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Help Wanted in Campaign Against Water Rule Page 5

County Fair Calendar Page 4

INSIDE: News in Brief.....................2 Rules & Regulations...........3 County News.....................4 Around IFB........................6 Communications...............7 Around Indiana.................8

The Hoosier Farmer

®

A Publication for Voting Members of Indiana Farm Bureau

Rushville farmer represents Indiana dairies at the Indy 500 —Rachel Schrage Public Relations Team Each year in Victory Lane at the Indianapolis 500, the winning driver receives the coveted bottle of ice-cold milk from an Indiana dairy farmer. This year, that dairy farmer was Ken Hoeing of Rushville, Ind., and the winning driver was Ryan Hunter-Reay, who, along with half of the field, selected 2% milk as his beverage of choice. One of the most unique prizes in the sports world, the post-race milk tradition began in 1933, when Louis Meyer requested a glass of buttermilk after winning the race. The tradition has continued uninterrupted since 1956.

Being selected as Milkman is a two-year endeavor. Last year, Hoeing served as Rookie Milkman, an internship of sorts before taking on the responsibility of being veteran Milkman. As Rookie Milkman, job responsibilities include making sure the milk is on ice and not lost during the course of the race and handing celebratory bottles to the winning crew chief and team owner in victory lane. This year’s Rookie Milkman was Alan Wright of Muncie, Ind. The night before the race, the Milkmen made sure that the milk was in the appropriate bottles and refrigerated for the following day. “ESPN Sports came to film us bringing in the milk, and that was really cool,” said Hoeing.

JUNE 9, 2014 Issue No. 54

At the Indianapolis 500 on May 25, dairy farmer Ken Hoeing (shown at far left on Race Day and in the inset photo on his farm near Rushville), who was this year’s official Indy 500 Milkman, handed an ice-cold bottle of 2 percent milk to winning driver Ryan Hunter-Reay of Andretti Autosport. Main photo courtesy of the Indiana Motor Speedway; inset photo by Jackie Barber of the American Dairy Association of Indiana

“Race day was so much fun,” Hoeing said. “I don’t know how to describe it. It was an honor to represent Indiana dairy farmers and to play a part in carrying on the milk-passing tradition.” Hoeing farms 3,000 acres of grain and milks 400 cows with four of his brothers, on a farm started by his grandfather in 1947.

School referendums becoming common as districts grapple with tax caps —By Kathleen M. Dutro Public Relations Team In recent elections, voters have seen a huge jump in the number of referendums on school funding. There’s a specific reason for this, said Katrina Hall, Indiana Farm Bureau’s state government relations director and tax specialist. “The property tax caps are hurting more and more schools all the time,” Hall said. “The referenda are a way to overcome the caps.” A total of 10 school funding referendums were on the ballot in Indiana’s May 6 priIndiana Farm Bureau P.O. Box 1290 Indianapolis, IN 46206

mary election. Two of these were for what the Indiana Department of Local Government Finance calls “controlled project” referendums – that is, Hall explained, they are intended to fund a capital improvement project such as a school building. The one that passed was for Elkhart Community Schools. It will fund various improvements to existing schools at an estimated cost of $19 million. However, a proposal to fund nearly $40.5 million in improvements for Madison Consolidated Schools in Jefferson County failed. It was Non-Profit Organization U.S. Postage

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defeated partly as a result of the efforts of the Jefferson County Farm Bureau, Hall said. The reason the Jefferson County Farm Bureau decided to fight the referendum, said board member Dave Ferguson, is that the district already spends $1,100$1,300 more in property dollars per student per year than any other schools in the area. That and other basic facts were the basis of a letter sent by Farm Bureau to all members in the affected townships. “We stayed away from emotion,” Ferguson said, and stuck with the facts, using the school’s own information that Farm Bureau got from the Indiana Department of Education’s website. “They couldn’t punch holes in our information because it was their own information.” Another thing that Farm Bureau did, Ferguson noted, was to work with other groups with an interest in controlling property tax increases.

The measure was defeated 77 percent to 23 percent, Ferguson said. But since the defeat, the school and Farm Bureau have started talking to see if they can find a more efficient way to get the school what it needs, he added. Also on the May 6 ballot were eight “school tax levy” referendums, which are intended to help schools defray operating costs, Hall explained. “Voters are asked to make up a deficit with property taxes,” she said. Seven of the eight passed: Concord Community Schools, Elkhart County; Elkhart Community Schools, Elkhart County; Eminence Community School Corp., Morgan County; Lanesville Community School Corp., Harrison County; Metropolitan School District of Decatur Township, Marion County; Mt. Vernon Community School Corp., Hancock County; and White River Valley School Corp., Greene County. The one that

failed was for the Metropolitan School District of Boone Township, Porter County. The current process for approving capital projects has been in effect since 2008. Forty-five percent have passed. In contrast, the referendum process for operating costs has been in effect since 1976, but it’s become much more common since the tax caps went into effect, Hall said. A total of 56 percent have passed since 2008. “Since 2008, these have gone from being rare occurrences to being common occurrences,” Hall said, adding that this trend is expected to continue. “We don’t know how many will be on the ballot this fall, but we’re anticipating that there will be several,” she said. Those interested in finding more specific information on school referendums can find it on the DLGF’s website, www.in.gov/dlgf/, by clicking on “Referendum Information.”

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NEWS IN BRIEF Species Act. “The drought situation in California has been made significantly worse because of the Endangered Species Act,” noted the letter. Further, “In light of the fact that wholesale ESA reform is unlikely at this time, targeted legislation is required to address the problems states face as a result of heavyhanded, federal ESA requirements,” the senators stated. In closing their letter to Reid, the senators called passage of the legislation “a targeted step forward from which we anticipate our support at this critical juncture receiving reciprocal support when similar ESA challenges arise in our states.” (AFBF 5/28/14)

News Bites —Compiled by Kathleen M. Dutro Public Relations Team

Congress passes water transportation bill—A bill that, accord-

ing to the American Farm Bureau Federation, “puts America’s inland waterways and port infrastructure on a solid and sustainable foundation to contribute to U.S. economic growth, jobs and global competitiveness for generations to come,” has been passed by Congress and now moves to the president’s desk for his signature. The Water Resources Reform and Development Act passed the Senate on May 22 on a 91-7 vote, following the House’s 412-4 vote earlier that week. “The American Farm Bureau Federation and our 6 million member families have long championed an efficient and reliable inland waterway system linked to competitive ports,” said American Farm Bureau Federation President Bob Stallman. “We’re pleased that Congress recognizes that the ports, channels, locks, dams and other infrastructure that support our waterways transportation are vital to America’s ability to provide affordable agricultural products at home and abroad. “We urge President Obama to swiftly sign this important bill into law,” he added in a May 22 statement. Stallman noted that the ports, channels, locks, dams and other infrastructure that support America’s waterways transportation are vital to America’s ability to provide affordable agricultural products at home and abroad. WRRDA will bring $6 billion in total cost savings and important reforms to ensure the reliability and strength of our nation’s inland waterways and ports, he added. AFBF strongly supported

Barges on the Ohio River typically carry ag commodities as well as coal, scrap metal and other bulk products. © iStock Photo/bsauter

passage and tracked this important vote as part of its annual Congressional Scorecard. (AFBF 5/22/14)

Noted economist finds EPA analysis of water rule flawed—

an economic standpoint,” said American Farm Bureau Federation President Bob Stallman. “The rule is also an end run around Congress and two Supreme Court rulings, and in their official comments, farmers and ranchers across the national are calling on EPA to ditch the rule.” (AFBF 5/28/14)

HSUS and co-defendants pay $15.75 million settlement—

The Humane Society of the United States, along with co-defendants, have paid Feld Entertainment Inc., the parent company of Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey

Rural broadband access to be studied by working group

The Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed Clean Water Act rule is rife with errors, lacks transparency and would greatly expand strict federal control over land that was previously not regulated by the federal government, according to a report by economist and University of CaliforniaBerkley faculty member Dr. David Sunding. Sunding’s report, “Review of 2014 EPA Economic Analysis of Proposed Revised Definition of Waters of the Unites States,” raises the blinds on the controversial proposal by detailing how EPA failed to provide a realistic explanation of the scope, costs and benefits of the rule. “The EPA’s proposed waters of the U.S. rule is irreparably flawed from

has approved by unanimous consent S. 2198, which addresses water problems exacerbated by the severe California drought. The California Farm Bureau Federation welcomed the news and is urging congressional leaders to immediately begin negotiations to reconcile the bill with legislation passed earlier by the House. A group of Senate Republicans sent a letter to Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) regarding the legislation, pointing out that the bill is not a long-term solution to the challenges created by the Endangered

The availability of broadband Internet access in rural Indiana is a topic that’s starting to receive some attention, according to Katrina Hall, Indiana Farm Bureau’s state government relations director. Hall has been appointed to the newly formed Rural Broadband Working Group, which is being led by the lieutenant governor. “We’re exploring the question ‘How might we increase broadband connectivity in rural Indiana?’” Hall explained. Among the variables being considered are actual demand for broadband, what kind of broadband is available (e.g.,

Administrative/Finance Team

Legal Affairs Team

Public Relations Team

Regional Managers

President...................................... Don Villwock Vice President.................................Randy Kron Second Vice President................. Isabella Chism Chief Operating Officer/Treasurer....Mark Sigler Receptionist...................................... Kim Duke General Fund Accountant.............. Tiffanie Ellis Office Manager & Meeting Planner.Kay Keown Controller.......................................Elaine Rueff Administrative Assistant....................Jill Shanley Executive Secretary..................... Beverly Thorpe Accounting Intern..................... Melissa Cuttriss

Director & General Counsel ...Mark Thornburg Associate Counsel for Corporate Compliance & Nonprofit Affairs ............Sara MacLaughlin Legal Assistant........................... Maria Spellman Law Clerk....................................... Sarah Doyle

Director & Editor .......................Andy Dietrick Web Designer/Developer..............Diane Brewer Publications Managing Editor & Media Relations Specialist...... Kathleen Dutro Marketing & PR Specialist.............. Mindy Reef Communications Assistant......... Rachel Schrage Intern...........................................Taylor Scuglik

Wayne Belden (1 & 3) Greg Bohlander (6) Andrew Cleveland (4 & 6) Janice Deno (3) Jennifer Chandler Gish (9) Seth Harden (7 & 9) Allison Hines (10) Amy Hutson (5) Susan Lawrence (2) John Newsom (1 & 2) Kermit Paris (8) Keegan Poe (5 & 8) Brad Ponsler (10) E.B. Rawles (7) Allie Rieth (4)

District Directors Larry Jernas (1) Kevin Ousley (2) Kevin Underwood (3) Steve Maple (4) Dave Wyeth (5)

Scott Trennepohl (6) Jeff Gormong (7) Mark Bacon (8) Philip Springstun (9) Robert Schickel (10)

Indiana Agricultural Law Foundation

Public Policy Team Director........................................ Megan Ritter Policy Development & Industry Relations.........................Bob Cherry National Government Relations Policy Advisor................. Kyle Cline Policy Advisor & Counsel..............Amy Cornell Administrative Assistant .................... B.J. Fields State Government Relations Director...................................... Katrina Hall Administrative Assistant .............Wanda Hunter Senior Policy Advisor & Counsel..................................Justin Schneider Livestock Development Specialist... Greg Slipher Direct Retail Business Specialist........Bob White

Senate approves emergency drought relief act—The Senate

Organizational Development Team Director............................................... Kim Vail Program Assistant........................ Ashley Beasley Field Services Program Director.....Chris Fenner Young Farmer & Women’s Program Coordinator................ Meggie Foster Collegiate Farm Bureau Coordinator................................ Seth Harden Program Assistant.......................Kathryn Rogers Education Coordinator.................... Julie Taylor Member Services Coordinator...........Anna Todd Program Assistant............................ Tracie Trent Intern........................................ Samantha Lowe

Circus, $15.75 million to settle cases stemming from a lawsuit brought against Ringling Bros. over the care of its Asian elephants. This historic settlement payment to Feld Entertainment ends nearly 14 years of litigation between the parties. “We hope this settlement payment, and the various court decisions that found against these animal rights activists and their attorneys, will deter individuals and organizations from bringing frivolous litigation like this in the future,” said Kenneth Feld, chairman and chief executive officer of Feld Entertainment. “This settlement is a significant milestone for our family-owned business and all the dedicated men and women who care for the Ringling Bros. herd of 42 Asian elephants. We look forward to continuing to set the standard for providing world-class care for all our animals and producing high quality, family entertainment.” (AFBF 5/21/14)

—By Kathleen M. Dutro Public Relations Team

Indiana Farm Bureau Inc./ Indiana Farm Bureau Insurance Director of Affiliate Relations.................. Julie Klarich

satellite, fiber or wireless), whether the available broadband is adequate, cost, and how common it is for a cell phone to be a household’s primary or only means of accessing the internet. “At some point soon, we will be asking members a few questions about their use of broadband Internet services. It will boil down to, ‘If you’re not using broadband, why not?’” Hall explained. “The bottom-line question is, ‘Is the lack of broadband making a difference in your family’s daily pursuits and especially in your farming operation?’” she said. Members who are unsure what broadband is available to them can find out at www. indianabroadband.com. Address Letters & Questions To: Indiana Farm Bureau Inc. Box 1290, Indianapolis, IN 46206-1290. Phone: 1-800-327-6287 or (317) 692-7776 E-Mail Address: askus@infarmbureau.org Duplicate Magazines If you are receiving more than one copy of The Hoosier Farmer®, please cut out both labels and return them to the address above. Magazine Design and Layout Davis Graphic Design www.davisgraphics.com The Hoosier Farmer® is published 14 times per year by Indiana Farm Bureau Inc., P.O. Box 1290, Indianapolis, IN 46206, and is furnished as a service to voting members and others. Controlled circulation. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Hoosier Farmer® P.O. Box 1290 Indianapolis, IN 46206-1290. Copyright 2014. All rights reserved.

Director..................... John Shoup

June 9, 2014

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RULES & REGS

IFB Drainage School returns Indiana Farm Bureau’s annual Drainage School, a seminar focusing on Indiana drainage issues, will take place Aug. 27 at IFB’s home office in downtown Indianapolis. The seminar’s purpose is to promote an understanding of the laws and regulations that control drainage laws and dispute resolutions. It is open to farmers, public officials, agency personnel, attorneys and members of the public. Continuing education credits are being sought for attorneys and surveyors. This year’s program features speakers on surface water and common law con-

cerns; an update on legislative issues, including those surrounding Indiana Department of Natural Resources and Indiana Department of Environmental Management enforcement and permits; a federal regulatory update; floodway mapping and insurance; levees; dams; and public trust doctrine. Check-in begins at 8:30 a.m.; the program runs from 9 a.m. until 4:15 p.m. Lunch is provided. Sign-up runs until Aug. 8 or until the program fills, whichever comes sooner. Those interested are encouraged to register early due to limited space. Registration is not complete without payment, and there will be no refunds after Aug. 8.

Register online at www. infarmbureau.org under the events menu. The seminar is $50. The registration fee includes a flash drive with all of the information. A hard-copy binder is available for $25. Contact Maria Spellman, 317-692-7840 or mspellman@infarmbureau. org, with questions. The event is sponsored by IFB, Indiana Agricultural Law Foundation, Association of Indiana Counties, Indiana Association of County Commissioners, County Surveyors Association of Indiana, Indiana Association of Soil and Water Conservation Districts, and Indiana Local Technical Assistance Program. Photo by Kathleen M. Dutro

—By Mindy Reef Public Relations Team

‘Big data’ topic of Aug. 15 workshop —By Taylor Scuglik Public Relations Intern The collection, sharing and utilization of “big data” is being hailed as the next big thing in agriculture. “Big data” is defined as data whose scale, diversity and complexity require new architecture, techniques, algorithms and analytics to manage and extract value and hidden knowledge from it. Big data has become a developing tool for agriculture as farming technology advances. In agriculture, large amounts of data such as soil maps, weather data, yield information and other statistics are collected from farms and third party companies, according to John Shoup, director of the Indiana Ag Law Foundation, and Mark Thornburg, Indiana Farm Bureau’s general counsel. These data pieces are combined to create big data, which is then analyzed and used to make decisions and customize solutions for different areas. As technology continues to evolve, new ways of gathering and utilizing data be-

come available. One emerging technology is the use of unmanned aerial vehicles to collect satellite images on crop conditions, Thornburg and Shoup said. With access to all this information, farmers are faced with both opportunities and challenges. Opportunities include information for management adjustment and enhancing production efficiency. The challenges involve data ownership, how to profit from the sharing of data, access to data and how to use the information collected to make decisions. To provide more information, Indiana Farm Bureau will hold a workshop on Aug. 15 addressing the topic of big data and its growing importance in agriculture. The workshop is geared toward Indiana farmers and agricultural stakeholders interested in learning more about big data and its applications. “Farmers have to balance the risk of giving out this information, how secure it is and who they’re going to share it with. But they also have to think about how can this help my operation, does it make me more profitable

and then make the distinction between which is more important to them,” Shoup said. “And I think with our program that we’ve put together we’re going to help them better understand the risks and legal implications.” Attendees will hear from attorney Michelle Kaiser Bray about data privacy policy, and attorney Todd Janzen will speak about the legal aspects of unmanned aerial vehicles. Participants will also explore the use of UAVs with Dr. Kevin Price, a UAV technology representative from RoboFlight, who will discuss the type of data the drones capture and the ways it can be used and shared. Representatives from The Climate Corporation and Beck’s Hybrids have also been invited to discuss data privacy policy. The workshop will be held at Indiana Farm Bureau’s main office in Indianapolis. The cost for the program will be $50 for registrations made by by July 14 and $75 for those made by July 31. Registration information is available at www. inaglaw/bigdata. Registration will open June 16.

Estate and succession planning seminar available —By Mindy Reef Public Relations Team There are still spots available for Indiana Agricultural Law Foundation’s July 17 seminar, Estate and Succession Planning for the Family Farm. The day-long event will feature sessions on why a succession plan is necessary for a farm, basics of estate planning, choosing a busi-

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ness structure, Medicare planning and insurance. The seminar will end with a question-and-answer panel with three of the day’s presenters, which include attorneys Gary Chapman of Bose McKinney and Evans and Dan Gordon of Gordon and Associates, and Ken Roney of Indiana Farm Bureau Insurance. Ken Foster, Purdue Department of Agricultural Economics, is also on the

agenda. Early registration is available for $50 until June 16. If space is still available, the registration cost after June 16 will be $75. Space is limited for this event. Early sign-up is encouraged. To learn more, visit the IALF website, www.inaglaw. org. Questions may be directed to Maria Spellman, mspellman@infb.org or 317692-7840.

Purdue Top Farmer Conference offers competitive strategies, networking —From the Purdue Center for Commercial Agriculture Corn Belt farmers, agricultural lenders and agribusiness managers can learn how to remain competitive in an uncertain business environment at the 47th Purdue Top Farmer Conference. The event is set for July 15 and 16 at the Beck Agricultural Center in West Lafayette, Ind. Conference sessions will include discussions on key strategies to use in today’s agricultural marketplace, the impact of the 2014 farm bill, what’s driving commodity and interest rates and how to leverage “big data.” Participants will also explore how to develop a dashboard to track farm financials and what is ahead for farmland prices. “Midwest agriculture experienced an unprecedented boom from the mid-2000s through 2013. But margins in the crop sector could tighten significantly over the next several years,” said Jim Mintert, Purdue agricultural economist and director of the Center for Commercial Agriculture. “We developed this conference with that in

mind. We want participants to focus on key decisions farmers will be making in this new environment.” Conference speakers will include agricultural economics experts from Purdue’s Center for Commercial Agriculture and the University of Illinois’ farmdoc website team. Jason Henderson, director of Purdue Extension, will lead the keynote session, “Macroeconomic Outlook: What it Means for U.S. Agriculture.” In addition to educational sessions, conference participants will have opportunities to network with their peers from across the country. For a full conference schedule and to register, visit www.agecon.purdue.edu/ commercialag/progevents/ topfarmer.html. You can also reach the conference web site by simply typing “Center for Commercial Ag” in your favorite web search engine. Those who register before July 1 will receive the early registration fee of $275/person. To obtain the discount, use the code EARLYFARMER14 when you register. After July 1, the fee will be $325. Pre-registration for the conference is required.

June 9, 2014

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COUNTY NEWS

2014 4-H County Fair Dates Adams............................................ July 20-24 Allen ............................................. July 22-27 Bartholomew ................................... July 4-12 Benton......................................July 23-July 28 Blackford ....................................... July 11-19 Boone ............................................ July 18-24 Brown ..................................... July 27-Aug. 2 Carroll ........................................... July 11-19 Cass.................................................. July 6-12 Clark.............................................. July 11-19 Clay................................................ July 13-18 Clinton........................................... July 13-19 Crawford.......................................... July 6-13 Daviess 1..................... June 20-28 / July 11-18 Dearborn ...................................... June 14-21 Decatur ......................................... July 10-17 DeKalb 2 .................... .July 19-23 / Sept. 22-27 Delaware 3 .................... July 7-16 / July 14-19 Dubois .......................................... July 15-21 Elkhart ........................................... July 18-26 Fayette ..................................... July 26-Aug. 2 Floyd ............................................... July 7-12 Fountain ........................................ July 11-17 Franklin ......................................... July 14-19 Fulton ............................................ July 12-19 Gibson ............................................ July 6-12 Grant ............................................ June 15-21 Greene .......................................... July 11-19 Hamilton ....................................... July 17-22 Hancock ....................................... June 20-27 Harrison 4 ................... July 11-17 / July 13-19 Hendricks ..................................... July 13 -19 Henry .............................................. July 9-19 Howard ........................................... July 7-12 Huntington .................................... July 11-25 Jackson .......................................... July 20-26 Jasper ............................................ July 12-18 Jay 5 ................................ July 5-11 / July 7-13 Jefferson .......................................... July 7-12

Jennings ........................................... July 6-12 Johnson ......................................... July 13-19 Knox .............................................. July 21-26 Kosciusko ........................................ July 7-12 LaGrange ......................................... July 5-12 Lake ...............................................Aug. 1-10 LaPorte ............................................ July 6-12 Lawrence ....................................... July 12-19 Madison ........................................ July 20-26 Marion ......................................... June 20-29 Marshall ........................................ July 13-19 Martin ........................................... July 11-16 Miami ........................................... June 22-28 Monroe ................................... July 26-Aug. 2 Montgomery .................................. July 17-24 Morgan .................................... July 25-Aug. 2 Newton ......................................... July 14-19 Noble ............................................ July 12-19 Ohio ............................................. June 20-28 Orange .......................................... July 19-25 Owen .............................................. July 6-12 Parke ............................................. July 19-26 Perry ................................................ July 9-12 Pike ............................................... July 20-25 Porter ............................................. July 17-26 Posey ............................................. July 13-19 Pulaski ......................................June 28-July 3 Putnam .......................................... July 18-25 Randolph ....................................... July 19-24 Ripley ............................................ July 20-26 Rush ............................................. June 21-28 Saint Joseph ..............................June 27-July 5 Scott .............................................. July 13-19 Shelby ......................................June 30-July 5 Spencer ........................................ June 27-30 Starke ............................................ July 12-19 Steuben ......................................... July 19-25 Sullivan ......................................... July 12-19 Switzerland ................................... July 14-19 Tippecanoe .................................... July 19-26

Christopher Gauck, age 10, poses with Spike, his Old English Bantam rooster. Christopher will be showing Spike at the Decatur County Fair. Photo by Kathleen M. Dutro

Tipton ............................................ July 11-16 Union ............................................ July 19-24 Vanderburgh .................................. July 21-26 Vermillion .................................... June 15-21 Vigo ................................................ July 6-12 Wabash ........................................... July 6-12 Warren ......................................... June 17-21 Warrick ......................................... July 14-19 Washington .................................. June 22-28 Wayne .......................................... June 21-28 Wells ............................................. July 19-24 White ............................................ July 19-24 Whitley ......................................... July 11-17 Daviess County: County fair, June 20-28 (Elnora); 4-H show, July 11-18 (Washington). 2 DeKalb County: Summer judging, July 19-23; fall fair, Sept. 22-27. 3 Delaware County: 4-H fair, July 7-16; county fair, July 14-19. 4 Harrison County: 4-H fair, July 11-17; county ag fair, July 13-19. 5 Jay County: 4-H fair, July 5-11; county fair: July 7-13. 1

Sixteen-year-old Audrey Luse will be showing her Hereford steer Buddy at the Boone County Fair. Photo by Kathleen M. Dutro

County fair dates courtesy of Indiana 4-H

BOAH offers advice on reducing PEDv risk at county fairs The recent decision by the Dubois County Fair Board to cancel its 4-H swine show has generated many questions to the Indiana State Board of Animal Health. BOAH has issued a statement to clarify its position on handling PEDv (porcine epidemic diarrhea virus) and other diseases. BOAH is not at this time recommending the cancellation of shows. “Each county must determine the best course of action for that community,” BOAH said. The agency does,

June 9, 2014

however, offer the following recommendations and observations: • Information for exhibitors and others is available at www.pork.org. • Farms where PEDv has been diagnosed or is suspected should not provide swine to exhibits or other swine events without first consulting with a veterinarian. Swine that show clinical signs of illness should not be taken to shows or sales. • People can be vectors of PEDv as well as other diseases.

• Show equipment should not be shared while at an exhibition. All gear should be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected after the event. The same is true for vehicles, which should be cleaned and disinfected inside and out. • Commercial pork producers should consider their own participation and attendance at swine exhibitions based on the biosecurity risk to their operations. • Terminal shows are an alternative

to cancelling shows. • Swine that have been exhibited should be isolated and observed for any signs of illness after the event. • Steps to minimize the transmission of influenza can be found at www.in.gov/boah/2569.htm. County fair organizers who would like more information or to discuss options with BOAH staff may contact a district veterinarian or the central office at 317-544-2400.

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SPECIAL REPORT

Help Wanted To make IFB’s campaign against proposed EPA rule effective, action from individual farmers is needed —By Kathleen M. Dutro Public Relations Team Indiana Farm Bureau, the American Farm Bureau Federation and other state Farm Bureaus, have begun their offensive against a proposed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency rule that could radically redefine what can be considered “waters of the United States” and greatly expand the EPA’s jurisdiction over farmland and other private lands. Among other things, the rule would expand federal control over land features such as ditches and areas of agricultural land that are wet only during storms. The comment period is currently set to expire on July 21. AFBF has asked that this comment period be extended another 90 days, but that extension hasn’t been granted as yet, said Kyle Cline, IFB national government relations policy advisor. “We need to proceed on the assumption that the comment period will end on July 21,” he said. An important part of that

offensive is making sure that the EPA and members of Congress know the effect that this proposed rule will have on individual farmers. This is why IFB is encouraging farmers who believe they could be affected by the rule to submit comments to EPA. A comparison of EPA’s interpretation of the law vs. actual on-farm impacts, as well as other materials, will be available on IFB’s campaign website, www.infarmbureau. org/waterule. Members are urged to visit frequently for updates and information to assist them in taking a stand against the EPA. Cline said that those who have an interest in this but need help or advice can call or email Cline, 317-6927845, kcline@infarmbureau. org, or IFB senior policy advisor and counsel Justin Schneider, 317-692-7835, jschneider@infarmbureau.org. Other useful tactics include: Submitting photos of questionable water features to Cline or Schneider. IFB, AFBF and other state Farm Bureaus are collecting such photos in order to demonstrate the

Local farmer has major concerns with EPA’s ‘Waters of the U.S.’ rule —By Kyle Cline Public Policy Team If the EPA’s proposed Clean Water Act rule is allowed to be implemented as currently written, entire farming operations could be disrupted, making it very difficult, if not impossible, to carry out many “normal” farming practices, according to Martinsville grain and cattle farmer Norman Voyles Jr. “What really concerns me about this rule is that virtually every practice associated with my cattle operation and much of my grain operation could be subject to extensive EPA regulation that could cost me money and time and – worst case – make it impossible to run my farm,” he said. Given the natural features of Voyles’ pasture, his cows must cross a stream when relocating to another area of the pasture, a common practice used to enhance animal nutrition while protecting the

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environment. Voyles, who is the current president-elect of the Indiana Beef Cattleman’s Association, is also concerned about several small natural gullies that carry small, temporary amounts of water to the stream that divides the pasture. But the gullies do have banking and a high-water mark, two features that the EPA is using to determine if the feature can be regulated. “Will I be able to continue making the management decisions that work best for my operation and are also the best environmentally, such as rotating grazing patterns? Will I have to spend enormous resources to fence off most of the stream and keep cows from the gullies? Is a cow going to be considered a “point source” for pollution?” Voyles asked. “The scary part is that we don’t know at this point, but the EPA is trying to move forward with their one-size fits all plan without defining the details.”

Norman Voyles Jr. of Morgan County fears that seasonal creeks, such as this one that intermittently flows through one of his pastures into a semi-permanent stream, could be subject to extensive regulation under a new rule proposed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. “That’s the real fear that we’ve got – that it could be so broadly applied,” he said. Photos by Kathleen M. Dutro

scope of EPA’s expansion of the definition of waters of the U.S. Of particular use are before-and-after photos of ditches and swales, ponding in driveways, water flowing in gullies on hillsides (preferably with a ditch or creek in the background) and flooded lawns. Using social media, such as Facebook, Twitter and blogs, to raise the profile of this issue by posting photos and talking points. Contacting your member of Congress to ask him or her to submit comments to the EPA docket. Organize a toolshed meeting or other informal gathering so that members of Congress, or their staff, can discuss this issue face to face with farmers. “The proposed rule really impacts every type of farm

in every state,” Cline said. “EPA is making a big PR effort to get people to calm down,” Cline said. “But the agency has given us no assurance that normal farming

The proposed rule attempts to expand the current definition of “Waters of the United States” to include waters such as small, isolated wetlands, ephemeral drains and many ditches. Currently, EPA regulatory oversight only includes “navigable” waters, a legal interpretation that has been confirmed twice by the U.S. Supreme Court. Despite major reservations with the flawed EPA rule, Voyles was quick to add that he is not against all environmental regulation, but rather, supports a local approach to the regulation of water that better reflects the types of farms and land features in a given region or watershed. “Government has become way too large over time and this proposed rule represents additional growth and over-

reach of the federal government. One size does not fit all when you talk about regulation of natural resources and water because of the diversity across the U.S. IDEM (Indiana Department of Environmental Management) is in a much better position to regulate these features than the federal government. The EPA is simply trying to overstep Congress and state regulators to achieve their ill-defined goals.” As Voyles looks into the future, he is concerned about agriculture and the challenges that threaten the special way of life that has given so much back to his family. “My multi-generational farm began as a homestead farm established here in 1828. This farm and the land have given back to us enor-

activities will be exempt, even such ordinary practices as building a fence, tillage and spraying. The proposed rule, as it’s written, is all encompassing,” he added.

Norman Voyles Jr. says that despite his concerns about the proposed rule, he wouldn’t want anybody to think he’s somehow against clean water. “My livestock needs clean water, my family needs clean water, my neighbors need clean water.” But, he added, the way to keep the water clean isn’t a one-size-fits-all federal mandate. It’s much better if individuals can work with their local and state authorities.

mously and have contributed to our way of life, one that is unlike any other opportunity. But the core values of independence, sound stewardship of resources, and pride that define farming are under fire by the EPA and other government efforts.” “I have a much better appreciation for what works best for caring for my land than someone in some office looking at a topographical map or even making a onetime survey,” Voyles said. “My family and animals live off of the land and resources. My neighbors depend on me to take care of the water, land, and produce the best beef possible. That is a charge I take very seriously, one that the EPA clearly does not understand.”

June 9, 2014

6

AROUND IFB

Summer offers opportunities for county Farm Bureaus —By Chris Fenner Organizational Development Team

county should be reviewed and updated by July 1.

Listed below are some opportunities for county Farm Bureaus to receive credit through IFB’s County Recognition Program for all their efforts. If you have any questions about any of these opportunities, contact your regional manager or contact Chris Fenner at 317-692-7844, cfenner@infb.org. Membership Section • Delegates and alternates should have been certified and reported to Indiana Farm Bureau by June 1. • Membership classification of all members in the

Issue Engagement Section • All policy recommendations on local and state issues that were discussed, voted on and passed by our members should be submitted to Indiana Farm Bureau through the policy recommendation reporting system by June 13. • Policy recommendations on national issues that were discussed, voted on and passed by our members should be submitted to IFB through the policy recommendation reporting system by the June 13 deadline. • All policy recommenda-

One way counties can help themselves qualify for IFB’s County Recognition Program is to sponsor interactive events at a county fair, festival or farmers market. Shown is one of the events sponsored at its 2013 county fair by the Lake County Farm Bureau. Larry Name is running the “wheel of agriculture” while Hank Wunderlink prepares to answer a question and win a prize. Photo courtesy of the Lake County Fair

tions on local, state and national issues that were discussed, voted on and

IFB’s Intern Class of 2014

passed by our membership should be submitted to IFB through the policy reporting system within two weeks after the policies were adopted locally and before the June 13 deadline. Influential Organization Section • At least three member contacts should be made on a local regulatory issue such as local zoning and reported to the Public Policy Team. • At least two members should make contact with congressional offices on a

Indiana Farm Bureau’s latest crop of summer interns will be assisting in the areas of accounting, law, public relations and ag promotion and outreach. From left to right: • Melissa Cuttriss is from Huntington, Indiana. She is currently a senior at Purdue University working toward her bachelor’s degree in accounting and management with a concentration in finance.  After graduating, she will continue to study at Purdue to obtain the credits necessary to take the certified public accountant exam.  This summer, she will be working at IFB as the intern in the administrative and finance treamn.  In her time with IFB this summer, she hope to gain a wide range of real-world experience that she can apply to her course work and her future career. • Sarah Doyle is a J.D. candidate at the Penn State Dickinson School of Law who joins IFB this summer as a legal clerk. While at school, Doyle serves as president of the

June 9, 2014

Penn State Agricultural Law Society, and was a member of the National Environmental Law Moot Court Team. Last year, she worked as a research assistant for the Penn State Agricultural Law Center. Prior to law school, Doyle graduated from Penn State with a bachelor of science degree in animal sciences. She hopes to work as an attorney specializing in food and agriculture law. She hails from Red Lion, Pennsylvania, where her family raises registered Southdown sheep and Christmas trees. • Taylor Scuglik is a senior at Indiana University, majoring in English and journalism. This summer she is working as an intern in IFB’s public relations team, where she helps to write articles for IFB’s publications and assists with different aspects of marketing campaigns. When she graduates, she would love to move to a big city and work at a publishing company. In her spare time, she enjoys reading, writing and competing in gymnastics. She also volunteers

at the animal shelter in Bloomington and is involved with a group at IU called Globemed, which sponsors a health clinic in Ecuador and works to promote global health. • For the second year in a row, Samantha Lowe is interning with the organizational development team as its ag promotion and outreach intern. Some of her responsibilities include assisting with state fair planning, helping to organize IFB’s showcase exhibit at Indiana FFA State Convention, and working closely with the education coordinator on grant material. She will be graduating in December 2014 with a degree in animal agribusiness from Purdue University. While attending Purdue, she is involved in Collegiate Farm Bureau and Purdue Dairy Club. In the future, she hopes to continue her career at Farm Bureau or work for a company that is involved in promotion and outreach for those not involved in agriculture.

federal priority issue and reported the activity to the Public Policy Team. Public Relations Section • Man a county Farm Bureau booth at a county fair, festival or farmers market that includes an interactive element such as a game or contest. • At least two volunteers need to complete a shift for an Indiana Farm Bureau activity at the Indiana State Fair. (Taste from Indiana Farms, shift in the Farm Bureau Building, Pancake Breakfast on Farmer’s Day, etc.)

Three organizations receive grants from women’s committee —By Kathleen M. Dutro Public Relations Team Three organizations – the Linton-Stockton School Corporation in Greene County, Rush County Farm Bureau and the Jay County Soil and Water Conservation District – were recently awarded grants by the Indiana Farm Bureau Women’s Leadership Committee. The grants are through the Ag Education & Promotion Development Grant program, which provides assistance to county Farm Bureaus, Farm Bureau members and educators that do not have adequate funds for a new program, activity, or to attend an event that would enhance the promotion of agriculture and education. Indiana Farm Bureau awards grants of up to $250 to winning applicants. Linton-Stockton School Corporation will use its grant to buy a microscope and ac-

cessories. The grant to the Jay County SWCD will be used to develop an educational unit on earthworms. And the Rush County grant will be used to start a new program that uses “Grow Boxes” to show students how food is grown. Among previous winners was the Elizabeth Starr Academy for Young Entrepreneurs in Richmond, Ind., which received one of the 2013 grants. The school, in cooperation with Farm Bureau, Purdue extension and the Master Gardeners, used the grant to build raised-bed gardens in the school yard. “We are truly appreciative of this opportunity you gave us,” the school wrote. For more information on the grant program, visit IFB’s website, www.infarmbureau. org, and under “Programs,” click on “Women’s Leadership Committee.”

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7

COMMUNICATIONS

Moudy personifies media relations —By Andy Dietrick Public Relations Team Dwight Moudy, public relations coordinator for Elkhart County Farm Bureau, speaks matter-of-factly about how he and other Farm Bureau members have become the go-to sources for local media. Moudy is on the top of the list when reporters call looking for information about the county’s agricultural community.

But it wasn’t always that way in this northern Indiana county, and agriculture didn’t become a media mainstay overnight. According to Moudy, you have to stick with it. “You have to have persistence. You have to be willing to be told ‘no’ five hundred times,” he advises with a bit of hyperbole. “Because on the five hundred and first, they are going to say ‘yes’ and run with your story.” In fact, Moudy offered up 25-30 story ideas before the local television station, WNDU in South Bend, took him up on the offer. During this period of story pitching and relationship building, Moudy discovered that the anchor of the morning news was a farm girl, still tied to her family farm in Ohio and very interested in doing stories about local agriculture. But because she was behind the anchor desk, producing stories from the field was difficult. “Then they got a younger reporter in, one with a real interest in agriculture,” Moudy remembers. “She

bought herself some boots and is not afraid to come out and talk and videotape. When it’s twelve below zero, she’s out there doing her job. She’s been great to work with.” Local agriculture proved to be fertile ground for the new WNDU reporter, and she has since made on-air visits with local farmers a regular part of her beat: road safety reminders during planting, seasonal crop updates, teaching Cowboy Ethics at a grade school, the effects of too much or too little rain, the ravages of a brutal winter or a deadly pig virus. And all of those stories were shaped to some degree by Moudy and his fellow Farm Bureau members. “I write up the idea, research it, loosely script the interview, let them know which points we’d like to cover, look for someone to talk on camera, and email copies to both the reporter and the person being interviewed,” Moudy explains. “That way, everyone is literally on the same page so the interview goes smoothly

Elkhart County Farm Bureau public relations coordinator Dwight Moudy during one of his appearances on WNDU in South Bend.

and editing is kept to a minimum.” Moudy’s tactics track like a Media Relations 101 textbook. Get to know reporters, find out what kind of stories they want, round up good interviews and on-air personalities, make sure the content matters to the community, do what you can to make the reporter’s job easier. And above all, be truthful and transparent. That formula has worked with the print media, too. In fact, the Elkhart County Farm Bureau PR coordinator finds that the multiple print outlets in his area are a better vehicle for more complex, policy-driven discussions such as zoning, regulation and legislation. He works

with reporters to share facts and resources and to make sure the Farm Bureau position is clear. But for Moudy, good media relations boils down to one thing. “You have to have passion. Facts and research are necessary, but you have to be passionate about your message,” he says. “You have to believe that farmers and ranchers are doing it right. Because we are! Farmers and ranchers are doing the job better than anyone in the world, and we should take pride in what we do.” And that is the clear message that Dwight Moudy shares with the print and electronic media in Elkhart County every chance he gets.

Annual Farm Management Tour to highlight Spencer, Dubois counties —From the Purdue Ag Communications Service Purdue University’s Department of Agricultural Economics will hold its 82nd annual Farm Management Tour on June 16 and 17. The tour, created in 1932, showcases successful farms around the state that demonstrate management knowledge and skill within the farming community. This year, the tour will focus on five farms in Spencer and Dubois counties. After the tour, a lunch will be held at the Spencer County fairgrounds. The tour is open to anyone interested in farm management or family farm businesses. Tour Schedule June 16, 1-2:30 p.m.: Interview with owners of Fischer Farms Natural Foods LLC at the Spencer County 4-H Fairgrounds, 1101 E County Road 800 N., Chrisney. The Fischers produce and direct-market natural beef from their 250-head cow herd and another 350 calves that five other cattle producers grow for them. The beef finished on their farm is direct-marketed to more than 70 restaurants and 10-plus retail stores. June 16, 3-5 p.m.: Vogel

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Seed Farms Inc., 4560 N. County Road 200 W., Rockport. Vogel has three main enterprises: 3,550 acres of corn and soybean, a Pioneer seed dealership and 110 beef cows. The crop operation features an RTK satellite guidance system, variable rate technology, dual fertilizer planters and about 300,000 bushels of grain storage. The seed business features bulk soybean handling and Pioneer Premium Precision seed treatment. The farm supplies seed and treatments to 40-50 customers in addition to itself. June 17, 7-8:45 a.m.: Whitsitt Farm Inc., 6626 W. 350 S., Huntingburg. Whitsitt Farm is a diversified farm with row crops, hay, cattle and a test plot of Miscanthus. Discussion will include how the family takes advantage of market opportunities for value-added crops, including food-grade white corn and popcorn, and keeps the conservation-oriented farm at the forefront of precision agriculture and accounting technologies to improve efficiency of inputs, soil quality and profitability. June 17, 9:15-11 a.m.: Giles Farms Inc., 374 W. State Route 62, Gentryville.

Giles Farms has about 775 acres of crops and manages another 90 acres of wetland. The goal of the operators, who have a conservation ethic, is to improve the soil and the farm before it transitions to future generations. June 17, 11:30 a.m. - 2 p.m.:

Lunch at the Spencer County Fairgrounds. As part of the program, the owners of Vollmers Turkey Farms will share their experiences with investing in and managing a turkey grow-out operation. In addition, Purdue Extension agricultural economist Chris

Hurt will give his annual Agricultural Outlook. There is no cost for the tour or the lunch but registration is required. Registration can be made online at www.agecon.purdue.edu/ commercialag/progevents/ tour.html or by calling 765494-4310.

Farm Bureau Building at the state fair to feature new look, new activities —Rachel Schrage Public Relations Team This year at the Indiana State Fair, it is the Year of the Coliseum. It’s also the year of the redesigned Indiana Farm Bureau building. Visitors to the building this year can expect to see new displays, child-friendly learning activities and updated technology emphasizing a few key subject areas: the evolution of farming, the prevalence of agriculture in everyday life and the differences in farm sizes and types. Fair visitors can rest assured that, despite the updates inside the building, some of their favorite IFB building activities will not be changing. Popcorn will still be available and the

three-day Taste from Indiana Farms will still be held. “A lot of time and effort on the part of many people has gone into the development of the new exhibit, and we are excited about the opportunity to educate fairgoers about the importance of

agriculture,” said Julie Taylor, education coordinator for Indiana Farm Bureau. The Indiana State Fair runs August 1-17. Stop by the Indiana Farm Bureau building (located on the north side of the fairgrounds) to take a look.

June 9, 2014

8

AROUND INDIANA

Harrison County auction house goes on the block —Rachel Schrage Public Relations Team The second Monday of every month, beginning in April 1990, was the day of a feeder calf auction at the Milltown Auction. On the second Monday of April 2014, that tradition ended. Each month for 24 years, a co-op of the auction’s more than 100 farmer-owners volunteered to collect and sort calves, run them through the action ring and load them up after the sale. The only paid personnel

were the auctioneer and the office staff. “In 1990, we handled well over 2,000 head of feeder cattle yearly. Last year, we only had 886 head,” said Robert Harmon, one of the members of the ownership co-op. “Many of the farmers have aged and gotten out of the cattle business over the years.” Years ago, Indiana Farm Bureau agreed to help with the sale of the auction, should it ever go out of business. The Milltown Auction will be sold in an

online-only auction on June 17, with bidding ending at 7 p.m. EDT. “It’s ironic and is a sign of the times. We’re selling a business that, for years, its income was generated via the live auction process, but we’re using modern technology and selling it through an internet-only auction process,” said Brian D. Beckort, owner of Beckort Auctions. Visit beckortauctions.com for more information about Milltown Auction and its sale.

Milltown Auction held its last livestock auction on April 14. The auction is now itself being auctioned off through an online auction. Photos courtesy of Beckort Auctions

IFB members invited to help Phyllis Stackhouse celebrate 90th birthday Phyllis Stackhouse, widow of former Indiana Farm Bureau President Marion Stackhouse, will host an open house on June 28 to celebrate her 90th birthday, and any Farm Bureau member is welcome to attend. Phyllis’ late husband, Marion Stackhouse, served as president of Indiana Farm Bureau for 11 years. He succeeded George Doup as president in 1976. Stackhouse then served until he

died in 1987. Stackhouse, a grain and hog farmer, graduated from Purdue University in 1947 and served as first lieutenant of the US Army artillery in World War II. Stackhouse resided on a farm in Westfield and was the owner of a 330-

acre farming operation in Boone, Hamilton and Marshall counties that he operated with the help of Phyllis and their five children. He joined Farm Bureau in 1950 as a field representative for northeast Indiana and went on to work as the

Who: Phyllis Stackhouse What: 90th Birthday Open House When: June 28 from 2-5 p.m. Where: Christ United Methodist Church 318 N. Union St. Westfield, Indiana In the Gathering Room

p.m. EDT at the Johnson County Fairgrounds’ Scott Hall. An RSVP is not required to attend, but you may contact LuMar Griggs, jlwpc5@netzero.net, or

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Calendar of Events June 9 IFB Women’s Leadership Committee meeting, Indianapolis. 10 Ag in the Classroom update, Indianapolis. 12 IFB policy advisory group meeting on taxes, Indianapolis. 13 District 1 Summer Fun Night, South Bend Silver Hawks baseball park. 13 Deadline for IFB policy recommendations. 18, 19 IFB Board of Directors meeting, Indianapolis. 23 IFB policy advisory group meeting on ag labor, Indianapolis. 24 IFB policy advisory group meeting on rural development, Indianapolis. 30 IFB policy advisory group meetings on crops, livestock, transportation, local gov- ernment and fiscal policy, private property, and nutrient management, Indianapolis. July 14 17 22-24 24, 25

Association and the Indiana Institute of Agriculture, Food & Nutrition, among others. Phyllis’ daughter, Gloria Del Greco, said that her mother would prefer not to receive any gifts.

NEW SERVICES

Rural Youth/Young Adults plan reunion in September Former Indiana Rural Youth/Young Adults members, mark your calendars. The biennial state alumni reunion, a celebration of 75 years, will take place Sept. 27, 2014, beginning at 1

director of Farm Bureau’s commodity department for 12 years. He served many different ag groups, including the American Farm Bureau Federation, the National Livestock Producers

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Farm Bureau ELECT oversight committee meeting, Indianapolis. IFB estate planning workshop, Indianapolis. State resolutions committee meeting, Indianapolis. IFB Board of Directors meeting, Indianapolis.

June 9, 2014

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The Hoosier Farmer - Issue 54