboy Club, all at the Palms (just west of The Strip on West Flamingo Boulevard.). While most off-Strip casinos are classified as “locals,” the Palms has redefined both that concept and set a number of new standards for all Vegas hotels. Eschewing long-running, big-name shows and a giant mall, it has instead gone all-out to attract Hollywood’s A-list, the movers and shakers of entertainment, to its hot nightclub scene and a new (or at least greatly enhanced) twist on Vegas luxury – massive themed suites.

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What is a themed suite? How about the twostory, 10,000-square-foot “Hardwood Suite,” with a basketball half-court, scoreboard, professional locker rooms, pool table, full bar with lounge, and dance floor? Or the 4,200-square-foot “Kingpin Suite,” which sports two full-size bowling lanes? Or indulge the ultimate male fantasy in the “Hugh Hefner Sky Villa,” which features an outdoor, cantilevered Playboy Jacuzzi® pool with glass end wall offering a spectacular view of The Strip, a fully equipped gym, glass elevator, and 8-foot, round rotating bed. Not as unusual as you might think – it is a penthouse suite for the new Fantasy Tower, which also houses the world’s only Playboy Club. Of course, the Palms is not alone when it comes to luxury suites, a hallmark of virtually every major Las Vegas property. The Hilton, next to the Las Vegas Convention Center about a mile east of The Strip, has its own set of themed suites, but nothing can hold a candle to the city’s three largest – the 15,400-squarefoot Verona (the largest hotel suite in the world), the 13,200-square-foot Tuscany, and the “modest” 12,600-square-foot, two-story Conrad. Each has a full kitchen (chef available), private pool, and up to two dozen TV sets. All for a tad more than a dollar per square foot a night – but even that won’t do it if a whale (someone who gambles from $500,000 to $1 million or more during a single stay) comes along. Caesars Palace also lays claim (with an asterisk) to the world’s largest suite by offering to combine its normally four Villa and Forum Penthouse Suites into a single, 45,000-square-foot, 14-bedroom, 8bath suite, complete with private cigar bar, billiards room, and full fitness center. Useful if you want to entertain a few close friends overnight. Overall, there are more than 142,000 hotel rooms in Las Vegas, with another 37,000 being added in the next four years.

With the opening of the Palazzo tower this year, the Venetian/Palazzo becomes by far the world’s largest hotel complex, with more than 7,000 rooms. That will be short-lived, however, as The Wynn, across the street, will soon open its second tower (Encore), lifting it to more than 5,000 rooms – and owner Steve Wynn, who started the super luxury trend with Bellagio, plans two more 2,500-room towers where the old Desert Inn Golf Course now stands. But no size record stands for long in Las Vegas. Sheldon Adelson, chairman of the Las Vegas Sands Corp. (owner of the Venetian/Palazzo), is talking about building a new convention center east of the existing Sands Expo, to which both the Venetian and Palazzo towers connect. If a replacement for the Sands, it would clear the way for additional hotel towers. Such a plan could shift bragging rights to the world’s largest hotel complex back across the street. For awhile, anyway. From high rollers to non-gamblers, Las Vegas has something for everyone – enough variety that it cannot all be covered in a single trip. Not that it matters, for you never return to the same Vegas you last visited.

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El Salvador’s Emergence Cultural and Historical Wealth Anchors a New Age of Tourism Emphasis

Written by David A. Brown

years, with an increasingly bright complexion for a country not so long removed from days of darkness and despair. Today, visitors find new roads, new beach resorts, and new attractions leveraging the country’s abundant natural features, such as waterfall hikes, canopy zip-line tours, and coral reef snorkeling. No doubt, El Salvador’s rapidly emerging tourism industry is banking on the glimmer of its youngest offerings, but as a recent visit revealed, the eternal sparkle of historic and cultural facets provides an endearing complement to the modern appeal.

%0-880)&%'/+6392( Tucked between Guatemala to the west and Honduras (north and east), El Salvador wears the nickname “El Pulgarcito,” or “the Little Thumb,” of Central America. Nevertheless, this country has much to offer in an area about the size of Massachusetts. You can drive border-to-border in a day, but you’ll miss a wealth of cultural and historical treasures – some prominent, others nearly hidden – within the small towns scattered never far from the major highways. One thing I noticed since my last visit in 2005 was a vast improvement in the highway system. Expansions under construction three years prior

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he explosions started around 6 p.m. Sporadic flashes illuminated the San Salvador skyline as heavy detonations, interspersed with rapid bursts of smaller projectiles, sounded from all directions across the capital city. Some watched from their windows, others hid inside their homes. In the faint moonlight, young men ran through the streets, leaving explosive devices just moments behind. The firing spared no neighborhood, as rich and poor alike knew their night would see only increasing chaos. Sounds like a news bulletin from sometime during 1978 and 1991. But unlike the chaos and destruction of El Salvador’s bloody civil war, this was a celebration of happiness with revelers ringing a new year. Mid-December through January 1 sees nearly every street corner and town square filled with vendors hawking their wares and waving in drivers. From bright, sparkly display fountains and sky-blasting rockets, to strings of red-wrapped firecrackers and dense morteros that make a really loud, chest-thumping “boom,” these cohetes, or fireworks, litter streets with singed, shredded paper, while reminding Salvadorans how far they’ve come in a relatively short time. Subtly symbolic, such annual festivities have fostered feelings of greater optimism in recent

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now offer convenient linkage between San Salvador and its outlying areas. Travel was easy and convenient, although the impromptu roadblock by freeroaming cattle ambling across rural roadways is one of the inescapable truths that season the soup of El Salvador’s charm. Bustling provincial life emanates tradition within colonial-style townships, each built around a center square called a “portal.” Often dressed with gardens and trees, portals usually boast a colorful fountain or historic monument and an ornate church at the top of the block. Portals are gathering spots, comfortable sites for catching up with friends, waiting for a ride to work, or resting and people-watching after a day’s labor. Vendors sell everything from coffee and snacks to fresh garlic cloves and powdered spices. Men often carry machetes in decoratively fringed sheaths hung from shoulder straps. No doubt a protective asset, these corbos are mostly for agricultural uses or simply traditional pieces. Strolling through pueblos is generally safe, as local police patrol town squares and keep a safeguarding eye on tourists. Just beware anyone dressed in modern garb such as U.S. sports jerseys and designer fashions. El Salvador still struggles with street gang issues, however most favor the capital so rural areas see less riffraff. I was fortunate to have family members escort me throughout my stay, but El Salvador’s reliable bus system links the capital to practically anywhere you care to visit, while traditional cabs and covered scooters handle local routes. Detailed maps, with tourist sights indicated, are available at the ministry of tourism in San Salvador, as well as most hotels and restaurants.

83;2,344-2+ During my recent trip, I decided to undertake a whirlwind tour to see what I could find within a day’s jaunt from San Salvador. One morning we headed east; another west; and then we visited a must-see region south of the capital on my way back to the airport. Fascinating and enriching experiences were many and residents displayed a comfortably casual disposition – neither wary, nor aloof – toward a gringo snapping pictures of everything imaginable. Each area offered much more than I could see in a week – hence my plans for future visits. The first two trips covered distances that could justify overnight accommodations, while the third outing was close enough to San Salvador to stay in the capital. Here’s a snapshot of what I found. DAY 1 Direction: East along CA-1. Known for: The Ruta Artesenal (Artisans Route) boasts some of the country’s finest handicrafts. Suggested Accommodations: Hotel San Lorenzo in Suchitoto. This 200-yearold hacienda converted into a hotel is one of the area’s nicest establishments and a real traveler’s bargain at just $85 a night for a standard room. As is often the case in El Salvador, an unpretentious front gate belied the visual splendor of colorful verandas accented with indigenous crafts, a pool deck framed by heliconias and mango trees, and a waterfall feeding a series of streams and pools surrounding a patio with lime trees overlooking a central fountain.

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Must See: Twin peaks of the Chinchontepeque volcano in San Vicente, about an hour past the main route. Its name in the Nahuatl language means “two breasts” for obvious reasons. From CA-1, about 2 kilometers from the city, there’s a great view of the peaks across the Jiboa Valley.

Try This: Dulce de leche candies at Dulceria Villalta in San Vicente. Owner Argelia Villalta has been making sweet treats by hand for more than 60 years from her small candy kitchen/shop tucked behind a garden path. Trip Memories: The cool stuff started early as we passed through San Martin, where brick makers created a dense mud with water and clay from the adjacent hill, formed four-brick sets, and dried them on concrete slabs before the final baking process inside a walk-in kiln. North from CA-1 in the Cuscutlan Department (county), Suchitoto presented a beautiful colonial-style church with a large fountain centered in an open park bordered by concrete benches where old men in dress slacks, cowboy boots, and matching hats sat cross-legged while school kids lined up to catch the morning

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bus. Around 9 a.m., parishioners started strolling into the church for morning prayers, while shop owners swept sidewalks and set up exterior displays. I bought a hand-carved slingshot, while my twin nieces, Cindy and Karen Gutierrez, browsed the earrings made of silver and semi-precious stones. In the square, I bought minutas (Salvadoran snow cones) from a vendor carrying one of those decorative machetes and listening to an iPod®. Cindy works as a nutritionist in San Salvador, so she went with a waist-slimming lime and salt concoction. I was on vacation, so it was a double shot of strawberry syrup and a generous dollop of homemade tamarindo honey, which congeals into a nice bite-size nugget if you let it settle into the ice. Perched atop a hill on the outskirts of town, the Fonda el Mirador offered casual alfresco dining on a covered deck overlooking the Aguacayo River, which feeds into Lago Suchitlan. At the river’s mouth, fishermen tended nets strung for tilapia, mojarra, and guapote. In Cojutepeque, strings of Salvadoran sausages called “chorizos” hung from storefronts. A mixture of ground pork and various seasoning is stuffed into the standard casing and individual links – some oblong, others round – are formed by cinching off sections with corn husk bindings. The resulting strand gives the appearance of leafy bows tied between links. At the north end of the Artisans Route, Ilobasco abounds with artistic offerings. You’ll find some touristy trinkets, but finely crafted pottery is the big thing; particularly detailed miniatures depicting most every facet of Salvadoran life from farming to childbirth. Food items are a common theme

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and the work at El Arte de Mi Pueblo was so realistic that I literally had to squeeze the papayas and smell the chorizos to confirm the imposters. DAY 2 Direction: West along CA-1, linking to CA-8 and continuing northwest. Known for: Ruta de los Flores (Flower Route), so named by Spanish explorers dazzled by millions of coffee blossoms scattered across this mountainous region. Suggested Accommodations: Santa Leticia Hotel & Resort in Apaneca. Containing El Salvador’s only private archaeological site, the spacious and wellmanicured grounds hold free-roaming pheasants, peacocks, turkeys, and indigenous species such as the exquisite currasow, while cozy cabins emanate a traditional hacienda vibe. In La Finca restaurant, delicious Salvadoran cuisine is served within a magnificent wooden interior, where a tall stone fireplace, cultural accents, and rough-cut timbers from locally hewn trees leave an indelible mental imprint. On the weekends, musicians entertain patrons with traditional instruments including the marimba – El Salvador’s version of the xylophone. Must See: El Jardin de Celeste and Las Flores de Eloisa. Adjacent properties offer an outdoor café accented by an eclectic blend of antique tools, crafts, toys, and knickknacks; kids’ tree house; and luxurious cabanas. Colorful flowers are in abundance, including indigenous favorites such as the snowy white arpopilio, the yellow Lycaste aromatica, and the clarin dorado, whose tiny orange blossoms explode like a fireworks display. Try This: Locally grown coffee served in Apaneca (whole and ground beans available for sale at Santa Leticia). Trip Memories: Exiting San Salvador on CA-8, my group stopped in the suburban town of Santa Tecla (aka “New San Salvador”) on the capital city’s south-

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west corner. In Plaza Daniel Hernandez, sanitation workers use palm fronds to sweep the sidewalks around an elevated veranda overlooking a monument to local luminary Dr. Manuel Gallardo. From there, we picked up CA-1, from which the normally prominent volcano Izalco was obscured by seasonal haze. Around mid-morning, we stopped in Sonsonate for a traditional Salvadoran breakfast (eggs, chorizos, pureed beans, white cheese, coffee, and orange juice) at the Agape Restaurant (four meals totaled $13). With formal table service, a lovely floral garden encompassing a baby blue fountain, and delicious mariñones (a type of fruit common in El Salvador) growing curbside, this classy establishment is part of a nationwide charitable network serving the elderly and orphans. Where CA-8 turns north, an old locomotive had been converted into the eyecatching lead to a string of small shops and eateries on the road to Nahuizalco. A couple of kilometers from this indigenous city, master woodworkers assembled and varnished everything from elaborate bed frames to dining room sets in primitive roadside workshops. In town, retailers displayed thousands of woodcrafts from tableware to baby strollers to multi-level bird feeders, along with pottery, textiles, and souvenir machetes. Nahuizalco’s artisans are also known for turning mimbre, local plant fibers, into tightly woven hats similar to the famous Panama hats (made in Ecuador). At the street market in Nahuizalco, vendors sold seafood, local produce, regional snacks, and Flor de Izote – El Salvador’s national flower, whose white petals are edible. As patrons shopped and women balanced baskets on their heads, full-size buses navigated impossible corners and passed so close that pedestrians turned sideways to pass. Just outside of Salcoatitan, a small town known for honey production, the road forked and the right branch led to Juayua, the self-proclaimed “Gourmet City of El Salvador” and home of the weekend gastronomical festivals in which vendors from throughout the region pack the streets with carts and outdoor cooking stations offering everything from sandwiches and skewered meats to complete meals featuring platos typicos (typical dishes). Musicians entertain crowds that fill every chair, bench, and curb in the town square, while street merchants capitalize on the traffic. Nearby, a picturesque fountain spouts cool water just outside El Templo del Señor, Juayua’s central church. Branching left above Salcoatitan, led to my favorite place in El Salvador – the tranquil hillside town of Apaneca, located at the west end of its namesake mountain range. Its Nahuat name meaning “The Wind in Form of a Current” befits this place of cool breezes and thoroughly refreshing elevated escapism. Ideal for coffee plantations, the altitude isn’t high enough for respiratory challenges, but you’ll appreciate a light jacket in the evening.

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Light poles here bore colorful murals of flowers and native birdlife, while views of the Cerro Apaneca and the crater lakes, Laguna Verde and Laguna de las Ninfas, never fail to impress. Ecotours – including a canopy zip line – bring visitors close to Apaneca’s pristine flora and fauna. About an hour from Apaneca, on the road linking CA-8 to CA-12, Chalchuapa’s claim to fame is El Salvador’s most famous archaeological site – the Tazumal ruins. With construction dating back to 500 B.C., the site contains a terraced, rectangular tower and adjacent temple. Tazumal

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is thought to have been the center of Mayan obsidian trade and the origin of some of the most famous Mayan ceramics. DAY 3 Direction: South along the airport road. Known for: Suburban relaxation with strong indigenous history. Must See: Giant ceiba tree (estimated at more than 500 years old) across from the colonial church in

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Panchimalco. Green parakeets flutter among the branches, screeching at one another and picking apart bulbous seed pods to reach the tasty innards. Try This: Pupusas at Pupusaria Paty in Planes de Renderos (see sidebar: “Local Fare”). Trip Memories: On my last morning in El Salvador, we spent a few hours between the capital and the airport 45 minutes south. Throughout the indigenous town of Panchimalco, where centuries-old religious festivals remain paramount and women still make colorful fabrics by hand on waist looms, life moves at a leisurely, yet purposeful pace along uneven cobblestone roads. In the town’s center, school kids scampered across a playground, while a man carried a tank of water over his shoulder. The appetizing smell of pupusas sizzling on a flat griddle drifted from a streetside comedor (an informal cooking facility) made of wooden beams and corrugated aluminum propped against the schoolyard’s stone wall. Little girls peeked

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through the cracks and giggled at the foreigner photographing cheese pupusas. On the opposite curb, one booth sold various snacks and candy, while another offered DVDs of questionable origin. Adjacent to the school, the local church, La Iglesia Santa Cruz de Roma, dates back to 1725. The dark wood pews, wooden columns, and handcarved wooden alter with adjacent alcoves stood in simple artistic contrast to white stone walls. Over the church’s left corner was Puerto del Diablo – a sinister rocky crevasse in Cerro el Chulo where victims of civil war violence were often cast. The Casa de la Cultura displays local art, musical instruments, agricultural tools, and an antique weaving loom. Across the street, the pale exterior of Casa Taller art studio encloses magnificent multi-level trellised gardens where artists find inspiration amid fountains, pottery, vine-draped trees, and flowers galore. An observation deck on the second level offers a nice view of city streets, mango trees, and Puerto del Diablo.

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Between San Salvador and Panchimalco, Planes de Renderos typifies suburban bliss and adds spectacular views along a winding hillside road. The popular mirador â&#x20AC;&#x201C; an observation deck with parking, benches, and security â&#x20AC;&#x201C; offers a panoramic view of San Salvador. In Parque Balboa, towering bamboo creaks in the wind but shades much of the playgrounds and walking/biking/skating paths through this safe and scenic city park. Picnic areas facilitate cookouts, but I enjoyed the corn cakes and grilled corn cobs from a vendor cooking on an iron grate laid across a tire rim.

4%68-2+8,39+,87 Between my first and second day trips, I sampled the coastal fishing action by hiring a charter boat that launched out of Puerto Acajutla. Located at the countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s western end, near Guatemala, Acajutla is El Salvadorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s primary oceanic port and home to a vibrant commercial fishing fleet. Each day, â&#x20AC;&#x153;pescadoresâ&#x20AC;? roll their pangas, or fishing boats, on wood frame carts to the seawall where a crane operator

lifts them via central support ropes and places them in the water. (At dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s end, the process reverses.) My captain targeted hard-charging Spanish mackerel over submerged rock piles between the port and Punta Remedios to the east. Trolling large diving lures tempted several jumbo mackerel up to 10 pounds. By comparison, mackerel half that size are considered â&#x20AC;&#x153;largeâ&#x20AC;? in my home waters of Tampa Bay, Florida. Abundant fishing opportunities, along with sailing, surfing, and estuary tours, exist along the Pacific Coast between the port and San Salvador. Throughout this region, beachfront development is flourishing and that means good things for this modest countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economy, and hence its ability to continue developing infrastructure, highways, security, and all those things that identify a country as a legitimate tourism destination. However, visitors who step away from the seaside pool decks and venture beyond the resorts will find a wealth of indelible treasures providing pleasant integration between that which moves El Salvador toward its future and that which keeps the country in touch with its past.

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Toronto: No Second City Written by Edie Jarolim

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his is the world’s longest street, measuring 1,178 miles,” said Richard Fiennes-Clinton, pointing to a sign marked “Yonge Street.” The founder of Muddy York Walking Tours, Fiennes-Clinton was shepherding our group of three friends through downtown Toronto. “And until Dubai overtook us, we also had the highest building, the CN Tower.” He stopped, and laughed ruefully. “I guess we’re overcompensating.”

“For what?” I wondered. Fiennes-Clinton smiled, but didn’t answer. I was baffled. Toronto is no second city. With a population of nearly 2.5 million (more than 5 million in Greater Toronto), it is not only Canada’s largest metropolis, but also the country’s financial and publishing hub. It vies with Montreal for the mantle of top cultural center, it’s known for its name-brand shopping, and it’s one of the world’s most ethnically diverse cities, with restaurants spanning

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the global spice spectrum. That’s why three former Manhattanites, wanting to add a frisson of unfamiliarity to the requisite urban amenities, had decided to meet here for a long weekend in early June. Along with sightseeing, we were planning to attend some events at LuminaTO, a multi-genre arts extravaganza that debuted in 2007. Yet in spite of the city’s many assets, I’d noticed an oddly modest vibe. Fiennes-Clinton’s remark was a prime example of Toronto’s surprising diffidence. Fiennes-Clinton had met us at our hotel, the Four Seasons in Yorkville, and took us by subway – cleaner and easier to use than our hometown version – to King Street, one of the city’s earliest thoroughfares. As we made our way south toward Front Street, I noticed an unusual number of dogs, many decked out in jaunty caps, colorful eyeshades, and other canine accessories. I’d heard Toronto was dog friendly but hadn’t expected the city’s pups to be quite so numerous – nor so fashion forward. Indicating a line of booths and tents in the near distance, Fiennes-Clinton explained that we were approaching Woofstock, the largest outdoor festival for dogs in North America.

The dogs we continued to pass were clearly not treat deprived, but they would have been happier still had they been permitted to enter our final destination, the St. Lawrence Market. Part of the original eight-block square laid out by Toronto’s colonial precursor, the Town of York (1793-1834), this had been prime waterfront property before an 1858 storm and an accumulation of refuse helped turn an adjacent swathe of Lake Ontario into landfill. We were here to learn the history of the South Market portion of the current St. Lawrence complex – and, more pressingly, to have breakfast. We elbowed our way down a crowded aisle to reach the Carousel Bakery, renowned for its peameal bacon sandwiches, culinary artifacts of the city’s British heritage. I had envisioned this local specialty as a BLT with peas instead of tomatoes. Instead, a cheery proprietor handed us fresh Kaiser rolls stuffed with thick slabs of sweet-cured meat lightly dusted with ground corn – this last ingredient a replacement, Fiennes-Clinton said, for the once trendy smashed peas. Also relegated to the past was the pork-processing plant that William Davies founded a few blocks away in 1860. Davies’ pig empire eventually grew so vast that it earned Toronto the nickname “Hogtown,” one it never

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Distillery District, a newly trendy national historic site. When I told friends that I was headed for Toronto, this was the one unanimous â&#x20AC;&#x153;donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss.â&#x20AC;? The reason soon became clear. Unimpeded by automobiles, banned in this 13-acre area, visitors strolled around European-style piazzas, ducking into chic boutiques and art galleries, lounging on the patios of cafĂŠs. The former domain of distiller Gooderham & Worts, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s North Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best-preserved collection of Victorian industrial architecture, and picturesque without the theme-park sterility that comes from trying to re-create, rather than restore, history. Of course, in 1877, when Gooderham & Worts was the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest distiller, the complex would have smelled of hops and other fermenting grains as well as cattle feed, horses ... you get the picture. We were happy to sacrifice that bit of authenticity to enjoy the full olfactory glory of our first stop, SOMA Chocolatemaker, where all the sweets are made on the premises. I ordered a cup of the rich, chili-laced Mayan hot chocolate and wondered how anything this good could be legal to enjoy in public. The galleries and shops we browsed next were eclectic â&#x20AC;&#x201C; everything from housewares, clothing, and jewelry to glass art â&#x20AC;&#x201C; but had a few things in

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outgrew. Perhaps this moniker was a source of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s modesty? Sandwiches finished, and our ability to focus on something other than the fragrant food booths on the ground level thus restored, we began our survey of the building. Talk about multiuse spaces. The imposing brick structure had always hosted a market, and from 1845 to 1899, it had additionally served as Torontoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s City Hall and as its Police Station No. 1. We first headed to the upper level, where the former Council Chamber now houses municipal archives and the Market Gallery, with shifting historical exhibits; the one we viewed traced the growth of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s garment trade. Then it was down to the basement, where leaks into the police station holding cells sometimes left prisoners standing knee-deep in murky water. Fiennes-Clinton shared one of his guaranteed methods of holding the attention of the school groups he frequently leads: Pointing to the remains of shackles on the wall, he observes that teenagers who tried to escape from indentured servitude might have been held here before being publicly whipped. Bidding farewell to Fiennes-Clinton and the Dickensian prison, we took a leisurely stroll west to the

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common. They were all one-offs; no chain stores are allowed in the district. And the staff were uniformly solicitous. I was wearing cargo pants and a cotton shirt now adorned with a few drops of Mayan chocolate â&#x20AC;&#x201C; an outfit that would have gotten me frosted, or at least ignored, in these storesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; New York equivalents. Here, the sales philosophy seemed to be, â&#x20AC;&#x153;You never know.â&#x20AC;? It was only a short dip south and quick cab ride from the Distillery District to the Queens Quay Terminal, where we booked a Harbour Tours excursion to the Toronto Islands. Municipal ferries run there regularly from the foot of Bay Street, but we were on a get-to-know-Toronto mission and wanted a narration to accompany our lake views. The shipâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first mate didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t disappoint. As we glided away from the shore, she singled out from amongst a phalanx of soaring office towers and condos such landmarks as the CN Tower and the Rogers Centre, home to the Toronto Blue Jays. We

were soon facing a more bucolic vista, a lush green network of islands. They were, we learned, created from a sand spit separated from the mainland during the same devastating 1858 storm that helped reshape the lakefront. Once a getaway for Torontoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s elite and host to an early stadium for the Toronto Maple Leafs â&#x20AC;&#x201C; as a result of the storm, the ball from Babe Ruthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first professional home run, in 1914, lies submerged beneath Lake Ontario â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the islands are now part of the municipal park system. Laced with lagoons and free from all but park service vehicles, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re the premier retreat for Torontonian bikers, inline skaters, paddleboaters, canoers, kayakers, and yachters. As we approached Centre Island, the largest and most popular of the group, our guide pointed out a dock where, she said, a vessel belonging to a member of the Liquor Control Board of Ontario was often moored. Its name? Cirrhosis of the River.

 

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We didn’t have time to disembark, but vowed to return to this and the other islands on a future visit. Clearly, we needed to check out the topiary maze, old-style amusement park, haunted lighthouse, and other quirky attractions. Now, back on Front Street, afternoon tea at the Fairmont Royal York beckoned. The largest hotel and tallest building in the British Commonwealth when the Canadian Pacific Railway opened it in 1929, the Royal York retains its air of Old World opulence but also keeps up with contemporary trends – in some cases, by returning to older traditions such as beekeeping. This we discovered after enjoying crumpets, scones and Devonshire cream, finger sandwiches,

tarts, and shortcake in the hotel’s stylish EPIC restaurant. By the time we’d cleaned our Villeroy and Boch plates, we definitely needed the stroll around the roof garden that came with the Tea and Tour package. The guide that day was David Garcelon, the hotel’s executive chef. Walking us past raised wooden beds brimming with pansies, nasturtiums, marigolds, and other edible flowers, as well as tomatoes and basil, he said, “I was gardening up here last summer and thought how remarkable it was that so many insects find their way up to our little patch of green, including ladybugs and honeybees.” This led him to wonder if the hotel could make its own honey. A few phone calls later and it was a done deal. Members of the Toronto Beekeepers Cooperative tend three tidy boxes that wouldn’t hint at their buzzing contents were it not for their labels: “Royal Sweet,” “V.I. Bee Suite,” and “Honey Moon Suite.” Garcelon hopes the industrious insects within will eventually produce as much as 700 pounds of honey a year. By now it was late afternoon, and we were ready to return to the bee-free Four Seasons to relax before our planned evening activities. LuminaTO’s scheduled offerings for the day ranged from free funk dancing lessons in Nathan Phillips Square to the play we’d chosen, a production of the National Theatre of Scotland. Following a late night, we decided to stick close to our hotel the next day – which didn’t limit our sightseeing options in the slightest. Yorkville was a bohemian enclave in the 1960s, a folksier version of San Francisco’s Haight-Ashbury (think Neil Young, Gordon Lightfoot, and Joni Mitchell instead of Janis Joplin, Jefferson Airplane, and the Grateful Dead).

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It’s now a high-rent neighborhood, but Tiffany, Chanel, and Canada’s only Rolls-Royce dealership mingle with modest local boutiques, while slick office tower restaurants vie with outdoor cafés spilling from the fronts of renovated brownstones for the plentiful pedestrian trade. And strung along Bloor Street, the neighborhood’s main east-west thoroughfare, are three of the city’s most interesting museums. We arrived first at the largest and best known of them, the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM). Its holdings are as eclectic as those of New York’s Metropolitan, with natural history as a particular strength. Since the addition of the Michael Lee-Chin Crystal, created by Daniel Liebeskind – the Berlin-born architect known for his still-stalled redesign of the Twin Towers space – the ROM’s design is eclectic, too. Part of a larger restoration and expansion project, the pavilion has kept the ROM in the news since it debuted in the summer of 2007. Many consider its

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contemporary multi-planed style to be at odds with the classical brick original, built in 1914 – a nice way of saying it was dubbed an eyesore. Moreover, the addition has sprung a few leaks, and its angles make it hard to determine exactly where the moisture is coming from. No controversy was evident during our visit, just the happy bustle of dinosaur-seeking kids and their parents. We did have a bit of difficulty locating the featured exhibition, devoted to Charles Darwin, but it was a challenge that evolved museumgoers like us could easily surmount. As we took a departing glance back, we agreed that if Parisians could get used to the Louvre pyramid, Torontonians couldn’t fail to accept the ROM addition – eventually. Anyway, they’d soon be diverted by the expansion of another major museum, the Art Gallery of Toronto, slated for completion by the end of 2008. Perhaps they’d be kinder to a design by Toronto native son Frank Gehry. About a half a mile farther along Bloor Street, the Bata Shoe Museum also got a lot of press when it opened in 1995. In this case, however, there was a consensus that Raymond Moriyama’s awardwinning modernist structure was perfectly suited to a collection that celebrates style and function. I admit that I had looked forward to this museum beyond all the others – and wasn’t disappointed. Where else can you spend an hour ogling three floors of footwear without feeling the least bit frivolous? It was hard to decide which exhibit was my favorite – the intricate miniatures used to display fashionable shoes in the 1920s, the super-high clogs worn by Japanese royalty, Napoleon Bonaparte’s silk

socks, the leather booties crafted for a pampered Parisian poodle in the 1950s … ? I was surprised to learn that male and female shoe styles had only begun to diverge dramatically in the 17th century, saddened that my gender was the one that chose to remain devoted to the high heel. Luckily, my current footwear was comfortably low-heeled. We’d been planning to stop at the Gardiner Museum, devoted to ceramics, but gazing at all those shoes had spurred the retail urge in all of us. So we headed back east along Bloor Street until we reached the Holt Renfrew department store – also educational, we rationalized, for its history. It got its start as a hat shop in 1837 in Québec City and served as the furrier to Queen Victoria before expanding and opening branches, including the first (1899) Toronto one. As we began wandering around the store, I realized that all of the clothes I was looking at bore designer labels; I’d expected a larger selection of less expensive off-the-rack items. I’d dressed for museum hopping, so my automatic reaction was, “I look too sloppy to shop here.” Sure enough, a wellturned-out sales clerk soon approached our group. Instead of asking us if we needed help in a tone that indicated he was speaking to women who were

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beyond it, however, he warmly inquired if he could assist us in any way – without a trace of irony. Too bad this was our final day. I was getting awfully fond of Toronto. That night, after another excellent LuminaTO theater experience, we had dinner at Sassafraz. This Yorkville restaurant is renowned not only for its French-accented New Canadian fare, but also for being a celebrity magnet. Dressed nicely, but far from paparazzi targets, we were again impressed by the cordiality with which we were treated – and the good table we were given, near a dramatic wall of water. As we toasted each other and congratulated ourselves on our excellent destination choice, I posited a theory about Toronto’s particular appeal. Perhaps the city’s long-standing loyalty to British rule, including its embrace of loyalists fleeing the newly formed United States, had created a London without the arrogance of power, a New York without the brashness of rebellion. Who says excitement and modesty and civility and vibrancy have to be mutually exclusive? Not me and my friends – at least not any longer. For further information, log on to www.torontotourism.com or call 877-342-4243.

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Color Wheel The art world circles its wagons in Miami Beach Written by Eric Tegler

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ou could be forgiven for not recognizing what a force Art Basel Miami Beach (ABMB) has become in the art world. The annual South Florida art fair has taken place just six times (beginning in 2002), but it has become the crossroads for a major portion of the art community and all who appreciate the many forms â&#x20AC;&#x201C; sublime and ridiculous â&#x20AC;&#x201C; that art takes. The sun, sand, and flashing glitz of Miami Beach might not seem in sympathy with the introspection commonly associated with art exhibits, but ABMB is a contemporary art fair and much of the featured work squeals for your attention as urgently as the exotic cars, nightclub promoters, and surgically enhanced women cruising nearby Ocean Drive.

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For the week of the art fair, it seems that the entire New York art crowd, a large contingent from Los Angeles and Europe, and an increasingly active core of Asian art folk descend on Miami Beach and the city. 107

The Miami Beach Convention Center is the hub of ABMB. Opened in 1957, it has served, among other things, as the site where Cassius Clay (Muhammad Ali) defeated Sonny Liston for his first Heavyweight Championship of the World in 1964. Every December, it is transformed into a nearly overwhelming concentration of art exhibits inside and out. What’s more, it’s become the inspiration for and epicenter of 21 satellite art fairs, which run concurrently around Greater Miami. The ABMB director, Sam Keller, described his event as the “mother ship fair” last December. Collectively, ABMB and its 21 “satellites” brought more than 1,000 dealers to town and an almost unimaginable

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but you’ll find them in Greater Miami as well. As a member of the media, I had access to a few of these, but even the average Joe or Jane can take part if at the right place at the right time. And of course, the clubs of Miami Beach always sway and pulsate, art crowd or not. Putting aside any “brush-with-greatness” moments you may experience, ABMB is a fascinating place to people-watch. You can lump them all together or break them into categories if you like. There are the “art people” – artists, dealers, collectors, folks who simply attach themselves to the scene. They’re often easy to spot, because they tend to dress eccentrically. In their midst, stay quiet and immobile and you’ll hear gossip (light and vicious) about people you likely won’t know. As one wag put it, words/phrases like “nouveau-modernism,” “post neopointillism,” and “blurbist art philistine” will be bandied about relentlessly. There is a decided business crowd, identified by their more conservative dress, sometimes with a twist, discussing what they think is bound to take off next or has recently gone flat (in dollar terms). They mingle in the evenings with what I call the “Miami pack,” distinguished by tan skin tones and a more casual, colorful wardrobe. There are people from around the world as well but aside from accented English (frequently with a New York/New England tinge), the foreign tongues most often heard are German and Spanish. And there are just “peoplepeople,” sometimes new to the art fair, sometimes unaffecting old hands. At the Convention Center or at the satellite fairs, they can enrich the work on display or be a distraction from it. After all, ABMB is about the art.

quantity of art. For the multitudes of us not among the art cognoscenti, Cathy Leff, director of Miami’s Wolfsonian Museum of Modern Art, offered an apt analogy for ABMB. “I think Sam Keller has reinvented what we used to call the ‘World’s Fairs’ at the height of their success between 1850 and 1940. Then, if you wanted to see who had the economic, technological, or political power, you went to the World’s Fair and it was apparent. Now, if you want to know what’s going on in the art world, you can come to Art Basel Miami Beach and see everything.” Not only can you see everything but everybody. For the week of the art fair, it seems that the entire New York art crowd, a large contingent from Los Angeles and Europe, and an increasingly active core of Asian art folk descend on Miami Beach and the city. Artists, art dealers, art media, critics, buyers, collectors, students, and hangers-on are joined by a cross section of the beautiful people – some celebrities, some hedge-fund managers. Many simply cross Biscayne Bay from Miami and environs. Others descend on Miami International Airport from all points in a fleet of private jets sizeable enough to move a small army. Celebrities attending the 2007 edition of ABMB included Calvin Klein (who hosted a private party with personally picked waitstaff), Lance Armstrong, Iggy Pop, Lou Reed, Paris Hilton, and more. In fact, parties – private and public – are an integral part of ABMB. There are VIP pre-parties and ultra-exclusive pre-pre-parties. Then there are the after-parties, which tend to roll over into the next day’s parties. Most are in South Beach,

8,)'6-8-'%0)=) Let me say up front that I’m no art critic. I’ve seen just enough art in museums and elsewhere to have formed basic opinions about what appeals personally and what doesn’t, but I’m far from a “sophisticate.” And that’s perfectly fine as anyone at the fair will tell you. In fact, Art Basel Miami Beach has been lauded for, and alternately accused of, democratizing art to an unprecedented level. The sheer size of ABMB and its satellites ensures that there’s something for everyone in practically every medium from painting and sculpture to audio, video, Internet, performance art, and design. Collectors, dealers, writers, and artists let their guard down and it’s typically easier to approach one at a fair than at a private downtown gallery. That’s good, because you may have questions like, “What the heck is that?”

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In fact, Art Basel Miami Beach has been lauded for, and alternately accused of, democratizing art to an unprecedented level.

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the gallery reps do it for you. With so much to see, you’re bound to confuse details as I did.

7')2) ABMB brings together 200 galleries in booth spaces in the Miami Beach Convention Center. Many more apply for inclusion (850 total in 2007) but are ultimately rejected. That doesn’t mean that only the most influential or best supported galleries make it. The organizers make an effort to include new galleries and experimental installations that might not be on the conventional art

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And here’s where democracy can equal tyranny depending upon your viewpoint. As often as not, the answer to your question will be, “Whatever you want it to be.” There is a prevailing attitude among the participants (and of course in contemporary art) that beauty is in the eye of the beholder. A fair statement and a fine sentiment on one hand, it has the effect of reducing all offerings to the same level. There is no good or bad – just different. On such a basis, Hernan Bas’ painting “The Burden,” featured in the Rubell Family Collection New European Art display in Miami’s Wynwood District, is no better or worse than Paul McCarthy’s aromatic chocolate Santas stacked densely in a corner of the Convention Center. New York art writer Karen Rosenberg referred to the material at Miami Beach as “heavily scripted, raucously colorful, and monstrously proportioned.” She’s right. Much of the stuff is big, bold, and flashy – perfect for South Florida even if not intended as such. And much of it is commercial, sometimes bizarre for the purpose of being commercial. What will stand the test of time? That’s arguable. And arguing (or learning, or trying to understand) about it in good spirits is fun. Art, after all, is for sharing, and if you don’t take up at least one discussion at ABMB or elsewhere, you’re missing a treat. Wandering the corridors of the Convention Center or strolling through the hotel and tent exhibits of South Beach, Wynwood, and Greater Miami, you’re bound to find something or some things to your liking. I came across a sort of impressionist/ realist painting near the central plaza in the Convention Center that knocked me out. It was somewhat (to say the least) outside my price range, but still holds my imagination. Trouble is – and here’s a tip – I forgot to note the artist and the gallery. You can always look in the show catalog provided you can get a copy, but for goodness sake, make a note of what you’re interested in or have one of

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contemporain map. In all, the works of more than 2,000 20th- and 21st-century artists are on view. The booths more or less radiate out from a central plaza inside the center, which serves as a bar/lounge and meeting/orientation point. It’s easy to lose your bearings inside the maze of gallery booths, but if you make the plaza your home base, you can always regain your direction. Getting lost is actually fun, but a program with maps will help you understand how the spaces are designated.

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display with works from the weird to the whimsical and shocking (or at least meant to shock). The 20 galleries that were part of the “Art Supernova” sector shared interconnected exhibition spaces filled with works on paper, videos, performances, artist files, and catalogs. From lesser-known artists, the works probed a variety of themes, some more clearly than others. But these sections were just what lay inside. Out in the sun and directly adjacent to the sand a couple blocks east of the Convention Center by Collins Park, “Art Positions” was a literal beachfront village of shipping containers (think of the roll-on, roll-off trailers you see stacked on freighter ships) converted into mobile art spaces. None moved while I strolled through, but they did house installations from 20 young galleries with work from cutting-edge (maybe “bleeding-edge”) artists. It could be a little stuffy inside the trailers at high noon, but if you were woozy, you were probably in a good frame of mind for the offerings. Amidst the trailers was a bar and a half-pipe wherein skateboarders skated, beer and energy drinks were consumed in equal measure, and DJs pumped mash-ups, hip-hop, and other beats while psychedelic videos ran on a screen above the skaters. It was “tractor,” as the kids say. Punk-rock geezer Iggy Pop and the Stooges performed there on opening night. The proximity of the fair to the beach is always on your mind and the sands are a great temptation. After a late night on Ocean Drive, I decided to take about two hours’ sleep in my hotel room, rise with the sun, and spend the morning sleeping/reading/lazing about on the beach. After changing in my rent-a-car around lunch time, I ambled back into the Convention Center bronzed, windswept, and sleep deprived, feeling truly in the spirit of ABMB. Artistic recognition of the beach’s pull was recognized on a wall of the Lambert Gallery’s booth on which was written, “What the hell are you doing inside here on a day like this?” What indeed when one could cross Convention Center Drive on the west side of the building and stroll through or sit in the botanical gardens, partaking of audio pieces provided by the Art Sound Lounge? Using an MP3-type portable player, you could listen to a 90-minute piece called “Decked Out: A History of the Turntable.” Most folks couldn’t stick around quite that long and alternately they could enter darkened mini-theaters in the Art Video Lounge and watch offbeat video pieces by artists from the Pacific Northwest. Most of these “cleverly” involved snow, contrasting the 80-degree temperatures outside. The nearby Cartier Dome showed off the jeweler’s commitment to art, its patronage, and its wares to those with admittance.

Established galleries dominate the core of the exhibition space with booths grouped next to one another featuring a wide range of fine and multimedia art from well-known contemporary artists. Among these were spread 22 galleries that made up what ABMB calls “Art Kabinett.” Art Kabinett booths featured curated exhibitions representing everything from thematic group presentations to solo-artist shows and installations. Around the periphery of this core, following the interior borders of the center, were spaces for the 58 galleries from 22 countries in the “Art Nova” section of the fair. Art Nova places the more cutting-edge part of the establishment on

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One could take a shuttle (or hop in the car) 2 miles back across Biscayne Bay to north Miami and the Wynwood District where the National Art Dealers Alliance (NADA), a gathering of more than 80 international ultra-hip younger art dealers, held forth in the Ice Palace Film Studios. A short distance away, the SCOPE Art Fair, with a similar number of dealers, filled a huge tent in Roberto Clemente Park in Wynwood. Another stoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s throw away, Pulse provided more affordable works in Wynwoodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s SoHo Studios, drawing record attendance. There was also Design Miami, specializing in furniture, design, and the applied arts, and back in Miami Beach the hotel-centered Aqua-Art, Flow, Bridge, and INK Miami fairs. Not surprisingly, I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make it to all of these. For first-timers like myself, it can be a bit confusing. With more than 20 associated fairs plus permanent institutions like the Rubell Collection and Miamiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Museum of Contemporary Art, the ABMB scene is considered overgrown by many. How many fairs will return in 2008 is an open question. Exhibiting dealers pointed out that even enthusiasts have a limited amount of time and intellectual energy to devote to art.

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There was quite a mix of material at ABMB, something for every sense and sensibility. This being contemporary art, statement and irony were, as ever, in vogue. A fake ATM by Michael Elmgreen and Ingar Dragset actually reeled in a few cashstrapped individuals Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m told. An English artist named Merlin Carpenter hastily dipped a brush in black paint and wrote the words â&#x20AC;&#x153;Die Collector Scumâ&#x20AC;? across a large white canvas. This â&#x20AC;&#x153;text paintingâ&#x20AC;? sold for something like $15,000 the first day. I helpfully suggested to the dealer that my friends and I would quickly turn out five more of these in my garage for a reasonable split of the proceeds.

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For something less pricey, you could go to the ShanghART booth, which featured Xu Zhenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s full-scale replica of a Chinese convenience store, â&#x20AC;&#x153;SHANGHARTSUPERMARKET.â&#x20AC;? Its pink signage appeared fresh from Beijing and inside it offered items including bottles of Tiger beer and boxes of Pocky candy. Every package in the store, however, was empty. Nevertheless, one could purchase anything therein for cash. An empty bag of NescafĂŠ and cereal boxes went for about $24. Sales were apparently brisk with empty shelves in evidence by the second day. Time will quickly tell whether

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it was a â&#x20AC;&#x153;hollowâ&#x20AC;? experience for shoppers, but the folks at ShanghART no doubt partied with the takings. There were large, self-serving, black-and-white photos of the sexual hobbies of various artists, convinced of the voyeuristic demand for their peccadillos. There was a similarly self-involved display of artistic/business rancor in the form of e-mails between an artist and a museum staff. There were odes to German tabloids, mural-sized paintings by hot artist Eric Fischl of unattractive American beachgoers, and an odd obsession with shoes throughout. Not to forget other mediums, there was a truly strange three-minute video at White Cube by artist Sam Taylor-Wood, who features herself naked on a wooden floor, her legs open with a large white mute swan between them. The swan rests its head on her shoulder while she engages in some sort of deep breathing exercise (I hope thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what it was) for the duration. Over by the beach, there was performance art in the form of an untitled but eminently Saturday Night Live-worthy piece by Brazilian artist Marepe in which two dancers filled their costumes with water balloons then proceeded to literally bust each otherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s balloons with pins. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m told it alluded to war and bombs. It did fuel my desire to get bombed. The Internet was celebrated in a way by the successful sale of Chinese artist Chao Feiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s artwork for RMB City, a â&#x20AC;&#x153;unitâ&#x20AC;? to be part of Second Life, the online avatar-based virtual world. Some gal or guy paid $100,000 for the privilege of owning this piece of virtual art real estate, which features bits resembling various well-known Chinese buildings. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s believed to be the highest-priced piece of virtual art yet sold. Fingers crossed the owner experiences few power outages. It wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t all silly. I saw 10 or more pieces that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d put in my home from a large watch-inspired installation at Blum & Poe to whimsical doodles

of executive speakers on Merrill Lynch stationary. Personal opinion notwithstanding, ABMB and the other fairs certainly moved some art.

Â&#x; '311)6') Artworks priced into six figures are common at ABMB. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a plentiful selection of seven-figure art and lots of more modestly priced stuff as well. Pricing relates in part to the size of the works, because collectors with big dough have big houses with huge interior walls crying out for adornment. Estimates put this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ABMB sales at more than $500 million, a figure that doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t count the satellite fairs. Put aside the glitter and people-watching and the object in Miami is no different than at the â&#x20AC;&#x153;starving artistâ&#x20AC;? blowout at your local Holiday Inn â&#x20AC;&#x201C; to sell art. And, hopefully this doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t disappoint too much, a lot of the most desirable or fashionable work will be off the table before you get there unless youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a mover and shaker in the art world. Pre-selling takes place several days before the fairs open for the real high rollers. Once the gates are swung aside, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d better be quick on the draw if you like a piece. Los Angeles dealer Blum & Poe sold its stand out in two hours the first day. Perhaps wiser, New Yorkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mary Boone Gallery restocked its stand every day of the fair. Money is simply everywhere, from the Davidoff Cigar lounge at the Convention Center to a diner in South Beach where early one morning I was told by the help that the eccentric fellow at the table opposite owned one of the largest potash mines in Canada. And because of this, art proliferates like goosegrass in Miami Beach. There is so much of it that after three days, I was reminded of the color wheels I learned about in elementary school. Spin one fast enough and the primary hues around the circle blur into a white disc. That can happen at ABMB, but you still owe it to yourself to experience this Worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fair of art.

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Rally of Dreams Arizonaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Copperstate 1000

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Written by Craig Collins

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t’s early – a little too early, maybe, for some of Arizona’s car enthusiasts – when my father and I arrive at Tempe Diablo Stadium for the second annual Field of Dreams Departure Day, the kickoff event for what has become one of the premier vintage car rallies in America: the Copperstate 1000. Today the ballpark, the spring Cactus League home field of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, is host to 75 vintage automobiles from all over the world. Even at 8 a.m. on an April Sunday, the sunshine in Tempe is almost blindingly bright – but it

pales in comparison to the sleek, candy-colored metal sculptures arranged on the infield and along the warning track. The next couple of hours have been set aside for “scrutineering”: the public’s chance to admire and learn about the cars. Before they depart for a four-day, 1,000-mile tour of a vast chunk of the Sonoran Desert, the cars and their drivers will greet the many who wish they were going along. But most of the scrutineers aren’t up and at it yet. It’s strange to see so many gorgeous cars with

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meo that competed in the 1948 Mille Miglia, Italy’s famous open-road endurance race; and two of the fewer than 100 Giotto Bizzarrini-made automobiles known to exist in the world – both GT 5300 Stradas, and one literally a movie star, having appeared in Bullitt and Herbie the Love Bug. By 9 o’clock, the field is buzzing. Most of the drivers are here, as are an increasing number of spectators, who are beginning to cluster conspicuously around a few individual cars – perhaps the largest group around what are clearly three of the event’s biggest stars: prewar Bentleys, each a near-identical

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The Copperstate 1000 is, according to Scott McPherson, the second-oldest rally of its type in the country, a year younger than the prestigious Colorado Grand.

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so few people around them; if the day weren’t so warm and still, I’d expect a few stray tumbleweeds to drift across the lush green outfield. My father, who bought his first car, a 1952 Ford sedan, when he was 17 years old, seems to enjoy having the cars to himself. There’s an impressive variety, including a number of vintage bluebloods: a perfectly restored 1930 Hispano-Suiza; a powder-blue 1936 Delahaye race car that once belonged to French chocolatier Jules Menier; a velvet green 1954 Bentley R-Type Continental; a 1959 Ferrari Series I Cabriolet, one of only 40 in existence; a burgundy 1939 Alfa Ro-

shade of British racing green. Two of the cars – both tourers, a 1926 and a 1928 – arrived here together, shipped from Switzerland to Long Beach in the same container; after the Copperstate and a few months touring the Pacific coast of North America, the cars will leave together in a container bound for Jordan, explains Juergen Lenz, the owner of one. The third prewar Bentley, a 1926 6 1/2 Litre, now raised to Speed Six specifications, is owned by Michael Hammer, president and CEO of the Los Angeles-based Armand Hammer Foundation. A longtime Copperstate participant, Hammer only recently purchased the 6 1/2 Litre, completing his own prewar Bentley collection; this year’s Copperstate will be the car’s first rally in the United States. I want to ask him about his car, but it’s Hammer Time in left field: His Hollywood smile, his tumbling locks, his sunburned face – along with his museum-piece car – have attracted a throng of curious car buffs. For several minutes, he walks a camera crew through his car’s features – it’s a numbers-matching 6 1/2, he says, the engine, transmission, and chassis all original – and then he turns to face another group of questioners. In addition to these heavyweights, however, the field of 75 also contains a number of cars you might

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find in your neighbor’s driveway. There are six Chevy Corvettes, eight MercedesBenz SL 300s, a couple of Ford Mustangs, and a Pontiac Trans Am – all lovely automobiles, passionately maintained, but none approaching the rarity and significance of other Copperstate entrants. The only official criterion for participation in the Copperstate 1000 is that the car be built before 1973, and according to this year’s event chairman, Scott McPherson, every year there are about twice as many applicants as there are spots available. “There are over a hundred past participants who want to repeat each year,” McPherson says. “But we try to allow as many new people as possible, and we try to mix the cars up, to make them interesting – you know, cars with good provenance, historically significant, exciting cars you don’t see all the time. A Hispano-Suiza, two Bizzarrinis – that’s pretty unusual at any single function.” This fellowship – of mid-year factory cars, some unrestored, and multimilliondollar coach-built paragons – is what the Copperstate is all about, says McPherson. Three years ago, before it sold at auction for $9.25 million, the Ferrari 330 TRI/ LM Testa Rossa that Phil Hill drove to victory in the 1962 Le Mans appeared here. “There might also be room for a $20,000 car,” says McPherson. “We don’t want to make the Copperstate exclusionary, but we might want to make it exclusive.”

Just before the scheduled departure, I find my father, who has latched onto a pair of American classics in left center field: a 1936 Cord 810 sedan – a trailblazer, he explains, with its front-wheel drive, retractable headlights, and a single-body design – and a gleaming black 1940 Mercury convertible, owned by a guy from the neighborhood: Bob Beck, a Tempe real estate dealer. Beck’s wife, Paula, a retired teacher, will be his co-pilot for the four-day tour, and they stand proudly together next to the Mercury, posing for a round of photos. Maybe it’s Tempe, representing, or maybe it’s the curious magnetism of the 1940 Merc – which seems to have hypnotized my father – but the crowd around the Mercury rivals those around the prewar one-offs. “I just love it,” Beck told me later, in a telephone interview, “when people stand there, and you can see they’re thinking back to the ‘40s, or whenever they last saw a car like that, and they’re thinking, ‘I remember what was going on at that time in my life.’ That car kind of filled a niche. It was one-of-a-kind. It wasn’t exotic, it wasn’t a racecar, wasn’t a sports car, but it was a piece of history. And vintage. And you know, the funny thing is, we had more people on the trip, driving their million-dollar-plus sports cars, coming up to us and asking: ‘How’s the Merc running? How’d it do today?’”

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At 10 o’clock, it’s time for the drivers’ departure. The scrutineers are ordered into the stands, where they pack the seats along the first-base line. Modeled after the Mille Miglia’s kickoff, the departure is a slow single-file procession, each car announced as it cruises past, its driver waving to the adoring masses before disappearing through a great swung-open section of right-field fence. I find myself unusually interested in the drive-off of the ‘39 Alfa Romeo: Could the racer who drove it beneath the arch at Brescia, 60 years ago, ever have imagined it would some day be here in the Arizona desert, looking good as new, driven by a man from New Jersey named Herb – ready, after all these years, for another 1,000-mile run?

The Copperstate 1000 is, according to McPherson, the second-oldest rally of its type in the country, a year younger than the prestigious Colorado Grand. In 1990, a member of the Men’s Arts Council – a nonprofit formed 40 years ago to support the programs and activities of the Phoenix Art Museum – conceived of a vintage car rally over Arizona’s scenic byways as a museum fundraiser. The Arizona highways proved popular with car owners, and the pool of applicants grew rapidly.

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linen table next to a retired builder from Rancho Mirage, California, driver of a 1964 Ferrari Lusso. “What are you driving?” he asks. “Chrysler minivan.” Without a moment’s pause he nods and says: “That’s a good car.” There’s no room at the inns in the drivers’ ultimate Day One destination, the tiny mountain village of Greer, so we turn back. We meet up with the drivers two days later, outside Tucson, as they’re descending Arizona’s highest peak, 9,157-foot Mt. Lemmon, along the gorgeously sinuous Catalina Highway. We snap a few photos as they wind through the cactus and the pink cliffsides, and then follow them in the rest of the way to their lunch destination, the Pima Air and Space Museum south of town: past the entrance to Saguaro National Park, past the acres and acres of mothballed B-1s, C-47s, and F-4 Phantoms parked across the street from Davis-Monthan Air Force Base – the famously eerie “Airplane Boneyard” of the 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group (AMARG). At the museum, when the Becks arrive in the parking lot, I ask about their favorite stretch of road. Paula says the most talked-about section so far has been the Greer-to-Safford leg, a 6,000-foot descent along the lonely, treacherously winding U.S. 191, also known as the Coronado Trail or – in honor of its former designation, U.S. 666 – the Devil’s Highway. The route is reputed to be the leasttraveled federal highway in the country, and yesterday, the Copperstate drivers learned why: The steep, twisting highway has more than 500 hairpin turns in a single, 100-mile section, enough to overpower even the most liberal doses of Dramamine® ingested by several participants beforehand. “I hear one gal threw up four times,” Paula chirps. Bob, for his part, not wanting to test the brakes of the ’40 Merc, claims to have taken it easy on the curves. One of the last to arrive for lunch on Day Three is Stephen Brauer, driver of the velvet green 1954 Bentley R Continental, one of the most interesting cars in this year’s rally. I had heard, on opening day, that Brauer’s car had been Ian Fleming’s inspiration for “the Locomotive,” a car purchased by James Bond in the 1961 novel Thunderball. When I asked about it, Brauer handed me documentation of this connection: the Continental drophead coupé in which Bond gives chase to his future wife, Tracy di Vincenzo, in On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, does, in fact, bear such a strikingly detailed resemblance to this 1954 R Continental – down to the half-performed post-accident body restoration, the

While Arizona is a huge state, says McPherson, the Copperstate has faced some logistical challenges over the years due to the sparseness of suitable accommodations outside Phoenix, the fifth-largest U.S. city. The event’s organizers try to mix up the route a bit every year, to keep it fresh – McPherson says he’s sometimes driven 7,000 miles in a year, just trying out routes – but, he says, “After 18 years, there are only so many places you can go – north and south [of Phoenix], the roads are a little bit more limited. We try to keep it to around a thousand miles of driving during the four days, and mix up the terrain. Once you go outside the city of Phoenix, the smaller towns are a little more difficult to manage for hotel rooms.” For today’s first leg, the drivers exit the Valley of the Sun to climb gently through saguaro-studded mountainsides glowing with wildflowers – yellow brittlebush, orange globe mallow, purple lupine – along a route that, just days earlier, had been completely closed by a sudden landslide. We follow the drivers to the foot of the Mogollon Rim, the boulder-strewn escarpment that defines the southwestern edge of the Colorado Plateau. When we reach the town of Payson, where Zane Grey once holed up in a cabin to write several novels set in his beloved Rim Country, the saguaros have given way to pines, and suddenly, in the middle of nowhere, we come across Chaparral Pines, a huge country club in the mountains. The cars dump off the two-lane highway and wind through the trees into a parking lot, where they pull alongside several golfers putting on a practice green. Inside, my father and I take our seats at a white-

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squared-off rear, and the 2-inch exhaust pipes – it seems probable that Fleming knew about the car. “I actually collect postwar coach-built cars, and I have three R Continentals now,” says Brauer. “But I wasn’t even aware of the James Bond connection until after I bought it.” Searching for more information on the car – BC63LC – on the Internet, Brauer found an article on the Bond car at the online Continental registry, www.continental.org.uk. The car, apparently, had been wrecked in 1956, and the first owner had commissioned the British coach-builder H.J. Mulliner to rebuild it as a drophead coupé – but later switched to a less-expensive French coachbuilder, Chapron. It was this version – completed in 1958 and photographed in London at about the same time Fleming was working on Thunderball – that made its way into Brauer’s hands. “It needed restoration,” says Brauer. “And the more I looked at that ugly back end, the more I decided it wasn’t really worth doing. It had a terrible bench seat in it, and a bunch of other things that needed attention.” Brauer acquired a pair of original Continental seats from a dealer in England. “We put it all together and then sent it out to have the whole rear quarter made from the Mulliner drawings.” The result – sleek, shapely, elegant – is a car that, even while parked outside the Pima Air and Space Museum, looks as if it’s gliding over the blacktop.

*368,)03:)3*'%67 On Day Four, the 18th Copperstate 1000 comes to an end at the Bondurant School of High Performance Driving, just south of Phoenix, where about half the drivers decide to put their cars to

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the test under the guidance of a lead driver. One of the cars on the track is Bob Beck’s ’40 Mercury; his son has joined him in the passenger’s seat, and they’re barreling along the long straightaway and cornering hard, the car leaning through the turns, leaving rubber behind. Paula stays behind in the bleachers, one of about 20 bystanders snapping photos. Despite the roaring engines and the squealing tires, there’s a quietness to today’s events, as if nobody wants it to be over just yet. The drivers who aren’t racing are milling about the parking lot, almost subdued, visiting each other’s cars one last time. After a night at the Ritz-Carlton®, Phoenix, they’ll go their separate ways. But many, including the rally rookie, Beck, vow to return. Brauer has now driven in eight Copperstate rallies. “It’s a terrific rally,” he says. “There’s a lot of variety in Arizona – a fascinating state. There’s much more to it than people realize.” To Hammer, another Copperstate veteran, it’s been gratifying to see how the event has grown and become more sophisticated over the years. “It was great to have three of these prewar Bentleys out there,” he says. “Plus we had the old Delahaye race car, the Alfa Romeo – there was a great representation of prewar cars out there. It just shows you, each year this event goes up two or three notches in its reputation and world participation. You have people coming from all over.” For McPherson and his colleagues at the Men’s Arts Council – which has raised more than $7 million for the Phoenix Art Museum since its founding – the rally has become a labor of love. “It’s kind of like envisioning, say, a fundraiser for an evening, and then taking it on the road, and then having 200 people coming, and then adding vintage cars – and think about it, a thousasnd miles times 75 cars is 75,000 miles of driving cars that are 50, 60, 70 years old. And you’re responsible for all that. We take the event very seriously,

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Watch the Rolex Regatta from your private infinity pool!

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At latitude 18, the Caribbean sea is 80 degrees, crystal clear and inviting. Palm trees sway gently in the cooling trade winds, hammocks rock, feet are bared and time stands still. This is St. Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

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and we really want people to have fun, and try to make it as seamless as possible,” he says. A future goal for the council is to get the message out about the opening-day Field of Dreams activities – not only the scrutineering of rally cars, but the new Historic Racecar Showcase, illustrating 50 years of international racing, as well as the Valley Car Club Showcase – a display of more than 500 vintage cars from owners throughout the metropolitan area, all assembled outside Tempe Diablo Stadium.

The Field of Dreams departure venue is a relatively new wrinkle for the Copperstate 1000, one that McPherson says will be refined in coming years. But the opportunity to introduce the public to the exquisite vintage cars of the Copperstate is treasured by participants and scrutineers alike. “People bring their own cars here,” says McPherson, “and we understand that this is their passion, their love. It’s their car. It’s part of them. It’s pretty special to have that many of these kinds of cars in one place.”

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hose who seek to achieve results in today’s rapidly accelerating society understand the need to take appropriate measures to get what they want out of life.

Irene Valenti President and Founder

Never before has there been more emphasis on healthy relationships, family togetherness, and emotional well being as the necessary foundation leading to a road of life-long success. Yet with time as our most precious and limited resource, it has become increasingly difficult for high achievers to balance work, cultural and academic activities, and the time available to invest with loved ones. With this in mind, it is easy to see and understand why today’s most intelligent and successful individuals in search of a life partner are taking more care and precaution when it comes to choosing their mate. For years we have seen the appearance of practically every fathomable method of pairing individuals and individuals pairing themselves; from well-meaning friends and family, to singles parties and the internet superhighway. Undoubtedly however, if you are an attractive, successful, relatively private and selective individual, you have found that the more you have to offer the more difficult it seems to find the person who is right for you. Discerning people today want more out of their lives and relationships. There is clearly a special focus when it comes to the selection process for finding a potential romantic companion. Most people recognize the value of engaging an expert to assist them in their personal search. The question is, “How do you find an expert you can trust?” Valenti International of Rancho Santa Fe, California is the only company of its kind. The organization consistently attracts a select worldwide clientele of quality individuals— individuals that are searching for a suitable and compatible life partner. Irene Valenti, President and founder, is actively involved in every aspect of the business. “We truly understand what today’s most exceptional individuals must endure in order to find a compatible life partner. With a staff of Ph.D. psychologists and an experienced team of

®

professionals, we are able to meet with and get to know our clients personally. This enables us to create a solid foundation for providing the best recommendations to our clients; of course there is risk, but the real risk is drastically increasing your options and actually meeting the right person,” Valenti states. Valenti International takes into consideration social and economic backgrounds, family values and interests, as well as personalities and other individual considerations necessary for a successful match. The term “Matchmaking in the European Tradition®” represents an established professional process carefully structured to promote the best opportunity for results for each client of Valenti International. There are no impersonal methods or computers used for making or selecting introductions. “Each personal introduction or recommendation is made on a respectful and selective basis.” What started as one woman’s quest to make a difference in people’s lives has grown into a world-renowned company, a family legacy, and a powerful model for building successful relationships through effective introductions. “I am always impressed with the quality of people my service attracts,” says Valenti– who continues to position her reputable company through service excellence and quality advertising. Valenti International’s clients range from the comfortable to the extremely wealthy, embracing all ages and a variety of backgrounds and cultures. If you or someone you know would like to find that special someone, contact Valenti International at 800.200.8253 or internationally at +01.858.759.9239. You can also visit their website at: ValentiInternational.com A confidential consultation will be arranged with no obligation. Valenti International World Headquarters, P.O. Box 2534, Rancho Santa Fe, California 92067 United States of America.

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Collecting on a Grand Scale Proper motor car stamps and toys from the Leo Pascal Collection Written by Paul Pascal

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Photos by Larry S. Glenn

ack in l908, when America was just taking to wheels, that immortal songster William A. Dillon penned, “I’d Rather Have a Girlie Than an Automobile or Anything Else I Know.” The Pascals would rather have an automobile, if it’s not real, and everything else as well, including toy automobiles, games, driver’s manuals, catalogs, advertisements, road maps, posters, books, buttons, clothing, jewelry, china, petromobilia, license plates, songs about cars, and just about anything faintly related to “autodom.” The Leo Pascal Collection was featured in the 2003 RROC Desk Diary, and shown in several national exhibits including the award-winning exhibit, “Automobilia, Fact, Fun & Fantasy,” at the National Geographic Society’s Explorer’s Hall in Washington, D.C., and at the San Francisco Airport Museum. Portions of the collection have been exhibited at the Washington, D.C., Automobile Show for the past 25 years. There are little tin cars, little wood cars, little rubber cars, little cast-iron toys, big and little steel toys, little glass cars, big pedal toys, and even a pipe shaped like a car. There’s an early gas-pump sign that advertises gas for l0 cents a gallon plus a five-cent tax, portable picnic sets with real china and silver including china with the RR mark, and even a rubber repair kit for inner tubes. Then there’s the sheet music of songs about cars – between l900 and l9l5 the topic seemed second only to love as an inspiration to songwriters. Can hard-rock song titles really compare to “Fifteen Kisses on a Gallon of Gas,” “I’m Wild about Horns on Automobiles that Go Ta-Ta-Ta-Ta,” “Sweet is the Perfume of Summer Flowers From the Auto Race,” or “Henry’s Made a Lady out of Lizzie”? Brenda and Paul Pascal inherited their collection from Paul’s father, Leo Pascal, who moved to Washington, D.C., from Cleveland, Ohio, and became an archivist at the National Archives. In l934, Leo’s nephew gave him a toy car and Leo stated “that the automobile would be the social revolution in America.” How true was that prophesy? His passion for automobilia took him to bookshops

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and antique stores, and at his death he left more than 20,000 items for the Pascals to organize. Over a period of seven years, the books and automobilia were sorted out and cataloged and during that process many unique items were found. One such grouping was a sheet of approximately 20 postage stamps. Certain stamp collectors consider themselves “topical” collectors – that is, collectors who seek out specific topics – and for these philatelists there is the American Topical Association, which can be reached at P.O. Box 57, Arlington, TX 76004-0057. The Pascals took their sheet of auto-themed stamps to the stamp department located in the now gone Woodward & Lothrop’s Department Store and requested that they research and obtain all such stamps printed from that point in time back that were not on the sheet, and to continue to send new issues as they were issued. For 46 years, the same company that had the concession at the department store, Treasure Hunt of Wexford, Pennsylvania, has been sending new issues to the Pascals, generally every few months. Treasure Hunt of Wexford, Pennsylvania, can be reached at l.800.545.6604. Leo’s rule was to only collect items produced prior to l940, and not to collect reproductions. However, Brenda noted that “what was new today will be old tomorrow,” thus allowing the collection to expand and provide for the ongoing collection of stamps and current items of interest. Annual visits to Toy Fair, the industry trade show in New York City, and even to McDonald’s® and Burger King® for fast food toys, produce an ongoing supply of items for the collection. Unlike early car toys, which were generic in style, stamps generally portray specific models, and included in the collection are stamps with our proper motor cars. Out of the collection’s 8,634 stamps (kept in more than l5 stamp albums), 115 RollsRoyce and Bentley stamps were found, and examples of these stamps are set forth in this article.

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As noted previously, early car toys were generally generic in style. Starting after World War II, dealer promos started to appear that were specific to models available at dealerships. Those were the days when such items were given out at dealerships and gas stations, and those items are now collectibles. As time went on, die-cast toys appeared on the scene and they also were created to reproduce actual models, both new and old. The Pascal rule against collecting reproductions is also violated in regard to proper motor car toys, as now, any model available will be acquired for the collection.

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Some of the earliest Matchbox die casts included Rolls-Royce models, and over the years, many other makers of die-cast toys started producing RollsRoyce and Bentley models. Manufacturers include The Franklin Mint, Burago, Corgi, Telsalda, Rex Toys, Guisval, Ideal, Elicor, Minichamps, Polistil, Solido, Dinky, and Monogram Kits. Sizes range from l/87, l/43, l/l8, and larger kit sizes. Bentley and Rolls-Royce dealers now offer a wide range of die-cast toys, and unlike the cars themselves, they take up little room, need little maintenance, and require just a little dusting now and then. Included in this presentation are some die-cast models paired to the cars found on the stamps as well as other models of interest. Now let’s buckle up and take our tour through areas that have probably never had a proper mo-

tor car on their roads but have on their stamps, such as République Togolaise, République de Guinée, Republique De Haute-Volta, République Centre Africaine, République Fédérale Islamique des Comores, Royaume du Cambodge, Nevis, Umm al Qiwain, Guyana, Grenada, Jersey, Saint Lucia, Yemen, Jordan, Ghana, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Lesotho, Nicaragua, the Marshall Islands, Tanzania, and the one place for sure that has our cars: Monaco. Cars pictured start from the l904 RR and include Silver Ghosts, Phantoms l and ll, 20/25s, Wraith, Silver Cloud, Corniche, Silver Shadow, Silver Spur, the new Phantom, and Bentley Tourers. For additional information on the collection, contact ppascal@pascalweiss.com.

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Slow Food

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Life at a snailâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pace

Written by Andrea Rademan

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wo events elevated Bra, Italy, from a tiny, tired, baroque town to the Holy Grail of gastronomy: Carlo Petrini and Slow Food. Petrini was born here in 1949 and by the age of 28, the prolific journalist, restaurant reviewer, and advisor to the mayor had helped found CantĂŠ Jâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Euv, based on a medieval celebration. The event became the largest folk festival in Europe, drawing performers from Morocco to Sweden who staged their acts in piazzas, schools, theaters, and on the streets. To save expenses and involve the community, the charismatic Petrini enlisted local residents to bivouac the visiting artists in their homes. By 1983, he was involved with the Italian nonprofit food and wine association, Arcigola, evolved from the massive Italian Recreational and Cultural Association. He was already steeped in charity and politics when, in horror at the sight of a McDonaldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sÂŽ undergoing construction near Romeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Spanish Steps, he declared war on fast food. Using bowls of penne for ammunition, he led a protest that eventually evolved into the International Slow Food Movement. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The movement was almost like a game at first,â&#x20AC;? Petrini recalls. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know it would explode like it did.â&#x20AC;? But it did. In 1990, filmmaker Paolo Cingolani was hired to make a documentary about the group. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Carlo gave me my first gold snail pin,â&#x20AC;? says Cingolani, referring to the Slow Food logo. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At first, they mainly produced culinary guides to establishments that shared their principles,â&#x20AC;? he says, but the group added political significance when Petrini issued a manifesto calling for â&#x20AC;&#x153;the safeguarding of local economies, the preservation of indigenous gastronomic traditions, and the creation of a new kind of ecologically aware consumerism committed to sustainability.â&#x20AC;?

food world calendar,â&#x20AC;? says Ana Alfaro, food critic of La Prensa, Panamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest newspaper. And who could argue, given sightings of Spanish chef Ferran AdriĂ  and Vancouver chef Vikram Vij; TV chefs Mario Batali and Bobby Flay; Mexican cuisine superstars Rick Bayless and Mary Sue Milliken and Susan Feniger; food experts Hugh Acheson, Joan Nathan, the Lee Brothers and John T. Edge; food writers ChloĂŠ Doutre-Roussel, Corby Kummer, and Mort Rosenblum; Michiganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ari Weinzweig from Zingermanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Delicatessen; and celebrities such as Drew Barrymore and Gayle King (Oprahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best friend), to name just a few? The area is divided into four pavilions, numbered 1,2,3 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and 5, an anomaly that everyone takes in stride. At the heart of the Salone is the Market, where hundreds of food stalls offer the opportunity to sample, learn about, and purchase fruits, vegetables, and spices; cheeses; cured meats; oils and condiments; grains (cereals, pasta, bread); meats; fish; sweets and spirits (desserts, chocolate, honey, jams and preserves, spirits and liqueurs, and beer). They include rarities such as Pinzgauer cow cheeses made from both the morning and evening milks; boar porcini; plin (chestnut flour); and vegetable preserves. Local specialties range from Turinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s famous grissini (handmade

8,)7%032)()0+9783 2)<8943'83&)6  Fortuitously, by the inauguration of the first Salone del Gusto (Tasting Salon) in 1996, which alternates biennially with Braâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cheese Festival, the world was just beginning to grasp the downside of globalization. What started in a corner of Turinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lingotto Center, once the old Fiat factory, spread out to encompass a space the size of seven football fields. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think it is the most important event in the

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breadsticks) to cardoons (a marriage of artichoke and celery) and gianduiotti, a hazelnut-chocolate confectionary that also comes as Nutella®, a spread that is eaten out of the jar like peanut butter. Regional Kitchens serve inexpensive dinners featuring local specialties; Street Kitchens serve international snacks; and Taste Workshops offer in-depth study and tasting seminars with seating at tables arranged in tiers, headsets for simultaneous translations, and appropriate wine accompaniments. The Enoteca (Wine Bar) showcases 2,500 wines, all available for sampling. A few Euros buys a wine glass and a holder that hangs around your neck for the duration to leave your hands free. After you peruse the 67-page catalog, buy tasting tickets, grab a table, and start sipping. Or sign up for a wine-tasting workshop. The Greeks called Italy “Enotria,” the land of wine, and the 500-plus registered regional varieties of Italian grapes are proof it is. Producers converge at the Salone from Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Colombia, France, Germany, Great Britain, Guatemala, Japan, Mexico, the Netherlands, Norway, the Philippines, Poland, Slovakia, Spain, the United States, the West Indies, and numerous other places. The Swiss have done cheese tutorials; the Japanese have put on sushi demonstrations; and the Americans have brought the raw milk cheeses they are not permitted to sell at home. Exhibitors are encouraged to go green in both production and distribution and to follow Slow Food’s straightforward mantra of “Good, Clean, Fair” – good food produced in ways that don’t harm the planet and don’t exploit workers. The Presidia are exhibits of endangered regional foods from 100 countries on five continents, including 200 from Italy. Says Allana Elovson, a regular Salone attendee from Los Angeles, “Italians flock here to search out items from their parents’ and grandparents’ villages.” And well they might. “Slow Food,” points out Elovson, “has rescued Puglia’s toritto almonds; Abruzzo’s sessanio lentil, which dates from the 10th century; and Valtellina’s bitto cheese, which requires rotating grazing and hand-milked cows.” The Presidia are the working arm of the Ark of Taste, Slow Food’s catalog of global endangered products, which the organization’s Foundation for Biodiversity promotes and protects. The Presidia inspired Slow Food USA, spearheaded by Alice Waters, to create 2008’s Slow Food Nation in San Francisco, with hopes that the event will be replicated nationwide.

at the Cathedral of San Giovanni Battista, where the Shroud of Turin is kept. Peer up at the giant screens as you recline on a chaise lounge at the National Museum of Cinema, and wonder at the history of projection from camera obscura to magic lanterns. Only Cairo’s is larger than the 1824 Egyptian Museum filled with worldclass exhibits. Take a taxi to Valentino Park to see the Medieval Village, then walk along the riverbank and climb Monte dei Cappuccini for a view of the city. Stop at the Porta Palazzo, the largest open-air market in Europe; sip a cup of the bicerin (espresso, melted chocolate, and fresh cream) that Caffè al Bicerin has served since 1763; have a worker’s lunch of vitello tonnato (chilled veal in a tuna sauce), gnocchi fonduta fontina, grissini, and torta di noci (nut cake) at Le Vitel Etonne; stop for coffee at Lavazza’s original shop. Pick up some marrons glacés (candied chestnuts) at Galleria Sabauda confectionary and housemade chocolates at Peyrano. Explore the restaurant-shop, La Montagna; doff

%8%78)3*896-2%2(8,)0%2+,) During the Salone del Gusto, even the Po River that divides the city of Turin seems to flow at a more leisurely pace. Except for fall’s frantic white truffle fair in nearby Alba, and the wine festivals in Asti and Barolo, the capital of Piedmont remains stubbornly non-touristy. Stroll the arcaded streets, which run the entire length of the city in both directions. From Piazza Castello, the heart of Turin, stop

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a Turinese aperitif at Fornelletti; and duck into Grom, the gelateria with a Slow Food sensibility, which opened in Turin before expanding across Italy and abroad. The Salone organizes “dinner dates” in castles, estates, and restaurants in Turin and the nearby hill towns of the Langhe, a number of which host outstanding Italian and foreign chefs. Or, on your own, drive out to La Contea di Neive, where mother and daughter Claudia and Elisa Verro turn impeccable regional ingredients into luscious classics and Papa Tonino is the consummate host and runs a remarkable specialty food and wine boutique across the way.

:))62368,83:)6')00-6-') If Vercelli were a woman, her hourglass shape might land her on the cover of Playboy. As it is, even though she is Europe’s most important rice producer and has been the source of 70 percent

of Italy’s rice since the Middle Ages, she remains a secret to most travelers. Rectify that by checking into the Saggia family’s Hotel Ristorante Garibaldi, where the chef is renowned for his version of the local specialty, salam d’la duja, in which seasoned pork is buried in pig fat to mature. It’s a required ingredient in panissa, a thick risotto made with local saluggia beans. Native Vercellese chef Massimo Milan, of Osteria Cascina Dei Fiori, makes an excellent version of the dish. At Balin in Castell’Apertole, chef Angelo Silvestro says, “Sincerely, I have one favorite that grows [on] my land: rice. With this food, I try to link flavors and tastes, looking for the harmony that merges the pleasure of eating with the sweet things in life.” Il Giardinetto is a family-owned restaurant and hotel that serves up local specialties such as fried, stewed, or stuffed frogs; bicciolani biscuits, flavored with cloves, cinnamon, cardamom, coriander, and pepper; lingue di gatto, tongue-shaped biscuits soaked in Gattinara wine; and tartufata, a cream

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and custard cake with hazelnuts and chocolate flakes. To try some of these dishes at home, visit a rice farm like Lodigiana, which harvests and sells some of the more than 100 regional rice varieties: arborio cooks evenly; baldo and maratelli are excellent for risotto and baking; balilla and Sant’Andrea are best in soups, croquettes, and rice cakes; carnaroli absorbs liquids well; roma is ideal for puddings; and venere nero (black venus) is a mélange of the ancient Chinese forbidden rice that was traditionally reserved for the emperor and an Italian variety. It pairs well with white fish, poached chicken, or just butter and grated cheese, and is used to make delicate cookies, available at the farm shop. Although they are all made from the same Nebbiolo grapes that grow in the hills north of Vercelli, Gattinara and Ghemme wines are outshone by their pricier Barolo (“king of wines and wine of kings”) and Barbaresco cousins. They may be outclassed at the top but, as food and wine critic John Mariani

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says online in Bloomberg Muse News, â&#x20AC;&#x153;they are much more approachable wines at much more reasonable prices and will go well with the same kinds of food.â&#x20AC;? Having been awarded the prestigious DOCG [Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita] appellation, expect to see Gattinara achieving the recognition it would already have attained with less severe competition.

+3*36&%6359)-2&6%%8',))7) 2)<8947)48)1&)6  The heart of the Slow Food Movement lies in the storybook town of Bra, where the organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s de facto canteen, Osteria del Boccondivino, is as unadorned as chef Beppe Barberoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s scrupulously fresh rustic dishes. A few favorites are the tajarin (a regional pasta), veal braised in Barolo, and egg custard. The pristine wine list is limited to local labels. Visitors are often housed at Lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ombra della Collina, a B&B in a 19th-century manor house tucked into a nearby courtyard. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an easy stroll to the historic Caffè Pasticceria Converso for some of Italyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s finest espresso, sweets, and pastries. Explore the old townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fashionable boutiques, tantalizing food shops, and elegant churches, particularly Santâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Andrea and Santa Chiara. A few miles away, the miniscule Roman-era town of Pollenzo is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and home to Slow Food headquarters. The organization built the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first University of Gastronomic Sciences, where some of the students are sons and daughters of great restaurant families. Top wineries from throughout Italy send about 100,000 of their best bottles every year to stock the wine library. Reserve well in advance to dine at restaurant Guido, which is housed in a stunningly restored granary with soaring brick arches. Historically, Bra was an important center for the cheese trade. That tradition is honored on alternate years at â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cheese â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the shape of milk,â&#x20AC;? a street fair for every kind, shape, size, and age of cheese imaginable â&#x20AC;&#x201C; soft, hard, stretched, pressed â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and dairy farming in general. The stars are PDO (Protected Designation of Origin) mountain cheeses; rare cheeses; and one type of cheese that is featured in depth. In 2007, the focus was on Eastern European cheeses, including a sheep cheese aged in pine bark from Romania; sack cheese from Bosnia; and oscypek made by Polish shepherds. Fermented milk from the Mediterranean and the Middle East appeared in the form of yogurt, kefir, and labnĂŠ, alongside ice cream and butters. There were Parmigiano from White Modena cows and alpine Castelmagno, rare cheeses from Norway and Sweden, Cape Verde and Switzerland, and raw cheeses from the United States and Ireland.

To go with these are bottles of honey, jam, fruit preserves, and jellies. In the Enoteca, 1,500 other bottles hold late harvest dessert wines such as Sauternes, fortified wines (Port, Sherry, Madeira), ice wines from several countries, and artisan beers. The open-air Slow Food CafĂŠ sells snacks and aperitifs; the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best restaurants offer special menus; and 51 restaurants prepare a giant cheese platter. None of the presentations, classes, workshops, and other events impressed us more as an expression of Slow Foodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vision of the table as a center of â&#x20AC;&#x153;pleasure, culture, and communityâ&#x20AC;? than the coffees from Guatemala and the Dominican Republic, which were carefully roasted by inmates of Turinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Vallette prison.

703;*-7,-2+)23%-8%0= 2)<894%46-0  Slow Fish is held biennially in Genoa. It is similar to the Salone del Gusto, though smaller and focused entirely on fish. Nevertheless, given the constraints of time, choosing among the various offerings is a challenge. Italian and international regions introduce visitors to their traditional local food and wines, seasoned with cultural heritage to enhance appreciation. Enticing classes bear such names as Green Shell Mussels, Oysters and Wines from New Zealand; Raw Fish and Spirits; Innovations in a Can; Have Cod Will Travel; or Fish Roe Compared. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s even a class for children, Fish Tales, that teaches them how fish get from the water to the plate. While fisher people

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SLOW FOOD PUBLICATIONS

MORE SLOW FOOD EVENTS IN 2009

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chez, who started cooking at the tender age of 8, demonstrates how he cooks merluzza at Cenador de AmĂłs (www.cenadordeamos.com), one of Spainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most acclaimed fish restaurants. He and Bertilio Gomes of VĂ­rgula in Portugal rotate with their Italian counterparts, Enrico Chicco Cerea of Da Vittorio in Bergamo; Gennaro Esposito of La Torre del Saracino in Naples (www.campania-startup. it); Marcello Leoni and his brother Gianluca of Il Sole in Antica Locanda del Trebbo; Paolo Masieri of Paolo e Barbara in Liguria (www.paoloebarbara.it); Luigi Pomata of Sardinia (www.carloforte.net); Mauro Ricciardi (www.locandadelletamerici.com); and Alfredo Russo of Dolce Stil Novo near Turin. Navigate the same alleyways of the Caruggi District that Christopher Columbus roamed when Genoa was a maritime power. Pass Via Garibaldiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s marble palaces, including Italyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first stock exchange, the Loggia dei Mercanti. Santa Maria di Castello is one of Genoaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s oldest churches; San Lorenzo, with its slate and white marble facade, is the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cathedral. The Palazzo Ducale, for centuries Genoaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s seat of government, is now a cultural center. These, and the Via San Bernardo that Mark Twain described as â&#x20AC;&#x153;crooked as a corkscrewâ&#x20AC;? are reminders that Genoaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s old city is one of Europeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best-preserved medieval quarters. They are also reasons not to pass up this vibrant city in favor of the glamorous, star-studded hillside resort towns and villages of Portofino, Santa Margherita, and Rapallo. But even more compelling are the food shops and old-fashioned family restaurants like Trattoria Maria, a second-floor, lunch-only spot with no pretensions and no fussy attitude. Everyone sits at communal tables and orders off the handwritten menu of the day. Choices run to earthy dishes: polenta with mushroom ragĂš; pork ravioli; vegetarian meatballs; stuffed artichokes; and fennel-onion Parmesan trenette with pesto. Since this is the birthplace of pesto and focaccia, the basil in that pesto is likely from Pra and worth carrying home a few jars. The town is so mad for focaccia, the puffy dimpled bread, that they even hold a Festa del Focaccia. At lunchtime, people line up outside their favorite storefront to wait for it to come out of the stone oven, topped with onions, cheese, or herbs, and sprinkled with sea salt.

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from Norway, Mauritania, Dakar, and Dalyan network with each other and discuss their products, people at the Bistro down sea- and freshwater fish dishes with wines from the Enoteca. At an eel exhibition, we learn that the prized eels that draw day-tripping Italians to the quaint canals of Comacchio in Emilia-Romagna actually migrate there from Puglia. Allison Levine of The Tasting Panel Magazine, a wine publication, says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Aside from Pugliaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pasta, cheeses, olive oil, fruit, and vegetables, the Foggia province produces DOCs [wines with the certification of Denominazione di Origine Controllata] such as Rosso di Cerignola, CaccĂŠ Mmitte di Lucera, Orta Nova, and San Severo.â&#x20AC;? Great chefs take the stage to lecture and demonstrate their skills with the fruits of the sea, lakes, rivers, and lagoons at the Theatre of Taste. JesĂşs San-

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70-47398,837430)83132-2-30-:)3-0 Spoleto is famous for the Festival of Two Worlds, more commonly known as the Spoleto Festival, an international showcase of the performing arts. One of the official sponsors of the festival is Monini, the olive oil company that produces the best-selling brand of extra virgin olive oil in Italy from its home in this Umbrian town. Sophia Loren, who famously said, “Spaghetti can be eaten most successfully if you inhale it like a vacuum cleaner,” mentions Monini in her cookbook. Carrying on the tradition created by their grandfather in 1900, Zefferino Monini Jr., and his sister, Maria Flora, use purely Italian olives to achieve the signature flavor. “There is nothing wrong with using an oil blended from a mix of Mediterranean olives, but there is a difference,” says Mr. Monini, a former racecar driver who now devotes all of his time to running the company. Maria Flora, who handles the company advertising, lives in the walled medieval village of Eggi, in the foothills of the Sibillini Mountains outside Spoleto. A wreck when she bought it, she rebuilt her house meticulously from its historic footprint, seamlessly fitting it into the olive trees and rocky landscape that surround it. The living room is hung with dramatic modern art, but there’s even more drama in the kitchen, where she employed an ingenious technique to color the rough-plastered walls. “I used a bucket of house red wine,” she says, “with black paint and white paint mixed in.” Zefferino and Maria Flora keep the company contemporary, too. The Monini laboratories and quality-control departments are the most technologically advanced

in the industry. The pride of the line is Il Monello, a strong and vibrant extra virgin olive oil culled from the first harvest that must be used in season. Originale Extra Virgin has a balanced, sweet flavor and a distinct olive scent. GranFruttato is intense and pungent, with a hint of almond aftertaste that makes it an ideal garnish. Extra virgin Amabile is refined, and extra virgin Bios is made from organic olives and used raw.

703;'-8-)7 “We are enslaved by speed,” said Carlo Petrini, “and have all succumbed to the same insidious virus: Fast Life. …” In obvious agreement, Paolo Saturnini, mayor of Greve in Chianti, founded Città Slow (Slow Cities) in 1999, applying the basic tenets of Slow Food to all aspects of urban life. To qualify, among other things, member cities must keep their permanent population under 50,000; reduce traffic; ban car alarms; and restore old buildings before constructing new ones. Additionally, they must promote awareness among all citizens that they live in a Slow City, and promote hospitality and tourism to spread the Slow City message to the rest of the world. So far, upward of 46 Italian towns, and a growing number in other European countries and Asia, have joined. In the days since Carlo Petrini staged his penne protest, he has evolved from fighting globalization to envisioning “virtuous globalization,” in which

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agriculture, industry, commerce, and ecology value the common man and work for the common good. “The political message that’s sort of inherent in Slow Food appeals to me,” says Evan Kleiman, who owns Angeli Caffé in Los Angeles and organized the city’s first convivium. “It’s about how we perceive our culture, the idea that if we want to protect our culture and our humanity, then we will protect our food.” Apparently, she is not alone. The organization has grown to 80,000 members in 100 countries, a publishing house, and an annual budget of about $25 million. One thing hasn’t changed. Petrini has not veered from his initial vision, that we can “surely, slowly, fully, and without excess enjoy the pleasures of the senses.”

The market is ripe for lovers of historical and contemporary Western art Written by Kirsten Ott

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he first artists and explorers who headed west into the vast unknown of North America brought back paintings and drawings of a land so extraordinary, so massive, and so wild – and so interestingly inhabited by exotic primitive people – that their East Coast compatriots could hardly believe it. Early images by artists such as George Catlin (1796-1872), Karl Bodner (1809-1893), and Alfred Jacob Miller (1810-1874) testified to what these men had seen, and contributed to the powerful magnetism that fostered a stream of seekers, pioneers, entrepreneurs – and artists – in their westwardflowing wake. While the West has grown increasingly familiar since then, it remains inspirational, serving as a symbol for the endless optimism, romanticism, and adventure deeply rooted in this nation’s heart. Generations of artists over the past 175 years have continued to put forth visions of the West. And generations of viewers and collectors have been enchanted by Western art – a broad genre whose various aspects all have seen a strong rise in collector interest in recent years. “The renaissance of Western art really began with the bicentennial in 1976, which focused our nation’s attention on everything American,” notes Nedra Matteucci, owner of Nedra Matteucci Galleries in Santa Fe. “The reputations of Frederic Remington and Charlie Russell soared as the importance

of their art became even more apparent. At about the same time, contemporary Western artists began receiving additional, much-deserved attention, this continues today, notably with the Cowboy Artists of America. A further reason for the popularity of Western art is the general national trend of the increasing importance of the West to so many aspects of America in the last half century.” The genre’s increased popularity and legitimacy is such that the major New York auction houses now have Western art specialists on staff, and important annual exhibitionists around the country are ringing up record sales. The fall 2007 Cowboy Artists of America Sale and Exhibition at the Phoenix Art Museum brought in $2.3 million. Sales totaled more than $4.4 million in February 2007, up from $1.7 million in February 2004, at the esteemed Masters of the American West Fine Art Exhibition and Sale, held at the Museum of the American West (formerly the Autry Museum of Western Heritage) in Los Angeles. And total sales at the July 2007 Coeur d’Alene Art Auction in Reno were more than $35 million, up from $10 million in 2003. “It is definitely becoming more mainstream,” says Peter Stremmel, director of Stremmel Gallery in Reno and co-founder of the Coeur d’Alene Art Auction. “The spring [2008] sales at Sotheby’s and Christie’s show this. Traditionally, they ignore the Western art market. This year, they placed Western art on their catalog

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covers. This has never happened before. A major sale of Western art took place this season, as well. A Thomas Moran [painting] was estimated to bring in $3.5 to $5 million. It brought in $17 million – the highest for a 19th-century American Western art painter.” These figures also indicate a steady rise in prices for individual artworks by both historical and living artists. The majority of original paintings by the earliest Western artists are now in museums and therefore more scarce for purchase. However, some periodically do show up for auction,

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such as Alfred Jacob Miller’s circa-1850 painting “Indian Village,” which brought $1,064,000 at the 2003 Coeur d’Alene Art Auction in Reno. The next significant wave of early Western artists included Hudson River School painters Albert Bierstadt (1830-1902) and Thomas Moran (18371926), both known for their magnificent landscapes created between the 1860s and ’70s. Bierstadt’s “Yosemite Valley” commanded more than $7 million at Sotheby’s in 2003. At least as important, in terms of last influence on the genre, were the famed cowboy artists of the 1880s, notably

Proudly representing

Dan Oster miller

Nedra Matteucci Galleries 1075 Paseo de Peralta, Santa Fe, NM 87501 TEL  sFAX   www.matteucci.com

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currently has 23 active members, is dedicated to preserving the integrity of Western cowboy heritage through art. The CAA’s first exhibition was held in 1966 at the National Cowboy Hall of Fame in Oklahoma City; it now takes place each October in Phoenix. Today’s cowboy artists generally fall into two sub-genres; there are those who portray cowboy and American Indian subject matter in the spirit of Remington and Russell, romanticizing the open range, simple life, and an intimate connection with nature as lived in times gone by. Top names in this category include James Reynolds, Bill Owen, Howard Terpning, Martin Grelle, Tony Eubanks, Jim Norton, Ken Riley, and John Moyers. Prices reflect the artists’ prominence. For example, “The Shaman and His Magic Feathers,” by Terpning, had a $1,310,000 price tag at the 2007 Masters of the American West show, while at the same venue, Grelle’s “Paradise Lost” went for $105,075. The other primary type of cowboy art is a contemporary one, with depictions of ranch hands set among pickup trucks and power poles, as well as horses and cattle. William Matthews is known for his masterful watercolors in this style. Forbes magazine has written, “the artist who captures the cowboy, captures the American soul. Once it was Frederic Remington. Now it is William Matthews.” And pencil artist Karmel Timmons won the People’s Choice award for “The Legacy of the Vaquero,” at the 2008 Coors Western Art show. Aside from cowboy artists, other notable Western painters today include Mian Situ, who portrays the Chinese-American experience of the West, and William Acheff, whose striking still-life images incorporate American Indian objects. Situ’s “Ten Miles in One Day/Victory Camp, Utah/April 28, 1869,” went for $251,200, at the 2007 Masters of the American West show. In figurative art, the gap between late 19th-century and contemporary Western artists was bridged by members of the Taos Society and other early New Mexico artists, including Georgia O’Keeffe, whose paintings have fetched more than $6 million at auction in recent years. The West is synonymous with its landscapes. Richard Altermann, owner of Altermann Galleries in Santa Fe and head of one of the country’s most distinguished annual auctions of Western art, says, “The initiation of American art ironically took place in New York City. Well-trained artists traveled to Dusseldorf and Paris. Once they returned to New York, they looked to the West, wanting to portray American art. Artists such as Thomas Moran [1837-1926] and Albert Bierstadt [1830-1902] were sending art back to the East Coast. This

Charles M. Russell (1864-1926) and Frederic Remington (1861-1909). Through their eyes came the romantic and eternal image of the cowboy, which, for many, is synonymous with the spirit of the West. “The Western art market has grown dramatically over the last several years and remains very strong for very good art,” says Peter Riess, director of Western art for Gerald Peters Gallery in Santa Fe. “Recent auctions have broken past records for works by Moran, Bierstadt, Walter Ufer, Joseph Henry Sharp, and Charles Marion Russell. Russell always has had a bit of a cult following. In his lifetime, he achieved success, a rarity for an untrained artist. He is considered by many to be the original cowboy artist, living and observing firsthand the rapidly changing West. Now that his annual sales totals have gone from six figures to eight figures, his works have been the focus of much more attention. The Gerald Peters Gallery has been a large part of the equation, selling many major Russells to private collectors, museums, and institutions.” Although cowboy art has enjoyed perennial popularity, in the mid-1960s, a group of accomplished artists, including Joe Beeler, Johnny Hampton, and Charlie Dye, founded the Cowboy Artists of America (CAA). The group, which

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the centuries. Western art derives from early American art, the Hudson River School, the great illustrators of the last century, Latin American art, and many other influences. The most talented and famous Western landscape painter today is the New Mexico artist Wilson Hurley,” says Matteucci, who represents him in her Santa Fe gallery. “He is nationally acclaimed for his masterful depictions of the Western landscape.” Other esteemed living landscape painters who impressively render their surroundings include Curt Walters and Clyde Aspevig. On the list of artists to watch: Dennis Doheny, Louisa McElwain, Russell Chatham, Raymond Knaub, Elizabeth Sandia, Jeff Aeling, and Jay Moore. Keep in mind that the list of outstanding Western landscape painters is virtually endless. It comprises every style of representational art imaginable, including the celebrated plein-air work of the California impressionists. As the West’s human population has increased and its wildlife populations declined, the popularity of wildlife art has risen. The most important early painter of North American wildlife was Carl Rungius (1869-1959), who has had a major influence on contemporary wildlife art. Fittingly, a Rungius painting sold for almost $135,000 at the 2007 Coeur d’Alene Art Auction. His works have commanded almost $250,000 in past years. Less well-known but also of significance are works by Alexander Phimister Proctor (1860-1950) and Edward Kemeys (1843-1907), the first two American bronze sculptors to specialize in wildlife. Today, the field of wildlife art is rife with talent. At the top of many collectors’ lists are painters such as Bob Kuhn, whose “A Gathering of Elders,” brought $226,126 at the 2007 Masters of the American West show. Others in the same league include Ken Carlson, Robert Bateman, Luke Frazier, Julie T. Chapman, Jim Morgan, and Tucker Smith. And when it comes to sculpting wildlife, look to talents such as Kenneth Bunn, Kent Ullberg, T.D. Kelsey, Steve Kestrel, Deborah Butterfield, Veryl Goodnight, George Carlson, Dan Ostermiller, Tim Shinabarger, and Sandy Scott. Western art is not only just comprised of paintings and sculpture. A wealth of meaningful art exists beyond those categories in the fields of photography, American Indian art, and furniture. Photography in the realm of Western art is not to be overlooked. William Henry Jackson’s 1880s orotone locomotive image on glass with rich tonality can

tradition has continued for more than 120 years. Now, when we look back over the last 10 years, the interest has been increasing in Western art. The auction scene has allowed collectors to establish market values in the past 10 to 20 years. Collectors are the ones deciding value. There’s much more scholarship now, so people can understand the history. Major shows, such as the Los Angeles Art Show, the Cowboy Artists of America show, and the Prix de West, an annual show in June, provide infrastructure and the opportunity for collectors to meet living contemporary Western artists such as James Reynolds and Michael Stack.” Stack, a Tuscon artist, is represented by Altermann Galleries, among others. “Stack portrays the more exotic in Western art, showing the pristineness of Western landscape. He sometimes puts structures in his paintings, but keeps them rural,” says Altermann. “His works show open spaces and natural beauty. It’s pre-global warming; that’s the way we like to think the earth looked before man built anything on it.” “Western art is not just cowboys and Indians; it involves landscape, portraiture, still life, genre scenes – all the various areas of important art through

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command more than $20,000 at auction. Jackson’s mammoth-plate Colorado landscapes can be found for $5,000 to $10,000 in galleries. If terms like orotone, albumen, and platinum print sound strange to you, enlist the help of an expert. Use caution when buying photos at online auctions, because it’s difficult to judge the quality of the lot. Timothy O’Sullivan is a master photographer

of the 19th century who’s becoming increasingly rare. Examples of his survey photos occasionally come to market and range in price from $2,000 to $10,000, depending on quality, size, and subject matter. To find one of these prints, keep an eye not only on photographic auctions but also sales of Americana. Best known for his romantic yet ethnographically precise portraits of American

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Indians, Edward S. Curtis is always in high demand. Individual large-format photogravures from the portfolios of The North American Indian book set range in price from $1,000 to $30,000 for a picture of Chief Joseph or another historically important American Indian. Be aware that prints are still being made from Curtis’ negatives. If you are buying a vintage print or photogravure, make sure it’s really vintage. “Antique Indian Art has historically been a great investment,” says Terry Schurmeier, Cowboys and Indians Antiques, Albuquerque. One of the most undervalued categories is pottery. Scout out early 20th-century pieces in perfect condition attributed to makers such as Reyes Galván Aguilar (Zia Pueblo), María Martinez (San Ildefonso Pueblo), or Felipita Aguilar García (Santo Domingo Pueblo). A medium (11-inch) García vase will realize about $8,000 at auction, while a large, high-quality Martinez olla (jar) can command $75,000 or more because Martinez’s work sets the artistic standard for Pueblo pottery and therefore is the most desirable. Baskets, the new investment collectible, often aren’t attributed to a maker as pots are, so examine instead the size, shape, decoration, quality of weaving, and condition. Pictorial baskets, highlighted with figures and animals, are more valuable than those with geometrical decorations. Large 19th-century Apache ollas can garner $15,000 to $30,000 at auction, depending on the level of elaboration in decoration. A small Pima horsehair basket may run only $100. Navajo weavings are a niche collectible warranting attention. Pre-1910 Navajo textiles are blankets, not rugs. Distinctive “Germantown” blankets woven from wool sent west from Germantown, Pennsylvania, feature tight, canvas-like weaving. Small, high-quality Germantown examples go for $1,000, while larger examples retail for $15,000 or more. Blankets woven from locally produced wool during the Late Classic period, circa 1880,

are rare. Top-quality examples sell for $200,000 and up. Take caution when approaching artifacts, however. Federal and state laws restrict the types of American Indian artifacts that can be bought and sold. If an antique object is described as “funerary,” “ritual,” or “ceremonial,” just walk away. For everything else, make sure to obtain detailed documentation of the item’s provenance. Furniture is highly recognized as a valuable investment. Shoshone Furniture Company is a very desirable type of ranch furniture commonly referred to simply as “Molesworth,” after the craftsman who designed it. Only about 7,000 pieces of Thomas Molesworth’s “Cody style” furniture (incorporating elements such as burled wood, antlers, leather, hide, and Chimayo weavings) were produced between 1935 and 1975. Early pieces are scarce. You can find them at major houses like Sotheby’s and also at smaller places, such as the Cody Old West Auction and specialty dealers in Wyoming and Montana. Expect to pay about $30,000 for a leather club chair with matching ottoman. A small table lamp of burled wood with stretched hide shade usually sells for about $5,000. Started by Paul Hindman, a craftsman who worked for Molesworth, furniture from Wyoming Furniture Company also reflects Cody style. Currently considered less desirable than authentic Molesworth, this furniture is more affordable when it can be found, with costs at about half the price. Molesworth and other makers furnished the lavish ranches and guest lodges of the 1930s, including Moses Annenberg’s “Ranch A” and “Gros Ventre Ranch,” which belonged to the Abercrombies of Abercrombie & Fitch. These pieces recently have become more desirable strictly because of these associations. “Western art – in all of its many forms – will continue to evolve and grow as America evolves,” says Matteucci.

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Sleuthing San Francisco The Chinese New Year’s Treasure Hunt

Written by Vera Marie Badertscher

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og should be rolling in, creating halos around the streetlamps. A solitary man in a trench coat and fedora should be slinking down an alley. In San Francisco, it seems that someone knows a secret that you have not quite figured out. This atmosphere breeds mystery, literature, and movie and TV series by the dozen. From Dashiell Hammett, the godfather of hard-boiled literary mystery, to the eccentricities of Adrian Monk with his goofball TV crime-solving tactics, mystery and San Francisco go together. The annual Chinese New Year’s Treasure Hunt that trained private investigator (PI) Jayson Wechter created has grown over 20 years from a party for a few friends to an event that draws 1,400 to 1,500 people each year. In addition to the main event in February, the PI’s calendar is crammed with private party events and corporate events used for team building, problem solving, and recreation for employees. To unravel the case of the San Francisco Treasure Hunt, I checked into the Dashiell Hammett Suite of the Hotel Union Square. This historic hotel overlooks the Powell Street Turnaround for the San Francisco cable cars and, during speakeasy days, was linked by a tunnel to John’s Grill across the street.

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Wechter, with his eagle eye and encyclopedic knowledge of the area, pointed out brass sidewalk plaques that most people think honor noted figures from San Francisco history. However, a bit of detective work shows that they bear the names of anybody who cared to pay the price. In a parking garage’s motorcycle section, he pointed out a mural of cycles zipping up a mountain road. We walked down Maiden Lane and he pointed out that the Xanadu Gallery inhabits the only Frank Lloyd Wright-designed building in San Francisco. A peek through the window of the closed gallery revealed that this was clearly a prototype for the Guggenheim Museum in New York. 4LSXSF]:IVE1EVMI&EHIVXWGLIV

Hammett reportedly reserved a room here (then the Golden West Hotel) for his wife-to-be in 1921. After all, it stands across the street from one of his favorite hangouts. Meanwhile, back in the 21st century, time travel and role-playing beckon. The wooden swivel desk chair sits before a gray metal desk in the Dashiell Hammett Suite. On the desk, you find a black manual typewriter and photos of Hammett’s wife and daughters. Another photograph shows his paramour, playwright Lillian Hellman. The radio, with its curved wooden case, turns out to be one of those disguised CD players, and the hotel has supplied 1930s and 1940s programs on discs to help with the illusion. Listen to an episode of The Shadow or Fibber McGee, according to your mood. A gray fedora and tweed overcoat hang on the wooden coat tree. Hammett’s daughter and granddaughter supplied some of his personal effects for this room and a display case down the hall. Bold letters on the window proclaim Spade and Archer. Watch late in the morning as the sign casts a shadow on the floor mimicking the opening scene of The Maltese Falcon. The only thing missing is a floor-stand ashtray filled with stubs of half-smoked cigarettes and a half-empty bottle of whiskey in a desk drawer. I asked Wechter, key figure in this case, to meet me in the Dashiell Hammett Suite. “Look for the Maltese Falcon on the door,” I said. When he knocked on the door, I got right to the point. “Why did you do it?” I asked, looking for the motive behind the Treasure Hunts. “It combines all of my interests – the joy of discovery, solving puzzles, and finding things,” he said. He had arrived at 10 p.m. and the city was still lively, so we went out for a walk in the area of nearby Union Square. I wanted to try out the role of private investigator as he helped me observe the city. He set off at a fast pace up Powell toward Union Square, which is presided over by the historic Westin St. Francis Hotel.

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Wechter guided me past apartments where Hammett lived, and buildings, alleys, and overpasses that figured in the writerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stories and movies based on his work. All of these sites cluster within walking distance of the now-defunct library where Hammett penned the stories that made him famous. Hammett never drove a car, preferring to walk or use the bus and cable cars. The library, Wechter explained, now houses the Asian Art Museum, and all that Hammett would recognize is the stairway. Like the detectives he wrote about, Hammett had a keen sense of observation. Hammett buffs can uncover the real landmarks behind his imagined scenes. Along the way, Wechter occasionally stopped to whip out a spyglass with which he could peer at the details of decorations atop a building or the words inscribed on a plaque. What

he lights on may turn up as a clue in the next Treasure Hunt. A trained observer, Wechter sees things that others pass by. He says on the introduction handout to participants, â&#x20AC;&#x153;This Treasure Hunt is an exercise in urban awareness ... The goal is to make you see and appreciate nuanced features of your environment that you normally overlookâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; which, of course, is what successful detectives do. They see things that other people miss. Once the clues are revealed, they seem so obvious, â&#x20AC;&#x153;elementary,â&#x20AC;? as Sherlock Holmes would say. Michael Anderson, an annual participant in the Treasure Hunt, says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not only about solving the clues, but it is also about seeing what Jayson wants you to see.â&#x20AC;? Wechter loves history and delights in research that uncovers pieces of San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s past. For a couple of the hunts, he has created temporary

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1EVO,STOMRW [[[QEVOLSTOMRWRIX EX 3RI2SF,MPPSTIRIHMR2S[ER-R XIVGSRXMRIRXEP‹,SXIPW 6IWSVXWTVSTIVX]IZIV] SRIORS[WXLI1EVO,STOMRWERHXLIZMI[JVSQ XLIXLµSSV8STSJXLI1EVOPSYRKI7SEVSZIV 7ER*VERGMWGSEW]SYGLSSWIEQSRKQEVXMRMW ERHLSMWXEKPEWWXS,EQQIXX[LS[VSXI8LI 1EPXIWI*EPGSRNYWXEJI[FPSGOW[IWXSJLIVI historic markers explaining the prior use of a building on Stockton Street. The Times Theater once stood in what is now a Chinese market. Consulting with local historians, he made a cardboard marker. Treasure hunt participants gather in midafternoon at Justin Herman Plaza in front of the Embarcadero by the Bay. They pay a fee, most of which goes to charity, and each team (at least four members) receives an instruction sheet, clues, a map, and an index of street names. Instead of desperate murderers, they are looking for innocent historic sites. At 4:30 p.m., Wechter declares the Hunt on and the teams set out to find the hidden locations and fill their answer sheets. Some of the would-be gumshoes are running from the start. Others take time to solve the puzzles before they take off, pacing themselves for a four-hour stint that Anderson says “puts miles on your feet.” Because the Treasure Hunt takes place on the night of the Chinese New Year’s Parade, “there are already thousands of people out and about on the streets of downtown S.F.,” says Anderson. The city’s brooding sense of mystery never is far away. “Jayson sends you down dark alleys in Chinatown. You are forced to go through some neighborhoods that you wouldn’t normally spend a lot of time in. It’s at night, you’re searching around with your flashlight.” Participants must be in line to report their results by 9:00 p.m. Wechter and his team of volunteers distribute prizes to the searchers that return first with the correct answers.

Anderson enjoyed his Treasure Hunt experiences so much that he organized a team-building experience for his group of auditors at PricewaterhouseCoopers. “It is a good way to show people that four or five minds together can solve something that one person alone couldn’t.” Wechter’s Treasure Hunts for private groups, staged year-round, provide extra challenges to the puzzle crafter. Wechter says that some law firms and accounting firms now have Treasure Hunts as annual affairs for their companies. “One law firm uses it as a get-acquainted exercise for interns each summer,” he says. “I sometimes customize clues,” he says. “For example, in a hunt for a law firm, I used a little alley called Harland. There have been two Supreme Court justices with that name, one as a first name and one as a second name. I would expect that some lawyers would know that.” Besides providing corporate management exercises, some hunts are purely party. Jean Kovacs, senior vice president of corporate marketing and strategic alliances for Sterling Commerce, wanted something different for her husband’s 50th birthday. Kovacs travels a lot in her job and her husband, Brooks Stough, a corporate lawyer, has an equally busy life. Kovacs says, “I came from Boston where there is a tremendous appreciation of local history and culture and stories. There is an amazing amount of history in San Francisco and I don’t think people know as much about it or care about it as much as they do on the East Coast.” She saw the party as not only fun, but also “a way to give people an insight into the stories and legends of San Francisco.” Kovacs says that the hunt was a great way of bringing a diverse group of people together. The 100 participants ranged from family members in their early 30s to business associates in their early 60s. The nature of the party was a surprise for the participants as well as her husband. “I just said to people you have to come at 2:30 p.m. for a special

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KHARMA VISIONAIR-ONE The ultimate personalised AV-system The idea behind the Visionair-one project was to create a highend AV system with a high degree of personalisation possible and to create a singular system beholding all technology to fullfill the whole experience of a dedicated hometheater. The ideal of having one system both handling highdefinition images as well as ultra high definition sound shaped in a sculpture that redefines luxury appearance of technical equipment. has been embodied in the Visionair seriesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;. When not in use the Visonair one just looks like a breathtaking beautifull Furniture that was created somewhere in the future. When active , either as a pure sound system, or as a hometheater system with plasma/LCD or dropdown screen and projection, the system comes alive and produces a totally encompassing sound at whatever powerlevel you wish to enjoy. Because the visonair-one cabinettry provides ample room for dedicated amplifiers and electronics there are almost no boundaries to the power that can be housed. At kharma we are aware of the future in integration of audio and video in system form. But as always we like to explore the very boundaries of what is possible, converging multiple technologies and designs. Think of it: No wires, no hassle, just sheer beauty and enjoyment. Charles van Oosterum

President/designer of Kharma International

KHARMA HIGH-END AUDIO

Beyond Imagination K h a r m a I n t e r n a t i o n a l b . v.

info@kharma.com

w w w. k h a r m a . c o m

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event. Bring a pair of walking shoes and get a lot of rest the night before. So they had no idea [about the planned activity].â&#x20AC;? The partygoers gathered at the Mark Hopkins Hotel, a San Francisco landmark. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jayson is so knowledgeable that he can pick and choose what fits your event,â&#x20AC;? Kovacs says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He graphed it out geographically so it was all in walking distance.â&#x20AC;? Unlike the Chinese New Yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Event, where no public transportation is allowed, Kovacs says at their party, â&#x20AC;&#x153;We let them take one cab ride or public transportation to get back if they wanted to.â&#x20AC;? Even if they had not finished all the clues, the birthday party group had to be back by 6 p.m. for cocktails and dinner at the Mark Hopkins. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The one big surprise was how much people got into it and how competitive they became,â&#x20AC;? Kovacs says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They were running, these grown-ups at 3 in the afternoon, running with their papers in hand. The second team came in about two minutes after the first team and they were so bummed out that they werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the first team back. It was just amazing.â&#x20AC;? Beyond San Francisco, Wechter suggests donning an investigatorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hat and seeing any city you

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visit in a new way. Even if you do not plan to participate in a Chinese New Yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Treasure Hunt, Wechter encourages using his model when traveling. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Embark on walks of discovery instead of being told what is important [by a guide book],â&#x20AC;? he says. He encourages getting lost in a new city. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some of the things [that he discovers and leads people to] are too minor or too transitory to make it into a guidebook.â&#x20AC;? He cites some examples like little bits of outdoor art or, for example, a house number or cement work, or a small mural, or some vestige of the past. He says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Treasure Hunt gives an urban tour in the guise of a game.â&#x20AC;? And if you follow Wechterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s approach, and apply his skills of observation, you will uncover previously hidden corners of any place you visit. As you walk, watch closely. You may see a shadowy figure carry a package down a narrow alley. Slip into Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grill and check to see if the statue of a black bird of prey still stands on its pedestal.

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Written by Vera Marie Badertscher

N

o family in the United States accumulated more wealth and influence, enjoyed it so thoroughly, and passed it on to the public more graciously. Roads that wind through the Brandywine Valley of Delaware lead to a collection of mansions built by the du Pont family in the early part of the 20th century. Many of the estates became public museums and gardens. Because of the French roots of the family, and because the lavish estates of former generations sprawl across picturesque hills and valleys that resemble southern France, the area has been dubbed “Chateau Country.” Transportation played a major role in the du Ponts’ business, political, and personal lives. Pierre Samuel du Pont de Nemours rode in horse and buggy when his friend Thomas Jefferson first invited him to take his gunpowder manufacturing skills to the United States. In ensuing generations, the family adapted to railroads, cars, and airplanes. Du Pont de Nemours had narrowly escaped the guillotine in the French Revolution, but when the political situation settled down, he returned to his native land. His son, E.I. du Pont, built a home in 1802 on a cliff above the Brandywine River near Wilmington, Delaware, overlooking the powder mills that he established. Buggies delivered the explosive powder manufactured by E.I. and his son Henry until they built a railroad to transport their products. The family gene pool created generations of engineers and also skilled gardeners, not to mention entrepreneurs with a sharp eye for a business deal. One of these engineers, E. Paul du Pont, worked in the family business until his interest in motors drew him to start the DuPont Motor Company in 1919. Unlike the other family businesses, centered around Wilmington, Delaware, he located his marine motor and automotive company in Moore, Pennsylvania, until 1924, when he finally moved back to Wilmington. The former horse carriage manufacturer Merrimac of Massachusetts and other firms that had started making buggies created the bodies of the DuPont cars. After the chassis was assembled in Pennsylvania or Delaware, someone had the job of driving the open frame over the narrow, bumpy roads still shared with horses all the way to Massachusetts or other states. There the carriage company fitted the custom body to the chassis. At a time when Henry Ford was cranking out flivvers every three minutes and selling them for $260 each, the DuPonts cost $3,500 to $6,000 each and took three months to complete. In present-day dollars, Fords were selling for about $3,000, while the luxury cars were $40,000 to $70,000. Unfortunately for E. Paul’s enterprise, the Great Depression struck, the number of millionaires dwindled, and in 1931, the company turned out the last three DuPont cars, which

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were Model Hs. Du Pont folded the car business into the Indian Motorcycle Company, which he had bought in 1920, and stopped building cars. E. Paul du Pont never had the support of his family, which was deeply involved in General Motors. Despite its short run and small production – just 547 cars between 1919 and 1932 – the DuPont models made an impression. Purchasers included Jack Dempsey, Will Rogers, and Douglas Fairbanks Jr. Only about 35 of the cars still exist, but visitors to the Hagley Museum, where the family business

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started, can see an original 1928 DuPont Motors Phaeton, Model G. The green trim, touches of wood and leather on the exterior, and green leather interior would have been specifically chosen for the owners, and was done by W. Briggs Weaver and Alex Wolman. E. Paul built this 8-cylinder, fourseat model to race in LeMans, since an earlier twoseater was disqualified. Another DuPont car, which entered LeMans in 1929, with a 5.3-liter, 125-horsepower motor did well – until it crashed. At Hagley Museum, visitors see the small wooden buildings along the Brandywine River where the explosive powder was mixed. On the cliff above the powder works, E.I. du Pont’s Georgian-style home, furnished in the hodgepodge style created by five generations of family, stands beside a garden and fruit trees like the ones he planted. It is in the barn of that home that the DuPont Phaeton rests, along with some other vehicles like a Conestoga wagon, a delivery wagon for explosives, and a 1911 Detroit electric car. Other attractions include workers’ homes, a schoolhouse, and a museum that shows the growth of the DuPont Motor Company from a small powder manufacturer to the creators of nylon and weather-proof automobile paint. DuPont, today a worldwide company, still supplies many critical components for automobiles. Henry Francis du Pont, like his cousin E. Paul, found a life apart from the family company. In Henry, the gardening gene dominated over the business orientation, and he became known for his expertise in botany, breeding Holstein cattle, and collecting early American furniture and decor. Henry took charge of Winterthur, the estate of his father, Henry Algernon du Pont, and built it into a national treasure. At Harvard University, he majored in horticulture. In 1906, when his father was elected to the Senate and moved to Washington, Henry began enlarging the gardens of Winterthur, once planning a whole hillside bulb by bulb. Like

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most du Ponts, Henry surrounded himself with the finest of everything and entertained in grand style. In his 40s, Henry became intrigued by American craftsmanship and set about accumulating samples of all the furniture, china, and other decorative arts that he could buy at auctions up and down the East Coast. He targeted the best examples made between 1640 and 1860. Early in his collecting, he realized that he was building a treasure he could share, and he methodically converted the family home into a museum. When the rooms of the estate failed to show off his acquisitions in the proper way, he purchased and disassembled architecturally significant houses. He installed doors, windows, stairways, and, sometimes, whole rooms in Winterthur until he had filled 175 rooms with his matchless collection. Du Pont continued to lavish attention on the gardens he had created and even specified certain cut flowers for certain rooms, because he wanted the colors to be just right. Henry Francis du Pont became the preeminent expert on early Americana, interviewed by scholars and consulted by Jacqueline Kennedy on her redecoration of the White House. The first lady visited Winterthur, and was as impressed as today’s tourists are at what Henry accomplished.

He served on the company board of directors from 1918 to 1944, and loyally bought the Cadillacs made by General Motors. However, later in life, he owned three Rolls-Royces. Four chauffeurs and six mechanics kept the fleet of cars running out of eight garage bays behind the Winterthur mansion. Henry had expended considerable effort on outfitting the coachmen for the horse and buggy rigs on the estate, and he gave detailed oversight to the building of his automobiles as well. As Greg Landrey, director of conservation at Winterthur, and Joseph F. Thompson point out in a 2003 article for Winterthur Magazine: The du Ponts’ early personal vehicles were very much a crossover between the carriages of the horse-drawn era and those of the developing motor car age. The carriage trade that had served those of [Henry’s father] Henry Algernon’s time and stature did not die out but rather adapted to the evolving automobile industry. Coach companies such as Brewster & Company of Long Island City, New York, (founded in 1810) made a successful transition from creating horse-drawn carriages to make custom bodies or “coaches” for Cadillac, Rolls-Royce, and other upscale automobiles. Many people kept a favorite body and attached it to a new chassis when mechanical improvements came out. Even when that custom died, the du Ponts

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continued to have many alterations made to their stream of Cadillacs, usually purchasing two a year. In 1959, Henry and his wife Ruth sailed on the Queen Mary along with their valet, maid, chauffeur, and the 1955 Cadillac Imperial limousine, which they listed as chauffeur’s luggage. After the DuPont Company no longer maintained ties to General Motors, Henry’s personal cars were made by Rolls-Royce. He and his wife owned a 1959 Silver Cloud Saloon (just like Elvis Presley), a 1960 Phantom V limousine with Park Ward body (as did the Beatles), and a 1966 touring limousine with James Young body. Henry used the latter car until his death in 1969. Correspondence in the Winterthur library indicates that Henry approached the change from General Motors’ cars to those of Rolls-Royce with trepidation. Letters flew back and forth regarding the interior of the car. “He wanted to understand what he [was] getting,” says Landrey. Landrey says one of the bones of contention involved some lost luggage. Although it may seem an odd amenity today, the old cars with luggage racks sometimes came with custom-made suitcases. Unfortunately, the Rolls-Royce company shipped Henry’s luggage to Wilmington, North Carolina, instead of to Wilmington, Delaware. That problem sorted out, he was happy enough with the ’59 Silver Cloud to order a 1960 Phantom V limousine. Before the car arrived, he fired off some letters expressing his concern that the Silver Cloud, which had a smaller engine than his 8-cylinder Cadillac, had been underpowered and he hoped that the new Rolls-Royce would have sufficient power. When automobiles became available, the du Ponts were the first to acquire them. Landrey points out that automobiles were an essential part of the lifestyle of the country estates. Much thought went into the curving driveways that carried guests from the public roads up to the mansion. Landscaping provided pleasant views all along the way. Gradual-

ly the army of carriage drivers and horse handlers gave way to chauffeurs and mechanics. Today, visitors take a small bus called the Garden Tram along a curving driveway at Winterthur. The path winds through a small part of the 982 acres of gardens, meadows, and woods that Henry carefully planned. Finally, the tram arrives at the grand mansion that became a museum and research center. Du Pont would have driven his guests along this very course. Or rather, the chauffeur would have driven, since, according to a biography by his daughter, he never managed to coordinate feet and hands well enough to shift gears and steer while accelerating and braking. Thank goodness for chauffeurs. Various tours of Winterthur focus on elegant entertaining, gracious living, distinctive collections, family living, and more. Save your last burst of energy for the most impressive gift shop you will ever see; it is housed in the smaller home that Henry and his wife lived in after they officially turned over the mansion to the Winterthur Museum. Even if your feet hold out, you will not see all of the rooms in the main house, but the general idea is to re-create

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Last year, the event focused on Rolls-Royces, supplied by members of the Keystone Region RollsRoyce Ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Club. The exhibit of cars compliments a design conference, which each year focuses on a different time period. In 2009, the theme will be the designs of the 1940s and 1950s. While design of automobiles may be part of the discussion, the conference looks at a multitude of products. Additionally, on May 3, 2009, the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pointto-Point horse race takes place, and Winterthur complements the race with a car show on its property. Last year, a total of 57 Rolls-Royces and 14 Stanley Steamers were on exhibit. The types of cars on exhibit in 2009 have not yet been determined. Of the other public estates, only Nemours, the showplace built by Alfred I. du Pont, features cars.

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the experience of living on a country estate in the early- to mid-20th century. With that in mind, Landrey, an administrator at Winterthur who happens to love cars, would like to open up the garage area to visitors in order to showcase the estateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s car collection. After all, in an estate so large that it had its own farm, dairy, sawmill, railroad station, and post office, transportation played a big role. Landreyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s goal includes displaying more family cars in the setting in which they were used. It is appropriate, he says, because the custom body work echoes the craftsmanship featured in the Winterthur collection. A move toward exhibiting cars as though they belong to visiting guests, takes place in May. Each Saturday in May, about 10 period cars of the type that Henryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s guests would have driven, â&#x20AC;&#x153;visitâ&#x20AC;? Winterthur, and are parked near the houses.

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A prominent member of Henry’s generation, irked by a family feud, Alfred I. campaigned against Henry’s father in his race for Senate. In 1915, Alfred I. du Pont joined with two cousins to take control of the family company and modernize it for the new century. Although he was a brilliant businessman, some family members were aghast at his divorce and remarriage in 1907. Alfred built and furnished Nemours, one of the most lavish of the du Pont estates, starting in 1909, as a gift for his second wife. In a lengthy feud that split the family for generations, Alfred was removed from the board. Since he was the great-grandson of E.I. du Pont, he felt entitled to better treatment. Alfred might have invented a new maxim. Don’t get mad; get even richer. He moved to Florida, where he made millions in real estate and railroads. Unlike

Henry’s scholarly approach to collection, Alfred bought whatever took his fancy, the pricier the better. He flaunted his French ancestry by modeling Nemours on the Petit Trianon at Versailles. Alfred, who had many interests, gave away money as lavishly as he spent it on his country estate. The home and surrounding gardens now stand on the 300-acre property shared by the Alfred I. du Pont Hospital for Children. The impressive mansion and formal gardens had begun to show signs of age and in 2005, a massive restoration began. Thirty-nine million dollars later, the estate started once more welcoming visitors in May 2008. The new visitor center orients guests with a film, after which they hop a small bus for their arrival through the gardens, passing priceless fountains and sculptures. The small groups – only

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PLACES TO EAT

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six people to a tour leader – ensure that the Nemours experience seems more like a visit to a home than to a museum. It may be a bit of a stretch to imagine living in such surroundings, but Alfred’s family did indeed live there, and filled the house not only with priceless paintings, chandeliers, and the like, but also family photos crowded on tables. Alfred seemed to have a propensity for acquiring objects that make for name-dropping. For instance, one entrance to the house is through a gate dating to 1488 that once belonged to Henry VIII, who had presented it to his sixth wife, Catherine Parr. Was Alfred having a bit of fun with the precedence of re-marriage? Another gate belonged to Catherine the Great. His ancestors’ friendship with early American statesmen is underlined by the chair once used at Mt. Vernon and another used in Philadelphia’s Congress Hall from 1790 to 1800. Artist Gilbert Stuart inscribed a portrait of Thomas Jefferson to Alfred’s grandfather. The wife that caused so much grief in the family died at 45, and Alfred married a third time in 1921. Jessie Ball du Pont was to continue to decorate the home and live there until she died in 1970. Besides the name-dropping furniture, the estate provides a bowling alley that converts to a movie theater, a shooting range, an ice cream-making factory, and a water-bottling facility in the basement. Fittingly, the tour ends in the chauffeur’s quarters and garage. Alfred loved all kinds of machinery and was the first owner of an automobile in Delaware, obtaining a 1-cylinder Benz in 1897. Presently the garage shows off a 1933 Buick with a rumble seat, two Cadillacs, a 1921 Renault with cane work on the body, and two Rolls-Royces, a 1951 Silver Wraith and 1960 Phantom V. Besides the autos, a family pleasure boat and the children’s pony cart occupy space in the garage. The building provided an apartment for the chauffeur and his family, and space for visiting chauffeurs. Alfred also loved music, and started a music group, which became the Delaware Symphony Orchestra. Sadly, he lost his hearing in his later years. Jessie continued to manage the estate until her death, so visitors today see a home that served a family for nearly 60 years.

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Return of the Green Fairy Yes, it’s real absinthe. And it’s in the United States – legally – for the first time in nearly a century. Written by Craig Collins

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t was spring break, and before I could visit St. George Spirits in Alameda, California – where master distiller Lance Winters was making one of the first true absinthes to be sold legally in the United States since 1912 – I needed a babysitter. I called my mother-in-law. “Absinthe?” she said. “Not real absinthe.” I told her the story – the condensed version, since it spans two centuries. She welcomed the chance to see the grandkids. “But be careful,” she said. “I hear that stuff is highly addictive.” I called my brother and asked if he wanted me to pick up a bottle for him. “It’s not real absinthe,” he said. Is too, I said. Did he want a bottle or not? “Nah. I’ve had it before. Didn’t like it.” “Why?” “I don’t remember. I was at a bar. It was late. They were pouring it in a back room. You had to know somebody. I was – let’s just say I’d already had a few.” My friend Marshall, a spirits marketing consultant who spent years as a brand manager for Bacardi – some of those years in London, from where he launched daring tasting expeditions, sampling the Continent’s finest elixirs – would be more enthusiastic, I thought. I called and invited him along. He’d heard of the new absinthes, and was interested in visiting St. George Spirits. A boutique distillery housed in an old military airplane hangar off the Oakland shore,

St. George made its name in the 1980s with small-batch, handcrafted eaux-de-vie, and eventually became more widely known for its premium Hangar One vodkas. “I’ll go. But I have to tell you,” Marshall said. “I’ve had absinthe before. There’s nothing good about it.” Oscar Wilde, who compared the swirling green cloud of watered absinthe to a sunset, disagreed, as did many of the artists and bon vivants of the rollicking pre-World War I period known in France as the Belle Époque: Van Gogh, Manet, Toulouse-Lautrec, Degas, Rimbaud, and Rimbaud’s lover/nemesis, Paul Verlaine, among others. “For me,” wrote Verlaine, “my glory is but a humble ephemeral absinthe.” While bellying up to the bistro table at Le Chat Noir, a Montmartre café that became an indelible emblem of the Belle Époque, Verlaine and Rimbaud joined all of Paris for what became known as “l’Heure Verte” (the Green Hour, or 5 p.m.) – and, from the sound of things, for many greener hours thereafter. Absinthe was so wildly popular in turnof-the-century Europe, in fact, that nearly every country deemed it necessary to ban it at the height of the Western temperance movement. The ignominious fate of many high-profile absintheurs, such as Van Gogh, Hemingway, and Verlaine, certainly helped things along. After things went south between the two poets, Verlaine, in what is often described as an absinthe-fueled rage,

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shot Rimbaud in the hand and went to prison for a while. In the year before his death in 1896, Verlaine had changed his tune about his former glory: “This drink, this abuse itself, the source of folly and crime, of idiocy and shame, which governments should tax heavily if they do not suppress it altogether: Absinthe!” Absinthe is also implicated – without any evidence – in Van Gogh’s decision to slice off his own ear. It seems obvious today that these men probably had bigger problems than absinthe. Still, no beverage has been so passionately loved and reviled; no drink has inspired such romance, mystery, and myth. It’s impossible to read about the Belle Époque without wondering about its signature drink: What was all the fuss about?

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&6)%/-2+8,)&%2 The simple explanation for artists’ – or anyone’s – attraction to absinthe is this: First, as any absintheur will tell you, its effects are more complex than other spirits. It’s a strongly alcoholic (120 to 140 proof) drink, and you’re likely to feel its effects quickly, but its blend of botanical compounds – including thujone, the excitatory neuroinhibitor contained in wormwood – also has a kind of clarifying, almost stimulating “secondary” effect, making the drinker feel at once intoxicated and focused, energized – an ideal state of mind, perhaps, for making art, provided you don’t overdo it. Absinthe also involves an aesthetic ritual unique to the world of spirits, still practiced today with an exactitude reminiscent of the Japanese tea ceremony. The classic French method of preparing absinthe is to pour a small amount in a glass, lay a specially slotted spoon over the top, and place a sugar cube on the spoon. In order to mellow the bitterness of the wormwood, ice-cold water is then dripped, one patient drop at a time, onto the sugar cube, until the water-absinthe ratio is about 3- or 5-to-1. As the sugared water hits the liquor, aromatic oils precipitate out of the alcohol, forming a swirling, pearlescent cloud known as the louche. Many heated bulletin board postings can be found today on the Internet, arguing over label-specific louche variables and their meaning: how quickly it forms, how opaque it is, how green or yellow or white it is. Everyone seems to agree, however, that the louche is a singularly lovely facet of the absinthe experience. Don’t be surprised if, on your second or third glass, you become unusually focused on the formation of your louche and its resemblance to things you’ve never before associated with a glass of liquor: sunsets, thunderheads, the smoke of an approaching forest fire. While several different regional styles of absinthe have evolved since its appearance in the 18th century, it’s accurate enough to describe absinthe as a spirit distilled from anise and the bitter-tasting leaves of Artemisia absinthium,

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or grand wormwood, for which it is named. Additional “base” ingredients either distilled or infused into absinthe include hyssop, fennel, lemon balm, and petite wormwood. Usually – unless the absinthe is a clear Swiss-style blanche or bleue – distillation is followed by a “coloring step,” a further steeping that adds complexity and a rich green color – resulting in an absinthe verte. The predominant flavor in any absinthe is anise, but a good absinthe is much more complex and interesting than that, and ought not to be dismissed out of hand by someone who, say, doesn’t care for black jellybeans. Pierre Ordinaire, a physician from the Swiss district known as the Val de Travers, is most widely credited with “inventing” absinthe in 1792, and while he certainly concocted a medicinal elixir from aromatic wormwood, it was his own refinement of a potion, already called absinthe, that had sprung from the French/Swiss countryside. Ordinaire’s recipe for “la fée verte” or “the green fairy,” as the elixir was almost immediately known, passed into the hands of the Pernod family, who were producing it at their distillery in nearby Pontarlier, France, by 1805. By 1910, the French were consuming a staggering 36 million liters annually, making absinthe by far the nation’s most popular drink – and raising concerns among critics about the country’s alarming alcoholism rate. The absinthe craze was enabled, in part, by a widespread phylloxera epidemic that devastated the grapes of French winegrowers – a group who did not enjoy being displaced, and that promptly joined the anti-absinthe campaign, proclaiming in 1907 that they were “United for the wine against the absinthe!” Anti-absinthism became a nearhysteria when researchers argued that thujone had psychoactive properties. The evidence for this was an experiment in which guinea pigs were sealed in jars packed with wadding soaked in pure

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thujone concentrate. In their jars, the guinea pigs usually went into convulsions. Science has come a long way since then, but in the Belle Époque, Western Europe’s sober government officials demonstrated no more reason than the alleged absinthe-addled lunatics who threatened civilization: Within a few years, the drink was banned throughout most of Western Europe, and the United States – where absinthe had gained a toehold in New Orleans – joined the movement, banning absinthe in 1912. The door – or more accurately, the loophole – was reopened to absinthe production in 1988, when a review of European Union (EU) regulations allowed small percentages of thujone in food and beverages, and omitted any mention of absinthe. After so many years, there weren’t many people left who knew how to make absinthe – with the exception of the underground network of Swiss moonshiners who had been making their bleues and blanches all along, in defiance of the ban. These liquors, including a label called “La Clandestine,” were some of the first true absinthes to hit the post-ban market. Even before it was re-legalized in Western Europe, absinthe captured the imagination of David Nathan-Maister, a South African vintner who, 15 years ago, upon reading the book Absinthe: History in a Bottle by Barnaby Conrad, became obsessed: collecting antique absinthe accoutrements such as spoons, glasses, and fountains, and hunting vintage absinthes – a task made much easier when he sold his wine estate and moved to the United Kingdom, where, under his alter-ego, Oxygénée, he continues to track down and sell pre-ban absinthes, along with antique and replica absinthiana, from his Web site, www.oxygenee.com. He also distills his own

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Absinthe was so wildly popular in turn-of-thecentury Europe, in fact, that nearly every country deemed it necessary to ban it at the height of the Western temperance movement.

brands, Roquette and Mystique, in Pontarlier, the birthplace of Pernodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s absinthe. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a thrill associated with drinking any century-old liquor,â&#x20AC;? says Nathan-Maister, â&#x20AC;&#x153;but drinking absinthe has an extra-special something. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re drinking something that was literally wiped out. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sort of like seeing a dodo or a passenger pigeon alive again. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something that was extinct, and suddenly you get the chance to actually drink it.â&#x20AC;? In the early 2000s, the Swiss absinthe-maker KĂźbler began the campaign to have absinthe reintroduced to the United States. The short version of the tortuous bureaucratic epic is this: It was eventually proven, with the help of a New Orleans absinthe fanatic named Ted Breaux, that absinthe wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really illegal in the United States. Breaux, an environmental microbiologist, had collected and stashed several sealed century-old bottles of absinthe, and in the after-hours at his laboratory, he began using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry equipment to test samples. Among Breauxâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most significant discoveries: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thujone Madnessâ&#x20AC;? was unfounded fear mongering. Most of the absinthes he tested had very little thujone in them â&#x20AC;&#x201C; so little, in fact, that they were essentially â&#x20AC;&#x153;thujone-freeâ&#x20AC;? under existing U.S. regulations, which placed the threshold at 10 parts per million. Armed with a molecular map of several vintage absinthes, Breaux â&#x20AC;&#x201C; whose first efforts to distill absinthe from old recipes were, he admits, dismal failures â&#x20AC;&#x201C; began to reverse-engineer them. Today he makes his own absinthes in the Loire Valley, at a historic distillery with 125-year-old equipment that includes Gustave Eiffel-designed ironwork. Distributed globally by his own company, Jade Liqueurs, Breauxâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s absinthes are winning gold medals at spirit competitions all over the world. However, at the

time of this writing, Jade absinthes are not yet allowable in the United States, under a set of regulations that remain obscure and self-contradictory. To convince U.S. regulators to allow one of his absinthes into the American market, Breaux teamed with New York-based Viridian Spirits, whose lawyers took his scientific data to Washington and slipped in the door that had been pried opened by KĂźbler. In March of 2007, just a few weeks before KĂźblerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s absinthe won its official approval, Breauxâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s absinthe, Lucid, became the first legal U.S. absinthe in nearly a century. â&#x20AC;&#x153;[Viridian] had the gun,â&#x20AC;? says Breaux. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And I had the ammunition.â&#x20AC;?

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As with his Jade absinthes, Breaux’s focus in making Lucid – which he describes as “an accurate representation of a good midmarket product in the 19th century” – is the meticulous resurrection of a Belle Époque absinthe, molecule by molecule. He insists on making all of them in France, with ingredients grown in the same regions as 100 years ago. “Modern stills are for the

most part not equipped to do what I need to do,” he says. “Secondly, the herbs I need to do it are not available here in the U.S. There are different types of Artemisia absinthium, just as there are different types of grapes. The scientific name for Merlot and Cabernet is the same. But they’re certainly not the same thing. It’s the same with the Artemisia absinthium. The artemisia I use is from France,

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wormwood and a traditional recipe. “But at the same time,” he says, “I’ve never wanted to copy anyone. And really if you look back at all the [absinthes] that were done at the turn of the century, everybody had their own house style. I’m trying to create my own house style as well. To do that, we’ve incorporated a number of different finishing herbs that wouldn’t typically be found in some of the more traditional absinthes.” Winters’ idiosyncratic choices for the coloring infusion include tarragon, basil, and stinging nettle. “We’ve also used brandy as the base for our absinthe,” he says, “which gives it a softer, sweeter base for all the botanicals to settle into. And I think that makes it much, much more approachable.”

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Approachable enough that, in December of 2007, Winters’ first batch – 1,800 bottles – sold off the tasting room floor within six hours. At Cyrus Restaurant, one of the Sonoma wine country’s most acclaimed culinary destinations, bar manager Scott Beattie says that most drinkers – the majority of whom have never tasted absinthe – are as likely to praise Winters’ absinthe as they are many of the premium European imports, including a couple of Breaux’s medalists. “Lance is a mad scientist, man,” Beattie says. “That guy is so talented. Everything he touches is incredible.” Winters seems grateful for all the attention, if perhaps a little embarrassed by it. “I don’t want

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grown in France, near the distillery. It’s the specific sub-variety that was used in making absinthe.” Meanwhile in California, Lance Winters, who began experimenting with an old Pernod recipe not long after the EU loophole opened, was using grand wormwood farmed in eastern Washington and nearby Davis, California. After the first undrinkable batches (“We drank them anyway,” he admits), Winters came up with something he was proud of – and he found few U.S. drinkers, even hard-core absintheurs, who cared where the Artemisia absinthium was harvested. As a distiller drawn to absinthe by his own admiration for Belle Époque artists and writers, Winters wanted to make an authentic absinthe verte, using grand

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people to buy it because there’s a hype about it ... I want people to smell and taste and look at this stuff, and say: ‘These guys really know what they’re doing.’”

view of the San Francisco skyline across the Bay. Smith pours a finger of earthy green liquor into each of two glasses, and invites us to smell. I’m pleasantly surprised by the smell – amazed, really. There’s some licorice in it, sure, but also citrus, mint, a fresh springtime grassiness. Marshall takes a sniff and his eyebrows shoot up for a moment, but then lower again skeptically. Smith, apologizing for his breach of Belle Époque protocol, dribbles some ice water from a pitcher into the glasses. The louche is coming. I drop to my knees to get a level view as the sunlight streams in and illuminates the glass like a bulb. Smith seems amused. “What do you see in that crystal ball?” he asks. I don’t want to sound melodramatic, so I don’t tell him: I see the city of San Francisco being swallowed up by a milky green fog, an eddying cloud resembling the dust of a thousand demolitions. I can almost hear the people screaming. And I haven’t even drunk the stuff yet. The louche, Smith explains, often takes several minutes to form, especially if you’re adding drop by drop. But Smith doesn’t really have several minutes, so he picks up our glasses and swishes them around a bit, forming an insta-louche, then thanks us for coming and rushes off to a meeting with St. George’s owner, Jörg Rupf. We drink. It’s not what I expected – not like black jellybeans at all. It’s everything I smell, hitting my tongue in waves – licorice and spices and citrus and a cool, numbing menthol, followed by an astringent bite that I suppose must be wormwood. I can’t be sure, though. I’ll have to try it again. Marshall – who buys two bottles of his own before leaving – apparently agrees. “So,” I say, as we walk across the tarmac to the car. “You said you didn’t like absinthe. Why?” “I don’t remember,” he says. “It was Paris. It was late. I’d had a lot of Scotch already. Somebody took me behind a long black curtain. …”

0%2'),%70)*88,)&9-0(-2+ Because Breaux, the original mad scientist, does most of his work in faraway France, and because there are still only a handful of absinthes approved for sale in the United States – though there are likely to be more than a dozen available by early 2009 – Winters is still the Elvis Presley of American spirituous liquors when Marshall and I make our way to St. George’s distillery. In fact, Winters isn’t even at the distillery; he’s on the other side of the country, triple-booked for lunch interviews in Manhattan before he kicks off his European media tour. St. George Spirits is a remarkable space, about the size of two football fields, its high rim of clerestory windows illuminating rows of cases on pallets, infusion bins, and open boxes of dried herbs. It smells a little like a Chinatown apothecary. All the spirits made by St. George, including its Hangar One vodkas, are distilled in three small German-made, copper pot stills on the hangar floor. The work takes a long time, and the only person who seems to be in the slightest hurry today is our guide, Dave Smith, a distiller who hands us a business card that says: “Dave Smith. General Antagonist” – though he seems nice enough. He’s making absinthe and whiskey today, and he invites me to look through a portal-shaped window into a still, where I watch brandy and chopped wormwood churning and foaming while Smith and Marshall debate the merits of pot stills versus column stills. Smith invites us to the tasting room. The tall windows behind the bar reveal a vast expanse of abandoned military tarmac, offering an unobstructed

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Multi-family Offices Taking the complexity out of family money management Written by Henry Kenyon

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ealth can be a tricky thing. Entrepreneurs work hard to make their businesses succeed and grow, but they can be blindsided by the complex financial issues associated with prosperity when it affects their families. In recent decades, a new type of financial service has emerged that is specifically designed to help affluent families manage their assets. Multifamily offices (MFOs) are financial organizations that provide financial services to a number of well-off households. They can operate in a variety of forms, such as trust companies, a bank, or as registered investment advisors, explains Bob Casey, director of research for the Family Wealth Alliance, a consulting group specializing in matching wealthy families with appropriate MFOs. MFOs provide a range of services focusing on business management tailored to support clients with complex financial issues. Casey explains that these needs and their corresponding services include bookkeeping, accounting, cash management, investment management, tax planning, and estate oversight and planning. Another characteristic of MFOs is that they are oriented toward supporting the unique need of multi-generational families. “They tend to provide family-related

services such as family education or counseling on family governance issues,” he says. Casey explains that most affluent people acquire their wealth through their own effort or by inheritance. One of the services provided by MFOs is advice about family businesses such as transition advice and planning. For example, if the head of a family business decides to sell it when he retires and his children or relatives are not going to be involved in that business, an MFO usually helps manage this process. He notes that this service covers financial requirements and locating the brokers and investment bankers to handle the transaction. Other duties include structuring a family’s assets to meet certain goals. “Maybe the owner wanted to sell the business and set up a foundation, or maybe he or she wanted to set up a multi-generational trust, which would support their grandchildren. Depending on the goals of the family, that’s the kind of thing that you’d expect a multi-family office to provide and help with,” shares Casey.

%2);*-2%2'-%0348-32 MFOs are a relatively new type of service, only emerging in the last two decades. They grew out of single-family offices that opened their doors to

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MFOs provide a range of services focusing on business management tailored to support clients with complex financial issues.

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other families. Casey notes that according to some accounts, single-family offices can be traced back to the Middle Ages and that they are a natural result of great wealth. He adds that the Astors, the first super-affluent family in the United States, set up a family office in the 1830s to manage their affairs. Casey estimates that there are now some 150 MFOs with perhaps 100 more organizations claiming similar services. But how much money must a family have to truly benefit from this kind of service? Casey believes that a family’s net worth must be in the $20 million range to take full advantage of an MFO. He notes that recent research by the Family Wealth Alliance found that the average family financial size in relation to MFO services is now about $50 million and in some cases, $100 million. Families with a net worth below this cutoff have many financial service options, says Casey. Besides MFOs, families with a net worth of $1 million or more can be served by independent financial advisors, banks, and brokerage houses. “There are people that are in lower segments of the market that don’t require a $20 million minimum account size. There are some firms, such as the big brokerage houses – that will take just about everything you’ve got. If you have a million, you get served by this group, but if you have $5 million, you get served by that group, and if you have $25 million, you get served by another group. It just depends on what door you’re walking in,” he explains.

entity and they want to address all the issues that they’re going to need to address, then they’ll need these services,” says Casey. He adds that the difference between an MFO and a traditional investment advisor or trust bank is the service menu and the multi-generational focus. As a rule, MFOs provide an extensive menu of services that can be categorized into several groups such as accounting and bookkeeping; consolidated financial reporting; and complex accounting practices such as trust and investment performance accounting, partnership and general ledger accounting. Major services include financial control and family advisory services. Casey adds that some clients want concierge or “life-management” services. “If you’ve got five homes and you don’t want to supervise the help and make sure all the refrigerators are full every time you show up, you need somebody to do that kind of property management,” he explains. Most firms also provide families with financial planning services and oversee trusts. Casey explains that many wealthy families will have several trusts, each with different mixes of beneficiaries and objectives and structures. MFOs keep track of these various structures. Other services include investment support. Typically, this covers investment policy, asset allocation, and the selection, monitoring, and evaluation of investment managers. Casey notes that this type of service is almost universal among MFOs.

136)8,%2*-2%2'-%040%22-2+ %6%2+)3*7)6:-')7 Compared to traditional brokerages, MFOs provide a much higher level of integrated services. “It’s going to cost more money. If the people controlling the wealth in a multi-generation family are concerned about the family as an ongoing

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But managing a family’s assets is more than just money. Families often have histories and traditions that define who they are and maintaining this special asset is just as important as keeping finances balanced, says Mark Casella, president of Coppertree Ltd., an MFO specializing in

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far back they can trace their ancestry and the journey that brought the family where it is today. These tales and histories reveal much about the family’s core values, and most families want to perpetuate their values into future generations, he says. But the challenge is maintaining a set of core values through the generations. Casella explains that he focuses on where families come from, how they define their visions and dreams, how they plan to enjoy life, how they define success and achieve goals, and if there is any legacy that they wish to share with others. “It’s not about the money, it’s about the family,” he maintains. After determining these needs, Coppertree works with families to create a governance system to help them make important decisions and a strategic plan to help them use resources. A resource management plan covers how capital – both financial and intellectual – is distributed among family members, their financial resources to meet goals and how they invest in their social networks among family, workplace, and community. “It’s our job as resource managers to help them manage their capital – intellectual, social, and capital,” Casella says.

86)2(7 Before MFOs became available, wealthy families could either establish their own family offices (single-family offices) or approach a major bank. Casey explains that it is very expensive and increasingly demanding to run a family office, noting that today a family requires a net worth in excess of $100 million to justify establishing its own office. As a result, many very affluent people have decided that it’s too complex to manage their affairs in-house. “It can take half their time and they don’t want to spend their time with that. They’ll go to a multi-family office and get those services provided by somebody else,” he says. Other factors behind this trend include increasing amounts of wealth for successful families, and what Casey calls the “decay” of single-family offices. He notes that after several generations, many single-family offices begin to falter. One challenge is that it is difficult to hire qualified executives to run a family office. Another issue is that as families grow, they become more diffuse, with members moving into other professions. As the number of relatives increases, the individual wealth of each member declines over time. Although this is not the fate of all single-family offices, they often wither, are absorbed into other financial entities, or become an MFO or a bank. Globalization is another challenge. Casey notes that as the world becomes smaller, prosperous families are increasingly operating on an international

maintaining family legacies. He explains that families spend considerable amounts of time ensuring that their financial wealth, possessions, and generational transitions are all laid out. “We help families transition those values and their heritage – their history, their stories – so that they are passed from generation to generation,” he says. Coppertree seeks out families with a definite group ethic and identity. Casella explains that this is a better starting point for planning a future than looking at amassed wealth. Understanding a family and its story is Coppertree’s first goal. “Where did it come from? What does it look like today? Is it important for the family to have its grandchildren, great-grandchildren, and great-greatgrandchildren celebrate who they are as family, and embrace the values that brought them to where they are?” he says. When a family meets with Coppertree for financial services, Casella initially interviews the family leaders and elders. He learns about their stories, how

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Sometimes, wealth can appear quickly and catch families off guard.

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level with offices in multiple countries. As a result, more MFOs are structuring themselves to serve a range of global clients. He shares that in the United States, there are MFOs focused on Latin American clients while offices in Europe and the Middle East focus on their clients’ specific regional needs. Another advantage of MFOs is that many are smaller and more flexible than major banks. “They’re not giant enterprises. They may manage a few billion dollars as opposed to many billions,” says Casey. Technology is another enabler for the spread of MFOs and other independent financial advisory firms. Modern computers and communications technology allows smaller firms to provide services that were once the province of financial giants with massive computers. “It just wasn’t feasible for a small organization to try and provide those kinds of services. Now with the technology, they can do it,” he says.

A over option B in terms of complexity, costs, and control,” he says. In many cases, when a family sells a business for a large sum of money, it encounters a “liquidity event.” Casey notes that often the representatives of the investment bank that conducted the deal are present when this cash bonanza arrives. “The first thing they say is ‘now that you’ve got all this cash, you’ll want to talk to our people and they’ll help you manage it.’ In many cases over the years, that hasn’t worked out so well,” he observes. Often a family will hire a brokerage firm or a bank to manage its finances. These entities usually do not provide suitable service models to meet the family’s needs, he says. “It’s very difficult for a lot of families; even though they have a lot of money, they may be in a quandary as to what to do,” he says. Some groups, such as the Family Wealth Alliance, exist to provide families with advice on these matters. Casey notes that his organization places families with MFOs best suited to meet their specific needs. Families also can get advice from their attorneys to find a good service. “It’s a tough question. Families are often uninformed and confused about what they ought to do,” he says.

;,)6)83+3 Sometimes, wealth can appear quickly and catch families off guard. Casey notes that this largess can be a challenge because there are not many sources of information and advice about how to manage sudden prosperity. “They’re confused. They don’t know what their options are. They don’t know what’s entailed in picking option

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Celebrating the Everyday Bounty Written by Claudia Jannone

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n the 19th century, young British ladies and gentlemen were sent on a Grand Tour of the Continent in order to finish their education: Only through travel in cultures different from ours do we truly begin to understand life. So many new experiences opened for me when I moved to Paris. Prior to France, my naiveté was shocking. In Paris I discovered the taste of real coffee, the sensory pleasures derived from seasonal dishes flavored by the earthiness of truffles, the delights of fine, single-malt Scotch, the decorating elegance that results from a few well-chosen handcrafted artisan pieces, and a renewed interest in the fine art of writing personal notes on strong creamy stationery. As an American, I had assumed my life to be perfect, a case of blissful ignorance that had to be toppled in order to awaken, like storybook Alice, as a person transformed. Today I realize that what I call indulgences and time’s little gems are for others just a part of life’s daily bounty. After living in Paris, I began to treasure and treat myself in that wonderful way that French women have transformed into an art form. Trust me, living well shows, so much so that Oscar Wilde termed it the best revenge – even when revenge is not in the picture. A great cup of coffee powers my day. In the sidewalk cafés of Paris, I learned to appreciate subtle distinctions in coffee styles that depend upon roasting processes, brewing methods, water temperature, and water source. Even terroir makes a

tremendous difference in taste, body, depth of flavor, and aromatic flavor nuances. I like my coffee like I like my men – rich, dark, smooth, sweet, and strong, with a whisper of bitterness to keep things interesting. In Seattle, friends introduced me to the friendly and truly local Tully’s coffee shops. At the Tully’s in Seattle’s Queen Ann Hill neighborhood, I chatted with residents at big, shared wooden tables or lounged outside beneath the awning on nice days with a cup of java and my newspaper, where many locals sat with their well-mannered dogs lazing underfoot. Although distinctly American, I swear the coffee shop had a Hemingway-in-Paris sort of vibe. Seattle knows coffee. Tully’s coffee is handcrafted by master roaster Brian Speckman, who works with the world’s coffee growing artisans in South America, Africa, Arabia, India, and Indonesia. He roasts the finest Arabica beans to bring out nuances of flavor in an antique cast-iron roaster. Roasting in small batches, Speckman lets his senses guide him: how beans look; the pop

Trust me, living well shows, so much so that Oscar Wilde termed it the best revenge – even when revenge is not in the picture. 176

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beans make during roasting; developments in smell; the feel of the beans’ texture during roasting. Cast iron creates even heat distribution and a high level of control over roasting that computerized roasters cannot. He can adjust the roaster for changes in humidity, temperature, and barometric pressure. On a holiday in Greece, I chanced upon an Athens coffee shop with a similar operation. The smiling master roaster presided over an immense antique iron roaster with wheels and cogs that he adjusted with shiny chrome mechanical handles. So I watched mesmerized as I sipped a cup of the master roaster’s work of art. To produce a crème on top that mimes that of European espresso requires espresso machine power, which will form so heady a crème that it takes a few seconds for added sugar to penetrate. In Italy, I learned an espresso sweetening trick – blending raw sugar with a dash of fresh hot espresso to make a paste. When it is stirred into the espresso, the sugary paste activates aromatic coffee oils and causes a rich layer of crème to form. It works even with stove-top espresso pots, which seldom produce a desired layer of crème. Coffee surveys of the world’s best brews contain the names of little known brands, available

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in fine coffee emporiums and through direct sales. Green Mountain, Paradise Roasters, Terroir® Coffee Company, Kickapoo Coffee, Intelligentsia Coffee, R Miguel, Willoughby’s Coffee & Tea®, Allegro® Coffee, PT’s Coffee Roasting Co., and Novo® Coffee all score high ratings in Coffee Review. A highly ranked selection of fair trade, organic, blends, and single-origin coffees comprises delicious offerings from Green Mountain. My favorites include Fair Trade Organic Espresso Blend, a dark, aromatic brew that had me salivating while grinding the beans and prepared my palate for the intense flavor depth to follow. I tossed back my tiny espresso cup with Roman zeal, finding it also excellent as cappuccino. Green Mountain’s Dark Magic Espresso Blend is complex yet balanced between sweet and bitter, and formed a nice crème. Fair Trade Organic Rain Forest Blend is shade-grown beneath wild tropical canopy – which supports tropical forests – and has a deep, lush taste that ranges from complex bitterness to toasty sweetness. After grinding it fine for my espresso machine, I ground it for my French press, again producing a superb cup of java. I also enjoyed two single-origin medium roasts that Green Mountain sells pre-ground. Tanzanian Gombe Reserve is the smoothest French press I have ever tasted – exotic with notes of honey, coffee blossoms, and chocolate. Its Sumatran Lake Tawar is full-bodied and earthy, with a soft chocolaty mouthfeel that is lovely black and sweet, or velvety with milk. Speaking of Java, an Indonesian island that came to mean coffee itself, the next-door island of Sumatra produces fine beans favored by the best roasters. Paradise Roasters, a family-run business that specializes in fair trade coffee roasted in small batches to bring out regional distinctions, looks to Sumatra’s Lake Toba region for beans with distinctive leafy and earth notes wed with flowers

and buttery butterscotch. The resulting coffee, Danau Toba, rates 96. Its Sumatran Lake Tawar, a medium-dark roast, produced robust flavor in my Bodum® French press and Chemex® filter drip. Paradise Roasters’ offering from Sumatra’s Aceh Province has a silky mouthfeel and clean finish, with cherry and lemon notes, rating 95. Espresso Classico, a smooth yet voluptuous espresso

characteristic of northern Italy, is complex, with notes of spice, fruit, and chocolate. Paradise Espresso Nuevo in central Italian style is dark and zesty with fruit, perfect for latté and cappuccino. Paradise also ranks highly (92-97) with beans from south-central Kenya, Panama, southern Ethiopia, and east-central Colombia, partly due to freshness. Each order is custom roasted and shipped.

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Truffles form a rarefied indulgence, one based on difficulty in harvesting and brief shelf life, which helps to explain their high cost. The best and largest white Italian truffles grow in the Piedmont, often reaching tennis ball size. These white beauties impart a mellow garlic flavor that marries well with other fungi, fowl, game, cheeses, and vegetables. With a shelf life of only three refrigerated days, truffles form the essence of superb seasonal dining. During truffle season chefs at Café Procacci in Florence spread truffle puree on diminutive sandwiches. Whether served freshly grated over a salad of fresh greens or sautéed for two minutes in butter with barely melting Parmesan cheese and poured over steaming pasta, truffles make for a tasty indulgence. The best black truffles, highly pungent, come from Umbria in Italy and France’s Perigord and Quercy regions, where they are called black diamonds. Truffles strike earthy notes when blended into fine European honey. Italy’s Lunardi Truffle Honey strikes the tongue as a sweet honey bouquet before it melts into the earthy depth of the fungi, making it the perfect accent for a good hunk of Parmigiano Reggiano. Piedmontese Truffle Honey has a sliver of black truffle visible in its millefiori (a thousand flowers) honey. Rich, earthy, sweet, it strikes well-balanced flavor notes in salty dishes.

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Welcome to “Om el Donya”

There is an old Arabic saying that EGYPT is “Om el Donya”, meaning MOTHER OF THE WORLD. Indeed, for over 70 centuries Egypt has entertained civilization and culture and is today known as the largest open air museum in the world! Whether your interest lies in culture, history and mythology OR in a vast array of outdoor sports that can be enjoyed all year round, Safaga, on Egypt’s east coast and offering the full splendour of the Red Sea, is a truly strategic location! Offering a unique combination of commercial and recreational attributes and providing you with the best potential for return on your investment in both time and money, PANORAMA SAFAGA, a “PEACH RESORTS” Premier location, now offers a choice of villa’s, apartments and commercial properties on a ‘no games no gimmicks’ basis. So if you are looking for pure, value for money, resort based real-estate in a location that has literally so much to offer, welcome to Om el Donya, welcome to Panorama Safaga and welcome to Peach Resorts, pioneers in promoting and International marketing of Egyptian resorts real-estate.

Enquiries: peachresorts@yahoo.com oyoun.developments@yahoo.co.uk unique.resorts@yahoo.co.uk

Tel. + 20 2 330 36 759 Tel. + 20 2 330 36 793 Fax. + 20 2 334 55 770 Cell. + 20 100 200 857

Egypt Egypt Egypt Egypt

Tel. + 44 207 569 3010 U.K. Fax. + 44 207 569 3001 U.K. Cell. + 44 7706 988 666 U.K.

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Though truffles are available only from October to March, truffle oils allow for an infusion of earthy fungi flavor in dishes from game fowl and chicken to sausages and risottos. A L’Olivier, a French producer of gourmet oils since 1822, creates a unique marriage of the woodsy flavor of black truffles and olive oil that enhances omelets and sauces. Napa Valley Harvest uses extra virgin olive oil as the base for its White Truffle Oil Spritzer, a convenient way to deepen the flavor of grilled mushrooms and asparagus. In dishes without oil, truffle-infused salt is the way to go. Saltworks’ Fusion Black Truffle Sea Salt allows the power of natural aromatic sea salt to intensify the complex nature of the pricey mushroom. Truffle salts spark pastas, potatoes, and a variety of egg and red meat dishes. Merlano’s Genovese Pesto Sauce with Truffles takes a traditional Italian sauce and gives it an earthy kick with sheep’s milk cheese and black truffles. Leave it to Italians for genius in following

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Uncramp your style. The CJ2+ will put more hours in your day, more feet in your legroom, more miles in your tanks and more airports on your map. Now, along with integrated Pro Line 21 avionics, workload-reducing FADEC and a restyled cockpit and cabin, the CJ2+ enables you to carry more payload, climb and cruise faster, use shorter runways and do it all on less fuel. To find out more about this extraordinary aircraft value, call 1-800-4-CESSNA. Outside the U.S., call +1-316-517-6056. Or visit CJ2plus.Cessna.com. Citation CJ2+

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old cuisine wisdom: What grows together goes together. My French friends shocked me when it came to hard spirits. Because bourbon was rare there, many preferred it to Scotch, although a fine single malt Scotch always adorned their liquor cabinets. For reasons of good health, craggy old Scotsmen believe in taking two fingers of single malt daily for good digestion, sleep, and longevity. In 1824, George Smith ignored distiller opposition to their trade becoming licensed (thanks to the Excise Act of 1823) and took one, a wise decision allowing his heirs to secure a decree that only the Smith family could use the name The Glenlivet®. Other distillers may use the word only as a suffix.

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Macallan distillery, said to have run an illicit trade for years, got its license in 1824. The Macallan hits all the single malt notes – smoky, peaty, breathy with oak – and is created to be enjoyed neat. Scotch is a study in diversity itself, something we are losing on so many fronts today. Those feisty, set-in-their-ways distillers – hundreds of them – take pride in producing unique spirits that taste like no other distiller’s Scotch. Various casks for aging partly explain why, but factors like water source, distilling processes, and malts – even proximity to sea air – all play roles. Each distiller has its favorite cask source – from old sherry butts and aged port pipes to wellseasoned bourbon barrels. Every maturing barrel creates unique harmonies, so finding my brand took just a bit of sipping. Highland malts have a breathy sweetness, Isle of Islay malts are redolent of peat with grace notes of seaweed and iodine. I enjoy a tot of The Macallan®, but my heart belongs to another monarch of the top shelf – Laphroaig®. Paris showed me the Europeans’ zeal for travel. One travel find Parisian friends brought back from Morocco nearly made me salivate every time they entertained – a couscousier, called a kiskas in Arabic. Tall and round and gleaming of brass on the exterior, the couscousier stood in a place of honor

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in the living room like a priceless statue. Anne and Henri explained how each section of the bulbous contraption worked to cook a large family meal while using a single heat source. Water, vegetables, meat, and spices go into the bottom pot, with the top pot functioning as a steamer. Washed couscous goes into the upper pot and the fragranced rising steam slowly puffs the couscous to plumpness. Some of the newer ones in steel look overly utilitarian, but older couscousiers may be found

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in the cookware areas of a traditional Moroccan medina, including those crafted in terra-cotta. Getting serious about Moroccan cuisine also calls for a majmar, a charcoal brazier of terra-cotta with raised lips that allow a cooking pot to rest above its heated surface. In northern Morocco, families use them to take the chill out of winter rooms, which makes a majmar an interesting alternative to the outdoor fireplace on a patio. Travelers to Morocco have long looked to Moroccan artisans to enliven their homes, which has the nice side effect of making friends jealous. From intricately carved headboards, inlaid chests, and painted armoires to stained glass lanterns and silk floor cushions, the craftsmanship of the country is stunning. Although the painted geometric designs of Morocco’s tiles and massive carved doors speak to me the most, my pleasure in the North African aesthetic lies in its use of electrifying colors – deep sea greens and blues, vibrant reds and intense yellows – colors typical of bustling market stalls

in the medina. The nation’s color sensibility also nods to its desert and agricultural environs – sandy golds, camel tans, ambers, and the silvery leaves of olive groves. Decorating Moroccan means going dramatic with at least one piece and celebrating the senses, so it’s not for the faint at heart. From Fez to Marrakech, furnishings are hand-painted on cedar by artisans who create magnificent accent pieces with simple tools as they draw upon knowledge of the craft passed down through generations – incising designs into wood and hand-mixing paint shades. Two shops in Marrakech – yes, going there is the best way to shop – exhibit furniture and accent pieces that will have friends drooling when they see the prized purchases you have brought home. Cadeaux Berberes (31 Moissine, in the medina) sells lovely pottery accent pieces and painted pottery sinks that go for around $30. Maison Méditerranéenne (230 Z. I. Sidi, Ghanem, in the industrial zone) is the place for ornately carved beds and armchairs in the $150 range.

Handmade Savonnerie: Louis XIV Style, Design S-191-B

Travelers to Morocco have long looked to Moroccan artisans to enliven their homes, which has the nice side effect of making friends jealous.

© 2009 RCT

THEFINERTHINGS

RC aer pne ta &i sT sa pae snt rci ees Aristocratic

Handwoven Art

For centuries Savonneries have been Regarded as the Mark of Culture, Affluence & Style. Renaissance Elevates this Fine Artform by Employing Master Artisans to Achieve New Heights of Excellence in Color and Design. Extensive Selection Including Oversizes, Custom Projects Available Worldwide.

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Although Morocco enjoys a strong artisan tradition that dates to the Middle Ages, as the gateway to Africa it has absorbed influences from Europe and the Middle East. Terra-cotta tiles, characteristic of Spain and Italy, are rendered with geometric Islamic motifs. Caravan lanterns with glass panes of several colors each, such as those used in the tents of nomads, become mood pieces when electrified for the contemporary home. The effect achieved with even a few pieces transports any dĂŠcor to Arabian Nights elegance. In Paris, I acquired my first oriental rugs, flat-weave Moroccan wool kilims in earthy shades. After love at first sight, my passion for handmade kilims and knotted pile carpets grew over the years to become a scatter of color and pattern atop the hardwood in every room. Okay, except the kitchen. Carpets bring richness to a room, so choosing one is a simple matter of what one likes. They range from extremely elegant to frankly fun. Over a few years, my collection went from highly ornate, knotted silk car-

pets to playful, small wools that illustrate the rustic traditions of Central Asian tribal weavers. A few caveats make buying oriental rugs easy. A high knot count per square inch means longer wear. Natural vegetable dyed older rugs of wool or silk will not fade like newer ones colored with chemical dyes. Antique, handmade rugs in excellent condition maintain their value, whereas machine-loomed rugs have little cachet. Beware the flashing smiles of carpet dealers: Conduct research and get word-of-mouth recommendations about reputable carpet stores. Never purchase a carpet from a traveling carpet sale, rug exposition, or auction because, like the snake oil sellers of old, such operations pull up stakes and disappear. Jacqueline Kennedy was famed for promptly mailing little handwritten notes after every party or dinner. Sending notes on fine velvety paper makes a statement about the writer that reveals good breeding and good manners. In the words of Peggy Post, great-

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THEFINERTHINGS

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Sending notes on fine velvety paper makes a statement about the writer that reveals good breeding and good manners.

granddaughter-in-law of Emily, “You can tell who someone is by their stationery.” Fine writing paper is to email as black tie is to a loincloth. Crane & Co., which dates to Boston’s Tea Party, was Massachusetts’ first paper producer. With invention of the envelope and postage stamp in the mid-1800s, Crane paper became the fashion in European society. Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt used Crane paper for official correspondence. My latest Crane fancy – Hand Bordered Notes, Caribbean Blue Kid Finish, with metallic gold envelope linings – is made of 100 percent cotton, like all Crane papers. The kid finish feels as velvety as fine kid gloves. William Arthur delivers quality through handcraftsmanship of its weighty, creamy smooth and textured papers that exhibit a high opacity. An acid-free blend of 75 percent wood pulp and 25 percent cotton produces the ideal surface to retain ink cleanly and clearly. Calligraphers love William Arthur papers. Dempsey & Carroll, in business since 1878, specializes in custom engraving and die stamping its paper with steel or copper dies at thousands of pounds of pressure. It hand tools its dies and hand stamps its cotton paper – a process that has not changed since the company was founded in New York

City. Dempsey & Carroll aficionados include heads of state and celebrities. After the cost of making the die, exquisite papers may bear one’s mark for a lifetime (or till divorce doth ye part). A lovely aspect to having one’s own die is portability. Tiffany stores more than 10,000 dies in its Massachusetts warehouse. Cartier keeps thousands in its flagship Fifth Avenue store. Fine paper also comes to the rescue as we plan activities. Keeping track of upcoming engagements throughout the year requires the stylish help of a Smythson fashion diary. For agendas with fashion-forward flair, Smythson draws on Europe’s leading names in fashion to design the covers – from Missoni’s dizzy squiggles to Zac Posen’s magic with calfskin. Since 1908, its portable diaries have stood for discreet good taste, fine quality, and distinguished designs. But the true calling of Smythson of Bond Street (established 1887) is crafting U.K.-milled cards and papers with its watermark – die-stamped motif cards, plain and bordered stationery, invitations, place cards, correspondence cards. The firm supplies paper to the British royal family, producing as well the light blue letter sheets (Nile Blue) so favored by Jacqueline Kennedy. So many little indulgences brighten my life with their quotidian presence, but my mother never experienced the life affirmation of the Continental Tour. She followed Emily Post like a First Lady, sent thank you correspondence and greeting cards to mark special occasions. The word “special” always bothered me. My mother sequestered away her nuptial treasures – sterling flatware and gold-edged china, crystal stemware and fine table linens – bringing them out only for holiday dinners. Such were the ways of so many women of her generation. I wish she had known Paris.

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You Gotta Be You Identity theft is a fast-growing crime, but you can protect yourself Written by Laura Spinale

Identity theft costs Americans their cash, their reputations, and their ability to get credit. You probably already know this. You may not know that ID theft can cost you a new job (if a credit check is part of the application process), or your freedom (if a bench warrant is issued in your name after your ID thief, oh, knocks over a liquor store). In America’s misty, analog past, proving your identity was typically a matter of flashing your driver’s license or birth certificate. In today’s world of electronic commerce, credit monitoring, and record keeping, proving your identity is much harder. Let’s take a look a closer look at identity theft – its scope, its perpetrators, its effect on American consumers – and what you can do to protect yourself.

tity theft.”) According to the FTC, identity theft cost Americans $15.6 billion in 2006. (Other estimates put that tally closer to $60 billion.) Reporting the thefts, getting your name removed from debts you never incurred, and repairing your credit is never an easy task. Respondents to the FTC survey reported spending anywhere from four to 130 hours in identity-theft rehabilitation.

,3;8,)=78)%0 Broadly stated, identity theft falls into two categories – the type against which you can try to protect yourself, and the type that’s out of your control. Thieves may steal your purse, replete with credit cards and ID, including, heaven forbid, your Social Security card. They can break into your mailbox to steal preapproved credit offers or any papers containing personal information. You may find thieves “Dumpster diving,” stealing bills that you didn’t bother to shred. Or you may lose your identity to someone you think you know: the cash-strapped family member who rifles through your desk drawer at Thanksgiving; the trusted contractor left alone in your home for eight or 10 hours while you’re at the office. Phishing, online or over the phone, is another popular scam. You may already know the drill: You receive an e-mail that looks as though it comes from, for example, your bank. In a typical fraud, the e-mail contains dire warnings about the bank’s plans to close your account if you don’t verify your identity by answering certain questions. You click on a link embedded in the e-mail, and it asks for your Social Security number. Phone scammers may tell you you’ve won a first-class vacation to the Bahamas, and that they just need your Social Security number in order to report the win to the IRS. Then there is the type of identity theft that has traditionally been largely out of your control – institutional theft. This type of ID theft begins when you provide your personal information to a legitimate company or other entity. The

%;-()746)%('6-1) In late 2007, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) published a report covering Americans’ experience of identity theft and identity fraud for the previous year. (Technically, “identity fraud” is a crime in which thieves gain access to consumers’ existing accounts. “Identity theft” describes a situation in which thieves use your personal information to open new accounts. For the purposes of this story, we’ll use the phrase “iden-

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problem arises when the security of that organization is breached.

;,3«7%86-7/# Who’s at risk for identity theft? The simple and accurate answer is anyone with a Social Security number. However, representatives of identity theft-protection companies such as TrustedID™ and LifeLock® interviewed for this article point to children, the elderly, and anyone who sees a doctor as emerging groups now being targeted by identity thieves. Credit decision-makers are currently unable to make seemingly obvious connections. For example, if an identity thief obtained the Social Security number of a 2-year-old and applied for a credit card using that number a run of the Social Security number’s credit would simply indicate that the applicant has no past credit history. It would not indicate that the person applying for a card was, in fact, 2. The situation gets worse. Todd Davis, CEO of LifeLock, said that once an identity thief is able to obtain his first credit account, information appearing on his credit statement is considered “accurate and factual,” further complicating the child’s future credit life. Finally, the 2-year-old girl and her family may not even realize that a problem exists for a full 16 years – until she goes to apply for her first car loan, student loan, or credit card. One would think that the problem could be solved by the girl marching into a credit bureau office with her birth certificate, showing the powers-that-be that she was just a toddler when the first credit line was secured in her name. It’s not. Just ask Lyn Chitow Oakes, chief marketing officer for TrustedID.

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“Proving a child’s identity has been stolen is a complicated process,” she said. “Often there are multiple creditors involved. You have to prove to all of them that you are who you say you are. You have to show that the information wasn’t forged, that it wasn’t, say, a parent using a child’s information. The lenders are going to want to collect from someone.” Finally, college students face particular dangers. Credit card companies aggressively target the college market, often sending mass preapproved offers to students, which can be pilfered by identity thieves hanging around college mailrooms and used to open new accounts under the students’ names. Youth represents one emerging target for identity thieves. Old age represents another. Elderly people are more likely to fall prey to phone phishing scams. In addition, they are less likely to regularly monitor their credit reports or apply for new credit, meaning that fraudulent accounts can be in existence for a long time before the victim realizes it. Medical identity theft is a third emerging threat, according to Chitow Oakes. The large number of the uninsured in this country has led some people to access patients’ basic benefit coverage information, and use that information to cover their own health care costs. In addition, doctors and dentists “aren’t encryption experts,” according to LifeLock’s Davis. Translation: Sometimes, their computer systems can be hacked.

;-8,8,-7-2*361%8-32-2,%2(Ÿ Once ID thieves have your personal information in hand, the list of what they can do with it seems endless. Thieves can open new cards or take out loans in your name, often filling out change-of-address cards at the post office so you never see a bill. Ditto for the loans they may take out in your name. They can create fake checks using your account number. They may clone your debit card. They can open utility accounts in your name – phone, cell phones, electricity, cable. They may use your Social Security number to get a job. They may use your Social Security number and credit record to rent or buy a home, to buy or lease a car. Things can get even hairier when identity thieves jump from the private sector to the public realm. ID thieves can get a driver’s license issued in your name, but bearing the thief’s picture. They may use your Social Security number to get Social Security benefits. They may file fake tax returns under your name. (The goal here is to get your tax refund, and it’s a growing crime.) They may even file for bankruptcy under your name to avoid paying the bills they’ve incurred.

What happens to you? Your credit may be ruined, making it impossible for you to obtain a loan until your name has been cleared. You may be denied entitlements – good luck getting your Social Security benefits if a thief is already receiving those benefits under your Social Security number. You may be denied a new job or even a summer rental, if a non-lender is checking your credit report as a general barometer of your stability. You may be arrested if the thief uses your ID. The list goes on and on.

,3;838)00-*=39«6)%:-'8-1 Unlike other forms of crime, the theft of your identity may take a while to spot. Be on the lookout for bills that don’t arrive in the mail. (This may be an

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indication that an identity thief has filled out a change of address card.) Conversely, closely examine any unexpected credit card bills or statements that arrive at your home. If you’re unexpectedly denied credit, this may also be a sign that your credit has been pilfered. Finally, examine your credit report immediately if you receive calls from collection agencies about an account that is unfamiliar to you.

common tactic consumers employ is regular examination of their credit reports. All three – those compiled by ExperianSM, TransUnion®, and Equifax® – must be examined regularly to make sure that no one has opened an account in your name. However, even the most diligent examination schedule can only alert you to an existing problem. It does nothing to prevent ID theft in the first place. Credit alerts and credit freezes may help keep the wolf at bay. Credit alerts are orders to the three credit bureaus that would-be lenders contact you (usually by cell phone) before issuing credit in your name. This service is typically free, but only lasts about 90 days. You must contact the credit bureaus every three months to reinstitute the alerts. A credit freeze prevents the bureaus from releasing your credit report to any third party. It helps stop identity theft, but it also means that you must contact the credit bureaus to lift the freeze if you want to apply for credit. Fees for instituting and lifting freezes vary by state, but expect to spend roughly $10 for every freeze and lift. The next-generation means of protection are perhaps offered by identity theft-prevention companies, such as LifeLock or TrustedID. Both services are reasonably priced and both insure you against losses of up to $1 million. To get an idea of what these types of services do, take a look at the program offered by LifeLock. After you sign up, LifeLock places fraud alerts on your behalf with all three credit bureaus, and renews them every 90 days. Therefore, any would-be lender must contact you by phone before extending credit. The company scrubs your name from junkmail lists, and opts you out of preapproved credit offers. It provides you with a new copy of your credit reports every year. If your wallet is ever lost or stolen, its identity theft specialists will help you contact every credit card company

4638)'8-2+=3967)0* You can take a number of simple steps today to help protect yourself against identity theft. • Make sure your computer’s anti-spyware and anti-virus programs are up-to-date. • Buy a cross-cut shredder and use it. • Don’t carry your Social Security card in your wallet. Keep it in a safe, along with your pass port, wedding certificate, and other important papers. • Use complicated passwords – not your birth date; the name of your spouse, children or pets; your mother’s maiden name; or your Social Security number. • Get a mailbox that locks. • Never give out your Social Security number to telephone solicitors. • At work, keep your purse or wallet in a secure place. • When you order new checks, don’t have them sent to your home. Pick them up at the bank. • Before disposing of a personal computer, invest in a “wipe” program to overwrite the entire hard drive.

8,)2)<80):)0 As instances of identity theft increase, many consumers want more protection than the basic measures listed above can provide. The most

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ALREADY A VICTIM?

or bank in question, and even help protect the information on your driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s license, Social Security card, and checkbook. And, if your identity is ever stolen, LifeLock workers will do the repair for you â&#x20AC;&#x201C; even if it means hiring lawyers, investigators, and accountants. Davis is so comfortable with the program that he gives out his own Social Security number on LifeLock commercials. You may not want to do that. Still, there is value in the next-step identity protection efforts that companies like LifeLock employ.

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hiding your data doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t work,â&#x20AC;? Davis said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why identity theft is the fastest-growing crime in America. Our goal is to take your information and make it useless to the criminal.â&#x20AC;?

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2010 JANUARY MON

TUE

WED

THU

CALENDAR

FEBRUARY

FRI

SAT

SUN

MON

TUE

WED

THU

MARCH

FRI

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MON

TUE

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APRIL

FRI

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1

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1

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1

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7

MON

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MAY MON

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JUNE

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1

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JULY

THU

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1

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6

MON

TUE

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AUGUST

THU

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1

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1

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SEPTEMBER MON

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OCTOBER

FRI

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1

2

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5

MON

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THU

NOVEMBER

FRI

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MON

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DECEMBER

FRI

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1

2

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1

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5

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7

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1

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Hacienda Pinilla, Guanacaste LOS MALINCHES – A NEW RESIDENTIAL PROJECT IN GUANACASTE

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he sweeping beauty of the Guanacastecan landscape and Hacienda Pinilla’s unfaltering journey toward securing a match between the sophisticated, selective tastes of its clientele and preserving the landscape’s visual and emotional impact has led to a sumptuous new residential project: Los Malinches. Residencial Los Malinches opened in August 2008, with over 23 hectares of lush natural paradise in the Rodera Este area home to 20 unique buildings. Carolina Ramírez, the marketing manager at Hacienda Pinilla, believes that nature lovers looking for peace and quiet, privacy, and quality amenities will find a new home for their hearts at Los Malinches. “Hacienda Pinilla has been known for its exclusiveness, security, and privacy from day one and Los Malinches will follow that grand tradition. When you come home to Los Malinches, you will be coming home to relaxation and luscious comfort,” she said.

%7)0)'8-323*()7-+27 A project such as Los Malinches has to be somewhat ambitious but it also must be undertaken in a stepped approach to ensure quality, uniqueness, and attention to detail. To continue with the excellence that has always been a hallmark of Hacienda Pinilla, Mr. Ronald Zürcher, the renowned architect who designed and oversaw the Four Seasons Hotel project in Costa Rica and is currently captaining the JW Marriot project at Hacienda Pinilla, agreed to lend his considerable talents to our very own Los Malinches. The first fruits of this meticulous effort are four buildings, each housing 23 apartments. Mr. Zürcher is of the belief that the warmth, dignity, and human interaction seen in traditional Guanacastecan home architecture should also be embodied in Los Malinches. He is taking great pains to ensure that there will be spaces for neighbors to get to know each other, all the while safeguarding the privacy so near and dear to our hearts.

This prestigious designer has expressed his intent to ensure that the successive rings of central patios will create a flowing space for residents to meet in a setting reminiscent of the Guanacastecan haciendas of yesteryear. The homes will be grouped together into Colonialstyle communities of five or six units. The selection includes one- or two-story designs, with three or four bedrooms each. They will feature commodious terraces and balconies, master suites, and walk-in closets. The kitchens will be modern with blue-chip appliances and the bedrooms will have Jacuzzi-style tubs. Beautiful internal gardens will pay homage to modern life with outdoor showers. Some villas will also be equipped for people with physical disabilities. Residents of the two-story apartments will be able to relax in an inviting TV room, while staying in visual and sensual contact with the condominium gardens, golf course, and Pinilla’s arresting natural setting from the attached terrace. The per-square-foot price for this first cluster of homes ranges from $232 to $247, which translates into purchases of between $748,000 and $1,174,000. These seductive introductory prices belie the fact that the quality at other projects that are purported to be as exclusive as Hacienda Pinilla and that are, in fact, more expensive, fail to even remotely approach what Pinilla has envisioned and turned into reality. The second cluster prices will increase perhaps 20 percent and a number of enlightened individuals have already expressed their intention to purchase a space in this gorgeous ambience.

+30*+%-2-2+136)%2(136)*%27 History tells us that golf has traditionally been the sport of kings, princes, and aristocrats. Nowadays the number of live tournaments broadcast on the international sports channels would seem to indicate that more and more people aspire to joining the ranks of royalty.

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The Costa Rican Ministry of Tourism, taking heed of that swell in the ranks of serious golfers, has proposed Costa Rica as a golf destination. We at Hacienda Pinilla are not taking that proposal lightly. The Hacienda Pinilla has taken steps to ensure that the course is benevolent to the environment and that not a single tree had to be felled. U.S. architect Mike Young designed the course, and each hole is designed to fall within the swells of the rolling Guanacastecan plains and to seem to be part of the native landscape. A gentle sea breeze wafts across the European-style course and toward the mountains. The course’s leadingedge technology and the professional PGA instructors contrast with the at times eerie calls of the howler monkeys and the flash of emerald green iguanas going about their lives in their natural dry tropical forest habitat. As is its custom and privilege, Hacienda Pinilla went to great lengths when creating the water hazard and the efforts were rewarded when the course received Audubon International’s Certified Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary award. Being eligible for and actually receiving this distinguished award means that the hazard met the highest international environmental standards as they relate to planning, habitat and wildlife management, safer and reduced use of chemicals, water conservation/ quality management, and community outreach and education. For more information, call 011-506-2-6803000. (from the U.S. and Canada) e-mail: info@haciendapinilla.com or visit www.haciendapinilla.com

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Handmade Luxury Mr. Antonio de Matteis, Chief Operating Officer at Kiton, the international sartorial maison, recently answered some questions about the company whose devotees swear its handmade suits are unrivaled.

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iton relies on traditional tailoring to create its luxurious handmade suits. What role, if any, does technology play in Kiton’s operations? There are very few machines at the Kiton factory that are used for refining. Everything you can imagine is made by hand. There are 560 people working here, most of whom work on the main factory floor, where they make the suits – they do trousers, ties, and shirts in a different building. How does Kiton go about finding skilled tailors at a time when some would argue that artisans with such skills are becoming ever more rare? The best tailors in the world are in Naples, and the sartorial tradition is well-known here. At Kiton, we’ve had our own tailoring school for 10 years. Twenty students study tailoring and sewing for two years, then complete a two-year internship in the Kiton factory. In a few years one of those students could become one of the best tailors in the world.

The “Neapolitan look” is synonymous with high style and high quality. What do you feel sets Kiton apart from other Neapolitan fashion houses? We always follow sartorial tradition – our suits are made the same way now as they were made 30 years ago in tailors’ shops, made by hand and with attention to each small detail. Each step to create the final product is the same process used for 30 years in sartorial shops. One of our priorities is using always the highest quality and finest fabrics. Kiton’s reputation rests on its superbly constructed, handmade tailored clothing, but in recent years the Neapolitan international sartorial maison has applied this craftsmanship and attention to other sartorial products, including leather outwear, knitwear, custommade shoes, even denim jeans, and this year launched a sunglasses collection. What other plans does Kiton have in this accessories area? At Kiton, we’re very interested in developing accessories. We are currently searching for a company to purchase or merge with so we can produce large quantities and handle distribution.

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It’s very important to us, though, to work with a company that shares our philosophy and works in the same manner we do: one that prioritizes the quality of materials and pays a very high level of attention to each detail. Kiton now has flagship stores around the world (Paris, London, Milan, New York, Moscow, and Beijing, to name a few). Where is Kiton heading next? We recently opened a location in Venice. Shops in Rome, St. Petersburg, Russia, and Peking (Beijing), China, are planned. We are also opening in Las Vegas at the Mandarin Hotel in 2009. The year 2008 marks the 40th anniversary of the Kiton brand. What do you envision for Kiton 40 years from now? Our first goal in the coming years is to maintain and also further develop the quality of Kiton products. Second, we are aiming to continue to satisfy what our customers ask for and even exceed their expectations. We have top customers and they appreciate high quality. They are very discerning and we will continue to strive to satisfy their high standards.

Lifestyle Lures Luxury-Lovers at The Ritz Carlton When it’s complete, The Residences at The Ritz-Carlton, Toronto will be home to an elite population of luxury-lovers from around the world. Why does this condominium hold such global appeal? “Buyers have responded to its remarkable location, the truly incredible lifestyle it offers, and the strong design team that is bringing the building to life,” says Pat Baker, CEO of Baker Real Estate. The 5-star hotel/residences combination is situated in what Baker calls Toronto’s “black-tie district” – adjacent to the theatre and financial districts. “Imagine living steps from amenities such as Harbourfront, the Air Canada Centre and Rogers Centre, and having two public parks in the vicinity. Plus, owners will have easy access to Toronto’s underground PATH System. It’s an absolutely fabulous location.” Well under construction, the 5-star Ritz-Carlton Hotel Toronto carries a certain cachet. “There is tremendous prestige in living

in a building that bears the Ritz-Carlton name,” Baker says.

Architects. Suites are appointed by acclaimed Babey Moulton

“Buyers know they will experience a legendary level of luxury. In the 23,000 sq. ft. spa, they can indulge in beauty/wellness

Jue & Booth, and buyers can customize layouts through the Ritz-

treatments in the midst of sumptuousness beyond belief. Plus, they can tap into hotel services such as housekeeping, catering and room service.

The building is designed by renowned Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates Architects and Planners, and Page + Steele

Carlton Owner’s Concierge Program. “With suites starting at the 22nd floor and offering views from massive wraparound windows,” Baker says, “every residence is a penthouse. Owners will even save on energy costs through Enwave Energy Corporation and the City of Toronto’s deep-water cooling system. This is one of the best residential opportunities in the world!”

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Mad About the Brand THE RESIDENCES AT THE RITZ-CARLTON, TORONTO OFFERS THE PINNACLE OF PANACHE

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he Residences at The Ritz-Carlton, Toronto offers one of the best luxury residential ownership opportunities in the world. Now well under construction, this highly successful condominium set atop a brand-new Ritz-Carlton Hotel is attracting purchasers from across the globe. This international appeal is a testament to the RitzCarlton brand and the ultimate luxury, design and service it embraces. Residents will revel in the kind of lifestyle that most people only dream of, in a striking building that will stand as a timeless icon on Toronto’s skyline. This building is being developed by The Cadillac Fairview Corporation Limited, Graywood Developments Ltd. and The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company, L.L.C. RitzCarlton is one of the world’s most powerful luxury brands, and is consistently ranked among the highest in the surveys of affluent business and leisure travelers. The company is known for offering all the creature comforts while catering to guests and residents with an unsurpassed level of genuine caring and attention. When it is complete, The Residences will be home to an elite population of discerning owners. “Buyers have responded to its remarkable location and the truly incredible lifestyle it offers,” says Pat Baker, CEO of Baker Real Estate Incorporated, which is handling sales. In 2007, Toronto was ranked among the top “Cities of the Future” and placed first for quality of life, and Standard & Poor’s 2007 Industry Report Card ranked Toronto as one of the 10 economic centres in the world. Immigrants and visitors appreciate the political and economic stability they find in Toronto, as well as extremely competitive condominium pricing compared to other major cities across Canada and the globe. The Residences is situated in what Baker calls Toronto’s “black-tie district” – adjacent to one of North America’s most exciting entertainment areas and Canada’s financial centre. Residents will be able

to walk to fine-dining restaurants, major sporting events, and celebrated theatres. “Imagine living steps from world-class amenities such as Roy Thomson Hall, Harbourfront, Air Canada Centre and Rogers Centre, and having two public parks in the vicinity,” Baker says. “Plus, owners will have easy access to Toronto’s underground PATH System, a 27-kilometre walkway that is the world’s largest underground shopping complex.” To bring The Residences at The Ritz-Carlton, Toronto to life, the developers assembled a notable design team. The building’s exterior is by New Yorkbased Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates Architects and Planners, and Page + Steele Architects of Toronto. Hotel suites and public spaces are by HBA/Hirsch Bedner Associates Design Consultants, a leader in hospitality design. Acclaimed Babey Moulton Jue & Booth designed the amenities spaces and common areas of The Residences and appointed the suites. In addition, buyers can customize layouts through the Ritz-Carlton Owner’s Concierge Program. The striking 53-storey building features a five-storey glass podium that dramatically cantilevers 45 feet over the granite entrance drive, creating a sheltered port cochère entry. The tower will angle out at the 26th floor, and will be wrapped in tinted glass through the use of curtain wall technology, which provides exceptional air, water and wind resistance. The project will also be connected to the Enwave deep-water cooling system, an energy-efficient and cost-saving environmental feature. Suites start at the 22nd floor and offer views from a minimum of 120 feet of floor-to-ceiling wraparound windows, so in essence, every residence is a penthouse. Lavish amenities for The Residences range from exclusive concierge, valet parking and doorman services from a private main-floor lobby, to a fitness area, guest suite, bar/lounge opening onto a terrace, plus games, board and screening rooms.

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In addition, residents can tap into the 5-star Hotel amenities that include a fine-dining restaurant on the mezzanine overlooking the main lobby area, a business centre, two ballrooms, and a 23,000 sq. ft. full-service spa and salon complete with a pool and fitness facilities. Here, residents will be able to indulge in beauty/wellness treatments in one of the single most pampering urban retreats in Canada. The Spa includes 18 treatment rooms, including two V.I.P. couples treatment rooms and 12 manicure and six pedicure stations. In addition, spa clients will be able to access full food services from The Ritz-Carlton Hotel. The building design also encompasses separate front- and back-of-the-house areas so that guests and residents will not see food, laundry and luggage being moved. This lifestyle will satisfy the most cultivated of tastes, especially with owners also having the opportunity to access Hotel housekeeping, catering and room service. Encapsulating relaxed elegance, the suites themselves are graced with sumptuous features including superb appliances by Sub-Zero, Wolf and Miele. The Residences truly offers the supreme combination of preeminent locale, superb architecture, glorious design, grand layouts and decadent amenities for those who expect only the finest that life has to offer. Choices range from pied-à-terres to the top 10,820 sq. ft. penthouse with its 2,000 sq. ft. terrace. Prices range from $1.5 million to over $8 million. The Presentation Centre is located at 55 Simcoe Street in Toronto, and is open Monday to Thursday Noon to 6 p.m.; weekends and holidays Noon to 5 p.m.; closed Fridays. For more information, call 416591-1000 or visit www.theresidencestoronto.com.

SETTLE FOR EVERYTHING.

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I M AG I N E A N E W C I T Y I N S P I R E D B Y T H E G R E AT C I T I E S O F E U R O P E . Rising up in the heart of Markham, Ontario, Canada, a quick jaunt from Toronto, is a place with all of the finest luxuries, in a community that demands the best. The Remington Group, a leading Canadian developer of luxury green communities, is proud to introduce its boldest and most successful initiative to date. D OW N TOW N M A R K H A M : a live, work, and play urbantopia that is unfolding before our eyes, right now. Come and see a future where you can truly S E T T L E F O R E V E RY T H I N G . For more information visit www.downtownmarkham.ca Downtown Markhamâ&#x201E;˘ is developed and built by The Remington Group Inc. and inspired by the best in the world.

LEEDÂŽ Candidate

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New York. Paris. London. Toronto?

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anada’s most populous city is undergoing an architectural and cultural renaissance. With a revitalized museum courtesy of Daniel Libeskind, an art gallery being transformed by Frank Gehry and Donald Trump’s International Hotel and Tower, Toronto is finally coming into its own. This boom is not confined to Toronto proper. Since the city amalgamated with five surrounding municipalities ten years ago, Toronto has become the fifth largest city in North America. The result? Neighbouring suburbs within the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) are now closer than ever to the city and have been the greatest benefactors of this renaissance, with growth exceeding that of Toronto’s. Nowhere is this more evident than at the north end of the city’s edge, in the Town of Markham. Just a 20-minute drive from the downtown core, Markham has seen a remarkable 41 per cent growth in the last decade. With IBM, Sun Microsystems, Motorola, and Honeywell calling Markham home for their Canadian headquarters, the town has been dubbed the “Silicon Valley of the North” and highly educated and skilled professionals now call Markham home. Residents are lured not only by proximity to employment, but by the town’s pleasing mix of urbanity and natural environment. The Remington Group Inc., a GTA developer with 60 years of experience in residential, industrial and commercial real estate, saw Markham’s potential, and planned its most ambitious project to date: Downtown Markham, a $3-billion, 243-acre mixed-use project that is largest LEED-registered development in North America. After ten years of planning in cooperation with municipal and provincial governments, in addition to environmental consultants and advocates, Downtown Markham’s vision is nothing short of a transformation and redefinition of the North American suburban experience. The Remington Group looked to Europe for inspiration when planning Downtown Markham.

The developer found that European neighbourhoods were vibrant, each with a distinct personality and rich combination of retail, residential and commercial life. Remington envisioned a live, work and play lifestyle for Markham. Careful attention was paid to scale. No soaring skyscrapers or six-lane thoroughfares. Instead, Downtown Markham will feature welcoming, humanproportioned buildings. Tree-lined, boulevards lure residents to shop the small, upscale boutiques in cosmopolitan gallerias. Commercial districts will boast high end, luxury and premium retailers traditionally only found in major urban centres, but interspersed with airy, green, public spaces. Large piazzas, similar to those found in Europe, will be natural gathering places for residents to enjoy after enjoying a leisurely day of shopping, or to briefly unwind over the workday lunch hour. Neighbouring the development is the Rouge River, one of the province’s most spectacular eco systems. Stunning, varied, and unobstructed views of the Rouge River can be found in Downtown Markham’s condominiums and town homes. Remington also knew that the lush scenery outside had to be complemented by equally impressive finishes on the inside. With a demanding, highly educated and sophisticated clientele, the developer understood that its future tenants sought Downtown Markham’s European lifestyle because they have actually experienced it. Nexus is the first mixed-use, luxury condominium in Downtown Markham. A pure realization of Downtown Markham’s live, work and play vision, Nexus boasts elegant and sophisticated residential suites, a second floor with soaring 11-foot devoted to work/live spaces, and retail at the ground level. The condominium is a stone’s throw away from Downtown Markham’s main commercial district, Simcoe Promenade, where upscale boutiques and public squares and parks If residents were to venture outside their sanctuarylike suites, they would find Nexus’s amenities to suit

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their discerning tastes. Residents and guests have access to a fully-equipped exercise facility, resistance pool and golf room. The common rooftop terrace offers a pleasing bird’s eye view of Downtown Markham’s sparkling lights and rich greenery. In the south tower, Nexus has two guest suites and party and media rooms for entertaining, with a 24-hour concierge to ensure all residents and guests are taken care of. The business centre and a combined 35,000 square feet of retail space make Nexus truly a place where residents can connect with friends, have their shopping needs met with convenient and easy access to all the entertainment Simcoe Promenade has to offer. The lush Rouge River Valley, pleasurable mixeduse lifestyle and ability to enjoy urbanity in the lush landscape of this suburb has lured sophisticated and discriminating homebuyers from crowded, noisy cities and into Downtown Markham. This project redefines what it means to live just outside the city. It is becoming a city of its own, with visions of New York, London and Paris to guide its growth. There are still units available in Downtown Markham’s newest luxury condominium, Nexus. For more information, visit www.downtownmarkham.ca or call 905-948-9900.

THE CLASSIC REDEFINED. Presenting The St. Regis Residence Club® New York, a new chapter in contemporary luxury at the most desired address in the world, at the corner of 55th and Fifth. Now this enduring icon can be yours for a lifetime, accompanied by the service that is as legendary as it is bespoke and a heritage rich with tradition. A limited collection of studio, one-bedroom and two-bedroom Residences, designed by Sills Huniford, is now available for fractional ownership. Fractional Ownership Residences from $195,000

two east 55th street at fifth avenue, new york, new york 10022

stregisownership.com/ownersclub or call 888 415 3027 St. Regis Residence Club® was rated the top luxury fractional club in the United States in a survey by the Luxury Institute, an independent and objective research organization dedicated to ranking the finer things in life. The Luxury Institute’s impartial surveys are conducted with independent panels weighted to reflect national results, and the results are tabulated by external analytical experts to ensure objectivity. The income criteria utilized represents the top 1.2 million (1.1 percent) of U.S. households, according to the 2004 Federal Reserve Board Survey of Consumer Finances (SCF).

This advertisement is being used for the purpose of soliciting fractional timeshare sales. The complete offering terms are in an offering plan available from the sponsor, St. Regis Residence Club®, New York Inc. (T05-0007). (Listed price range of interests: $195,000 to $1,000,000 as of 6-19-08.) (Prices subject to change.) This offer is void where prohibited by law and/or where registration or licensing requirements have not been met. Equal Housing Opportunity

SRNMKT7671 | 0708 | © 2008 Starwood Vacation Ownership

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Luxury Brand Status Index Ranks St. Regis Residence Club “Most Prestigious.”

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t. Regis Residence Club® was rated the top luxury fractional club in the United States in a survey by the Luxury Institute, an independent research organization known to be the global voice of the affluent high-net consumer. Every year, the Luxury Institute conducts a comprehensive survey polling high net-worth individuals regarding which brand and experiences epitomize luxury and meet their exclusive lifestyle standards. The 2008 Luxury Brand Status Index (LBSI) proclaimed St. Regis Residence Club to be “most prestigious,” ahead of four other leading fractional companies, including The Ritz-Carlton Club, Four Seasons Residence Club, Marriott Grand Residence Club and Fairmont Heritage Place. St. Regis Residence Club was ranked number one overall, with the highest score for self-enhancement, social status and exclusivity. It also scored well above average for all components of the LBSI and both outcome metrics. Those who would recommend St. Regis say it is known for “great service and nice amenities” and has “excellent quality” and is “very upscale.” According to the Luxury Institute CEO Milton Pedraza, “This is the first time that we have rated Private Residence Clubs, known as Luxury Fractional Clubs. We rated only hotel brands with multiple fractional destinations to see how they compared with their competitors. In a transparent world, where consumers define your brand, and you are simply a steward, these surveys provide quantitative metrics, as well as extensive consumer comments, as to why they will, or will not, recommend each brand.”

8,)(-78-2'840)%796)73*1)1&)67,-4 Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc. has reshaped the hotel experience with emphasis on innovation, design and brand differentiation. And with St. Regis Residence Club, part of Starwood Residence Club, you can enjoy an extraordinary lifestyle along with the distinctive privileges of fractional ownership.

With St. Regis Residence Club Membership, you will have the opportunity to travel to each exquisite property in the Starwood Residence NetworkSM. Currently, locations exist at Starwood hotels and resorts in Aspen, New York City and Scottsdale; future locations are under development, including one of South Florida’s most alluring destinations, the exclusive enclave of Bal Harbour, Florida. Membership also entitles you to elite status at the Platinum level of Starwood Preferred Guest®, one of the hotel industry’s highest-rated award redemption programs and the first with no blackout dates.

8,)'0%77-'6)()*-2)( From the moment John Jacob Astor IV opened the doors of his Beaux-Arts masterpiece at the now legendary address of 55th and Fifth Avenue in 1904, The St. Regis® New York has been a landmark of unsurpassed luxury and personalized service. Today, the future of luxury endures with a limited collection of studio and one- and two-bedroom Residences available for ownership within The St. Regis New York. This rare real estate opportunity represents the best of both worlds: first-class hotel amenities coupled with the convenience and comfort of a peerless city home from which you can experience the pinnacle of Manhattan life, including social events, upscale shopping, fine dining and world-renowned theater productions. Each exquisite Residence at The St. Regis New York is designed to exceed your imagination with thoughtful touches and the most intricate of details. The utmost care has been engaged to create an effortless home within one of the world’s most desirable cities. You will find yourself surrounded by a soothing sea of fabrics in hues of silver-pale green and steel blue or refreshing saffron and dusty daffodil yellow. Soaring ten-foot ceilings, silk draperies, modern technologies, fine furnishings, hand-selected artwork and marble bathrooms are signature elements.

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To enhance every stay, you will enjoy the privilege of signature St. Regis Butler service. Attentive and discreet, the Butlers are keenly aware of your unique preferences and are dedicated to bringing every request and whim to brilliant fruition, whether it is serving as the ultimate link to Gotham’s most exclusive venues and privileged experiences or providing an extra cashmere blanket on chilly evenings or French tulips and Casablanca lilies next to the bedside table. No matter where you travel, the Butlers of each St. Regis will flawlessly anticipate every need with consummate style. In all, the St. Regis lifestyle truly embodies the art of living. To learn more about St. Regis Residence Club and the pleasures of ownership at The St. Regis New York, visit stregisownership.com/ownersclub or call toll free 888-415-3027 or or +011 212 835 9100 internationally.

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Privileged Putting in Paradise

Terre Blanche Golf Club is a very private affair – and a dream come true of absolute quality of life, combining calm with beauty, luxury with security, and exclusivity with a love of golf, the type of universe in fact that one would wish to share with only a very privileged few.

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eing a member in Terre Blanche Golf Club is more than a matter of money. It is a privilege and a true one of its kind experience. The word about the breathtaking beauty of this marvelous place has echoed around the world. Since its inception, the legendary Golf Resort Domaine de Terre Blanche has attracted many golf passionates from around the globe. Many of these have made this paradise their homestead on one of the generous plots of land measuring between 2,000 and 10,000 square meters. They enjoy the ultimate in luxury, golfing tuition and well-being. Owning property up there in the wild Provencal landscape in southern France gives automatic access to a membership in one of the most desirable golf communities on the continent: Terre Blanche Golf Club! Nestled in the rolling countryside, the club is home to a perfect setting of two of Europe’s finest golf courses, complete with one of the most comprehensive training and development centers in the world. A Biomecaswing Center – exclusively throughout Europe – and a David Leadbetter Academy will care for the members’ perfect golfing tuition. For the rest of the world, membership in Terre Blanche Golf Club is “by invitation only.” Each new member must be proposed for membership by a current member and approved by the Club’s Admissions Committee.

For more information: Domaine de Terre Blanche 83440 Tourrettes, Var Tél. : +33 (0)4 94 39 98 65 Email : info@terre-blanche.com www.terre-blanche.com

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Bart Walter | sculptor | w w w. ba rt w a l t e r. c o m Please call for a complimentary artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s catalogue | 717-630-2437

Beijing Â&#x2039; London Â&#x2039; Paris Â&#x2039; New York Â&#x2039; Hawaii Â&#x2039; Cabo San Lucas SkyMed GLOBAL Brings Rolls-Royce Owners' Club Peace of Mind Travel

What is SkyMed and who might need this service? SkyMed International, established in 1989 with corporate offices located in Scottsdale, Arizona is the premier emergency medical air evacuation service in North America. Now SkyMed has gone global extending its impeccable service world wide. Anyone who travels globally for business or pleasure, or owns a vacation property, timeshare or an RV would benefit from having a SkyMed Global membership. SkyMed Global service begins for any traveler or their family when they are more than 100 miles from home. Have you ever witnessed or heard of a traveler who needed a helicopter or medically equipped air ambulance? It is a traumatic experience especially in a foreign country with potential language barriers, inadequate medical care and no support at hand. Who do you call? Marilyn Hoenes was faced with a life threatening medical situation in Cancun, Mexico. The Hoeneses were SkyMed members and were flown home to Kalamazoo, Michigan. $IWHUUHFRYHU\0UV+RHQHVVDLG³,ILWZHUHQœWIRU6N\0HG,ZRXOGQRWEHKHUHWRGD\´ SkyMed members can now travel anywhere in the world with the peace of mind of knowing should they suffer a critical illness or injury SkyMed will evacuate them to a hospital that can treat their circumstance and then repatriate them home. The cost of medical air flights can range from as little as $15,000 to upwards of $100,000 or more. SkyMed Global will pay up to a quarter of a million dollars for such a flight if it is medically necessary. Even more important, without SkyMed, air ambulance providers require payment up front. Can anyone put their family at this financial risk?

An Important Message For Rolls-Royce Owners' Club members From Will Klein, President Of SkyMed International ,WJLYHVPHJUHDWSOHDVXUHWRLQWURGXFH6N\0HG*OREDOÂśV6(9(1:RUOGZLGH emergency air evacuation and repatriation membership with I.D. theft resolution services.

Question: What would you do when traveling more than 100 miles from home when a critical injury or illness or I.D. theft occurred? Answer: One call to SkyMed Global and an international team of experts is at your side to reduce and eliminate your trauma Who Pays? SkyMed Global pays Without SkyMed? Up to $100,000 or more At What Cost? For a family - $299 annually valid to May 31, 2009

SkyMed Global services go beyond the repatriation factor. Stranded vehicles are returned. In the unforeseen likelihood of a death while traveling SkyMed will return mortal remains. If a hospitalization is an extended stay SkyMed will transport a family member to WKHVWULFNHQSDWLHQWÂśVEHGVLGH5HWXUQRIGHSHQGHQWFKLOGUHQDQGSHWV$QGWKHUHDUHHYHQ more services. 6N\0HG*OREDOLQFOXGHV,GHQWLW\7KHIW5HVROXWLRQ6HUYLFHV,'WKHIWLVRQHRI$PHULFDÂśV major consumer concerns and has been for several years. A special family rate of $299 per year for the Rolls-Royce Owners' Club members is in effect through May 31, 2009 plus a one time application fee of $60. The normal rate is $360 per year.

Â&#x2039; Medically supervised - evacuation/repatriation home Â&#x2039; Return of mortal remains Â&#x2039; Compassionate travel Â&#x2039; Medical, dental & legal referral Â&#x2039; Emergency translation services Â&#x2039; Identity theft resolution services and much more

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The 5-Star Index

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FIVESTAR FIVESTAR

5-Star Index ENGELS & Vร–LKER.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . THE FAIRMONT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MUSE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SOLARIUM DESIGN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . HANDS OM CREW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . THE ROYAL CANCUN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0AC<DB4D<B 0[cTa\P]]6P[[TaXTb) $$('" $( fffP[cTa\P]]R^\ 0a\hCaP]b_^acPcX^]<dbTd\) &$&'&' $ fffcaP]bRW^^[TdbcXbPa\h \X[<dbTd\<dbTd\Wc\[ 0ac1PbT[<XP\X1TPRW01<1) ! !%!& %$# fffPacQPbT[\XP\XQTPRWR^\ 0ac6P[[Tah^U>]cPaX^) # %(&(%%#' fffPV^]Tc 0bXP]0ac<dbTd\ ^UBP]5aP]RXbR^) # $$' "$ fffPbXP]Pac^aV 0c[Pb6P[[TaXTb) 2WXRPV^8; '#!"&%"$ '$#$!(!( fffPc[PbVP[[TaXTbR^\ 1^]WP\b1dccTaร‚T[Sb) BP]5aP]RXbR^20 # $'% &$ fffQ^]WP\bR^\ 1PacFP[cTaBcdSX^) & &%"%!#"& fffQPacfP[cTaR^\ 1PcPBW^T<dbTd\) # %(&(&&(( fffQPcPbW^T\dbTd\RP

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FIVESTAR FIVESTAR

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FIVESTAR

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