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2012

MEDIA KIT What is Community Media?

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anhattan south of 42nd Street is home to many of the world’s wealthiest and most diverse neighborhoods. Community Media reaches their inhabitants with five award-winning neighborhood and niche publications. We help advertisers targeting Tribeca, Greenwich Village, SoHo, Chelsea, East Village, Lower East Side, NoHo, the Financial District, Battery Park City and Seaport publicize their real estate, fitness centers, spas, retail establishments, hotels, restaurants, boutiques, hospitals, universities, business associations and non-profit organizations. Sponsors may direct their messaging to every corner of the Big Apple—with extra distribution in Chelsea, West and East Villages—by reaching the LGBT community through the pages of Gay City News, America’s premiere LGBT newspaper. We are your one-stop media souce. Our print and online editions effectively reach over a half-million readers every month, utilizing an efficient distribution network of streetboxes, retail establishments, cafes, bars, restaurants, office buildings, mailed subscriptions, newsstands, weekly e-blasts and web.

COMMUNITY MEDIA 2012 MEDIA KIT // NEWSPAPERS

Savoring dance by Camille, p. 23

West and East Village, Chelsea, Soho, Noho, Hudson Square, Little Italy, Chinatown and Lower East Side, Since 1933

Volume 81, Number 34 $1.00

NEWSPAPERS:

The Preferred Channel of Consumers

downtown

48% of U.S. adults read the printed edition of a newspaper on an average weekday. Customers for many products and services are the heaviest newspaper readers. Neighborhood newspapers provide advertisers with unique, local audiences. Newspapers are the most-used medium for coupons. Newspaper website users are prime prospects for advertisers...over 62% look for ads online.

DOWNTOWN’S HISTORY IN ART, PG. 12

express

®

These compelling facts underscore the strength of newspapers:

January 26 - February 1, 2012

City Planning O.K.’s Rudin condo project for St. Vincent’s site

VOLUME 24, NUMBER 36

THE NEWSPAPER OF LOWER MANHATTAN

BY ALBERT AMATEAU The City Planning Commission on Monday unanimously approved Rudin Management’s plan for the residential redevelopment of the former St. Vincent’s Hospital campus. The Jan. 23 vote, with Amanda Burden, commission chairperson, and 11 other commissioners attending, took less than 10 minutes. It was the next-to-last step in the city’s uniform land use review procedure,

or ULURP, for a project that would create 450 new condominium apartments on the east side of Seventh Ave. and a 17,000-squarefoot park in the triangle on the west side of the avenue. The City Council has the final word and must now vote within 60 days whether to approve the $800 million project. The redevelopment plan includes converting four former hospital buildings to

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Wanna buy Trump Soho hotel? Well, JANUARY 25-31, 2012 then, you’re hired!

Angst over possible BY ALBERT AMATEAU A partner in the 46-story Trump Soho, the condo dismissal in Chen case hotel that opened in April Photo by Tequila Minsky

Construction workers wearing orange shirts held up signs backing the N.Y.U. 2031 project at Thursday’s full Board 2 meeting.

N.Y.U. calls out the troops in support of its mega-plan

BY ALINE REYNOLDS superior command could 2010 in the Hudson Square Community advocates still send the charge to trial district over the and family members of U.S. but could also follow the objections Army Private Danny Chen recommendation and disof neighborhood preservaare railing against a prelimi- miss thetion charge.” The multi- last week advocates, nary suggestion by the Army step, multi-player procedure, theisbuilding that Specialist Ryan Offutt’s Wright put noted, designed on the auctiontheblock. manslaughter charge be dis- to protect rights of the missed. accused. Alex Sapir, the partner of The Article 32 military This explanation was of the Bayrock Group in buildhearing of Offutt, one of little consolation to Chen’s ing theand hotel BY LINCOLN ANDERSON the 300-person audience at P.S. 41 He noted the board had “avoided a eight American soldiers family, friends, OCA’smanaged by (Organization Chinese family, said DonaldforTrump’s In what opponents blasted as an repeatedly told N.Y.U. and the construc- melee” after who the fiface rst criminal of thesecharges hearings, tied to Chen’s Oct. 3 death Americans) New York chaplast week that the unsold “orchestrated” show of support for tion workers to “Build it Downtown!” when the auditorium at the A.I.A. in Afghanistan, concluded ter, a leading advocate in the condo units and the public N.Y.U.’s 2031 large-scale development — meaning the university should Center proved be too for the on to Monday, Jan.small 23. The Chen case. investigating cer “It is not enough,” said plan, union construction workers — develop its new space nearby in the overcapacity Army’s crowd, and theoffimeeting proceeded to recommend Chen’s cousin, Banny Chen, moved to Our Lady along with university deans and even Financial District where Community had to be quickly forwarding all of Offutt’s on behalf of the soldier’s basement. the women’s basketball team coach Board 1 has an open invitation for of Pompei Church’s charges, which range from family. “Offutt and all the — testified on behalf of the ambitious N.Y.U. to come grow. Hoylman negligent said, at this to point, homicide reck- the suspects should be tried on less aendangerment the maximum charges posFREE development scheme at Community Several N.Y.U. faculty members also board will send formal lettertotoderN.Y.U. eliction of duty, to a court- sible because of what they VOLUME ELEVEN, ISSUE TWO Board 2’s packed full board meeting spoke against the plan, saying it would regarding plan, asking the university Downtown Express photo by Milo Hess themartial, with one exception. did to Danny. JANUARY 18-31,night. 2012 of the Chinese Lunar Newdisrupt last Thursday bothis their classrooms and their to respond to “In it inthiswriting. Monday was the beginning Year. 2012 the Year of the Dragon. case, the Following invesElizabeth R. OuYang, tigating of OCA-NY, said And, in a first, a lone local resident families’ lives. that, there will be a officer secondrecomround president of mends that the involunthe community is “extremespoke in favor of the plan. But the Brad Hoylman, C.B. 2 chairperson, meetings on the 2031 plan by the C.B. tary manslaughter charge ly” disappointed that Offutt February. crowd mockingly accused him of being said 1,000 people had turned out at 2 committeesbeduring dropped,” according to might not be tried for manthe board’s previous five hearings on paid off. Amy Spokesperson George slaughter, and continues to Wright. urge Meanwhile, local residents among the N.Y.U. “Core Proposal” this month. Continued on page 14 the Army to prosecute The recommendation, the suspects to the greatest however, does not guarantee extent possible. the “There a big difference BY ZACH WILLIAMS member Grace Meng and NYS by •saying recognition 5 15Senator CAN ALsupport ST RE ET N YCsuch 10 013 • CO P YisRIGthe HT dismissal © 2 012 of CO M charge, MU N ITY MED I A,isLLC Wright said. “Under the between a three-year and If state legislators and other elected Daniel Squadron urged Mayor Michael due considering the historically low Uniform Code of Military a ten-year maximum prison officials representing Lower Manhattan Bloomberg to establish the holiday in attendance levels on the holiday and Justice,” he explained, “a sentence,” said OuYang. have their way, Chinese New Year will order to recognize the growing role of the impact that has on state funding to be a public school holiday next year. the Asian-American community in the In a Jan. 20 letter, NYS Assembly- city. Local school officials expressed Continued on page 16 Continued on page 17

Santorum’s Anti-Gay Evolution Page 9 New Trenton Marriage Push Page 14 Anthony Rapp, Dublin Dreamer Page 18 William Christie at the Met Page 25

Pols push to make Lunar New Year official school holiday

areas of the hotel would be auctioned in March or April. Sapir told the business press on Jan. 18 that the developers had received unsolicited offers from unnamed buyers. “They were numbers that we would be very happy selling at,” Sapir told Bloomberg News and Crain’s New York Business. Sapir said the auction of

Continued on page 2

LETTUCE ENTER THE DRAGON PAGE 13

EDITORIAL, LETTERS PAGE 16

BY PAUL SCHINDLER Steampunked, p. 23

Politicians, particularly in the heat of an election contest, often fudge the facts. That’s no surprise, and there are no end of media outlets and advocacy groups — of varying reliability, to be sure — who put on a full court press ferreting out the “truthiness” of debate pronouncements, stump speeches, and campaign websites. Sometimes it’s child’s play to demonstrate that a candidate’s claim is a flatout falsehood, though even then it’s not always easy to prove the candidate THE WEST SIDE’S COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER knowingly deceived voters. But every once in a while, a politician says something untrue where the evidence is unmistakable that they knew they were lying. During a Republican presidential debate on January 7, Newt Gingrich, the former House speaker — amidst a rant about what the news media is ignoring — asked, “Should the Catholic Church be forced to close its adoption services in Massachusetts because it won’t accept gay couples, which is exactly what the state has done?” Catholic Charities of Boston had, in fact, elected to end its adoption services in 2006 after Massachusetts officials made clear that its decision to specifically bar adoptions by gay people ran afoul of state law. Gingrich was on a roll making the claim the Obama

VOLUME 4, NUMBER 37

ROMNEY, continued on p.8

JANUARY NUARY 25 - FEBRUARY 7 7, 2012

Chelsea Hotel tenants back in court BY BONNIE ROSENSTOCK On January 19, the Chelsea Hotel tenants association returned to Housing Court for the next round of their case against Chelsea Dynasty LLC, the Chetrit Group, Chelsea Management LLC, Joseph and Meyer Chetrit, Michael Butler and Lilly Sirkin. Representing the tenants association were Janet Ray Kalson and Ron Languedoc of Himmelstein, McConnell, Gribben, Donoghue &

Joseph. Of the 35 tenants named in the Order to Show Cause, eight attended the proceedings. Fred Daniels of Daniels, Norelli, Scully and Cecere PC — a firm that specializes in debt collection — represented the respondentsowners. Butler, an executive with the Chetrit Group and named in the lawsuit, sat on the opposite side of the courtroom from the tenants. Valentine Moretti was the

Continued on page 7

© GAY CITY NEWS 2012 • COMMUNITY MEDIA, LLC, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Newspaper print advertising reinforces and increases reader response from other types of media, like the Internet. Source: 2009 Newspaper Association of America’s “Why Newspapers?” report

OTDA grants final permit to Bowery Residents’ Committee The many faces of fiber, p. 16

East and West Village, Lower East Side, Soho, Noho, Little Italy and Chinatown

Volume 2, Number 26 FREE

Photo by Scott Stiffler

Christopher P. Moore (commissioner of the NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission) speaks at Jan. 15’s official landmarking of the Lamartine Place Historic District.

BY WINNIE McCROY Five months after the Bowery Residents’ Committee (BRC) began to move clients into its 127 West 25th Street facility, the facility is operating at full capacity. Despite the possibility that a long-standing lawsuit mounted against the BRC may undergo a final appeal, state agencies seemingly found no further reasons for withholding the certificate for the BRC’s

96-bed Reception Center (which serves homeless men with one or more diagnosed mental illnesses). “BRC’s programs in Chelsea and throughout NewJanuary York19City, are suc- 25, 2012 cessfully helping the people we serve,” said BRC Executive Director, Muzzy Rosenblatt. “Our programs at West 25th Street have already helped hundreds

Te amo, Bimbo:

Marker honors Manhattan’s only Two Boots tribute documented Underground Railroad station to an L.E.S. legend BY SCOTT STIFFLER A crowd of well-insulated locals, historic preservationists and elected officials — whose ranks far exceeded the number of degrees Fahrenheit — attended an outdoor ceremony on the afternoon of Sunday, January 15. Such events would normally be peppered with grumblings about having to “brave the cold” and complaints about

BY BONNIE ROSENSTOCK With great fanfare, family, friends and food, Two Boots Pizzeria kicked off its yearlong 25th anniversary celebration with a tribute to one of the Lower East Side’s most beloved figures, Bittman “Bimbo” Rivas. On Thursday evening, Jan. Continued on page 15 12, after much sampling of scrumptious Two Boots accompanied by the 5 15 C A N A L ST R E ET • N YC 10 013 • C OP Y R I G HT © 2 012 C OMMU N IT Y ME Dpizza, IA, LLC booming sounds of the Stumblebum Brass Band, the overflowing crowd was

the “bitter chill.” But more than one speaker alluded to how fortunate those in attendance were to be free, safe and generally comfortable — considering the dangers and indignities endured by those whom the gathering sought to honor. The ceremony, held to officially landmark the Lamartine Place Historic District, bestowed some hard-won and

long-sought respect upon a row of mid-19th century antebellum Greek Revival houses standing from 333 to 359 West 29th Street, between Eighth and Ninth Avenues. “For years, the community worked to designate this area as an historic district,” noted Assembly Member

Photo by Bonnie Rosenstock

Two Boots owner Phil Hartman and Michelle Rivas admiring the new mosaic mural of Bimbo Rivas at Hartman’s Avenue A pizzeria.

N.Y.U. takes heat on school and open space at hearings BY ALBERT AMATEAU New York University presented two more aspects of its 2031 redevelopment plan to hostile Village audiences over the past seven days. On Thurs., Jan. 12, Community Board 2’s Parks Committee heard an outline of the open space proposed for the university’s large-scale redevelopment of its two superblocks over the next 20 years. On Tues., Jan. 17, the board’s Education and Social Services Committee hosted a forum on the proposed public elementary school space proposed as part of the project, which is intended to add 2.5 million square feet of new construction on the superblocks, including 1.5 million of that aboveground and the rest belowground.

While the public school space is included in the 2031 land use review, it was still uncertain this week when or whether the proposed school would be built. N.Y.U. is proposing to provide 100,000 square feet of space for a 650-seat kindergarten-to-eighth grade public elementary school on the first seven floors of a new building, where the Morton Williams market is now located on the northwest corner of the south superblock. The proposed building, at the corner of Bleecker St. and LaGuardia Place, would also rise an additional six or seven stories for an N.Y.U. student dorm — but the dorm would be set back at the eighth floor to allow for a children’s playground on the roof of

the school space. Alicia Hurley, N.Y.U. vice president for government relations and community engagement, said the university is providing the property for the school for free, but that the city’s School Construction Authority would have to construct the “core and shell” of the school at its own expense. There would be separate lobbies and entrances for schoolchildren using the public school and N.Y.U. students using the dorm. The S.C.A. would be able to build the public school by 2025 or before. Although N.Y.U. and the S.C.A. have been discussing the school space, Hurley acknowledged that the agency

Continued on page 5

feted with the unveiling of a mosaic of Rivas, created by artist Juan Carlos Pinto. Afterward, a small but enthusiastic group8conPAGE tinued to honor Rivas with reminiscences and poetry at the Nuyorican Poets Cafe on E. Third St. between Avenues B and C. PAGE Rivas, known to 3 all as Bimbo, was a Puerto Rican community activist, poet, playwright, actor, director and teacher, who coined the

EDITORIAL, LETTERS

REMEMBERING BOB BERGERON

Continued on page 8

Authorities are still unable to bag army of knockoff vendors BY ALINE REYNOLDS On a recent weekday afternoon, about 30 men displaying counterfeit handbags, watches and other illicit merchandise lined Canal St. between Mercer St. and Broadway. As pedestrians passed, some of the vendors gestured to pocket-sized catalogues, featuring photos of the knockoff goods, while others whispered, “Gucci,” “Louis Vuitton” or simply “handbag.” One of them succeeded

Continued on page 5

in hooking Calvin Morley, 18, of Bradenton, Florida. “They were trying to sell us G-Shock watches, which are normally about $120 new. I bought this one off a guy for $20,” Morley said as he pointed to the new watch on his wrist. Psyched about his purchase, Morley sought out another watch from a different vendor. “He was sketchy about

Continued on page 6

EDITORIAL, LETTERS PAGE 10

IN ‘THE PICTURE BOX’ PAGE 14

5 15 C A N A L ST R E ET • N YC 10 013 • C O P Y R I G HT © 2 012 C O M M U N IT Y M E D I A , L L C

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he New York Pres s Asso ciatio n (NYPA) and the Natio nal News pape r Asso ciatio n (NNA ) have recog nized Com muni ty Medi a with more than 155 awar ds over the past ten years , inclu ding NYPA’s top prize for exce llenc e (The Villag er) and Com muni ty Lead ershi p acco lades from both.

Community Media | 515 Canal Street | New York, NY 10013

COMMUNITY MEDIA 2012 MEDIA KIT // THE VILLAGER

The Villager

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reenwich Village, Soho, Noho, Chinatown, Union Square, Gramercy, and Little Italy,—in short, the neighborhoods The Villager covers—are among the most dynamic, colorful, contentious and exciting places on earth. And it’s the people who live, work and play here that make this area such a desirable market. From preservation and quality of life to development, housing, parks, schools, politics and community boards, the news doesn’t stop. Because Villagers—active, committed and creative—don’t either. For over 70 years, The Villager has been Downtown Manhattan’s preferred news channel. The Villager offers the most in-depth local news — information you’ll find nowhere else. Whether it’s the waterfront, community board, politics, quality of life, local business, arts and

entertainment or profiles of newsmaking personalities, The Villager covers it best. The Villager was voted New York State’s best weekly community newspaper in 2001, 2004 and 2005 by the New York Press Association, winning the coveted Stuart C. Dorman Award.

READER DEMOGRAPHICS male 47% female 53% median age 47 AGES 25-34 18% AGES 35-54 57%

college-educated 84% employed 75% working full-time 68% professional /managerial 65%

median HHI $87,500 HHI $50k+ 64% HHI $75k+ 43%

married 34.9% with kids 23%

Source: PULSE RESEARCH

print ad rates

I have lived in the Village since 1956. I have read The Villager for all of those years and continue to read it every week. The Village would not be the place that it is today...were it not for The Villager.”

ED KOCH Former Mayor N E W Y O RK C I T Y

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Monthly WEB TRAFFIC 471,241 PAGE VIEWS 118,924 UNIQUE VISITORS 401,974 VISITS

Local display ad rates are net per insertion

PRINT EDITION

Reaching over 30,000 readers, The Villager is distributed every Thursday, subscription only. Print edition includes legal ads. The print edition is also online at www.thevillager.com. Community Media | 515 Canal Street | New York, NY 10013

COMMUNITY MEDIA 2012 MEDIA KIT // DOWNTOWN EXPRESS

Downtown Express

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owntown Express readers have the means— and motivation—to buy products that simplify their busy lives. While balancing many priorities—professional, family and community—they recognize the importance of taking care of themselves, their familes, friends and neighbors. In the fall of 2001, after 13 years covering Lower Manhattan, The Downtown Express expanded to weekly distribution. Providing readers with crucial, ever-changing, in-depth information about quality of life, up-to-date news about civic and political events, schools and

businesses, Downtown Express is a must-read in lower Manhattan. The Downtown Express is the only publication focusing on all of the neighborhoods below Canal Street — Tribeca, Financial District, City Hall, The Seaport, Chinatown and Battery Park City.

READER DEMOGRAPHICS male 44% female 55% median age 42 AGES 25-34 30% AGES 35-54 62%

Downtown Express helps spread the word about our youth programs, brings in new participants, and is critical in creating a sense of community downtown. It is a must-read every week for its local news and forceful and independent editorials.” BOB TOWNLEY Executive Director MANHATTAN YOUTH

Monthly WEB TRAFFIC 529,853 PAGE VIEWS 129,109 UNIQUE VISITORS 321,836 VISITS PRINT EDITION

college-educated 94% employed 93% professional /managerial 65%

median HHI $112,500 HHI $100k+ 62% HHI $75k+ 74%

married 61% with kids 40%

Source: PULSE RESEARCH

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Reaching over 100,000 readers, Downtown Express is distributed every Wednesday with a residential focus in Tribeca, Financial District, City Hall, Chinatown, Battery Park, South Street Seaport, World Trade. 350 street boxes, restaurants, bars, cafes, retail businesses, banks and a targeted subscription list. The print edition is also online at www.downtownexpress.com Community Media | 515 Canal Street | New York, NY 10013

COMMUNITY MEDIA 2012 MEDIA KIT // GAY CITY NEWS

Gay City NEWS

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ay City News boasts America’s most experienced and pioneering team in LGBT journalism, a team that since the 1980s has chronicled cross-currents, struggles and triumphs of the gay civil rights movement and the determined fight to surmount the AIDS epidemic. Gay City News is dedicated to providing the most insightful, informative and up-to-date news about New York City’s diverse gay community. GCN speaks to the core of “America’s most

influential, untapped market,” according to The Wall Street Journal, reaching more LGBT New Yorkers than all national gay magazines combined.

READER DEMOGRAPHICS male 81% female 19% median age 42 AGES 25-34 17.9% AGES 35-54 66%

college-educated 79% employed 87% working full-time 78% professional /managerial 58%

median HHI $62,500 HHI $50k+ 63% HHI $75k+ 47%

married 3% Significant Other 42% with kids <1% Source: PULSE RESEARCH

print ad rates Gay City News editor Paul Schindler’s always-strong opinions make the paper kind of a must-read even outside the community.” BEN SMITH, Politico.com

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COLOR CHARGES [NET] Monthly WEB TRAFFIC 1,010,168 PAGE VIEWS 290,530 UNIQUE VISITORS 710,157 VISITS

FULL PAGE $395 // HALF PAGE $295 // QUARTER PAGE $195 Local display ad rates are net per insertion

Print EDITION Reaching over 100,000 readers, Gay City News is distributed every 14 days (Wednesday) throughout the Metropolitan New York area, via over 500 street boxes, newsstands, restaurants, bars, cafes, retail businesses, banks and community gathering spots. The print edition is also online at www.gaycitynews.com. Community Media | 515 Canal Street | New York, NY 10013

COMMUNITY MEDIA 2012 MEDIA KIT // Chelsea Now

Chelsea Now

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anhattan’s Chelsea neighborhood represents one of the most diverse and evolving communities in New York City. Its mix of residents—from families and single twentysomethings to artists and members of the LGBT community—continues to make the neighborhood thrive as a destination for new development, hotels, restaurants, theaters and nightlife activity. Bordered by the revitalized High Line in the Meatpacking District to Herald and Times Squares, Hell’s Kitchen and the Hudson River, this booming West Side locale represents a study in contrast—from tree-lined brownstone blocks to bustling avenues and high-

rises. Chelsea is also home to America’s most innovative technology firms. Chelsea Now is the ONLY publication devoted exclusively to this world-renowned locale, sharing the most esoteric and breaking news from Manhattan’s epicenter of art and fashion.

READER DEMOGRAPHICS male 52% female 48% median age 37 AGES 25-34 26% AGES 35-54 37%

college-educated 81% professional /managerial 71%

median HHI $84,500 HHI $50k+ 62% HHI $75k+ 47%

married/PARTNER 36% with kids 26% Source: PULSE RESEARCH

print ad rates We were thrilled with the ads for First Saturdays/March, which directly contributed to a hugely successful program! We had a record 240 guests in attendance...” ANNIE WACHNICKI Marketing Manager NEW MUSEUM, MANHATTAN

Monthly WEB TRAFFIC 417,953 PAGE VIEWS 102,155 UNIQUE VISITORS 210,044 VISITS

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PRINT EDITION Reaching 75,000 readers, Chelsea Now is distributed every 14 days (Wednesday) via 125 street boxes located on street corners from 14th to 34th Streets, from Broadway to the West Side Highway. Plus high-traffic indoor locations, including bookstores, cafes, restaurants, clubs, residences, etc. The print edition is also online at www.chelseanow.com Community Media | 515 Canal Street | New York, NY 10013

COMMUNITY MEDIA 2012 MEDIA KIT // The EAst villager

The East Villager & Lower East Sider

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he East Villager and Lower East Sider is the newspaper of record for the neighborhood of Manhattan defined by boundaries that run from Broadway to Avenue D, 23rd Street to Delancey. Each week we deliver 20,000 copies to hundreds of locations including dozens of street boxes, doorman buildingand businesses throughtout the area. For over 70 years, The Villager has been the most authoritative voice in Manhattanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s West Village, documenting politics, arts, neighborhood events, crime and an ever changing array of personalities and issues. The East Villager and Lower East Sider will use the same formula to take a weekly

snapshot of life in one of New Yorkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most iconic neighborhoods. It is the East Village that has been at the heart of just about every revolution that has spun out of New York...from fashion and the arts, literature, civil rights and immigration, politics, technology and even architecture.

READER DEMOGRAPHICS male 55% female 45% median age 41 AGES 25-34 19.9% AGES 35-54 64%

college-educated 88% employed 79% working full-time 81% professional /managerial 30%

median HHI $52,500 HHI $50k+ 47% HHI $75k+ 41%

married 29% SIGNIFICANT OTHER 22% with kids 15% Source: PULSE RESEARCH

print ad rates This is a great addition to the East Village. Love the coverage. Harry Hanson Hanson Fitness

Monthly WEB TRAFFIC 243,890 PAGE VIEWS 32,233 UNIQUE VISITORS 88,061 VISITS

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PRINT EDITION Reaching over 20,000 readers each Thursday The East Villager and Lower East Sider is distributed to dozens of locations within the district of Manhattan that is defined by Broadway to Avenue D, 23rd Street to Delancey. You will find our bright yellow streetboxes in hightraffic areas and single copy distribution inside residential buildings, clubs, associations, medical facilities, retail establishments, entertainment venues and retirement/assisted living facilities and centers. The print edition is also online at www.eastvillagernews.com. Community Media | 515 Canal Street | New York, NY 10013

COMMUNITY MEDIA 2012 MEDIA KIT // readership & distribution

Distributed throughout MANHATTAN, BROOKLYN, QUEENS and the BRONX. 500 distribution points every other Thursday.

Distibution by ZIP CODE: THE VILLAGER: 10001, 10014, 10003, 10013, 10012 EAST VILLAGER: 10009, 10003, 10002, 10012, 10010 CHELSEA NOW: 10001, 10018, 10016 DOWNTOWN EXPRESS: 10004, 10280, 10007, 10038, 10002, 10007, 10014 GAY CITY NEWS: ALL OF THE ABOVE + 10017, 10036, 10019, 10023, 10025, 10027, 10029, 10128, 10028, 10021, 10022, 10034, 10026 QUEENS: 11368, 11355, 11367, 11109, 11101 BROOKLYN: 11201, 11231, 11215, 11205 Community Media | 515 Canal Street | New York, NY 10013

The Villager 30,000 East Villager 20,000 Chelsea Now 75,000 Downtown Express 100,000 Gay City News 100,000

COMMUNITY MEDIA 2012 MEDIA KIT // WEB ADVERTISING

EMAIL BLAST

MONTHLY WEB ad rates [NET] SMALL RECTANGLE 300X250 PX RIGHT MARGIN* WIDE SKYSCRAPER 300X600 PX RIGHT MARGIN* LEADERBOARD 975X121 PX PUSH DOWN 970X60 PX EXPANDING

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Weekly e-newsletters:

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3475

* SIZE AVAILABLE ON NEWSLETTER; ADD 20 PERCENT FOR NEWSLETTER ADVERTISING.

Downtown Express: 8,000+ subscribers $249

Gay City News: 17,000+ subscribers $499

Chelsea Now: 2,000+ subscribers $149

Monthly TRAFFIC

downtown 速

express

sea Chelnow

Page Views

unique visitors

# of Visits

471,241

118,924

401,974

529,853

129,109

321,836

1,010,168

290,530

710,157

417,953

102,155

210,044

243,890

32,233

88,061

Average Length of Visit: 4.16 minutes. Source: OCTOBER 2011 internal metrics.

DIGITAL AD SPECS/DEADLINES DEADLINES are 7 days in advance of publication for both insertion orders and acceptable artwork. EMAIL all ad creatives to: ads@CommunityMediaLLC.com. We do not accept Flash files for email blasts. 1. Most current web technology advertising file-types and creative are accepted. Rich Media can have a 100k secondary load file size. All locally served ads require a SWF, FLA, GIF/JPG and click-through URL. Overlay ads, expandable ads, video ads and 3rd-party iFrame requests must be made in writing to your sales representative. No flash ads accepted for E-blast 2. Files must be no larger than 30k. 3. Schedule, all URLs and billing info must be included in email.

Community Media | 515 Canal Street | New York, NY 10013

COMMUNITY MEDIA 2012 MEDIA KIT // Print ad Creation + submission

Print ad creation + submission ABOUT YOUR ARTWORK

To Submit Files By Disk

Four-color or black and white creatives submitted electronically must be industry-

PDFâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s can best be submitted by FTP or delivered

standard Adobe Acrobat PDF files.

by email. CDs can be delivered to our office.

Black and White

To Submit Files By Email (5mg or smaller)

The following standards are recommended for black and white newspaper ads: Every continuous tone or halftone image should be evaluated on an individual basis with an expected dot gain of approximately 30%. Dot gain curves are non-linear; ads will gain more in their mid-tone values than highlight or shadow. All continuous tone images should be at least 170 ppi at their final output size. Line art should be at 1016 ppi. All supplied ads should have a minimum of 5% in the highlight and a maximum of 80% in the shadow area. Any part of the ad not intended to print solid black should be created at a maximum of 75%. A minimum of 20% contrast between foreground and background is suggested. Type should be kept at a minimum of 8 pt. for standard or 12 pt. for reverse. All type intended to print solid black should be set at 100% black. Surprinted type should be solid black and contrasted against a 30% or less black screen. Reversed or knocked-out type should be 0% black (white) type on a 70% screen or higher. Fine serif typefaces should be avoided. We will not modify PDF files.

ads@communitymediallc.com

Deadline For Camera-Ready Materials Noon on the business day following space reservation deadline.

INSERTS $97/M net. Sample required, rate may vary depending on size, stock and weight. Due at printer at least one week prior to insertion date. Please contact the Sales Department for shipping details. Commercial printing available.

POSTAL ADDRESS COMMUNITY MEDIA, LLC 515 Canal Street New York, NY 10013 Tel: (212) 229-1890

Four-Color We strongly discourage same color family type on top of color boxes and will not be held liable for bad reproduction of such artwork. For instance, no typeface in shades of auborn over an auborn background.

Tone (or Contrast) Reproduction Newsprint offers less contrast than text matte or coated stocks. The darkest fourcolor area should not exceed 240%, the dot percentage should not

FULL PAGE 9.875 W x 11.4 H

1

exceed 90%. Dot gain is approximately 30%. Reversed type or four-color black type should be at least 14 pt. and a medium-to-

1/2 PAGE V 4.85 W x 11.4 H

bold sans-serif typeface is recommended. Dropped-out (reversed) type in a blackonly area should be at least 10 pt. medium to bold sans-serif typeface.

Fonts Since we accept only PDF files for artwork, font files are not required. We cannot make font corrections or any type of modifications to a PDF.

Resolution and Line Screen Images @ 203.2 dpi (8 pixels/mm) Line Art @ 1016 ppi (40 pixels/mm) Output screen ruling @ 100 lpi

1/2 PAGE H 9.875 W x 5.6375 H

1/2 H

1/2 V

1/4 PAGE 4.85 W x 5.6375 H 1/8 PAGE 4.85 W x 2.75

1/4

1/8

FRONT STRIP 9.875 W x 2.0 H Community Media | 515 Canal Street | New York, NY 10013

FRONT STRIP

COMMUNITY MEDIA 2012 MEDIA KIT // editorial calendar

GayCity

The

East

2012 editorial calendar

Chelsea now

downtown express

january

JANUARY 11

JANUARY 4 JANUARY 11

JANUARY 4

JANUARY 5 JANUARY 12

JANUARY 5 JANUARY 12

JANUARY 25

JANUARY 18 JANUARY 25

JANUARY 18

JANUARY 19 JANUARY 26

JANUARY 19 JANUARY 26

February

FEBRUARY 8

FEBRUARY 1 FEBRUARY 8 FEBRUARY 15 FEBRUARY 22

FEBRUARY 1 WEDDINGS/VALENTINE FEBRUARY 15

FEBRUARY 2 FEBRUARY 9 FEBRUARY 16

FEBRUARY 2 FEBRUARY 9 FEBRUARY 16

FEBRUARY 23

FEBRUARY 23

FEBRUARY 29

FEBRUARY 29

MARCH 7 MARCH 14 MARCH 21

MARCH 14

MARCH 1 THRIVE MARCH 8

MARCH 1 MARCH 8

MARCH 28

MARCH 28

MARCH 15 MARCH 22 MARCH 29

MARCH 15 MARCH 22 MARCH 29

APRIL 4 APRIL 11 PROGRESS APRIL 18 TRIBECA FILM

APRIL 11

APRIL 5 APRIL 12 PROGRESS APRIL 19 TRIBECA FILM

APRIL 5 APRIL 12 APRIL 19 TRIBECA FILM

APRIL 26

APRIL 26

MAY 3 MAY 10 UNION SQUARE MAY 17 MAY 24 HANDBOOK MAY 31 THRIVE

MAY 3 MAY 10 UNION SQUARE MAY 17 MAY 24 MAY 31

JUNE 7 VOLUNTEERS JUNE 14 JUNE 21 PRIDE JUNE 28

JUNE 7 VOLUNTEERS JUNE 14 JUNE 21 PRIDE JUNE 28

JULY 5 JULY 12 ARTS JULY 19 JULY 26 MEAT MARKET

JULY 5 JULY 12 ARTS JULY 19 JULY 26 MEAT MARKET

FEBRUARY 22

MARCH 7

March

MARCH 21

APRIL 4

april

APRIL 18 TRIBECA FILM

APRIL 25 MAY 2 MAY 9 MAY 16 MAY 23 HANDBOOK MAY 30

MAY 2

may

MAY 16 MAY 30

JUNE 13

june

JUNE 27 PRIDE

JULY 11

july August September October

JULY 25

NEWS

APRIL 25 10TH ANNIVERSARY

MAY 9 WEDDINGS MAY 23

JUNE 6 GRADS JUNE 13 JUNE 20 JUNE 27

JUNE 6 PRE-PRIDE

JULY 4 JULY 11 JULY 18 JULY 25

JULY 4 POST-PRIDE JULY 18 WEDDINGS: ANNIVERSARY

JUNE 20 PRIDE

December

Villager

AUGUST 1

AUGUST 1

AUGUST 8 FRINGE FEST

AUGUST 8 FRINGE FEST AUGUST 15

AUGUST 2 AUGUST 9 FRINGE FEST

AUGUST 2 AUGUST 9 FRINGE FEST

AUGUST 15

AUGUST 22

AUGUST 22 AUGUST 29

AUGUST 29

AUGUST 16 AUGUST 23 THRIVE AUGUST 30 SCHOOL

AUGUST 16 AUGUST 23 THRIVE AUGUST 30 SCHOOL

SEPTEMBER 5 SCHOOLS SEPTEMBER 12 SEPTEMBER 19

SEPTEMBER 12

SEPT. 6 SCHOOL/THRIVE SEPT. 13

SEPT. 6 SCHOOL SEPT. 13

SEPTEMBER 26

SEPTEMBER 26

SEPT. 20 SEPT. 27 HUDSON SQ.

SEPT. 20 SEPT. 27 HUDSON SQ.

OCTOBER 10

OCTOBER 4 OCTOBER 11 THEATER OCTOBER 18 EV/LES

OCTOBER 4 OCTOBER 11 THEATER OCTOBER 18 EV/LES

OCTOBER 24 ELECTIONS

OCTOBER 25

OCTOBER 25

NOVEMBER 1

NOVEMBER 1

NOVEMBER 7

NOVEMBER 8 NOV. 15 PROGRESS NOV. 22 THANKSGIVING

NOVEMBER 8 NOV. 15 PROGRESS NOV. 22 THANKSGIVING

NOV. 29

NOV. 29

SEPTEMBER 5 SEPTEMBER 19 PROGRESS

OCTOBER 3

OCTOBER 3 HUDSON SQUARE

OCTOBER 17 THEATER

OCTOBER 10 OCTOBER 17 THEATER OCTOBER 24

OCTOBER 31

OCTOBER 31 NOVEMBER 7 PROGRESS

November

Villager

NOVEMBER 14 NOVEMBER 28

NOVEMBER 14 NOVEMBER 21 NOVEMBER 28

DECEMBER 5 DECEMBER 12 DECEMBER 26

DECEMBER 12 DECEMBER 19 DECEMBER 26

NOVEMBER 21 WEDDINGS

DECEMBER 5 HOLIDAY

DECEMBER 6 THRIVE

DECEMBER 6

DECEMBER 19

DECEMBER 13 DECEMBER 20 DECEMBER 27

DECEMBER 13 DECEMBER 20 DECEMBER 27

Community Media | 515 Canal Street | New York, NY 10013

Community Media 515 Canal Street, New York, NY 10013 FRANCESCO REGINI | SR. V.P. OF SALES AND MARKETING francesco@thevillager.com 646-452-2496 212-229-2790 fax COMMUNITYMEDIALLC.com

CM2012


Community Media 2012 Media Kit