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Emory & Henry College

LYCEUM

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Emory & Henry College

Lyceum Program Note to E&H students

You are admitted free to all events (with the exception of Barter Theatre plays, for which your ticket price is discounted). However, for certain events reserved seating may be required. See note below under Advanced Reserved Seating. You must present your E&H ID both before and after each oncampus event for which you want Lyceum credit. When attending eligible Arts Array films at the Cinemall or plays at the Barter Theatre, retain your ticket stub and present it promptly at the CSA office for credit. Each event listed in this booklet carries one Lyceum credit unless otherwise noted in the event description. Please refer to the Lyceum policy described on the inside back cover.

More questions about Lyceum credit? Call the Centralized Student Assistance Office, 276.944.6105.

Note to E&H employees

You are admitted free to all college events. However, for certain events reserved seating may be required. See note below under Advanced Reserved Seating. Even if reserved seating is not required, you must show your college activity pass at the door for free admission to those events marked with an asterisk* (the events requiring an admission fee from the public). Questions about the events

requiring your activity pass? Call the Office of the Arts Coordinator, 276.944.6846 or 6866.

Note to members of the public

All Lyceum events are open to the broader community. Those marked with an asterisk* on the table of contents on the next page require an admission fee or advanced reserved seating. If there are questions about handicapped accessibility, call 276.944.6810.

Advanced reserved seating

Advanced reserved seating: Recital: Allen Vizzutti and Vince DiMartino, trumpets, Laura Vizzutti, pianist, Feb. 18; E&H Theatre Dept. Performance: “Proof,” Feb. 20-23; Theatre Performance: “A Commedia Romeo and Juliet,” Feb. 25; Recital: Lisa Withers, pianist, March 18; Recital: Bradley Welch, organist, April 1; E&H Theatre Dept. Performance: “Pericles Prince of Tyre,” April 10-13; Concert: Emory & Henry Annual Brass Spectacular: April 24; Concert: “It’s About Time,” E&H Concert Choir and Chamber Singers, April 27.

Tickets are available at the Emory Train Depot two weeks prior to the performance, from noon to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday, and at Van Dyke Center one week prior to each performance from 11:15 a.m. to 1:15 p.m. daily.

Cover: Annie Hogan, Gettysburg, 2013, pigment print, 3” x 19”, 2013 (detail)

For information about our programs visit www.ehc.edu.

Lyceum Events, SPRING 2014 January 16 Mlk Student Forum If You Really Knew Me: Racism, Slavery and My Impact.................... 2 19 Mlk Film “Call + Response”............................................................................... 2 20 Mlk Keynote Address How Many Slaves Work For You? Justin Dillon.................................. 2 20 Mlk Breakout Sessions From Bondage to Freedom: What is Your Slavery Footprint......... 2 20 Mlk Concert Appalachian State University Gospel Choir........................................ 2 21 Panel Discussion The World of Sport from the International Athletes’ Perspective......... 3 25 Film “The Butler”......................................................................................... 3 27 ARTALK Annie Hogan, photographer................................................................ 3 February 3 Lecture Culture of Sport: Is There Really a Value in Athletic Participation?..... 3 4 Lecture My Career with the U.S. Department of State…and Yours................. 3 5 Lecture “Best” in a Biological Context.............................................................. 3 6 Panel Discussion Understanding Alliances: The United States, Syria and Iran............... 4 10 Film & Discussion “Chasing Ice”....................................................................................... 4 11 Lecture Ten Weeks at Quantico....................................................................... 4 17 Artalk Amanda Wojick, recent work............................................................... 4 *18 Recital Allen Vizzutti & Vince DiMartino, trumpets; Laura Vizzutti, pianist...... 4 20-21 Lecture The Mathematics of Proof................................................................... 4 *20-23 Theatre Performance “Proof,” E&H Theatre Department....................................................... 4 20 Lecture Cazuelas and Contact........................................................................ 5 23 Concert Coffey Anderson.................................................................................. 5 24 Lecture The Loves of My Life: Pieces of a Complicated Puzzle...................... 5 *25 Theatre Performance “A Commedia Romeo and Juliet,” Faction of Fools Touring Theatre... 5 27 Poetry Reading Rita Sims Quillen................................................................................. 5 March 3 Lecture Is the First Amendment Too Radical for Comfort?............................... 5 *18 Recital Lisa Withers, pianist............................................................................ 5 19 Lecture The Right Car for the Right Price: You Do the Math........................... 6 20 Lecture Surviving Homophobia: Overcoming Evil Environments..................... 6 24 Lecture Autism Spectrum Disorder.................................................................. 6 27 Convocation Founders Day...................................................................................... 6 31 Artalk Melissa Harshman, printmaker............................................................ 6 April *1 Recital Bradley Welch, organist...................................................................... 6 2 Lecture Saffron Cross...................................................................................... 7 3 Presentation Honors Thesis Showcase.................................................................... 7 4 Presentation Sciencefest, Lesley Owens ................................................................ 7 5 Presentation Sciencefest.......................................................................................... 7 6 Staley Lecture Byron R. McCane, Jesus in Galilee.................................................... 7 7 Staley Lecture Byron R. McCane, Jesus in Jerusalem............................................... 7 8 Educational Forum Ian Jukes, Teaching the Digital Generation......................................... 7 *10-13 Theatre Performance “Pericles Prince of Tyre,” E&H Theatre Department........................... 7 14 LEIDIG Lecture Kwame Dawes, Crafting Poetry.......................................................... 8 14 Poetry Reading Kwame Dawes.................................................................................... 8 *24 Concert Emory & Henry Annual Brass Spectacular.......................................... 8 *27 Concert It’s About Time, E&H Concert Choir and Chamber Singers................ 8 *Barter Theatre Program.................................................................................................................................. 9 Arts Array Program......................................................................................................................................... 10 Lyceum Program.................................................................................................................. Inside Front Cover Lyceum Requirement............................................................................................................Inside Back Cover .*Reservations and/or admission fee are required. See inside front cover.

MLK Day 2014 Celebration Events “From Bondage to Freedom: What is Your Slavery Footprint” is the theme for Emory & Henry’s 2014 Martin Luther King (MLK), Jr. Day Celebration. This year’s events seek to open the eyes of participants to the chilling reality of modern-day slavery and to challenge them to make a difference by changing their consumer choices and by speaking out in favor of a modern anti-slavery movement.

Student Forum If You Really Knew Me: Racism, Slavery and My Impact

speaker and abolitionist. In 2008, he made his directorial debut in the film “Call + Response.” In 2011, he partnered with the U.S. State Department to found the website slaveryfootprint.org. The website and mobile app allows consumers to visualize how their consumption habits are connected to modern-day slavery and provides them with an opportunity to have a conversation with the companies that manufacture the goods they purchase. Last year, President Obama acknowledged Dillon’s organizations’ work in his speech on slavery to the Clinton Global Initiative.

Thursday, January 16, 7:30 p.m. Martin Brock Gymnasium

In the style of the MTV television series “If You Really Knew Me” (which focuses on youth subculture and different cliques in high schools), this event challenges stereotypes and helps unite members of our student body. Participants are assigned to a group where they will be asked to reveal something personal about themselves within the context of the 2014 MLK Day theme.

Breakout Sessions

Monday, January 20, 11:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. Various locations across campus

Film “Call + Response”

Eight break out sessions address topics related to the MLK Day theme. Specific forms of slavery, both historical and modern-day, are addressed. Topics include Biblical slavery, human trafficking, slavery in Ghana, slavery in Washington County, Emory & Henry’s ties to slavery, as well as fair trade food, clothing and electronics. Presenters of the morning sessions include Robert Vejnar, Ed Davis, David St. Clair, Tal Stanley, Todd and Krista Clark, Jimmy Whited and Alise Coen. The afternoon breakout session are led by the keynote speaker, Justin Dillon, who conducts a Q&A session related to the film “Call + Response.”

Sunday, January 19, 7:30 p.m. Wiley Hall Auditorium The kick-off of Emory & Henry College’s MLK Day 2014 Celebration is a screening of Justin Dillon’s film “Call + Response” about the world’s 27 million most terrifying secrets. From the child brothels of Cambodia to the slave brick kilns of rural India, filmmaker Justin Dillon travels the globe to shed light on a simple but shocking fact: there are more slaves in the early 21st century than at any other point in human history. In 2007 alone, slave traders drew a bigger profit than Nike, Google and Starbucks combined. The film features a variety of luminaries including Daryl Hannah, Madeleine Albright, Julia Ormond and Ashley Judd who are doing their best to make the world aware of this deplorable fact.

Concert Appalachian State University Gospel Choir Monday, January 20, 7:30 p.m. Memorial Chapel

Keynote Speaker How Many Slaves Work For You? Justin Dillon

The Appalachian State University Gospel Choir, directed by Keith McCutcheon, presents a program in honor of MLK Day. This dynamic performance includes the composition “Spiritual Medley,” which begins with “Wade in the Water” and concludes with the Gospel selection most sung by Mahalia Jackson, “How I Got Over.” In addition to these pieces, the Jazz Vocal Ensemble sings a medley from Duke Ellington’s sacred concerts including the Ellington hymn “Come Sunday.” Lastly the choir will sing a selection of contemporary gospel songs including selections from Grammy-and Stellar Award-nominated gospel recording artist James Bignon. 

Monday, January 20, 10 a.m. Memorial Chapel

Taken from the title of his award winning website, Justin Dillon will address the question, “How Many Slaves Work for You?” His presentation includes an overview of the lives of the 27 million people world-wide who are forced to produce the things that we use every day. But he won’t stop there. He also discusses what we can do to end slavery in our world. Dillon is an artist, entrepreneur, public

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January

February

Panel Discussion The World of Sport from the International Athletes’ Perspective

Lecture The Culture of Sport: Is There Really a Value in Athletic Participation? Doug Reavis

Linda Gess, E&H Women’s Soccer Coach Jessica Giuggioli, E&H Women’s Tennis Coach Robert Richardson, E&H Men’s Soccer Coach

Monday, February 3, 7:30 p.m. Wiley Hall Auditorium

Tuesday, January 21, 7:30 p.m. Wiley Hall Auditorium

Doug Reavis is a professional speaker and author of the book, Silent Strength. He is a 1990 graduate of Emory & Henry College and a former middle and high school teacher. He was All-ODAC First Team in 1988-89, All-American Second Team in 1988, and All-American First Team in 1989.

How is sport different in the rest of the world than in the U.S.? Panelist speak of experiences in participating in team and individual sport (soccer and tennis) from both male and female experiences and opportunities.

Saturday, January 25, 8:30 p.m. Wiley Hall Auditorium

Lecture My Career with the U.S. Department of State…and Yours Julie A. Ruterbories

The Emory Activities Board presents a viewing of Lee Daniels’ film “The Butler,” which tells the story of a White House butler who served eight American presidents over three decades. The film traces the dramatic changes that swept American society during this time, from the civil rights movement to Vietnam and beyond, and how those changes affected one man’s life and family. A talkback follows focusing on how Black Americans living during the Jim Crow era are portrayed in today’s films.

Julie Ruterbories is a senior foreign service officer with 21 years of experience in Europe, Central Asia, the Caucasus and Washington, D.C. During these tours she advanced foreign policy interests across a broad range of issues, including democratization and human rights, trade and investment, and immigration. She shares her personal experience working for the U.S. Department of State and highlights similar opportunities for E&H graduates.

Film “The Butler”

Tuesday, February 4, 7:30 p.m. Van Dyke Center, Board of Visitors Lounge

Artalk Half Seen, Half Told Annie Hogan, photographer

Groseclose Lecture in Biology “Best” in a Biological Context: Optimization across the Biological Hierarchy Louis J. Gross

Monday, January 27, 7:30 p.m. Van Dyke Center, Board of Visitors Lounge

Wednesday, February 5, 7:30 p.m. McGlothlin-Street Hall, Room 102

Annie Hogan pushes the possibilities of photography in her haunting images that are a sensitive exploration of the politics of the South. She draws material from civil war re-enactments, slave cabins and plantation houses. Her photographs address the subject matter with highly evolved aestheticism, resulting in lush, poetic work. Her research includes how architecture that is used to protect and imprison is used to reinforce and maintain power. Annie Hogan is a native of Australia and visiting assistant professor of photography at Rutgers University. This Artalk is in conjunction with an exhibition of Hogan’s photography in The 1912 Gallery, Tuesday, Jan. 14 through Saturday, Feb. 8, 2014, Noon-5 p.m., Tuesday-Saturdays. The Gallery opens at 6:30 prior to the Artalk and following for a reception with the artist.

Many central concepts in biology involve notions of what is “better” or “best” in the context of evolution, physiology and behavior. Similarly, in many applied areas of the life sciences, we are concerned with developing a “best” method to carry out drug therapies, resource harvesting, pest management and epidemic control. This event addresses what it might mean to be “best” for several problems at different levels of the biological hierarchy.

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Panel Discussion Understanding Alliances: The United States, Syria and Iran

formalism come across as both whimsical and intelligent, giving a refreshing twist to art for art’s sake, and an interesting spin to by now repeatedly examined questions such as what to paint and how to paint. This lecture is in conjunction with Wojick’s exhibition in The 1912 Gallery, Tuesday, Feb. 18 through Saturday, March 22, 2014, Noon- 5 p.m., Tuesday-Sunday, except March 11-15. The Gallery opens at 6:30 prior to the Artalk and following for a reception with the artist.

Thursday, February 6, 4:30 p.m. McGlothlin-Street Hall, Room 102

In this panel discussion, three E&H faculty and one advanced undergraduate student share their research and insights to take audience members beyond the headlines in understanding the historical and contemporary factors underpinning relations among the United States, Syria and Iran. Audience members are invited to participate in a Q&A session with the panelists. Panelists include Dr. Alise Coen, assistant professor of political science and international studies; Dr. Samir Saliba, professor of political science and international studies; Dr. Matthew Shannon, assistant professor of history; and Ms. Rachael Sharp, E&H Class of 2016.

*Recital Allen Vizzutti and Vince DiMartino, trumpets; Laura Vizzutti, pianist Tuesday, February 18, 7:30 p.m. Memorial Chapel

These performers are among the leading trumpet players in the country, having played and taught from coast to coast. In addition to solos and trios with pianist Laura Vizzutti, the three play half the program with a group of local music educators, performers and Emory & Henry students in a big band format. Besides the concert, they work with Emory & Henry brass students, and have a clinic with Washington County high school band members during their residency. Dr. Matthew Frederick, director of instrumental programs at Emory & Henry says, “This program promises to be an unforgettable musical opportunity for all experiencing their incredible artistry!”

Film and Discussion “Chasing Ice” Laura Hainsworth

Monday, February 10, 7:30 p.m. McGlothlin-Street Hall, Room 102 “Chasing Ice” depicts a photographer’s mission to document the retreat of glaciers across the globe. This film highlights the effects of climate change and challenges the audience to consider our current carbon-powered system. A discussion follows the showing.

Lecture The Mathematics of Proof John Iskra and Teena Carroll

Lecture Ten Weeks at Quantico: The Study of Crime, Society and Human Behavior Thomas Foster

Thursday, February 20 and Friday, February 21, 6:30 p.m. Van Dyke Center, Board of Visitors Lounge E&H mathematics professors discuss the nature of mathematical proof as it relates to David Auburn’s play, “Proof,” which is being performed by the E&H Theatre Department Feb. 20-23 (see below). Background on prime numbers, which is a major plot element in the play, is presented so that the mathematics will be accessible to all.

Tuesday, February 11, 4:30 p.m. McGlothlin-Street Hall, Room 102

Special Agent Foster graduated from the 253rd session of the FBI’s National Academy July 2013. In this presentation, he describes his training, including new evidence about the social and behavioral factors that influence crime and its prevention.

*Theatre Performance “Proof” E&H Theatre Department

Artalk Amanda Wojick, recent work

Thursday-Saturday, February 20-22, 7:30 p.m. Sunday, February 23, 3 p.m. Studio Theatre

Monday, February 17, 7:30 p.m. Van Dyke Center, Board of Visitors Lounge Amanda Wojick creates work with a modest economy of means. She uses surprising, inexpensive materials such as band aids, rubber bands and styrofoam in her sculptural paintings. Her work can be seen almost as an antidote to the pompous heyday of abstract expressionism. She is anchored in the tradition of abstraction but conveys a subtle sensitivity. Her exercises in arbitrary

This 2000 play by David Auburn is a riveting tale that explores the worlds of mathematics and mental illness through the grief of the daughter of a brilliant and recently deceased mathematician. She seeks to come to grips with her possible inheritance from her father: his insanity. All is complicated by the arrival of a former student of her father’s and her own estranged sister. This play opened off4

and promote the Renaissance theatre style of Commedia dell’Arte, by both representing its heritage and exploring its future. Commedia dell’Arte began in the early 16th century and quickly spread throughout Europe, creating a lasting influence on Shakespeare, Moliere, opera, vaudeville, contemporary musical theatre, and improv comedy. Through the lens of Commedia’s physical comedy, masks and recognizable theatre types, the audience experiences Shakespeare’s greatest love story, “Romeo and Juliet.”

Broadway but in a few months transferred to the Broadway theatre, and later won both a Tony for best play and a Pulitzer Prize for drama. Theatre department faculty member Dr. Kelly J.G. Bremner directs this production.

Lecture Cazuelas and Contact: An Introduction to an Important 17th Century Qualla Town on the Nolichucky River Nathan Shreve

Poetry Reading Rita Sims Quillen

Thursday, February 20, 7:30 p.m. McGlothlin-Street Hall, Room 102

Thursday, February 27, 7:30 p.m. Van Dyke Center, Board of Visitors Lounge

Emory & Henry graduate Nathan Shreve presents research on a number of Cherokee archaeological sites in the upper East Tennessee region in which he has participated. Use of GIS technologies in archaeological research are a particular focus.

Poet, novelist, workshop leader and teacher, Rita Sims Quillen, reads from her forthcoming works: a novel entitled Hiding Ezra (2014) and a chapbook of poems entitled Something Solid To Anchor To (2014). Quillen’s previous poetry collections include October Dusk (1987), Counting the Sums (1995), and Her Secret Dream (2007). A book signing follows the reading.

Concert Coffey Anderson

Sunday, February 23, 7:30 p.m. Wiley Hall Auditorium

March

Coffey Anderson’s music can’t be pigeonholed into just one category – whether it be pop, country, Christian or folk. He says, “My music is for anyone who has ears.” His mission is to take inspirational music that you might hear on Sunday and turn it into something you want to listen to all week. This is Coffey’s third visit to Emory & Henry.

Lecture KKK Marches, Flag Burning, and Revealing Government Secrets: Is the First Amendment Too Radical for Comfort? Teresa Keller

Lecture The Loves of My Life: Pieces of a Complicated Puzzle Brett Webb-Mitchell

Monday, March 3, 7:30 p.m. Van Dyke Center, Board of Visitors Lounge Even though we say we believe in free speech, we often find ourselves feeling uncomfortable with our rights to free speech and press. In this 30-minute video presentation, area television anchors join with E&H Mass Communications Department faculty, staff and an Emmy-Award-winning alumnus to present important Constitutional principles in a captivating and entertaining way. Audience members confront the radical freedoms of the First Amendment in the 30-minute video and in the following short discussion period.

Monday, February 24, 7:30 p.m. Van Dyke Center, Board of Visitors Lounge Dr. Webb-Mitchell discusses the loves of his life – God, the Presbyterian Church (PCUSA), his family and his dog – in the context of being a person of faith and the LGBTQ community. Participants are invited to take part in a conversation about how the different facets of our lives fit together to make us the persons that God created us to be, especially when those pieces don’t seem to fit together.

Recital Lisa Withers, pianist

*Theatre Performance “A Commedia Romeo and Juliet” Faction of Fools Theatre Company

Tuesday, March 18, 7:30 p.m. Memorial Chapel

Text by William Shakespeare Adapted by Paul Reisman and Matthew R. Wilson Directed by Matthew R. Wilson Tuesday, February 25, 7:30 p.m. Wiley Hall Auditorium

Dr. Withers plays a recital of personal favorites: Franz Schubert’s Sonata in A Major, D. 959 and Maurice Ravel’s Sonatina, along with several tangos by Astor Piazzolla. Withers has been teaching and performing professionally for more than twenty years. Since joining the faculty at Emory & Henry in 2002, she has performed solo and collaborative recitals and master classes

The goal of Faction of Fools Theatre Company, based in Washington, D.C., is to preserve 5

throughout the Southeastern and Midwestern United States. A 2010 recipient of the Jean F. Ritchie Fellowship in Fine and Performing Arts from the Appalachian College Association, she holds a doctor of musical arts degree in piano performance from West Virginia University and a master of music degree in piano performance and pedagogy from the University of Michigan.

testimonies from those who have a connection to this disorder. The clinical perspective includes information about the symptoms of ASD, its prevalence, associated features, potential causes, and treatment options. Personal testimonies from relatives of individuals with ASD are presented.

Convocation Founders Day

Lecture The Right Car for the Right Price: You Do the Math Anthony Boyd

Thursday, March 27, 11:15 a.m. Memorial Chapel The 177th anniversary of the founding of Emory & Henry College is celebrated. Founders Day citations are presented by the College to honor community members and organizations and alumni awards are given.

Wednesday, March 19, 7:30 p.m. Wiley Hall Auditorium

Purchasing a car can be a very stressful and potentially costly process unless you know what you are doing. There are many ways that a dealership can profit from you beyond the price of the new vehicle. Price negotiation, trade in values, finance rates, extended warranties and other finance contracts are just a few ways that a dealership can earn a profit at your cost. Our speaker explains how to know you are getting the best deal possible for the car of your choice.

Artalk Melissa Harshman, printmaker

Monday, March 31, 7:30 p.m. Van Dyke Center, Board of Visitors Lounge The Southern Graphics Council International 2012-2015 Traveling Exhibition represents the latest currents in contemporary printmaking. From traditional methods to prints made into sculptural pieces in unexpected materials, the artists explore a myriad of techniques and themes. The featured speaker related to this exhibition is Melissa Harshman whose work is included in the collection on view. She manipulates a storehouse of popular, recognizable images digitally, altering their meaning and creating new juxtapositions, and finally adapts her Pandora’s box of imagery into traditionally crafted prints. She is associate professor of art in the Lamar Dodd School of Art at the University of Georgia, where she serves as area chair in printmaking and director of the FirstYear Odyssey Program. The exhibition opens in The 1912 Gallery on Tuesday, April 1 and continues through Wednesday, April 30 except for March 18. The gallery opens at 6:30 p.m. and following for a reception with the artist.

Lecture Surviving Homophobia: Overcoming Evil Environments Claudia Card

Thursday, March 20, 7:30 p.m. Van Dyke Center, Board of Visitors Lounge In 1988, Claudia Brenner was hiking the Appalachian Trail with her lover, Rebecca Wight, when Stephen Roy Carr stalked and shot both women. Brenner physically survived the attack, but did she “survive” homophobia? What is homophobia? Are words or crimes motivated by homophobia worse than those motivated by other sources of hate? What does it mean to survive homophobia, and what does that survival cost? Could complicity in maintaining homophobic environments count as surviving those environments? Dr. Card, Emma Goldman Professor of Philosophy at the University of WisconsinMadison, addresses these and other important issues.

April *Recital Bradley Welch, organist Tuesday, April 1, 7:30 p.m. Memorial Chapel

Lecture Autism Spectrum Disorder: Professional and Personal Perspectives R. Christopher Qualls

This is concert organist Dr. Welch’s fifth recital on the Dyer Organ in Memorial Chapel and with each performance he has expanded his popularity in this region. He endears himself to his audience by playing with great energy, flawless technique and expressiveness. Welch currently serves as Artist-in-Residence at Highland Park United Methodist Church in Dallas, Texas. He graduated magna cum laude in organ performance and won the Dean’s Award for Outstanding Performance

Monday, March 24, 7:30 p.m. McGlothlin-Street Hall, Room 102

Dr. Qualls provides an overview of the features of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) from a clinical perspective while incorporating personal

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from Baylor University. He completed a master of organ performance as well as a doctorate in organ performance from Yale University.

research in the fields of chemistry, biology, physics, math, engineering, psychology and health sciences.

Staley Lectures Byron R. McCane Jesus in Galilee

Lecture Saffron Cross: The Unlikely Story of How a Christian Minister Married a Hindu Monk Rev. Dana Trent and Fred Eaker

Sunday, April 6, 7:30 p.m. Van Dyke Center, Board of Visitors Lounge

Jesus in Jerusalem

Wednesday, April 2, 7:30 p.m. Van Dyke Center, Board of Visitors Lounge

Monday, April 7, 7:30 p.m. Van Dyke Center, Board of Visitors Lounge

Rev. Trent and Mr. Eaker discuss Rev. Trent’s book Saffron Cross, a memoir about the sometimes daunting but always inspiring path of their interfaith (Christian and Hindu) relationship. Theirs is a typical girl-meets-boy story with a theological twist.

Archaeology can offer surprising insights into the historical Jesus. Dr. McCane’s first lecture focuses on the villages and towns of the Lower Galilee and the typical patterns of life there. His second lecture focuses on the events leading to Jesus’ execution, especially the event in the Temple. McCane is internationally recognized for his work in New Testament and was the featured archaeologist in the Discovery Channel’s production “Who is Jesus?”

Presentations Honors Thesis Showcase

Thursday, April 3, 6:30 p.m. Van Dyke Center, Board of Visitors Lounge Students who have completed or who are nearing completion of their honors thesis research present their work at the Spring Honors Thesis Showcase, featuring students from a wide range of disciplines. Honors thesis research is a major commitment. These students have been working on their projects for at least two semesters. They are responsible for crafting a work that would be considered publishable in their field, and in order to complete the process, they must make a public presentation of the work.

B.G. Raines Education Forum Teaching the Digital Generation Ian Jukes

Tuesday, April 8, 5:30 p.m. Southwest Virginia Higher Education Center, Grand Ballroom, Abingdon, Virginia The 26th Annual B.G. Raines Education Forum consists of afternoon workshops by McGlothlin Award of Teaching Excellence teachers, research poster sessions by Emory & Henry teacher preparation students and a keynote address by Ian Jukes, a founding partner of the 21st Century Fluency Project.

Lecture Sciencefest Lesley Owens

*Theatre Performance “Pericles Prince of Tyre” E&H Theatre Department

Friday, April 4, 7:30 p.m. McGlothlin-Street Hall, Room 302 Lesley S. Owens is a graduate of the Department of Chemistry at Virginia Tech and earned a bachelor of science degree in chemistry from Emory & Henry in 2004. While at Emory & Henry, Owens participated in the Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program at Virginia Tech during the summer of 2004, focusing on the speciation of chromium ions in groundwater sources using Supported Liquid Membranes (SLMs). She was supported by a Cunningham Fellowship and is currently employed in the Blacksburg area.

Thursday-Saturday, April 10-12, 7:30 p.m. Sunday, April 13, 4 p.m. Studio Theatre In this late romantic play by William Shakespeare, the young prince Pericles is presented with an impossible choice of solving a riddle, the solution of which would accuse the King of incest. The hero flees across the countryside while avoiding the King’s assassins and murderous pirates, and winning the hand of the young virtuous woman he loves. Theatre Department faculty member Andrew Blasenak directs this production.

Presentations Sciencefest E&H Students

Saturday, April 5, 9 a.m. McGlothlin-Street Hall, Room 302 Current Emory & Henry students present original

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Leidig Poetry Lecture Crafting Poetry Kwame Dawes

Concert Emory & Henry Annual Brass Spectacular

In this session, poet Kwame Dawes, who presents a formal reading in the evening, talks about the process of crafting poetry and entertains questions by students. Born in Ghana and raised in Jamaica, Dawes has lived in the United States for a number of years. His most recent poetry collections include Duppy Conqueror (2013); Wheels (2011); Back of Mount Peace (2009); Hope’s Hospice (2009); and Impossible Flying (2007). Progeny of Air (1994) was the winner of the Forward Poetry Prize for Best First Collection in the UK. A man of many talents, Dawes is the author of a best-selling book on Bob Marley’s lyrics, a filmmaker, a singer in a reggae band, a novelist, and a playwright. In 2009, Dawes won an Emmy for LiveHopeLove.com, a project on AIDS in Jamaica. Dawes is currently the Glenna Luschei Editor of Prairie Schooner at the University of Nebraska, where he is a Chancellor’s Professor of English, a faculty member of Cave Canem, and a teacher in the Pacific MFA Program in Oregon.

This popular event features all brass ensembles at Emory & Henry College, and celebrates a culmination of a semester of collaboration between these students. They are conducted by Dr. Matthew Frederick, associate professor in the E&H music department, chair of the Division of Visual and Performing Arts and director of instrumental music at the College.

Monday, April 14, 3 p.m. The Calliopean Room, Byars Hall

Thursday, April 24, 7:30 p.m. Memorial Chapel

Concert It’s About Time E&H Concert Choir and Chamber Singers Sunday, April 27, 3 p.m. Memorial Chapel

The E&H Concert Choir and Chamber Singers present beautiful and captivating music in this concert focusing on time through the works of John Corigliano, Craig Hella Johnson, Charles Villiers Stanford, Josef Rheinberger, Johannes Brahms, Stephen Hatfield, William Dawson, Moses Hogan and Robert Shaw. Dr. Robert Matthews, assistant professor of music and director of vocal studies, directs these ensembles. Robert J. Greene, Jr. collaborates at the organ and piano.

Leidig Poetry Reading Kwame Dawes

Monday, April 14, 7:30 p.m. Wiley Hall Auditorium In this session, poet Kwame Dawes presents a reading of his poetry. A reception and book signing follow.

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Barter Theatre Program Emory & Henry College has an arrangement with the Barter Theatre in Abingdon whereby students may attend the following Main Stage and Stage II plays for a discounted price of $16, upon showing the E&H student ID. These plays carry Lyceum credit. When attending a play at the Barter Theatre for Lyceum credit, you must arrive 15 minutes before show time. Retain your ticket stub and present it promptly at the CSA office for Lyceum credit. Descriptions are found below. No more than two Lyceum-credit events in any semester may be Barter plays. herself to three different men. How shall she decide? Well, you won’t know until the final moment in this hilarious romp of misadventures and loves lost and won. A new romantic comedy from Robin Hawdon, the writer of “Don’t Dress for Dinner” and “Perfect Wedding.”

“Don’t Cry for Me, Margaret Mitchell”

Begins January 31 Stage II, Barter Theatre, Abingdon, Virginia Hilarious, irreverent and mostly true. It’s 1939, and David O. Selznick has already begun filming Gone With the Wind, but he needs a new script. There’s only one writer up to the task, the legendary Ben Hecht. The only problem is, Hecht has never read the book! Selznick locks himself, Hecht and director Victor Fleming in his office, with only bananas and peanuts to eat. Their mission: write a new script in exactly one week.

“The Dryad: an Appalachian Tale” Begins March 8 Stage II, Barter Theatre, Abingdon, Virginia

A world premiere and winner of Barter’s 2013 Appalachian Festival of Plays and Playwrights dry*ad (Greek) a tree nymph, spirit of the forest Lena has returned to the family homestead after leaving her no-good husband only to find hard times. To make matters worse, the chestnut trees that locals have always depended on are dying, one by one. When a mysterious young girl appears, their lives are changed forever. But where did she come from, and what does she want? By Carol Wright Krause.

“Man of La Mancha”

Begins February 13 Main Stage, Barter Theatre, Abingdon, Virginia Dream the Impossible Dream and be inspired by this glorious story of hope in the face of almost insurmountable odds. A funny, moving musical featuring Cervantes’ unforgettable characters: the knight errant Don Quixote, his lovable sidekick Sancho Panza and the beautiful Aldonza, who becomes his inspiration: Dulcinea. Book by Dale Wasserman, lyrics by Joe Darion and music by Mitch Leigh.

“Educating Rita”

Begins May 9 Stage II, Barter Theatre, Abingdon, Virginia A funny, thoughtful play that explores the relationship between a jaded English professor and his ambitious and feisty young student as they explore the value of education. In the end, who is the teacher and who is the student, and what life lessons are learned? This play was made famous by the movie starring Michael Caine. By Willy Russell.

“I Do, I Do, I Do”

Begins February 27 Main Stage, Barter Theatre, Abingdon, Virginia Diana has it all. She is beautiful, intelligent and sweet-natured. There’s just one problem: it’s one week before her wedding and she has promised

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Arts Array Film Program Emory & Henry College, Virginia Highlands Community College, King University, the Southwest Virginia Higher Education Center and the Abingdon Cinemall sponsor art and foreign films, shown at the Cinemall Mondays and Tuesdays at 4 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. The films are free of charge with ID to students and employees of sponsoring institutions. When attending an eligible Arts Array film at the Cinemall, retain your ticket stub and present it promptly at the CSA office for Lyceum credit. Each of these films described below carry Lyceum credit. However, no more than two Lyceum-credit events in any semester may be Arts Array films. There will be a $2.75 surcharge for 3-D movies.

“Parkland”

“Last Love”

Parkland weaves together the perspectives of a handful of ordinary individuals suddenly thrust into the extraordinary circumstances surrounding the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

Two-time Oscar-winner Michael Caine stars with Clémence Poésy, Justin Kirk and Gillian Anderson in this richly nuanced, emotion-charged story of lost souls, newfound hope and last love.

“Salinger”

“Out of the Furnace”

Over the course of his lifetime, iconic American story writer J.D. Salinger (1919-2010) developed a complicated reputation on both personal and professional levels. When his first major novel, 1951’s The Catcher in the Rye, grew into a national phenomenon, some were intent on seeking Salinger out.

Russell and his younger brother Rodney live in the economically-depressed Rust Belt, and have always dreamed of escaping and finding better lives. But when a cruel twist of fate lands Russell in prison, his brother is lured into one of the most violent and ruthless crime rings in the Northeast.

Monday & Tuesday, Feb. 10-11: 4 & 7:30 p.m. The Cinemall: Abingdon, Virginia

Monday & Tuesday, Jan. 13-14: 4 & 7:30 p.m. The Cinemall: Abingdon, Virginia

Monday & Tuesday, Feb. 24-25: 4 & 7:30 p.m. The Cinemall: Abingdon, Virginia

Monday & Tuesday, Jan. 20-21: 4 & 7:30 p.m. The Cinemall: Abingdon, Virginia

“Dallas Buyers Club”

“Romeo and Juliet”

Monday & Tuesday, Mar. 3 & 4: 4 & 7:30 p.m. The Cinemall: Abingdon, Virginia

Monday & Tuesday, Jan. 27-28: 4 & 7:30 p.m. The Cinemall: Abingdon, Virginia William Shakespeare’s timeless tale of love and tragedy gets a 21st century makeover in this update, starring Douglas Booth as Romeo and Hailee Steinfeld as Juliet, directed by Carlo Carlei and adapted by Downton Abbey’s Julian Fellowes.

Ron Woodroof likes living his life hard: heavy smoking, drinking, using cocaine and having sex. He’s also a stereotypical redneck with racist and homophobic ideology. While in the hospital due to a work-related injury, Ron learns that he is HIVpositive.

“Fruitvale Station”

“The Artist and the Model”

Monday & Tuesday, Feb. 3-4: 4 & 7:30 p.m. The Cinemall: Abingdon, Virginia

Monday & Tuesday, Mar. 10 & 11: 4 & 7:30 p.m. The Cinemall: Abingdon, Virginia

This is the true story of Oscar Grant, a 22-year-old Bay Area resident, who gets a head start on his New Year’s resolutions: being a better son, partner and father. He starts out well, but soon realizes that change is not going to come easy.

Marc Cros, an elderly sculptor, lives with his wife Léa in the south of France, safe from the War that rages. He seems to have reached the end of his life and of his art. One day, Léa gives shelter to a beautiful young Spanish political refugee named Mercè who inspires him and he embarks on this last artistic adventure.

“As I Lay Dying”

Monday & Tuesday, Feb. 10-11: 4 & 7:30 p.m. The Cinemall: Abingdon, Virginia

“Haute Cuisine”

Adapted from the 1930 classic American novel by William Faulkner, this story chronicles the Bundren family as they traverse the Mississippi countryside to carry the body of their deceased mother Addie to her hometown for burial.

Hortense Laborie is a celebrated chef living in the Perigord region. To her great surprise, the President of the Republic appoints her as his

Monday & Tuesday, Mar. 17 & 18: 4 & 7:30 p.m. The Cinemall: Abingdon, Virginia

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“Philomena”

personal cook. Hortense puts her heart and soul into producing both a stylish and authentic cuisine despite the jealousies she arouses among the other chefs.

Monday & Tuesday, Apr. 7 & 8: 4 & 7:30 p.m. The Cinemall: Abingdon, Virginia Based on the 2009 investigative book by BBC correspondent Martin Sixsmith, The Lost Child of Philomena Lee, the film focuses on the efforts of Lee (Judy Dench), an Irish-Catholic woman, to find her son, who was conceived out of wedlock and given away for adoption in the United States.

“Diana”

Monday & Tuesday, Mar. 24 & 25: 4 & 7:30 p.m. The Cinemall: Abingdon, Virginia This film is a compelling portrait of Diana, Princess of Wales, during the final two years of her life. The film stars British-born Academy Awardnominated actress Naomi Watts (“21 Grams,” “The Impossible”), in the leading role of the eponymous and iconic princess.

“One Chance”

Monday & Tuesday, Apr. 14 & 15: 4 & 7:30 p.m. The Cinemall: Abingdon, Virginia From the director of “The Devil Wears Prada,” “One Chance” is the remarkable and inspirational true story of Paul Potts, a shy, bullied shop assistant by day and an amateur opera singer by night. Paul became an instant YouTube phenomenon and went on to win “Britain’s Got Talent” and the hearts of millions with his enthralling musical performances.

“American Hustle”

Monday & Tuesday, Mar. 31 & Apr. 1: 4 & 7:30 p.m. The Cinemall: Abingdon, Virginia A fictional film set in the alluring world of one of the most stunning scandals to rock our nation, “American Hustle” tells the story of brilliant con man Irving Rosenfeld, who along with his equally cunning British partner Sydney Prosser is forced to work for a wild FBI agent Richie DiMaso. The film features Christian Bale, Amy Adams and Jennifer Lawrence.

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Justin Dillon MLK Keynote Address: Jan. 20

Annie Hogan, photographer Artalk & Exhibition: Jan. 27

Amanda Wojick, recent work Artalk & Exhibition: Feb. 17

Allen Vizzutti and Vince DiMartino, trumpets; Laura Vizzutti, pianist Recital: Feb. 18

Coffee Anderson Concert: Feb. 23

“A Commedia Romeo and Juliet� Theatre Performance: Feb. 25

Rita Sims Quillen Poetry Reading: Feb. 27

Melissa Harshman, printmaker Artalk: March 26

Bradley Welch, organist Concert: April 16

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Lyceum Requirements The Lyceum Program is an Emory & Henry College academic requirement for graduation. Accordingly, you should view Lyceum events much as you would a class obligation.

Appropriate Behavior You must behave respectfully during any Lyceum you attend. You are expected to be seated no less than five minutes before an event is scheduled to begin. Avoid extremely casual attire when attending Lyceum events—especially those held in the Chapel. Any faculty or staff member may dismiss you from a Lyceum event for any behavior that distracts you or others from full participation in the event, including sleeping, talking, reading, doing homework, texting, and generally any form of rude behavior. If you seek credit for an Artalk, you are expected also to view the 1912 Gallery exhibit to which the Artalk relates.

Documenting attendance You must have your ID card with you and present it upon entering and leaving each on-campus event. (You are responsible for making sure that your ID card is properly bar-coded and for consulting campus security if recoding is needed.) If you arrive at an event late or leave it early, you will not receive credit for attendance. In the case of Barter plays and Arts Array films that are Lyceum-eligible (as indicated in this booklet), you must retain the ticket stub and present it to the CSA office for credit within a week of the event in question. No more than two credited events in any semester may be films, and no more than two may be Barter plays. You may not receive more than one credit for a multiple-performance event (e.g., a play), even if you attend several performances.

Calculating the requirement As a student enrolled in an undergraduate degree program at Emory & Henry, you are generally required to register attendance at five Lyceum events per semester, exclusive of summer school. If you extend your academic program beyond four years, you are not required to attend more than 35 Lyceums. If in a particular semester your enrollment falls below 12 credit hours (such that you are a part-time student), you are required to attend one event for each course in which you are enrolled that semester, up to five. If you are enrolled in student teaching, your Lyceum requirement for that semester is two events. If you accumulate more than five credits in a fall semester, you may carry up to five of the excess credits over to the following semester, but no credits may be carried over beyond a spring semester.

Seniors If you do not complete your Lyceum requirement, you will not be awarded a degree, even if you have met all other graduation requirements. You are exempt from any Lyceum obligation during your final semester before graduation—but only if you have already completed your Lyceum obligation fully. If you enter your final semester with a Lyceum deficit, you are advised to remedy it by attending as many Lyceums as needed during the first half of the final semester. Do not enter the final weeks before commencement with a Lyceum deficit.

Transfer Students Your total Lyceum requirement is tied not to the number of credits you have transferred in; rather it is tied to the number of semesters you are enrolled here. If there is a reduction in the usual 35-Lyceum requirement in your case, it will thus be because you spend fewer than eight semesters as a full-time E&H undergraduate. Your overall Lyceum requirement can usually be estimated using the following guideline: five Lyceums per semester for each E&H semester except the final one. Your specific requirement may be clarified at the time of graduation audit.

Academic Honesty As attendance at Lyceums is an academic

requirement, any attempt on the part of a student to present her or himself as having attended a Lyceum which she or he did not attend is viewed as a form of academic dishonesty and is dealt with accordingly. For example, submitting a ticket stub for a Barter play or an Arts Array film that one had not attended is a breach of the Honor Code and subject to Judicial disposition. Random checks may be conducted regarding attendance at such events.

Alternatives If you anticipate that extraordinary circumstances will make Lyceum attendance impossible during a given semester, you must, during the first two weeks of that semester, petition the Lyceum Committee to request an alternative way of satisfying part of the requirement. The alternative, which is usually far more time-consuming than attending Lyceums, involves reading published essays (as approved by the Committee) and writing critical reviews of them. No more than five Lyceum credits (total) may be obtained in the alternative fashion.

Please address questions regarding Lyceum policy to the Centralized Student Assistance Office, 276-944-6105.

www.ehc.edu/lyceum


Lyceum Spring 2014